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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 8, 2020 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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two us airbases in iraq are hit by more than a dozen ballistic missiles fired from iran. you're watching bbc newsroom live. 22 missiles were launched it's 11.00 and these are the main in the early hours of the morning. iranian state television stories this morning: said the attack was in retaliation for the death iran has fired missiles of general qasem soleimani, killed last week in a us airstrike. at two air bases housing us—led forces in iraq, in response to the us drone strike, which killed general qasem soleimani. we of course condemn the attack on iraqi military bases in response, president trump has hosting coalition forces. tweeted that "all is well" and he'll iran should not repeat these reckless and dangerous make a statement later today. attacks but must instead the iranian foreign minister said his country will defend itself pursue urgent de—escalation. "against any aggression". more than 170 people have been officials in ukraine say three killed, including three britons, british nationals were on board a ukrainian boeing—737 plane, after a ukrainian passenger plane crashed shortly after which has crashed after taking off from tehran. 170 people were on board — it's thought there are no survivors. the prime minister is due to have his first meeting with the new president of the eu commission. it's expected the pair will discuss the importance of a future trade
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deal with the eu after brexit. thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike over pay and staffing levels. thousands of appointments and procedures have been cancelled. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. iran has carried out a ballistic missile attack on two us bases in iraq in retaliation for the killing of general qasem soleimani. more than a dozen missiles were launched from iran in the early hours of the morning. they struck air bases housing us forces in al—asad, west of baghdad, and irbil in the north. it's unclear if there have been any casualties. president donald trump tweeted that "all is well". he wrote: "assessment of casualties and damages taking place now. so far, so good!". he is expected to make
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a statement later today. iran's foreign minister tweeted: "we do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression". our middle east editor, jeremy bowen, in baghdad says this appear to suggest that iran wishes to draw a line under its retaliation for the assassination of soleimani. the military leader was killed on friday in a missile strike outside baghdad airport, on the orders of president trump. the general — who controlled iran's proxy forces across the middle east — was regarded as a terrorist by the us government, which says he was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of american troops and was plotting "imminent" attacks. iran vowed "severe revenge" for his death. dan johnson reports. the world had wondered how iran would respond... well, here is how it looks and sounds. explosion. missiles hitting iraqi air bases used by america and its allies. local tv says this is footage of them being launched
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from iran over the border. and all this as iran was still laying to rest the body of its assassinated general, qasem soleimani, killed by a us drone strike. a martyr to the millions on the streets for his funeral calling for retaliation. but the us says he's a murderer who was planning attacks to extend iran's influence over its neighbour. this was the white house warning yesterday. if iran does anything it shouldn't be doing, they will suffer the consequences, and very strongly. with the damage still being assessed, iran's foreign minister posted on social media, proportionate measures of self defence, he said, adding, we do not seek escalation or war. the president was untypically low—key, saying all is well and restating american military might. he said he will give more reaction later today. the uk ministry of defence
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says none of the 400 british service personnel who were helping to train iraqi forces were caught up in these attacks. the british government has urged all sides to calm things down, to try to take the tension out of the situation. the early signs are that the impact of these limited strikes has been fairly light. iran can say it fought back, but the us may not feel it needs to respond. what that means for the future of iraq is still a complex question. dan johnson, bbc news. in the past hour it's emerged that iraq was officially warned by tehran that the attacks were imminent, and would be targeted at the locations of us troops. our middle east editorjeremy bowen is in the iraqi capital baghdad — he's sent this update on the situation. well, attacks on two bases, a dozen or so missiles perhaps. no definitive word on casualties.
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the iraqis have said, though, that they didn't lose any people, and they've also said that the wider coalition didn't either. and i think the fact that the americans did not immediately respond suggests that they didn't take heavy casualties, or maybe no casualties at all. because in a sense they probably guessed this was coming and they were already on a higher level, as they call it, of force protection. i think what's going on at the moment is that the signal from the iranian government is they want to root all this in international legality. there was a tweet from the foreign minister, dr zarif, and he said that what they've done follows article 51 of the un charter, which is about the rights of self defence of a state, and that it is therefore legal. unlike — iran would say — what the americans did, which they have condemned as terrorism and an act of war. it may be that his advisers were saying to him or he was saying
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to himself, well, let's look at the profit and loss account here. on the plus side, for the usa, is the fact that one of their most formidable enemies, general soleimani, is dead. on the minus side, they have sustained some damage at a couple of bases in iraq and maybe trump's thinking could be, hang on a minute, that's pretty good. i've come out on top of this deal, and therefore, once again, i've made an absolutely brilliant decision. from the iranian point of view, though, they have said that this is what the state is going to do. they also, though, have allied militias in different countries, including iraq, this one, and the iranian speciality over the years has anyway not been full—on warfare face—to—face with more powerful countries, it is asymmetric warfare, trying to find a way around the sides. so if there is more action from their side, it may well come
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from one of those militias. the reason why americans are here in this country is because of operations against the continuing menace of the extremist jihadists of islamic state. while their caliphate, their territorial mass, has gone, the fact is that now they are still operational and that is why the troops are here. the iraqis, though, of course, the parliament have said they have got to go. a ukrainian airliner carrying more than 170 passengers and crew has crashed in iran. the president of ukraine has urged people not to speculate about the cause. ukrainian officials say three british nationals were on board the aircraft. the boeing—737 was bound for the ukrainian capital kyiv. the ukraine international airlines plane crashed just after ta ke—off from iran's imam khomeini airport in tehran, said the fars state news agency. reports from both iran and ukraine say there are no survivors.
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ukraine's tehran embassy initially blamed engine failure but later removed the statement. iranian state tv has broadcast interviews with local emergency services, who said the aircraft burst into flames after crashing. the bbc‘s transport correspondent, tom burridge, spoke to us just before about the ukrainian airliner carrying more than 170 passengers and crew that crashed in iran. the investigation is in its earlier stages, this airline —— this aircraft went down and what we do thatis that is available online. it shows that is available online. it shows that the plane took off normally, it climbed to about 8000 feet. at that point, the data suddenly disappears. that is unusual and suggests a catastrophic incident at some time on the plane. that is a broad term i'm using because we can't say for certain what caused that incident at
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the time. there have been reports about engine failure and a mechanical problem. i think any claims about that at this stage are premature, and even if there was an engine failure, the boeing 737 is designed to keep flying if an engine fails, so at the moment i think we have to keep an open mind. graham braithwaite, a professor of safety and air accident investigation at cranfield university, spoke to us a little earlier regarding the big questions now for boeing. it is also a very large fleet of aeroplanes, said there are more 737'5 aeroplanes, said there are more 737's flying than any other aircraft type, so there is a lot of them and the safety record for this particular aircraft was an example of that generation of 77. it has a really great safety record, so boeing will always want to ask questions themselves as to whether there was anything they could do or learn from an investigation like this, and this is why it is important that it is investigated properly. as an international convention, formed through the
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international... part of the un, it will set the rules for how this kind of investigation will be conducted. it is not about apportioning blame or liability, the focus is very much about what the industry can learn. it is led by the state in which the accident occurred. the national investigation of iran will take the lead on this, and then there is provision for whoever else will participate. these are what are called accredited representatives, so called accredited representatives, so ukraine will be an accredited representative. one at the other states that normally participate is the state of manufacture. in this case, that was the united states national safety board. they can bring technical advisors into the investigation from boeing. the reason it is done that way is to ensure there is independence between manufacturers and so on. in this case, that will be very difficult for the ntsb to deploy to iran. in in that case, there is provision for
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another state to volunteer its services. a more neutral state, in the circumstances, might offer to decode the flight data, for example. a local state such as the uae, which suffered a 737 accident eight years ago. they might be able to build on the expertise that they showed in that investigation. so lots of states will offer help to make sure we get an answer swiftly. tobias ellwood is a former minister at the foreign office with special responsibility for the middle east. hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us. we have 110w thank you forjoining us. we have now seen iran's retaliation for the killing of general kasem soleimani. what are your reports on what has happened overnight? firstly, it is the response ability at the british government to make sure that any britons are safe, and it is good to hear the ministry of defence confirmed that is the case. but we also heard from doctor zarif, the
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foreign minister and even the president of the united states, trying to draw a line under ratcheting up of the hostilities. i think the world will have a collective sigh of relief to see things de—escalate. unfortunately, that isn't the case with the supreme leader, who has underlined the fact that iranians geopolitical intentions have not changed. they will continue to fund, to arm and to traina will continue to fund, to arm and to train a paramilitary terrorist operations across the middle east. so whilst we can, i think, be pleased, cautiously and welcome the events this morning, following the inevitable retaliation, they world remains a very dangerous place. are you surprised by the iranians response, in that the airbases were already on high alert and it seems that iraq was given advance notice that iraq was given advance notice that these attacks were on the way?
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it does seem, as are indicating, in some of the reaction there has been that there was a desire to avoid building up tension here. absolutely, there was. this is partly a message for iranian people do show that iran can stand up to the united states, that military against the military, iran would never win. it wants to return to proxy influence, to work beneath the threshold of all—out war. it is asymmetrical warfare in which it does well. that is the challenge that we face. as much as we may have diminished tensions at this moment, the wider issues, the challenges that we face in iran, from an interfering right across the region and operating in so many shadow wars, has not gone their way. this isa wars, has not gone their way. this is a big question for the united states, no doubt something that dominic raab will be raising when he visits washington this week. how, if this is an opportunity with solar money removed, whether this is the chance to press the reset button on
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the middle east strategy and stand up the middle east strategy and stand up with more assertiveness to what iran has been doing. stay with us for a moment, if you will. wejust need to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. goodbye. sojust picking up, then, on what you are talking about fair, up, then, on what you are talking aboutfair, iran up, then, on what you are talking about fair, iran effectively interfering in other countries operating under the radar. do we go back to business as normal if this is as it seems and is being discussed, that potentially the situation we are in currently doesn't go any further? but if it doesn't, does the status quo continue? when you say business as normal, it is correct, but it is such a horrible phrase, to recognise that iran has been allowed for too long to be such a destabilising force. notjust in lebanon, in libya, in iraq and syria, but also
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places like bahrain and yemen, where that war has gone on and on. so this isa that war has gone on and on. so this is a chance for us to regroup, to collectively revisit are at the objectives, away from the acute and tactical issues that have been taking place. let's not forget why we are there, along with the americans in the first place. we are there in numbers because we are taking on dyas. they are taking advantage of the chaos here to regroup, and we know that what they do with their extremism activities sends shock waves right across the middle east all the way to the uk. when you say that it could be a time to research, how would that happen without the risk of greater confrontation and attention? well, this is the big challenge. we need to recognise that general soleimani was pivotal in driving a wedge between the shi'ite and sunni face. there is there little difference between the two. but —— their safes.
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he furthered their adventurism and their interests, which caused greater instability. this is the chance, if we are willing to grasp it, for us to be more result in standing up to this assertive iran, to also stand up to its weapons proliferation, but also to provide better avenues for economic rehabilitation with conditions. and so what do you think about the way borisjohnson has handled it so far? well, you only see the tip of the iceberg. he has had frequent conversations with the president of the united states. we have got ben wallace, who gave a statement yesterday. he will be visiting his european defence colleagues in brussels over the next few days. dominic rob is going to america as well. we could play an important diplomatic role here in advancing the conversation forward as to where we go, but also helping de—escalate tensions in the immediate future.
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thank you very much. our assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster. what has been the reaction?|j what has been the reaction? i think eve ryo ne what has been the reaction? i think everyone is waiting to hear from the prime minister because i think many people have spoken in the wake of the assassination of general soleimani, and of course the iranian retaliation overnight. the one person we have not heard from publicly is boris johnson. person we have not heard from publicly is borisjohnson. his team say that that is because he has decided to delegate responsibility for addressing mps and making public state m e nts for addressing mps and making public statements to the defence secretary, ben wallace, because he is after all be minister in charge. nevertheless, it has raised a number of eyebrows that boris johnson it has raised a number of eyebrows that borisjohnson has not come out and shoot some sort of statement, particularly because british soldiers are in harms way. if you think of previous instances, it is
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ha rd to think of previous instances, it is hard to imagine to be is david cameron, for example, not making some sort of statement to reassure the public, to set out the british position when you're involved in the sort of international crisis. be that as it may, we will now hear from borisjohnson that as it may, we will now hear from boris johnson in that as it may, we will now hear from borisjohnson in the next or so at prime minister's questions, when inevitably, he will be asked by someone inevitably, he will be asked by someone about the situation and the position of british forces. it is, indicative lay, a different approach that boris johnson indicative lay, a different approach that borisjohnson is determined to take. it is that he is not going to respond and make himself available to the cameras and the media every time there is a situation or crisis or story, unlike, perhaps, time there is a situation or crisis orstory, unlike, perhaps, some of his predecessors. nevertheless, given that this is a situation where the military potentially are involved, i think a lot of people will still find it surprising that indeed, he did come in for a amount of criticism in the commons
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yesterday, when the defence secretary actually gave a statement. jeremy corbyn are accused boris johnson of seeking to hide behind the defence secretary. a david boris johnson, he has got title like prime minister's questions at midday and is also going to be meeting... she is also going to be meeting... she is actually about to speak now, so i think we might listen to her in a moment. but very quickly, what is the... will come back to you later, norman. we are going to listen to as sheila, the eu commission president. thank you very much. what a pleasure to be back here at the london school of economics. it is a place, indeed, that brings back many memories to me, of the year, i spent one year only at the london school of economics. it taught me so much, it
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taught me a lot inside and a lot outside. and anyone who knew me at that time will tell you that i probably spent more time and soho bars and can then record stores and the library, so to spare me my own blushes, i will spare you the details of that. but what i can say is that the time i spent here opened my eyes. i got to know a warm, vibrant, colourful, multicultural society. the likes of which i had never experienced before. isaw people from different walks of life going out together and enjoying life, inbreeding freedom. i immersed myself in the pot of cultures —— like the culture's traditions and music. i truly fell in love with the
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city and this country. this country, strong willed. open minded. bighearted. proud and patriotic. kind and generous in spirit. full of traditions, full of contradictions too. and it took me a while to understand, for example, the fantastic sense of humour of the british people, and that there is a su btle british people, and that there is a subtle meaning hidden in everything —— in every sentence. but this only deep into my fascination and admiration for the united kingdom, which remains as strong today as it was back then. and you can imagine that in the period just before and after the referendum, i thought a lot about my london time. i say this not only because of my love for this country, but also because of what
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the united kingdom has brought to europe and the european union. in a very understated british way. i think we do not always talk enough about that, and therefore, allow me to look a little bit back before we look forward. before the ashes of the second world war, even settled, it was winston churchill who made the best case for a united europe. i read out passages from his 1916 zurich speech, a famous speech the last time i was here. it is the most eloquent and powerful case for the european union you could ever wish to read, and if you haven't read it, ican to read, and if you haven't read it, i can only recommend to do so. and while the uk initially chose to be on the upside, it eventually took its place on the inside, making us both that much stronger. the
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relationship may have not have a lwa ys relationship may have not have always been smooth or perfect, but what relationship there is? and in my opinion, the good far outweighs the difficult. as president of the european commission, i want to pay tribute today to all those british people who contributed so much to the 45 or more years of the european union membership. i think at the british pragmatism and leadership when it came to opening up our union to members of ourfamily when it came to opening up our union to members of our family who have been out in the cold for so long. the successive european enlargements we re the successive european enlargements were historic steps to our continent, and they bear a british hallmark. i think of those who helped to build our institutions, people like commissioner arthur cockfield, who was known as the
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father of the single market. or roy jenkins. he was president of the european commission while i was at lse. he did so much to pave the way for our single currency. i think, of the european civil servants of british nationality, who devoted their lives and their careers to europe, and have done so much to build our union. they will always be pa rt build our union. they will always be part of the family. i think of the british servicemen and selfish women who had helped to keep the peace, from the balkans to the baltics. and i think of the millions of ordinary british people, who have taken to the streets in pro—european marches over the last few years. of course,... applause this is one event! of course, indeed, for them and for many
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millions more, the result of the referendum was a bitter pill to swallow. but it is people who make politics and the decision of the british people in june politics and the decision of the british people injune 2016 was clear. as much as we regret it, the european union has always fully respect that decision. you have seen, throughout this last three and a half years, the negotiations were ha rd a half years, the negotiations were hard and they were long, but the european union negotiated in good faith, trying to find solutions that defend our own interests and respect the uk's choice. it is an agreement that we negotiated with our people and the integrity of the european union in mind. it is one that preserves the remarkable piece and progress on the island of ireland over the past 20 years. and i were
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not going to the ins and outs of the negotiations of the divorce. this is done and dusted, as far as i'm concerned. before the end of the month, i expect both the british and the european parliament is to ratify the european parliament is to ratify the agreement, and so, injust the european parliament is to ratify the agreement, and so, in just over three weeks, on the 31st of january, the uk will spend its last day as a member state. this will be a tough and emotional day. but when the sun rises again, on the 1st of february, the european union and the united kingdom will still be the best of friends and partners. the bonds between us will still be unbreakable. we will still contribute to each other‘s societies, like so many brits have donein societies, like so many brits have done in the european union. and as so many eu citizens do hear every
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single day, whether as teachers or as nurses, as doctors, whether working as ceos or in ngos. we will still have a lot to learn from each other. the uk is home to thriving creative and cultural sectors, to cutting edge digital innovation and scientific excellence, in some of the worlds best universities with brilliant minds, many of them from all across europe. we will still share the same challenges. from climate change to security. we will still be allies, and like—minded partners in nato, the united nations and other international organisations. we will still share the same values and the belief that democracy, freedom and the rule of law must be the foundation of our
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societies. we will still share the same history and geography, and whatever happens, our continent will still share the same destiny too. so as one door will unfortunately close, another one will open. and now is the time for us to look forward together. it is the time for the best and oldest friends to build a new future together. and as only two friends can, i want to be a very honest about what lies ahead of us. during the withdrawal agreement negotiation, there was always the uncertainty around whether brexit would happen or not. it was an uncertainty that made the negotiations inevitably tense. this fresh negotiation ahead of us will
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ta ke fresh negotiation ahead of us will take place against the backdrop of clarity and mutual interest in making it work. the european union is ready to negotiate a truly ambitious and comprehensive new partnership with the united kingdom. we will make as much as we can. we will go as far as we can. but the truth is that our partnership cannot and will not be the same as before. and it cannot and will not be as closed as before because with every choice, comes a consequence. with every decision comes a trade—off. without the three movement of people, —— the free movement of people, —— the free movement of people, you cannot have the free movement of goods, and services.
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without the level playing field and environment of labour, tax aid, you cannot have the highest quality access to the world's largest single market. the more divergent it is, the more distant the partnership will be, and without an extension of the transition period beyond 2020, you cannot expect to agree on every single aspect of our new partnership. the european union's objectives are clear. we will work for solutions that uphold the integrity of the european union, its single market and its customs union. there can be no compromise on that. but we are ready to design a new partnership with zero tariffs, zero quotas, zero
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dumping is not a partnership that goes well beyond trade and it is unprecedented in scope. everything from climate action to data protection, fisheries, energy, transport, space, financial services and to security and we are ready to work day and night to get as much done within the timeframe we have. none of this means that it will be easy. but we start this negotiation from a position of certainty, goodwill, shared interest and purpose. and we should be optimistic. we need to be optimistic. we need to be optimistic. we need to be optimistic optimistic. we need to be optimistic optimistic for optimistic. we need to be optimistic for those young people leaving school in the next years who want to study and learn abroad. we need to be optimistic and we need to look to
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how british and european researchers can work together to find solutions of our most pressing challenges and to develop new technologies that the world doesn't really need and we must ensure that we continue to work together on upholding peace and security in europe and around the world. we must build a new comprehensive security partnership to fight cross—border threats ranging from terrorism to cyber security to counterintelligence. events in recent years in salisbury, manchester, london and all across europe have underlined the need for us europe have underlined the need for us to work together on mutual security. the threat of terrorism is real. and we have to share the necessary information and intelligence between the european union and the united kingdom to stop terrorists from crossing borders and
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attacking our way of life. nature of today ‘s threats mean that no one can deal with these challenges on its own. this is even more true for foreign policies as we see today even though britain will be outside the european decision—making structures, there will be plenty of need for common responses to address a foreign security and development challenges near and far. be it in our immediate neighbourhood in the east and south, africa, sub—saharan africa or be it in wider middle east or different parts of latin america or different parts of latin america or asia. the truth is, that brexit will not resolve any of the existing challenges for the european union norfor the uk challenges for the european union nor for the uk and challenges for the european union norfor the uk and even being a part
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of not bound in the treaties, it will require intensive cooperation on ourforeign will require intensive cooperation on our foreign and security policies. that is essential. that is essential because we share so much experience and because we share so many of the same values, we have to uphold these values, not only when it is easy but above all when it is hard. dearfriends, as we embark on this new partnership with the united kingdom, the european union must also continue to forge its own path in today's well. one consequence of the brexit vote has been to strengthen the unity and the faith in europe as a project for the common good. the truth is that brexit has highlighted the value of being together in a today's ever
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more unsettled world. it reaffirms our collective belief that we can do more when we do it together. individually, the nations of europe are becoming smaller and less influential on the wealth scale. in 1950, before the union was formed, the united kingdom, italy and germany were among the ten most populous countries in the world. 1950. today, only one life span later, only one of those is in the top 20 and while europe's population is set to decline by the end of the century, africa's alone will grow by more than 3 billion. at the same time, new economies are emerging and all partners are retreating back to their own pats and we face change
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and new challenges ahead of us. —— their own pats. climate change for example. if there is one area where the world needs our leadership, it is on protecting our climate. it is existential for europe and for the whole world. last month we launched the european green deal. the european green deal is not only about emissions, it is also about emissions but not only, it is about boosting innovation for it is about clea n boosting innovation for it is about clean technologies, green financing, quality food. it is about modern mobility. the european green deal is our new growth strategy and it will create new businesses and markets in europe and across the world. the novelty and the difference is that we will and can foster a growth
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model that is not consuming or extracting but one that gives back more to the planet than it takes away from the planet. great britain is as dedicated as the european union as it comes to addressing climate change and taking global leadership. a whole continent has to mobilise and the whole world needs to be part of this transformation. the european green deal won't happen overnight and it will be demanding and no country can hope to handle climate change alone. but if this is the right thing to do and if we do it together, we can lead the change. dear students, over the next month and years we will have to loosen some of the threads that have been carefully stitched together between the european union and the united
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kingdom overfive the european union and the united kingdom over five decades. the european union and the united kingdom overfive decades. and as we do so we will have to work hard to weave together a new way forward. i say this because brexit does not only marking the end of something, only marking the end of something, on the contrary. it also marks a new phase in an enduring partnership and friendship. it will be a partnership for your generation and i count on you all to make it a success. you can choose collaboration over isolation. you can shape your continents destiny. you can hold your governments accountable. you can refuse to be satisfied with the status quo and you can turn things into how they should be. i note the last few years have been difficult
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and divisive. —— i know the last few yea rs. and divisive. —— i know the last few years. i hope i been constructive and ambitious in the upcoming negotiations we can all move forward together. there will be tough talks and each side will do what is best for them but i can assure you that the united kingdom will always have a trusted friend and partner in the european union. this is the story. that is ursula von der leyen. she is meeting brycejohnson at later that is ursula von der leyen. she is meeting bryce johnson at later and shejust meeting bryce johnson at later and she just peeking there at the london school of economics where she described her year that she spent the at the start of her speech but obviously the parts that are keen to pay attention to our what she was saying about brexit and what shape the deal might be with the european union for some she said they will go as far as they can but the
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partnership cannot and will not be the same as before, it will not be as close as before inevitably, she said each side will do what is best for them. she said, said each side will do what is best forthem. she said, the said each side will do what is best for them. she said, the more divergence there is, the more distance the partner to will inevitably be and she also talked about the deadline of next december for a deal and the government's position here not to have any extension even if a deal isn't agreed by then. she said without an extension they cannot expect to agree on everything from that there are questions now been put to her so let's have a listen. if the stewards could come and if you could just give your name and your affiliation and then ask your question. thank you very much for your speech my question regards the place of citizen's rights in the settlement between the uk and the eu. yesterday
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there was a letter from michel barnier. .. there was a letter from michel barnier... not directly from you i expect from the fact that the withdrawal agreement bill that the uk parliament is passing at the moment was granting the ability to rights of eu citizens' rights in the uk relative to the watchdog that could help eu citizens have a proper ability to due process in the case and be able to live in the uk will settle status and what i'm wondering is how should the eu respond to a threat of watering down eu citizens' rights here in the ongoing processes and negotiations. thank you, the
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woman at the back and then there was a woman here in a green top, yes. thank you, i am a former european official. mine is the other half of the question that my friend just asked which is whether you consider associate to citizenship for british individuals. i feel torn up by the notion that we leave the eu as a bureaucratic structure but as someone who loves someone from another bit of the eu i don't quite see howl another bit of the eu i don't quite see how i managed to leave it sol would like you to say a little bit more perhaps about citizenship for us more perhaps about citizenship for us brits who want to continue to be citizens of the european union and thank you so much for coming today. my name is george and i am at a masters student at the lse. i was interested at what you spoke about with the pathway towards future
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security cooperation and especially between britain and eu with transnational threats and bilateral disputes between us and china and things like that, what does this partnership look like in practice in the future? could you repeat the second part? what is the future relationship between britain and the eu look like combating disputes in international affairs and things like the us china trade war? so, of course the question of citizen's rights is a pressing one so the good news is that whoever, festival what the numbers are concerned, we have around 3.5 european union citizens living in the european union. all that though is, i'm just addressing those who live in the opposite
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region, the good news is, where you work and live, you can stay under the same conditions till the end of your life so you have an absolute clear status when, for example, if you live here in the united kingdom, same rights, same possibilities as you have at the moment till the end of your life and vice versa. in europe, it is so that you have these rights in the member state you live in so if at the moment you are situated in belgium or croatia or portugal you have the right to stay and work forever under the same conditions in belgium, croatia or portugal, wherever you are. the bitter truth then is, as i have said, the uk will be third country
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after brexit and then we will have to negotiate and this applies to everything i have been talking about so we are very everything i have been talking about so we are very open everything i have been talking about so we are very open to do the most because i am a true believer that as much exchange as possible we should allow it to our citizens but as i have said before, for example free movement of people is excluded, there is a trade—off to that so it isa there is a trade—off to that so it is a matter of negotiation where we end up at the very end. you know that the european union is very open to that question that we are strong believers, that we benefit both sides very much from the free movement which goes on to the free movement which goes on to the free movement of not only people but good services and capital but those principles go together and therefore the next weeks and months will show
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at what point we will end. the same goes for, for example erasmus, for research projects, whatever we decide on the 28th, research projects, we will finish at 28 so the future is a matter for negotiations and i insist as much in keeping in mind that we have so many common interests that we shall build a strong future, mainly looking around at the rest of the world and then we realise how much we share and we should be very careful within these negotiations to achieve the most possible for the citizens and for a good partnership in the future. the question on security. it is internal and external security
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although both are very much interwoven but officially we kind of separate it. internally of course we have to talk about things like your pole or extradition. where security is concerned, the uk will be a third country. it can choose, when invited, to take part in missions and operations. we will have to negotiate about the other topics, for example being a part or taking pa rt for example being a part or taking part in projects in the european defence agency eda. there are clear rules for third countries so the uk will be subject of these rules for third countries or what the european defence union and fund is concerned, the european union is itself at the
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moment in the process of defining what the conditions are for third countries tojoin what the conditions are for third countries to join specific projects and the uk will be then a third country. that will fall under these rules of the european union. if we look at the world, we have an enormous interest on both sides to work as closely together as we can. you know i have been forfive work as closely together as we can. you know i have been for five years defence minister in germany. i have seen our service and women fighting and working in missions shoulder by shoulder. i have seen how are they defend our values in this very confiscated world and therefore i really recommend it to ourselves to be clear minded and far—sighted where threats are concerned and
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common interests are concerned to build a security partnership that is unprecedented and that really meets the purpose we are all aiming at. where china is concerned, festival, i think it is important that where do we stand together? for me it is clear and do we stand together? for me it is clearand in do we stand together? for me it is clear and in the potential trade what you are mentioning between the us and china, we will never ever forget where we come from and what side of the table if i may put it that way we are sitting on. so, i am a strong believer in the transatlantic partnership and friendship although we do have issues with the white house. laughter but, you know we are looking back on
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seven decades, 70 years or more on a friendship that is built of millions of co nta ct friendship that is built of millions of contact in the cultural sector, science, business sector, personal friendship and this is the foundation we do have. from that foundation we do have. from that foundation we do have. from that foundation we can tackle these issues, too. so, to be very clear at where we are at... i think it is very important that conflicts in a trade, we always keep in mind who will benefit at the very end and therefore i would be very welcoming if there are sensible and smart agreements we can find with china. with china, china's very assertive and far—reaching by now but i think we have to be very clear on topics
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where we disagree, very clear on that. we have to be very clear on the cyber domain where we have a lot of wars but there are other topics where we have come round for example the topic of climate change. china sta rts the topic of climate change. china starts now to introduce the emission trading system and is coming to the european union commission and asking for our experience we have with introducing the emission trading system which is good because in an ideal world over time fighting climate change we need a worldwide budget of co2 with an emission trading system honoured and co2 has to have a price so if we get china to have a price so if we get china to go into that topic together with us, it is good for us, china and the
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planet but as i said, you have to be very frank on other issues such as cyber security where we have a huge differences. ursula von der leyen, the new president of the european commission answering questions after giving her main speech focusing on brexit and the shape of the negotiations going forward and it really the key points emerging from what she has been saying is that there is mutual interest in making it work and the eu is ready to negotiate and will go as far as it can. however, each side will do what is best for them. she is going to mean meeting boris johnson is best for them. she is going to mean meeting borisjohnson a little bit later and that is after prime minister's questions which start at midday. that i can stay with our main news at this hour. iran has carried out a ballistic missile attack on air bases housing us forces in iraq, in retaliation for the us killing of general qasem soleimani. more than a dozen missiles launched from iran struck two air bases in irbiland al asad,
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west of baghdad. it is unclear if there have been any casualties. dr lydia wilson is from the centre for the resolution of intractable conflict and middle eastern studies, at cambridge university. shejoins me now from york. what is your view on the retaliation overnight? i think it was a carefully response to the killing of sol amani. the ceilidh had to do something —— they ceilidh had to do something —— they ceilidh had to do something in response to the killing of soleimani. we know that it is ballistic missiles and not cruise missiles which would have been far more effective and accurate. we do have a verified report of a single death, we don't actually have a verified report of a direct hit and so this was not an attack that was
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designed to really damage us or iraqi capabilities will stop it was much more of a symbolic attack. and, how does that then play in terms of the domestic audience at home for iran to say that it has responded appropriately to the killing of general sol amani? it is being reported quite differently in iran. —— general soleimani. what it is is saying that they have honoured the memory in kind against military target so have taken steps. memory in kind against military target so have taken stepsm things rest here, we will have an donald trump a little bit later but if they do, whether you see things going from here? there is no real
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need for america to attack. i'm not saying i can never predict what champ might do next but there haven't been any deaths to avenge or retaliate for —— what donald trump might do next. that's as far as we know at this time. so there is no need for retaliation. so the fact that it happened... debris, switch off your phone. the concerns about how dramatic the escalation could be, are you surprised by this apparent reasonableness that seems to be breaking out? surprise? know, iran was not going to risk a major escalation in this climate. they are very stretched in the region, they're involved in lebanon, syria, their presence iraq is large, they're not going to easily take on
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at the biggest military in the world. and i wasn't expecting anything bigger than this. thank you very much. let's speak to norman smith who is in the commons waiting for prime minister's questions. what are you expecting? i think will be questions about the situation in the middle east, interesting to whether there are questions about the eu trade deal ahead of that meeting with ursula von der leyen who we we re with ursula von der leyen who we were hearing from just a while ago. it struck struck me that number ten will be encouraged and by the tone of her comments she seemed more amicable than jean—claude juncker and talking about how she enjoyed being a student in london and admired it in for its multicultural society, openness and significantly talking about trying to reach an unprecedented deal, albeit accepting that relations are not going to be
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the same as before and there will be tough negotiations ahead but nevertheless you got a sense that this is probably someone who boris johnson can do business with so there may be questions about that. they may also be questions about the words we have been hearing from number ten about looking for further savings in so—called sacred... trying to claw back some money which labour believe amounts to another round of austerities of a number of areas that might be picked up. a lot of it areas that might be picked up. a lot ofiti areas that might be picked up. a lot of it i expect will be post—election euphoria because this is boris johnson's first p and since that election victory and wait for this, there is his fourth set since he became leader in july, there is his fourth set since he became leader injuly, he has been prime minister all that time and has only done three pmqs in all that time. time now for a look at the
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weather. we can speak the country into two today. over northern areas it is largely dry, sunny spells but habitually compared to yesterday. further south a bit more cloud around. just on the border there on that cloud. southern areas of england rain will spread its way in during this afternoon, one further north one or two entry showers over the north of scotland. you will notice the change in temperatures, seven or eight celsius in northern parts, 11 to 13 further south. tonight, that rain will continue to spread northward, they can be a bit of snow over the high ground of the north pennines, the southern uplands and quite chilly in the north—east of scotla nd and quite chilly in the north—east of scotland but temperatures hit double figures across the south. a rather wet start to the day on thursday, this could be some strong winds for a time, particularly in southern areas. wrinklies away, dry for a time before further rain
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spreads in late into the afternoon. quite chilly northern areas, further south, temperature is again in double goodbye for now.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday, and these are the main stories this morning: iran has fired missiles at two air bases housing but right now, prime minister's questions is beginning, with boris iran should not repeat these dangerous and reckless attacks, but should pursue urgent de—escalation. mr speaker, i know the thoughts of the house are also with our friends in australia, as they tackle the bushfires, as they are with the families of those killed in the ukrainian air crash. this
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morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. in addition to my duties at the house, i will have further meetings today. motor neurone disease it if terminal illness, with a third of people dying within a year and more than half of people within two years of diagnosis. the last thing terminally ill people and their families should be worrying about are their finances. the scrap six month campaign between the motor neurone association, which is based on my constituency, has managed to bring an important issue of payments to those with terminal illnesses to the fore. and i welcome the department of... special rules for terminal illness, brought into effect terminal illness, brought into effe ct la st terminal illness, brought into effect last july. can terminal illness, brought into effect lastjuly. can i ask dup to complete its review and... the last six months. i would like to pay tribute to my friend and the work he is doing with motor neurone disease,
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which is a terrible illness. we are doing everything we can to ensure that the welfare system works the rows of that illness, and that is why the department for work and pensions is indeed looking at how they can change the way they can help people nearing the end of their life with the most severe conditions, including motor neurone disease. and i sure that my right honourable friend, the secretary of state and the dup will be only too happy to meet my honourable friend ata happy to meet my honourable friend at a meeting of his earliest convenience. mr speaker, iwould like to start by paying tribute to andrew miller, the former member for ellsbury port in neston, who sadly died on christmas eve. he has sadly lost to this house, he spent over 20 yea rs lost to this house, he spent over 20 years here and was an expert in science and technology, and made an enormous contribution to this house. our thoughts are with his family and his friends,. he is deeply lost and
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mourned under this side of this house, for his great contribution that he made. i also want to pay tribute to the loss of human life in australia, where the fires had claimed over 20 people and thousands of animals have been destroyed as a result of this. this is a warning of what global warming does to all of us what global warming does to all of us and we have got to take this very seriously. the threat of climate change. ijoin the prime minister in the foot is going to the friends and family of those who died, sadly, in the ukrainian plane that crashed into tay run last night. mr speaker, following last night's attack on the united states bases in iraq, can be prime minister confirmed that he opposes any further retaliation or escalation in violence, in a situation where the region is in real risk of going into a full—scale war? well, mr speaker, of course i can confirm that, and i can point out to the right honourable
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gentleman back to the united kingdom has been working solidly since the crisis began to bring together, in particular, our european allies in their response. and the house will have noted the e3 declaration that was issued by france, germany and the united kingdom, in which we drew particular attention to the baleful role played in the region for a very long time by kasem soleimani. the this view doesn't appear to be shared by the right honourable gentleman, i've been reviewing all his commentary and he hasn't yet raised that matter. government support for oh over the assassination of kasem soleimani, is the premise to confident that the united kingdom troops and civilians are not at further risk in the region and beyond? mr speaker, i can of course and it it is an question,
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that as far as we can tell there we re that as far as we can tell there were no casualties last night sustained by the us, and no british personnel were injured in the attacks. and we are doing everything we can, of course, to protect uk interest in the region, with hms defender and hms montrose operating ina defender and hms montrose operating in a state of readiness to protect shipping in the gulf. as my right honourable friend, the secretary of state said, we have relocated non—military personnel from baghdad to somewhere else, and we will do everything that we can to prevent escalation. the government has said it is sympathetic to the assassination of general soleimani. what evidence has the prime minister got to suggest that this attack on him and his death was not an illegal act by the united states? jeers
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mr speaker, clearly the strict issue of legality is not for the uk to determine, that it was not our operation, but i think that the most reasonable people would accept that the united states has a right to protect its bases and its personnel. and i were to remind the house that the individual concerned, kasem soleimani, was not only responsible for many years, amongst other things, arming the who fees with missiles, with which they attacked innocent civilians, arming his brother, which again, they used to sustain the sad regime in syria, won the most brutal and barbaric machines in the world, and of course, supplying explosive devices to terrorists, who i am afraid maimed and killed british troops. that man had the blood of british troops on his hands. well then, if we stand by international law, as i'm sure the government does and would want to, then, surely, killing
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somebody in foreign territory is an illegal act and it should be condemned as such. if we believe in international law, that should be the solution to the problems in the world. and as a permanent member of the united nations security council, can they... jez mack is a permanent member of the united nations security council, could the government say what things have been made to make sure that... to bring about a resolution to be very dangerous situation in the region, we will all be allowed to attend and in the event of the us administration blocking them, what representations will he personally make to president trump, to make sure that you and can operate in the way that it should and must be able to operate? i think the right honourable gentleman is probably well aware that the united states
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has a duty under its national law to allow people to visit the eu, and thatis allow people to visit the eu, and that is indeed the position the uk supports. iraqi parliament passed a resolution, calling for troops to leave their country. us troops. can the prime minister confirmed that the prime minister confirmed that the british government will respect any decision made by a sovereign parliament and government in iraq that may make such a request in the future? and will respect the sovereignty of iraq as a nation? well, mr speaker, i have spoken extensively to our trends around the world, including ourfriends in baghdad. and the prime minister there, who, of course, like many people in iraq, has come to rely and depend on the support of coalition forces, not least from the uk. as you will know, there is a very
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significant new nato mission in a row at the moment, helping in the fight against dyess. we must do everything we can to support the integrity of the iraqi people. my question was if the government will respect the sovereignty of iraq its parliament and its government, and the prime minister did not answer that question. the united states's actions have undoubtedly ignited the risk of conflict in an already stabilised region, putting civilians, uk troops and nationals at risk, and leaving the runyon us deal in danger of being dead in the water. this government seems not interested in putting its people first, but instead seems more interested in prioritising its relationship with president trump over the security of this country.
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is that the truth that this prime minister is unable to stand up to president trump because he has pitched his wagon to a deal with the united states, and that prioritises over everything else he ought to be considering? mr speaker, iwas over everything else he ought to be considering? mr speaker, i was kind of waiting for the little green men to come out at the end about the trade deal. this is absolute fiction, but what i will say is that the uk will continue to work for de—escalation in the region. i think we are having a great deal of success in bringing together a european response, and in bridging that, the european response, of course, with that of our american friends, and in working with the iranians and the iraqis to dial this thing down. but he should be in no doubt that —— this is a leader of the opposition that has famously received £10,000 from iranian tv, and he should be in absolutely no
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doubt that we are determined to guarantee with everything that we can, the safety and security of the people of iraq, whereas he would disband nato. it is this government that would continue to step stick up for people who have suffered at the hands of soleimani, the iranians task force that he has led anti terrorism that he has promoted. and there very surprised at this exchange, that he has yet to condemn the activities of soleimani. applause in the last ten years, there have been volumes of reports and videos calling for an end to inappropriate patient care for people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour, in the lake at the winterbourne scandal alone, there were seven such reports. as we start a new decade, when my right honourable friend state honey people
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are chatting in appropriate care settings, and instruct the department of health to act on those recommendations and be asks of families and campaigners? it so that the very venerable people get the ca re the very venerable people get the care they need and deserve?” the very venerable people get the care they need and deserve? i think my right honourable friend for the passionate campaign that she wages. ican passionate campaign that she wages. i can tell her the current number is 2190, which is patently unacceptable, but it is moving down. the health secretary tells me the number is coming down rapidly. we have a pledge to reduce it by 50%, and i'm sure that he will meet her there is shortly. in black said. can i welcome you to your place, mr speaker, which you and all members of staff are... i associate myself with the people who rates to sympathy for the airline crash. we wa nt to sympathy for the airline crash. we want to see democracy in iraq, we wa nt to want to see democracy in iraq, we want to see democracy in iraq, we want to see the return to peace, and of course, we support or measures to
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make sure that the diplomatic effo rts make sure that the diplomatic efforts can get us to a better place. mr speaker, prime minister, who should determine the future of scotland? who should determine the future of scotland ? the who should determine the future of scotland? the prime minister or the people who live in scotland? mr speaker, i think the answer to this is very clear. it is the people of scotland, who voted decisively, only four or five years scotland, who voted decisively, only four orfive years ago, scotland, who voted decisively, only four or five years ago, whose two stay members of the most successful partnership in history, but a decisive majority, in a once in a generation choice! jeers this is about democracy. in 2016, the people of scotland voted to remain in the european union, yet they have been dragged out of europe against their will by this prime minister. in 2019, the people of scotla nd minister. in 2019, the people of scotland elected a majority of snp
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mps to westminster. the scottish national party won the election on the promise of scotland's right to choose its own future, rejecting the prime minister, who lost more than half his seats in scotland. mr speaker, today, the scottish parliament will declare legislative consent to the withdrawal bill. they are legislating today. why is this conservative government dismissing the will of the people of scotland? ignoring their voice and disregarding our parliament?” ignoring their voice and disregarding our parliament? i think the real question is why does the snp keep going on about breaking up the most successful union in history? to distract from their abundant failures in government! look what is happening. in spite of getting an extra £9 billion a year from the uk, from the exchequer, which of course, they would lose if they were to break away, they are mismanaging their health care and,
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you will see, i'm afraid, and it is not the fault of scottish pupils, but scottish schools are falling behind in education. concentrate on what you're doing and stop going on about bring up the union. does the prime minister agree that at the heart is that we need strong... we need strong families. for the prime minister outline how we will fulfil a pledge to have family herbs and serve vulnerable families with the intensive integrated support they need to care for our children? i pay tribute to my honourable friend and it was because how do we put hubs in the
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ma nifesto because how do we put hubs in the manifesto so be in no doubt that we are working with local authorities to delivery family hubs. finally, it appears that there is some action being taken against northern rail. with the prime minister committed to stripping them of their franchise and also devolving the power and the money to the region so that local people have the power over their local transport and never have to suffer the appalling cattle of delays, overcrowding, cancellations and disruptions that have gone on a far too long? i have to say to the honourable lady that i share her outrage and i do understand what she is saying and we are developing contingency plans for a replacement for northern rail but what we are also doing and she raises the point, we are also looking at the whole way the franchising system works and she will have seen keith william's very valuable report on that. my right
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honourable friend has always been a vocal advocate of localism and so what advice can you give to my constituents that are concerned about the local lib dem councils and wa nted about the local lib dem councils and wanted housing plan in eastleigh which would lead to even more overdevelopment without securing the vital infrastructure that easily needs. i'm not surprised at what he says about the cavalier behaviour of lib dems councils in eastleigh. we will make sure that insofar as we need to build many more homes, which we do, we will of course supply the infrastructure necessary and do it on brownfield sites. the prime minister is a man of vision apparently. what is his vision for the constitution relationship between wales and england in the events of irish reunification and
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scottish independence? our relationship, like the relationship of the whole united kingdom will go from strength to strength. an american company has a track record of breaching environmental legislation in the usa and now seeks to build an incinerator in the test valley, local residents are looking to this comment because of their consent as emissions levels and are seeking reassurance that emissions from incineration will have a greener option is encouraged.” from incineration will have a greener option is encouraged. i see your concern because as we move to a their economy which will by 2050 it is vital that we tackle that kind of emissions and that is why we are establishing office for environment protection and we will chair a new cabinet committee about a drive forward action on climate change because the whole government.
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happy new year to you and all your staff and everyone in the house. the prime minister knows that his get brexit done slogan was vacuous, he also knows that it is not even the end of the beginning with no deal firmly back on the table. so, will he now acknowledge that any job firmly back on the table. so, will he now acknowledge that anyjob loss and any impact on british industry asa and any impact on british industry as a result of his brexit policy is firmly at his door? mr speaker, contrary to the predictions of the grim stairs, and are plummeted at a record low, we put on about eight hundred thousand jobs in the referendum and we will indeed get brexit done by january the 31st. thank you, for social justice, brexit done by january the 31st. thank you, for socialjustice, for life chances, the opportunities for the next generation, education is the next generation, education is the key and that is why the prime minister's pledge for additional funding are so welcome, especially for historically underfunded areas
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such as dorset and pool but equally important are discipline and standards. when the prime ministers ensure that there is a continued focus on the most disadvantaged especially when it comes to vital literacy and numeracy skills? yes, indeed i will. i pay tribute to my honourable friend the member from chichester who campaigned for synthetic phonics which has done such a huge amount to help kids to read in this country. this is the only country in the g7 performance of disadvantaged pupils has actually improved in reading since 2009. we need to do more and as my honourable friend said, that is why we are investing more of our record sums in education. margaret thatcher, john major all accepted that the union of the united kingdom has... start
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ain! the united kingdom has... start again! thank you, mr speaker. start again. margaret thatcher, john major, your immediate predecessors all accepted that the union of the united kingdom can only be maintained by consent. yet, despite winning three elections, seeking to test that consent, the prime minister insists that the snp government does not have a mandate to hold another independence referendum so could he tell me exactly what mechanism is available to the scottish people to give their consent or otherwise for maintaining this union and how should they go about exercising that? mr speaker, i can only repeat my point which is that the scottish people do have a
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mechanism, they used it in 2014. it a referendum and it took place and it was as members opposite all confirmed, it was a once in consideration vote. thank you, mr speaker. mr speaker, you have been a northern mp for myself and would welcome the news that they'll be more money spent the north of england. i want to reiterate that malcolm needs the eden project and we wa nt malcolm needs the eden project and we want to get the eden back in morecambe. they have today that the eden project is now very likely to come to morecambe. for more than two
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yea rs i have come to morecambe. for more than two years i have been campaigning on behalf of my constituents since across the uk have waited more than 20 years to receive money that is rightly theirs. in 2018, there was a breakthrough when hmrc came to repay millions of pounds in a wrongfully paid tax however i understand that they are now trying to recoup tax on every penny possible from those low income workers. given that the trust was set up as a nontax employee ownership scheme, does the prime minister think it is fair that hmi see would seek to rush or over that and would he now meet with me in order to discuss this? —— that hmrc. i make the point that we have done a lot to lift the burden of taxation on the low paid and we are lifting it by the biggest ever increase but
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i know that my right honourable friend will welcome the opportunity to discuss this particular matter he raises in person. in the period 2018 to 2019, overseas companies investing in northern ireland created nearly 1500 newjobs put up with my right honourable friend agree with me that if the stormont we re agree with me that if the stormont were to be up and running again then this year, that number would be considerably higher and that it is important that no stone is left unturned in efforts by the northern ireland parties to seek agreement to sell at the northern ireland assembly can be properly functioning ain? — assembly can be properly functioning again? —— so that the assembly can function again? northern ireland could get even more than it currently does if people took their responsibilities and got stormont up and running again. in the twilight
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of the last parliament, both the scottish affairs and health select committee produced reports on the drug crisis and both drew on international evidence and recommended a change on the law to allow venerable alex to be able to consume substances in secure places. —— to allow vulnerable users. will he consider on a pilot basis the establishment of overdose prevention centres in order to gather evidence as to whether this could help prevent deaths in this country as it has in other countries? i'm grateful to the honourable member because he is raising a very important issue and a difficult problem and the question is how do you introduce as it were consumption rooms without encouraging consumption? that is a challenge that we face and as he knows we are having a drugs summit
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this year. it will be held in scotla nd this year. it will be held in scotland and we will be announcing a date shortly. my local nhs trust is currently consulting on stroke rehabilitation service in hospital. staff on the world are rightly concerned about closure and the impact it will have on local residents, particularly those in my rural communities and so can the prime minister, are you willing to work with myself and the health secretary to take this matter seriously and prove to the residents that you are on their side? can i congratulate my honourable friend and welcome her and all the new collea g u es and welcome her and all the new colleagues to the first edition of pmqs. i think ever erasing her concerns and i've heard just from the health secretary passing the ball straight down the line that he is indeed going to address the
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matter that she raises as fast as possible. as you know, we're putting sums into the nhs. like much of the rest of the country, hospital a&e waiting times in coventry have been under constant pressure with the latest figures showing that almost a quarter of attendances are waiting for hours or more to be seen. i'm aware that the government has made commitments to the nhs so would the prime minister agree to meet a delegation from coventry to discuss the prospect of opening a second walk—in centre in the city to alleviate some of the pressure on our a&e departments?” alleviate some of the pressure on our a&e departments? i thank her for raising the issue and if i can do it i'm sure the health secretary can. does my right honourable friend that share my concerns about the lack of educational achievement and aspiration amongst so many of our
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waking has boys across the country? will he make it a top priority to ensure that all schoolchildren throughout the country are given the opportunity to maximise their talents ? opportunity to maximise their talents? yes, i can. not only are we investing record sums in a primary and secondary education but we are also setting up a national skills fund to help those who don't necessarily think they are candidates for university but are having a huge amount to offer the economy and need every help they can get. they have massive potential. can you buy minister detail what steps he has taken working with germany and france in working to restore the iran nuclear deal since he was appointed prime minister? i'm grateful to the honourable friend, he makes a very important point and as he knows it is our view that the jc poa remains the best way of preventing nuclear preparation in iran, the best way of encouraging the iranians not to develop a
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nuclear weapon and we think that after this crisis has evaded which we sincerely hope it will that that way forward will remain. it is a sheu way forward will remain. it is a shell that is currently being voided but it remains a shell into which we can put substance again. in recent months the performance of west midlands railfor months the performance of west midlands rail for my constituents and constituents across the region has been absolutely woeful. will he agree with andy street, the west midlands mayor that if they do not shape by the end of january that they should have an inspection by they should have an inspection by the secretary of transport and potentially have their franchise taken away? mr speaker, the hassle of head what i had to say already to the honourable lady about the performance of various franchise holders across our rail network. we are looking the whole issue and the bell is tolling for west midlands
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rail ifi bell is tolling for west midlands rail if i hit my honourable friend correctly. during the festive season i've been thinking about the prime minister basking in his hammock and contemplating his mandate but the mandate is absolutely nothing won by my colleagues here on the benches winning 45% of the popular vote and 80% of the seats. our mandate is unassailable so the prime minister was ‘s holidays are over and it is now time to deliver on that mandate. the scottish government has a numb and ready... in a word while discussions begin? i think i have given this answer already. the scottish government had the chance to decide and they decided emphatically to remain in the uk. i
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think that decision should be respected. thank you, mr speaker. cani respected. thank you, mr speaker. can i warmly welcome the prime minister's continued commitment to invest and level up across the country. this will be particularly welcome in cornwall, which continues to be one of the poorest parts of the uk. what the concern to the people of cornwall that we will continue to be at the heart of his plans to invest in the regions of this country? absolutely, i can confirm that and my honourable friend and i have discussed this many times. not only will cornwall continue to receive all the cash it gets for the shared prosperity fund, but we are doing extraordinary things with the with the infrastructure, the a33, you name it, to improve road transport throughout cornwall, and with the nhs as well, in penzance and truro and virtually every hospital in cornwall. final question. thank you,
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and 2005, my constituent did a bad thing. for which he is serving a life sentence in prison. but on the 29th of november, he was the third man on london bridge. he wrestled the knife wielding murderous terrorist to the ground, so that police marksmen could shoot him dead. stephen is rightly serving life in prison, but will be prime minister congratulate and pay tribute to stephen for his bravery that day, which, no doubt, saved lives? well, i think the honourable gentleman for his question, and for making a very good point, which i think the whole house would agree, i am lost in admiration for the bravery of stephen and indeed, for others who went to the assistance of members of the public on that day, and fought a very determined
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terrorist. obviously, it is not for the government to decide these things, but it is my hope that that gallantry will, in due course, be recognised in the proper way. point of order. prime minister's questions done now, very smartly done there. 33 minutes, which is a lot shorter than previous programme have been. that the snappy, wasn't it, norman? it was. iwonder if maybe they had a word with boris johnson ahead of pm queues and said we are going to do things differently. it was being, bang, bosch. he went through all the questions, and everyone, i thought, was curtailing their questions and a nswe rs was curtailing their questions and answers much more than they would have done in the balko era. i suspect that will be welcomed by a lot of people, particularly on the
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conservative benches, who are pretty fed up with john conservative benches, who are pretty fed up withjohn bacco. certainly a very different feel to prime minister's questions. finished on time for the first time in years, because previously, it has been edging up to almost an hour. one noticeable thing. the second noticeable thing. the second noticeable thing. the second noticeable thing was that at last,, borisjohnson noticeable thing was that at last,, boris johnson speaks on noticeable thing was that at last,, borisjohnson speaks on the crisis in iran. the first public words of his after he was pressed byjeremy corbyn very strongly defending the actions of the americans, that is, borisjohnson defending actions of the americans, that is, boris johnson defending the actions of the americans, that is, borisjohnson defending the actions of the americans. the planning and deployment of explosive devices, saying that the americans had an absolute right to defend their own citizens when challenged byjeremy corbyn over whether the assassination was an illegal act. he didn't give any clarity over whether british troops would pull out if the
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iraqi government confirmed the request from the end of the iraqi parliament. he left that one open, simply saying that britain would work to ensure the security of people in iraq against daesh. elsewhere, a flurry of questions from snp mps about how on earth they go about securing independence, given that borisjohnson has pretty much slammed the door. his answer, the door stay shut because there was a referendum in 2014. that was a once ina a referendum in 2014. that was a once in a generation decision. there isn't going to be another one anytime soon. thank you, norman. now it's time for a look at the thank you, norman. weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. a slightly quieter weather day today. it is much colder across scotland, northern ireland and northern england, but there is some sunshine afforded between the showers. still quite lively winds here. whilst further south, yes, it has been dry and bright to start, but rain is creeping back in and the milder air is still close by to southern parts.
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and that is giving us a bit of a headache on the detail. the next area of low pressure is arriving as we go through this evening and overnight, pushing its rains northwards. the area of low pressure, if it does deepen more, could potentially bring some very windy weather, so we are keeping an eye on that. and as it comes into the cold air, the likelihood is that the pennines, the cumbrian fells and the southern uplands could see some snow fall towards morning as well. so that is the milder air in the south, cold enough for frost, so a colder night in the north. and potentially some windy weather in england and wales, with gales around the coasts, and the windiest around southerly and western areas. it will push the rain away tomorrow though, but we have got more coming in to the south and west later in the day. the warnings on the website. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines iran has fired missiles at two air bases housing us—led forces in iraq,
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in response to the us drone strike which killed general qasem soleimani. at prime minister's questions, borisjohnson siad there were no uk casualties and the government was doing everything it could to protect uk interests in middle weast. in response to the attack president trump tweet that "all is well" and he'll make a statement later today. the iranian foreign minister said his country will defend itself "against any aggression". officials in ukraine say three british nationals were on board a ukrainian boeing—737 plane which has crashed after taking off from tehran. 170 people were on board — it's thought there are no survivors. it's not clear if the crash was in any way connected to the ongoing tensions between the us and iran. the prime minister is due to have his first meeting with the new eu commission president ursula von der leyen this afternoon. she told an audience in london this morning that future negotiations between the eu and the uk will pose a challenge, but both sides must remain optimistic. without an extension of the
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transition period beyond 2020, you cannot expect to agree on every single aspect of our new partnership. we will have to prioritise. thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike over pay and staffing levels. thousands of appointments and procedures are cancelled. iran has carried out a ballistic missile attack on two us bases in iraq in retaliation for the killing of general qasem soleimani. more than a dozen missiles were launched from iran in the early hours of the morning. they struck air bases in al asad, in the west of baghdad, and irbil in the north. the two bases that were targeted were housing us and coalition troops. it's unclear if there have been any casualties. president donald trump tweeted that "all is well". he wrote: "assessment of casualties and damages taking place now. so far, so good!". he is expected to make a statement later today.
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iran's foreign minister tweeted: "we do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression". our middle east editorjeremy bowen in baghdad says this appears to suggest that iran wishes to draw a line under its retaliation for the assassination of soleimani. at prime minister's questions earlier, boris johnson called for de—escalation in the region, and said that there were no us casualties, and no british personnel injured. as british personnel injured. far as we can tell, there casualties as far as we can tell, there were no casualties last night sustained by the us, and no british personnel we re the us, and no british personnel were injured in the attacks. and we are doing everything we can, of course, to protect uk interest in the region, with hms camco case hms defender and hms montrose defending
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the shipping lanes. we had relocated nonessential personnel to catchy. and we will do everything that we can to prevent an escalation. danjohnson sent this report. the world had wondered how iran would respond... well, here is how it looks and sounds. the world had wondered how iran would respond... well, here is how it looks and sounds. explosion. missiles hitting iraqi air bases used by america and its allies. local tv says this is footage of them being launched from iran over the border. and all this as iran was still laying to rest the body of its assassinated general, qasem soleimani, killed by a us drone strike. a martyr to the millions on the streets for his funeral calling for retaliation. but the us says he's a murderer who was planning attacks to extend iran's influence over its neighbour. this was the white house warning yesterday.
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if iran does anything it shouldn't be doing, they will suffer the consequences, and very strongly. with the damage still being assessed, iran's foreign minister posted on social media, proportionate measures of self defence, he said, adding, we do not seek escalation or war. the president was untypically low—key, saying all is well and restating american military might. he said he will give more reaction later today. the uk ministry of defence says none of the 400 british service personnel who were helping to train iraqi forces were caught up in these attacks. the british government has urged all sides to calm things down, to try to take the tension out of the situation. the early signs are that the impact of these limited strikes has been fairly light. iran can say it fought back, but the us may not feel it needs to respond. what that means for the future of iraq is still a complex question. dan johnson, bbc news.
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time for a business update now. the boss of sainsbury‘s has said sales were lower during the christmas period because fewer people bought toys. more on this injust a moment. customers of travelex — the foreign currency trader — say they feel let down after being left with no travel money. the company confirmed on tuesday that it is the victim of a ransomware attack. lawyers for the fugitive ex—nissan boss carlos ghosn have accused the company of conducting a biased investigation of his leadership. the comments come ahead of a press conference that mr ghosn is scheduled to hold in lebanon later today.
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now, the great and the good of the consumer tech world were all at the tech show in las vegas, including our very own tech show in las vegas, including our very own reporter, who sent us this walk around of day one at a texture. here we are at this tech show, it is absolutely buzzing. there are thousands of tech companies here and they are all vying to be the theme to use in the 20 205. vying to be the theme to use in the 20 20s. this is called the shoe blast, and is from the south korean fund. what it claims to do is disinfect smelly trainers using uvc. we have brought a trainer along, belonging to a colleague of mine. it smells pretty bad, i'm not going to name and shame then that lets see if this shoe blast can do its job. name and shame then that lets see if this shoe blast can do itsjob. what this shoe blast can do itsjob. what this device does, you put one in each show, and we will show you what is happening. you plug it in, you switch it on, and there you go! apparently, it takes 20 minutes, so while our smelly trainer is cooking,
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as it were, i will show some of the other stuff i had seen today. this a sta ple other stuff i had seen today. this a staple of this convention. it is a concierge robot, aimed at the hotel industry. this one will set you back a mere $50,000. it this needs a bit more thought. this is called pantry on. basically, you put it in your kitchen cupboards. it has a weighing scale, so it weighs everything and tells you if you are running out of something. it will set you back $700 per shelf. here is something else from the uk. this is a meat thermometer that will tell you if your hoop food is perfectly ready. let's see how our stinky shoes have got on. here we go. i am quite nervous. they had been cooking for about 30 minutes. oh! iam nervous. they had been cooking for about 30 minutes. oh! i am sorry! well, they are a little bit better than they were, but i'm not looking forward to having to carry them back
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to my colleague, let's put it that way. rather higher than the. at the ces show in las vegas. some other stories for you today. anglo—american is in talks to buy minerals. the offer is about 40% above tuesday's sirius minerals for 5.5p a share, valuing the business at £386 million pounds. the offer is about 40% above tuesday's close price. thousands of greggs staff are set to get a £300 one—off payment after a what they've called a "phenomenal year". sales growth had been helped by the bakery chain's vegan sausage rolls and strong demand for its traditional snacks. shareholders received a £35 million pound special dividend in october. (ani) following 19 complainsts, an advert saying "you do the girl boss thing" has been banned by the advertising standards authority, ruling it reinforced "harmful gender stereotypes". people per hour, an online platform that connects
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businesses and freelancers, ran the advert on the london underground last year. the firm removed the word "girl" from the advert and issued an apology. nerves returned to global market today, sending stock prices lower, after the iranian missile attacks on us targets in iraq, but investor sentiment has now improved slightly. oil prices spiked but have since settled back with brent crude currently up around 1.4% at over $69.21 per barrel. so—called safe haven assets, like gold and the japanese yen, also rose on the news of the attack. gold was up more than two percent, surging above $16 hundred an ounce for the first time in six years, before falling back slightly. that's all the business news.
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but first the headlines on bbc news: iran has fired missiles at two air bases housing american—led forces in iraq, in response to the us drone strike which killed general soleimani. the prime minister of iraq's spokesman said tehran gave an advance warning about the attack. officials in ukraine say three british nationals were on board a ukrainian boeing—737 plane which has crashed after taking off from tehran. 170 people were on board — it's thought there are no survivors. the prime minister is due to have his first meeting with the new eu commission president. it's expected borisjohnson will say he wants a future trade deal with the eu to be finalised this year. a ukrainian airliner carrying more than 170 passengers and crew has crashed in iran — the president of ukraine has urged people not to speculate about the cause. ukrainian officials say three british nationals were on board the aircraft. the boeing—737 was bound
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for the ukrainian capital, kiev. the ukraine international airlines plane crashed just after take—off from iran's imam khomeini airport in tehran, iran and ukraine say there are no survivors. ukraine's tehran embassy initially blamed engine failure but later removed the statement. iranian state tv has broadcast interviews with local emergency services, who said the aircraft burst into flames after crashing. james waterhouse reports. a fiery trail of devastation. this is where the 737 came down close to tehran airport, leaving the grim task of searching for bodies and belongings. medics say it is impossible that any of the 176 people on board could have survived. ukraine's foreign minister says that three britons were among the dead, along with iranians, swedes, canadians, afghans, ukrainians and germans.
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it was on its way into the ukrainian capital kiev and the government there says it has sent a crisis group to investigate. in a statement, the president volodymyr zelensky said he sends his sincere condolences to the relatives and friends of all passengers and crew. the boeing 737 800 belonged to ukraine airlines, unlike its successor, the 737 max, which has had to be grounded after two crashes, this model has been described as a workhorse of the skies. there are several thousand of them around the world and there have been ten events, including this one, where at least one passenger was killed but this was again several tens of millions of flights. in fact, of all the variations of the 737, this has by far the lowest fatal event rate. right now there are more questions than answers over what happened. the only thing clear is the sheer loss of life. james waterhouse, bbc news. a former children s home owner
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described as depraved and wicked by a judge has been sentenced to 14 and a half years injail. john allen had already been imprisoned for life in 2014. today's sentence was handed down for eight historical sexual offences against five boys as young as 13 in his care. allen is one of 13 people to have been convicted as part of operation pallial, an investigation into past abuse in the north wales care system. the number of people killed in cases of murder and manslaughter in the uk fell in 2019 for the first time in four years. the situation was different in london, which saw its third annual successive rise in a row. but the figures, compiled by the bbc, suggest some forces may be getting to grips with the rise in serious violence. here s our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. shouting. relentless — that's how merseyside police describe their battle against organised crime. in the last year, they've seized drugs, cash, guns,
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even hand grenades. they've been using these quad bikes to search for the weapons gangs hide in the undergrowth and they've been persuading communities to turn against the serious criminals. the result — the force appears to have turned a corner, cutting murders and manslaughters. organised crime and killing, it says, are inextricably linked. we know a lot of those homicides are related to serious organised crime, which is why we are relentless in targeting those who lead, who bully, who exploit young people, who will carry guns and knives in order to dominate a certain territory. merseyside police, emergency. another strategy is better training for handling domestic violence. we've examined 100 of last year's killings in detail. a fifth took place in the home. we've tracked every single murder or manslaughter in the uk
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in the last year, and our figures show that for the first time in four years, the number of killings has fallen, with 650 in 2019. hopeful, but only a start. london's recorded its third rise in as many years. it now has 150 outstanding homicide cases, including this one, the murder of a delivery riderjust this weekend. tom symonds, bbc news. about 9,000 nurses across northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike. the action began at eight o'clock this morning in a second wave of protest over pay and staffing levels. more than 2,000 appointments and procedures have been cancelled. the heads of northern ireland's health trusts have warned that the strike could tip services over the edge and urged nurses not to walk out. pat cullen, director of the royal college of nursing in northern ireland, spoke to us a little earlier from belfast. nurses have been telling those very health chiefs
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for many years now, it is all a matter of record, that the system was about to tip, and actually, that we were in an absolute crisis with our health service in northern ireland. that's not new information, and it certainly shouldn't be new information to those health chiefs. what nurses said to me last night, when those very health chiefs came out on the airwaves and said to them enough is enough, then they tipped the health service over there. i wished they had listened to our nurses for the many years we have been telling them, please do not put in place temporary measures to get money out of the system. please put back in the 2800 nurse vacant posts in northern ireland, and please addressed the nursing crisis. nurses in northern ireland are coming into
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their work everyday and every and having to manage in an absolute crisis situation. beds lined up in corridors and single rooms meant for one patient. two patients pushed into it now. and with one oxygen point. it is those nurses that are trying to deal with that day in, day out. they say when they wake up in the morning and get out of the bed and go into work, it is with absolute dread and they wonder, how are we going to get through the day? how are we going to be that care, how are we going to cope? and how are we going to keep a patient safe ? someone has to take responsibility, and last night, what are nurses are saying is it is tantamount to bullying going on by our health chiefs from. the european commission president ursula von der leyen has been delivering a lecture in london — she says the eu and britain will have to prioritise what they want agreed by the end of this year, unless there is an extension of the negotiating period. a partnership cannot and will not be
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the same as before and as close as before because with every choice comes a consequence. with every decision comes a trade—off. without the free movement of people you cannot have the free movement of capital goods and services. without a level playing field on environment, labour, taxation and state aid, you cannot have the highest quality access to the world's largest single market. the more divergences there is, the more distant the partnership will be and without an extension of the transition period beyond 2020, you cannot expect to agree on every single aspect of our new partnership. we will have to prioritise. the eu's directive in the negotiations are clear. we will
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work for solutions that uphold the integrity of the european union, the single market and its customs union. there can be no compromise on that. there can be no compromise on that. the one o'clock news is coming up but now it's time for a look at the weather. a quitea a quite a spell for most of us today. we have had some heavy showers moving in and the brisk wind still blowing through scotland, northern ireland and northern england but through the showers we have some sunshine. more limited further south but it is brighter. however, the cloud is thickening now and it will bring more rain back into the south—west as we go towards the evening rush hour so a rather wet end to the day here. at least it is still relatively mild whilst further north, despite the sunshine, it is noticeably colder than it was yesterday and it will be a much colder at night. the big talking point is around the rain coming into the south or actually the strength
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of the wince. we will see our first significant rain across england and wales for some time and there is the potential as well. very windy weather and that is still giving us a headache, even at this short time ahead as to how deep that a low pressure will be and stronger winds but they have the potential to be quite lively and gusty as we go through the night and into tomorrow morning's rush hour so tomorrow night will bring the in and with it as it comes into the cold air in the north, potentially over the pennines, dumfries and galloway, the southern upland area, can and fells with some snow whilst it stays in a relatively mild further south but mild, wetand relatively mild further south but mild, wet and windy so it lively weather through the morning rush. not nice to drive on, hill fog as well and potentially snow and gusty winds which look strong at around southern and western areas but as i say, we have some uncertainty still and more to come in later, more rain and more to come in later, more rain and strong winds. quite a turbulence day tomorrow with dry weather in
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between but it will still feel cold, particularly in the northern half of the country. that second low then skips across the channel islands and northern france and looks like they'll get quite a battering with those winds but then pressure building over the course of friday toa building over the course of friday to a quieter start to the day, quieterfor england to a quieter start to the day, quieter for england and wales but as we approach the end of the day we have the rain coming back in scotla nd have the rain coming back in scotland and northern ireland. rain and strengthening winds and there are warnings out for that rain because it looks set to last through friday evening into saturday, certainly through saturday may even into sunday so there are weather warnings out on the website. 01:59:39,804 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 this.
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