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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 22, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good on you. one lady told me she got into fish keeping as a way to stimulate her cat, because she saw that the cat was looking very bored and so she decided to get fish for the cat so that the cat could watch the cat so that the cat could watch the fish when she was at work.” hope it doesn't stress the fish stop you know, you've got to think about all the pets. honestly... please do good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker send us in your pictures of your and louise minchin. our headlines today: nine dead and more than 400 pampered pooches. just loving out. infected with a mystery thank you very much. i'm beginning new virus in china. the world health authority meets later today to decide to feel a bit left out. we went very whether the outbreak is an international public health emergency. low maintenance on our dog.” thought we were... it has educated the duchess of cambridge starts me. thank you very much. a 24—hour tour of the uk the duke and duchess of sussex have issued a legal warning to the media to launch a new survey looking at the problems faced by many after paparazzi shots of meghan children underfive. walking her dogs with baby archie were published. press intrusion is one of the reasons the couple say they wanted to give up royal life and move to canada. but will their desire for a private life be respected? the chek news service in vancouver island was one outlet which decided not to use the pictures. we're joined now by its news
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we will hear from ozzy osbourne as editor, scott fee. he announces he has parkinson's. good morning, scott, thank you very britain's pet industry is set to top 2 billion pounds. with one in four households owning much indeed. presumably, given what you are, you must have been one of a dog and one in five homes the first people to see these also home to a cat, spending is set pictures. do you know how they were to rise 25% in just 5 years. taken? we spoke to the paparazzi we'll be speaking to the boss of britain's biggest pet store chain today who took that very picture. we sent a crew out as the whole just after 7:00. saved by the bell, down to ten men. arsenal hit back twice at chelsea. hector bellerin with a sensational equaliser. international media has landed here today, a cloudy day with low cloud, missed, dank conditions. —— mist. in victoria over the last 48 hours, really took a turn again when harry arrived here on a commercialflight, walked on the tarmac, and ignited back with more later in the programme. it's wednesday the 22nd of january. paparazzi from los angeles, around our top story: the world, tokyo, they are all here, and we went out to horse hill park the number of people who have died from a new mystery virus has now reached nine. where maga has been seen walking in more than 400 others are infected in china. health officials will today consider the past, also walked then the declaring coronavirus christmas holidays. and we talk to a global health emergency. the paparazzi who was hiding in the here in the uk, the government bush and to putt out and took the is expected to announce a series of precautionary measures picture. that is what happened. they at heathrow airport. tulip mazumdar has this report. have claimed these pictures were taken by have claimed these pictures were ta ken by photographers have claimed these pictures were taken by photographers hiding in bushes with long lens cameras. you a city on high alert.
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wuhan, where this mysterious can confirm that, can you? the virus first emerged, paparazzi photographer i talked to is bracing itself. today said i was on public property, several hospitals in the city are already dealing with hundreds of cases. happened to be on this trail, maga happened to be on this trail, maga happened to be walking up and took a this virus which can cause severe picture. that's his version. he said lung problems appears to be spread through close contact meghan did not prevent it from happening. those were his words. if with infected people. thatis happening. those were his words. if that is how it played out it is hard to say. there is no way he was out there are particular concerns ahead of the lunar new year as millions there for exercise. right. you chose get ready to travel for the holidays. china says the situation is under control but many more cases are expected. not to publish that picture, also the outbreak has already hit several areas of china, pictures of prince harry landing as well. what is your editorial including the capital, beijing, and shanghai. decision making? well, we have had a handful of cases have also been identified in other countries in the region. to listen to our viewers, our audience is going to be really two in thailand, one injapan sensitive to this topic. they are and one in south korea. really protective, i believe, of harry and meghan, that is the now the us has also confirmed a case, a travellerfrom china feedback we have been getting. we who became sick in seattle. area feedback we have been getting. we are a heritage station on the island, we have been here over 60 yea rs, island, we have been here over 60 yea rs , we island, we have been here over 60 years, we plan to be here for 60 more, so we want to listen to them the world health organization has only declared a global health and we want to respect what they are
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emergency five times before, saying. we are not looking to be intrusive or stalk the couple. we including for ebola and swine flu. today health experts will meet are going to follow this story as the world is watching and it unfolds to decide whether this outbreak poses a serious enough international threat to call one again. in ourown the world is watching and it unfolds in our own backyard, but, like today, our story turned into the they will be looking paparazzi. we interview different at what measures might the necessary in order to better deal media from around the world, got with the outbreak. there te, how long they are saying, they will assess the outbreak based what they are looking for, and on three conditions: taking a different tone to it. so we is it unusual? is it spreading internationally? are still being respectful by keeping the story alive, and it is a and does it risk causing proper news story. we know the duke interruption of travel and trade? screening is already under way and duchess of sussex have issued a at airports around the world. legal wanting to the media after it's unclear how this some outlets publish those pictures. outbreak is going to unfold, what are the answers to the but health authorities are trying questions, what are they telling to be as prepared as possible. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. you, how long are they going to be there? is it really intense what is happening at the moment? there? is it really intense what is happening at the moment7m there? is it really intense what is happening at the moment? it is certainly intense for our part of the world. we are not used to it. there was a confrontation today we we ca speak now to our caught on video between the china correspondent paparazzi and people who were stephen mcdonell. stephen, how worried are people about this virus? legitimately out enjoying the trail with their kids, walking their dogs, certainly everybody sat up and paid isa with their kids, walking their dogs, is a popular hiking trail. probably attention when a couple of hours ago more popular over the last month or
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so, but people regularly use it as chinese officials came out and announced they were now nine people normal individuals using it. in the dead, at least 440 people infected. paparazzi was there and we caught on video a couple arguing with them they are saying the reason that the telling them to leave the island, infection numbers are jumping they are saying the reason that the infection numbers arejumping up they are saying the reason that the infection numbers are jumping up so quickly is that they are getting get off, you are not contributing better at identifying who has the anything to this, by making it difficult for harry meghan. i think coronavirus, a potentially deadly theyis difficult for harry meghan. i think they is potential for a difficult for harry meghan. i think violence which causes pneumonia. they is potentialfor a backlash. if for some reason they choose worryingly, these officials have somewhere else and move on, there suggested that the virus could could be blame on the media and say mutate, making it more contagious and some chinese scientists have your local media were hounding them even suggested that nobody travels and now they don't find a to nor leaves wuhan, a city of 11 co mforta ble and now they don't find a comfortable place to stay. i don't think that's the case. i think they million people, and all of this at are used to more intensity than what is happening here. but it has certainly revved up a bit. the the height of the chinese new year, paparazzi are saying they are doing the height of the chinese new year, the most important festival in this thejob, they paparazzi are saying they are doing the job, they say there is a desire country. it does show the extent to and an appetite for these images and which there is concern and they are being bought by papers and potentially, we have heard from organisations across the pond. scott fee, good to chat. thank you very these scientists in britain and in much. thank you. thanks for getting in touch with us hong kong, saying that the real infection rate could already be this morning on all sorts of thousands rather than hundreds. very stories. many of you excited that
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interesting to hear from you, thank steph will be here later, after you, stephen. 8:30am. democratic party prosecutors have time now to get the news, travel, failed in their attempts and weather where you are. to call witnesses to use as evidence in president donald trump's good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. impeachment trial. a series of amendments were blocked by republican senators, who make up the majority of the house. a man's been arrested in denmark it's expected that they will continue to back the president in connection with the death of a man who was shot dead and clear him of any wrongdoing. outside his home in battersea from washington, on christmas eve. flamur bakieree, a swedish national, was killed in front of his family. a 22—year—old arrested at copehagen chris buckler reports. airport remains in custody in denmark pending extradition proceedings. london has become the "epicentre of the elites," making it "off america's constitution gives the limits" for young people from poorer backgrounds — congress the power to remove a that's according to the social mobility charity the sutton trust. it says high living costs and unpaid internships are barriers to young president but in this divided working class people — country, republicans and democrats and they have greater success are struggling even to agree on the outside the capital. rules for this impeachment trial. mr chiefjustice, i sent an amendment to the desk to issue a subpoena to john michael mick mulvaney. democrats put forward an amendment after amendments, asking for the right to demand documents, witnesses and evidence from the white house, the state department and other parts of the administration which have the number of people with dementia refused to comply with subpoenas. who end up in hospital has risen
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sharply across london. are you prepared to say and accept there were more than 48,000 emergency admissions between 2017 and 18. the alzheimer's society said it shows the strain on the nhs. the president saying, i have absolute immunity, you want me to ministers say they are "determined" come testify? senator, you want me to come testify? no, no, i have to tackle the problems. absolute immunity. each amendment as part of a special bbc series, we're looking at what we can do was voted down by cutback personally to help tackle climate change. ander zabala claims to have republicans who hold the majority in cut his landfill waste to just one bina year. the senate and want this trial to be he tries not to buy any products over with as quickly as possible. and thousands of miles away in davos, at a meeting of world leaders, donald trump couldn't hide in packets and refills. his frustration at the attack on his presidency. it is a hoax. it goes nowhere because nothing happened.- it will cost you, eventually, less, but it will take you some time they debated in dc, mr trump tweeted to get used to it in the beginning. and that little effort can be in capital letters, "read the beneficial for you and for everyone. transcripts". a in capital letters, "read the tra nscripts". a reference in capital letters, "read the transcripts". a reference to the phone call he held with the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky. the central as occasion is mrtrump if everyone did a tiny bit zelensky. the central as occasion is mr trump threatened to withhold there would be an environmental military aid to ukraine unless they impact reduced. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service lodged investigations into his on the tubes this morning.
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political rival. both sides are not on the roads, blackfriars road just talking to the senators who remains closed between will act as a jury in this st george's circus and southwark street after a water impeachment trial. they are speaking main burst yesterday. to the american public who will vote repairs are due to be ongoing until the end of next week. through a presidential election in tottenham, broadwater road before the end of the year. chris is closed because of a collision. buckler, bbc news, washington. the duchess of cambridge kingston: there's a lane closed is on a 24—hour tour of the uk in the one way system on wheatfield way at fairfield north to launch a new survey she hopes — that's for emergency repairs will help tackle the problems faced to a burst water main. by many in early childhood. now the weather with kate kinsella. she is visiting a number good morning. of organisations to hear how early it's feeling less cold this morning compared to this time yesterday. intervention can prevent the repeated problems affecting some families. temperatures largely above zero. our royal correspondent, we've had a bit more cloud overnight and some mist and fog around this daniela relph, reports. morning as well, particularly over higher ground out towards the chilterns, for example. getting stuck in at think tank but the cloud is going to stay with us. one or two glimpses of something a bit brighter, hence of a little birmingham science museum. the first bit of sunshine, but like stop on the duchess's tour of england and wales. it hasn't been an i say largely cloudy. easy week for the royal family but there is now a sense of business as usual. this is increasingly where and temperatures reaching 8—9 celsius. a gentle the duchess's focus will lie, north—north—easterly breeze. now, the cloud is thick enough to produce the odd spot of light improving the experiences of early rain and drizzle but it is childhood to help ensure a healthy going to be largely dry, and fulfilling life as an adult. and stays with us overnight as well tonight, minimum temperature,
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chatting to parents with children underfive, she again, largely above zero, around 5—6 celsius. so relatively mild. chatting to parents with children under five, she explained why support during the early years was so support during the early years was so vital. are part of the next now, more in the way of cloud generation, it proves the importance as we head through friday, of the early years but actually, it it will stay grey for the next few days. high pressure continues is knowing how best to support to dominate, it does, pa rents is knowing how best to support however, started to slip away. parents and families and do the best as it does we pick up a south—westerly flow and you will notice temperature a little milder and turning more job... the work of the duchess in unsettled towards the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half—an—hour. now though it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. this area has even included her own children. here at the chelsea flower show, george, charlotte and louis tested out a garden there mum helped design to help promote the benefits of being outdoors. it is hoped the findings of the new survey will help good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker break the cycle of problems some and louise minchin. our headlines today: young families face. they will also nine dead and more than 400 inform the kind of work the duchess infected with a mystery new virus in china. of cambridge does going forward. the world health authority meets later today to decide whether the outbreak is an international public health emergency. daniella —— daniela relph, bbc news. the duchess of cambridge starts a long lost painting by the artist a 24—hour tour of the uk ls lowry has been sold to launch a new survey looking at auction for more than two at the problems faced by many
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point six million pounds. children underfive. the work called "the mill, pendlebury", depicts one we'll get reaction as ozzy of the artist's typical osbourne announces he scenes in north west england, has parkinson's. and was painted in 1943. it had belonged to a manchester—born scientist who took the painting a multi—billion pound industry. spending on our pets is set to rise with him to the us in 1949, leaving the art world unaware 25% in just five years — the piece even existed. it was then rediscovered we'll be speaking to the boss following his death in august last year. of pets at home just after 7:00. saved by the bell. down to 10 men, arsenal hit back twice at chelsea, hector bellerin it is 6:09. sally is here. carol is with a sensational equaliser. good morning britain. today will be also in the studio which is lovely. fairly cloudy, extensive low cloud. a lot of damp conditions and we also a great day. a brilliant day when carol is here. steph is going to be have fog to boot but i will have more details later in the programme. here. the gang 's back together! her it's wednesday the 22nd of january. last ever experience. well, —— the number of people who have died appearance. well, she is probably from a new mystery virus has now reached nine. going to launch another show... more than 400 others are infected in china. never her last appearance! carol is health officials will today consider declaring coronavirus a global health emergency. here in the uk, the government over there, she might is expected to announce a series never her last appearance! carol is of precautionary measures overthere, she might even at heathrow airport.
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never her last appearance! carol is over there, she might even wave at me. morning, carol! whether in a tulip mazumdar has this report. minute but a tiny bit of sport. —— weather. we're down to two britons at the australian open. heather watson came from a set down to beat kristyna pliskova,, but dan evans lost to yoshihito nishioka — watson and harriet dart are the only a city on high alert. wuhan, where this mysterious britain's left in the singles draws. virus first emerged, is bracing itself. arsenal had david luiz sent off several hospitals in the city are already dealing early on against chelsea with hundreds of cases. but they came away with a draw — this virus which can cause severe captain hector bellerin scoring lung problems appears to be spread a late equaliser to make it 2—2. through close contact with infected people. there are particular concerns ahead of the lunar new year as millions sergio aguero came off the bench get ready to travel for the holidays. to score manchester city's china says the situation is under control winner at sheffield united — but many more cases are expected. but city are still 13 points behind liverpool at the top of the table. mo farah have said he is happy for the outbreak has already hit several areas of china, including the capital, beijing, and shanghai. a handful of cases have also been identified in other countries any of his previous samples to be in the region. tested after world anti— said it two in thailand, one injapan would investigate all athletes who and one in south korea. trained with his band former coach. now the us has also confirmed really interesting words from mo a case, a travellerfrom china who became sick in seattle. the world health organization has farah yesterday. he released a only declared a global health emergency five times before, including for ebola and swine flu.
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today health experts will meet little statement himself, it wasn't to decide whether this outbreak through a journalist, he just said poses a serious enough international it himself. he is happy for any of his samples for previous years gone by to be tested. thank you very much threat to call one again. was that we will look at the papers ina minute. was that we will look at the papers in a minute. we would do an update on tidy house. they will be looking at what measures might the necessary in order to better deal here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. with the outbreak. lovely to see you in the studio. lovely to see you in the studio. lovely to see you in the studio. lovely to be here! that morning to screening is already under way you, too. what we have in store is a at airports around the world. it's unclear how this lot of cloud. milder than it was outbreak is going to unfold, but health authorities are trying yesterday but the cloud is thick to be as prepared as possible. enough to be producing drizzle tulip mazumdar, bbc news. almost anywhere and there is fog to watch out for first wing as well. the high pressure that has been dominating our weather this week has and we've just heard more -- it is dominating our weather this week has —— it is still with us. —— first on the measures being introduced to monitorflights from wuhan — there are currently three flights thing. it is sucking in more a week from there to heathrow. moisture and more milder conditions. as indicated by the yellow. breezy today across scotland where we have let us tell you what is going to go a weak weather front so patchy rain on. the measures are an augmented oi’ a weak weather front so patchy rain or drizzle here. cloud thick enough most anywhere to see some of that team, broadcasting and vocal m essa g es to team, broadcasting and vocal messages to passengers while on the drizzle. brightest guys in the light flight messages to passengers while on the
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flight to encourage reporting a bill that make illness and then they will breezes. it will be across scotland, use an isolated area of london north—east england and the channel islands. quite breezy also through the channel islands where we have heathrow terminal for. —— four. highs of only six degrees. northwards, i2 and possible 16 in public health england and the chief medical officer have the north of scotland. as we had on revised the coronavirus risk from very low to low, through the evening and overnight, which is why the measures we continue with a lot of cloud are have been introduced. still thick enough for some drizzle almost anywhere. one or two breaks we will be talking about that a in the cloud so they will be some little bit later in the programme as chillier spots. in the cloud so they will be some well to find out exactly what, if chillierspots. generally in the cloud so they will be some chillier spots. generally speaking, anything, we should be doing. not anticipating any areas with donald trump's impeachment trial got frost. these are the overnight lows. underway in america overnight. senators clashed over attempts to call witnesses to use as evidence. thursday and friday, a bit more of it's expected the senate will continue to back the president the same, actually, a bit of cloud, and clear him of any wrongdoing. from washington, drizzle, fog, to look out for first thing in the morning was not the only difference is that north of chris buckler reports. scotla nd only difference is that north of scotland where we have a weather front trying to come in, introducing some rain and at times some stronger america's constitution gives the us congress the power to remove a president winds. that takes us into saturday. but in this divided country, republicans and democrats are struggling even saturday we have a lot of cloud to agree on the rules for this impeachment trial. still. they will be some brighter brea ks still. they will be some brighter breaks but our high pressure is mr chiefjustice, i send going away which allows the weather an amendment to the desk to issue a subpoena to john
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fronts in from the west which will michael mick mulvaney. introduce rain. ahead of the rain, democrats put forward an amendment after amendment, asking for the right they will also be showers. you can to demand documents, witnesses and evidence from the white house, shelter from the wind, that is where the state department and other parts we are likely to see sunshine. even of the administration which have refused to in sunday, watch what happens, we comply with subpoenas. have the weather front coming in on are you prepared to say and accept saturday, it pushes steadily that president saying, southwards as a weak affair and then i have absolute immunity, you want me to come testify? behind it, it turns much cooler as senator, you want me you can see from the snow on the to come and testify? no, no, i have absolute immunity. tops of the hills. first thing on sunday, patchy rain courtesy of the weather front drifting down towards the south—east. behind it, the sun will come out and they will still be some showers, but more showers, some each amendment was voted down of them merging across northern by republicans who hold the majority ireland and western scotland and in the senate here, too, they are likely to be and who want this trial to be over with as quickly as possible. wintry on the hills. temperatures, and thousands of miles away in davos, at a meeting of fourin wintry on the hills. temperatures, four in stornoway, eight in howe but world leaders, donald trump couldn't hide his frustration at the attack on his presidency. that whole thing is a hoax. tens and ii is further south. —— hull was the first part of nest —— it goes nowhere because nothing happened. as they debated in dc, mr trump tweeted next week is looking unsettled. dare in capital letters, "read the transcripts". a reference to records of a phone call he held
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i mention the word stormy? because with ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky. the central allegation is mr trump that could well be in the forecast threatened to withhold for next week. something to look out military aid to ukraine unless the country lodged for. thank you, carol. ithink investigations into for next week. something to look out for. thank you, carol. i think you are going to come and join us again. the full gang is in! let's take a look at today's papers. his political rivals. the metro depicts president trump and greta thunberg going head—to—head, in what the paper calls a "war of words" over climate but in making their arguments, change at this year's davos summit. both sides aren'tjust talking to the senators who will act the i newspaper calls mr trump as a jury in this impeachment trial. the planet's "no—one climate change denier". they're speaking to the american public who will vote it says that great thunberg told in a presidential election before the president in her speech that, the end of the year. "our house is still on fire. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. your inaction is fuelling the flames." the sun leads with ozzy osbourne's there's been a steep rise in the number of women aged between 25 and 29 being diagnosed parkinson's diagnosis, with cervical cancer. overall, cervical cancer rates in the uk among all ages fell, that's a story we'll be discussing but the rise among young women after 7:00 this morning. is worrying experts. and online, the huffington post reports on a good day for lisa nandy figures published by in the labour leadership race, public health england show thatjust with the headline "fine and mandy". over 70% of women aged 25 to 49 were screened she has secured the backing in the last three years — which is below the 80% regarded as acceptable by the nhs. of the gmb union. jess phillips stood down her candidacy yesterday. then there were
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social media sites and online games four. should we start with carol? used by children will have to abide carole, you do whatever you like. by a new privacy code set by the uk's data watchdog. i've feel like royalty this morning. the safety standards include they have a story about the crown. measures to make sure a child's location is not revealed, and privacy settings automatically set to high to protect young people. 73 million viewers watched the third series of the crown, the netflix the changes are expected to come series. that is a huge amount. there into force by the end of next year. we re series. that is a huge amount. there were people binge watching that in the duchess of cambridge my house over christmas was have you is on a 24—hour tour of the uk to launch a new survey she hopes not watched it yet?! i watched bits will help tackle the problems faced by many in early childhood. she is visiting a number and pieces. you can't help it. when of organisations to hear how early intervention can prevent the repeated problems affecting some families. our royal correspondent, you start you just curl up a new daniela relph, reports. find six hours has vanished. you start you just curl up a new find six hours has vanishedm you start you just curl up a new find six hours has vanished. it is one of those programmes where you getting stuck in at thinktank birmingham science museum. find, if it is an hour, it takes you the first stop on the duchess's tour an hourand 40 of england and wales. find, if it is an hour, it takes you an hour and 40 two watch because you it hasn't been an easy week are constantly stopping and googling. really happen, that for the royalfamily relationship? i think is all true. but there is now a sense of business as usual. victoria. yesterday we were talking
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about the high street and what was this is increasingly where the duchess's focus will lie, going on. i said lots of things...” improving the experiences of early childhood to help ensure a healthy and fulfilling life as an adult. chatting to parents with children saw this last night and i thought under five, she explained why victoria told us something different is because... because i was told support during the early something different! we were all years was so vital. told something different! it was not just me love red—faced. part of raising the next generation, told something different! it was not the science proves the importance just me love red-faced. it's good to admit your mistakes.” of the early years, that actually is knowing how best to support just me love red-faced. it's good to admit your mistakes. i no. why was parents and families and do given the wrong data. we all wore. the markets reported at seven o'clock, the listed companies, and the bestjob because we can. they said sales were rising and there was a 2% sales rise over christmas, they were selling x, y, nz, all sorts of things, and it the work of the duchess in this area has even included her own children. here at the chelsea flower show, turns out that was not true. —— and george, charlotte and louis tested out a garden their mum helped design to help promote the benefits z. turns out that was not true. —— and 2. actually, sales fell by 2%. of being outdoors. it's hoped the findings of the new survey will help break the cycle of turns out that was not true. —— and z. actually, sales fell by 2%. how did they get that then?” problems some young families face. z. actually, sales fell by 2%. how did they get that then? i don't they will also inform the kind of work the duchess of cambridge know. they are not overseen by does going forward. accountants. all the various people daniela relph, bbc news. are different levels including the chief executive and the finance
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chief executive and the finance chief as well as the public relations staff will have seen the statement before i saw it and i told a long lost painting by the artist ls lowry has been sold at auction for more than two the nation. we got to the truth in point six million pounds. the work called "the mill, pendlebury", depicts one of the artist's typical the nation. we got to the truth in the end. the back page of the daily scenes in north west england, and was painted in 1943. mail they have interesting was from kevin pietersen about the england cricket team. he is talking about it had belonged to a manchester—born jofra archer, and saying if england scientist who took the painting don't look afterjofra archer he with him to the us in 1949, leaving the art world unaware mightjust decide don't look afterjofra archer he might just decide not don't look afterjofra archer he mightjust decide not to play don't look afterjofra archer he might just decide not to play for the piece even existed. them. they have to be careful with it was then rediscovered following his death how they handle him. kevin pietersen in august last year. has a little bit of experience, shall we say, with how england handle their cricketers and he is it is fast approaching 7:10. saying don't let him be treated the way i was to do. he goes on to talk about his life, how it is much rock star ozzy osbourne has revealed quieter now. he says," live in a that he has a "mild" form of parkinson's disease, which was diagnosed a year ago. very quietly now. we used to live in in an interview with good morning america, the 71—year—old black sabbath singer, alongside his wife sharon, the same street as hugh grant, frank lampard, and liz hurley. it was an described how he found out incredible street." what an amazing he has the condition. street to live in. funky parties
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it was —— i did my last show on new there. or maybe they never spoke to year's eve at the forum and i had a anyone. or maybe they were all watching netflix. updating the bad fall and had to have surgery on my neck which screwed all my nerves papers from yesterday. stacey andi my neck which screwed all my nerves and i found out solomon, you are amazed by the way my neck which screwed all my nerves and ifound out i had a mild form to keep things tidy in our house. there are more photographs. this is of... its parkinson's to which is a what takes it for me, the dishcloth, underneath the sink, all hung up. form of parkinson's and it is, there genes are neatly put out, batteries lined up. charges... i was i was are so many form of parkinson's and it is, there are so many different types of like this. i am not like this. but parkinson's. it is not a death the time... i do not -- do know what sentence by any stretch of the imagination but it does affect certain nerves in your body and its rice looks like. you say look at like you have a good day, a good day, and then a really bad day. issues, but they are not exactly lined up, are they? if you open the year ago next day, and then a really bad day.‘ year ago next month, day, and then a really bad day. year ago next month, i was in a shocking state. so door i will have the whole cupboard fallout. i was i was more like that. they have two quick ones. the year ago next month, i was in a shocking state. 50 hard year ago next month, i was in a shocking state. so hard to watch and people with parkinson's will have strictly tal law ballroom, it has been watching that. we're joined now been done —— tower. it has been by carole buckingham, who was diagnosed with parkinson's 20 years ago, and her husband peter. steve ford, who's the chief
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executive of parkinson's uk, alsojoins us. covered in 100 litres of barnidge carol, from your point of view, to after being stripped back. have a hear ozzy osbourne he has a type of look at the picture —— varnish. did parkinson's, how does that impact on mike make it? no. he is enjoying the you? well, he kept it secret, there tour though. i can also confirm we is no reason to. if you like you have to do. if you like at the time did not go to blackpool. we did not. the other thing is, mary berry says, its a death sentence but it is not. it is something that affects quite a i can't believe a... you are not lot of people now, people don't realise. how did you first tell your la ke sta cey i can't believe a... you are not lake stacey sullivan, are you? after family? i think they realised when i you put this in the newspaper area, wouldn't stop shaking when i was she has never had a takeaway in hollow. she is doing a programme reading the paper because it came with best home—cooked, and she says, out at the same time as michael] fox. then everybody noticed it. i with best home—cooked, and she says, with gloria winkelmann, she has never had a takeaway. not even fish and chips?! does that count? i didn't really want to hide it. it is difficult but you just get on with suppose so. what is your top it. peter, does it help that ozzy takeaway? i would take her for a osbourne talks about it for example, do you think? ozzy osbourne was one check—in. of my rock odds. i remember doing
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takeaway? i would take her for a check-in. normally on a skewer, the school disco to black sabbath. isn't it? mine has a source. that is yeah, of course it does, someone what i would do. you are quite the like that, certainly of my culinary expert. a really dirty polo generation. one of the things you notice with parkinson's, especially men, they are in denial about pesto, like a pasta pesto which notice with parkinson's, especially men, they are in denialabout it, they don't want to come forward because there is a lot of issues chicken and cheese. it is tasty.” about, men being vulnerable. carol's would take for chinese, am bringing approach and our approach has always this idea. yeah, absolutely. i would been, we have got this thing, let's go fish and chips. i don't tell as many people as we can. there catfishing chips as a takeaway. i is no point in hiding it. we have to deal with it. you can pretend as don't county does not ian back. —— i much as you want reality is, this is don't county does not ian back. —— i what we are stuck with so it is don't county does not ian back. —— i don't count fish and chips. with making the best out of it. you are curry sauce? no, never. we will tell obviously open and honest about it mary she has a date. who will she go but it must have a big impact on what you do, where you go and with? i think you have won her over everyday life? yes, it does. you with? i think you have won her over with the chicken. your posh chicken, you are in. thanks, al. see you have to have your medication every time on time. it is the fact of it. later. if you're a regular train user, you've probably heard fellow
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passengers criticising private rail operators for yet another late or over—crowded service. but a report published yesterday it is very tight. in hospital, it is said the state—owned network rail, which provides the tracks and stations, is also to blame for delays. important. the kids now, when my breakfast‘s tim muffett squeezed onto a rush—hour train to meet long—suffering commuters in one phone goes off, "grandma, grandma, you've got to take your tablets. of the worst affected areas. they are getting used to it, you know? 5 it is not something to be absolute nightmare. it is ajoke. i ashamed of. through the parkinson's society, we have little books. i actually pay about £30 a day for my grandma has parkinson's, my travel. and, as you can see, this isn't worth £30 today. it isn't grandmother has parkinson's, my grandfather has parkinson's. we sat worth 30p a day. delays, and cancellations. commonplace for many down and explained it with her. it of these commuters. can you please is age—appropriate and she got it and it is just is age—appropriate and she got it and it isjust what grandma is. allow passengers to a like service is age—appropriate and she got it and it isjust what grandma ism is not just old and it isjust what grandma ism is notjust old age group people who before boarding. we are only 7:45 can get parkinson's either, is it? tell us about ozzy osbourne and the particular type he says he has. ozzy trans ben knight express service from leeds to manchester. this is
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like the only train you can get to osbourne i think is 71. i think that manchester to get to work in time for nine o'clock and it's outrageous, really. we are not isa osbourne i think is 71. i think that is a typical age to be diagnosed. seeing the longer trains and the people are diagnosed in his 30s and more frequent service we were promised. i started a newjob in manchester just before christmas promised. i started a newjob in manchesterjust before christmas and i was late every day to work for 40s. about 8% of parkinson's cases like the first month. the season tickets are increasing by the are genetic and ozzy osbourne and service is progressively getting sharon talked about parkins two. it worse. it's absolutely ridiculous. if you like cattle like moving about, in and out. and now they are asking people to move down. where are we supposed to move down to? asking people to move down. where are we supposed to move down mm is it still presents in the same way we just left huddersfield, the train, as you can see, is now in the same treatments, actually. incredibly crowded. i've actually the way they are dealing with it in got a reserved seat, down there, but theirfamily, is the way they are dealing with it in their family, is that the sort of there's actually no chance of ideal way to do it? everybody getting to it. and as that quite a common occurrence? yes. this train responds differently but i think is always a nightmare. it is not just have a'sjob is always a nightmare. it is not just have a's job that is affected thatis by his commute but his family life responds differently but i think that is something very powerful about that sense of we're going to and mental health. increased ta ke about that sense of we're going to take control of this, we are going to be well—informed and going to get involved and be part of a support capacity, regular delays, it isjust group and that is what parkinson's
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unusual —— unusable. i'm regularly uk is all about, really, bringing late for work and have to work on my people together so they can have lunch break to make up the time. that support and face a future sometimes they don't see the kids positively. they were talking about before they go to bed. it doesn't good days and bad days. help with your well—being because you know you will be phased with an absolute nightmare for the best part ofan hour positively. they were talking about good days and bad dayslj positively. they were talking about good days and bad days. i do a lock absolute nightmare for the best part of an hour before you start the working day and the stresses you and then the next day and then may have to deal with once you get to work stop too many it is a mystery. be for two days i am just useless. i can't get on. i'm just sat there in compared to other places, why are front of the telly. sometimes i some rail services here so bad?“ you go back even 15 years there were half the number of people using the can't get up in the morning. having ra i lwa ys half the number of people using the railways in west yorkshire. so what you've got is you're basically got a to try to get myself out of bed because i'm so stiff. the joints get victorian infrastructure that has had a certain amount of updating, and you are trying to cater for stiff, the muscles don't work and twice the number of people you work the nerves. the nurse just say no, 15 years ago so by both transpennine you are not doing it. you've done express and northern say they have too much and i don't like that, it invested in new rolling stock and is really frustrating to me. i've that new timetables brought in last month will eventually improve the always been doing things, i've always been doing things, i've always done things so do not do what situation. but they say many issues like a rise in passenger numbers and i used to do is really hard. delays to rail upgrades are beyond their control. became totally unreliable. nick mitchell has given today could be a classic example.
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up unreliable. nick mitchell has given up on trains. in now drives into manchester each day. it's cheaper and more reliable. go to a station and more reliable. go to a station and expect the train to be on she was about four, i'm about three. schedule, and you just can't make this is very different to our routine. 20 years ago it would not plans are only train service. the have been an issue. so i expect... five, 19 northern service from manchester big e bilic —— manchester i'm really... ifeel bad! i'mjust piccadilly to bolton. it is gilding you! this afternoon she will unreliable. the strain i get every day. you know it won't be on time. probably be sat in the chair asleep for a couple of hours —— gilding. delays, no announcement. the journey and you know that will happen to and from work is monstrous —— because it is a change from routine. stressful than the day work. they our life is a routine by the medication, nine, 12, three, six, have been commuting for 22 years and we haven't seen improvement in that nine. that is our life at the time at all. add bolton from a different service, run by northern, is delayed by half—an—hour. moment. various times she has to different service, run by northern, is delayed by half-an-hour. i'm stop and take medication. she trying to get home after work. it is doesn't stop and take the medication just a heavy night. i am paying £90 there are consequences. we went to there are consequences. we went to the pictures once, she should have a month for the service. and what taken them a nine o'clock, she are mike gatting? a victorian rail didn't, we were driving home, you haven't taken your meds, but it was a good, she was fast asleep in the network grappling with 21st—century
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challenges, but whoever runs it there are no quick fixes insight. car, we got a home and she was fast tim muffett, bbc news. asleep. it has consequences for the day after. listen, we really appreciate that. sorry! thank you so what do you think of that this morning? and at 8:10 this morning we'll be talking to the transport secretary, much and thank you very much indeed. we will speak to carol in a second. grant shapps. about that, about what he thinks we will speak to carol in a second. we know the last few minutes or so should happen to the rail networks and what is going on when you that mike, who was going to step compare with what is spent in the north compared to the south. coming down as ceo of sainsbury ‘s, six yea rs down as ceo of sainsbury ‘s, six years he has been at the helm, will up, we will speak to friend and presenter steph mcgovern, who has left the breakfast sofa. talk to victoria but that shortly as well. the fact that you have come on today, even if it might be but is back with us for one difficult, i'm sure you have helped more morning to tell a lot of people by coming on and us about her new tv shows doing that. join the group, join the and life as a new mum. local groups, find it on the steph brought so much to the programme during her eight website, there's loads of information out there. just find it. years with us, so let's remind i hope the day goes ok as well. ourselves of some of our favourite thank you. carol is here looking at steph moments. now, though, we are going to welcome steph mcgovern to the programme. our variable weather i think is the thing to say. good morning. business additive for the day, or presenter for the day... presenter good morning, everyone. fortoday, tonight, and tomorrow, we are looking at extensive low cloud. it already? i'm going to kick off my is enough to be producing drizzle
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shoes for this. here we go. almost anywhere. there will be fog around as we have this morning dense fog patches, particularly across music plays. england and wales and particularly across parts of lincolnshire. that in mind if you are travelling. one common denominator is it will be mild. the high pressure has been dominating our weather for the last good morning from warwick castle, few days is slipping in towards the where i am hanging out with a couple of nights and the breakfast van for west, so it has more of an atlantic influence. that means is dragging in the last day ahead of the election. more moist air but also more milder it has been so much fun learning how to do this. laughter. conditions than we have been used. first thing this morning we have the fog, some of it will lift into low cloud. if that happens where you are it will peg back the temperatures. we could see drizzle almost anywhere and quite breezy across the north of scotla nd and quite breezy across the north of scotland and the english channel. now the brightest guys today will be does it hurt when they nip you? in the channel islands, parts of north—east england, and also eastern scotland. here we should see a that yeah, it does. but if you keep of sunshine, temperatures up to 12 moving, i've found that if a dance with them kinda works all right. you in aberdeen, maybe 13 and parts of scotland. across the board, more or know what i am going to miss the most? less, we‘ re scotland. across the board, more or less, we're back to double figures. a laugh. she laughs at everything. as we had on through the evening and
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overnight we hang onto that she is great. steph will be here extensive low cloud, still dank, after eight. damp conditions, and we have still time now to get the news, travel, got that fog, particularly across parts of the midlands, east anglia, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. southern england, parts of northern england, and also southern scotland. if you are travelling, be aware of that. temperature wise, if we hang onto any clear skies, for example in aberdeen, the temperature will dip toa aberdeen, the temperature will dip to a chilly four degrees. generally most of us won't be that cold unless a man has been arrested in denmark. we are in the channel islands. for a man has been arrested in denmark. a swedish national was killed in the same friday, more of the same, front of his family. the 22—year—old we're looking at a lot of cloud. was arrested at copenhagen airport, there will be some brighter breaks around, but on friday we have a weather front coming across the he is awaiting extradition north of scotland as our high pressure squeezed away. that will bring in some windy conditions and proceedings. also some rain. for saturday, again, london has become the "epicentre of the elites," making it "off also some rain. for saturday, again, a lot of cloud around, but this time limits" for young people with a southerly breeze. some of from poorer backgrounds — that's according to the social that cloud will break up and it will mobility charity the sutton trust. it says chasing high—flying jobs be quite a busy day. some of us will in london is becoming increasingly for the privileged, with high living see some sunshine but there will costs and unpaid internships acting also be some showers and then we as barriers to young working class people.
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the number of people with dementia have a weather front coming in from and who end up in hospital has risen the west. we have not seen this for sharply across london. a while. we will also have heavy and there were more than 48,000 emergency admissions between 2017 persistent rain at times, with and 2018 — an increase ofjust temperatures backed down a touch, over 30% in five years. 8-11. that the alzheimer's society said it temperatures backed down a touch, shows the strain on the nhs 8—11. that weather front on saturday coming in from the north—west will and is calling for urgent action scooter south—east with those we go through the night and into sunday is a weakening feature. behind the to address the care system. floodgates open and we are looking at some colder conditions coming our as pa rt of way. here is the weak weather front as part of a special series we're looking at what we can do to climate pushing away from the south—east. behind it sunshine and showers. but a bit of sunshine, much drier. then change. we have these showers, some merging ander zabala claims across northern ireland and western to have cut his landfill waste to just one bin a year. scotland. some of those will be he tries not to buy any wintry on the hills. just before a products in a packet, but says it's worth it in the long run. 90, it will cost you, eventually, less, wintry on the hills. just before a go, done and louise, the beginning but it will take you some time to get used to it in the beginning. it of the weekend looks very much like can be beneficial for you get used to it in the beginning. it can be beneficialfor you and for we will see some stormy conditions. everyone. if everyone did a tiny bit i keep you posted. back again! early there would be an environmental warning. thank you very much, carol. impact, reges. let's take a look at as the number of people infected the travel situation now. with a new mystery virus increases, the world health organisation will today consider declaring
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good service on all tubes this a global health emergency — as it did with swine flu and ebola. morning. the coronavirus has killed nine people in china so far and the first on the roads — blackfriars road remains closed between case has been confirmed in america. st george's circus let's speak to our china and southwark street. correspondent stephen mcdonell, after a water main burst yesterday. who's in beijing. repairs are due to be ongoing until the end of next week. in tottenham: broadwater road is closed because of a collision. kingston: there's a lane closed thank you very much for coming on the programme. give us an idea of in the one way system on wheatfield way at fairfield north the programme. give us an idea of the concerns, how worried people — that's for emergency repairs about this virus? well, the mood has to a burst water main. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less cold com pletely about this virus? well, the mood has completely changed here in recent this morning compared to this time days. we went out on monday to the yesterday. temperature is largely above zero. we've had a bit more cloud overnight and some mist and old est days. we went out on monday to the oldest long—distance train station fog around this morning as well, here in the chinese capital. people particularly over higher ground out we re here in the chinese capital. people were pretty blase about it saying towards the chilterns, for example. but the cloud is going to stay with the authorities have got everything under control. we think there is us. but the cloud is going to stay with us. one or two glimpses of something a bit brighter, hence of a little nothing really to worry about as we travel to other parts of the country. today we have done it bit of sunshine, but like i say largely cloudy. temperatures again. and there is a lot more reaching 8— nine celsius. a gentle concern. people you speak to in the north north—easterly breeze. the streets have actually cancelled cloud is thick enough to produce the their lunar new year trips. and why odd spot of light rain and drizzle but it is going to be largely dry, and stays with us overnight as well wouldn't they be worried? a couple tonight, minimum temperature, again, of hours ago chinese officials held a press c0 nfe re nce
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of hours ago chinese officials held a press conference announcing that the number of deaths hasjumped largely above zero, around 5— six a press conference announcing that the number of deaths has jumped to nine. there are at least 440 people celsius. so relatively mild. more in infected, and when asked why it is the way of cloud as we had through friday, it will state the grey for that the infection rate isjumping the next few days. high pressure up that the infection rate isjumping up so much in recent days they are continues to dominate, it does, saying it is because they are however, started to slip away. as it getting better at identifying who does we pick up a south—westerly has the coronavirus, this flow and you will notice temperature potentially deadly virus which a little milder and turning more causes pneumonia. so concerned are u nsettled a little milder and turning more unsettled towards the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website some scientists that they have said at the usual address. now though it's back to louise and dan. people shouldn't even travel to the bye for now. city of wuhan. and nobody should leave that city. that is a city of 11 million people. this is at a time of the spring festival, the most important couple of weeks, really, hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. on the chinese calendar. and it has it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. as ozzy osbourne reveals he has been taken very seriously as well parkinson's disease, elsewhere, we are talking about the we're talking to a couple case in australia, one in america, about what life is really like living with the condition. the government is taking measures with flights arriving at heathrow. the world health organization we'll meet the man who's become meeting to decide whether this is a a ballet dancer at the age of 75 years old to help global health emergency. things cope with losing his wife. really stepping up in the next few and he's the film—maker from liverpool hours, potentially. yeah. just the
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who's already won a golden globe for his animated movie "missing link" — now chris butler is hoping to bag an oscar too — fa ct hours, potentially. yeah. just the he'll be here later. fact that that meeting is taking good morning, here's place at all shows how seriously the a summary of today's main world health organization is taking stories from bbc news: this problem. scientists in britain and hong kong have estimated that the real infection rate could already be in the thousands. and if they declare at this meeting, in the a mysterious virus that has already led to nine deaths is mutating and coming hours, that there is a world could spread further according to health emergency they wouldn't be chinese health officials. more than doing this lately. itjust shows that they want to control this 400 people in china have been virus, which could potentially mutate, making it more easily spread between humans. before that happens affected by the coronavirus. one they are trying to get the situation under control. stephen, thank you case has been confirmed now in the very much for that update. steven mcdonnell speaking to us from united states. health officials will beijing about the virus that has today consider a global health emergency. in the uk, heathrow killed nine people in china, one airport is expected to step up precautionary checks on passengers case in australia and one in the us arriving from the chinese city of wuhan. the us senate has clashed at as well. the start of president donald the boss of sainsbury‘s trump's impeachment trial. mr is standing down. trump's impeachment trial. mr trump's charged with abuse of power victoria's here with more on this. and obstructing the congressional authority. he denies wrongdoing. is it isita is it a surprise and why? good there is a view that a guilty view questions. i mean, a guest time was
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is highly unlikely as republicans a lwa ys questions. i mean, a guest time was always ticking for effectively the control the senate. the duchess of very public face of that failed cambridge has launched a uk wide survey to help improve early merger bed, that attempted to take over asda. this is mike coupe. he childhood. the five at question online survey aims to spark a has been 15 years with the retailer and 35 years in terms of retail national conversation to help create overall. he is going, he is going in what is called a lasting change for generations to come. that is what kensington palace is saying about may. that is soon. you don't it. she is urging a number of normally hear they are going as soon organisations —— she is visiting a as that. he has presided over some number of organisations. the army has been brought in to help clear su ccesses , as that. he has presided over some successes, the sale of the record snowfall in canada. more than pharmaceutical business, for example, the purchase of next door, 28 inches, 70 centimetres, fell in and argos. that has generally done 24 hours in newfoundland. it buried quite well. however, when it comes to asda, he was so confident, he was ca rs. so sure that was going to go ahead 24 hours in newfoundland. it buried cars. canadian forecasters expect and there was always that clip. it six more inches to fall in the next few hours. not exactly driving your went viral. he was caught on camera when he was doing a round of car. are you? if you had that in the interviews, about two talk about the planned with asda doing this.
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uk... we wouldn't be able to cope. # wherein the money, this guy is is that a fair assessment? a 17—year—old girl in india has retained her crowd as the girl with sunny —— the world's longest hair. look at # wherein the money, this guy is sunny “ we are # wherein the money, this guy is sunny —— we are in the money, the sky is sunny... that! she remains a cut above the rest, i think it is fair to say, turns out he wasn't. quite far from it. the competition regulators had a according to the guinness world few things to say about, not the record ‘s. she bettered her own record of a centimetres, with a new particular clip, but about the logic length of 190 centimetres. wow. and and where it would leave the rest of the retail market if these two went ahead. that didn't happen. they had to scramble very much for a plan b. obviously it takes quite a bit of looking after. imagine how long it they have done that. they are looking to save about £500 million. ta kes to looking after. imagine how long it takes to wash that. a cut above the rest is probably not good because it they are cutting one in five senior has probably never been cut. sally. leadership roles in the company. a big insider, safe bed, retail is i want that hair, it is amazing! love it! tough. 875,000 as a base salary is a talking about the tennis this nice way to start. just the base. morning. heather watson has made it victoria, thank you. you are never
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to the next round. alone with a microphone, are you? let's get straight over to melbourne as we know. and talk tojohn watson. time now to get the news, travel, john, that was a real and weather where you are. gutsy performance from heather watson, wasn't it? good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. it was. when you consider she was a man's been arrested in denmark in connection with the death of a man who was shot dead outside his home in battersea on christmas eve. meant playing yesterday so there was flamur beqiri, a swedish national, was killed in front of his family. a 22—year—old arrested at copenhagen airport remains in custody in denmark pending loads of waiting around for heather watson. she was warming up in court yesterday only to be told that she won't be playing as you will be extradition proceedings. coming back today so she was one of the first out. an impressive performance from hers considering she had to come from asset down london has become the "epicentre against kristyna pliskova. as you of the elites," making it "off say, disappointment for dan evans. he was playing his second round limits" for young people match hoping to reach the next round from poorer backgrounds — where he would have faced novak that's according to the social mobility charity the sutton trust. djokovic. it wasn't to be. he came it says high living costs and unpaid back from two sets down in his opening match but he couldn't internships are barriers to young produce the goods unfortunately working class people — today as he lost to nishikora in and they greater success outside the capital. japan. a man ranked lower than him. the number of people with dementia let us hear from who end up in hospital has risen japan. a man ranked lower than him. let us hearfrom heather watson. two sharply across london. there were more than 118,000 emergency admissions between 2017 and 18. the alzheimer's society said it
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shows the strain on the nhs. ijust let us hearfrom heather watson. two i just feel very happy and confident ministers say they are "determined" in myself and injust i just feel very happy and confident in myself and in just really enjoying my tennis at the moment. —— to tackle the problems. especially in the tough moments, as part of a special bbc series, we're looking at what we can do even after the first set today when personally to help i have lost it in the past, i may tackle climate change. ander zabala claims to have have let that get to me or bring me cut his landfill waste to just one down confidence wise. but it is not bina year. he tries not to buy any products in packets and refills. affecting me now and that is what is making me so strong. it will cost you, eventually, less, what's but it will take you some time the news from the other big stars? to get used to it in the beginning. and that little effort can be it has been a day of defending beneficial for you and for everyone. champions. naomi is —— naomi osaka is through. novak djokovic is also if everyone did a tiny bit there would be an environmental through. five other grand slam impact reduced. champions today. caroline wozniacki, let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. petra kvitova, ash barty, so you can on the roads, blackfriars road remains closed between imagine what this place was like, st george's circus and southwark street after a water absolutely rocking when she went main burst yesterday. repairs are due to be ongoing through. of course, the world number one. we are still going loco for until the end of next week. coco, coco gauff is also through. in tottenham, broadwater road
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thank you john, lovely to talk to is closed because of a collision. kingston, there's a lane closed you. ten man arsenal snatched a late in the one way system equaliser to draw 2—2 on wheatfield way at fairfield north — that's for emergency repairs at chelsea in the premier league. to a burst water main. now the weather with kate kinsella. despite playing most of the match with ten men. the gunners lost david luiz early on to a red card and with the score one all chelsea good morning. it's feeling less cold this morning looked to won the game late compared to this time yesterday. on through cesar aspulicuetta. temperatures largely above zero. there was still time from it stunning goalfrom there was still time from it we've had a bit more cloud overnight and some mist and fog around this stunning goal from the morning as well, particularly over higher ground out towards the chilterns, for example. there was still time from it stunning goalfrom the captain hector bellerin to make it to happen but the cloud is going to stay with us. one or two glimpses of something to. —— hector bellerin to make it to happen to. -- 2-2. manchester city had to work for it a bit brighter, hints of a little but they came away with three points after beating sheffield united last night. it was a frustrating start bit of sunshine, but, after a first—half gabriel jesus like i say, largely cloudy. penalty was saved by dean henderson, and temperatures reaching 8—9 celsius. but it only took sergio aguero a gentle north—north—easterly breeze. now, the cloud is thick enough minutes coming off the bench to score the winner to produce the odd spot of light in the second half. city are now 13 points behind rain and drizzle but it's leaders liverpool but six ahead going to be largely dry, of leicester in third. newcastle staged a dramatic and stays with us overnight as well tonight. comeback to draw minimum temperature, with everton at goodison park. again, largely above zero, they were two nil down in injury around 5—6 celsius. so relatively mild. time but florian lejeune scored in the 95th and 96th minute now, more in the way of cloud as we head through friday,
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to seal a very late draw. elsewhere there were it will stay grey wins for southampton, aston villa and bournemouth. what a night of football. mo farah for the next few days. is happy for any of his previous samples to be tested. all athletes who trained with his former coach high pressure continues to dominate, it does, however, start to slip away. alberto salazar who was found will as it does we pick up a south—westerly flow give doping allegations in october and you'll notice temperature and band before years. that is a little milder and turning more unsettled towards the weekend. something mo farah has been very i'm back with the latest clear about. he said quite simply he from the bbc london in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website and on bbc radio london. is happy for all of the store now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. samples to be tested again, no problem with that. as we have been hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. hearing today, us senators have been a mysterious virus that has already debating the ground rules of donald led to nine deaths in china trump's impeachment trial late into could be declared a global health the night. emergency later by officials. the majority republican senate blocked an amendment from the president's opponents, more than 400 people who wanted to have new evidence in china have been affected by the coronavirus and one case has and witnesses included in the trial. been confirmed in the us. it's expected they will continue to back the president and clear him in the uk, heathrow airport will step up checks on passengers of any wrongdoing. arriving from the chinese city political analyst eric ham has been following the proceedings closely of wuhan with a team of medics and joins us from washington. meeting passengers off flights and an isolation area being set up in the terminal.
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thank you very much. i know you have enjoyed staying up late to speak to us on enjoyed staying up late to speak to us on back first. thus your view on day one, how did it go? —— brea kfast. the us senate has clashed day one, how did it go? —— breakfast. a bit of a surprise, the at the start of president donald trump's impeachment trial. all—powerful mitch mcconnell mr trump is charged with abuse capitulated to some demands of power and obstructing democrats and for many who thought the congressional inquiry. he denies wrongdoing. chiefjusticejohn there's an accepted view that a guilty verdict is highly unlikely democrats and for many who thought chiefjustice john roberts would as republicans control the senate. simply be someone as a figurehead, in the final wee hours of the deliberations between republicans and democrats, we saw him admonish both democrats and republican the duchess of cambridge has launched a uk—wide survey council. the trial is getting off to to help improve early childhood. the five—question online survey aims a bit ofa to "spark a national conversation" council. the trial is getting off to a bit of a bang right now. we are to help create "lasting change seeing a marathon session and of for generations to come", kensington palace said. she is visiting a number of organisations to hear how early course republicans are staying intervention can prevent unified, at least for now. but there the repeated problems affecting some families. is still so much more to be said and donein is still so much more to be said and done in this trial. do you think this is very much a washington bubble story? is it being talked about and discussed outside of the army's been brought in to clear record snowfall in canada. washington around the rest of the more than 28 inches, that's 70 centimetres,
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states ? fell in 2a hours on st john's in newfoundland. washington around the rest of the states? no, unfortunately! winds caused snow drifts washington around the rest of the states? no, unfortunately i think this is still very a washington which blocked roads and buried cars. story and the reason for that is canadian weather forecasters predict there are many who believe the four to six more inches to fall in the next few hours. outcome is already baked in. that republicans control the senate and of course they are standing very much behind president donald trump and many expect that the senate republicans will do whatever is necessary to acquit president donald trump even though today we have seen i think at that point you might phone work and say its a little bit an overwhelming amount of evidence that the impeachment manages at ha rd to phone work and say its a little bit hard to get in. it is not like that least presented today. at least they here, thankfully. sally is here this morning. we have steps coming in, carol is here. the gang is all back caught the trumpet legal team flat—footed today but still very together! we have a little bit of many people, or very few people, i good news this morning. should say, think there will be any heather watson has made surprises at all in this trial. do it through to the next round at the australian open but dan evans is out. watson came from a set down to beat kristyna pliskova — you think it might affect the watson said she'd been nervous at first but managed to loosen up — presidential race in any way? and she only dropped one game absolutely it will. we are hearing in the deciding set. it's given her a great lift. tonight that there is absolutely —— ijust i just feel very happy and confident actually some back and forth behind—the—scenes of a trade work ——
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in myself and i am just really where we could see one of the bidens to testify in exchange forjohn enjoying my tennis at the moment, bolton. many expect that bolton is enjoying my tennis at the moment, enjoying being out there competing, especially when it is the tough moments, and i, you know, even after expected to testify and that would be explosive. touch of this the first set today when i lost it, information will continue to i think in the past i may have let that get to me or, you know, bring me down dog president donald trump throughout the campaign and of course the question is now that you confidence wise but it is not affecting me at all now and i feel have four of these democratic like that is what is making me so presidential nominees who have come strong. meanwhile, off the campaign trail, what impact will they have on the race? member dan evans was expecting a tough match against yoshihito nishioka — we have the all—important iowa he doesn't like playing him — caucuses that are just weeks away and he lost in straight sets. the prize of a meeting with novak djokovic was waiting but evans couldn't right now so this is crucial campaign time they are not having so find a way through. this it is —— this trial is not only djokovic strolled through to the second round and coco gauff also affecting donald trump but also the progressed — she'll face the defending champion naomi osaka next. arsenal showed the kind of spirit new manager mikel arteta has been asking for, democrats. when we have heard snatching a late equaliser president donald trump talk about at chelsea, despite playing most this, he is quite dismissive and of the match with 10 men. david luiz was sent off mid—way appears to be at least unconcerned by what is happening. this is that a through the first half and chelsea front, do you think? is he worried? looked to have won the game when cesar aspulicuetta scored no, not at all. i think he believes in the 84th minute,
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mitch mcconnell will do whatever is but there was still time for a stunning goalfrom arsenal necessary to ensure that make captain hector bellerin, republicans stand with the president and mitch mcconnell on key votes. also we do know that president to make it 2—2. donald trump is raising an enormous amount of campaign cash behind this. sergio aguero came off the bench and scored manchester city's winner this is a president who has raised more money in history than any other as they ground out a 1—nil win at sheffield united. city are back to 13 points president including former president barack obama and that is pretty behind leaders liverpool. remarkable when you consider how unpopular this president is right and florian lejeune had a great now given all of the scandals that night for newcastle — have plagued his presidency. we are they were 2—0 down in injury time seeing some pictures at the world at home to everton — but he scored in the 95th and 96th economic forum in davos, playing with a football. he was also going minutes to give his side a draw. toe to toe with climate activist greta thunberg which has made loads of drama last night! headlines around the world. sure, and mo farah says he's happy for any this is a president who has pushed back against climate change and the fa ct back against climate change and the fact he has gone after the young of his previous samples activist and he is doing what president donald trump has done since he came down those fateful stairs announcing he would run for to be tested, after the world
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anti—doping agency said it president. attacking any and all who would investigate all athletes who trained with his former coach we re alberto salazar, who was banned president. attacking any and all who were getting his way and criticise for four years in october. his policies or his positions on farah has never failed a drugs test issues, even though the rest of the world is moving in a opposite and has always strongly denied breaking any rules. direction. i am sure we will be it isa talking to you again. eric ham it is a very clear statement for him to say, because of course, they keep speaking to us live from washington. those test for years, he is happy for any of those tests to be looked here's carol with a look at again and didn't want to release at this morning's weather. it through a journalist or a carol is in the studio with us today newspaper, he just released it through a journalist or a newspaper, hejust released it himself that he has been very clear which is really lovely for her to be here in person. lovely to be here and very, very, very direct. so much indeed. morning to you. the weather for the next few days is going to be going on here this morning. carol is here and that is because stefan will fairly cloudy, extensive low cloud, be back later, to say goodbye? —— ‘s misty, murky conditions and fog to boot as well. it is turning that bit milder so if you are just stepping out we have quite a bit of fog and low cloud across parts of england —— steph. and wales, southern scotland as be back later, to say goodbye? —— ‘s -- steph. she will be also talking about her new show. lim we will be well. some very poor visibility across parts of lincolnshire at the able to congratulate her on being a moment so do take extra care. as i new mother as well. she will be here mentioned, it is going to be cloudy after 830. victoria will be here in but it will also be mostly dry. some
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of the cloud is thick enough for after 830. victoria will be here in a moment. hello. sneaking in! some drizzle. the high pressure that has been dominating the weather is drifting out of the west so that is allowing milder weather to move out and it is pulling in a lot more however a 32 week pregnant person can sleep in. you were talking about how much people are spending on moisture, hence the amount of cloud their pet and it is notjust the essentials, is it? that we have. thick cloud, don't in fact forget the mist and fog, the parts infactfar in fact farfrom in fact far from it. everything that of corn oil, for example, you are out of that so you will see brighter is not food was a lead, collar, a skies with a cooler start but generally today, the brightest guys are going to be across eastern bed? well, is not food was a lead, collar, a bed ? well, all of is not food was a lead, collar, a bed? well, all of is going to cost scotland, north—east england and also the channel islands. especially over £2 billion a year by 2023, we in the afternoon. it will be breezy through the english channel and it think. it is staggering. we are spending about a a year on average will also be breezy across the north just for the food and then up to of scotla nd will also be breezy across the north of scotland but those are our temperatures. we are looking up to over a year per annum all that we 12, maybe 13 degrees across the north of scotland. ten in london and cardiff. as we go on through the evening and overnight we hang onto are spending on things like agility all of this extensive low cloud. mist, some fog around as well, and classes, surveillance, wearable also dank conditions. it won't be a particularly cold night in fact, no
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problems with frost. if you are in technology, fashion fate —— an area, say eastern scotland, whether cloud does break, it will be fragrance. people have been coming chillierfor you first whether cloud does break, it will be chillier for you first thing in the morning. as we had on through on this morning saying that they thursday and also into friday, we treat their pet like a member of the continue with this pattern of a lot family and they do not mind spending of low cloud, some drizzle coming money on their presence like you do out of that and still relatively for your kids for christmas and milder temperatures slipping just a birthdays. some research was showing little bit. we still have to see the arrival of a weather front coming one in three people will spend more one in three people will spend more across scotland and that will on their pets and they would and their friends on their pets and they would and theirfriends for things on their pets and they would and introduce, especially friday and their friends for things like the pet cosmic birthday. —— pet's into saturday, heavy rain and also some stronger winds. we take a look at what is happening through the birthday. people go really in for course of saturday, you can see a this. they are members of the lot of dry weather, still a fair bit of cloud around. some holes family. we are all dog owners on developing in that cloud so they this so far. i would say they are will be some sunshine around as well but it will be breezy and then as one of the most important members of our weather front approaches in from my family. so i am not the only one the west, it will introduce some who spoils my pets. i will ask what rain which could be heavy at times and persistent. ahead of it, we will you to get up to with yours later on sit —— still see some showers. what was up but i met some very generous is happening on sunday? well, that owners yesterday. have a look. same weather front coming in bridget and her brothers live the good life. saturday will push down towards the since a retired i've got three tibetans.
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south—east are taking its increasingly patchy rain and cloud with it as it does so. but that and we go away on holiday three orfour times a year opens the floodgates for some cold to cottages or hotels. aircoming ourway. so bridget's in here every three weeks opens the floodgates for some cold air coming our way. so there goes the rain, behind it sunshine and for a wash and blow dry, showers, but the showers across parts of northern ireland and scotland, well, some of them will be meanwhile, molly's diet is better heavy but some of them will also be wintry. temperatures in stornoway than mine. only four degrees. compare that to she loves beef, she loves chicken, turkey, the sort of meat 11 as we swooped down towards london. if you have plans for the we would eat ourselves, to be honest. early pa rt sometimes a casserole. 15 years into the business and dog london. if you have plans for the early part of next week, worth mentioning even at this stage, we groomer sarah has never been busier. you have never been busier today. could be in for some stormy i think he has been conditions. again, carol! yes, up to a grooming salon before. we have cellars in the salon and down, isn't it? mild, cold, that we are looking to convert at the moment and looking at getting mild, cold... mixed. victoria's here — and you're looking at how much we spend on our pets. a professional pet photographer. and it is a lot, isn't it? it's bonkers. it's completely crazy. there can be something else we can we're due to spend, on stuff that is offer our clients and also not food, this is over and above new customers can come in. food. so not a necessity. not a and it is kind of a whole package as well. what is the weirdest thing you have been asked to do? necessity for keeping them alive, we have done a couple the extra bits and pieces, more than of dogs for weddings. a dog for the wedding,
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£2 billion a year on our pets. to be groomed especially for a wedding that they are going to go to on the day honestly?! it is bonkers, completely and they are going to be ring bearers going down the aisle. nuts. this is made. at the moment it and, of course, every ring bearer is just below this figure. by 2023 has to smell their best for the big day. it will be over £2 billion. that is no, no short back and sides for this little lady, a huge rise. it is a rise of about it's the big bouncy blow dry. then, two hours later, 2596 in a huge rise. it is a rise of about 25% in about five years. so what on bridget's ready to meet her public. earth is going on? why on earth have we decided that this is what we want to do even though people are trying we have peter withe us on the sofa, to do even though people are trying to cut back, they are budgeting, the household shop are what they are the boss of the biggest pet shop. —— spending at the supermarket. we spending at the supermarket. we spend it here instead. it is not peter with us on the sofa. just toys and grooming which you peter, record—breaking might think is the obvious things, performance in retail, including our biggest ever online doesn't stop there. fashion. fashion and offline trading days. no of vips up 24% year on year. shoots. fashion shoes?! surveillance, wearable technology... we've always loved our animals — honestly. fragrance. pet perfume? but we're expecting phenomenal growth in the pets market in the next couple of years — what's driving this trend? pets are very much part of the family. we are worried about what we pet perfume. his and hers. i've eat, what we feed, healthcare,
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found it yesterday on a shelf in stockport. there is unbelievable enrichment, these are all the trends driving our market. when you look at what goes on. interactive games consoles you can have now. i have seen consoles you can have now. i have seen the video. someone is making a other countries like the us and japan, they go even further in terms lot of money. it is absolutely of humanising their animals but how amazing. someone sent me a video much further do you think it has to yesterday of their phone with their go? at the moment, some of this cat on top of the phone chasing a stuff on the market already seems bonkers. interact with games mouse that's on the screen. so it's consoles for pets. the vast majority all about cultural enrichment for of the british pets, i mean, we're your animals. i'm not joking. all about cultural enrichment for youranimals. i'm notjoking. this british. most of us are bothered is completely bonkers but people really go in for this stuff. this is what you spend on essentials, we about the essentials like diet, think, about £140, pretty much enrichment, toys, healthcare. it is minimum on food. that can vary easy to talk about the bonkers part depending on... the size of the of it and there are a lot of people really engaged with their pets but animal. the size of the beast. with the vast majority of pet owners are just that about doing the best they yougov premium, organic, et cetera. can for their pets. ok. when you yougov premium, organic, et cetera. you add the extras, dog agility look at some of these areas, the classes, swimming, the rest of it —— developing areas. things like whether you go. we're talking about on average, over £1000 a year a pet. it is completely mad. lots of
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retailers are cashing in on this. wea ra ble developing areas. things like wearable technology... they are not worth a lot. i want to know about the biggest pet store in the uk, we will be speaking to the boss after wearable technology. where is that seven o'clock this morning. he will be updating us. we will have him on at the moment with pets? still in the sofa. he told us the numbers are early days was up there are some things people are bothered about. the first thing is losing a pet, it amazing and they will be going up. is something we know customers will lots of extras there. they went out be very bothered about and the to meet some dog owners. i've found ability to track, that is one thing. the his and hers fragrance amongst other things. let us look at some but increasingly people are bothered dog owners and their pampered about whether their dogs are getting teachers. enough exercises. there is obesity bridget and her brothers live the in humans but also it is an issue in good life. since a retired i've got pets. how active pets are, three tibetans. and we go away on particular dogs. i see it as a helpful friend, seeing that pets are holiday three or four times a year to cottages or hotels. bridget's in the right weight for their age. we here every three weeks for a wash and blow dry, but it doesn't end were looking at the ongoing battle there. we've done agility, fly born, with amazon being the biggest seller of pet food. how have you taken on keeps me fit as well, and we do that date —— gigantic worldwide
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training with them. tell me, what's beast was to mark we do everything the most ridiculous amount of money you've spent? we did have a disabled amazon don't do. amazon is a really dog which we spent a —— bought a great simple shopping experience and buggy for, which was about £100, so thatis great simple shopping experience and that is why we focus on our shores we could take her out with all the —— stores where you can interact other dogs. meanwhile, molly's diet with experts and talk to real human is better than mine. she loves beef, beings. we are able to do everything she loves chicken, turkey, although amazon are able to do in terms of sort of meat we would eat ourselves, to be honest. sometimes a casserole speed and we are as competitive as amazon on price but the things that lead. itjust depends, really, what it actually is a. but young reggie amazon on price but the things that amazon are not comes down to people here is me to think for his supper. and experience. you are bucking the trend on the high street. we were he has to use his nose to find his talking about big shops, not being food, which is one of the natural able to hold their own. what can they learn from the pet experience? it comes down to what retail has a lwa ys it comes down to what retail has instincts. very good. 15 years into always been about, understanding your customer really well and serving them really well. that is why we put focus on people, expertise and having services in our stores so they are pet —— places the business and dog groomer sarah people have to come to. you can't has never been busier. you have never been busier today.” get your dog seen by a vet online, has never been busier. you have never been busier today. i think he has been to a grooming salon today —— before. has been to a grooming salon today -- before. we have sellers in the you can't groom your dog online. we
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salon that we are looking to convert at the moment and looking at getting have to make sure we can do at the moment and looking at getting a professional pet photographer. there can be something else we can everything a pet owner needs under offer our clients and also new one roof but also have the flexibility that if you want to shop customers can come in. and it is online, we can do that as well. we kind of a whole package as well. try and make it as easy as possible what is the weirdest thing you have for customers. in terms of your been asked to do? we have done a services, the number of people couple of dogs for weddings. a dog signing up to your vip service is up by 2a— for the wedding, to be groomed especially for a wedding that they signing up to your vip service is up by 24— 25% signing up to your vip service is up by 2a— 25% and your vet business seems to be doing really well as well because top do people really are going to go to on the day and they are going to be ring bearers realise how expensive owning a pet going down the aisle. so we have can be? that is one of the most groomed a couple of dogs that kind of the morning of the wedding they important things we try and educate get brought in, groomed nose, and people on because the unintended consequence is pets and up in they go off to their mum and dads adoption centres so one of the wedding. and, of course, every ring things we increasingly try and do is if you are going to sign up for a baronies to smell their best for the pet, we need to make sure you big day. no, is no shot back and understand your pet —— sides for this little lady, it is responsibility for top dog isn't for christmas, it is for life. understanding that responsibility is the big blow then two hours later, something that anybody who works for bridget's ready to meet her public. pet —— work is to make sure that pet is looked after. the owner is imean, she bridget's ready to meet her public. i mean, she looks lovely. tibetan responsible and understand their responsibility to that pet. do you
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terriers apparently need a lot of have a pet? i have two cats. i have grooming. my found are... the rabbit been a lifelong pet owner. i hole and went down yesterday, you currently have two cats and they are don't even want to know! but a handful. they keep you going. a p pa re ntly don't even want to know! but apparently tibetan terriers need quite a lot of maintenance. but they are quite a lot of maintenance. but they a re lovely quite a lot of maintenance. but they are lovely dogs. we've been asking for examples thanks very much and congratulations on those results. we are all pet of the sort of things you buy for your pets. this is nina, from glasgow, basking in her very own sun lounger. owners on this couch. and here's matthew — in his cat stroller he sits in it for trips to the vet. i would call that vip travel. molly needed her own doggy life jacket when she was a puppy so she could go sea—kayaking with her owners. carol's cat donald. that is donald and here's bella. she's a seven—stone deerhound, but you're never too big for a toy lamb. and finally, for now, here's norman — who is sadly no longer with us. on the front of the magazine. is he was a stray who was taken in and lived the life of riley, 00:51:46,449 --> 2147483052:02:37,939 with no fewer than six 2147483052:02:37,939 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 beds to choose from. that you, carol on the front of the magazine? that is the pet version and yes i am on that magazine. refusing to sleep in a basket bought for christmas... this is victoria's
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dog. this one is pink. she is four years old, very much top dog. —— tink. she is a gorgeous blonde. this isa tink. she is a gorgeous blonde. this is a whinny playing her violin and everything. look at her! —— winnie. finally, finally, look at these two beauties. on the left you have waffle a nd beauties. on the left you have waffle and ruby. that is how it goes on our house. ruby is always on the front. thank you for your messages and your lovely photos. good morning. you are right of donnal‘s christmas cloud list. here is perfect enable not hear a bad word said about my boy! morning,
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everybody. it is a foggy start across parts of staffordshire, but not just across staffordshire. today, tonight, and tomorrow we are looking at extensive low cloud. thick enough to producing some drizzle just about anywhere. and also fog. take it easy if you are travelling in the next 36—48 hours or so. travelling in the next 36—48 hours or so. we have high pressure still in charge. it has been pulled more in the direction of the atlantic and that doesn't mean we will pull in moist air, hence the cloud, and milder conditions. where it was cold yesterday it won't be as cold today. a lot of cloud around this morning, some fog across england and wales, especially across lincolnshire, where visibility is pretty poor at the moment. also some drizzle. breezy across the north of scotland and the english channel. my disguise today was sunshine are likely to be across the channel islands, north—east england, and eastern scotland. temperature is mild for the time of year. somewhere in the
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north could hit 13 degrees today. through the evening and overnight it is more of the same. extensive low cloud, some fog across england and wales, the midlands, east anglia, for example, northern england and into the southern upland. if you are travelling, poor visibility. the cloud thick enough for some drizzle. whether cloud broken, example in aberdeenshire. it will be a cold night. for the rest of us, not anticipating problems with frost. as we anticipating problems with frost. as we had from thursday into friday and saturday, we have the high pressure sinking south. that is allowing weather front to penetrate the north of scotland. that means here we will see some rain coming in and especially so on friday, the wind will pick up as well. quite the cloudy scenario with some brighter skies, was still some fog to watch out for first thing in the morning. beyond that, into saturday, a brighter day. again, a breezy day, the breeze coming up from the south, relatively mild. some holes developing in the cloud. you can see
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the arrival of a weather front introducing some rain, some of which will be heavy as it comes in across western scotland and northern ireland. joe was ahead of it across parts of england and also wales. temperature wise, 8— 11 degrees. as we temperature wise, 8— 11 degrees. as we head on into sunday, that weak weather front careers down towards the south—east bringing some cloud and patchy rain with it. behind the sun comes out and there will be quite a bit of dry weather around. having said that, there will be showers. the heavy showers will be across northern ireland and western scotland. as we are now in calder and what you will find some of those will be wintry on the hills. four in stornaway. 11 in london. before i 90, stornaway. 11 in london. before i go, iwant stornaway. 11 in london. before i go, i want to warn you that at the moment on current thinking the beginning of the week could be quite stormy with very strong winds and also some heavy rain. 0k, ok, carol, thank you. good for planning. the duchess of cambridge is hoping for as many people as possible
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to join a conversation about how we should be raising the next generation. she's launching a survey featuring five questions to find out what's important to help improve early childhood. joining us now is david holmes, from the charity family action, which has been working with the duchess on this project. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. what is the idea behind this survey? the idea is to spark a national conversation about how important those first five years of life are and the duchess, and we are hoping as many people as possible will get involved. what sort of interaction and input has she had with parents and carers? how much is she driving is a self? we know that the duchess is really passionate about the early years. she is a patron of family action, the charity i chief executive. i have seen first—hand how interested is on all issues to do with children and pa rents. issues to do with children and parents. but also it is what she has been taking forward herself and through a steering group i was part of. talk about the question is a
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little bit, they are multiple—choice questions, things like what you believe is most important for children growing up in the uk today to live a happy life? these are questions i suppose we think about, a lot of us, quite a lot of the time. absolutely. children are so pa rt time. absolutely. children are so part of our life. you know, so many of us are parents, it is so vital for us all to be having this conversation about children, children are ourfuture, conversation about children, children are our future, thinking about the things that make a difference to children, how we can promote good child development.” suppose it is one thing to go and a nswer suppose it is one thing to go and answer these questions and talk about how to make lives better for children, but another thing to try to implement the changes. so what happens after that?” to implement the changes. so what happens after that? i think the idea behind this survey is to spark a national conversation, to get people talking about the early years and that will inform what happens next. the key thing is to use, i think in this case, the duchess's amazing convening power, the ability to get people talking, ring people together around an issue, and make it
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something that people really want to know more about and focus harder on. you work for family action, what is the thing to me 21 thing, families are under pressure, what is giving them the most pressure? families are different, of course. but i was say every pa rent different, of course. but i was say every parent at some stage will need some help. it's just every parent at some stage will need some help. it'sjust part every parent at some stage will need some help. it's just part of the reality of being a parent. you don't get everything right all the time. some families have much more complex needs. they are dealing with poverty, complexities in the family, lots of difficult issues. and they will need much more intensive help stop there is also a general message that it stop there is also a general message thatitis stop there is also a general message that it is normal to need help from time to time and we should talk about that within families, within the community, and recognise that it's normal. that is a very interesting point. thank you much, david holmes. thank you. so will the duke and duchess of cambridge be in the spotlight more because of harry and meghan's decision?
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we have certainly seen them in the papers, all of them, in the last few days. royal commentator, dickie arbiter joins us now from buckingham palace. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. it is interesting looking at the interest in the royals. is that they are all doing more work or is there more interest at the moment? not harry and meghan but other members of the royal family in the papers. there's a lot more interest. there has always been aof more interest. there has always been a of interest. they are doing a lot more work. when you think of the prince of wales and the cambridges, they are doing a lot of work on behalf of the queen. we saw william the other night hosting a reception in behalf of the queen, the uk commonwealth, uk africa organisation. so they are doing a lot more work. the duchess today, the duchess of cambridge, that is, she will be in suffolk at a drop in nursery, then goes off to the other side of the country to do something similar in cardiff. so they are pretty busy and it is part of the ongoing programme. suppose the question is, who picks up the slack?
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we know those rotors and trips have been organised months in advance, presumably there were things organised for harry and meghan, for example, who will be doing them instead ? example, who will be doing them instead? were there things organised for harry and meghan? they might well have been on hold from the autumn last year. i'm in, for example, the duchess of cambridge's programme, that would have been discussed in the early autumn last year to look ahead to the first six months to this year. she did today and what she did yesterday would have been put in in the first half of last year. so anything that has been left in abeyance by the sussexes might well be picked up by the cambridges and other members of the cambridges and other members of the royal family or they mightjust fall by the wayside. let us also talk to you, if we can, we know the duke and duchess of sussex have issued a legal warning over these pictures of meghan walking the dogs with baby archie. they were hoping the decision might change that. what you think of what is happening?
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well, if they thought the decision to move to canada was going to change anything, they have been in cooker land, actually. it hasn't changed in canada and if they decide to go to the states it will be even worse. the united states, that is. it will be even worse. those pictures yesterday, nice pictures, not sure how far away they were taken. i saw video of the same sequence taken. i saw video of the same sequence last night. they doubt whether the photographers were hiding in the bushes. i think meghan was well aware of photographers. she was well aware of photographers. she was beaming, happy, smiling. ithink they are pushing the envelope a little bit too far if they are thinking they are going to be able to sue the paparazzi on this one. but on that one, we know there is legal action pending i think, in the uk as well. what you think of them making those decisions to go ahead with the legal actions? it is a bit ofa with the legal actions? it is a bit of a knee—jerk reaction. there has been a loss of kick back on that one. i think associated newspapers, the ones being sued, will want their
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day in court. will the sussexes want their day in court, because it seems that associated newspapers have thomas markle seen on board, who have the sussexes got? it is so messy —— senior. the best thing they could do, the sussexes, is to negotiate an out—of—court settlement rather than go through the whole business of through the courts because it will be very messy and it will create a bigger story that has already been created. dickie arbiter, thank you for your time. very, very busy programme for you this wednesday. coming up, steph mcgovern will be back on the sofa. she left, one, to go and be a new mum, and she has a new programme she will tell us all about, but she will be here later. she brought so much i°y be here later. she brought so much joy to the programme. it was 80 as she was here. so we will have a look back at some of our favourite moments. now, though, we are going to welcome
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steph mcgovern to the programme. thanks, very much. our business editor for the day, or presenter for the day... presenter already? i'm going to kick off my shoes for this. here we go. music plays. good morning from warwick castle, where i am hanging out with a couple of knights and the breakfast van for the last day ahead of the election. it has been so much fun learning how to do this. laughter. does it hurt when they nip you? yeah, it does. but if you keep moving — i've found that if i dance with them it kind
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of works all right. and off she danced, to get away. always great fun on the television. i love, particularly, always great fun on the television. ilove, particularly, her laugh. it was infectious. great company on and off. she will be arriving shortly and we will talk to her about her new programme, which is about how to live better, it. we have been talking transport as well. the transport secretary grant shapps will be here in about ten minutes. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. a man's been arrested in denmark in connection with the death of a man who was shot dead outside his home in battersea on christmas eve. flamur beqiri, a swedish national, was killed in front of his family. a 22—year—old arrested at copenhagen airport remains in custody in denmark pending extradition proceedings.
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london has become the "epicentre of the elites," making it "off limits" for young people from poorer backgrounds — that's according to the social mobility charity the sutton trust. it says high living costs and unpaid internships are barriers to young working class people — and they have greater success outside the capital. the number of people with dementia who end up in hospital has risen sharply across london. there were more than 118,000 emergency admissions between 2017 and 2018. the alzheimer's society said it shows the strain on the nhs. ministers say they are "determined" to tackle the problems. as part of a special bbc series, we're looking at what we can do personally to help tackle climate change. ander zabala claims to have cut his landfill waste to just one bina year. he tries not to buy any products in packets and refills. it will cost you, eventually, less, but it will take you some time
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to get used to it in the beginning. and that little effort can be beneficial for you and for everyone. if everyone did a tiny bit there would be an environmental impact reduced. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads, blackfriars road remains closed between st george's circus and southwark street after a water main burst yesterday. repairs are due to be ongoing until the end of next week. in tottenham, broadwater road is closed because of a collision. kingston, there's a lane closed in the one way system on wheatfield way at fairfield north — that's for emergency repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's feeling less cold this morning compared to this time yesterday. temperatures largely above zero. we've had a bit more cloud overnight and some mist and fog around this morning as well, particularly over higher ground out towards the chilterns, for example. but the cloud is going to stay with us. one or two glimpses of something a bit brighter, hints of a little
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bit of sunshine, but, like i say, largely cloudy. and temperatures reaching 8—9 celsius. a gentle north—north—easterly breeze. now, the cloud is thick enough to produce the odd spot of light rain and drizzle but it's going to be largely dry, and stays with us overnight as well tonight. minimum temperature, again, largely above zero, around 5—6 celsius. so relatively mild. now, more in the way of cloud as we head through friday. it will stay rather grey for the next few days. high pressure continues to dominate, it does, however, start to slip away. as it does we pick up a south—westerly flow and you'll notice temperature a little milder and turning more unsettled towards the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website and on bbc radio london. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan and louise. our headlines today... nine dead and more than 400 infected with eight mystery new virus in china. the world water organisation will meet later to decide if the outbreak isn't international public health emergency. of the duchess of cambridge starts at 2a hour tour of the uk to launch a new survey looking at problems faced by children underfive looking at problems faced by children under five predict misery on the railways in northern england. i pay on the railways in northern england. i pay about £30 a day for my travel and as you can see, this isn't worth that, it's not worth 30p a day. who is to blame and what is the solution? the transport secretary will bejoining us in the next few minutes point to the sainsbury‘s boss has stepped down. chief executive mike coupe will leave in may and i will find out why. saved by the bell and down to ten men,
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arsenal hit back twice at chelsea, hector bellerin with a sensational equaliser. we are looking at extensive low cloud and some fog and drizzle, the best of the brightness in parts of the north—east and the very far south but i will have more later on. good morning. it's wednesday the 22nd of january. our top story. a mysterious virus that has already led to nine deaths in china could be declared a global health emergency later by officials. more than 400 people in china have been affected by the coronavirus and one case has been confirmed in the us. here in the uk, passengers arriving into heathrow from the chinese city of wuhan will be met by a team of medics to carry out checks. tulip mazumdar has this report. a city on high alert. wuhan, where this mysterious virus first emerged, is bracing itself. several hospitals in the city are already dealing with hundreds of cases.
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this virus, which can cause severe lung problems, appears to be spread through close contact with infected people. there are particular concerns ahead of the lunar new year as millions get ready to travel for the holidays. china says the situation is under control but many more cases are expected. the outbreak has already hit several areas of china, including the capital, beijing, and shanghai. a handful of cases have also been identified in other countries in the region. two in thailand, one injapan and one in south korea. now the us has also confirmed a case, a travellerfrom china who became sick in seattle. the world health organization has only declared a global health emergency five times before, including for ebola and swine flu. today health experts will meet to decide whether this outbreak poses a serious enough international threat to call one again.
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screening is already under way at airports around the world. it's unclear how this outbreak is going to unfold, but health authorities are trying to be as prepared as possible. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. and we've heard more in the last hour on the measures being introduced to monitor flights from wuhan. there are currently three flights a week from there to heathrow. augmented port health team will meet each direct flight, broadcasting a message to passengers whilst on the aircraft to encourage reporting of illness and they will have the use ofan illness and they will have the use of an isolated area of heathrow terminal four for the reception of the aircraft and this is direct flights from wuhan. public health england and the chief medical officer have revised the coronavirus risk from very low to low, which is why the measures have been introduced. quite a few developments on that story this morning. we can talk now to our china correspondent stephen mcdonell who's in beijing.
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how worried are people about the virus? the mood has changed completely in the last couple of days. on monday we the last couple of days. on monday we went to beijing station and asked passengers what they thought they we re passengers what they thought they were pretty blase about it and thought the authorities had everything under control, going about their normal business and heading off onjourneys. they about their normal business and heading off on journeys. they were not too worried to put it we spoke to people again today, just people on the streets and they have cancelled their new year trips and are much more worried and why wouldn't they be? a couple of hours ago chinese officials at a press conference announcing that the death toll had risen to nine with at least 440 people infected and when asked why the numbers were jumping up, 440 people infected and when asked why the numbers werejumping up, the officials said they were getting better at identifying people who had the potentially deadly coronavirus. concern has also been passed on by
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officials that the virus could actually mutate, making it more contagious. at a time when hundreds of millions of chinese people are moving across the continent and throughout the world, the potential for the pie was to be passed on is obviously much greater. —— the virus to be passed on. people are wearing masks and taking less chances and they are more worried now than a few days ago. thank you very much for bringing us up—to—date. the us senate has clashed at the start of president donald trump's impeachment trial. mrtrump is charged with abuse of power and obstructing the congressional inquiry. he denies wrongdoing. there's an accepted view that a guilty verdict is highly unlikely as republicans control the senate. the boss of sainsbury‘s mike coupe,
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is stepping down. he will step down in may. sales were down slightly over christmas. the duchess of cambridge has launched a uk—wide survey to help improve early childhood. the five—question online survey aims to "spark a national conversation" to help create "lasting change for generations to come", kensington palace said. she is visiting a number of organisations to hear how early intervention can prevent the repeated problems affecting some families. you are up—to—date with the latest news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we are very early here! it will throw a lot of people! but if you're making your cup of tea and want the weather, you need to listen right now! what a build—up! lovely to be hit with everyone this morning. if you are stepping out, there is a lot of low cloud, mist and fog, and tank
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conditions outside. you can see this picture from hampshire, that sums up a lot of what is happening, especially in england and wales. for many it will be dry, some will see some sunshine it will be milder foremost than it was yesterday. the high pressure that has been dominating the last few days has been squeezed towards the atlantic and it will move south and today it is dragging in milder air but also a lot of moisture hence the low cloud. will be quite grey today. brighter skies in some eastern parts of scotland, north—east england and the channel islands and in the english channel islands and in the english channel it will be breezy and also in the north—west of scotland but for the rest of us, light breezes. the temperatures, milder than yesterday, most in double figures across the board with a couple of exceptions and through the next few days you will find the temperature is not far away from where they should be at this time injanuary.
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this evening and overnight, we hang on to the low cloud and there will bea on to the low cloud and there will be a lot of fog around again, especially in england, wales and southern scotland to the midlands, east anglia and parts of north—east england especially so if you are travelling, bear that in mind. any clear skies left over from the daytime mean it will be told but most of us not having problems with frost. into friday, the high—pressure moves away allowing the penetration of some weather fronts to the north and that means we fronts to the north and that means we start to see some rain and it will turn a bit windier from the north on friday. still a lot of cloud around and some fog, some of us with brighter conditions. as for the weekend, on saturday still quite a bit of cloud around but we have a southerly breeze and it will be noticeably breezy on saturday which will help break up some cloud but ahead of the front bringing rain, some of which will be heavy, we will have a few showers predict
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temperatures of 9—11 in the west but only eight on the east coast. the weather front will move steadily southwards on sunday, a fairly weak affair, soa southwards on sunday, a fairly weak affair, so a band of cloud and some patchy rain and behind it and return to sunshine and showers. some of the showers, particularly in northern ireland and scotland, will merge, giving heavier downpours and it will turn colder so again we will have some snow on the tops of hills. and a heads up of what is happening at the beginning of the week, we could have some stormy conditions again, particularly on monday. notjust to strong winds but some heavy rain. and when do they decide if it is a named storm? it depends on impact and criteria at the moment the models are not converging so exactly where it will be will happen before it is named. thank you.
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a lot to be getting in contact with comments about travelling by rail. if you're a regular train user, you've probably heard fellow passengers criticising the private train operators for yet another late or over—crowded service. short platforms, cancellations and all that sort of stuff. thank you for sending in your messages. but a report published yesterday said the state—owned network rail, which provides the tracks and stations, is also to blame for delays. in a few minutes we'll speak to the transport secretary, grant shapps. but first, tim muffett went on to a rush—hour train to meet long—suffering commuters in one of the worst affected areas in the uk. absolute nightmare. it's a joke. i actually pay about £30 a day for my travel. and, as you can see, this isn't worth £30 today. it isn't worth 30p a day. delays, overcrowding, and cancellations — commonplace for many of these commuters. announcer: can you please allow passengers to alight the service before boarding.
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we are only 7:45 transpennine express service from leeds to manchester. this is, like, the only train you can get to manchester to get to work in time for nine o'clock and it's outrageous, really. we're not seeing the longer trains and the more frequent service that we were promised. i started a newjob in manchester just before christmas and i was late every day to work for, like, the first month. season tickets are increasing, but the service is progressively getting worse. it's absolutely ridiculous. you feel like cattle moving about, in and out. and than now they're asking people to move down. where are we supposed to move down to? so we've just left huddersfield. the train, as you can see, is now incredibly crowded. i've actually got a reserved seat, down there, but there's actually no chance of getting to it. and is that quite a common occurrence? yes. this train's always a nightmare. it is notjust trevor's
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job that is affected by his commute but his family life and mental health. they've not increased capacity, regular delays, it's just unusable. i'm regularly late for work, have to work through my lunch break to make up the time. sometimes i may not see the kids when i get home before they go to bed. it doesn't help your well—being because you know you're going to be faced with an absolute nightmare for the best part of an hour before you even start the working day with whatever stresses you have to deal with when you get to work. to many it's a mystery. compared to other places, why are some rail services here so bad? if you go back even 15 years, there were half the number of people using the railways in west yorkshire. so what you've got is you're basically got a victorian infrastructure which has had a certain amount of updating, and you're trying to cater for twice the number of people you were 15 years ago. both transpennine express and northern say they've invested in new rolling stock and that new timetables brought in last month will eventually improve the situation. but they say many issues like a rise
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in passenger numbers and delays to rail upgrades are beyond their control. they became totally unreliable. nick mitchell's given up on trains. he now drives into manchester each day. it's cheaper and more reliable. go to a station and expect the train to be on schedule — and it's not. you just can't make plans around the train service. the 5:19 northern service from manchester piccadilly to bolton. it's reliably unreliable, i think. this train i get every night. you know it's not going to be on time. regular delays, cancellations, no announcement. the journey to and from work is actually more stressful than the day at work. i've been commuting for 22 years and we haven't seen improvement in that time at all. at bolton, a different service run by northern is delayed by half—an—hour. i'm trying to get home after work. it's just a heavy night. i'm paying £100 a month for this service.
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and what am i getting? a victorian rail network grappling with 21st—century challenges, but whoever runs it, there are no quick fixes in sight. tim muffett, bbc news. let's speak now to the transport secretary, grant shapps, who joins us from westminster. mr shapps, you're announcing a new railcard for military veterans today. but hearing some of the concerns, and we have had thousands of m essa g es and we have had thousands of messages today talking about issues with travel and you have been quick to criticise train operators in the past for bad service but network rail is run by the state so how much response will it do you accept for the poor state of our rail network in the uk? the first thing i can say isi in the uk? the first thing i can say is i can add to the list of complaints with my own tales of transport woes as a frustrated
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commuter so i absolutely agree with the comments that have been made and some of those stories, particularly those tra ns—pennine routes, some of those stories, particularly those trans—pennine routes, they are nowhere near good enough and to a nswer nowhere near good enough and to answer your question directly, the whole system and set up and that includes network rail as well as the operation of some of the train companies are to blame. we have to com pletely companies are to blame. we have to completely change it and that change is coming in a very big way. in what way? we have talked about taking franchises away from rail operators but will that happen because it has been spoken about in the past? that is the starting point. northern are in default now and at the end of the month i will be making a further announcement about that so that is a starting point but does not solve the problem. specifically on the passengers who featured in your package that travelling from manchester to leeds and back, we are going to build an entirely new railway between those cities and we are going to consult on potential
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routes for that. that is a huge project. perhaps 12— £15 billion. what is the time frame on that project? you say you are a frustrated commuter but people have struggled to get to work this week and this year and last day, they will be wondering when you are going to see the changes. that sort of thing takes a long time but in the meantime we are carrying out a £2.9 billion upgrade of the trans pennine line, the line the people you interviewed are travelling on at the moment, to try to expand some of the capacity on it. we have a dual approach of doing things in the much more shorter term now and also building an entirely new line. but your correspondent identified exactly the issue, we are victims in a sense of the railway‘s own success with a number of people travelling on it doubling over the last 15 yea rs, on it doubling over the last 15 years, the number of miles travelled and journeys doubled and it is just eight victorian infrastructure creaking under that enormous
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pressure. and everyone who travels ona train pressure. and everyone who travels on a train would agree with that but you said a long time, what sort of timeframe are we looking at? a decade? 20 years? the consultation is about to be launched on the manchester to leeds, it was the first saturday after boris johnson became prime minister that he went to manchester and announced the building of that line before expanding it out across what is called the northern powerhouse rail. all across the north, joining up eight cities i think is the plan as it stands. but that is a multi—year project and will not happen overnight and there are a lot of things in the meantime we have to do with the smaller projects, still big, a2.9 with the smaller projects, still big, a 2.9 million upgrade of trans—pennine, and sorting out the network itself. to ask about network railand network itself. to ask about network rail and the interchange between network rail who run the track, and the train companies, and the government view is it is all too complicated. it served a purpose
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after privatisation as we have seen in some cases been successful but the system is fragmented and broken. we wa nt the system is fragmented and broken. we want to bring it back together in something called the williams review which will be a white paper on the future of our rail ways which will mean it is less fragmented and you don't get the situation with them blaming each other. you haven't given a timeframe. that will come out in the consultation because it depends on which route is chosen which is a matter not least what local people through their leaders and transport for the north so it depends on which route is chosen. clearly it is a multi—year project, you don't build new £15 million rail lines overnight which is why in the meantime we are taking the action and upgrading the trans—pennine route. a few other things to talk about before we get your announcement, if i could ask you to be as brief as possible but there
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was a report from the institute of public policy research last year in august that that less than half its spent per person in the north a being led compared to the south put up being led compared to the south put up with that in mind, you can understand, i could spend the best pa rt understand, i could spend the best part of half an hour reading complaints from people who travel across the country but particularly in the north and the issues they face on a daily basis when they are not getting the money to make the changes compared to those who live in the south. i think that is right. the problem is that even now the treasury had said something called the green book, which decides where public money is invested, always tends to bring the money back down to the region that has the highest productivity and inevitably that is london and the south—east and it sucks in money. the figures you have quoted are broadly speaking correct and we want to change that. we want to make sure that money is put into areas particularly in the midlands and north, to connect the country much better and make sure it is a more productive place to work whatever region you are in it so i agree with that. and can you tell us
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about the veterans rail card which you have unveiled? who will be able to get hold of it? anyone who has served this country and has been in the armed forces will be able to get hold of this railcard when it is launched on remembrance day. it is about 830,000 people so a lot of people who would benefit from it, as well as their spouses and children. the idea is to honour the service that people had given to this country. i don't think that should be left to just military organisations and the like, i think the whole of society and every government department needs to pitch in and that is why i have decided that transport will play our part by making that available project if you really wa nt making that available project if you really want to make a difference, it isa really want to make a difference, it is a third off travel, the card will cost £30, so why not give free travel? to put this into context, it will cost about £10 million a year to the wider taxpayer and the department for transport to have
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that income more in the first year. it will give a third off travel. as with all those things, it is about balancing how taxpayers' money is spent but it is a significant contribution, £10 million per year. i think it will be extremely popular and it is the least we can do to honour people who put their lives on the line to defend our freedoms. grant shapps, we appreciate you spending time with us this morning. i think answering some of your questions this morning. thank you for all your comments come just a few, dean said he had to take a pay cut and look for a newjob because of the stress of his commute. john says he has travelled all this week, never caught a train on time so far but barry said he recently went on a train between wigan and manchester and there were 28 people standing between the carriages. thank you for getting in touch, a lot of you still having
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issues with that. it is 22 minutes past eight. a falklands veteran forced out of the royal navy because of his sexuality will have a military medal returned to him later today. joe ousalice served as a radio operatorfor 18 years, but was discharged in 1993 because of the ban on lgbt people serving in the armed forces — a ban which was lifted 20 years ago. joejoins us now from our southampton newsroom. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. i know you are going to get this medal back today but how important is it that that happens? it is brilliant, it has made me feel over the moon. it isjust such it is brilliant, it has made me feel over the moon. it is just such a shame it has taken 27 years to get it. and notjust 27 shame it has taken 27 years to get it. and not just 27 years but you had to take legal action as well? yes, i tried to take the case on myself originally but i was getting nowhere can i just myself originally but i was getting nowhere can ijust kept hitting a brick wall and eventually i got in touch with emma naughton at liberty
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who took the case over. she took it to the high court in london and at the last minute, somebody saw the light and decided to give me the medal back. what was it like? take us back to those years when you were forced to hide your sexuality in the navy. how difficult was that?” forced to hide your sexuality in the navy. how difficult was that? i was living a double life. it was not all that difficult but i had to be careful what i said and did, where i went. basically i wasn't living my own life. which is really hard. what about the day when you're medal was taken away from you? describe what happened. started about six months beforehand. every few years the sib would interview me and bring out some concoction, a new story to try to kick me out but they never managed it. on this particular occasion, they made two charges
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against me. i was found not guilty of the first and the second charge, which was conduct prejudicial to good order and naval discipline, they found me guilty. when i was in they found me guilty. when i was in the courtroom, they stopped the meeting and put me in a little side room and got somebody to walk by who i had never seen in my life, then they resumed the court case and they got this new incriminating evidence that this person had seen me in a 93v that this person had seen me in a gay bar somewhere in plymouth. that is one place i would never go to. you can imagine just is one place i would never go to. you can imaginejust how i is one place i would never go to. you can imagine just how i felt. and they took the medal off you? they cut it off my chest with a big pair of scissors. i can see now that is incredibly hurtful. it was, i told the captain of the base who wrote a damning letter about me and my sort
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and what he would do with us, i told him that he had not heard the last from me and until my dying breath i would fight the case. and here i am i have success. but i would like to mention, i am i have success. but i would like to mention, iam not i have success. but i would like to mention, i am not fighting thisjust for myself. i am fighting it for hundreds of others who have been treated not too dissimilar to myself. and today is obviously going to be an emotional day for you i imagine so how are you feeling this morning going ahead? it is no different to any other day. i have been fighting them for 27 years. this is going to be fantastic in as much that i have got my medal back but we also have to bear in mind that when they diss rated me, i had to wait a further 17 years after they kicked me out of the armed forces before i could get my pension and that was at a much lower rate. i
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would like my rank to be reinstated andi would like my rank to be reinstated and i would like my pension to be paid back to what it should have been where i would have got paid from the day i left the armed forces. i can see this is a fight you will continue? indeed, they have not seen the back of me yet. i am sure i must be a thorn in their side. thank you very much for talking to us this morning and good luck today. thank you very much. still to come, we will be speaking to the director of the film missing link which has already won a golden globe and is up for an oscar. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. good morning. if you're travelling in the next few hours, do bear in mind across england and wales the fog is a good deal more extensive than it has been of late. on a day which is essentially another dry day for the most part, and there will be a good deal more
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cloud than was the case yesterday because of the centre of the highly has drifted away and the most flow, the relatively mild flow from the atlantic coming around the northern and eastern flanks of that high—pressure to deliver those cloudy conditions to many more spots across the british isles. it would have been quite a chilly start across the far south, where the cloud didn't fill in overnight. a touch of frost there, but elsewhere not very many people scraping the cars. on into the afternoon, the best of the sunshine eastern and southern parts of scotland. not too much on the way of breeze. it's going to take a long time for some of that fog to lift up into low clouds, so quite a grey day in many spots. temperatures in a range of nine to 12 degrees or so. not a deal changes overnight. if you keep any gaps in the cloud, well, temperatures may well drop well down into single figures. 2—3d perhaps for the eastern side of scotland, but many more of us keeping a lot more cloud, so i think the chances of frost are pretty remote for many areas. temperatures, 5—9 or so, but it could well be a murky start to thursday. this is thursday. this front eventually
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dribbles its way into the north of scotland before rather dying a death as high—pressure begins to build back in through that frontal system. again watch out for the fog on friday morning. this is another quiet day. not too much in the way of breeze, save for the northern parts of scotland. eventually, frontal systems just thickening that cloud into the far north—west and it's that front which will eventually produce some wet and windy weather. overnight for the most part, saturday into sunday, that introduces a completely different week next week, which has got a lot more wind about it and some rain, as well.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with ben bland and samantha simmonds. counting the rising cost of not taking care of employees' mental health, we have exclusive research on the issue. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 22nd january.
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a study for the bbc has found employees' mental health issues cost businesses tens of billions of dollars a year. we're going to look at what's being done to tackle the issue. also in the programme, we're assessing the growing impact on travellers of the lethal corona virus outbreak in china.
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