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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 18, 2020 6:00am-10:00am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. after the fires, the storms — heavy rain brings the risk of flooding to parts of australia. after years of campaigning on period poverty, free sanitary products will be made available to schools good morning. and colleges in england from monday. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty good morning. and charlie stayt. our headlines today: bess in show in the third test — a clock projected on the walls of downing street — two wickets for dom bess and two is one of a series of events great catches for ollie pope announced to mark ther moment the uk as england press home their advantage over leaves the eu. south africa on day three. don‘t mess with mari, after yea rs of the great gandmother who took on a six foot theif and won. after years of campaigning on period poverty, free sanitary products will be made available to schools and hello, good morning. it‘s all change for this weekend. colleges in england from monday. most places are going to be dry. good morning — england there is going to be sunshine in the land of pope and glory. around, but it will be quite cold a maiden test century for ollie pope and there could be some frost around has put them in complete control this morning and tomorrow morning. after day two of the third test in south africa. more details later on. the teenage flyer. we meet the 16—year—old aiming be britain's first ever female olympic ski jumper. it‘s saturday, 18th january. our top story:
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with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, hello and good morning. it is all the government has announced that change for this weekend. most places a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down will be dry with sunshine around but to brexit on 31st january. it will be quite cold and there could be some frost around this meanwhile, a campaign to make morning and tomorrow morning. more big ben ring when the uk details later on. leaves the eu has raised more than £200,000. our political correspondent it's saturday, the 18th of january. our top story: with less than two weeks to go helen catt has more. until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street it‘s here that the moment of brexit itself will be marked at 11pm to count down to brexit. on the 31st of january. meanwhile, a campaign to make a light show and countdown will be big ben ring when the uk leaves projected onto the walls the eu has raised of downing street and live streamed on social media. more than £200,000. borisjohnson is planning an address our political correspondent to the nation in the evening. in nearby parliament square the union flag will fly helen catt has more. on every flagpole. it is here that the moment of brexit commemoratives 50p coins will come into circulation. itself will be marked at 11pm on but the government says they want january 31. a light show and this to be a moment to heal divisions and reunite communities. countdown will be projected onto the a special cabinet meeting will take walls of downing street and live streamed on social media to boris place in the north of england. johnson is planning an address to many brexiteer had hoped that this the nation in the evening. in nearby would be the focal point, though. big ben restored to chime at 11pm. parliament square, the union flag
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will fly on every flag pole to hundreds of thousands of pounds has commemorative 50p coins will come been raised by the public into circulation to the government towards the estimated £500,000 cost says it wants this to be a moment to after borisjohnson told breakfast on tuesday he had in idea. heal divisions and reunite communities. a special cabinet we‘re working up a plan so people meeting will take pace in the north of england. many brexiteers had can bung a bob for a big ben bong. hoped that this would be the focal there are some people who want to... i haven‘t quite worked it out. point, however. did ben restored to chime at 11 p.m.. hundreds of thousands of pounds have been raised but downing street stepped back by the public towards the estimated from the idea after the commons half £1 million cost after boris authorities said there might be problems accepting the money even if enough was raised. johnson told exit on tuesday he had an idea we are working up a plan the chancellor has admitted not all businesses will benefit from brexit. because there are some people who sajid javid made the comments in today‘s financial times. let‘s speak now to our political wa nt because there are some people who want to... bungay park... i haven't quite worked it out. but downing correspondent, susana mendonca. street stepped back from the idea after the commons authority said there may be problem with accepting there may be problem with accepting the money even if enough was this is about which rules the uk will not have to adhere to once it raised. leaves the eu and whether or not and after seven, we'll be that will benefit or hurt business speaking to conservative mp mark francois, who says the celebrations don't here in the uk. exactly. if you look go far enough. free period products are to be made
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available to all schools at his predecessor, philip hammond, he talked about having close and colleges in england, to support students who struggle to afford them. alignment to the european union, but the government—funded scheme starts on monday and has been here we have savage added centre welcomed by campaigners. our education and family correspondent, frankie mccamley will be no alignment with eu rules. reports. we don‘t know what rules he is talking about, but he is saying to businesses that they need to get just over two years ago outside ready for this, they have had more downing street, campaigners gather, than three years to for brexit. calling for an end to so—called period poverty. the shame needs to those businesses would argue there go. everyone has it. not the first has been a lot of uncertainty and they are not ready for it. we spoke time that concerns have been raised about the affordability of sanitary to businesses last year about this product, specifically for girls from issue, especially in the food and lower income families. research has drink industry, also found nearly one third of teenage girls in school or college have or pharmaceuticals, the automotive industry, they are worried about the know someone who has been four did prospect of not being closely aligned to the eu and the impact they period poverty with more than that could have on their half admitting they missed lessons productivity. what we are getting because of their period for things from the chancellor today is him like cramps, embarrassment or saying that some businesses will affordability. ultimately, if you struggle, others will do better. for are facing impossible decisions and struggling to make ends meet, trying those businesses, uncertain times to decide whether to pay your rent ahead. nothing changes immediately,
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oi’ to decide whether to pay your rent or heat your house and actually the we will maintain the same rules for question of purchasing menstrual product, although they are com pletely product, although they are the 11 month transition period, then completely essential, becomes a there is the trade deal. part of second—tier priority. this talking tough is preparing for completely essential, becomes a second-tier priority. from monday, the trade deal with the eu and the all primary schools, secondary schools and colleges in england will uk government wanting to set out its be provided with free period product stall. thank you. for their students to the move thank you. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools follows scotland's announcement last and colleges in england from monday year to spend £4 million on a to tackle the issue of ‘period poverty‘. similar initiative and in wales, it‘s estimated that just over £3 million was announced one—in—ten girls are unable to afford period products. earlier this month to supply girls the government—funded scheme has in primary and secondary schools been welcomed by campaigners. with sanitary product. heavy rain and thunderstorms have british scientists have told the bbc lashed parts of eastern australia that the number of people infected dousing some long—burning bushfires, but bringing a new bya new virus in china is far threat of flooding. greater than official figures suggest. there have been downpours there have been fewer than 50 in the states of queensland, confirmed cases of the coronavirus victoria and new south wales, — but the experts estimate the true where wildfires have scorched figure is closer to 1,700. millions of hectares dr peter daszak — an expert of land since september. in emerging diseases — we can get the latest says it may have come from bats. now from phil mercer, who is in sydney this morning. it looks like the virus is closely you have spent many months covering the fires, now we have a new issue.
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related to sars. since sars emerged that‘s right. this drenching rain people have been developing vaccines that has fallen across much of and drugs to work against sars at eastern australia is a blessing and a curse. australia‘s prayers for this illness is difference we don't know if those drugs and vaccines rain have been answered, but this is work. so the risk is that if it the land of extremes and begins to spread and is lethal and unpredictability. what we have seen we do not have the capacity to control it. in queensland for example, three times the average monthly rainfall police are appealing for help to find two thieves who were involved in a dramatic in certain parts falling injust attempted burglary at a jewellery shop in west london. three people drove a range rover times the average monthly rainfall in certain parts falling in just one night. streets have been turned into through the front window of the store in shepherds bush, rivers and there was at least one before breaking display cases community in the northern part of with a sledgehammer. one offender was detained new south wales where they have seen by shoppers as he attempted to flee a creek flew with water for the and was jailed for ten years, but police are still looking first time in five years. the fire for the two others involved. authorities in new south wales say that rain has fallen on many fire a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in three stones but many areas have missed popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down out altogether. what australia needs on alcohol—fuelled holidays. restrictions apply to the tourist is more rain. the forecast for the hotspots of playa de palma next day is looking pretty good, but and magaluf in majorca with the heavy rain comes the risk and sant antoni in ibiza. the regional government says it's of flash flooding that we have seen the first legislation of its kind in europe. in certain parts of australia. also the risk that ash could flow into
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it is now five minutes past six and rivers and water catchment is thank you forjoining us. contaminating water supplies. this isa the chancellor has admitted not contaminating water supplies. this all businesses will benefit is a country battling serious fires, from brexit, warning companies they must adjust to new regulations. dozens continue to burn. now we are sajid javid made the comments in today's financial times. having to contend with flash let's speak now to our political correspondent, susana mendonca. flooding as well. australia‘s five susana, surprising words crisis is continuing and what we from the chancellor? need is much more rain to fall from the heavens so that this crisis that there have been many questions about began back in september will finally what things will look like as we began back in september will finally be put to rest. in the meantime, the leave the eu. and the chancellor was authorities say that the dangers are farfrom authorities say that the dangers are making suggestions that for some far from over. thank you. people there may be some problems thank you. british scientists have told the bbc ahead. analysts will be concerned that the number of people infected for problems —— for businesses about bya new virus in china is far greater than official figures suggest. there have been fewer not being aligned with the eu. last than 50 confirmed cases, but scientists estimate the true year we had industry experts from figure is closer to 1,700. two people are known to have died from the corona virus, which appeared in wuhan food and automotive industry saying city in december. they would be damaged if there was police are appealing no alignment. so we're not getting for help to find two thieves detail on what rules will not be who were involved in a dramatic attempted burglary at a jewellery
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followed but there is an indication shop in west london. that the government would be moving three people drove a range rover away from alignment with the eu and through the front window of the store in shepherds bush, before breaking display cases basically saying that these with a sledgehammer. businesses are going to have to just change their ways. in order to be one offender was detained able to operate within that system. by shoppers as he attempted to flee and was jailed for ten years, and then in this article he ref but police are still looking first of the japanese car industry for the two others involved. saying that it found success are not a law has been passed banning pub following eu rules and that is crawls and happy hours in three something that british business can popular spanish tourist destinations also do. in terms of changes in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. business will see they will not be restrictions apply to the tourist seen immediately, we leave on hotspots of playa de palma and magaluf in majorca january 31 but there will be a transition period of 11 months and and san antonio in ibiza. the regional government says it‘s during that period all the rules the first legislation of its kind in europe. that are currently in place would stay as there. what we don't know is what happens afterwards dig the government needs to do trade deal with the eu and only at that point really will we know what the impact we have the weather and the sport will be on business. but we are coming upfor starting to get more of the detail we have the weather and the sport coming up for you a little later on. oi’ starting to get more of the detail oran starting to get more of the detail or an indication that things are going to change. thank you. "heartbreaking", "powerful" and "inspiring". those are just some of the words used to describe alicia davis, three brothers from edinburgh have set three new world records who spoke to us yesterday after rowing across the atlantic about the death of her husband. he took his own life ocean in just 35 days.
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lachlan, jamie and ewan maclean a week ago after battling are the fastest and youngest trio with post—traumatic stress disorder since serving in afghanistan. to row across the atlantic, we‘ll hear more about how veterans like him can access help and the first team of siblings and support injust a moment, but first, let‘s remind ourselves of what alicia had to say. to cross any ocean. they beat the previous record of a trio rowing the atlantic ocean by six days. he would go out of his way to make i wonder how long ago that one was set. six days! it is extraordinary. anybody smile, anybody laugh, but he and we will catch up with them and would never show his pain. everybody hear the full story later on in the says that the war is out there but programme. in a few minutes we will they bring it back with them. the have the weather but first let's talk about legs and rivers in —— staff that he kept seeing and la kes talk about legs and rivers in —— lakes and rivers in britain. feeling throughout the day, when he you may think that lakes and rivers fell asleep and brought it all back. in britain are environmentally friendly, but did you know there was no escape for him at all. they release greenhouse gases into the air? scientists say they produce around a quarter of the net carbon dioxide he would scream and shout in his and methane going into our atmosphere from the earth's surface. sleep. he would yell orders, he now, research from a team at the university of cambridge suggests climate change would yell man down, man down! you could double those amounts. richard westcott reports. it is obvious where some greenhouse gases come from. but there is imagine sitting next to your husband and you are hearing him shout things another vast source of carbon like that. as a much as it hurts me dioxide and methane that may
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surprise you. freshwater lakes and to talk about it, ever gets one person to pick up the phone, one rivers. so we're going to put this wife, one husband, one brother, sophisticated looking bucket into sister to pick up the phone and say, the river here and what it will do please, can you help me with my is trap carbon dioxide and methane loved one, then it is worth all the paini as it comes off the river, trying to loved one, then it is worth all the pain i am feeling now talking about escape into the atmosphere. as it, it really is. we‘rejoined now by beth hamilton, leaves and plant litter fall into a psychotherapist from a charity the water, they are eaten by tiny that supports veterans, and karl, who suffered with ptsd microbes, bacteria and fungi and after leaving the military. they give off methane and carbon dioxide sitting the bucket may be good morning to you both. you both basic but it is connected to a saw at least a year yesterday. what sophisticated laser that misses the did that mean to you? she makes the point that she is determined to talk about her husband and what he went —— measures the gases. so that one through in order to make sure that is methane, that one is c02, and you people feel more equipped and able can see them jump when the bucket is and competent to talk about the placed on the water. exactly. i problems they are experiencing. my think it would surprise people that freshwater is a source of greenhouse heart goes out to alicia. i think gases. how much do they contain? she gave a powerful statement. she freshwater is a source of greenhouse gases. how much do they contain7m terms of global land cover, freshwater only covers about 4% of
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the planet that if we look at was one of the reasons why i agreed last night to come here this morning methane, for example, up to 16% of to talk about the issues of ptsd and all natural methane emissions come how to access the charities that you from freshwater so we can see those fres hwaters a re from freshwater so we can see those freshwaters are disproportionately important in the global carbon can. it is not easy talking. we all cycle. to demonstrate the point, ta ke cycle. to demonstrate the point, take this dig and switch it around sat yesterday thinking how a lease and many of those bubbles coming up are likely to be methane. freshwater year was able to do that, but she did it for year was able to do that, but she did itfora year was able to do that, but she did it for a reason, to help people is responsible for around one like you in the past and people in quarter of the net carbon dioxide the future. what have you been and methane going from the earth's surface into the atmosphere. through? i did a number ofjurors in although that could be about to change. when we push it through the northern ireland. i was part of a filter, water goes through the other side and all the microbes stay on bomb disposal team. i saw a lot of devastation and destruction, what the paper and then we take that back had happened, and i did thatjob to the laboratory and we look at what is there. we know that some microbes arejust what is there. we know that some microbes are just producing methane professionally. on leaving the and some don't. we just need to stop forces i‘d just put everything under my cap badge and try to get on with
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filming where this family comes through. we will get a picture. my cap badge and try to get on with my life. subsequently, the filming where this family comes through. we will get a picturelj think i did. so what we have here is transition into civilian life is a giant flashlight and based on the very difficult. i struggled for many type of light that bounces back we yea rs very difficult. i struggled for many years with mental health issues. i can tell what types of algae are just tried to function on a daily growing. so algae, like trees, it ta kes growing. so algae, like trees, it takes the co2 out? growing. so algae, like trees, it basis. i then tried to access the takes the c02 out? exactly. andrew's latest research in canada suggests climate change could double the greenhouse gases coming from nhs, which was very limited at the freshwater. forests for example with under a warmer climate they may time and mental health issues what is prevalent then when i was produce more leaves and more dead pan —— plant material to fall in the struggling. you met your wife, who water to feed microbes, bacteria and helped you realise that you weren‘t fungi that produce these gases. they can now use that knowledge to find coping as she could have been. yeah. natural solutions, perhaps different trees or algae which can trap some how were your symptoms showing? for of the greenhouse gases. as for our a lease year, her husband, if he readings, methane levels are low but carbon dioxide was average. that heard a siren he would hit the means carbon dioxide was average. that m ea ns 750 carbon dioxide was average. that means 750 metres of the river emits ground. he felt guilty about being about the same amount of co2 a day as getting into your car and driving happy because what he had seen.”
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the 60 odd miles to struggled to find any interest or gain any interest in being happy and anything i did. loud noises i would london. you're watching struggle myself. i jumped breakfast from bbc news. time now anything i did. loud noises i would for a look at the newspapers. struggle myself. ijumped over a fence at one point when i heard a "bong out of order", is the headline in the daily express, as it reports the half—a—million pound bill loud noise. that was a couple of for big ben to ring on brexit day months after i left the forces. i is 35 times more than it cost at new year. the sun says the sussex brand used to walk around, if i felt is taking a bashing, finding 70% off souvenir tea u nsafe o n towels in one store. used to walk around, if i felt unsafe on one side of the road i would move to the other side of the road. i was hypervigilant in my it comes more than a week after the decision by prince harry and his wife meghan to step everyday life. i would walk into a down as senior royals. building and! everyday life. i would walk into a building and i would be looking for and the guardian's front page includes a picture of michelin—star the danger point is, how i would get chef, sat bains, who says he won't be offering vegan food out. i struggled with sleep. i in his nottingham restaurant. meanwhile, over on twitter, struggled with enjoyment in life. if "eminem is cancelled" is trending. it follows criticism of a line it hadn‘t been for my wife, vanessa, in one of the us rapper's new tracks which makes reference to the 2017
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my wife may have been where lec is. manchester bomb attack. these stories are only too familiar for you. yes. if these people get to one story to bring to you. this has used you to take it as just a little shotin used you to take it as just a little shot in the times. and this image someone for you. yes. if these people get to someone like you, how is it that you could sit down this is a horse in try and put something in order that people can deal with things in a different way. these desperate cardiff and the horse was seen wandering around on the a 48 on people who knock on my door, many of thursday evening in rush—hour them come with the suicide plan, traffic. so people try to help it out. it is a little horse! people they might have even practice them. tried to get it off the road and a the first thing is to get them in bus driver who was coming by said and relaxed and comfortable, then we just pop it on the bus just to get can start looking at the issues that it off the road. the horse ended up we can start looking at the issues that we need to resolve for them. can you on the bus to get it away from the give it some sort of insight into what you do in practice? we have danger of the road. it was lead in, it did not go in by itself. but it trauma specialists. there are 200 was not worried. it was in a specialists across the uk like me dangerous situation and the bus that are dotted around, so that driver told it to hop on. how far factoring can be placed very close
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away from home was it?|j toa factoring can be placed very close driver told it to hop on. how far away from home was it? i don't know. was a very good question but i do to a therapist. we use a technique not have the answer. the horse was only on the bus for five minutes, called the rewind technique that very quickly, in one session, can four or five stops may be. darren, what did you think of that story? rewind a horrible experience that would you get on the bus if you saw horse on the bus? of course, of produced the flashbacks and course. but there will always be another one coming along. the horse nightmares and the horrendous was probably cold, shocked by the hypervigilance that these people hot weather we have going. you have. so you relive it? how does cannot catch me out. that help is a mechanism to deal with it? first of all, the person has to be really relaxed. when they it has been so mild and so wet but are really relaxed we can get them to visualise the experience and go it has all changed really for this weekend and probably over the week backwards and forwards through the ahead as well because we have a lot experience, which is the normal way of how the brain processes memories. of dry weather this weekend. the sunshine will be out for most of the they go backwards and forwards weekend and the winds have been through the memory when they are strong will be lighter as well but it is going to be colder and there deeply relaxed and that takes the
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will be some frost around, notjust fear, the adrenaline, the horror this morning but particularly tomorrow morning as well. the reason away from that memory, so that's for the change, we have areas of cloche —— low pressure close by, that memory can be placed at the bringing some cloud, but it is an back of the brain with all the other memories. i suppose what is being described by beth is how everyday area of high pressure that will people cope with big or small arrive across the uk this weekend and settle things down. we have some fresh breezes across scotland bringing in some wintry showers incidents in life. obviously, when here. running a few towards the you‘re in the military, you are north—west of england but those showers become fewer through the day. a thin high cloud coming across faced with huge threats, things that northern ireland and wales towards the south—west of england later but on the whole, plenty of sunshine around. those temperatures near lay people cant imagine. you are normalfor around. those temperatures near normal for this around. those temperatures near normalfor this time of told in your training that this is around. those temperatures near normal for this time of year so yes, colder, but this is what we should going to happen. what guidance are be expecting, 6— a normalfor this time of year so yes, colder, but you given when it comes to coping, this is what we should be expecting, 6-8d. with this is what we should be expecting, 6—8d. with the clearing skies, the shah was fading away in scotland, or is it simply that this is the we're going to find a frost developing and temperatures easily down to —2, —3. the exception really job, man up, dealwith or is it simply that this is the is the far north—west of scotland, job, man up, deal with it? or is it simply that this is the job, man up, dealwith it? it was man up, get on with the job. tours and that is why we still have high pressure, the position is going to in northern ireland were six months at the time, two weeks break. you shift slightly. it allows us to draw in more of a breeze into the
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north—west of scotland and draw in some mild airand north—west of scotland and draw in some mild air and also, near the weather front, or cloud as well. otherwise after frosty started could be on two or three incidents a should be dry and sunny. the threat day and you would have to deal with ofa should be dry and sunny. the threat of a showerjust should be dry and sunny. the threat of a shower just wandering should be dry and sunny. the threat of a showerjust wandering in the that. he would get back to the southern parts of the north sea but on the whole are dry and sunny day attachment, you may have a beer, you with light winds. really cold and we re and frosty to begin with and again, attachment, you may have a beer, you were allowed two beers a day and that was it. he would discuss the temperature 6— eight foremost and milder in the north—west of scotla nd and milder in the north—west of scotland where we have more cloud. today‘s events with our number one. we keep the high pressure as we move into the early part of next week. thought of getting eroded a little we would discuss the events of the bit. more of an atlantic breezes day and that was the way we let our coming in across the northern half of the uk and that means what a emotions... we had no professional contrast early monday morning. a counselling when leaving the forces frost likely across the midlands, or during that period. one of the southwards, less likely further north, and more cloud coming into a things that struck many people when western pa rt of they saw a lease ear talk about north, and more cloud coming into a western part of scotland, and maybe some patches of fog though further south across parts of england and jamie yesterday, she gave us a very wales. they should lift and again, vivid description of this lovely guy sunshine. more of a breeze across scotla nd sunshine. more of a breeze across who would help everyone else, the scotland perhaps northern parts of strong character. you can do people northern ireland, lifting temperatures here to around nine or ten, still rather chilly further a bit, but they can also be
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south. with high pressure, not far functioning in the place they are away of the weekend, it looks like despite what is going on behind—the—scenes. despite what is going on behind-the-scenes. it can be absolutely catastrophic. it destroys it is going to remain dryjust about their relationships, their working everywhere. notice there is a bit life, every single part of their more cloud around, we're not going to see as much sunshine from tuesday onwards. there may well be some mist life, every single part of their life, but they still function in some manner. it is really very, very and fog. outside of that though the temperature should rise to eight or nine celsius. back to you two. you wa nt to nine celsius. back to you two. you want to know what i was hearing in hard. this means possibly that they my ear? we're not going to see as delay seeking help because it is much sunshine and more cloud. people the gallery going what sunshine? we sort of pretending it doesn‘t exist, ina sort of pretending it doesn‘t exist, have not seen any! not as much in a way. that's right. i avoided sunshine as this weekend, naga. there you go! they will get some it. i tried to hide everything. it this weekend and it will be dull was my wife, vanessa, that noticed again. unless they are working all that i wasn‘t operating on a normal day... i very much doubt that! we'll be back with a summary basis. she was very... she wouldn‘t of the news at 6.30. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. ta ke basis. she was very... she wouldn‘t take no foran basis. she was very... she wouldn‘t take no for an answer. i got some cbt help through the nhs. the nhs is
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fantastic but it is not really geared up for a broken military hello and welcome to mind. icame the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's geared up for a broken military mind. i came out of the cbt, i gained some knowledge and i got some cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? coping mechanisms, buti very interesting mix this week. we have bombshell, gained some knowledge and i got some coping mechanisms, but i quickly had which is up for three oscars. a relapse, somewhat. my wife wasn‘t a hidden life. giving up. she was back on the the new film by terence malik. and weathering with you. internet and she found ptsd an anime from the director of your resolution and she phoned them. we name. really interesting week. met and she is an absolute diamond, a very good week. let's start with bombshell. she has changed my life and i can three oscar nominations thank her enough. i am so pleased for charlize theron, margot robbie, and hairand make—up that you‘re in a good place. i know — which is interesting because it this was so difficult to and talk has a lot to do with prosthetic work. to make them look like the real—life characters. this is a drama based about this. the veterans minister, on the real—life scandal of roger ailes at johnny mercer, has said that he the fox news network. his downfall prefigured that of harvey weinstein, ta kes a ny vetera n which is currently in the news. johnny mercer, has said that he takes any veteran suicide personally. he is determined to the movie went into
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the preproduction before that scandal broke. tackle the issue and has instructed john lithgow is really his team to look at every single convincing as roger. case to ascertain whether we could or should have done more so we can he is running this organisation, this toxic culture, where he believes he has learn lessons and put an end to the the absolute right to essentially situation, so people are talking abuse the women working under him, and the culture is such that nobody about this. thank you. you are so appears to be ready to speak out. everyone thinks "this welcome. is the way it is. if you speak out, it you are so welcome. here‘s darren with a look will end very badly." at this morning‘s weather. until finally, nicole kidman's character decides to take her complaint to the public. here's a clip. we have this lovely picture to start with. it sums up how cold it has been first thing this morning. this if you are able to stick it out at fox, gather more evidence, was in western berkshire. it is a you might be able to sue com pletely was in western berkshire. it is a completely different look to the weather this weekend compared to him, instead of fox. what we have been used to. it will be dry for most places, the sun will and that is why i am here. because be dry for most places, the sun will be out, the winds would be a strong but it will be colder. we have cloud marty hyman told me that if i was here in newjersey i could avoid not far away from the uk. a lot of arbitration by suing roger it will be diving away. pressure personally. he says you have managed to change the law and we could call
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other women and show a pattern. will other women come forward? will build today. there will be an area of high pressure, something we you live and work in new york. haven‘t seen for quite some time. around the edge of the high pressure you have done your homework. we have a cool breeze blowing across no fingerprints. scotland. we have the odd one for that's how much i practise the bible northern ireland, north—west england, but the showers will fade asa that's how much i practise the bible as a child. if roger finds out you came to us, away. sunshine hazy for northern he will not just fire you, he will bang us with a $1 million ireland. otherwise, blue skies. lawsuit and attack you personally. temperatures between six and 8 men like him worry more degrees, which is normalfor this about reputations than money. time of year. the showers will fade he won't stop, you know that? away, the winds will drop. 0h, oh, i know. colleagues you admire temperatures will fall away very quickly overnight night to night and will also publicly you are a there will be a widespread frost. superior ambitious woman who is suing because her career has temperatures down to —3 even in stalled. let ‘em. towns and cities. the exception is wow. really the highlands and islands. even that tells us how here we have an atlantic breeze important this story is. it is very timely and what i think coming around the top of the area of the film does is create a very good high pressure. there is a northerly image of a toxic environment. breeze, blowing one or two showers the abuse goes from the lowliest newcomer to people who are very high early tomorrow morning into the up in the organisation. southern north sea, but they should i think the film stay offshore. cloud moving into the itself is not perfect.
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i think it is solidly done. occasionally, it has a tv north west part of scotland. winds drama feel about it. will be lights. it will be a cold, it owes a debt to the big short. crisp winters day. double figures in stylistically, it is more the north where it is cloudy. back adventurous. but what carries this shoulder—high are the performances. it is a terrific trio cloudy atlantic air will not stand of nicole kidman, charlize theron and margot robbie. across the uk next week as the it reminded me a little of the film to die for, d rifts across the uk next week as the drifts its way southwards on monday which is a very good film. morning. the northern areas, it will be milder on monday morning. in contrast with further south where we nicole kidman made that film back in have a frost from the middle and the 90s which is a very good and southwards. there could be in mist very overlooked film. this takes the story and it leads and fog patches by this stage, they will still be left on monday morning you through it in a way that and the sun will come out. more of a breeze for scotland and northern pastiches the infotainment style. ireland, cloud for western scotland. you feel like you are being given a lot of information mild in the north—east of scotland. as the story progresses. at the centre of it is this idea of silence that everyone kind of knows what's going on but nobody let‘s look further into next week. is able to speak out the first thing you will notice is because there is this poisonous culture, this character who seems where has the sun chang gone? we to be unassailable. have cloudy skies across the uk. the film is also interesting about the beginning of the relationship
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between trump and fox news. in the light of everything that has little or no rain and because of the cloud it would be as cold at night. happened with that relationship, it is very interesting the way in which the film sets it up and initially, it is an adversarial one—in—ten girls in the uk thing, but you can see people has resorted to using thinking "oh, improvised sanitary products because they cannot this guy thinks the things we think afford to buy it. and this guy is somebody we should be getting behind." that‘s according to the charity plan international. it's a really interesting film ‘period poverty‘, as it‘s known, but if the performances were not affects nearly a third of young as good as they were, women in the uk and campaigners have i think you might start to see long been calling for the government the flaws in the drama more, to tackle the problem. but the performances are really good. from monday, products will be made 0k. available to schools i really bought into it as a result. and colleges across england in a government—funded scheme. plus, it is a really timely we can speak to the minister story and quite shocking, for children and families, but very engrossing. michelle donelan. all right. terrence malick for your second choice. where do you stand on him? i like what i've seen, but i've not seen huge amounts, so i'm not the bestjudge. so, how will this work? as of he has been off the boil monday, schools and colleges will be for a few years. able to order those free sanitary in fact, for a few films. you look at prince of cups. people think of badlands and those great films, products so that we can really try everything up to the thin red line. and reduce the stigma around this is a partial return to form. periods, but also allow them to have
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access. there are a number of a true story of children that can‘t afford to access a austrian protester. he refused to swear allegiance to these, but also there are those who forget them, get caught short and we hitler in world war ii. we begin with the delicate life really wa nt forget them, get caught short and we really want to make sure that with him and his partner starting a family. nobody‘s education is being clouds gather overhead and then becomes a battle of conscience and will. disrupted due to something as normal quite literally cloud cover overhead. the community turn on him asa disrupted due to something as normal as a period in today‘s age. disrupted due to something as normal as a period in today's age. we spoke to amika george earlier, she started for refusing to fall in. the film was originally called the campaign in 2017 and has been working to get this process under radigan, the place where the home way. she was talking about the fact was set, but the new title comes from elliott, that schools have to opting for so the film declares itself to be a celebration this. why isn‘t this compulsory? one of a quieter defiance and one of the questions he asks of the things you brought up was if is "what is the point? what is the point? do you think it will make a difference?" the head teacher isn‘t aware of the the point the film makes is not unlike the central point of it's a wonderful life — just issues or perhaps isn‘t easy to talk being a decent man is important. it is beautifully shot to, why isn‘t this compulsory for and beautifully scored. i thought rather overuse of music. schools? i do urge all schools to
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it has a religious element get involved and there will be and if you didn't notice the religious element, don't worry, e—mailed on monday. really, this is the score will tell you. about schools and colleges making the music choices will tell you the decisions to suit their there is something religious going on here. ok! students. it will not not suit i like it up to a point. anyone, well it? there are a number it does have a lot of the kind of of schools and colleges that already do this anyway so they might have their own provisions in place. this scheme is based on what is happening stuff of hand—held voice—over heart on its sleeve stuff. on scotland so we have based it on i think it is an important story about defiance and it is a story the evidence. schools and colleges have taken it up there. i am about standing up for the thing you believe in, even when everyone confident that they will do. i will around you turns against you. review it personally twice throughout the contract to make sure and i think it is really found they are doing that. we can malick back on track certainly change it if they are not. after the last couple of films which were just self—indulgent waffle. this is designed to break down those weathering with you, which i read is the highest—grossing film injapan? barriers to education, to ensure last year. terrifically successful. that something as a period —— as he made your name which you remember i reviewed a couple of years ago? directed by makoto shinkai, set in a period of rain simple asa that is threatening to drown tokyo. that something as a period —— as simple as a period is disrupting we have a young hero things. could you make this compulsory? i would look at the who runs away from home.
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reasons as to why, did they have he gets to tokyo to start a new lfie their own provisions in place, and where he falls in love is it being as effective a qb? i from a distance with a young girl who he believes is a weather maiden. as in, she can affect the weather. competent confident they will be here is a clip. whoa. opting into this. are you surprised at how long it is taken for this to happen? in a way, yes, as a woman of watch. course i think it is unbelievable that we have this barrier to it's gonna clear up. huh? education. periods are something that happened regularly and is a very normal part of life, but i think it is fantastic news that this government has backed that up, put the money behind it and are rolling out a scheme based on the evidence hey, what do you mean by...? and more work than scotland and based on the research that the department did last year, as well. minister for children and families, thank you forjoining us. what?! you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. former editor of the news i should say, that is the english language dub because i saw it of the world phil hall is here to tell us what‘s
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in the original version. caught their eye. let‘s have a look at the stories we that is the version i would advise people to watch. i thought this was really didn‘t get to in the last hour. fascinating firstly because, like your name, it is a young love let‘s look at the story about a story, but it is connected clamp—down in pub crawls in a couple to a global event. secondly, it looks beautiful. of places where people do that quite even that was gorgeous! a bit. the spanish authorities have passed a law that now i close —— even seeing it on a small screen, it is really beautiful. it has a great musical score. i'm sure you have all of the that will outlaw serving more than composer's albums. sorry! the music is really, really good and relates its tone of the film itself. i found it enchanting. i love the way it's a love story three drinks to a person at a time, and the wider fantasy of it all. no more happy hours. presumably, it is aimed at a young adult audience but i thought it was fully terrific and i hope it finds its audience here as well. this didn‘t happen before because it was about money. you have to praise fantastic! sticking with the theme of things them for doing this. how do you that are visually stunning. visually, this is absolutely extraordinary. police it? how do you stop a pub did you find it overwhelming? crawl? i suppose if it is organised, extraordinary! the whole thing about if there is a group that is advertised as such, butjust a group
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the world war i drama is that it of people that...? plays out as if one shot. it is not. but it plays out as if... it is did you find it immersive? advertised as such, butjust a group i did, but i didn't find it of people that. . . ? you could see it as emotionally traumatic adding to the tension. it is all as i thought it was going to be. 0h, 0k! about the intention, isn‘t it. i was stunned by the visuals adding to the tension. it is all but then my other half trained about the intention, isn't it. we talked in the last hour about the in camera work and spent the whole time going "this is extraordinary!" press coverage of the duchess of the camera work is extraordinary. sussex. he picked up on this piece. it is the telegraph. the pictures yes, yes, so that is what we came tell the story. does meghan want a out discussing. i thought the score was great as well, but i really did think — i was suspicious because the whole quieter life or doesn‘t she? the one—shot thing sounds like it could be a gimmick. even though it is not one shot. picture in the top right—hand corner was taken yesterday with her pilates you think of specter as well, teacher. she published it herself on following james bond, but i forgot early on that it was a stylistic format. ijust i just felt that you were seeing the their new website. also, there are a world unfold as these two central characters saw it. constantly discovering things as they couple of charity visits. she is discovered them. see it on a big screen. trying to control every message around herself. they have announced that is what it is all about. see it they are going to use young
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on the biggest possible screen, do not wait for dvd. and i love your choice of dvd this week as reporters and the traditional reporters and the traditional pain and glory, dvd. reporters pushed to one side. young, it is the new almodovar. what i love about it is it's co ntrolla ble reporters pushed to one side. young, a semi—autobiography. controllable reporters. it is about controlling the message and having it is the most vulnerable i have to have complete control of a cool ever seen antonio banderas. site. i suppose on one side people yes, yes. you really feel... might say that makes sense if you you see his pain, his growth, his nostalgia for the past. are railing against the media and you get a sense his body how they dealt with you, instinctively you are saying i will is failing him and i could listen ta ke instinctively you are saying i will take more control. but they said to his voice for — they wanted a quiet life. they went that sequence early on, just spellbinding. anatomy and geography. yes, yes! to canada for six weeks are totally left alone. if you want to go out absolutely loved it. again, it looks beautiful. and promote yourself you promoting it is the whole works. yourself falsely and i think the when have you ever seen a almodovar that does not look beautiful mr mark even the ones that are not that press a re yourself falsely and i think the press are entitled to check you out. great still look beautiful. see you next week. enjoy your cinema—going, she promoted this letter to her whatever you choose to see. it isa it is a cracking week. enjoy it. goodbye.
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father, and now comes out that this letter was very hard to her father. reporters should be allowed to question whether she is telling the truth or not. do you think this will find its place? she is challenging the media, how the royalfamily is. attention has been put on them in unprecedented levels. i think next year we will see every move analysed. megan marco is very much a product of hollywood, she enjoys the fame and the spotlights. whether that goes on with the royal family, we will see. stay with us, headlines coming up. that goes on with the royal family, we will see. we used to look after paul gascoigne in my company and he hello, this is breakfast isa paul gascoigne in my company and he is a very gentle man, he is a very with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning.
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here's a summary of today's main gentle man. he can't drink now and stories from bbc news. we all wish him well. he is a lovely with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, character. he has struggled with ocd the government has announced that and has omitted that —— has admitted a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on the 31st of january. borisjohnson will also chair that he has had his issues. harry a cabinet meeting in the north of england, before making a special redknapp is still supporting him. address to the nation. what a lovely story that is. you meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves the eu has raised look after people‘s pr and advise them, when you think somebody is in more than £200,000. a vulnerable position with mental the chancellor has admitted that not health issues, you have a just say, say out of this and avoid the media. all businesses will benefit from brexit and firms will have to adjust live a private life. that is one of to new regulations. javid made the the key messages. the problem with comments in today's financial times paul is that he can‘t. he is always where he warned manufacturers there out there. he is absolutely full of will not be alignments with the eu. the government is yet to do this —— life all the time. i can be trying to play football with him on a agree on a future trading computer game and he just was taking arrangement with the eu. free sanitary products are to be it like it was an fa cup final. that made available to all schools and colleges in england from monday to tackle the issue of ‘period is what we did with him, actually. poverty‘. it's estimated that one we advise and to keep a low profile. in ten girls are unable to afford period products. he can‘t resist it.
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the government—funded scheme has been welcomed by campaigners. british scientists have told the bbc we advise and to keep a low profile. that the number of people infected he can't resist it. thank you. bya new virus in china is far greater than official figures this is breakfast. suggest. there have been fewer than 50 we‘re on bbc one until 10.00am this confirmed cases of the coronavirus morning, when matt tebbutt takes — but the experts estimate the true over in the saturday kitchen. matt, what‘s on the menu? figure is closer to 1,700. dr peter daszak — an expert in emerging diseases — says it may have come from bats. good morning, how are you to? we are at that point in the morning when it looks like the virus the hunger is kicking in. it is the is closely related to sars. point in the morning when you are since sars emerged, people have least welcome in my view. no offence been developing vaccines and drugs to work against sars taken. today‘s‘s special guest is but this illness is difference we don't know if those ben elton. good to have you here, drugs and vaccines work. ben. my early memories of comedy was so the risk is that if it begins to spread and is lethal watching you on riding ice live, and we do not have the capacity to control it. saturday night live. one of the crew police are appealing for help to find two thieves mentioned it to. we will talk to you who were involved in a dramatic attempted burglary at a jewellery shop in west london. ina bit. mentioned it to. we will talk to you in a bit. we will talk about that it was a bit later on, food heaven and three people drove a range rover through the front window food how. i love chips, potatoes, of the store in shepherds bush, before breaking display cases
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with a sledgehammer. one offender was detained by shoppers as he attempted to flee yorkshire puddings, batter, stodgy and was jailed for ten years, stuff. not a big fan of fashion but police are still looking for the two others involved. trends, the fennel thing. stuff. not a big fan of fashion trends, the fennelthing. i stuff. not a big fan of fashion a law has been passed banning pub trends, the fennel thing. i can't crawls and happy hours in three stand capers and balsamic vinegar. i popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. try to avoid flaky fishes and i'm not too fishy, i don't want it to restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of playa de palma fishy. you like starch and toad in and magaluf in majorca and sant antoni in ibiza. the hole. goodness gracious, i try the regional government says it's the first legislation of its kind in europe. to eat more healthily but it is a struggle. we also had to rate chefs. time is 6.32 and time to look at the sport with holly. we spoke yesterday —— we had to rate chefs. about ann stokes and he has been at it again. a century on day two of the third test in south africa but the third test in south africa but the other man next to him excites struggle. we also had to rate chefs. -- we had to rate chefs. burns people. ollie pope. hejust turned leaks. what if you got at the bar? i 22 years old and scored his maiden test century, the youngest inglis —— have read, white and an orange wine as well. have you? english batsman to do that since
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alistair cooke. it is easy to be excited about the future with booing spritz is its? you are in charge of someone excited about the future with someone might that in the what their needs at the end of the show. it is a cunning plan! it has team. a century apiece for ben stokes and ollie pope that left england in a commanding to be something blackadder related. position going into day three stay with us, the headlines of the third test in port elizabeth. andy swiss reports. first, ben stokes at his blistering best. so long it ended up bouncing are coming up. down a nearby road. new balls please? not quite. one intrepid fan finally retrieved it. stokes did his best to lose it again and that took him to 4000 test runs and another landmark soon beckoned. and that is 104 ben stokes. that is why he has just been named the world's best player. a superb 124 stokes. and there was soon another centurion to any two—year—old ollie pope showing any two—year—old ollie pope showing hello, this is breakfast with a composure way beyond his years. —— charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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it‘s 9:34am. 22—year—old ollie pope. and after here‘s a summary of this reaching his first test 100 he morning‘s main news. with less than two weeks started to have a bit of fun. the to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that english camp loved it, south africa a clock will be projected not so much. pope later said he onto downing street to count down to brexit on the 31st of january. could not remove the smile from his borisjohnson will also chair a cabinet meeting in the north of england, face after steering england to a before making a special hefty 499. it is a celebration, to address to the nation. be honest. i need to get rid of a meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves bit of energy. it was a special the eu has raised moment and it was great to look up more than £200,000. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools and colleges and see the board in the change room in england from monday to tackle and see the board in the change room and seeing how happy we were. it was the issue of ‘period poverty‘. something we enjoyed in the change it‘s estimated that room, enjoying each other‘s success. one—in—ten girls are unable to afford period products. the south african batsman had a the government—funded scheme has mountain to climb and they soon been welcomed by campaigners. heavy rain and thunderstorms have stumbled. don bess struck twice, lashed parts of eastern australia dousing some long—burning some start for him, for bushfires, but bringing a new threat of flooding. there have been downpours england. in the states of queensland, all—rounder georgia elwiss is back victoria and new south wales, in the england women's squad where wildfires have scorched millions of hectares for the twenty20 world cup of land since september. in australia, which starts we can speak now to michelle hill, at the end of next month. she replaces spinner kirstie gordon in the only change since the recent who lives in the gold coast.
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series win over pakistan. england are playing under a new coach and hoping to win one of those who has witnessed first the title for the first time since 2009. hand, michelle, the effect of these it is going to be a fantastic rains and describe what you have tournament. there are competitive seen. rains and describe what you have seen. major flooding. lots of flooding all over the place. teams across the board. you have torrential downpours, just amazing. india who are looking really good, south africa, a first round match roof caved in. cars fully submerged. thatis south africa, a first round match that is a big game for us and they are playing quite well from what i the pictures we are showing right have seen through wb btl competitions. new zealand looked now, michelle, are fast flowing dangerous as well. there are so many waters. this is a theme park. can good teams it will be an exciting you explain what this place is and what the effect of the reins has competition and we will definitely have to play well. been? this theme park is called if you're watching a premier league match today, you may well see movie world. it is owned by warner the referee using the pitchside var monitor. brothers. it is probably our michael oliver is the only ref to have used one this season — equivalent of a disneyland, i guess. and that was in the fa cup match between crystal palace and derby. the guidance was to avoid as you can see, the big huge ride in using them, because it could slow down the pace of the game, the background there. we live next but they've now been told door to this theme park so yes. all they should be checked for red card decisions,
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when the final say should go roads in and out were actually cut. to the on—field referee. it's scottish cup fourth we have lived there for ten years, round weekend — and rangers never ever ever seen began their campaign by seeing off third—tier stranraer last night. stranraer are bottom we have lived there for ten years, never ever ever seen floods like that. that is the car park and of scottish league one — and they managed to frustrate rangers untiljust before half time, ground surrounding the theme when scott arfield poked in the opening goal. flooded. we are seeing if you people ajermain defoe penalty in some of the waters there finished thejob. cavorting around. but the question stuart bingham enjoys a late night, it would seem. is, there are cars deep under water. he made a stunning recovery where people injured ? is, there are cars deep under water. where people injured? where they at the masters snooker, able to be evacuated in time? they coming from 4—1 down we re able to be evacuated in time? they were evacuated in time, yes. just so to beat kyren wilson 6—4 and reach the semi—finals. the match finished at ten past people understand, in times of the midnight, having started at seven geography, this is an area that o'clock in the evening. bingham will face david gilbert this hasn‘t been hit by the bushfires as afternoon, after shaun murphy takes on ali carter — both matches other parts of australia have. that is correct. we actually had are live across the bbc. bushfires originally back in we're less than 24 hours away from the return of one october, but ours were nowhere near of the biggest name as devastating as the ones down in new south wales and victoria, in in mixed matrial arts. recent times. we are nowhere near the bushfires. that is a shame,
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—— martial arts. conor mcgregorfights in las vegas in the early hours because they desperately need the of tomorrow morning. he's suggested he'll be earning rain in those areas. i do believe a record 80 million pounds for his fight against donald they have received some rain but ‘cowboy‘ cerrone at ufc 246 — nowhere near as much as we received it's the irishman's first last night. thank you very much, michelle for your time this morning. bout in over a year. seeing images of what is now a flood we haven't really had a big situation. not necessarily in places discussion of what the exact fight where they need the rain but will be welcome in some places. ijust feel strategy is in terms of taking him down in the first round, back like if you live in those scorched and flooded places it is just punches, big punches, it is going to relentless. thank you forjoining us bea punches, big punches, it is going to be a master class, he will be at on breakfast. there is good news for have a lot of pressure from the get go and it will not let up. an amateur golfer hit the shot england‘s cricket team. of the day at the pga tour event they began day three this week in la quinta. of the third test with a lead of 439 laurent hurtubise was born with one arm. runs over south africa. he started playing golf at the age of 11 and he hit this glorious hole and they took two wickets in one at the fourth hole. in the first half an hour — this is one of the tournaments ollie pope, after his century where amateurs play alongside the professionals — his partner was three—time pga tour winner troy merritt, yesterday, with a great who said it was the coolest experience he'd had
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on a golf course. reaction catch there, cannot beat a hole in one. that to dismiss dean elgar, feeling is fabulous. and it was not off the bowling of dom bess. his first time either. he has done it for. quite a good golfer. and captain faf du plessis lasted just six balls before he went the same way — apparently. and this is a brilliant event but it will be an another catch for pope and that‘s extraordinary day. the youth olympic four wickets for bess now — games in switzerland. most 16—year—olds might be preparing south africa are 109—4. for their exams and spending time with their friends, south africa are ——109—5. but mani cooper is taking on a very different challenge. it‘s scottish cup she is aiming to be britain's first fourth round weekend — ever female olympic ski jumper and rangers began their campaign by seeing off third—tier stranraer when she competes in last night. the youth games in lausanne. stranraer are bottom nick hope has been to meet her. of scottish league one — but they managed to frustrate they leap from 70 — 90 metre hills, rangers untiljust before half time, when scott arfield poked in the opening goal. ajermain defoe penalty reach speeds of over 60 mile an hour finished thejob. and can travel a hundred metres stuart bingham enjoys a late night, before landing. there is it would seem. thrillseeking and then there is ski he made a stunning recovery at the masters jumping. and this 16—year—old is the snooker, coming from 4—1 down first british woman to ever to beat kyren wilson 6—4 attempted at an olympics. and reach the semi—finals. first british woman to ever attempted at an olympicsm first british woman to ever attempted at an olympics. it is quite scary and you do have jumps
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where it lifts you up and you get the match finished at 10 past midnight, having started at 7 o‘clock in the evening. the timing right, you get the air and the positioning right and you bingham will face david gilbert this just have a smile on your face when afternoon, after shaun murphy you land it. one sport is not enough takes on ali carter — both matches are live across the bbc. for this teenager who took up nordic combined after moving to austria more than £20,000 has been with herfamily combined after moving to austria with her family in 2012. combining raised for a rugby league the two is very special. ski player who suffered a career—ending jumping, you have to be explosive injury nearly a week ago. when you jump out, you have to be hull kr‘s mose masoe needed emergency surgery after suffering a serious spinal concentrating as well and injury in a friendly match last weekend. cross—country you need endurance and sprints, you need the pace so you tony smith is the head coach can keep up. when you push yourself at the club, and hejoins us now. afterwards you feel so good, feeling that yes, i did itand tony, thank you forjoining us here afterwards you feel so good, feeling that yes, i did it and that went well. think of ski jumping and you on brexit this morning. watching would probably picture eddie the what happened last weekend, it looked like a pretty innocuous eagle edwards in the 1988 calgary tackle, what exactly happened? yes, winter olympics. things have changed in 32 years but he still follows it it was. it is a tackle that you closely and he had this message for probably see numerous times in any manny ahead of her own historic ski jumping bid. i have just match. unfortunately it went a manny ahead of her own historic ski jumping bid. i havejust heard little wrong for mose masoe and he through the grapevine that many
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cooper is taking part in the nordic combined for great written. i want has got three artificial discs in to wish her the very, very best of his neck from injuries from years luck. have fun. enjoy it. from the gone by. he has been able to get moment it starts to the moment it clea ra nce to gone by. he has been able to get clearance to play with those finishes. jump well, good luck, i artificial discs. but when they were hope you do well. that is amazing to pinched or put in the position that think that is really cool. i dojump put some pressure on it, one of the discs broke and caused some damage further than think that is really cool. i dojump furtherthan him, think that is really cool. i dojump further than him, however, which is quite cool. he put the sport on the to mose masoe‘s spinal. from there, map all those years back. how much he was left immediately paralysed do you want to do that now and for women in the uk? i want kids to and from there he has had a successful operation in terms of start nordic combined because i think it is a great sport. i wanted their now some feeling within his to get bigger and i want to improve limbs and some of his limbs and we and get goals to go to bigger are hoping that he continues to competitions, continental cups, world cups in the next olympics. few progress. but as to how far that would doubt she has both the talent progression goes, we are all yet to find out. we have been told career and tenacity to achieve those dreams. ending, but from what we have heard you can watch live and read here, he is lucky to be coverage of lausanne 2020 today and through to wednesday on the bbc alive really. how is he happy
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moments. —— how lucky is he? iplayer, sport website and app. her delightful smiling attitude alive really. how is he happy moments. -- how lucky is he? is a strong positive human being and he belies the nerve that you must have is just trying to make everybody to do that sport, doesn't it? she else at ease around him and that makes him a very special individual doesn't feel it, though does she? i think that is part of the skill, that you just do not have the fear under the circumstances. i don‘t when you stand at that incredible think it is life—threatening, but it height. not to mention the gradient. and the speed. just remarkable. and was certainly mobility threatening and we are still not sure how far 80 eagle they're sending a little that improvement will go. it is message. quite a nice touch. going to be a long process. he has been shifted from intensive care somebody in barnsley got a lot more when he was tackled by a into wakefield. the national spinal great—grandmother. he had stolen a centre there. from there he has got mountain bike get a pensioner six weeks on his back and he will go wrestled it from him. this is the through various treatments and rehab treatments there. he is on the right moment the great—grandmother murray place and getting the right care and parker tussled with a 6—foot man who tried to sell her a stolen bike. 72 has got the right people around him. he is very positive and we are all yea rs old tried to sell her a stolen bike. 72 years old and five foot three marie
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very positive and hopeful for his future. you mentioned his fought with him for 60 seconds. we got right out into the road, halfway team—mates. it is a difficult time for them, for his family, and you up got right out into the road, halfway up the road and he was still hanging have had to introduce councils onto it, so was i. the bike, with because a lot of them witnessed what happened and very close to him too. over £1000 had been stolen from a 13—year—old boy. they are. most of them have been to over £1000 had been stolen from a 13-year-old boy. it was spur of the moment, knowing the young boy was coming back for his bike. so i was see mose masoe and they all feel better for that because mose masoe thinking that i will not let go is so special at making them feel because he is on his way to collect better and that has been his focus and he has asked them to get on with his bike. mary has worked at this things and do the best and as you can hear in the background, or antique shop for four years. she suspected the bike was stolen and probably see in the background, they are coming together and we are quickly checked on a local facebook site. mother and son then showed the trying to, you know, make this, you man the website and told him the bike was being confiscated. but when know, a united front. we are going to help him through and he is helping us though as well. we have daniel left the shop a short time later, the man returned to retrieve the bike. but thanks to marie's councillors, sporting chance have been fantastic and the benevolent fund in rugby league cares, and courage, it was eventually returned organisations like that but i was to its rightful owner. you are being there to support the players, as called a hero. how does that make you feel? i don't think i am. ijust
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well as mose masoe and mose masoe‘s don't like the thought of somebody stealing, especially from a family and we are royally grateful 12—year—old boy, by force, taking for the support we have been given. his bicycle, his pride and joy, that there have been donations and support that you mentioned earlier, in my eyes was just so wrong. his bicycle, his pride and joy, that in my eyes wasjust so wrong. the boy's grandfather says the family but he has got a long way to go, he was relieved to get the bike back. and his family were overwhelmed by he was absolutely over the moon. he the love that has been given. he did not expect to see it again. he thoroughly deserves it. you just thought that that was it. that it was gone. what a wonderful woman. mentioned the support and donations, it is over £24,000 that has been the bravery. she has really gone out raised already. just how important is that money to him right now?m ona limb. the bravery. she has really gone out on a limb. a 23-year-old doncaster man was arrested in connection to is that money to him right now?m is going to be important for now. it this matter no charges were brought. is going to be important for now. it is going to be important for now. it is going to be important for the future. he has got some family that have been flown over from australia, mari has continued her crime—fighting crusade and has since apprehended other shoplifters, proving she will not give up easily where he... family from various without a fight. parts of the world. it is also for his children and his children‘s i want her on my side. yes, don't future. we are not to know how long mess with mari, what a message. what a brilliant woman. i am this is going to take. it is going
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to ta ke this is going to take. it is going to take time. we are all hopeful it mess with mari, what a message. what a brilliant woman. iam in admiration. darren is taking a look is going to be a speedy recovery. at the weather now. did you like but what the recovery means, we are that story? i like every story this not sure. he has got young children and a young one on the way. he is going to need support and we are not morning, naga! really? i'm glad you sure about where he is going to get do! it is cold out there this his income. all those things we are trying to make it as comfortable for morning if you are going to be his family and mose masoe‘s future, stepping out it is frosty across the country with probably a colder night not only has immediate future. we to come tonight. the weather is changing, at last it is drying off. wish him all of the best and a we have a lot of dry weather this recovery and tony, thank you very weekend, some sunshine around as much forjoining us. it is an well, which would be a welcome incredible story and it is one of change too, and the winds are turning lighter. the downside is it those things that touches a lot of isa people because anyone who plays turning lighter. the downside is it is a bit colder and there will be sport of know someone who plays some frost around each morning as sport, it was such an innocuous well. we have been used to rain and tackle, and it is that feeling of it areas of low pressure but these two can happen to anyone. areas of low pressure but these two are actually moving away from the uk and we have got an area of high pressure building in, settling things down. around the top of it there is a breeze blowing and a games outside our studio right now flowing some showers into scotland, is that it is very beautiful
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some wintry showers here, and one or outside. —— a glimpse outside our two for northern ireland over the irish sea to north—western england studio. a moment of time when we but they tend to fade away through the day. there will be some sunshine need it most. darren, you take us around, maybe turning hazy for from that moment of calm. we are all northern ireland, wales and the south—west later on. those transported by that picture and then temperatures are down to 6— eight so you have those icy fields behind thatis temperatures are down to 6— eight so that is colder than we have seen you. this is the contrast i am recently but those temperatures are about what we should expect at this seeing. this is a contrast. time of year. with clearing skies and light winds through the evening and light winds through the evening actually, in northern ireland, it and tonight, we find the blues was the coldest night so far. developing widely. that is frost. widespread frost tonight. tim spoke temperatures down to —5 one half degrees. this picture gives you an easily down to —2, —3, but impression of how cold it is this exceptionally the north—west corner of scotla nd exceptionally the north—west corner of scotland because while we have morning. particularly outside towns high pressure and clear skies and cities. we have seen overnight, the position of the high temperatures in berkshire down 2—3 means we are drawing in slightly milder atlantic air and more cloud also. there is a complete change in into the north—west of scotland, our weather this weekend. the wild increasingly through the day, so not wet windy weather has gone and it as cold here. otherwise a lot of should be dry for the most part. sunshine but with the change in the some trial and not as windy but it wind direction there is a chance of will be colder. there are some areas one or two showers floating with the of cloud you keep an eye on. this eastern coast and southern parts of one for example and shower clouds the north sea but a sunny day, a dry coming into scotland. but instead of low pressure that has brought all of
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the wet windy weather, we have high day pretty much across the board, pressure building in. we have not had that for quite some time. around those temperatures seven or eight the high pressure, there is still a degrees, possibly double figures in the north—west corner of scotland where we have got more cloud and quarterly read into scotland and breeze. and the cloud and breeze some showers there. they will become will continue as we head into the start of the new week. i pressure fewer and some sunshine arrives. not getting squeezed away a little bit resting nine the shower should fade what it means quite significant away as well. it is a bit hazy from differences early monday. with the that cloud coming into northern frost more likely across the midlands well southward, further ireland, wales and the south—west. otherwise it is blue skies and north it will get milder and pretty mild actually in the north—west of sunshine. temperatures at six to 8 scotla nd mild actually in the north—west of degrees and that is what we should scotland again. here we have got be getting at the time of year. it more of a breeze and more cloud coming in but with some sunshine further south, the morning could does get cold very quickly start with mist and fog patches. overnight. dry, clear skies, does get cold very quickly overnight. dry, clearskies, light watch out for those. they should winds and it is a recipe for widespread frost really. even in lift readily. again, a little on the chilly side, seven or eight degrees towns and cities, —20 —3 is likely. for most of the country and double the exception is the highlands and figures in the far north of islands where it will be mild here. scotland. heading into next week, we find the high pressure tends to cloud over. there will not be as much sunshine around but it is shifting position slightly, follow the lines all of the way round into essentially going to be dry and those temperatures by day around the lines all of the way round into the southern north sea and they could be one or two showers here on eight or nine degrees or so and it will not be as cold overnight sunday morning. they should stay off because we will not have the clear shore. apart from that and the cloud skies. unlike at the moment, and and a stronger wind we have in the
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unlike tomorrow morning. back to north—west of scotland, will have you. at least it will be lovely and light winds, a frosty start, it‘s sunny tomorrow. thank you, darren. going to be crisp, cold winter‘s we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00. day. those temperatures typically now it's time for the latest seven or eight breeze. double technology news in click. figures in the north—west of scotla nd figures in the north—west of scotland where it is cloudier and windier too. that‘s milder air will topple its way into the uk next week. we still start on monday with low pressure in the south. it means quite a contrast between north and south. northernmost part of the uk seeing milder and cloudier breezy weather. further south they will be at the southern end of the las vegas strip is the mandalay bay hotel. a frost. there could be some mist is the mandalay bay hotel. and fog patches by monday morning slowly lifting and then the sunshine now, on october 1, 2017 this developed in many places. with that was the scene of a tragedy — breeze, though, further north, we the us' deadliest—ever have more cloud for northern mass shooting. ireland, particularly western a gunman in one of the rooms opened scotland. very mildly for north east fire on a crowd of concert—goers and scotland. not as mild putting across the road. and scotland. not as mild putting and wales at that frost. he killed 58 people temperatures again at seven or 8 and injured more than 400. degrees. if we look ahead into next week and there is a significant change here. where is all the the incident sparked a review sunshine gone? it is going to be
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of security across the city but now, clouding over once again. there is it's being taken further. little or no rain. that is great news for the farmers who really want richard taylor has been looking to get out into the field. there is at whether technology can stop would—be perpetrators temper to still around eight or 9 in their tracks. degrees belief but more cloud around here's the dilemma. at night, it‘s nothing to be as cold how do you keep the world's and frosty. —— temperatures still entertainment capital safe around eight or 9 degrees. it feels for its revellers without turning it into a party pooping security fortress? like it has been raining nonstop the multisensor covert threat recently. cloud, no sunshine but no rain, we will take it. have a good detection is a next—generation weekend, see you. security solution. patriot one believes a bike thief in barnsley got it has the answer. more than he bargained using unobtrusive sensors for when he was tackled which generate information feeds by a 72—year—old great grandmother. that can be assessed to see mari parker wrestled the stolen mountain bike if someone is carrying a weapon. this vegas casino resort is now from the six foot thief, who was forced to flee empty handed. rolling out the technology which has been in testing for olivia richwald reports. the past two years. this is the moment great—grandmother mari parker tussled we have got various bits of hardware here. with a 6—foot man who tried the system can be discreetly placed in, say, a building entrance to sell her a stolen bike. or a turnstile. and unlike a metal detector, it creates an invisible fence you wouldn't 72 years old and five foot three, mari fought with him for 60 seconds. even know was there.
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we got right out into the road, so if i'm carrying a concealed halfway up the road weapon on my person, and he was still hanging onto it. or worse still with intent so was i. on an act of violence, or worse still, intent the bike, worth more than £1000, had been stolen from a 13—year—old boy. on an act of violence — it was just a spare of the moment the system, as it is deployed thing, knowing that the boy here invisibly in these planters, was coming back for his bike, the ai can kick in, making i didn‘t want it not to be here. a determination of whether this is benign i was thinking, i‘m not and alerting security authorities to take the relevant action. letting it go because he‘s on his way to his bike. the patscan device works mari has worked at her son daniel‘s on several levels. antique shop for four years, she had suspected the bike one sensor emits frequency was stolen and had quickly checked patterns that identify the shape of an object. on a local facebook site. it creates residency frequency objects —— frequency fields which mother and son then showed the man the website and told him the bike was being confiscated. can detect an object. another sensor creates a magnetic field and detects disturbances but when daniel left the shop as an object passes through. a short time later, the man returned but the real smarts lie in the ai algorithms. to retrieve the cycle. within seconds, they assess but, thanks to mari‘s courage, the sensor data against its own it was eventually returned database to figure out to its rightful owner. you have been called a hero, if weapons are being hidden. how does that make you feel? with daily shootings in the us i don‘t think i am, ijust and a knife crime epidemic don‘t like the thought in the uk, the allure of somebody stealing, of a system to keep us safe is certainly seductive. especially from a 12—year—old boy
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we want to be in public schools, hotels, university campuses. by force, taking his bike — we are now in the business his pride and joy. thatjust was so wrong in my eyes. the boy‘s grandfather says of rolling it out, north america the family was relieved to get the bike back. he was absolutely over the moon. he didn't expect to see it again. is the starting point, the uk market will be extremely important to us, particularly he just thought that when it comes to knives that was it, it is gone. because of the knife crime crisis. what a wonderful woman. the bravery. but groundbreaking is the tech is, she has really gone out on a limb. it is largely unproven. fantastic! how accurate is your system? a 23—year—old doncaster man was arrested in connection with this because when it comes to ai, matter but no charges were brought. the machine is only as is the data mari, though, has continued her , because when it comes to ai, crime—fighting crusade and has the machine is only as smart since apprehended other shoplifters, as the data proving she won‘t give up that you are feeding it. we have been out for a long time now easily without a fight. with tremendous partners like westgate who have allowed us olivia richwald, bbc news, barnsley. to get a lot of data here. we have built sufficiently large data holdings that we now have confidence in the accuracy of our systems. enough confidence that we are now into our first commercial deployment. our early adopters also understand that the systems get better a formidable lady! and better the more data is fed in, our next guest has been a regular so they are equally allowing us part on some of itv‘s most popular to ingest data for tv programmes for more than 20 training the system. years, but you may
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have never seen him. still, the system isn't100% accurate or foolproof. british sign language an assailant may well get interpreter alex duguid, into the premises another way who signs for coronation street entirely, or a weapon could be and emmerdale, received hidden in something different an mbe on tuesday. like a metal box. so an additional security and the duke of cambridge ‘signed‘ his congratulations whilst layer is needed. bestowing the honour. mr alexander duguid for services so if i'm openly brandishing to deaf people and to a weapon, that is where the eyes british sign language education. of the system kick in — a so—called machine vision where a security camera can make an assessment based on what is in my hand against its data base and if it finds it is likely to be a weapon, then it will trigger a relevant alert. the idea of augmenting human eyes with the smarts of computer vision is catching on globally. a number of outfits promising enhanced security through person alex is here to tell us and object detection. but understandably, that all about it, and we‘re also joined leaves many people uneasy. by ryan lewis from the charity deafway. we are very conscious of the fact ray williams will be interpreting that people don't want to live in a mass surveillance society. for us this morning. so there are very different ways good morning to you all. alex, could in which you can collect data. we don't capture any personal information or store you explain for us why it was so or distribute personal information.
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special that prince william signed we are looking for objects — to you as he was giving you your people are of no interest to us unless they are carrying a threat object. so what our ai has been trained honour? when prince william did sign to recognise is the threats. it is not making any determination on people or capturing personal congratulations to me, and then went information or generating a body image. i think that puts us on the right on to spell my name, it was a shock. side of that line between too much i think itjust showed from our surveillance and not future king and effort to actually wa nt to future king and effort to actually enough security. want to sign. i do hope it will inspire more people, you know, to ta ke inspire more people, you know, to take heed from that. and ryan, this is something you campaigned for and no, this is not a pair of goggles. work towards to get more people it is the prototype using british simon rich. yes, i of an air—purifying mask. the finished product fully agree with that and we want to will look like this. promote silent ridge to be used with claims it is 50 times more across the country and increase effective than the market—leading cycling mask, the ao air uses death awareness and death cultural nanotechnology and air pressure awareness and british sign language, to filter out harmful for the future. we need to try to particulate matter. groan that and see more people using apparently, the prototype is a lot it. -- less comfortable than the finished groan that and see more people using it. —— grow that and see more people version and this is a size too large using it. does it need to be used in
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and i need a smaller one. ifeel like my nose is being held and i probably sound like that. muscles? ryan has two daughters that it will take some getting used to but it is actually adjusting are deaf and for the future, according to my respiration rate, education is so important. i think so right now the fan speed is at 16%. now is the time to start looking at i can make the fan go up more if i want more air to be pumped. a british simon ridge gcse to make i feel like i'm at the dentist. people more aware of the language and make that —— a british sign imagine what i could do — i certainly couldn't run like this but maybe ride a bike. language gcse to make people more i don't know. it has five hours battery life and in time, the device aware language. in the past, there will be miniaturised. but despite the fact that i thought we re aware language. in the past, there i looked completely and utterly were a lot of people interested in ridiculous, it has actually trying to learn to sign because made it to the catwalk, there was government funding for featuring in new york further education. developing and seoul fashion weeks. languages. but over the last couple of years, that further education back on the show floor, there was also the sixth finger. funding for sign languages has been reduced. before we would have 20 or sixto is a device for people who have limited mobility in one hand, so could be due to a stroke 30 students sometimes in a or something like that. classroom, now 30 students sometimes in a classroom , now we 30 students sometimes in a classroom, now we are getting 67 or the way it works is, eight. i want to see more people you position the bad hand where it needs to grab something and this come along to those courses. joystick, which will be held especially front line staff in in the good hand, is used to be able places such as hospitals, shopping to close the device so you can
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actually pick something up. centres, places like that, those front line staff where death people one of the other benefits of this can approach them and —— deaf people is that it actually encourages somebody to use a hand which isn't functioning properly rather can approach them and —— deaf people than holding their arm in a position can approach them and —— deaf people can approach them and have that language. i‘m getting a gcse in where it is likely to get stiffer. schools. most people pick up french, but in the depths of one slightly more secret meeting spot, came this view into the future. german, italian, for me, ifeel they should be a bit more focus on this is a contact lens that british simon ridge because a chance of meeting a deaf person is higher provides augmented reality. apparently, it fits —— british sign language. like any other scleral or semipermeable contact lens. of meeting a deaf person is higher -- british sign language. can i ask you about your work with the soap this could be used for something like translation, the words operas, emmerdale and coronation would come up in front street? what are the particular of you when you are having challenges of signing when you are a conversation with someone. doing a drama? i think the biggest the idea is that this is all about invisible computing, that something like this should be less intrusive than having your phone in front of you. wow! challenges are translating it from that is incredible! english into british simon ridge. in a way, the fact that there there is a lot of brain work that is little enough information for it goes into that process. at a to not be totally distracting makes it better. translation work. british sign i think if they put too much up it language as a language is a language would become too overwhelming.
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while i wasn't allowed to wear it, in its own right as english is. just holding it up, i could see some british sign language has its own simple stats right before my eyes, which having been sceptical brand principles, different to the in advance, i was slang which. you have got to pretty blown away by. remember that when interpreting so how is it possible to fit all of this into the lens? those questions. where have you we've had to build our own wireless protocol between the contact lens and another wearable accessory, because we had to manage power and data and size of chip, been, for example, would translate and that accessory connects to you been where? if you are to your mobile phone or the cloud, to access additional computing resources and information. someone to you been where? if you are someone who hasn‘t learned sign it is very comfortable, fits language, in much of the same sense to your eye and corrects your vision when you wear it. as foreign—language as, it comes to so if you have a prescription, confidence. what would you say to we build the prescription into the lens. someone confidence. what would you say to someone who doesn‘t know how to sign but would like to know at least the heart rate data, speed, basics and has alex has said, you and even with your eyes shut, you would able to see this are much more likely to meet someone because it is lit up and obviously who is hearing impaired and you are the lens is sitting beneath your eyelid. it feels seriously sci—fi. going on holiday once or twice a and there you have it — year. i think at the minute, it what to wear, to see and feel the future. comes into the equality and
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diversity. we have a lot of people there. from different countries living never taken that photo before. within the uk, but if you were to the thing about coming to las vegas meet the diverse and, gesture with straight after christmas is you eat lots of food, followed them. awave, by lots more food. meet the diverse and, gesture with them. a wave, forms, like if you and chris fox has decided we re them. a wave, forms, like if you were to go to italy. you would mix that he is going to use technology to help knock him back into shape. how you would communicate. you would this is what he has found. feel they are patronising, a thumbs up feel they are patronising, a thumbs up or something like that, what are these three new apps are designed the basic you should learn?” to help with your fitness goals up or something like that, what are using image recognition, the basic you should learn? i don't machine learning and motion sensors. think it is patronising. it is but are any of these apps commune occasion and that is advanced enough to replace a personal trainer? important and it is making an effort i've come to the gym to find out. to build. there are different ways of the munich ageing and if you are due to italy, and you can't speak first up is vay sports which uses italian, you gesture a bit more you image recognition and a selfie point, you usual facial expressions. camera to make sure you're doing you bring your body language into the exercises properly. it, that applies to the deaf you choose a trainer and put the phone a few metres away community. alex is saying you had to and follow the instructions in your headphones. options, go along to a deaf awareness course, that is a good way great, i can see you. here we go with push—ups today. of learning about deaf culture and get into the starting position deaf people and what deaf people
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so i can se you at all times. —— get into the starting position like and what is culturally appropriate and what isn‘t. can i so i can see you at all times. touch them, can‘t i touch them? deaf based on what the camera sees, awareness touch them, can‘t i touch them? deaf the app gives you feedback aware ness cove rs to correct your form. touch them, can‘t i touch them? deaf you call that a rep? awareness covers that topic and your hips are a bit too high up! going along to evening classes at it also counts how many reps couege going along to evening classes at college or university to learn you do properly so you can track your progress. british sign language after that. nice work. you always start with the basic how are the back of the arms feeling? at the moment, the app only works level one, and then that progresses to level two and three and with body weight exercises so to move on to weight training, progresses up to level six. if you i'm trying gymfitty — a virtual trainer you can talk to. wa nt progresses up to level six. if you want your level one, i am more than i'm done. rest for two minutes. happy to teach you. what i want to how many reps did you do? ask is if there is a common mistake 10. well done! that people make when they are first let's do another set. trying to do some form of sign the app creates a bespoke workout tailored to your goals and it language with sometimes. you know, remembers how well you did last time, so you don't have to log your workout or write anything down. i want you to add another five kilograms to each side of the bar. up language with sometimes. you know, up in scotland, for example, the ping me when you are done. signs are different than they are in to relax, i'm finishing off with some yoga. this is yoganotch, which uses england. sign language varies motion tracking sensors regionally across the uk. london to detect my position signs will be different, i am from and correct my form which, fairwarning, is newcastle, ryan is from preston, the going to be terrible.
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not quite. signs are different where you go regionally. but scotland sign give me the chime, i'm doing it. chime. agreements like this, whereas we oh, i gota chime, i did it right. i'm not sure whether setting up sign like this and that could also these senses every time will take bea sign like this and that could also be a swearword down in england. for —— i'm not sure whether setting up these sensors every time will take people who don‘t know that, some of the zen out of yoga, sometimes they can feel a bit, oh, i although the company says it is more accurate than using thought that was a swearword. lovely image recognition. oh, come on. these apps certainly add a layer to see you all this morning and of interactivity to a workout, congratulations on your award. thank but can they match the kind you so much. of encouragement you get from a human personal trainer? and there you have it, that‘s all from a downward facing dog from a forward—facing fox. breakfast this morning. was that cheesy? we are in vegas, you know? roger and rachel will be back tomorrow morning from 6am. although next week, we won't be. from us, have a lovely weekend. goodbye. we're going to la. and there is more in the full—length version which you can see on iplayer. don't forget, you can find us all across social media, youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter. thanks for watching and we will see you in la.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 10.00am: the chancellor warns business leaders that there will "not be alignment" with eu rules in any post—brexit trade agreement and that some businesses will benefit while "some won‘t". a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. british scientists say the number of people already infected by a new virus
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emerging in china is far greater than official figures suggest. heavy rain and thunderstorms in australia help to tackle the bushfires but bring flooding to some areas. following campaigns, free sanitary products will be available to all schools and colleges in england from monday. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. after years of campaigning on period poverty — after fires, storms. afterfires, storms. heavy rain brings the risk of flooding in parts of australia. good morning — england in the land of pope and glory. a maiden test century for ollie pope has put them in complete control after day two of the third test in south africa. three scottish brothers break three records by rowing 3000 miles
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across the atlantic. hello and good morning. it is all change for this weekend. most places will be dry. some sunshine around but it will be quite old and there could be some frost around this morning and tomorrow morning. more details later on to —— quite cold.. it's saturday, the 18th of january. our top story — with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on the 31st of january. meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves the eu has raised more than £200,000. our political correspondent helen catt has more. it is here that the moment of brexit itself will be marked at 11pm on january 31. a light show and countdown will be projected onto the walls of downing street and live streamed on social media. borisjohnson is planning an address to the nation in the evening.
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in nearby parliament square, the union flag will fly on every flag pole. commemorative 50p coins will come into circulation. the government says it wants this to be a moment to heal divisions and reunite communities. a special cabinet meeting will take pace in the north of england. many brexiteers had hoped that this would be the focal point, however — big ben restored to chime at 11 pm. hundreds of thousands of pounds have been raised by the public towards the estimated half a million pound cost after borisjohnson told breakfast on tuesday he had an idea. we are working up a plan because there are some people who want to... i haven't quite worked it out. but downing street stepped back from the idea after the commons authority said there may be problem with accepting the money even if enough was raised. and we'll be speaking to conservative mp mark francois, who says the celebrations
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don't go far enough, in about 15 minutes' time. the chancellor has admitted not all businesses will benefit from brexit. sajid javid made the comments in today's financial times. let's speak now to our political correspondent, susana mendonca. so the suggestion here from the chancellor, just two weeks to go until we leave the eu, that not all business will benefit. he is talking about the issue of alignment with the eu on rules that affect business. and what we do not have any details on which specific rules would go but he basically says they will not be alignment on many of those rules. this is an issue of concern and has been so for many businesses here in the uk. just last year we had automotive, food and drink and pharmaceutical sectors talking about their concerns on this issue saying that if they were not aligned to eu rules that could be damaging to them. but the chancellor
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basically says that there will be some businesses that will struggle and these businesses have had since 2016 to plan and need to get themselves ready and adjusted. the problem is we do not know what the relationship will be like because, yes, we leave the eu in two weeks time in terms of the rules they will continue to be the same for the 11 months of a transition period and it is during the transition period we will get some indication from the government as to what the actual relationship with the eu will be like and what the trade deal will be like. for many businesses, being told that they will have to adjust, they know they will have to but they still don't know what they need to adjust to. free period products are to be made available to all schools and colleges in england, to support students who struggle to afford them. the government—funded scheme starts on monday and has been welcomed by campaigners. our education and family correspondent, frankie mccamley reports. campaigners gather, calling for an end to so—called just over two years ago outside downing street, campaigners gather, calling
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for an end to so—called period poverty. the shame of our periods needs to go. everyone has it. not the first time that concerns have been raised about the affordability of sanitary product, specifically for girls from lower income families. research has found nearly one third of teenage girls in school or college have or know someone who has been impacted by period poverty with more than half admitting they missed lessons because of their period for things like cramps, embarrassment or affordability. ultimately, if you are facing impossible decisions and struggling to make ends meet, trying to decide whether to pay your rent or heat your house then actually the question of purchasing menstrual product, although they are completely essential, becomes a second—tier priority. from monday, all primary schools, secondary schools and colleges in england will be provided with free period products for their students. the move follows scotland's
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announcement last year to spend £4 million on a similar initiative and in wales, just over £3 million was announced earlier this month to supply girls in primary and secondary schools with sanitary products. dangerous storms described as a once—in—a—century event have swept through some parts of eastern australia, dousing some long burning bushfires but bringing a new threat of flooding. downpours in queensland, victoria and new south wales where wildfires have scored millions of hectares of land since september. we can get the latest now from phil mercer who's in sydney this morning. so many were hoping for the rain but the impact of this on already scorched land is not great. in some parts australia has been praying for rainfor parts australia has been praying for rain for weeks and weeks and weeks. this fire crisis began back in september in queensland and parts of queensland have now had three times
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their monthly average of rain in just one night. there have been flash floods in parts of the gold coast and roads have turned to rivers and people have been forced to navigate flooded streets in boats. some of the fire zones here in new south wales have received this in rainfall but such is the precious nature of australia's whether some fire affected regions remain dry and there have been huge downpours here in sydney and it is very nice to see the grey sky but no sign of that bushfire smoke that has infiltrated the city sky so much recently. the authorities cautioned however that some of this rainfall, if it falls on fire grounds, it may run off because of the ash on the ground and will not be absorbed. so dozens ground and will not be absorbed. so d oze ns of ground and will not be absorbed. so dozens of fires continue to burn across australia's southeast and the authorities cautioned that although more rain is on its way this fire crisis is far from more rain is on its way this fire
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crisis is farfrom over. thank you very much. british scientists say that the number of people affected by a new virus in china is far more than the numbers even. they believe the truth is closer to 1700. one scientist says it may have come from that. —— from thats. it looks like the virus is closely related to sars. since sars emerged people have been developing vaccines and drugs to work against sars at this illness is difference we don't know if those drugs and vaccines work. so the risk is that if it begins to spread and is lethal and we do not have the capacity to control it. police are appealing for help to find two thieves who were involved in a dramatic attempted burglary at a jewellery shop in west london. three people drove a range rover through the front window
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of the store in shepherds bush, before breaking display cases with a sledgehammer. one offender was detained by shoppers as he attempted to flee and was jailed for ten years, but police are still looking for the two others involved. three brothers from edinburgh have set three new world records after rowing across the atlantic ocean in just 35 days. lachlan, jamie and ewan maclean are the fastest and youngest trio to row across the atlantic, and the first team of siblings to cross any ocean. they beat the previous record of a trio rowing the atlantic ocean by six days. i think these days you say that they smashed it, isn't that how you say it? we will catch up with one of them later on. so by the time they get here, they still have the energy to play bad pipes? and i think they
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had a ukulele as well to —— bagpipes. there will be more sunshine for some of us later this weekend and darren will have the details. cancer treatment comes with huge challenges, but dental problems are one of the less well known side effects of chemo and radiotherapy. now, there's a call forfree dental treatment for cancer patients, with a petition calling for change reaching more than 100,000 people in a week. michele solak—edwards is the woman behind it, and shejoins us now. there is a reason why you are the person to talk to about this because you are recovering from triple negative breast cancer, diagnosed in 2016 and that meant you had nine months of? two months of chemotherapy, not very pleasant. tell us what that involved. you expect to hear that it ravages the body because you are effectively
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poisoning the body to kill the cancer but the side—effect are not as well known. for me, i have osteoarthritis now in quite a few joint. i had minor dental issues but not too many. there have been many long—term side—effect for me and for many cancer patients as well. i got away relatively lightly compared to some people. you mention dental problems and this is what you campaignfor problems and this is what you campaign for now. what is the problem, specifically, in relation to people getting this treatment and the possible effects in terms of their teeth? the problems with getting treatment are that it is not free at the minute and if you have to give up work or you are on benefits that are not means tested, you have to pay for dental treatment and people do not realise the chemotherapy and radiotherapy and all the other life—saving treatments you need for cancer do have an effect on your mouth. if you start
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treatment and you have any problems with your mouth, you can get infections. and if you are undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy, you have no immune system. so you had some problems but not as bad as others? that is right. what happened. for me, i had a crumbling tooth and increased sensitivity. mine happened after chemotherapy and that is quite common. side—effects can go on for many years. one lady, 47 years old, she had a checkup before chemotherapy started and after chemotherapy started and after chemotherapy she had to have every single one of her teeth, barring four, removed and she now has two dentures. was she told that was as a result of the chemotherapy equal and she was not entitled to any help with the payment? she had to pay £3000. people are hearing what you account there and that story in particular you think obviously
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something should be different. what has been the rationale behind it not being part of nhs, not being paid for? i don't know. what i do know, i thought, when i brought this campaign forward, that dentist would burn effigies of me and say don't do this to us. actually the dental world a re this to us. actually the dental world are on board with this and it is amazing that they have identified that there is an issue. there is an also an issue that people cannot get in with nhs dentists unless they already have one. and that is to do with a wider problem of getting access to a dentist in the first place. absolutely. and the cost is a big factor. returning to your question, why has nothing been done about it before? i do not know. pregnant ladies get free dental care for one year. cancer patients do not get anything. what you the petition will do? it is great having support for this, obviously and you have campaigned it is important to you. you have a petition and then your mp
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has been supporting you with this as well, where does it go from here? sitting here on the sofa, we have spoken about nhs funding and it is in crisis. i'm not going to stop because the way that the nhs funds dental treatments is that there are seven regions throughout england and they are each given a budget and the directors of each region can decide how much they spend on dental care. it could be 1% it could be 50%. so really we are looking... it is not every single cancer patient that will need dental treatment, it really is not. half of us will be diagnosed with cancer but out of that not everybody will need dental treatment. yes, extra resources are needed from the nhs but it may not be as much as we think. there are going to be extreme cases and there will be cases like me where it is actually not that bad. the
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department of health and social care said that it will ensure by next year every person diagnosed with cancer will have access to personalised care including needs assessment. a care plan, well—being information and support. is that a good step forward? absolutely that isa good step forward? absolutely that is a step forward if it does include dental treatment because sometimes the mouth and dentistry is not foretold. it is thought of in the body. this is high quality dental care? that would be amazing. that is a step forward but i would like more, i want cancer patients to have priority dental treatment if they needed because it can prevent you from having your life—saving cancer treatments if your mouth is not in tip top condition, they will not start cancer treatment. it is imperative. great to talk to you this morning and good to see you looking so well. thank here's darren with a look at this morning's weather.
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there is some sunshine this weekend, i understand? oh, yes! sunshine this weekend, naga. it will be dry but it is pretty cold up there at the moment. we have a frost across many parts of the country. it is all change really for this weekend, for some time we have been used to wind and rain and mild weather but not so this weekend. most of us are going to be dry, the sunshine will be outcome the winds are falling lighter but it is getting colder as well. by day and particularly by night as we are seeing first thing this morning. some areas of cloud, thin, high cloud not far away from the uk. areas of low pressure too. one here and one to the north of scotla nd one here and one to the north of scotland but they are moving away and instead, i pressure is building. that is settling things down. around the top of it, breeze across scotla nd the top of it, breeze across scotland and wintry showers here and maybe some icy patches and the cello first thing for northern ireland heading into the north—west of england but the showers become fewer and a lot of sunshine around, a little hazy at times for northern ireland, wales and the south—west
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but a fine day to come for most of us. but a fine day to come for most of us. x— not sound too impressive but it is normalfor this us. x— not sound too impressive but it is normal for this time of year. what we have been seeing is not particularly normal. we have got the clear skies overnight and light winds and the showers fading away from scotland so a frost developing pretty widely. easily down to —2 or -3. not pretty widely. easily down to —2 or —3. not so much for the north—west of scotland, where we have got more of scotland, where we have got more ofa of scotland, where we have got more of a breeze and more cloud. that is coming around the area of white —— high pressure which is changing position slightly so this is mild atla ntic position slightly so this is mild atlantic air coming into the north—west of scotland and it will bring with it more cloud. and probably temperatures into double figures! elsewhere, brightand sunny. a frosty start. the chance of one or two showers commenced to some of those eastern coasts of the southern north sea but that is the exception to a generally dry and sunny picture. again, the temperatures for most of us 7—8. light winds continue for southern parts of the uk as we move into the beginning of next week. have the
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stronger mild wind coming into northern areas which means a change in the temperatures, really, across the northern half of the uk where it will be somewhat milder. further south, frost is likely. some mist and fog around on monday morning. watch out for that. it should lift through the morning and we will see some sunshine. cloud coming in, especially western scotland and maybe into cumbria and laid across northern ireland, where we have the mild atlantic winds, temperatures nine or ten and again, further south overnight. looking ahead, further into next week, the high pressure is getting eroded and it is also getting eroded and it is also getting contaminated with cloud. we will see much more cloud from tuesday onwards. little or no rain. the temperatures by day may lift a little to eight or nine degrees. but with more cloud around at night, we're not with more cloud around at night, we' re not really with more cloud around at night, we're not really going to have more much my —— much of a frost around but it should be dry which i am but it should be dry which i much my —— much of a frost around but it should be dry which i am sure
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many people is what they are looking forward to. back to you. thank you, darren. it is 18 minutes past seven. a countdown clock projected on to downing street, a commemorative coin and a special address to the nation — that's how the government says it intends to mark the day the uk leaves the eu. perhaps unsurprisingly, the plans haven't been universally welcomed, with some remainers criticising the celebrations as tone—deaf, while some leavers say the plans don't go far enough. let's speak now to conservative mp mark francois. hejoins us now. what do he joins us now. what do you hejoins us now. what do you make he joins us now. what do you make of what has been announced? this is official now and what will happen on january 31. first of all, the countdown clock projected onto downing street. good morning. thank you for having me on. it is all well and good and of course the prime minister should address the nation, leaving the eu is a historic moment. but on new year's eve you do not look at a countdown projected onto the wall. you look at big ben. and the wall. you look at big ben. and the reason we feel strongly about this is because under article 50, by
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law, we leave the european union and it isa law, we leave the european union and it is a specific moment. at 11pm gmt on the 31st. so for those who want to celebrate, some do, some do not, but for those who do, after all of these years, you need a clock to mark the moment. and it seems com pletely mark the moment. and it seems completely illogical to me and many of my colleagues in the house of commons that you would not look to the most iconic timepiece in the world which is big ben. some people may argue that if what is important here is what is going to happen in the future, boris johnson's approach now and the government's approach now and the government's approach now is entirely right which is they will hold a special cabinet meeting in the north of england which is symbolic in itself because of the change that will happen, he will be making a special address to the nation in the evening, he is getting on with the business of what is going to happen next and that is really what isn't that what actually matters? it was the prime minister who called for this on the bbc. a few days ago, when he said people
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should bunk a buck for big ben to bong. i saw him play it! the prime minister called for this crowdfunding campaign and we responded to his call so you cannot on the one hand asked the british public to pay for it and three days later go orbs! sorry! that is not what i meant! the prime minister started it and this is where we are. i checked the total before coming on air, we arejust a few i checked the total before coming on air, we are just a few pounds shy of £250,000. and we have done that in just over two days. the public response has been amazing, the average donation is £610. from mr and mrs smith. the house of commons commission inflated the estimates, i got a parliamentary question a nswered got a parliamentary question answered yesterday, i submitted a cost of new year's answered yesterday, i submitted a cost of new yea r‘s eve answered yesterday, i submitted a cost of new year's eve and remembrance as a comparison. £14,200. so they have been caught red handed inflating the cost.
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yesterday under pressure, they slashed the cost to £320,000. so we are effectively at £250,000. so really, we a re are effectively at £250,000. so really, we are about 75% of the way there already. within a couple of days or so, we will have that money. so the public could pay for it, there would be no cost to the taxpayer, and if people support that idea, they should go to the gofundme webpage and donate now. the thing is, what we already know, it is not going to happen, is it? you are encouraging people to give more but is it right that you have put in £1000 into this... yes, i put my money where my mouth is! what we know now is it will not happen. it has been cleared, downing street made it clear that whatever boris johnson said, and it was on this programme when he said it, whatever he said at that moment in time, it was never going to happen and you
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are still encouraging people to put money into that fund. charlie, if we do not hit the target, all of the money goes to help the heroes anyway. the prime minister called for this and secondly, he does not own big ben. big ben is the nation's clock. it does not belong to the prime minister. it does not belong to the government. it belongs to the nation. but mps, because it is in westminster, we are respectively its guardian. so what must happen now is that there has been so much argument over this, the only way to settle it is for mps to vote on it and i believe there are mechanisms by which such a vote can take place early next week. mark francois, thank you for your time this morning and we will see what happens in the next two weeks. we have a countdown happening now. thank you. 23 minutes past seven. you may think that lakes and rivers in britain are environmentally friendly, but did you know they release greenhouse gases into the air?
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scientists are warning that climate change could increase the amount of carbon dioxide and methane they emit. richard westcott has more. it's obvious where some greenhouse gases come from. but there's another vast source of carbon dioxide and methane that might surprise you — freshwater lakes and rivers. so we're going to put this very sophisticated—looking bucket into the river here, and what it will do is trap carbon dioxide and methane as it comes off the river, trying to escape into the atmosphere. as leaves and plant litter fall into the water, they're eaten by tiny microbes, bacteria and fungi, and they give off methane and carbon dioxide. the bucket might be basic, but it is connected to a sophisticated laser which measures the gases. looking through your cracked screen, but these are spikes... this is why
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we need more funding, richard! so that one is methane, that one is co2, and you can see them jump when the bucket is placed on the water. jump up. exactly. i think it would surprise people that fresh water is a source of greenhouse gases. imean, how i mean, how much is in them? exactly, they do. in terms of global land cover, fresh water only covers about 4% of the planet. but if we look at methane, for example, up to 16% of all natural methane emissions come from fresh water, so we can see those fresh waters are disproportionately important in the global carbon cycle. a little experiment to illustrate the point. take a stick and switch it around the point. take a stick and switch itaround in the point. take a stick and switch it around in the mud and a lot of those bubbles coming up are likely to be methane. fresh water is responsible for around one quarter of the net carbon dioxide and methane going from the earth's surface into the atmosphere — although that could be about to change. we push it through the filter, water goes through the other side and all the microbes stay on the paper, and then we take that
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back to the laboratory and we look at what is there. we know that some microbes are just producing methane and some don't. so as the climate is changing, it may change the microbes that are there and it can produce different outcomes. we just need to stop filming where this family comes through. we will get a picture. i think i did. what elinore has in her hands like a giant flashlight. based on the type of light that bounces back, we can tell what types of algae are growing. so algae, like trees, takes the co2 out? exactly. andrew's latest research in canada suggests climate change could double the greenhouse gases coming from fresh water. forests, for example, with under a warmer climate they may produce more leaves and more dead plant material to fall in the water to feed microbes, bacteria and fungi that produce these gases. they can now use that knowledge to find natural solutions — perhaps different trees or algae which can trap some of the greenhouse gases.
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as for our readings, methane levels are low, and carbon dioxide was average. that means 750 metres of the river emits about the same amount of co2 a day as getting into your car and driving the 60—odd miles to london. richard westcott, bbc news. i never knew that! so much focus at the moment on climate change and a lot of coverage across the next year and looking ahead on the bbc. there is the big climate thing in november in glasgow. one story to bring you that has tickled us this morning, a horse, a lucky escape, it was picked up horse, a lucky escape, it was picked up by horse, a lucky escape, it was picked up by pass on a busy dual carriageway in cardiff. there was a reason. the story goes that what you are seeing here is at the end of the tail ina are seeing here is at the end of the tail in a way yet! the horse was actually on board the bus but it was
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found roaming around the a 48 and people were concerned and it was causing a hazard and a bus driver stopped and said the horse can get on the bus, get it out of the problem area, and passers—by helped the horse onto the bus and there we go. all was safe and well. about five minutes away from home or something. a few stops. sorted! i have worked on that for about ten seconds. did anyone hear that? still to come this morning! this is a brilliant story. the great—grandmother in her 70s who has been battling burglars.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on the 31st of january. borisjohnson will also chair a cabinet meeting in the north of england, before making a special address to the nation. meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves the eu has raised more than £200,000. the five labour leadership candidates will go head to head for the first time later. emily thornberry, rebecca long—bailey, sir keir starmer, jess philips and lisa nandy will take questions
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from party members at hustings in liverpool. it comes after rebecca long—bailey promised to shake up government, and emily thornberry warned of a tough road back to power as they launched their campaigns last night. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools and colleges in england from monday to tackle the issue of ‘period poverty‘. it's estimated that one—in—ten girls are unable to afford period products. the government—funded scheme has been welcomed by campaigners. heavy rain and thunderstorms have lashed parts of eastern australia dousing some long—burning bushfires, but bringing a new threat of flooding. there have been downpours in the states of queensland, victoria and new south wales, where wildfires have scorched millions of hectares of land since september. it's been described as a once—in—100—year event. british scientists have told the bbc that the number of people infected bya new virus in china is far greater than official figures suggest. there have been fewer than 50
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confirmed cases of the coronavirus but scientists estimate the true figure is closer to 1,700. two people are known to have died from the virus, which appeared in wuhan city in december. police are appealing for help to find two thieves who were involved in a dramatic attempted burglary at a jewellery shop in west london. three people drove a range rover through the front window of the store in shepherds bush, before breaking display cases with a sledgehammer. one offender was detained by shoppers as he attempted to flee and was jailed for ten years, but police are still looking for the two others involved. a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in three popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of playa de palma and magaluf in majorca and sant antoni in ibiza. the regional government says it's the first legislation of its kind in europe. the time now is 7.32. let's talk to
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holly now about the cricket. yesterday we spoke at length about ann stokes and he scored another century and is best —— ben stokes and he scored another century but the man next to him has everyone excited. 22 years old and the youngest england batsmen to score a maiden century since alistair cooke. and we are now in a commanding position going into day three in port elizabeth. if england fans were hoping for flag—waving fund, they were in the right place. first, ben stokes at his blistering best. so long it ended up bouncing down a nearby road. new balls please? not quite. one intrepid fan finally retrieved it. stokes did his best to lose
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it again and that took him to 4000 test runs and another landmark soon beckoned. and that is 100 for ben stokes. that is why he has just been named the world's best player. a superb 120 for stokes. and there was soon another centurian — 22—year—old ollie pope showing a composure way beyond his years. and after reaching his first test 100, he started to have a bit of fun. the english camp loved it, south africa not so much. pope later said he could not remove the smile from his face after steering england to a hefty 499. it is a celebration, to be honest. i need to get rid of a bit of energy. it was a special moment and it was great to look up and see the boys in the change room and seeing how happy we were. it was something we enjoyed in the change room, enjoying each other‘s success. the south african batsmen had
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a mountain to climb and they soon stumbled. dom bess struck twice, some start for him, for england. all—rounder georgia elwiss is back in the england women's squad for the twenty20 world cup in australia, which starts at the end of next month. she replaces spinner kirstie gordon in the only change since the recent series win over pakistan. england are playing under a new coach and hoping to win the title for the first time since 2009. it is going to be a fantastic tournament. there are competitive teams across the board. you have india who are looking really good, south africa, a first round match that is a big game for us and they are playing quite well from what i have seen through wbbl competitions. new zealand looked dangerous as well. there are so many good teams it will be an exciting
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competition and we will definitely have to play well. it's scottish cup fourth round weekend — and rangers began their campaign by seeing off third—tier stranraer last night. stranraer are bottom of scottish league one — and they managed to frustrate rangers untiljust before half time, when scott arfield poked in the opening goal. ajermain defoe penalty finished thejob. if you're watching a premier league match today, you may well see the referee using the pitchside var monitor. michael oliver is the only ref to have used one this season — that was in a fa cup match. they'd been told to avoid using them, because it could slow down the pace of the game, but the guidance now is to check the replays pitch—side for red card decisions, so the on—field referee has the final say. former england international andy goode says saracens deserve to be relegated from rugby union's premiership, if they break the salary cap again. all indications are that they won't
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be able to keep their wages bill under the 7 million pound limit once again, so they will be sent down at the end of the season. they are looking at immediate relegation at the end of the season to don't know if that is the case it isa to don't know if that is the case it is a just punishment. stuart bingham enjoys a late night, it would seem. he made a stunning recovery at the masters snooker, coming from 4—1 down to beat kyren wilson 6—4 and reach the semi—finals. the match finished at ten past midnight, having started at seven o'clock in the evening. bingham will face david gilbert this afternoon, after shaun murphy takes on ali carter — both matches are live across the bbc. as we head towards the first tennis grand slam of the year, the atp
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captain has been put in his place. he had been implemented —— complimentary about evans but if it wields but he suggested that evans could miss a few meals. just because you are a good tennis player does not mean you are an expert in all fields. so... ten months ago he had plenty of opinions and his opinion on this is subject and i will leave him to it. i am fit. it isjust how i look, i guess. i don't think there is much of me, really. we're less than 24 hours away from the return of one of the biggest name in mixed martial arts. conor mcgregorfights in las vegas in the early hours of tomorrow morning. he's suggested he'll be earning a record 80—million pounds for his fight against donald ‘cowboy‘ cerrone at ufc 246 — it's the irishman's first bout in over a year.
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we haven't really had a big discussion of what the exact fight strategy is in terms of taking him down in the first round, big punches, it is going to be a master class, he will be at have a lot of pressure from the get go and it will not let up. it's going to be an extraordinary day for 16—year—old mani cooper at the winter youth olympic games in lausanne. later on, she'll become the first british woman to compete in an olympic nordic combined event, which involves two completely different sports — cross—country skiing and skijumping. our reporter nick hope met up with her in switzerland. they leap from 70 — 90 metre hills, reach speeds of over 60 mile an hour and can travel a hundred metres before landing. there is thrillseeking and then there is ski jumping. and 16—year—old mani cooper is the first british woman to ever attempt it at an olympics. when it goes wrong it is quite scary and you do havejumps where it lifts
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you up and you get the timing right, you get the air and the positioning right and you just have a smile on your face when you land it. one sport is not enough for this teenager who took up nordic combined after moving to austria with her family in 2012. combining the two is very special. ski jumping, you have to be explosive when you jump out, you have to be concentrating as well and cross—country you need endurance and sprints, you need the pace so you can keep up. think of ski jumping and you would probably picture eddie the eagle edwards in the 1988 calgary winter olympics. things have changed in 32 years but he still follows it closely and he had this message for mani ahead of her own historic ski jumping bid. i have just heard through
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the grapevine that mani cooper is taking part in the nordic combined for great britain. i want to wish her the very, very best of luck. have fun. enjoy it. from the moment it starts to the moment it finishes. jump well, good luck, i hope you do well. that is amazing. that is really cool. i dojump further than him, however, which is quite cool. he put the sport on the map all those years back. how much do you want to do that now and for women in the uk? i want kids to start nordic combined because i think it is a great sport. i wanted to get bigger and i want to improve and get goals to go to bigger competitions, continental cups, world cups in the next olympics. few would doubt she has both the talent and tenacity to achieve those dreams. you can watch live coverage
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of lausanne 2020 today and through to wednesday on the bbc iplayer, sport website and app. if you ever go up close to those slopes, it is quite terrifying. it is bad enough when you stand like that but standing next to it and looking at the slope, it is so frightening. it doesn't look that bad when you are down below but when you get up there and look down it a lwa ys you get up there and look down it always looks terrifying. i'm scared of heights. but that is part of the thrill for them. part of the training, that it does not scare you. but it is like going down on a skeleton or a bobsled. just saying i am going for it and i cannot have any fear. i don't think you could tell me that all day long... there isa tell me that all day long... there is a reason we sit down here isn't there? yes. on a nice comfortable
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sofa with a half foot drop. when you are a young sports star trying to be the best you can be in the person most famous in your sport, eddie edwards, was the biggest failure ever. not the biggest failure ever! it isa ever. not the biggest failure ever! it is a fantastic story and we love him but the bottom line is that he was not the best at the sport and yet he is the person most famous. was not the best at the sport and yet he is the person most famouslj suppose it does create a low bar. but he understands. he knows how tough it is. she he understands what she is going through. and to get that sort of a message would mean the world to her. we shall see you later. time now to talk to darren to find out what is happening with the weather. it was your weather hero, darren? before i joined weather. it was your weather hero, darren? before ijoined the met office i wrote a letter to ian mccaskill. did he write back? he did. nota
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mccaskill. did he write back? he did. not a secretary, he sent a hand written letter and many years later i got to work with him. amazing. did you still have the letter? did you show it to him? i need to find it. but i cannot show him anymore, is a shame. i did not study geography at all and just wanted to know whether i needed to study geography to go into weather forecasting. i i needed to study geography to go into weatherforecasting. i did not imaginei into weatherforecasting. i did not imagine i would end up on television, however. thank goodness you are here. tell us what is happening. it is cold out there! —4 in oxfordshire, but today we see a change in the weather instead of all of this wild, wet and windy weather, it is dry for the most part and some sunshine around and the winds dropping but it is getting colder by day and night. still have some cloud on the scene, a lot of it
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approaching the uk thin, high cloud. still areas of low pressure not far away but moving away from the uk, so pressure is building and we have one of these an area of high pressure which we have not seen for a while, digging around for the next few days. around the top, north—westerly wind bringing wintry showers in scotla nd wind bringing wintry showers in scotland and icy patches and the odd shower first thing scotland and icy patches and the odd showerfirst thing for scotland and icy patches and the odd shower first thing for northern ireland and north—western parts of england but those become fewer. a bit hazy at times towards the south—west but on the whole, dry, plenty of sunshine for most of the uk and 6—8d may not sound too impressive but it is normal for the time of year. clearing skies, lighter winds, showers fading from scotla nd lighter winds, showers fading from scotland so we get lou on the chart which is frost developing widely, and temperatures down to —2 —3, a touch lower in rural areas —— blue. except for scotland, milder air coming in from of the atlantic and again around the area of high pressure but more cloud moving in as well will keep the temperatures up. you may well find temperatures in the afternoon in the north—west of scotla nd the afternoon in the north—west of scotland in double figures. away
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from here, a chance of a shower coming into southern parts of the north sea but it is a small risk getting the coast essentially for the most part, dry and sunny, lovely day, cold and frosty start you but a crisp winters day and temperatures generally seven or eight. we still have high pressure as we head into the new week. again, slipping further south a little bit of allowing this slightly cloudier atla ntic allowing this slightly cloudier atlantic and to further encroach upon the uk. it means quite a difference in temperatures north—south, milder in the north, colder in the south and we may will have some mist and fog patches around as well. midland, wales, southern england, to lift slowly through the morning on monday. otherwise a fair bit of sunshine again and more cloud, more breeze towards the north—west of the uk, lifting the temperatures to around nine or 10 degrees. whereas further south, after a frosty start, we're looking seven or eight. next week, we're going to find it clouding over, little or no rain, which is good news i suppose, and with more
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cloud it will not be cloud it will not good news i suppose, and with more cloud it will not be as cold at night. thank you darren! your ems gaskell story has touched us all. william. —— ian mccaskill. brilliant. we'll be back with the headlines at 8 o'clock. now on breakfast, it's time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. is bbc newsjoining in the tabloid feeding frenzy over the duke and duchess of sussex? and was breakfast the best bbc outlet for the prime minister's first big interview of the year? we featured last week some of your reactions to the bbc‘s reporting of the duke and duchess of sussex since the announcement of their intention to step back from their roles as senior royals. since then, it's fair to say that the couple have stayed in the news. the queen prepares to meet prince harry and other senior royals at a crucial summit to discuss his and meghan's future. the queen attended church
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at sandringham this morning ahead of tomorrow's meeting. we'll have more details from the queen's statement. she's asked for final decisions in the coming days. negotiations continue over the sussexes' future as it's revealed that meghan didn't take part over the phone in the family summit, as expected. meghan's first public appearance in canada since last week's shock announcement as it emerges her father could testify against her in court in her privacy battle with the mail on sunday. prince harry posts this — his own footage of his first public engagement since his announcement of stepping back from royal duties. one of the viewers who got in touch with us this week about coverage of the duke and duchess of sussex was tara physick, and she joins us from our studio in exeter. and with me is paul royall, editor of the bbc‘s news at 6 and news at 10. tara, why were you unhappy about the coverage of this story? i think after several days of coverage of the sussexes
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in various guises, different stories, after their announcement, wanting to have a more private life in canada, we've — we really had had ourfill, and iflicked on the news, as i often do, praying that the bbc would not open and lead another bulletin with a story about the sussexes, only to discover that there was a story largely speculative about thomas markle. i had my head in my hands, iflicked over, i couldn't take any more and i was very disappointed, you know — i was waiting for some... there are many, many great bbc reporters both nationally and internationally which i feel would have better stories than another story about the sussexes. lots of points there. let's start with too much coverage. paul, in the past week it has been in the headlines of bbc one bulletins every day. have you been overdoing it? i think first of all, it is a serious story. it's a major story around the royal family and their future
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and there is huge audience interest in the story. at the same time, i completely take tara's point, but what i would say across bbc news, i think we led on the story when it was a legitimate lead story. but we also had the crisis surrounding iran at the top of our running orders and our websites and our radio bulletins. last friday, we led the news on stormont and the return of the northern ireland executive. what's going on regarding climate change and the changing planet has been the lead story and highly prominent as well so i think in the round, the balance has been about right. and tara, to be fair, it is a big story, isn't it? i mean, you seemed concerned partly about the speculation, rather than the story? idid. indeed. i had no issues with the original
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story of the sussexes going to canada. obviously, public interest in the finances. i'm all behind that and coverage of that. however, there had been all online and since early that morning, wednesday morning, a lot of coverage on other lesser media of the speculation that thomas markle might have to testify, so very much conjecture and no, no — nothing definitive, nothing factual, and i was therefore extremely disappointed when i flicked on and the bbc led with that article. because paul, all that's actually happened in the past week has been the news that they're stepping back and a meeting with the queen, and most of that coverage, then, about whether he — thomas markle — might testify, isn't news, it is just speculation, and it serves, you know, the agenda of certain newspapers. well, obviously, we avoid speculation and we tried to base our coverage and ourjournalism in context and properly sourced information. the issue regarding
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thomas markle was — was — was — came out of court papers involving the case between the daily mail and meghan markle that had emerged the night before. and the following day, there was — or there is this prospect — of thomas markle potentially testifying against his daughter in this court — or been called as a significant witness for the daily mail, and that's what that reporting was doing. 0k. tara, i know you have concerns about the impact of the coverage on the couple themselves, don't you? i do, i do. i do feel — i'm fairly neutral on the royals. i feel that they, on the whole, they do a very good job. i'm all for coverage and reporting on their movements and what they're doing for the public and, of course, how they are funded. but they would like to change their lives and i think then, they should really be allowed to get on with it. i think to hound them, it is as though ever since that announcement, the amount — and i take the point, yes, other media are all over it.
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it's a frenzied period of reporting. but i just feel that once it starts to get into areas of speculation, it's less in the public interest. paul, i think there is — a lot of viewers feel there is a difference between the top line of a story and the way that the papers turn it into something that seems to be quite dark, and should the bbc not be rowing back a bit from it now? i think part of the challenge here is this is obviously getting major coverage across the media, across television, across newspapers, across online, social media. and so, there is that sense of wherever you turn, you're hearing or seeing this story, whether you're — whether you want it or whether you're interested in it or not. what about the couple themselves, though, as tara was saying? well, i mean, these are — these sort of issues do fall into our editorial conversations about whether we should be covering this story or not and whether we have a legitimate editorial purpose in doing that and i can sort of reassure tara that we do have those conversations.
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and also, in other times, bbc news, we cover some of the great work that harry and meghan, for example, have done around the issue of mental health and raising awareness over that issue. tara, last word to you — do you feel reassured by what you've heard? i feel partly reassured. i feel concerned, though. paul raised another point there which is interesting. really, you justified coverage by saying that there's an enormous frenzy and an enormous amount of interest in them with the other media and i did feel — i'll be honest — when i switched the news on and you led with that article, that it was a reactionary response. it felt like that because that news had been around since the night before and i feel as though the bbc should be doing more to lead the media, rather than follow. we'll have to leave it there. tara physick and paul royall, thank you both. now, one of the rows during the campaign leading up to december‘s general election concerned boris johnson's failure
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to appear as invited, and as other party leaders had, on the andrew neil show. since then, number 10 downing street has made it clear that neither the prime minister nor other senior ministers would be interviewed on radio 4's today programme anytime soon. so there were some interest in where, or if, mrjohnson would be appearing on the bbc airwaves in the new year. the answer — tuesday's breakfast programme. and among the subjects covered in a half hour conversation was the proposalfor big ben to chime on the night the uk leaves the eu. we're working up a plan so that people can bung a bob for a big ben bong, if there — because there are some people who want to... er, bung — bung a... i haven't quite worked out. i love the fact that you're developing policy live on tv. no, because, you know, because the — as everyone knows, big ben is being refurbished. they have taken — you see, they seem to have taken the clapper away, so we need to restore the clapper in order to bong big ben for — on brexit night. well, maggie foot approved
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of the way dan walker conducted that interview, e—mailing: but others felt breakfast wasn't an appropriate outlet for this encounter. sue williams wrote: we asked breakfast why they had invited mrjohnson onto the programme to be questioned by dan walker. they told us in response that the interview was watched by 2.9 million people, adding: wednesday's news at 6 lead with news
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of a significant clinical trial aimed at finding treatments for motor neuron disease, for which there are currently no effective treatments, let alone a cure. the reporter here, health correspondent dominic hughes. one, two... ruth was an active runner and cyclist when she was diagnosed a little over two years ago. now, the illness is affecting notjust her speech, but also her ability to walk. but at edinburgh university, scientists are preparing to launch one of the biggest mnd drug trials in the uk. mark mather—inglis had this response: there was rather less love around earlier in the week after bbc news
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featured items about a certain itv reality show. if you haven't been following developments in the villa in south africa, one contestant, ollie williams, has left the programme after admitting he had feelings for someone back home. this is what gwynneth elliott had to say: thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on what you see or hear on bbc news, or read online, or even appear on the programme, please do e—mail us. or you can find us on twitter.
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you can call us. and do have a look at previous discussions on our website. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a clock projected on the walls of downing street — one of a series of events announced to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu. after the fires, the storms — heavy rain brings the risk of flooding to parts of australia. we speak to the scottish brothers who have broken three records by rowing 3,000 miles across the atlantic good morning. england in the land of pope and glory — a maiden test century for ollie pope has put them in complete control after day two of the third test in south africa. don't mess with mari —
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the great gandmother who took on a six foot theif and won. hello, good morning. it's all change for this weekend. most places are going to be dry. there is going to be sunshine around, but it will be quite cold and there could be some frost around this morning and tomorrow morning. more details later on. it's saturday, 18th january. our top story: with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on 31st january. meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves the eu has raised more than £200,000. our political correspondent helen catt has more. it's here that the moment of brexit itself will be marked at 11pm on the 31st of january. a light show and countdown will be projected onto the walls of downing street and live streamed on social media. borisjohnson is planning an address
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to the nation in the evening. in nearby parliament square, the union flag will fly on every flagpole. commemoratives 50p coins will come into circulation. but the government says they want this to be a moment to heal divisions and reunite communities. a special cabinet meeting will take place in the north of england. many brexiteer had hoped that this would be the focal point, though. big ben restored to chime at 11pm. hundreds of thousands of pounds has been raised by the public towards the estimated £500,000 cost after borisjohnson told breakfast on tuesday he had in idea. we're working up a plan so people can bung a bob for a big ben bong. there are some people who want to... i haven't quite worked it out. but downing street stepped back from the idea after the commons authorities said there might be problems accepting the money even if enough was raised. the chancellor has admitted not all businesses will benefit from brexit.
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sajid javid made the comments in today's financial times. let's speak now to our political correspondent susana mendonca. susana, surprising words from the chancellor? he is making it very clear that when it comes to eu rules, things will change. yes, very tough talk from the chancellor, sank the uk will not bea the chancellor, sank the uk will not be a real taker. you get the feeling that says the prime minister and chancellor gearing up for trade negotiations. we do leave in two weeks but nothing changes in terms of how things work until the end of the transition period. during that time the government has to do a trade deal with the eu. there will bea trade deal with the eu. there will be a lot of industries in britain that will be concerned about this. last year we had the automotive, food and drink and pharmaceutical sectors talking about how if there was no close alignment with the eu on certain rules that could be damaging. what we got from the
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chancellor today is basically saying that some businesses will benefit but some businesses will struggle and businesses will need to step up and businesses will need to step up and find a way to work around the new future post brags it. some pretty tough talk from the chancellor and a departure from the kind of mood music we have from his predecessor, philip hammond, who was a lwa ys predecessor, philip hammond, who was always about those assignment alignment with the eu. heavy rain and thunderstorms have lashed parts of eastern australia dousing some long—burning bushfires, but bringing a new threat of flooding. there have been downpours in the states of queensland, victoria and new south wales, where wildfires have scorched millions of hectares of land since september. we can get the latest now from phil mercer, who's in sydney this morning. what is the latest? what you can see behind me are grey skies. australia
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has been praying for rain. many parts of the eastern regions have received huge amounts. in queensland, parts of that northern state received three times their average monthly rainfall in just one nights. in parts of the gold coast, roots are turned into rivers and people had to navigate flooded streets on boats. rain has fallen in the fire zones here in new south wales and also further south in the state of victoria. 75 bushfires still burn here in new south wales. 25 are uncontained. what we need is more rain to bring this fire crisis to an end. the rain is a blessing and a curse. it brings with it not only relief from those fire affected communities and the firefighting effort, but also the threat of flash flooding and concerns that ash from the bushfires could seep into rivers and contaminate water supplies, so
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australia needs much more rain to bring the spa crisis to an end. what we have noticed here in sydney, more rain on the way here in the next day, there is a huge psychological boost. it has been a tough time in australia. the fire crisis began backin australia. the fire crisis began back in september. the site of rain coming to australia is extremely welcome and we would like some more! thank you. british scientists have told the bbc that the number of people infected bya new virus in china is far greater than official figures suggest. there have been fewer than 50 confirmed cases of the corona virus, but the experts estimate the true figure is closer to 1,700. dr peter daszak, an expert in emerging diseases, says it may have come from bats.
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it looks like the virus is closely related to sars, which emerged previously. since sars emerged, people have been developing vaccines and drugs to see if they work against sars. the problem is this virus is different. we don't yet if those drugs and vaccines work. the risk is that it is something that begins to spread, it is lethal, and that we don't have the capacity to control it. police are appealing for help to find two thieves who were involved in a dramatic attempted burglary at a jewellery shop in west london. three people drove a range rover through the front window of the store in shepherds bush, before breaking display cases with a sledgehammer. one offender was detained by shoppers as he attempted to flee and was jailed for 10 years, but police are still looking for the two others involved. a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in three popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of playa de palma and magaluf in majorca and san antonio in ibiza. the regional government says it's the first legislation of its kind in europe.
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those are the main stories. we will have sport and weather coming up later on. one in ten girls in the uk has resorted to using improvised sanitary products because they cannot afford to buy it. that's according to the charity plan international. ‘period poverty‘, as it‘s known, affects nearly a third of young women in the uk and campaigners have long been calling for the government to tackle the problem. from monday, products will be made available to schools and colleges across england in a government—funded scheme. our education and family correspondent frankie mccamley reports. just over two years ago, outside downing street, campaigners gather calling for an end to so—called period poverty. the shame of our periods needs to go. everyone‘s got them! not the first time concerns have been raised about the affordability of sanitary products, specifically for girls from lower income families. research has found nearly a third of teenage girls in school or college have or know someone
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who has been impacted by poverty, with more than half admitting they have missed lessons due to periods, because of things like cramps, embarrassment or affordability. ultimately, if you are facing impossible decisions, struggling to make ends meet, trying to decide whether to pay your rent or heat your house, and actually, the question of buying menstrual products, although they are completely essential, actually really becomes a second—tier priority. from monday, all primary schools, secondary schools and colleges in england will be provided with free period products for their students. the move follows scotland‘s announcement last year to spend £1 million on a similar initiative and in wales, just over £3 million was announced earlier this month to supply girls in primary and secondary schools with sanitary products. frankie mccamley, bbc news. we‘rejoined by period poverty campaigner amika george and the minister for children and families, michelle donelan, who is in our bristol newsroom.
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you began this campaign to end a half years ago. yeah. what prompted you? i read about girls having to miss school because they couldn‘t afford menstrual products. missing a week every single month because of a lack of funds to buy pads and tampons, or they were using alternatives, things like toilet paper, newspaper, socks just alternatives, things like toilet paper, newspaper, socksjust to be able to go to school. that horrified me. naively, ithought able to go to school. that horrified me. naively, i thought somebody will ta ke me. naively, i thought somebody will take care of that. the pledge never came from the government so i started a campaign and started to try to get everyone talking about it. we organised a big protest outside downing street which was attended by 2,000 people. we launched a legal challenge under the equality act. in april they made the
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pledge they would provide the products of the scheme starting on monday. talk us through your understanding of how it works in practice. monday is start day in england. all state funded schools and colleges will be able to order in the products the same way they order in toilet paper. this is the first time that every single child in england will have access to the products in their school bathroom. we won‘t see them as a luxury that only some can afford. in a practical sense, if they are from homes without much cash and they are struggling what they will know is in the school or college they can have access. exactly. the important thing have to sign up to the scheme so we need to make sure that every single school is talking about this, doing something about it, students are encouraging their head teachers. the head teachers might be male so they might not know the period poverty is happening, so it is key that everybody is signing up to the
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online portal and getting these products. part of the reason that that period poverty has remained almost under the radar for so long is embarrassment. a lot of women will know the experience of sneaking off to italy with a tampon up your sleeve or trying to hide a sanitary towel, trying to not let people know that they are on their period. you area that they are on their period. you are a young girl, you‘re insecure about that, you are nervous about people knowing. this is a huge opportunity. the fact that they will be provided in schools will signal a change in conversation. where will they be? how would a girl ask for these products? they willjust be in these products? they willjust be in the bathroom the same way toilet paper is. hopefully, because they are there that will trigger conversations with teachers, with
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people who don‘t have periods, and finally they will be seen as normal, not an embarrassing topic of conversation. you must have heard some pretty desperate stories from people who have been affected personally by this. yes, girls have told me that they know the funds just aren‘t there and because of that they don‘t ask their parents they are too embarrassed to ask their parents. they know if they do ask a lot of the time the choice is between eating dinner that night or buying a packet of pads. a lot of critics have said that they are cheap, but it can be a lot of money forfamilies with cheap, but it can be a lot of money for families with no cheap, but it can be a lot of money forfamilies with no money. we can shut her eyes to the amount of poverty in this country. what is youridea poverty in this country. what is your idea of the tampon tax? again, they are taxed because they are seen asa they are taxed because they are seen as a luxury item. something like jaffa cakes is seen as a basic
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necessity! it is ridiculous. it is something the government in principle agreed would exist, but they catch anything about it now because it is an eu law. the fact that it even existed in the first play shows the extent of patriarchy. women are taxed for having periods, which is a normal biological process. it is a success story this because your campaign has worked, but there must be a little bit of you that thinks, why did it take a young lady like yourself to get this donein young lady like yourself to get this done in the first place, when it was already affecting so many people? done in the first place, when it was already affecting so many people ?|j know. already affecting so many people?” know. it is to do with the stigma thatis know. it is to do with the stigma that is bound up with periods. even though there was quite a lot of publicity in 2017 it was able to be brushed under the carpet is a silent topic. politicians didn‘t have to engage with it. it wasn‘t acted on immediately because of the shame.
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and it is notjust in schools that this is an issue. yes, period poverty affects homeless women, everyone. one day i hope we will live in a world we don‘t have to pay for them. they should be freely available in all public toilets. would you carry on campaigning? homelessness, prism stop macro for now, i want to stick to school. we wa nt to now, i want to stick to school. we want to expand across europe and see if they success of the scheme will set a precedent for other eu countries. good for you, good for you. lovely to see you this morning. lovely to see you this morning. here‘s darren with a look at this morning‘s weather. it is all change on the weather front for this weekend. we have a frost across many parts of the
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country. temperatures have been down as low as —5. we have been used to mild, wetand as low as —5. we have been used to mild, wet and windy weather but that is not we will get this weekend. the sun will be out more widely. the winds are too strong. it is a bit colder out there. we have some areas of cloud flirting with the uk. most of cloud flirting with the uk. most of this cloud is thin, high cloud. two areas of low pressure, both of them moving away from the uk and we have an area of high pressure over us. have an area of high pressure over us. having said that, we still have wintry showers coming over on the breeze across scotland. one or two early showers for northern ireland and the north west of england. the showers will fade away and there will be a lot of sunshine, maybe he is eight times in the south—west. the temperature is between six and 8 degrees this afternoon. that is what we should be getting at this time of year. with clear skies, lighter winds and no showers to speak of, the temperatures will drop away
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widely, so easily down to —2 or —3. the highlands and islands, it will not be as cold here because our winter at the top of that area is coming in from the atlantic. if we follow the isobars round there is a northerly breeze threatening one or two showers for southern parts of the north sea. they should stay offshore. still more cloud coming in and a breeze for the north—west of scotland, but elsewhere is winds will be light, skies will be clear. a lot of sunshine to come on sunday. a lot of sunshine to come on sunday. a bit milder in the north—west of scotla nd a bit milder in the north—west of scotland tomorrow. we will probably see more of these atlantic winds overnight and into the start of next week as the high—pressure centre moves further south. for monday morning, we start with milder air across northern most parts of the uk, from the midlands and south would more likely to have a frost.
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this sun chang will come out when the mist and fog lifts. the reason from the atlantic will lift temperatures in the north, further south maybe seven or 8 degrees. with the outlook, you can see the lack of sunshine. it will cloud over more into next week. little or no rain, which is good news and temperatures may be a shade higher by day. it won‘t be as cold and frosty at night. it won‘t be as cold and frosty at night. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. let‘s look at the front pages. former editor of the news of the world phil hall is here to tell us what‘s caught their eye. you have picked up on this, bobbies on the beat forjust you have picked up on this, bobbies on the beat for just four you have picked up on this, bobbies on the beat forjust four hours, and that has cut crime. yes, just four
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hours, in many ways it supports borisjohnson hours, in many ways it supports boris johnson plasma hours, in many ways it supports borisjohnson plasma policy of getting 50,000 more police officers back on the street. this was a cambridge university study, london tube station find thatjust introducing these short patrols slashed the amount of crimes. when you think of bobbies on the street, a lot of what people are saying is that people want visibility. a lot of what people are saying is that people want visibilitym people see police officers around, whatever crime they might have committed, they move on elsewhere. it has had a dramatic effect. committed, they move on elsewhere. it has had a dramatic effectm committed, they move on elsewhere. it has had a dramatic effect. it is a hot political story at the moment given the pledges about police numbers, which we will remain to see if they do rise, and if whether that
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will be seen on the streets. theresa may will say we have new policing methods and we don‘t need these same numbers. boris johnson has methods and we don‘t need these same numbers. borisjohnson has gone back to basics and said we need police officers on the beat and this seems to prove it. and in the guardian? schools are using to grating isolation booths. you see these on these television programmes, the fly on the wall programmes. these isolation booths are being used more and more by schools. the children‘s commissionerfor and more by schools. the children‘s commissioner for england has said. they are sent to be silenced. yes, people can sit there for four hours, six hours at a time. the pictures there of the isolation booth. you choose exactly what it is. the questions posed in the articles is
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what else do they do? in my day there was horrific corporal punishment, that was very wrong. we have become a kind of society, but what do you do with permanently disruptive pupils? the argument for the best will in the world they would want to help those kids, but there are other children in the school and how do you cope? they are supposed to be supervised, there are supposed to be supervised, there are supposed to be lessons, but it is a very difficult issue. it looks very victorian, but what do you do? there has been research into what works and what doesn‘t. where else are you taking us? the front page of the daily telegraph. this in many ways, short story that sums up the biggest problem. when they talk about financial settlement, what control
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will the palace have a how they behave? there is a question that megan might go back to tv or movies, they may get involved in commercial deals and that is never something that the royal family has never been co mforta ble that the royal family has never been comfortable with. with your former newspaper editor plus manhattan, there is a debate raging about the coverage of mac and in particular with them as a couple. are you sufficiently to one side of that newspaper business now, have you had thought on that? categorically, i don‘t see any racism in it at all. i have never experienced that in a newsroom in 40 years. she is a fantastic story, that is the point from a newspaper point of view. diana had a very difficult ride but the media love chair. from the start, megan has kept a distance and not try to get to know the media and that has caused some of the
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problems. newspapers will fill the inches with their own version of events. the duchess of sussex does get bad press with 43% of negative stories. there has been the comparison to the duchess of cambridge and how megan was portrayed when she was cradling her bump and the language used to run that, the flowers that you had at her wedding. the wedding of this a success they were potentially poisonous to princess charlotte. the same poisonous to princess charlotte. the sa m e flowers poisonous to princess charlotte. the same flowers used in kate like wedding. some of the coverage has been wrong, just like it was with diana. overall, the country were in love with her at the beginning, very open, harry was up there at the top of the popularity polls. what megan
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has done, by cutting herself off and trying to be a bit aloof and complaining and complaining she has turned them against her and there is a negative vibe now. given your expertise, genuinely, how often does a news editor of the paper scratch their head and asked the question are we being fair, or the land it took a moment ago, great story? how often do they genuinely stop and think like that. truthfully? two or three times a day every day. the top executives in the newspaper discussed the stories over and over again. honestly, they will be sampling their readers, you get a feel from the letters coming in, you get feedback online straightaway. but isn‘t that the basis of do they love it, do they want more of it? here you have a soup actress coming
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into one of the most regarded institutions in the world, that is a lwa ys institutions in the world, that is always going to be a huge story. news editors will be even more careful than before. only look at this court case, when take newspapers, they always advise clients not to take them on in a court case because you can be asked anything in your life in the dark. when your father is going to be the star witness against you, it is very, very complicated. you know! advise people about how to deal with the press. build relationships is a lwa ys the press. build relationships is always what we say. what you stand at their isolated and think you are going to fight the press, you will lose. i think the british public back harry and megan‘s view of doing what you want to do, but you can‘t have your cake and eat it. if you‘re
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going to be paid by the royalfamily you need to have some control and understanding of the royalfamily. let‘s tease this up for a moment, the story about the ban on pub crawls and boozing in magaluf and other places. he talked about bobbies on the beat, what about 72—year—old great—grandmother is? have you seen this? no, i haven't. we will talk to about this in the next hour, there was bicycle thief in barnsley. a bike thief in barnsley got more than he bargained for when he was tackled by a 72—year—old great grandmother. mari parker wrestled the stolen mountain bike from the six foot thief, who was forced to flee empty handed. olivia richwald reports. this is the moment great grandmother mari parker tussled with a six—foot man who tried to sell her a stolen bike. 72 years old and five foot three, mari fought with him 60 seconds. we got right out into the road, halfway up the road
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and he was still hanging onto it. so was i. the bike, worth more than £1000, had been stolen from a 13—year—old boy. it was just a spare of the moment thing, knowing that the boy was coming back for his bike, i didn‘t want it not to be here. i was thinking, i‘m not letting it go because he‘s on his way to his bike. mari has worked at her son daniel‘s antique shop for four years, she had suspected the bike was stolen and had quickly checked on a local facebook site. mother and son then showed the man the website and told him the bike was being confiscated. but when daniel left the shop a short time later, the men returned to retrieve the cycle. but, thanks to mari‘s courage, it was eventually returned to its rightful owner. you have been called a hero, how does that make you feel? i don‘t think i am, ijust don‘t like the thought of somebody stealing, especially from a 12—year—old boy
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by force, taking his bike, his pride and joy. thatjust was so wrong in my eyes. the boy‘s grandfather says the family was relieved to get the bike back. he was absolutely over the moon. he didn't expect to see it again. he just thought that that was it, it is gone. what a wonderful woman. the bravery. she has really gone out on a limb. fantastic! a 23—year—old doncaster man was arrested in connection with this matter but no charges were brought. mari, though, has continued her crime—fighting crusade and has since apprehended other shoplifters, proving she won‘t give up easily without a fight. olivia richwald, bbc news, barnsley. coming up in the next half—hour:
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we‘ll speak to the three brothers from edinburgh who have become the fastest and youngest trio to row across the atlantic. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it‘s 8:30am. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main news. with less than two weeks to go until the uk leaves the eu, the government has announced that a clock will be projected onto downing street to count down to brexit on the 31st of january. borisjohnson will also chair a cabinet meeting in the north of england, before making a special address to the nation. meanwhile, a campaign to make big ben ring when the uk leaves the eu has raised more than £200,000 pounds. earlier on breakfast mark francois told us he is hopeful the bell will chime at the end of the month. big ben is the nation‘s clock, it doesn‘t belong to the prime minister, it doesn‘t belong to the government, it belongs to the nation.
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but mps, because it‘s in westminster, we are effectively its guardians. so what must happen now is that because there has been so much arguing over this, the only way to settle it is for mps to vote on this. and i believe there are mechanisms by which such a vote can take place early next week. the five labour leadership candidates will go head to head for the first time later. emily thornberry, rebecca long—bailey, sir keir starmer, jess philips and lisa nandy will take questions from party members at hustings in liverpool. it comes after rebecca long—bailey promised to shake up government, and emily thornberry warned of a tough road back to power as they launched their campaigns last night. free sanitary products are to be made available to all schools and colleges in england from monday to tackle the issue of ‘period poverty‘. it‘s estimated that one—in—ten girls are unable to afford period products. the government—funded scheme has been welcomed by campaigners.
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heavy rain and thunderstorms have lashed parts of eastern australia dousing some long—burning bushfires, but bringing a new threat of flooding. there have been downpours in the states of queensland, victoria and new south wales, where wildfires have scorched millions of hectares of land since september. it‘s been described as a once—in—100—year event. a law has been passed banning pub crawls and happy hours in three popular spanish tourist destinations in a bid to crack down on alcohol—fuelled holidays. restrictions apply to the tourist hotspots of playa de palma and magaluf in majorca and san antonio in ibiza. the regional government says it‘s the first legislation of its kind in europe. those are the main stories this morning. now let‘s take a look at the sport. ben stokes got a century yesterday,
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that they belonged to them. it is over to the bowlers today and what a brilliant start, particularly for dom best. they are looking to press home their home advantage on day three. they were leading with 439 ru ns three. they were leading with 439 runs overnight. they have already taken more wickets today. all the pope with a brilliant reaction catch. south africa are currently 72-4. all—rounder georgia elwiss is back in the england women‘s squad for the twenty20 world cup in australia, which starts at the end of next month. she replaces spinner kirstie gordon in the only change since the recent series win over pakistan. england are playing under a new coach and hoping to win the title for the first time since 2009. it‘s going to be
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a fantastic tournament. there is really competitive teams across the board and you know, you have india looking really good. you have south africa, ourfirst—round match, that is a big game for us and they are playing really well with what i have seen through wbbl competition and their players. new zealand look really dangerous as well. there are so many good teams, it is going to be an exciting competition and we definitely have to be playing well. it‘s scottish cup fourth round weekend — and rangers began their campaign by seeing off third—tier stranraer last night. stranraer are bottom of scottish league one — but they managed to frustrate rangers untiljust before half time, when scott arfield poked in the opening goal. ajermain defoe penalty finished thejob. another busy day ahead in the scottish cup, and plenty of premier league action as well — dan‘s here to look ahead to this afternoon‘s football focus. we have a packed weekend this
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weekend and we are on for midday. manchester united and liverpool. they meet each other this weekend and looking back at the history of it all, to great footballing dynasty is, they are both been at the top for a long period of time and have both fallen back for a long time, and are we about to enter an area of liverpool domination? we will discuss that with martin keown and dion dublin the studio. was at the 80s for liverpool? end of the 70s, start of the 80s. incredibly dominant, they won european cups, domestic competitions and leaks. manchester united enjoyed that in the previous two decades. it is old trafford today. — — the previous two decades. it is old trafford today. —— it is old trafford today. —— it is old trafford tomorrow. doesn't have a serious bearing on the result was mike —— mike does that have a serious bearing on the result?m
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mike —— mike does that have a serious bearing on the result? it is going to be interesting. it's never decides the season, but there is... often the build—up is better than the game itself. they've often been a damp squid. fingers crossed it won‘t go that way. a damp squid. fingers crossed it won't go that way. hopefully after all this talk it won't be nil— nil. they call phil foden the stockport iniesta. he has a similar style to iniesta. he has a similar style to iniesta. you can't just iniesta. he has a similar style to iniesta. you can'tjust be a good footballer, you have to be compared to somebody else who used to play football. we put him together with a stockport man and this is what happened. i was on the park of the other day and john stones came on with his little girl and she probably don‘t know my name and that, but he says, my little girl loves dogs. and he was like, what is it called? and i was like, pep. and his face, he was like, what? and i said, yeah, pep.
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after that, he changed the subject. iwasjust like, oh, no. he's obviously said, you are like one of the most talented footballers he has ever seen. who, john? no, no. pep. john wouldn't say it. to say that would be crazy, because think of the players he has worked with — messi. he believes in me and says i'm going in the right direction and that is the main thing. it is at anfield. it always fascinates me about home advantage and the extent to which it makes a difference. liverpool have a ridiculous record at home and they are in fabulous form. it would the pressure on the home team, the incentive to the away team, spoil the record? i think liverpool are
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feeling so good though. complacency kicks in! i will tell you that danny ings has scored ten in ten and he has played for southampton at the moment and he will talk about that. norwich and bournemouth playjoy this weekend, both at the wrong end of the premier league at the moment and their record between them, they have won three games in 30th four matches. we have moyes at west ham, david moyes who has been spoken to by the man he used to be managed —— he used to manage at everton, leon osman. we have a brighton chief executive joining is live on the programme and if you are a fan of tom davies, he will do premier league predictions this weekend. we also have the fa cup goals from mid week as well. when you have had a really long run—up losses like that, the positive is that when the wind comes, it is so sweet. —— when the
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win comes it is so sweet.” comes, it is so sweet. —— when the win comes it is so sweet. i will see you at midday on bbc one. stuart bingham enjoys a late night, it would seem. he made a stunning recovery at the masters snooker, coming from 4—1 down to beat kyren wilson 6—4 and reach the semi—finals. the match finished at 10 past midnight, having started at 7 o‘clock in the evening. bingham will face david gilbert this afternoon, after shaun murphy takes on ali carter — both matches are live across the bbc. we‘re less than 24 hours away from the return of one of the biggest name in mixed matrial arts. conor mcgregorfights in las vegas in the early hours of tomorrow morning. he‘s suggested he‘ll be earning a record £80 million for his fight against donald ‘cowboy‘ cerrone at ufc 246 — it‘s the irishman‘s
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first bout in over a year. we haven‘t really gone into big discussions about the exact fight strategy is going to be in terms of, are we going to take him down first round, bang in big punches? that‘s not been it. he‘s got to go in and play, enjoy it, it is going to be a master class. it is going to be a hell of a lot of pressure from the get go. an amateur golfer hit the shot of the day at the pga tour event this week in la quinta. laurent hurtubise was born with one arm. he started playing golf at the age of 11. and he hit this glorious hole in one at the fourth hole. this is one of the tournaments where amateurs play alongside the professionals. his partner was three—time pga tour winner troy merritt, who said it was the coolest experience he‘d had on a golf course. i would agree with that. it must
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feel good to have a hole in one. i don‘t think i will ever experience it. i can tell you who can show off right now, these three brothers we are about to talk to. three brothers from edinburgh have set three new world records after rowing across the atlantic ocean in just 35 days. lachlan, jamie and ewan maclean are the fastest and youngest trio to row across the atlantic, and the first team of siblings to cross any ocean. let‘s take a look at their amazing journey. it‘s been a tough day. conditions are not great. we‘ve got dolphins.
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body‘s starting to get some pretty sore aches and pains. after all that, is that land ? 0h! yes! people cheer. jamie, ewan and lachlan are in antigue, let‘s speak to them now. gentlemen, congratulations. how are you feeling? thank you. sorry, i didn‘t heara you feeling? thank you. sorry, i didn‘t hear a single answer because he spoke at the same time. tell me how your legs are feeling at the moment. sima it is great, it‘ll be a bit surreal. it‘s is starting to
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feel a bit more normal now. what we re feel a bit more normal now. what were celebrations like? we have had a chilled 48 hours and lots of food, we a chilled 48 hours and lots of food, we have got our friends and family coming out over the next day and tomorrow. they are all a bit delayed getting in. we are looking forward to some partying. jamie, can ijust ask you about sitting on that co mforta ble ask you about sitting on that comfortable sofa, that must be appreciated after all of those days just rowing on what must have been a pretty tough environment. yes, the sofa is pretty great to be honest. the seats, although they were great, your bum does get a bit sore. of course, your bum does get a bit sore. of course , you your bum does get a bit sore. of course, you have the salt soars and thatis course, you have the salt soars and that is the thing that really gets to you, controlling the salt and it get everywhere. before you know it,
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you have got blisters and salt soars all over your body and it is pretty painful. how did you all get on together? you had to be 18, but you know, brothers, they are known to clash and it was a family environment for 35 days, where there any legally moments? -- any legally moments? every morning we would share, we would have a big bowl of porridge and would each eat a third and if the last third, the other two had eaten a bit too much, than the last person would feel a bit hard done by. apart from that, we got on fine. i think because we are brothers we also title high on many levels and there were fewer sources of conflict. that was probably our strongest suit. if the worst thing you are arguing about was porridge
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thatis you are arguing about was porridge that is impressive. ewan, you are persuaded to take time off work because the other two were at university. did it take much persuading to do this? no, absolutely not. originally lachlan had seen it and thought it was an awesome idea and thenjamie heard about it and thought it might be an amazing thing to do as students in the summer. little did they know it was going to be over christmas and then i was desperate to get involved. not much persuasion and it was great for work to let me come out and spend the time. it is lovely to hear about the teamwork and everything on how well you got on and there are no big problems on the way, but there must be a little bit of you that is desperate to get away from the other two. surely. that is that human nature, isn‘t it? from the other two. surely. that is that human nature, isn't it? yes, i think we are all looking forward to a bit of time alone and even since arriving in antigua, it has been
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pretty intense post race and post inspections to make sure that we hole have the kit we started off with an interview like this. meeting all of the requirements that you need to do when you finish a race like this, i think over the next week we are looking forward to decompressing. spending a bit of time on our own. the others thing that springs to mind is that often when we talk to explorers and adventurers, as soon as they have done one thing, the mind races to another thing. has that process already begun or are you done for now? it is certainly a source of conversation, what is to come. they definitely will be something. we have a few ideas ranging from a few start—ups to maybe more expeditions. but we have plenty of ideas and they will definitely be something. not quite joy yet what that will be.
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interesting that you say about checking the kit is correct and it is all still present on the boat, when you are planning for a trip like this, how on earth do you decide to take a ukulele, a harmonica and bagpipes? music has a lwa ys harmonica and bagpipes? music has always been a important thing for us andi always been a important thing for us and i think that is one of the things that has brought us together asa team. things that has brought us together as a team. we kind of thought, you know, with bagpipes, although it adds quite a lot of weight, that is one of the critical things you have to think about, improving time, getting across the atlantic, but we thought, you know, getting into antigua with jamie playing the pipes, that would be the coolest thing ever. we couldn‘t not bring it. sima we were jealous so thought we would take our instruments too.” heard that you have the instance with you right now. is that true? we have got them here. are you going to
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give us ajune? have got them here. are you going to give us a june? something have got them here. are you going to give us ajune? something may be played as you are going along. what did you play? just the chorus. i don‘t know whether my voice will be up don‘t know whether my voice will be up to it or not. go on! ok. i don't if you can see the changes that have come over me. afraid that ijust... to high! let me tell you that i love you. that i think about you all of the time. now i‘m going home. i will
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leave it there. that was really good! ican leave it there. that was really good! i can tell you something. everyone who is watching was impressed by the rowing, you have got another region of fans after that performance. i can tell you. look, lachlan, ewan, jamie, you are brilliant, impressive and you have brought us some this morning on brea kfast, brought us some this morning on breakfast, enjoy the celebrations. enjoy relaxing and decompressing in whatever you are doing next it has been a joy to speak to you. thank you. he was pretty good. pretty good. 8:49am is the time and darren, how you going to follow that? we
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will talk about what is in the sky today. sun is up, our weather watchers are out and about in the cold air that we have got this morning and this picture was taken in northamptonshire. very different look to the weather compared to what we have had over the net loss a few weeks or so because it is generally dry this weekend. the sun will be out, the winds will be lighter but it will be a bit colder than we have seen it will be a bit colder than we have seen recently. there are still some areas of cloud around. shower cloud in scotland. these areas of cloud here, mostly thin and high cloud. this area of low pressure is moving away. again we will find high—pressure moving and settling things down we still have a north—westerly wind bringing showers over scotla nd north—westerly wind bringing showers over scotland and one or two icy patches. the showers tend to fade away through the day. a favourite of sunshine around, a bit hazy at times across the south—west perhaps and those temperatures, six to 8 degrees, no great shakes. cool of late but these are the average temperatures for this time of the
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year. those tempted will following quickly with the clear skies, light winds as well for looking at a frost, widely, temperatures will be -2' frost, widely, temperatures will be —2, minus three degrees. except in the highlands and islands where here we are actually drawing in milder air overnight and into tomorrow. that is coming in from the atlantic around this area of line pressure. there is a chance of one or two showers here tomorrow morning. it should stay offshore and partial match, the cloud coming into the north—west of scotland, we have a light winds, a frosty start, lots of sunshine during the day on sunday. a cold, crisp winter‘s day. there‘s temperatures again will be up to around seven or 8 degrees. though figures perhaps where we have the cloud in the north—west of scotland. that atlantic breeze will eventually find its way across the country, i think, over the course of next week. we are bringing milder airfor
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monday morning. it is a contrast with the no so. there will be some mist and fog patches around on monday as well. it little slow to clearly morning, otherwise the sunshine comes through. the atlantic breeze brings in more cloud to northern ireland and into western scotla nd northern ireland and into western scotland and north—east and scotland could be pretty mild. that cloudiness in the north is going to move its way southwards next week so we are going to lose a lot of sunshine, little or no rain and it won‘t be as cold at night. back to you. that was very good! elderly and vulnerable people had £7 million stolen from them last year by thieves posing as police officers. it‘s a crime known as courier fraud where the victim is persuaded that their money is at risk in the bank and they should withdraw the cash and give it to a police courier. radio 4‘s money box presenter paul lewis has
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been looking into this. paul, tell us about how the scam works? i‘m sorry, i‘m not going to do a song. it is a devastating crime for the people affected. it is usually elderly people, it is a cold call, they are told that people are trying to use steel there money via their credit card. they then say there is a crime in the area and they think that the local bank staff may be behind it. they then say they want them to go to the bank, withdraw a large amount of cash, they find out how much they have got, and then ta ke how much they have got, and then take it home and then give it to a police career will call for it and have a code word so they know it is the right person. there are more elements to it, to persuade them that these are real police officers, this is a real event, but it falls
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many people sadly. i spoke to one elderly woman and they knew. she told them that she had a terminally ill husband and they still went ahead and managed to steal £4000, all of their life savings that they we re all of their life savings that they were going to use to go on short holidays before her husband‘s inevitable death. it is a tragic and wicked crime. you bring these kinds of stories to us sometimes and on the face of it you think, why would anyone fall for it? when you hear it asa anyone fall for it? when you hear it as a story and you know how it ends, you think, why would anybody fall for it? but these people are vulnerable and, you know, people are plausible when they resent themselves in that way. el mag yes, and the pleas of site spoke to about this says that these are criminals and thieves who use the telephone as their weapon of choice. they are absolute experts at persuading you that what they are saying is plausible. some people are even told to put the phone down and then 999
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nine immediately. the criminal still on the line and they believe it, they really believe it. i haven‘t spoken to any of these victims who haven‘t said to me at the end, within a few hours, i have been really stupid. and when you hear in you think, yes, that is a relief silly thing to do. they know that i know they have been stupid, but these are professional con artists. they can almost read your mind. they can get information from you and they can persuade you it is real and they can persuade you it is real and they are absolutely professionals, if wicked ones. paul, a couple of things, have these people ever been reimbursed? and what can you same terms of people protecting themselves? sometimes the money will be reimbursed by the bank. the rules have changed recently and that might affect bank‘s attitude. some people did and some people didn‘t get their
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money back. usually they say it was you, you took the cash out, you gave us you, you took the cash out, you gave usa you, you took the cash out, you gave us a story, you gave it to a fee, it is your fault. us a story, you gave it to a fee, it is yourfault. as. get, the police are doing what they can but to be honest, most frauds are never caught or prosecuted. it is up to us to defend ourselves. there is an impenetrable barrier to these frauds. in summary because you and you don‘t know who it is, put the phone down. don‘t engage with them. the moment you start engaging their plausible silver tongued deception, you will be drawn in. don‘t worry about being rude, these are thieves. they are going to steal your money. just put phone down. and if you do that, you can‘t be full. just put phone down. and if you do that, you can't be full. it is very good advice. thank you very much for that. you can hear more about that on moneybox on radio 4 from midday today. you feel rude putting the phone down and some people are polite and it is
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general manners, so you and some people are polite and it is general manners, so you don‘t want to be rude. and you get sucked in. and these people are preying on those instincts. most 16 year olds might be preparing for their exams and spending time with their friends, but mani cooper is taking on a very different challenge. she is aiming to be britain‘s first female olympic ski jumper when she competes in the youth games in lausanne today. nick hope has been to meet her. they leap from 70 to 90 metre hills, reach speeds of over 60 mph and can travel over 100 metres before landing. there is thrillseeking and then there is ski jumping. and 16—year—old mani cooper is the first british woman to attempted at an olympics. things can go wrong and it is quite scary. but then you do have jumps where it really lifts you out and you get the timing right, you get
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the air right, you get the positioning right and then you just have a smile on your face when you land, like, yes. but one sport isn‘t enough for the kettering —born teenager, who took up nordic combined after moving to austria with family in 2012. combining the two is obviously very special. ski jumping, you have to be explosive when you‘re jumping out, you have to be concentrated as well. you need endurance sprint, to have to have that pace, you can keep up. when you push yourself afterwards it is like, yes. i did it, it went well and it is just the next set. think of ski jumping and you will probably think of eddie the eagle edwards and his iconic appearance at the winter olympics, and the sport may have moved on in the last 32 years, but he still follows closely and he had this little message for cooper ahead of her own historic ski jump in bed at the olympics. ——at the olympics. hello, everyone, eddie the eagle here and i've just heard that mani cooper had his taking part in the nordic
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combined for great britain. ijust want to wish the very best of luck stop have fun, enjoy it. from the moment it starts to the moment it finishes, jump well, good look, hope you do well. that is amazing. that is really cool. really nice guy to chat to. ididjumpfurther than him on my home hill, though, which is really cool. he kind of helped the sport get on the map, how much do you want to do that now, and for women in the uk? i want to inspire little kids to do nordic combined because i find it is a great sport. i am seeing things differently and i want it to get bigger and i want to improve, to get biggers goals and go to bigger competitions and then to the olympics. few doubt she has the talent and tenacity to achieve her dreams. you can watch live coverage of lausanne 2020 today and through to wednesday on the bbc iplayer, sport website and app. a young lady with a lot of nerve. 03:00:01,393 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 stay with us, headlines coming up.
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