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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  January 13, 2020 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at 9 with me joanna gosling. the headlines. the queen will hold emergency talks with senior royals later today — about the future role of the duke and duchess of sussex. lam in i am in sandringham where the meeting is due to take place, the first time the royals have met face since the couple's statement was released last week. —— face to face. nominations for the labour leadership close at 2.30 this afternoon — some of the contenders could be knocked out of the race a volcano in the philippines has begun spewing lava, as authorities warn that a "hazardous eruption" is possible "within hours or days". now there is lava flowing from the volcano. a weak flow at the moment but that is causing this black smoke to billow out of the volcano.
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borisjohnson and the irish prime minister will meet the new northern irish executive at stormont to mark the restoration of devolution. coming up at 0915: regional airline flybe is reported to be seeking government help to keep the company going. and later in sport — rugby league legend rob burrow reflects on an emotional fundraiser match following his diagnosis with motor neurone disease. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9. the queen is holding talks at sandringham later today to try to map out a future path for the duke and duchess of sussex, following their announcement that they want to "step back" as senior royals. prince charles, prince william and prince harry will be at the meeting, and meghan is likely
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tojoin by phone from canada. there are plenty of questions that might be discussed. how will harry and meghan fund their new lives? they say they want to become financially independent — but what does that mean for them? will the couple keep their royal titles? at the moment, there's no suggestion they wish to renounce them. the cost of their security and who will pay for it is also unclear. the home secretary priti patel was asked this morning about this issue and said safety was a priority. just by discussing it publicly compromises much of the security arrangements and that is not something that is for discussion today. i think it is right the royal family have the time and space to discuss the issues they need, and therefore i am not going to and neither will the government give a public commentary in terms of the security arrangements of anybody with protective security. but safety is a priority. safety is a lwa ys but safety is a priority. safety is
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always a protein which is why certain individuals have that. it is important we preserve the integrity of that which is why i am not going to comment. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is at sandringham this morning. what are the options? this is the first time the royals have met face to face since the statement was published last week. in the room will be the queen, prince charles, prince william and prince harry, meghan on the phone, and their private secretaries. over the last few days after the queen made it clear she wanted a resolution quickly, they will have been beavering away talking to government, officials, different governments, because harry and meghan have wanted to divide their time between the uk and america. you heard the issue of security, where they will live, how do you as a royal step back so you are part royal, part private, how do you
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combine holding down a career without accused of cashing in on the royal name. these are tricky problems which royal family members have fallen foul of but which will have fallen foul of but which will have to be resolved. there is a clear determination on the part of prince harry and meghan they want a different path and will not settle for the status quo. the royal family will have to work this out because they want to retain the herrick —— they want to retain the herrick —— the harry and meghan star dust within the royal family. in terms of how advanced their plans are, various things have emerged around trademarking the sussex royal brand effectively, using that for merchandise, talk of meghan having already recorded a voice over for disney albeit in return for a charity to —— donation. what is known?
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and also prince harry, they announced a while ago, he had a tie—up with oprah winfrey and chappell to do a series on mental health. these questions are not really known because there are so many complicated issues —— apple. meghan and harry have said they want to become financially independent and to carve out a niche for themselves. it has been reported meghan has already done a voice—over deal with disney, albeit in behalf ofa deal with disney, albeit in behalf of a charity. these things are as yet to be decided, no doubt these things will be discussed today. this isn't just a business things will be discussed today. this isn'tjust a business transaction, this is a family transaction, lots of the headlines are talking about a rift between william and harry.
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there are very personal aspect to this issue as well as the fact meghan and harry have this desire to break out on their own. so much to be discussed behind closed doors. roya nikkhah is the royal correspondent for the sunday times and joins us from buckingham palace. it is extraordinary seeing this playing out, knowing this summit will be happening, and what is at sta ke. absolutely it is. sam is taking place —— it is unprecedented, what is being discussed is completely unprecedented in the royalfamily. we will wait to see whether the personal issues can be resolved, these huge questions about whether members of the royal family can keep within the royal family but also be in the commercial world. really sad personally at the heart of it for the family which is clearly very
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fractured at the moment. what is your understanding about the state of relations? my state of relations? my understanding is, we ran in the sunday times yesterday, deep sadness certainly from prince william, about the broken bond with his brother. but the hope, with support from the royalfamily, but the hope, with support from the royal family, they want to support harry and meghan, to reconcile, find a way forward so everyone can play on the same team. in terms of finding a halfway house, is there a sense that is going to be something that is possible, maintaining royal status but effectively cashing in on it as well? ido well? i do not think anyone knows that right now, that is what this meeting is about, that is the deal they will try to thrash out. i am sure there will be certain things on the table the queen will make clear have to be
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off the table, seven commercial areas that will not work because the royalfamily being areas that will not work because the royal family being accused or held up royal family being accused or held up to scrutiny that they are cashing in on their royal status has always been toxic for the institution. meghan has gone back to canada, she will bejoining this meghan has gone back to canada, she will be joining this conversation by phone link. is there a sense, it sends a big signal, the fact she went back to canada so quickly after just being back for a few days, having left archie there. it possibly shows how uncomfortable she feels here, very difficult for prince harry to be left on his own to face the music. judgment from the public. discussions with the family by himself. but meghan also wanted to get back because archie is in canada, as a mother, she did not wa nt to canada, as a mother, she did not
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want to be parted from him too long. the dogs are with them. it gives you a sign perhaps she is not coming back anytime soon. thank very much. we will keep you updated on those discussions. nominations from mps and meps for the labour leadership close at 14:30 this afternoon, and to get through to the next stage, each candidate needs the support of at least 22 of their peers. sir keir starmer, rebecca long bailey, jess phillips and lisa nandy have the required number of nominations — leaving emily thornberry and clive lewis lobbying to get the backing of at least 22 of their fellow labourmps and meps. registered supporters — who are not full party members — will have 48 hours from 14th to the 16th of january to secure a vote by paying £25. the ballot will be open from 21st february until the second of april. with the results announced days later on the 4th april. our political correspondent
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jonathan blake is with me. jonathan, is there an expectation they will all go through or does it look like emily thornberry and clive lewis may not get the required support? it is touch and go for those too. there are four through to the next round, sir keir starmer, on 68. behind him, rebecca longbailey seen as the other leading contender, in the ‘20s, as are the prominent backbenchers lisa nandy and jess phillips. still struggling to make up phillips. still struggling to make up numbers, the shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry saying yesterday she was confident she would get over the line, no doubt having last—minute conversations with her parliamentary colleagues to make sure she gets the required numbers by that deadline of 2:30pm. and clive lewis, if there is anyone who looks like he is in danger at this stage, it is him, the shadow
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treasury minister, just four nominations, one of whom is himself, for leadership of the labour party. he was asked this morning whether he was still confident he could make up numbers and he said he had faith in his colleagues. we will see how much faith they have in him when that deadline comes at 2:30pm and we will find out which candidates are going through to the next stage in this contest. at this stage, it is mps who get to decide. that changes in the later stages. as we have seen before everything can change at that point. there are three phases to this contest for labour leadership, firstly, nominations from labour mps. the next is winning support from trade unions, affiliated groups to the labour party, and local constituency labour parties across the uk. the candidates who go through after today will have to win the backing of two trade unions or more than 30 local labour parties
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across the uk. those who do that will go forward to the ballot, a postal ballot, of labour party members and registered supporters, and it is that vote which will decide the eventual winner, that i’u ns decide the eventual winner, that runs from the 21st of january through to the 2nd of april, and the winner will be announced a couple of days after that. we might have a fair idea come this afternoon of the shape of the race. when unions get involved and the membership as a they are a difficult and disparate group to predict, it could all change again. thank you very much. the taal volcano in the philippines has thrown molten rock into the sky, triggering official warnings that a hazardous eruption of toxic gas may be imminent. sped—up footage of the spewing earlier shows the plume of white smoke that's several kilometres high. as tremors shook the area you could see a volcanic lightning storm in the column of steam and ash.
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25,000 people have been evacuated across the province of batangas, south of the capital manila. our correspondent howard johnson is there. the taal volcano has entered a magmatic eruption phase. last night it was a phreatic phase where there was lots of steam and ash. now, there is lava flowing from the volcano. a weak flow at the moment but that is causing this black smoke to billow out of the volcano and that is affecting the air quality around here, lots of dust and ash in the air, and that is affecting international airports in this area. new clark city and manila have had lots of flights cancelled and suspended. there is ash on the runway. if we look to my left, you can see ash all over the floor, it has turned into a mud state in some places and on the road on the way up we saw people clearing that mud from the road. we saw pineapple groves completely covered in dust, no doubt affecting livelihoods in this area. the other major risk that the scientists are saying is that there could be
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a volcanic tsunami. if you look over here, you can see taal volcano surrounded by a lake. if there is a major eruption that could cause the earth to move which will displace water, so, low—lying communities on the coastline could be affected by a tidal wave if there is a major eruption. and these are the live shots of the volcano. you can see people watching from a safe distance. that kano is on a small island in the middle of the lake, one of the world's smallest volcanoes, recording 3a eruptions over the last hundreds of years. they are anticipating another eruption in hours, perhaps days. boris johnson will travel to belfast today, alongside irish prime minister leo varadkar, to meet ministers of the devolved government, which was restored on saturday after three years
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of deadlock. mrjohnson is expected to to urge the stormont administration to tackle problems with nhs waiting times in nortehrn ireland — both the uk and ireland say they are prepared to put new money in to help. keith doyle is at stormont for us. what's going to happen today? good morning from a very stormy stormont. storm brendan has already arrived here, i hope you can hear me above the noise. we expect the prime minister and the taoiseach the overwrite card to arrive in an hour. nothing has been happening in terms of politics at the assembly in the building behind me for three years. the last five years has seen a flurry of activity culminating on saturday with the first minister arlene foster and deputy first minister from arlene foster and deputy first ministerfrom sinn fein being sworn
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in. so, boris johnson ministerfrom sinn fein being sworn in. so, borisjohnson willarrive here today, he has already said this is an historic time for the people of northern ireland, stormont is open for business again and the executive can now move forward with improving people's lives. there is a lot to do. for three years there has been no government here, there are lots of things on the to—do list, health, education, policing, infrastructure. they will put some questions to the prime minister today about where funding will come from that. there is talk of a lot of money heading that way. yes, absolutely. we talk about the health service. it is widely believed here and accepted the health service is in a state of crisis, massive waiting list. vast amounts need to be put in. on education, there is a crisis as well, lots of money needs to be put
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in here. a big problem with sewage and the water system, big infrastructure projects need to be funded. other things, big infrastructure projects need to be funded. otherthings, big plans have been put on hold for three years, the north—south interconnector on electricity, decisions have to be made on that. massive decisions and massive bills. all the parties signed up to this agreement over the last few days. there were big promises but no price tag is put on it. when you add it up, there are various amounts, 1.5 billion, even as much as £2 billion needed to implement all those things promised. when the by mr borisjohnson and the taoiseach wawrinka arrive here, arlene foster and michelle o'neill, and the prime ministers will have to say, you have made all these promises, now we need the money. —— datsyuk leo varadkar. promises, now we need the money. -- datsyuk leo varadkar. thank you very much, keith.
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the headlines on bbc news. the queen will hold talks with the duke and duchess of sussex to find a way forward for the couple after their decision to step back from royal duties. labour leadership contenders are making their last pitches ahead of the deadline for nominations this afternoon. they need to get the backing of 22 mps and meps to make it on to the ballot authorities in the philippines are warning a hazardous eruption is possible within hours or days after a volcano began spewing lava. in the sport, sergio aguero becomes the premiership‘s record ever scrub with a hat—trick in the 6—1win at aston villa. wales and british lions playerjames hook aston villa. wales and british lions player james hook has aston villa. wales and british lions playerjames hook has announced he will retire from rugby at the end of the season, he wants to focus on writing rugby themed children's books and a career in coaching. and the kansas city chiefs came from 24-0 the kansas city chiefs came from 211—0 down to beat the houston texans
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to advance to the afc championship game. more on all those stories in 20 minutes, iwill see game. more on all those stories in 20 minutes, i will see you then. the airline flybe has refused to comment on reports that it's trying to secure emergency funding to prevent its collapse. flybe was bought by connect airways, a consortium created by virgin atlantic, stoba rt group and investment adviser cyrus capital last year. our business presenter dominic o'connell is here. they are not commenting on media reports on crisis talks being under way, what do you understand? certainly not denying. they say they are focused on passenger service and not focusing on speculation but they are not saying this is the case. it would not be surprising if they were in some financial difficulty, there isa in some financial difficulty, there is a sense of deja vu, they had
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difficulty this time last year. it put itself up for sale and was bought by virgin atlantic, cyrus capital and start —— and stobart group stop experts say the main problem is if flybe needs more money, where will it come from? with investors having funded the rescue, do they want to put more money in and on what terms? it is hard to see how the government could help. there isa how the government could help. there is a limited range of options and not much history of airlines being bailed out in the uk. 2,000 employees at flybe. add a question for passengers, we are familiar with what happens with thomas cook, the government and protection scheme helped passengers get repatriated or refunded with tickets already booked. at flybe, almost all passengers will not be covered because it is seat early bookings are not part of a package holiday.
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an uncertain time for staff and customers, and regional connectivity across the uk because it is the biggest regional airline. why is it in difficulty? it is a two speed game for airlines, the big players are doing quite well, international travel is holding up quite well. regional allies have been struggling as has flybe in particular, it has a legacy of debt, struggling with the wrong kind of aircraft flying the wrong kinds of roots and too many seats are chasing too few passengers. were it to go, what gap would that leave ? if it goes into administration it does not mean the end, it might re—emerge a slimmed down and in a new form. there could be something profitable that a new backer would like to put their money behind. it would mean some travel routes would
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be lost and it flies the kinds of roots not well served by rail. it has been clear it is offering too much service on those routes and hasn't found the backing for it. thank you. former pope benedict has warned his successor pope francis not to allow married men to become catholic priests. his successor pope francis is considering allowing married men of "proven virtue" to be ordained as priests in remote parts of the world such as the amazon — in order to address the shortage of priests in the region. there have been more protests in tehran after the iranian government confirmed it was responsible for the shooting down of a ukrainian passengerjet. demonstrators voiced anger at the blunder — a product of raised tensions following america's assassination of general qassem soleimani. let's talk to our correspondent caroline hawley who is in beirut for us. what's the latest on the protests —
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and what more do we know about the investigation? iam not i am not aware of any protest this morning but there were protests through the weekend including late into last night in several cities. some videos have emerged on social media which appear to show gunshots and blood on the pavement in one of the videos. we have had a comment from the police chief in tehran who denied that his forces at any rate fired on any protesters, and said they had orders to use maximum restraint. so, for the moment, we are not seeing any protest. what we have been seen over the last couple of days is prominent iranians coming out to criticise the regime. you may know we have had a female olympic medallist, taekwondo champion, who defected on saturday, and now the
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captain of the men's volleyball team speaking of oppression in the country, saying he hopes iran has seen the last show of what he calls deceit and stupidity. one of the country's most famous actresses who has posted on her instagram page, she has nearly 6 million followers, she has nearly 6 million followers, she said, we are not citizens in iran but millions of hostages. there is fury being expressed very openly about this catastrophic mistake that was made in shooting down the airliner, and not just was made in shooting down the airliner, and notjust that, the cover—up that appears to have happened, it took iran three days to admit to it, and the policy of confrontation with the west that iran has pursued for so long which set the context in which this mistake took place. what we know about the investigation into the plane? we have had 45 ukrainian officials
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on the ground in tehran for some time. there was an initial team of three canadians who went over the weekend, and we believe eight more have now been given visas because iran doesn't have diplomatic relations with canada. we believe that brings it to a number of 11 canadians with visas who can now be in tehran helping to investigate. we have just seen a statement actually from the head of the insurance company in iran who has said that compensation will be paid to the victims because there have been calls for accountability, justice and compensation for the 176 people who died in that terrible tragedy. thank you very much. this year's awards season is well under way — and the nominations for the 92nd academy awards are announced today, with british film 1917 expected to pick up several nominations,
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alongside films like martin scorsese's the irishman, and quentin tarantino's once upon a time in hollywood. you can watch the nominations live here on the bbc news channel at 1.15, with my colleaguejane hill and ourfilm criticjason solomons. now, it's time for a look at the weather. good morning. we are expecting storm brendan today. the winds picking up in the west, and as storm brendan approaches, not only will it bring heavy rain but also gales all severe gales across western areas. ahead of it, some quite a few showers and sunny spells. but it will not necessarily end like this. all of this is moving from the west towards the east and we could have guts over the east and we could have guts over the western isles as much as 90 miles an hour —— gusts. 50 across
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norwich. some tricky travelling conditions, expect delays and disruption and take extra care. tonight, we will see the back end of that band of rain and strong winds move away. an unsettled week ahead.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the queen will hold
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emergency talks with senior royals later today — about the future role of the duke and duchess of sussex nominations for the labour leadership close at 2.30 this afternoon — some of the contenders could be knocked out of the race a volcano in the philippines has begun spewing lava, as authorities warn that a "hazardous eruption" is possible "within hours or days". borisjohnson and the irish prime minister will meet the new northern irish executive at stormont to mark the restoration of devolution coming up... regional airline flybe is reported to be seeking government help to keep the company going time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let's return to the labour leadership. candidates for the labour leadership have until this afternoon to win enough support to stay in the contest. our political correspondent iain watson takes a look at the runners and riders —
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and what to expect from the campaign. these are the mps vying to succeed jeremy corbyn. and the question for labour's membership is this — do they simply want to change leader, or do they want the party to change direction? ourfuture prime minister the shadow business secretary rebecca longbailey is seen as close to jeremy corbyn. she said she didn'tjust agree with labour's policy at the election, she spent the last four years writing them. sir keir starmer is a former director of public prosecutions, as an mp he backed the unsuccessful challenge to jeremy corbyn's leadership in 2016. but in his campaign video he emphasises his left—wing credentials, he supported the miners strike and opposed the iraq war. as shadow brexit secretary, he endeared himself to the predominantly pro—remain grassroots and he backed a new referendum. tell me what democracy looks like. this is what democracy looks like.
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the shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry was also a very vocal campaigner for another public vote, she says that her experience of pummelling boris johnson in parliament is what would make her a strong leader. the wigan mp lisa nandy opposed another referendum and in this contest, her message to mps is don't tell working—class people what's good for them. she says winning back the towns which labour lost will be her priority. she was a key figure in owen smith's attempt to oust jeremy corbyn four years ago but says it's time to end factional fighting. how are you love? jess phillips says she can be a different type of leader, one with a big personality who can take borisjohnson on with passion. i'm from birmingham, hello. an outspoken critic ofjeremy corbyn, she's been reaching out to nonmembers, trying to bring them into labour in order to change it. shadow treasury minister clive lewis is firmly on the left.
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but says he is willing to work with other parties, from the lib dems to the greens, to pursue progressive policies. securing the support of 22 mps or meps is just the first hurdle the candidates have to overcome. then, they'll need the support of two trade unions or more than 30 local parties, it would then be down to the members to decide the party's future direction. i've been speaking to former mps who were defeated in december, and they have very different views on what path the next leader should take. unless we change direction, fundamentally, and we prove to people that we can be trusted with their taxes, to improve their public services, and crucially, on the security and defence of our country, we may not exist in five or ten years' time. it's not the policies which failed us at all, it really isn't, we had a very good manifesto. the socialist manifesto, we need to
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stick to that because that is why people joined. so this contest isn'tjust about personalities. fundamentally, it's about how, or if, labour will change. iain watson, bbc news. someone who has been following the labour leadership contest, and the re—defining of the left very closely, is paul mason — journalist and author of clear bright future. welcome. are you predicting a winner at this stage? we've got three months to go, the end of the process my prediction will be it will be a race between lisa nandy and sir keir starmer, i pick up from so many people in the party who are not particularly ideological, they don't wa nt to particularly ideological, they don't want to see food banks, they don't wa nt want to see food banks, they don't want council spending cuts, they wa nt want council spending cuts, they want someone who looks like they can win. but this is also a battle of ideas, this is a big party, 500000 and growing party, since the
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election. and people, ithink, what we are about to see, once the shenanigans of nominations are over, isa shenanigans of nominations are over, is a battle of ideas about what is it to be, left—wing and progressive in this country. were it to be one of those candidates, would that be the labour party taking a more central role? look, i think the labour party taking a more central role? look, ithink the closest person in this race to me right now is clive lewis, he's been talking about things like looking for a progressive alliance with the lib dems and the snp in the next election to get proportional representation, for that reason, it's quite a radical idea, it doesn't look like he will get on the ballot paper, but for me, the person i want to see leading the labour party is sir keir starmer, he is from the left but looks like they can win and for me, he's the only one right now who does do that. why not rebecca long bailey, she's been described as by supported jeremy corbyn, i was part of the corbett
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movement and i'm proud of what he did in terms of taking the party away from the focus of big business, high finance, constantly supporting what the americans want to do in international relations but by the end of it, jeremy ‘s leadership and the people around him were running at almost like a faction against almost every part of the party. if you were talented, had new ideas, if you were talented, had new ideas, if you want the right sort of person, you want the right sort of person, you didn't get on. i think your starmer is of the left but is prepared to open up the leadership to marshal the talent of talented people who unlike me, are far more towards the political centre, talented people who had different ideas. and to rebase or socialism on something moral. we need to be supporting the human rights of everybody in the world, notjust in countries we don't like, for example. when you say rebates socialism on something moral, what do you mean? what are you referencing? we cannot, i'm 59, i
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cannot bequeath a planet in crisis to the next generation. it is a moral crusade, it's a moral cause of justice to stop climate change, to get rid of carbon from the economy. it is also, i think, morally repugnant that we have millions of children living in poverty, that's what tribe most people in the labour party and they want that expressed ina way, party and they want that expressed in a way, those people on the doorstep who voted tory, the place where i come from, lancashire, the didn't trust our party to deliver that better world. and so, i think, we have to go deeper than just a battle of personalities and specific policies. it has to be about a vision of the future and i think, as i say, i think clive lewis has a perfectly good one, if he doesn't get on the ballot paper, keir starmerfor me, get on the ballot paper, keir starmer for me, embodies that long tradition, of moral and ethically based socialism. in terms of
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policies, brexit you know, is right at the centre of things. what should be the policy of the next labour party leader? i think brexit is a disaster, i fought ha rd party leader? i think brexit is a disaster, i fought hard against it, i think it's an attack on working class people but now people have voted for it, that is the will of the people and we have to accept that. the future labour policy will be about being close to europe, not abandoning a common culture we have with europe of enlightenment and rationality. but we have to accept brexit, there is no faction inside the labour party that wants us to rejoin within a generation are co nsta ntly rejoin within a generation are constantly obsessed about re—fighting what we did, there is a new thing now. my worry is there are some on the hard left of the party who actually think brexit is a good idea and i've spent a long time fighting against the proposition for the past two years. and i don't want to see any kind of return to what we call economic nationalism, celebrating a closed off economy,
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for example, abandoning an open attitude towards migration. thank you very much. the ballot closes at 2:30pm. we will tell you what happens then. currently the candidates are all expected to go through apart from clive lewis and emily thornbury who currently don't have enough to go through but that could change. let's take a look at what you are looking at online. the most what you are looking at online. the m ost rea d what you are looking at online. the most read stories, flybe, the prospect of that airline collapsing is the number—1 story that you are at home. followed by the volcano in the philippines. that is expected to erupt in the next few hours or days. interesting one at number three, we've been covering it in the news is welcome of course, the retired pope benedict morning pope francis against relaxing celibacy rules for preschool particularly because it's a very unusual situation to have a former pope still around for the current pope and also very unusual for that pope to be speaking out. in
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terms of constraining what his successor might do. number six, a japanese billionaire seeking a partner for a japanese billionaire seeking a partnerfor a boon trip, once japanese billionaire seeking a partner for a boon trip, once a japanese billionaire seeking a partnerfor a boon trip, once a life partnerfor a boon trip, once a life partner for a partnerfor a boon trip, once a life partnerfor a moon partnerfor a boon trip, once a life partner for a moon voyage. partnerfor a boon trip, once a life partnerfor a moon voyage. looking for a female life partner to accompany him on the maiden tourist voyage of space x to the moon. the 44—year—old fashion mogul, said to be the first civilian passenger to fly around the moon on the starship rocket, planned for 2023. the first lunar journey by humans rocket, planned for 2023. the first lunarjourney by humans since 1917 sorry, 1972. made an online appeal saying he wants to share the experience with a special woman. at each morning briefing for today. let's show you what's happening in tehran. i'm not sure what we are going to do, actually, i think we might show you some pictures here we go! this is an iranian spokesperson in
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iran, government spokesperson. speaking about what has been happening since the events following the assassination of the iranian general which then led of course to the iranian retaliation, firing rockets at military air bases in iraq. and in these comments, i understand, this spokesperson has been criticising the british ambassador, saying that his actions we re ambassador, saying that his actions were unacceptable, just in case you are not a cross that, basically over the british ambassador went to what was described as a vigil in memory of the 176 people killed on board the ukrainian airline shot down by iran last week. and he was arrested. and accused of inflaming anti—regime
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demonstrations. you may have seen earlier, when we were reporting, they have been growing across the country and he has tweeted to confirm i wasn't taking part in any demonstrations, i went to an event advertised as a vigil for victims of the plane tragedy. it's normal to wa nt to the plane tragedy. it's normal to want to pay respects, some of the victims were british, i left after five minutes when someone started chanting. here, the iranian government spokesperson saying his actions were unacceptable. right, time for a sports update. here's sally. good morning. good morning, good morning everyone. he is the rugby league star who has become one of the sport's greats. now rob burrow is tackling his biggest challenge yet after being diagnosed with motor neurone disease.
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fans and players showed their support yesterday with a special benefit match at his former home club leeds rhinos. we'll speak to him in a moment but first let's take a look at what was an emotional day at headingley. there is rob burrow with his youngest, jackson, in his arms. just come to show my support for rob, i think the whole game has shown why we are a family, as we are as a sport. we've all been touched by rob's story, i thought it were key that we come out and show we are here to support each other. where have you travelled from today? from birmingham. that's quite a trip. why have you come? to support rob burrow. rob burrow enters the field. five minutes to go. myler salutes him. burrow, hero of headingley. hero of the hour. what a man. you can see the emotion written large all over his face.
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everybody in the stadium standing to applaud rob burrow. well done, young man. well, they talk about the rugby league family. i think yesterday it was perhaps one of the biggest exa m ples we was perhaps one of the biggest examples we have ever seen of that. yeah, you know what? the sport is in the biggest but something like this, when it happens to rugby league, they rally round, it's absolutely unbelievable, unbelievable day, one i will remember forever. looking at these pictures now, this hat must have been incredibly tough. these pictures now, this hat must have been incredibly toughm these pictures now, this hat must have been incredibly tough. it was tough, but great. my daughter has been on the pitch before. but my son, jackson, to take him out one
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last time. top is through the kids. jackson is one? meyer is for. may see the eldest is eight. you have a young family, busy life, it's not that long since your diagnosis, is it? how have you managed to talk to the family and to explain what's been going on? you know what? i wa nted been going on? you know what? i wanted to do that early. before christmas. i thought it would be a distraction. the middle one, she is the character. when i told her, she said, what are you telling me that for? it's boring. everyone was laughing. it totally change the mood. i'm glad they know. they don't fully understand. but they know and i wouldn't lie to them. hopefully i'm around to see them grow up, that's my intention. and you know,
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looking at you now, we've had a great chat already this morning. you say you were in the early stages. how do you feel? you know what? my voice makes me look really pearly but i feel really good. not speaking. but you know, other than that, i feel absolutely great, speaking. but you know, other than that, ifeelabsolutely great, i feel fit, strong. i have a great appetite. other than doing things like this, it's just normal life for me. looking at your fellow players here, what offers of support, what words of support had they been able to give to you? you know what? they've been there from day one. we've spilled a lot of blood on the pitch but they are therefore now when i need them most. and they say,
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a friend in need is a friend indeed. i've got so many friends, people who have supported me, i'm very lucky. you know? it's not about me, for me, my point is to raise awareness about this horrible disease. you have already achieved so much. we know you've been in touch with dodie weir, who has mnd and his own foundation. what would you like to achieve? through this, i know they're making achieve? through this, i know they‘ re making massive achieve? through this, i know they're making massive strides in research. i saw a professional, a professor last week. he was absolutely brilliant for me. they are making big strides. one day, hopefully, they will find a cure. whether it's in my time or not, that is the hope. raise awareness, get
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more people looking into it. hopefully, one day, you know, cure this horrible disease. thank you so much for taking the time to come and talk to us. thank you. rugby league legend. back to you. sally, thank you. three men have been charged with terror offences after an investigation by counter terrorism police. the three were arrested as part of a planned operation on the 30th of december in manchester. the charges relate to the distribution of a terrorist publication and possession of items connected to the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism. the economy shrank by 0.3 percent in november, according to monthly estimates by the office for statistics. that's worse than expected. the picture was slightly better for the three month period from september to november last year though. to give us some more detail,
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our economics correspondent andy verity is here. what does this mean, andy? the number you mentioned, 0.1% growth over three months, we tend to focus on the three month numbers, they are a little bit more reliable, the monthly numbers are quite volatile, wobbling up and down, but three—month growth of no .1% which is better than most economists expected, they expected shrinkage of three months over september to november. the one month, 0.3% contraction according to that. accepting all the qualifications, they are often revised, these numbers, quite a bad performance, if you compare it to a year before, 0.6% growth over 12 months, that's a really wea k 0.6% growth over 12 months, that's a really weak economic performance. you have to put it in context, when you talk about the period from september to november, there was a lot of politics going on, the run—up
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to the general election, a time when borisjohnson tried to prorogued parliament and there was the so—called surrender bill, etc. lots of political conflict which people said was holding back economic growth because businesses didn't have the certainty about what was coming. to know to invest. but here we have some quite worrying numbers in the three months numbers. example, in production, things like oil and gas as well as manufacturing, use shrinkage over three months of 0.6%, quite a steep shrinkage, construction grew and services was just about up. but overall, we are looking at a pretty wobbly economic performance, the hope is, that post—general election, things will settle down and we will get a bit more business investment, a bit more confidence going. but so far, in the numbers, we haven't had any sign of that. what might policy do to try and encourage greater optimism and investment? do to try and encourage greater optimism and investment7m do to try and encourage greater optimism and investment? if you want to stimulate the economy, if they feel the economy is lagging and
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we've had pretty flat economic results recently, there are several things you can do, monetary stimulus which is what we know about interest rates, the bank of england can cut interest rates although they don't have much scope to do that, my credit cheaper and bigger cheaper for people to borrow to try and encourage more economic activity. the other thing we could have as a fiscal stimulus, the government either spends more or cuts taxes so consumers can spend more. we are looking at a bit of a stimulus from the government, they are proposing to spend a lot more than they were say, six months ago. that could help the economy to get through this. at the economy to get through this. at the main thing people will be watching for over the next few months, is will this confidence effect revive the economy? because at the moment, we are flat—lining. andy, thank you. to italy now — where exceptionally low tides in venice have left the city's famous canals almost dry.
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water levels reached a peak of minus fifty—two centimetres. this comes only two months after venice faced its worst flooding in more than fifty years. the bbc‘s tim allman reports. what a difference a few weeks can make. the boats and gondolas of venice barely able to stay afloat. a city renowned for being built on the water, now the water has all but disappeared. these canals look more like mud trenches. getting around, a big problem, if how you get around is beached and a romantic journey may not be so easy if you have to get out and push. but this was venice late last year, more than two—thirds of the city underwater. landmarks like st mark's square were flooded. shops and businesses had to close, and there was a race against time to protect pressures artwork. these were the worst floods venice had seen in half a century. this low tide, while exceptional, is not quite as unprecedented. this the tides here mean water levels can vary by around half a metre or sometimes quite a bit more.
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for the people of venice, life seems to move from one extreme to the other. tim allman, bbc news. julian assange is appearing in person at westminster magistrates‘ court today for an administrative hearing ahead of his full extradition hearing which begins at the end of february. assange has been kept at belmarsh prison since may 2019 after he was found guilty of skipping bail. the united states wants assange extradited so that the wikileaks co—founder can be tried over allegations of leaking i'm joined now byjoe corre — julian assange's spokesperson in london. welcome and thank you forjoining us. how is he? he's not very good. i mean, ithink us. how is he? he's not very good. i mean, i think it's astonishing, really, the way he's been treated at the moment. being kept in isolation, 23 hours a day. kept on
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tranquillisers. he doesn't really know what's going on half the time. what we are seeing is a series of court appearances that are going on at the moment. that will determine how the extradition case is to be handled next month. but what we've seen so far has been a joke. i mean, the first magistrate that he saw called him a narcissist, we found out actually that that magistrate was, well, she should never have heard the case in the first place because it i don't know where you are going with this but i would prefer if you don't. the last hearing, which was to set the time that was needed to hear the case next month, the magistrate turned
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round to the us attorneys and said, i thought you wanted to get this over with quickly? which shows collusion between the parties. it seems like he's in a kangaroo court. he hasn't been allowed to prepare sorry, the comment that you've just made, the code, doesn't, i wouldn't suggest, show evidence of what you're asserting, i mean, this isa what you're asserting, i mean, this is a legal process, he is facing extradition to the united states. it's shocking what's happening to him at the moment. this man is facing what is a death sentence. he evaded justice for a very long time by hiding out in an embassy. he hasn't evaded justice at all. what do you mean? he claimed asylum. because he was in fear of his life. he stayed in the ecuadorian embassy in order to avoid he was in fear of his life. you should really look
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at this. he did that. what's happened is exactly what he'd fear was going to happen. he's going through the court process. he is going through a court process that anybody is facing allegations go through. but in this case, he's being treated exceptionally cruelly and unfairly. exceptionally so. thank you. this year's awards season is well underway — and the nominations for the 92nd academy awards are announced today, with british film 1917 expected to pick up several nominations, alongside films like martin scorsese's the irishman and quentin tara ntino's once upon a time in hollywood. you can watch the nominations live here on the bbc news channel at 1.15, with my colleaguejane hill and ourfilm criticjason solomons. the first ever beatles record to be played on the radio is being put up for auction. the fully authenticated demo copy of theirfirst single,
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love me do, will be sold in britain at the end of the month. the record was kept by radio luxembourg's programme director, when he was once asked to slim down the station's record library. it's expected to fetch at least 19,000 dollars. now it's time for a look at the weather. here's a simon. joanna, thank you. a turbulent spell of weather on the way this week. some very strong winds expected. it's worth staying tuned to the forecast over the next few days to stay abreast of that. this morning, many of us waking up to sunshine, quite a quiet start to the date with the sunshine. but in the date with the sunshine. but in the atlantic in a storm has been brewing, it's been moving eastwards, this is storm brendan. going to push its way gradually north and east. going to give us some strengthening winds. on top of that, some heavy rain moving its way into northern ireland, eventually into scotland, england and wales this afternoon, the wind always strengthening. some showers ahead of that, largely dry towards the south—east. into this
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evening, temperatures 8—10 celsius but if you are travelling this afternoon and into the rush hour this evening, bear in mind for all of us there will be strong winds, especially around coastal areas, 70— £75 and about around the rac, wind gusts perhaps 90 miles an hour in the west of scotland, showers moving in as the rain clears. really strong winds, likely to see some travel disruption at times today. the rain pushing into the south—east, eventually clearing. storm brendan moving away. we have got another separate area of low pressure moving infor separate area of low pressure moving in for tuesday. another spell of very wet and windy weather. for the morning, there will be a bit of a chilly start, some ice, snow initially, rain spreading north is the day goes on. the wind strengthening, quite widely for england and wales, tuesday may well bea england and wales, tuesday may well be a windier day than today, gusts of 60, perhaps 70 miles an hour in the south—west of wales, south—west england and into the north of scotland. maximum temperature is
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11-13d in scotland. maximum temperature is 11—13d in the south, further north, chilly are four or 5 degrees. we go into wednesday, this system clears, bit of a quieter day, we still have an area of low pressure to the far north, still quite gusty winds. rain clearing away from the south—east, for many of us, dry, bright, some sunny spells and some showers. most frequent in the north—west, temperatures on wednesday around 7-10d. i temperatures on wednesday around 7—10d. i mentioned thursday at the start, we have another area of pressure moving in. that's going to bring those isobars quite close together, the white lines across the uk, another windy spell. throughout this week, windy and wet for many of us, gales or severe gales, travel disruption likely, whether that be fairy cancellations, bridge restrictions, problems with high sided vehicles for example on some of the roads across northern england and scotland. well worth staying tuned to the workers, you can find the details available on the
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website. if you are travelling particularly later on today into this evening, to bear that in mind. again, the same for tuesday and into thursday. that's all for me. goodbye for now.
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hello, it's monday, it's ten o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, and we're live from new broadcasting house. our exclusive story today : parents in this country are being wrongly arrested and their kids taken into care because of fears that they will carry out female genital mutilation. the police came to my house to remove our children. they arrested my wife, and they put our children into foster care. we did not know what the allegations were. nobody asked anything, nobody said anything. it was just really a shock. yousef and his family have since received an apology. campaigners say families like his are being "racially profiled".

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