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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 10, 2020 8:00pm-8:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. after three years of deadlock, power—sharing ball return to northern ireland, a deal aimed at restoring devolved government has been agreed by sinn fein and the dup. i believe that power-sharing can work. that requires everyone to step up. sinn fein‘s commitment is to do all in our power to make this happen. we believe there is a firm, balance deal, we believe it can be the basis of us going back into government and deal with all the issues. videos are held in canada for some of the victims of the ukrainian plane crash that killed 176 people. president trump says
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iran was planning to attack for embassies when they decided to kill general soleimani. a21—year—old woman who disguised herself as a teenage boy to sexually assault young girls is jailed. residents in australia in the path of a huge fire with gale force winds. we need to keep moving! two soldiers under k a perilous journey in the sands new drama.
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good evening. after three years of deadlock, power—sharing will return to northern ireland. a deal aimed at restoring devolved government has been agreed by the main political parties, sinn fein and the democratic unionist. well, the deal i’u ns democratic unionist. well, the deal ru ns to democratic unionist. well, the deal runs to 62 pages and is entitled, new decade, new approach. lets give us new decade, new approach. lets give usa new decade, new approach. lets give us a sense new decade, new approach. lets give us a sense of new decade, new approach. lets give us a sense of some new decade, new approach. lets give us a sense of some of the main points. extra funds will be given to settle the parity dispute in the nhs. an action plan will be drawn up to tackle hospital waiting times. language and tradition was one of the main sticking points, and while there is no stand—alone irish language act, other legislation does provide for the appointment of an irish language commissioner, and there will also be a commission of there will also be a commission of the ulster scots and ulster british tradition. there is flash
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photography in this report. after three years of resistance, the final steps to an agreement. faces from northern ireland past, here to witness a new future. i believe that power—sharing can work. that requires everyone to step up. sinn fein‘s commitment is to do all in oui’ fein‘s commitment is to do all in our power to make this happen. fein‘s commitment is to do all in our power to make this happenm marks the end of a better stand—off between sinn fein and the dup, who had also given their endorsement of the deal. late last night the ultimatum was given in dramatic fashion. the secretary of state for northern ireland and the irish government's deputy prime minister chose to go public with the deal before all the parties were on board, saying it is on the table, ta ke board, saying it is on the table, take it or leave it. not all the documents are agreed by all the parties. some are commitments by
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each government, but i believe we have a deal that all parties in northern ireland can support. the deal contains wide—ranging provisions for the health service, education, policing and other areas, but the biggest ask was getting agreement for the much fought over legal protection for the irish language. well, it's my community language, it's a language i speak at home and with my friends. the decades of conflict in northern ireland means even today, issues over british and irish identity often needs attention. over british and irish identity often needs attentionlj over british and irish identity often needs attention. i don't see how one identity can erode another. i think if you are secure enough in your own i think if you are secure enough in your own identity, it shouldn't be an issue. it's about time that we kind of moved into a new era, which respects the culture here. given the
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irish language legal status has faced opposition. they want said that every word spoken in irish is a shot fired for irish freedom. people would see that as being a blunt instrument to further irish identity against other identities. the secretary of state tried to reassure voters in loyalist heartlands today that the deal is fair. it brings relief for many after three years, but in this city, compromise never comes easily. what is the problem of having laws to protect the irish language? we need the irish government back. it's been going on and on for years now. they have got other places. the northern ireland's nurses who are striking for the first time in their history, today's deal would bring an end to these
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picket lines. there is extra cash from the british government to raise wages, and measures to reduce crippling waiting lists at hospitals. but parties know the devil is in the detail, and no doubt the provisions for northern ireland will provoke plenty of rows to come —— but now that will happen in government not outside it. emma vardy government not outside it. emma va rdy reporting government not outside it. emma vardy reporting there. reporting from londonderry is suzanne rogers, a former newspaper editor in northern ireland. how to speakfor all of editor in northern ireland. how to speak for all of the communities, but how do you feel this deal is being met? it has to be said, we have been sitting in a grid lock for three years. its grant to a halt. you mentioned there about pay parity for nurses... and people had a
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growing sense of anger and annoyance that... apologies, we are having trouble with that line to suzanne rodgers in londonderry. we will try and geta rodgers in londonderry. we will try and get a better line and hear what she has to say. we will be taking a closer look, of course, how the restoration of power—sharing in northern ireland and lots of other stories are covered in tomorrow's front pages, that is at 10a0, and then at 11:40pm in the papers are joanne nadler and political writer and academic maja goodfellow. the are being held in canada for some victims of the plane crash iran. iran has rejected suggestions that one of its missiles brought down the plane. the picture remains unclear, but what we do know is that the flight took off from tehran just
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after six i am, but only to days later, the data stopped. 63 of the victims were canadian. our american correspondent reports from toronto. the sense of utter disbelief now is palpable, and the shocking revelations about how this disaster may have happened, compounded, of course, by the huge sense of loss here. i'm the last one of the stu d e nts here. i'm the last one of the students from the school. it's so sad, so sad. some people say it was just engine failure, some say it was done by missile, really, it's very confusing. iran says it may take one 01’ confusing. iran says it may take one or two years to resolve the confusion, and for its crash investigation to reach any conclusions. but these pictures show
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it has already chosen to clearer much of the crash site, potentially burying important leads. even before the data has been analysed from the flight the data has been analysed from the flight recorders, its officials say they are sure one thing. translation colon we can say for certain is that a missile did not strike the plane, but we still need to work out what happened. this mobile phone footage does appear to back up the theory the plane was struck by a missile. a small outgoing speck of light suddenly exploding. the impact follows. the iranians insist if it really was a missile strike, the degree would have been spread over a larger area. that's not what mike
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pompeo thinks. we do believe that it's likely that plane was shot down by on it's likely that plane was shot down byona it's likely that plane was shot down by on a rainy and missile. he announced new sanctions on iran. we wa nt announced new sanctions on iran. we want iran to behave like a normal nation. we believe the sanctions we re nation. we believe the sanctions were imposed today will further that strategic objective. for families in iran, ukraine, britain and more than 16 canada, focus is on grieving. they want answers. people here who have been affected by this tragedy have been affected by this tragedy have told us that even though they have told us that even though they have been affected by such loss, they are reluctant to criticise the regime openly because of the repercussions that could have relatives in iran. there is no question that this tragedy could have been the consequence of those regional tensions. it has only added
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to the despair. let's get the latest from our correspondent live in washington this evening. we will talk in a minute about the sanctions, but president trump has been giving an interview and passing comment on this. yeah, and he has also been talking specifically about the detailed threat that soleimani posed to the united states. the americans have been struggling over the past few days to get hold of this narrative about this imminent threat that justified the narrative about this imminent threat thatjustified the killing of soleimani, the leader from thatjustified the killing of soleimani, the leaderfrom iran, and todayis soleimani, the leaderfrom iran, and today is the president is saying that there were four embassies, for us embassies, that he was targeting, and not any detail about any evidence for that, that would be intelligence based, they will say
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that they can't tell us, but the response from concerns in congress among many democrats and some republicans, too, that the administration hadn't really made the case for taking someone out and upping the stakes are so significantly, without being clearer about what this imminent threat was. so, a debate that is likely to continue. in the meantime, there has been action by the us saying they are imposing further sanctions on iran. yes, yet more sanctions. i remindi iran. yes, yet more sanctions. i remind i have been wave after wave of sanctions already imposed on iran's economy, its financial sector, on a whole bunch of individuals inside the regime itself. today we have another swathes of them imposed as well, eight individuals that america says was involved in targeting those us air bases in iraq, and who they say we re air bases in iraq, and who they say were involved in terrorism, and also more sanctions on particular
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sectors, like the mining sector, the construction centre, textiles, not sure why textiles, but there are some sanctions and textiles, as well, all aimed at this maximum pressure policy of the us has been following to bring iran to its knees economically, and it has had an impact. we have seen that, and over the last four years at various points that economic impact has brought people out onto the streets of iran. thanks very much indeed. at 8:30pm! of iran. thanks very much indeed. at 8:30pm i will be discussing the sanctions on iran with former us senior state department official. a woman who posed as a teenage boy to groom and sexually assault girls as young as 13 has been jailed for eight years. gemma watts, who is 21 and from north london, admitted the offences at an earlier hearing at winchester crown court. police believe she may have assaulted up to 50 victims. our news correspondent
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reports. gemma andjake, gemma and jake, two faces and one person. on the left, the real gemma watts , person. on the left, the real gemma watts, on the right, a fake creation, jake. watts, shown here, pretended to be jake online to fool girls into meeting her. what's claimed to be jake online, fooling girls into thinking they were in touch with a boy. they agreed to meet up, and when they did, watts, disguised in hats and baggy clothes, even convince the girls parents that she was a boy. for many of them it was the first relationship with a boy, and for the first time that they were intimate. for them fact to find out that it was a girl in
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disguise has been life changing. this is gemma watts as herself. the court heard that as jake she travelled across the country meeting up travelled across the country meeting up with her victims. in court, she admitted seven offences of grooming and sexual assault, involving four girls under 16. this is a highly unusual case, not only because it involved online grooming by a woman, but also because of the pretence of being a boy, and although the court heard that watts suffered from gender identity issues, thejudge said that she had caused psychological harm to all the girls involved. police think this online real life case may actually involve up real life case may actually involve up to 50 victims. young girls duped bya up to 50 victims. young girls duped by a woman posing as a boy, making them feel abused, angry and ashamed. the time, 8:15pm.
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power—sharing raw return to northern ireland. the agreement has been agreed by sinn fein and the dup. videos are held in canada for some of the victims of ukrainian plane crash that killed 176 people. iran rejects suggestions that one of its missiles brought on the aircraft. as we have just been missiles brought on the aircraft. as we havejust been hearing, 21—year—old woman who disguised herself as a teenage boy to groom and sexually assault girls is jailed for eight years. let's turn our attention to sport, if we can get a full round—up from the sports centre. we'll start in the sports centre. we'll start in the premier league. sheffield united who have extended, today, the manager's contract until 202a. they are taking on west ham, about quarter of an hour played there,
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goalless still. there are two matches, meanwhile, in rugby union's union champions cup. you can see sale are up 13—12. harlequins at the recreation ground lead 12 — seven. england say they won't be calling up another batsman. burns suffered ankle damage playing football in cape town. england are already missing james anderson, who is out with a broken rib. brighton goalkeeper mathew ryan is the latest to pledge his support for the australian bushfire relief efforts. he has vowed to donate 500 australian dollars, about £600, for
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every safe this weekend. warm—ups for the australian open have been affected by the bushfires, including the british number six, katie swann. it was due to be played in canberra, but players weren't able to train her because of the smoke. we were advised not to even go outside, to buy masks so that when we were outside we could breathe, basically, i'm not in ar or the smoke. they we re i'm not in ar or the smoke. they were able to move the tournament to a different city, so we ended up staying in canberra for three days without being able to practice or really use the gym, because this smoke was inside as well as outside. sunday sees the start of the snooker tournament, but ronnie o'sullivan won't be there. he's giving it a miss this year. the man who runs the
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sport leaves its decision will regret. geniuses are not normal people, and ronnie is definitely not a normal person, but extra disappointed because he has a fabulous record at the masters. he doesn't have to travel very far, it his home tournament, he has a legion of fans who will be disappointed he is not there, and it's one of those decisions i think we have all made in our lives where you look around and think, i shouldn't have done that. it was a waste. we are all on this earth for a short period of time, we have to maximise, and ronnie is a sad loss for the masters. there is no two ways about it. not an irreplaceable loss, because there is lots of great players in this event. looking forward to that. finally, juergen klopp and jose marine your inkjoyed
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of glittering playing career, which got... i'm not sure if he was a bettis footballer than i was, but... does anyone know where jose mourinho played? don't blame me if no one knows it. does anyone know the position ofjose knows it. does anyone know the position of jose mourinho? knows it. does anyone know the position ofjose mourinho? i think he was a goalkeeper. i want to know it now! google it. we have time. sorry, jose! more on the website, and you can follow what's happening. for me and the team, that's for your sport. thank you. let's return to our top story, the news that after three years of deadlock, power—sharing will return to northern ireland. a deal aimed at
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restoring government has been agreed by sinn fein and the dup. i'm pleased to say thatjoining me from her home in londonderry is suzanne rodgers. you are starting to say how this news is playing out. there is a huge amount of relief in northern ireland, because it's being a stalemate situation for the last few yea rs, stalemate situation for the last few years, and it's only recently that the indications of that has started to come through. we have had issues around education, nurses pay, all those things that were stuck in a traffic jam situation, because those things that were stuck in a trafficjam situation, because we didn't have a stormont assembly which was sitting, which is working, which was sitting, which is working, which could make decisions, and more and more we were hearing that decisions couldn't be made on things like additional recruitment for police, for instance, until stormont was back in place, so, with
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reservations on both sides of the community, there has been a general welcome the stoma will be back up and running. isuppose welcome the stoma will be back up and running. i suppose the various political parties have had to meet the electorate on the doorstep, and have had to answer them, because we didn't have a general election, we didn't have a general election, we did have a net election, and sinn fein did have a net election, and sinn fei n loss did have a net election, and sinn fein loss to see that they had previously held by a margin ofjust under 200 votes, and they lost more moderate sdlp, who hadn't been in government but had been in opposition, by a government but had been in opposition, bya margin government but had been in opposition, by a margin of 17,000 votes, and at the scene very much as a backlash, as it was in other areas in north belfast, south by a fast,,
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where they lost out to the moderates, and the big change is that we have had an indication that those smaller parties that have been in opposition are now going into government, which means that they will be taking under a different system, ministerial roles in seats, and that is seen as a change of emphasis. of course, this is not brought about without some pain, that sinn fein had previously said they would not go back into government with arlene foster, and you will remember that partially it is because of concerns about her leadership, and the scandal that caused stormont to fall in the first place. arlene foster is adamant that she will go back in as first minister. we have had the irish language act, and five years ago senior dup people were saying that they would never support an irish
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language act, and although maybe not exactly what had been in position that time, we certainly have an act of sorts now. given those bumps on the road, if we call them that, how do you see the make—up of the assembly now going forwards, and the balance of power? what we expect is that the dup will take three ministerial seats, sinn fein will ta ke two, ministerial seats, sinn fein will take two, and then the three smaller parties, the sw —— s dlp, etc, hence in the last occasion there was an attempt to get an alliance, and the alliance to be broadly unionist, but it is seen as more sensuous, and certainly the leader has been very, very impressive and appealing to both communities. they will want to
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ta ke both communities. they will want to take the justice both communities. they will want to take thejustice ministry, but that isa take thejustice ministry, but that is a poison chalice, because in northern ireland terms, anyone who has any kind of say over prisons and police, it is a very, very difficult ministry, so they will have to weigh that up, whether that is something they are going to accept or not. sounds like there will be quite a lot of horse trading to come. i'm afraid you must leave it there. thank you very much. the metropolitan police are treating an attack on a guard at whitemoor prison as a terrorist attack. a conflicted terrorist is suspected. the ministry ofjustice, they are
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wrestling with the aftermath of what's police have caught a terroristic arc, the first to ever happen inside an englishjail. it follows years of warnings, that someone could be attacked by a convicted terrorist or by somebody radicalised in prison, and now that is exactly what happened. this is the man who has been convicted of carrying out the attack in prison, and it has been described as a terrorist attack. it happens on a wing in whitemoor prison. yesterday, two prisoners wearing fake suicide belts attacked officers from hind,.
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it was only but for the professionalism of all the professionalism of all the professionalism of all the professionalism of the officers there that we are not now talking about a murder over police officer. ina about a murder over police officer. in a statement, they said... the government has been repeatedly warned by a senior governor by the risk at convicted terrorists opposed to prison staff, who are obvious targets for inmates wanting to commit violent acts. there has been a colossal failure of intelligence here in terms of protecting prison
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staff from somebody who is clearly very radicalised, and that is very important, because if we can't recruit and retain and train and protect front line prison staff, who are dealing with some of the most dangerous and sophisticated terrorists in the country, we are going to have a very serious problem. whitemoor prison is where it was when khan was also held. he was released terrorist prisoner who carried out the attack in november, killing jack merritt and saskia jones, people who have been trying to rehabilitate him. violence against prison staff has been rising sharply in recent years, causing some offices to quit what they see asa some offices to quit what they see as a more dangerous job. the bbc presenter samir ahmed has won her a sex discrimination claim
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against the bbc. an employment tribunal agreed she should receive the same pay for presenting newswatch as jeremy vine got for presenting points of view, for which he earned twice as much. so mira ahmed always argue that this wasn't just about as single individual. she has been vindicated. no one wants to ta ke has been vindicated. no one wants to take action against their own employer. i love working for the bbc, i'm glad it has been resolved. hello, and welcome to newswatch. she argues that there was no difference between what she did, presenting newswatch, and whatjohn reminded, presenting points of view. fine was
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paid £3000 per programme, more than six times as much as ahmed, for newswatch. welcome to the first newswatch. welcome to the first newswatch of 2020, and a happy new year. the burden fell on the bbc to show that the difference between ahmed's pay and that a vine was not determined by sex dissemination. we have always believed that some era and jeremy vine's pay had not been... we are sorry that the tribunal didn't think the bbc provided enough evidence in this case. this is another bad day for the bbc‘s management, who have long cast themselves as champions of gender equality and diversity, but the essential issue here goes beyond the essential issue here goes beyond
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the bbc, where fame or profile has an economic value which justifies paying different people for different work regardless of race or gender. the tribunal says it doesn't, which means that this has to be revisited. it is really important because it demonstrates a failure within the bbc which is a common problem across the whole of uk industry. that is a failure to undertake job evaluation at the very beginning, and to pay people according to a job evaluation scheme. the bbc has made some substantial reforms and increase transparency. it is now a nap vast in blocks of fresh claims. a look at the weather now. find and write with sunshine but the next system has been making his presence
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known. gusts of around 60 miles an hour and that is only half the story. i also have heavy and persistent rain, spilling in, pushing its way into cumbria and north wales. after a chilly start, temperatures will rise as we head towards dawn. starting to get into mild airfeeding in on the south—westerly plan and it will be when he across the board. the strongest of the wince to scotland in northern england and north wales. after the rate we will stay dry but cloudy, behind it turns fresher but a little brighter with a few showers which could be wintry over the higher ground. away from the fresh conditions it will be a mild day with double digit temperatures. heading into sunday, the rain in the wind gradually clears down in a cooler day and a blustery day in the wince that are strong and saturday, some sunshine around but also some showers which could be wintry.
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hello you are watching bbc news. here are the headlines. after three yea rs of here are the headlines. after three years of deadlock, power sharing will return to northern ireland. a deal aimed at restoring devolved government has been a read by the main political parties sinn fein and the democratic unionist party i believe that power—sharing can work. that requires everyone to step up. sinn fein commitment is to do all in our power to make this happen. we believe this is a fair and balanced deal and we believe it is a deal that can form the basis for allowing us that can form the basis for allowing us to go back into government and to deal with all of the difficult issues we need to deal with. vigils are held in canada for some of the victims of the ukrainian air crash that killed 176 people. and it had trump says iran was planning to attack for american embassies when the us decided to kill general qasem
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soleimani. the 21—year—old woman who disguised herself as a teenage boy to groom and sexually assault girls is jailed for eight years. preparing to leave their homes, the residents ofa to leave their homes, the residents of a town in australia and the path of a town in australia and the path ofa of a town in australia and the path of a huge fire that is being whipped up of a huge fire that is being whipped up by of a huge fire that is being whipped up by gale force winds. keep moving! i can't see! and two soldiers undertake a perilous journey in the world war i drama. find out what mark thinks of 1917 and the rest of this week's cinema releases. in the past half hour, the spokesman for harry dent who died in a crash involving a diplomats wife says an extradition order has been delivered to the department ofjustice in washington. after the crash, she
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left the uk and returned to the states claiming diplomatic immunity. we can speak now to someone. thank you forjoining us. update us on your understanding of the situation. yes. as you said, i got a phone call about 45 minutes ago now from officials in london informing me that the extradition request has been carrier to the united states department ofjustice. i let the pa rents department ofjustice. i let the parents know straightaway. it is obviously a huge day, if you want ago they were told they had no chance of ever having her held accountable for harry's death and this is a monumentally big step in the right direction. clearly as you say, it is been a huge fight where harry's mum and dad. give us a sense of the reaction because i guess whilst this is progress that is still a long way to go. yes.
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absolutely. in the circumstance, let's not forget that these parents lost their lovely son. can we say we are please? actually, that was their reaction and the circumstances. given all they have been through. they are pleased and they are believed. but unlike a lot of the nonsense coming out of the united states administration at moment, the pa rents states administration at moment, the parents continue to be dignified and measured and respectful and they will simply step back now and allow the legal process to unfold. i was simply urged everybody in the administration of the united states to hop off of the airways, roll their sleeves up and get down to dealing with the request and get the lawyers onto it. you described that the suggestion it is nonsense that she will not be returned, but do you expect this extradition request to be acted upon? 10096! there is no doubt in my mind, there never has
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been. whether it is today, or tomorrow, orfive been. whether it is today, or tomorrow, or five years or ten yea rs, tomorrow, or five years or ten years, she will come back. she has to. there is no other way. whether they put up a fight or actually refuse it, we will only know in time. the parents are determined to just take this step at a time. it is being handled by the officials now by the lawyers, and we will not get our of ourselves. let's just see what happens. thank you for speaking to us. the trump administration has announced fresh sanctions against iran following the missile attack at two iraqi military bases holding us troops on wednesday. the measures are the latest in a number of punishing financial sanctions on the iranian economy as president trump continue his campaign of maximum pressure against tehran. at a press conference earlier, the us secretary of state mike pompeo explained the effect the sanctions were having on iran.
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their budget, they will felt by tens of billions of dollars over to achieving their revenue for this year. they have real challenges in figuring out how to make difficult decisions. do you underwrite the shi'ite militias in iraq or allow your people to have the opportunity to live the life they want and grow your economy? those that are difficult choices they redeem is facing. you can see the protest. protest we expect will continue. that will demand from the regime that they began to treat the iranian people the way they so richly deserve and this administration will continue to support those efforts. peter harrell was deputy assistant secretary for counter threat finance and sanctions in the us state department under president obama. he joins me from atlanta. thank you for being with us. we got a sense there of what sanctions have done thus far according to mike pompeo. what do you make of this
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latest ramping up of sanctions? thank you for having me on. i think this latest round of sanctions was no surprise. president trump had been signalling over the last couple of days quite directly that more sanctions would be forthcoming in the administration feels a strong need to respond without further military force to iran's rocket attack. but when i look at the sanctions, i think in many ways the administration is becoming a victim of its own success. what sanctions on iran and as pompeo said, he was correct sanctions today have really put quite a bit of crushing economic pressure on iran and the reality is looking forward, what they did today and what they have left going forward isn't that much compared to what they have done. an important symbolic message but i make sure there will be a lot more actual economic pressure brought to bear.
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in terms of the wider picture about trying to break iran back to the table by putting pressure as you put it, you believe this is not the way to go? i don't know that the administration had much of a choice. they wanted to do something to send a signal to they wanted to do something to send a signalto iran they wanted to do something to send a signal to iran that more pressure is coming and it didn't want to use more military force. sanctions is where this administration lands. i think the reality is that although both washington and tehran exit not over the last couple of days that they would like to figure out how to de—escalate, we have a long road ahead of us before we actually see any meaningful de—escalation in the days ahead. on secretary of state pompeo's statement about the impacts of the sanction, he is right. this is had... the sanctions coming prior
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to today have had a real economic impact on iran they have had to make trade—offs and how lost billions of dollars of oil revenue. u nfortu nately dollars of oil revenue. unfortunately what we have seen so far is that iran has been choosing to weather the storm, choosing to keep finding their proxies in the region, rather than coming to the negotiating table and i'm not sure today's action is really going to change that strategic calculus of resista nce change that strategic calculus of resistance and tehran. we heard from mike pompeo of the claim that there are increasing protest from ordinary iranians about the process really back approach to government is taking in the sanctions. what did you make of that? clearly back in december come in the first couple of days of this year, we saw protest in iran. they were worried about those process that is shut off the internet for a couple of days to try and prevent a spread of the process last month. i think the reality is
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at least in the short term, the us, they heightened tensions between the us and iran are unified. —— unified iran. we saw millions of people turned up over the last couple of daysin turned up over the last couple of days in support of the funeral of general qasem soleimani. we might get back to economic protest down the road, but i think probably in the road, but i think probably in the short term we are seeing her belly around the flag affect and tehran. looking forward into the longer—term, we know president trump isa man longer—term, we know president trump is a man who likes to mix it up. —— seeing a rally around the flag. do you think we will see any new kind of strategy in his approach to iran? i think the trump administration has been pretty consistent over the last 18 months of putting pressure on iran and and i think we will see more of that. the trump administration has said for the last two years they would like to have a diplomatic track with them and they
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would like to limit them to agree to changes come and lift sanctions and restore diplomatic relations. i think the challenges that the chopper administrationdemands of iran are really very aggressive. —— trump administration possum at the men. we haven't seen any thing out of iran yet that they want to budge. we know from the obama administration that they will meet very specific demands or demands on the nuclear flight delay file but i am sceptical that when president trump says he wants not only nuclear concessions and concessions in the region and domestic concessions within iran or talking about a very aggressive list of us demands, that i think aggressive list of us demands, that ithink iran aggressive list of us demands, that i think iran is unlikely to meet, at least anytime soon. thank you for joining us. to also get out will gale force winds have merged two big
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brushfires. —— to australia now. the fire on the border of the states of new south wales and victoria border is said to be four times the area of greater london. almost a quarter of a million people nationwide are being urged to flee their homes as the blustery, changing winds create unpredictable conditions. our correspondent katy watson has been to wandiligong in victoria where troops are preparing to move residents out of the town. a sleepy town in the line of fire. and authorities not prepared to take any chances, preparing to tell an entire village to evacuate, before it's too late. going house to house, speaking to everyone. i'll certainly be watching the sides of the hills here, when the wind changes. not all residents were taking the advice to leave. should all be used up by 3:30 today. it's too late now. i suppose it is a resistance, but we probably do expect, at the same time, that a lot of people will stay.
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it's perhaps a bit of a typical australian thing, that people do want to stay and protect their properties. this is a rural part of australia, we're talking communities with just one or two houses, sometimes miles apart from each other. so, it's a massive job to tell everybody to evacuate. well, they're not allowed to contact us... renata and tony have stopped taking calls from worried relatives. told them they will be in touch, if there is a problem. they are prepping their house in case the flames approach. they've filled the bath, got the masks and goggles at the ready, and they are feeling pretty positive. are you nervous, are you on edge? i think we'll know if it's time to go. as a hunch? a hunch, a gut instinct. the gut instinct of your neighbours is to get out now. well, they've got little children, so that's their priority. they've got other priorities. and there is still bird life around. when the birds desert, time to go. the critters know stuff, we don't. listen to the critters? oh, yeah. they are more in tune with it than we are.

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