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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 10, 2020 7:00pm-7:46pm GMT

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hello, darling. good to see you. you have done it all. 2019 was the year for you. you want the greatest dancer, you won strictly, you presented the show. which of those was the highlight? careful of your answer. definitely the greatest dancer. what a year, and to end it on such a high. most people at this time of the year are looking forward. we believe this is a fair and balanced deal and we believe it has a deal that can form the basis ofan has a deal that can form the basis of an alliance. ideal with all the difficult issues we need to deal with. the jewels are difficult issues we need to deal with. thejewels are held in canada for some of the victims of the ukrainian plane crash that killed
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176 people. iran rejects suggestions that one of its missiles brought down the aircraft. a 21—year—old women here disguise herself as a boy to groom and sexually assault girls, she is jailed for eight years. the cheshire teenager helped during a seizure by a stranger 5000 miles away. 0n seizure by a stranger 5000 miles away. on your switch, seizure by a stranger 5000 miles away. 0n yourswitch, remember election night. if you saw some of the results online, chances are the articles you read my written partly bya articles you read my written partly by a computer. join us tonight at 7:45pm on bbc news. enjoyed most of all the training. i think the training was just enjoyed most of all the training. i think the training wasjust being in the room and putting our minds together and really pushing ourselves. there were days when we would come up with something and i would come up with something and i would want to do it even better and he had to calm me down and be welcome to the bbc news after three yea rs of welcome to the bbc news after three years of deadlock parachuting will return to northern ireland. the deal
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aimed at restoring the devolved government has been agreed by sinn fein and the democratic unionist. the british and irish covenants who brokered the deal said their proposals were a fair compromise that contained if your comprise of everyone. but they have warned that the serious challenges remain. a reminder that there is a flash photography in this report by r and correspondent emma va rdy. photography in this report by r and correspondent emma vardy. after three years of resistance, the final step to an agreement. this is from and's past here to witness that requires everyone to step up. sinn fein plasma commitment is to do all in our power to make this happen. it marks the end of a bitter
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stand—off between sinn fein and the democratic unionist. late last night the ultimatum was given in dramatic fashion. secretary of state for northern ireland and the irish government's deputy prime minister chose to go public with the deal before all parties were on board, saying it is on the table, take it 01’ saying it is on the table, take it or leave it. not all the documents are agreed by all the parties. i believe we have a deal that all parties in northern ireland counterpart. the deal contains wide—ranging provisions for the health service, education, policing and other areas. the biggest ask was getting agreement for the much fought over legal protection, the irish language. it is my community language. it is a language i speak
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with my friends, at home. decades of conflict in northern ireland means even today issues over british and irish identity often lead to tension. i don't see how one identity can erode another. if you are secure enough identity can erode another. if you are secure enough in your own identity, it shouldn't be an issue. it is about time we kind of moved into a new era which doesn't respect everyone's right. given the irish language legal status has faced opposition within unionist community. people would say that would be a blunt instrument for irish unity. the secretary of state tried to reassure voters in loyalist heartland today that the deal is fair. it brings relief for many
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after three years but in this city compromise never comes easily. what's the problem with having laws to protect the irish language? none of us want it. we don't want the irish longridge. it has gone on and on for years. for northern ireland's nurses, who are striking for the first time in the history, today's deal will bring an end to these picket lines as extra cash from the british government to raise wages and measures to reduce the crippling waiting list at hospitals. parties know the devil is in the detail and no doubt the new provisions for northern ireland will provoke 20 of rows to come. this will happen within a devolved government, not outside it. they will need to select
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ministers and stormont can really get back to work. the smaller parties are yet to officially sign up parties are yet to officially sign up but the moves between the big parties, the dup, the sinn fein, have now been made. it went down to the wire. we didn't know until the last minute which way it was going to go. so this moment will bring celebration for many people across northern ireland after such a long period of frustration, but at the same time dissatisfaction amongst voters is high with the main parties at the moment of why this had to ta ke at the moment of why this had to take so long. we saw that in the last general election with the dup and sinn fein taking a real hit to their vote share. they will try to restore confidence now and their firstjob in this building will be to the problem is that mounted up in public services during this period without a government. the dup and sinn fein will also have to convince people that these two parties, who are in many ways sworn enemies, can
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really work together again. joining me now from salford is a specialist from northern irish politics from the university of... it is tempting to sayjob done, but as ms said, this is the beginning rather than end. the hard work starts now but the parties had nowhere else to go but back to stormont today. if you look at the last general election result, it removed the dup influence at westminster. the share dropped at the general election and they were being punished by an increasingly exasperated northern ireland electorate who looked at the bizarre situation in which not a single member of the assembly had lost a days pay, even though they had not been to work in three years. none of the political parties fronted another generation of powerlessness. frankly, they had to go back to
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stormont. the nhs crisis is very acute in northern ireland and there isa acute in northern ireland and there is a whole load of items on the to—do list as soon as those assembly members to get back to work. give us a sense of the impact not having the assembly sitting for three years has had. the nhs has a worst waiting list anywhere in the uk, you have got a postponement of vital treatments like cancer, big waiting lists for operations. you have had no ministerial direction in terms of the health service. frankly, people have called time. it is not they have called time. it is not they have given up on devolved power sharing. every single survey showed that that is what the electorate wa nted that that is what the electorate wanted but they were getting set out —— sick and tired that the two parties had not gone back to stormont. there was a blame game going on. the electric had had enough. the parties got the message from last december plasma collection
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and as soon as that exit poll appeared, the devolution show was getting back on the road from their own. some people have suggested that pa rt own. some people have suggested that part of the reason their bites were very focused on this deadline is at the northern ireland secretary julian smith had said two things, if this didn't happen he would withhold money and secondly, he would say another election was needed. how much did those things focus the minds of the politicians? both. julian smith is not a bluffer. his two predecessors have let loads of deadlines go where is this time i think the party has a message that julian smith was not to be messed around, he would go to elections. there were big risks for the dup and sinn fein in those elections because voters had been gravitating to other parties, most notably the alliance party. there was an awful lot of cash attached to this devolution settlement. you could argue there was more money attached to this devolution deal then there was
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obtained by the dup, £1 billion, that they got from the conservatives for northern ireland in 2017. a huge amount of money attached to this. it made good sense for the parties to go back into government together. there are still issues that will be difficult. today's deal is a fudge on the irish language act. it is not a stand—alone irish longridge act. it is something close to it. there are various issues in the hands of commissioners to deal with which is not necessarily a solution to those vexed issues. you have got an office of culture and identity today. that could be a repository for all sorts of grievances within a restored executive so you shouldn't imagine that the parties will live happily ever after. at remember that since the devolved power—sharing executive we re the devolved power—sharing executive were set up in 1999 it has been absent for 46% of the time. so there have been long—standing problems with development in northern ireland
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which today's deal, welcome as it may be, isn't automatically going to solve. it is interesting that the title of that deal is new decade, new approach. it sounds like one is very much needed but may not be forthcoming. you have had successful periods of devolution in northern ireland. from around 2007 to 2016 you had the chuckle brothers, the astonishing, jaw—dropping deal between ian paisley and martin mcguinness followed by a pragmatic working relationship between peter robinson and martin mcguinness. you we re robinson and martin mcguinness. you were ten years of relatively successful devolved power—sharing but you could argue that was the exception rather than the bill because ultimately the two parties have very different ambitions. they are not on the same page about brexit other than the fact that they do not like boris johnson's brexit other than the fact that they do not like borisjohnson's forma brexit. you still have difficult issues coming very soon. let's not pretend this is anything other than a loveless marriage, but the fact
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they are going back to work will place an awful lot of people in northern ireland tonight. place an awful lot of people in northern ireland tonightm place an awful lot of people in northern ireland tonight. it sounds like we may be talking to you again. thank you very much. we will of course be taking a look at how the resumed northern ireland assembly and many other stories are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 1040 and then at 1130 this evening in the papers. my guest tonight, joanne nadler and political writer and academic my good fellow. bejewelled have been held in canada for some of the victims of the ukrainian plane crash on wednesday. iran has again rejected suggestions that one of its missiles brought down the aircraft, killing 176 people. the picture still remains unclear but what we do know is the flight took off from tehranjust after six know is the flight took off from tehran just after six in the morning but just two tehran just after six in the morning butjust two minutes later the data on that flight stop. the plane came down to the south—west of the
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capital tehran. 63 of the victims we re capital tehran. 63 of the victims were canadian. we have a report from toronto. the sense of utter disbelief now is palpable at the shocking revelations of how this disaster may have happened, impounded by the huge sense of loss here. i am crying since yesterday. i realised all of the students from the school... it is so sad, so sad. some people say it was an engine failure, some people say it was done bya failure, some people say it was done by a missile. really, failure, some people say it was done bya missile. really, it failure, some people say it was done by a missile. really, it is very confusing. iran says it may take one or two years to resolve the confusion and for the investigation to reach any conclusions. but these pictures show it has already chosen to clear much of the crash site,
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potentially burying important leads. and even before the data has been analysed from the flight recorders, its officials already say they are sure of one thing. the aviation authority cannot speculate. we aren't sure of the causes yet but we can say for certain that the missile did not strike the plane, but the causes we still need to work out. but this mobile phone footage does appear to back up that they beat the plane was struck by a missile. the small outgoing speck of light suddenly exploding. with the impact following. the the iranians insist if it really was a missile strike the debris would have been spread over a larger area. it is not what mike pompeo thinks. we do... we do
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believe it was shot down by an iranian missile. he announced new sanctions on iran. we want iran to simply behave like a normal nation. we believe this entranceway fee impose today further the strategic objective. but for families in impose today further the strategic objective. but forfamilies in iran, ukraine, britain and more than 60 in canada, the focus is on grieving, although they do want answers. some of those here affected by this unspeakable tragedy have told us that even though they are in canada, even though they have suffered loss, they are still reluctant to criticise the iranian regime openly partly because of the possible repercussions that could have fought relatives back in iran. there is no question that this tragedy could be a consequence of regional tensions, which has only added to the spare.
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let's speak to a global affairs a nalyst. let's speak to a global affairs analyst. he worked at the crash site of the downed malaysia airlines mh 17 in ukraine back in 2014. hejoins us from new york. i wonder first of all, whether you're prepared to express our hunch as to what you happened? good to be with you. it is looking more and more like a missile strike. what is really starting, starting to me is that it appears to bea starting to me is that it appears to be a rush missile, not only that, as in the case of mh 17, the technology is such that the missile actually explodes outside the aircraft, releases a shrapnel, pieces of shrapnel into the fuselage, making the plane on here's ready. —— making the plane on here's ready. —— making the plane on here's ready. —— making the plane not airworthy. this one
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was below 10,000 feet. in much smaller debris field of about two hectares. with demolition plan, we had about 30 hectares. there are going to be very important clues, of course, any fuselage, even in the body remains that investigators need to look at. that crime scene, that is what it is, a crime scene, is being bulldozed over and cleaned by iranian authorities is simply shocking. that needs to be preserved until proper investigators get in there and had a close look at all of there and had a close look at all of the evidence. we will talk a little bit any moment about what you feel ought to happen in the sketch make these kind of cases but what is your view about what is happening? my fear of what is happening is that you cover—up is happening, that the iranians are keen to whitewash the findings. they do not want to let any more international scrutiny and criticism, perhaps, of what happened. i would like to think that
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this was a human error or mechanical error that sent that missile up, but the best thing the iranians could do it now, given that so many of them not only their own nationals, but evenin not only their own nationals, but even in canadians are on there, is to be open, transparent and get to the bottom of what happened. they have to come clean on what happened. he said as well that in these kind of scenarios, and who in terms of her is embedded take part in his investigations and share thoughts and approaches. what would be best practice? what would be normal is exactly what happened with the mh 17 investigation. do not forget that was an active conflict zone. the ukrainians took the lead, but then they basically delegated the investigation to the dutch because there were so many dutch nationals on that aeroplane and also because
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they have a very good expertise. that was a very, very professionally run investigation with all of the parties concerned. the airplay manufacture, engine manufacture, journal of degrading countries involved. there were very good expertise led by the australians in terms of i need to be, at that crash. the exact same thing should happen here. sing some news agency copy that is coming in saying that iran will announce the raising for the crash of the ukrainian airliner tomorrow. what would be your response to the fact that they are saying they will have an answer on saturday?” that they are saying they will have an answer on saturday? i am quite surprised. the line has been that it is not a missile and they said quite earlier, too early on, that it was some kind of mechanical reason, sol think it is far, far too soon to jump think it is far, far too soon to jump to conclusions and, again, anything they say right now is hard to believe because it does not
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involve those experts. when the plane went down in eastern ukraine, the area was controlled by rebels. and it took some time for them to allow the foreign experts and undertook some time for the seam to be safe enough for them to come in. —— the scene. that is why they need to preserve that site in order for it to be in the same shape for those investigators to have a look at it. there are too many clues and pieces of evidence in this open crime scene. i suppose, finally, politics aside, which is clearly so massive in this investigation, there is a lwa ys in this investigation, there is always the human side and, for families of civilians, essentially have been cut up on this, the need for a nswers have been cut up on this, the need for answers is very strong. -- caught up. indeed. i was reading before i came on air about some of the people who are lost. there was a canadian scientist who found a treatment for a disease that has killed up to 50,000 people a year. such incredible talent. i know many of the relatives from the mh 17 disaster and they are still looking
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for a nswers disaster and they are still looking for answers five years later and they are still looking forjustice. i hope that does not happen in this case, but the fact again that the iranians are apparently tampering with the site, we know from the mh 17 site that human remains and evidence was found for years afterwards. i am told that some of the passengers have done nationality, iran does not reckon is that, so there could be some negative actions there i am afraid. a very difficult time indeed. very good of you to join us a very difficult time indeed. very good of you tojoin us here. here, a women who pose as a teenage boy to groom and sexually assault girls as young as 13 has beenjailed groom and sexually assault girls as young as 13 has been jailed for eight years. 20 when you're gemma watts from north london admitted the offences at a crown court in manchester. it is the nation we have
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assaulted up to... gemma and jake. to date court she pretended to be jake online. she spent months combing her victims. the girls were so convinced that they were in touch with the boy that they were in touch with the boy that they arranged to meet up. when they did, watts, disguised in baggy clothes and hats, convinced even at the girls parents that she was a boy. for a number of the victims, it was their first serious relationship with the boy. and for some of them, it has been their first time that they have been intimate. to then find out that it was actually a female that has groomed, and it manipulated and then abused the trust that they placed in them has
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been, i think, trust that they placed in them has been, ithink, life trust that they placed in them has been, i think, life changing. trust that they placed in them has been, ithink, life changing. this was gemma watts as herself. as jake, she travelled across the country, meeting up with her victims. in court, she admitted seven offences of grooming and sexual assault. involving four girls under 16. this was a highly unusual case, not only because it involved online grooming by women, but also because of the pretence of being a boy —— by a woman. and although the court heard that watts suffered from gender identity issues, thejudge that watts suffered from gender identity issues, the judge said that she because psychological harm to all the girls involved. police think that this online case may involve up to 50 victims. young girls are duped by women posing as a boy about making them feel abused, angry and ashamed. the metropolitan police are treating an attack on a guard at
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whitemoor prison in commissioner as a terrorist incident —— in cambridgeshire. the officer was stabbed by two inmates wedding cake suicide vests. 0ur stabbed by two inmates wedding cake suicide vests. our home of your correspondent has been at the ministry ofjustice for us tonight. he that the ministry ofjustice and the prison service headquarters, ministers and officials are resting with the aftermath —— resting with the aftermath of the attack. the first of this type tap inside an englishjail. it first of this type tap inside an english jail. it follows years of warnings that prison staff could be attacked by a radicalised person. as the inmates were being unlocked, thatis the inmates were being unlocked, that is exactly what happened. this man was jailed five years ago for plotting to a heady soldier. he had been carrying this large knife and hammer at the time of his arrest ——
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plotting to behead a soldier. he is one of the two men who committed what is said to be a terrorist attack. it happened on a high security section of the jail. two inmates wedding fake suicide belts and shouting allahu akbar attacked —— to admit wearing excessive belts. it was only but for the professionalism of all the other stuff that i am not standing here talking about a murder of a prison officer. that is how serious this caribbean vicious attack was. any statement, the prime minister said...
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the government has been repeatedly warned by a former senior governor about the risk that convicted terrorists opposed to prison staff her obvious targets for an inmate wanting to commit violent political acts. there has been a colossal failure of intelligence here. in terms of protecting prison staff from somebody who was clearly very radicalised. and that has been important because, if we cannot recruit and retain and train and protect front line prison staff, who are dealing with some of the most dangerous and sophisticated terrorists in the country, we are going to have a very serious problem. whitemoor prison is where usman khan was held. he is the released prisoner who carried out the attack on fishmongers hall.
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violence against prison staff in england and wales has been rising sharply for five years. causing some officers to quit what they see as a more dangerousjob. officers to quit what they see as a more dangerous job. this attack will only increase the concerns about the risks run by those keeping the rest of us say. the bbc presenter samira ahmed has won her 60s commission claim against the bbc. they have agreed that she should be paid the same for presenting as much as jeremy vine is paid for presenting point of view. samira ahmed always argued this wasn'tjust about a single individual, but a systemic injustice. now, she has been vindicated. no woman wants to have to take action against her own employer. i love working for the bbc. i'm really glad it's been resolved. hello, and welcome to newswatch,
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with me, samira ahmed. her argument was that there was no material difference between what she did as a presenter of newswatch, a bbc news channel programme that was repeated on bbc one... first this week... ..and whatjeremy vine did as the presenter of points of view, also on bbc one. for the bbc, it was the repeat of newswatch on bbc one that undermined their case. vine was paid £3,000 per programme, more than six times as much as ahmed for newswatch. we're doing the show. welcome to the first newswatch of 2020, and a happy new year. the burden of proof fell on the bbc to show that the difference between ahmed's pay and that of vine was not explained by sex discrimination, but otherfactors such as skill or charisma. it failed. we've always believed that samira and jeremy vine's pay was not based on their gender. presenters, female as well as male, have always been paid more on points of view than newswatch.
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we're sorry the tribunal did not think the bbc provided enough evidence about specific decisions in this case. this is another bad day for the bbc‘s management, who have long cast themselves as champions of gender equality and diversity. but the central issue here goes beyond the bbc, where the recognisability, in other words fame or profile, has an economic value which justifies paying different presenters different amounts for equivalent work, regardless of their race or gender. the tribunal says it doesn't, which means countless contracts across the whole of the industry now need to be revisited. it's really important, because it demonstrates a failure within the bbc which is a common problem across the whole of uk industry. and that is a failure to undertake job evaluation at the very beginning, and to pay people according to a job evaluation scheme. reporter: could youjust
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tell us how you feel? the bbc has made substantial reforms and improved transparency. but it's now braced for a vast influx of fresh claims. amol rajan, bbc news. moon gators are in for a treat this evening. tonight's wolf moon, the first full moon of the year, coincides with a lunar eclipse. these pictures were taken an hour ago. it is expected to end at around 9pm. it means it is moving through the earth's 9pm. it means it is moving through the ea rth‘s penumbra, 9pm. it means it is moving through the earth's penumbra, or outer shadow. clear skies down here mean we are getting a good view but not a lwa ys we are getting a good view but not always the same elsewhere. if you are missing out on this one, there are missing out on this one, there are another three to look forward to this year. let's get a look at the weather. for many friday offered a
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quieter spell of weather. fine and dry with sunshine but that next system has been making its presence known. gust of wind of 60 mph in the western isles. heavy and persistent rain spilling in, pushing its way into parts of cumbria and north wales. after a chilly start to the night, temperatures will rise as we head towards dogs. as we tap into milderair head towards dogs. as we tap into milder air feeding south—westerly winds. it will be windy on saturday. the strongest winds in scotland, northern england and north wales. it will stay dry and cloudy. behind it, fresh and bright out with some showers. away from pressure conditions, it will be mild with double digit temperatures. as we head into sunday, the rain and wind clears. a cooler and blustery day. wind is not as strong as saturday. some sunshine but also some showers which could be wintry over the hills of scotland. you are watching bbc
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news with rachel schofield. after three years of deadlock, power—sharing will return to northern ireland. a deal aimed at restoring devolved government has been agreed by the main political parties, sinn fein and the dup.” believe the power can work. that requires everyone to step up. sinn fein's commitment is to do all in our power to make this happen. we believe this is a fair and balanced deal, a deal that can form the basis for allowing us to go back into government and deal with all the difficult issues we need to deal with. the jewels are held in canada for some of the victims of the ukrainian plane crash that killed 176 people. iran rejects suggestions that one of its missiles brought down the aircraft. a 21—year—old woman who disguised herself as a
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teenage boy to groom and sexually assault girls is jailed for eight yea rs. assault girls is jailed for eight years. and the cheshire teenager helped during a seizure by a stranger 5000 miles away. let's return to our top story. sinn fein has agreed to restore devolved government at stormont just has agreed to restore devolved government at stormontjust over three years since power—sharing caps. the dup earlier agreed to the draft deal following nine caps. the dup earlier agreed to the draft dealfollowing nine months caps. the dup earlier agreed to the draft deal following nine months of negotiations between the main political parties. sinn fein's leader mary lou mcdonald has been explaining why they have signed up to the deal. we need to have an inclusive executive. at these historic times we will also continue to work for irish reunification. and we wa nt to work for irish reunification. and we want to ensure that the criteria for ensuring the triggering of an irish unity pole are set out and
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that planning for irish unity is stepped up. including the convening ofa stepped up. including the convening of a national forum to discuss and plan for the future. three years ago martin mcguinness set down a challenge to all of us, to get it right and to deliver for all, for every single citizen. and now we need to go to work. mary lou mcdonald there. the agreement will see sinn fein return to a power—sharing government would be dup. their leader has been expanding to bbc northern ireland why her party agreed to the deal. it is an entirely different construct from the february 2018 in terms of culture, language and heritage. there is an overarching cultural piece inserted into that and the irish peace and the ulster, british peace. it is an identity piece, it
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hangs together and it is very balanced. we also now have the implementation of the armed forces cove na nt. we implementation of the armed forces covenant. we have a veterans commissioner which i think it's very important for a lot of people in northern ireland. we also, excitingly for me, have a new foundation in memory of lord castlereagh, one of our greatest statesman. that will allow academic work to take place into british identity. there is a lot in this new deal and i think it is a good deal in terms of balance. on the cultural side, when it comes to unionist, they are not happy. i understand many will be challenged by the legislation in relation to irish language but we had to get a deal that meant we could get devolution back up and running and to do that we have to acknowledge that to facilitate irish language speakers with public authorities we needed to have that in place. but we should also recognise that there is much
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donein also recognise that there is much done in this deal in relation to the british tradition here in northern ireland and much more to do as well and i'm quite excited about the possibilities that we can take forward as a result of this deal. one would expect jim forward as a result of this deal. one would expectjim to be negative about this as he is about everything else in northern ireland. for me, this is a fair and balanced deal. it provides us with the bases to come backin provides us with the bases to come back in to the assembly and executive and when we are here and doing that we can then actually start to deal with the health crisis, the mental health crisis, the fact that we need to have education reform here in northern ireland, the fact we need more and better infrastructure in northern ireland and indeed we need to bring more jobs here for our young people. all of those priorities now are coming to the floor of the assembly here i think tomorrow. to do that we needed to get a deal that was fair and balanced. gale force winds in australia have merged two big
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bushfires creating one huge single place. the fire, on the border of the states of new south wales and victoria border, is said to be four times the area of greater london. you get a sense of where it is on our map. almost a quarter of a million people nationwide are being urged to flee their homes as the blustery, changing winds create unpredictable conditions. i will correspond and katie watson has been to victoria where troops are preparing to move residents out of the town. a sleepy town in the line of fire. and authorities not prepared to take any chances, getting ready to tell an entire village to evacuate before it is too late. going house to house, speaking to everyone. but not all residents we re to everyone. but not all residents were taking the advice to leave.|j
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suppose it is a persistence but we probably do expect at the same time that a lot of people will stay. it is perhaps a typical australian think that people want to stay and protect their robbery. this is a rural part of australia. it is a passive job to tell everybody to evacuate. renata and tony have stopped taking calls from worried relatives. told them they will be in touch, if there is a problem. they are prepping their house in case the flames approach. they've filled the bath, got the masks and goggles at the ready, and they are feeling pretty positive. i think we'll know if it's time to go. as a hunch? a hunch, a gut instinct. the gut instinct of your neighbours is to get out now. well, they've got little children, so that's their priority. they've got other priorities. and there is still bird life around. when the birds desert, time to go.
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the critters know stuff, we don't. listen to the critters? oh, yeah. they are more in tune with it than we are. high temperatures and strong winds have fanned bushfires across south—eastern australia. bushfire season doesn't usually get started until february here in victoria, so this year, authorities are stretched. so much so, they urged people to reschedule massive climate change demonstrations to a less risky fire day. to no avail. thousands of people turned out in cities across australia, calling on the government to do more. this has been a bushfire season like no other. but renata and tony aren't afraid. que sera sera, says the sign on the gate, a bit like their approach to these fires. what will be, will be. katy watson, bbc news, north—east victoria. police investigating the disappearance of an off firefighter in east sussex three weeks ago said they believe they are found his body. the father of four went
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missing after going to a pub with colleagues. a body was recovered from the river it was at newhaven. further questions have been raised about the safety of boeing 737 backs after the firm released messages. in one message an employee said the plane was designed by clowns who are intent supervised by monkeys. other e—mails discuss problems with simulators, with two workers saying they wouldn't let family members travel on the plains. the 737 backs was grounded in march last year after two fatal crashes which killed almost 300 people. the government has given another slice of cash to help the redevelopment of redcar‘s from steelworks. 3000 jobs were lost. today's announcement promises
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a boost of £71 million. cold for more than four years, but life could soon be slowly seeping back to redcar‘s steel site. the government stumped up £71 million for the area. it brings the total invested here to more than £200 million. an investment, we are told, for the future. there is an exciting time to make this a hub for clean energy, manufacturing, technology. it will be unveiled later this year but there is a potential for thousands of newjobs to be created here which is vital for the area. there's money is vital for the area. there's money is needed to back up a compulsory purchase order, much of the land is owned by lenders to former operator ssi. to successfully get the land back the development corporation, which wants to regenerate the area, has to show it has the cash to do so. it enables us to go into the
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compulsory purchase enquiry starting in february with full confidence that we know that we can deliver on the plans of their regeneration of the plans of their regeneration of the site. the major objection from the site. the major objection from the tied banks to opposing the compulsory purchases we don't have the means to redevelop the site in the means to redevelop the site in the way we have said to the public. 4500 acres in total. over 100 companies already expressed an interest in the site. still no more, then, but all are apparently far from lost. parents are always warning their children to be careful about who they speak to online. but for one teenager in cheshire, befriending a stranger may have saved his life. 17—year—old aidan jackson was chatting to a woman in texas 5000 miles away when he suddenly fell ill. his family were downstairs and had no idea. aidan
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jackson spent hours playing video games against opponents from around the world. online gaming can be a test of fast reflexes. luckily for him, it was one of his game offence from texas who did the quick thinking and called for help when aidan started to feel unwell. that caller lived 5000 miles away from aidan's come in cheshire. today we spoke to her online.|j from aidan's come in cheshire. today we spoke to her online. i could hear him seizing and braiding really hard and it sounds like he was joking and crying. automatically it is the red flag that he is in trouble, what is going on? aidan had passed out. use
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to him being a silent teenager, his pa rents to him being a silent teenager, his parents thought nothing of him being quiet upstairs until the police turned up. i was sitting there watching tv and saw two police cars are tied with flashing lights. what did they say to you? they said they had a call from america and there was an unresponsive mail, possible seizure. so i ran upstairs to check on aidan. since this happened, have you had the chance to thank her and tell what you think? i thank her every day because life could have been over it like that. seizures are dangerous things sometimes. obviously, if a it had gone on for longer, we don't know what would have happened. one day aidan would like to meet his online saviour and thank herfor staging like to meet his online saviour and thank her for staging a like to meet his online saviour and thank herfor staging a real world rescue. what an amazing story. now it is time for news watch. it is about automated journalism.
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hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. clive myrie was sent to australia to report on the country's bushfire crisis. is his presence there worth the financial and environmental cost? and remember election night last month? if you saw some of the results online rather than finding them out from the tv, chances are the articles you read were written partly by a computer. first, wednesday's surprise announcement from the duke and duchess of sussex that they would be stepping back from their roles as senior royals clearly caused some consternation among other members of their family and prompted a raft of royal commentators and plenty of airtime on bbc news, including a point raised by royal correspondent nicholas witchell on thursday's news at six in conversation with george. remember that for the royal family,
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there is the spectre of another

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