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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 28, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. this morning's top stories: no comment from buckingham palace after prince andrew was accused of zero cooperation about an enquiry into sex offender geoffrey epstein. and whether huawei can help build the uk's ig network. an ice glazier is melting weaker than previously feared. the scientists behind the biggest project in antarctic history willjoin us on the sofa.
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supermarkets are responding to the climate crisis. sainsbury is is pledging $1 billion to make the company carbon neutral. roger federer is facing a real test at the australian open right now. he's starting to his cool against tennys sandgren, they will pay for a place in the semifinals. the northwest are waking up to snow in the morning, but it won't last, it will be a hill future throughout the day and the hmmfi future throughout the day and the forecast is one of sunshine and showers, some heavy and thundery and feeling cold in the wind. i'll have more later in the programme. good morning. it's tuesday, january 12. our main story for you. an american lawyer who represents women say they were assaulted byjeffrey epstein says that prince andrew has failed to co—operate with the investigation into the convicted sex
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offender. a prosecutor in new york says the prince has received no response from lawyers despite repeated approaches. he is andy with more on the story. speaking at a jeffrey epstein‘s mansion, the american prosecutor said he didn't normally comment on whether a witness was cooperating or not stop but he would make an exception in this case because prince andrew had publicly offered to help. the district of new york and the fbi have contacted prince andrew's attorneys and requested to interview prince andrew. and to date, prince andrew has provided zero cooperation. prince andrew says he did not see or suspect any specific behaviour when visiting the homes of his then friend. now that prince andrew has stepped down from it as duties, buckingham palace is not commenting. and there has been a responsive upfront prince andrew's lawyers, but there has been from some of the women who say they were
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epstein‘s victims. some of the women who say they were epstein's victims. i'm glad geoffrey berman has gone public to try to embarrass prince andrew, he made one statement and then behind closed doors is doing something very different, the five epstein victims who i represent are outraged and disappointed at prince andrew's behaviour. virginia roberts giuffre says she was forced to have sex with prince andrew by epstein and his associates was up and you completely denies any sexual encounter with her. he knows what happened. i know what happened. and there's only one of us telling the truth. in that now infamous newsnight interview last november, prince andrew said he was willing to talk to american investigators with some conditions. if push came to shove... and the legal advice was to do so, then i would be duty— bound legal advice was to do so, then i would be duty—bound to legal advice was to do so, then i would be duty— bound to do so. legal advice was to do so, then i would be duty-bound to do so. in a statement a few days later when he stepped down from royal duties, his commitment was even clearer. he said "of course i am willing to help any
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appropriate law enforcement agency with their investigations, if required." american prosecutors have many questions to ask about prince andrew's relationship withjeffrey epstein. so far at least, andrew's relationship withjeffrey epstein. so farat least, prince andrew seems unwilling to answer them. andy moore, bbc news was up and we speak to andy now who is outside buckingham palace. has there been any response from buckingham palace on this story? well, nothing from buckingham palace, they are referring us to prince andrew's lawyers are nothing from them either. even 12 hours after that statement was made in new york so we don't know if there has been some sort of misunderstanding, if prince andrew will make a statement at a later date, or whether, as the american seem to suggest, is a flat no, we can't help. at the moment there has been zero cooperation from andrew's lawyers with the british media. now, it's interesting. that
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statement was made outside epstein's mansion, that big distinctive wooden door behind him. and you saw in my report, prince andrew at that same door in 2010, waving goodbye to an identified woman. that's when he went to new york to tell epstein as a matter of honour, andrew said, that their friends it was over. at that their friends it was over. at that stage epstein was a convicted sex offender. some interesting comments also from the american lawyer, lisa bloom in that interview with newsnight last night. she said it would be very difficult at this stage to get prince andrew to make a statement if he didn't want to. that's because this criminal investigation is still at an early stage and nobody has been charged. but the american prosecutor, geoffrey berman, said the investigation was moving at base, he said, and it also involved co—conspirators, although he didn't name who they were. 0k, andy, good to talk you this morning was a thank you very much. we will be speaking to lisa bloom
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later in the programme. boris johnson will cherry meeting of intelligence chiefs and ministers on whether or not to allow huawei in building britain's 5g network —— chaira building britain's 5g network —— chair a meeting. there are concerns it could jeopardise the security relationship between the us and the uk. this morning ministers and intelligence chiefs will gather for one of the most contentious and significant decisions good as the national security council has had to take. whether to let the chinese company huawei they are role in building the uk's new 5g telecoms network was that the us has argued it's a security risk to let it in because it could be used by china for espionage or it could be used by china for espionage 01’ even it could be used by china for espionage or even sabotaged. something the company denies. there are two options for government, the first is to exclude the company and thoroughly, that is what the uk's closest ally, the united states wa nts. closest ally, the united states wants. but it would come at a significant economic cost since it
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would require removing existing huawei equipment from the infrastructure and slowing down the adoption of improved connectivity, a priority for government. the second option is to allow huawei in, but with restrictions on where and how it operates in order to try and manage the risk. something intelligence and officials believe is possible. that is thought to be the more likely outcome, with the restrictions painted is particularly tough on the company's robbers that are mostly divisions are deep, the decision is expected today, it's one with important consequences for security, prosperity and the uk's relations with its closest ally. gordon carreiro, bbc news. there has been another rise in the deaths from the corona virus in china with the figure now standing at over 100. severe travel restrictions are in place across much of the country in an attempt to stop the infection from spreading. chinese authorities confirmed
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overnight on hundred and six people have died so far in the outbreak. air accident investigators in the united states have described the site of the helicopter crash which killed the basketball the kobe brya nt killed the basketball the kobe bryant and eight others as devastating. the investigation is expected to focus on the foggy weather conditions at the time. let's talk to our correspondence, david willis in los angeles. still so many tributes are being paid to kobe. very much so, louise. throughout the day here in los angeles accident investigators have been combing through the wreckage of that trust, a crust which of course killed kobe bryant and his 13 old daughter, gianna. they've deployed drones over the crash site and they say the wreckage is spread over a very large area. the nose of the aircraft, for example, some way away from the rest of the fuselage and the engine. they are also bringing in whether experts, a sign that they
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believe that the foggy conditions may well have been to blame for this crash —— weather experts, so foggy indeed were the weather conditions when this helicopter took off that the helicopters belonging to the police and local emergency services we re police and local emergency services were grounded at the time and indeed, the pilot of this helicopter had to ask for special clearance in order to fly. now, the coroner says they've recovered three bodies as well as kobe bryant and his daughter. the victims are thought to include one of her team—mates on a local basketball league and her parents stopped louise. such a sad story. thank you david willis for bringing us up—to—date. the only widower who spoke up after her husband took his own life after suffering for years are —— of post—traumatic stress disorder has said since her interview on this
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programme, 100 x service personnel have come forward looking to help stop every time he fell asleep it was held. he couldn't escape it. they are screaming stuff. and shaking and thrashing about in bed. it just shaking and thrashing about in bed. itjust — it breaks you because you just want to help them. and we will hear from just want to help them. and we will hearfrom her just want to help them. and we will hear from her later as well. are you going to start with the sport this morning? there are we're going to start with the tennis. that is happening right now in melbourne. roger federer, who we have had on this programme quite recently, the coolest dude in town, is in a spot of bother. he is using swears, as we say in our house. yes, he is losing his cool little bit. he is getting a top match from tennys sandgren after the first set. federer has really lost momentum. then a level at 1—1,
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better is 5—2 down mark in the third. -- better is 5—2 down mark in the third. —— federer is down 5—2 in the third. —— federer is down 5—2 in the third set. the skies the limit for england after they completed a test series over africa. the code says they are building a side that can win back the ashes. the la lakers say they are heartbroken over the death over kobe bryant. they have cancelled the game against the clip is denied. james says it is his responsibility to keep going —— james lebron. you notice 2a hours ago none of the games were cancelled. but this game, you know, between the two la sides has been cancelled, they simply couldn't put it on. and there has been talk of his number being permanently taken
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out of the league. statues, all sorts of things. and particularly in the outback staples centre, we saw a nizic is saying this is the house that kobe bryant built, i'm sure they will mark his legacy in some way there. thank you very much. we will have a look at the papers soon. i think it's time for the weather. can we give you an update, carol? i think it's time for the weather. can we give you an update, caronm was a bit grim coming in this morning. there are good morning, everybody! that is a good meteorological term as well. some of us are waking up to some snow at lower levels. this weather watchers pictures at the tomato from the isle of skye, and i bring you some more because we do have snow in parts of scotland and northern ireland. a lower levels it is going to bea ireland. a lower levels it is going to be a transient feature but it's worth pointing out that if you are travelling this morning in northern and western areas, watch out for ice in particular was up and for some of us, snow, particularly on the higher roots, but as you'll see as we go through the morning, some of us have
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seen it at lower levels. the blue indicates where we have had rain showers, the light indicates where we have had snow showers. some of this in northern ireland and scotla nd this in northern ireland and scotland has fall into lower levels, so there may be some slicing units or indeed, bill snow, where you are. south—west of england this morning some snow in the moors, some sleet and showers and for wales, a very similar story. northern england, watch out for ice, as you should do across northern ireland and scotland. and here to we are looking at some snow showers mainly in the hills. but for a little while yet we could see some at lower levels in northern ireland and scotland in particular. but the level of the snow will rise into the hills as we go through the course of the day. you can see here we have all of these showers, some of those will be heavy and thundery with some hail. a lot of them will be in the west but some of them will be blown over towards the east. it is going to be quite a blustery day wherever you are. the strongest winds will be
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around the south—west of england, the other silly, the english channel and around the channel islands, with and around the channel islands, with a bit of gust in excess of 50 miles an hour. temperature—wise, the thermometer will see four in murk, eight in london —— 15 miles an hour, but with you at the windshield it will feel even colder. it's aid, but it will feel like four if you are out and about. it's a day for wrapping up warmly. as we had on through the evening, still blustery, still a lot of showers and some of those will be wintry, but mostly on the hills. in sheltered areas out of the hills. in sheltered areas out of the wind you could find there is a touch of rust, but once again with all those showers and low temperatures there is going to be a risk of ice on untreated surfaces. as we had through the rest of wednesday we have this transient ridge of high pressure across the south of england and this weather front coming in across scotland and the uk the isobars tell you it is going to be another windy day. so a lot of dry weather to start with,
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the risk of ice, there will be some sunshine, sunshine hanging on across most of england and wales a few showers. for northern ireland we could see the rain clip you, but it may just be a could see the rain clip you, but it mayjust be a bit further north than most of the heavy and persistent rain will be across scotland proceeded by some hail and snow, it will move eastwards throughout the day. temperatures, 5—10, north— south. with the windshield it will feel more like four —— windchill. that tenant will feel like ten, but we will be in the colder air in the north. 0n we will be in the colder air in the north. on thursday, ourfirst we will be in the colder air in the north. on thursday, our first front has cleared off, we have a second cold front coming in from the north—west, slowly moving south—east with. behind it, brighterwith some showers, not as cold, and as we come further south a lot of cloud is going to be dank. murky conditions,
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some brighter breaks in the shelter of the hills. temperatures up to 12, louise and dan, as we head into friday it can be wet. some parts of the south have an unseasonably high 40 the south have an unseasonably high a0 degrees. —— 1a degrees. that is very confusing. we will have a look at the front pages. the telegraph shows a picture of auschwitz, a survivor during the wreathlaying service we saw on brea kfast yesterday wreathlaying service we saw on breakfast yesterday at the concentration camps, the death while, on the 75th anniversary of the cam's liberation. the sun have gone for a mocked up missing persons poster above a picture of prince andrew, it asks have you seen this prince and describes his appearance when he was last seen. the guardian understands there will be no attempt to force prince andrew to testify, according to us prosecutors investigating jeffrey epstein. while on the other side of the atlantic,
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the los angeles times says that prince andrew has provided zero cooperation to the american investigators who want to interview him. that is one of our lead story this morning as well. i know you are going to talk about sport in a different way this morning, shall we let sally go first? i want to show you this in the daily telegraph. we have talked in this programme about football and the link between heading and dementia in men. it is something we have talked about more and more, and they have worked out that football is a three times more likely to develop dementia later in life. a former striker 22 times is saying she feels very strongly that football has a link, certainly linked to the condition she has now. and one of the things we are hearing is that some of the american women players are now talking about donating their brains to science in order for this to be studied. i think it is a really important step forward, that
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we can look and research and find out exactly what it is. lots of unknowns, aren't there? lots of unknowns, aren't there? lots of unknowns, and sue lopez says she wholeheartedly agrees with the idea that younger children should not be heading the ball, certainly not heading the ball, certainly not heading the ball in training. this tickled me this morning, this is on the front page of the times. you wa nt the front page of the times. you want the top one. female staff alienate it by sports talk at work claims this top manager, what do you make of this? and frank is the chief executive of the chartered management institute. she was on the radio yesterday saying that a lot of women in particular don't follow sports, don't follow the likes of cricket, for example, and they don't like being forced to talk about their network, or not in the conversation. you don't have to be forced to talk about it. it is called the art of conversation. sometimes you have to talk about things you are not interested in. banging on conversations about
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holidays, or... you are not interested in my holiday?” holidays, or... you are not interested in my holiday? i fake my interested in my holiday? i fake my interest in your holiday! i am joking, but sometimes you all have to have conversations that sometimes you are not particularly invested m, you are not particularly invested in, don't you? ithink you are not particularly invested in, don't you? i think what she was trying to say here is a conversation can suddenly turn into what happened on the weekend, which can turn into some laddie conversation, and it goes too far down a direction that people at work are uncomfortable with. so just people at work are uncomfortable with. sojust ban people at work are uncomfortable with. so just ban any talk in the office, then, let's just with. so just ban any talk in the office, then, let'sjust walk with. so just ban any talk in the office, then, let's just walk around like robots. i love sport, i love listening about sport, but there are some that i am more interested in than others. would that be fair? what did jackie say? she said it is a terrible idea to try and stop speaking about sports. sport helps colleagues get to know one another better. you have to talk about something. i agree with jackie. do
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you think sometimes people use sport asa you think sometimes people use sport as a way to kind of keep other people out of the conversation? i have seen that happen before. yes, i think that's... i think that is probably the case, and obviously you get people who all they can talk about is sport. so maybe we need to bea about is sport. so maybe we need to be a bit more open—minded about how we talk about sport in the workplace. and other things as well, what else we talk about. anyone see the football last night? look, i love a good... there has been quite a few discussions over brexit over the last few years. i am banning all talk about brexit! i wish we could. this is the latest one about the commemorative 50p coin and the punctuation on it, people very exercised about whether or not there should be a,, they say there should be an oxford, after prosperity and
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before and. i think, and be an oxford, after prosperity and before and. ithink, and i be an oxford, after prosperity and before and. i think, and i could easily be wrong, i am sure i will know in about five seconds, it is a punctuation mark in a list, before and. people are very worried about it. susie dent, you are big fans of susie dent, she says, and it is very important, because i believe everything she says, i use it and always have done, it clarifies things ina always have done, it clarifies things in a list so it is simpler to use it all the time. and i watched her last night. i got an eight letter word this week. normally i get pig. letter word this week. normally i get pig, dog, and ifind an s and can make it dogs. i got an eight on my own. what word was it? do you know, i can't remember. i have gone
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very highbrow today, talking about commas. i have tom jones's face in a welsh valley. this is residence of mid wales, the green grass of home, and surprised to see the face of tom jones on the hills there, the brecon beacons. it took me a while to realise. andrew sheehy was out walking, put it on facebook and it has gone viral. there was mrjones, in case you are confused, and there is the shadow of the great man. we we re is the shadow of the great man. we were going to talk about antarctica ina minute, were going to talk about antarctica in a minute, but let's talk about this one, the first briton to scale the world's most remote peak, so isolated that only ten people have seen it, and there he is having a party on the top of the mountain. seen it, and there he is having a party on the top of the mountainlj will come out and talk to you about cricket in a minute. can you talk
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about speed climbing? he is going to be talking about speed climbing quite a lot. that is going to be the olympic sport, speed climbing. i have become obsessed with it. olympic sport, speed climbing. i have become obsessed with itm olympic sport, speed climbing. i have become obsessed with it. it is brilliant to watch. thank you both, we will see you a little bit later. none of you are interested. the thwaites glacier in the antarctic is the size of the united kingdom. and it is melting faster than first thought. as part of the bbc‘s our planet matters series, our chief environment corresponded justin roberts has travelled across the country and is the first to reach the glacier —— rowlatt. until this year, only four people had ever been here, the front of what they call the doomsday glacier. but understanding what is happening here is crucial for us all. this ice here is very accessible to change.
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if we are thinking about what is sea level going to be like in ten years, this glacier is the place to be and this is the location to ask these questions at. we are standing right on it. the chaos of broken ice at front is almost 100 miles wide, and is collapsing into the sea at two miles a year. it sits at the heart of the vast region of ice in west antarctica. the glacier is the size of britain, and contains more than half a metre of sea level rise. but if thwaites goes, much of the west antarctic ice sheet will as well, and there is three metres more locked up in that. it is enough to swamp many of the great cities of the world, and drive hundreds of millions of people from their homes. getting here is not easy. it takes five weeks just to get the science teams and their equipment to the front of the glacier. this is a historic moment, the first time anyone has tried to drill down through this glacier. beneath the 600 metres of ice below me is the most important point
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of all, the point at which the ice meets the ocean water. it is difficult work, but deploying instruments under theice is the only way to begin to understand the processes at work here, and to make accurate predictions of how sea level will rise in the future. this is a world first, the first time anyone has seen the place where this glacier goes afloat, the point where it begins to melt. i was yelling and screaming, like, oh, my god! we're there, we're there! you can see the water, the ice coming down at you, the sea floor coming up at you, and it'sjust a huge rush of energy. the bed of glacier is a place we have never been and particularly here where it starts to float. and thwaites really matters because it is so vulnerable. strip away the ice from west antarctica, and look — most of this part of the continent is below sea level.
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that means the glacier, and indeed the whole region, could begin to retreat increasingly rapidly. this year's work has already confirmed the scientist's worst fears. the deep, warm ocean water that circles antarctica is flowing into the coast here. and because the seabed slopes downwards, as the ice melts, it willjust expose more and more ice to that water. it will take decades, maybe more than a century, for thwaites to melt. but it is melting, and we need to know how quickly if we're going to protect ourselves as the world's oceans rise. and that is such a great story. we will be talking tojustin rowlatt as well as someone from the british antarctic survey to bring us more details about what they think is going on and how important that might be. coming up in the next half hour or so, we will be looking at plans by sainsbury‘s to dramatically cut its food waste, plastic packaging, and increase recycling.
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i noticed that had commas, i am not quite sure, but i like oxford commas. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a man has been stabbed to death near a busy railway station in south london during yesterday evening's rush hour. officers were called to east croydon shortly before 5pm, but paramedics in the air ambulance were unable to save the man. the local mp sarahjones unable to save the man. the local mp sarah jones says unable to save the man. the local mp sarahjones says the killing has left her heartbroken. there are extra police by the station this morning, and they are appealing for information. surrey county cricket club is launching a scholarship in an effort to create new opportunities for young african — korean players. it is aimed at boys and girls aged between 11 and 18 and it will provide access to coaching, sports science and personal development —— caribbean. three open days will be
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held at the oval cricket ground, and it is aimed at increasing the reach of the sport in underrepresented communities. and our animal hospital in putney is appealing to londoners to donate any spare baby socks. it is to keep the pores of special pets warm as they recover from operations —— pores of special pets warm as they recoverfrom operations —— paws. as well as cats, they can be helpful for rabbits and dogs. the putney animal hospital centre says it also uses the socks as little jumpers for kittens. as you can see. a snapshot of hackney in the 1970s and early 80s has been published, showing the lives of people who lived and worked there. photographer neil martinson started taking the pictures while he was at school. he says hackney was a place to leave, with its crumbling housing estates and high unemployment. yet there was vitality and resilience among local people. you can see more of his pictures on our website. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the travel situation now. the tube, no service betw south
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0n the tube, no service between south holloman barking, minor delays between gospel oak and south cotton because of repairs to the track from yesterday. there are clockwise delays on the circle line. on the road, in southwark, blackfriars road remains closed between st george's circus and southwark street for repairs following a burst water main. and in harrow, kenton road is closed between northwick park hospital and peterbrough road, again because of a burst water main. now let's get a check on the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we've had a bit of rain overnight. some cloud this morning. the temperatures this morning. the temperatures this morning largely above zero. now, the rain clearing away eastwards. we will see some sunshine today, but also still some scattered showers. all accompanied by quite a fresh westerly breeze. now, the showers, one or two of which could be quite heavy, might get a bit of winter in over higher ground, the chilterns down toward the downs. elsewhere, you might get a bit of hail and a rumble of thunder. temperatures today between four and six celsius, but factor in that westerly wind, it is going to feel a few degrees colder. now, overnight tonight, largely dry and largely clear.
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temperatures dropping right the way down. still breezy, though, overnight. but with a minimum of —1, and after showers today, we might just see one or two icy stretches first thing on wednesday morning. a brief ridge of high pressure builds in tomorrow, so we should get a largely dry day, with plenty of sunshine. still breezy, 10 celsius the maximum temperature, and for thursday onwards, it turns more u nsettled. thursday onwards, it turns more unsettled. but we are dragging on some other areas we had through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. you are watching breakfast with louise and dan. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the news in a moment. 0n the programme today will be taking another look at the devastating issue of ptsd in army vetera ns. devastating issue of ptsd in army veterans. in the days since alyssa davis told breakfast about the heartbreaking death of her husband, jamie, i hundred ex— service personnel have come forward looking to —— alicia davis. —— 100. the
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infamous beeching cuts of the 60s, could they be brought back to life? we will talk to the transport secretary later this morning. and this man had his entire long returned through a two inch hole. we will hear from the surgeon later this morning. let's bring you a story in oursummary this morning. let's bring you a story in our summary of the main stories this morning from the bbc. prosecutors in the usa they have received zero cooperation from prince andrew in connection with the investigation into the prince andrew in connection with the investigation into the disgraced american financier, jeffrey epstein. the fda said to have made repeated approaches to the prince's lawyers. ina bbc approaches to the prince's lawyers. in a bbc interview last november he promised to help the us authorities was that the duke of york, a friend of epstein does make who was, has denied any knowledge of his wrongdoing or misbehaviour. security
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chiefs are expected to decide today whether the chinese firm huawei will be able to help develop the uk's telecoms network. borisjohnson will jerry meeting at the national security council where he is expected to save the company will allow a limited role. the us has lobbied hard for huawei's exclusion, posing they represent a major security risk. there has been a rising coronavirus deaths, with the figure standing at over 100. severe travel restrictions are in place across much of the country an attempt to stop the infection from spreading. chinese authorities confirmed overnight 106 people have died so far in the outbreak. those are some of the main stories around on this tuesday morning. and sally has been keeping a close eye on roger federer. normally a very cool customer, not so much at the moment. he is struggling in the quarterfinals of the australian 0pen. he is trailing the american, brilliantly named tennys sandgren by
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two sets to one. let's find out from john watson in melbourne. his losing his cool, not like him at all. what is going on, john? roger is rattled, it's fair to say. 2—1, and is going on, john? roger is rattled, it's fairto say. 2—1, and in is going on, john? roger is rattled, it's fair to say. 2—1, and in that first that things started to fall apart for roger federer. he was out on court there and was caught swearing. very unlike him. the umpire gave him a warning he took it saying, give me a break out here. roger federer clearly struggling, 2-1 roger federer clearly struggling, 2—1 down, still going. if roger federer is your book its place in the semifinals he will have to do so over five sets. we saw him do that a couple of rounds ago, he would have to do the same again. we've seen a few u psets to do the same again. we've seen a few upsets at this year's tournament, we didn't think roger federer would be delivering once—a—day. he could face an adductor commits in the next round. roger federer has never lost to a
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player ranked as low as tennys sandgren at the australian open before. so it would be a huge upset. no upsets for ash barty committee well number one, who is safely through committee bit patrick a bit ofa through committee bit patrick a bit of a bit earlier on to reach the semifinals —— petra kovitiva, support and expectations on her shoulders. she was pleased to book a place in the semifinals. john, it was great to talk to you. i'm looking forward to going back and watching the dramatic and do the tennis. john watson in melbourne for us this morning. events have been taking place across america to remember kobe bryant, the basketball legend who died alongside his teenage daughter and seven others in a helicopter grass on sunday. in new york, the empire state building was lit up in the colours of his team, the la la kers. lit up in the colours of his team, the la lakers. we can now speak to kobe bryant's friend joins us from
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san francisco. i know the past couple of days have been incredibly difficult for you, so thank you for talking to us. first of all, i want to ask you, we have heard much about kobe bryant the player, does about him asa kobe bryant the player, does about him as a man. what was he like? he was an amazing man and we also what he did on the court, but off the court he was an even better man in the way he would embrace everyone, all walks of life. he instilled so much in all of us. he knew the struggles i had being the first female scout in the nba and he a lwa ys female scout in the nba and he always had encouraging words with everyone. he made sure we always kept our head up and that we didn't get down he said life was too short, his at that often. life is too short, smile. you know, his charitable efforts, what he did for charity, he never said no to any request, he never said no to anyone. he was very good as a man and full
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of life. he was groundbreaking, from what you are saying, considering you we re what you are saying, considering you were the first female scout in the nba, we saw him encourage this fa ntastically nba, we saw him encourage this fantastically talented daughter who could have gone on to be a big stuff was that he didn't mind breaking away from the old ideas that women weren't involved in sport. yes, definitely. he was so empowering when it came to the wnba, he was one of the few nba players that would go to those games. him and gg, his focus was always basketball but his primary focus was his family and his children. once he retired he really just had the goal of making sure his kids had the best life and that he was a part of it every step of the way, being at every practice, every game coaching. he saw a bright light with gg and people thought he wanted to have a boy, that is why he kept trying for more kids? and he did, he
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had a boy stop he said at one point i want someone to live through my legacy of basketball. it doesn't need to be a boy, it could be a girl. you talk about him being a family man. what was his actual life like? i can't imagine. he was so well—known. i imagine his life was slightly mad a way. —— mad in a way. he was using the helicopter because the la traffic was so bad and he wa nted the la traffic was so bad and he wanted to spend more time with his family. how did he manage to have a family. how did he manage to have a family life, considering the career he had? he made sure he didn't miss any more of his kids, you know, practices, rehearsals, plays, no matter what it was he wanted to be there for them. the girls and va nessa, there for them. the girls and vanessa, that's why it was so hard, the traffic in los angeles is so ha rd the traffic in los angeles is so hard was that he wanted to cut the
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traffic from two hours to 10—15 minutes. he wanted to make sure he was there for his family. even while he was playing, before he retired he was such a gym rat. his work ethic was such a gym rat. his work ethic was unparalleled. there is no—one who could outwork kobe bryant but he also wanted to make sure he was there for his family. and he was someone that really mastered the balancing act, being able to balance work and being able to be there for his family as well. i love that you call him a gym rat, that is what we're from lots of people who played with him. he would train and then he would train for three hours more. training would be at a certain time and you would find that he would arrive two hours before you. he will be working and working and working. in terms of basketball, how will he now be remembered? i imagine a lot of people want to do something official to mark his legacy? of people want to do something officialto mark his legacy? it's funny you say that, because after we won one of the nba finals he was in the gym the next day. you know?
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after you when you think you would ta ke after you when you think you would take some time, not kobe, he was in the gym the next day. i will never forget that. he loved the game of basketball. he was there before anyone showed up sing without even the coaches sing with us and he was there afterwards. —— he was there before the coaches and afterwards. the tributes to him, i know the la kers the tributes to him, i know the lakers andjimmy bus are going to have a statue by him, i know we will have a statue by him, i know we will have to fast forward to get that up outside staples. an perhaps even having him as the nba logo. like what they did in baseball with jackie robinson, retiring number 2a across the league. there are many things that are going to happen, i think in the next year. this would be the first year he would be eligible to be in the basketball of bam, we know he is the first ballot nominee, that is coming up this year as well. there is a lot more to come
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on the legacy of kobe bryant. thank you so much for your time today. first female scout in the nba talking to us about kobe bryant and his legacy. isn't that interesting? hearing about his work ethic, just extraordinary. always there before eve ryo ne extraordinary. always there before everyone else, getting the key to the gym, training before everyone else and winning and training the next day. incredible. the draw for the fa cup produced some mouthwatering ties was up wayne rooney will be facing his old club, manchester united. and she's reward for winning against liverpool will bea for winning against liverpool will be a trip to chelsea. arsenal will pay portsmith after beating dortmund 2-1 pay portsmith after beating dortmund 2—1 last night. mikel arteta said he was impressed. in the women's fa cup, manchester city will be home to ipswich, being in the fourth year. details are on the bbc sport website. so if you do want more
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information, go to bbc sport online and have a look there. you very much. thank you. it's 6:40am. women who say they are abused by the —— we re who say they are abused by the —— were abused by the late financier jeffrey epstein have called on prince andrew sue assist with the investigation. a prosecutor in new york says he has provided zero cooperation with the investigation so far. we can speak to a lawyer for some ofjeffrey so far. we can speak to a lawyer for some of jeffrey epstein's so far. we can speak to a lawyer for some ofjeffrey epstein's alleged victims. thank you for coming onto the programme this morning. can i ask you, it's quite an extra merry step, wasn't it is to for berman to make the comments yesterday does not geoffrey berman, some people have said it's a media stunt. he really had no choice. he doesn't have the power to subpoena prince andrew simply as part of the criminal investigation. what can he do except
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use the power of the press to come forward publicly and say, you know what, prince andrew, you say publicly that you would fully co—operate with law enforcement and you have not done it. we got in zero cooperation. i don't see what other choice the attorney had. we've seen, i'm sure you've watched the prince andrew interview from the bbc last year. in that interview he did say he would co—operate with american authorities, but i suppose the caveat was if push comes to shove... well, guess what? which has come to shove. this is a serious criminal investigation. there are dozens of women, i represent five of them, who allege they were the victims of sexual assault by this predator, jeffrey epstein. it is time for anyone with information to come forward and answer questions. prince andrew himself is accused of sexual misconduct and he also spent a great deal of time with jeffrey
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misconduct and he also spent a great deal of time withjeffrey epstein. so it's time to stop playing games and to come forward to do the right thing and answer questions. what sort of power do us officials have too actually force prince andrew to speak to them and answer questions? at this point they don't have the power to sabina him and that's why i think geoffrey berman took this step —— subpoena. he may have information about other people like elaine maxwell, who i think it is also being investigated, that might exoneration her or make a look guilty, we don't know, but we do know he spent a great deal of time with her and mr epstein so it would make no sense for him to not answer questions —— ghislaine maxwell. make no sense for him to not answer questions -- ghislaine maxwell. we should reiterate prince andrew has denied those claims made against him. what you think will happen next? is the next in how this will
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develop does make what is next?” think law enforcement will continue to investigate without prince andrew if he continues to stone well. i represent a woman who says she was a witness to the night of tramp nightclub in 2001, when prince andrew was there and virginia roberts was there. i have spoken to the fbi to give that information. i have urged the fbi to speak to her and they may very well do that. and anyone else who was a witness should come forward, they can speak to an attorney like me or they can contact the fbi directly so that we can get to the truth of what happened. taking prince andrew out of this, you say you represent, what was it? five clients? is that right? yes. what are the conversations been like? did they feel in terms of the broader scandal that they will ever find justice, do you think? you know, it's a tough question. i am confident we are going to continue to fight to get an actual compensation from the estate. but
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real justice would be compensation from the estate. but realjustice would be criminal accountability. of course, paedophilia is a crime, sexual assault is a crime. jeffrey epstein managed to escape criminal responsibility by taking his own life injail. responsibility by taking his own life in jail. but responsibility by taking his own life injail. but there responsibility by taking his own life in jail. but there are certainly many others who also need to be answerable as to what happened and that's why i think these investigations continue, because they are very important. lisa, i am sure we will continue to follow the story from this and does well. lisa bloom, a lawyer in thejeffrey epstein case. thank you. we will talk about this later as well. if you have woken up this morning, you might notice it is pretty miserable, but i don't have the details, of course, carol does. good morning, everyone. some snow around as well, even to lower levels. this weather watch a's picture is from livingston stop you can see quite a bit of snow at lower levels, and on the other side, scotland, again some
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snow falling. there is some lying snow falling. there is some lying snow also this morning in parts of northern ireland, and that's no level will tend to lift as we go through the day. but if you are travelling across northern and western parts of the uk, western parts including england and where, watch out for ice. there will be some snow on the higher roots, particularly slow across scotland and northern ireland. and you can find out how it is affecting your journey of course on your bbc local radio station. now, this is where we have had the rain in the snow. the blue indicates that rain, the light indicates the snow. a lot of it on the hills, but some of it at lower levels as well. if you are travelling first thing this morning in the south—west of england, there will be a lot of dry weather, but they will be some showers. some of those will be sleazy across parts of the moors, for example, on the tops of the hills in wales we could also see some snow, as we could on the tops of the hills in northern england. perhaps in the heavier bursts you will see some sleet at lower levels, but there is the risk
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of ice. northern ireland has snow at lower levels, as does parts of scotland, and that will tend to lift up scotland, and that will tend to lift up into the hills as we go through the course of the day. it will be rain showers you will see at lower levels. through the day, where we have the showers, a lot of them will be of rain on higher ground, even in the south—east for a time this morning we could see some of that falling as sleet. and in gusty winds todayit falling as sleet. and in gusty winds today it is going to feel cold. in fa ct, today it is going to feel cold. in fact, our temperature range, four in the north to about eight in the south, but when you add on the effect of the wind, it will feel more like fourfor effect of the wind, it will feel more like four for example where we have had the eight in london. some of the showers will notjust be happy, they will also have some hail and some thunder and lightning embedded in them as well. as we head onto the day and into the evening, the wind still strong across the south—west of england and the english channel, and through the night we will be looking at gusty winds wherever you are. still a lot of showers and still some snow on the hills. temperature—wise, a lot
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of us roundabout freezing orjust below, so once again there is the risk of ice. you may see some pockets of frost as well if you are sheltered from the wind. that leads us into wednesday daytime. we have a transient ridge of high pressure in southern areas. we have a weak front coming away from the atlantic. we call it weak, perhaps that is misrepresenting exactly what it is going to do. it could well clipped northern ireland with some persistent rain, and the same for scotland, preceded by some snow. and thatis scotland, preceded by some snow. and that is going to be slowly moving north eastwards. the snow will be a hill feature. for england, wales and the rest of northern ireland, we're looking at a drier day. there will be some showers around, but they will also be some sunshine. look how much milder it is going to be in the south. 10 degrees, but only five as we push up towards lerwick. by friday, some parts of the south—east could well hit 1a degrees, high for this time of year. it is up—and—down, isn't it? thank you, carol. get your speedos on out in
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the sea, 1a degrees! not yet, no. certainly not speedos. in the 1960s, hundreds of translations and thousands of miles of track were closed across britain following a report by the chairman of british railways. but now work will begin to see if any of those cuts can be reversed. 0ur transport correspondent tom burridge has been to one town in lancashire to see if the line there can be brought back to life. they have been renovating the railway their town last four years. volu nteers railway their town last four years. volunteers who want this, the only line into fleetwood, reopened. the railway corridor is here, and we are very passionate on getting it reopened. if it reopened to fleetwood, it would make the joined up fleetwood, it would make the joined up transport that we need in this area. work needed to bring it back to life will now be assessed, as
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well as the value of fun —— a functioning railway would ring. back in the day used to be able to get a train from fleetwood, half a mile in that direction, right down that track, direct into london euston. but for around half a century it has been a challenge for people to even get to places nearby, like manchester or preston. the line was one of hundreds to close in the 19605 one of hundreds to close in the 1960s and 1970s. doctor beeching's new look for british railways is as sweeping as expected. richard beeching's plan was radical. more than 2000 stations will be closed. scotland's rail network before and after. wales in the north of england. today, a commitment from the government that it will spend £500 million on bringing some lines, like fleetwood, back. i moved to reverse those cuts is welcome news for those living and working in the town. how much does this town need
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it? this town needs a lot, to be fair. the train station, bringing the railway back into the town, would help a hell of a lot, and high street has been forgotten. so all the shops that closed down on the high street don't seem to be open. it's all empty stores. so having a train line coming back into the town might boost businesses, to get more into the high street. when you are a town of 25,000, tucked away on the lancashire coast, with only reminders of the links used to have, ita reminders of the links used to have, it a no—brainer. reminders of the links used to have, it a no-brainer. had enquiries about a three day music festival here before, and we had to turn it down because there's just not the links for people to get here, and it would just be so amazing to have that on your doorstep, as a young person. connecting places like this is something the conservatives believe they have to deliver if they are to retain the support they won the election. the people we met believe this line will mean a brighter
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future. do let us know what you think about that, because we will be speaking to the transport secretary, grant shapps, just after 7:30am this morning, about using or reusing or bringing back to life old rail lines. lots of people would look forward to that, i think. last week we found out that tesco plans to remove tons of plastics from its shelves. today it is the turn of sainsbury‘s to make a big climate pledge. victoria has the details. ido, i do, good morning to you. everything has stepped up a gear when it comes to climate change and what the pledges are from different countries. we have had david attenborough and his warnings, we have had climate change strikes all of last year, have had climate change strikes all of last yea r, greta have had climate change strikes all of last year, greta thunberg and her campaign, the supermarkets realise that they only make money when they listen to their customers and they are selling stuff and providing services that people want to buy and wa nt to services that people want to buy and want to use. so i suppose it is probably no surprise that we are
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seeing lots of pledges and targets coming out from these companies. i just want to update you on what is going on with sainsbury‘s, because they have made a big pledge today. backin they have made a big pledge today. back in march of last year, greenpeace, the environmental charity, said that sainsbury‘s was number ten of ten of the big supermarkets when it comes to plastic policy. they were in last place. they said that their pledges we re place. they said that their pledges were not that great, and there were only a small number of targets. they we re only a small number of targets. they were so appalled by all this that they actually rebranded sainsbury‘s big slogan, live well for less, to this, couldn't care less. and this sparked quite a lot of media attraction last year. so sainsbury‘s got its act together and started changing various things, and they came up with one pledge, which was to cut plastic packaging by 50%. they also decided to start introducing reusable plastic bags, reusable bags, sorry, for things like loose vegetables and fruit and
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that kind of thing. and those two pledges together meant it went from 10th and lea pfrogged pledges together meant it went from 10th and leapfrogged over to third place. and when greenpeace did the survey again in november this year, they found that. but the verdict was very much still that this business could do better. could they do things like the refill stations that we are seeing at asda, where you go in and you can get your loose coffee and rice and pastor, or maybe the pledge you were talking about, like the tesco pledge with the multipacks of tens —— pasta. why are they still packaging around that? there are still various things they could be doing that their competitors are already looking at. so what are they looking at? well, they're big pledge todayis looking at? well, they're big pledge today is something called net zero. they want to be a net zero business by 2030. what is a net zero business? well, there is actually no agreed definition of what net zero means despite the fact that the government wants to be net zero x 20 50, ten years later. the whole idea
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is that there is no net impact on the client from greenhouse emissions from a business. part of that is going to be cutting back on carbon emissions and part of that is a kind of carbon removal processes, things like granting trees. so it is a combination of those two things. in practice, for a businesslike sainsbury‘s, that means rethinking how they do chilling and storage and all that kind of stuff, because that is really energy intensive, how much water they are guzzling, and how much food waste they are generating as well, because that is a big aspect for the business as well. and like i said, they are also planning to halve all their plastic pollution and plastic packaging by 2025, so only five years away from now. some big promises. what are the chances of that actually happening in being successful? well, they have put aside £1 billion already for this. and it is notjust a press release. they have published pages and pages of plans for all of this. but the big question is whether or not they have got a mountain to climb when it
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comes to their own climate goals. we did pop in, which is why i have got all the food here. we will see what they are offering customers. ijust wa nt to they are offering customers. ijust want to start with these croissants, as it is breakfast. sainsbury‘s reports they have already removed plastic bags from bakery and loose plastic bags from bakery and loose plastic bags from bakery and loose plastic bags on the counters. it says they are saving 290 million bags and a million tons of plastic a year. we found that was the case, but we bought two loose croissant here for 75p each, but if you were to buy these ones next to them, in the plastic, they are 20p cheaper. so it is slightly tricky, what is going on here. they are still doing the multipacks of tens here. they have got these, but these bags will cost you 30 p. so how many people are going to decide not to put in a few more apples in the bag if the choice is a bit more food or a better bag to put them in? so it is very difficult, and there is a big question around how much all of this is going to cost and who it will cost, will it be the customers, the
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shareholders? we have the boss on in about an hour. thank you very much indeed. my problem with the bags is i forget to ta ke problem with the bags is i forget to take them. are they up for grabs? give me an hour, i will waive them in aboutan give me an hour, i will waive them in about an hour, and then after that they are all yours. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been stabbed to death near a busy railway station in south london during yesterday evening's rush hour. officers were called to east croydon shortly before 5:00pm, but paramedics and an air ambulance team were unable to save the man. the local mp, sarah jones, says the killing has left her heartbroken. there are extra police by the station this morning, and they are appealing for information. surrey county cricket club is launching a scholarship
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in an effort to create new opportunities for young african—caribbean players. it is aimed at boys and girls aged between 11 and 18, and it will provide access to coaching, sports science and personal development. three open days will be held at the oval cricket ground, and it is aimed at increasing the reach of the sport in underrepresented communities. an animal hospital in putney is appealing to londoners to donate any spare baby socks. it is to keep the paws of special pets warm as they recover from operations. as well as cats, they can be helpful for rabbits and dogs. the putney animal hospital centre says it also uses the socks as little jumpers for kittens. a snapshot of hackney in the 1970s and early ‘80s has been published, showing the lives of people who lived and worked there. photographer neil martinson started taking the pictures while he was at school. he says hackney was a place to leave, with its crumbling housing estates and high unemployment.
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but he also says there was vitality and resilience among local people. you can see more of his pictures on our website. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground has no service between south tottenham and barking. minor delays between gospel oak and south tottenham because of repairs to the track from yesterday. and there are clockwise delays on the circle line. 0n the road, in southwark, blackfriars road remains closed between st george's circus and southwark street for repairs following last week's burst watermain. and in harrow, kenton road is closed between northwick park hospital and peterborough road, again because of a burst watermain. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we've had a bit of rain overnight, some cloud this morning, so temperatures this morning largely above zero. now, the rain clearing away eastwards. we'll see some sunshine today, but also still some scattered showers, all accompanied by quite a fresh westerly breeze. now, the showers, one or two of which could be quite heavy, might get a bit of wintriness over higher ground, the chilterns down towards the downs.
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elsewhere, you might get a bit of hail and a rumble of thunder. temperatures today between four and six celsius, but factor in that westerly wind, it is going to feel a few degrees colder. now, overnight tonight, largely dry and largely clear, temperatures dropping right the way down. still breezy, though, overnight. but with a minimum of —1, and after showers today, we mightjust see one or two icy stretches first thing on wednesday morning. brief ridge of high pressure builds in tomorrow, so we should get a largely dry day, with plenty of sunshine. still breezy, 10 celsius the maximum temperature, and for thursday onwards, it turns more unsettled. but we're dragging on some milder air as we head through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you're watching breakfast with louise and dan.
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it's 7:00am. no comment from buckingham palace after prince andrew was accused of zero cooperation into the investigation into convected sex offenderjeffrey epstein. senior chiefs will me today to convene on whether huawei will be allowed to build the uk's telecoms network. and a member of one of the biggest antarctica projects willjoin us on the couch. sainsbury is will pledge £1 billion to make its company more environmentally friendly in 20 yea rs. environmentally friendly in 20 years. the roger federer is up against it at the australian open, he has saved three match points so far against tennys sandgren. they are paying for a place in the semifinals. good morning! some of us are waking up to some snow this morning, even at lower levels,
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particularly across northern ireland is and —— and scotland. sunshine and showers ahead in the forecast, some heavy and hungry, cool in the wind. i'll have more later. —— heavy and thundery. it's january 28. an american lawyer who sees represents women who say they are victims of geoffrey epstein says they are outraged prince andrew won't co—operate in the investigation. the fbi says they have received no response from prince andrew's lawyers. here is andy moore. speaking outsidejeffrey epstein's mansion, the american prosecutor said he did not normally comment on whether a witness was cooperating or not. but he would make an exception in this case because prince andrew had publicly offered to help. the southern district of new york and the fbi have contacted prince andrew's attorneys and requested to interview
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prince andrew and to date prince andrew has provided zero cooperation. prince andrew says he did not see or suspect any suspicious behaviour when visiting the homes of his then—friend. now that prince andrew has stepped down from official royal duties, buckingham palace is not commenting. and there has been no response so far from prince andrew's lawyers. but there has been from some of the women who say they epstein's victims. the five victims who i represent are outraged and disappointed at prince andrew's behaviour. it is time for anyone with information to come forward. virginia roberts giuffre claims that she was forced to have sex with prince andrew by epstein and his associates.
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andrew completely denies any sexual encounter with her. he knows what happened. i know what happened. and there's only one of us telling the truth. in a now—infamous newsnight interview last november, prince andrew said he was willing to talk to american investigators, with some conditions. if push came to shove and the legal advice was to do so then i would be duty—bound to do so. in a statement a few days later when he stepped down from royal duties, his commitment was even clearer. he said "of course i am willing to help any appropriate law enforcement agency with their investigations, if required." american prosecutors have many questions to ask about his relationship with jeffrey epstein. so far at least, prince andrew seems unwilling to answer them. well, let's get a little bit more from andy, who is outside of buckingham palace for us this morning. it seems not much is being said from there, good morning. yes,
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nothing from buckingham palace, they we re nothing from buckingham palace, they were referring us to prince andrew's lawyers and nothing from them yet, even though this statement was made in new york yesterday afternoon. so, we don't know for example if there has been some misunderstanding, if prince andrew will make a statement to the fbi at some stage, or whether, as the americans seem to suggest, if they flout no, we can't help. you could say at the moment from prince andrew's lawyers, there has been zero cooperation with the british media. i think it's interesting that statement was made by the american prosecutor outside those very distinctive, big, wooden doors ofjeffrey those very distinctive, big, wooden doors of jeffrey epstein's those very distinctive, big, wooden doors ofjeffrey epstein's mansion. those same wooden doors we saw prince andrew peeking out of, saying goodbye to an unidentified woman in 2010 that was when he went to new york and he said it was a matter of honour, he had to tell his old friend their relationship was over. at that time epstein was convicted
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asa at that time epstein was convicted as a sex offender. the american prosecutor said their investigation is proceeding, moving at pace, and there were co—conspirators of epstein involved, although he didn't name them. interestingly, lisa bloom, the lawyer there, saying some of her clients were outraged and disappointed that prince andrew wasn't cooperating with the fbi enquiry. thank you very much indeed for that, andy. here on breakfast in the next few minutes we will speak toa the next few minutes we will speak to a retired fbi agent about what the kind of procedure is next and also to kate williams, a royal historian and commentator as well. let's bring you some of the day's other news was that boris johnson some of the day's other news was that borisjohnson will chair a meeting of intelligence chiefs and ministers on whether or not huawei will be afforded a role to build the id network here in the uk. americans say allowing them to with jeopardise the relationship between the us and
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uk. this morning ministers and intelligence chiefs will gather for one of the most contentious and significant decisions the national security council has had to take: whether to let the chinese company huawei play a role in building the uk's new 5g telecoms network. here in the uk, providers, consumers should have access to fantastic communications but also protect our security interest and protect our key partnerships and other security powers around the world. the us has argued it's a security risk to let it in because it could be used by china for espionage or even sabotage — something the company denies. there are two options for government, the first is to exclude the company entirely, that's what the uk's closest ally, the united states, wants. but it would come at a significant economic cost since it would require removing existing huawei equipment from the infrastructure and slowing
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down the adoption of improved connectivity, a priority for government. the second option is to allow huawei in, but with restrictions on where and how it operates in order to try to manage the risk, something intelligence and officials believe is possible. that's thought to be the more likely outcome, with the restrictions painted is particularly tough on the company's role. unless the divisions are deep, the decision is expected today — it's one with important consequences for security, prosperity and the uk's relations with its closest ally. gordon corera, bbc news. there has been another rise in the number of deaths from the coronavirus in china. the figure stands at more than 100. severe travel restrictions are in place across much of the country in an attempt to try and stop the infection from spreading. chinese authorities confirmed overnight that 106 people have now died so far. air
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accident investigators in the united states have described the site of the helicopter crash which killed basketball legend kobe bryant and eight others as devastating. the investigation is expected to focus on the foggy weather conditions. let's get more information from david willis, our correspondent in los angeles for us. david, while people are still paying tribute to kobe bryant, the investigation continues. but a bit of discussion now as well about how basketball and various other places in america might mark his death. absolutely. and in the absence of any formal place to do that, they are marking it here. it's a bit yonder 11pm at night here and still people are flocking to the staples centre in downtown los angeles where the headquarters of the la lakers is to be found. that's the theme of course that kobe bryant paid for with such a distinction for 20 years —— the
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team, he won five nba titles in the process. throughout the last couple of days thousands of people have come here to light candles, to lay flowers a nd come here to light candles, to lay flowers and to shed a tear, if you like, at the passing of a man that was seen as one of the greatest sportsman of his era. about 30 miles from here the crash site — rather, a morse number —— more sombre site, investigators picking through the rubble and trying to figure out because of the grass. they brought ina because of the grass. they brought in a weather expert who believes fog may well have played a key role in that crash. meanwhile, matches due to ta ke that crash. meanwhile, matches due to take place here involving the la la kers to take place here involving the la lakers tonight, that has been cancelled. that is in memory of kobe brya nt cancelled. that is in memory of kobe bryant a lot of people here will still be coming over the next few days to pay their respects to a man who locally is nothing short of a
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legend. david, thank you. an army widow who spoke out after her husband took his own life after suffering years of post—traumatic stress disorder will meet the veterans minister today. alicia davis gave a heartbreaking account of the struggles her partner, jamie had struggled before his death earlier this month. since her interview here on breakfast, about 100 ex—service personal have come forward asking for help. every time he fell asleep it was held. he couldn't escape it. it's screaming stuff. and shaking. and thrashing about in bed. itjust — it breaks you because you just want to help them. —— it was hell. you because you just want to help them. -- it was hell. the american prosecutor leading the investigation into jeffrey epstein prosecutor leading the investigation intojeffrey epstein has accused prince andrew are failing to co—operate. the fda said to have approached the duke of york after promising to help if needed, in his newsnight interview last november.
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let's discuss what might happen next with royal storey and kate williams thank you forjoining us. at morning. the way he has described it is zero cooperation from prince andrew. what's going on? well, yes, this is really — we don't normally see this is really — we don't normally see this. prosecutors cooperated but clearly mr berman, the state attorney for new york his very frustrated at the fbi's office, they have made repeated calls to prince andrew's lawyers and no response. not anyone saying we will speak to you ina not anyone saying we will speak to you in a couple of weeks, but absolutely no response. this is com pletely absolutely no response. this is completely untypical to what prince andrew said last year in his november statement in the newsnight interview. he said of course i will co—operate with the authorities, he said he would. now here we are, coming into february and he isn't answering. this, ithink, it looks very bad. no wonder it's on the front page of every newspaper. this is, you know, this is not what he said he was going to do. and as
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roberts jeffrey has said he was going to do. and as robertsjeffrey has it raises more questions than than it answers that he wouldn't speak. —— virginia roberts guiffre stop and apparently the lawyers are saying nothing to the lawyers are saying nothing to the media. so no—one is really saying anything. i think this is very concerning and clearly mr berman feels, openly saying that prince andrew hasn't said anything, thatis prince andrew hasn't said anything, that is going to bring — you know, but some public light on prince andrew. i was really struck by lisa bloom's interview that you were referring to, she spoke to just earlier on the show, how outraged the victims are. and i think this really sing with us we have to think about the victims here. these women, these girls, they suffered so much of the hands ofjeffrey epstein, they want justice but they are going to get it unless people are willing to get it unless people are willing to talk to the fbi, to talk to
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prosecutors. it's unimaginable all the pain they have been put through here, they don't know is good as they can't get this closure. prince andrew said he sympathised with the victims, he said he wants closure and he really does sympathise with the victims, then he should help by telling the fbi everything that he knows. realistically, given where we are, what you think will happen next? well, what do i think will happen next? there are various things we just happen next? there are various things wejust don't happen next? there are various things we just don't know. who else is the fbi talking to? they could be talking to ghislaine maxwell, she also knows an awful lot. and if someone in the circle, as the fbi have pointed out and mr berman have pointed out, jeffrey epstein didn't operate in a vacuum. people helped him with the trafficking. who are these people in the ring? the fbi strikes deals, they strictly deals. if someone says they will tell all in response for a plea deal, that could bring all kinds of evidence against other people. and there is also the question about whether or
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not there are other authorities compiling inquiries here. mr epstein did notjust conduct his crimes in the us, other countries as well, perhaps other authorities are engaged with this. so we just don't know what is going to happen. but i think it's very striking, isn't it, when we think about the wider royal family. a couple of weeks ago we we re family. a couple of weeks ago we were talking about ari and meghan —— curry, they aren't using their working titles because they aren't working titles because they aren't working rose was up there is a lot of international outrage. why are harry and meghan in the ways he losing his military associations? why can't they keep their military associations when they just want to be in canada for longer, when prince andrew is still hr age and involved in this absolutely shocking case, he consorted with his convicted paedophile and he is being accused of other allegations —— he is still hrh. and he has consistently denied any claims of wrongdoing or impropriety against him as well. what you make of the queen? she has
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been seen going to church with him? well, i was told by a source that the royal family, the establishment, we re the royal family, the establishment, were hoping they could rehabilitate prince andrew back into the public imagination through charity work. i don't know whether that is the case or not. but i think certainly the royal family... we saw a discrepancy because on one hand he is going to church but on the other hand it was made very clear with the photos on the queen's table in the queen speech and the photos of the immediate airs that the royal family was being slimmed down and there was no space for energy within that —— immediate heirs. i simply don't think he can ever come back into public duties. it is simply not possible if there is an enquiry and he is completely and absolutely clears —— cleared, there maybe. but i think prince andrew is out of public life. people talk about royal scandals in history, and adultery and scandal and things like that,
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but this is not adultery. this is not having mistresses like lots of kings have had. this is actually a royal being involved in this really serious and very distressing and very shocking case. and you know, the only way he is going to clear his name is by speaking to the prosecutors, but clearly his lawyers are telling him not to do so. cadeyn williams, royal historian and commentator, thank you for your time —— kate williams. it is tuesday morning, and a lot of people send pictures in and you send whether watcher pictures to carol as well, and quite a bit of snow out there last night and this morning as well. well, and quite a bit of snow out there last night and this morning as well. good morning, both. there has been some snow, especially across scotla nd been some snow, especially across scotland and northern ireland, and we are talking at lower levels. this is one of our lovely whether watcher pictures sent in of londonderry, so thatis pictures sent in of londonderry, so that is northern ireland, but in the north—west highlands you can see just how this driving snow has been coming in. and a look at, starting
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this morning, again there is some snow lying on the ground at lower levels. but through the morning the snow level will rise back into the hills, as comparatively mild air sta rts hills, as comparatively mild air starts to come our way. the other thing to watch out for this morning is ice. notjust in scotland and northern ireland, but also across parts of northern england and wales. so that combination is not a pretty one, and you can find out what the weather conditions are like of course on your bbc local radio station. this is where we have had the rain and also the snow, the blue indicating the rain, the light of course is the snow. a lot of that will be on the hills, but we have four centimetres at the moment in strathallan, more of that in the highlands. for south—west england, more showers around. some will have sleet, we have seen some snow on the moors, the same across wales and the higher ground. we're looking at some snow. south—east england, where you have showers, there could be sleazy on the downs, for example. north—east england drier. north—west
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england showers. showers and northern ireland and still some of those wintry at lower levels for a time. the risk of ice stopped through the day, as i mentioned, the snow level will rise back up into the hills. you will still see a plethora of showers coming our way. some of those will be happy in thundery, with some hail. the other thing you will notice is it is going to be quite a blustery day. the strongest winds will be around devon and cornwall, the isles of scilly, the english channel and the channel islands, where we could have gusts in excess of 50 mph, possibly at times closer to 60. so these are our temperatures. four in the north to about eight in the south. but because it is going to be windy, it is going to feel colder than that. so if you are out and about, this is what it will feel like. freezing in newcastle, four in london, so another day for wrapping up warmly. through the evening and overnight, we hang onto the blustery winds. we also hang onto the showers, still wintry on the hills. where the wind... 0r
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wintry on the hills. where the wind... or if you are in shelter from the wind you could see pockets of frost here and there, but ice is more likely to be another issue on untreated surfaces as we go through tonight and first thing tomorrow. during the course of tomorrow, this transient ridge of high pressure builds across england and wales. this weather front comes in, bringing some rain with it across potentially northern ireland, but certainly scotland. that will be heavy and persistent. we could see a big deluge from this, and ahead of it we are looking at some snow on the hills. for england and wales and for northern ireland, it doesn't see the rain. it is going to be drier and brighter with some sunshine in just a few showers. temperatures tomorrow milder in the south. so if you remember today in london, it will feel like eight, with the different ms, tomorrow will feel like ten, and it will feel like ten, so it will feel milder. still pretty cold as we push further north. and then for thursday, well, ourfirst front clears up towards scandinavia. we have a cold front coming in from
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the north—west, sinking slowly south—east woods. behind it, something brighter comes our way, with a few showers. not quite as cold in the north at this stage. but as we come across england and wales and parts of northern ireland, there will be a lot of cloud around. some murky and thank conditions, some drizzle, some hill fog, you get the picture, brighter skies in the hills with highs up to 12 degrees. funny old few days, thank you very much for that. it sounds pretty miserable. thousands of women placed their trust in disgraced breast cancer surgeon ian patterson. he was jailed for conducting hundreds of unnecessary surgeries. here is our midlands correspondent with more. marie penfield died two years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. 12 years on and her death is now
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being investigated by a coroner looking to establish whether women, including marie, died needlessly. looking to establish whether women, including marie, died needlesslym was awful. i mean, you've got a woman who is in her prime, beautiful, enigmatic, funny, hard—working beautiful, enigmatic, funny, ha rd—working woman, whose beautiful, enigmatic, funny, hard—working woman, whose life was ended. marie was one of hundreds of patients treated by disgraced surgeon ian patterson. he was described as appearing to have their best interests at heart, but left many disfigured by carrying out watched or unnecessary operations. in 2017, patterson was jailed for 20 yea rs in 2017, patterson was jailed for 20 years after being convicted of assaulting a number of patients. but the investigation hasn't ended there. west midlands police have asked for this new review of women who died from breast cancer to consider whether his treatment led to their premature deaths. marie was a police officer. she believed in fairness, she believed in right and wrong. and he has committed terrible
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things. under the auspices that he isa things. under the auspices that he is a consultant, he knows best. and that's got to be put right. paterson had operated on marie twice using a controversial surgical technique that he had pioneered. hers is one of 23 test cases the coroner is now investigating. you know, i haven't had my day in court with marie. i haven't. i have listened to other people's day in court, and that satisfied me to some extent, but i have never been able to face him with the fact that what he did to my sister, and i am sure there were lots of other families out there that feel the same way. the impact of paterson's actions on his arms has been devastating, but the effect could also be far—reaching. an independent enquiry which aims to learn lessons and make recommendations to improve the safety a nd recommendations to improve the safety and quality of care provided to patients in england is due to report its findings next week.
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surely as already given evidence to that investigation. —— shirley. surely as already given evidence to that investigation. -- shirley. to have to keep going through what happened to my sister is just really hard. and, you know, iam welcoming the enquiry. i'm glad we did it. but it's just, the enquiry. i'm glad we did it. but it'sjust, in the enquiry. i'm glad we did it. but it's just, in terms of, you the enquiry. i'm glad we did it. but it'sjust, in terms of, you know, your mental health and being able to cope with your grief, you've got to bring it all up again. and now we've got, you know, the coroner's office contacting us, saying that they want to look into marie's case. to be honest with you, even if it meant just one extra day of him being in prison, i'll do whatever it takes, as tough as it is to me, i'll do whatever it takes. marie's death is one of the first to be reviewed by the coroner, but it could lead to many more. it is clearly very distressing to people, and we will of course
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continue to follow that story as well. coming up in the next half—hour or so, we will be looking at plans by sainsbury‘s to dramatically cut its food waste, plastic packaging, and increase recycling. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been stabbed to death near a busy railway station in south london during yesterday evening's rush hour. officers were called to east croydon shortly before 5:00pm, but paramedics and an air ambulance team were unable to save him. the local mp, sarah jones, says the killing has left her heartbroken. there are extra police by the station this morning, and they are appealing for information. surrey county cricket club is launching a scholarship in an effort to create new opportunities for young african—caribbean players. it is aimed at boys and girls
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aged between 11 and 18, and it will provide access to coaching, sports science and personal development. free open days will be held at the oval cricket ground, and it is aimed at increasing the reach of the sport in underrepresented communities. an animal hospital in putney is appealing to londoners to donate any spare baby socks. it is to keep the paws of special pets warm as they recover from operations. as well as cats, they can be helpful for rabbits and dogs. the putney animal hospital centre says it also uses the socks, as you can see, as little jumpers for kittens. a snapshot of hackney in the 1970s and early ‘80s has been published, showing the lives of people who lived and worked there. photographer neil martinson started taking the pictures while he was at school. he says hackney was a place to leave, with its crumbling housing estates and high unemployment. but he also says there was vitality and resilience among local people. you can see more of his
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pictures on our website. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground has no service between south tottenham and barking. minor delays between gospel oak and south tottenham because of repairs to the track from yesterday. in the track from yesterday. south—east london, ther woolwich in south—east london, there is no woolwich ferry. that will put pressure on nearby lines. 0n the road, in southwark, blackfriars road remains closed between st george's circus and southwark street for repairs following last week's burst watermain. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we've had a bit of rain overnight, some cloud this morning, so temperatures this morning largely above zero. now, the rain clearing away eastwards. we'll see some sunshine today, but also still some scattered showers, all accompanied by quite a fresh westerly breeze. now, the showers, one or two of which could be quite heavy, might get a bit of wintriness over higher ground, the chilterns down towards the downs. elsewhere, you might get a bit of hail and a rumble of thunder. temperatures today between four and six celsius, but factor in that
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westerly wind, it is going to feel a few degrees colder. now, overnight tonight, largely dry and largely clear, temperatures dropping right the way down. still breezy, though, overnight. but with a minimum of —1, and after showers today, we mightjust see one or two icy stretches first thing on wednesday morning. brief ridge of high pressure builds in tomorrow, so we should get a largely dry day, with plenty of sunshine. still breezy, 10 celsius the maximum temperature, and for thursday onwards, it turns more unsettled. but we're dragging on some milder air as we head through the weekend. va nessa vanessa phelps will be talking about prince andrew on her radio show in about ten minutes' time. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. good morning. if they tuesday morning, you are watching breakfast with louise and dan. prosecutors in the usa they have received zero cooperation from prince andrew in
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connection with their investigation into the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. the fbi has said to have made repeated approaches to the prince's lawyers and a bbc interview last november, he promised to help the authorities was of the duke of york, who was a friend of epstein's has denied any wrongdoing or knowledge of his behaviour. buckingham palace have refused to comment so far. security chiefs are expected to decide today whether the chinese firm huawei will be able to develop the uk's telecoms network. wasjohnson will chair a meeting at the national security council where he is expected to say the company will be allowed a limited role. the us has lobbied hard for huawei's exclusion, arguing they pose a major security risk. there has been another rise in the number of deaths from the coronavirus in china with the figure now standing at more than 100. severe travel restrictions are in place across much of the country. this is all about an attempt to try to stop the infection from
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spreading. chinese authorities confirmed overnight 106 people have died so farfrom confirmed overnight 106 people have died so far from this outbreak. air accident investigators in the united states have begun to recover the bodies of the basketball player kobe bryant, whose daughter gianna and seven others who died in the helicopter crash on sunday. they describe the crash site as devastating and say that to be spread over 200 metres has been found. investigators are expected to focus on the foggy weather conditions. an army widow who spoke out after her husband took his own life after years of post—traumatic stress disorder will meet the vetera ns stress disorder will meet the veterans minister today because the alicia davis gave and heartbreaking account of the struggles her husband suffered before his death. since her interview on breakfast, 100 ex—service personnel have come forward , ex—service personnel have come forward, looking for help. you are watching bbc breakfast. coming up as the weather. carol says there is no out and about was a thank you for
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sending in photos of the snow where you are. i know some of you are disappointed you don't have any. i thought you would so some snow pictures as well was not completely different conditions in australia, where roger federer is still hanging on? it is difficult was that i'm not going to tell you the score. in the time it has taken for me to walk from my desk to the school, he had saved seven match points! he had been using a bit of bad language earlier, i mentioned that to me a bit clever, typical fatima, to swear in france. right, but the umpire is swisse. his that it's unfair the umpire understood because she was swiss. so, john watson, what is happening now? hello! this wasn't in the script, was it, sally? the man
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is superhuman. 2—1 down, facing seven match points in that fourth set and he saves the lot. we have talked so much about roger federer, the matches he has one, i guess it is in moments like this, when his backis is in moments like this, when his back is against the wall he shows why he is widely regarded as the greatest of all time. as you say, not quite himself out on court, he has been a little flustered, big roger, as you say, good swearing but i guess it's wearing is wearing in whatever language you are speaking in and he was good for that. he took a medical timeout. perhaps the few issues there, it may be a back problem? we answer at this stage. there was an awkward moment at the end of the fourth set in the tie—break, his opponent tennys sandgren was run into by a ballboy. it has had everything, this marriage was up we are into the fifth and deciding that. we're just waiting to see whether or not roger federer can the goods and book his place.” see whether or not roger federer can the goods and book his place. i was going to ask you about the outcome
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of the ballboy. is tennys sandgren injured in some way? things seem to change at that point. what is it that better has really hit stride ain? that better has really hit stride again? i think it's probably a bit of both. it probably threw him off his stride a little bit. he wasn't expecting it was that he was bending over to his chair where all of his kit is and the ballboy ran straight into his legs. it looked awkward and nasty. he has a strap around his knee now, so perhaps it is a factor. i think roger federer, when he is playing up well, doing what he does saving all of those match points, that has to grind you down. you just wonder what tennys sandgren has in the tank now in dispute that. it's worth pointing out that roger federer has never lost to a player is laying —— is ranked as low as the australian open —— as low as tennis centre and in the australian open. —— as low as tennys sandgren. earlier on roger federer did look like roger federer was struggling
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with an injury but there was some kind of magic ream applied to his five. that seemed to work? -- magic cream. clearly something is working. he seems to be drawing on every bit of resolve that he's got. i think it's in moments like this that you just see the magic and talent of roger federer. we speak so much about the matches that he wins co mforta bly about the matches that he wins comfortably or the matches you expect him to win or those grand slam titles, but when the pressure is really on, roger federer doesn't look flustered at all. he takes it all in his stride. he looks so co mforta ble all in his stride. he looks so comfortable and composed when eve ryo ne comfortable and composed when everyone else is biting their fingernails. it was a lovely moment in those pictures when there was a young boy, just nervously watching on, and as he saved those match points he was jumping forjoy, as so many people here were at the australian open. so much love roger federer the world over and it looks like it is also easy for him. —— love for roger federer. and that's why he is regarded as the worlds
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greatest player of all time. no disrespect for the opponent, but it would be great to see roger face the semifinals, he would be against novakjock semifinals, he would be against novak jock events, what semifinals, he would be against novakjock events, what a matchup that would be. thank you for all that. i know it isn't magic cream, it was anti—inflammatory. i would love magic cream, but whatever it was it did the trick. the english side says they have the building blocks to win back the ashes. they won the final test injohannesburg by hundred 91 runs. they now play a one deity 20 series before heading to sri lanka in march. —— one—dayer t20 series. historic railways have been reopened since the beaching
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cards. critics argue the £500 million funding would be enough to reverse the closures of the 1960s. it won't be? let's speak to the transport secretary, grant shapps good morning to you. thank you for coming on. we will get to those announcements in a moment. i want to ask you about something else we're today, the government's advice about the coronavirus and advice about the coronavirus and advice about the coronavirus and advice about that. do you feel in terms of government advice, the latest advice about keeping yourself away from everybody else, is this a case of — you know, shutting the sta ble case of — you know, shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted, do you think? this coronavirus has a 1a day also incubation period before it becomes obvious to anyone. so it's just common sense advice really, to anyone who has come back from that region in china. but i know that the health secretary is working on this very closely and there will be further advice if any is required. it's just a commonsense approach for
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the time being. as transport secretary, why didn't you introduce restrictions on those coming back from wuhan? it came very quickly of course. i was on from wuhan? it came very quickly of course. i was on your programme from wuhan? it came very quickly of course. i was on your programme the other day when this started to break was that the chinese very quickly stopped travel, so it effectively happened immediately. and an update this morning about dental plans? we spoke to two british citizens in wuhan you had been locked down in their apartment block aa—5 days, are there plans to bring uk citizens back to this country? —— for a—5 days. one of the issues we have working on this is identifying how many british citizens there are in wuhan. 0ne many british citizens there are in wuhan. one of the things we are asking citizens to do is contact the consulate there to make them aware. people have started to do that and we're on arrangements as well. so making contact would be very hopeful indeed. in fairness, they did do
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that and they said they got an automated response back saying don't travel to wuhan, and they were already there. if they contact the consulate where they are, that contact donna consulate is gathering all the information of the people who were there in order to battery eight where appropriate —— contact the consulate and it is gathering all the information on people who are there in order to battery —— repatriate people there. and talking about these train lines, potentially there are two trendlines you are looking at possibly reopening. i am sure many people, and as you yourself have said, struggle with rail travel at the moment with cancellations and other issues. why are you looking into, and spending money on potentially reopening these lines when surely that money would be best directed into improving an
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already troubled service? first of all we are spending a record £a8 billion on the whole of the network, there is no sense we are doing this and not worrying about that. so that's happening. these beeching cuts, this was in 1963, doctor beeching wrote a report recommending the government closing down 5000 miles of our rail network, 2300 stations were shut during the programme was that it decimated what was a fantastic rail linked up country through rail services across the country. what this government is doing is starting to reverse that process. as you mentioned, i'm in fleetwood today, where the prime minister went in the election to announce that would be one of the services that we would be looking to reopen. i have already been up to ashington, by the valley and that area for the line there that runs to newcastle, again we are announcing thatis newcastle, again we are announcing that is one of the lines we are
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working on today. and there are dozens and dozens of others. so this half £1 billion isjust dozens and dozens of others. so this half £1 billion is just the start. we wa nt half £1 billion is just the start. we want to see the whole country network up with railways or late ra i lwa ys network up with railways or late railways where appropriate. ok. you mentioned the figures involved in those beeching cuts, 2300 stations, 5000 miles of track, in terms of your plans then, can you give a figure as to how much you are potentially looking at reopening, how many stations? so, we don't know exactly as yet, which is why we are putting money into finding this programme. but, for example, iwas ata programme. but, for example, iwas at a station the other day, part of what is called the new train station is fine, we're reopening that station. that station has the reach of 57,000 people —— new train stations fund. so reopening these stations fund. so reopening these stations along these beeching lines, which we are going to reverse and recreate those lines, the potential is to reach millions of people.
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that's what we intend to do. but this is just the start, as that's what we intend to do. but this isjust the start, as i that's what we intend to do. but this is just the start, as i was saying. there is a lot we are planning to do to reconnect those communities and really level up across the country. that is what we said we were doing the manifesto. the shadow transport secretary says this is a distraction from the colla pse this is a distraction from the collapse of the northern rail franchise. what can you tell us about that? you said there was an announcement coming in the next few days last time you were on brea kfast. days last time you were on breakfast. is right and that is still the case. i will make a further announcement before the end of the year. the end of the year? sorry, the end of the week. what i was going to say is you have to do all of these things. we have got to build the entire network, which is why that £a8 billion, working on the existing networks is important. i also think things like reversing these beating cuts is really important as well. so we can connect up important as well. so we can connect up all of these communities that get left behind —— reversing the
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beeching cuts. they were cut off from the railway network and no—one seemed to care for all these years. if you go outside this morning you will probably notice it's a bit cold out and about. carol, lots of people have been sending a species of snow, haven't they? hello. our weather watchers have done us proud. we had pictures from early on this morning. this is in londonderry, we also had a bit of snow in parts of scotland, not just a bit of snow in parts of scotland, notjust in a bit of snow in parts of scotland, not just in ireland, a bit of snow in parts of scotland, notjust in ireland, northern ireland, this is here in perth and kinross. you can see the depth of that. if you are travelling this morning there is still snow in other levels. that will go into the afternoon as well. there is ice not just in northern scotland and northern ireland, but also england and wales. you can find out how the roads are faring on your local bbc radio station as well as everywhere else. you can see the rain indicated
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by the blues and is no by the whites. some of this is hail and snow, but in scotland and northern ireland in particular, its at lower levels. some sleet, a real slushy mix with snow in the hills, there is a risk of ice. any showers could still have sleet on higher ground, but at lower levels it is likely to be rain. the east coast is pretty much drier but northern ireland, northern england and scotland, watch out for ice. we still have showers at lower levels, rain, but for a time we will see snow at modest levels across northern ireland and scotla nd levels across northern ireland and scotland before that snow level rises into the hills later. now, it will be quite a lot of showers around today, some of them heavy with them hail and thunder embedded in them. and we've got some blustery winds as well. those are blowing those showers west to is. joe was in devonin those showers west to is. joe was in devon in core, isles of scilly, the english channel and the channel islands —— devon and cornwall police
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gusts at 50 miles an hour. these are the temperatures if you are looking at your thermometer, a— eight as we push towards the south. because there is a cold wind it will feel more like losing a newcastle or plus fourin more like losing a newcastle or plus four in london. so it is a day for wrapping up warmly if you haven't yet tapped outside. as we head onto the evening and overnight it still is going to be blustery, we will have all of these showers, still with some snow in the hills. if you managed to stay in the shelter of the wind, that means you could see some pockets of frost. but once again tomorrow morning ice is likely to bea again tomorrow morning ice is likely to be a hazard on untreated surfaces. tomorrow, during the day we have this transient ridge of high pressure a cross we have this transient ridge of high pressure across us. we also have this weather front coming in, moving across scotland and ireland, the isobars tell us it is going to be another blustery day. so we start off in another blustery day. so we start offina another blustery day. so we start off in a dry note with some sunshine, a risk of highs, some showers and for england and it will remain fairly settled. for northern ireland, you can get some of this rain heading north across scotland,
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thatis rain heading north across scotland, that is preceded by some hail and snow and we are still in the cold air in the north but something milder coming our way in the south. back to you. i suppose that will be good news, thank you, carol. and for those photographs as well. here is a question for you. what role do the big supermarkets have been cutting carbon emissions? victoria will look at that and talk to the boss of sainsbury ‘s. good morning to you. we will put some of these examples to mike coupe injust a moment. first here is an example of what they are offering. they will devote £1 billion to making sainsbury‘s net zero. in practice, cutting down on carbon emissions and for the emissions they have to make, finding ways to offset them by supporting schemes that suck gases out of the
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atmosphere. part of that is going to be cutting back on carbon emissions and part of that is a kind of carbon removal processes, things like planting trees. so it is a combination of those two things. in practice, for a business like sainsbury‘s, that means rethinking how they do chilling and storage and all that kind of stuff, because that is really energy intensive, how much water they are guzzling, and how much food waste they are generating as well, because that is a big aspect for the business as well. back in march of last year, greenpeace, the environmental charity, said that sainsbury‘s was number ten of ten of the big supermarkets when it comes to plastic policy. they were in last place. mike coupejoins mike coupe joins us mike coupejoins us now mike coupe joins us now from mike coupejoins us now from our london newsroom. thank you for appearing on the programme. lots of people would say this is fantastic, great that you are doing something, but why is it taking you 20 years to do something your customers want to happen now? yes, as you say, it is an ambitious programme over 20 yea rs. an ambitious programme over 20 years. it is ten years earlier than the government has set targets for the government has set targets for the nation as a whole, and we think it is very ambitious. and of course,
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we have to bring our customers on the journey with us. that is why we made the pledge over 20 years. as you say, we have made significant inroads in reducing plastic in our business, but we know there is a lot more that we can do. your big rival, tesco, is also pledging to be net zero on greenhouse gas emissions, but is able to include its entire supply chain in this. and walmart, one of the biggest retailers in the world, is looking to do the same thing, the owner of asda, of course. why can't you make that pledge to customers? well, we are making a pledge. we have signed up to science —based targets, so we have to work with our suppliers to eliminate their carbon emissions as well. we will be writing to our suppliers and asking them to set targets for themselves and come on the journey with us. ok, now, £1 billion is a lot of money, and obviously it has to come from somewhere. i am wondering whether shoppers who are ona wondering whether shoppers who are on a budget will have to make a choice between paying 30p for a bag
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like this, this is one of your reusable fruit and veg bags, orjust p0p reusable fruit and veg bags, orjust pop in more pieces of fruit and veg, we have some apples in here, inside the bag. that is a really tricky choice for customers, and one that lots of people are not able to make. well, we have been really pleased with the response of our customers to us eliminating reusable plastic bags, or rather, plastic bags from our produce departments, and giving our produce departments, and giving our customers the choice of using reusable bags, as you say, a30 p. there has be some disincentive from using those bags, for obvious reasons, but we're really pleased to see that our customers continue to shop with us and are gradually changing their behaviour. this is pa rt changing their behaviour. this is part of the challenge we have as an organisation, to bring customers on the journey with us. we don't have all the answers, but we are making a lot of progress, and as you said, we the most improved retailer as far as the most improved retailer as far as the greenpeace survey is concerned in the space of six months. still a lot of work to be done. tesco thinks they have the answer when it comes to multipacks of tin. i have a four
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pack of beans, still in the plastic. why can't you get rid of the plastic the way that tesco is doing? well, again that is an example of perhaps again that is an example of perhaps a move we will make in the future. we know that particularly our produce departments, our milk, plastic packaging and carbonated soft drinks, are the three biggest areas of plastic in our business, and we are focusing on dealing with those first and foremost. and there are other areas we know we have to improve. we are on thatjourney. we have said we will reduce our plastic by 15% by 2025 and we have made huge progress in a relatively short period of time —— 50%. progress in a relatively short period of time -- 50%. and you can't see my table, but i will tell you what is on it. i have bananas, broccoli, all sorts of things in plastic that we went round and bought at one of your stores yesterday. even a shrink—wrapped swede. who needs this? if you are really serious about plastic reduction, why don't you just sell all of this stuff loose and only loose, not give people the option
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for this sort of thing? —— swede. well, we sell produce loose and we have reduced our prices of packaged products, which is a big move for us, but plastic packaging does have a role to play. it protects the products we sell, eliminate and reduces waste, it lengthens date codes, it means customers have more date life in their homes, and if we took away all the plastic tomorrow, we would throw away a lot more food, not just we would throw away a lot more food, notjust in our business, but in people's homes. so all of this is a trade off and balance. we don't pretend that we have all of the a nswe rs pretend that we have all of the answers right now, but we know that there is a significant progress we need to make over the next 20 years. talking about trade—offs and balances, i know dan and louise have had their eyes on these croissants this morning. i have two loose croissants, bought for 75p each, £1.50 for the two. butjust next to them, pretty much the same, two croissants, 1.30 pounds. what is the
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incentive if it is cheaper to buy it in the plastic? well, i am really pleased they will eat our croissant straight after the interview. they are two different products, i can't see them but i know they are different products, but as i said, we have already made progress to eliminate a lot of packaging in our fresh fruit and vegetable departments, and there are other areas of the store, like the bakeries, where we need to also make progress. so bakeries, where we need to also make ro ress. so we're bakeries, where we need to also make progress. so we're not again pretending that we have all of the a nswe rs. pretending that we have all of the answers. this is a journey, and it is about making sure that we make the right changes in our business. we don'tjust eliminate plastic and increase food waste in our customers peoples homes and in our business. and our customers come on the journey with us, that is all part of the programme of change that we are making. ok, now, since we last spoke to you in the programme at the beginning of the month, you have announced that you are stepping down. in april you told the bbc, i am sticking with the company, i am not going anywhere. this was after that plan to take over asda went south. what has changed for you?” promised myself i would retire by
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the age of 60 and that is what is happening right now. i love thejob ido, happening right now. i love thejob i do, i've done it for eight years, i have worked for sainsbury‘s and the grocery industry for 35 years. it is the right time for me and for the business. we are in great shape, we are doing a greatjob for our customers and we have a really strong management team. so i am looking forward to taking a break from the end of may, and we will see what happens after that. well, good luck with it. enjoy retirement. thank you, and you can hand over the croissants later. there are others available from different shops, but happy to eat them as well. passengers landing in the uk from wuhan, the city where the coronavirus has killed over 100 people, will be met by health authorities. the health secretary has said those who come back from wuhan should stay indoors. officials are still trying to trace more than 1a00 british people who have recently returned from the wider
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hubei province. test for the virus in the uk have all come back negative so far. people who have recently returned are advised to keep away from others and call the nhs 111 keep away from others and call the nhs111 number. to explain a little more about what self isolation means, we are joined more about what self isolation means, we arejoined by a consultant at the liverpool school of tropical medicine. very different from the doctor beating we were talking about with the transport secretary earlier on “— with the transport secretary earlier on —— doctor dr beeching. is it as simple as it sounds? the idea is that you stay at home, especially don't go into crowded places, don't go into lifts with people, and that sort of thing. and don't potentially spread the virus. because u nfortu nately spread the virus. because unfortunately the incubation period, thatis unfortunately the incubation period, that is the time from infection until getting symptoms, maybe up to 14 until getting symptoms, maybe up to
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1a days. and so government is asking people to stay—at—home for 1a days. and presumably very important not, for example, to go to the doctors, so call the doctor rather than go, presumably. absolutely, it is like any other infectious disease. you don't want to be there in the waiting room with lots of other people. if a person has come back and developed symptoms, a cough or a fever or shortness of breath or chest tightness, they should ring 111 and then somebody will ring them back and assess what the risk might be. does it work, self isolation? does it stop viruses being spread? as far as we know. it is a very good question. it seems sensible and logical that it is much better than encouraging people to go to work. if you think about it, nobody really wa nts you think about it, nobody really wants the person with a bad cold next to their network. they would rather they stayed away and stayed at home. it is exactly the same principle for this. in terms of what we know and what we don't know about the coronavirus, this strand of it, whereabouts are we at the moment? is ita whereabouts are we at the moment? is it a case that there is a lot of
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information out there that we don't have at the moment? yes, i think it is quite remarkable thinking back to 2002, with sars, it took quite awhile. we already know what the viruses. it is amazing we already have test for it in the uk, specific tests that we can get back. we know what kind of virus that is, but the problem is it may be mutating, it may be changing stop the initial suggestions are that it is quite infectious, but perhaps not as severe as the sars virus, which is a sort of relative. but that could change over time. so it is an evolving situation. given that you don't know too much about this particular coronavirus, but comparing it to influenza, people die offlu, comparing it to influenza, people die of flu, don't they? so how does it compare? so far, if you think about the patients who get to hospital, which of course is the tip of the iceberg, the mortality reported from china is around 3% to 596 reported from china is around 3% to 5% so far. that may change. people sick enough to get into hospital
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with flu probably have a higher mortality rate. to put that into perspective, we think that is thousands and thousands of people. but that could change. but it is in that sort of bracket. so if you are starting to feel unwell, and i am assuming that is sort of temperature and whatever symptoms then come from that, what is the plan? what should you be doing? well, stay at home. if you be doing? well, stay at home. if you develop the symptoms and you have come back, i emphasise that you have come back, i emphasise that you have to have had contact or come back from that area of china, then ring 111. they will either get your gp or someone else to phone you up, and then a decision will be made whether you need to go to be assessed, probably at a hospital, a specialist unit. other than that, it is old—fashioned specialist unit. other than that, it is old —fashioned precautions. specialist unit. other than that, it is old—fashioned precautions. you know, if you have a runny nose or a cough or a cold, blow your nose on tissues, dispose of those safely, wash your hands frequently, because this is spread by people coughing in your face, this is spread by people coughing in yourface, or droplets this is spread by people coughing in your face, or droplets falling this is spread by people coughing in yourface, or droplets falling on this is spread by people coughing in your face, or droplets falling on a table surface and then someone
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else's hand. so good hand hygiene, good old—fashioned else's hand. so good hand hygiene, good old —fashioned don't else's hand. so good hand hygiene, good old—fashioned don't sneeze in people's faces. sneeze into the crook of your elbow, not on your hand. all extremely good advice for, as you say, the common cold as well. thank you very much indeed. we still have plenty to come, here until 9:15am this morning. what are you laughing at? timejust flies. you are having one of those days where it is going quickly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been stabbed to death near a busy railway station in south london during yesterday evening's rush hour. officers were called to east croydon shortly before 5:00pm, but paramedics and an air ambulance team were unable to save him. the local mp, sarah jones, says the killing has left her heartbroken. there are extra police by the station this morning, and they are appealing
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for information. surrey county cricket club is launching a scholarship in an effort to create new opportunities for young african—caribbean players. it is aimed at boys and girls aged between 11 and 18, and it will provide access to coaching, sports science and personal development. free open days will be held at the oval cricket ground, and it is aimed at increasing the reach of the sport in underrepresented communities. an animal hospital in putney is appealing to londoners to donate any spare baby socks. it is to keep the paws of special pets warm as they recover from operations. as well as cats, they can be helpful for rabbits and dogs. the putney animal hospital centre says it also uses the socks as little jumpers for kittens. a snapshot of hackney in the 1970s and early ‘80s has been published, showing the lives of people who lived and worked there. photographer neil martinson started taking the pictures while he was at school.
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he says hackney was a place to leave, with its crumbling housing estates and high unemployment. but he also says there was vitality and resilience among local people. you can see more of his pictures on our website. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground has no service between south tottenham and barking. minor delays between gospel oak and south tottenham because of repairs to the track from yesterday. in south—east london, there is no woolwich ferry. that is because of technical problems. that puts extra pressure on the nearby blackwall tunnel. and in harrow, kenton road is closed between northwick park hospital and peterborough road, again because of a burst watermain. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. we've had a bit of rain overnight, some cloud this morning, so temperatures this morning largely above zero. now, the rain clearing away eastwards. we'll see some sunshine today, but also still some scattered showers, all accompanied by quite a fresh westerly breeze. now, the showers, one or two
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of which could be quite heavy, might get a bit of wintriness over higher ground, the chilterns down towards the downs. elsewhere, you might get a bit of hail and a rumble of thunder. temperatures today between four and six celsius, but factor in that westerly wind, it is going to feel a few degrees colder. now, overnight tonight, largely dry and largely clear, temperatures dropping right the way down. still breezy, though, overnight. but with a minimum of —1, and after showers today, we mightjust see one or two icy stretches first thing on wednesday morning. brief ridge of high pressure builds in tomorrow, so we should get a largely dry day, with plenty of sunshine. still breezy, 10 celsius the maximum temperature, and for thursday onwards, it turns more unsettled. but we're dragging in some milder air as we head through the weekend. neser feltz is talking about all things brexit in a few minutes' time. goodbye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. 0ur headlines today... no comment from buckingham palace after prince andrew was accused of "zero co—operation" with an american inquiry into the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein. senior ministers and intelligence chiefs will meet today to decide whether controversial chinese telecoms firm huawei can help build the uk's 5g network. a widow's fight for more support for veterans with ptsd, after the loss of her husband. he made me feel alive, he made me feel safe. he brought out the best in everything. ijust wish i could say thank you to him. a glacier the size of britain is melting more quickly than previously feared. the scientist behind the biggest project in antarctic history willjoin us on the sofa. roger federer does it again. he saves seven match points to beat the american tennys sandgren at the australian open. federer now into the semi—finals
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we have seen some overnight snow across scotland and northern ireland in particular, at lower levels. the snow level will rise through the afternoon, the rest of us are looking for a mixture of sunshine and showers, some heavy and thundery with hail, and a cold wind. i will have more later. it's tuesday, the 28th of january, our top story: an american lawyer has called on prince andrew to help the us authorities with their investigation into the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein. it comes after a prosecutor in new york said the fbi had received "zero co—operation" from the prince's lawyers — despite repeated approaches. speaking to us here on breakfast, the lawyer lisa bloom said that the duke should now "do the right thing." we can join our reporter andy moore now, who is at buckingham palace for us this morning. this is quite something for the
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prosecutor in the united states to say there has been zero cooperation? eight was a very flat, bold statement two months or so after prince andrew said he would cooperate. perhaps the american authorities are trying to shame or embarrass him into helping them. there has been no comment from buckingham palace, they are referring us to prince andrew's legal team some 1a hours after the statement in america, still nothing from those lawyers so we don't know if there has been a misunderstanding, if prince andrew will give a statement at some stage all, as the american prosecutors suggested, it is a flat know, we can't help. lisa bloom is one of the lawyers representing some of epstein's victims and she said five of her clients were outraged and disappointed that prince andrew wasn't apparently co—operating with this inquiry. push has come to
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shove. this is a serious criminal investigation, i represent five of the dozens of women who allege they we re the dozens of women who allege they were the victims of sexual assault by this predator, jeffrey epstein. it is time for anyone with information to come forward and answer questions. lisa bloom has been repeating what she said previously, one of her clients was ina previously, one of her clients was in a nightclub with virginia roberts and prince andrew. intangible subsequently accused of sleeping with virginia roberts, she says she was traffic to him by prince andrew. prince andrew denies any sexual encounter with her, he says he didn't notice anything suspicious or u ntowa rd didn't notice anything suspicious or untoward when he was staying in the homes ofjeffrey epstein. the american prosecutor said his criminal inquiry is pursuing at pace
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and also said they were investigating co—conspirators of jeffrey epstein, although he did not identify all say who they were. thank you very much, andy moore at buckingham palace. borisjohnson will chair a meeting of ministers and intelligence chiefs today, to decide whether or not to allow huawei a role in building britain's 5g network. washington has warned that granting the chinese telecoms giant access to the system would jeopardise intelligence sharing between the us and britain. here's our security correspondent, gordon corera. this morning ministers and intelligence chiefs will gather for one of the most contentious and significant decisions the national security council has had to take — whether to let the chinese company huawei play a role in building the uk's new 5g telecoms network. here in the uk, allow consumers, businesses, in the uk to have access to fantastic technology, fantastic communications, but also protect our security interest and protect our key partnerships and other security
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powers around the world. the us has argued it's a security risk to let it in because it could be used by china for espionage or even sabotage — something the company denies. there are two options for government, the first is to exclude the company entirely, that's what the uk's closest ally, the united states, wants. but it would come at a significant economic cost since it would require removing existing huawei equipment from the infrastructure and slowing down the adoption of improved connectivity, a priority for government. the second option is to allow huawei in, but with restrictions on where and how it operates in order to try to manage the risk, something intelligence and officials believe is possible. that's thought to be the more likely outcome, with the restrictions painted is particularly tough on the company's role. unless the divisions are deep, the decision is expected today —
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it's one with important consequences for security, prosperity and the uk's relations with its closest ally. gordon corera, bbc news. the transport secretary grant shapps has told breakfast that they're working to establish exactly how many british citizens are currently in the virus hit chinese city of wuhan. there's been another rise in the number of deaths from the coronavirus, with the figure now standing at 106. severe travel restrictions are in place in the country, in an attempt to stop the infection from spreading. mr shapps told us that they need people to come forward before any plans can be made to help them leave the area. for anybody who is there, one of the issues we have working with our partners internationally on this is identifying how many british citizens there are in wuhan, one of the things we are asking people to do is to contact the consulate to make them aware, people had started to do that and we are working on arrangements as well.
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air accident investigators in the united states have described the site of the helicopter crash which killed basketball legend kobe bryant and eight others, as "devastating". the investigation is expected to focus on the foggy weather conditions. let's talk to our correspondent david willis who's in los angeles. thank you for coming on the programme again. i know it is very late at night there and we can still see so many people outside the sta ples see so many people outside the staples centre paying their respects, and tributes to kobe brya nt respects, and tributes to kobe bryant flooding in? absolutely, this is the scene at the staples centre in downtown los angeles, the home of the la la kers in downtown los angeles, the home of the la lakers where kobe bryant spent its entire basketball career, winning five nba titles along the way and acquiring basically a fan base around the world. this area has become a makeshift shrine if you like, thousands of people have come here in the very short time since that crash occurred on sunday,
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basically to lay rees, light candles, write messages or simply to shed atm. —— choulay wreaths. it is past midnight here and people are still coming. at the grammys, the singer alicia keys referred to this whole area as the home that kobe built, it is fair to say that lots of what surrounds us here would not be here were it not for the success of the la lakers and what was its star player. meanwhile, about 30 miles away, a very grim surge through the wreckage continues. they have brought in drones to map the site of that crash and they have a weather expert, a sign that they believe fog might at least have been a contributory factor to the crash on sunday. thank you very much, david. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it has been pretty miserable out and
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about and lots of people seeing snow? yes, lots of weather watchers have been sending pictures of snow, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. there is some snow in 0magh, and parts of northern england in the higher ground had seen overnight snow. you can see the depth of the snow in perth and kinross, but it will rise through the morning, we have seen it at lower levels but it will not last. there is some ice on untreated surfaces, not just scotland, northern ireland and northern england the parts of wales as well. there could be some tricky travelling conditions for a while yet. the rain showers are indicated by blue and the snow showers are indicated by whites. we have a wintry mix across the south—west of
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england coming out of the showers, sleet at lower levels and drain, some snow in the hills across wales. in northern england we have seen snow coming out of the showers crossing. for northern ireland, you have seen snow at lower levels which will rise, and a similar story across scotland, the snow level rising through the day. we will be left with showers, most of them at lower levels will be of rain, we will have a mixture of hail, thunder and lightning and the snow will be in the hills, but driven along by blustery winds wherever you are. the strongest winds will be across the els of city, devon and cornwall, english channel and the channel islands. we will have guests between 50 and 60 mph. temperatures of four in aberdeen, 18 london's although it might be what your thermometer will say, this is how it will feel, freezing in edinburgh and four in london so wrap up warmly if you are
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stepping out. —— temperatures of fourin stepping out. —— temperatures of four in aberdeen, eight in london. if you are in the shelter from the wind, you could see pockets of frost tomorrow morning, watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. across england and wales we have a transient ridge of high pressure but we have the weather front coming which could spread northern ireland with its rain before moving across scotland. some of this rain could be heavy and persistent, preceded by hill snow. for england, wales and parts of northern ireland, it will be drier, a bit brighter and we will see showers with highs in the south of ten or 11, still chilly in the know. the tenant 11 in the south tomorrow will feel like ten or 11 with a different air mass moving across us. let the ten and 11 in the south. by thursday, rememberthe rain moving north at sun wednesday?
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there it is. then we have rain coming southwards from the north—west of scotland towards the south—east. so there is the risk of localised flooding, the totals will be mounting. for northern ireland, england and wales, quite a murky day with lots of low cloud. dank with some drizzle, but it will be a bit milderfor some drizzle, but it will be a bit milder for all events. some drizzle, but it will be a bit milderfor all events. by some drizzle, but it will be a bit milder for all events. by friday we could even see 1a degrees somewhere in the south. thank you, carol. you are watching breakfast from the bbc. you may remember earlier this month we spoke to alicia davis, whose husband jamie, an army veteran, took his own life. alicia gave a heart—breaking account of jamie's struggles with post—traumatic stress disorder, in the years leading up to his death. since she told her story on breakfast, around 100 ex—service personnel have come forward looking for help. 0ur reporter fiona lamdin has been to see alicia to find out what more needs to be done. he just always tried protecting me.
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he always... he'd wrap his arms around me, he would make me laugh, he would make me smile. he is such a gentle giant. a big teddy bear. and gives you the best hugs. i'm going to miss those hugs. he'd just wrap his arms around you and you'd feel safe. jamie davies was 17 when he joined the four rifles. he just always, always wanted to be in the army. and when i met him, that's what i loved, that passion. and by 19, he was serving in iraq and afghanistan. he witnessed his friend losing both his legs in an ied explosion. the next month, one of his best friends had been shot in the head doing jamie's job. and the guilt from that never left him. he always said that that should have been me. he never got over that. and then the next month he got shot.
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so just... just one of those things should have been enough for somebody to think, hang on, go make sure you see somebody. but three in three months. five years later, jamie left the army but was left with post—traumatic stress disorder. for him, every time he fell asleep it was hell. he couldn't escape it. they are screaming stuff and shaking and thrashing about in bed. it just. .. it breaks you, because you just want to help them. yeah, i loved how he always looked after people... jamie tried desperately hard to lead a normal life, throwing himself into the local rugby club, but he didn't get the help he needed. but, yeah, it would be like when we were at a train station and, like, the tannoy would go off, and i think that would trigger something and he just disappear. and then, two weeks ago, it all got too much.
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he just sort of... he switched his phone off, because because he knew we would geo—tag him and we'd find him, and he didn't want to be found. when i did get the message, itjust... my heart sank. it said, i love you, and i'm sorry, i don't want to do this to you any more. and please find somebody that deserves you and the boys. hours later, aged just 30, jamie took his life. the boys are his absolute life. he'd do anything for them. he loved them so much. so for him to have done this, itjust shows how bad it was in his head and... reliving that torture over and over again, it just. .. i can't imagine the sort of stuff that he must have been thinking to have done that. there's been no official study on veterans' suicide here in the uk, but it's thought over the last
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couple of years there's been an increase. i'm angry with myself that i didn't see it, i'm angry with the fact that he did it, i'm angry at the fact that he didn't have the help. yes, the army medicals, they even look after their teeth and everything that they do for them, is really good. but they don't do anything mentally to help these soldiers when they get back. all of them together, they should have worked together to say, ok, if we're going to sign a piece of paper to send you over there, then we can sign a piece of paper to say, let's help you when you get back. you haven't even had his funeral yet. you are incredibly brave to be speaking to us. ifjust one person just picks up and asks for help and just take those first steps, then... that would mean the world to me, it really would. but it's thought 100 veterans have
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reached out for help since hearing this family's story. for his funeral, your boys are going to wear his medals? yes, they've got one each to wear, so... jamie's family and friends will say goodbye to him later this week. i keep thinking that he's going to walk through the door and just dump his bags everywhere and say, "oh, what's for dinner? are we having macaroni and cheese? that's my favourite." and i keep waiting for him to do that. he made me feel alive. he made me feel safe. he brought out the best in everything. ijust wish i could say thank you to him. fiona lamdin, bbc news. let's say thank you to alicia for talking to us and telling their story, which is similar to other people's as well. she is meeting the
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minister responsible for veterans, johnny mercer, later today, and we will update you tomorrow. we can speak now with the former head of the british army, lord richard dannatt. thank you for spending time with us this morning. i know you were listening to that, it is so hard to hear stories like that, of alicia andjamie her hear stories like that, of alicia and jamie her husband. when you hear that, what does that make you feel, given yourformer that, what does that make you feel, given your former role? my heart absolutely goes out to alicia, it is absolutely goes out to alicia, it is absolutely tragic that her husband jamie felt he had no option but to ta ke jamie felt he had no option but to take his own life. it is a tragedy for that family and for any family when it happens. i think we have to try to put this in some form of wider context. i think it is fair to say there is something of an epidemic of cases of people taking their own lives up and down the country, i'm told reliably that every 17 minutes, someone makes an attempt to take their own life and
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every 107 minutes, someone tragically succeeds. it is notjust confined to the military. hitherto, coroners inquest do not record whether someone was a veteran or not, so it is quite hard to get fa cts o n not, so it is quite hard to get facts on this. but there is no doubt that someone like jamie, serving in difficult circumstances and two campaigns in iraq and afghanistan, saw and experienced and did things that are quite horrific for young people, so that group is particularly vulnerable. i think the ministry of defence recognises this, iam glad ministry of defence recognises this, i am glad alicia is meeting johnny mercer later, he is a ex—soldier himself. people know there is a real problem, the government is just set up problem, the government is just set up an office for veterans affairs and have produced or are about to produce a strategy for veterans. much more needs to be done, much more has been done that much more needs to be done, but my heart goes
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out to alicia and other families in that situation. veterans suicide is not recorded at the moment by the government so it is really hard to find the true scale of the problem. you spoke about general statistics but we try to do some digging and some charities estimate that about 73 people took their own lives last year, veterans, does that shock you? of course. i don't how accurate it is, but 7373 too many. we have to work harder to prevent this. —— megabit 73 is 73 too many. between 60 and 70% of people who take their lives have never sought help, it is said. that is a tragedy in its own way. it was said after the falklands that it was often 20 two 25 years before a ex—service men would ask for help. awareness means it has
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been budgeted three of four years. people have got to know that a mental—health issue is an illness like any other. when you are ill you need to ask for help. there is help. help is good in many ways but in many ways is not good enough. what the big issues is the transition from serving soldier to civilian and under the responsible to the national health service —— one of the biggest users. the nhs is struggling with suicide across the country and it also struggles to understand the particular needs of service people, veterans, who had seen and done things beyond the normal, particularly on these overseas campaigns, and they need special help. we need to make sure that all gps are aware of the special needs of veterans, particularly the swift passage of medical documents from the ministry of defence on discharge to gp surgeries so if people have a
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medical history, a mental history background, their cases understood. much is being done but much more needs to be done. of you join the army in 1971, you ahead of the british army from 2062 —— to 2009. —— you ahead of the british army from 2006 to 2009. is ptsd known more now because people are more willing to talk about it?” more now because people are more willing to talk about it? i think mental—health has been an issue as long as warfare has gone on. in the first world war we called it shellshocked, in more recent years we have come to understand it is much more treatable provided people put their hand up and say, doctor, i need help. isorted put their hand up and say, doctor, i need help. i sorted through my a0 yea rs need help. i sorted through my a0 years serving in the army. i think we have got better at recognising and treating it but we are not doing enough. —— i saw it to my a0 years.
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lodge richard dunne edge, thank you for joining lodge richard dunne edge, thank you forjoining us. thank you. we will be following alicia's story, but it is very important listening to somebody of his calibre, the message that if you need help, go and get it, it is really important. that figure, between 60 and 70% of people who take their own life have never sought help, that is a really graphic figure. we will continue following that story, especially with alicia. in the 1960s, hundreds of train stations and thousands of miles of track were closed across britain, following a report by the chairman of british railways, dr richard beeching. but now work will begin to see if any of those cuts can be reversed. 0ur transport correspondent tom burridge has been to one town in lancashire to see if the line there, can be brought back to life. they have been renovating the railway in their town last four
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years — volunteers who want this, the only line into fleetwood, reopened. —— they have been renovating the railway lost by their town for yea rs. the railway corridor is here, and we are very passionate on getting it reopened. if it reopened to fleetwood, it would make the joined—up transport that we need in this area. work needed to bring it back to life will now be assessed, as well as the value a functioning railway would bring. back in the day, you used to be able to get a train from fleetwood, half a mile in that direction, right down that track, direct into london euston. but for around half a century, it has been a challenge for people to even get to places nearby, like manchester or preston. the line was one of hundreds to close in the 1960s and ‘70s. dr beeching's new look for british railways is as sweeping as expected. richard beeching's plan was radical. more than 2,000 stations will be closed.
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scotland's rail network, before and after. wales and the north of england. today, a commitment from the government that it will spend £500 million on bringing some lines, like fleetwood, back. a move to reverse those cuts is welcome news for those living and working in the town. how much does this town need it? this town needs a lot, to be fair. the train station, bringing the railway back into the town, would help a hell of a lot. and the high street has been forgotten, so all the shops that closed down on the high street don't seem to be open. —— don't seem to reopen. it's all empty stores. so having a train line coming back into the town might boost businesses, to get more into the high street. when you are a town of 25,000, tucked away on the lancashire coast, with only reminders of the links you used to have, it's a no—brainer.
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we've had enquiries about a three—day music festival here before, and we had to turn it down, because there's just not the links for people to get here. and it would just be so amazing to have that on your doorstep, as a young person. connecting places like this is something the conservatives believe they have to deliver if they are to retain the support that won them the election. the people we met believe this line will mean a brighter future. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. morning. we haven't seen too much of the white stuff this winter, but for scotland, northern ireland, we've seen snow through the night. you can seen snow through the night. you can see through this morning the bulk of the snow has been through central and southern areas of scotland,
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tending to clear, wintry showers feeding in behind that but for some, winter wonderland seems this morning. that is in argyle and bute from our weather watcher. through the day we continue with wintry showers, snow over the higher ground of western scotland, the highlands. receipts and wintry showers across north—west england, wales, heavy showers toward southern areas of england, that could contain some hell. maximum temperatures today for— 8 degrees but bear in mind there will be a fairly brisk west or south westerly wind, especially around southern areas. it will impact on how it feels outside. this is the feels like temperature, zero, one, 2 degrees for many of us. feeling quite cold through the day. through this evening and tonight we continue with wintry showers, moving in across scotland, north—west england, much of the snow will be over higher ground but temperatures close to freezing once again. real risk of ice first thing tomorrow
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morning across many parts and we had some overnight showers. temperatures dropping down to about freezing or below. into wednesday, low pressure towards the north. bringing in this weather system from the west very gradually. any of us will start to try on wednesday, some sunshine as well but watch out for the frosty, icy start to the day. the cloud and rain making its way into the north of northern ireland, scotland, as it bumps into colder air there will be some snow over the higher ground once again. state largely try the further south you are, some sunshine, temperatures coming up a touch and southern areas, 8—10d here. goodbye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with ben bland and david eades. to ban or not to ban. the british government decides today whether to freeze huawei out of its 5g infrastructure. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 28th of january. crunch day for huawei: the uk decides whether to ban the chinese firm's equipment from its 5g network also in the programme the economic cost of the spread of the coronavirus in china — as several carmakers and other firms being forced to take action.
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