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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 11, 2020 10:00pm-10:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 10: britain's ambassador is arrested during anti—government protests in tehran after iran finally admits it shot down a passenger plane by mistake. 176 people died in the crash. tonight, the canadian prime minister says he expects a full investigation. this is an extremely serious matter. canada and the world still have many questions, questions that must be answered. the queen and other senior royals will meet at sandringham on monday to discuss harry and meghan‘s decision to step back from their roles. the northern ireland assembly resumes for the first time since the collapse of power—sharing three years ago. we can agree that there was too much suffering and that we cannot allow
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society to drift back and allow division to grow. and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers — broadcaster lynn faulds wood and the journalist and commentator anne ashworth. borisjohnson has said that iran's admission that it shot down, by mistake, a ukrainian passenger plane over tehran is an important first step. four britons were among the 176 people killed in wednesday's crash. a senior iranian military official said the airliner was misidentified as a cruise missile. iran's president rouhani has called
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the downing of the jet an unforgiveable mistake. today, there have been a number of demonstrations on the streets of tehran, which is unusual for the country. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, has more. almost from the moment the ukrainian airliner crashed early on wednesday morning, officials in tehran furiously rejected the growing video and intelligence evidence suggesting that it had been hit by an iranian missile. then today, an abrupt about—turn. in a flurry of social media postings, iran's president spoke of a disastrous mistake. the foreign minister talked of human error. the ambassador in london apologised for misleading the media with wrong findings. on state tv, a senior revolutionary guard commander explained that iran's air defences had been on high alert after the attack on us bases in iraq. the aircraft was misidentified as an american missile and the wrong decision was made. he said he wished he could die.
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translation: we are sorry. we share the sorrow with victims‘ families. we regret the incident, but this was the price we paid for the tensions and us activities in the region. in tehran, people gathered on the streets, notjust to mourn some of the 176 dead, but also to voice their anger at the government, shouting, "death to liars". ukraine's national security secretary told my colleague, jonah fisher, how iran could simply no longer deny the evidence. translation: this photo shows us the first part of the plane where a rocket hit. it hit the cockpit from underneath. we think this is proof, and it explains why we didn't hear anything from the pilots. they died immediately from the first hit. the question now is whether iran's u—turn means international
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investigators will get full access to data from the black box and the crash site. borisjohnson said iran's admission was an important first step, but he and his canadian and swedish counterparts all demanded a transparent inquiry and full cooperation. james landale, bbc news. the british ambassador to iran, rob macaire, was detained today by authorities in the capital, tehran. unconfirmed reports say mr mccaire was arrested while filming demonstrations near the university earlier. the foreign secretary dominic raab denounced the arrest as a "flagrant violation of international law" and said the iranian government was at a crossroads moment. a little earlier, rana rahimpour from the bbc persian service told me about previous protests in iran and how today's events compare. there were mass protests in iran in november, 2019. it was violently cracked down,
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hundreds of people were killed, thousands imprisoned and, at the time, many analysts thought it would take years for the opposition to mobilise itself and energise itself to come back on the streets. but the anger that people are feeling over this incident, the tragedy, has turned the opposition against the government yet again. and that is why, today, we can confirm that there are at least, in eight cities, major cities, ongoing protests against the iranian authorities. that was earlier today, and you can see them shouting as there seems to be a police motorcade driving through. for many watching these events, it's highly unusual to see that, is it safe for people to take to the streets? no. hours after these videos, we have confirmed reports that anti—riot police were deployed, and they are now using gas in order
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to, tear gas, to disperse people. which creates even more anger among people because they say, ok, you have killed 176 innocent people and we are not able to mourn. that is why we hear many protesters chanting against the leadership, they are calling for the commander—in—chief, which means the supreme leader ayatollah to resign. they are chanting death to dictator and they say they've had enough. these protests have continued into the night, we understand. it is interesting, isn't it, because like so many commenters, particularly on social media, have said it does bring into question past errors as well that we have never had explanation for. real questioning of the government, how likely is it though that anything will change? to be honest, what has been
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going on over the last few days has proved to me that iranian politics is very unpredicatable. since the beginning of 2020, a lot has happened. if you asked me to two days ago whether iran would take responsibility, i would have said it is highly unlikely. at this moment, i think i can see that i don't think anything will change but that depends how many people will stay on the street and whether the protests continue not. in terms of cooperation, there have been calls from, a number of calls from governments, saying they want a transparent investigation. ukraine has said they need at least a0 investigators on site. international cooperation and iran, talk us through that. what is it going to look like? according tojustin trudeau, the canadian prime minister, iran has been very cooperative in issuing visas for investigators, mr trudeau asked for accountability,
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transparency and justice for some the iranian authorities are not famous for any of those but given they have taken responsibilty for the event, which is very unusual, maybe more co—operative? possibly. especially because there are now other countries involved, it is no longer an iranian matter, there is the international community and they want answers, so one can only hope they will cooperate. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, has been speaking in ottawa earlier today. iran's admission that its own armed forces unintentionally shot down flight 752 is an important step towards providing answers for families, but i noted that many more steps must be taken. a full and complete investigation must be conducted. we need full clarity on how such a horrific tragedy could have occurred. families are seeking justice and accountability, and they deserve closure.
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and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers — the broadcaster lynn faulds wood and the journalist and commentator anne ashworth. that's coming up after the headlines. senior members of the royal family, including the queen, will meet on monday to discuss the future for prince harry and meghan following their declaration last week to step back from their prominent roles in the royal family. the summit at the queen's sandringham residence in norfolk is expected to look at a range of possibilities. the issue of funding is expected to play a central role. meghan is in canada. it's thought likely, though not certain, that she willjoin the conversation by telephone. devolved government is back up and running in northern ireland after three years of political stalemate.
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the dup leader, arlene foster, has been appointed first minister, while sinn fein‘s michelle o'neill is the deputy first minister. all of the main parties agreed to return to the stormont assembly this afternoon after a deal was reached yesterday. so what's in the deal? the new agreement contains wide—ranging promises. firstly, to tackle the cirsis in the health service and to try and resolve a pay dispute that has seen nurses and health workers on strike. there'll be more money for schools after months of head teachers saying they face an unprecedented shortfall. and northern ireland will get about another 800 police officers to increase numbers to 7,500. our ireland correspondent, chris page, has sent us this update from stormont. for more than 1,000 days, northern ireland has been in the remarkable position of not having an elected government. but all that has changed. this parliament building on the outskirts of belfast is a place of power once again. the 90 members of the
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stormont assembly met to formally appoint ministers to the devolved government. it will be headed by the dup leader, arlene foster, and the vice president of sinn fein, michelle o'neill. they are respectively the first minister and deputy first minister and, in their speeches to the assembly, they spoke of the need to leave behind the years of division and disagreement and build a new future on common ground. most of the ministries went to those two largest parties but three others were involved as well — the nationalist sdlp, and the ulster unionist party have a ministry each. and the job ofjustice minister, always a sensitive one here given the legacy of the long conflict, that has gone to the leader of the cross—community alliance party, naomi long. the deal to restore these institutions put a heavy emphasis on reforming public services. you could read it, perhaps, as a sign that the aim is to move politics in northern ireland to a different place, away from divisive issues of identity and towards matters like health, education, the economy, which tend to dominate politics in most other places.
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all the parties agree that the measure of the success of the new administration will be how much it delivers in terms of those issues for the people in this part of the uk but the priority, i think, in the coming days will be simply rebuilding those power—sharing relationships after such a long period of toxic stalemate.
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after days of denials, iran finally admits it did shoot down a ukrainian passenger plane, killing all 176 people on board. the admission sparks angry protests against the regime on the streets of tehran, while world leaders demand justice. shooting down a civilian aircraft is horrific. iran must take full responsibility. there are now calls for iran to pay compensation. also tonight... the royal family call a summit on monday to discuss harry and meghan‘s new roles. back in business — the northern ireland assembly sits for the first time in three years
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as power sharing is restored. it's accurate. oh, it's off the mark! oh, it's off the mark! and exeter reach europe s quarter—finals after a tense tussle with glasgow. good evening. there have been angry protests on the streets of iran after the country's military finally admitted it did shoot down a ukrainian passenger plane, killing all 176 people on board, four of them british. iran says it made a disastrous mistake when it wrongly identified the plane as a cruise missile. tonight demonstrators in tehran have been calling for iran's supreme leader to resign. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports.
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almost from the moment the ukrainian airliner crashed early on wednesday morning, officials in tehran furiously rejected the growing video and intelligence evidence suggesting it had been hit by an iranian missile. then today an abrupt about turn. in a flurry of social media postings iran's president spoke of a "disastrous mistake". the foreign minister talked of "human error". the ambassador in london apologised for misleading the media with "wrong findings". a senior military commander explained that iran's air defences had been on high alert after the attack on us bases in iraq and the aircraft was misidentified as an american missile. he said he wished he could die. translation: we are sorry, we share the sorrow with victims' families. we regret the incident. but this was the price we paid for the tensions and us activities in the region. in tehran people gathered on the streets notjust to mourn some of the 176 dead,
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but also to voice their anger at the government, shouting "death to liars". in one protest the british ambassador was arrested and detained three hours in what the foreign secretary said was a flagrant breach of international law. ukraine's national security secretary told my colleague jonah fisher how iran simply could no longer deny the evidence. translation: this photo shows us the first part of the plane where a rocket hit. it hit the cockpit from underneath. as canada continued to mourn its 57 dead, the prime minister demanded that iran cooperate with a full and transparent international investigation. iran must take full responsibility. canada will not rest until we get the accountability, justice and closure
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that the families deserve. the question now is how much access iran will give to the crash site and data from the wreckage. only then will we know if today's admission of responsibility will be enough to de—escalate the latest confrontation in the middle east. james landale, bbc news. our correspondent aleem maqbool is in toronto. aleem, so many of the victims were canadian, what does the government there want to happen next? many of the victims were from here and even though the weather conditions have been terrible people have been coming all day to the tribute site in toronto behind me. a short while ago there was a protest here as well with canadian iranians chanting down with the islamic republic. you heard from justin trudeau, he said he was outraged and furious at what happened, but what he said, and this was echoed by borisjohnson as well, was that
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iran's admission was at least a positive first step towards families here getting some sense ofjustice. we have had a tweet in the last hour from donald trump who has lent his support to those protests in tehran. but a short while ago we went to a memorialfor but a short while ago we went to a memorial for one but a short while ago we went to a memorialfor one couple but a short while ago we went to a memorial for one couple from here who were killed and a lot of people told us that anger had certainly added to the grief they were already feeling, given the circumstances of this crash. but they said that that anger was directed not just this crash. but they said that that anger was directed notjust at this crash. but they said that that anger was directed not just at the iranian regime, but also at the united states for escalating tensions in the region. many thanks indeed. senior members of the royal family, including the queen, will meet on monday to discuss the future for prince harry and meghan. it follows their decision to step back from their current roles. the summit will take place at the queen's sandringham estate in norfolk. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is here. who'll be at this meeting?
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so, the queen, the prince of wales, prince william and prince harry, the first time they will have come together face—to—face since the sussex has issued their statement. it is also thought meghan will phone in from canada. officials now have a much better, not a complete idea, of what they want and a range of possibilities will be presented, a little bit of reality check perhaps for them and they will hope to agree the next steps. they need to pin down how much work will they really wa nt to down how much work will they really want to do, official royal work? and what will be the rules of the game for their nonroyal work. what will be the protocols which will be there to prevent them, to be brutal about it, cashing into blatantly on their royal status ? it, cashing into blatantly on their royal status? it will be businesslike i am sure, but an underlying sadness i would imagine. meghan clearly underlying sadness i would imagine. meg ha n clearly wa nts to underlying sadness i would imagine. meghan clearly wants to do this, but has harry thought through fully the
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implications of all of this? the distress he is causing his grandmother at this point in her life? a potential loss of respect from the royal marines and the general, not universal, but the general, not universal, but the general sense in the country of disappointment. nicholas witchell, oui’ disappointment. nicholas witchell, our royal correspondent. nicholas witchell, our royal correspondent. the northern ireland assembly has sat for the first time in three years after a deal to restore power—sharing at stormont. the dup leader arlene foster has been appointed first minister, while sinn fein‘s michelle o'neill is deputy first minister. chris page reports. it has been a long, tense, exhausting journey to bring back northern ireland's government. for three years stormont has mainly been a nice venue for runners. now it is a place of power again. order, order, members. in the assembly politicians appointed the leader of the democratic unionist party and the vice—president of sinn fein to head up the power—sharing coalition. they both put the focus on the future. i am not sure we will ever agree on much about the past, but we can agree that there was too
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much suffering and that we cannot allow society to drift back and allow division to grow. let's not re—fight the battles of the past, it's time to bring people together. we can open doors, we can let the future in, we can give people hope and we can give our young people opportunity. so, after more than a thousand days, elected politicians are now back in control of this part of the uk. the deal to restore the devolved government can be read as an attempt to normalise politics here, move it away from divisive issues of identity and nationality, and make it more about health, education, the economy. whether your flag is the flag of ireland or the flag of britain that doesn't really matter when you are not being cared for or looked after. the future of our children and the future of the economy for small business owners, they are all things that are becoming more and more important and people are just not really putting up with excuses any more that will argue
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about tribal politics. rebuilding political relationships won't be easy after such a toxic stalemate. northern ireland has a road map to stability but there will be tough work ahead. chris page, bbc news, belfast. in taiwan, president tsai ing—wen has secured a second term in office after sweeping to victory in an election dominated by the island's relationship with china. this report, from john sudworth in taiwan, contains flashing images. not long ago, she was struggling in the polls. now, she's being swept to a second presidential term. her strategy, rallying voters to a single cause. to show that we can be against...communist. yeah, so, this is really important to us. has china been a factor for you? i think, yes! it's my reason to vote,
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to defend our country. beijing's attempts to pressure president tsai with renewed threats to take taiwan by force have badly backfired. do you think you have the chinese president, xijinping, to thank for this victory? translation: the taiwanese people insist on protecting our democracy. i hope china gets the correct message as a result of this election. there is, in fact, a great irony to these celebrations. beijing's authoritarian vision of a greater china, wholeheartedly rejected in the one place that actually gets to vote on it. she's promised to stand up to china. the risk is, it will only antagonise it further.
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john sudworth, bbc news, taiwan. with all the sport now, here's holly hamilton at the bbc sport centre. good evening. we're starting in the premier league, so those of you planning to watch match of the day after the news, time to look away if you don't want to know the results. liverpool remain unbeaten, as roberto firmino scored the only goal of their game at tottenham to extend their lead at the top of the league to 16 points. that lead was helped by the result at the king power stadium, where second—placed leicester city were beaten 2—1 by southampton. danny ings continued his scoring run as saints avenged the 9—0 thrashing they suffered to leicester earlier this season. elsewhere, crystal palace and arsenal drew 1—1 in their london derby. chelsea eased to victory over burnley and everton beat brighton. manchester united scored four at old trafford against the league's bottom side norwich,
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while wolves and newcastle drew. in the women's super league, manchester city have moved joint top after they beat everton. a brace from germany's pauline bremer gave them a 3—0 win to move level with arsenal for the moment. they play brighton and hove albion tomorrow. as the race for the final eight continues in rugby union's european champions cup, ulster suffered a set—back, while gloucester kept their quarterfinal hopes alive with victory over montpellier. but for exeter chiefs, a draw in glasgow was enough, while defending champions saracens overcame adversity once again to beat ospreys 22—15. patrick gearey reports. it has been a season of punishment for saracens, find and docked points for saracens, find and docked points for breaching the salary cap, their squad may soon be scattered. after five minutes against ospreys they we re five minutes against ospreys they were in trouble again. the shoulder met the head, and it was a red card
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offence for rhys carre. saracens had only 13 on the field when evans went overfor his only 13 on the field when evans went over for his second try. the welsh side were finally ahead. but despite the comments on their past and doubts about their future, saracens have kept their eyes on the ball. it paid off beautifully for alex lewington, england's european champions cup battling. a bonus point for exeter against glasgow warriors would take them through, but the warriors came out charging. tommy seymour scored within one minute and six minutes later they added a second. exeter knew their chance would come. one mistake and nic white was in. exeter followed him over with two more tries, glasgow grabbed one, 20 4—24 the break. exeter chiefs needed just one more for that crucial bonus point, matt kvesic saw his chance and his second try sealed it, and with that lunch, exeter were over the line, to the next stage. but glasgow were not done, another try meant it was 31—31
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going into the final seconds, when exeter‘s stuart hogg took aim against the side he had played for until last summer. so far, and yet so until last summer. so far, and yet so near, until last summer. so far, and yet so near, no until last summer. so far, and yet so near, no matter, the chiefs are into the quarterfinals anyway. patrick geary, bbc news. there's more on the bbc sport website. but from me, good night. hello again. there is no getting away from the fact that for many northern and western parts of the british isles saturday really was one of those days, very windy and at times very wet. that is one of the cheerier
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photographs i could find from the west of the british isles. not all doom and gloom, though. at least for a time, it was that bright out towards the east, a long way from that front that started the day across scotland and northern ireland but as the day progressed, relatively mild airs swept ever further towards the south. but it will take its time before we see the last of it, and it will be a feature of the weather overnight across the greater part of england and wales. further north, the skies will have cleared but still a peppering of showers and because it will get that cold, the showers will be wintry to about 300 metres and a touch of frost in the eastern side of scotland to start the new day on sunday. that will not be the case across wales across to east anglia and all points south because the rain will clear at lunchtime. one or two showers following on behind on a much reduced wind. as you experienced on saturday. still a fresh feel about the day despite all the sunshine across the north. further south, 8—11 will cover it but a glorious afternoon,

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