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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  January 13, 2020 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. stop using inflammatory language: princes william and harry issue a joint statement denying a newspaper report speculating about their relationship. with his wife meghan joining on a conference call, prince harry prepares for a crucial meeting with the queen, his father and brother to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. what's so great about it today is, asi what's so great about it today is, as i say, that northern ireland politicians have put aside their differences, stepped up to the plate and shown leadership. thousands leave their homes as the taal volcano begins to spew lava, sparking warnings
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of a ‘hazardous eruption‘ — possibly within hours. tight—lipped: flybe declines to comment on reports that the airline is in crisis talks in an attempt to prevent financial collapse. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — jane. former world athletics president lamine diack has arrived for his corruption trial in paris. he's been investigated over allegations that he took payments for deferring sanctions against russian drugs cheats. he denies the charges. talk to you later, thank you. and storm brendan is on its way? yes, i'll give you more on that later, and on how these stones develops rapidly and drive across the uk. you then. also coming up —joker leads the oscar nominations, the film is up for eleven awards.
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and just behind that, with ten oscar nominations is war drama 1917. i'll be speaking to the star of that film, george mackay, at two—thirty. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. the eyes of the world are on sandringham this afternoon — as members of the royal family gather for a historic summit. top of the agenda: the future role of the duke and duchess of sussex — but at stake perhaps the future role of all so—called ‘minor‘ royals. the stage is already tense — a few hours ago princes william and harry issued a strongly—worded statement, describing as false and offensive a report in the times newspaper which suggests a breakdown in their relationship. last week, harry and meghan announced out of the blue that they wanted to step down as senior royals. in the next few hours that will be at the heart of discussions between the queen,
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prince charles, prince willam, and prince harry — with the duchess of sussex expected tojoin by phone from canada. this report from our royal correspondent nicholas witchell does contain some flash photography. there are big issues at stake but at the heart of this is a family, and a feature of that is the relationship between two brothers, william and harry. this morning, a newspaper reported that harry felt he and his wife had been pushed away from the royal family by the, quote, "bullying attitude of william". that brought a swift response, a joint statement from william and harry describing the story is false. at sandringham, as the duke of edinburgh was seen out and about on the estate, in the main house, the queen will be joined by the prince of wales, prince william and by prince harry. it will be a chance for him to explain to them face—to—face why he and his wife want partially to withdraw from royal life and for the family to try to agree
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on how such a withdrawal would work. the main issues have been identified. how would they finance a semi—royal life? would they expect to keep their royal titles? and who would pay for and provide their security? there's already evidence that the couple are seeking nonroyal work. here are harry and meghan at a film premiere last summer. the cameras caught harry's conversation with the chairman of the disney corporation, asking him if he could find his wife some voice—over work. and, as the royal family tries to find a way forward, commentators are adding their analysis. some are suggesting that criticism of meghan has been racially motivated. it's the tabloid press who have taken a particular tone with meghan markle and from the very beginning wanted to allude to the fact that she had african heritage and that this was something that really threatened continuity within the royal family. officials reject suggestions that
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either meghan or harry have been driven out. quite the reverse, in fact, they say that ever since their wedding, everyone from the queen down has recognised them as a hugely popular couple. furthermore, they‘ve been at the heart of the prince of wales‘ vision for the future of the monarchy, or at least, they have been until now. now, it appears that they want to find a way out. meghan is said to be adamant, harry is said to be conflicted. our royal correspondent daniela relph is at sandringham. every now and then in your life, there‘s a meeting at which you just wish you were a fly on the wall. this is going to be one of those! 0h, this is going to be one of those! oh, gosh, this is definitely one of those! oh, to be a fly on the wall in that room inside the main house at sandringham where we have to presume now that that meeting, the sandringham summit as it‘s been
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dubbed, is now under way. what we are not getting as any kind of running commentary, guidance on when things started, when things are likely to wrap up exactly who is in the room and what is on the agenda. so they are just not willing to give us so they are just not willing to give us that kind of detail. but i think we can probably safely say at this point that things are under way. we know that both william and harry have been here since this morning, prince charles came in last night, the queen is obviously year as part of her winter court, it‘s where she spent the period of time after christmas. so things are under way. and it‘s 6am or so on vancouver island on the west coast of canada there. you would expect that leg would be in a position now to sorted through the ring in and join the conversation as well. —— that meghan would be in a position. and someone has to put out a press release at the end of this? what we are hoping for is that the end of the day that there will be some kind of closing statement in terms of what the state of play is. and because we have been
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given such a full briefing that this is happening, you know, told over the weekend that this was going to be happening today, all the media have been facilitated here on the sandringham estate, with various facilities late on for us, you would think if they‘ve gone public on the meeting actually happening, one who is attending and really what the kind of issues at stake are, you would hope that buckingham palace and the press teams around all the senior members of the royal family would feel that they would need to sort of with what‘s happened and what has gone on over the course of the afternoon. so i think we can anticipate, hopefully, some kind of kind of end of day statement. but what‘s not clear is how much detail that will give us. thank you very much, back to you later on. katie nicholl is the royal editor at vanity fair magazine and author of the book ‘harry and meghan‘. we‘ve already had one statement today, perhaps underlining how tense things are. yes, the statement from the brothers. already we‘ve had discord in briefings, royal sources,
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to have a statement that is actually a joint statement between these two brothers was actually a bit of a relief because it does show that there is unity there. and i think eve ryo ne there is unity there. and i think everyone is hoping that if we don‘t get the statement that we want at the end of the day, that at some point soon there is going to be a compromise that will be reached. because the idea that this is all going to be wrapped up in a day, it‘s not, but this meeting at such an important meeting because it is the bringing together of the four principles of the first time since this all exploded and because so many damaging and sensational headlines, for them all to get together and start to thrash things out. you say four a mate's five, there is someone listening in and contributing presumably on the phone. we know that meghan is an early riser, don‘t forget those dawn e—mails to staff that upset some people at the palace, if anyone is going to be on the phone early, it would be the duchess of sussex! the
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mood in this meeting is going to be crucial, do you think there will be a sense of anger perhaps of the queen feeling snubbed by not being first told about this, or is at the heart of this a couple who are extremely vulnerable, clearly?” think the latter, and i think the queen is aware that they are both quite vulnerable. i‘m told she is very concerned for her grandson. the queen doesn‘t really do angry. she was certainly hurt and upset by the way they took matters into their own hands and busted this out without really thinking it through, but anger doesn‘t get anyone anywhere. this just needs to be resolved now andi this just needs to be resolved now and i think it‘s got to be a cool head ina and i think it‘s got to be a cool head in a crisis. but it‘s clearly a lot of simmering resentment, but i do think that statement you just mentioned between the two brothers does say a lot about wanting to perhaps draw a line under that anger and move on. whatever is discussed will not just affect the duke and move on. whatever is discussed will notjust affect the duke and duchess of sussex, we talking billy about how all royals in the future, particularly prince william‘s children will be expected to behave,
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whether you can be half on or off out of this family. —— we are really about. absolutely, and i think if a blueprint is to be found whereby this couple can have some commitment to the royal family, this couple can have some commitment to the royalfamily, carry this couple can have some commitment to the royal family, carry out some duties but actually be able to lead lives that they want to lead, then perhaps the prospect is a sunnier one for the cambridge children. i‘m not sure quite whether the principles are seen in that way at this point but that might perhaps be something to think about further down the line. meghan need only look at twitter this morning and perhaps feel, this is why i‘m doing all this, those of us who are around in the diana years, there is a move thatis the diana years, there is a move that is strikingly familiar and a rather dangerous one at that. yes, absolutely, there is. and there are a lwa ys absolutely, there is. and there are always two size every story and she does feel she has been the victim of a negative press, certainly over here in britain. —— two sides to every story. harry has always had a
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complex relationship with the press, there is a huge part of this that is about wanting to escape this, i think. but there are misguided if they think going to canada is going to bea they think going to canada is going to be a place where there are no cameras and the paparazzi, and in fa ct if cameras and the paparazzi, and in fact if you think about the level of intrusion they have had, the british media have largely left them as a family alone to raise archie away from the spotlight in windsor. i mean, there haven‘t been any paparazzi pictures of them. i think that something that might change in canada. it's less the paparazzi, though, isn‘t it? it‘s those snide comments, the article suggesting that what meghan does is harmful in some way, there are those articles about... there is something wrong. s, and a lot of people are quick to pounce on it being racism and sexism and all that. i think a key part of it is that she is married into the royalfamily are it is that she is married into the royal family are quite different women to previous brides, she had a successful career before she‘s an
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outspoken she wasn‘t this blank ca nvas outspoken she wasn‘t this blank canvas the royal family could just project an image onto, she was a person under the personality at that. and clear that she has married into a that. and clear that she has married intoafamily that. and clear that she has married into a family that‘s based on tradition and heritage and moves at a slow pace while meghan does not move at a slow pace, and i think that has become apparent through all this. —— a person and a big personality. she has leveraged, archie is with her in canada at the moment. i'd say that is leveraged, bigla ridge. the message is clear, i‘m here with archie and that needs to be resolved. —— big leveraged. and there‘s a degree, the couple do have the royal family over a barrel of it, if they decided to do a tell all interview, can you imagine how damaging that could be for the royal family? you would imagine that could be nothing but damaging to everyone involved, one way or another. absolutely, and you would hope it would never come to that but i would think everything is under discussion
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as far as the couple is concerned. i would say don‘t rule everything out. —— don‘t rule anything out. would say don‘t rule everything out. -- don't rule anything out. thank you. borisjohnson and the irish prime minister leo varadkar are in belfast meeting members of the new devolved government. mrjohnson says it‘s a ‘historic time‘ for the people of northern ireland — after power—sharing was restored on saturday after a three—year stand—off. our ireland correspondent chris page reports — and a warning, his report does contain some flash photography.,' the first official visit to the headquarters of the government which hasn‘t existed for more than 1,000 days. many wondered if the deal would ever be sealed. but after months of negotiations, the power—sharing coalition is back, headed by the democratic unionists leader arlene foster and michelle o‘neill of sinn fein. mrjohnson wanted to savour a landmark moment. never mind the hand of history on my shoulder. i see the hand of history... no, i see the hand of the future.
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i see the hand of the future beckoning us all and i hope that with goodwill and compromise and hard work on all sides it will be a very bright future indeed. the prime minister was might come to apartment building that‘s suddenly the prime minister ——has come to apartment building that‘s suddenly functioning and abuzz after a long and toxic stalemate. but now that the negotiations to restore devolution have succeeded, the parties are keen to talk cash. the biggest priority will be solving huge problems in the regional nhs. northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far, and workers, including nurses, have been on strike over pay and staffing levels. but they think having a government back will make a big difference. of course our health service is still in crisis. nothing has changed in two days, but the fact we have local political leaders in place, decision—makers, that we have found the table around the table that we can have decisions made at, that‘s
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a tremendous step forward. the question now is how much money local ministers will need to resolve the health service crisis and achieve all the other aims set out to restore devolution. there‘s commitment that schools will have a sustainable budget, stormont says that in the last decade education spending has fallen by £250 million in real terms. another focus is infrastructure, a high—speed rail link from belfast and dublin to cork will be considered, and there is a promise to upgrade the sewerage system. the water company says it will take £2.5 billion to make it fit for purpose. all that is just a start. stormont‘s power sharing partnership has been reborn. but these new ministers have a massive challenge to make northern ireland thrive. in the past half hour, clive lewis has pulled out of the labour leadership race.
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candidates wanting to replace jeremy corbyn as leader have until 2:30 this afternoon to secure the support of 22 mps or meps. mr lewis — the mp for norwich south — only had five of the 22 needed and in a statement said he was standing aside ‘in the spirit of pluralism, diversity and generosity.‘ four candidates, including the favourites, sir keir starmer and rebecca long—bailey are already through. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young — so what are we expecting today? clearly some labour mps are living in pretty late to get their nominations and, not all of them will do so, of course. clive lewis has not got over that hurdle so he will not be able to go forward and he is saying he‘s pulling out of the race because he wants those who nominated him, there‘s five including himself, to be able to nominate other people. the other person struggling is emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, very high—profile, senior woman in the party. she still needs
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more votes and she‘s got 15 minutes to get those. yesterday she told the bbc she was confident she would manage to do so. she‘s been over in the house of commons, some people have spoken to her and she suggested it will be pretty tight for her. and of course there‘s the deputy leadership race, and in that, all the candidates have managed to get the candidates have managed to get the nominations, richard burgin, though, trying to do so. so i think once we know what that list is then they have to go through another hoop, they have to get the backing of at least two unions and for some constituency leaders, so it‘s not overfor constituency leaders, so it‘s not over for them. they still had to get to the hustings and the leadership contest itself, and the big question is what they want to do? do they wa nt to is what they want to do? do they want to carry on under the same policies as under corbyn, that is what rebecca long—bailey is offering, she does not have any of a
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problem with those policies, and indeed says she was one writing them. sir keir starmer says he wants more change. of course the membership is the same one that nominated jeremy corbyn, is of course they will have to think about that. but as it stands, sir keir starmer is ahead of the others. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines prince harry prepares for a crucial meeting with the queen, his father and brother to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont — to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. thousands leave their homes as the taal volcano begins to spew lava: sparking warnings of a ‘hazardous eruption‘ — and coming up, we‘ll speak to the astronaut tim peake about sir isaac newton‘s apple seeds which accompanied him to space and back. and in the sport, only last a few
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minutes, the trial of lemmy jack has been delayed after the submission of new documents the course, he has been under house arrest since 2015 when he was accused of corruption. —— the trial of lamine diack. aston villa were defeated 6—1 by manchester city yesterday. and kick it out to say greater action needs to be taken following reports of anti—irish sectarian abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james mcclea n abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james m cclea n over abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james mcclean over the weekend. more on all those stories that have passed. —— at 1a:30pm. the airline flybe has refused to comment on reports that it‘s trying to secure emergency funding to prevent its collapse. the airline is the uk‘s biggest regional carrier and insists it‘s business as usual — with all of its flights currently operating as normal.
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the reports come a year after flybe was bought for 2.2 million pounds by a consortium including virgin atlantic and the stobart group. virgin atlantic and since then, the consortium has invested tens of millions of pounds in the airline, but losses have continued. iran‘s ambassador to the uk has been summoned to the foreign office to explain the arrest of his british counterpart at the weekend. the uk‘s ambassador to iran, rob macaire, was detained for three hours after attending a vigil where he was paying respects to victims of the crash, some of whom were british. mr macaire said he left the vigil when some people started chanting and had played no part in the demonstration. britain has condemned the arrest of the uk ambassador to iran in tehran as a "flagrant violation of international law". the economy shrank by 0.3 percent in november, according to monthly estimates by the office for national statistics. that‘s worse than expected. the picture was slightly better for the three month period from september to november last year which saw growth of 0.1% — economists had predicted a slight fall in the same period. a british backpacker has died after falling from a cliff in australia. madalyn davis from lincoln is understood to have died near sydney yesterday morning.
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the makeup artist and model had been travelling in australia. friends paid tribute to the 21—year—old as ‘talented‘ and ‘incredibly beautiful‘. a volcano in the philippines, which has been spewing lava and ash, could erupt "within hours or days", according to the authorities there. 25,000 people have been evacuated across the province of batangas, south of the capital manila. our correspondent howard johnson has this report. volcanic lightning, a spectacular event that confirmed that taal volcano had entered a more dangerous phase. the philippine authorities say the volcano is at alert level four out of a maximum of five, a warning that means a hazardous eruption could occur within hours or days. today, thick black ash billowed out of the volcano as scientists confirmed it had begun to spew lava. close to taal volcano, a steady flow of local residents left a 1k kilometre exclusion zone.
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translation: when it started to drop ash in our area, that‘s when we decided to evacuate. when we were at the boundary, there were numerous shakes. we experienced around 100 tremors. at a petrol station, there were scores of motorcyclists panic buying fuel. elsewhere, people vainly attempted to clear thick ash from their properties. translation: when we went to the volcanic island there were many destroyed houses. it's almost like a desert there because of the thickness of the mud. even my cultivated fish were all killed. elsewhere, manila‘s main international airport reopened today and many flights are subject to cancellations and long delays. ——but many flights are subject to cancellations and long delays. taal, the country‘s second most active volcano, last experienced a sustained period of volcanic activity between 1965 and 1977, which saw a major explosion and several lava flows. tonight, families taking refuge
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in evacuation centres are hoping that history won‘t repeat itself and today‘s limited lava flow is as bad as it gets. a man has been rescued after spending more than three weeks in the alaskan wilderness with nothing more than a temporary shelter to protect him. tyson steel was spotted by mountain rescue teams after his log cabin burned down. he had built himself a snow cave, and carved an sos sign in the snow. the 30—year—old had managed to salvage a few tins of food and a sleeping bag to help him survive the minus 26 degrees celsius nights. his parents had raised the alarm when they hadn‘t heard from him for three weeks. we have a full weather for cash out there, but storm brendan has begun
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to reach uk insurers. —— a full weather short forecast shortly. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning of high winds across the west, south—west and north—east of the country until midnight today. the strongest winds are expected around exposed coasts and hills with gusts of 60—70mph likely, and gusts of up to 80mph possible in some places, particularly around the west coast of scotland. all schools in the western isles are closed to pupils. around 4,000 homes in northern ireland are without power. there are warnings that there may be some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport, particularly for high—sided vehicles on exposed routes and bridges now more worrying news for the uk‘s high streets — figures from the retail analysts springboard show the numbers of shoppers fell by 3.5 per cent in december, compared with the same period in 2018. the government plans to spend millions of pounds reviving run—down town centres. but is it time for us to rethink how we use our high streets? panorama‘s adam shaw reports.
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high streets are under pressure. one in ten stores are closed and in some places it‘s a lot worse than that. pressured by online and out—of—town competition, many high streets are in crisis, facing huge questions about their future. but some are fighting back. stockton—on—tees has a reputation for being ahead of the curve in rejuvenating its town centre with the council planning and investing in change. the investment in our town centre started with the public realm and this central fountains area. we have created what we describe as a large outdoor room so that we‘ve got places for performers and our large sporting events that we have right throughout the year here in stockton. it‘s about creating that footfall so the more people we‘ve got living in town, working in town and coming and experiencing the fantastic events programme that we‘ve got, then they are going to use the retail. the town is on the shortlist for a share of a £1 billion pot the government has committed to its future high streets fund, set up to help towns reinvent their high streets.
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we are investing in buildings we can take control of, we recognise that retail is a changing market. the truth is, high streets have always had to adapt and change, responding to the shifting demands of their communities. here in southsea, portsmouth, they know only too well what it‘s like to see big stores closing. i‘m standing between two iconic brands, john lewis and debenhams. thisjohn lewis has already closed and this debenhams is scheduled for closure. in some places, they‘re finding answers by getting new, multiple uses for old department stores. retailers will find it hard to meet the challenge alone but collaboration between shops, planning authorities, local politicians and developers might bring in a reimagining of our town centre which could halt, or possibly reverse, the decline.
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we‘ve been talking about the weather already, let‘s get some more detail. hello, it‘s brendan, visiting our shores. here‘s a map you canjust about make out the uk over here, this is the bit we are interested m, this is the bit we are interested in, this swirl of cloud like a snail shell, the area of low pressure. why are we excited about this? you might have heard this term referred to before, a weather bomb, have you heard that one? an explosive cycle genesis? what does that mean? no idea. basically, the traditional old—fashioned area idea. basically, the traditional old —fashioned area of low idea. basically, the traditional old—fashioned area of low pressure you get all the time, it‘s a much deeper feature, you get all the time, it‘s a much deeperfeature, and you get all the time, it‘s a much deeper feature, and it‘s you get all the time, it‘s a much deeperfeature, and it‘s to do you get all the time, it‘s a much deeper feature, and it‘s to do with how fast it deepens. and years of low pressure, we kind of grape and by how low the pressure falls in the middle, in terms of millibars, and if they drop fast enough within 2a
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hours they get to be claimed as a weather bomb. —— areas of low pressure are graded by how low the pressure. it just pressure are graded by how low the pressure. itjust deepens into that beautiful swirl. so it's already hitting western coasts... it started moving in. in uk, we are perfectly placed to cook these up, we got that formula, areas of low pressure, no problem, we‘ve got plenty of those. a warm ocean current, we are spot on, and the gulf stream, and a strong jet stream. this is why we mostly strong jet stream. this is why we m ostly get strong jet stream. this is why we mostly get them in winter, it‘s the time of year that you get the strongest jet stream affecting time of year that you get the strongestjet stream affecting the uk, so we are perfectly positioned to get this at the moment. so already is causing some problems, i was talking to you earlier, you were saying there could be other problems tomorrow? that's because of another area of low pressure. let me take you out in north america. i don‘t know if anyone has been looking at any of what has been going on weather—wise there recently but some
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very dramatic storms have come out of the pines and slimed through the eastern seaboard. there is a big contrast in the air temperature across north america at the moment, it‘s very warm to the south, very cold for the north and what that temperature contrast gives you is, exactly what we need, a strong jet strea m exactly what we need, a strong jet stream so we can then hop on ourjet strea m stream so we can then hop on ourjet stream and then drift all the way across the atlantic and we‘ve still got that big temperature contrast as we cross , got that big temperature contrast as we cross, and thatjet stream tax straight into the uk, so that is what has perfectly helped us to develop brendan. here‘s another look at that: the satellite picture, that simon‘s eye, it‘s already working its way into our shores. but it could be the case that the worse for some is still to come, it‘s looking particularly stormy through the latter pa rt particularly stormy through the latter part of the evening and donned into the —— latter part of the afternoon and on into the early pa rt the afternoon and on into the early part of the evening. we could have snow across the higher part of the highlands, squally showers for
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northern ireland, but the wind i think they real defining factor for this storm, gusts of up to 60 mph for the south coast, westinghouse, 65, 75, maybe even storm force winds for the north—west of scotland, we could see gust of up to 95 mph which could see gust of up to 95 mph which could see gust of up to 95 mph which could see damage and some disruption. the rain will whip across as pretty quickly overnight but wind stays with us, and the gradual easing but continuing to feed wintry showers into scotland, a few for northern ireland as well, and a chilly night, frost and ice to content with first thing is well as we move into tuesday. for the south, e—mailed a story. and then, as simon‘s eye, choose a‘s area of low pressure, the remnants of brendan hanging around up there, and another system develops into england and where is, so here the strongest winds for tuesday, gusting 40—50 mph, again stronger in southern and western exposures. wind is a little lighterfor northern western exposures. wind is a little lighter for northern england and
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northern ireland but still close enough to that low centre further north, a chance of some strong gusts for the north—west of scotland. rain across the board almost and some of it wintry is that rain bums its way across the pennines and into the highlands of scotland. —— bumps its way. wednesday, a bit of a breather, the system pulls away eastwards but the system pulls away eastwards but the front could just stroll across the front could just stroll across the south—east of england. because of that we could be talking 30, a0 millimetres of rain because of that on wednesday. but overall a quieter day. still breezy, if not windy, but nothing like monday and tuesday, more in the way of sunshine and temperatures in single figures, little chillier to the south. hang on in there until friday and that weekend, it looks like things will start to settle down a bit.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: stop using inflammatory language — princes william and harry issue a joint statement denying a newspaper report speculating about their relationship. with his wife, meghan, joining on a conference call, prince harry prepares for a crucial meeting with the queen, his father and brother, to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont, to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. thousands leave their homes as the taal volcano begins to spew lava, sparking warnings of a "hazardous eruption" possibly within hours.
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seeds from the tree which inspired the lincolnshire scientist sir isaac newton, and have travelled millions of miles in space, have today been given new homes. several seeds from the grantham apple tree were taken into space by the british astronaut tim peake and spent six months in microgravity as part of the ‘pips in space‘ programme. they have been grown into young saplings and it‘s hoped the eight trees will inspire a new generation of scientists. let‘s talk now to astronaut, tim peake who joins us from grantham. first, what was the reaction from those you talk to about this? there isa those you talk to about this? there is a scientific purpose to all this. it has been a fantastic project, it is the combination of something started five years ago, to take seeds from the apple tree here in this orchard behind me. the birthplace of sir isaac newton and the apple tree that inspired him to
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think about the universal laws of motion and gravity. those seeds were flown with me on board the international space station for six months. quite a punishing environment for any seed, brought back to earth, they were nurtured in cold storage and then we have eight saplings presented today two establishments aground the uk where these saplings can hopefully continue to inspire our future generation of engineers and scientists. your mission was named in her marriage to sir isaac newton. it was indeed. it was a very proud moment to name the mission after so isaac newton‘s works. he is one of the greatest scientist that ever lived and space flight owes so much to his work in terms of understanding the laws of gravity. it isa understanding the laws of gravity. it is a very proud moment to be involved in this project. what sort of things can we learn from the
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seeds having spent so much time in space? interestingly, we are doing a lot of work about understanding how to grow plants, how to grow vegeta bles to grow plants, how to grow vegetables in a space environment for our future vegetables in a space environment for ourfuture missions. we are focusing on sustainability, we need to be able to grow our own food and we re to be able to grow our own food and were looking at how we can improve the techniques back on earth, how we can improve our understanding of crop growth and so there is a lot of research that we can gain from the seeds stop i shared a platform with you in the last few weeks at an awards ceremony where you showed a home video of storms from space, the most remarkable thing. the audience was in awe. ratherfunny looking most remarkable thing. the audience was in awe. rather funny looking at you now, the surroundings couldn‘t be more different. sorry, i miss that. it is a bad line. these are not the surroundings you are in at the moment that many associate you with having seen those amazing images from space. absolutely. for
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me, sir isaac newton, what a hero, what an inspiring character and these environments here are indicative of what we can take forward to hopefully inspire the future generation. what is next for you? next for me is to continue as a european space agency astronaut of course and my class of 2009 will hopefully get a second mission by 202a. hopefully get a second mission by 2024. my hopefully get a second mission by 202a. my two classmates have flown to the international space station so the next five years and space flight so the next five years and space flight will be incredibly exciting. a lot happening and so it will be a great time to be involved in those projects. tim, good to talk to you. thank you very much forjoining us. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. there was an important trial getting under way today, which is linked
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to the russian doping scandal, but there‘s been a change to proceedings? breaking news this hour, the trial of former world athletics president lamine diack has been delayed after new documents were submitted to the court in paris. this was a huge story when it broke — diack accused of taking payments of more than 3 million euros to cover up cheating in russian athletics. his arrest plunged the iaaf into an unprecedented scandal, and has done a great deal of damage to athletics‘ credibility. these are shots of him arriving at the court earlier — our sports editor dan roan asking him for comment. hugely significant — diack was president of the iaaf or world athletics, for 16 years — he was one of the most influential figures in world sport — he was replaced by britain‘s lord
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coe in august 2015. he‘s 86—years—old now, from senegal — he faces corruption and money—laundering charges linked to the russian doping scandal. diack denies the charges, but if found guilty he could face up to ten years in jail. these new documents submitted to the court concern testimony that his son and co—defendant papa massata diack gave in senegal in november. parties have been given time to review the documents. the trial is expected to begin again injune. premier league action yesterday. one heavy defeat for one club and their reaction may be to bring in a new goalkeeper. they might need him as well — aston villa were on the recieving end of a 6—1 defeat to manchester city yesterday. former liverpool goalkeeper pepe reina is having a medical at villa today ahead of a loan move from ac milan. villa manager dean smith has moved to sign the former spanish international after tom heaton was ruled out for the rest
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of the season with a knee injury. the deal is expected to be completed later today. that win moved city up to second but still 1a points behind leaders liverpool. former city captain vincent kompany says his old club stil have plenty to play for. he won the title with city four times, and points out that this season, they still have three other trophies in their sights. this season has so much still to be done. 0k, winning the league is a big, big thing, unbelievable, such a ha rd big, big thing, unbelievable, such a hard achievement. but still in the champions league, still in the fa cup, still in the carling carabao cup. i wouldn't look at this as a season of anything else than opportunity still. kick it out say greater action needs to be taken following reports of anti—irish and sectarian abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james mcclean over the weekend. mcclean was allegedly the victim of abuse during stoke‘s match
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with millwall on saturday. that comes after similar incidents reported at huddersfield and barnsley. earlier this month, barnsley were charged by the fa following an investigation into allegations of sectarian abuse aimed at mcclean, while huddersfield are investigating discriminatory sectarian chants aimed at the player. after a 16—year career that included 81 caps for wales, james hook will retire from rugby union at the end of the season. the 3a—year—old, who plays predominantly at fly—half, is at ospreys at the moment and also had spells at perpignan and gloucester. he wants to move into coaching but he‘s also written a series of children‘s books, with a rugby theme that will be published later this year. rob burrow made his final appearance for leeds rhinos over the weekend, a five—minute cameo in a fundraising match for motor neurone disease. the 37—year—old former great britain scrum—half was diagnosed with the incurable
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condition last year. they are making massive gains in research. i saw a professor last week. he was great, absolutely brilliant for me. making big strides, so hopefully they will find a cure. whether it is in my time or not, raise awareness, get more people looking into it and hopefully one day, cure this horrible disease. such an incredibly positive attitude. that‘s all the sport for now. this year‘s oscar nominations have been announced and four films lead the way. out in front, thejoker with 11 nominations. the irishman, 1917 and once upon a time in hollywood have ten each.
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and netflix films have 2a nominations. let‘s talk about this with jason solomons. thejoke are let‘s talk about this with jason solomons. the joke are leading the pack. rightly so. a lot of people's favourite film. i saw this at the venice film festival and the loudest cheer for venice film festival and the loudest cheerfor a movie. there was venice film festival and the loudest cheer for a movie. there was a venice film festival and the loudest cheerfor a movie. there was a real well for this to do well because so often superhero movies are overlooked at the oscars and people have been complaining about that. thejoker is have been complaining about that. the joker is different. have been complaining about that. thejoker is different. it is an origin story. a gritty film. there are not many caves and flying in it, it is about how a man can become evil. a very unsettling film. but equally the music gets a nod as well and that is interesting because that is an important part of this. a huge
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pa rt is an important part of this. a huge part of this. the first female to win the best score for the film. the production design stop macro it gets 11 nominations because they make up is great,. very much a gritty, new york streets of the 70s. a genre we associate with martin scorcese. an interesting collision between the irishman. talk about best film in a moment that little women needs a mention because that is up there. moment that little women needs a mention because that is up therem is up there. not perhaps where eve ryo ne is up there. not perhaps where everyone wants it to be with greta gerwig as best director. that female ceiling hasn‘t quite shouted. gerwig as best director. that female ceiling hasn't quite shoutedm gerwig as best director. that female ceiling hasn't quite shouted. it is still a very white and male list. ceiling hasn't quite shouted. it is still a very white and male listm is. martin scorcese has been doing this for a long time. you would like to see a bit. there is a korean
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director up there, so he isn‘t a white male. his film is an extraordinary film that has done very well to get six nominations. people will say it is a dominated list. look at the best supporting actresses, two who are not blood in this whole thing. —— blonde. we do celebrate those, you don‘t want to do down those people who have done extraordinary achievements. little women has been nominated for best picture and screenplay and two of its actresses have been nominated in the acting categories. both under 25. extraordinary performance from florence. she has only been doing this five or six years and she is already nominated for her performance. we spoke to her earlier. literallyjust 20 minutes ago, i was asleep and then my publicist called me. so all the lights are on now
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and i'm trying to wake up as quickly as possible! you have a very, very busy day ahead. you were nominated in your role for little women at the baftas as well. once you get a bafta nomination, do you anticipate this? does it make you more excited for the oscar period ? i don't think it is ever expected. it is completely bizarre. i have never been in this... i have never got this far certainly in the awards season ever before, so i'm just making sure that i am staying awake and i am taking it all in. but no, this is a crazy feeling. i never assumed this would happen. dreams can come true it seems. let's talk about netflix. they were built up talk about netflix. they were built up from the golden globes then knocked down. they are up for 23 nominations. netflix is way ahead of the traditional studios like fox and
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paramount and universal who trail behind. a lot of these nominations. a major player. what they really wa nt a major player. what they really want is to win the big one, they thought they would do it last year. missed out. a bit of enmity in hollywood to say, these disrupting our process. they see them as u psta rts our process. they see them as upstarts and disru ptors. our process. they see them as upstarts and disruptors. the irishman is a fantastic piece of film—making. there is no way the company behind that is not behind a cinema but will they break through and wina cinema but will they break through and win a best picture? this could be another year in which they are eluded that the main prize that they are desperate to have. ten nominations for 1917. let‘s have a clip from the film. did you hear that story about wilco? about how he lost his ear? not in the mood. keep your eyes on the trees.
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top of the ridge. i bet he told you it was shrapnel. what was it then? well, you know his girl is a hairdresser, right? and he was moaning about the lack of bathing facilities when he wrote to her. remember those rancid jakes? yeah. anyway, she sends him over this hair oil. smells sweet, like golden syrup. wilco loves the smell but he doesn't want to cast it around his pack, so he smothers it all over his barnet and goes to sleep and in the middle of the night, wakes up and a rat is sitting on his shoulder, licking that oil off his head. wilco panics and he jumps up and when he does, the rat bites clean through his ear and runs off with it.
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it will win something. it certainly is, ten nominations. i really think it could win the big one. the sort of thing that blows people away. a visceral experience to watch it. it isa visceral experience to watch it. it is a visceral, energetic performance. a big, british film. all the hits of world war i movies you have seen before. it is altogether in one. i have never seen altogether in one. i have never seen a first world war movie do it all this way. those of us who have not seen it, it is done in ten minute chunks. yes, so when they're walking through the trenches, it doesn‘t cut, there is no blinking if you like. your eyes are wide open through it. you don‘t breed through the tensions. it is about two young boys and they have been sent on a
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mission, as all missions in the first world war are, seemingly reckless and they had to make this terrible journey to pass this message on. they go through all sorts of different situations to get there. will they make it? will they prevent british troops going to certain death in a german trap? that is the ticking clock of this film. it is almost as if it is happening in real time. a real achievement technically. very exciting cinema and that is why this film, it came quite late to the awards race. it is the sort of film that arrives in a shock. it has blown all the others away. it has the power to do that and it is desperately worthy. it tells the right story about war. another documentary about syria which is similar in a way. this
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person living under war with bombs going off. they are 102 years apart. i going off. they are 102 years apart. , for sama. thank you. cooler weather in australia has allowed firefighters to take control of most of the huge bushfires that have swept over the eastern side of the country. 28 people have been killed and thousands of homes destroyed, with record temperatures and strong winds fanning the flames. our correspondentjonathan head has been to one small community in much of south—eastern australia, the fires have moved on, leaving behind a withered landscape and wounded communities now counting the cost of this disaster. we came across an army ambulance, here to offer help. but they found that few residents had come back yet. there‘s no power and so many houses
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have been destroyed. this is, or was, a small hamlet called kiar and it is very typical of the kinds of places australians have come to be close to nature but in this exceptional hot season, they know now it comes with a very high price. and once the immediate threat of the fires has eased, this community is going to face the challenge not only of how they rebuild but whether they can defend themselves more effectively against future fires. graham mcloughlin is a retired civil servant who moved here 20 years ago for the tranquillity, he says, and for the views. his house was consumed by a bushfire so intense, it melted machinery into puddles. he‘s had enough. we willjust drift off north to queensland and move to be near children and grandchildren. you‘ve decided there is no more future for you here?
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well, i‘m getting a bit too long in the tooth to think about putting in the years necessary to try and rebuild this. i think i‘lljust pack up my bag and drift off into the sunset. the weather has now cooled, but smoke hangs ominously over the hills. hundreds of fires are still smouldering. this isn‘t over yet. in kiar, they are hoping there‘s not much left to burn now, that this is the end of their losses this fire season. but what about next year and beyond? jonathan head, bbc news, kiar, new south wales. in a moment, the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the duke and duchess of sussex prepare for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss the future role. a historic moment
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for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont — to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. thousands leave their homes as the taal volcano begins to spew lava: sparking warnings of a ‘hazardous eruption‘ — possibly within hours. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. management at flybe has written to staff, telling them they are "determined to do everything" they can to turn the airline around. to do everything" they can the regional carrier told the bbc that it "does not comment on rumour or speculation" after sky news reported that it was struggling to secure fresh finance. new data out today shows that the slowdown in manufacturing and services sectors depressed economic growth in november of last year. the economy shrank by 0.3% in november, a figure worse than expected but over a three month period gdp did still grow. online shoppers have been warned about the risks of buy now, pay later arrangements.
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the money and pensions service says its helpline expects a call every four minutes from people who have gotten into repayment difficulties, particularly from younger shoppers. there‘s a new man in charge at boeing. david calhoun, a former boss at ge and former chair of boeing, takes over today. he is the man on the left. he has onejob — get 737 max flying again. the latest version of world‘s biggest—selling aircraft, rounded since march after two fatal crashes, killing more than 300 to say it‘s shaken confidence in world‘s biggest plane—maker is an understatement. samira hussain is in new york for us. thank you for being with us. what confidence is there in the new boss to succeed where his
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predecessor failed? on the one hand you see that he has a lot of previous experience with are the really big companies, most notably he spent more than 25 years at ge. in terms of leadership, there is a lot of confidence in mr calderon. that said he was part of the board at boeing during this entire crisis, soi at boeing during this entire crisis, so i think in that way, there is scepticism in terms ofjust how much change he can put through. just to give you an idea of some of the things that boeing is trying to change, one has always been a communication and just how the company has been communicating with shareholders, regulators and even the general public. to that end we see calhoun has sent an e—mail to employees outlining his priorities and one of the first is to get the max back up and running. but that
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second priority he listed was to rebuild trust because in the wake of this crisis we have seen a boeing, a giant in the plane making business, has lost the trust of shareholders, other airlines and of regulators and of course the flying public. other airlines and of regulators and of course the flying publicm other airlines and of regulators and of course the flying public. it is where we talk about a business story with such a high human cost, there was 3a6 lives lost those two crashes back from a financial perspective, the longer this ground continues, the longer this ground continues, the higher the financial cost to boeing. absolutely. there is the financial cost of boeing in terms of the fact these planes are not up in the fact these planes are not up in the airand not the fact these planes are not up in the air and not being sold. this is their most profitable plane. then there is also the billions of dollars it is going to owe in penalties to us regulators and the money it is going to had to pay to airlines for damages. we already saw at the end of last year at the
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beginning of this year airlines that are settling with boeing for some of those damages, but that is going to certainly continue for boeing in the coming months and possibly in the coming months and possibly in the coming years, depending just how long this continues. thank you very much for that. a reasonably good day for markets across the board. investors were quite excited about the us trying a trade deal. an appointment in the diary for trade deal. an appointment in the diaryfora trade deal. an appointment in the diary for a signature. the ftse generally does pretty well as well when the pound is falling. the pound is falling today, down below the $1 30a is falling today, down below the $1 30 a month. policymakers have said that unless the uk economic picture improves, he will be voting for an
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interest rate cut this month. bad news also for banking stock. lloyds banking group down by 2.3%. taylor wimpey, one of the house—builders, doing quite well. one of the details in the gdp data say house—building is doing pretty well. there you go. thank you. let‘s catch up with the weather. heroes brendan, this cloud rolling its way across the uk at the moment. the are our biggest concern this afternoon and this evening. 50, 60 mph gusts along the south coast. the rest of it to come from the north—west of scotland, gusts of 80 or 90 mph. strong enough to cause some disruption and do some damage. some heavy rain whipping across the uk as well. skies start to clear through the evening but snow showers
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will pack into scotland and northern ireland. accumulations for higher levels, ice also a risk for scotland and northern ireland as our temperatures fall below freezing. milder to the south, loads of six or 7 degrees. tuesday, another area of low pressure heading our way for england and wales. a very wet and windy day with widespread gales and tuesday for england and wales, a little quieter for northern england and northern ireland. snow showers in the north—west of scotland and strong winds here once again.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 3... stop using inflammatory language: princes william and harry issue a joint statement denying a newspaper report speculating about their relationship. with his wife meghan joining on a conference call, prince harry prepares for a crucial meeting with the queen, his father and brother to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. what‘s so great about today is, as i say, that northern ireland politicians have put aside their differences, stepped up to the plate and shown leadership. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. tight—lipped: flybe declines
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to comment on reports that the airline is in crisis talks in an attempt to prevent financial collapse. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. the trial of former world athletics president lamine diack has been delayed after new documents were submitted to the court. he is accused of taking payments to cover up accused of taking payments to cover up cheating in russian athletics. thank you, jane. susan has her on brendan. it looks beautiful on the satellite picture, the swirl of cloud, the deep area of low pressure. not so much fun on the ground, rain sweeping across the uk and the wind the big story this afternoon and into the evening. more details in half an hour. also coming up —joker leads the oscar nominations, the film is up for 11 awards. and behind that, with ten oscar nominations apiece are three films
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including war drama 1917. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. the eyes of the world are on sandringham this afternoon — where members of the royalfamily have gathered for a historic summit. top of the agenda: the future role of the duke and duchess of sussex — but at stake perhaps the future role of all so—called ‘minor‘ royals. the stage is already tense — a few hours ago princes william and harry issued a strongly—worded statement, describing as false and offensive a report in the times newspaper which suggests a breakdown in their relationship. last week, harry and meghan announced out of the blue that they wanted to step down as senior royals. in the next few hours that will be at the heart of discussions between the queen, prince charles, prince willam, and prince harry — with the duchess of sussex expected tojoin by phone from canada. this report from our royal correspondent nicholas witchell does
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contain some flash photography. there are big issues at stake but at the heart of this is a family, and a feature of that is the relationship between two brothers, william and harry. this morning, a newspaper reported that harry felt he and his wife had been pushed away from the royal family by the, quote, "bullying attitude of william". that brought a swift response, a joint statement from william and harry describing the story as false. at sandringham, as the duke of edinburgh was seen out and about on the estate, in the main house, the queen will be joined by the prince of wales, prince william and by prince harry. it will be a chance for him to explain to them face—to—face why he and his wife want partially to withdraw from royal life and for the family to try to agree on how such a withdrawal would work. the main issues have
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been identified. how would they finance a semi—royal life? would they expect to keep their royal titles? and who would pay for and provide their security? there‘s already evidence that the couple are seeking nonroyal work. here are harry and meghan at a film premiere last summer. the cameras caught harry‘s conversation with the chairman of the disney corporation, asking him if he could find his wife some voice—over work. and, as the royal family tries to find a way forward, commentators are adding their analysis. some are suggesting that criticism of meghan has been racially motivated. it‘s the tabloid press who have taken a particular tone with meghan markle, and from the very beginning wanted to allude to the fact that she had african heritage and that this was something that really threatened continuity within the royal family. officials reject suggestions that either meghan or harry have been driven out.
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quite the reverse, in fact, they say that ever since their wedding, everyone from the queen down has recognised them as a hugely popular couple. furthermore, they‘ve been at the heart of the prince of wales‘ vision for the future of the monarchy — or at least, they have been until now. now, it appears that they want to find a way out. meghan is said to be adamant, harry is said to be conflicted. our royal correspondent daniela relph is at sandringham. just as a side bar, really, but looking at the pictures of that wedding, it was only, what, 18 months ago, and it underlines just how bad things have gone and how quickly. yeah, very much so. in fa ct, quickly. yeah, very much so. in fact, just before the wedding, there area number of fact, just before the wedding, there are a number of occasions when harry and meghan talked about working alongside kate and william, there was all the talk of a fab for, you
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remember, then working together under the umbrella of the royal foundation, using this work and their status to make the greatest impact they could in terms of their charity work. but that message did not last long and recently there has of course been lots of rumours about the relationship between the brothers, the relationship between kate and meghan, and things as they have paid out now show that there are very different parts that both wa nt to are very different parts that both want to go down, and for harry and meghan, they want out. they want to do something completely different and want to forge a whole new role for themselves. how much of a pain is at royal heckler! do you want to go on? shouting over loudspeaker. some of the language might be fruity! i don‘t know if you can hear that. the tone of the meeting, it's more sorrow than anger, isn‘t it?
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that. the tone of the meeting, it's more sorrow than anger, isn't mm is, and you have to remember at the pa rt is, and you have to remember at the part of it —— heart of it, there are all these issues that are diplomatic and constitutional, but remember this is a family in a bit of a mess and trying to find a way out of it. this is going to be harry, who is clearly unhappy, wanting to do something different, trying to please his wife, sitting in front of his father, his brother, his grandmother, trying to find a solution. and i think you mustn‘t forget those personal elements at play as well as bigger picture stuff. and i think the mood music has been pretty consistent now over recent days, that this is about finding a solution. this isn‘t about fighting and arguing and family breakdown, it is about trying to find some way through this that please everybody. we are going to have to leave it there. the duke of edinburgh is never around when you wa nt edinburgh is never around when you want him! he could deal with it fast. we will come back to you later on. borisjohnson and the irish prime
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minister leo varadkar are in belfast meeting members of the new devolved government. mrjohnson says it‘s a ‘historic time‘ for the people of northern ireland after power—sharing was restored on saturday after a three—year stand—off. our ireland correspondent chris page reports — and a warning, his report does contain some flash photography. the first official visit to the headquarters of a government which hasn‘t existed for more than 1,000 days. many wondered if the deal would ever be sealed. but after months of negotiations, the power—sharing coalition is back, headed by the democratic unionist leader arlene foster and michelle o‘neill of sinn fein. mrjohnson wanted to savour a landmark moment. never mind the hand of history on my shoulder. i see the hand of history... no, i see the hand of the future. i see the hand of the future beckoning us all forward, and i hope that with goodwill and compromise and hard work on all sides it will be a very
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bright future indeed. the prime minister has come to a parliament building that‘s suddenly functioning and abuzz after a long and toxic stalemate. but now that the negotiations to restore devolution have succeeded, the parties are keen to talk cash. the biggest priority will be solving huge problems in the regional nhs. northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far, and workers, including nurses, have been on strike over pay and staffing levels. but they think having a government back will make a big difference. of course our health service is still in crisis. nothing has changed in two days, but the fact we have local political leaders in place, decision—makers, that we have found the table that we can have decisions made at, that‘s a tremendous step forward. the question now is how much money local ministers will need to resolve the health service crisis and achieve all the other aims set out in the deal to restore devolution. there‘s commitment that schools
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will have a sustainable budget. stormont says that in the last decade education spending has fallen by £250 million in real terms. another focus is infrastructure — a high—speed rail link from belfast and dublin to cork will be considered, and there is a promise to upgrade the sewerage system. northern ireland water says it will take £2.5 billion to make it fit for purpose. all that is just a start. stormont‘s power sharing partnership has been reborn. but these new ministers have a massive challenge to make northern ireland thrive. chris, what are we expecting to happen in the next couple of hours? the parties who were involved in talks with boris johnson parties who were involved in talks with borisjohnson this morning a meeting with the northern ireland secretary gillian smith this afternoon to discuss, it is
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understood, more details of the financial package that could be on the way to northern ireland. —— julian smith. some people are speaking to the assembled media who have gathered here at stormont. this is to be an empty and forlorn place for 36 months, —— was an empty for them place, but now it is a buzz. borisjohnson hasjust them place, but now it is a buzz. borisjohnson has just left them place, but now it is a buzz. boris johnson has just left at stormont. the irish taoiseach at leo varadkar is still here, he‘s been having talks with all the ministers. what‘s different i suppose about this agreement to get devolution back up and running, in previous times whenever politicians have had to get around the table and resolve their differences, whenever they have done so, you‘ve usually got the british and irish governments giving a financial commitment which contains cold ha rd a financial commitment which contains cold hard figures. it has not happened this time, but the governments have said they will be generous in their financial support, but haven‘t given any actual figures as to how much money they are prepared to stump up. so certainly whenever boris johnson
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prepared to stump up. so certainly whenever borisjohnson was speaking to is here a couple of hours ago, he said that in his talks with the new stormont ministries, there was a conversation about funding as you would expect but he was not keen really to put the cash on the table just yet, by the sounds of things. he said it was notjust about money, it was also about leadership. so you can certainly expect the incoming stormont executive to keep up the pressure on london and dublin for more details of that package in the coming hours a days if necessary. 0k, coming hours a days if necessary. ok, we will be back to you later when it happens, chris. thanks for now. we now know that the next labour leader will be one of the following five mps. the favourites sir keir starmer and rebecca long—bailey were already through — and have beenjoined by lisa nandy, jess philips and emily thornberry. candidates had until 2.30pm this afternoon to secure the support of 22 mps or meps in order to take part in the contest. clive lewis — the mp for norwich south — pulled outjust before the deadline after only getting five nominations. the new leader will be announced on april ath.
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we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young — so what are we expecting today? the problem is they have to get through another hurdle, another hoop, if you like, after this. they now had to try and get the backing of at least two trade unions or affiliates and if not, then 30 constituency labour parties. so that‘s not terribly easy, there‘s more criteria, as well, it all gets very completed. so it‘s not over yet, there are not yet on that ballot paper. but i think as we can see from those numbers, sir keir starmer, way ahead when it comes to nominations from mps and meps. emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, just really scraping in their own right at the end. so the contest is just really getting going, even if they‘re not sure whether they will make it onto the ballot paper. and itjust going to be whether the labour party membership, who has a vote in this, of course, whether they want to
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stick with the policy set out by jeremy corbyn, whether they think may be the problem was the leader rather than the policies themselves, that‘s certainly what rebecca long—bailey has been saying, and whether they want to change direction completely. now, straightaway, lisa nandy, one of those who is on, got through this stage of the contest, she has gone to make a speech and this was her view on what needs to happen next. after this bruising few years in the labour movement and after what was a shattering, devastating electoral defeat in which we lost good friends and colleagues who deserve so much better, and in which people around the country lost good labour mps and they deserved so much better, i say to you, despite all of that, that now is not the time to steady the ship and play it safe. because if we do not change course as a labour movement, we will die and we will deserve to. so now is the moment to up deserve to. so now is the moment to
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up our game deserve to. so now is the moment to up ourgame and deserve to. so now is the moment to up our game and recover our sense of ambition. now is the moment when i ambition. now is the moment when i am asking you to take the brave, not the easy choice in this leadership contest. now, there will be a discussion in the coming weeks and months about what led to labour‘s defeat, don‘t forget, the task for whoever wins this is absolutely huge, to win more than 120 seats just to really get even with the conservatives. so there is going to be a lot of soul—searching, a lot of analysis of what went wrong. some are saying that it was brexit, lisa nandy was one of those who represent a brexit voting constituency, she warned about labour really losing touch with those voters, labour voters who backed brexit. her main pitch is about reconnecting with towns, particularly in the north of england. but this will all keep going for several weeks and don‘t forget there is also the deputy labour leadership contest as well, thatis labour leadership contest as well, that is to replace, of course, tom watson. thank you very much.
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you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the duke and duchess of sussex prepare for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest as clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. and in sport: the trial of former world athletics president lamine diack has been delayed. he was due to face charges of taking payments for covering up cheating in russian athletics. former liverpool goalkeeper pepe reina is having a medical at aston villa ahead of a loan move from ac milan. villa were defeated 6—1 by manchester city yesterday. and kick it out say greater action needs to be taken following reports of anti—irish and sectarian abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james mcclean over the weekend. i‘ll be back with more
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on those stories. the airline flybe has refused to comment on reports that it‘s trying to secure emergency funding to prevent its collapse. the airline is the uk‘s biggest regional carrier and insists it‘s business as usual — with all of its flights currently operating as normal. the reports come a year after flybe was bought for 2.2 million pounds by a consortium including virgin atlantic and the stobart group. since then, the consortium has invested tens of millions of pounds in the airline, but losses have continued. with me now is our business correspondent theo leggett. do we know what‘s happening at the moment? we don't so that we have the line from the company that it‘s business as usual but it‘s pretty apparent that behind—the—scenes financial pensions appear to have come to a head. if you look at flybe, a year ago, we were in much the same position, probably worse. the airline was on the verge of colla pse the airline was on the verge of collapse and the consortium stepped m, collapse and the consortium stepped in, made up of stobart group the
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logistics operator, virgin atlantic and cyrus capital. and they promised to inject £100 million into the business, 20 millionjust to keep it going, really, and 80 million to invest. it would appear since then either those investors have not come up either those investors have not come up with the money they promised are they needed more. and at the moment they needed more. and at the moment they are trying to raise it. so that‘s a situation we are in. they are trying to raise it. so that's a situation we are in. two groups of people i also think of on the stories, passengers in a moment, but staff must be worried. it's a deeply worrying time for them, there about 300,000 staff working for flybe, it‘s a big airline. —— 200,000 staff. it carries 8 million people a year, which is across britain of course, but also into europe. so they don‘t know what‘s happening at the moment. the head of the british airline pilots association has said that it‘s appalling they‘re not being told and a p pa re ntly appalling they‘re not being told and apparently things are going on in secret behind their backs. let's talk about passengers, many people have bookings with them. this is where it becomes a little bit worrying because if the airline were to collapse, and we don‘t know
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that‘s going to happen, there are reportedly talks going on about raising extra finance. but if it we re raising extra finance. but if it were to stop operating, they might well find themselves in difficulties because when we had seen airlines colla pse because when we had seen airlines collapse in the past like monarch or thomas cook, a lot of passengers we re thomas cook, a lot of passengers were package holiday passengers and they are protected under the atol scheme but if you simply buy a ticket, it‘s not part of the package holiday, you‘re not protected by the atol scheme and those people would find themselves losing their bookings. if you used a credit card you can go to your card provider and try and get money back in that way, but if you paid in other ways it might be more difficult. thank you. this year‘s oscar nominations have been announced — and a films lead the way. out in front — thejoker with 11 nominations. the irishman, 1917 and once upon a time in hollywood have 10 each. and netflix films
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have 2a nominations. with me on the line now is the actor george mackay — who plays lance corporal schofield in 1917. so you know the work of the cinematographer roger deakin is better than most, you will be thrilled he‘s been nominated. better than most, you will be thrilled he's been nominated. it's wonderfulfor roger. it‘s thrilled he's been nominated. it's wonderful for roger. it‘s an amazing thing that he pulled off for this one, so it‘s wonderful he‘s got the recognition. and what about 1917, ten nominations, that‘s a huge deal? yeah, it‘s fantastic. this film was truly such a team collaboration, given the way that it was shot, the way that it was made, it was just such a team effort. it‘s the biggest tea m such a team effort. it‘s the biggest team effort i‘ve ever been part of and so the fact that it‘s been recognised and nominated across so many categories is, i think, part of how it was made, is a wonderful thing. i don't want to give too much away, but explained it sort of work
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the roger deacon and some lenders do, what makes it so different, that scene where you‘re running on the camera operator starts running with you, and then the audience just becomes a transfixed watching you. i just wonder what that was like, to be part of but then to watch back? —— roger deakin and sam mendes stop yermak i didn‘t see it until i saw the film, unless it was required for a position or something, i a the film, unless it was required for a position or something, ia roach ta kes. a position or something, ia roach takes. and doing it was amazing. —— i never watched takes. we were working in layers, almost working through the film, going back and across different locations. but, you know, that shot, i think i know that one you‘re talking about, as you say it involved two cranes, two camera groups, in question because they couldn‘t get out of the shop, and in
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a tracking vehicle, all being attached on the move. and that‘s what i mean about this team effort, it was an amazing thing. and when we‘ve got those scenes, it was wonderful, such a celebration every day on set. it was just really great. tough work, though. i think sam mendes said you‘ll never be this fit again? just the doing of it, it‘s a very physical film, people go and see the film, it‘s a journey that happens in real time and it happens nonstop. we rehearse these scenes in most shots that we did we re scenes in most shots that we did were about five minutes each, and you‘re covering a couple of hundred metres each one with all the gear on, either running orjumping or crawling or walking, and we would rehearse it again and again and again, have to walk back to the start each time on film again and again and again. so it was really constant... kind of like an amazing
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sort of conveyor belt, you just never stopped. because of the lighting wasn‘t right for shooting weird rehearse, if the light was right we would shoot. he would stay up right we would shoot. he would stay up to 50 takes of these five—minute scenes. “— up to 50 takes of these five—minute scenes. —— you would do up to 50 ta kes. scenes. —— you would do up to 50 takes. so it was unbelievably physical. i would be in realtrouble doing thisjob! but if physical. i would be in realtrouble doing this job! but if you‘ve got a ten minute scene everyone is relying on, there is huge pressure on you as an actor, isn‘t it? on, there is huge pressure on you as an actor, isn't it? ithink on, there is huge pressure on you as an actor, isn't it? i think people assume it‘s just on us because we are the ones in vision, but, as i said, it is a team effort. the camera operators were doing equal, if not more, of a physical task in carrying the camera to achieve these things and if their timing was off the take would be unusable in the same way as if we fluff the lines. so there‘s real pressure but also a real sort of fair attitude of
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knowing how difficult it was for everyone. so everyone was always, you always had to be very aware of each other, it was a very constant handoff between the actors and the camera and the sound, a artists fluid relationship that happen shot by shot which eventually became the whole film. you're going to hollywood on february night then? hopeless so! —— hopefully so! it will be an amazing thing to go to that ceremony. you hear about it from childhood and watch over the yea rs from childhood and watch over the years and, you know, it‘s an amazing marker of work, of the industry that we are a part of. so it‘s really, really wonderful thing. george, congratulations to all of you involved in that film and thank you so much for talking to us this afternoon. thank you very much, have afternoon. thank you very much, have a lovely day. thank you. iran‘s ambassador to the uk has been summoned to the foreign office to explain the arrest of his british
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counterpart at the weekend. the issue will be raised in an urgent question at the house of commons at 3:30pm after the uk‘s ambassador to iran, rob macaire, was detained for three hours after attending a vigil where he was paying respects to victims of the crash, some of whom were british. we are joined on the kine from tehran by journalist and commentator ghanbar naderi. can you explain to me the mood in iran, that has changed, clearly, that iran has said it was behind that iran has said it was behind that accident? this is a lost opportunity for the establishment and of course the irg see. —— last opportunity. yesterday people were celebrating the fact that irg see had hit us bases in retaliation for the assassination of qasem soleimani, many took to the streets to show solidarity with the
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establishment and condemn this illegal act, but suddenly table has turned because of the terrible situation, the tragedy that brought down this ukrainian aeroplane by mistake because of human error. so you can see how fast things could easily change here, especially when it comes to public mood. people are outraged and angry and upset, they have lost many students on that flight, have lost many students on that flight, and they want some answers. and they want justice flight, and they want some answers. and they wantjustice and accountability on the part of the government, the aviation industry officials and of course the commanders. you mentioned the stu d e nts commanders. you mentioned the students on the plane and its that protest but perhaps will worry the redeem more than most. thousands of stu d e nts redeem more than most. thousands of students have taken to the streets, no doubt about it they are outraged and angry, they want answers. but
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let‘s not forget the fact that more than 20 million students live in this country in this small crowd do not represent the whole academic community. much less the iranian nation. but this is a democracy, we should respect their outrage and feelings and anger at the establishment and the irgc, and we should respect that, we shouldn‘t get out to disperse this angry crowd. an angry crowd that is sick and tired of being lied to, but where does it go from here? notjust iranian politicians lie to the people, many politicians in other parts of the world also lie. it took a lot of courage for the to come clea n a lot of courage for the to come clean and explain what happened and ta ke clean and explain what happened and take responsibility, full responsibility. —— for the irgc to come clean. the commander was so sincere when he apologised to the whole country for the terrible, terrible mistake that was carried out by just terrible mistake that was carried out byjust one foolish member of
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the irgc, but look what happened, all hell broke loose and the whole nation is paying the price. i think we should accept this kind of apology and sincerity and the fact that they promise not to repeat the same mistake again. but that said, i mean, it wasn‘t that long ago you would have been slightly concerned or perhaps wouldn‘t even have considered doing an interview like this, critical of the regime. considered doing an interview like this, critical of the regimelj considered doing an interview like this, critical of the regime. i am not concerned at all. this is a democratic country, this is a democracy. if you are acting within the framework of the low and the constitution and if you‘re not going against national security, you‘re more than welcome to talk to foreign media, especially when it is a balanced media outlet like the bbc. but at the end of the day, i am speaking in my own capacity and i‘m not concerned about my own, you know, fate. i think as long as i am not telling lies i‘m not concerned. i‘m not concerned at all. i‘m telling you the truth and nothing but the truth. we should keep in mind that this is a democratic country and people have the right to
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freedom of expression and opinions. i give 100% rights to those who are on the streets and protesting, they need some answers and their rights have been violated because of some lies that were uttered by certain individuals in this country. but they don‘t represent the whole nation. i‘m telling you that. they don‘t represent the whole nation. i'm telling you that. it's good to talk to you, thank you for joining us this afternoon. time for a look at the weather. is with us, brendan. and here is brendan, a little bit hard to make out, but this is dick‘s round here much the band brendan, if you like. —— this big swirl here. so one way or the other, brendan is going to get you! the terminology, i thought we‘d have a little look at the terminology, a lot of quite dramatic
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language gets use, weather bomb, you might have seen that, the other one is explosive cyclogenesis. i've not heard that one before, explosive cyclogenesis. this is a term i think our scientists like, it‘s basically the same thing. rapidly deepening area of low pressure. we are no stranger to them, every time it rains across the uk that‘s basically thanks to an area of low pressure. the difference is, this one has basically developed so much faster, it can pretty much come from nowhere. it looks like nothing to start off on the satellite picture but within 2a hours you‘re facing a potentially disruptive storm. and we are in the perfect spot where we sit on the edge of the atlantic to develop these storms. they‘re not actually that rare, maybe the severity that rare depending on how they track across the cakes, some head further north, some further south, probably around the 30, a0 mac per year. —— across the uk. if
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we could have a gulf stream adam a strong jet stream. the us has had terrible weather we are getting that? actually, brendan is the re m na nts of that? actually, brendan is the remnants of an aggressive system that ran across east side of the us. there are breeding ground because you get big temperature contrasts this time of year because of air mass, still warm air to the south pulling warm airfrom mass, still warm air to the south pulling warm air from the gulf of mexico, further north you have cold air pulling down from the arctic, and the boundary between those two air masses, we set up a wind flow at high level in the atmosphere. and thatis high level in the atmosphere. and that is a good old jet stream, another time you know that hero a lot. and we can follow it now with a temperature contrast right across the atlantic, heading straight towards the uk. here‘s our area of low pressure. forgive me, i got to
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pull away. she will forgive me at some stage, but the house of commons, an urgent question on the situation in iran and the uk ambassador. i would first like to express my condolences and those of the government to the loved ones of those who tragically lost their lives on ukrainian international airlines flight. our thoughts are with all of those. among the 176 passengers who lost their lives were four british nationals as well as 82 iranians. we stated publicly alongside our partners such as canada and the us that given an increasing body of information, we believed iran was responsible for the downing of the flight. despite the downing of the flight. despite the initial denials, the government of iran own knowledge on the 11th of
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january that they were responsible. now is the time for a full transparent and independent investigation and there must be a collaborative endeavour with a strong international component. the families of the victims, including those in iran, must have answers and must know the truth. the uk is also working with the canadian led international coordination and response group consisting of countries of national skilled in the crash. this group will help with the issuing of visas and the repatriation of the bodies of the victims. her majesty ‘s ambassador to iran was arrested over the weekend and illegally held for three hours. on the 11th of january the ambassador attended a vigil to pay his respects to the victims of flight 752. his respects to the victims of flight 752. he left shortly after when there were signs that the video might turn into a protest. let me be clear, he was not attending or recording a political protest or demonstration. his arrest later that day without grounds or explanation
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isa day without grounds or explanation is a flagrant violation of international law. in response, we today will be summoning the iranian ambassador to demand an apology and seek assurances this will not happen again. given the treatment of the ambassador, we are keeping security measures for the embassy under review and we updated our travel advice on the 10th of january as review and we updated our travel advice on the 10th ofjanuary as i am sure the house would expect. we currently recommend british nationals do not travel to iran or ta ke nationals do not travel to iran or take any flight to or from within iran. on the diplomatic front in the past week, i have met with our partners in brussels, washington and montreal including an e3 meeting yesterday in paris. i spoke to foreign ministers on the 6th of january and the prime minister spoke to the president of the 9th of january. we welcome the overwhelming international support for her majesty ‘s ambassador to iran and the rights to which all diplomats are entitled to under the vienna convention on diplomatic relations. the regime in tehran is at a
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crossroads. it can slip further and further into political and economic isolation. but there is an alternative and the regime does have alternative and the regime does have a choice. the diplomatic door remains open. now is the time for iran to engage in diplomacy and chart a peaceful way forward is. i commend the statement to the house. lam commend the statement to the house. i am grateful for you granting this urgent questions. tensions have ratted since the drone strike killing and the rain in proposals. those the iranian president and the us president had momentarily checked any further military aggression but the wider issues relating to iran's destabilising foreign policy ambitions remain. it still wants to advance its sectarian regional influence by funding, training, arming paramilitaries and militias right across the middle east. it has restarted its nuclear programme and it shamelessly attempted to cover up the missile strike against flight 752. this weekend as the secretary
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of state confirmed it breached the vienna convention by arresting our own ambassador in tehran. i believe these irresponsible actions are out of sync with the views of the people of sync with the views of the people of iran. who once again have bravely taken to the streets to vent their fury against this regime, against the failing economy and against the regime's international adventurism. cani regime's international adventurism. can i ask the secretary of state for an update to the house on if calls for full transparency into the crash investigation will be met? on the welfare and the security of our ambassador, diplomatic staff in tehran, and how recent events affect efforts to release nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. efforts to release nazanin zaghari— ratcliffe. could efforts to release nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. could i commend the prime minister's efforts and his own efforts are not losing sight of the nuclear deal but i say this is the nuclear deal but i say this is the former foreign minister responsible for this area, the last deal fell because no international
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investment due to the legacy sanctions connected to missile procurement which prevented any bank particularly with us ties from aiding economic reform. so iran gained little from the deal and the release of frozen assets worth $150 billion plus oil revenues were not used to support the ailing economy but indeed to advance iran's proxy wars. for a fresh deal to succeed, any new talks must cover missile sanctions and conditional economic reform. finally, may what talks the us, the uk has had with the us and other allies so we remain united and engaged? there is a leading role for the uk to play in resetting our middle east strategy towards iran, firstly being more assertive and secondly, more proactive in offering conditional but genuine economic rehabilitation for iran. can i thank my honourable friend. he makes a
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range of powerful points and i pay tribute to his experience in this area. he is right to say that there isa area. he is right to say that there is a pattern of behaviour by the regime in iran which is flouting the basic rules of international law are not living up to the kind of conduct we would expect from any government that wants to be a responsible member of the international community. we have seen it on the nucleoside and the further noncompliance in relation to centrifuges. we have seen it with the destabilising activity that qasem suleimani was responsible for. we have seen it in regard to our dual nationals and of course we have seen it not just dual nationals and of course we have seen it notjust with it retreatment of our ambassador in iran but more importantly the downing of the ukrainian flight. there must be some accountability for that wrong doing and it is no important not least given iran has accepted and welcomed that first step of acknowledging responsibility. there must be a full, thorough investigation into
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what happened with an international component so people can have faith and confidence in that process. at the same time, whether it is on the nuclear front or the same time, whether it is on the nuclearfront or in the same time, whether it is on the nuclear front or in relation to the airline, whilst we insist on accountability and keep up the pressure, we do also want to be clear that the diplomatic door is ajar. this is something the us president has made clear, it is something the french president has made clear, it is something certainly this government support. the skating detentions and seeking long—term diplomatic resolution of all the outstanding issues. he mentioned jc pla. iran is systematically failed to comply. we are systematically failed to comply. we a re clear systematically failed to comply. we are clear that we do still support it. we have not signed up for the doctrine of maximum pressure. at the same time, the jc doctrine of maximum pressure. at the same time, thejc poa has been left a shell of an agreement because of systematic steps by iran taking it
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out of compliance. for it to be made to work, iran must make a choice that it wants to come back to compliance and for the diplomatic negotiating table. he asked about the conversations we have had with our partners. i‘ve spoken to the foreign minister is a reef. i was in brussels for the three representatives last week and i saw them last night in paris for a further discussion and i was in the us last week to talk to secretary of state pompeo and the national security advisor. it is important at this point that we do maintain transatlantic unity because whilst we leave the diplomatic door ajar, and open to the regime in iran, we wa nt to and open to the regime in iran, we want to be crystal clear that the message that they are receiving from the uk, europeans and us is the same, that there is a route forward for the iranian government and the iranian people if iran take steps to comply with the basic tenants of international law. thank you. thank
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you for granting this urgent question. may i congratulate the memberfor question. may i congratulate the member for bournemouth east on securing it. the events in iran and iraq that have followed the assassination of general kasem and amani have been utterly appalling. the missile attacks on us bases in iraq, iran's decision to remove all limits on uranium enrichment, the attacks on protesters recently in the last few days in tehran, detention of our excellent ambassador rob mckenna, and of course the unforgivable shooting down of the ukrainian airliner, killing 176 innocent civilians including four britons. all of whose deaths we mourn today. these are sure signs that the hard lines in tehran are firmly back in the ascendancy in the iranian regime but also out of control when it comes to their actions. nothing and
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also out of control when it comes to theiractions. nothing and no also out of control when it comes to their actions. nothing and no one can excuse those acts of violence. unlike all of us, i feel notjust for the iranian people as well as for the iranian people as well as for the iranian people as well as for the stability of the region, but especially for nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe especially for nazanin zaghari— ratcliffe and our other dual nationals are languishing in iranian jails today. i hope the foreign secretary can comment on their current health and safety unlike him,| current health and safety unlike him, iwill current health and safety unlike him, i will be raising those concerns when i read the iranian ambassador to london tomorrow. the question we must all ask and which ask the foreign secretary today is where do we go from here? ever since donald trump started to walk away from the iranian nuclear deal, we have been on a path to this point. with the strategy of engagement from the so—called moderates in iran now discredited and abundant, and with the hardliners firmly back in charge in tehran and an equally
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unpredictable trigger— happy president in the white house, we are just one more mistake or miscalculation before brinkmanship tips over into war. may ask the foreign secretary what action he is taken to ensure a permanent de—escalation of the tension rather than an inexorable drift towards war? i thank the gentleman and welcome his condemnation of the conduct of the government of iran from thejc poa noncompliance to the treatment of our ambassador in tehran. it is important to maintain asi tehran. it is important to maintain as i mentioned in my earlier remarks transatlantic unity and solidarity so it is in this house to make sure we give a clear signal to the regime in iran that we stand together on these important issues. i raised the issue of dual nationals including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe with the foreign minister when i spoke to him. they remain at the centre and forefront of our thinking on iran.
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we constantly consistently and every level weighs both their welfare and the need for them to be released without conditions. they should not be held, they should be back home with theirfamilies... be held, they should be back home with their families. .. the situation anyone in the commons and calling on iran to engage in diplomacy. if you wa nt to iran to engage in diplomacy. if you want to keep watching that, the bbc parliament continuous coverage. here on afternoon live, we shall move on. we are going to go to showbiz now. this year ‘s oscar nominations have been announced and four films lead the way but one comes out on top with 11 nominations. can you guess what it is? joker. joker.
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let‘s talk about the joker. 11 oscars. a controversial film for many. i think so. a quite unsettling film, a wild film. normally with a superhero movie you have a goodie and a buddy. there is no goody as suchin and a buddy. there is no goody as such in this, just about the creation of a manic wild abandon to evil. that is part of what appeals about it. the social breakdown, a bank —— bankrupt new york. a man falling through the cracks of mental care. if you treat someone like this you will end up with his bruised, violent, uncontrollable person. there is an element to it. ifound
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the film a bit wild in that it didn‘t know which side it was on. it wa nted didn‘t know which side it was on. it wanted to have all of its violent ca kes wanted to have all of its violent cakes and eat them. i am making this up cakes and eat them. i am making this up as cakes and eat them. i am making this upasi cakes and eat them. i am making this up as i go along. ifound it a strange sort of film that i didn‘t really know where it was going to end up politically and i am still not quite sure what it was trying to say. i know it has appealed massively across the board and this is something that is very unusual for a superhero movie. the only one ever nominated was black panther. these are the films that people go and watch, $1 billion movie in terms of the box office, a hugely popular movie with a girl film star performance byjoaquin phoenix. a little bit too much for me. but i don‘t think he can take it down. little bit too much for me. but i don't think he can take it down. he is upfor don't think he can take it down. he is up for best actor and the director for best director.|j thought the direction was a little bit uncontrolled and it lost sight
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of the thread of the story. i thought there were some more perfect directing performances out there but if you have got 11 nominations and the director is in charge of all of this stuff, it seems right he gets one. we had the concerns over lack of diversity with the baftas. we have the same argument here with the nominations for oscars. yes, one of the acting nominees, 20 acting nominees, four categories and five nominees, four categories and five nominees in each, one of them is not white. a fantastic performer but most people don‘t know she is from london. she has taken the us by storm, she plays harriet a —— tubman. she has had to go to america to make it big. last week we had the ba fta to make it big. last week we had the bafta nominations and none of the nominees were of any colour, they
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we re nominees were of any colour, they were all white. three years ago we had the hashtag oscars so white. the academy decided, let‘s take a look at our membership, let‘s change the diversity of our make—up. it is not that any of these nominations are bad, all of these are consummate professionals and have done to the top of their game but the question is what constitutes the best? there are other performances out there and i would like to see that widen. this year we have 11 nominations for the joker, ten each for once upon a time in hollywood and the irishman and 1917. big productions hogging these awards and i think you can share them. there is great work being done elsewhere in the world. little women has raised eyebrows because florence pugh is nominated and that was a welcome surprise for many. a big
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surprise. she is fantastic in the film. she plays amy march. traditionally a problematic role in both the novel and previous adoptions but she turns this character and makes her admirable and lovable and fun and strong. amy is always seen as this annoying little sister and here she is a major player. nominated alongside her co—star. where gerwig has been muscled out of that. we spoke to florence earlier. let‘s hearfrom her. 20 minutes ago i was asleep and then my publicist called me, so all then my publicist called me, so all the lies are on now and i i am trying to wake up as quickly as possible. you have a busy day ahead. you are nominated for your role in little women at the baftas as well. once you get a bafta nomination, do
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you anticipate this? does it make you anticipate this? does it make you more excited for the oscar period? i don't think it is ever expected, it is completely bizarre. i have never got this far in the awards season ever before so i am just making sure that i am staying awake and taking it all in, but no, this is a crazy feeling. i never thought this would happen. she has only been doing this five or six yea rs. little only been doing this five or six years. little women is great but i think 1917 will surprise everyone. it will come up with the best picture at the end. rightly so. a terrific film. a volcano in the philippines which has been spewing lava and ash could erupt "within hours or days," according to the authorities there. twenty five thousand people have been moved from their homes across the province of batangas,
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south of the capital manila. our correspondent howard johnson has this report. volcanic lightning, a spectacular event that confirmed taal volcano had entered a more dangerous phase. the philippine authorities say the volcano is at alert level four out of a maximum of five, a waning that means a hazardous eruption could occur within hours or days. today, thick black ash billowed out of the volcano as scientists confirmed it had begun spew lava. close to taal volcano, a steady flow of local residents left the 1a—kilometre exclusion zone. translation: when it started to drop ash in our area, that is when we decided to evacuate. when we were at the boundary there were numerous shakes. we experienced around 100 tremors. at a petrol station there were scores of motorcyclists panic buying fuel. elsewhere, people vainly attempted to clear thick ash from their properties.
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translation: when we went to the volcanic island, there were many destroyed houses. it‘s almost like a desert there because of the thickness of the mud. even my cultivated fish were all killed. elsewhere, manila‘s main international airport reopened today but many flights are subject to cancellations and long delays. taal, the country‘s second most active volcano, last experienced a sustained period of volcanic activity between 1965 and 1977, which saw a major explosion and several lava flows. tonight, families taking refuge in evacuation centres are hoping that history will not repeat itself and that today‘s limited lava flow is as bad as it gets. howard johnson, bbc news, tagaytay. in a moment, the latest
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business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the duke and duchess of sussex prepare for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss the future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. management at flybe have written to staff, telling them they‘re "determined to do everything" they can to turn the airline around. the regional carrier told the bbc that it "does not comment on rumour or speculation" after sky news reported that it was in danger of collapse. new data out today shows that the slowdown in manufacturing and services sectors depressed economic growth towards the end of last year. the economy shrank by 0.3% in november, a figure worse than expected but over a three month
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period, gdp did still grow. online shoppers have been warned about the risks of buy now, pay later arrangements. the money and pensions service says its helpline expects a call every four minutes from people who have gotten into repayment difficulties, particularly from younger shoppers. how clean is your desk? this is my real desk. that is from last week. i will take responsibility for the coffee cups and that bottle of water. the newspaper is hiding a kit kat rapper
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and a train ticket. doesn‘t say a lot... probably why we have a mouse problem in the newsroom! today is national clean your desk day. the logic being a clean desk makes you more productive and makes you feel good about your workspace. what do you think? i am fairly well ordered. shall we bring in an expert? a lecturer in work and organisational psychology at astor university joins us now. what is the evidence from your perspective that says clean desks make for more productive workers? from our research, i would say are not necessarily so. if we are talking about workspace, we have one important factor which is workspace enrichment and in this regard, what makes you more
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productive is having an enriched workspace in the sense that you have pla nts workspace in the sense that you have plants in your workspace, you have paintings, you have some sort of psychological stimulation. whereas cleanliness in itself doesn‘t have necessarily any effects. cleanliness in itself doesn‘t have necessarily any effectslj cleanliness in itself doesn‘t have necessarily any effects. i should stress you are not actually from whatever pr company behind this initiative. but you are an expert in workplace culture and i wonder how much of this has to do with the concept of hot the skin? the idea that many of us don‘t have our own desk, we share desktop, is there any evidence coming into a messy desk or feeling pressure to clean up your deskis feeling pressure to clean up your desk is helpful or harmful to productivity? i think it can be quite harmful. especially if you think about the concept of desk ownership or space ownership in the workplace in general. and especially transitioning from having allocated
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desks to a clean desk policy takes away ownership from people and what we experience is that we value losses much stronger than games, so we know this from the salary research. so salary increases for example don‘t have the same positive effect on well—being and engagement as compared to salary decreases, so for example if you get a bonus and it is taken away a few months later, then you end up being less motivated than before getting the bonus at all and the same happens to workspace ownership. if you‘re used to your ownership. if you‘re used to your own workspace, then obviously being taken away has quite some detrimental impacts but if you‘re not used to it, then it basically has no impact at all. ok. thank you. thank you forjoining us today.
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shall we talk about the markets? very quickly. ftse is up a touch. it was stronger earlier today because the us and china are signing a trade deal on wednesday. assuming that happens. a mixed picture across the board. the pound not doing too well against the dollar or euro. that is because one of the bank of england‘s policymakers is talking about voting for a rate cut this month. what will ido for a rate cut this month. what will i do with these? i don‘t know, take them back to your desk. thank you. let‘s have a look at the weather. a spell of stormy weather for all parts of the uk through this evening and overnight. that‘s well on the satellite picture is brandon, the deep area of low pressure that through this evening will bring widespread gales and strong winds sweeping across the uk. winds
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gusting up to 90 mph potentially to the north—west of scotland. we could see a0—50 for the south east and those are the quieter spots. snow showers full of the rain in the north—west of scotland. the risk of ice as well. further south it should look clearer. but not for long. another area of low pressure deepening pretty quickly as it pushes in from the south—west through tuesday daytime. again the wind is up with the strongest for england and wales. a bit of a breather for northern england and northern ireland. still windy in the far north of scotland. heavy rain to come on tuesday widely across england and wales. turning wintry across the hills in the north.
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situation in iran and the uk ambassador. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at a: the duke and duchess of sussex held a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william this afternoon to discuss their future role. ahead of that, princes william and harry issue a joint statement denying a newspaper report speculating about their relationship. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont — to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. what‘s so great about today is, as i say, that northern ireland politicians have put aside their differences, stepped up to the plate and shown leadership.
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five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. the british government says now is the time for iran to engage in diplomacy — it‘s after the foreign office summoned the iranian ambassador coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. the former president of world athletics has expressed dismay after his trial was delayed. he has denied taking payments to cover up russian cheating in world athletics. and let me introduce you to storm brendan, this beautifully designed swirl here on the satellite picture behind me. it won‘t take much introduction, though, in the next six hours or so. gales will become widespread across the uk, risk of disruptionjust widespread across the uk, risk of disruption just about anywhere. we will look at how these storms develop in a little more detail in the next half hour. also coming up —joker leads the oscar nominations,
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the film is up for eleven awards. and behind that, with ten oscar nominations apiece are three films including war drama 1917. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. the eyes of the world are on sandringham this afternoon — where members of the royalfamily have gathered for a historic summit. top of the agenda: the future role of the duke and duchess of sussex — but at stake perhaps the future role of all so—called ‘minor‘ royals. the stage is already tense — a few hours ago princes william and harry issued a strongly—worded statement, describing as false and offensive a report in the times newspaper which suggests a breakdown in their relationship. last week, harry and meghan announced out of the blue that they wanted to step down as senior royals. in the next few hours that will be at the heart of discussions between the queen, prince charles, prince willam, and prince harry —
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with the duchess of sussex expected tojoin by phone from canada. this report from our royal correspondent nicholas witchell does contain some flash photography. there are big issues at stake but at the heart of this is a family, and a feature of that is the relationship between two brothers, william and harry. this morning, a newspaper reported that harry felt he and his wife had been pushed away from the royal family by the, quote, "bullying attitude of william". that brought a swift response, a joint statement from william and harry describing the story as false. at sandringham, as the duke of edinburgh was seen out and about on the estate, in the main house, the queen will be joined by the prince of wales, prince william and by prince harry. it will be a chance for him to explain to them face—to—face why he and his wife want partially to withdraw from royal life and for the family to try to agree
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on how such a withdrawal would work. the main issues have been identified. how would they finance a semi—royal life? would they expect to keep their royal titles? and who would pay for and provide their security? there‘s already evidence that the couple are seeking nonroyal work. here are harry and meghan at a film premiere last summer. the cameras caught harry‘s conversation with the chairman of the disney corporation, asking him if he could find his wife some voice—over work. and, as the royal family tries to find a way forward, commentators are adding their analysis. some are suggesting that criticism of meghan has been racially motivated. it‘s the tabloid press who have taken a particular tone with meghan markle, and from the very beginning wanted to allude to the fact that she had african heritage and that this was something that really threatened continuity within the royal family.
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officials reject suggestions that either meghan or harry have been driven out. quite the reverse, in fact, they say that ever since their wedding, everyone from the queen down has recognised them as a hugely popular couple. furthermore, they‘ve been at the heart of the prince of wales‘ vision for the future of the monarchy — or at least, they have been until now. now, it appears that they want to find a way out. meghan is said to be adamant, harry is said to be conflicted. borisjohnson and the irish prime minister leo varadkar have been in belfast meeting members of the new devolved government. mrjohnson said it‘s a ‘historic time‘ for the people of northern ireland — after power—sharing was restored on saturday after a three—year stand—off. our ireland correspondent chris page reports — and a warning, his report does contain some flash photography. the first official visit to the headquarters of the government which hasn‘t
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existed for more than 1,000 days. many wondered if the deal would ever be sealed. but after months of negotiations, the power—sharing coalition is back, headed by the democratic unionist leader arlene foster and michelle o‘neill of sinn fein. mrjohnson wanted to savour a landmark moment. never mind the hand of history on my shoulder. i see the hand of history... no, i see the hand of the future. i see the hand of the future beckoning us all forward, and i hope that with goodwill and compromise and hard work on all sides it will be a very bright future indeed. the prime minister has come to a parliament building that‘s suddenly functioning and abuzz after a long and toxic stalemate. but now that the negotiations to restore devolution have succeeded, the parties are keen to talk cash. the biggest priority will be solving
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huge problems in the regional nhs. northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far, and workers, including nurses, have been on strike over pay and staffing levels. but they think having a government back will make a big difference. of course our health service is still in crisis. nothing has changed in two days, but the fact we have local political leaders in place, decision—makers, that we have found the table that we can have decisions made at, that‘s a tremendous step forward. the question now is how much money local ministers will need to resolve the health service crisis and achieve all the other aims set out in the deal to restore devolution. there‘s commitment that schools will have a sustainable budget. stormont says that in the last decade education spending has fallen by £250 million in real terms. another focus is infrastructure — a high—speed rail link from belfast and dublin to cork will be considered, and there is a promise
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to upgrade the sewerage system. northern ireland water says it will take £2.5 billion to make it fit for purpose. all that is just a start. stormont‘s power sharing partnership has been reborn. but these new ministers have a massive challenge to make northern ireland thrive. and in the last hour, prime ministerjohnson and prime minister varadkar made further statements to the press about the success of the talks and agreements before prime ministerjohnson departed. very real hope for northern ireland, the people of northern ireland, and great to see leaders here taking responsibility and preparing to take northern ireland forward, and the government of the uk is absolutely committed to giving whatever help we can to ensuring that success as well as building up close relations, obviously, with our irish friends. it's a real privilege to be here with boris, with the prime minister here in stormont, on what is a really good day for ireland and for the united kingdom. the good friday agreement is back up
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and running again with power—sharing here in northern ireland. i look forward to the north—south ministerial council meeting as soon as we have a new government in place south of the border so that we can resume north—south cooperation. and the prime minister and i spoke a lot about how we can beef up east—west co—operation in particular over the next couple of years. dealing with all of those issues that come to us, issues that ——are common to us, making sure that northern ireland works, improving infrastructure between britain and ireland and also cooperating on the new relationship that we are going to build between the uk and the eu, both very much with the view that we want to see a new trade deal in place as soon as possible, one that works for businesses and the economy and jobs in both countries. it‘s fantastic to see, you know, all the five parties in the executive working together with a shared agenda. obviously asking for money, but that‘s, you would expect that. but also offering leadership now and i think that‘s what northern ireland needs and is going to get. that‘s a priceless thing.
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chris page also said that there‘s still more negotiating to be done. the parties who were involved in the talks with borisjohnson this morning our meeting with the northern ireland secretary, julian smith, this afternoon to discuss, it is understood, more details of what financial package could be on the way to northern ireland. some of those politicians have been coming and going a bit here in the great hall at stormont, speaking to the assembled media, who have gathered. this used to be a very empty and for alone place, it was that way for 36 months, but today certainly it is a buzz. boris johnson months, but today certainly it is a buzz. borisjohnson hasjust left stormont, the irish prime minister leo varadkar is here himself, he still remains here. he‘s also been having talks with all the ministers. what i suppose is different about this agreement to get devolution back up and running, in previous times whenever politicians in northern ireland have had to get round the table and resolve their
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differences, when they have done so, you usually have the british and irish governments giving a financial commitment which contains cold hard figures. that hasn‘t happened this time. the british and irish governments have said they will be generous in their financial support but have not given any actual figures as to how much money they are prepared to stump up. certainly, whenever boris johnson are prepared to stump up. certainly, whenever borisjohnson was speaking here a couple of hours ago, he said that in his talks with the new stormont ministers, there was certainly a conversation about funding as you would expect, but he wasn‘t keen to put cash on the table just yet by the sounds of things. he said for him it wasn‘tjust about money, it was also about leadership. so you can certainly expect the incoming stormont executive to keep up incoming stormont executive to keep up the pressure on london and dublin for more details of that financial package in the coming hours and if necessary. “— package in the coming hours and if necessary. —— hours and days if necessary. we now know the five mps who will be vying in the next stage of the labour leadership contest.
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earlier today the mp for norwich south, clive lewis, pulled out of the race — he had managed to secure only five, out of a required 22, nominations from labour mps and meps. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. and then there were five. yes, five at the moment, but this is not the end of the matterfor all of at the moment, but this is not the end of the matter for all of those candidates. they still had to get over another hurdle. it means they have to get the support of at least two trade unions or elites to the labour party, or get the backing of at least 30 constituency labour parties. —— trade unions affiliated. but five have got to the stage. emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary leaving it pretty late to get her nominations but she did scrape in, clive lewis known the game was up when he only had five people decided to withdraw from the race. beside the race for the do of course is the deputy leadership race, another set of candidates there, as well. they all managed to
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get the required number of nominations. and if you look at the leadership, keir starmer is out in front when it comes to support from the parliamentary party, mps and meps, followed by rebecca long—bailey, and when it comes to the deputies, and the looks to be in a very, very strong position at the moment. —— angela rayner looks to be ina moment. —— angela rayner looks to be in a strong position. but of course it‘s also about the direction of the labour party. will they decide they need to break away from the corbyn yea rs, need to break away from the corbyn yea rs , m ove need to break away from the corbyn years, move in a different direction, not follow the policies he had in place? i think all of that will be discussed in the coming months. it‘s a long contesse, no result until the beginning of april, so plenty of time to chew over that huge defeat they suffered at the general election and really try and work out why it happened, what is the best way to re—engage with voters and particularly try to win back those labour voters who switched to the conservatives in brexit supporting areas in the north of england particularly. as far as bookmakers are concerned, sir keir starmer it somewhere out in front.
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yes, i mean, there will be some that look at him and say he is the person possibly with the most experience and of course many labour mps have spoken to think it‘s time to have a female leader, they were never had one on a permanent basis. but of course, keir starmer is the only man in this race now. he‘s been really playing up his left—wing credentials, pointing out that he opposed the iraq war, supported the miners strike, he‘s more central to the party than people like rebecca long—bailey. but of course don‘t forget the people voting are the same people who voted forjeremy corbyn on more than one occasion. some people have left the party but the question will be how many will decide to pay the £25 to become a, basically, temporary member that they can vote. will that be enough to change things? and will it be that those who backed jeremy corbyn before will accept that project did
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not succeed in that they want to move in another direction? we‘ll see all of that really playing out in the coming weeks. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the duke and duchess of sussex prepare for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. and in sport: the trial of former world athletics president lamine diack has been delayed. he was due to face charges of taking payments for covering up cheating in russian athletics. kick it out say greater action needs to be taken following reports of anti—irish and sectarian abuse aimed at stoke city‘s james mcclean over the weekend. and neil robertson is looking like booking his place in the next round of the
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master snooker. he‘s currently beating stephen maguire 5—2 at alexandra palace. i‘ll be back with more on those stories after half—past. the airline flybe has refused to comment on reports that it‘s trying to secure emergency funding to prevent its collapse. the airline is the uk‘s biggest regional carrier and insists it‘s business as usual — with all of its flights currently operating as normal. the reports come a year after flybe was bought for 2.2 million pounds by a consortium including virgin atlantic and the stobart group. since then, the consortium has invested tens of millions of pounds in the airline, but losses have continued. earlier i spoke to our business correspondent theo leggett, who had the latest on the airline. behind the scenes, financial tensions appear to have come to a head. if you look back at flybe, a year ago, we were in much the same position, in fact, probably worse. the airline was on the verge of collapse and a consortium stepped in, made up of stobart
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group, the logistics operator, virgin atlantic and cyrus capital. and they promised to inject £100 million into the business, 20 millionjust to keep it going, really, and 80 million to invest. it would appear that since then, either those investors have not come up with the money they promised, or they needed more. and at the moment they are trying to raise it. so that‘s the situation we are in. two groups of people i always think of on these stories, we‘ll talk about passengers in a moment, but first, staff must be worried. it‘s a deeply, deeply worrying time for them, there‘s about 2300 staff working for flybe. let‘s not forget, this is a big airline. it carries 8 million passengers a year. domestic routes across britain of course, but also routes into europe. so they don‘t know what‘s happening at the moment. the head of balpa, the british airline pilots association, has come out and said it‘s appalling that they‘re not being told and that apparently things are going on in secret behind their backs. let‘s talk about passengers, because many people have bookings with them. yes, and this is where it becomes
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a little bit worrying because if the airline were to collapse, and we don‘t know that‘s going to happen, there are reportedly talks going on about raising extra finance. but if it were to stop operating, they might well find themselves in difficulties because when we have seen airlines collapse in the past like monarch or thomas cook, a lot of their passengers were package holiday passengers and they are protected under the atol scheme, but if you simply buy a ticket, it‘s not part of a package holiday, you‘re not covered by the atol scheme and those people would find themselves losing their bookings. if you buy a ticket using a credit card you can go to your credit card provider and try and get money back in that way, but if you paid in other ways it might be more difficult. the economy shrank by 0.3 percent in november, according to monthly estimates by the office for national statistics. that‘s worse than expected. the picture was slightly better for the three month period from september to november last year which saw growth of 0.1% — economists had predicted a slight fall in the same period.
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a british backpacker has died after falling from a cliff in australia. madalyn davis from lincoln is understood to have died near sydney yesterday morning. the makeup artist and model had been travelling in australia. friends paid tribute to the 21—year—old as ‘talented‘ and ‘incredibly beautiful‘. the foreign secretary dominic raab has condemned the arrest of the uk ambassador to iran in tehran as a "flagrant violation of international law". rob macaire was detained for three hours after attending a vigil where he was paying respects to victims of the crash, some of whom were british. iran‘s ambassador to the uk has been summoned to the foreign office to explain the arrest of his british counterpart at the weekend. in the past hour, dominic raab answered an urgent question on the issue in the commons. on the 11th of january the ambassador attended a public vigil to pay his respects to the victims of flight 752. he left shortly after when there were signs that the vigil might turn into a protest. let me be very clear about this,
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he was not attending or recording a political protest or demonstration. his arrest later that day without grounds or explanation is a flagrant violation of international law. in response, we today will be summoning the iranian ambassador to demand an apology and seek full assurances this will not happen again. given the treatment of the ambassador, we are keeping security measures for the embassy under review and we updated our travel advice on the 10th ofjanuary, as i am sure the house would expect. we currently recommend british nationals do not travel to iran or take any flight to, from or within iran. mr speaker, on the diplomatic front in the past week, i have met with our partners in brussels, washington and montreal, including an e3 meeting yesterday evening in paris. i spoke to foreign minister zarif on the 6th of january and the prime minister spoke to president rouhani on the 9th of january. we welcome the overwhelming international support for her majesty‘s ambassador to iran and the rights to which all diplomats are entitled
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to under the vienna convention on diplomatic relations. a volcano in the philippines which has been spewing lava and ash could erupt "within hours or days," according to the authorities there. twenty five thousand people have been moved from their homes across the province of batangas, south of the capital manila. our correspondent howard johnson has this report. volcanic lightning, a spectacular event that confirmed that taal volcano had entered a more dangerous phase. the philippine authorities say the volcano is at alert level four out of a maximum of five, a warning that means a hazardous eruption could occur within hours or days. today, thick black ash billowed out of the volcano as scientists confirmed it had begun to spew lava. close to taal volcano, a steady flow of local residents left a 1a kilometre exclusion zone. translation: when it started
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to drop ash in our area, that‘s when we decided to evacuate. when we were at the boundary, there were numerous shakes. we experienced around 100 tremors. at a petrol station, there were scores of motorcyclists panic buying fuel. elsewhere, people vainly attempted to clear thick ash from their properties. translation: when we went to the volcanic island there were many destroyed houses. it's almost like a desert there because of the thickness of the mud. even my cultivated fish were all killed. elsewhere, manila‘s main international airport reopened today but many flights are subject to cancellations and long delays. taal, the country‘s second most active volcano, last experienced a sustained period of volcanic activity between 1965 and 1977, which saw a major explosion and several lava flows. tonight, families taking refuge in evacuation centres are hoping
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that history won‘t repeat itself and today‘s limited lava flow is as bad as it gets. seeds from the tree which inspired the lincolnshire scientist sir isaac newton, and have travelled millions of miles in space, have today been given new homes. several seeds from the grantham apple tree were taken into space by the british astronaut tim peake and spent six months in microgravity as part of the ‘pips in space‘ programme. they have been grown into young saplings and it‘s hoped the eight trees will inspire a new generation of scientists. a little earlier tim peake gave me some more details about the project. it's it‘s been a fantastic project, it‘s the culmination of something that was started five years ago to take seeds from the apple tree here in this orchard behind me, obviously at the birthplace of sir isaac newton, and the apple tree that inspired him
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to think about the universal laws of motion and gravity. so those seeds we re motion and gravity. so those seeds were flown with me on board the international space station for six months. it was quite a punishing environment for any sort of seed, brought back to earth, nurtured in cold storage, and here we have eight saplings that were presented today to establishments around the uk where these future saplings can hopefully continue to inspire our future generation of engineers and scientists. your mission to space was actually named principia in homage to sir isaac newton?m was actually named principia in homage to sir isaac newton? it was, indeed, it was a very proud moment to be able to name the mission after sir isaac newton‘s works, he is not just one of the uk‘s greatest scientist but one of the greatest scientist but one of the greatest scientist who ever lived, and we owe so much to his work in times of the understanding of the laws of gravity. so it‘s a very proud moment to be involved in this project. what sort of thing is can we learn from these seeds having spent so much
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time in space? interestingly we are doing an awful lot of work about understanding how to grow plants, how to grow vegetables in a space environment, for our future how to grow vegetables in a space environment, for ourfuture missions to the moon and mars, we are focusing on sustainability. we need to be able to grow our own food. we are also looking at how we can improve the techniques back on earth, how we can improve our understanding of crop growth, and so there is an awful lot of research that we can gain from these seeds. there is an awful lot of research that we can gain from these seedslj shared a platform with you in the last few weeks were, at an awards ceremony, you showed basically a home video, your home video is a storm from space, it‘s the most remarkable thing. the audience was in awe of the whole thing. it‘s funny look yet you know, the surroundings could not be more different! —— looking at you now. yes, but for me, isaac newton, what a hero, what an inspiring character. and the environment here is indicative of what we can take forward to hopefully inspire the future generation. what's next for you? next for me is to continue as a
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european space agency astronaut, of course. and my class of 2009 will hopefully get a second mission by 202a. already my two classmates have flown to the international space station. so the next five years in space flight is going to be incredibly interesting, we have a lot happening, so it‘s going to be a great time to be involved in this project. a man has been rescued after spending more than three weeks in the alaskan wilderness with nothing more than a temporary shelter to protect him. tyson steel was spotted by mountain rescue teams after his log cabin burned down. he had built himself a snow cave, and carved an sos sign in the snow. the thirty year old had managed to salvage a few tins of food and a sleeping bag to help him survive the minus 26 degrees celsius nights. his parents had raised the alarm when they hadn‘t heard from him for three weeks. storm brendan has begun to reach uk shores. the met office has issued a yellow
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weather warning of high winds across the west, south—west and north—east of the country until midnight today. the strongest winds are expected around exposed coasts and hills with gusts of 60—70mph likely, and gusts of up to 80mph possible in some places, particularly around the west coast of scotland. all schools in the western isles are closed to pupils. around a,000 homes in northern ireland are without power. there are warnings that there may be some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport, particularly for high—sided vehicles on exposed routes and bridges. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. a spell of stormy weather for all parts of the uk, through this evening and overnight. that swirl the satellite picture there behind me is brendan, that‘s the deep area of pressure that this evening will bring widespread sales and strong winds sweeping across the uk because of —— low pressure. potential in the
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north west of scotland we could see 50 and as for the quiet spots. showers of rain, spots of ice first thing on tuesday possibly for northern ireland as well, south they look clearer, but not for long. an area of low pressure deepening pretty quickly as it pushes and from the south—west through tuesday daytime. again it will kick their winds up with the strongest this timea winds up with the strongest this time a thing for england and wales, a bit ofa time a thing for england and wales, a bit of a breeze for northern england and northern ireland, still windy for the north of scotland, wintry too, but heavy rain to come on tuesday widely across england and wales, turning wintry in the north.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the duke and duchess of sussex are preparing for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss their future role. ahead of that meeting, princes william and harry issued a joint statement denying a newspaper report speculating
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about their relationship. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. the british government says now is the time for iran to engage in diplomacy — it‘s after the foreign office summoned the iranian ambassador. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. there was an important trial getting underway today which is linked to the russian doping scandal — but there‘s been a change to proceedings? we were greatly anticipating this trial, due to start today — former world athletics president lamine diack is accused of taking payments of more than 3million euros to cover up drugs cheats in russian athletics. it was a four year investigation by french authorities. his arrest in 2015 plunged the iaaf
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into a huge scandal. but his trial has been delayed untiljune. these are shots of him leaving court — pretty chaotic scenes — our sports editor dan roan asking him for comment. all he would say was that he was dismayed at having to stay in france untiljune — he‘s been under house arrest since 2015 in the country. this man was one of the most influential figures in world sport — replaced by lord sebastian coe. he‘s 86 years old now, from senegal. he was arrested in 2015 after he stepped down — after those corruption and money—laundering charges linked to the russian doping scandal. diack denies the charges, but if found guilty he could face up to ten years in jail. the reason the trial was delayed was because new documents were submitted to the court with testimony from his son —
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who also faces charges. the lawyers need time to process them. the trial is expected to begin again injune. there were a couple of shocks in the masters snooker yesterday. what‘s been happening today? yes, the three time world champion, mark selby, and ding junhui, the winner of 1a major titles, were both knocked out in the first round yesterday. but it doesn‘t look like former world number one neil robertson will suffer the same fate. he‘s in a strong position against scotland‘s stephen maguire — leading by five frames to three. but maguire did hit one freak shot with the red ball spinning into the pocket. before the white also went in causing much confusion. former liverpool goalkeeper pepe reina is having a medical at villa today ahead of a loan move from ac milan. villa manager dean smith has moved
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to sign the former spanish international after tom heaton was ruled out for the rest of the season with a knee injury. was ruled out for the rest the deal is expected to be completed later today. that win moved city up to second but still 1a points behind leaders liverpool. former city captain vincent kompany says his old club stil have plenty to play for. he won the title with city four times and points out that this season, they still have three other trophies in their sights. this season has so much still to be done. 0k, winning the league is a big, big thing, unbelievable, such a hard achievement. but still in the champions league, still in the fa cup, still in the carling carabao cup. i wouldn't look at this as a season of anything else than opportunity still. rob burrow made his final appearance for leeds rhinos over the weekend — a five—minute cameo in a fundraising match
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for motor neurone disease. the 37—year—old former great britain scrum—half was diagnosed with the incurable condition last year. they are making massive gains in research. i saw a professional professor last week. he was a brilliant for me, making big strides, so one day, hopefully, they will find a cure. whether it is in my time or not. raise awareness, get more people looking into it and hopefully, one day, cure this horrible disease. more details on that story on the website but that is all the sport for now. this year‘s oscar nominations have been announced — and a films lead the way — but one comes out on top
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with 11 nominations. can you guess what it is? joker. joaquin phoenix in joker. joker. todd phillips. joker. todd phillips, bradley cooper, emma tillinger koskoff — producers. well, earlier i spoke to film critic jason solomons. he gave us his take on this year ‘s nominations. jason solomons. he gave us his take on this year 's nominations. this film has no goody, so it isjust about the creation of this manic wild abandon to evil and that is pa rt wild abandon to evil and that is part of what appeals to it. it is about social breakdown set in this 70s, bankrupt new york where the social provisions are falling for this man. he is falling through the cracks of mental health. if you treat someone like this, then you will end up with this bruised, violent person, this uncontrollable person. there is an element to it. i
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have found the film a bit wild in that it didn‘t really know what side it was on. it wanted to have all its violent cakes and eat them and explode them. i am making this up as igo explode them. i am making this up as i go along. ifound it a strange sort of film in that i didn‘t really know where it was going to end up politically and i‘m still not quite sure what it was trying to say. the concerns over lack of diversity with the baftas, we have the same argument here with the nominations. in at one of the acting nominees, 20 acting nominees, one of them is non—white. that is cynthia revo, a fantastic performer. most people do not know she is from london. she has taken the us by storm, she plays harriet tubman, a slave emancipator and she is terrific in it. most people don‘t know she comes from south london, she has had to go to
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america to make it big. last week we had the bafta nominations in which none of the nominees were of any kind at all, they were all right. this has become a problem now and then. three years ago we had the hashtag oscars so white and the academy decided, let‘s take a look at our membership, let‘s change the diversity of our make—up. it is not that any of these nominations are bad, all of these are consummate professionals and have done the top of their game. the question with diversity is our notion of what constitute the best needs to widen. little women has raised eyebrows because florence pugh is nominated, that was a welcome surprise for many. a big surprise. she is fantastic in the film. she plays a bee march, traditionally a problematic role in the novel and previous adaptions. she makes the
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character admiral, level and a fine. here she is a major player and nominated alongside her co—star for that film. many thought this would be the film that greta go would get nominated for but she has been muscled out of that. we spoke to her earlier, florence pugh. just 20 minutes ago i was asleep and then my publicist called me. all the lights are on now and i'm trying to wake up as quickly as possible. you have a very, very busy day ahead. you are nominated for your role in little women at the baftas as well. once you get a bafta nomination, do you anticipate this? does it make you more excited for the oscar period?” don't think it is ever expected. it is completely bizarre. i have never been, got this far in the awards
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season over before so i am making sure i am staying awake and i am taking it all in. but this is a crazy feeling. i never assumed this would happen. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. first in birmingham we have kathryn stanczyszyn from midlands today talking about new transport plans for the city centre. and janine machin is in cambridge with the story of a postman whose heart stopped five times on the way to hospital, we‘ll be catching up with you soon, janine. but first, kathryn. bring us up to date with the plans for the city centre. it is quite radical. birmingham city council has today launched a series of big moves to change its transport
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strategy over the next ten years. the biggest of which is this a plan to ban cars from travelling through the city centre. why? because it says it has to take further action on air pollution. it says air pollution in the city contributes to a 900 early deaths a year. it also says on average a motorist in birmingham sat in congestion for 13a hours last year and it needs to do something about it. it already is in the form of a clean air zone, so high polluting vehicles will have to pay, that is coming later this year. at the council has decided that hasn‘t gone far enough and that is where today‘s launch comes in. it says it basically, if you are starting and ending yourjourney outside of the city centre but you go through the city centre to get there, he would not be able to do that any more. at the moment we have the a38, this main route that goes
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right through the city centre fairly quickly at certain times of the day. the council is talking about turning that into something may be just for public transport or for walkers and cyclists so that if you are driving, you will be pushed on to the ring road you will be pushed on to the ring roa d i nstea d you will be pushed on to the ring road instead and you will be able to get in and out of the city centre, but only from certain points of that ring road. it bans all the through journeys. quite a big change. also they are talking about logistics and service vehicles, those daytime deliveries in the city centre may be being restricted or managed. also bring ina being restricted or managed. also bring in a 20 mph limit or residential roads, so it will affect people here in birmingham. huge changes based on a model in the belgian city of ghent which is considerably smaller but it has been a controversial model there as well. and what‘s been the reaction of those who live and work there? the devil will be in the detail and
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we haven‘t got very much of that as yet. but some people today, critics have been saying they simply won‘t work because public transport isn‘t good enough and they need to get that better before they bring anything in. it is a tail wagging the dog situation. also some say business will be hit hard. one business will be hit hard. one business contacted me today saying they are worried birmingham doesn‘t wa nt they are worried birmingham doesn‘t want them any more, that they are making difficult for their staff and now these measures. we spoke to some people out on the streets of birmingham earlier. i think that it'll be fine, i mean, personally, i'd be more than happy to leave my car at home if there were better transport links. at the moment it just takes so long on the bus and not having the rail link open here, it can be really inconvenient. it's probably the single most stupid decision i've heard of in a long time. if you've got people going through the expressway, you actually save congestion because what is going to happen, it will build up all the way around. i don‘t think it‘s a good idea
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because then the drivers, they‘re going to, it‘s going to take longer where they‘re going to, and that sort of thing. so i don‘t think it‘s a good idea. sounds like a pretty good idea, but whether it will work is another thing. a bit ofa a bit of a mixture of views there but some people are a building birmingham fora but some people are a building birmingham for a bold move. consultation will start later on at the end of this month, so i‘m sure we will hear many more opinions on this but it is a huge story here in the west midlands today and it has been making a lot of national news as well. thank you very much. let‘s go on to janine. you have the story of a postman who died five times technically. incredible. died five times, he had to be shocked ten times, he had to be shocked ten times and despite the fact this happened less than two weeks ago, he is here to tell the tale. today he
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has been to meet the team who saved him. a lot of people get that back to work feeling in january. him. a lot of people get that back to work feeling injanuary. it is also fair to say, forjimmy watson, that feeling turned out to be far more serious. about 6:30 a:m., he started to feel uncomfortable. he said it felt a bit like he needed to burp. he isn‘t one for causing a fuss. he carried on then he started to feel hot and dizzy and at that point, his workmates decided he should call 999. before long he was unconscious, the ambulance crew were there, they shocked him, brought him back but that was the first of ten shocks that he had. if you don‘t know where where speech is, it is in the heart of the cambridgeshire fans, they called for the ambulance team, they were scrambled and over the course of getting jimmy into that helicopter and two hospital, they had to shock him eight times and critically he remembers it all.
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like, two concrete blocks either side of you, and a big loud bang, and i said, "what was that?" and they said, "we've just shocked you." and i thought, this is getting serious now. and then there was one time i did think i had actually died because it took me that long to come round with my brain and that. and then i started hearing voices and i thought, i'm still here. it's unbelievable. and all the while, ijust was trying to just stay with it until they could get me. ididn't want... all these people's time to be wasted, you know. and... they got me here and i am alive, basically. amazing story. the most remarkable thing about it is how he was bouncing back in between each time they started his heart. completely. usually patients going through this are largely unaware of it. they certainly cannot chat to the team with them butjimmy was having these fully coherent conversations with them. he was telling them when it
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was about to happen again and shouting i am back when they revived him. he was fighting to stay alive and he managed it. today, he said he is very much making the most of that second chance. he has quit smoking, drinking less, he is part of a little band are planning a fundraiser. anyone checking my maths, the tenth shock i mentioned happened at the hospital. great story. plenty more at 6:30 p:m.. thank you very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at a30 here on afternoon live.
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now more worrying news for the uk‘s high streets — figures from the retail analysts springboard show the numbers of shoppers fell by 3.5 per cent in december, compared with the same period in 2018. the government plans to spend millions of pounds reviving run—down town centres. but is it time for us to rethink how we use our high streets? panorama‘s adam shaw reports. high streets are under pressure. one in ten stores are closed and in some places it is a lot worse than that. pressure buy online and out—of—town competition many high streets are in crisis. facing huge questions about their future but some are fighting back. stockton—on—tees has a reputation for being ahead of the curve and reduce donating its town centre with the council planning and investing in change. investment in our town centre started with the public realm and the central fountains area. we have created a large outdoor room so we have places to perform, large sporting events.
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it is about creating that footfall so that the more people we have living in town, working in town and coming and experiencing what we have got, they‘re going to use the retail. the town is on the shortlist for a share of a £1 billion part the government has committed to its future high streets fund set up to help towns reinvent their high streets. we are investing in buildings that we can take control of. we recognise retail is a changing market. the truth is high streets have always had to adapt and change, responding to the shifting demands of their communities. here in southsea, portsmouth, they know only too well what it is like to see big stores closing. i am standing between two iconic brands, john lewis and debenhams. thisjohn lewis has already closed and this debenhams is scheduled for closure. in some places they are finding a nswe rs in some places they are finding answers by getting new, multiple
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uses for old department stores. retailers will find it hard to meet the challenge alone but collaboration between shops, planning authorities, local politicians and developers might bring ina politicians and developers might bring in a reimagining of our town centre which could halt or possibly reverse the decline. in a moment, the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the duke and duchess of sussex prepare for a crucial meeting with the queen, prince charles and prince william to discuss their future role. a historic moment for northern ireland — as borisjohnson arrives in stormont to mark the restoration of devolution in northern ireland. five candidates are through to the next round of the labour leadership contest — clive lewis withdrew only an hour before nominations closed. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. management at flybe
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have written to staff, telling them they‘re "determined to do everything" they can to turn the airline around. the regional carrier told the bbc that it "does not comment on rumour or speculation" after sky news reported that it was in danger of collapse. new data out today shows that the slowdown in manufacturing and services sectors depressed economic growth towards the end of last year. the economy shrank by 0.3% in november, a figure worse than expected, but over a three—month period, gdp did still grow. online shoppers have been warned about the risks of buy now, pay later arrangements. the money and pensions service says its helpline expects a call every four minutes from people who have gotten into repayment difficulties, particularly from younger shoppers. the boss of embattled beales department store has been speaking about its troubles. interesting to hear a retail boss speak so candidly at this
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incredibly difficult time. beals has 22 shops and tony brown is fighting to save that chain and the 1000 people who work for it. he told us today that as far as he can see, councils really don‘t care about supporting the high street. and his issueis supporting the high street. and his issue is with council rates, the tax that there is upon commercial units in town centres, because while rents are of course negotiable and lots of retailers are surviving because they can renegotiate their rents with landlords, rates are not. he says in some of his outlets, council rates are three orfour times higher than the rent that they are paying and he says that simply doesn‘t stack up and he is complaining that only one council has so far tried to help him keep his shops open. what happens next? as he puts it they are trying to secure a profitable future for the chain. what that means is they are looking for a buyer for all the
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shops, negotiating rent reductions and considering some store closures, particularly unprofitable stores but he is facing an uphill battle at a time when many people are talking about the death of the department store. let's look at the wider picture. how are the markets ending the day? the ftse ending pretty much where it started. went into negative territory around lunchtime but investors liking the fact that the us- investors liking the fact that the us— china trade deal is you to be signed on wednesday. also the weakening of sterling because growing expectations the bank of england will cut rates. but banking stocks don‘t like the likelihood of a rate cut and that is why you are seeing a fall by lloyds banking group. let‘s bring injeremy stretch from cibc world markets. let‘s talk about flybe. the carrier which was bailed out last year, now possibly
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looking for another bailout. what you think is the likelihood of it getting new investment? it isjust a year after the previous bailout so it does underline the difficulties in the industry. we are undergoing unprecedented economic uncertainty or have done over the last 12 months. if they can be a degree of clarity in that regard, it may provide a window of opportunity. it is not a lost cause but it is going to still be a challenging environment and there may well be some degree of overcapacity in that sector. let's talk about the wider economy. mixed picture today or mixed impression painted by the gdp figures for november. not .3% fall in november but over the three months that preceded it, the economy did not shrink as many had been expecting. we had today from the bank of england, one of their policymakers saying that if things continue as they are, he will be voting for a rate cut. that is
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right. the market is wrapping up expectations of a rate cut next month. gdp being part of that. the manufacturing data is also particularly troubling in november as well. what we have seen a several bank of england membersjoining those two members of the committee who have voted for immediate cuts at the last two meetings but it comes down to the data which is post—election. that will be pivotal here. there is some data out next week which will be significant, that will be forward looking survey data which may well be the final variable which may well be the final variable which will decide whether the bank of england will cut rates as early as january. what have surveys been telling us in terms of if you contrast that time in november, we didn‘t know who would form the next government and what that would mean for brexit. that to a degree has been sewn up although the final trade deal remains unresolved. what
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about that pent up demand that we we re about that pent up demand that we were told was there ready to be unleashed? were told was there ready to be unleashed ? it was were told was there ready to be unleashed? it was a big hallmark of the election campaign. there are issues in regard to the business investment and whether that will pick up because of those trade issues as you mentioned which are still unsettled. the cfo survey for the end of last year suggests there may be some degree of pick—up in business investment and from the consumer side because of the brexit story being parked for a period, that may well have reduced some of the uncertainty which could encourage consumer spending. we have seen an equity market relief rally since the election as well. there are some signs that markets are looking at the data prior to the election and being a little too doom laden at this juncture. election and being a little too doom laden at thisjuncture. today is a start of a new bureau for boeing. it has a new boss in david calhoun but inevitably he is mopping up the mess of his predecessor with the 737 max. he is preparing to unveil some bad
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numbers. how bad you think they might be? his in tray is immense. the 737 issues are ongoing. the inventory overhang is burning $a billion a month and we are likely to see a significant accounting charge may be in the region of $6 billion taken by the company when they announced their results in a couple of weeks‘ time. it makes sense for a new ceo to kitchen sink all of the problems, so it may well be the case that he announces a negative backdrop but in a sense trying to deal with all the bad news now i provide an opportunity for some better times ahead in 2020 once 737 issues start to diminish. thank you. that is it from me. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello.
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stormy times ahead for the uk through this evening and overnight, as storm brendan moves into our shores. widespread gales, severe gales for some, and a spell of heavy rain as well. here is brendan on the satellite picture, this beautifully defined swirl of cloud. the clarity and definition giving you some idea of how well formed, really, this storm is. the winds are our biggest concern as we head through the late afternoon into the evening, gusting up to 60 mph along the south coast, 65—75 generally along western coasts and then for the north west of scotland, those winds could touch up to 90 mph. plenty of rain as well, pushing in from the west of the uk, sweeping its way eastwards quite quickly through the evening, but a challenging rush hour, i think, across the board and even as the rain gradually clears the south—east, the snow showers come piling into scotland. also some for the mountains of northern ireland and there is a risk of ice here first thing on tuesday, too, as the
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temperatures fall below zero. to the south, a milder night, lows of six and seven degrees. and then, for tuesday, we are staring in the face of another rapidly deepening area of low pressure. not quite as deep as the one affecting us today, and england and wales the areas that come into focus with the strongest of the winds. again, widely, 50—60 mph gusts, particularly around some of our southern and western coasts. a windy day right the way across england and wales, and widespread rain, too. in comparison, a little quieter for northern england and northern ireland, but still strong winds affecting the far north of scotland and it could turn quite wintry as well, as the rain bumps in the cold air further north across the higher ground of the pennines and for parts of the highlands of scotland. chilly for scotland tomorrow, very mild to the south of our weather system. that snakes right the way across the uk overnight tuesday into wednesday, except where it stalls across the south—east of england. that‘s our big question in the weather really for wednesday. how quickly will this rain clear? it could be 30—a0 millimetres in it before it pulls off
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into the continent through wednesday daytime, then we should see increasingly widespread sunshine but definitely a chillier feel to proceedings with temperatures widely in single figures. plenty of showers for the north west. so there goes your week ahead, a very unsettled week to come, look out for strong winds and heavy rain.
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