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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 16, 2020 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. "the moment of crisis has come" — david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures are the second highest on record. this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. and what is more, we know how to do it. that's the paradoxical thing, that we're refusing to take steps that we know have to be taken. prince harry will make his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be stepping back from their roles as senior royals. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest
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they've been in a decade. the nhs demands gambling companies take urgent action to tackle addiction and its impact on mental health. an aide to donald trump's lawyer claims the president "knew exactly what was going on" when ukraine was pressured to investigate his democratic rival. tv cameras are to be allowed to film in crown courts in england and wales for the first time. and in sport...the third test between england and south africa is under way with england making a solid start — they're 70—1 in port elizabeth. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the naturalist and broadcaster
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sir david attenborough has given a new warning about climate change, telling the bbc, "the moment of crisis has come." in an exclusive interview to mark the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, sir david called on governments to do more to tackle the threat before it's too late. here's our science editor, david shuckman. the moment of crisis has come. we can no longer prevaricate. as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? because the temperatures of the earth are increasing. that is a major international catastrophe. and to say, oh, it's nothing to do with the climate, is palpably nonsense. and who has been affecting the climate? we have. we know that perfectly well. so that we have to realise that this is not playing games.
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this is notjust having nice little debates and arguments and coming away with a compromise. this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. and what is more, we know how to do it. that is the paradoxical thing. we are refusing to take steps that we know have to be taken and, every year that passes makes those steps more difficult to achieve. what is your take on the degree of urgency that needs to be felt now? we have to change and we have to change not by appeals to different kinds of optimism, but to deliberate, compelling, life—or—death decisions. and so where on a bigger scale to these decisions needed to come next? answer — china. china is the most populous country in the world and it is also having problems. it is also having problems
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with its climate. if the chinese come and say not because we are worried about the world, but for our own reasons we are going to take major steps to curb... our carbon output because our climate is changing. we are going to do it. that would be the big change that would happen. from your observations and travels, what is your sense about whether people understand the importance to their own lives of the functioning of the natural world? the natural world is not just an inanimate object from which you can plunder riches and plunder food and whatever you require. we actually depend upon the natural world for every breath of air we take and every mouthful of food that we eat. that may sound extreme, but if you have the basic understanding of the way the world works, the natural world, you know that we breathe oxygen and that oxygen isn't renewed automatically, it comes from plants.
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and if you wreck the oceans and knock down the forests, you reduce the amount of oxygen there is in the atmosphere for us to breathe. we depend upon the oceans more and more. as the human population increases, we cannot afford to eat in the way that we have. because we can't grow enough to do that. if we're going to exploit the earth in the way we need to do in order to get food, the way to do that is to produce vegetable food. the steps that have taken place in this country in the past decade have been extraordinary. many people would never have predicted them. there has been a huge change in public opinion. people can see the problem, particularly young people can see the problem. that must force governments to take action. the nations of the world, particularly young people in the nations of the world, can see the writing on the wall more
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clearly than perhaps older people, who are set in their ways and set in their opinions and do not want to shift and for whom it is easier to say, "don't worry about that." "it'll happen." that no longer holds. young people realise that is not the case. there are serious problems facing us unless we change our ways. and, for that, we must thank the younger generation that is coming along, because my generation has made a mess of it. david attenborough there. the bbc news channel will be in glasgow tomorrow, focussing on climate change. we want to put your questions on this complex issue to our experts. you can do so on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. please remember to leave your name
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and where you are from. prince harry will shortly make his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they will be stepping back from their roles as senior royals. the duke of sussex will conduct the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup and, in his role as patron of the sport, will launch a new mental fitness charter to run alongside the competition. jon donnison has more. prince harry, seen here at the challenge cup final last summer, is patron of the rugby football league. today his first public appearance since he and his wife announced they want to step back from their roles as senior royals will be to host the draws for the rugby league world cup, to be held in england in 2021. rugby league isn'tjust a sport, it's a community. in the run—up to the tournament, harry is launching a charter to look at mental health within the sport. something like a mentalfitness
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charter will help us make real progress in getting rid of the stigma associated with mental illness, and remind people that it is not just about being physically fit, but, more importantly, mentally strong. so prince harry is not stepping back from a public role just yet. he also appeared in an invictus games video, released last night. in 2022 the invicta schemes will travel to a new country... but how much of this kind of thing the sussexes will be doing in the future remains unclear. meghan is now in canada, where she was photographed at a local women's centre. it might provide some respite from the headlines at home, and questions over whether the duchess's father might testify against her in her lawsuit against the mail on sunday. prince harry is expected to join his wife in canada next week. jon donnison, bbc news. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is outside
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buckingham palace for us. this is prince harry's first public appearance since he and his wife announced they would be stepping back from their royal duties. in your view could it be his last public appearance, at least for a while? possibly, at least for a while. he has some private meetings next week but there is nothing else in the royal diaries or public engagements yet. today harry is patron of the rugby football league and has been since 2016. it is one of the things senior working royals do. he is patron and that is why he's carrying out the draw which will happen at around midday. around about now he will be going into the gardens of buckingham palace and watching some local schoolchildren who are giving a rugby
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demonstration, and meeting representatives from the 21 nations which will be taking part in the world cup, which is due to take place in english cities, across a number of english cities, in 2021. this doesn't feel like a normal week, even though this would normally be a fairly standard engagement for him because it has been the end of the mulch was weak for the royal family. first been the end of the mulch was weak for the royalfamily. first of been the end of the mulch was weak for the royal family. first of all their announcement last wednesday that they were planning to step back as full—time and senior working royals, whatever that means. then there was a summit in sandringham on monday, the queen afterwards releasing a personal statement saying it would have been her preference for them not to want to step back but she understood the reasons that was happening and wants progress to be made in days as to how that will happen. yesterday meghan markle's father, thomas, the possibility he could travel to testify against his daughter in the ongoing privacy case against the
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mail on sunday, so it has been a very much abnormal week in the royal household. meghan we know flew back to canada last week. it was thought that perhaps harry might fly back today to rejoin her and his son archie, who he hasn't seen for the best pa rt archie, who he hasn't seen for the best part of a couple of weeks, but we now know he has some private meetings in the diary for next week, but no more public engagements as far as we but no more public engagements as faras we are but no more public engagements as far as we are aware. so yes, there is the possibility when we see the pictures from today's engagement that this could be the last for some time. in the background, questions to be asked as to whether he will remain patron of organisations like this, and if he does, how will that work if he's spending a significant amount of time in canada, north america, and some time here? so many questions to be answered around that one. sarah, this is not the first time that he has been highlighting issues around mental health, is it?
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indeed, so you are talking about the mental health charter. the world cup are talking about the fact this is the first time something like a mental health charter has been launched and what this will mean is that they say by the very last game they want every official, every team player to have been basically considering their mental fitness throughout the tournament because it is the idea that as well as health and physical fitness, mental fitness is just as important. and physical fitness, mental fitness isjust as important. this is something the organisation has been doing for years now. they have been making mental health workshops available for some 8000 players and theirfamilies across available for some 8000 players and their families across the country, so it is a big issue for them. as we know, the heads together campaign which was launched by harry, william and meghan came on board, and that
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was a huge issue for all of them, but particularly harry who has been very open when talking about his own struggles with mental health and changing the nation's conversation... i don't think that is an overstatement, changing the nation's conversation on mental health, drawing on his experience. sarah cambell outside buckingham palace, thank you very much. the number of people cautioned or convicted for carrying knives in england and wales has reached record levels. in the 12 months to the end of september last year, 14,135 offences of knife possession were dealt with by police at the courts. that's the highest number since the figures were first compiled in 2009. overall, the number of knife and other weapons possession offences hit 22,286. our home affairs correspondent danny shawjoins me now. tell us a little bit more about
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these figures and why they are so high. these figures are for england and wales and they apply to people who are caught in possession of an offensive weapon or a knife, so this does not include cases where someone is attacked with a knife for insta nce is attacked with a knife for instance or is attacked with a knife for instance 01’ cases is attacked with a knife for instance or cases of murder involving knives. so it is possession offences and these are people who are dealt with by police and the courts for these offences. in fact the offences have been compiled in this way since 2007 and they show that knife possession is atan they show that knife possession is at an all—time high, 14,135 cases in the year to september as you say. when you add in other types of weapons as well, it is the highest figure for about a decade. more of these people are going to prison. 38% were sent to prison immediately with an average prison term ofjust over eight months. that has been on the increase but what is concerning the increase but what is concerning the government is an increasing
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proportion are repeat offenders, people who have been caught before carrying a knife or a weapon. approaching one third had already been cautioned or convicted before. are there any positives? it sounds really bad. the figures are a concern but what they may reflect, as well as the fact that more people are carrying weapons, is increased police activity on the streets by greater use of police stop and search powers. we know that the police have stepped up their use of stop and search in a number of cities so it could be that the police are simply catching more people than they were before. from that point of view there is perhaps a positive to be drawn, but the figures going up is not something i think many people would take much comfort from. am i right there is also a downward trend in crimes being solved? also a downward trend in crimes being solved ? if also a downward trend in crimes being solved? if so, how much of a concern is that? in separate figures we have seen, the next set of figures coming out next week, they
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have shown a reducing proportion of crimes, particularly robberies and fences with knives, are being detected by police and leading to people being charged and convicted, and that is a real concern. what we are looking for is to whether or not these figures, which tend to suggest there is greater police activity, will lead to an increase in the number of cases solved. we have had a government response from the ministry ofjustice, they say they are determined to turn the tide in violent crime, pointing out 20,000 more police officers have been recruited and there will be increased powers to stop and search repeat offenders. danny, thanks for that. danny shaw. the headlines on bbc news... david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now. we are going to go straight to buckingham palace, sorry to interrupt the headlines, to see pictures of prince harry there. as
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we know, this is his first public appearance since he and his wife announced that they were stepping back from their public duties. he will be conducting the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup, and in his role as patron of the sport will launch a mental fitness charter to run alongside the competition. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell canjoin us. royal correspondent sarah campbell can join us. this royal correspondent sarah campbell canjoin us. this is the royal correspondent sarah campbell can join us. this is the first time that prince harry has been seen conducting a public duty since the events of last week, isn't it? yes, indeed. it was last wednesday that the couple meghan and harry released that statement, about 6:30pm last wednesday saying they wished to step
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back from royal duties. they wanted to become financially back from royal duties. they wanted to become financiéég back from royal duties. they wanted to become financiafig of . back from royal duties. they wanted to become financiafig of their and spend at least some of their time in north america. the pictures we are looking at, to give you some context, that is the back garden of buckingham palace. you can see the little mini rugby pitch has been set up little mini rugby pitch has been set up and those are children from a local school giving a rugby demonstration. this is because in about an hour prince harry, as the patron of the rugby football league, will conduct the draw for the world cup which is due to take place in 2021. this will for the first time bring together men's, women's and wheelchair rugby. it will be staged at the same event, that is a first. they have also announced that they are launching a mental fitness charter. this is interesting, obviously we have spoken about harry's personal interest in mental health and wellbeing, so he has
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helped to launch that. basically the mental fitness charter will run alongside the tournament, and the organisation says this is a commitment that by the final game of the tournament every player, team official, match official, team—mate and volunteer will have been trained to look after their own mental fitness and of those around them. prince harry has been very much involved with the launch of that charter as well, as well as the draw that will take place. he is meeting officials, those involved with the rugby league world cup. will he pick up rugby league world cup. will he pick upa rugby rugby league world cup. will he pick up a rugby ball and give a demonstration himself? we don't know. he has been patron of the organisation since 2016 and took over the patronage from his grandmother, the queen, who held the patronage for 64 years. as we look at those pictures, it is hard not to, at the back of your mind, be thinking that this is what harry
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does very well, particularly if he sta rts does very well, particularly if he starts interacting with the children, but will this be one of the last times certainly for the foreseeable future that we see him ata foreseeable future that we see him at a royal engagement like this? because harry and meghan have made clear their intention that they would like to step back from this. this is the bread and butter if you like of being a senior working royal, is shining a spotlight on causes, on organisations that you have an interest in or you are patron of, in this case as i say he is the patron of the rugby football league. as we look at these pictures, these are the questions we should be asking. is this one of the last times we will see him at such an event? will he be able to remain patron of organisations like this in what harry and meghan have described in their progressive new role. if he wishes to remain patron of an organisation such as this, how
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exactly will that work? because we know, and the queen has given permission for them to spend at least some of their time in canada. so all of these questions to be a nswered so all of these questions to be answered as we look at those pictures. significant in that it is the first time we have seen him since the announcement was made last wednesday, potentially the last time we will see him at a royal engagement for some time. in terms of his travel plans, we know that meghan flew back to canada last thursday, the day after that announcement was made. a couple of pictures have been posted of her visiting a couple of women's charities in vancouver, that was on tuesday, so we know that she has been out and about. harry we know has some private meetings in his diary for the early part of next week, so we know that he will certainly be in the uk for the next few days. after that we just don't know. rumbling along in the
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background, those talks as to how exactly their future role will pan out. so many issues to talk about. security costs, tax implications, where they will live, how long they will live in each country. lots of detail to be worked out and that is what courtiers are doing very much behind closed doors. what we do know is the queen would like some sort of resolution as quickly as possible. she has made that very clear. as you are talking, i know that you, alongside everyone at home, we are watching these pictures of prince harry in the palace gardens as you say. he was welcomed by the rugby league world cup chief executive officerjohn dutton and its nonexecutive director stuart kane. those are the gentle men you can see him chatting to. sarah, are we likely to hear him speak at all, do
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you think? i would expect that he would say something, not least because he will be making the draw. i would imagine he would be saying something. i wouldn't imagine he will be saying anything in relation to the events of the last week because that is not what this engagement is about. and it is very much the focus today he will want to be, whether the media like it or not, he will want the focus to be on the rugby football league and what he is here to do, which is to shine a light on the 2021 world cup. also of course this mental fitness charter. but no doubt in his mind as well as our mind is the thoughts that he is looking for a different future. he's not looking to do this kind of public engagement in the future. they talked about in their statement last wednesday trying to achieve some sort of financial independence, stepping back as being working royals. so we await the
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detail as to exactly what that means. we cannot but he has always had a very natural ability to talk to children. it will be interesting to children. it will be interesting to know what he is saying and what questions they are asking him. but you know, as we watch this it is one of those things. how many more times are we going to be able to see harry doing something like this? sarah, i know you have been keeping a close eye on what has been happening in the last week and we know from that very personal statement that the queen issued that she was hoping these matters would be resolved and some sort of pathway for the future of the duke and duchess of sussex could be agreed. i know the palace are not ones for giving regular updates on how the negotiations and discussions are going, but do you have any sense of when those
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discussions might be concluded? i think the best sense we can take was that the queen has made it clear that the queen has made it clear that she wants a resolution quickly. she wants a way forward found quickly. i think we can all agree that the last seven days the headlines have been very damaging for the royal family. when headlines have been very damaging for the royalfamily. when that initial statement was posted by harry and meghan, which hasn't been run past the senior members of the royalfamily, it run past the senior members of the royal family, it was run past the senior members of the royalfamily, it was made clear run past the senior members of the royal family, it was made clear that there was hurt and disappointment within buckingham palace that that statement had been made. very quickly the optics changed to looking to see how this can be accommodated. the queen made it clear that she wanted this to happen quickly, and hence the summit which was called on monday at sandringham, so that was prince charles, the queen, prince williams and prince harry ina
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queen, prince williams and prince harry in a room in sandringham discussing the way forward. that meeting we understand lasted less than two hours. in the late afternoon the queen issued that statement, which as you say the key phrase in it was her saying that she would have preferred them to have remained as full—time working royals but she also in the statement said that she had understood their wish to live a more independent life. as i say, behind the scenes, since then, courtiers with probably advice from governments and speaking to as many people as they need to speak to, because there are many complex issues to do with their working arrangements, tax arrangements, to do with public money. they have made it clear and the queen has made it clear they will no longer take public taxpayer money from the sovereign grant so these issues are to be ironed out and that is what is
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going on behind—the—scenes. to be ironed out and that is what is going on behind-the-scenes. as we we re going on behind-the-scenes. as we were watching, the duke of sussex has gone back inside now, presumably in preparation for the draw for the rugby league world cup. for now, thank you so much. the us house of representatives has passed a resolution to submit articles of impeachment against president donald trump to the senate for a trial. the resolution passed largely along party lines by 228 votes to 193. house speaker nancy pelosi signed copies of the articles alongside the team of democratic lawmakers, who will prosecute the case against mrtrump. in a separate development, an associate of rudy guiliani — mr trump's personal lawyer — has accused the president of lying about what he knew of his administration's dealings with ukraine. in a tv interview, lev parnas said mr trump knew that military aid would be withheld from ukraine unless it investigated joe biden,
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a potential rival in this year's presidential campaign. mr parnas, who is facing separate criminal charges, said mr giuliani was never investigating corruption in ukraine. instead, the intention was to damage mr biden. the president denies the allegations. here's what mr parnas told rachel maddow on msnbc when asked what the main innacuracy was coming out of the white house. that the president knew exactly what was going on. he was aware of all of my movements. i wouldn't do anything without consulting rudy giuliani or the president. i have no reason to speak to these officials and they have no reason to speak to me. why would all of these people meet with
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me? naomi ruchim is a correspondent for cbs and joins us now from new york. how serious are these new claims? these accusations are about the president and his involvement with ukraine. lev parnas, an associate of rudy giuliani, said president trump knew about the effort to pressure ukraine to investigate the bidens. he said us aid was held as they demanded action. rudy giuliani denies that. lev parnas claims eve ryo ne denies that. lev parnas claims everyone was in the loop including vice president mike pence. the justice department is calling the allegation 100% false, but this is crucial because some lawmakers now hope this and other unheard testimony will be included in the president's trial. what happens next? today will be another day of
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funfairand next? today will be another day of fun fair and formalities. chief justice will come from the supreme court of the senate so he can swear in the senators. they will take an oath, sign an oath book, it won't be a —— able to talk or use their cell phones. prosecutors will again walk to the senate to formally present the articles of impeachment. all of those democrats have backgrounds in law but one of their toughest feeds will be convincing at least four republicans in the trial, and afterwards arguments are set to begin on tuesday. naomi, good to talk to you. time now for a look at the weather with simon king. thank you very much indeed, rebecca. the prospects for the weekend are looking good, there are prospects for some sunshine over the weekend,
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but before we get there, more rain and wind to come. it is already moving in across wales and northern ireland. there could be 60 mph gusts around the coast of england giving us around the coast of england giving usa around the coast of england giving us a bit of disruption. the rain moves further east but it won't reach the far east of england until much later in the afternoon. maximum temperatures today 8—13dc. that area of low pressure will move away to the north and will be followed tonight and into tomorrow by this weather front here. across western areas, the showers will move away to the east during this afternoon with sunshine in between. a chilly day tomorrow, temperature 7—10, but as i mentioned for the weekend, it is looking dry and sunny.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live with me, rebecca jones. the headlines: prince harry has made his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be "stepping back" from their roles as senior royals. "the moment of crisis has come" — david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been in a decade. the nhs demands gambling companies take urgent action to tackle addiction and its impact on mental health.
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an aide to donald trump's lawyer claims the president "knew exactly what was going on" when ukraine was pressured to investigate his democratic rival. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. england have been made to work a bit harder after a very good start to the third test against south africa in port elizabeth. joe root won the toss and chose to bat, with the openers dom sibley and zak crawley putting together a 70—run partnership before sibley was dismissed by kagiso rabada on 36. england are currently 84—1. jofra archer's not fit enough to play as he's still recovering from an elbow problem. mark wood has replaced james anderson. british tennis player liam broady has described an email sent to players about air quality at the australian open as a "slap in the face".
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in a post on twitter, broady says it "boils his blood" to think he was made to play a qualifying match on tuesday. he goes on to question whether conditons were healthy at a time when people were being warned to keep animals indoors. manchester united's1—0 win over wolves in the fa cup was marred by an injury to marcus rashford. juan mata's goal was all that separated the teams and enough to secure a trip to watford or tranmere in round four. but with a visit to liverpool coming up on sunday in the league, united fans would have been concerned to see rashford only last 16 minutes as a substitute before going off with a back injury. united manager 0le gunnar solskajer admits the decision to bring on rashford turned out to be a mistake. yeah, that backfired but you've got to go for them once in a while and it seems like he's got a knock there and he couldn't run, so let's test him the next couple of days. hopefully ok for sunday, i don't know.
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a ban on children heading footballs could come into force in just a few weeks in scotland because of fears of a link between head injuries and dementia. the scottish fa could announce the ban on under—12s heading the ball soon, after it highlighted a report that said former players are more at risk of dying from the disease. 0ur sports correspondent chris mclaughlin has more. commentator: as usual, billy mcneill will be up for this. there's mcneill, it's a goal! billy mcneill scoring for celtic in 1969 typically with a header. commentator: brilliantly taken by mcneill. the club's former captain and manager died last year after suffering from dementia. this just months before a study revealed former players are 3.5 times more likely to die of the disease. they've been discussing the issue here at the national stadium for months, and although there's no firm evidence linking heading a ball to dementia,
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the scottish fa are taking no chances and children under the age of 12 will be banned from heading in training. we need to take some sensible, pragmatic steps at the moment and that's largely going to be to try to reduce the overall burden, the overall number of times that young players head, and heading in training is much more common than in matches. kyle mcculloch does one—to—one youth coaching. he's also coached in the us, where a ban on children heading the ball has been in place since 2015. they see players like ronaldo on tv scoring wonderful goals with his head. i think that might be the problem here — how we try and un—coach them. there has been some serious situations where players have lost their lives, ex—legends and players have gone on to get dementia and things like this. so i'm glad the sfa are leading the rest of football and doing something like this, because it's very, very important. chris mclaughlin, bbc news.
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that's all the sport for now. just a reminder you can follow the live draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup on the bbc sport website and app from 1145. back to you, rebecca. thank you. let's return to that potential ban on children heading footballs, which could come into force injust a few weeks in scotland because of fears of a link between head injuries and dementia. joining me now in the studio is peter mccabe, the chief executive of headway, the brain injury association. thank you for coming in to talk to us. good morning. is this ban a good idea in your view? i think it is a practical common—sense approach to this particular issue, and it does make sense for this suggested move.
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because we don't know for certain thatis because we don't know for certain that is what the scottish fa are going to do, but if that is what they are about to do, then we think it's a good plan. what it is as we understand it is it would be stopping hitting balls in training. it's not saying you don't head balls ina it's not saying you don't head balls in a match. so in your view, potentially, should it go further? we've been calling for more research on this issue for many years, and when you think about all the money that there is swilling around in football you would have thought that they would have done more about this to establish for certain what the fa cts to establish for certain what the facts a re to establish for certain what the facts are and give people clear guidance. the research that was done by the university of glasgow a few weeks ago has clearly established a link, but you can't be certain of the cause of the neurodegenerative diseases, and so for that reason, the scottish fa i think i've made a sensible choice, banning repeated
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heading in training, but still allowing heading in matches. picking up allowing heading in matches. picking up on what you're saying, where do you think the responsibility lies for improving safety in terms of head injury and the longer term effects that they might cause?” think it clearly lies with the football authorities. this is a workplace injury that may be occurring. but they also have a responsibility to younger people, and they are taking that seriously. we think there does need to be further research is done, and one of the big questions i think parents will be left with, the speculation is that the cut—off age will be 12 yea rs, is that the cut—off age will be 12 years, so who's to say that at 13 it's safe, whereas at 12 it's not, and what's the scientific basis for that? but the most important thing going forward is that they use some of the money that football generates to protect players and to protect youngsters who are playing for them.
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there are huge benefits to playing football, i enjoyed those benefits asa football, i enjoyed those benefits as a young lad, and i remember heading the old leather footballs that were very, very hard, particularly when they were wet. we don't know quite what the impact of the modern lightweight balls are, and it is important that we establish that so that parents are sure and have clear guidance. you are quite rightly looking forward, but you touch on looking back in a way, and i suppose as you say the game is changing in terms of the weight and what the footballs are made of, but what about current and perhaps older players? how worried you think they should be? well, jeff astle from england, west bromwich and england forward, died at the age of 59, and his brain when it was examined was found to be like that ofa examined was found to be like that of a much older man, really damaged. and it said on his death certificate that that was one of the causes of his death. and so i think there are
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issues concerning former footballers, and more and more footballers, and more and more footballers are speaking out about this now. john hartson has this morning said that he thinks this is a very sensible practical step. we agree with him. and i think there is potential down the line for some litigation as there has been in the nfl in the united states. we shall see. peter mccabe from headway, thank you. the head of nhs mental health services in england has demanded urgent action from the gambling industry to reduce the number of people becoming addicted. claire murdoch says incentives such as free bets and tickets should be banned — to stop what she calls the "vicious gambling cycle". this industry, which invests more than £1.4 billion a year in advertising alone, which helps it to generate £14 billion in profits, invest in other things in aggressive
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advertising, the use of social media. when you have problem gamblers who are trying to stop gambling, it becomes really difficult for them to get away from it, so there are things like free bets. i'm calling upon the industry for example to stop taking bets by credit cards, which allow people to build up debt. i want them to stop targeting loss—making customers who i'm told i called vips, which if thatis i'm told i called vips, which if that is true is cynical beyond belief. they target customers by offering them hospitality, inviting them to events, sending them free bets. and of course we saw last week, incredibly poor practice around having to bet to view, if you area around having to bet to view, if you are a punter who wants to see your tea m are a punter who wants to see your team play, you had to open an account or place a bet to what your heroes play. that is the head of nhs mental health services in england, claire murdoch. the industry says it is
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determined to make gambling safer. earlier i spoke to alex macey, a former police officer whose gambling addiction cost him £250,000. he told me about his experience. most of my adult life was spent in gambling addiction and harm, and it was a mask, and escapism for underlying issues that existed in my life, probably depression that was undiagnosed and anxiety. so i think it is important that we have got this message from the nhs, because this message from the nhs, because this sort of gambling is inherently linked to mental illnesses, and a lot of people have extreme mental illnesses, far more extreme than i have suffered, so by default it should really be considered as a mental health condition that is linked to disordered gambling. and
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was it to your experience of being targeted in some of the ways that claire murdochjust targeted in some of the ways that claire murdoch just described? did that sound familiar to you? absolutely. i have looked back at my own gambling history and i can see there is literally a bombardment of adverts and text messages that you just can't escape even when you are trying your best to come out of that spiral. you know, for others, other people have spent a massive, massive amounts more than i have, which not only resulted in massive hardship for them, but it has also resulted in crime, and if you are getting people who are committing crime to fund their gambling, people who are committing crime to fund theirgambling, and people who are committing crime to fund their gambling, and there are no checks being made, no basic money—laundering checks being made, people are ending up in prison for this. i'm scratching my head to wonder, where is the accountability on the companies involved? 0f wonder, where is the accountability on the companies involved? of people are going to prison, fair enough, they are holding their hands up, i did wrong. but that sort of money
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stays on the books of the gambling companies, and this is something that i'm really wanting to look into. alex, the betting and gambling council as you know have said it ta kes council as you know have said it takes its responsibility to customers incredibly seriously. what do you want them to do?” customers incredibly seriously. what do you want them to do? i think i wa nt do you want them to do? i think i want them to look at the basics, really. u nfortu nately want them to look at the basics, really. unfortunately the gambling commission don't seem to have been very proactive in sorting this mess out, so we are asking the gambling companies to look at the measures such as vip exploitation. keep vip for people who are happy to lose their money and can recover next day. things like reverse withdrawals i think by default encourage people to spend more than they should do. so let's look at the basics, and i know that there is a debate around
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if we tackle the industry to hard, then we may see unregulated companies coming in. so we have to really tackle the unregulated market as well, make sure they are blocked off from coming to this country also. i suppose at the end of the day these companies want to make money, don't they? how confident are you that they will make the kind of changes that you want to see without it being necessary actually for it to be properly regulated and legislated? i think we have come to a tipping point now where there is so much attention on this issue. so they have to come on board, they know that. and i will happily work with them, and so will others, to try and achieve these basic aims. 0therwise try and achieve these basic aims. otherwise of course we are going to have this hard regulation. because, look, the exploitation has got to end. so let's hope that the right things can be done and we can all
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work together and achieve in those common aims. alex macy talking to us a little earlier. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. prince harry has made his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be "stepping back" from their roles as senior royals. david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been in a decade. hello. i'm ben bland with the business news. the uk housing market got a boost after the general election, according to a regular monthly survey. the royal institution of chartered surveyors said its members saw increased interest from new buyers in december. but there were some quite stark differences across the country. more in a moment. a supermarket in leeds is opening
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a section where shoppers can bring their own containers to fill with food. customers at the asda store will be able to use refill stations for own brand rice and pasta as well as kellogg's cereals and pg tips tea. it's the latest major grocer to launch a scheme to cut down on plastic packaging. asda uses around 65,000 tonnes of plastic a year. british retailers have reported mixed results for the critical christmas period. major supermarkets suffered their slowest festive season in years. shoppers cut back on spending late last year, amid uncertainty about brexit and last month's election. primark owner associated british foods says sales rose as a result of it opening new high street stores. and halfords said it sold a record number of children's bikes the week before christmas. let's start with the uk housing market. activity in the uk housing market seems to have picked up
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after the general election — and the greater certainty the result has provided. the regular survey by the royal institution of chartered surveyors found that in december the number of house sales rose for the first time in seven months. growing interest from new buyers — especially in wales and north east england — is helping to push up prices. but the report found a fall in sales in northern ireland and scotland. simon rubinsohn is the chief economist at the royal institution of chartered surveyors. more activity, rising prices — it's good for sellers, but not great for buyers? no, absolutely. ithink no, absolutely. i think that the most encouraging aspect of this survey, and if we look at the detail and the real key metrics from it, it's the expectations which are stronger than the current indicators, so they're telling us there is some improvement going on, but it is really the forward—looking
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guides, the three month in 12 months indicators which are strongest. but the point i would make is that there are some encouraging trends coming through on the activity side. the nub of the issue is whether there is going to be the stock for people to buy, and that was a problem through last year and in fact the year before that, there hasn't been enough stock on the market, and when you see this pick—up in demand and you see this pick—up in demand and you notice in your introduction that enquiries have indeed edged up through december and will probally continue to edge up through the early pa rt continue to edge up through the early part of the, if there isn't a stop then you get the squeeze on prices, and that really wouldn't be good news, certainly in those parts of the country where affordability is really quite constrained. so how do we know if it is just a short—term bounce of euphoria after a general election that has given a degree of certainty and clarity, or actually a longer term trend? there
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are two things. first of all i reinforce my earlier comment that the expectation is certainly responding positively, so that is encouraging and can create a positive narrative for the market. but you are right, understanding whether this is going to be sustained will depend on a couple of big issues, and in particular whether there is enough stock out there to buy, so that is going to be pa rt there to buy, so that is going to be part of it. but also whether the confidence of buyers can be sustained. and that will depend on a range of issues including what the government chooses to do about stamp duty, for example, a discussion as the budget approaches, how the interest rate environment plays out... we are pushed for time and i wa nt to out... we are pushed for time and i want to get to one of the point. just briefly, why is there such a regional variation in what we are seeing in house sales?” regional variation in what we are seeing in house sales? i think this is an ongoing story, and it was a story from last year. a lot of the high price regions, london, the
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south—east, east anglia, were under the cosh. we are seeing more recovery there and although there is some slight pull—back, you mention, scotland, northern ireland, that was from what was pretty robust trends in those markets. 0k, thank you very much indeed. thank you. here's a look at some other stories we're folling today. nestle has said it will invest more than £1.5 billion to stop using plastics that are difficult to recycle. the food and drinks company behind kitkat and nespresso says it plans to use recycled plastics that are good enough to use for food, to try to make all of its packaging reusable by 2025. free bets and other incentives should be banned to make gambling safer — that's the suggestion in a letter to betting firms. the head of mental health services in england has written to five major gambling companies, demanding urgent action on tackling gambling addiction and its impact on people's health.
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this is one for you to dream about perhaps. the second biggest diamond ever found is reportedly being polished up and sold to louis vuitton. the french luxury fashion house, known for its leather handbags, will own the rock — that was found in a bostwana mine last year. it's 1,758 carat — and is roughly the size of a tennis ball. we don't know the price it'll fetch — but a diamond almost as big eventually sold for $53 million. so perhaps start saving now! let's have a quick look at the markets. the ftse 100 is down. it's feeling some downward pressure from pearson — the education publisher — and whitbread, which owns premier inn. that's after they posted disappointing trading updates. meanwhile, generally, investors are a bit cautious — as some elements of the trade deal between the us and china were unclear. still, shares in oilfirms and mining companies gave some suppor to the market — limiting the overall losses. that's all the business news.
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i will have more for you throughout the day, rebecca. ben, thank you. for the first time, tv cameras are to be allowed to film in crown courts in england and wales. it means that sentencing remarks in serious high profile cases can be seen on tv and online. 0ur legal correspondent clive coleman reports. this is a moment of history. this is the first time that we've been allowed to broadcast television pictures from court number one at the old bailey, the most famous criminal court in the world. it's here that people like the kray twins, ruth ellis, the last woman to be hanged in britain, the wartime traitor lord for war and the yorkshire ripper peter sutcliffe we re yorkshire ripper peter sutcliffe were tried and sentenced. but the only members of the public who got to see it were the few people sitting up there in the public gallery. new laws will allow
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television cameras to film judges' sentencing remarks in murder, terrorism and other serious high—profile cases. it is a radical extension to the operation of open justice that has been welcomed by the judiciary. there are two reasons, i think. the judiciary. there are two reasons, ithink. the the judiciary. there are two reasons, i think. the first is that it is important that the justice system, what happens in our courts, is as transparent as possible and disc consistent with the interest of justice, and the second is that it aids public of understanding of what the courts are doing. the new measures will apply to crown courts in england and wales. filming in scottish courts has been allowed since 1992, subject to strict conditions. avriljones, you may stay seated. you were convicted after trial of the murder of margaret fleming... so is there an unequivocal welcome for filming judges so is there an unequivocal welcome forfilming judges passing so is there an unequivocal welcome for filming judges passing sentence? if the public see their face in the living room and are able to identify
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them more readily, then u nfortu nately they‘ re them more readily, then unfortunately they're more likely we think to be personally attacked and possibly details published about them which shouldn't be. the change in the law doesn't mean that television and online audiences will experience the full drama and turbulence of a criminal trial. like that in america's 1995 trial of oj simpson for the murder of his ex—wife nicole and herfriend ron goldman. week, thejury, in the above action find the defendant not guilty... victims, witnesses, lawyers, jurors, none of those will be seen. it does mean that for the first time, millions of viewers will get to see and hear the sentencing remarks ofjudges in some of the most serious criminal cases that come before the courts. clive coleman reporting there. let's catch up with all the weather,
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and simon is reporting. it has been windy and wild. it has indeed, a brief respite yesterday with many of us having sunshine, and some sunshine this morning, particularly around eastern areas. this was the scene in cambridge a short while ago. but if you look at the satellite you can see this area of cloud coming around to the west of ireland. that is a low pressure system moving its way eastward, and is bringing cloud and also some rain. that is going along with quite a strong wind, many gales around coastal areas, gusting 65—70 mph for the coast of wales in the south—west of england. the rain not quite reaching the far east of england until later in the evening, and with a south—westerly wind it will feel quite mild. temperature generally 8—12dc. the rain heavy of southern areas which could cause localised flooding issues, but it will tend to clear away into friday, with this next weather system moving its way in, and that will bring us
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some showers. the showers this morning will be around western parts, they could be a little bit heavy. they will move their way east, they could be sunny spells either side. sunshine for much of scotla nd either side. sunshine for much of scotland and northern ireland a lower band of rain will make its way steadily through. wintry over higher ground. temperatures a little lower tomorrow compared to today, the wind coming in from the north—west, six or7 coming in from the north—west, six or 7 degrees. and then into the weekend, looking largely fine, much drier, much more sunshine around compared to the past week or so, but it will feel colder. 0n compared to the past week or so, but it will feel colder. on saturday, this area of low pressure slips away to the south, and pressure builds across the uk. then by sunday we will have a large area of high pressure a cross will have a large area of high pressure across the united kingdom, so that means it will be much more subtle. a few showers dotted around, especially on saturday across northern parts of scotland, still breezy here but for most of us actually saturday will give some light winds, some sunny spells, temperatures, though, around six to
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eight celsius, low for the time of year. then through saturday night into sunday, temperatures dropping away and some frost in the forecast, we haven't seen that for a while. that is into sunday morning, so they could be some whiteness around first thing in the morning, but some blue skies overhead. 0nce thing in the morning, but some blue skies overhead. once again a dry day and a sunny day really for many of us. we will see a bit of cloud just drifting around, temperatures very similarto drifting around, temperatures very similar to saturday. then into next week, we keep that area of high pressure for a time, again some frost around, staying largely settle, perhaps a bit more unsettled into the end of next week. goodbye.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live — it's midday and these are the main stories: prince harry makes his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be stepping back from their roles as senior royals. "the moment of crisis has come" — david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. and what is more, we know how to do it. that's the paradoxical thing, that we're refusing to take steps that we know have to be taken. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been
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in a decade. the nhs demands gambling companies take urgent action to tackle addiction and its impact on mental health. an aide to donald trump's lawyer claims the president "knew exactly what was going on" when ukraine was pressured to investigate his democratic rival. tv cameras are to be allowed to film in crown courts in england and wales for the first time. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm rebecca jones. prince harry has made his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they will be stepping back from their roles as senior royals.
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the duke of sussex met young rugby players in the grounds of buckingham palace before conducting the draw for the 2021 rugby league world cup. in his role as patron of the sport, he launched a new mental fitness charter to run alongside the competition. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell is outside buckingham palace for us. clearly this all comes against the backdrop of a torrid and turbulent week for prince harry. has he said anything at all about the discussions that are still going on in that building behind you about his future? not as far as we are aware. this is a royal engagement so frankly one wouldn't expect him to, as is the norm at a royal engagement. the idea is very much about what is going on. just to let you know this is the rugby league world cup draw. the rugby league
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world cup draw. the rugby league world cup draw. the rugby league world cup is due to take place across 16 cities in britain in autumn 2021. it is the first time in the tournament history there are men's, women's and will bear —— wheelchair rugby staged in one place. harry is the patron and has been since 2016, when he took over from his grandmother who had been patron for something in the region of 64 years. you can see him there with katherine grainger, chair of uk sport, a former 0lympic rower. jason robinson, a former international by robinson, a former international rugby player, standing next to her. that draw taking place today and harry will want the focus to be very much on what he is doing, which is the rugby world cup. i think it is fairto the rugby world cup. i think it is fair to say normally there wouldn't
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be banks of cameras outside buckingham palace, and that is because, as you alluded to, this comes at a very turbulent time for him and the royalfamily, and one which at the moment still hasn't seen any resolution. so just a reminder, if you needed, it was only last wednesday night the couple made their announcement that they wanted to step back from being full—time working royals, senior royals, that they wanted to have some degree of financial independence. that happened last wednesday, then there isa sandringham happened last wednesday, then there is a sandringham summit where the queen expressed at the end of that i guess some regret if you like in the statement. she said she would have preferred they hadn't taken that decision to step back but at the same time she understood their decision and understood they wanted to have some sort of independent life. then of course we had the news yesterday that thomas markle,
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meghan's father, potentially could testify against her in court, so it has been a very turbulent week but prince harry hoping this public engagement today, his first public engagement today, his first public engagement since that statement was made last wednesday. and perhaps we have to say his final royal engagement for some time. we don't know that for definite, we haven't heard that from the palace. all the palace will say at the moment is he has a few private meetings in his diary for next week but there are certainly no official royal engagements after that, so one can assume that he may fly back to canada next week to be reunited with archie, who he won't have seen by that time for the best part of two weeks, and of course meghan who flew back to vancouver last thursday. as we are watching these pictures, we know that behind the scenes, behind palace doors, there are discussions
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going on between courtiers with government officials involved, all trying to put their heads together and work out how the wishes of meghan and harry can be accommodated. how they can continue with this sort of part royal, part private lifestyle, which has u nsuccessfully private lifestyle, which has unsuccessfully been tried at all. it seems a very difficult balancing act to try to earn money and get a job asa to try to earn money and get a job as a royal without being accused of cashing in on the royal status. there's all sorts of issues in terms of tax implications. there is where they were live, who will pay for their security, so many issues to be ironed out. while this is his royal engagement, back to work, one gets the sense this will be a rare event in the forthcoming... well, we don't know how much longer but we are not expecting many more royal engagements from prince harry in the near future. it's interesting that the press association agency is
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reporting that the reporter did shout a question, how are the discussions going on your future. prince harry making his way into the palace only smiled at one of his entourage and didn't reply, no surprise there. sarah campbell, good to talk to you. thank you so much. the naturalist and broadcaster sir david attenborough has given a new warning about climate change, telling the bbc, "the moment of crisis has come." in an exclusive interview to mark the start of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, sir david called on governments to do more to tackle the threat before it's too late. here's our science editor, david shuckman. the moment of crisis has come. we can no longer prevaricate. as i speak, south—east australia is on fire. why? because the temperatures of the earth are increasing. that is a major
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international catastrophe. and to say, "oh, it's nothing to do with the climate," is palpably nonsense. and who has been affecting the climate? we have. we know that perfectly well. so that we have to realise that this is not playing games. this is notjust having nice little debates and arguments, and coming away with a compromise. this is an urgent problem that has to be solved. and what is more, we know how to do it. that is the paradoxical thing. we are refusing to take steps that we know have to be taken and, every year that passes makes those steps more difficult to achieve. what is your take on the degree of urgency that needs to be felt now? we have to change, and we have to change not by appeals to different kinds of optimism, but to deliberate, compelling,
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life—or—death decisions. and so where on a bigger scale do these decisions needed to come next? answer — china. china is the most populous country in the world and it is also having problems. it's also having problems with its climate. if the chinese come and say, "not because we are worried about the world, but for our own reasons we are going to take major steps to curb our carbon output because our climate is changing. we are going to do it." that would be the big change that would happen. from your observations and travels, what is your sense about whether people understand the importance to their own lives of the functioning of the natural world? the natural world is not just an inanimate object from which you can plunder riches and plunder food and whatever you require.
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we actually depend upon the natural world for every breath of air we take and every mouthful of food that we eat. that may sound extreme, but if you have the basic understanding of the way the world works, the natural world, you know that we breathe oxygen and that oxygen isn't renewed automatically, it comes from plants. and if you wreck the oceans and knock down the forests, you reduce the amount of oxygen there is in the atmosphere for us to breathe. we depend upon the oceans more and more. as the human population increases, we cannot afford to eat in the way that we have. because we can't grow enough to do that. if we're going to exploit the earth in the way we need to do in order to get food, the way to do that is to produce vegetable food. the steps that have taken place in this country in the past decade have been extraordinary.
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many people would never have predicted them. there has been a huge change in public opinion. people can see the problem, particularly young people can see the problem. that must force governments to take action. the nations of the world, particularly young people in the nations of the world, can see the writing on the wall more clearly than perhaps older people, who are set in their ways and set in their opinions and do not want to shift and for whom it is easier to say, "don't worry about that." "it'll happen." that no longer holds. young people realise that is not the case. there are serious problems facing us unless we change our ways. and, for that, we must thank the younger generation that is coming along, because my generation has made a mess of it.
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david attenborough there talking to david attenborough there talking to david sugarman. —— shukman. the bbc news channel will be in glasgow tomorrow, focussing on climate change. we want to put your questions on this complex issue to our experts. you can do so on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. please remember to leave your name and where you are from. ministers from five countries that lost citizens when a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down over iran are meeting in london at the moment. the representatives from canada, ukraine, sweden, afghanistan and britain, are demanding a transparent investigation, accountability, and financial compensation for the victims' families. meanwhile, investigators from canada have arrived in tehran tojoin the inquiry. the us house of representatives has passed a resolution to submit articles of impeachment against president donald trump to the senate for a trial. the resolution passed largely along
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party lines by 228 votes to 193. house speaker nancy pelosi signed copies of the articles alongside the team of democratic lawmakers, who will prosecute the case against mrtrump. in a separate development, an associate of rudy guiliani — mr trump's personal lawyer — has accused the president of lying about what he knew of his administration's dealings with ukraine. in a tv interview, lev parnas said mr trump knew that military aid would be withheld from ukraine unless it investigated joe biden, a potential rival in this year's presidential campaign. mr parnas, who is facing separate criminal charges, said mr giuliani was never investigating corruption in ukraine. instead, the intention was to damage mr biden. the president denies
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the allegations. more on today's stories coming up, including prince harry at buckingham palace, but now on the bbc news channel we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. staying on that donald trump impeachment story... naomi ruchim is a correspondent for cbs and spoke to me earlier. the president knew exactly what was going on. he was aware of all of my movements.
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i wouldn't do anything without consulting rudy giuliani or the president. i have no reason to speak to these officials and they have no reason to speak to me. why would all of these people meet with me? and that was in fact lev parnas. the headlines on bbc news... prince harry has made his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be stepping back from their roles as senior royals. david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been in a decade. sport now, and with all the latest.
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we will start with england. england have lost zak crawley after lunch on day one of the third test in south africa... just as he was closing in on a patient half century. joe root won the toss and chose to bat with the openers, putting together a 70—run partnership before dom sibley was dismissed by rabada on 36. and crawley was the second wicket to fall a short while ago when he was on 44 — a brilliant catch from rassie van der dussen. england are currently 103 for 2. jofra archer's not fit enough to play as he's still recovering from an elbow problem. mark wood has replaced james anderson. british tennis player liam broady has described an email sent to players about air quality at the australian open as a "slap in the face." in a post on twitter broady says it boils his blood to think he was made to play
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a qualifying match on tuesday. he goes on to question whether conditons were healthy at a time when people were being warned to keep animals indoors. manchester united's one—nil win over wolves in the fa cup was marred by an injury to marcus rashford. juan mata's goal was all that separated the teams and enough to secure a trip to watford or tranmere in round four. but with a visit to liverpool coming up on sunday in the league, united fans would have been concerned to see rashford only last 16 minutes as a substitute before going off with a back injury. united manager 0le gunnar solskajer admits the decision to bring on rashford turned out to be a mistake: yes, that backfired but you have got to go for them once in a while. it seems like he got it up there and he couldn't run, so let's test him the next couple of days. hopefully he will be ok for sunday, i don't know. the draw for the rugby league world cup is taking place right now at buckingham palace. the duke of sussexis buckingham palace. the duke of sussex is conducting the draw. hosts england have already been placed in
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group a. france have also been drawn in groupa group a. france have also been drawn in group a along with greece. i will have more sport for you in the next hour. lovely, see you then, thanks. the number of people cautioned or convicted for carrying knives in england and wales has reached record levels. in the 12 months to the end of september last year, 14,135 offences of knife possession were dealth with by police at the courts. whilst overall, the number of knife and other weapons possession offences hit 22,286. earlier i spoke to our home affairs correspondent danny shaw about the record numbers. this does not include cases where someone is attacked with a knife for instance or cases of murder involving knives.
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so it is possession offences and these are people who are dealt with by police and the courts for these offences. in fact the offences have been compiled in this way since 2007 and they show that knife possession is at an all—time high, 14,135 cases in the year to september as you say. when you add in other types of weapons as well, it is the highest figure for about a decade. more of these people are going to prison. 38% were sent to prison immediately with an average prison term ofjust over eight months. that has been on the increase, but what is concerning the government is an increasing proportion are repeat offenders, people who have been caught before carrying a knife or a weapon. approaching one third had already been cautioned or convicted before. are there any positives? it sounds really bad. the figures are a concern but what they may reflect, as well as the fact that more people are carrying weapons, is increased police activity
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on the streets by greater use of police stop—and—search powers. we know that the police have stepped up their use of stop—and—search in a number of cities, so it could be that the police are simply catching more people than they were before. from that point of view, there is perhaps a positive to be drawn, but the figures going on up is not something i think many people would take much comfort from. am i right there is also a downward trend in crimes being solved? if so, how much of a concern is that? in separate figures we have seen, in fact we've got the next set of figures coming out next week, have shown a reducing proportion of crimes, particularly robberies and offences with knives, are being detected by police and leading to people being charged and convicted, and that is a real concern. what we are looking for is to whether or not these figures, which tend to suggest
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there is greater police activity, will lead to an increase in the number of cases solved. we have had a government response from the ministry ofjustice, they say they're determined to turn the tide in violent crime, pointing out 20,000 more police officers have been recruited and there will be increased powers, they hope, to stop and search repeat offenders. danny shaw. the number of cases being looked into by an independent inquiry into maternity care at shrewsbury and telford hospital trust has risen to 900. the cases include the deaths and serious injuries of babies and women, and those where families have concerns about the care they received. some date back 40 years. for the first time tv cameras are to be allowed to film in crown courts
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in england and wales. it means that sentencing remarks in serious high profile cases can be seen on tv and online. 0ur legal correspondent clive coleman reports. this is a moment of history. this is the first time that we've been allowed to broadcast television pictures from court number one at the old bailey, the most famous criminal court in the world. it's here that people like the kray twins, ruth ellis — the last woman to be hanged in britain, the wartime traitor lord haw haw and the yorkshire ripper, peter sutcliffe, were tried and sentenced. but when they were sentenced, the only members of the public who got to see it were the few people sitting up there in the public gallery. new laws will allow television cameras to film judges' sentencing remarks in murder, terrorism and other serious high—profile cases. it's a radical extension to the operation of open justice and has been welcomed by thejudiciary. there are two reasons, i think. the first is that it's important that the justice system, what happens in our courts, is as transparent as is possible and is consistent with the interests ofjustice. and the second is that it aids public understanding of what the courts are doing.
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the new measures will apply to crown courts in england and wales. filming in the scottish courts has been allowed since 1992, subject to strict conditions. edward kearney and avriljones. you may stay seated. you were convicted after trial of the murder of margaret fleming... so is there an unequivocal welcome forfilming of judges passing sentence? if the public see their face in the living room and are able to identify them more readily, they are, unfortunately, more likely, we think, to be personally attacked and possibly details published about them which shouldn't be. the change in the law doesn't mean that television and online audiences will experience the full drama and turbulence of a criminal trial. like that in america's 1995 trial
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of oj simpson for the murder of his ex—wife nicole and her friend ron goldman. we, the jury, in the above entitled action find the defendant 0renthaljames simpson not guilty of the crime of murder. victims, witnesses, lawyers, jurors, none of those will be seen. but it does mean that, for the first time, millions of viewers will get to see and hear the sentencing remarks ofjudges in some of the most serious criminal cases that come before the courts. clive coleman, bbc news. our legal correspondent clive coleman joins me. as you say, this is a limited experiment in some ways because it's only thejudge we experiment in some ways because it's only the judge we will see but nonetheless how big a departure is this? i think it's a really big departure because as i said in the piece from 1925 it's been a criminal offence to even make a sketch, so the pictures people see in news items that someone has drawn, they have to go outside and draw from
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memory so it has been a strict rule protecting court trials in england and wales for a very long time. such filming we have seen in courts, we see it in the supreme court which we have had since the creation of the supreme court in 2009, that is lawyers making legal argument and then we hear thejudge's rulings. this is the end of what are going to be trials of enormous public interest so there will be a huge amount of interest in the opportunity to see and hear the judge passing sentencing remarks. for instance in the last month, reynhard sinaga, we would have seen and heard the judge reynhard sinaga, we would have seen and heard thejudge passing sentence in that case. there has always been an openjustice in that case. there has always been an open justice disconnect in the fa ct
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an open justice disconnect in the fact that you and i can go into a court room and sit in and listen to thejudge making court room and sit in and listen to the judge making his court room and sit in and listen to thejudge making his sentencing remarks but it's never been available to millions of people watching television and online. that isa watching television and online. that is a big departure. clearly the hope and expectation is the public understanding will increase but are there any potential drawbacks?” think there are. they have been voiced by lawyers responding to this announcement. sentencing is really complicated. you talk to judges who have to pass a sentence and they will moan and moan. the law commission has for a long time wa nted commission has for a long time wanted a single sentencing code. it isa wanted a single sentencing code. it is a thicket of legislation the judges have to pick their way through. what will make it onto screen often is the 15 second clip, the really juicy screen often is the 15 second clip, the reallyjuicy bit if you like, and there is a concern that will put judges in the firing line and that context is everything and that broadcasters will have to work hard to make sure the viewer gets the
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context. there is concern that people watching at home in their living rooms will see the judge and perhaps not understand the issues, get very angry, and that will put additional pressure on judges. get very angry, and that will put additional pressure onjudges. but generally speaking, this is an experiment in open justice which eve ryo ne experiment in open justice which everyone is welcoming. theyjust wa nt to everyone is welcoming. theyjust want to make sure the relevant safeguards are in place. when it is it happening? statutory instrument will be laid in parliament today, that will take about two to three so we should see the first cases, the firstjudges' sentencing remarks in two to three months' time. thank you. let's catch up with all of the weather news now. hello, helen, how are you doing? i am well, thanks, i hope you are too. we have a looming clouds, wind and rain. already the
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winds are up to 65 miles per hour around the coast. wind clearly a concern but possibly the rain more so because it was saturated the night before last and we have more heavy rain to come. another inch potentially before the day is out across many central and eastern areas. that's a roundabout 25 millimetres. the wind and rain can combine to bring atrocious conditions with standing water. it is the amount of rain we will see. that rain still with us but lingers until the early hours of tomorrow morning in the south and east before clearing. temperatures fall behind, we may see a frost in northern ireland, but still largely frost free across mainland uk. tomorrow looks drier but there will still be showers around.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live with me, rebecca jones. the headlines: prince harry makes his first public appearance — since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be "stepping back" from their roles as senior royals. "the moment of crisis has come" — david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now — as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been in a decade. the nhs demands gambling companies take urgent action to tackle addiction and its impact on mental health. an aide to donald trump's lawyer claims the president "knew exactly what was going on" when ukraine was pressured to investigate his democratic rival.
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i want to bring you up—to—date with some news coming into us from russia, that the lower house of parliament has approved mccalman justin as the new prime minister. they voted to approve him as prime minister this morning. they voted to approve him as prime ministerthis morning. he they voted to approve him as prime minister this morning. he was proposed as the prime minister by president vladimir putin yesterday following the resignation of the incumbent dmitry medvedev. you are watching live pictures here from moscow, this is the lower house of parliament in russia. and i have to say, it isn't a huge surprise. we we re say, it isn't a huge surprise. we were talking to our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford a little earlier, and she said it was expected that his candidacy would be approved. not a lot is known about
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the new prime minister of russia. he is head of the federal tax service, known as a bit of what we sometimes call a technocrat, but he was proposed as a candidate yesterday by vladimir putin following the mass resignation of the government, including the prime minister dmitry medvedev, and the new prime minister, mikhail mishustin, has promised, and i quote, sweeping changes to the government structure and personnel. so there you are, news in from russia that russia has a new prime minister, mikhail mishustin. let's get more now on sir david attenborough's exclusive interview with the bbc in which he gives a dire warning about the climate crisis. earlier i spoke to our science editor david shukman, who told me there's a change in tone from the naturalist and broadcaster.
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i think this time you're hearing a different tone. just a frustration with the fact that the science is becoming clearer and clearer about the need for action and what sort of step should be taken, there is clamourfrom step should be taken, there is clamour from the streets and particularly young people, louder and louder, demanding some kind of action. and yet at the same time, absolutely stultifying lack of progress internationally in the negotiating process hosted by the un. putting all that together, you are right. he is exasperated. the a nswer are right. he is exasperated. the answer are clear, the motivation is clear, the answer isn't happening.” wa nt to clear, the answer isn't happening.” want to come to the answer in a minute, but i pick up on your phrase about young people, because that was the one thing that struck me, that he almost feels embarrassed that this happened on his watch, and i suppose i was reflecting on the length of his career, and for a long while presumably, climate change wasn't really an issue. definitely. although some scientist in the 70s
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and particularly 80s had started to raise concerns about it, it perhaps arguably it took longer for sir david and other programme makers to engage with the subject. i think he feels acutely that throughout most of his life, he wasn't considering the effects of our lifestyles, how human activity is affecting the climate, whether it is in the loss of natural habitats as forest are chopped down to make way for farmland to grow our food or the use of fossil fuels heating the planet, all of these things together, but i think in the last 15 years he has definitely engaged with this more and more vociferously, if you like, and more vociferously, if you like, and we are seeing evidence of that now. he is calling all governments to do more. what needs to be done? big question. it is. for some time now, but particularly in the last 18 months or so, scientists, the un climate panel, have laid out all the options that need to happen. if you
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wa nt to options that need to happen. if you want to avoid, they say, the worst effects of global warming, a rise of above1.5 effects of global warming, a rise of above 1.5 degrees compared to the preindustrial level. we have warmed 1 degrees. they say another half a degree and you bump into a safety limitand degree and you bump into a safety limit and beyond that all kinds of dangerous things will intensify. so they are saying, the way to avoid that, and it is possible though extremely difficult, is for emissions of the gases that are heating the planet to be basically halved in the next ten years. now thatis halved in the next ten years. now that is an enormous challenge if you think about how we all use fossil fuels, all our activities contributing to this problem, but thatis contributing to this problem, but that is what the science has laid out. a very tight timetable. and at the moment, we are not heading in the moment, we are not heading in the right direction. emissions are going up not down. people are looking to a really crucial event towards the end of this year, a un summit in glasgow on uk soil where
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heads of state and governments from around the world will gather, and thatis around the world will gather, and that is seen as a chance to try to persuade governments to come up with tougher targets, to actually enshrine and make promises that they will reduce emissions dramatically and rapidly, and if you like turn the tide on the wind direction in which climate change is going now. but we will have to see if that happens. and of course sir david attenborough has given this interview to mark the start of an ambitious series here in the bbc to mark climate change. can you give us a sense of what that will involve? an incredible array of programmes on television, on the radio, on the web. we in the news will be offering a great range of coverage. my colleague justin a great range of coverage. my colleaguejustin rowlatt is in antarctica right now, the first journalist of to visit the glacier
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that scientists are particularly worried about right now, so a big course of programmes running up to the summit. david shukman there. now — staying with the weather — and as fires and floods regularly make headlines across the world, what impact do events like these have on our planet's climate? every month, bbc weather will examine the latest data to help give us a guide to the global picture — here's their latest update. welcome to climate check from bbc weather. every month, we will be using the latest data from experts around the world to give you a picture of the states of our changing climate. so, as we begin the 2020s, what do we know? well, 2019 was the second warmest year on record. according to copernicus, that is the eu's climate monitoring service, continuing what has been an accelerating trend of rising temperatures in recent years. the average global temperature was 1.2 degrees above pre—industrial levels. close to 400 separate temperature records were broken in the northern hemisphere summer alone,
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including in the uk, where temperatures reached 38.7 degrees in july, which was also the hottest month ever globally. and temperatures haven't just been rising over land, a new study suggests sea temperatures reached a new record high and that is important. the oceans cover most of the earth's surface and scientists say they absorb 90% of the excess heat caused by an greenhouse gases. one of the key greenhouse gases is carbon dioxide, measured here at mauna loa in hawaii and, in december, the average level was close to 412 parts per million. now, to put that into some context, for a million years, until the start of the industrial revolution, it never climbed above 300. but it has been rising since then, more and more quickly in recent years, a sign, scientists say, of the way we live today. warmer air is able to hold more moisture and that means
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more extreme rainfall. the usa, large parts of south america, the uk and europe all saw severe flooding in 2019 but the east of africa was particularly badly hit, with two huge cyclones, idai and kenneth, and, then, later in the year, heavier than usual seasonal rains which brought devastating floods too kenya, somalia and tanzania. this was due in part to something called a positive indian ocean dipole, but what is that? well, sea temperatures on the western side of the indian ocean were far higher than normal. warming the air, helping shower clouds to erupt, driving those intense downpours. but on the eastern side of the ocean, sea temperatures were lower than normal, suppressing rainfall in australia, which, according to its national forecaster, had its hottest, driest year on record. now, these climate stripes have become a popular way of visualising
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trends in temperatures and these are australia's. they go back to 1910. cooler years showing up in blue, warmer years showing up in these red colours. the hot weather and parched lands gave perfect conditions for the bushfires, which have burned an area equivalent to about 15 million football pitches so far. scientists expect climate change will make these hot, dry years more frequent and more extreme. there were also unprecedented fires in the arctic, which released well over 100 million tonnes of harmful carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. that extra c02 could help to accelerate the rising temperatures, making wildfires even worse in future years. something called a positive feedback loop. scientists say temperatures in the arctic are already climbing twice as quickly as elsewhere. just look at the impact on sea ice. it's post—summer september minimum was the joint second lowest on record. so what can we expect in 2020?
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the uk met office predicts global temperatures will again be more than a degree above pre—industrial levels. the first day of the year brought flooding in indonesia, thanks to the worst monsoon rains in decades and the australian bushfire season, well, that is far from over. we will be keeping track of the world's weather and climate trends in more editions of climate check throughout 2020. now with all the business news here's ben bland. ben rich there. now with all the business news, another ben, ben bland! indeed! hello there. in the business news: the uk housing market got a boost after the general election — according to a regular monthly survey. the royal institution of chartered surveyors said its members saw increased interest from new buyers in december. but there were some quite stark differences across the country. more in a moment. a supermarket in leeds is opening a section where shoppers can
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bring their own containers to fill with food. customers at the asda store will be able to use refill stations for own brand rice and pasta — as well as kellogg's cereals and pg tips tea. it's the latest major grocer to launch an scheme to cut down on plastic packaging. asda uses around 65,000 tonnes of plastic a year. british retailers have reported mixed results for the critical christmas period. major supermarkets suffered their slowest festive season in years. shoppers cut back on spending late last year, amid uncertainty about brexit and last month's election. primark owner — associated british foods — says sales rose as a result of it opening new high street stores. and halfords said it sold a record number of children's bikes the week before christmas. christmas feels like a long time ago already — butjust cast your mind back for me, for a moment. did you cut back on spending this time around? maybe you bought less in the shops or online?
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well, that certainly appears to be the trend. several big retailers have reported their december sales figures this week — and it's a mixed picture. halford, primark and moss bros are among those reporting today. let's speak to catherine shuttleworth, ceo, savvy. who were the main winners and losers? it has been a mixed bag of performances this christmas, but in terms of winners, we have seen discount retailers do pretty well, and some of the online only fashion businesses. but we have seen profit warnings from brands like super dry, so there is a real change across the market, and consumer spending is definitely changing. do you sense there is a shift in what people are spending money on? are we seeing people moving away from spending on stuff and towards spending on experiences and doing things? there
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seems to be a bit of that. looking across the market, people are spending more money on big things, important things, so as we say, health and sales are up this morning on bikes and electrical bikes, they have gone up significantly, but we have gone up significantly, but we have stopped buying high end electrical items for the car like stereo systems. so there is a bit of that going on. we are also spending more money going out and enjoying ourselves, so in the entertainment sector we see good results from some of the bar change this christmas. so we aren't buying as much stuff, but we aren't buying as much stuff, but we aren't buying as much stuff, but we are younger we are still buying stuff. if you look at the jd sports results, they are pretty good. so it depends on how are old you are and where you are in your lifestyle, but we are more mindful about how money. we talk about christmas being a critical period for retailers. is it more of a nice bonus period when they make a bit extra, or is this vital to propping up their performance and averaging throughout the year? it is critical. it is
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called the golden quarter for a reason, because it tends to be the time of year where most retailers make profit, so it is a really important time of year. and if we look at the department store sector, people like debenhams, house of fraser and john lewis, that is critical to their performance for the rest of the year, and it looks like they have had a pretty tough time. and add to that there will be store closures, we are seeing stores across the high street close today, some of those ones have been there for years. so it is absolutely critical, and if you don't get christmas right, it is very difficult to pick up your performance through the rest of the year. 0k. and catherine, you and i have spoken throughout 2019. it was a really tough year for retailers. what was your sense of how 2020 will shape up? i don't think we will see a massive change. we will still see some profit warnings and sadly more stores closing but i think the ones that are in the right place could have quite a positive year, but retailers have just got to accept that consumer spending is changing for good, and what we are going to
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spend our money on looks different. catherine shuttleworth, thank you very much. let mejust very much. let me just run you through some of the other main business stories we are following today. nestle has said it will invest more than £1.5 billion to stop using plastics that are difficult to recycle. the food and drinks company behind kitkat and nespresso says it plans to use recycled plastics that are good enough to use for food, to try to make all of its packaging reusable by 2025. extinction rebellion protesters say they are "holding shell to account" by blocking the entrances to shell's aberdeen headquarters. the group said the protest was part of its two—week long campaign targeting the fossil fuel industry. the second biggest diamond ever found is reportedly being polished up and sold to louis vuitton. the french luxury fashion house, known for its leather handbags, will own the rock —
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that was found in a bostwana mine last year. it's1,758 carat — and is roughly the size of a tennis ball. we don't know the price it'll fetch — but a diamond almost as big eventually sold for $53 million. you wouldn't want to leave that on the bus, would you? let's have a look at the markets. the ftse100 is down. it's feeling some downward pressure from pearson — the education publisher — and whitbread, which owns premier inn. that's after they posted disappointing trading updates. meanwhile, generally, investors are a bit cautious — as some elements of the trade deal between the us and china were unclear. still, shares in oilfirms and mining companies gave some support to the market, limiting the overall losses. that's all the business news.
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just quickly. if it's the second biggest diamond and it's the size of a tennis ball, how big is the biggest diamond? that's a very good question. very big, it's probably the answer. nothing bland about you! thank you very much, ben. see you later. let's update you with the headlines on bbc news. prince harry has made his first public appearance since he and his wife meghan announced they'll be "stepping back" from their roles as senior royals. david attenborough tells the bbc efforts to tackle climate change need to happen now as global temperatures reach the second highest on record. figures show the number of knife crimes in england and wales are the highest they've been in a decade. the head of nhs mental health services in england has demanded urgent action from the gambling industry to reduce the number
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of people becoming addicted. claire murdoch says incentives such as free bets and tickets should be banned to stop what she calls the "vicious gambling cycle". this industry, which by the way invests more than £1.4 billion a yearin invests more than £1.4 billion a year in advertising alone, which helps it generate its £14 billion profit, invest amongst other things in aggressive advertising, the use of social media. when you've got problem gamblers who are trying to stop gambling, it becomes really difficult for them to get away from it, so there are things like free bets. i'm calling upon the industry for example to stop taking bets by credit card which allow people to build up debt. i want them to stop targeting loss—making customers, who
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i'm told are called vips, which if true is cynical beyond belief. they target those loss—making customers by offering them hospitality, inviting them to events, sending them free bets. and of course we saw last week, incredibly poor practice around having to bet to view. if you area around having to bet to view. if you are a punter who wants to see your tea m are a punter who wants to see your team play, you had to open an account or place a bet to what your heroes play. that is the head of nhs mental health services in england, claire murdoch. well, the industry says it's determined to make gambling safer. earlier i spoke to alex macey, a former police officer whose gambling addiction cost him £250,000. he told me about his experience. most of my adult life was spent in gambling addiction and harm, and it was a mask, and escapism for underlying issues that existed in my life, probably depression that was undiagnosed and anxiety.
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so i think it is important that we have got this message from the nhs, because this sort of gambling is inherently linked to mental illnesses, and a lot of people have extreme mental illnesses, far more extreme than i have suffered, so by default it should really be considered as a mental health condition that is linked to disordered gambling. and was it to your experience of being targeted in some of the ways that claire murdoch just described? did that sound familiar to you? absolutely. i have looked back at my own gambling history and i can see there is literally a bombardment of adverts and text messages that you just can't escape even when you are trying your best to come out of that spiral.
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you know, for others, other people have spent a massive, massive amounts more than i have, which not only resulted in massive hardship for them, but it has also resulted in crime, and if you are getting people who are committing crime to fund their gambling, and there are no checks being made, no basic money—laundering checks being made, people are ending up in prison for this. i'm scratching my head to wonder, where is the accountability on the companies involved? if people are going to prison, fair enough, they are holding their hands up, i did wrong. but that sort of money stays on the books of the gambling companies, and this is something that i'm really wanting to look into. alex, the betting and gambling council as you know have said it takes its responsibility to customers incredibly seriously. what do you want them to do? i think i want them to look at the basics, really. unfortunately the gambling commission don't seem to have been
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very proactive in sorting this mess out, so we are asking the gambling companies to look at the measures such as vip exploitation. keep vip to rich people who are happy to lose their money and can recover next day. things like reverse withdrawals i think by default encourage people to spend more than they should do. so let's look at the basics, and i know that there is a debate around if we tackle the industry to hard, then we may see unregulated companies coming in. so we have to really tackle the unregulated market as well, make sure they are blocked off from coming to this country also. i suppose at the end of the day these companies want to make money, don't they? how confident are you that they will make the kind of changes that you want to see without it being necessary actually for it to be properly
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regulated and legislated? i think we have come to a tipping point now where there is so much attention on this issue. so they have to come on board, they know that. and i will happily work with them, and so will others, to try and achieve these basic aims. otherwise of course we are going to have this hard regulation. because, look, the exploitation has got to end. so let's hope that the right things can be done and we can all work together and achieve in those common aims. alex macy talking to us a little earlier. a ban on children heading footballs could come into force in just a few weeks in scotland because of fears of a link between head injuries and dementia. the scottish fa could announce the ban on under—12s heading the ball soon, after it highlighted a report that said former players are more at risk of dying from the disease. chris mclaughlin reports.
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they have been discussing the issue here at the national stadium four months, and although there is no firm evidence linking heading a ball to dementia, the scottish fa are taking no chances, and children under the age of 12 will be banned from heading in training. we need to ta ke from heading in training. we need to take some sensible pragmatic steps at the moment, and that is largely going to be to try and reduce that overall burden, the number of times young players head, and heading in training is much more common than in
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matches. kyle does one-to-one youth coaching. he has also coached in the us, where a ban on children heading the ball has been in place since 2015. they see players like ronaldo on tv scoring wonderful goals with his head. i think that might be the problem here is how we try and coach them. there has been some serious situations where players have lost their lives, former legend and players have gone on to get dementia and things like this. so i'm glad the sfa are leading the rest of football and doing something like this, because it is very important. ben brown will be here with the news that one. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello. another deep area of low pressure bearing down on the uk today. the skies were looking rather
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threatening across shropshire at lunchtime, and this is the area of rain, the weather front and the low pressure responsible for today's wet and windy weather. there are gales already in southern and western areas, they will be escalating or wins will be picking up in the north—west as well as we go through the afternoon. gusts of wind around 65 mph in coastal areas, so certainly lively in land, and with it some wet weather too, not what we need at the moment. so there are concerns particularly for southern and eastern parts of england where we have had a lot of rain recently. there will be spray and standing water through the rush—hour, and that continues through the night. elsewhere it clears away, the wind strengthening towards the north overnight, and that is where the windiest where will be. relatively mild overnight, largely frost free except perhaps in some of the glens of scotland, but the day tomorrow looks one of sunshine and showers, the shower is easing their way eastwards, and following that squally winds, temperatures a little
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down today. feeling a little cooler, certainly some wintering us further north but at least there will be some sunshine in between. as those eased off into the weekend, it looks brighter, drier but colder. the reason for the drier weather and coinciding with the weekend is a very intense area of high pressure, still not totally dry, a few showers in the north of scotland, but we do onto a frosty note quite widely on saturday morning. but a few showers in the north and west, a good deal of sunshine will be enjoyed by most parts of the uk. temperatures won't be as high as they have been, back down to normalfor this be as high as they have been, back down to normal for this time of year, perhaps even a little bit below, but that sunshine will compensate. another very cold start as we head into sunday morning. widely frosty as you can see within the towns and cities except perhaps the towns and cities except perhaps the far north, just because we have a bit more breeze and a bit more cloud. still largely dry, lots of sunshine for the day on sunday to enjoy, and again great for getting out and about despite that frosty
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start, one or two icy patches. temperatures should lift back towards the norm. but heading into monday we might see a few more issues with fog. more online.
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prince harry makes his first public appearance since announcing he and meghan will be stepping back from front—line royal duties. the duke of sussex met schoolchildren at buckingham palace as he hosted the draw for next year's rugby league world cup. so the couple have said they want to step back from royal duties, so could this be one of the last time as we see prince harry representing his family in this way? we'll have more from the palace as talks continue to work out the future roles of harry and meghan. also this lunchtime: time for life or death decisions on climate change — a warning from sir david attenborough. we have been putting things off year after year, we've been raising targets
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and saying, "oh, well, if we do it within the next 20 years

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