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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 19, 2020 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning — welcome to breakfast, with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. our headlines today: a clean break — harry and meghan will drop their ‘hrh' and end all royal duties under a new agreement with buckingham palace. the queen says they remain ‘much loved members' of herfamily. the couple are expected to spend most of their time in canada and will pay back taxpayers‘ money used to refubish their windsor home. new powers to help protect potential stalking victims while police investigate allegations are due to come into force. after the calls for big ben to bong for brexit — we'll look at the debate over whether britain's church bells should chime too.
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saracens are relegated — the premiership champions will play next season the second tier of english rugby, after paying too much in wages it's pretty cold out there this morning. some widespread frost. otherwise it's going to be a dry day and we will have some sunshine as well. it's sunday, january the 19th. our top story. a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to step down as working royals in the spring. buckingham palace has announced prince harry and his wife meghan will no longer receive public funds, and will pay back taxpayers‘ money spent on renovating their home in windsor. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, has the story. they have been freed from royal
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duties and they are free to earn their own living with, it would seem, very few restrictions. the styling of his and her royal highness hasn't been taken away from them. they simply won't use it. harry remains prince, six then mine to the british throne and the remainder duke and duchess of success sussex? although they no longer formally represent the queen, the lead with her blessing. in a statement, they said. here are the essentials. under the new arrangement, they are required to step back from royal duties, including official military appointments. they will no longer receive public funds but they will also receive money from the prince of wales. and they have shared their wish to repay funds used to renovate frogmore cottage in windsor. one big concession for them is they appear to be free to earn money with very
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few restrictions, other than a general commitment to uphold the values of her majesty. first impressions are that it's an attempt to make the separation is clear and distinct as possible. the fact that they are not going to be doing any royal work is probably the best solution because then it makes a very clea n solution because then it makes a very clean break and everyone is clear about what they will be doing and there will be no blurred lines. i think this is a good solution. but the royal family, it's a moment of undoubted sadness. it must be particularly ha rd undoubted sadness. it must be particularly hard for william. but harry has made his choice. he is going to seek a new life with his family. the couple's decision to step away from their traditional duties is a momentous one for the royal family. our royal correspondent, daniela relph, looks back now at the road that lead the duke and duchess to this point. they'd met just over a they'd metjust over a year earlier but these were the first pictures in
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september 2017 which showed the relationship was serious. meghan lived and worked in toronto. prince harry's invictus games. two months later the engagement was announced. the couple interviewed at kensington palace by the bbc. how much of a sense of the enormity you are getting into? i think i can sense of the enormity you are getting into? i thinki can very safely say, as naive as it sounds now, having gone through this learning curve in the past 1.5 years, idid learning curve in the past 1.5 years, i did not have any understanding of what it would be like. four days later, the couple carried out their first engagement together. just like harry, she was tactile, informal and confident. this seemed a different
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kind of royal walkabout. when meghan joined harry, prince william and kate on stage as the soon—to—be patron of the royal foundation, it seemed like the future of the royal family was safe in the hands of the so—called fab four. their wedding, watched by millions around the world, seemed the perfect end to a fairytale romance. by january 2019, meghan was pregnant and had begun work with her first patronages, but behind—the—scenes there were several unexpected moves. rather than live in kensington palace, next to the cambridges, they chose frogmore cottage in windsor. they moved their staff from kensington palace to buckingham palace. injune, it was revealed the sussexes would leave the royal foundation, setting up their own instead. the split led to rumours of a rift between harry and william. towards the end of their high—profile tour of southern africa, it was clear the couple were struggling with the glare of the royal spotlight. can you deal with it?
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can you manage it? can you continue with it? and what happens if you can't? you know, i've said for a long time to h... that's what i call him. yeah. that it's not enough to just survive something, right? like, that's not the point of life. you've got to thrive. you've got to feel happy. the clues were there. despite outward appearances, this was a couple deeply unhappy with their royal role, and determined to make a change. after the intense discussions of recent days, this new way of working will be something quite different for harry and meghan and for the wider royal family. making a success of it will be a test for all those involved. daniela relph, bbc news, at buckingham palace. we'll have reaction to this story throughout today's programme from various analysts and commentators, including the former royal press secretary, dickie arbiter. he'll be on at 7:10.
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what do you think it means for the royal family and is this the best way to try to work out the differing demands of the duke and duchess of sussex and that of the queen as well. you can let us know. new measures to protect victims of stalking will come into force in england and wales from tomorrow. police officers will have the power to issue "stalking protection orders" which ban alleged offenders from contacting or approaching their victims while a complaint is under investigation. andy moore reports. the ministerfor women the minister for women visiting a stalking helpline whose staff are in the front line of dealing with the problem. what's your experience of the first phone call? it's believed one in five women and one in ten men will have to deal with stalking at some stage in their lives. these new protection orders will give police extra powers to stop offenders in their tracks while further investigations are being carried
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out. these are really groundbreaking orders that the police will be able to apply for to protect victims of stalking but also to make sure that the perpetrators are getting the treatment programmes they need to break this cycle of abuse or stalking. a protection order will usually stay in place for a minimum of two years. anyone who preaches it will face five years in jail. campaigners have welcomed this initiative so the orders are a powerful new tool to stop stalking that they are warning anyone who breaches in order must be arrested immediately. andy moore, bbc news. a 10—year—old boy has been stabbed in a leicester street, while walking with his mother. the child was taken to hospital, where his condition is described as non life—threatening. leicestershire police described the suspect as a light—skinned asian man, in his mid—20s and are appealing for witnesses. trainee paramedics will receive a bursary
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of five thousand pounds per year, as part of a government drive to recruit more nhs workers. they've been included in a £200 plan — announced last year — to provide trainee nurses, midwives and other health students with an annual maintenance grant. the new system comes more than two years after the conservative government scrapped free tuition and bursaries for nurses. we know that most of the uk grinds to a halt at the first hint of snow — but when canadians declare a state of emergency over wintry weather, you know it's serious.
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the island of newfoundland has just seen a record—breaking blizzard which dumped 30 inches of snow on the capital, stjohn‘s, leaving cars buried and homes without power. members of the armed forces have been sent in, and a state of emergency declared. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. most of the papers are leading on the deal between the queen and the duke and duchess of sussex. the headline in the sunday express reads ‘freedom...at a price'. "they're out," says the sunday times. it reports that the deal
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"amounts to the abdication of the royal rock stars'". the front page also features an exclusive investigation into a government data breach that reportedly allowed betting companies to access the personal information of 28 million young people. the observer is leading with politics. it says boris johnson will warn his cabinet to focus all their energy on developing policies for post—brexit britain — or face losing their positions during the cabinet reshuffle in a few weeks. and online, the indepedent leads with nhs waiting times. it says long waits are pushing more patients towards private surgery, with the sector expected to be worth £1.3 billion by 2021. here's darren with a look at this morning's weather. it was absolutely beautiful yesterday morning. that kind of gorgeous slightly frosty, foggy morning but the sun burned through in the end. have we got the same today? similar, yes. most of us will
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see a bright blue sky. we got a frost quite widely. temperatures as low as —5, —6 this morning but we've also got some areas that will be seeing some fog that could hang around. let me show you where the areas of dog are likely to be. it's quite a small area that could affect a few people. you can see all the way down here. that fog around through the morning. it could linger perhaps even into the afternoon. away from here, a lot of sunshine after the start. more of the trees coming into the north—west of scotla nd coming into the north—west of scotland lowering in more cloud and probably making it milder as well. not as cold here early this morning and temperatures could make double figures. around seven or eight degrees. maybe the sunshine turns a bit hazy doing the afternoon. that fog drifting its way across the midlands towards the fens overnight.
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you can see how the cloud and breeze freshen up. it should be generally frost free. until you get into southern scotland. likely to have a widespread frost in southern england. that is underneath the centre of high pressure. a very high, high pressure. drawing on this atla ntic high, high pressure. drawing on this atlantic and that's why we are seeing more of the reasonable cloud coming in to scotland, northern ireland, moving down into parts of northern england on monday. some sunshine to the east of high ground and after morning fog, we will see some sunshine as well. probably the lowest temperatures, even though we got the sunshine, further north, likely to make double figures once again. this high pressure will be there or thereabouts over the week ahead. we got this weakening weather front. the first of any rain. temperatures are lifting a bit more
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overnight across northern england with a frost further south. maybe a few patches of mist and fog as well. it's going to be that sort of weather. that is the weather front, may produce a little drizzle, south—west scotland, northern ireland. cloud breaks here and there and we will see some sunshine. temperatures 6—9d. that is the story through the rest of the week. it should be dry. barely cloudy. dries good. you may still live in the you may still live in the home you may still live in the home you you may still live in the home you grow up in but for many people, what would you give for a chance to revisit that place you spent the early years of your life? one artist has taken the ultimate trip down memory lane. everyone is welcome to drop in. very little money, but lots
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of determination. an influx of south asian immigrants stepped onto the business ladder as shopkeepers. this is like one of my old family photo albums... darinda grew up in her family's on a shop in 19805 wolverhampton. corner shops that we re wolverhampton. corner shops that were video shops like my parents owned were so significant back in the day, because it really provided an essential lifeline to them in term5 an essential lifeline to them in terms of back home. it closed down after ten yea r5, terms of back home. it closed down after ten years, but over three decades on, she bought her data's old shot back to life through rediscovering old objects. the idea came from one very special briefcase. so, talk me through what in this briefcase? so, this briefcases my fatherold briefcase. and really, this is where the sole project started. i opened it up and it had been put away in storage for many years. i started to look
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through it and ifound many years. i started to look through it and i found that there is something here to be explored. there is an amp fuse, note the 35 p. i don't think you can get anything that's cheap anymore. this is in the shop where your dad worked? yeah. did you ever use this back in the day? i used to use it and treated a bit like a toy, really. and likely till behind us, it wasjust fascinating to press all these buttons and just be a little girl and see what was going on. and in the new exhibition committee corner shop isn't the only thing that has been recreated. welcome to my home! wow, this is brilliant. it is a blast down memory lane. and people are invited for a housewarming. this isa are invited for a housewarming. this is a recreation of darinda living room from back in the 19805, which most of us can probably relate to. i know i certainly can. in fact, i still have this wallpaper in my house today. i had three of these two shoeboxes. and let's face it,
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and asian household wouldn't be the same without food on the table. it's amazing. i walked same without food on the table. it's amazing. iwalked in same without food on the table. it's amazing. i walked in and same without food on the table. it's amazing. iwalked in and i same without food on the table. it's amazing. i walked in and i was like, i'm pretty sure i've been in this living room several times before in my life growing up. this isjust something i've needed to see today. it'sjust makes something i've needed to see today. it's just makes everything something i've needed to see today. it'sjust makes everything come alive for me. every little object has so many layers. i love it so much. i was amazed, has so many layers. i love it so much. iwas amazed, how has so many layers. i love it so much. i was amazed, how they have put it all together. i have got relatives under the house still looks like this! putting this together has been a journey of discovery for dawinda. she has taken a trip back in time to share a culturally historic past. the living room in south asian community is the linchpin. it keeps everyone together. i want them to come in together. i want them to come in together in the space and stay as long as they want. i want them to have a cream and sit on the sofa and watch the film. and get a real sense of what it was like for me and my family growing up in wolverhampton in the 19805, and get a real sense ofa
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in the 19805, and get a real sense of a lived experience. it would be quite interesting to go back to the house you first lived in, my house was quite small, but at the time the room seemed was quite small, but at the time the room seemed enormous was quite small, but at the time the room seemed enormous because you are only a tiny little person. we had quite a small little tin bath on feet and the most extraordinary, i seem to remember it sort of brown and orange and green, patterned wallpaper... only in the 1970s. yeah! probably quite funky now. if they brought it back, maybe. but exhibition monica was reporting on is on at nottingham's new art exchange gallery until march. we will be back with a summery of the news at 6:30am. now it is time for the film review. hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema
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releases is mark kermode. hi, mark. hello. very interesting mix this week. we have bombshell, which, as you probably know, is up for three oscars. a hidden life, the new film by terrence malick. and weathering with you, an anime from the director of your name. yeah, really interesting week. a very good week. so, let's start with bombshell. so three oscar nominations — two performances for charlize theron, margot robbie, and hairand make—up — which is interesting because make—up is a lot — it's to do with prosthetic work in order to make them look like the real—life characters. this is a drama based on the real—life scandal of roger ailes at the fox news network. his downfall kind of prefigured that of harvey weinstein, which is currently in the news at the moment. although actually, the movie went into sort of preproduction before that scandal broke. sojohn lithgow is eerily convincing as roger ailes who sort
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of is running this organisation, this absolutely toxic culture, in which he believes he has the absolute right to essentially abuse the women who are working under him, and the culture is such that nobody appears to be ready to speak out. everyone just thinks "this is the way it is. if you speak out, it willjust end very, very badly." until finally, gretchen carlson, played by nicole kidman, decides to take her complaint to the public through the law. here's a clip. if you're able to stick it out at fox, gather more evidence, you might be able to sue ailes himself, instead of fox. and that is why i am here. because marty hyman told me that over here in newjersey, i can avoid arbitration by suing roger personally. he says that you've managed to change the law and that we could call other women and show a pattern. will other women come forward? yes. they will. you live and work in new york. roger has a house in bergen county, where he stays when he can't make it upstate. you do your homework, ms carlson.
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no fingerprints. that's how much i practised the violin as a child. if roger finds out you came to us, he won't just just fire you, he will bang us with a $1 million lawsuit, he will attack you personally. men like him worry more about reputations than they do money. roger won't stop. you know that. oh, i know. colleagues you admire will say publicly you're a superior, ambitious woman who is suing because her career has stalled. let ‘em. wow! i mean, even that tells us how important this story is. it is, and it's very, very timely and what i think the film does manage to do is create a very good portrait of a toxic environment in which this sort of thing is going on. and what's interesting is that the abuse goes from, like, you know, the lowliest newcomer to people who are very sort of high up in the organisation. i think the film itself — which is directed by jay roach — isn't perfect. i think it's solidly done. occasionally, it has a little bit of the tv drama about it. it owes a debt to the big short.
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stylistically, the big short is kinda of more adventurous. but what carries this shoulder—high are the performances. i mean, it is a terrific trio of charlize theron nicole kidman and margot robbie. for me, funnily enough, watching it reminded me a little bit of the fact that nicole kidman had made that film to die for, back in the ‘905, which is a very good and very, very overlooked film. but this takes the story and it leads you through it in a way that kind of pastiches the infotainment style. and it is entertaining but you feel like you are being given a lot of information as the story progresses. and at the centre of it is this idea of silence — that everyone kind of knows what's going on but nobody is able to speak out because there is this poisonous culture, there is this, you know, this character who seems to be unassailable. the film's also kind of interesting about the beginning of the relationship between trump and fox news. and obviously, in the light of everything that's happened with that relationship, it's very interesting the way
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in which the film sets it up and initially, it is a kind of adversarial thing, but you can see people thinking "oh, actually, this guy thinks the things we think" and "this guy is maybe somebody that we should be getting behind." so i think it's a really interesting film but if the performances were not as good as they were, i think you might start to see the flaws in the drama a little bit more — but the performances are really good and... 0k. ..and i really bought into it as a result of that. plus, as you say, it is a really timely story and, you know, quite shocking, but yeah, very, very engrossing. all right. terrence malick for your second choice. yeah, so where do you stand on terrence malick? uh, i like what i've seen, but i've not seen huge amounts, so i that that's — i'm probably not the bestjudge. he has been off the boil for a few years — in fact, for a few films. you look at things like prince of cups, song to song. people think of badlands and they think of the great malicks. yes. everything, i think, up to the thin red line. this is a return to form — partial return to form. the true story of a austrian conscientious objector, franz jagerstatter, who refused
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to swear allegiance to hitler during world war ii. we begin with an idyllic scene of him and his partner starting a family. clouds are gathering — quite literally clouds gather overhead — and then it becomes a battle of conscience and will as the community turn on him for refusing to fall in line. the film was originally entitled radegund, which is the place where the home is set. the new title comes from george eliott — "with people who lived faithfully — a hidden life and rest in unvisited tombs" so the film sort of declares itself to be a celebration of a sort of quieter defiance and one of the questions he's asked all the way through is "what's the point? what's the point? you think it's going to make any difference?" and the point that the film is making is actually not unlike the central point of it's a wonderful life — just a decent — a decent man, you know, actually is important. it's beautifully shot, beautifully scored. i have to say, i thought rather over — overuse of music. it has a religious element and if you didn't notice the religious element, don't worry, the score will tell you, the music choices will tell you there's something religious going on here. 0k! but so i like it up to a point.
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it does have a lot of that malicky stuff about hand—held, wispy, you know voice—overs, but i think its heart is absolutely in the right place. i think it is an important story about defiance and it is a story about standing up for the thing you believe in, even when everyone around you turns against you. and i think it's really found malick back on track after the last couple of films which were just self—indulgent waffle. and weathering with you. yeah! which i read is the highest—grossing film in japan last year. terrifically successful. so directed by makoto shinkai, who made your name — which you remember i reviewed on this show a couple of years ago? so set during in a period of rain that looks like it's threatening to drown tokyo and japan. we have a young hero who runs away from home and he gets to tokyo to start a new life, where he falls in love, from a distance, with a young girl who he starts to believes is a weather maiden. as in, she can actually affect the weather. here's a clip.
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whoa. watch. it's gonna clear up. huh? hey, what do you mean by...? what?! now, i should say, that's the english language dub. of course, i saw it in the original version which is the version that i would advise people to watch. i thought this was really fascinating, firstly because, like your name, it does the thing
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about it's a young love story, but it's connected to a kind of global event. secondly, because it looks absolutely beautiful. i mean, just watching it... even that was gorgeous! yes, but even seeing it on a small screen, it is really beautiful. it has a great musical score by radwimps — i'm sure you have all of radwimps' albums. sorry! laughs. the music is really, really good and really sort of suits the tone of the film itself. i found it enchanting. i love the way it's the details of a love story but the wider fantasy of it all. it is aimed at a young adult audience — a 12a certificate film — so a lot more grown—up than some animations, but i thought it was fully terrific and it's not a surprise that it's been a huge hit and i hope it finds its audience here as well. oh, fantastic! and sticking with the theme of things that are visually stunning. yes! your best out, not surprising, ithink, 1917. 1917 — have you seen 1917? 0h. i mean, visually, absolutely extraordinary. did you find... extraordinary! ..overwhelming — because the whole thing about 1917, first world war drama starring, brilliantly, george mackay, directed by sam mendes, is that it's — it plays out as if one shot. it's not one shot. it's not, but it's... but it plays out as if... gosh, it's clever! did you find it immersive? i did, but i didn't find it
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as emotionally traumatic as i thought it was going to be. 0h, 0k! i was stunned by the visuals but then, you know, my other half trained in camera work and spent the whole two hours going "oh, my god! oh, my god! this is extraordinary!" the camera work is absolutely extraordinary. yes, yes, so that's what we came out discussing. i thought the score was great as well, but i really did think — i mean, i was kind of suspicious at the beginning because the whole one—shot — even though it's not one shot — thing sounds like it could be a gimmick. you kind of think of the beginning of specter — you remember the one shot going up, following bond, in and out the window and then across the rooftops — but i actually, i forgot very early on that it was a stylistic format and i just felt that you were seeing the world unfold as these two central characters saw it, constantly discovering things as they discovered them, and... yeah, it — see it on a big screen. that's what it is all about. see it on the biggest possible screen, don't wait for it to come out on dvd. a big screen, a big screen. and i love your choice of dvd this week as well. so, pain and glory, which is —
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got this fantastic, you know, award—nominated performance by antonio banderas in the central role, it's the new almodovar. what i love about it is this — it's a semi—autobiographical for almodovar. i think it's the most vulnerable i have ever seen antonio banderas. yes, yes. you really feel... you know, you feel his vulnerability, his pain, his growth, his, you know, nostalgia for the past. you get the sense his body is failing him and i could listen to his voice for — that sequence, anatomy and geography very, very early on, which i... gasps. yes, very clever. just spellbinding. absolutely loved it. yes. absolutely loved it. and — and again, actually looks beautiful. i mean, it's the whole — it's the whole works, but it looks gorgeous. the thing is when have you ever seen a almodovar film that didn't look beautiful? yes, good point. even the ones that aren't great look brilliant. good point well made. chuckles. mark, see you next week. thank you. and enjoy your cinema—going, whatever you choose to see. it's a cracking week. enjoy it. bye— bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to start new lives away from royal duties and without public funds. the deal — described by the queen as a "constructive and supportive way forward" — will see the couple pay back taxpayers' money which was spent on renovating their home in windsor. they're expected to spend most of their time in canada. there is no doubt now that they are being plain citizens. they are not doing any royal duties on behalf of the queen. she is the queen of canada and they are simply going to be private citizens. the vocation
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they've been doing on vancouver island or when actually start working, but it makes it clear that harry has no official status in canada as a royal. he has no constitutional status. he belongs to the queen. questions are raised as to what he could potentially do. the one thing that has come out especially the papers today is that they are going to need immigration tax lawyers quite quickly. especially as they spend any amount of time here. they've been here for a number of weeks and they are going to start triggering some alarm bells. as to whether they are going to stay there and their staff is. whether they are going to incur some tax bills. and under this new arrangement it's clear prince
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charles is going to be funding part of their lifestyle. and that will depending on who you talk to count as income here in canada. one of the associate editors, this isa one of the associate editors, this is a kind of a lose lose situation. married to a mixed—race american divorcee heralded a new dawn for the house of windsor another dream is over. it's one that still making headlines several days after it first emerged. will come to some of those comments a little later on. holly is here this morning. a huge story in rugby
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union. premiership champions saracens will start next season facing life in the second tier of english rugby after being relegated for persistent salary cap breaches at the club. it's one of the biggest stories in english club rugby history, and with us now is the bbc‘s rugby union correspondent chris jones. for that and be able to get their house in order. they were given two options. they could open up their books and let them investigate further or they can accept the fact that they would be relegated to the championship next season. that is the option they've gone for. it's one of the biggest stories in english club rugby history, and with us now is the bbc‘s rugby union correspondent chris jones. chris, what's been the reaction within the game? i think the reaction hasjust
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i think the reaction has just been one of amazement, really. you are quite right. if it's not one of the biggest stories in club rugby history, it probably is the biggest. we had blood gate back in 2009 which led to harlequins being hauled over the coals and going through all kinds of changes there. but this is something that has such a wide reaching ramifications. everything that saracens done, tainted by what has gone on. what happens to this star—studded squad. clubs would have made selection decisions. it wouldn't happen to anyone but saracens. it's an absolutely huge story and got everyone in the rugby world and sporting world talking. finally it's going down, more and more questions are being asked.
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you've got some very prominent england players. it the likes of owen farrell, the england captain. what happens to them now. that's the million—dollar question. it's hard to imagine. these guys have been so loyal to saracens. they conducted this band of brothers mentality. surely, surely that has to be seriously stretched and challenged, that kind of spirit. how badly do the players feel let down by those of them who told them back in november, nothing to see here in the way saracens met the initial punishment with indignation rather than contrition. it looks so ill thought out. agents are working overtime. i'm sure other clubs are thinking today have room in their salary to squeeze in one of these
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players. they have about 25 internationals. this onlooker permanent switches or this time say with saracens and try to salvage the club's reputation. it's one thing asking these players to help and stay in the second tier. it's another getting them to do that and what impact playing in the second tier will have an england on the lines. i mentioned earlier, the fact they had two options. they could have opened up a book or gone to relegation. this is what tony rowe, the chairman on the bbc last night, this is what he said the situation is. premiership rugby for their part. no detail and again, you asked what the reaction was. as well as that kind of bewilderment and amazement, at what has gone on also, amazement, at what has gone on also, a bit of confusion and a little bit of anger around. also other fans who
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wa nt to of anger around. also other fans who want to know more detail but certainly, saracens had the choice. clearly, they got more to hide and relegation is the more palatable option. this also throws into question the salary governance. we also keep going back to november. what would happen to back then? try to get some players off their books. rather they kicked it into the long grass. it's badly cost them. saracans still have a chance to retain their european champions cup trophy — if they beat racing this lunch time and other results go their way they'll be in the quarter—finals. ulster made it through as one of the best second—placed teams, thanks to a 22—15 win over bath — will addison on the scoresheet in the week he was recalled
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to the ireland sqaud. and northampton did all they could to keep their hopes alive, with a bonus—point win in lyon. george furbank scoring the vital fourth try. they'll be waiting on the results from saracen's and gloucester today. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has ramped up the tension ahead of their match at liverpool this afternoon. he sasturgen klopp has a long way to go before he can be regarded as anywhere near as good as sir alex ferguson. well, liverpool will move 16 points clear at the top of the premier league if they beat united at anfield, after (00v)second—placed manchester city were held to a 2—all draw against crystal palace. they were 1—nil down with 10 minutes to go, but sergio aguero scored twice in five minutes to put them ahead before an own goal by ferandinho in the final minute. there was a dramatic victory for newcastle — theirfirst in five league matches — isaac hayden heading in a last—gasp winner at home to chelsea —
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that was the only goal of the game. and it was a big day at the foot of the table — bottom side norwich giving themselves a lifeline with a 1—0 victory over bournemouth, who're just one place above them. bournemouth captain steve cook tried to keep his side in the match with a fine save — the problem is, he's a defender, not a goalkeeper, so that gave norwich a penalty, which teemu pukki scored. i think it'sjust i think it's just something he's done purely on instinct. he hasn't meant or planned to long to think about it. i just meant or planned to long to think about it. ijust think, i can only put it down to that. he's very down the dressing room. we have to support at this time. it's just one of those things he couldn't help. celtic moved past struggling championship side partick thistle to reach the fifth round of the scottish cup. leigh griffiths scored his first goal since august to set them on their way to a 32nd win in a row, in domestic cup competitions — celtic are targetting
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a fourth consecutive treble. some spectacular bowling from dom bess left england in a strong position, going into day four of the third test against south africa. bess took his first five—wicket haul, as south africa struggled to chase england's first innings score of 499. after a rain delay, quinton de kock made a half—century but he was then remarkably dropped three times by ben stokes. south africa still trail england by 291 runs. twice, the world champion ali carter has made it to the final of of the masters snooker for the first time, he'll face stuart bingham after beating shaun murphy 6 frames to 3. carter took his opportunity to close out the match in the ninth frame with a break of 97.
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twice a world championship finallist, he was only invited to play when ronnie o'sullivan decided to give the tounament a miss this year. after more than a year out — conor mcgregor made his return to the ufc and it lasted all of a0 seconds. it was one of the most highly anticipated fights — the irishman and donald ‘cowboy‘ cerrone in vegas — it ended about an hour ago after mcgregor landed a series of blows in the first round — and the american quite simply failed to recover. if you're going to get a0 seconds. unbelievable. thanks, holly. there was a bit of a ding—dong this week over whether big ben should "bong" to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu, after the prime minister suggested a public whip—round to cover the £500,000 cost. but what about the thousands of church bells across britain?
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should they be chiming to herald a new dawn, or stay silent to avoid dragging the clergy into the brexit debate? breakfast‘s john maguire has been looking into it. from the london olympics in 2012 to royal weddings, to showing solidarity with notre—dame cathedral after its devastating fire. church bells of marked momentous occasions in our history. as well as a call player, bell towers are used to commemorate and to celebrate, to bring us all together. so is brexit a fitting occasion? it's believed saint michael's in the village of london in milton keynes dates back almost thousand years. it will have witnessed many changes in our relations with europe. on a sunday, we normally don't have bellringers anymore but we have the chime of the
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bells up on the belltower so we have somebody who does it for us on a sunday when we don't have the bellringers. it's one of the eight churches look after by the reverend canon christoph pumphrey. born in germany, she's been a vicarfor more than 20 years. she believes such an historic day should be marked in the time—honoured fashion. historic day should be marked in the time-honoured fashion. on a secular level, it's marking an historic event. i think honouring away democracy, and second point would be the churches task. what we had to unite people to bring healing into this nation again which has been so bitterly divided. it's practice night for the young bellringers. the brumdingers hewitson maries the mosley suburb of birmingham. they regularly ring peels for important
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national occasions but a drawing line exit. simon, should the bells be run for brexit day?” line exit. simon, should the bells be run for brexit day? i mean, the central council of church ringers which represents rings around the country and in fact all around the world does have policies in terms of what we encourage people to ring for and politics is just what we encourage people to ring for and politics isjust not what we encourage people to ring for and politics is just not one of those. major national events if we are asked by the church, we might say yes, we've been asked to do such and such. we think it's a good idea but political events isn't one of those. we have to ask the clergy they belong to the church and it's up they belong to the church and it's up to individual incumbents. one thing that years of arguing over the european union has done is create a lot of noise but this is one place where the church bells will be silent. john mcguire, bbc news, birmingham. the debate rages on. it is a
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beautiful day to get out and look at those church spires. that is a beautiful sunrise! yes, it is. it is not a sunrise, it is a sunset from yesterday, from a weather watcher. we had some high cloud yesterday. again, these beautiful colours to end the day. you can see in the valley is a bit of fog which was pulling yesterday evening. we have actually got some fog around this morning which will prove rather stubborn and dense in places. we also have a really cold start, quite widely across the uk. now, here is the fog. it will be all the way through chick spree, roster, all the way up to lancashire. —— tewkesbury. it has been quite tricky for travelling. some of it could linger into the afternoon. outside of that, lots of sunshine. except more towards the west of scotland, we have more of a breeze coming in from the atlantic. that made if the temperatures to double figures. elsewhere, it will be chillier, even with the sunshine.
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that fog could be a nuisance into the evening across parts of the midlands, operably drifting more towards the east midlands and the fa ns towards the east midlands and the fans overnight. at the same time we can see more cloud topping down across scotland into northern ireland. a patchy frost, perhaps southern scotland to northern ireland and northern england, much colder further south, where we will have the clear skies. could be —6 across some southern parts of england. that is in the centre of this large and very high area of low pressure. just getting squeezed across northern parts of the uk by that atlantic wind, which is why we see more cloud. further south, across a good part of wales, some fog around in the morning and that will lift. then we see lots of sunshine. further north we will see sunshine. further north we will see sunshine to the east of the pennines, and north—eastern scotland. elsewhere, the northern half of the uk will see a lot more cloud, temperatures nine or 10 degrees, further south it will be chillier, especially if the fog is stubborn to lift. my pressure will be with us throughout next week. it
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will get pushed a bit by that week when a front which moves down from the north—west, bringing more cloud in. temperature staying high across the northern half of the uk, but there will still be a touch of frost further south. that weak weather front is just producing a little of drizzle, the only rain we will get over the next few days, and even that will fade away on either side of that band of cloud, where we may see a bit more sunshine around. a bit more in the way of temperatures, around nine degrees in the northern half of the uk, 5—6 further south. quite a chilly feeling. over the week had we will find temperatures near normalfor this week had we will find temperatures near normal for this type of year. those at high temperatures we are expecting over the weekend. a fair bit of cloud. some patchy frost and may be some patchy fog around as well. a little bit of sunshine coming out here and there. i will be not quite as much sunshine as we are seeing over the weekend. nevertheless, it will be dry and i am sure many people will appreciate that. cold this morning, wasn't it? very
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cold. scraping the ice off the windscreen for sure. now it is time for click. at the southern end of the las vegas strip is the mandalay bay hotel. on october 1, 2017 this was the scene of a tragedy. the us's deadliest ever mass shooting. a gunman in one of the rooms opened fire on a crowd of concert—goers across the road. he killed 58 people and injured more than a00. the incident sparked a review of security across the city but now it is being taken further. richard taylor has been looking
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at whether technology can stop would—be perpetrators in their tracks. here's the dilemma. how do you keep the world's entertainment capital safe for revellers, without turning it into a party pooping security fortress? a next—generation security solution... patriot one believes it has the answer. using unobtrusive sensors which generate information feeds which can be assessed to see if someone is carrying a weapon. this vegas casino resort is now rolling out the technology which has been in testing for the past two years. we have got various bits of hardware here... the system can be discreetly placed in, say, a building entrance or a turnstile — and unlike a metal detector, it creates an invisible fence you wouldn't even know was there. so if i'm carrying a concealed weapon on my person,
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or worse still with intent on an act of violence, the system as it is deployed here invisibly and these planters, the ai making a determination of whether this is benign and alerting security authorities to take the relevant action. the patscan device works on several levels. the one thing emits residents frequency patterns that identify the shape of an object. another sensor creates a magnetic field and detects disturbances as an object passes through. but the real smarts lie in the ai algorithms. within seconds, they assess the sensor data against its own database to figure out if weapons are being hidden. with daily shootings in the us and a knife crime epidemic in the uk, the allure
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of a system to keep us safe is certainly seductive. we want to be in public schools, hotels, university campuses. we are now in the business of rolling it out, north america is the starting point, the uk market will be extremely important to us, particularly when it comes to knives because of the knife crime crisis. but groundbreaking is the tech is, it is largely unproven. how accurate is your system? because when it comes to ai, the machine is only as is the data that you are feeding it. we have been out for a long time now with tremendous partners like westgate who have allowed us to get a lot of data here. we have built sufficiently large data holdings that we now have confidence in the accuracy of our systems. enough confidence that we are now into our first commercial deployment. our early adopters also understand that the systems get better and better the more data is fed in, so they are equally allowing us to ingest data for training the system. still, the system isn't100% accurate or foolproof, an assailant may well get into the premises another way entirely, or a weapon could be
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hidden in something different like a metal box. so an additional security layer is needed. so if i'm openly brandishing a weapon, that is where the eyes of the system kick in, a so—called machine vision where a security camera can make an assessment based on what is in my hand, based on what is in its database and if it finds it is likely to be a weapon, then it will trigger a relevant alert. the idea of augmenting human eyes with the smarts of computer vision is catching on globally. a number of outfits promising enhanced security through person and object detection. but understandably, that leaves many people uneasy. we are very conscious of the fact that people don't want to live in a mass surveillance society. so there are very different ways in which you can collect data. we don't capture any personal information or store or distribute personal information. we are looking for objects — people are of no interest to us unless they are carrying
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a threat object. so what our ai has been trained to recognise is the threats. it is not making any determination on people or capturing personal information or generating a body image. i think that puts us on the right side of that line between too much surveillance and not enough security. no, this is not a pair of goggles, it is the prototype of an air purifying mask. the finished product will look like this. with claims it is 50 times more effective than the market leading cycling mask, the a0 air uses nanotechnology and air pressure to filter out harmful particulate matter. apparently, the prototype is a lot less comfortable than the finished version and this is a size too large and i need a smaller one. ifeel like my nose is being held and i probably sound like that. it will take some getting used
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to but it is actually adjusting according to my respiration rate, so right now the fan speed is at 16%. i can make the fan go up more if i want more air to be pumped. i feel like i'm at the dentist. imagine what i could do — i certainly couldn't run like this but maybe ride a bike. i don't know. it has five hours battery life and in time, the device will be miniaturised. but despite the fact that i thought i looked completely and utterly ridiculous, it has actually made it to the catwalk, featuring in new york and seoul fashion weeks. back on the show floor, there was also the sixth finger. sixto is a device for people who have limited mobility in one hand, so could be due to a stroke or something like that. the way it works is, you position the bad hand where it needs to grab something and this joystick, which will be held in the good hand, is used to be able to close the device so you can actually pick something up.
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one of the other benefits of this is that it actually encourages somebody to use a hand which isn't functioning properly rather than holding their arm in a position where it is likely to get stiffer. but in the depths of one slightly more secret meeting spot, came this view into the future. this is a contact lens that provides augmented reality. apparently, it fits like any other scleral or semipermeable contact lens. this could be used for something like translation, the words would come up in front of you when you are having a conversation with someone. the idea is that this is all about invisible computing, that something like this should be less intrusive than having your phone in front of you. wow! that is incredible! in a way, the fact that there is little enough information for it to not be totally distracting makes it better. i think if they put too much up it would become too overwhelming. while i wasn't allowed to wear it, just holding it up, i could see some
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simple stats right before my eyes, which having been sceptical in advance, i was pretty blown away by. so how is it possible to fit all of this into the lens? we've had to build our own wireless protocol between the contact lens and another wearable accessory, because we had to manage power and data and size of chip, and that accessory connects to your mobile phone or the cloud, to access additional computing resources and information. it is very comfortable, fits to your eye and corrects your vision when you wear it. so if you have a prescription, we build the prescription into the lens. heart rate, speed, and even with your eyes shut, you would able to see this because it is lit up and obviously the lens is sitting beneath your eyelid. it feels seriously sci—fi. and there you have it — what to wear, to see and feel the future. there, never taken that photo before.
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the thing about coming to las vegas straight after christmas is you eat lots of food followed by lots more food. and chris fox has decided that he is going to use technology to help knock him back into shape. this is what he has found. these three new apps are designed to help with your fitness goals using image recognition, machine learning and motion sensors. but are any of these apps advanced enough to replace a personal trainer? i've come to the gym to find out. first up, is vay sports which uses image recognition and a selfie camera to make sure you're doing the exercises properly. you choose a trainer and put the phone a few metres away and follow the instructions in your headphones. great, i can see you. here we go with push—ups today. get into the starting position so i can se you at all times.
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based on what the camera sees, the app gives you feedback to correct your form. you call that a rep, your hips are a bit too high up. it also counts how many reps you do properly so you can track your progress. nice work. how are the back of the arms feeling? at the moment the app only works with body weight exercises at the moment so to move on to weight training, i'm trying gymfitty, a virtual trainer you can talk to. i'm done. rest for two minutes. how many reps did you do? 10. well done! let's do another set. the app creates a bespoke workout tailored to your goals and it remembers how well you did last time so you don't have to log your workout or write anything down. i want you to add another five kilograms to each side of the bar. ping me when you are done. to relax, i'm finishing off with some yoga. this is yoganotch, which uses motion tracking sensors to detect my position and correct my form which, fairwarning, is going to be terrible. not quite.
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give me the chime, i'm doing it. chime. i got a chime, i did it right. i'm not sure whether setting up these senses every time will take some of the zen out of yoga, although the company says it is more accurate than using image recognition. oh, come on. these apps certainly add a layer of interactivity to a workout, but can they match the kind of encouragement you get from a human personal trainer? and there you have it, a downward facing dog from a forward facing fox. was that cheesy? we are in vegas, you know. although next week, we won't be. we're going to la. and there is more in the full—length version which you can see on iplayer. don't forget, you can find us all across social media, youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter. thanks for watching and we will see you in la.
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good morning — welcome to breakfast, with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. our headlines today: stepping back — harry and meghan are to stop all royal duties and drop their ‘hrh' titles but the queen says they remain ‘much loved members' of her family. prince harry will also lose his military positions and the couple will pay back
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the taxpayers' money used to renovate their windsor home. new powers to help protect potential stalking victims while police investigate allegations are due to come into force. saracens are relegated — the premiership champions will play in the second tier of english rugby next season — after paying too much in wages. it's pretty cold out there this morning. we have a widespread frost, there is fog around as well to the west wind moans in the welsh marches but otherwise it friday will have some sunshine as well. our top story in the programme today. a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to step down as working royals in the spring. buckingham palace has announced prince harry and his wife meghan will no longer receive public funds, and will pay back taxpayers' money spent on renovating their home in windsor. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, has the story.
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it isa it is a clean break which allows harry and meghan to seek a new life. they have been freed from royal duties and they are free to earn their own living with it would seem very few restrictions. the styling of his and her royal highness hasn't been taken away from them. they simply won't use it. ariel remains a prince, sixth in mind the british throne and the duke and duchess of sussex. and although they will no longer formally represent the queen, they leave with her blessing. in a statement, she said:. here are the essential details of that new life. they. back from royal duties. that includes harry's military appointments. they will no longer receive public funds but they will receive public funds but they will receive money from the prince of wales. and they have shared their wish to repay the public funds used
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to refurbish frogmore cottage in windsor. one big concession to them is that they appear to be free to earn money with very few restrictions other than a very general commitment to uphold the values of her majesty. first impressions are that it's an attempt to make the separation is clear and distinct as possible. the fact that they are not going to be doing any of their royal work is doubly the best solution because then it makes a very clean break and everyone is clear about what they will be doing and there will be no blurred lines. i think this is a good solution. the royal family, it's a moment of undoubted sadness. it must be particularly ha rd undoubted sadness. it must be particularly hard for william. but harry has made his choice. he is going to seek a new life with his family. let's speak now to our royal correspondent, daniela relph, whojoins us now from buckingham palace. daniela, how clean a break is this?
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is this more of a clean break than the couple originally expected. is this more of a clean break than the couple originally expectedlj think the couple originally expected.” think it is. when they first issued that statement, talking about stepping back from royal life and trying to forge this progressive role within the royal family. i don't think this is necessarily what they had in mind. it's not the stepping back, it stepping away from the royal duties and royal role. it's something much harder and cleaner and i think clearly it was felt by senior members of the royal family, that any attempt to try and doa family, that any attempt to try and do a hybrid role, harp and the royal family, half out was just not viable. and that they had to do something different. they are stepping back from royal life entirely and will forge a new role for themselves whether they will have to earn money. they will not get public money anymore so they will have to forge a light, a commercial life of themselves and
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what's interesting is there isn't going to be any strict oversight from buckingham palace. there aren't going to be any rules and regulations as to the kind of work they are going to do. it is a test of the integrity of harry and meghan going forward. the only one thing that they have been told is that they need to uphold the values of they need to uphold the values of the queen and quite what that means isn't clear. they will have to be thejudge of that isn't clear. they will have to be the judge of that and in one year's time, the whole plan will be looked at and time, the whole plan will be looked atand an time, the whole plan will be looked at and an assessment made by senior members of the royal family. interestingly, a couple of the papers picking up on the fact that for a papers picking up on the fact that fora man in many papers picking up on the fact that for a man in many ways who's been forged by his military service, it's made him the man he is. he is going to lose all those military connections. that is really noticeable in terms of what harry is going to walk away from. is an military career, he saw active service. he won't have a formal role now. that does seem quite marked.
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the royal family have taken the view that this needs to be a clean break. he is prioritising his family. that does mean stepping back from royal life. thank you very much indeed. we'll have reaction to this story throughout today's programme from various analysts and commentators, including the former royal press secretary, dickie arbiter, and the royal editor of vanity fair. they'll be on in a few minutes new measures to protect victims of stalking will come into force in england and wales from tomorrow. police officers will have the power to issue "stalking protection orders" which ban alleged offenders from contacting or approaching their victims while a complaint is under investigation. andy moore reports. the minister for women visiting a stalking helpline whose staff are in the front line of dealing with the problem.
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what's your experience of the first phone call? it's believed one in five women and one in ten men will have to deal with stalking at some stage in their lives. these new protection orders will give police extra powers to stop offenders in their tracks while further investigations are being carried out. these are really groundbreaking orders that the police will be able to apply for to protect victims of stalking but also to make sure that the perpetrators are getting the treatment programmes they need to break this cycle of abuse or stalking. a protection order will usually stay in place for a minimum of two years. anyone who breaches it will face five years in jail. campaigners have welcomed this initiative so the orders are a powerful new tool to stop stalking but they are warning anyone who breaches an order must be arrested immediately. andy moore, bbc news.
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a 10—year—old boy has been stabbed while out walking with his mother. he was attacked in the belgrave area of leicester yesterday afternoon and taken to hospital, where his injuries were described as "non life—threatening". leicestershire police appealed for witnesses and described the suspect as a light—skinned asian man, in his mid—205. president trump's legal team has described his impeachment as an attack on the american people. it's their first response to the charges against the president ahead of his trial in the senate, which will start on tuesday. a six—page letter describes the process as "unconstitutional" and a "brazen attempt" by his rivals to interfere in the upcoming presidential election. vigils have been held in toronto to mark the tenth day of mourning since a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down by the iranian military. 57 canadians — and four britons — were among the 176 people who died when the plane was shot down in error over tehran. ministers from the countries which lost citizens have called
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for iran to pay compensation. trainee paramedics will receive a bursary of £5,000 as part of a government drive to recruit more nhs workers. they've been included in a £2 billion plan — announced last year — to provide trainee nurses, midwives and other health students with an annual maintenance grant. the new system comes more than two years after the conservative government scrapped free tuition and bursaries for nurses. we know that most of the uk grinds to a halt at the first hint of snow, but when canadians declare a state of emergency over wintry weather, you know it's serious. the island of newfoundland has just seen a record—breaking blizzard which dumped 30 inches of snow on the capital, stjohn's, leaving cars buried and homes without power.
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members of the armed forces have been sent in, and a state of emergency declared. clearly there will be some people who are very vulnerable.” clearly there will be some people who are very vulnerable. i had some canadian friends who lived over here he rented a house and when they were negotiating the rental agreement asked whether snow blowing was included in the rental price. and was rather surprised. it is 7:10am. a "constructive and supportive way forward." that's how the queen has described the terms of the agreement reached with her grandson, prince harry, and his wife meghan, over their future. it's a future without their "royal highness" titles or public funding for royal duties, though the couple will remain the duke and duchess of sussex. let's get the views now of former royal press secretary, dickie arbiter, and katie nicholl, who is the royal editor at vanity fair.
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both of you have been very busy commenting on these stories. it looks like we have a plan of a sketch of a planet least. a lot of the papers trying to work out who has one in this deal. i think they both won. it's a win— win situation. it's the best sort of deal they can come up with without upsetting the apple cart although harry and meghan made a good job of it with our bombshell announcement but it's a workable situation and a situation to be reviewed after a year. the door mightjust to be reviewed after a year. the door might just be to be reviewed after a year. the door mightjust be left ajar. we talked about their royal titles being stripped but that's not entirely accurate. this is something they have willingly given up stop i don't know how willingly it is. you ask it they are losers or winners. they have one on this one because they got what they want which is essentially independence from the royal family. i do think the royal family will have lost out. harry and
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meghan brought a magic and unique brand to the royal family and they will not be carrying around royal duties. there is hope they might be splitting their time between north america and britain but that's not now going to be the case.” america and britain but that's not now going to be the case. i know there is a lot of talk in a statement about this. it's going to be very difficult role in commonwealth because the queen appointed them vice president, they we re appointed them vice president, they were hang onto the title of the queen plasma commonwealth trust. whether they will perform any duties remains to be seen. a lot of things are to be worked out. how they are going to support the queen if indeed they do. it's all very fluid and much up in the air and these are things they are going to have to discuss and work out. are there restrictions on how they can earn their money? there will be.
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everything will be in keeping with her majesty's reputation, adhering to the principles and values of the monarchy. that's what is really going to underline this plan moving forward but in terms of our future and earnings, they can go out now and earnings, they can go out now and do pretty much what they want to do. which may include, what, acting roles for the duchess of sussex?m she wanted to go down that route, she wanted to go down that route, she said at the time of their engagement she felt that was a chapter that was now closed, she is moving on from but there is room for voice—over work but my understanding is no deals have been signed yet but there is a huge amount of opportunity for them, whether it's in that film world, public speaking, the ambit at the heart of this is going to be their philanthropic work, charitable work. as dickie was saying, they're not going to be carrying on engagements by the queen
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unless they are invited. we may see them at events like trooping the colour on the balcony behind us but that would be at the queen's invitation. it gives them the freedom, the path to start a new life for themselves and that is alive independent of the royal family. and they are still part of the family and the queen emphasised that. it was warm and its tone but nonetheless they will have also had an eye out for public opinion in all of this and that is why this idea that they will repay that money for the renovation of frogmore cottage is going to be quite crucial in gaining public support for their future role. it is going to be very crucial in gaining public support. it was quite durable when it was announced the £2.a million had been spent. some money had to be spent because it was basically derelict. but not 2.a. the fact they've offered to pay back is in the right direction. they will find it pretty ha rd direction. they will find it pretty
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hard initially. all sorts of opportunities open to them but they haven't got there yet and the only money they are getting is from the prince of wales. how much that will be remains to be seen because there isa be remains to be seen because there is a tax implication on this. that money themselves. harry doesn't have as hands—on cash. it's all invested. they going to be finding it pretty difficult to live the lifestyle they are used to until they got some money coming in. life is expensive, particularly if you live the way they have been doing. they have had an awful lot of stick that this since they made their announcement, katie, but i know you think this is potentially a blueprint for the future of the royal family so in some ways, have they done the royal familya some ways, have they done the royal family a favour? i suppose we will have to ask prince louis and princess charlotte when they grow up, if this is being seen asa they grow up, if this is being seen
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as a possible blueprint. this is going to be reviewed, within about a year it will be reviewed to see how effectively this blueprint is working, but the reality is that as much as we love prince harry, he has a lwa ys much as we love prince harry, he has always had a special place in the nation's heart, he has slipped down the line of succession. he is now six, archie ‘s seventh, i think it said so much when they said they would dispense with the hrh title for archie. prince charles wants to slimmed down the monarchy, maybe this is in keeping with how the monarchy saw itself moving forwards. if this works, if this is a success, i think it really could be a blueprint for future generations. and in that respect it could be a very good thing. the monarchy has to move, it has to progress, i think it is the manner in how this was handled which has surprised and upset people, pa rtick handled which has surprised and upset people, partick lily here at the palace. but at the heart of all of this, and we are told that the discussions were friendly and it was in everybody‘s interests for the solution to be found, this could be quite a good thing. a final question, dickie, do you think will see more of them or less of them
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now? that's entirely depends up on what they do. they complained in this country about press intrusion. they haven't seen anything yet, because they will certainly be press intrusion in canada. there is no control over the paparazzi. they will be out for as many pictures as possible. i don't think it is the la st we possible. i don't think it is the last we have seen of them. we will see much more of them but in a different guise altogether. thank you to both of you. we appreciate your time this morning. and a couple of comments from you coming through on this. "outstanding use of harry and meghan and their sun, very happy for them". "are they had to do this for them". "are they had to do this for their own well—being, the media in all its forms needs to take a ha rd in all its forms needs to take a hard look at itself". gerald says "why concern ourselves about weather or not they will pay tax in canada? like their lives from now on, it is bad business are not ours". we will be talking about that financial point in an hour. john says by email "what about security, who will pay
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for that?" our understanding of the taxpayer will continue to pay for their security. you can get in touch with us by email or twitter. let's have a look at the weather forecast. very foggy, very cold at 3:30am when i ventured outside this morning. i suspect it isn't getting much warmer? notjust not just yet. i notjust yet. i have been talking this morning about much—needed dry weather across the uk, and i am sure the farmers will agree with that sentiment. the reason it is going to be dry is because there is high pressure over the uk dominating our weather. this evening the pressure could get over 1050 millibars. that will be the first time that has happened in the uk since 1957. the highest pressure we have recorded was back in 1902 in aberdeen. some statistics for you there. underneath
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at high pressure we have got clear skies and widespread frost this morning. it has been down to —6 in a few places. we also have patchy fog, which will be dense. likely to linger all morning. it will affect the m5, the m6, perhaps the and 56 as well. we have had reports of difficult travelling conditions already. some patches might linger into the afternoon. outside of this, it might turn a bit hazy in scotland and northern ireland through the day and northern ireland through the day and on the far north—west of scotland, with a semantic breeze we are seeing, we will have more cloud. this is what we have advised temperatures. 6— eight, about average for this time of year. as we head into this evening and overnight we still have the centre of the high—pressure, and more across the southern half of the uk. we are getting these atlantic breezes, through the night we will see more clouds coming in through the north—west, pushing further south across scotland and towards northern ireland. some patches of fog still. probably drifting east through the midlands towards the fans late in the night. a widespread frost, it
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could be down to —6 in southern england. further north the frost will be more patchy and it should be milder in northern scotland, where they will be a lot of cloud again on monday. further south, they will be a lot of cloud again on monday. furthersouth, but will take much of the morning to lift. then they will be a fair bit of sunshine again for southern england, wales and the midlands. sunshine east of the pennines and in the north—east of scotland, but elsewhere, for the northern half of the uk, much more cloud. temperatures could reach double figures, chillier further south, 7—8d. that area of high pressure is still around into next week but we will see a well—defined drifting down into that by the time we get to tuesday morning. milder for the northern half of the uk, frost more likely further south. those temperatures down to —2 —3. drizzle heading south across scotla nd drizzle heading south across scotland and northern ireland, the first sign of any rain over the next few days, even that peters out. milder across the northern half of the uk, chillier in the further south when there could be packets of
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fog once again. quiet and dry through the week ahead. maybe not as much sunshine, but not as much. fog. —— frost or fog. as we've been hearing this morning, new measures to protect people from stalkers are about to come into force. sadly, for many people, they have come too late. clive ruggle's daughter alice was murdered by her former partner in 2016. and zoe dronfield suffered terrible injuries when she was held hostage by her ex—boyfriend in 201a. both alice and zoe had told the police they were in danger. alice's data joins us now, alongside zoe. thank you for your time this morning, we appreciated. is it so hardtalk about this? it doesn't get easier, for sure. but it is important to talk about it, because while we cannot change what happened to alice, we feel we can change what happens to others in the future. driving force for you and the family, iam driving force for you and the
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family, i am sure. zoe, driving force for you and the family, iam sure. zoe, tell us driving force for you and the family, i am sure. zoe, tell us a bit about your story and what happened to you ? bit about your story and what happened to you? it was back in 2014, i had ended a relationship, that was when the stalking started. i was that was when the stalking started. iwas being that was when the stalking started. i was being contact with numerous times a day, in fact, hundreds of times a day, in fact, hundreds of times a day on different platforms. i had reported it to the police and actually, their response was not great at the time. they said he has not really done anything so there isn't really anything we can do. in terms of the protection orders, that is great, but we need to make sure that the police on the ground know what they are doing. in terms of stalking, can you explain what form that took? it was calls, text messages, voicemails, he was consta ntly messages, voicemails, he was constantly turning up at the door, he was turning up drunk, he was banging at my door in the middle of the week. i've got children, i was having to contact police. this kind of escalated over time. it started with the calls and when he wasn't
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responded that i wasn't responding he would turn up. the police were cold out to my property many times. nothing was actually done about it. the orders may be would have stopped that behaviour, and in the end, what happened was, because i was not getting the response from the police i wanted and needed, i took matters into my own hands and thought, if i met him and spoke to him, talk sense into him, it would stop. i now realise i put myself into a huge amount of danger. we have a photograph, which you have seen, obviously viewers might find it upsetting, but he held hostage for eight hours and did considerable injuries to you. but ijust compared with what happened to alice, you know, you probably thank your lucky stars. exactly, i survived, i am here andl stars. exactly, i survived, i am here and i am able to tell the story. you know, alice, it isjust a heartbreaking story. i have heard
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the 999 call, you can find it online. because showers not your perfect victim, you know, showers very, very polite on the call, showers saying, i'm so sorry, i don't want to trouble you, but my ex—boyfriend don't want to trouble you, but my ex— boyfriend is at don't want to trouble you, but my ex—boyfriend is at my bedroom window of my ground floor apartment, and the response from the police, exactly, it was that he hadn't really done anything, but he had reported —— been reported previously. what was lacking in the police response and the system as a whole that might have better protected her? the first thing to say that alice did not know what danger she was in. she went to the police far too late. but when she did state issued him with a thing cold a pin, a police information order, and she was told, mistakenly, she would then be protected and he would be arrested if he breached it. a pin wasjust a piece of paper. forces have stopped using them. and
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of course, he wasn't, and when he breached it a week later she rang the police again and it was classed asa the police again and it was classed as a separate incident. four days later he killed her. so with the new stalking protection orders, they have teeth, and if one of those is issued, and the police can issue them even if they do not already have a conviction, that can be done much more quickly. they are a civil order but breaching them will be a criminal offence. you say they have got teeth, but those teeth need to be applied. absolutely. the thing is that stalking is a fixation, an obsession. the actual issuing of an order can challenge that and can make things worse. if somebody is not held up by the order and some perpetrators will be, if they are not, and they breached them, that tells you that you are with a perpetrator who is high up in the level of fixation. and you have to do some immediately. you have to arrest the perpetrator if they breached them, because that is telling you. so it could really offer an extra layer of protection,
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if these things were because they are designed to. are we clear on what the definition of stalking is? because it definitely goes beyond the physical, doesn't it? it does not necessarily mean you are being physically followed. there are all kinds of ways that that's right. there is no legal definition of all the different ways, because a's stalker can always find other ways. they are trying to exert that control, if one way is closed. and it can even buy by proxy, it doesn't have to be direct contact. the cyberstalking aspect of it, new technology, it is helping them. in many different ways. so for you, what kind of lasting impact has this had on you? has it affected you now? imean, i had on you? has it affected you now? i mean, iactually had on you? has it affected you now? i mean, i actually feel like one of the lucky ones because he got a lengthy sentence, he got 14 years, ten years behind bars, however, there are constant challenges for me
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within the system. obviously, we we nt within the system. obviously, we went through the criminal court case and he was convicted. however, i am still continuing to have this fight with the system because he has appealed a number of times, which means he still doesn't believe he did anything wrong. so his delusion is still there. they were talking about putting him in open conditions, and that is a fear for me iwas conditions, and that is a fear for me i was expecting him to do a ten year prison sentence and he is now behind bars and actually they are talking about letting him out on day release. so i do live in fear. thank you both are coming in and sharing your stories. thank you for telling us about your beautiful daughter, we really appreciated. you are doing incredible work to protect other women out there, and men is welcome at risk of this. it is 7:27am. the andrew marr show is on bbc one injust over 90 minutes. let's see what he has in store for us. morning, andrew. well, one of the big questions, i
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suppose, is what life will be like for harry and meghan over in north america. will they find the media scrutiny just as harsh? america. will they find the media scrutinyjust as harsh? i am joined by mike thompson, ceo of the new york times, former director—general of the bbc, to talk about that. and i will be talking to alex sharma, international development secretary, about many things, including the budget. lots of big choices for the uk coming up. i am talking to the only scottish labour mp, in murray, because if they cannot do better in scotla nd because if they cannot do better in scotland they can probably never form a government in britain. —— ian murray. a very busy hour at nine o'clock. thank you, andrew. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00 this morning, and coming up in the next hour. a new future for harry and meghan. we get new reaction to the duke and duchess of sussex's decision to stop using their hrh titles as they step back from royal duties. we've had the big ben bust—up. now there's a ding—dong over whether church bells should ring out on brexit day. we'll hear from those opposed to it and those who can see the appeal. that is all to come on the bbc news
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channel. this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to start new lives away from royal duties and without public funds. the deal — described by the queen as a "constructive and supportive way forward" — will see the couple pay back taxpayers' money which was spent on renovating their home in windsor. they're expected to spend most of their time in canada.
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new measures to protect victims of stalking will come into force in england and wales from tomorrow. police officers will have the power to issue "stalking protection orders" which ban alleged offenders from contacting or approaching their victims while a complaint is under investigation. campaigners are welcome to the move but say the orders will only be welcome police act swiftly. a 10—year—old boy has been stabbed while out walking with his mother. he was attacked in the belgrave area of leicester yesterday afternoon and taken to hospital, where his injuries were described as "non life—threatening". leicestershire police appealed for witnesses and described the suspect as a light—skinned asian man, in his mid—205. trainee paramedics will receive a bursary of £5,000 as part of a government drive to recruit more nhs workers. they've been included in a £2 billion plan — announced last year — to provide trainee nurses, midwives and other health students with an annual maintenance grant. the new system comes more than two years after the conservative government scrapped free tuition and bursaries for nurses.
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oddly, we're going to talk about connor mcgregor‘s fantastic comeback. quick and effective, to be fair. we will talk about saracens. this story has kept on going and yesterday, it wasn't shock news but very dramatic. they are going to be relegated. i've had people contact me, robbie burns. the championship is being used as a dumping ground. in terms of what the players are going to do, it's hard to imagine the likes of owen barrell playing in the likes of owen barrell playing in the championship. saracens relegated to the second tier. one of the biggest destroyers in years. there the premiership champions. it's absolutely remarkable. this is the salary breach. and it's not the first time.
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they were given two options. they could open up their books and let them investigate further or they can accept the fact that they would be relegated to the championship next season. the saracens players were told on friday it wouldn't matter how many points they earned. they would be relegated. the chief executive resided over the team meeting. perhaps it is why he wasn't keen to talk on camera. the club was forced to respond. the club has made errors in the past and we unreservedly apologise for those mistakes. it's the first time they've said sorry. they have one for european cups and four premiership titles. nine of
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their players appeared. but this this season, saracens were never able to prove they complied with the salary caps are premiership by with the salary caps are premiership rugby decided they would be relegated. it they will stay and play for the club in the lower tier. saracens are in action and they still have a chance to win. if other results go their way they will be in the quarterfinals. ulster made it through as one of the best second—placed teams, thanks to a 22—15 win over bath —
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will addison on the scoresheet in the week he was recalled to the ireland sqaud. and northampton did all they could to keep their hopes alive, with a bonus—point win in lyon. george furbank scoring the vital fourth try. they'll be waiting on the results from saracen's and gloucester today. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has ramped up the tension ahead of their match at liverpool this afternoon. he sasturgen klopp has a long way to go before he can be regarded as anywhere near as good as sir alex ferguson. well, liverpool will move 16 points clear at the top of the premier league if they beat united at anfield, after second—placed manchester city were held to a 2—all draw against crystal palace. they were 1—nil down with 10 minutes to go, but sergio aguero scored twice in five minutes to put them ahead before an own goal by ferandinho in the final minute. there was a dramatic victory for newcastle — their first in five league matches.
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isaac hayden heading in a last—gasp winner at home to chelsea — that was the only goal of the game. and it was a big day at the foot of the table — bottom side norwich giving themselves a lifeline with a 1—nill victory over bournemouth, who're just one place above them. bournemouth captain steve cook tried to keep his side in the match with a fine save — the problem is, he's a defender, not a goalkeeper, so that gave norwich a penalty, which teemu pukki scored. i think it's just something he's done purely on instinct. he hasn't meant or planned to long to think about it. ijust think, i can only put it down to that. he's very down the dressing room. we have to support at this time. it's just one of those things he couldn't help. celtic moved past struggling championship side partick thistle to reach the fifth round of the scottish cup. leigh griffiths scored his first goal since august to set them on their way to a 32nd win in a row, in domestic cup competitions. celtic are targeting a fourth consecutive treble.
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some spectacular bowling from dom bess left england in a strong position, going into day four of the third test against south africa. bess took his first 5—wicket haul, as south africa struggled to chase england's first innings score of a99. after a rain delay, quinton de kock made a half century but he was then remarkably dropped three times by ben stokes. south africa still trail england by 291 runs. lee westwood rolled back the years with a brilliant round of 65 at the abu dhabi championship. he's a6 now, but he showed all the class that took him to the world number one spot 10 years ago. he starts his final round at 8:00 with a one—shot lead. ali carter has made it to the final of of the masters snooker for the first time, after beating shaun murphy by 6 frames to 3.
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carter took his opportunity to close out the match in the ninth frame with a break of 97. twice a world championship finallist, he was only invited to play when ronnie o'sullivan decided to give the tounament a miss this year. he'll play stuart bingham for the title. it's live on bbc 2 from 1:00. after more than a year out, conor mcgregor made his return to the ufc, and it lasted all of a0 seconds. it was one of the most highly anticipated fights, the irishman and donald ‘cowboy‘ cerrone in vegas. it ended about an hour ago after mcgregor landed a series of blows in the first round, and the american quite simply failed to recover. you'd be really disappointed and if you sat up all night long for that. people make quite a lot of money for it. get yourselves a copy in a bacon sandwich. thank you.
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you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. in a moment we'll ask the businesswoman and campaigner the headline in the sunday express reads "freedom...at a price." "they're out," says the sunday times. it reports that the deal "amounts to the abdication of the royal rock stars." the front page also features an exclusive investigation into a government data breach that reportedly allowed betting companies to access the personal information of 28 million young people. the observer is leading with politics. it says boris johnson will warn his cabinet to focus all their energy on developing policies for post—brexit britain, or face losing their positions during the cabinet reshuffle in a few weeks. and online, the indepedent leads on nhs waiting times. it says long waits are pushing more patients towards private surgery, with the sector expected to be worth
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£1.3 billion by 2021. anne—marie imafidon has pulled a few stories out for us. what have you found? nice to see you. we're going to start with a story that you mentioned. about a data reach between betting firms. this is on line betting. you're only allowed to do it if you over 18. adding firms huge age verification. a database that has details of children in school. gambling addiction between
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the ages of 17 and 20 is rising. because is what the data is a data reach. it's like a lack of. try to exert their influence elsewhere. banning the use of credit cards. restrictions on who they can sponsor. it seems a constant battle for those desperately concerned about the impact. across the papers today, there are a number of different netting firm related. it's like mcnamara. they could cost more for insurance. keyless cards have become the norm. —— keyless cars.
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the kind of a relay attack. stealing the car is based on the fact that it's wireless. between your khaki in your car. insurance it's wireless. between your khaki in your car. insurance premiums are going to head up if you've got that kind of car. it'sjust going to head up if you've got that kind of car. it's just a going to head up if you've got that kind of car. it'sjust a bit going to head up if you've got that kind of car. it's just a bit of a psa to say there are a couple of suggestions as to what to do overnight to reduce, maybe your insurance premiums but more importantly the likelihood of your car being stolen. i recently got little rfid wallet, a faraday cage that can block those comms. like a box. the 2020 equivalent of that. keeping it away from the window. that's how these relay attacks work. i guess many of these cars have them. and/or a steering lock. the good old days of that.” them. and/or a steering lock. the good old days of that. i heard that from insurance companies. it's one of the most simple and effective
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ways. what they want is something thatis ways. what they want is something that is quick and easy. this is a picture like something out of avengers. this is the future of military hardware. or star wars, it's got to the top. britain's first drone squadron and they are calling them wingmen helping fighterjets. they are quite low cost drones. they done really well in our trials. april, fighterjets will be using drones, swarms of drones to help them along with their missions. where do you see as a scientist drone to ology going? it's here to stay. the issues were got now, there isa stay. the issues were got now, there is a lot of technology and they are able to do quite a lot being able to regulate them has become quite a big issue for the authority. the drone attack on heathrow. the other is us being able to accept that. would you
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trust drone to kind of take you on short distances rather than using a car? no answer to that one. the raf ones are very car? no answer to that one. the raf ones are very different. that would ta ke ones are very different. that would take you to tesco. or the front one that some had at gatwick. there is a bit of adoption we need to work on. the same issue we have with d riverless the same issue we have with driverless cars. this is a surprising start. a third of dog owners spend more than pets food than they do on their own. some dogs eat an even better dial. 150% raised. dogs on plant —based diets as well has been reported and noted. it's nice that dogs are doing their bit of a climate change if i can put it that way. how happy other dogs about this? we will never know, i guess. my parents dog staying with
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us and! guess. my parents dog staying with us and i slipped error delicious piece of pork fat so apologies to veggies and vegans out there. not pa rt veggies and vegans out there. not part of this diet. it is veganuary. it's also dry january, but that's failed. how is it out there darren? good morning. it's really cold across many parts of the country. temperatures of —6. also patchy fog quite dangerous. this will be affecting the m5, the m6, the 56 as well. reduced visibility if you will be out and about. that will be there in the morning and some patches in the afternoon. lots of sunshine to come, turning hazy in scotland and
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northern ireland. in the far north—west we will also see thicker cloud and a stronger breeze from the atlantic. at least here it will be milder. elsewhere, 6—8. that is near average at this time of year and that's what we had yesterday. high—pressure is in charge of our weather at the moment for the first time ina weather at the moment for the first time in a long time. an unusually strong area of high pressure. this evening it could get to over 1050 millibars for the first time since 1957. that is how strong it is. probably not reaching the record high, that was sent back in 1902 in aberdeen. that is drifting what was the southern half of the uk, allowing these atlantic winds to top all—around and some weak weather fronts rushing the northern isles. under those clear skies, the centre of pressure across england and wales, that fog will drift its way eastwards a cross wales, that fog will drift its way eastwards across the midlands and towards the fans. at the same time,
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more cloud coming into scotland and northern ireland. northern scotland should be mild, touch and go for the frost further south. that fog is also around, that will take a while to lift, outside we've got plenty of sunshine to look forward to. more cloud coming down into scotland, northern ireland and northern england. sunshine in the north—east of scotland. very mild here, 11— 12 degrees, and 7— eight under the sunshine in the south. that will be around in one shape or another in the week ahead. we have a weak weather front toppling into that. that continues to drag down more cloud across the northern half of the uk, keeping it frost free on tuesday morning, while further south there will be patches of fog also. that is the weather fronts, growing rain, the first sign of rain, there isn't much of that and that will tended to —— tend to peter out. we
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should see that breaking out. mild in the north, cold in the south, five or six degrees. looks like it will be a quiet week ahead. high—pressure in charge. quite a bit of cloud. some patchy frost and fog. depends where the cloud breaks but the important thing is that it looks like it will be dry. back to you. you don't often see all of scotland and northern ireland and wales all in one weather graphic. well done, darren. thank you. i am glad you noticed, two hours in. have you been doing it all morning? laughter. shows how much attention i have been paying. the good news is that all the sports games are back on. teachers me to try to be clever. will be back with headlines at eight o'clock. now it's time for the
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travel show. this week on the travel show: the swamp that is becoming a tinderbox. let's rehydrate this peat. same time, ready? three, two, one...whoo. where the amish go on their holidays. i think we have been very blessed to have a place to go like this. people accept us and it is quite unique. plus what will the 205 bring for travellers? this week we begin the swamp.
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this area is home to dark swarms of mosquitoes, blood—sucking ticks, poisonous copperheads and rattlesnakes and even the occasional black bear. back in the 18th century, this place was considered so bleak and inhospitable, it was given a name that was just as unwelcoming, the great dismal swamp. it is right on the border between virginia and north carolina. back when the us was formed, it was around 1 million acres. today it is much smaller, about an eighth of his original size and it looks very different. now it is protected wildlife preserve with trails for biking and hiking and a lake for boating. but the changes have
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brought some problems. the wetlands are now much more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. in 2011, a devastating forest fire burned through 6500 acres, taking more than 100 days to put out. i am meeting the man leading efforts to save the swamp. we are actually walking along washington ditch, named after george washington who was one partner in the dismal swamp land company. these ditches were dug under his direction to drain the swamp, log the timber and then farm the land. "to drain the swamp" — he's not the only us president to say that. no, no, i guess not. it took more than 200 years of development for the wetlands to drain and for the area to become just a little less dismal. in that time, the swamp featured in another chapter of american history.
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this is one of our water control structures which acts as a little dam where we can manage the water, to raise water levels in the ditch, slow the drainage and then it allows to rehydrate the peat soil. these are called boards. we put them in these channels. cool and so those are about what? six inches, about half a foot. so it will raise the surrounding water, raise this water and then rehydrate the surrounding area. correct. and why is that important? the ditch network that's been here dries out the peat, makes it more prone to severe wildfires. it also, because it subsides, it does not provide a base for our forest. you need healthy soil to have a healthy forest. it is hoped rehydrating the swamp will reduce the severity of future fires and, during the hurricane season, protect nearby communities from flooding.
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let's rehydrate this peat. same time, ready? 0k. three, two, one...whoo. nice. well, it sounds like the swamp won't ever be as expensive or as dismal as it was during washington's time but that is not the point, is it? no, we are never going to restore the swamp to what it was. what we're trying to do, with managing the swamp is to bring back some of those past characteristics that are beneficial to promote resiliency going into the future.
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to end this week, i am headed down to sarasota, on florida's glorious gulf coast, where every year a small neighbourhood is transformed by one of america's most distinctive communities. welcome to pinecraft. since starting as a tourist resort in the 19205, this has become a holiday hotspot for the amish. we have a mural here depicting everyday amish life. and a friendly man welcoming us. maybe we can ride the horse. the amish are christians that have held on to a simple, rural way of life. they are best known for their regimented plainclothes, worn for reasons of humility and modesty. they also reject most forms of modern technology, some even avoiding electricity from the national grid. well, i guess we grow up working. i mean, we don'tjust sit around doing nothing. it's always, you've got something to do. and, like, in the evening, of course we read books. we don't have tv. and our children like to come home, we have cookouts. it is a very secure life. you grew up in an area where your life was always,
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sort of, you knew what to expect. course as time goes on it's not so simple anymore, you know? we don't do things like we did 100 years ago or 50 years ago. this might look like a normal street in central florida, but actually many of these are amish holiday homes. and if you look right here, this is a power line. even the amish want to kick back on vacation. the neighbourhood offers more modern conveniences than you might find in one of their traditional settlements. bicycles and golf carts replace horse and buggies, and the holiday homes, they all have power. we heard there is a saying that whatever happens in pinecraft stays in pinecraft. every winter and spring, an estimated 5000 people come to visit.
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but if you're not amish, you might have to prepare for a cold reception. they tend to keep themselves to themselves, not so much out of unfriendliness than modesty. and when the camera comes out, everyone tends to scatter. i've been to a of places and i've met a lot of people, and i fit in most the time, but here, obviously i stick out like a sore thumb here, and i don't exactly know how to interact. so it can feel a little bit lonely at times. i head to a hotel which welcomes both amish and non—amish guests, where, luckily, john and wilma have agreed to sit down with me, and even then we take a while to warm up. so we will have some fun, make a few little pieces for television, and tell some stories like this one. can you both tell me a bit about pinecraft? there's no other place like it in the world, i don't think. why do you say that?
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it's really a social life for older people. you go to the park, it is kind of a gathering place where people come, sit and visit. there is shuffleboard down there. and people, a lot of the older guys are shuffling, mostly men, but there is always one court open for the women. so, yeah, you get to know people from a lot of different areas. different denominations, you know? they come in here and it has been interesting that people, what we would call outsiders, that are not really amish, just happen to be in the area, and now they are coming back ever since. there is that cincinnati couple, some of them. yeah. we have become close friends with them. they are nice, clean people, you know? not..people that you don't have to be ashamed of. i think we've been very blessed to have a place to go like this, that people accept us and, yeah, it's quite unique.
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on john's recommendation, i head to be park, hitching a ride on a very non—traditional mode of transportation. my new guide is immanuel, a long—time resident here in pinecraft. so this game is called shuffleboard. yeah. and what's the point? the point is to get your puck on the area that is marked. in shuffleboard, players are awarded points for landing discs within the scoring area. so my teammate is the guy over in the blue. it seems like quite a popular sport. alright, here we go. my first ever shuffle. my first ever shuffleboard. three, two, one... aw, i knocked us both out! it turns out the shuffleboard court
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is definitely the place to be. john has come over all the way from the hotel to cheer me on. i'm afraid you are not ready for the tournament. i was playing better until you showed up, i swear. so are we going to play or what? no, i'm just watching. just criticising? yeah, i like to criticise. no, i don't think that was good. their score goes up, our score goes down. game over? you win? we win. well, it was a learning experience. thank you so much. thank you, that was so much fun. i appreciate it. how was i? iwas ok? yeah, for the first time. ok, that's good to know. apparently, all it takes to make friends in pinecraft is losing a game of shuffleboard.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden.0ur headlines today: a clean break — harry and meghan will drop their ‘hrh' and end all royal duties under a new agreement with buckingham palace. the queen says they remain ‘much loved members' of herfamily. prince harry will also lose his military positions and the couple will pay back the taxpayers' money used
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to renovate their windsor home. new powers to help protect potential stalking victims while police investigate allegations are due to come into force. after the calls for big ben to bong for brexit — we'll look at the debate over whether britain's church bells should chime too. saracens are relegated — the premiership champions will play in the second tier of english rugby next season — after paying too much in wages. it is pretty cold there this morning. we have a widespread frost and fog in the west midlands and welsh marches. otherwise it will be a dry day. it's sunday, january the 19th. our top story. a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to step down as working royals in the spring. buckingham palace has announced prince harry and his wife meghan will no longer receive public
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funds, and will pay back taxpayers' money spent on renovating their home in windsor. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, has the story. it is a clean break which allows harry and meghan to seek a new life. they have been freed from royal duties and they are free to earn their own living with, it would seem, very few restrictions. the styling of his and her royal highness hasn't been taken away from them. they simply won't use it. harry remains a prince, sixth in line to the british throne and the duke and duchess of sussex. and although they will no longer formally represent the queen, they leave with her blessing. in a statement, she said: she added: here are the essential details of that new life. they will step back from royal duties. that includes harry's military appointments. they will no longer receive public
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funds but they will receive money from the prince of wales. and they have shared their wish to repay the public funds used to refurbish frogmore cottage in windsor. one big concession to them is that they appear to be free to earn money with very few restrictions other than a very general commitment to uphold the values of her majesty. to make the separation as clear and distinct as possible. the fact that they are not going to be doing any of their royal work is probably the best solution because then it makes a very clean break and everyone is clear about what they will be doing and there will be no blurred lines. i think this is a good solution. for the royal family, it's a moment of undoubted sadness. it must be particularly hard for william. but harry has made his choice.
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he is going to seek a new life with his family. let's speak now to our royal correspondent, daniela relph, whojoins us now from buckingham palace. daniela, how clean a break is this? clearly this is negotiation that has been going on of the queen says in her statement going on for several months. this was the best solution could be found get everyone involved happy. but it is not quite what harry and meghan said they wanted initially. the thought of stepping back from royal life and trying to forge a progressive role in the royal family. this is not really that, this is stepping away entirely from the royal role in doing something completely different. and what will be interesting is the oversight we had over the work they do now going forward. they will have to do some commercial work. if it will still be charity what you will be still have money from the prince of wales to live off but there will be some commercial interests stop
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how they manage? this will be a test of the integrity of high and —— high and harry and meghan going forward. they have been told they have to respect the integrity of the queen. this will be reviewed in a year's time. terms of the whole restructuring of the royal family in future this is a very significant move. in a few minutes we'll be talking to david mcclure, who has written a book about royal finances, and the royal commentator victoria murphy. new measures to protect victimsof stalking will come into force in england and wales from tomorrow. police officers will have the power to issue "stalking protection orders" which ban alleged offenders from contacting or approaching their victims while a complaint is under investigation. their victims while a complaint andy moore reports. their victims while a complaint the minister for women visiting
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a stalking helpline whose staff are in the front line of dealing with the problem. what's your experience of the first phone call? it's believed one in five women and one in ten men will have to deal with stalking at some stage in their lives. these new protection orders will give police extra powers to stop offenders in their tracks while further investigations are being carried out. these are really ground—breaking orders that the police will be able to apply for to protect victims of stalking but also to make sure that the perpetrators are getting the treatment programmes they need to break this cycle of abuse or stalking. a protection order will usually stay in place for a minimum of two years. anyone who breaches it will face five years in jail. campaigners have welcomed this initiative so the orders are a powerful new tool to stop stalking but they are warning anyone who breaches an order must
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be arrested immediately. andy moore, bbc news. authorities in the australian state of victoria are warning that severe storms there could lead to flooding. heavy rain has helped to extinguish many of the recent bushfires in the south—east of the country, but also caused power cuts and road closures. the government there has announced a £a0 million package to help the tourist industry. a ten—year—old boy has been stabbed while out walking with his mother. he was attacked in the belgrave area of leicester yesterday afternoon and taken to hospital, where his injuries were described as "non life—threatening". leicestershire police appealed for witnesses and described the suspect as a light—skinned asian man, in his mid—205. president trump's legal team has described his impeachment as an attack on the american people. it's their first response to the charges against the president ahead of his trial in the senate, which will start on tuesday. a six—page letter describes the process as "unconstitutional" and a "brazen attempt" by his rivals to interfere in the upcoming presidential election. vigils have been held in toronto
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to mark the tenth day of mourning since a ukrainian passenger plane was shot down by the iranian military. 57 canadians — and four britons — were among the 176 people who died when the plane was shot down in error over tehran. ministers from the countries which lost citizens have called for iran to pay compensation. trainee paramedics will receive a bursary of £5,000 per year, as part of a government drive to recruit more nhs workers. they've been included in a £2 billion pound plan — announced last year — to provide trainee nurses, midwives and other health students with an annual maintenance grant. the new system comes more than two years after the conservative government scrapped free tuition and bursaries for nurses. we know that most of the uk grinds to a halt
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at the first hint of snow — but when canadians declare a state of emergency over wintry weather, you know it's serious.the island of newfoundland has just seen a record—breaking blizzard which dumped 30 inches of snow on the capital, stjohn's, leaving cars buried and homes without power. members of the armed forces have been sent in, and a state of emergency declared. that guy looked like he was digging his card. but where could you drive? —— mike digging out his motor car. just two weeks ago it would have seemed inconceivable. but this morning, the deal is done. from spring, prince harry and his wife meghan will no longer be working members of the royal family, and will spend much of their time outside the uk. in a moment we'll speak to a pair of seasoned palace observers. first, our royal correspondent daniela relph has been looking back at the road that led the duke and duchess to this point. they metjust over
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a year earlier but these were the first pictures in september 2017, which showed the relationship was serious. meghan lived and worked in toronto, the host city for prince harry's invictus games. two months later, their engagement was announced and the couple were interviewed in kensington palace by the bbc‘s mishal husain. how much of a sense did you have, meghan, of the enormity of what you are getting into, of what it might mean for your life? i can very safely say, as naive as it sounds now, having gone through this learning curve in the past year, i did not have any understanding of just what it would be like. i don't think either of us did, though. we both said that, even though we knew that it would be... no, i tried to warn you as much as possible. four days later, the couple carried out their first engagement together. just like harry, she was tactile, informal and confident. this seemed a different kind of royal walkabout. when meghan joined harry, prince william
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and kate on stage as the soon—to—be patron of the royal foundation, it seemed like the future of the royal family was safe in the hands of the so—called fab four. their wedding, watched by millions around the world, seemed the perfect end to a fairy tale romance. by january 2019, meghan was pregnant and had begun work with her first patronages, but behind—the—scenes there were several unexpected moves. rather than live in kensington palace, next to the cambridges, they chose frogmore cottage in windsor. they moved their staff from kensington palace to buckingham palace. injune, it was revealed the sussexes would leave the royal foundation, setting up their own instead. the split led to rumours of a rift between harry and william. towards the end of their high—profile tour of southern africa, it was clear the couple were struggling with the glare of the royal spotlight. can you deal with it? can you manage it? can you continue with it? and what happens if you can't? you know, i've said
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for a long time to h... that's what i call him. yeah. that it's not enough to just survive something, right? like, that's not the point of life you've got to thrive. you've got to feel happy. the clues were there. despite outward appearances, this was a couple deeply unhappy with their royal role, and determined to make a change. after the intense discussions of recent days, this new way of working will be something quite different for harry and meghan and for the wider royal family. making a success of it will be a test for all those involved. daniela relph, bbc news, at buckingham palace. let's speak now to david mcclure, who has written a book on royal finances, and victoria murphy, who's a royal commentator. theyjoin us from buckingham palace.
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david, your reaction to this deal thatis david, your reaction to this deal that is been struck. you'll think it was inevitable stop this idea of having higher morals and one foot in the commercial can when fitting the royal campjust the commercial can when fitting the royal camp just wasn't going to work so there was no other solution that you have a green break like this. victoria, your view? i think it is clear over the discussions in the last ten days that harry and meghan have held onto the freedom and to thomas late operate their foundation in the way. they were hoping for a half in and half out option with a good still carry out some duties but it has become clear that will not work. no one else believe that is the sustainable long—term option. harry will not have military appointments and they will not have
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appointments and they will not have a rules and they will not do their duties for the thing that stuck is the freedom. david, iwondered duties for the thing that stuck is the freedom. david, i wondered go through this. a lot of people asking about the specifics about what may or may not be still funded by the taxpayer what will not. you might have an insight on this. security festival. will we still be peeling for that is that? it certainly looks that way. the security bill is properly the most expensive item of expenditure for the royal family. some well—known £100 million per year. the real question is who pays for the other in canada? there was an estimate last week from one canadian security firm saying it could be as much as £7 million per year just could be as much as £7 million per yearjust for their could be as much as £7 million per year just for their security in canada. the canadians are not keen on picking up the tab so i am sure there will be quite heated discussions between that the
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canadian and british governments as to who pays for it. there will also be pressure that harry and meghan make some contribution to the cost. if they are going to america and maximise commercial facilities may be the students and we contribute to this enormous bill of paying for their security. one more on the money before a top again to victoria. frogmore cottage. they will repay the £2.a million spent on refurbishing that. they will then pay a commercial rent on that property. without the correct? that is what i hear as well. the actual status of the cottage is unclear. it was a gift from the queen and in the past and she has given gifts to members of the family often the hoses have been put in a trust so sometimes the status of the property isa sometimes the status of the property is a bit confused. victoria, what
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sort ofjobs might they be able now to do in order to become financially independent? that the question. the skies the limit in terms of what we do. the good and absolutely loads of money as it usually high profile company delete couple. they will not use that hrh status is not brand themselves in that way. the kind of things we have seen and do so far i think is an meghan indication has done a voice—over deal with disney. meghan —— has done a voice—over deal with disney and i guess you will do some writing and perhaps some guest editing. they will let us know these details in due course. he will still bea details in due course. he will still be a prince in this will still be the duke and duchess of sussex. if
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they are coming out of the raw family can still trade off that? —— royal family. there is no clear a nswer royal family. there is no clear answer whether they will still use sussex royal. they will be known as harry duke of sussex and meghan, duches of sussex. david, this will all be reviewed by senior members of the royal household after a year so who knows what might happen the line? i think they are keeping their options open. the fact they will not lose the titles. the result was a possibility that might be a bit of rolling back think at the end of the day this is a clean break and i think that ties with the monarchy
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are really going to be quite cut dramatically. one final one on the money. it just occurs dramatically. one final one on the money. itjust occurs to me they we re money. itjust occurs to me they were so get money from brand from the prince of wales. does that come from his duchy of cornwall income separate from any taxpayer income? at the moment they're getting over £2 million per yearfor the public duties from charles and his duchy. but there were hints coming out last 90 might be able to find some of that not from the duchy but from his own private income and other private income so it is an open question the future role of prince charles in helping harry meghan. there has been the impression he has perhaps been bankrolling in the past activities of william and harry and clear what the role of chance will be in the future financing harry.
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not to view sending in your comments. for to say a couple of you do not care about that match. when man says i don't clear that i want to be polite. robert stevenson e—mailed. he said i served with the royal marines in afghanistan. prince harry was alongside us and i wish i prince and his wife all the best. he isa prince and his wife all the best. he is a heal. he will no longer be captain of the royal marines. this is the view outside our building in salford this morning.
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it's a cold, and for some of us, foggy morning this morning. we did see wave, roger. this is a weather watcher picture taken in warwick. you can see the extent of the frost a lot of trust this morning. some areas seem patchy dense fog. it is quite a small area but will affect people if you're travelling up the m5 motorway on the m6 are the m 56. it will be their own morning and good still be rendered the afternoon. away from that a lot of sunshine to come as we've seen in london. probably telling more hazing in scotland and northern ireland through the afternoon. in the final twice a stronger reason for quickly. here we
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will see the highest temperatures. elsewhere 6 degrees to 8 degrees stop about what we had yesterday. that is underneath this area of high pressure giving us frost and phone. we will see more of that through the night. —— four. —— fog. that will move into scotland and northern ireland. the south across the midlands and east anglia frost. —6 in parts of southern england by tomorrow morning. fog could be dense in places and particular to left. should be generally dry and sunny through the afternoon across wales and england but more pledge for the north. some sunshine east of the pennines and in the north of scotla nd pennines and in the north of scotland would be very mild. but colder weather for the south. that
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is underneath the area high pressure. that'll be there out of the weekend. toppling into that weak weather front and the first signs of some reign on the one be much at all. keep tempted up across the northern half of the uk on monday night and tuesday morning. frost for the south and medicine pockets of mist and fog. but a drizzle moving sites in scotland and northern ireland fading away during the afternoon north and south of that but of sunshine come through. more mild across the northern half of the uk by day and more chilly in the south. idiot little bit of sunshine. —— may be a little bit of sunshine. a favourite of cloud around some patchy frog microphone —— some patchy frog microphone —— some patchy fog and frost over the weekend. but it will be a dry weekend. but it will be a dry
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weekend ahead. in parts of the country you can see more than a few feet in front of you. —— you cannot see. there was a bit of a ding—dong this week over whether big ben should "bong" to mark the moment the uk leaves the eu — after the prime minister suggested a public whip—round to cover the £0.5 million pound cost. but what about the thousands of church bells across britain? should they be chiming to herald a new dawn, or stay silent to avoid dragging the clergy into the brexit debate? breakfast‘s john maguire has been looking into it. from the london olympics
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in 2012 to royal weddings, to showing solidarity with notre—dame cathedral after its devastating fire — church bells have marked momentous occasions in our history. as well as a call to prayer, bell towers are used to commemorate and to celebrate, to bring us all together. so is brexit a fitting occasion? it's believed st michael's in the village of lavendon in milton keynes dates back almost 1,000 years. it will have witnessed many changes in our relations with europe. on a sunday, we normally don't have bell—ringers unfortunately any more but we have got that, chime the bells up on the belltower so we have somebody who does it for us on a sunday when we don't have the bell—ringers. it's one of the eight churches looked after by the reverend canon christa pumfrey. born in germany, she's been a vicar in the church of england for more
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than 20 years. she believes such a historic day should be marked in the time—honoured fashion. so its two things. sort of on a secular level, it's marking an historic event, and the second point would be the church's task, what we have to unite people, to bring healing into this nation again which has been so bitterly divided. it's practice night for the young bell—ringers — the brumdingers, as they're called, here at st mary's in the moseley suburb of birmingham. they regularly ring peals for important national occasions but are drawing the line at brexit. so simon, should the bells be run for brexit day? i mean, the central council of church bell—ringers, which represents ringers around the country and in fact all around the world does have policies in terms of what we encourage people to ring for, and politics isjust not one of those. major national events
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if we are asked by the church, or if we're asked by government, we might say yes, we've been asked to do such and such, we think it's a good idea, but political events isn't one of those. we have to ask the clergy — they belong to the church and it's up to individual incumbents, the rectors of churches, whether their bells ring or not. one thing that years of arguing over the european union has done is create a lot of noise but this is one place where the church bells will be silent. john maguire, bbc news, birmingham. coming up in the next half hour: we'll speak to the woman who had surgery to remove a brain tumour — but the operaton also stirred her inner comedian. now she's doing stand—up gigs to help her recovery. an amazing story of how the health
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crisis stood creativity. —— start. more to come.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson a deal has been agreed on the future of the duke and duchess of sussex, who are to start new lives away from royal duties and without public funds. they will also drop their hrh titles. the agreement — described by the queen as a "constructive and supportive way forward" — will see the couple pay back taxpayers' money which was spent on renovating their home in windsor. they're expected to spend most of their time in canada.
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it isa it is a win—win search —— a situation. it is a workable situation. it is a workable situation and it is a situation that will be reviewed after a year, which kind of... they will not carry on with engagements for the queen unless they are invited. we may still see them on the palace balcony behind us but will be at the queen's invitation. it gives them the freedom to start a new life for themselves, and that is a life independent of the royal family. new measures to protect victims of stalking will come into force in england and wales from tomorrow. police officers will have the power to issue "stalking protection orders" which ban alleged offenders from contacting or approaching their victims while a complaint is under investigation. campaigners have welcomed the move, but say the orders will only be effective if police act swiftly to enforce them. a ten—year—old boy has been stabbed
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while out walking with his mother. he was attacked in the belgrave area of leicester yesterday afternoon and taken to hospital, where his injuries were described as "non life—threatening". leicestershire police appealed for witnesses and described the suspect as a light—skinned asian man in his mid—205. people in australia's fire—hit state of victoria have been warned that severe storms there could lead to flooding. recent heavy rains have dampened many of the country's bushfires, but have also caused to power cuts and road closures. the government there has announced a £a0 million package to aid tourism recovery following the fires. the floods are providing their own challenge. now the sport. we will start with the crickets.
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england's cricketers have made a stunning start to day four of the third test against south africa. we talked earlier about conor mcgregor and how that match lasted ao mcgregor and how that match lasted a0 seconds. if you'd pay for a day at the cricket, they might wrap it up at the cricket, they might wrap it up very quickly. with the sixth ball of the day, stuart broad sent vernon philander‘s stumps flying. in the next over, sam curren bowled quinton de kock. it didn't stop there. four balls later, broad struck again, removing keshav maharaj. south africa losing three quick wickets without adding to their overnight score. they are now 290 runs behind england and england have enforced the
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follow—on. saracens had already been punished for breaking the salary cap rules for three previous season, but it was confirmed last night that they would be relegated, with premiership rugby saying they wanted a level playing field. jane dougall reports. the saracens players were told on friday wouldn't matter how many points they earned this season, they would be relegated. their chief executive, ed griffith, presided over that team meeting, perhaps why he wasn't keen to talk on camera, but after confirmation from premiership rugby that the champions would not be in the top flight next season, the club was forced to respond. gemma neill neil golding said ina respond. gemma neill neil golding said in a statement,. it's the first time they have said sorry. saracens have been described as the greatest english club side of all time. in the last decade they
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have won three european cups and four premiership titles, including the double last season. nine of the players appeared for england in the rugby world cup, including marrow a tog rugby world cup, including marrow a to g and captain owen farrell. in june, an investigation was launched into the way the club paid them. by november it was confirmed saracens had breached the league's salary cap rules and were deducted 35 points and fined £5.3 million. for this season, saracens were unable to prove they will comply with the salary cap so premiership rugby decided they would be relegated. the link below doesn't have a salary cap but it is not clear if those players that were attracted by large wages with stay and play for their club in the lower tier. with stay and play for their club in the lower tier. as things stand, saracans still have a chance to retain their european champions cup trophy and they can reach the semi—finals today if they beat racing this lunch time and other results go their way. ulster made it through as one of the best second—placed teams,
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thanks to a 22—15 win over bath. will addison on the scoresheet in the week he was recalled to the ireland sqaud. northampton did all they could to keep their hopes alive, with a bonus—point win in lyon. george furbank scoring the vital fourth try. they will be waiting on the results from saracen's and gloucester today. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has ramped up the tension ahead of their match at liverpool this afternoon. he sasturgen klopp has a long way to go before he can be regarded as anywhere near as good as sir alex ferguson. well, liverpool will move 16 points clear at the top of the premier league if they beat united at anfield, after second—placed manchester city were held to a 2—2 draw by crystal palace. city were 1—0 down with ten minutes to go, but sergio aguero scored twice in five minutes to put them ahead, before an own goal by ferandinho in the final minute. there was a dramatic victory for newcastle, their first in five league matches. isaac hayden scoring
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the only goal of the game against chelsea in injury time. it was a big day at the foot of the table. bottom side norwich giving themselves a lifeline with a 1—0 victory over bournemouth, who're just one place above them. bournemouth captain steve cook tried to keep his side in the match with a fine save. the problem is, he's a defender, not a goalkeeper, so that gave norwich a penalty, which teemu pukki scored. i think it's just something he's done purely on instinct. he hasn't meant or planned to long to think about it. ijust think, i can only put it down to that. he's very down the dressing room. we have to support at this time. it's just one of those things he couldn't help. celtic moved past struggling championship side partick thistle to reach the fifth round of the scottish cup. leigh griffiths scored his first goal since august to set them on their way to a 32nd win in a row in domestic cup competitions. celtic are targetting
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a fourth consecutive treble. ali carter has made it to the final of of the masters snooker for the first time, after beating shaun murphy by 6—3. carter took his opportunity to close out the match in the ninth frame with a break of 97. twice a world championship finallist, he was only invited to play when ronnie o'sullivan decided to give the tounament a miss this year. he'll play stuart bingham for the title. it's live on bbc two from 1.00pm. controversial irish mixed martial artist conor mcgregor has won in his first return to the sport since october 2018. he was taking on american donald ‘cowboy‘ cerrone, and gained a technical knockout within a0 seconds. nick peet is in las vegas where the fight took place. good evening, nick. it was very
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brief but he is certainly back. he certainly is. he got the kind of performance we were hoping for all week. he has been like a breath of fresh airare week. he has been like a breath of fresh air are weak, great to deal with, receptive to the media, enjoyed being around the fans again. it was a nice and to a successful week, getting back in the win column, getting his arm raised. he remains the biggest star in mixed martial arts, one of the biggest pay per view starts in all of sport. we look forward to a busy twenty20 with him. before the fight, it was interesting watching him. a different conor mcgregor than we have seen in the past. the year he has had, getting into pub brawls, the last fight, how that went down. he is going for a new image, perhaps. yeah, hopefully it is him maturing. he has two children now.
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the last 15 months have been pretty embarrassing for him, generating more headlines on the front pages than the back pages. it was nice to see him back in this world. he was put to compete in mixed martial arts. he was given a standing ovation tonight after yet another legacy marking type of performance. his opponent was very much up for its, he was adamant he was going to test him, that he was the right opponent for conor mcgregor. when conor mcgregor is in the right frame of mind and is focused on this board, he is one of the best around. that is exactly the type of performance we got tonight. you either love him or hate him, but what he has done for the sport, people are watching him, they are excited. we did make history last night. of course he did. he needs to
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be motivated, training in the gym, he needs to be focused. i spent some time out here yesterday with tyson fury before the fight. he is a similar case. and these guys are focused, they have a goal in their sport, they can be untouchable at times. conor mcgregor needs to stay inside mixed martial arts, he needs to stay focused. he has all the money he will ever need. he has achieved his dream of being world champion, winning two belts in two different weight divisions. he has tasted life away from the octagon and realises he needs to keep out of trouble. the only way to do that is stay in the sport as long as he possibly can. he was very mature all week. his actions spoke as slightly as his words. tonight he delivered when it mattered most and got his
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arm raised. i like this new conor mcgregor. it is nice that we can have a conor mcgregor that we can call a role model again. lovely to speak to you. thank you. we love to watch him. a0 seconds! if anybody got to make themselves a of coffee... it is a decent rate of pay per second. his commercial pulling power is extraordinary. you have hit the nail on the head. people who aren't fully across the sport they do know his name, and that says a lot. thanks, holly. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the headline in the sunday express reads "freedom...at a price". most of the papers are leading on the deal between the queen
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and the duke and duchess of sussex. "they're out," says the sunday times. it reports that the deal "amounts to the abdication of the royal rock stars". the front page also features an exclusive investigation into a government data breach that reportedly allowed betting companies to access the personal information of 28 million young people. the observer is leading with politics. it says boris johnson will warn his cabinet to focus all their energy on developing policies for post—brexit britain or face losing their positions during the cabinet reshuffle in a few weeks. online, the indepedent leads on nhs waiting times. it says long waits are pushing more patients towards private surgery, with the sector expected to be worth £1.3 billion by 2021. anne—marie imafidon has pulled a few stories out for us.
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we are looking at all sorts of different things this morning. we are increasingly reliant on digital devices and teachers are saying we need to go back to the old—fashioned hands on a clock. yes, they are finding it is taking slightly longer to teach students how to tell time on an analogue clock. some children are struggling to hold a pencil. also, hunchback from smartphones. lots of skills like telling the time are frittering away. i do a lot of time working on what future working skills might be, looking at what we should prioritise. schools are moving towards using tablets and classes. some are concerned that we
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will lose the dexterous skills required for handwriting. do you stand on that? you still need that extra skills and there will be other times that you will need them. we spent a lot of time on school on handwriting, which at the moment is effectively useless. i had to write a cheque for the first time in years this week. it is interesting, children if they are on the computer and you say, what are you doing? they say, i'm doing my homework. you think, really? are you just toggling between jujube and your homework?- long as you know the quickest way to learn, that is the important bit. new research showing the toughest places in the country to grow up as a woman. they say blackpool is the ha rd est a woman. they say blackpool is the hardest place. yes, to be a girl.
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they have included non—binary young people in this research, as well. we have blackpool, hartlepool and nottingham. why in particular those places? we have an example here of a goal and blackpool who is out with herfamily goal and blackpool who is out with her family and being goal and blackpool who is out with herfamily and being harassed even though she's with her family, somebody tried to grab her. concern about the safety of girls being out in public spaces in these areas. it is quite distressing. i work with girls and young women in particular in science and technology and we see a big difference it will travel across the country. we are having to re—prioritise certain cold spots, to make sure we can focus on the ambitions of these girls, the opportunities they are able to take up opportunities they are able to take up as women. blackpool is really
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ha rd to up as women. blackpool is really hard to perceive improve perceptions. they get their fair share of negative publicity. they need a bit more funding, that is what the report is suggesting. there needs to be funded by local government and the government. they have got a bit complacent on the experience of girls in this country. some owners are spending more on their dog plasma diet than the personal ones. when anne—marie was on just after 7.30am, she mentioned a story about dog owners who spend more on their pet's food than their own. we've received a great email on the subject. it's from paul, who is the proud owner of this beautiful six—year—old tamaski dog called loki, who is fed on a raw food diet. paul has sent a few examples of the sort of dishes he prepares for loki. they include cucumber, eggs, whitebait, coconut oil and minced pheasant, venison and turkey, not all at the same time,
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plus some supplemental powders. i love the creativity of that one. a lot more effort in the effort and presentation in this! a lot more effort in the effort and presentation in this! paul says it costs no more than a standard kibble diet and has helped loki to overcome digestive problems. ido i do feel guilty every day, we put the same dry biscuits at everyday for my cat and i think, it is so boring. everything. have you got time for one more? i think so. smart contact lenses. my lenses came in this morning. what are the... to supposed future is here. you're able to control your music, read autocue maybe in your contact lens. therein lies a story! we will see. it has
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been tried before. remember google glasses? it is like google glasses put directly onto your eyes. we will see how this goes. we are all turning into the six million dollar man! thank you so much. it has been fantastic to have you in this morning. this is where we say goodbye. now, here's darren with a look at this morning's weather. there are some hazardous driving conditions across the uk today. this picture sums it up. it is very cold out there with temperatures as low as minus six degrees. there is a widespread frost this morning. we also have areas of dense fog which will be very slow to clear. it is covering a small area but it is up the m5, m6, all the way up to
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lancashire, there is dense fog this morning and if you purchase may linger into this afternoon. away from here we have the sunshine lifting those temperatures steadily. some time turning hazy across northern ireland and scotland through the day, with thicker cloud and stronger winds in the far north of scotla nd and stronger winds in the far north of scotland and the northern isles. 6-8d of scotland and the northern isles. 6—8d in the sunshine, cold weather fog persists. the temperature is very to yesterday. we still have an area of high pressure dominating our weather. the stronger winter coming on across the north. the cloud will arrive across northern ireland and scotla nd arrive across northern ireland and scotland through the night. further south we have the fog. it will push its way across the midlands towards east anglia. across the midlands, wales, southern england there will bea wales, southern england there will be a widespread frost. it could mind ain be a widespread frost. it could mind a in southern england. it will be milder further a in southern england. it will be milderfurther north, where a in southern england. it will be milder further north, where there
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will be more cloud. the fog in the morning for the rush—hour, beware of that. it will be very slow to left. some sun chang to the east of the pennines and in the north—east of scotla nd pennines and in the north—east of scotland where it has been very mild. elsewhere across northern parts of the uk there will be much more cloud, although temperatures may be a shade higher. we still have high pressure in one shape or another for next week. a weakening weather front moving southwards across the uk. that means the northern half of the uk on monday morning should be frost free. further south, we are likely to have a frost and patches of fog again. the weather from producing some light rain or drizzle across scotla nd light rain or drizzle across scotland and northern ireland, but that will peter wright. it is the only sign of any rain over the next few days. the cloud will break to give it some sunshine. mild for the northern half of the uk, calls for south at five or 6 degrees. over the week ahead, not a great deal
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changes. a gentle westerly breeze across the uk. there will be patchy frost and patchy fog. it depends on the amount of cry because i think there will be a fair amount of cloud around. the week ahead should be fine and dry, which i'm sure you will agree, is probably good news. enjoy the rest of your sunday and watch out for the fog if you're going to be travelling. what would you give for a chance to re—visit your childhood home? one artist has taken the ultimate trip down memory lane by recreating her parents' living room, along with the corner shop they ran during the 19805 — and everyone is welcome. monika plaha went along to take a look. with very little money, but lots of determination, an influx of south asian immigrants stepped onto the business ladder as shopkeepers.
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this is like one of my old family photo albums... dawinda grew up in herfamily‘s corner shop in 19805 wolverhampton. corner shops that were video shops like my parents owned were so significant back in the day, because it really provided an essential lifeline to them in terms of back home. it closed down after ten years, but over three decades on, she bought her father's old shop back to life through rediscovering old objects. the idea came from one very special briefcase. so, talk me through what's in this briefcase? so, this briefcase is my father's old briefcase. and really, this is where the whole project started. i opened it up and it had been put away in storage for many years. i started to look through it and i found that there is something here to be explored. there is an amp fuse, sold for the 35p. i don't think you can get anything that cheap any more! this is in the shop where your dad worked? yeah. did you ever use this back in the day? i used to use it and treated a bit like a toy, really.
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and like the till behind us, it was just fascinating to press all these buttons and just be a little girl and see what was going on. and in the new exhibition, the corner shop isn't the only thing that's been recreated. welcome to my home! wow, this is brilliant. it's a blast down memory lane. and people are invited for a house—warming. this is a recreation of dawinda's living room from back in the 19805, which most of us can probably relate to. i know i certainly can. in fact, i still have this wallpaper in my house today. i had three of these two shoe boxes. and let's face it, an asian household wouldn't be the same without food on the table. it's amazing. i walked in and i was like, i'm pretty sure i've been in this living room several times before in my life growing up. this isjust something i've needed to see today. it just makes everything come alive for me. every little object has so many layers. i love it so much.
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i was amazed, how they have put it all together. i have got relatives with a house that still looks like this! putting this together has been a journey of discovery for dawinda. she has taken a trip back in time to share a culturally historic past. the living room in south asian communities is the linchpin. it keeps everyone together. i want them to come in together in the space and stay as long as they want. i want them to have a cream and sit on the sofa and watch the film. and get a real sense of what it was like for me and my family growing up in wolverhampton in the 19805, and get a real sense of our lived experience. that exhibition is at nottingham 5 new art exchange gallery until march. when ruth linton had surgery to remove a brain tumour, she woke up to all the emotions you might expect — relief, confusion and a wariness about the future.
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what's more surprising is that she also found certain elements of her situation absolutely hilarious and now she's channelling that newly—awa kened sense of humour into a fledgling career as a stand—up comedian. we're joined by ruth and her daughter, deborah. it is wonderful to have your both with us. ruth, as a journalist, you have written about your mum? journey. i wrote in the guardian has weekend magazine about how it felt for my mum to go through surgery for her brain tumour, waking up high as a kite, really. finding comedy, dipping to the low slow in her recovery, then launching the stand—up comedy career out of
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nowhere. we wrote about it from both perspectives and it had a lovely reaction. 191a perspectives and it had a lovely reaction. 1914 was when the devastating news came about the tumour. how did you take the news at the time? there wasn't much time to process it. i was told that everything should be fine but we would have a scan to make sure and of course they find something. i didn't have time to process, really. i went to a football match in the evening, then got a phone call first thing in the morning to say could you come straight back to hospital. he knew it was pretty serious then. then what happens after that? i know that you have this awful period of ptsd after the operation, but you came through it. did you feel like it was a switch, a physiological
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switch in your brain as a result of the surgical intervention, or was it an emotional released that lead you to comedy? i think emotional release is exactly how i felt. i have always had a thing about finding the funny things and situations, even when difficult things that happen to us we have always laughed. yes, i do believe it was in me, but it is something about waking up from the operation feeling very upset and after a couple of hours i was back to maybe, what's the word i'm looking for... like helping me cope, like a coping mechanism, but i do find the funny side and things. he went to these comedy stand—up classes secretly. you didn't tell yourfamily orfriends. classes secretly. you didn't tell your family or friends. absolutely i
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didn't. i had to tell my son and my brother that i wasn't able to go to a match, we were playing chelsea. you are a big man city fan. we are. isaid i'm you are a big man city fan. we are. i said i'm sorry i will be able to come on that day, then i thought i better tell them why. i thought they might bea better tell them why. i thought they might be a bit gross. what did jesus think when you heard your mum was doing this? a mixture of emotions. i did not expect that, and whose mother does this? mum had been in the pits with her ptsd. she said she felt like a ghost. i tried so many things to try to get to rebuild her social life but she did this herself. as well as shock and slight apprehension, really. iwas herself. as well as shock and slight apprehension, really. i was so pleased she found something. for most people, standing up in front of a room full of people and trying to make them laugh would be terrifying,
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but particularly when you have been through something so physically traumatic. as a woman later in life, how did you get the courage do it? thank you, but i don't see it like that. for me, the first lesson that we had, comedy lesson that we had, they put us in the middle of the room and fired questions at us and told us just to say whatever came into our heads. for me, that was fabulous. it takes more guts for me to get any work on time, to rein it in. it does take more guts. is this a hobby? a career? i suppose i am aspiring and i have loved it. i maybe felt a little nervous about doing its. i have been well received wherever i have done it. for a long timei wherever i have done it. for a long time i didn't allow any one i knew
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to come and watch me, but then i did an event and acted really well. as with the interest that debora's article has risen, i thought, i must carry on. it will be great to see where ever it takes you. if you have an inkling on something, just go out and do it, that is what you have taught us. that's all from breakfast today. dan and louise are back tomorrow from six. have a great sunday.
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the this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9. harry and meghan will drop their ‘hrh' title and give up all royal duties under a new agreement with buckingham palace. prince harry will also lose his military positions and the couple will pay back the taxpayers' money used to renovate their windsor home. many questions but this is a clean ha rd many questions but this is a clean hard break from many questions but this is a clean hard breakfrom royal

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