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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 31, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: an historic day — at 11 o'clock tonight the uk will leave the european union after 47 years. boris johnson hails it as a "dawn of a new era". we'll be finding out what if anything will change during the transition period, and we'll be getting views from across the country. i'll be talking hearts and minds in sunderland, a city that voted heavily for brexit, and it's where the prime minister and his cabinet will meet later.
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brexit on the border — the northern ireland border with the republic of ireland was one of the most contentious issues of the brexit negotiations so, withjust hours to go, how are businesses and people who live and work here feeling? on their way home — a plane carrying more than 80 britons has left the chinese city of wuhan and is due back in the uk later today. could these trainers be banned? an expert says they amount to technical doping and world records set while wearing them should be wiped from the books. another fairly blustery day with ple nty of another fairly blustery day with plenty of cloud. incredibly mild. all the details on breakfast. it's friday the 31st of january. our top story: the uk will leave the european union at 11 o'clock tonight, three years after the british public voted for brexit, and 47 years after we firstjoined.
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the prime minister is due to make an address to the nation later tonight, in which he'll say this is not an end but a beginning. our political correspondent, helen catt, has this report. we've had brexit dates set before but as the union flags flying in central london, and especially minted 50p coins now in circulation suggest, today really is the day that the uk will leave the eu after 47 years. whether you love brexit, loaded or somewhere in between, it's a significant moment. make no mistake, it's a massive day and as of 11 o'clock year, 12 o'clock in brussels, we don't get to stop brexit, it's done. we are not a member state. we cannot rejoin without going through a very complicated process and at the end of the year, if transition ends then, real practical effects will begin. in brussels, british meps have already packed up, theirjob will no longer exist.
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but we are unlikely to notice much change overnight. the uk will keep following eu rules until the end of december as the government negotiates a new trade deal with europe. negotiations are likely to begin almost immediately and the government wants them done by the end of the year. a day to the eu has signed up to as well. talking about security and defence and the movement of people in the centrepiece will definitely this big trade deal so it's a massive undertaking and it's also very different from a normal trade deal because usually we are trying to build bridges and try to come together but in this case, we are diverging to some degree. from tonight, the uk will also be free to negotiate its own deals with other countries and parliament will soon start the process of deciding on what should go in the new laws that will be drawn up to replace eu ones. mps will be busy, though.
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they will need to pass a lot of legislation in time for next january. helen katt, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent, iain watson, is in downing street this morning. i think what is very clear, whoever you are hearing from politicians wa nt you are hearing from politicians want the the vision to end and fast to move forward? that's right and for that reason, whether you fought for that reason, whether you fought for or against brexit, today is really a n for or against brexit, today is really an historic day but also one whether politicians will be stressing that they want to bring the country back together. celebration likely to be fairly low— key. celebration likely to be fairly low—key. in downing street, a couple of projectors will be projecting at 11 o'clock, a countdown clock and some elimination of the buildings on
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the walls at whitehall. nothing overly celebratory. in sunderland, the first area to declare to vote the first area to declare to vote the european union, the message that from the prime minister in an address to the nation is that he wa nts to address to the nation is that he wants to bring the country back together and that this is a time of national renewal. jeremy corbyn is warning that britain is at a crossroads. there is a danger he is saying that the country could turn in words. we will see what the future brings but as of ii in words. we will see what the future brings but as of 11 o'clock tonight, we will be outside of the european union. a plane carrying more than 80 britons is on its way to the uk after leaving wuhan, the chinese city at the centre of a coronavirus outbreak. it's due to touch down at raf brize norton around lunchtime. in china, officals say more than 200 people have now died, and the world health organization has declared the crisis
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a global emergency. simonjones has this report. finally on their way home, 83 britons, along with 27 foreign nationals, some posting pictures of the journey on social media. the flight to raf brize norton delayed by several hours to allow as many as possible to get to the airport following some confusion for mixed nationality families. i am natalie and this is jamie. natalie francis is british but a son has a chinese passport. they got a last—minute message from uk officials. they called us about 20 minutes ago and said that there is a good guarantee that they will allow jamie on the plane. for other families, though, the call came too late. adam bridgeman, who has a chinese wife and a newborn baby, remains in wuhan. here at the foreign office, there will no doubt be a sense of relief that they've managed
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to fly the first british citizens out of wuhan. there had been a sense of anger amongst those stranded there that initially the advice from officials here was that they should leave of their own accord, even though much of the area was in complete lockdown. those flown home will be taken to arrow park hospital on the wirral. they will spend 14 days in quarantine on former staff accommodation blocks. the world health organization has now declared a global emergency but it stresses this unprecedented outbreak was being met with unprecedented response. simon jones, bbc news. we'll speak to our repoter caroline davies in brize norton in just a minute, but first let's get the latest from our china correspondent robin brant in shanghai. we now know who has declared this a global emergency. bring us the latest news from china itself.
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despite heaping much praise under the chinese leadership during a meeting between the head of the who and senior chinese officials two days ago, the organisation has declared this not just days ago, the organisation has declared this notjust a chinese emergency but a global medical emergency. the death toll and of those factors continues to rise. 213 people have died from coronavirus. the number of confirmed infected cases, almost 10,000, up the number of confirmed infected cases, almost10,000, up 20% the number of confirmed infected cases, almost 10,000, up 20% on yesterday's number. that is according to both official chinese numbers. the trend is a steady rise day—to—day. our reporter caroline davies is in brize norton, where the plane is due to land later. caroline, what will happen to passengers when they arrive?
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under the passengers, we anticipated 150 british nationals and around 50 eu national. but there are only 83 british nationals and 27 foreign nationals. the reason why that number is lower than anticipated is not yet clear. as we heard earlier, concerns about families being split up concerns about families being split up with people with dual nationalities and chinese passports not being able to get onboard but thatis not being able to get onboard but that is not clear. we do not what the screening process will be when they arrive but they will be taken to arrow park hospital, 170 miles north—west,, a four hour drive. they will be in quarantine for 1h days. the government's official review into the high speed two rail line has strongly advised against cancelling the project. the document, seen by the bbc, says that calls forjust one section
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of the railway to be built to control costs would not be value for money. and it says scrapping the plans would impact badly on the uk's "fragile" construction industry. the government will announce its final decision on the scheme next month. a state of emergency has been declared in canberra, as bushfires continue to ravage parts of australia. officials sounded the warning amid what they're calling the worst fire threat to the territory in nearly two decades. residents in suburbs have been urged to remain alert for potential evacuations. gwyneth paltrow‘s new netflix series poses a considerable health risk to the public, nhs chief executive, sir simon stevens, has warned. he likened the actress to quacks and charlatans who push unproven therapies, and accused her new series, the goop lab, of spreading misinformation. a spokesman for miss paltrow‘s wellness brand, goop, said it was transparent when covering topics that may be unsupported by science.
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those are the main stories. we have the spot now. good morning. we are talking controversial trainers. a possibility they could be giving an unfair advantage to athletes. these are ones worn by eliud kipchoge? and they might have not spring but a mechanism that acts like springs? yes. you know the stuff inside gospels, apparently it helps to drive forward so that apparently is what is inside the trainers. but he has made the point he still had to run into them. it is not going to make us run a sub to our marathon. but in the sport it isjust those
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marginal advantages. anyone can wear them... iamjust marginal advantages. anyone can wear them... i am just kind of offering an opposite view. world athletics will be looking at whether it is breaking the rules. eliud kipchoge used a version of them. world athletics will decide today whether it's breaking the rules to wear the carbon—fibre running shoes which have been worn to set world records. eliud kipchoge used a version of them last year, when he became the first athlete to run a marathon in under two hours. bruno fernandes said he would give everything to bring success to manchester united, after completing his move there. it's the biggest deal of the premier league transfer window, which closes at 11 o'clock tonight in england. the superleague season started with a bang last night. warrington captain, chris hill, was sent off for this high tackle which knocked out wigan‘s sam powell. his side lost 16—10. and the six nations gets underway tomorrow. wales begin the defence of their title against italy and we'll be talking to 2011 winner chris ashton later in the programme.
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thank you very much. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, how are you! not too bad at all. what a day to be out there today because it is going to be unusually mild for the end of january but after a a quite night last night, it says windy in parts of the north. galeforce went but not as strong as they have been. we started the week with frost around most places, particularly england, wales and northern ireland. if you're going out across southern scotland, north—west england and wales, rain to come. pushing southwards and eastwards as we go through the day. some breaks in the cloud in northern ireland eventually into northern england. showers
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continuing to come and go in the far north—west of scotland. average went concealed touch galeforce across parts of northern england and north wales especially. temperatures climbing in the afternoon. north—east wales possibly 15 degrees. it should be around seven celsius this time of year. still very blustery. the rain in the south is continuing. lusting through the night. southern part should stay dry. well clear of frost into saturday morning. at the start of the weekend, across england and wales a bright start. but outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards through the morning and early parts of this afternoon. scotland showers at times. temperatures dropping in the
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northern half. around 10—12, 13 degrees so it should feel quite pleasant. into sunday, the next weather system starts to work its way in. affecting the southern half of the country. dry and sunny through parts of scotland. after a wet, early start, brightening up. sunshine and a few showers. more persistent rain through northern ireland and southern scotland. contrast temperatures as we finish sunday. 5—6d. temperatures around 12-14 in sunday. 5—6d. temperatures around 12—14 in southern counties. into next week, a bit of a change on the way and things will turn that little bit cooler. after a wet day on monday, more dry weather around. that is how your weather is shaping
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up. looking at some of the papers for you this morning, friday 21 january 2020, it is not often you can say history will be made on a newsday. very much reflected in the way the newspapers are looking at the big story today, 11pm tonight we leave the eu. this is not an end but a beginning, taken from what will be the recorded speech boris johnson taken from what will be the recorded speech borisjohnson will be giving to the nation later today. the sunset tonight, at 11pm, after resista nce sunset tonight, at 11pm, after resistance to the creeping danger of a european superstate, the people of the united kingdom have at last finally got brexit done, saying our time has come. referring as well to the 50p coins which have been released today. on the daily mail, you can see the white cliffs of
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dover. a new dawn for britain, you can hear that a lot this morning, looking forward rather than back. contrasting view on the guardian, small island. after 47 years, britain leaves the eu at 11pm tonight, the biggest gamble in a generation. sunderland was the first place to return a leave result in the 2016 referendum and has been a symbolic location for the brexit campaign ever since. so how is the city preparing for a future out of the eu? brea kfast‘s jayne mucubbin is there for us this morning. where exactly are you? good morning to you, good morning everybody. yes, we are in the museum of sunderland and winter gardens, and this is a fascinating place. if you live outside sunderland, you will know of this city's association with nissan ca rs. this city's association with nissan cars. this is the very first bluebird to run off the factory lines in 1986. if you live in sunderland, you will know this guy.
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his name is wallace, a lion that someone hundred and 50 odd years ago mauled his owner. everyone has forgotten the trainer, he is a local legend. analyse that. anyway, this place is dedicated to the industrial past of this city, and the keyword. one of the key reasons why sunderland voted so heavily in favour of brexit is because it left behind. that is one of the things that boris johnson behind. that is one of the things that borisjohnson is going to talk about later today when he comes in this city. he is going to talk about levelling up. so we wanted to talk about how people feel in their hearts, in their guts, about this historical moment we have arrived at. we're talking about 11 p.m..! what's happening? i'm in bed. i've got no idea. meps are packing their bags, as you shop today. 0h, right, yes. what is it? i don't know. brexit. what? brexit. yes, i nearly
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forgot there. how can you forget? after a constitutional crisis that costa p.m., split communities, families, friendships, the moment is here. and does it all feel a bit meh? not for valerie. friday night i will be putting the flags up. we are leaving the eu. finally, so happy. i'mjust so leaving the eu. finally, so happy. i'm just so happy that it's finally done, and they finally listen to what we want. it's so nice to hear, isn't it? i'm going to cry. what started as a low rumble here in sunderland turned into a full—blown revolution. but not everyone at dave's record shopper thinks this is a moment that deserves an epic soundtrack. friday the 31st, dave. give me your soundtrack. soundtrack. friday the 31st, dave. give me your soundtracklj soundtrack. friday the 31st, dave. give me your soundtrack. i saw this one. perfect. you are going to be —— you are supposed to be my friends.
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chameleons. strange times. if history looks back on my city, sunderland is poster boys for brexit, it is people who count fast in elections and make angry decisions. we are known for more things than that. i have fallen out with people over this. i don't think those friendships are going to come back. friday night, the soundtrack from you? what a difference a day makes. but you are saying it is not going to make any difference, esther. you are saying you're not going to make pals again. that's true, that's true. but i'd like to be wrong — i'd like to be wrong. true, that's true. but i'd like to be wrong - i'd like to be wrong. # what a difference a day made... as we slip from friday night into saturday morning, nothing really will change. but on a personal level, for bill and gary, father and son for each —— on each side of the brexit divide, perhaps everything
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will change. it's been difficult, because i saw lots of problems leaving the eu. gary has a much more positive attitude about it. it's done now. it's done. hopefully his right. hopefully his right, and i'll stand corrected if he is. we will see how it goes. bill and gary there. that family genuinely, genuinely torn over which side of the divide they were on. write down the middle. there were other brothers in the family who we re other brothers in the family who were all divided over that. but they, like boris johnson were all divided over that. but they, like borisjohnson today, feel that this moment is a moment to turn the page into a new chapter. this is what boris johnson and the page into a new chapter. this is what borisjohnson and his cabinet are going to talk about later on today when they come here to sunderland. and throughout this programme we are going to be spending lots of time talking about the detail, what it means, how it
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will affect people. but we just wa nted will affect people. but we just wanted to spend just a couple of moments talking also about the emotion. because it has been a tumultuous journey, emotion. because it has been a tumultuousjourney, hasn't emotion. because it has been a tumultuous journey, hasn't it, emotion. because it has been a tumultuousjourney, hasn't it, to get to hear. there are people i have spoken to who said that they felt rage, still. they feel excitement. but like bill and gary, people who feel that this is a new chapter. that is what borisjohnson will talk about later. we will be back with more sites from the museum, more wallace, as well. they used to let children sit on the back of wallace in the 1800s. they had to stop that. steve cameraman, is it possible for you to crash in on sea lion appear? iam you to crash in on sea lion appear? i am told they used to let people sit on the sea lion, and that is all thatis sit on the sea lion, and that is all that is left of him today. god bless him. thank you. lesson learned, isn't it? leave the stuffed animals alone. we will get more throughout the morning. at 7:30am we're going to be talking to michael his official title is chancellor of the
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duchy of lancaster but what his job is is to overlook... he has been responsible for the oversight of all government departments' preparations for brexit. we will talk to him about how he thinks that is going, how the uk is going to look, especially when it comes to borders, post leaving the eu. here to take us through what happens next is professor anand menon, who is director of uk in a changing europe. we have spoken many times over these months and years. interesting talking to people in sunderland about the emotions involved in this, but what i would like to know and a lot of people would like to know, what happens next? well, it is a strange day, isn't it? there is no doubt it is momentous, it brings to an end a0 years of membership, there is no going back as of 11 oh 1pm tonight, yet very little will change because of their so—called transition period —— 11:01pm. from now until december 21 hour trading relationship remains exactly as it was beforehand, so in terms of those impacts people have argued overfor the last four years, we won't see
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any of them until next year. what then of the politics and the trade negotiations, which clearly have already begun? but that really has to change now, doesn't it? no, absolutely. the european union said all along we are not going to talk trade until you have actually left. in february the eu will talk about what its approach to trade relations is, and then all of a sudden you have this frantic race because the government has said we had to get this done by the end of the year. most people think that means our relationship with the eu going forward is going to be quite a thin one, simply because there is just not enough time to negotiate the sort of compounds of agreement that many people would prefer we have with the eu. and what will that look like in practice? are we going to see delegations? how will these trade talks work in practice? well, i suspect they will be virtually permanent in the sense that there will be a team of british negotiators in brussels. it will all be led in very centralised out of number ten. a guy named david frost will do the actual negotiating on behalf of the prime minister, but i
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expect that officials will be in brussels around the clock trying not this out, because they are very complicated things. you have to look at people's economy, way up the costs a nd at people's economy, way up the costs and benefits of doing certain things, very difficult and time—consuming and i expect lots of civil servants will be fully taken up civil servants will be fully taken up with looking after those trade negotiations for the rest of the year. and we were looking at those pictures of the last days of the meps in the european parliamentjust a moment ago. worth reiterating for people just concerned about really practical stuff. travelling to europe, your driving license, your health insurance, all of those things, worth reiterating that this extraordinary historic day, which is what it is, will not affect that as of 11 what it is, will not affect that as of11p.m.. what it is, will not affect that as of 11 p.m.. absolutely. the future of 11 p.m.. absolutely. the future of all of those sorts of things, whether it is health insurance, pet passports, whatever it might be, will be decided in the negotiations. and just to give you a sense, i think the institute of government have said they reckon they will be about 30,000 civil
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have said they reckon they will be about 30 , 000 civil servants have said they reckon they will be about 30,000 civil servants one way or another working on brexit at the time we start these negotiations. and we are going to be asking everyone, in a way, this question this morning, what will you be doing at 11pm tonight? i mean, you will be interested in the history of the moment, in a way. what will you be doing? actually, i think! am in a bbc studio at 11pm tonight, so at least it will be warm and dry. this isa least it will be warm and dry. this is a very historic occasion. it is a whole change of our international relations, of many of our policies. think about agriculture, immigration, fisheries. it is a momentous day stop thank you very much for your time this morning. director of uk in a changing europe, and we will be reflecting this morning amongst other things about some of the practicalities you have been hearing about there, and just what will happen next. what are you going to be doing 11pm tonight?|j going to be doing 11pm tonight?” will be fast asleep pairing for the following morning. saturday morning, 6am on bbc breakfast. some things don't change. very disciplined,
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charlie. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. and as you've been hearing tonight, after a7 years, the united kingdom leaves the european union. with it, one city of london expert is predicting the uk might have to compromise on access to its fishing waters if the financial services sector here in the capital wants to prosper. it looks like there's going to be a really big trade—off between fish and finance. just like the northern ireland border was for really the last two years, fish could be the sticking point to this entire negotiation. we are going to know by the early summer as to whether or not it is. passengers could face disruption today as around 300 transport for london workers begin a 2a—hour strike. members of the unite union, including ticket collectors, are taking action in a dispute over pay.
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tfl says it has plans in place to keep disruption to a minimum. hundreds of residents in richmond have now been without gas for more than a week after a burst watermain flooded the local gas network. many people have been without heating and hot water since. gas supplier cadent says it is doing all it can to reconnect the supply, but disruption is likely to continue into the weekend. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, minor delays on the circle line. overground trains remain suspended between south tottenham and barking, with minor delays between south tottenham and gospel oak as track repairs continue. on the roads, westbound traffic on the a13 is building from dagenham into barking. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in acton, old oak common lane is down to one lane in both directions between the aao and norbroke street for emergency repairs to the lights following an earlier accident.
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and finally, blackfriars road remains closed between stamford street and southwark station as emergency water work continues near the cut. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another mild start to the day. temperatures even higher than they were yesterday. always plenty of cloud around today. it's going to be rather windy, and there will be some rain later on through the afternoon. so it's not completely dry, but it isa dry so it's not completely dry, but it is a dry start. through the morning, the cloud will tend to thicken. the south—westerly wind will start to pick up, and then a weather front down from the north—west. there could be some heavy outbreaks of rainfora could be some heavy outbreaks of rain for a while, but most of it will tend to be light and patchy, and patchy, and it is clearing its way south—east with as we head towards the end of the day and into the evening. top temperatures today ofa the evening. top temperatures today of a very mild 11 or 12 celsius. now, it stays windy overnight. the rain will clear, there will always be plenty cloud around, but some clearer makes developing into tomorrow morning. and it's another
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mild start to the day. lows of around nine or 10 celsius. now, mild start to the day. lows of around nine or10 celsius. now, on saturday, i think we'll see plenty of cloud around. it will still be rather windy, feeling mild once more, but a touch cooler during the day. some rain in the afternoon, but after that ran clear that should brighten up. sunday afternoon it is windy, it is mild, some rain too much of the day, but brighter through the afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning we'll hear the video diary of a british mum trapped with her son in wuhan — as she was finally given the go—ahead to return to the uk. tonight the curtain falls on an important chapter in our history but how did we get to where we are today? we'll be looking back at some
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of the biggest moments of our time in the european union. and for people looking to travel to europe — what will change? from blue passport to mobile roaming charges — we'll have a full run down of all you need to know. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the prime minister will hail the "dawn of a new era" as the uk prepares to leave the european union tonight after a7 years. the formal process will happen at 11 o'clock, when the uk will enter a transition period until the end of the year, during which negotiations will start on how to shape the future relationship. let's get the view from european now from our correspondentjenny hill, who is in brussels give us a sense of what this historic day will look like?” give us a sense of what this historic day will look like? i think you can expect the mood to be pretty
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sombre as the unionjack flags are finally taken down. there will be some rather relieved that this long and bruising process is over but i think by and large, both here in brussels and across european capitals, it is not seen as a cause for rejoicing. it is losing an important economic and political partner and for many that is a cause of great sadness, including ursula von der leyen. it is a very emotional day and festival i want to pay tribute to all these british citizens in the european union who over half a century almost contributed to the european union and made it stronger and it is the story of old friends and new beginnings now and that therefore it is an emotional day but i am looking forward to the next stage. the next
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stage she is talking about, actually she has told a number of british and european newspapers, as soon as the sun rises tomorrow morning, negotiations will start. try to thrash out a trade deal by the end of this year, britain's deadline. many enter brussels and across europe are sceptical that much could be achieved beyond the very barebones. you're talking about fleshing out a relationship with things as diverse as fishing rights, financial markets, security arrangements. an awful lot of work to go through. the us has started talking about its position. while a lot has been said about how affectionately britain has been looked at, they are already saying that it cannot enjoy the same
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benefits it did as a member state. a plane carrying 110 people is on its way to the uk after leaving wuhan, the chinese city at the centre of a coronavirus outbreak. it's due to touch down at raf brize norton this afternoon. the world health organization has now declared a global emergency, and in chine, officals say more than 200 people have now died. the government's official review into the high speed two rail line has strongly advised against cancelling the project. the document, seen by the bbc, says that calls forjust one section of the railway to be built to control costs would not be value for money. and it says scrapping the plans would impact badly on the uk's "fragile" construction industry. the government will announce its final decision on the scheme next month. a state of emergency has been declared in canberra as bushfires continue to ravage parts of australia. officials sounded the warning amid what they're calling the worst fire threat to the territory in nearly two decades. residents in suburbs have been urged to remain alert for potential evacuations.
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gwyneth paltrow‘s new netflix series poses a "considerable health risk" to the public, nhs chief executive, sir simon stevens, has warned. he likened the actress to quacks and charlatans who push unproven therapies, and accused her new series, the goop lab, of spreading misinformation. a spokesman for miss paltrow‘s wellness brand, goop, said it was transparent when covering topics that may be unsupported by science. thank you forjoining us. talking trainers, are subject i love because thatis trainers, are subject i love because that is all i would shop for if i could. the argument here is whether this particular brand of trainers gives an unfair advantage to athletes. we have brought some in with us and we can have a look at them ina with us and we can have a look at them in a wee moment.
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world athletics will decide today whether the latest carbon—fibre running shoes, which have been worn to smash world records, break the sport's rules. athletes wearing them took 31 of 36 top three finishes in major marathons last year. eliud kipchoge wore a version of them when he became the first person to run a marathon in under two hours, as did fellow kenyan brigid kosgei when she broke the women's world record. i consider this technical doping, given the way the rules are currently worded at present. any record has to be expunged from the record books. you can see in the middle, the carbon pleads and it meant it gives the athlete a bit of a pushing off point. it almost propels them forward and if you compare them to a normal trainer...
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sorry, that is of the normal trainer, they bend like that but these are the actual and they do not bend at all. are you strong? well, ish. it is such a tricky area. i remember the one about swimming, they were suits and all sorts of questions about whether they were given unfair advantage. each different event has to go through some sort of process. everyone is wearing them, though. our expert was comparing it to mechanical doping so you can then argue that everyone should be allowed to take illegal substances. they have to have rules
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in place and they may be making a decision today that these across the line. what is next, spring under their feet? what is next everyone has to wear green flash, which barred people remember from has to wear green flash, which barred people rememberfrom a long time ago. everyone was so it was a level playing field, jane does not know what i am talking about. she has that look! great advertising. if it is ruled they are an unfair advantage... for everyday people. but still unfair. let's move on. bruno fernandes says he'll give "everything" to bring "success and trophies" to manchester united. he says he's loved united since he was a child, watching cristiano ronaldo play for them. his move from sporting lisbon could end up costing
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67 million pounds. it's the biggest deal in the premier league so far during the transfer window, which closes at eleven o'clock tonight in england. the superleague season got underway last night with a rather fiesty match which saw wigan beat warrington by 16 points to ten. warrington had captain chris hill sent off afterjust 23 minutes for this high tackle that knocked out sam powell. and liam marshall's winning try for wigan came against 11 men, with mike cooper having been sin—binned. new wales coach wayne pivac has picked his first six nations team, for the start of their title defence tomorrow. they face italy in cardiff. george north moves to outside centre with wales struggling with injuries in midfield. uncapped scarlets wing jonny mcnicoll will take north's place on the wing. england will be without wing anthony watson for their match against france in paris on sunday. he's been ruled out with a calf injury. and scotland coach gregor townsend will give edinburgh number eight nick haining his international debut
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against ireland tomorrow. and chris ashton will be talking us through the six nations here on the sofa after half past eight. very exciting for rugby fans with the six nations starting. 16 hours to go. in a little under 16 hours time, britain will leave the eu, and the curtain will fall on a a7—year chapter of our history. brexit will finally — in the words of borisjohnson — get done. but where did it all start? and how have relations with our european counterparts fared over the years? brea kfast‘s graham satchell has been looking back. order. order. it will be an in and out referendum. brexit means brexit. done. it has been quite a palaver
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but tonight, at 11 o'clock, written leaves european union. for sum it will mark a liberation. they will feel the pulse of solitary returning from brussels but for others it will mark a sad end to a great experiment. it would be a significant moment. we will be a different country with different people when we wake up tomorrow morning. 1963 and the first time we tried tojoin the morning. 1963 and the first time we tried to join the esc the french president family said, no. he said no again in 1967. the goal describe britain as insular, maritime, commercial and inextricably linked to america. in other words not really european. ——de galle. to america. in other words not really european. --de galle. he will probably say to himself looking
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down, i was right, you never quite fitted in. it was not always like that. in 1975, the british public had theirfirst proper that. in 1975, the british public had their first proper say as to whether we should be in or out. what do you think of the common market? not much of it. i think it is purely emotive. margaret thatcher famously campaign to stay in, with a jumper that had the flags of the than nine members. i think it is absolutely vital that everyone should turn out end of this referendum and vote yes so that the question is over once and for all. some hope. but look at the papers. it was economic benefits of the common market that persuaded many. come result might, 2—1 to stay
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in. fast forward a0 years and it is the same presenter but... the british people have spoken and the a nswer british people have spoken and the answer is, we are out. what happened? in 1973, it was clear.l new and a greater united europe. right from the very beginning, the european project had one very clear objective, to make sure that the horrors of two world wars would never be repeated. it is as if the brits have never read the opening, talking of a closer union. if we did read it was cut is in french waffle. it was a french president who announced the community will become union. it was all too much for margaret thatcher who went from saying yes to... no, no, no. fleet
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street turn. immigration brought things to a head. is it the debate finally done? it will haunt us for a while yet but one way of helping cope with that, from monday morning, we can start concentrating on the things that unite us rather than divide us. i live in hope. tonight will be a moment of history. but the end of a psychodrama? we will be talking a lot about it. it isa we will be talking a lot about it. it is a historic day. we will have michael gove later in the programme. matt has the weather for us this morning, and you have some statistics about the weather more generally, and looking all across europe, i see elsewhere as well. tell us more. i think you have a
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misleading map there. i think you are implying it will be really lovely and hot, and it is not. well, let me explain. we maybe officially leaving europe later, but this map just shows how temperatures over the next few days compared to where they should be at this time of year. if you have blue colours, it means we will be colder than normal, orange and red warmer than normal. temperatures well above the levels they should be. what that means for us they should be. what that means for us this morning is a pretty mild commute out there. remember the frost earlier this week? these are the temperatures as you step out the door, many close to double figures. but it is not necessarily a dry start. wet weather in southern and western scotland pushes into northern england and much of wales, some heavy burst of rain slowly pushing its way through east anglia and the south—east of the afternoon. it allows many central and northern areas to write up, some sunshine developing, and around the north and west of scotland through the day. it was also a pretty windy night through the night. it stays blustery throughout the day, we could see winds touch gale force were northern england and parts of north wales as
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well. but as i said, temperatures well. but as i said, temperatures well above where they should be. this is where we will be this afternoon, maybe 15 degrees and parts of north—east wales and eastern parts of england. should be around seven at this time of year, and we will stay above those levels, in fact, as we go through tonight. the evening rain in the south—east clears, showers start to become a bit more frequent across the north and west of scotland and northern ireland through the night. some of those could be heavy with thunder, and look at the temperatures as we go into tomorrow morning. as i said, staying at levels tonight higher than they should be by day. but we are into the weekend, and what to expect? well, a lot of dry weather through parts of england and wales. however, for these southernmost counties it looks like we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain putting away eastwards through and into the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland, a scattering of around, but start of something a bit cooler spreading into the north—west of scotland. most places not as mild as today, but it will be seeing temperatures above where they should be. if you are heading off to cardiff, after a bit of morning rain
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for the first of our six nations matches, we will see some sunshine come out. a bit blustery but it will be even windierfor those come out. a bit blustery but it will be even windier for those heading off to dublin for ireland against scotland. again, though, it should be largely dry. largely dry through saturday night. we could see a frost return to northern scotland. but look what is heading away by the end of the night, rain spreading offers across england and wales through we will see that ran spread to northern england, northern ireland and into southern scotland. the far north of scotla nd southern scotland. the far north of scotland will stay dry and bright throughout the day, but a bit of a contrast in temperatures on sunday. mid single figures in the far north, sticking with the mild weather in the south. that's how it is looking. as we have been hearing this morning, more than 80 british citizens are on a flight back to the uk from wuhan, as the coronavirus continues to spread. under chinese jurisdiction, only british passport holders who do not hold chinese nationality were originally permitted to board. let's talk now to adam bridgeman, who is still in wuhan, after he was told that his wife
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and newborn son couldn't leave with him. adam, thank you very much for joining us. i understand that that changed at the last minute. do you wa nt to changed at the last minute. do you want to explain to us? yes, we got a call at around 11:15pm saying that there would be a flight, and my wife and son could board. but we had to be... we had to get to the airport by 1am, and there was very short notice, and we didn't think we would be able to make it, so we decided to stay. then we got a call at around 1am saying they had pushed the time back, and we had to be there at 3am now. at that point, we changed our mind and we decided let's go, let's get out of here. but we were unable to get transport, and all of the city taxis are not on the road. there is a service like uber which is not on the road at the moment.
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eventually the foreign office managed to help us. we really appreciate the effort they put in. they managed to get a car to come and pick us up. but it was just a little bit too late, and we couldn't make the plane. how do you feel about that, adam ? make the plane. how do you feel about that, adam? because there are mixed feelings, aren't there? you have a very young child that you will be conscious of keeping safe. we are trying to stay positive and hope it blows over. we still have food, we have electricity, we have internet, so it is quite comfortable here. the foreign office did say that there might be another plane, we might be able to get on board a plane from, as they put it, an eu partner. so we hope something like that may can happen. but we don't know yet. did you get an idea of the timescale of when the plane might be available? no, no information yet. 0k. tell available? no, no information yet. ok. tell me a about how you feel in terms of keeping your son safe, very young at the moment. did you get any information about what risks there might be on board the plane, in terms of contagion of the
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coronavirus? well, all! know is that... i mean, i heard about the japanese evacuation. there were a couple of japanese nationals who showed no symptoms, and they ended up... so showed no symptoms, and they ended up...soi showed no symptoms, and they ended up... so i think there were three people on the plane with a virus, so thatis people on the plane with a virus, so that is a concern. also our son, he has had no vaccinations, he is quite vulnerable to any illness. so we we re vulnerable to any illness. so we were a bit concerned about that, yes. but i think that on balance they will probably still be safer than taking him to hospital here, which is full people who did have the virus, unfortunately. what impression have you had of how british authorities are interacting with the chinese authorities in terms of making sure britons are safe ? terms of making sure britons are safe? i think they have done the bestjob safe? i think they have done the best job they safe? i think they have done the bestjob they can in the circumstances, because i can't imagine it is very easy to negotiate with them, and it is all very short
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notice, and it seems as though they have been working around the clock to try and make something happen. so i really appreciate what they have done. so what is the plan now, adam, for you and your family? done. so what is the plan now, adam, for you and yourfamily? are done. so what is the plan now, adam, for you and your family? are you thinking if this plan, this other plane, does arrive with an eu partner that has been hinted to you, will you be on that? i think if we can get to the airport, we definitely will board that plane. well, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. stay safe, and thank you very much for letting us know how things are going, good luck. ever since the uk voted to leave the european union, we have been speaking to businesses about their hopes and concerns. ben is in strabane in northern ireland to gauge the mood. you have been talking to lots of people around there. where are you? good morning. good morning to you, welcome to northern ireland. we are right on the border, as you said, in strabane, right on the border, as you said, in stra bane, the right on the border, as you said, in strabane, the border just right on the border, as you said, in strabane, the borderjust a couple
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of miles down the road, and this place makes sporting equipment, associates, sporting gear, and it is sold all over the world but made right here. and what is interesting about this place, this is where all of this stuff crosses the border eight times before it gets to its customers. so quite clearly they have got a very close eye on what happens. remember, the border issue a really important issue in those brexit negotiations. so what do they wa nt to brexit negotiations. so what do they want to see happen next, and what could change for them? on the face of it, not a lot changes today for you, does it? but give me a sense of how important that borderjust down the road from here would be for you going forward. well, we have a very aggregated supply chain, we bring things down from the far east, we bring it through the border, up into strabane here, and then the fabric goes to our sister company in
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dublin, across the border, where they diet. it then comes back where we colour it or print it —— dye it. that isjust the we colour it or print it —— dye it. that is just the first stage. we colour it or print it —— dye it. that isjust the first stage. so half of our production goes there, and half remains here. but it could go north or south or east or west, so go north or south or east or west, so the fact that there are not going to be hard border and the fact that there are no days off the table gives us much more certainty than we had previously. i mean, it is not just the equivalent that you need and all the raw materials. it is your staff as well. you have to make sure you have enough staff to do thisjob, and sure you have enough staff to do this job, and they crossed the border as well. without a doubt, we have 750 people here, half of them cross the border on a daily basis. for us, there really is no border. we socialise, we go to the cinema, we do our shopping, people come back and forward. if there is any delays in them getting to their work, with a hard border, itjust would have beena a hard border, itjust would have been a disaster for us in terms of our employees getting to work. for
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now, thank you. we will have a look around later. that is his view, and business here has really been able to use that fluid order for so long, any changes would make a big difference. this is the sort of stuff that they may care, and we will show you around a little later. i want to introduce you to the chief executive of the firm called bubble bum, you make car seats and booster seats, and we are hearing the border issueis seats, and we are hearing the border issue is one that you just take for granted right now. what are you thinking about and concerned about is this transition period begins for the uk to leave the european union? the important thing for northern ireland in the uk, is we need to export. we don't physically have enough people in northern ireland, so we enough people in northern ireland, so we have to export. if we are not exporting, we need to get around the table again. we need to make sure there are not going to be any barriers for us, so that we can continue to export. with a product
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like ours, it is really, really important that we understand if there are going to be legislation changes, because there are so much —— there is so much compliance required for us, it is really, really important. and what have you been told about what changes could been told about what changes could be coming down the line, and what other things you are contending with in terms of your planning right now? from a perspective, we have been advised by our auditing accountants to set up a company in the republic of ireland, which we have done. we also had to apply for our vat numbers in the republic of ireland, and the same thing in holland as well. we need to make sure this will be frictionless for us, and we need to make sure that if we want to sell or grow the company, then we're going to have to export. and i don't think people understand that northern ireland and the republic of are really... i mean, we are really one and the same when it comes to trading. and you were telling me crossing that border is such an everyday occurrence for you right now. it would change some fundamental things. we know there won't be a hard border, but the thought of having to consider that
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borderfor the first time thought of having to consider that border for the first time in a long time is quite an important change. when i came to work, when they announced brexit, that was the only thing anyone talked about. no—one was talking about taxes or anything like that. the only thing they talked about was the hard border. i don't even turn on my sat nav during the day, i don't need to turn it on, but every time i turn it on, which is several times a day, my car tells me you are now entering ireland, and three minutes later, you are now entering the uk. that is all my car says to me all day long, and everybody is the same. northern ireland is so small, we are near nearly all living on border towns. thank you very much. we will be speaking to more people here to get a sense of that and whether anything changes at all. we will talk more about that later, before that, the news, travel and whether wherever you are watching this morning. ——
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weather. good morning from bbc london. and as you have been hearing tonight, after a7 years, the united kingdom leaves the european union. with it, one city of london expert is predicting the uk might have to compromise on access to its fishing waters if the financial services sector here in the capital wants to prosper. it looks like there's going to be a really big trade—off between fish and finance. just like the northern ireland border was for really the last two years, fish could be the sticking point to this entire negotiation. we're going to know by the early summer as to whether or not it is. st mary's hospital in paddington will stop using private contracters for somejobs, following industrial action by staff. around 1,000 cleaners, caterers and porters are provided by outside companies, but over the next few months, those roles will be brought in—house, with staff receiving the same pay and conditions as nhs staff. hundreds of residents in richmond
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have now been without gas for more than a week after a burst watermain flooded the local gas network. many people have been without heating and hot water since. gas supplier cadent says it is doing all it can to reconnect the supply, but disruption is likely to continue into the weekend. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, part suspended on the victoria line due to a fire alert at finsbury park. overground trains remain suspended between south tottenham and barking. on the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. westbound traffic on the a13 is building from dagenham into barking. in stratford, new plaistow road is partly blocked followng an accident. that is causing delays to the south of stratford park. and on the m25, delays anticlockwise betweenjunction 25 and junction 2a at potters bar causing delays back to the holmesdale tunnel. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini.
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hello, good morning. it's another mild start to the day, temperatures even higher than they were yesterday. always plenty of cloud around today. it's going to be rather windy, and there will be some rain later on through the afternoon. so it's not completely dry, but it is a dry start. through the morning, the cloud will tend to thicken, the south—westerly wind will start to pick up, and then a weather front pushes down from the north—west. there could be some heavy outbreaks of rain for a while, but most of it will tend to be light and patchy, and it's clearing its way south—eastwards as we head towards the end of the day and into the evening. top temperatures today of a very mild 11 or 12 degrees celsius. now, it stays windy overnight. the rain will clear, there'll always be plenty cloud around, but some clearer breaks developing into tomorrow morning. and it's another mild start to the day, lows of around nine or 10 degrees celsius. now, on saturday, i think we'll see plenty of cloud around. it will still be rather windy, feeling mild once more, but a touch cooler than today.
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some rain in the afternoon, but after that rain clears, it should brighten up. sunday again it's windy, it's mild, some rain for much of the day, but brighter through the afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: an historic day — at 11 o'clock tonight the uk will leave the european union after a7 years. boris johnson hails it as a "dawn of a new era". we'll be finding out what if anything will change during the transition period, and we'll be getting views from across the country. we have brought the sofa to dover. the channel will effectively become a border between the uk and the eu.
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what impact will that have? the irish border was one of the most controversial issues and that brexit negotiation so what will life look like for business and the people who live here? like for business and the people who live here ? i like for business and the people who live here? iwent like for business and the people who live here? i went to a factory right on the border to find out what it could mean. brexit on the border — the northern ireland border with the republic of ireland was one of the most contentious issues of the brexit negotiations on their way home — a plane carrying more than 80 britons has left the chinese city of wuhan and is due back in the uk later today. we will be speaking to chris ashton later in the show. mild weather. your full forecast coming up. it's friday the 31st of january. our top story: the uk will leave the european union at 11 o'clock tonight, three years after the british public voted for brexit,
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and a7 years after we firstjoined. the prime minister is due to make an address to the nation later tonight, in which he'll say this is not an end but a beginning. we will get the view from brussels injusta we will get the view from brussels injust a minute. we will get the view from brussels injusta minute. but we will get the view from brussels injust a minute. but our we will get the view from brussels in just a minute. but our political responded is in downing street. mixed emotion as we have seen but people across all parties saying we need to move forward together. that's right. borisjohnson will later today be addressing the nation on social media and i am told what he will be saying is that it is his job to bring the country back together. we will have the cabinet meeting in sunderland, the first area to vote to leave in the referendum. after 50 years of membership, he will be trying to
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back to local agenda. a rather mysterious black tent has appeared in downing street. if you open it up and takea in downing street. if you open it up and take a peek inside, there are a couple of projectors which will project a countdown clock onto the downing street later because we leave at 11 o'clock, 12 o'clock brussels time. we will also get the buildings eliminated in red, white and blue but that will be the exercise of it, the official celebrations. nigel farage and others will be having unofficial celebrations in parliament square. the prime minister wants to bring the country together and also bring up the country together and also bring up his agenda. jeremy corbyn is one it is ata up his agenda. jeremy corbyn is one it is at a crossroads, the country, and the danger it may look inwards. at 11 o'clock tonight we will no
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longer be in the ego. are you going to get in trouble going inside that tent? i only had a peek. a couple of projectors for the light show. some suggested it might be a tartarus so if things do not work out, you can go back in time! jenny hill is in brussels. time difference meant it is midnight when the departure happens in brussels. will there be any moments to mark the occasion? not really. i think this is going to be rather sombre moment as the union jack is taken down here in brussels. the eu is losing an important economic and political partner and many people here a very sad and
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concerned about the future although it has to be said some breathing a sigh of relief that this bruising process has come to an end but they are focused on what happens next, negotiating the difficult trade deal that has to be done by the end of the year, that is the british government thereby. we had a light show of our own in brussels. a lot of feeling amongst that european leaders and european capitals, affection for britain. the light show in brussels, historic buildings beaming red, white and blue, the colours of the unionjack as part of an event to say britain, we love you, we're sorry you are going and we wa nt you, we're sorry you are going and we want to keep you close. you will hear a lot of that from eu leaders but at the same time a lot of them talk about what happens next. ursula von der leyen has already told
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british and european newspapers that as soon as the sun rises tomorrow morning, work begins to fresh out the relationship. with saying as well, just after 7:30 a.m., we will be speaking to michael gove. to find out a little bit more about exactly what the government is planning and what the government is planning and what lies ahead. a plane carrying more than 80 britons is on its way to the uk after leaving wuhan, the chinese city at the centre of a coronavirus outbreak. it's due to touch down at raf brize norton around lunchtime. in china, officals say more than 200 people have now died, and the world health organization has declared the crisis a global emergency. simonjones has this report. finally on their way home, 83 britons, along with 27 foreign nationals, some posting pictures of the journey on social media. the flight to raf brize norton delayed by several hours to allow as many as possible to get to the airport,
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following some confusion for mixed nationality families. i am natalie and this is jamie. natalie francis is british buther son has a chinese passport. they got a last—minute message from uk officials. they called us about 20 minutes ago and said that there is a good guarantee that they will allow jamie on the plane. for other families, though, the call came too late. adam bridgeman, who has a chinese wife and a newborn baby, remains in wuhan. here at the foreign office, there will no doubt be a sense of relief that they have now managed to fly the first british citizens out of wuhan. there had been a sense of anger amongst some of those stranded there that initially the advice from officials here was that they should leave of their own accord, even though much of the area was in complete lockdown. those flown home will be taken to arrow park hospital on the wirral. they will spend 1a days in quarantine
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in former staff accommodation blocks. the world health organization has now declared a global emergency but it stressed this unprecedented outbreak was being met with unprecedented response. simon jones, bbc news. we'll speak to our repoter caroline davies in brize norton we are anticipating the plane should land at one o'clock. we have been told 150 british nationals and 50 eu nationals stop that figure is much lower. 87 and 27. the reason why the number is so much lower than originally anticipated, the foreign officer said hundred and 50 was their upper expectation. we have
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heard from families that the call came too late and they were concerned they were not going to be able to travel with people who had chinese passports, dual nationalities and that families would be separated. we do know they will be taken from here, to the north—west, where they will be kept at arrow park hospital an quarantined for 1a days. at arrow park hospital an quarantined for 14 days. thank you very much. the government's official review into the high speed two rail line has strongly advised against cancelling the project. the document, seen by the bbc, says that calls forjust one section of the railway to be built to control costs would not be value for money. and it says scrapping the plans would impact badly on the uk's "fragile" construction industry. the government will announce its final decision on the scheme next month. a state of emergency has been declared in canberra as bushfires
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continue to ravage parts of australia. officials sounded the warning amid what they're calling the worst fire threat to the territory in nearly two decades. residents in suburbs have been urged to remain alert for potential evacuations. gwyneth paltrow‘s new netflix series poses a "considerable health risk" to the public, nhs chief executive sir simon stevens has warned. he likened the actress to ‘quacks and charlatans' who push unproven therapies, and accused her new series the goop lab of spreading misinformation. a spokesman for miss paltrow‘s wellness brand, goop, said it was transparent when covering topics that may be unsupported by science. world athletics will today decide whether the latest carbon—fibre running shoes, which have helped smash world records — break sporting rules. the new technology was used in trainers like nike's latest vaporfly running shoes. they were worn by kenyan eliud kipchoge when he became the first person ever to run the marathon distance in under two
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hours last year. some athletes suggest this gives an unfair advantage. those are the main stories. the weather and spot coming up. more than 80 britons are due to land in the uk after being in wuhan. yesterday we spoke to natalie francis who thought she would have to leave her three—year—old son behind because he has a chinese passport. she was later told they we re passport. she was later told they were able to leave together. this is her heading to the airport last night. say hello, jamie. hello, mummy. wejust night. say hello, jamie. hello, mummy. we just got the call ten minutes ago. we first got a call several hours ago but they could give no guarantees if we were denied boarding they could not give us any help in getting back into the city.
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they called us about 20 minutes ago and said that get to the meeting point as soon as possible and there isa point as soon as possible and there is a good guarantee that they will allowjamie on the plane. a difficult time with children and we still think it is best to get jamie out of the city but it is still breaking up ourfamily out of the city but it is still breaking up our family and is going to be really, really hard, especially once jamie realises what is actually happening. that was natalie on the way to the airport. let's speak to her aunt. are they on the flight? i am certainly hoping they. i heard from nataliejust gone
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11 o'clock last night. she e—mailed me and said they had been through the medical process, the medical checks, they have been through security and she and jamie were at the departure gate. at that time she said that she had that was going to bea said that she had that was going to be a further delay for the flight departure. i have not heard anything since so, on that basis, i am assuming she is on the plane and therefore is not able to contact me. did she tell you much, you mentioned the tests and precautions going on board. what did she tell you about that? she didn't. it was a very short e—mail. basically that is what she told me. i sort of memorised it because i knew you would ask. tell mea because i knew you would ask. tell me a bit more about the decision—making. it has not been easy. complications about who was going to be allowed on, they were not sure. she was filming herself on
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the way to the airport and everything done in a bit of a rush. it was. in the early evening she had decided she would not go because she was very, decided she would not go because she was very, very worried about being refused, jamie not allowed to board the plane at the last minute and then she would be stuck in terms of getting back into the city. i had not realised initially but the muster point was not on the airport but on a motorway somewhere. i do not quite understand about all that but that was a great fear. she had more or less decided she was not going to go and i said to her, we will support whatever your decision is. you know best. and then a couple of hours later, i had another e—mail from her, saying she had just heard from her, saying she had just heard from the foreign office and they had
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said could she get to the meeting point now because there was a very strong possibility that jamie would be allowed on the plane. my response was to just e—mail back, go. be allowed on the plane. my response was tojust e—mail back, go. i assumed that strong possibility is diplomatic speak for we feel fairly confident we can get you on the plane whereas they were not saying that before. what we also know is that before. what we also know is that natalie's has been who is a chinese has remained. in terms of what happens next, we understand the flight what happens next, we understand the flight is due to arrive around lunchtime at brize norton. there will be a period of quarantine. are you concerned about her and jamie and about what will happen to them? well, there are all sorts of worries, aren't there? one can only hope that this has been thought
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through and organised. i don't really know much about the quarantine at all. i have heard from her that she has been told that at some point, there will be... she will be able to contact me. i very much doubt that i will be allowed to visit her, because she is in quarantine. so i think it will probably be phone calls and facetime and that sort of thing for the time being. and i guess i know even less than she does, and she doesn't know very much at the moment. we will leave it there for now. thank you for bringing us up—to—date and we will watch and see with interest whether indeed they are on that flight, whether indeed they are on that flight, and we will find out more.” love the fact that she knew exactly what you are going to ask and was all prepared. if only all of our interviewees were so prepared. and it isa interviewees were so prepared. and it is a sensitive time for those families, because they don't know. the assumption is made that they are on the flight, and that is good, but it isa on the flight, and that is good, but it is a worrying time. and also what
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happens after. we have our reporter there at raf brighton —— raf brighton norton. look at the colours on that. do you think that has been put through a filter, we have had some stunning sunsets and sunrises lately. -- raf brize norton. good morning to you, by the way. they will be some rain around. the big story i think for most of you is, considering it is the last day of january, just how mild it is out there. remember the frost we started there. remember the frost we started the week with. these are the temperatures you can expect over the next hour or two, anywhere between seven and 11 degrees for the vast majority. there is some rain for parts of west and southern scotland and increasingly went into northern england the north and west wales through the next few hours. here is when you will certainly need your waterproofs. the rain will be spreading its way towards east anglia and the south—east through
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the afternoon, allowing things to brighten up farther north. showers packing into the hebrides in the highlands, and while not as windy as it was last night, winds touching 70 mph ina it was last night, winds touching 70 mph in a few spots in northern england and southern scotland, it will still be a blustery day. gail is expected for northern england and north wales. winds coming in from the south—west, boosting the temperate is in some parts of south wales and eastern parts of england, heading 15 degrees this afternoon. to put that into perspective, it should be around seven celsius. for the evening rush hour, dry for many around england and wales, but the show is getting more frequent across scotla nd show is getting more frequent across scotland and northern ireland. they will continue through the night, some of those becoming heavy and thundery to take us into tomorrow morning. but like the night gone, it is not going to be a cold night by any means. temperatures to start the weekend around six to 10 celsius. a mild enough start to the weekend, a dry and bright one for much of england and wales, with varying amounts of cloud. the chance of some rain sliding across southern most counties of england and wales through mid morning to sort of
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mid—afternoon. more showers and more cloud across scotland, northern ireland, and eventually into the far north of england, introducing slightly cooler air into the far north later on. otherwise it is another mild day, not as mild as today, but temperatures widely into double figures. if you are off to cardiff for the start of the six nations, wales against italy tomorrow, after the chance of some late morning rain it looks dry, bright and very blustery. wintry still in dublin for ireland against winds could touch gale force but they should be dry and bright. most places dry as we going to saturday night. winds easing into touch frost in northern scotland. into sunday, outbreaks of rain will spread in from the south, pushing their way northwards, and reintroducing even milder weather back into southern parts once again. back to you both. you might be wondering how brexit will affect future trips abroad. is your passport still valid? can you still drive overseas with a uk licence? here is our business correspondent victoria fritz to explain.
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deadlines and departure dates, they have come and they have gone. but as of 11pm on friday evening, the uk will no longer be a member of the eu. some will celebrate, others commiserate. but what will actually change? the 58 million or so trips that we make each year to spain, france, all over the eu, will continue as normal. there are no changes to trains, two planes, coaches orfairies, changes to trains, two planes, coaches or fairies, and your passport is still valid. you don't need more than six months left on it, but you do need to make sure it's valid for the whole trip. you don't need a visa as a tourist, and you will bejoining don't need a visa as a tourist, and you will be joining the same cues that passport control. that said, we entering what's been called transitional period. that lasts until the end of the year. between now and then, the government and the eu have a lot to iron out. it is a long way off, but if there is no
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agreement on britain's longer term relationship with the eu, your passport might need renewing. but don't worry. we will keep you up—to—date with any changes there. now, do you remember these? your eyes a re not now, do you remember these? your eyes are not deceiving you. these are blue. they are being phased in soon, and by the middle of the year, all new british passports will be back to this colour. if you are going abroad this year, it is best to still take your european health insurance card, or ehic, if you have one. it is still valid, and it guarantees you access to urgent healthcare. remember, though, it doesn't replace travel insurance. road trip? well, there's no need for international driving permit at this stage. just remember, your valid uk driving licence and your valid car insurance documents. and what about
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these? well, once the transition period is over, mobile phone companies could use to bring back those roaming charges that we used to have to pay abroad. but, for now, nothing changes. let's not forget the most important members of the family. if you do have a valid pet passport, that will still be good to use after 31 january. but do keep an eye on this, because the rules could change from next year. your local vet, though, should have all the latest guidance. fan of a booze cruise? well, crack open another and celebrate, because nothing changes here. any alcohol you buy legally can be brought back home, if you transport it yourself, drink it, keep it, or give it away forfree. so there you have it. not a lot will change from this week to next. but remember, we'rejust change from this week to next. but remember, we're just at the beginning of all this. the clock has
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only just been reset, beginning of all this. the clock has onlyjust been reset, and a lot can happen a year. so many questions. you can tell from victoria that the message very clearly is 11pm, immediately, nothing is going to change. but a lot of people asking a lot of questions nonetheless. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is by the white cliffs of dover for us this morning, and can help us with some answers. good morning. yes, good morning to you. we thought we would bring the sofa to dover, and the english channel will become a border from 11pm tonight between the uk and the eu. iam 11pm tonight between the uk and the eu. i am delighted to bejoined by simon calder, travel expert, travel editor of the independent. passports. tell us the things that are or are passports. tell us the things that are orare not passports. tell us the things that are or are not going to change. passports. tell us the things that are or are not going to changem feels a bit monty python here, but if you are expecting and now for something completely different, don't. nothing is going to change. from a traveller's point of view,
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the thing to do is think that everything will be exactly the same. sta rt everything will be exactly the same. start with your passport. valid, exactly the same, up to its expiry date. i know there has been a lot of misinformation around, but no need for six months, and after the end of 2020 it will continue to be a british travel document. new passports, of course we have been promised new ones. they won't look anything like this. if you want to see what they will look like, search online for north korean passport or croatian passport. we crucially, of course. . . croatian passport. we crucially, of course... driving licences, many people at dover concerned about that. your driving licence has a little european symbol there. it will continue to work as an ordinary driving licence. you need one of these, or rather two of these, international driving permits, one for france and one for spain, but you might from the end of next year. european health insurance card, goodness me. that continues to be valid, delivering medical treatment on the same basis as local people in every eu country, in the public
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hospitals. mobile roaming, don't worry about that. those are going to continue as normal. and you can take your pet with the same rules. but that's only until the end of the year. after that, who knows? so the transition period, everything is as it is now. are you worried about what could happen at the end of that transition period? well, the government yesterday put out some news saying the pet passport scheme appears to be being scrapped, they will have to start planning four months in advance, and green cards, motor insurance, you're probably going to have to get that as well. just remember, the rest of this year, you are able to use the passport fast track when you get there. you won't be able to do that from 2021. sarah, iwill have there. you won't be able to do that from 2021. sarah, i will have a quick chat to you. for uk nationals living in europe, in the eu, are they going to be affected after 11 p.m.? it is the same story, so everything stays the same until the end of this year. so the things that expats have been concerned about, whether pensions will rise in the same way they do in the uk with inflation, that is guaranteed until
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the end of the year. healthcare is guaranteed, and freedom to there. actually, if you move there by the end of this year, most rights are guaranteed going forward. so you get to keep all of those rights, even after the end of the transition period. the key thing is if you move after the end of this year, then all thatis after the end of this year, then all that is up for negotiation, so there is nothing actually nail down about your rights for healthcare and pensions and your right to remain. the only exception to that is ireland, where there is an arrangement that predates the eu, and so therefore you will have all those rights that remain in ireland. thank you so much, simon, as well. so many things to get through. nothing changing from now, but beyond the end of next year, who knows. this port is one of the busiest in the world, some 90,000 passengers a day come through, 10,000 trucks. so clearly, what have we been talking about? potentially beyond may be the end of this year, more impacts will be felt then. lots today just on this more impacts will be felt then. lots todayjust on this historic day. a7 yea rs todayjust on this historic day. a7 years it has been coming along. we
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are now leaving the eu. but we will leave you with some images of this historic coastline as we catch up on the news, the travel and the weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm alex bushell. and as you've been hearing tonight, after a7 years, the united kingdom leaves the european union. with it, one city of london expert is predicting the uk might have to compromise on access to its fishing waters if the financial services sector here in the capital wants to prosper. it looks like there's going to be a really big trade—off between fish and finance. just like the northern ireland border was for really the last two years, fish could be the sticking point to this entire negotiation. we're going to know by the early summer as to whether or not it is. st mary's hospital in paddington will stop using private contracters for some jobs following industrial action by staff. around 1,000 cleaners, caterers and porters are provided by outside companies, but over the next few months,
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those roles will be brought in—house, with staff receiving the same pay and conditions as nhs staff. hundreds of residents in richmond have now been without gas for more than a week after a burst watermain flooded the local gas network. many people have been without heating and hot water since. gas supplier cadent says it is doing all it can to reconnect the supply, but disruption is likely to continue into the weekend. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, part suspended on the victoria line due to a fire alert at finsbury park. overground trains remain suspended between south tottenham and barking. piccadilly line there are minor delays too. on the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in stratford, new plaistow road is partly blocked following an accident. that is causing delays to the south of stratford park.
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and on the m25, delays anticlockwise betweenjunction 25 and junction 26 for the a10 following a breakdown in the roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another mild start to the day, temperatures even higher than they were yesterday. always plenty of cloud around today. it's going to be rather windy, and there will be some rain later on through the afternoon. so it's not completely dry, but it is a dry start. through the morning, the cloud will tend to thicken, the south—westerly wind will start to pick up, and then a weather front pushes down from the north—west. there could be some heavy outbreaks of rain for a while, but most of it will tend to be light and patchy, and it's clearing its way south—eastwards as we head towards the end of the day and into the evening. top temperatures today of a very mild 11 or 12 degrees celsius. now, it stays windy overnight. the rain will clear, there'll always be plenty cloud around, but some clearer breaks developing into tomorrow morning. and it's another mild start to the day, lows of around nine
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or 10 degrees celsius. now, on saturday, i think we'll see plenty of cloud around. it will still be rather windy, feeling mild once more, but a touch cooler than today. some rain in the afternoon, but after that rain clears, it should brighten up. sunday again it's windy, it's mild, some rain for much of the day, but brighter through the afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the uk will leave the european union at 11 o'clock tonight, three years after the british public voted for brexit and a7 years after we firstjoined. we're going to talk michael gove now. he has been all over this. i
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was looking at yourjob description. under the government website and you are responsible for the oversight of all government department preparations for brexit. are you happy that we are prepared as the uk prepares to leave the eu? absolutely. people across the country have been preparing. we will be leaving formally at 11 o'clock this evening but it is only the beginning actually of a new chapter in britain's history. there are lots of opportunities outside of the european union, commercial opportunities and a chance for us as a country to come together and recognise that many of the people who voted to leave, many of the areas felt they had been overlooked and undervalued and now it is time to bring our country together. what will you be feeling at 11pm this
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evening? on the one hand relieved that 3.5 years of wrangling are over and on the other delighted that what the british people voted for twice is at last coming to pass. the most precious gift that britain has given the world is parliamentary democracy and we are restoring faith and trust in that. in the future, it is the decisions made in this country that will determine what happens in this country and that is a really important thing. every single individual voice matters equally and politicians will be directly accountable. while we were in the eu, some ministers would say, i am afraid my hands are tied by brussels and that was the wrong way to go about things. politicians need to be directly accountable to voters. it also gives us the opportunity of all
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the opportunities in the 21st century. ministers might say it is a hangover from the eu century. ministers might say it is a hangoverfrom the eu days? century. ministers might say it is a hangover from the eu days?” century. ministers might say it is a hangover from the eu days? i think so. ina hangover from the eu days? i think so. in a transition period, 12 months, eu laws still apply but we are moving further away from the orbit of eu rules and laws and ultimately it will be for our parliament to decide. for example, on migration, we can decide what the right policies, who should come here and on what terms. since we have voted to leave the eu, attitudes towards migration have become warmer and more optimistic because now that we can control things, we feel better about britain being a beacon of hope for people wanting to come from other countries and make that
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life here because we are in control. faith in democratic institutions have also strengthened. you say you have also strengthened. you say you have 11 months now to get this business done. there is doubt this government can actually get the deal is done, there is simply not enough time. again, one of the things about a deadline is it concentrates minds and it can get things done. it is the view of lots of people in europe as well. a chief negotiator for the eu said it can be done. the foreign minister of northern ireland said it can be done as well. the eu is committed in negotiations to get this done so brexit happens tonight and then we have a conversation without friends in europe about free trade and friendly corporations but we will be having conversations with
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other countries around the world. how we can play a bigger role on the world stage with issues close to our heart like time a change. we will be hosting a major conference on fighting climate change. one of the reasons they are coming here is that britain has been a pace setter to reach net zero gas emissions. when you say and you say you will get the deal done by december 31, in 11 months, the top three things that will be tangible. a noticeable change for all of us in the uk. we will have control of our borders and we can decide who comes here. we can safeguard the security of british citizens and make sure we attract the brightest and the best. we will have a much more attractive regime for scientists to magicians,
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technicians, the people who will change the future. we can escape eu laws which have restricted innovations. a huge area where we can develop technologies of the future where we can ensure we can feed the world ‘s poor, developed the technologies that will enhance our lives and be able to do so without the bureaucracy that the eu imposes. and the third thing is going to use the power of government and the private sector to make sure that those parts of the country that have not benefited properly in the past see the benefits coming to them. michel barnier has said that when it comes to trade, the uk's choices will now make frictionless trade impossible and that is something the prime minister and cabinet ministers always said is possible. can you guarantee
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frictionless trade? no. we want trade to be as frictionless as possible. but the eu says you have to a cce pt possible. but the eu says you have to accept their rules and laws and are subordinate to them. we want a close relationship with eu and the approach we want is built on a relationship built with canada and that means we want a relationship where the right note tariffs, quotas but there will be some regulations that will differ in britain, two things that are better for our economy and that will mean you're creating processes that are not there now with europe in the interest of our economy. it is going to be more awkward for businesses particularly those importing and exporting trade across especially in
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the irish border. we have a specific condition that relates to northern ireland and our relationship with ireland and our relationship with ireland overall. axis throughout the uk. as we leave the eu we will be able to set the rules of the british economy and that means we will see all sorts of procedures, bureaucracies that in the past have held british businesses are back. let's talk about the intent of the cabinet. boris johnson a let's talk about the intent of the cabinet. borisjohnson a very clear that he appreciated those who switched their allegiance when it came to political parties and voted for tories. you cabinet meeting is in sunderland. of course many people are celebrating brexit and delighted that it are celebrating brexit and delighted thatitis are celebrating brexit and delighted that it is happening but they are going to be your fiercest critics of things do not look and feel right.
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is the cabinet meeting that today a token gesture is this the start of a future where you start travelling across the country, outside the london bubble? it is emphatically the second point you made. i was not born and brought up in the north. it is vital to recognise that for our country to prosper, everyone has to have an equal chance. talent is spread equally across the country, opportunity is not. the economic model we had was working well for some people but not for others. sunderland, both as the city that first voted to leave on that historic night, but also a city with a fantastic university and potential. as we leave the european
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union, we can work even harder to provide opportunities to people in sunderland, in the north—east and across the united kingdom.” sunderland, in the north—east and across the united kingdom. i do need to talk to you about the coronavirus. we have been talking to lots of people, some of whom have been able to get on the plane transferring them to raf brize norton and some who have not. there has been criticism of the uk government not getting britons back to the uk who are in fear of their safety quickly enough but also how much communication there is been keeping them aware of what is going on and getting them back home.” understand. it has been a fast developing situation. the home secretary has been working night and day with the foreign office to make sure we can meet this challenge and thatis sure we can meet this challenge and that is why you are absolutely right, a chapter plane taking people
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from china to the uk is in the air as we speak. on the plane there are trained medical staff and personnel to make sure they could be available to make sure they could be available to look after those who are affected. the situation has grown in china. we remain vigilant and work with the who and others. we make sure every uk national will get the chance to come home safety and be looked after because we absolutely wa nt to looked after because we absolutely want to ensure their health and safety. one said another plane might be due in cooperation with european partner? we want to make sure we work with other countries in order to help everyone who needs support. again, this is evidence of the fact that when it comes to dealing with the crisis, like the coronavirus, we
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work together, show solidarity in the interest of working together. you are not telling me about the plane. ok, michael gove, thank you for talking to us. let's turn our attention to sport. if you love big occasions, stadiums and a bit of by, occasions, stadiums and a bit of rugby, it is a great weekend, the six nations. the six nations returns to our screens this weekend, kicking—off the latest chapter in the world's oldest international rugby tournament. over the next six weeks all four home nations, plus italy and france, will battle it out for the championship trophy. we'll be looking ahead to the opening weekend with england international chris ashton in a minute, but first let's see the teams in action.
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commentator: island's bonus point try. acting scrum half. the wriggle, the turn, the presentation! interception and it is going to be another try for scotland. russell under the post and scotland go level. this is astonishing! chris, let's start with the holders wales. they have a new coach. how do you
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feel he will fare in his first tournament? a lot of teams have a new coach. wales is one of them. wayne has been in wales for a long time and knows the players really well. i cannot see it being much of a transition. i think they have a lot of injuries at the moment but wales will come together. there is a new winger in town. this is your position, a prolific try scorer, wales have a new winger in town. place in gloucester. people always love to see new characters. he is 19 years old, what do you make of him? he is lightning fast which is a good quality to have. unfortunately, i do not think he has made the cut this
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weekend but hopefully we will see him later. he has a long career ahead of him. how long were you when you had the first international?- but it was rugby league.“ you had the first international?- but it was rugby league. if it is not wales, who is going to lift the trophy? i think ithinka i think a lot of it will be based around this weekend's game, england, france. it is relatively the same english team that is going to play from that final, and france have got a lot of excitement around them. they have got a good young team, new coaches, so this weekend will count for a lot. there was quite a lot of criticism levelled at the england tea m criticism levelled at the england team during the world cup about it losing focus and momentum once it got in the latter stages. do you
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think that is fair, and do you think thatis think that is fair, and do you think that is going to affect england now? no, i don't think it is fair. i think especially when you are in a by think especially when you are in a rugby environment, you are in your own environment, completely detached from what is happening on the outside. it is not irrelevant, but you concentrate on each other and how you are playing. england went through that tournament very well, and unfortunately didn't get through the last hurdle in the final, which is the most important, and eddie jones will be looking to put that right. another hangover that might affect england, there is been a lot of coverage of saracens being relegated because of a breach of salary cap. is that going to cause disquiet in the england camp for the six nations? i think they will be really grateful, to be honest, to get away from the club environment and go into the country and be with all the different players, and take the mind away from it, be able to concentrate on playing for england for the next two months, and try and win the six nations. we have to talk about scotland, not just win the six nations. we have to talk about scotland, notjust because i am here, and finn russell was either sent home or kicked out because he had been drinking, wouldn't leave a drinking session, and missed
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training session as well. is he making a strong stand there, or has he shot himself in the foot?” making a strong stand there, or has he shot himself in the foot? i think he shot himself in the foot? i think he has to. he also has a new captain, stuart hogg, so they have made this decision to have a strong sta nce made this decision to have a strong stance on it, which you need to in professional rugby these days. they have hastings coming through, who has been with them for a while. got to mention northern ireland. thoughts on that? new coach, a lot of the same old faces in the team, but a new coaching set up. what will he bring to it? a lot of leadership and personality, he is a very strong character and gets his message across unbelievably well. what does that mean in real terms? does that mean he shouts a lot? it kind of is like management speak. he is one of the best speakers i have been involved with as a coach. he can put confidence and clarity into any team, and! confidence and clarity into any team, and i am sure he will do that.
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i love the national anthems in the six nations, the teams line up and you watch the emotions on the faces. what was the ashton way of dealing with that moment? straightfaced. you had to really think it through, did you? don't show the emotion? yes, it is like that. but of course you do. it is such an amazing spectacle to bea it is such an amazing spectacle to be a part of, especially playing in france, away this weekend, there is nowhere better to play. we are looking forward to watching it, and thank you so much for coming in to share your opinions with us. and the wales—italy match is live on bbc one tomorrow. voverage starts at 1:a0pm, with kick off at 2:15pm. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. but first of all? what are we looking at? we are looking at folkestone. a little bit messy. yes,
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it looks like a little bit of sea mist. just clearing up, maybe the sun coming out a little bit. it looks rather beautiful. cast your expert eye over that shot for us stop a bit of low cloud lingering at the moment, quite humid and quite moist for this stage in january. this is the scene further along the coast a short while ago in devon. a gloomy start for many but incredibly mild. at the moment we have temperatures in double figures for a few spots across the country. we don't usually see these during the afternoon at this time of year, but to go with it, some rain around across parts of wales in northern england through the morning rush hour. some heavy bursts of rain will be pushing their way through east anglia and the south—east. maybe a few breaks in that low cloud for a time, but better breaks in the cloud later. scotland, northern ireland, northern england and north wales, with some sunny spells. rain on the far north and north—west of scotland and still a blustery day. when is not as strong as they were last night but could touch gale force at times across parts of north england and north wales. but the
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south—westerly wind is bringing in the very mild air. a few spots in north—east wales and eastern parts of england hitting 15 degrees. we should only be around seven. as we go into the evening, a little bit of rain clinging for the rush hour across parts of kent and sussex. much of england and wales dry. showers getting going across scotla nd showers getting going across scotland and northern ireland to finish the day and take us into tonight. some of those could be on the heavy side, can't rule out the odd rumble of thunder, but temperatures holding up. i'll start for the weekend with temperatures 6— 10 degrees as we start saturday morning. showers in the far north of england, much of england and wales dry and bright before we see some rain spread erratically across those southernmost counties. scotland and northern ireland, a different day tomorrow. much more cloud and more in the way of showers at times. some sunshine and cooling around in the far north later. for most of you, when the sun is out, it should feel quite lessened. temperatures still into double figures, not quite as high as those of today. in northern scotland, the winds falling late
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into saturday night. we could see a frost, frost free further south because more cloud and more rain starting to push its way and as we go into the morning. ireland, england and wales are particularly damp. brightening up across southern counties during the day, quite a breezy day. lighter winds further north on sunday, northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland seeing some rain at times. heavy showers in the west end a big split in temperatures. chilly across the north, much milderfurther south, with temperatures still hitting the 13 or 1a degrees mark. we stick roughly with a milder theme on monday, with some outbreaks of rain. next week it looks like things will cool off roughly to where they should be for the time of year, but also a good deal drier. away from that, let's head quickly to australia. we will be talking to john later. temperatures this afternoon, canberra, hobartand melbourne all above a0 degrees, the first time that has happened in recorded history. but there is a big change on the way for melbourne, after temperatures of a3 degrees today, vicious storm is set to rumble across the city, and by
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monday it will just rumble across the city, and by monday it willjust be 17. how about that for a change in conditions. 26 degrees monday it willjust be 17. how about that for a change in conditions. 26 degrees change. is that normal? they can have massive swings, just a change in wind direction over that pa rt change in wind direction over that part of the world, and melbourne is certainly going to feel it. but they will be some nasty severe storms to go with that change. is there a technical word for sea mist?“ go with that change. is there a technical word for sea mist? if you haveitin technical word for sea mist? if you have it in the east coast, you sometimes call it haar.” have it in the east coast, you sometimes call it haar. i knew that, i wasjust trying sometimes call it haar. i knew that, i was just trying to use the colloquial phrase. world athletics will decide today on whether the latest carbon—fibre running shoes, which have helped smash world records, break sporting rules. athletes wearing the new footwear, such as nike's latest, vaporfly, have taken 31 of the 36 top three finishes made in major marathons last year, which some athletes suggest is giving an unfair advantage. our sports news reporter laura scott has more. the greatest ever performance in the
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marathon distance by a woman. when bridget won the chicago marathon, she not only broke apollo radcliffe's record, which had stood for16 radcliffe's record, which had stood for 16 years, she obliterated it. she did so wearing the latest issue technology, a pair of nike's vaporfly. these carbon plated shoes have dominated the marathon scene of late. but the sixth finisher for great britain at the beijing olympics is one of many athletes who believe it has gone too far. you have to have regulation in order to preserve fairness, justice, inclusion, and so on. and i think in this situation, the innovation has gone ahead of the regulation. it is a free for all now. it is making records a bit meaningless. and i would really like to see world athletics take us back to where running was about running, and the best athlete out there, not about
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who is wearing white shoes or who is contracted with which company. dissecting this super issue reveals the black carbon plate which helps runners feel like they are springing off the tarmac, and has helped shave seconds and minutes of race times. nike say they respect world athletics rules, which say that athletics rules, which say that athletic footwear should not give them an unfair advantage and should be available to all, and say they do not create any running shoes that release more energy than the runner expands. but a leading sports scientist claims that wearing traditional noncarbon plated shoes against the vaporfly is like wearing slippers. i consider this technical doping, given the way the rules are currently worded at present. any record that's been produced using those kind of shoes has to be expunged from the record books. he became the first person ever to run the marathon distance in under two
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hours, but one of the many factors helping eliud kipchoge's feet that day last october were a pair of nike prototypes which are still not available in the shelves. the challenge for world, world athletics todayis challenge for world, world athletics today is to encourage innovation while preserving the fundamental premise of the sport, to celebrate the best athletes, not the best shoes. at 11pm tonight britain leaves the european union, hearing from michael gove this morning about this being the beginning of a new chapter. well, what is clear is that lots of nurses will be depending on things staying as they are or at least being given a clear idea of how trading, for example, is going to change stop today, the future arrives, and ben is back in northern ireland to gauge the mood. lots of people really concerned
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about how this is going to pan out. you are absolutely right, good morning to you. we are not far from the body itself, the border that was so controversial during those brexit negotiations, and one that this place, which makes sporting equipment, cells around the world. it crosses the border eight times before it gets to customers. that border issue for you, just a fact of life, isn't it? you cross that water every day. yes, i cross it three or four times a day, so whenever i have to leave early in the morning, i have to beat the traffic, and if this border comes up, i might have to leave even earlier. it is not very good for me if it comes on, but my daughter's grandparents love it as well, they have to commute back to our place, so it can be tricky for me. thank you so much, it does give you a sense about what businesses are contending with, what they are thinking about, and just to make sure that they have enough
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workers to do everything. we will speak to the boss a little later, but i will give you a sense of what businesses dealing with. just to make sure that they have some a nswe rs , make sure that they have some answers, so many things they are facing right now, the 11 month transition period of course begins today. we have 11 months to get some a nswe rs. today. we have 11 months to get some answers. business say there are lots of questions still and not many a nswe rs. of questions still and not many answers. we will talk to some of them later, but let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alex bushell. and as you've been hearing tonight, after a7 years, the united kingdom leaves the european union. with it, one city of london expert is predicting the uk might have to compromise on access to its fishing waters if the financial services sector here in the capital wants to prosper. it looks like there's going to be a really big trade—off between fish and finance. just like the northern ireland border was for really the last two years, fish could be the sticking point to this entire negotiation. we're going to know by the early
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summer as to whether or not it is. st mary's hospital in paddington will stop using private contracters for some jobs following industrial action by staff. around a thousand cleaners, caterers and porters are provided by outside companies. but over the next few months, those roles will be brought in—house, with staff receiving the same pay and conditions as nhs staff. hundreds of residents in richmond have now been without gas for more than a week after a burst watermain flooded the local gas network. many people have been without heating and hot water since. gas supplier cadent says it ims doing all it can to reconnect the supply, but disruption is likely to continue into the weekend. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, minor delays on the bakerloo line. severe delays on the victoria line due to a fire alert at finsbury park. overground trains remain suspended between south tottenham and barking. piccadilly line is part suspended
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between northfields and heathrow. on the roads, in palmers green, westbound traffic on the aa06 north circular is slow towards arnos grove, with delays back to the a10 at the great cambridge interchange. in stratford, new plaistow road is partly blocked following an accident. that is causing delays to the south of stratford park. and on the m25, delays anticlockwise betweenjunction 26 and junction 25 for the a10 following a breakdown in the roadworks. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's another mild start to the day, temperatures even higher than they were yesterday. always plenty of cloud around today, it's going to be rather windy, and there will be some rain later on through the afternoon. so it's not completely dry, but it is a dry start. through the morning, the cloud will tend to thicken, the south—westerly wind will start to pick up, and then a weather front pushes down from the north—west. there could be some heavy outbreaks of rain for a while, but most of it will tend to be light and patchy, and it's clearing its way south—eastwards as we head
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towards the end of the day and into the evening. top temperatures today of a very mild 11 or 12 degrees celsius. now, it stays windy overnight. the rain will clear, there'll always be plenty cloud around, but some clearer breaks developing into tomorrow morning. and it's another mild start to the day, lows of around nine or ten degrees celsius. now, on saturday, i think we'll see plenty of cloud around. it will still be rather windy, feeling mild once more, but a touch cooler than today. some rain in the afternoon, but after that rain clears, it should brighten up. sunday again it's windy, it's mild, some rain for much of the day, but brighter through the afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... a historic day — at 11 o'clock
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tonight, the uk will leave the european union after a7 years. boris johnson hails it as a dawn of a new era. we'll be finding out what, if anything, will change during the transition period and we'll be getting views from across the country. i'll be talking hearts and minds in sunderland, a city that voted heavily for brexit, and it's where the prime minister and his cabinet will meet later. the irish border was one of the most controversial elements of the brexit referendum. what will life looks like after brexit for businesses and people who live here? on their way home — a plane carrying more than 80 britons has left the chinese city of wuhan and is due back in the uk later today. who will meet novak djokovic in the final of the australian open?
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after his victory over roger federer, djokovic will be watching the other semifinal closely this morning. we'll be live in melbourne for the build up. a fairly blustery day. the winds will bring very mild air, could hit 15 degrees this afternoon. full details on breakfast. it's friday, 31st january. the prime minister will hail the dawn of a new era as the uk prepares to leave the european union tonight after a7 years. the formal process will happen at 11pm, when the uk will enter a transition period until the end of the year, during which negotiations will start on how to shape the future relationship. michael gove, who campaigned for vote leave during the referendum, told us that leaving the eu would create more opportunities. it's only the beginning, actually, of a new chapter
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in britain's history. there are lots of opportunities for us outside the european union. there are commercial and economic opportunities, but it's also the case that there's a chance for us, as a country, to come together, to recognise that many of the people who voted to leave, many of the areas who voted strongly to leave felt that they had been overlooked and undervalued and now it's time to bring our country together. we'll get the view from brussels injust a minute, but first our political correspondent, iain watson, is in downing street. a historic day and the cabinet and other leaders say it is an opportunity to move forward and put divisions behind us. that is right. when borisjohnson addresses the nation tonight on social media, he will say it is hisjob nation tonight on social media, he will say it is his job to try to bring the country back together again. he will be saying it is the dawn of a new era, national renewal. he and his cabinet ministers meeting in sunderland. best placed to declare for leave in the referendum,
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2016. he will be talking strain enough on brexit day largely about the domestic agenda, moving on from brexit —— strangely enough. mysterious black tent, what is happening here, a couple of projecting a countdown clock onto the wall of downing street and just before 11pm, buildings here and around whitehall are going to be lit up around whitehall are going to be lit up in red, white and blue, the colours of the union flag. that will be about it for the official celebrations. borisjohnson talking about a new era butjeremy corbyn suggesting britain is at a crossroads and may end up turning in on itself. we will see what the future brings but as of 11pm, we are out of the eu. thank you. jenny hill is in brussels for us right now.
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quite a gathering behind you. give a sense of what will be happening in brussels, it will be midnight there that the transition takes place. before i do that, what you see here are the brexit party remaining meps ceremonially leaving the parliament led by ann widdecombe and a scottish piper, causing quite the stir in brussels. it is fair to say the brexit party are probably the only ones really celebrating here. britain's departure from the eu is not a cause for celebration among many here in brussels. nor indeed across many european capitals. we will keep an eye on what is happening, not sure if they are going to say something. it is worth pointing out that in brussels it will be a very sombre moment when the union jack is will be a very sombre moment when the unionjack is taken down later today. a great deal of sadness, a lot of eu leaders talking about the fa ct lot of eu leaders talking about the fact that not only are they losing an important economic and political
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party, also a real sentimental value to britain's membership of the eu. here people like the president of the eu commission saying britain, we still love you, we're still going to be close, a lot of messages of affection coming out. we had them last night. there was a light show in brussels in the central square. historic buildings lit up in red, white and blue, a message of affection, trying to tell people in britain they are still considered friends neighbours. at the same time, a very serious side to this. the reason you will not see a great deal of celebration going on in brussels is the fact of course that as of tomorrow very tough negotiations start, trying to thrash out the future relationship between the eu and the uk, what kind of a deal will be done. it has to be done by the end of the year. britain's deadline. a lot of scepticism not just in brussels but in berlin,
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paris, that any of detail deal can be thrashed out in the available time. one little celebration, the piper is leading the brexit party meps out, they campaigned long and ha rd of meps out, they campaigned long and hard of course for this day to come. they are celebrating. but i think it is very safe to say very few others here in brussels will be. interestingly, as the eu parliament ratified their withdrawal agreement a couple of days ago, the brexit party meps were on their feet waving unionjacks party meps were on their feet waving union jacks in the party meps were on their feet waving unionjacks in the chamber in stark contrast to other meps in the chamber rather tearful, linking arms to sing the old scottish folk song. a huge day in brussels. interesting watching everyone coming and going, coming to work, a lot of institutions around here, almost as if it was an ordinary day when of course for most people here it is anything but. thank you, jenny hill
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from brussels this morning. a plane carrying more than 80 britons is on its way to the uk after leaving wuhan, the chinese city at the centre of a coronavirus outbreak. it's due to touch down at raf brize norton around lunchtime. we can actually track the flight now as it makes its way back to the uk. our reporter, caroline davies, is in brize norton, where the plane is due to land. what do we know about the timing of the landing and what will happen to passengers on that plane? good morning. good morning. the plane is due to land at one p. the passengers will be taken from here, taken 170 miles north—west of the wirral where they will be staying in arrowe park hospital in the staff accommodation. separate to the hospital. we were anticipating there would be 150 british nationals on board and a
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further 50 eu nationals. that figure is far lower. we know there are 83 british nationals and 27 foreign nationals on board the flight. why is the figure so much lower than we thought? the foreign office said the 150 figure was an upper estimate. we have been hearing stories about how individuals found it very difficult to get to the airport in time, they we re to get to the airport in time, they were told relatively late on they would be able to travel with their family who might have chinese passports or dual nationality. we understand they will arrive here at around one o'clock today. thank you. a state of emergency has been declared in canberra as bushfires continue to ravage parts of australia. officials sounded the warning amid what they're calling the worst fire threat to the territory in nearly two decades. residents in suburbs have been urged to remain alert for potential evacuations. the government's official review
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into the high speed two rail line has strongly advised against cancelling the project. the document, seen by the bbc, says that calls forjust one section of the railway to be built to control costs would not be value for money. and it says scrapping the plans would impact badly on the uk's fragile construction industry. the government will announce its final decision on the scheme next month. the actor who voices the most famous cartoon pig on tv is leaving the role after more than a decade. never mind, we can walk around it. you can't walk around a muddy puddle! harley bird has been the voice of peppa pig since she was five and has been the longest—standing peppa in the show‘s history. she said the the tv series had given her unforgettable memories. are we not showing what she looks like so we don't ruin the idea...? exactly, that's the idea.” like so we don't ruin the idea...? exactly, that's the idea. i did not know peppa pig had been going ten
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yea rs. know peppa pig had been going ten years. many, many years of enjoyment for many people. we have the weather and sport looking ahead to six nations coming up later. one story we are following today is the evacuation of many britons from wuhan, the province at the centre of the coronavirus. they have been taken into —— they will be taken into quarantine when their flight plans this afternoon. 110 people will be taken to arrowe park hospital in the wirral and will stay there for two weeks. we will now speak to someone airlifted out of the city this week, spending his third day in quarantine in california. you have been through quite a quarantine experience, in the midst of it, what was the sequence of events? it was quite complicated way of getting out. i had to contact the embassy festival.
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once i got the embassy of approval to be on the plane, i had to make my own way from my apartment to the airport —— embassy festival. it was airport —— embassy festival. it was a challenge. all the roads were blocked and traffic was being stopped. i had to find an official carfrom one of stopped. i had to find an official car from one of the districts to get to the airport. on arrival at the airport, have to go through a lot of medical checks. we have had those co nsta ntly medical checks. we have had those constantly since we were on the plane. on the flight out, we flew to alaska first, where they refuelled and took us back down to the air force base in california. so we understand a little bit more about the plane itself, the tests you went through to get on board and then on board the plane... what were you advise to do? people might be
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thinking there would be a concern someone could be incubating the disease, the virus. that clearly must have been in your head too. yeah, but no one knows, we have been told it is 1a days before it can even show. they hope it is usually 3-a but it even show. they hope it is usually 3—a but it can be as long as 1a. even though i am here in quarantine here, we still don't know... 200 people we were on a plane with, someone could have been carrying the disease are not know it. talk to us a little bit about the quarantine arrangements you are in now. looking behind you, talk us through how it works. here it is actually very nice. we are in individual hotel rooms on the base here. we are quarantine to one area of the air force base. just between two
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buildings. a big walkway and park area. generally, it's actually quite nice. they are trying to... but the freedoms we are allowed, but also keeping shall we are not being a risk to any of the current community around here. one last thought, what about... how do you know when you will be allowed to leave? do you have a definitive test at some point you are waiting for? we did the test on the first day here, nasal and throat swabs and blood test. those went off to atlanta. we should be hearing back either tomorrow, in the morning, how those have come out. they will say whether we have a sign of the virus at the moment. but we still have to be monitored for the full 1a days, so we don't have to
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stay here, but once we leave here, we have to be monitored by wherever we have to be monitored by wherever we go to, so if i go back to detroit, i have to be monitored by the medical services in detroit. we wish you well, thank you very much. good luck in the next couple of weeks, hope everything works out for you. thank you. makes you question how the quarantine process actually works. here to tell us more is the virologist, dr chris smith. you were listening to how the quarantine process is working. 1a days of monitoring. why is quarantine so important? the origin of the word quarantine comes from ancient phoenicians and they realised many of these disorders arrive by people coming to a place so they put in place... initially they had 30 days but they decided to extend it to a0 days of quarantine while they would not let people on and off ships because they realised
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many diseases and plagues arrived by people coming to a place on a ship. if you keep the people on the ship for a0 days and they remain well, you know they are not going to infect you. and they would allow them ashore. it is sort of similar. you are removing from the infection the opportunity to pass itself to a new individual. the virus then dies. these viruses are acute infections. your immune system neutralises the virus and then you will no longer infectious. it has to be passing itself continuously from one person to the next and once that person is no longer infectious, you cannot pass it on and he will hopefully mean for the rest of your life, hopefully. i am mindful of those caught up in it, directly and there is no coming back, there is a lot of onus on the individual to say what is going on, even in as much as getting on the flight. naturally concerns you might be sitting next
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to someone who has already contracted the virus. you are reliant on people telling you the truth. that is true. but at the same time, when the people are on the ground in the city, they could be wandering around interacting with people who also are infectious. yes, we are relying on people to have common sense. but it is a no interest to have common sense and protect themselves and their family and loved ones and those around them because if they get symptomatic, they can be treated. there has been a lot of possibly surprise but praise for the chinese authorities how forthcoming they have been with information which possibly has not been the case in the past and what is emerging is how important it is in terms of internationally getting a grip on this. certainly true this time we have had a lot more information because when sars emerged under very similar circumstances in 2002—2003, the evidence is the chinese knew about it for maybe six months before the
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rest of the world cottoned on. by that time, the horse had bolted and it got to 8000 people, 50 countries, 800 deaths. this time, the first cases were documented at the beginning of december, the who was informed at the beginning of january, much faster movement. china appreciates there is a lot of population flux around the world, thousands of people leaving china every day for international destinations and with modern travel, no city is more than about 2a hours for any other city. that means you can be on the other side of the world and infectious and passing infection on and that is well within the incubation period. we need to share information. it is a global problem and a global solution to solve it. doctor chris smith, thank you. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. what have you got for us? incredibly mild start. if you are about to rush
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out the door to work, school, these are the temperatures we have at the moment. double figures for quite a few. frosts earlier in the week distant memory. northern england, wales, expect rain in the morning rush hour particularly on the western side of the hills, heavy rain. lots of cloud around. rain spreading through the midlands, south west, towards east anglia and south—east for the afternoon. sky is brightening up, sunny skies this afternoon. but it stays blustery. the wind is not as strong as last night. still could touch baleful sim parts of northern england. the wind is coming from the south—west bringing very mild air —— touch gale force in parts of northern england. showers in the north and west of england and northern ireland, becoming abundant through the night. rush hour rain in kent and sussex will gradually clear. wait for a
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time across the channel islands. many plants becoming dry overnight —— wet for many plants becoming dry overnight —— wetfora many plants becoming dry overnight —— wet for a time. the weekend, saturday, bright start full good parts of england and wales, variable amounts of cloud. some rain sliding across southern counties of england and wales. much more cloud. and i northern ireland. further showers. more than today. brighter weather to be found. sunshine to the south later. should feel quite pleasant. cooler in northern scotland later. going to cardiff, chance of rain. the nations, wales against italy. should be dry and blustery before and after the match, as it will be in dublinfor and after the match, as it will be in dublin for ireland against scotland. the story is a dry one. chance of frost to take us into sunday morning in scotland, northern ireland, far north of england.
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elsewhere, cloud increasing, outbreaks of rain. heavy bursts of rain pushing into southern scotland through the day. brightening up, a few heavy showers further south, quite breezy here, mild. chilly are in northern scotland. thank you. we will see you later on. sunderland was the first place to return a leave result in the 2016 referendum and has been a symbolic location for the brexit campaign ever since. jayne mccubbin is there for us this morning. good morning. notjust me, borisjohnson morning. good morning. notjust me, boris johnson and his morning. good morning. notjust me, borisjohnson and his cabinet are here today. we are in sunderland's museum and winter gardens, a celebration of the industrial past. they used to be 300 mines here. what has not gone is gala day, they know how to have a good time. step round
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the corner and we are transported into the old mine shaft, of course all of this has gone now and so many people in this part of the world felt so left behind. they got behind the leave vote. we went out to try to find out how people felt in the heart and their guts about where we are at. friday, 11pm, what is happening.” am in bed. i have no idea. meps are packing their bags. what is it? i don't know. brexit. yes. i nearly forgot. how can you forget? after a constitutional crisis that cost the pm and split communities and
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friendships, the moment is here, does it feel a bit... ? friendships, the moment is here, does it feel a bit...? friday night? putting the flags out. leaving the eu. finally. so happy. finally listening to what we want. so nice. lam going listening to what we want. so nice. i am going to cry. what started as a low rumble in sunderland turned into a full—blown revolution. but not eve ryo ne a full—blown revolution. but not everyone in dave's record shop thinks it is a moment that deserves an epic soundtrack. friday 31st, give me your soundtrack? this one, chameleons, strange times. it feels odd, if history looks back on my city, sunderland, poster boys for brexit, people who count fast in
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elections and make angry decisions, we should be known for more things than that. i have fallen out with people. i do not think those friendships are going to come back. soundtrack? what a difference a day makes. that you are saying it is not going to make a difference, not going to make a difference, not going to make pals again. that is true. but i would like to be wrong. # what a difference a day makes... # friday night to saturday morning, nothing really will change. but on a personal level, for bill and gary, father and son on each side of the brexit divide, perhaps everything will change. it has been difficult because i saw lots of problems leaving the eu, gary is much more positive about it. it is done now.
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it is done. hopefully, he is right. hopefully, he is right. and i will stand corrected if he is. we will see how it goes. iam going i am going to let you in on a secret, come close, i will whisper. at the end of filming the sequence, gary, voted leave, he said, if it all goes wrong, i am married to a german, i will move over there. it has been divisive, tumultuous, that is why we have taken a bit of time to ask people how they feel about the historic moment. meet some desks delete macro gas. diana, she has two florists —— meet some guests. david bell, vice chancellor of sunderland university. he voted remain. diana, how do you feel about the moment we are at tonight? excited to be moving forward out of the deadlock and
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really looking forward to the future. really optimistic. iam optimistic. i think the high street needs this and everyone needs to pull together. january, i was saying earlier to david, we were pleasantly surprised, good feel on the high street, which has been quite a long time not feeling like that. gut instinct of optimism. you are having a tea party today. yes, we are going to have cake and tea at the shop. when people think of florists, they think about the big lorries coming from the continent bringing the flowers, but even that uncertainty, thatis flowers, but even that uncertainty, that is not in the forefront of your mind. i have spoken to my supplies coming over, i have a shop in newcastle. they are all very positive and say, this year, obviously, changes, but nothing happening today, it will be over the year there are changes and we are ready to change with it. feeling really positive. you say, bring it
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on. david, let me ask you, you have an awful lot of eu students, how are they feeling and how are you looking after them? we have been reassuring them all the way through. actually, pretty pragmatic, getting on with studies. i am pretty pragmatic, getting on with studies. lam pretty pretty pragmatic, getting on with studies. i am pretty confident they will be happy as they complete their time with us in sunderland. do you think they have felt still welcome here? has there been any problems? absolutely. sunderland is a friendly, welcoming, great city. before you set actually there have been a few incidents. one or two. but even when there have been incidents, residents of sunderland, other residents have stepped in and said, that is not who we are. yes, there are people with different points of view but we are a great, welcoming city. thank you for talking to us today. borisjohnson says it is not the end, just the beginning. a curtain rising on a new era. that is why he has chosen the
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city to come down here for his special cabinet meeting. that is all from us in sunderland. going out to the news, travel and whether where you are waking up. i will leave you with the carps. as we go through the afternoon we keep mild weather but quite a bit of cloud and some rain. the rain has been heavy across parts of northern england and wales. it will break up a touch and pushes into the south—east of england into the evening. further showers into the west but look at the temperatures, 12 to 1a degrees, maybe 15 celsius to the east of wales and some sunshine for eastern scotland. further showers move into scotland on saturday morning and there will
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be variable amounts of cloud in england and wales. temperatures seven to 10 celsius. a bit of rain on saturday in southern areas. more significant rain pushing east and west across the uk during sunday.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with victoria fritz and samantha simmonds. prime minister borisjohnson will hail the "dawn of a new era" later, as the uk prepares to leave the european union after a7 years. live from london, that's our top story on friday 31st january. a $1.7 trillion gamble. britain's economic future at stake as it reshuffles trade ties with europe — and the rest of the world. also in the programme...

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