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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 30, 2020 10:00am-11:02am GMT

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hello, it's thursday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, and we're live from new broadcasting house. around 200 brits stranded in wuhan aren't coming home today, as planned, because the plane wasn't given permission to take off. so when are they coming back? we'll talk to people trying to escape the coronovirus, which has killed 170 people and spread to every region in china. we'll talk to the benefits advisor who says poverty shaming will not stop her from taking a stand against universal credit rules, which she says forced her into £2,000 of debt.
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single mum nichola salvato is taking the department of work and pensions to the high court. and the latest candidate to announce he's running for london mayor is this rapper. # like, how many times have we gone to the ballot box and seen no change? # mps lie in parliament, on tv, and in our face. # like, how many times have we heard them scream out "brexit" — what's that mean? # the single market don't mean nothing on road. # don't sell my dreams... #. we'll be speaking to drillminister, who says he's running for the capital's highest office on behalf of all those who feel "forgotten, persecuted, or ignored".
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hi, and welcome to the programme. a lot of your kids have got a mobile phone, but do you let your child sleep with their phone by their bed? plenty do according to a new survey today. and the research found that majority of kids have their fine by the age of seven —— their own phone. i feel quite shocked by that. maybe iamon i feel quite shocked by that. maybe iam on my i feel quite shocked by that. maybe i am on my own. how old was your child when they got the phone and do you let your son and daughter have their phone overnight in their room? do you let your son or daughter have it in their bedroom? use the hashtag victoria live. about 200 britons are still stranded in wuhan — the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak — because their evacuation flight has been delayed. the foreign office said there had been complications getting permission from the chinese government. the number of confirmed deaths in china now stands at 170, with the virus spreading to every region of the country's
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mainland. the chancellor, sajid javid, has decided to give his backing to the h52 rail project, ahead of a key meeting with boris johnson and the transport secretary, grant shapps. mrjavid is expected to tell the prime minister that he's decided to support the controversial rail link, after studying treasury analysis of its impact on regional development and rail capacity. last week, a leaked government review revealed the project could cost more than £100 billion. more than half of children sleep with their mobile phone beside their bed, according to a survey of young people's media use. the childwise report also found most children now have their own phone by the age of seven, and 44% feel anxious if they can't get a signal. the next five years are likely to be the warmest on record, the met office has warned. average global temperatures between now and 2024 are forecast to be higher than in the last five years, which is the hottest five—year
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period yet recorded. there's been a significant rise in the number of prison officers taking time off work because of stress, anxiety or depression. in the 12 months to the end of last march, nearly 2,000 frontline staff in england and wales representing about nine percent of the workforce took sick leave because of mental health problems. the figures were provided to bbc news under freedom of information laws. prosecutors in tokyo have issued a new arrest warrant for the former nissan boss, carlos ghosn, for illegally leaving japan while he awaited trial for financial misconduct. a former us green beret, michael taylor, and two other men are also wanted on suspicion of smuggling him out of the country to lebanon. an owl rescued from a ditch, and thought to be injured, was in fact just too fat to fly, a bird rescue centre has said. suffolk 0wl sanctuary said the "soggy" bird — who remains anonymous — was brought in by a landowner. the creature was found to be over her natural weight by a third.
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a strict diet was imposed and the bird, now a featherweight, has been released back to the wild. soggy anonymous owls, and we don't hit too much about them. we don't, and we are very large you brought that story for us. we can speak now to kharn lambert he's a pe teacher who has been stuck in wuhan with his 81 yr old gran — he told us yesterday he was staying in wuhan but his gran wld be on the flight, now he's changed his mind, and will be flying back to the uk when that flight eventually leaves. adam bridgeman lives in wuhan with his wife and one—month—old son. he's been told his chinese wife can't return with him, so won't get on a plane if it means
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splitting up his family. and matt raw, he lives in wuhan with his chinese wife, and they care for his mother with alzheimers. matt and his mother are booked onto the evacuation flight, but are giving up their seats, because his wife is not allowed to travel with them. hugh pennington has advised the government on several past disease outbreaks. thanks for talking to us, all of you and your reaction to the fact that the flight is delayed and what have you been told about exactly when it is going? and that, let me start with you. hello, victoria and hello listeners. i think like everybody else we have heard nothing in the last communication i had was this morning when they announced that the flight had morning when they announced that the flight had been delayed and it wasn't allowed to take off but we are ata wasn't allowed to take off but we are at a point now where my wife cannot come along so there's no point in us trying any more. so you are resigned to staying there?|j think are resigned to staying there?” think so. i think after this i
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will be calling to say that this just isn't going to fly. how do you feel about that? well, i don't know, to be honest. i think there is a danger 110w be honest. i think there is a danger now of in taking the flight especially with the news we receive this morning, the chinese news, saying three japanese people were infected whilst on the evacuation flight, infected whilst on the evacuation flight, so the risks of staying here versus the risks of taking the flight, versus the risks of taking the flight, and even then, my mother can come with us but my wife can't, so i've lost half of my space for her. adam, again, you are in a similar scenario. you have been told that your chinese wife cannot come back with you and your one—month—old son.
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first of all, how do you feel about that? it's a little bit upsetting but at the same time, i appreciate that we have been offered help because i've been here for a long time, about six years now and i do appreciate that there is something being offered to me. but at the same time it's an awful situation to have a newborn baby and i don't want to separate them from his mother. it's a bit upsetting but it is what it is. you are sounding very pragmatic about it. is there anxiety for you and your wife about the health of your newborn son. i am worried about him because he needs to get vaccinations and checkups and if anything that goes wrong with him, he needs help, but while we are here
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lam not he needs help, but while we are here i am not keen on taking him to a hospital because of the situation, so we are hospital because of the situation, so we are worried. because you don't wa nt to so we are worried. because you don't want to go out, you mean, you don't wa nt to want to go out, you mean, you don't want to go out, you mean, you don't want to go to a hospital where there are loads of people being treated for the coronavirus? exactly. welcome back to the programme, we did not know we would be talking to bay and we assumed your grandma would be on the flight but obviously it's been delayed. how is she. she is 81 and visibly desperate to come back to the uk, so how is she doing and what have you been told about when she can come back? she is doing 0k. she is packed up and ready to go and is waiting for the confirmation of when the flight will be. we did receive a text message to say the flight receive a text message to say the flight was delayed due to not having permission from the chinese authorities but beyond that we've not had further information and we have to wait and see when the flight might be leaving. and you said to us
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yesterday that you are not taking up a place on the evacuation flight because you thought the plans by the british government were, as you put it, ludicrous and stupid in that people were asked to make their own way home when they got back to heathrow and then self isolate. literally after we played your interview the advice came through from the health secretary here that brits were going to be quarantined for two weeks and we know it is in some sort of nhs facility but you are coming back now as a result, so how do you feel about the factory will be put into this facility 1a days? i feel happy about it and it was what we were talking about in the group chats yesterday about how it was not acceptable and once we heard the news the quarantine was happening i think everybody felt a lot more pleased with the news and we don't want to put the health of the british public at risk and if that means going into quarantine for 14 that means going into quarantine for 1a days, then that is what is
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necessary. let me bring in professor hugh pennington. good morning. can you give us some context? how does this virus outbreak compared to other outbreaks? we get outbreaks all the time, outbreaks of flu every year. but the response to this is unprecedented with the chinese basically putting, and other people, putting the whole country, the largest country in the world in terms of population in quarantine and trying to restrict the virus to wuhan and the surrounding area, who figures shows the virus is pretty through china but what i know from that figure is whether the other cases outside wuhan, or people who have been to wuhan, or people who have been to wuhan, have gone during the chinese new year and all that kind of stuff. it's unprecedented, the speed of response, it's unprecedented in the sense the virus only showed itself
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at the end of last year and within ten days we had the genome sequence which meant we could have tests developed quickly, within a day without knowing the sequence, which was published and for example public health england have devised their own tests so we are able to find out how many people have been infected rather than guessing, which is very often the case. and in terms of the speed of response, in terms of knowing what is happening in terms of having confirmed cases... on what you think of the british government response and their plans to bring people back and isolate them for a couple of weeks? the isolation is fine because we don't know for example what the incubation period is and that's the time between being exposed to the virus and falling ill and we don't know how communicable it is and how easy it is to transmit
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but there is pretty good evidence it goes from person to person. and that is relatively easily. about the same as flu would and putting people into isolation means you don't get the virus established in the uk, keeping fingers crossed, as it were. it depends on the quality of the isolation and there are problems associated because how do you protect or feed the people in quarantine and how do you protect anyone looking up to somebody who's got a cold and all that stuff so there are major logistic problems and we used to do it in smallpox in the 19th century where we put people in hulks on the thames and so on and i don't want to raise that as a comparison, but historically it's unprecedented to have this kind of response and there honestly been a problem with the transport from china to the uk, which is a pity but i hope the british government is doing the best it can to get the problem sorted out and get
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the diplomatic situation with china sorted out so there isn't any kind of hold up. let me go back to adam, with your chinese wife and one—month—old son, you are staying there because your wife is not allowed to get on the plane but i'm wondering how long you can sit it out before you need medical attention for your newborn.” out before you need medical attention for your newborn. i still haven't decided that i definitely will not board the plane because if ican take will not board the plane because if i can take my son we would still consider the option but at the moment we have been unable to confirm with the authorities, so if he cannot board, i won't board. you have been able to confirm whether your son can get on the plane? yes, that's right because he is in a grey area. ithink that's right because he is in a grey area. i think he is considered a chinese citizen by the chinese authorities but he could be considered a british citizen by the british authorities because he is my
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son, so he's in a grey area there. but he doesn't have any passport, for example so it's a bit unclear. would you be calling on the british embassy to show compassion and let the newborn onto the plane?” embassy to show compassion and let the newborn onto the plane? i think the newborn onto the plane? i think the british want him on the plane, it's not that they will not let him, the chinese authorities consider him a british citizen, sorry, the chinese authorities consider him a chinese authorities consider him a chinese citizen and they do not allow chinese citizens to board the plane. ok, i understand. thank you, adam. matt, iwillwish plane. ok, i understand. thank you, adam. matt, i will wish you the best and we will keep in touch with you and we will keep in touch with you and thanks for talking to the british people back here and we will keepin british people back here and we will keep in touch with you and see if you will be on the plane with your grandma. we appreciate you updating us. grandma. we appreciate you updating us. and professor hugh pennington, thanks for putting it into context and we appreciate your time. thank
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you for your many comments about children and mobile phones and whether you let your kids sleep with their mobile phone by their bed. new research today suggesting plenty of people do and also suggesting children as young as seven have their own mobile. steve says my child doesn't have a mobile phone and he doesn't even have a tablet and he doesn't even have a tablet and itan and he doesn't even have a tablet and it an easy way to children —— pa rents and it an easy way to children —— parents do not respond with their children. if twitter was around when tv was making its way in the same would be said about it, and before that it was probably cassette recorders. put it on silent, face down. if only kids could do that. susan tweets, not mine, it gets taken off him much to his disgust, otherwise he would be on it all night. charlie tweets, if you think pa rents night. charlie tweets, if you think pa re nts ca n night. charlie tweets, if you think parents can control device time, you are dreaming. take a child's phone, it's a death wish. yes it can cause friction, but it is
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doable. coming up before 11 — the latest candidate to announce he's standing for london mayor. we'll talk to drillminister live in the next few minutes. and ed balls will be here — it was almost four years ago he did gangnam on strictly — today he'll be talking about his latest documentary series for the bbc, travels in euroland. this single mum is a benefits adviser, and she says poverty shaming will not stop her from taking a stand against universal credit rules, which she says penalise working parents like her. nichola salvato is taking the department for work and pensions to the high court, after she says she was forced into £2,000 of debt, because of upfront childcare costs. it's understood to be the first high court challenge against the dwp relating to childcare costs and universal credit, and her case is being backed by a number of charities including
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save the children and gingerbread. nichola, hello, as well as carolin 0tt, a lawyerfor leigh day, the firm representing nichola, and victoria benson, the boss of the charity gingerbread, which supports single parents and is backing nichola's case. thank you for coming on the programme. let's just dig thank you for coming on the programme. let'sjust dig in to thank you for coming on the programme. let's just dig in to what is going on here, and first of all the broader question, you are a professional benefits adviser, somebody who understands, more than most of us about the benefit system yet you are taking the dwp to the high court. explain. well, ifi cannot fathom a way to make it work for me then i wonder how anybody else possibly can. that was the bottom line. you say you ended up in over £2000 worth of debt because of upfront childcare costs. talk is
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through that. the way universal credit works means that families on low incomes can get support for theirfrom low incomes can get support for their from the state via universal credit but the new rules, as opposed to the legacy system require families to pay upfront for their childcare costs and to declare those costs a nd childcare costs and to declare those costs and then claim it back and then you get a percentage of it back ina then you get a percentage of it back in a month or possibly two months and in contrast, not the voucher system but the tax—free system is an upfront payment from government that pays into a kitty and that is all better off families. and it seems really frustrated that families on the lowest income have the hardest time trying to find £1700 or
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£1500 and that was my situation. where did you borrow the money from, if you don't mind me asking?” you borrow the money from, if you don't mind me asking? i burrowed from family and friends and lenders. the government says it has a flexible support fund and a budgeting advance. why did that not work for you? they are not solutions at all. a number of reasons. the flexible support fund is not widely known by the public or the dwp staff idid known by the public or the dwp staff i did know about it as a benefits adviser but many people have not heard about it. why did that not help you? i was first advised that it could not be used for childcare costs by the department for work and pensions, thejob centre manager, in fa ct. pensions, thejob centre manager, in fact. that's not true. it can be used for those costs but only for single parents who have been in work for less than six months. that
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didn't apply to you? it didn't apply to me so it cannot deal with the fluctuating nature of childcare costs a nd fluctuating nature of childcare costs and on top of that if a parent does make a successful claim for the flexible support fund the way operates is that the flexible support fund will pay the childcare provider directly so you never get into a position where you've made a payment and you can declare those costs to universal credit and be reimbursed, so you're in the same difficulty in the following month to try and find the upfront costs. does that make sense? almost. i understand they pay directly to the childcare provider and i don't know why that infection next month?” think a direct payment is a good idea, continuously, but the requirements of universal credit is that to be reimbursed childcare costs you have to have paid the
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costs you have to have paid the costs a nd costs you have to have paid the costs and you have to show an invoice and shallow receipt of the payment. i get it. so they could pay the first bill for the first month, if you qualify, which he didn't because of what you are earning and why would they not help with an advance payment? because you did not owe them enough? £2600 in six months and if you have another advance you are paying off, most people that go over to universal credit take out what they call a new claim loan or a change of benefit advance to help people through that difficult five weeks and most people do take out that loan and you are paying that back over the course of a year and you cannot make a claim for another advance until you have paid that off so that is really putting lots of people out of the equation. understood. as you say, pretty complex, actually and you are
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a benefits adviser. let me bring in carolyn and victoria. carolyn, the case was billed in terms of the two grounds, the legal grounds. can you explain them? the first round we are arguing is that there is provision, the rule that you have to provide proof of payment to get your childcare costs paid back and that is indirectly discriminatory against women because the provision disproportionately affects lone parents and 90% of them are women and we say that is discriminatory and we say that is discriminatory and the second argument is that it is irrational and that's because it runs contrary to the stated aim of universal credit and the childcare cost provision which is to encourage people into work to increase their hours and reduce barriers for parents and particularly lone parents and particularly lone parents to enter into the workforce and thrive within the workforce.
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what the dwp say they are unable to comment on ongoing cases adding that they are committed to supporting parents moving into work and has increased the level of work support from 70% in legacy benefits up to 85% in universal credit. victoria. you want to support the case and are supporting the case. why? gingerbread represents and advises single parents and we completely support this case because unfortunately nicola is far from alone. we hear from so many other single parents who really want to work, most parents want to work that they find it really difficult to do that because they don't have the money to pay the cost of childcare. if nicola is successful, what does it mean going forward? what could the consequences other parents? the hopeis the consequences other parents? the hope is that a finding of unlawfulness by the court would leave the secretary of state for work and pensions to think again about the policy and change it so it
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operates in a way where parents do not have to find the costs of childcare upfront and have to make the payments upfront and that is the ultimate goal and we think there are realistic ways for that to be done including, as nicola said by paying the childcare cost directly to the provider which would address concerns about fraud and error that the dwp has raised as a potential justification but we say the justification but we say the justification of saying that is why parents need to pay in advance and it's not proportionate. letsjust unpick that. the justification for potential fraud means what? unpick that. the justification for potentialfraud means what? what unpick that. the justification for potential fraud means what? what do you mean? the dwp said the reason they require parents to provide proof of payment is that they need to do that to prevent fraud and error in the benefit system and specifically by parents who are trying to claim child care costs and we are saying there are ways to address those concerns without making parents pay
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the price. ok. you could provide proof of payment, couldn't you, if you could afford to pay it. so when you borrowed from family and friends and alone... u nfortu nately i family and friends and alone... unfortunately i wasn't able to borrow enough to cover the costs. so iam borrow enough to cover the costs. so i am borrowing and there is the difficulty of paying that back and secondly i'm not borrowing enough to cover the entire cost. but you have documentation from the loan company and an iou from family and friends, thatis and an iou from family and friends, that is not going to cut it with the dwp? yes. if anybody else pays the cost for you it doesn't work as you cannot use that as proof of payment. but the issue is, the costs are fluctuating, so for example during term time my average cost might be about £500 a month for breakfast clu b about £500 a month for breakfast club and after school month ——
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club. soi club and after school month —— club. so i might manage to pay 250 of that, so the following month i will get 200 back, say but then the following month i now owe £750 because i only paid £250 of the 500. so you never catch up. it is a wheel of stress. you look at holidays when you are looking at £1700 and since the press release was put out i've been inundated with women and families in exactly the same situation and there's a lot of people in the country who have a vested interest in the outcome of the case. they will follow it with interest. grateful for you to coming on the programme and we will follow it, of course. more messages about children and mobile phones because the research that suggest many kids
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sleep with their mobile phone by their bed. kerstin says, my son is 16 andi their bed. kerstin says, my son is 16 and i don't allow him to have his mobile phone overnight. he does complain now and again but i remind him the phone is our property and we allow him to use it until he is older and paying his way, it's my responsibility to make sure he sleeps well. it is too much temptation to stay up online. helen says, my daughter got her own phone aged four years old and this is because and there was a sharp intake of breath in the studio here, this is because her dad and i sadly divorced when she was one and a half yea rs divorced when she was one and a half years old. it was a fantastic way to keep a relationship with her father and his family strong while living 500 miles apart. seeing him in person once a month. she was able to video call him whenever she wanted to and vice versa. now she is seven and can read and write and can text her dad as well because not many families are split these days and live in different countries to one another and i think we need to keep another and i think we need to keep an open mind as to how mobiles can enhance the lives of children rather
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than just be a negative issue. enhance the lives of children rather thanjust be a negative issue. thank you for those. really interesting. i love the different take on it from you. keep e—mailing us and you can message us on you. keep e—mailing us and you can message us on twitter. the met office warns the next five years are likely to be the hottest since records began. we take a closer look at this world wide trend. you want me to get on that? you are joking. and ed balls will be here to tell us about his new documentary, the future of the labour party, and how he feels about brexit day tomorrow. this man wants to be london's next mayor. rapper drillminister with his signature balaclava and gold glasses says he's running for the capital's highest office on behalf of all those who feel ”forgotten, persecuted, or ignored”. we'll talk to him in his first tv interview since announcing his mayoral candidacy in a moment, but first — here's a bit
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of his musical manifesto. there has to be changes. they've done a wrong for too long. delaying the vote. never considering us. why. i'm sick of it. how many times? how many times. # yo, like, how many times have we gone to the ballot box and seen no change? # mps lie in parliament, on tv, and in our face. # like, how many times have we heard them scream out "brexit" — what's that mean? # the single market don't mean nothing on road # don't sell my dreams. # heard may had to run back europe. # to win and persuade back benchers. # cos the european court ofjustice. # ain't feelin' our country's agendas. # that's a trip down, buss up for a lap dance. # twerking for eu members. # that's michael gove in bikini. # that's theresa may
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in la senza's...#. and he's here. good morning. thank you for coming back in the programme. you said donald trump inspired you tojoin programme. you said donald trump inspired you to join this race. programme. you said donald trump inspired you tojoin this race. do you have anything in common with them? you know, that was kind of misquoted. i would them? you know, that was kind of misquoted. iwould not them? you know, that was kind of misquoted. i would not say inspired. i would say the mayor of sheffield was more inspirational. seeing somebody from an immigrant background, somebody that mostly is excluded from something like politics. rising to the top of the ship you ‘s elite in terms of politics, becoming the mayor, that was more inspirational to me than donald trump. just so the audience knows, people didn't take donald trump seriously when he was running, he is now the most powerful man in the entire world. that says it all. the budget the mayor has control over a three and a half billion. you have no tax—raising powers. so you are limited to an extent in what you can do. i'm looking at the kind of things you want to do, cap peak—time underground tickets for those earning under 21 grand a
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year. zero deaths on the london underground, air pollution is a massive issue for you, you say. regarding homelessness you, you say. regarding homelessness you want to introduce a contactless ca rd you want to introduce a contactless card that can be topped up to provide food, hostel accommodation and clothes. yes. how much would that cost? roughly, doing the estimates of it now, which i will release in two weeks, i don't want to give too much away of that now, that'll be in two weeks or more of that'll be in two weeks or more of that information comes out, my team have estimated it's possible, 153% possible. right now, sadiq khan is raising tax for a policeman. so we are able to move around funds. —— for police funds. he has been criticised for his failure to do with knife crime in the capital but how would you tackle it?” with knife crime in the capital but how would you tackle it? i believe there is nobody in this election thatis there is nobody in this election that is more street certified, has
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knowledge of what is really going on with our youth, has knowledge of the scope of where london is going in terms of its future. i think i'm the most obvious representation of what the youth recognise of what the people of the streets of london recognise ... what people of the streets of london recognise what would you do? i would definitely introduce more authority and community—based relations, there is a breakdown there. that breakdown, there's lots of talk about investing in putting more bobbies on the beat, it creates a police state and there's nothing wrong with protection of our citizens but i believe the citizens wa nt to citizens but i believe the citizens want to know the person living next door to them. there needs to be more cohesion within communities. how would you do that? something simple like parents for parents. parents who have experienced the trauma and all the things that come with being all the things that come with being a victim of their child being from knife crime or losing a child,
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losing a child to jail, going to a pa rent losing a child to jail, going to a parent going through that right now and giving them counselling and advice on working in the community and with the authorities, whether it's and with the authorities, whether its social workers, no matter what its social workers, no matter what it be, authorities, people who have the power to help the communities and get them out of that situation. rising crime right now, punishment, which is part of my manifesto, i don't want londoners to abandon each other. i feel as though we abandon the homeless, so many different scopes i'm still not hearing in practical terms how you would reduce knife crime. there is practical terms there, man. if you look at the situation right now. with the police and the communities which i keep stressing, that is fractured. i can't tell you the methods in which the police are going to be able to curbit the police are going to be able to curb it because the relationship between the police and the communities are fractured. sure, so how would you rebuild trust? you have to rebuild trust,
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things like divert, an organisation that helps young men or young people that are going through trials and tribulations, takes them away from street crime, things that they are doing and helps to rehabilitate them. i want to make things like divert and the london youth violence commission, i need those things implemented and made into legislation somehow. because those things need to be implemented to help the people on the ground right now. right now, divert is led by the metropolitan police, the community, like i said, it is fractured, they don't want to work with them. what is the root cause, do you think? something like that needs to be independent. sure, but what do you think is the root cause of knife crime, talking to someone the red cross of knife crime is austerity, poverty, people not having a chance at a future. it's people not being given the opportunity. that's the whole cause of why i'm doing this, to show people that look, look at the appearance of me. i'm not meant to
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be running for mayor, i'm meant to be running for mayor, i'm meant to be excluded from something like this because people from my background aren't meant to have the confidence or the ability to drive themselves forward but every single person from my background has been scared to do something like this because this is where you get chastised, this is where you get chastised, this is where the media focus on trying to destroy your character and make sure you cannot be a realistic candidate. so i'm trying to fight against all that oppression, that discrimination and put on the table, i am a decent human being who is fighting for queen and country, fighting for the democracy of what londoners want. you yourself have been stabbed. and kidnapped. tell us what happened. it's just, kidnapped. tell us what happened. it'sjust, an kidnapped. tell us what happened. it's just, an unfortunate things that happens between the ages of 1a and 21. these things happen when you're, your parents don't know what's going on when you leave their house. when you leave their house, there are so many dangers out there, a lot of parents don't know, between 14 a lot of parents don't know, between 1a and 21 it is a lottery for a child living in the inner city
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because there's so many different dangers, so many different things that are on whether it be county lines, child trafficking, whether it bea lines, child trafficking, whether it be a young girl being encouraged and groomed and put into sex work, we have a massive problem in london. what happened to you? my situation, i fell what happened to you? my situation, ifell in what happened to you? my situation, i fell in with the wrong crowd. i was mixing with people i shouldn't have, people your parents tell you to stay away from, i was mixing with them. let me ask you, you told us what you thought the root causes of crime were, did you get on with the wrong crowd and end up being stabbed because of austerity cuts all of these things. i'm from a council estate background, the same thing as most people but it's not cry me a river, that was my environment. if i was growing up somewhere else, i'm not saying the countryside is perfect, they have problems there but if i grew up somewhere else that is more affluent, my case would have
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been different but these are the cards i would have dealt and i am very good at poker. to encourage social cohesion i read that you want to open a hug shop, is that right? in picadilly circus i want to put something that's got a camera, it has a hashtag london is lit and strangers, or people from different backgrounds, different ethnicities can meet in his place in piccadilly circus and with a large crowd, just hug, just spreading out because maybe that's what's missing. there a lwa ys maybe that's what's missing. there always talk from my fellow candidates are people that are trying to be london mayor of making this a financial district. i think, yes, we can be the financial capital of the world but we need to be the financial capital of creativity and love first, humanity, we need to ca re love first, humanity, we need to care for one another and when we move on from that, we can talk about finance because without love or people, there is no finance. sure. i absolutely get the love thing,
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totally, i just absolutely get the love thing, totally, ijust wonder absolutely get the love thing, totally, i just wonder about the principle of strangers against rangers in the post me to era.” don't understand, i hear that, rangers in the post me to era.” don't understand, i hearthat, but there's strangers killing strangers, children killing children that don't know each other so if we can spread more love and put that into place, also transport is important to me as well. one of your rivals rory stewart has been out and about meeting people last year. in his bid to be the london mayor. we'll look ata to be the london mayor. we'll look at a clip of something he posted on twitter. let's look. hi, are you happy to have a quick film? definitely. good to see you, i'm rory. lilo. nice to see you. good to see you, i'm rory. screw, bro. good to see you. very nice to meet you. i'm sev, nice to meet you. hi, rory. good to see you. do you all live around here, or...? we do indeed, yes. sort of. have you always lived around here?
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we're from ireland, actually. you're originally from ireland? dublin ireland, yeah. dublin? all: yeah. uh-huh. and when did you move here, a few years ago? hi there, i'm rory. good to see you. my my mistake, it was a bid to become leader of the tory party. he mistakenly describe those three irish people as gangsters. he later apologised. your reaction? i'm sure there's many grandmothers out there who are shocked not necessarily. don't generalise about grandmothers! i'm here to help people understand their fears. i'm here to help people understand theirfears. a lot i'm here to help people understand their fears. a lot of people have fears, things they don't understand, rory stewart is meeting three random boys who are just walking, they dress different to him, they speak in slang and in a language unknown to him so he finds it strange so he probably, minor gangsters
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he apologised. you know shall become we've been on the programme before, you've explained far you we re before, you've explained far you were a balaclava. my artistic right. that's how people recognise me. that's how people recognise me. that's how people know how i promote myself. now you are running to be london mayor, is it not different, you know, billy is tweeting, why would anyone vote for a man hiding behind a mass? well, my are you scared of something? my mask to me, everybody has their own standard, how they will interpret me, i can only be represented by my words and what my message is. i believe my mask is a mask of democracy. because my grandfather, my great grandfather fought in the war, in the raf and killed germans for queen and country. my vote, my valid vote of democracy is not enough, i don't know what is. we have shed
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blood for our democracy. and we need to fight our democracy. and we need to fight our utmost. —— nazis. i'm not going to bea our utmost. —— nazis. i'm not going to be a victim of facial recognition, people trying to when you are running for an office like this. people want to be able to trust you. they don't simply want to look into your eyes, they want to see you, i want to think, can i go for a see you, i want to think, can i go fora drink see you, i want to think, can i go for a drink with that blow? would he stand up i'm definitely a bloke you can go for a drink with. but you understand about the face? the trust. i don't believe it's important. i believe we have politicians in suits and i think we've been conditioned to believe a man ina we've been conditioned to believe a man in a suit with his face exposed is going to tell you the truth but a man ina is going to tell you the truth but a man in a suit with his face exposed, a lot of the time these politicians they become targets, they feel as though become a target because of theirface. this is the though become a target because of their face. this is the cause of their face. this is the cause of their lives. there's much pressure on them. i have
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no political agenda. 0ther on them. i have no political agenda. other than to represent for the people, i'm not trying to, like, i believe sadiq khan, to worm my way into number ten and use this as a stepping stone, that's not my ambition, just like rory stewart because she failed in the conservative leadership you are trying to go for london mayor, i'm not trying to do something like that. not like sean bailey, the token black guy i don't think he said he was the token black guy. but that's how i interpret it. it doesn't matter, the colour, creed, race, we are in this together. we have to march forward. brexit tomorrow, what do you think the impact will be in london? that's a very important thing. i think a lot of people from certain minority groups are going to have to look out for each other because i think brexit is going to bring something across that hopefully unites the country, hopefully the country becomes united, hopefully london becomes united, hopefully london becomes more united. don't forget,
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the website, you can crowdfund ..” would vote for the people. which was. for the people, whatever the people voted for, that's what i voted for. ok, that could be either leave or remain. but you see, if you can't be straight about really fundamental questions like that that's not an issue with the london mayor, that's a national issue. and someone is running for prime minister but brexit is going to have an impact, positive or negative in london. we cannot fight against it, it's already happened. did you vote ? it, it's already happened. did you vote? i vote when it is important. in the eu referendum. labour remain? i cannot tell you that. it's not an important question for london mayor. it's an important question nationally but not for the london mayor. you mentioned your grandfather. and his role. when it came to fighting for democracy in this country. how has he shaved you? he has definitely shaped me because he isa he has definitely shaped me because he is a war hero. like everybody knows, you had auschwitz,
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were talking about it this way, people know the importance of fighting for those who need help, fighting for the people that have no voice, that's my entire make—up, i'm just fighting for the people that have no voice, as i'm sure you can see, my look, my background, and not mainstream, i'm not meant to be here but i'm here for the people because the people put me here and that's what i'm here to represent. you want to be the youngest london mayor? i'm old enough to vote! that's the most important thing. 27? i spot on. thank you so much. thank you for coming on the programme. so far ten people they have said they are standing for election as the next london mayor. you can see their names. the vote is on may the 7th. the met office reports today that the next five year period is expected to be the hottest 0n record globally. here's matt taylor from the bbc weather centre. is this in any way
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a surprise to you matt? i'm so sorry, i went to the wrong bed. no! not surprised at all. -- the wrong bit. the last decade has already been the warmest on record. really simple way of showing this, climate stripes. this is developed by professor ed hawkins, the university of reading. steamed climate scientist. it shows the trend that we have been seeing across the globe. each one of the stripes when you see them, just behind you. each one of them represents the global temperature each year from 1850 right through until now. the blue colours represent the years we saw average temperatures lower than average. the red colours they are above average and if you look at them, there is a trend, unmistakable. the past decade asi trend, unmistakable. the past decade as i said, the warmest on record, the warmest of all was 2016, we weren't far off that last year and to be honest, there's nothing there to be honest, there's nothing there to stop that trend continuing.
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we've seen some of the impact of the global temperature rises already, floods, fires in australia, we are going to show some just released pictures of how quickly those fires spread in new south wales. this clip is just spread in new south wales. this clip isjust under two spread in new south wales. this clip is just under two minutes long. spread in new south wales. this clip isjust under two minutes long. i just want to show this to our audience while we carry on talking. you will see how quickly this space. how much of this rise in global temperatures is our fault? most climate scientists would agree it's mostly our fault. various climate scientists would agree it's mostly ourfault. various natural factors will affect the global temperatures. the orbit of the earth, volcanic eruptions. the output from the sun which at the moment is at minimum and you take all of those natural variability is in, we should be cooling as a planet at the moment. but one of the main climate change gases, greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide is at its highest levels in a million years.
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the temperatures have risen greater, ata the temperatures have risen greater, at a greater rate than in the last 800,000 years, primarily down to what we are doing, land use, putting various gases back into the atmosphere and i think you find it very ha rd to atmosphere and i think you find it very hard to find a scientist he would say it wasn't. we've taken it off. but as you were talking, we could see how fast that fire is spreading. which was just under two minutes. thank you so much. let's talk to ed balls. the former labour education secretary and then shadow chancellor lost his parliamentary seat in 2015. since then, he's been on strictly, spending 10 weeks on the show and only getting kicked off a week before the semi finals. i'm sure he's sick to death of seeing that but not for the rest of
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us! and now he's got a new documentary out. travels in euroland sees him head to europe to find out why so many people are rejecting mainstream politics and supporting right—wing ideas. let's take a look at tonight's episode. is the european union supporting coal mining in poland? yeah. nearly 90% of polish electricity comes from coal, but it turns outjoseph runs on a different fuel. what's wrong? i don't know how to do it. i've never snorted anything before, let alone powdered tobacco, which has long been a tradition amongst the miners. you show me. 0h! it definitely perks you up. whoo! the programme is called travels in euroland with ed balls — you can watch it
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tonight at 9 o'clock on bbc2. hello. what effect did soaring tobacco hello. what effect did soaring to ba cco have hello. what effect did soaring tobacco have a new? actually, not very much. it was quite a bit of a rush but for those guys down there, we did an eight hour shift, a mile underground in a polish coal mine. they can't smoke down there, it's dark, hot, quite dangerous. and these guys do that every day. you found out, absolutely, why they are now voting the way they are voting. just tell the audience about that. they are building in poland for the governing party which is the law and justice party, which is, the anti—eu party, and the reason they are doing thatis party, and the reason they are doing that is because the eu is saying to all countries and governments are saying, for climate change reasons, we need to stop burning coal fired power stations because of the emissions. and the trouble is, these quys emissions. and the trouble is, these guys it's their way of life, it's about the whole community,
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notjust jobs, the football ground, the health, all those sorts of things. and if you can see why if paris is the elite in brussels, they are not on your site, we will stand up for you and your jobs, on your site, we will stand up for you and yourjobs, those guys are lawand you and yourjobs, those guys are law and justice stands for some rather difficult dangerous things as well, if you ask me. they are very anti—democratic in many things they stand for but for those polish coal miners, it's about theirjobs. you say some viewers have criticised you for not condemning people like the polish miners for voting the way they have voted? i think the point of the programme like the one i did in america, travels in trunk land, is to understand why are people voting for tom, why did people vote to leave the eu, why are they voting for these parties across europe? it's so easy to sit here and say why did they vote for a far right party, it must be because they are racist or extreme. actually, you find out,
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people are voting because they don't feel listened to, they want change, they want to protect their jobs or traditions. and i think myjob with the programme is to go and listen and try and understand and let the viewer understand and listen and make the decision. there have been people who say to me why don't you condemn them? i feel people who say to me why don't you condemn them ? i feel there's people who say to me why don't you condemn them? i feel there's too much condemning in our politics and not enough listening and this programme is about hearing and understanding. are there parallels with the boat for brexiteer? of course. it's easy for a remain voter in london to see all these people who voted leaf against the advice of the labour and the conservative party is must be because they are xenophobic, right—wing, anti—immigration, anti—the outside world. and actually, it's half the country. and for many people, there are people who are very anti—europe or people who are very anti the outside world but there are lots of people who said, we don't think the status quo is working for us, it's not fair, we want change and if you don't give us change, we are going
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to vote for something which will really change things and that is what they've done. i read you accept now that when you are in government, under the tony blair government, allowing net migration to go threefold contributed to the brexit vote. it did and i don't think that the vast majority of people in our country, the vast majority of leaf voters are anti—immigrants at all they don't want to shut the borders, but they know how important it is that people come to work your butt the words free movement, open border, free for all, people find that very hard to deal with socially or economically. and in the eu referendum, david cameron, the prime minister who said i will get control of immigration, came back and said actually i failed, but free movement is good for you and you see this all across the programme, lots of people saying, actually, we find that really ha rd to saying, actually, we find that really hard to deal with. like the blair government said free movement is good for us. we did and what happened back in
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2004, when we allowed the east european countries to come in without any restrictions. the reason was back then, if i'm honest, nobody thought people were going to come, the estimates were tiny and what actually happened as the decade went on, migration from eastern europe was in the tens, hundreds of thousands rather than really small numbers. it was definitely ..” thousands rather than really small numbers. it was definitely i do remember there being big questions over the weight those estimates had been reached but let's not go over old ground. there wasn't really a big debate about it at the time. there wasn't at the time but it's when it became clear how many people had come that people look back at the estimates which people question but anyway. i agree. i the estimates which people question but anyway. iagree. i remember you telling me some months after you we re telling me some months after you were on strictly come dancing and after being in politics so long and having lost your seat that you were searching for a purpose. have you found it now? well look, being a government minister, the education
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secretary, was incredibly purposeful. and i think in a democracy you need people to want to get elected because in the end, if you don't get good people to become mps, who ends up being parliamentarians? we need people to do that but i lost my seat in 2015, you have to think what is the next thing i can do, strictly come dancing was fun but actually, doing these programmes, i'm dry to understand why our politics is so rivalled, why so many people feel upset. and actually, to show that's happening across the whole of europe. and actually, to also show people ending up voting for parties which lets be honest, you'll see tonight, in germany, voting for the afd, the far right party, they are called the new nazi party in germany for a reason because what they stand for a reason because what they stand for is really extreme. we have to learn from history, see what's going on, understand it, if you write people off, say they are stupid, they end up footing the wrong way. i've got loads of questions and we don't have many minutes left. what don't have many minutes left. what
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do you think will happen to the labour party if rebecca long bailey wins the leadership contest?” labour party if rebecca long bailey wins the leadership contest? i don't think any leadership candidate can't succeed in turning things around the labour party unless they acknowledge the scale of the defeat and the scale of the failures. but if she wins? i don't think she has acknowledge those things at all and thatis acknowledge those things at all and that is a huge problem, even acknowledging them is not the answer because then you've got to do something about it. labour has got to be for patriotism, security, jobs for all, uniting the towns and cities. if she wins could labour ' ? cities. if she wins could labour split? well, there are really good reasons why our main political parties don't split because in a first past the post system, when a main party carries history and tradition, the conservatives looked pretty split for the last 15 years but they didn't split, labour has looked split but if it doesn't acknowledge those problems and turn things around, reach back towards the borders they lost, labour could be in opposition for a very long time, ithink be in opposition for a very long time, i think that's more likely
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than a split. your daughter ellie tweeted about the abuse that your wife yvette cooper was enduring. and how it has affected your family. and it was extraordinary. she said i'm scared, i'm scared when i scroll through the replies to my mum ‘s tweets calling her a liar and a traitor, i'm scared when our house gets fitted with panic buttons, explosive bags, industrial locking doors, i'm scared because in the 16th ofjune 2016 two children said goodbye to their mum before she left for her constituency to sit in surgery and help people and they never saw her again. you said you we re never saw her again. you said you were proud of her. we do encourage your children to go into politics?” would. because we need the next generation to see fighting extremism, uniting the country, public service, being a parliamentarian, as being a good thing to do. i'm afraid, at the moment, in our country,
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ifear, people think politicians are weird, useless, do we need them? but in a democracy you need them and i want every time a ginger person to think that could be a career for them, kids can decide, our kids can decide what they want to do and we protected them from the public glare, ellie is 20, when she said she wanted to write these tweets, we said are you sure, do you want to plunge yourself into the public world ? plunge yourself into the public world? she felt really strongly that it was important. thank you. thank you for having me on. you have to be quick. i think this is such a great programme. your journalism is quick. i think this is such a great programme. yourjournalism is so important. i'd love to come back in the future. and we would love to have you back. thank you so much for your support. thank you for coming in the programme. ed balls tonight, bbc two, 9pm. bbc newsroom live is next. hello. you may have noticed
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hype mild it was this morning, certainly compared to previous mornings. but i guess many of you may have seen a scene like this, lots of cloud at the moment across the uk and for some we've got rain, mostly affecting southern parts of wales, southern areas of england, that is continuing into the afternoon. the most persistent rain across scotland, especially the north—west, some brighter skies developing around aberdeenshire but elsewhere it's quite cloudy, some spots of rain over the higher ground of north—west england and wales. but look at the temperatures this afternoon, 11, 12, 13 degrees. as above the average of the time of year. tonight, we see further rain spreading from northern ireland and in scotland, moving south and east. for most areas sustained mild, temperatures no lower than seven or ten — 11 degrees, the exception of the north west of scotland, it's chilly here. but friday, rain moving south—east across the uk, quite patchy in the south—east. but look at those temperatures. 12—13 or 14
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possibly 15 degrees. bye for now. you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. worry for britons in the virus hit chinese city of wuhan, as plans to evacuate 200 british citizens are delayed. i think, like everybody else, we have heard nothing. the last communication i had was this morning when they announced that the flight had been delayed, it wasn't allowed to take off. now the ministry of defence say they've sent a small team of medics to china. it comes as the death toll from the coronavirus rises to 170. the virus has now spread to
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every region in mainland china. a boost for hs2. the chancellor gives his backing to the scheme ahead of a key meeting with borisjohnson today. new figures show that nearly 2000 prison officers in england and wales took time off work last year because of stress, anxiety or depression. astronomers reveal remarkable, never before seen images of the surface of the sun, all captured by a solar telescope in hawaii. good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom live. 200 british citizens who are trapped in wuhan, the city at the heart of the coronavirus, won't be flown home today as planned. british officials are still waiting for permission to fly from the chinese authorities.

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