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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  March 6, 2020 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at two: the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science which will in time deliver a vaccine, some science which will in time deliver a vaccine, some say science which will in time deliver a vaccine, some say about a year, around that scale. coronavirus testing kits are airlifted onto a cruise ship off the california coast where 140 britons are among those in quarantine when the water won't go away — the enduring misery of an east yorkshire village flooded for more than a week.
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campaigners say that the government must bring to justice the leader of dubai after he was fined responsible for the kidnappings on two of his daughters. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah — england's women footballers in disappointing form. yes, big questions about england's women's football team, and how the site have gone backwards since they run to the world cup semifinal last year. i will have more on their overnight loss in florida. thanks, sarah. and chris has all the weather — a bit less windy this weekend. a little bit, still unsettled for the week ahead with more rain around. we will also be taking a look at what has been a record—breaking winter in europe, so thatis record—breaking winter in europe, so that is all coming up a little later on. also coming up: prince harry meat racing royalty for a tour of silverstone.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. the government is promising to spend another 46 million pounds in the battle against coronavirus, including more money for the race to find a vaccine. ministers have said there's absolutely no need for people to stockpile food. the health secretary says the government is working with retailers to get supplies to people who self—isolate, although that has been disputed by an executive at a leading supermarket chain. the total number of confirmed cases in the uk has risen to 116. a woman in her 70s is the first person to die in the uk from covid—i9. she was being treated at a hospital in reading. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on a cruise ship off san francisco with thousands of others after some passengers developed flu—like symptons. lauren moss reports.
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this is one of our test kits, very simple. containing the virus, working on a vaccine to fight it and a fast test to detect it. today more money has been set aside for the research phase of tackling the coronavirus. what we're announcing todayis coronavirus. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science, which will in time deliver a vaccine. some say about a year, perhaps around that scale. but also to help us to have rapid test kits that anybody can use quickly and efficiently to tell whether we have the coronavirus.. the minute, results can take a few days. a rapid test like a pregnancy test could detect if someone has the virus within 20 minutes. but it's unlikely to be ready for several months, and any vaccine is a year away. that said, there have been remarkable changes in the ability to
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make vaccines and discover vaccines just in the last few years, and so things have progressed much more quickly than they would have done in the past, and it's not unreasonable to assume that we will end up with a vaccine, and we may do so in a year, 18 months. yesterday, a woman in her 70s became the first patient to die in the uk after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. she had been treated for other health problems. 0ut treated for other health problems. out of more than a hundred cases confirmed in the uk so far, 45 people are in isolation at home, 18 from the overall total have never recovered. but the source of infection for ten patients is still unclear. in recent days in some countries, supermarket shelves have been left empty, and these photos we re been left empty, and these photos were taken in shops here yesterday. but the government insists there is no need to stockpile. within the food supply, we are absolutely confident that people will, that there won't be a problem there, and
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crucially we are working with the supermarkets to make sure that if people are self isolating, then we'll be able to get food and supplies that they need. one supermarket executive says staff are working round the clock to keep shelves stocked. around the world, the number of cases continues to rise. the city of bethlehem is now under quarantine after seven patients were confirmed there, and one person has tested positive at a clinic inside the vatican. italy is the worst affected country in europe, with more than 3000 cases. here, the key advice remains. don't touch your eyes, nose or mouth u nless touch your eyes, nose or mouth unless you've washed your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water for 20 seconds. it's hoped these hygiene steps will slow the spread of the virus.
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our business correspondent emma simpson is here. it seems that supermarkets are a little bit baffled by some of the comments from boris johnson. little bit baffled by some of the comments from boris johnson. they say they have not had direct guidance from the government and getting food to people who have self isolated. 0ne executive said that matt hancock totally made up that comment. they have had contact from some government officials about their overall state of readiness. retailers have regular meetings with government officials because they are discussing brexit. and i think there is a feeling that perhaps the government has been a little slow to get coronavirus on that agenda. it certainly is now. the british retail consortium, the industry trade body, they certainly don't want to get into a row about this, saying today that they are working constructively
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with government officials to ensure that supermarkets remain stocked. we had a statement from the department for in and food and rural affairs are saying it is in regular contact with the food industry in saying it is well prepared. in fact, there is a meeting today. people's spending habits seem to have changed a bit, though. we have been told we don't need to stockpile, there is no need, but some shelves are empty than you would expect. we are seeing lots of pictures on twitter of big gaps on the shelves, and i certainly think there has been a change in the last few days. one executive saying demand has gone through the roof. 0nline sales are up and we know about the hand sanitiser, demand com pletely about the hand sanitiser, demand completely outstripping supply. but there has also been a significant uptick in demand for tins, rice, pasta, basic essentials. so retailers are very good at reacting to events. look at all the stormy weather that we've had. they react
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to anticipated increase in demand, so they are watching it by the hour and working very hard to replenish the shelves. the feeling is that it is manageable. 0ne executive said it is manageable. 0ne executive said it is very much within tolerable limits. but certainly we've been shopping a bit more. just to say that there is going to be a conference call with deborah this afternoon, that is happening at 2:45pm, the major supermarket bodies will be involved. —— a conference call with defra. the problem is once some people see others buying more than they would normally buy or bringing those purchases forward, the temptation is to follow suit and then you do get into this snowball effect. panic buying, that is the last thing the retail industry needs, and it is an interesting question. what are consumers up to? 0ut they simply buying a few extra bits and pieces just in case they have to self—isolate for a few
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weeks, or other panic buying because they think supplies are going to run out? i think it is a bit of the former. a few basic essentials, extra items going into the basket. so will this phase out? certainly there is an awful lot of extra demand right now in the system, but this is something that retailers are quite used to having to flex and adapt, and they knew this was coming, and they have had to prepare for a potential no—deal brexit too. so there is some state of readiness hung over from that. so there is some state of readiness hung overfrom that. for the moment, emma simpson, thank you very much. 94 countries and territories now have confirmed cases of coronavirus — cameroon, serbia, peru and the vatican have reported their first cases in the last few hours. the netherlands has reported its first virus—related death, and the number of cases has gone up drastically in iran, with more than 1200 new infections.
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let's take a look at the latest numbers. there are over 100,000 cases around the world so far with china still at the top. more than 3,400 people have died. but almost 56,000 people who had the virus have recovered. friday prayers have been cancelled in towns and cities across the middle east as the number of coronavirus infections in the region mounts. the city of bethlehem, in the west bank, has been put under quarantine after seven people were diagnosed with the covid—19. anna foster reports. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on board a cruise ship which has been put into quarantine off the coast of california. the authorities won't let anyone disembark, and they've used a helicopter to drop testing kits on to the vessel, the grand princess. it follows the death of a man in his 70s who'd taken an earlier cruise on the ship. peter bowes reports. another cruise liner paralysed by the coronavirus. the grand princess, with 3,500 passengers and crew on board, has been barred from docking in san francisco, after cutting short a trip from hawaii. a 71—year—old man died after taking an earlier round trip cruise on the ship to mexico. officials say he had
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underlying health conditions. another passenger was also infected. helicopters operated by the us coastguard dropped sampling kits on to the ship, for a medical team on board to administer tests for the virus. less than 100 people with flu—like symptoms have been identified as needing the test. passengers have been told to stay in their cabins. everything was running through my head, i don't want to go home, i don't want to go home to my family, because i don't want to take anything to them, but i don't want to take it to my city if i happen to have it on my clothes. i don't even know. a state of emergency has been declared in california. around the us, there are now cases in at least 20 states. in maryland, officials said three people contracted the disease while travelling overseas. in washington, the worst affected state, where 11 people have died, tech companies like amazon, facebook and google have told employees to work from home.
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the us vice president, mike pence, who is leading the effort to control the outbreak, visited washington to meet with state officials. 0ur message to families all across the state of washington is simply this — we're with you. we are here to help. and we are going to stay with you every step of the way, until the state of washington and america sees our way through the coronavirus. as officials say they expect the number of cases to continue rising, congress has passed an emergency $8.3 billion spending bill to try to combat the disease. but the financial markets continue to be nervous. on wall street, it was another rough day, as fears grow of a world economic slowdown linked to the virus. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles.
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we have just had the latest figures for the number of cases are coronavirus from the department of health. lauren moss is here, what are they saying? they update the number of positive cases daily, they have just posted on the website that 163 people have now tested positive for the virus. so that is quite an increase on yesterday, where there we re increase on yesterday, where there were 116, a rise of 47 eat new cases in the uk. so that is a sizable increase compared with what we have seen increase compared with what we have seenin increase compared with what we have seen in the past. and there is no more money being made available from the government to try to tackle the outbreak? ps, today they have announced £46 million additional funding to try to find a vaccine and also to try to find a faster test kit. a vaccine won't be available until next year, and any rapid test
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kit won't be available for several months at least. but 47 new cases in the uk, 163 in total, that is quite a rise, and it may well change the government's next response. yesterday we were told many times we are still in the cap might contain phase, moving on to delay where extra measures might be brought in. but this could be an increase in testing and diagnosing more cases, because 20,000 patients, 20,338 people have been tested in total, so the number of people being tested is increasing, so we know quite a few patients, 45 as of this money, were self isolating at home with mild symptoms not requiring hospital treatment, and a number of those as well had also recovered from the virus. for the moment, lauren moss, thank you very much. johan van hoof is the global head of vaccines forjohnson and johnson. he's is leading their efforts
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to develop a coronavirus vaccine. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. what are you mobilising in your response to try to find vaccines? thank you furst for inviting me. we are actually mobilising all our resources available to make sure that we can accelerate as much as we can the development of that vaccine. at this stage it is still in an initial stage, so it is essentially people from discovery working on making this vaccine and preparing this vaccine. we have started the first test in animals, and we hope to have a vaccine candidate selected by the end of this month which will then have to go through the normal processing to allow us to be in the clinic towards the end of the year. what with the vaccine before? i'm sorry? what with the vaccine be for?
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prevention or cure? it would be for prevention. they are screening molecules to see if there are any molecules to see if there are any molecules available that could be active on the virus, but when we talk about the vaccine it is only for prophylactic use. how likely is it that existing medicines are vaccines could be pulled in and used against coronavirus?” vaccines could be pulled in and used against coronavirus? i think the likelihood that we have anything that would work is extremely remote, if not zero. for molecules, we will have to see what the result of the screening is. because it is not that unusual to find molecules that could potentially be active as an antiviral, and ideally it would be molecules that we could re—purpose that have already when used for human experience, and develop them further. when have you used the same technologies in the past?|j
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further. when have you used the same technologies in the past? i cannot comment on the therapeutic side, on the vaccine side, the vaccine technology is that we are using now, the technology we have started to use for research purposes in clinical trials about eight years ago, and that allows us now really to use the experience we have built up to use the experience we have built up overtime on to use the experience we have built up over time on those platforms. today we have already more than 50,000 people that have been vaccinated with this type of platform for other indications, but it is the type of immune response that we were served, and the safety profile of the vaccine is very encouraging, it gives us hope that we can indeed develop a covid—19 vaccine. to the british government has announced they will be spending an extra £46 million on the efforts to combat the coronavirus outbreak. how much involvement will your research have? how much funding will it get from various governments around the world who are all, of course, very keen to close this out
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breakdown? it is clear that this is a joint effort today of all stakeholders, whether in private industry or in public, and a good example is the workshop that took place at the beginning of february in geneva, where all of the experts are sitting together, and i think we we re are sitting together, and i think we were all working together to make sure that we are very transparent, that we share the process as we proceed, such that we can altogether make sure that we get these vaccines as soon as make sure that we get these vaccines as soon as possible. we know that there may be many people around the world who would benefit from having a vaccine should one be developed in time. how confident are you that enough supplies could be made around the world if you strike lucky? there are several dimensions to that. several of our colleagues are also working on developing a vaccine, so ending up with more vaccine will be a great thing because then the supply already would be helped. 0n
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the other hand, with the platform that we are using, we do know that we can, once it is up and running, we can, once it is up and running, we could be able to need 400 million doses of the vaccine, so we have started to scale up already the production to get everything in place so that as soon as we have the material selected we can start production and that would allow us to have some stockpile and some vaccines by the beginning of next year, and in addition we are also looking into partners who the vaccine technology could be transferred to such that we can hopefully build up the supplies that i needed, if they are needed. does spending more money mean you are more likely to find the vaccine? not necessarily. as you know, every
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disease has its challenges. but is notjust disease has its challenges. but is not just about pouring disease has its challenges. but is notjust about pouring money in until you are certain you have a vaccine. the good news is we are not starting from scratch. the virus has some similarity to sars, fortunately not as virile or as deadly, but it has the same receptors into the body and the way it enters the lungs. due to that similarity, we can really learn from the experimental sars vaccines that he'd been developed 15-20 vaccines that he'd been developed 15—20 years ago, and where it was shown that targeting a particular pa rt of shown that targeting a particular part of the virus, you can get a vaccine that is protective in animals. so everyone is now building on that knowledge, and trying to develop vaccine candidates that actually hopefully induce the same type of immune responses in the animals as those that were observed
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for the sars vaccine. we really appreciate you talking to us. thank you very much. thank you, you're welcome. and we'll be answering your questions on the coronavirus outbreak at 4.30 this afternoon with our experts. keep sending your questions into us by tweeting to the hash tag bbc your questions or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that's coming up just after 4.30. last month, dozens of homes in the east yorkshire communities of snaith and east cowick were flooded, when the river aire overflowed. many of the properties still cannot be reached, and the water is taking a long time to recede. 0ur correspondent danny savage has been back to east cowick, to see how people there are coping with the flooding. it's still here. even though it hasn't rained for days, the draining of certain east yorkshire streets is taking time. the idea the flood waterjust comes and goes in a short period of timejust
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is isn't the case here. we're over a week now and there are still properties that can't be reached, because the water is too deep. you can see where people have put in their own flood defences, in the hope of holding back the water, but they were overwhelmed. look at that window — you can see on the line there just how high the water came. on monday, we visited mick in his flooded bungalow. so it's come up in a big hump? it's notjust the carpet it's... the whole floor? the water here has gone, now comes the plan for the future. grim. it will be six months at least, we are trying to get a caravan on front lawn, so that we're here on site. so, you're going to move into a caravan on the front garden probably? we're hoping to, but... that's not going to be much fun for six months, is it? better weather's coming! across the road, tony also talked to us a few days ago. you think you're going to get away with it and then when it actually goes in, you can relax, yeah, it's done, it's finished. he's been told by his insurers he can't
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move wet furniture out of the house, but the loss adjusters won't be here until next friday. it's getting wet upstairs now, damp, because there is all this rubbish in the bottom. and they don't want you to move the furniture and things out? no, nothing, no. so, it's got to sit here for another week? yes, as it is. it is already beginning to feel a bit mouldy and damp? and smelling and upstairs smells how, it's getting through the whole house. work to fix things here is under way, but there is a lot to do. they haven't even started on some houses. flooding was never meant to happen here, but lines of defences were overwhelmed. they're hoping these blue skies last. danny savage, bbc news, east cow wick. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed, after a family courtjudge ruled that he was responsible for the separate kidnappings of two of his own daughters. in a series ofjudgments,
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the court overruled the sheikh's efforts to keep the findings of the case secret. sheikh maktoum has said that the judgment has only given one side of the story. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner is with me. how much cases the coverage had an the emirates? absolutely none. this isa the emirates? absolutely none. this is a very bad news story for sheikh mohamend and sheikh maktoum. high court has taken ten months to all of the statements, and sheikh mohammed chose not to represent himself in court. he had very expensive lawyers, as did his former wife, and the court has come down on her side of events, which is to basically make public the very serious allegations that he, sheikh mohammed, kidnapped or abducted and rendered back to dubai his own
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daughters, one of whom was then subjected to inhumane and degrading treatment. we saw the video that was played in court and used as testimony. so it is a pretty serious allegation. is it going to bring criminal charges because my i doubt it. he is a head of state, british ally,, it is not something the british government i'm sure is going to wa nt british government i'm sure is going to want to pursue, because raf warplanes used to bypass my air bases, a million britons go there every year, it's a massive global trading hub as well as tourism, infrastructure, biotech, you name it. but it would probably make people think twice about what is going on behind palace walls. indeed, all that opulence and luxury and privilege, yet we are seeing that this very concerning underside to it. just for new readers start here, to briefly recap what this is about. the court heard and stood up
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the allegations as true that on two separate occasions, sheikh mohammed of dubai abducted or ordered the abduction of two of his wayward daughters, princesses who had tried to escape the family. in his view, wayward. indeed, fair point. one when she was 18 fled the family estate in surrey and was recaptured in cambridge by men working for sheikh mohammed. according to her testimony she was injected, sedated, bundled on board a helicopter and taken back to dubai, and she hasn't been seen since. certainly not a public figure, and she is held incommunicado, according to the court. the other princess latifah tried to escape nearly 20 years ago, was in prison for three and a half yea rs, was in prison for three and a half years, mistreated and then tried to escape, was recaptured and brought back to dubai and is currently being
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held incommunicado. his youngest wife, now divorced, princess haya of jordan, this started as a custody case of the children, because she was horrified by what she had found out had happened to these princesses, and feared it would happen to her or her children, so she fled with them to london, and according to her he told her in may last year, you and the children will never be safe in england. so he has a pretty long reach. it is paradoxical, this, because sheikh mohammed is hugely popular in his own country. he has built this massively successful global location of dubai, a popular destination, a fairly liberal place, but clearly he is an old—style patriarchal autocrat. how likely is it that they could be a tourist backlash, and people think it all looks flashy on the surface, but if this is going on
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behind palace walls, as you say, they don't want to be part of it? they don't want to spend their money on holidays there? i don't think it will make any difference. unless this goes much further, and there is talk of it being taken to the new n, to the committee that looks into displaced people. it's possible that if it goes further, then yes. but i think at the end of the day, dubai is an enormously popular place, and nobody sees this guy, most people. he is popular amongst his own people. the uae of which dubai is one of the emirates has a tiny minority of the citizens, most people they are from south asia, india, bangladesh, sri lanka, and there is a large population of expatriates, too. you don't tend to see him except possibly on television and it is not covered. this story is not getting any coverage at all in the local media there. so he is not likely to appear in court, but what, briefly, is going to be done by human rights groups to secure the release of these two women? they will carry on
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campaigning for it, they will be taking to the un. there will be questions. but as far as he and the royal court are concerned, these are troubled women who are in the tender ca re of troubled women who are in the tender care of their family and that is none of your business, stay out of it, nothing to see here, move along. frank, thank you very much. the duke of sussex has been to silverstone, to open a new museum that tells the story of british motor racing. harry toured the venue with the formula one champion, lewis hamilton, and was shown how wheels are changed in the pit. james waterhouse reports. it is not a bad person to get a lift off — his royal highness, until the end of the month, plays passenger to lewis hamilton. they're opening this new £20 million motor sports museum at silverstone. this visit is one of duke of sussex's lastjobs as a royal, before he steps down in april. with the clock ticking... the world champion tries out to gun that is used
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to change wheels in the pit. no danger of a job change coming soon, then. bloody hell! the prince chats to younger fans alongside the exhibition, which documents british racing over the years. i now officially open the silverstone experience. for lewis hamilton, there is no stepping back as he goes for a seventh world title. for harry and meghan this is their last engagement as senior royal family members is on monday. time for a look at the weather forecast. you have been reflecting onjust how warm forecast. you have been reflecting on just how warm the winter has been. yes, across europe this is a record winter. this is the orange colour
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telling us that temperatures have been above normal and for winter as a whole, out of all the temperatures across all of the land, that is the figure we come out with which is a massive anomaly, nearly three and a half degrees above normal which is incredible. 0ne half degrees above normal which is incredible. one of those was in finland, helsinki, 5 degrees warmer than normal during the winter which is shocking. the colour of that matters not what you expect to see in winter. no, the orange tells us where temperatures have been above normal. notice a couple of blue shades, greenland has been colder than normal. that is linked with something cold the stratospheric vortex. it is also linked with this. have you ever heard of the north atla ntic have you ever heard of the north atlantic oscillation? i have actually, yes. probably thanks to you. this is the biggest driver of winter conditions here in the north of the
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uk generally, it is a pressure index between where we normally have high pressure and low pressure. we have a positive north atlantic oscillation, that tells us how strong the winds are blowing and this winter, with the exception of a tiny couple of days around late january, early feathery, for the whole of winter it was positive it's of these westerly winds were blowing more strongly than normal, steering more storms our way and than normal, steering more storms ourway and bringing than normal, steering more storms our way and bringing us milder, wetter conditions. here in february in the uk record—breaking rain, across east anglia it was the warmest february ever in the top three. that is down to this. that map you showed us that is far more orange than we want it to be, what colour will it be if everything was average? average would be white. ican go average would be white. i can go back to it. we have the technology.
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iam going we have the technology. i am going to have to flip through all those charts again. it was my fault! even the colder areas, there was only a tinge of blue so temperatures have only just not only a tinge of blue so temperatures have onlyjust not the low average in greenland. we should think this is a good thing, iam we should think this is a good thing, i am guessing? we don't want orange everywhere? that is true, but i suppose i would think of it this way, sometimes natural climate variability, some yea rs a re natural climate variability, some years are colder than others. this isa years are colder than others. this is a cold year for polar regions and greenland, and the onlyjust sneak below. that is a sign of global warming as well, because if you take that out of the equation, that would bea that out of the equation, that would be a much darker blue. global warming, i mean, it would have been above average anywhere in europe without global warning, but it would have added a little bit of peat. it is not helping, it is one of the patterns and issues we see. as faras...
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patterns and issues we see. asfaras...| patterns and issues we see. as far as... i will talk while you flip through. i need to get you to our forecast. we have talked about how wet it has been and we have so many storms which have brought wind and rain, what is it going to be like this weekend? we had a change of fortunes today across parts of southern england and east anglia compared to the heavy rain we had yesterday. we have another area of low pressure out in the atlantic and this is coming our way. the main message is if you have got sunshine, enjoy it. there are some showers across western areas which will fade to time, sky is clear and it will turn cold, cold enough for a nip of frost across eastern areas initially before cloud for kids and the breeze strengthens and temperatures will be rising through the night, later on we will see temperatures climbing to six or 7 degrees in belfast and plymouth. for the weekend, we have some rain to come but for some of you the weekend is not going to be too bad.
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here is the low pressure coming in. you can see weather fronts moving here is the low pressure coming in. you can see weatherfronts moving in across the uk, so we are all going to see rain at some point during the weekend and even as that clears through, we will be left with blustery conditions, and colder air following for sunday bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. we will probably start on a bright note for eastern england, central england, largely dry, there will be dry spells for eastern scotland but across the north west we are looking at heavy falls of rain. 20—30 millimetres for west of scotland. that combined with snowmelt is quite likely to bring some localised flooding issues in scotland. we are going to have to watch out for that. it is not the only place we will see rain, rain will get into northern ireland and across cumbria, turning increasingly heavy, but it turns mainly dry in central and eastern england until overnight. that is when the weather front will push its way through. as the rain clears through saturday night, by the time we get to sunday, we are going to start to see their showers blowing in across the whole of the country.
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nobody is immune from seeing a downpour, but they are going to be frequent and at their heaviest across north—western areas with hail and thunder. between the sunshine and thunder. between the sunshine and showers, temperatures will come down a couple of degrees but time things right, there will be some nice weather to come this weekend. next week, it is going to stay wet and windy with low pressure spinning off the atlantic bringing further wet and windy weather at times our way. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen 263. —— two 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus,
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including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science which will in time deliver a vaccine, some say about a year, around that scale. coronavirus testing kits are airlifted onto a cruise ship off the california coast where 140 britons are among those in quarantine. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. sport now on afternoon live with sarah mulkerrins. england's women's football is not in great form and their manager phil neville coming in for some criticism? yes, neville coming in for some criticism ? yes, just neville coming in for some criticism? yes, just two wins in nine for england, that semi final world cup when they lost to the usa who went on to win the tournament and arguably the two wins have been from lesser opponents when you look
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at portugal and the czech republic. england have also dropped down the rankings by three places and then overnight in florida, we sought the she believes cup starting, england won this tournament last year ahead cup and the latest loss was to the usa. they are tough opposition, we know they are the world champions but it was a damaging defeat as the manager phil neville described it. it was goalless at half—time but the usa scored twice in three second—half minutes. this was carli lloyd, that was her hundred and 23rd international goal. the defeat was england's sixth in the last nine games. didn't have enough quality at the top and when it matters, and they did. carli lloyd, a world—class player, any space in that sort of
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area, she is going to cause some trouble. the important thing to understand is it is the first game and it can happen in the next two games. well the bbc pundits last night were critical of england's display. former striker lianne sanderson said they were going backwards and feels the infrastructure in the united states is far superior. they are living in and out of each other‘s pockets, they are encamped all the time. here, the leak is fantastic but we have to make sure players are forming in the league is transforming into a national team, i think it is suffering at the moment. one other thing to show you from this match. the pre—match handshakes were a little bit different... more elbow touching — giving us an insight into what could become commonplace in sport with the spread of coronavirus. and on the same subject the football league have today said they are following the lead of the premier league
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who announced yesterday they are dropped the handshakes at the start of games. yeah, coronavirus is having an impact ona yeah, coronavirus is having an impact on a number of different sports, not least the six nations. two fixtures this weekend and scotla nd two fixtures this weekend and scotland have named their squad that will face france? england play wales tomorrow at twickenham and scotland host france on sunday... tough ask for gregor townsend's side welcoming france there are jeevan after there arejeevan after a decade in the wilderness. —— their rejuvenation. they're top of the table, three wins from three — the only team left in with a chance of the grand slam... he has made three changes. grant gilchrist will start in the second row. worcester warriors fly—half duncan weir could win his first cap under townsend — he's been named on the bench. his last cap came back in 2017.
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johanna konta is wary of russian teeanger anastasia potapova ahead of their monterray 0pen quarterfinal tonight. the british number one says the 18—year—old's age will make her fearless. konta reached herfirst quarter final of 2020 by beating germany's tatiana maria in straight sets. it's the first time konta has won back to back matches since the us 0pen last september. rory mcilroy will look to build on an impressive start when he tees off in the second round of the arnold palmer invitational just before 6 this evening. five birdies and this eagles at the fourth left the 18 champion on six under par — one behind overnight leader matt every. the world number one has finished in the top 10 on each of his five appearances on the pga tour this season. that is the sport for now.
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in the past half hour — the number of people infected with coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163 — that's an increase of 48 cases from yesterday. now, the vast majority of people who contract coronavirus will recover quickly, and won't need hospital treatment. most will experience nothing more than flu—like symptoms, and children in particular seem to be only mildly affected. but for some patients, the virus is more dangerous. 0ur health correspondent, james gallagher, has this assessment of the risks. how deadly is the coronavirus? it is a simple question but the answer is quite elusive. if you look at confirmed cases and deaths you get a figure of 3.4% dying, that is between three and four in every 100 people, but that number is quite ropey. some of these patients are still being treated and could yet die, that will make the virus see more deadly, but at the same time there are huge numbers of mild cases going unnoticed, that could mean the
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death rate is much lower. when scientists take all this into account, the estimated death rate of 196, account, the estimated death rate of 1%, one in100 account, the estimated death rate of 1%, one in 100 affected people dying. that is higher than the typical flu season which kills closer to one in 1000. but wait a minute, does the flu killed more people? yes, it does. around about half a million people every year while coronavirus has killed just over 3000. the reason is flu infects hundreds of millions of people every year. coronavirus is onlyjust taking off, if that number soars, deaths will too. if coronavirus does start spreading more widely, who should be most worried? this is databased on should be most worried? this is data based on china, should be most worried? this is databased on china, but it suggests the death rate is quite low through to middle age. but over the age of 50, the deaths go up and up. as we get older our immune systems get wea ker get older our immune systems get weaker and our bodies frailer. this puts us at more risk. there is also a danger that people who are already
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sick. if you're struggling with a wea k sick. if you're struggling with a weak heart or lungs than your body is less able to fight off an infection. there is an interesting difference between men and women. it could be down to differences in the immune system or the fact that men are more likely to smoke and explains why actually men have a higher death rate than women. there is still uncertainty about all of these figures, but remember for most people, coronavirus will be a mild infection. meanwhile in brussels, eu health ministers have held an emergency meeting to coordinate measures to stop an outbreak. it is the european commissionerfor stop an outbreak. it is the european commissioner for health. the situation in the eu at this point is varied, with some member states more affected than others and there is also varied with the member states. this changes rapidly, but what we all emphasise as we cannot have a
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situation of one size fits all. we need to have a level of preparedness, appropriate to what the guidelines are from bho and dcs dc, and the situations facing the member state. for the first time in weeks there have been no reports of shelling or airstrikes in syria's war ravaged province of idlib. the ceasefire brokered yesterday between turkey's president erdogan and vladamir putin of russia, appears to be largely holding. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. for months, this what is much of idlib has looked like — a ghost town. as people fled the russian—backed offences by syrian forces, determined to seize the last remaining hold out of rebels supported by turkey. but this morning, look at this — people returning to the streets of idlib after a ceasefire brokered
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by russia and turkey. there were reports of some clashes to the south, but the skies appeared empty of war planes. the people here have long learned to be sceptical of ceasefires. translation: this agreement 100% will not hold. because in the past there have been many agreements that the regime has not respected. i'm not at all hopeful, and i'm not expecting anything from it. those people don't respect any commitments. the ceasefire came into force last night, establishing a security corridor or buffer zone, with joint patrols by turkish and russian forces. eu foreign ministers meeting to discuss the crisis said the ceasefire was good news. it is a good will, let's see how it works, it is a precondition to increase the humanitarian help to the people there. that is the point, the ceasefire says nothing about the almost one million people forced
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to leave their homes to escape the fighting. the other worry for eu leaders is the thousands of syrian and other refugees on turkey's borders, encouraged by turkish promise of an open door to europe. this morning there were clashes as greek police fired tear gas as greek police fired at migrants trying to break through the fence. and turkish forces fired tear gas back. there may be a ceasefire in idlib, but no one knows how long it will last and the continuing tensions on the turkish/greek border are plain to see. ina in a moment we will have the business news. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine
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against the disease. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. stockmarkets are falling because of fears about the spread of the coronavirus. investors are concerned that companies are losing business because of the outbreak. banks and airlines are especially under pressure. starbucks is to stop serving coffee in reusable cups brought in by customers — because of the virus. it's a temporary move — and follows similar action by train company lner. there's been a data breach affecting almost a million virgin media customers. their personal details were left unguarded online for 10 months. the firm's blaming
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a technical glitch. the world of business is continuing to feel the impact of the coronavirus — especially the markets. especially the we especially the can see it is a ugly picture, red all we can see it is a ugly picture, red all around. investors are very nervous about the impact on companies. 0riginally people were worried about the impact on the supply of goods from china. there are worries about what a there we re there are worries about what a there were due to companies around the world, but as the virus has spread, have concerns. flybe sate the coronavirus was the final nail in their coffin. and of course, the bond films had to be postponed because of the virus. all of this is feeding through to the market.
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what a market looking like now on street? we started trading at about 20 minutes ago and we have seen markets are down more than 800 points, more than 3%. we got some economic news here in the united states, we got the latestjobs number so it gives us a snapshot of how the labour market looks here in the united states and it continues to look really strong. we saw the economy added 273,000 jobs last month, the government also relies upwards on the number ofjobs that we re upwards on the number ofjobs that were added in december and january, 85,000. we are seeing the labour market looks good but that hasn't translated to investors here on wall street, the biggest reason is because these labour numbers are backward looking. so looking at how hiring happened in february, markets are looking at what is happening now
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and what they think will happen in the future and investors here are very worried about the economic impact of the coronavirus. if companies are facing a slowdown in demand, they will need fewer staff, won't they? the real concern there. absolutely, there is a real concern that a lot of companies are not able to get the raw materials to produce their goods from china, from southeast asia. there is also a problem on the manufacturing. that is going to have an impact right around the world. it is going to start having an impact on companies and it comes at a time in which we are now seeing an increased number of coronavirus cases here in the united states, as many people suspected we would. it is a bit of a double whammy and that still continues. from the side of the atlantic, it seems as if the authorities are really an ramping up
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their efforts to camp the markets. any chance of that working, do you think? -- any chance of that working, do you think? —— camp the markets. any chance of that working, do you think? -- camp the markets. we can't a nswer think? -- camp the markets. we can't answer the question of what it will take. the obvious answer is the elimination of this coronavirus as it isa elimination of this coronavirus as it is a threat to the economy, but you are right in pointing out the authorities here in the united states are making a lot of moves. just a couple of moments ago we stopped donald trump signed an 8.3 the dollar spending package to try and combat the coronavirus. we have seen other governments that have been very proactive in trying to combat the virus. making sure they are prepared. that is not doing much to ease concerns here because it is not so much about the virus, but more what kind of impact the virus has already had in china and other parts of the world, how that is going to hurt companies here in the united states.
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thank you very much. meanwhile as syrian refugees try to cross into europe, tensions have flared at the border between greece and turkey. greek guards have used water cannon to disperse them. turkey is host to millions of syrian refugees, but now says it will no longer abide by an agreement with the eu to stop them crossing over. jonah fisher reports. there are 14 children in this group of syrians and they are stuck. their country is at war and they are stranded on the greek turkey border. neither country wants them. translation: this is the youngest, he is one. what is your name? this is the oldest, he is 12. his father died in the syrian conflict, he has been working in a tailors to support his three sisters. all of this group
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fled syria to turkey three years ago, they came to the border with greece when they heard rumours that it was open. in fact, it is only the turkish side. the next morning we go to see them but the turkish police who are effectively directing the movement of migrants and crossings, force us to leave. so we meet one of the mothers outside the village. she tells us that they sought five migrants return in just tells us that they sought five migrants return injust their underpants having been caught by the greeks, and they are worried about crossing the river. what would use to people in europe who say you are safe here in turkey, you should stay here? —— what would you should stay here? —— what would you say? translation: of course someone who sits in comfort doesn't realise how big our crisis is. turkey is a safe
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place, but we are living like the dead. good luck. we returned them to the village with some food for the kids. then last night they sent us more good news. they say this boat was brought to them by masked police to encourage them to make the crossing to greece. but they declined for a second time and the syrians were moved away from the river and the village and dumped back on the streets. bargaining chips in a deepening row between turkey, greece and europe. jonah fisher, bbc news, on the turkey greece border. compared with yesterday, there is a vast improvement in the weather.
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most of us have dry conditions and sunshine around. there are some showers in western areas of the uk but most of us will see decent spells during the day. our next area of the pressure is waiting to come injust in time for of the pressure is waiting to come in just in time for the weekend, so enjoy the sunshine whilst it lasts. the showers across western areas will fade away overnight, sky is clear. that could be an early touch of frost across eastern areas, later in the night cloud and wind move in from the west and we will see some rain spreading into north—western areas. rain picking up, lifting the temperatures, by the end of the night, six or 7 degrees in plymouth or belfast. by the weekend, we have some rain on the way, thanks to that area of low pressure and cloud. here it comes, the wettest weather always across north—western areas. during the course of saturday. as the weather front moved eastwards, by the time we get to sunday we are looking at cooler conditions, blustery conditions following, and bringing a mixture of sunshine and
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showers. it is, to a degree, an u nsettled showers. it is, to a degree, an unsettled weekend. across much of eastern england and scotland, there will be some dry and bright weather but across western scotland, we are looking at some heavy rain. 20—30 millimetres of rain is going to fall widely but up to 70 across the mountains were combined with snowmelt we could see the risk of localised flood issues. the rain will go into northern ireland, turning very wet in cumbria. but there are not far away. should stay dry for east anglia and south—east england albeit with thickening cloud. saturday night, that band of rain is going to sweep eastwards across england and wales, showers getting in across scotland and northern ireland, and as we get into sunday, that showery weather will push its way eastwards to affect all parts of the uk although the showers will the most frequent across north—western areas where they will bejoined by hail north—western areas where they will be joined by hail and north—western areas where they will bejoined by hail and thunderfrom time to time. quite a strong wind that will knock the edge of the temperatures so sunday will feel
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like a cooler day, temperatures between nine and 12 celsius. enter next week, though pressure is lining up next week, though pressure is lining up so it is going to stay pretty wet and windy at times.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 3: the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we are announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science which will in time deliver a vaccine. some say about a year, perhaps around that scale. when the water won't go away, the enduring misery of an east yorkshire village flooded for more than a week. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of
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dubai, sheikh mohammed, aftera uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah, and criticism of england's women footballers after a poor showing in the cup? yes, lots of questions today after that result and whether they have gone backwards since they run to the semifinal of the world cup last year. i will have lots more on their overnight loss to the usa in the she believes cup. new and chris's here with the weather. what's in store? we will be taking a look at what a record—breaking winter, incredible temperatures in europe. but we will also be looking at the all—important weekend, decent day—to—day apart from a few showers, but rain all the way this weekend. i will tell you where and when it is going to hit a little later. also coming up in the business news at 3:45pm, how clean is your workplace? as businesses begin to
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deep clean the offices to reduce the risk of coronavirus spreading, we find out how it is done from the british institute of cleaning science. hello, this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. the government is promising to spend another £46 million in the battle against coronavirus, including more money for the race to find a vaccine. ministers have said there's ‘absolutely no need' for people to stockpile food. the health secretary says the government is working with retailers to get supplies to people who self—isolate, although that has been disputed by an executive at a leading supermarket chain. the total number of confirmed cases in the uk has risen to 116.
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a woman in her 70s is the first person to die in the uk from covid—19 — she was being treated at a hospital in reading. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on a cruise ship off san francisco with thousands of others after some passengers developed flu—like symptons. lauren moss reports. this is one of our test kits, very simple. containing the virus, working on a vaccine to fight it and a fast test to detect it. today more money has been set aside for the research phase of tackling the coronavirus. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science, which will in time deliver a vaccine. some say about a year, perhaps around that scale. but also to help us to have rapid test kits that anybody can use quickly and efficiently to tell whether we have the coronavirus. at the minute, results can take a few days. a rapid test like a pregnancy test
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could detect if someone has the virus within 20 minutes. but it's unlikely to be ready for several months, and any vaccine is a year away. that said, there have been remarkable changes in the ability to make vaccines and discover vaccines just in the last few years, and so things have progressed much more quickly than they would have done in the past, and it's not unreasonable to assume that we will end up with a vaccine, and we may do so in a year, 18 months. yesterday, a woman in her 70s became the first patient to die in the uk after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. she had been treated for other health problems. in recent days in some countries, supermarket shelves have been left empty, and these photos were taken in shops here yesterday. but the government insist there is no need to stockpile.
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within the food supply, we are absolutely confident that people will, that there won't be a problem there, and crucially we are working with the supermarkets to make sure that if people are self isolating, then we'll be able to get food and supplies that they need. 0ne supermarket executive says staff are working round the clock to keep shelves stocked. around the world, the number of cases continues to rise. the city of bethlehem is now under quarantine after seven patients were confirmed there, and one person has tested positive at a clinic inside the vatican. italy is the worst affected country in europe, with more than 3000 cases. here, the key advice remains. don't touch your eyes, nose or mouth unless you've washed your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water for 20 seconds. it's hoped these hygiene steps will slow the spread of the virus. lauren moss reporting, and lauren is here. we have had an increase in number since yesterday, lauren? yes, in the last 24 hours, another 40 or
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so people have tested positive, we have 163 now. 147 of them are in england, 11 in scotland, five of those diagnosed in the last 24 hours, two in wales and three in northern ireland. and now really it will be working to establish whether this increase is down to increased testing, 5000 more people were tested for the coronavirus since yesterday, or whether there is more person—to—person transmission within the uk. as far as public health england are concerned, they are saying there is currently only one confirmed death from coronavirus, but another death has been reported, but another death has been reported, but nothing has been confirmed about its connection with the virus yet? this afternoon we understand that samples have been taken from an elderly patient who has died at milton keynes hospital, and those samples are being investigated for
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coronavirus. it is our understanding that this man was in his 80s and he had underlying health issues. but further tests for the coronavirus are being carried out. yesterday like you say the first patient in the uk who tested positive for the virus died in reading, she was in her 70s and had been in and out of hospitalfor her 70s and had been in and out of hospital for various other health conditions and was diagnosed as part of routine testing the nhs are doing on all patients in intensive care with respiratory problems. she hadn't recently travelled abroad. we have talked about how the government is going to provide more money for tackling all aspects of the coronavirus. what sort of strands of their expecting to spend that money on? today an additional £46 million funding was set aside to investigate the virus, try and find a vaccine for it, and also what is called a rapid test kit, a total of £91 million now for the research phase, we hear a lot about these four
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phases, and research is one of them. we are not expecting any sort of vaccine for a year, there is a long way to go with animal testing, and when they do, whether vaccine, there isa when they do, whether vaccine, there is a race around the world right now, it will need to be mass produced. as for the rapid testing, at the moment if somebody is tested for the coronavirus, it can take a couple of days for that result to come back, but this rapid test kit would work something a bit like a pregnancy test, they take a sample of saliva or a pinprick of blood and they would be to test it and get the results in 20 minutes. but this kit isn't expected to be ready for around six months, which would be after the forecasted peak of the virus when this wave has ended. lauren, for the moment, thank you very much. as we heard in her report a moment or two ago, leading supermarkets have cast doubt on the health secretary's claim that the government is working with retailers to ensure supplies of food are available for people. stay at home
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because of the virus. emma simpson has more details. none of the supermarkets we spoke to this morning say they have had any direct guidance about getting food to people who have been forced to self—isolate. mark hancock made up what he said, said one executive. another retailer said that it recognises comments, although they had had contact from some government officials about their overall state officials about their overall state of readiness. now, representatives from retailers and the food and drink industry have regular meetings with government officials because of course they are discussing brexit, andi course they are discussing brexit, and i think there is a feeling, though, that perhaps the government has been a little slow to get coronavirus on that agenda. it certainly is now. the british retail consortium, the industry trade body, they certainly don't want to get into a row about this, saying today that they were working constructively with government officials to ensure that supermarkets remain stocked, and we had a statement from the department
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for environment, food and rural affa i rs for environment, food and rural affairs saying that they are in contact with the industry, and in fa ct contact with the industry, and in fact there is a meeting today. people but not spending habits seem to have changed a bit. we have been told we don't need to stockpile, there is no need, we are not going to run out. but some shelves are empty. we are seeing lots of pictures on twitter of big gaps on the shelves, and i certainly think there has been a change in the last few days. one executive saying demand has gone through the roof. 0nline sales are up, and we know about the hand sanitiser, demand com pletely about the hand sanitiser, demand completely outstripping supply. but there has also been a significant uptick in demand for tins, rice, pasta, basic essentials. so retailers are very good at reacting to events. look at all the stormy weather that we've had. they react to anticipated increase in demand, so they are watching it hour by hour, and they are working very hard
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to replenish the shelves. the feeling is it is manageable. 0ne executive said it is very much within tolerable limits. but certainly we have been shopping a bit more. emma simpson. and we'll be answering your questions on the coronavirus outbreak at half past four this afternoon with our experts. keep sending your questions into us by tweeting to the hash tag bbc your questions or email yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. that's coming up just after half past four. last month, dozens of homes in the east yorkshire communities of snaith and east cowick were flooded, when the river aire overflowed. many of the properties still cannot be reached, and the water is taking a long time to recede. 0ur correspondent danny savage has been back to east cowick, to see how people there are coping with the flooding. it's still here. even though it hasn't rained for days, the draining of certain east yorkshire streets is taking time. the idea the flood waterjust comes and goes in a short
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period of timejust is isn't the case here. we're over a week now and there are still properties that can't be reached, because the water is too deep. you can see where people have put in their own flood defences, in the hope of holding back the water, but they were overwhelmed. look at that window — you can see on the line there just how high the water came. on monday, we visited mick in his flooded bungalow. so it's come up in a big hump? it's notjust the carpet it's... the whole floor? the water here has gone, now comes the plan for the future. grim. it will be six months at least, we are trying to get a caravan on front lawn, so that we're here on site. so, you're going to move into a caravan on the front garden probably? we're hoping to, but... that's not going to be much fun for six months, is it? better weather's coming! across the road, tony also talked to us a few days ago. you think you're going to get away with it and then when it
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actually goes in, you can relax, yeah, it's done, it's finished. he's been told by his insurers he can't move wet furniture out of the house, but the loss adjusters won't be here until next friday. it's getting wet upstairs now, damp, because there is all this rubbish in the bottom. and they don't want you to move the furniture and things out? no, nothing, no. so, it's got to sit here for another week? yes, as it is. it is already beginning to feel a bit mouldy and damp? and smelling and upstairs smells how, it's getting through the whole house. work to fix things here is under way, but there is a lot to do. they haven't even started on some houses. flooding was never meant to happen here, but lines of defences were overwhelmed. they're hoping these blue skies last. danny savage, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163.
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the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. more on that story now, with campaigners are urging the government to bring to justice the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed, after a family courtjudge that he was responsible for the separate kidnappings of two of his own daughters. in a series ofjudgments, the court overruled his efforts to keep the findings of the k secret. sheikh mohammed has said that the judgment has only given one side of the story. frank gardner has been telling us more about this case. this is a very bad news story for sheikh mohammad shaikh maktoum and not a good story for dubai either, because it cast him in a very negative light. remember, this is a british court, the high court, that
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has taken ten months to gather all the statements, and hear both sides of the story. whatever the sheik says, it has heard both sides of the story. he chose not to represent himself in court. he hired very expensive lawyers, as did his former wife, princess haya, and the court has come down on her side of events, which is to basically make public the very serious allegations that he, sheikh mohammed, kidnapped or abducted and rendered back to dubai his own daughters, one of whom was then subjected to inhumane and degrading treatment, as we saw on the video that was played in court and used a testimony. so it is a pretty serious allegation. is it going to bring criminal charges because my i doubt it. he is head of state, a british ally, and it is not something that the british government i'm sure is going to want to pursue, because raf warplanes use dubai's air bases, a million britons go there every year. it's a massive global trading hub as well as
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tourism infrastructure, biotech, you name it. but it's certainly, it'll probably make people think twice about what is going on behind palace walls. indeed, all that opulence, luxury and privilege, and yet we're seeing that this very concerning underside to it. just for new readers, start here. to very briefly recap what this is about. the court heard and stood up the allegations as true that on two separate occasions, sheikh mohammed of dubai abducted or order the abduction of two of his wayward daughters, princesses who had tried to escape the family. in his view, wayward. exactly, yes indeed, sorry, fair point. so in one case, sheikha shamsa, she fled the estate in surrey and was recaptured in cambridge by men working for sheikh mohammed. according to her testament
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she was injected, sedated, bundled onto helicopter, ta ken she was injected, sedated, bundled onto helicopter, taken to france and put on a plane back to dubai and hasn't been seen since in public or hardly seen since. certainly not a public figure, and she is held incommunicado according to the court. the other princess, sheikha latifa, she tried to escape nearly 20 years ago, was imprisoned for three and a half years, mistreated and then tried to escape again two yea rs and then tried to escape again two years ago by boat, recaptured, brought back to dubai and is currently being held incommunicado. his youngest wife, now divorced, princess haya ofjordan, who was involved in this case, it started as a custody case over their children, because she was horrified by what she found out had happened to these two princesses, and feared it would happen to her or her children, so she fled with them to london, and according to her, he told her in may last year, you and the children will never be safe in england. in other words, he's got a pretty long reach. now, it's paradoxical, this, because
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sheikh mohammed is hugely popular in his own country. he's built massively successful global entrepreneur which is dubai, it is a popular destination, it is in arab terms are pretty freewheeling liberal place. yet clearly when it comes to his own family, he is an old —style comes to his own family, he is an old—style patriarchal autocrat. comes to his own family, he is an old-style patriarchal autocrat. our security correspondent frank gardner. almost a hundred allies of the home secretary, priti patel, have written to a newspaper to defend her, following a series of bullying allegations. they describe her as a tough, assertive leader who has never crossed a line. among those signing the letter, published in the daily telegraph, is the former head of the charity commission, william shawcross, and sir lynton crosby, the conservative election guru. campaigners say the government must bring homes and businesses have been evacuated in luton after a suspicious package. 0ne evacuated in luton after a suspicious package. one man was arrested at the scene, the second shortly afterwards. 50 people were
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taken to a local community centre. bedfordshire police said the device was not viable. for the first time in weeks, there have been no reports of shelling or fire in it live. the ceasefire appears to be largely holding. james landale reports. for months now, this is what idlib has looked like, a ghost town. this is the last remaining stronghold of rebels in jihad is supported by turkey. but today, people returning to the streets of idlib city after a ceasefire brokered by russia and turkey. there were reports of some sporadic clashes to the south, but for the first time in weeks, the skies appeared empty of russian and turkish warplanes. the people here have long learned to be sceptical of
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ceasefires. translation: this agreement 10096 will not hold, because in the past they have been many agreements at they have been many agreements at the regime has not respected. i'm not at all hopeful regarding this agreement, and i'm not expecting anything from it. those people don't expect any commitments. the ceasefire came into report last night, establishing a security corridor buffer zone along the front line, withjoint corridor buffer zone along the front line, with joint patrols corridor buffer zone along the front line, withjoint patrols by corridor buffer zone along the front line, with joint patrols by turkish and russian forces. eu foreign ministers and officials meeting to discuss the crisis at the ceasefire was good news. this is goodwill. let's see how it works, but it is a precondition in order to increase the humanitarian help for the people in idlib. and that's the point. the ceasefire says nothing about the almost1 million people forced leave their homes to escape the fighting. the other worry for eu leaders is this. the many thousands of syrian and other refugees gathered on
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tu rkey‘s and other refugees gathered on turkey's border with greece, encouraged by turkish promises of an open door to europe. this morning there were clashes as greek police fired at migrants trying to break the fence. in response, turkish forces fired tear gas themselves back over the border. so there may bea back over the border. so there may be a ceasefire in idlib, but no one knows how long it will last, and the continuing tensions on the turkish greek border are plain to see. james landale, bbc news. meanwhile as syrian refugees try to cross into europe, tensions have flared at the border between greece and turkey. greek guards have used water cannon to disperse them. turkey is host to millions of syrian refugees, but now says it will no longer abide by an agreement with the eu to stop them crossing over. jonah fisher reports. there are 14 children in this group of syrians and they are stuck. their country is at war and they are stranded on the greek—turkey border.
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neither country wants them. this is the youngest, abdul majeed, he's one. what's your name? jawaad is the oldest, he's12. his father died in the syrian conflict and he's been working in a tailor‘s to support his three sisters. all of this group fled syria to turkey three years ago and they came to the border with greece when they heard rumours that it was open. in fact, it's only the turkish side. the next morning we go to see them but the turkish police, who are effectively directing the movement of migrants and crossings, force us to leave. so we meet one of the mums, rayhaan, outside the village. she tells us that they saw
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five migrants returned in just their underpants, having been caught by the greeks and that they are worried about crossing the river. what would you say to people in europe, who say you are safe here in turkey, you should stay here? of course, someone who sits in comfort doesn't realise how big our crisis is, she says. turkey is a safe place but we are living like the dead. we return them to the village with some food for the kids. then, last night, they sent us more videos. they say this boat was brought to them by masked police, to encourage them to make the crossing to greece. but they declined for a second time and the syrians were moved away
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from the river and the village and dumped back on the street. bargaining chips in a deepening row between turkey, greece and europe. jonah fisher, bbc news, on the turkey—greece border. you're watching bbc news. it's 24 minutes past three. the duke of sussex has been to silverstone, to open a new museum that tells the story of british motor racing. harry toured the venue with the formula one champion, lewis hamilton, and was shown how wheels are changed in the pit. james waterhouse reports. it is not a bad person to get a lift off — his royal highness, until the end of the month, plays passenger to lewis hamilton. they're opening this new £20 million motor sports museum at silverstone. this visit is one of duke of sussex's lastjobs as a royal, before he steps down in april. with the clock ticking... the world champion tries
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out to gun that is used to change wheels in the pit. no danger of a job change coming soon, then. bloody hell! the prince chats to younger fans alongside the exhibition, which documents british racing over the years. i now officially open the silverstone experience. for lewis hamilton, there is no stepping back as he goes for a seventh world title. for harry and meghan this is their last engagement as senior royal family members is on monday. time for a look at the weather. he is chris. not quite the weather forecast just yet, but a he is chris. not quite the weather forecastjust yet, but a reflection on how warm it has been over the winter. yes, winter climate and logically runs through december,
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january, february, add up those temperatures up and you get a chart like this, with the orange colours telling you where temperatures have been above normal, and for europe, this is a massive figure. 3.4 celsius, nearly three and a half, a massive anomaly that smashes the previous record by a whole 1.4 previous record by a whole1.4 celsius. normally records like this might go by a few tenths of a degree, so that is a huge margin to have broken the record. there is a little bit of blue? yes, so the blue colours you can see here in greenland, that is telling you that temperatures were just below normal. so yes, there were some places on the globe, across the northern hemisphere, particularly, greenland, iceland, alaska, that had colder weather than normal, but those areas were onlyjust colder, and were completely swamped by the number of places that had above—average temperatures, and that is one of the trends we see with global warming, actually. so if everything were average, what colour would that man be? it would
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be white, meaning no anomaly, temperatures as usual. 0range means temperatures as usual. 0range means temperatures are higher than normal, and a few spots of blue, temperatures were just below normal. how likely is it that it is climate change that is causing this? what are the reasons behind it? it isa are the reasons behind it? it is a good question. climate change, no doubt, we have seen temperatures go up decade by decade, year by year, and the trend is continuing. we see it in the uk and around the world. so climate change is real and happening. but of course in any one season, some winters are colder than others, and this happens to bea colder than others, and this happens to be a particularly mild winter. climate change would have added some tenths of a degree. helsinki, 5 degrees warmer than normal? this is down to something called the north atla ntic down to something called the north atlantic oscillation, and this is a pressure pattern where we have high pressure pattern where we have high pressure around the azores, low pressure around the azores, low pressure around the azores, low pressure around greenland and iceland, and essentially this index
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tells us how strongly the westerly winds have been blowing, and but for a small blip, in late january, early favourite, the whole of our winter we have had a positive north atla ntic we have had a positive north atlantic oscillation index which has meant essentially that the wins have been blowing a little bit stronger than normal, steering more low pressure our way, bringing us milder and wetter weather. as far as february goes, he and the uk we had one of the wreck wettest on record, it was also the third warmest on record in east anglia, the fifth warmest ever in the uk. so that is really the big driver of our weather. and what effect is it going to have this weekend, if any? i wonder if you can guess. we have low pressure steaming in. iwonder you can guess. we have low pressure steaming in. i wonder if you can guess what the index looks like at the moment, positive or negative? i'm hoping that you are going to tell me we're getting... i know where we're heading, but i'm hoping you're wrong! i'm afraid not. it is still positive, which is why the weather pattern shows no sign of settling
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down anytime soon, so it is a case of while you have got the sunshine, grab it because it won't last that long. let's take a look satellite picture. we do have low pressure near greenland and iceland, high—pressure down towards the azores, the positive north atlantic oscillation index. 0vernight, the skies do clearfor a time, so oscillation index. 0vernight, the skies do clear for a time, so across eastern areas of the country, it could get cold enough for a little frost initially before we see the cloud moved back in, the wins strengthen and ultimately temperatures rising later in the night, with temperatures up around six or seven for belfast and plymouth towards the end of the night. the weekend is an unsubtle one. time things right and there will be some of us that have reasonable weather, but we do have rain to come at times. this weather front is going to be bringing the rain through across the uk. eventually that will move through across all areas, either saturday or saturday night, and then followed by these cooler blustery conditions with a mixture of sunshine and showers on the way. so, in detail,
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we start off on a bright note across eastern scotland, eastern and central areas of england, and there will be quite a bit of dry weather for these areas. however, will be quite a bit of dry weather forthese areas. however, brisk winds will be bringing some rain into western scotland, 20—30 millimetres falling widely, but over the hills we could see as much as 70 millimetres, weight combined with snow melt and i thought, that brings the risk of further flooding issues, particularly in scotland, and some wet weather getting it in northern ireland and parts of north—west eglin through the day on saturday. the central and eastern areas largely dry. as we go through saturday night, the cold front sweeps its way eastwards across england and wales, so gusty winds, heavy rain for a time, and that tends to clear through and it will be followed by a mixture of sunshine and showers. the shower is quite blustery, some of them could have hailand blustery, some of them could have hail and thunder mixed in, particularly across the north and west of the country. temperatures, west of the country. temperatures, we are looking at highs on sunday getting up to 9—12d, but perhaps feeling a little cooler than that,
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given the brisk winds that will be around, particularly around coastal hills in the west. into next week, i'm afraid that old north atlantic oscillation index is still pointing to the positive, and that means it's going to stay wet and windy with further low pressure is targeting the uk early next week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we are announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science which will in time deliver a vaccine. some say in about a year, perhaps, around that scale.
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when the water won't go away — the enduring misery of an east yorkshire village flooded for more than a week. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. sport now on afternoon live with sarah mulkerrins. very disappointing night for england's women at the she believes cup — and manager phil neville coming in for some heavy criticism? i think it has been some come down for england and phil neville since they reach that world cup semifinal in france last summer, as you remember. there have beenjust two wins in the last nine games for england, they drop down the rankings by three places. they won the she believes cup last year, phil neville said before this addition he wanted england to overtake the usa as the top team. 0vernight there was a reality check in florida, the latest
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loss to the usa for them, the world champions. after the game neville described it as another damaging defeat. it was all this at has time -- it defeat. it was all this at has time —— it was goalless at half—time but the usa went on to score twice in three minutes after the have time. england will face japan in their next match in newjersey on sunday. these girls in america they live in and out of each other‘s pockets, they are in camp all the time. it is privatised, whereas here the leak is fantastic but we have to make sure players are forming and the leak is transitioning into our national team. ithink transitioning into our national team. i think it is suffering at the moment. one other thing to show you, pre—match handshakes were a little bit different, more elbow touching giving us an insight into what could become commonplace in sport with the spread of coronavirus. 0n the same
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subject, we know the football league have said they are following the lead of the premier league who announced yesterday that they have dropped handshakes at the start of matches. you mentioned he had quite a wide range of impacts on sporting events, but six nations, still two fixtures are to go ahead this weekend and scotla nd are to go ahead this weekend and scotland have announced their squad to meet france? england play wales tomorrow at twickenham and scotland host france on sunday... tough ask for gregor townsend's side welcoming france as they're top of the table, three wins from three — the only team left in with a chance of the grand slam... so— there's been three changes to the starting line up that beat italy. nick haining is in at number eight. fraser brown will earn his 50th cap as hooker. and grant gilchrist will start in the second row. also — the worcester warriors fly—half duncan weir could win his first cap under townsend — he's been named on the bench —
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his last cap came back in 2017. england's decision to exclude their pf°p england's decision to exclude their prop as a cautionary measure against coronavirus after he travelled back via hong kong, they said it was unnecessary according to public health england. he has trained with saracens this week and will start against leicester on the premiership on saturday. johanna konta is wary of russian teeanger anastasia potapova ahead of their monterray 0pen quarterfinal tonight. the british number one says the 18—year—old's age will make her fearless. konta reached herfirst quarter final of 2020 by beating germany's tatiana maria in straight sets. it's the first time konta has won back to back matches since the us 0pen last september. rory mcilroy will look to build on an impressive start when he tees off in the second round of the arnold palmer invitational just before 6 this evening.
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five birdies and this eagle at the fourth left, the champion there two years ago on six under par — one behind overnight leader matt every. the world number one has finished in the top 10 on each of his five appearances on the pga tour this season. he is in some good form. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the number of people who have tested positive for coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163 — that's an increase of 47 cases from yesterday. over 20 thousand people have been tested so far. the vast majority of people who contract coronavirus will recover quickly, and won't need hospital treatment. most will experience nothing more than flu—like symptoms, and children in particular seem to be only mildly affected. but for some patients, the virus is more dangerous. 0ur health correspondent, james gallagher, has this assessment of the risks. how deadly is the coronavirus? it's a really simple question but the answer
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is actually quite elusive. if you look at confirmed cases and deaths, then you get a figure of 3.4% dying. so that's between three and four in every 100 people but number is actually quite ropey. first, some of these patients are still being treated and could yet die. that would make the virus seem more deadly but, at the same time, there are huge numbers of mild cases going unnoticed. that could mean the death rate is actually much lower. so when scientists take all of this into account, they estimate a death rate of 1%. one in 100 infected people dying. that is higher than a typicalflu season, which kills closer to one in 1,000 or 0.1%. but wait a minute, doesn't flu kill more people? well, yes, it does. around about half a million people every year, while coronavirus has killed just over 3,000. the reason is flu infects hundreds of millions of people every year, while coronavirus is only just taking off. if that number soars,
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deaths will too. if coronavirus does start spreading more widely, who should be most worried? this is all data based on china but it suggests the death rate is quite low through to middle age. but look what happens over the age of 50. the deaths go up and up. as we get older, our immune systems get weaker and our bodies frailer — this puts us at more risk. there is also a danger for people who are already sick. if you are struggling with say a weak heart or lungs, then your body is less able to fight off an infection. there is also an interesting difference between men and women. it could be down to differences in the immune system, or the fact that men are more likely to smoke, that explains why actually men have a higher death rate than women. there is still uncertainty about all these figures but remember, for most people, coronavirus will be a mild infection.
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in the last half hour the prime minister has been speaking to reporters about the outbreak. we seem to be at the contain stage and the advice to people is still if you think you have symptoms, you are best to stay at home, called the nhs. if you do need hospitalisation we will make sure the nhs has all the support it needs, the funding it needs. very importantly, if you have come back from a high risk area, italy is an example, and you have symptoms, stay—at—home as well. and wash your hands. i know you have heard me say it before but wash your hands twice, national anthem. heard me say it before but wash your hands twice, nationalanthem. hot water and soap. what is specific about the government's handling of the crisis? they health secretary
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said you are working with supermarkets, supermarkets have said they have not heard a peep. we are working to make sure we have had every possible provision in place but as i say, at the moment we are in the contain phase of our response to the outbreak and the advice is what i have just given you. to the outbreak and the advice is what i have just given you. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on board a cruise ship which has been put into quarantine off the coast of california. the authorities won't let anyone disembark, and they've used a helicopter to drop testing kits on to the vessel, the grand princess. it follows the death of a man in his 70s who'd taken an earlier cruise on the ship. peter bowes reports another cruise liner paralysed by the coronavirus. the grand princess, with 3,500 passengers and crew on board, has been barred from docking in san francisco, after cutting short a trip from hawaii. a 71—year—old man died after taking an earlier round trip cruise on the ship to mexico. officials say he had underlying health conditions.
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another passenger was also infected. helicopters operated by the us coastguard dropped sampling kits on to the ship, for a medical team on board to administer tests for the virus. less than 100 people with flu—like symptoms have been identified as needing the test. passengers have been told to stay in their cabins. everything was running through my head, i don't want to go home, i don't want to go home to my family, because i don't want to take anything to them, but i don't want to take it to my city if i happen to have it on my clothes. i don't even know. a state of emergency has been declared in california. around the us, there are now cases in at least 20 states. in maryland, officials said three people contracted the disease while travelling overseas. in washington, the worst affected state, where 11 people have died, tech companies like amazon, facebook and google have told employees to work from home. the us vice president, mike pence,
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who is leading the effort to control the outbreak, visited washington to meet with state officials. 0ur message to families all across the state of washington is simply this — we're with you. we are here to help. and we are going to stay with you every step of the way, until the state of washington and america sees our way through the coronavirus. as officials say they expect the number of cases to continue rising, congress has passed an emergency $8.3 billion spending bill to try to combat the disease. but the financial markets continue to be nervous. on wall street, it was another rough day, as fears grow of a world economic slowdown linked to the virus. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles.
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speaking this afternoon, the us president donald trump said a decision still has to be made on how to deal with the situation. we do have a situation of this massive ship with 5000 people where we have to make a decision, it is a big decision because we have a very low numbers compared to major countries throughout the world, our numbers are lower than just about anybody. in terms of deaths, the count is 11 people. in terms of cases, it is very few. it is a very tiny fraction because we have been strong with the borders. but then you have a ship with a lot of americans on it, 5000 people, a massive ship. we have to make a decision. 96 countries and territories now have confirmed cases of coronavirus — cameroon, serbia, peru and the vatican have reported their first cases today. the netherlands has reported its first virus—related death,
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and the number of cases has gone up drastically in iran, with more than 1,200 new infections. let's take a look at the latest numbers: there are over 100,000 cases around the world so far with china still at the top. more than 3,400 people have died. but almost 56,000 people who had the virus have recovered. more coronavirus implications in the business news. first, a look at the headlines. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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stockmarkets are falling because of fears about the spread of the coronavirus. investors are concerned that companies are losing business because of the outbreak. banks and airlines are especially under pressure. starbucks is to stop serving coffee in reusable cups brought in by customers — because of the virus. it's a temporary move — and follows similar action by train company lner. there's been a data breach affecting almost a million virgin media customers. their personal details were left unguarded online for 10 months. the firm's blaming a technical glitch. quite a lot of disruption to business from the coronavirus in one of the things company have to juggle with is how to keep the workplace hygienic. that is right, a lot of focus on hygiene, both in places of work and when we are travelling. companies
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like nikkei, heathrow and hsbc have all said they are going in for deep clea ns. h ow all said they are going in for deep cleans. how do you get one, and how much does it cost? dr andrew kemp, head of scientific advisory board, british institute of cleaning science. thank you for coming in, let's define our terms, what exactly is a deep clean? it is special measures taken in addition to the normal standard claim that you would do daily twice a day, depending on the type of office that you are in. 0bviously health care have different standards and different levels, depending on the risk for the patients and staff in those areas. but what does it involve? it is more than just taking out a mop but what does it involve? it is more thanjust taking out a mop or dusting a couple of surfaces? you have to make sure your cleaning operators are well trained and educated in what they are supposed to be doing. the supervisors for the
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cleaning operators are also trained, and able to help and advice. that is the first thing, mach one, human being is really important. the second thing you need to do is decontaminate. if you can remove a great deal of the bio burden, whether viral or bacterial from the services, when you go to the next stage which is the disinfection stage, this is where deep clean changes slightly from a standard clea n, changes slightly from a standard clean, the chances of actually getting a very clean surface is increased by doing it the correct way. that 2—stage cleaning is really important. if i am way. that 2—stage cleaning is really important. if! am getting way. that 2—stage cleaning is really important. if i am getting someone to do it it clean in an office, what cani to do it it clean in an office, what can i expect them to do? is it going to be massively disruptive? the first question i would ask is why are you getting someone to come in and doa are you getting someone to come in and do a deep clean when a standard clea n and do a deep clean when a standard clean should be sufficient. giving things a keyboards and phones clean
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is essential. you have asked me to come and talk to you today, nobody to date has published any testing on this cupboard 19 against the su rfa cta nts this cupboard 19 against the surfactants and hand sanitiser —— coronavirus. we are still in the dark to which ones work and which ones do not. do you think there is a danger we might overreact and get in deep cleaners, when in fact a good old—fashioned regular deep cleaners, when in fact a good old —fashioned regular clean deep cleaners, when in fact a good old—fashioned regular clean might suffice? i was in the usa last week and they released their figures for the 1st of january to the 22nd of february for the seasonal flu, which in the us alone had killed 18,000 people and at the time three had died from the coronavirus. we travel around the world all year and so does the seasonal flu, i think if you put this into perspective, do you put this into perspective, do you normally do that for issues not
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—— seasonal flu ? you normally do that for issues not —— seasonal flu? yet kill so many people. if you are at an inn risk group you need to take special measures. the covenant advice on thatis measures. the covenant advice on that is excellent and you should follow it. but outside of that, u nless follow it. but outside of that, unless you are a front—line medical staff the likelihood is you are going to be a so stop panicking. sage words. thank you much for joining us. new evidence that the glass ceiling for women in british companies is still intact. yes, any report today says one women in five is locked out of the top job because they cannot work the hours a company is demanding. city and guilds organisation: kirstie donnelly is the boss of the organisation
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what roles do working hours play in the lack of opportunity for women? it isa the lack of opportunity for women? it is a big factor, notjust for women but also for men. as a country we are not very good at recognising the important role of flexible and part—time working, but no doubt research has demonstrated the highest percentage of people we have spoke to are women who are in part—time work, where it was 12% with men. women are still associated with men. women are still associated with being carers at home, whether thatis with being carers at home, whether that is child or caring for a relative or whatever the situation might be. the fact our employers still recognised enough opportunities that there are four people who can really work and progress very well still doing flexible and part—time work. progress very well still doing flexible and part—time workm there is this differential between women and men in terms of part—time flexible working, is it perhaps that women are more comfortable coming forward and saying i need to work
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part—time than male counterparts? forward and saying i need to work part—time than male counterparts7m is whether they are more comfortable or they just is whether they are more comfortable or theyjust had to. i think we have traditionally and still have a culture where the male is the hunter gatherer and the female stays at home, looking after the cave. that anarchic analogy, but is still true asa anarchic analogy, but is still true as a sentiment. women have to come forward and us more willing to because by nature, they recognise that where they have got a need, they are willing to do that. the research also showed that whilst four times women are more likely to be the carers, three times women are more likely to be in those lower skills part—time roles, whereas with men they were six times more likely to be something like an engineer. there is something about stereotyping that we tend to associate with women and women in part—time work, rather than men and men who are in part—time work. we
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still do have a disconnect between the role of male and female carers, both in and out of the workplace. really quickly, what should companies be doing? really quickly, what should companies be doing ?|j really quickly, what should companies be doing? i think they should be recognising the value of flexible working patterns, pa rt—time, flexible working patterns, part—time, for both men and women. so they should be encouraging more role models, i think women should have more opportunity to demonstrate their innate female leadership skills and i think that blend of women inside were, whilst it is still in alpha male dominated culture, gives employers the right opportunity to get the right blend and mix. let's look at the markets. i was looking pretty an hour ago? we haven't got any markets. yesterday, the high court in london found the billionaire ruler of dubai abducted two of his daughters and
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carried out a campaign of intimidation against his former wife. in a series ofjudgments of the court overruled his efforts to keep the findings of the case secret. he said the judgment is only given one side of the story. the victoria derbyshire programme has been speaking to a friend of the princess and got her reaction.|j been speaking to a friend of the princess and got her reaction. i am very, very pleased with the news. i am happy there our reporting restrictions and they were finally lifted, and the whole world is now hearing the news that sheikh mohammed did indeed kidnap two of his daughters. this is now official and no longer an allegation. and of course, this is something you saw up close yourself because you were on the boat in 2018 when she tried to escape dubai, you were there and she was taken back. what was that like? 0bviously, that night when it all
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happened was terrifying. it is probably one of the scariest experiences i have ever had. the boat was stormed by indian commandos with machine guns, they were threatening to shoot us, it was extremely scary. and obviously afterwards she was dragged away, kicking and screaming, her pleas for asylu m kicking and screaming, her pleas for asylum were ignored and after that, myself and the rest of the crew were kidnapped as well. since then, the sheik has said what happened was she was effectively being rescued and taken home. what did she say to you at that time when you are on the boat together? when she was taken? what were her words about what was actually going on? she was actually repeating that she is seeking political asylum and they were
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ignoring her. and obviously her last words were, don't take me back, i would rather you shoot me here. she rather would have been shot then go back? that must have been so distressing. extremely, yes. have you had any contact with her at all since you went back? no, the last timei since you went back? no, the last time i have seen her was on the boat. if you hadn't had been there and been able to leave and tell the story, do you think we would even know what had happened? probably not. i assume dubai would have managed to cover this all up. they have tried very hard so far. they have tried very hard so far. they haveissued have tried very hard so far. they have issued different kinds of state m e nts have issued different kinds of statements saying that latifa is happy with her family at home and yeah, they try to cover it up but it is no longer possible after this ruling was made public. a friend of
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princess latifa of the by speaking their twojoanna princess latifa of the by speaking their two joanna gosling this morning. compared with yesterday there is a vast improvement in the weather, most of us have dry conditions and centring around. some showers and western areas of the uk but most of us will see decent sunny spell through the day. the next area of the pressure is waiting to come in, just in time for the weekend. enjoy the day plus ‘s sunshine while it lasts. the showers across western areas will fade away overnight. sky is clear, they could be a touch of frost across eastern areas, later in the night cloud and wind moving from the night cloud and wind moving from the west and ultimately, we will see rain spreading into north—western areas as well. the cloud, wind and rain, picking up and lifting the temperatures. by the end of the night, six or 7 degrees in plymouth and belfast. the weekend, we have got rain on the way, thanks to that
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area of cloud and low pressure that i showed you moments ago. here it comes. the wettest weather always across north—western areas. during the course of saturday, as the weather front moves eastwards, by the time we get to sunday we are looking at cooler conditions, blustery conditions, following and bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. it is to a degree and u nsettled showers. it is to a degree and unsettled weekend. across much of eastern england and eastern scotland, there will be some dry and bright weather here but across western scotland, we are looking at some heavy rain. 20—30 millimetres of rain is going to fall widely but up of rain is going to fall widely but up to 70 over the mountains, combined with the snowmelt we could see the risk of some localised flooding issues. the rebound will go into northern ireland, turning very wet through the afternoon and cumbria, the rain not far away from wales and south—west england. you should stay dry for east anglia and south—east england, albeit with thickening cloud. saturday night, that band of rain is going to sweep eastwards a cross that band of rain is going to sweep eastwards across england and wales, showers getting in across scotland and northern ireland and as we get
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into standard, that showery weather will put its way eastwards to affect all parts of the uk, although the showers will be most frequent across north—western areas, they will be followed by hail and thunder for some time. quite a strong wind that will knock the edge of the temperatures. sunday will feel cooler, temperatures between nine and 12 celsius. into next pressure is lining up so it will stay pretty wet and windy at times.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 4: the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science, which will in time to deliver a vaccine, some say about a year, perhaps around that scale. when the water won't go away — the enduring misery of an east yorkshire village flooded for more than a week campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two
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of his daughters. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. criticism of england's women footballers and their manager? there certainly is. a sixth defeat in nine games for england, big questions about whether the site have gone backwards since their run to the semifinal of the world cup. i will have more on their opening loss to the usa in the she believes cup in florida. sarah, thank you very much. and we will be getting all the latest weather from chris. and many of us have seen some sunshine during the day today, but the weekend weather prospects looking a little more unsubtle. i'll have the full weekend forecast for you a little bit later. also coming up, prince harry meets racing royalty for a tour of silverstone.
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hello. this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. the government is promising to spend another £46 million in the battle against coronavirus, including more money for the race to find a vaccine. ministers have said there's absolutely no need for people to stockpile food. the health secretary says the government is working with retailers to get supplies to people who self—isolate, although that has been disputed by an executive at a leading supermarket chain. the total number of confirmed cases in the uk has now reached 163 — that's an increase of 48 cases from yesterday. a woman in her 70s is the first person to die in the uk from covid—19 — she was being treated at a hospital in reading. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on a cruise ship off san francisco with thousands of others after some passengers developed flu—like symptons. lauren moss reports.
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this is one of our test kits, very simple. containing the virus, working on a vaccine to fight it and a fast test to detect it. today more money has been set aside for the research phase of tackling the coronavirus. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science, which will in time deliver a vaccine. some say about a year, perhaps around that scale. but also to help us to have rapid test kits that anybody can use quickly and efficiently to tell whether we have the coronavirus. at the minute, results can take a few days. a rapid test like a pregnancy test could detect if someone has the virus within 20 minutes. but it's unlikely to be ready for several months, and any vaccine is a year away. that said, there have been remarkable changes in the ability to make vaccines and discover vaccines just in the last few years, and so things have progressed much more quickly than they would have done in the past, and it's not unreasonable to assume
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that we will end up with a vaccine, and we may do so in a year, 18 months. yesterday, a woman in her 70s became the first patient to die in the uk after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. she had been treated for other health problems. out of more than a hundred cases confirmed in the uk so far, 45 people are in isolation at home, 18 from the overall total have never recovered. but the source of infection for ten patients is still unclear. in recent days in some countries, supermarket shelves have been left empty, and these photos were taken in shops here yesterday. but the government insists there is no need to stockpile. within the food supply, we are absolutely confident that people will, that there won't be a problem there, and crucially we are working with the supermarkets to make sure that if people are self isolating, then we'll be able to get food and supplies that they need. 0ne supermarket executive says staff are working round the clock to keep shelves stocked. around the world, the number of cases continues to rise.
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the city of bethlehem is now under quarantine after seven patients were confirmed there, and one person has tested positive at a clinic inside the vatican. italy is the worst affected country in europe, with more than 3000 cases. here, the key advice remains. don't touch your eyes, nose or mouth unless you've washed your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water for 20 seconds. it's hoped these hygiene steps will slow the spread of the virus. lauren moss reporting. there are reports of another death that could be linked to coronavirus. earlier i spoke to lauren moss and she said tests are currently under way. we understand that samples have been taken from an elderly patient who has died at milton keynes hospital, and those samples are being investigated for coronavirus. it is our understanding that this man is in his 80s and had underlying health issues, but further tests for coronavirus are being carried out. yesterday the first patient in the
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uk who tested positive for the virus died in reading. she was in her 70s and had been in and out of hospital, we are told, for various other health conditions, and she was diagnosed as part of routine test in the nhs are doing on all patience and intensive care with respiratory problems. and she hadn't recently travelled abroad. we have talked about how the government is going to provide more money for tackling all aspects of the coronavirus. what sort of strands are they expecting to spend that money on? today an additional £46 million of uk aid funding were set aside to investigate the virus, try and find a vaccine for it, and also what's called a rapid test kit. so a total of £91 million now for the research phase, we hear about these four phases, and research is one of them. we are not expecting to get a vaccine for a year, there is a long way to go with animal testing. human trials, when they do come up with a
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vaccine, it is a race around the world right now, it would need to be mass produced. as for the rapid testing, at the moment, if somebody is tested for the coronavirus, it can takea is tested for the coronavirus, it can take a couple of days for that result to come back, but this rapid test kit would work something a bit like a pregnancy test. they take a sample of saliva or a pinprick of blood, and then they would be able to test it and get the results in 20 minutes, but this kit isn't expected to be ready for around six months, which would be after the forecasted peak of the virus and this wave has ended. lauren moss reporting. she was mentioning there that a second person may have died from coronavirus. 0ur health correspondent, katharine da costa is at milton keynes hospital for us. what more do we know? very few details have been released about this patient other that we understand it is a man in his 80s with underlying health conditions, and that fits in with the picture
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that experts have been saying, that those in their 70s and 80s and particularly that have other conditions, that could be respiratory disease, heart disease, cancer, they are more likely to be at risk. but it's understood that doctors are still waiting for those official test results to confirm whether he did indeed die from covid—19. now, today we've seen that the largest daily increase of coronavirus cases, up 48 cases to 163 in the uk. that could be down to better surveillance, better detection rates. more than 20,000 people have been tested here in the uk. 0ne people have been tested here in the uk. one of those new cases has been confirmed as a resident here in buckinghamshire. again, not many more details are known other than that they'd recently come back from italy. now, it's worth noting that of those numbers, 18 people have since fully recovered. it's worth saying that for the vast majority,
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symptoms will be quite mild. but public health england will now be chasing those close contacts, trying to give advice on symptoms and if they should fall ill what to do. and reassuring the public that, if you're not contacted by public health england, then you don't need to ta ke health england, then you don't need to take any action. now, this is still said to be in the containment phase of the government's strategy on this. the government has said it will be led by the scientific advice, and that it will move into the delay phase of its action plan as and when the scientists say that we have moved a step closer. the pm today did say that we are to expect substantial disruption over the coming weeks. thank you very much. katharine da costa in milton keynes. this afternoon the prime minister has been speaking to reporters about the outbreak — here's what he had to say. we are still at the contain stage,
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and the advice very much to people is still, you know, if you think you have symptoms, you are best to stay at home, call the nhs. if you do need hospitalisation, then we will make sure the nhs has all the support that it needs, all the funding it needs. a very importantly if you've come back from a high risk area, italy is an example, and you have symptoms, stay at home as well, and the same point to be made about the nhs. and wash your hands. i know you've heard me say it before, but wash your hands, twice, national anthem, land of my father's, it doesn't matter, hot water and soap. and specifically on the preparations, the health secretary said you have been working with supermarkets, the supermarket so you haven't. what is the case? we are making sure we have every single possible provision in place, but at
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the say, we are in the contain phase of our response to the outbreak, and the advice is what i've just given you. the chief executive of the association of convenience stores james lowman joins me now. thank you for coming in and talking to us. what impact so far is coronavirus having on your members as far as you can tell? direct impact, not very much. a survey today said most consumers are not stockpiling product, the buying behaviour hasn't changed, and where they are it is limited to things like hand sanitiser which we have seen all those pictures and empty shelves for those sorts of products. there are no widespread changes in behaviour. certainly we expect that as things develop, people use their local shop a bit more, maybe people don't want to use public transport, or to drive. most people who use their local shop walk to the local shop, so there are advantages there that people might want to use this as things go on. so we are keeping close to the information and talking
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to members, but no significant change currently and buying behaviour that should impact our members. 46,000 convenience stores that we rely on from time to time, and in times of disruption, how much are they come into their own? the best comparison might be when there is snow and very cold weather, and people are less likely to travel so they stay a bit closer to home. probably different dynamics here, but nonetheless it is very important that stores are prepared, and that also involves working with their collea g u es also involves working with their colleagues in terms of those really good hygiene practices, which are commonplace anyway and happening everyday, but just commonplace anyway and happening everyday, butjust reminding people of those, and so preparing as best we can and minimising impact. what sort of advice or guidance would be helpful to your members from the government? you heard the prime ministers begin there, and the advice from the health secretary is right. there is no need for people to be changing their shopping habits at this time. the food supply chain has capacity in it. most of the products we are talking about that people might end up wanting to buy
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more of our ambient products, they are not short shelf life products, so there is capacity in the supply chain, no need to change. what we would like to do is think forward if his businesses are impacted, how we can help them, so if there is a change of the insurance status, retailers and businesses who have insurance policies will be able to claim against this as this category of incident. but we will talk to governments about what we can do to help businesses who have been affected. but essentially at the moment the government is doing the right thing to sharing the information, focusing on continued behaviour and basic hygiene practices which is the most effective way we can handle this challenge. how responsive can convenience stores be if demand does change? they are up against the might of the supermarkets, which are quite powerful. one of the things about independent local shops that they are talking about at the moment as they source through third—party whole side is that they themselves buy off the suppliers and distribute
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to retailers, so because the retailers have choice on which wholesaler they use, they have quite a lot of choice to change and manoeuvre and make sure they have products on their shelves if there are problems in the supply chain. at the moment we are very encouraged by the moment we are very encouraged by the response of the supply chain so far, and the responsible behaviour of consumers. most of them are not changing their buying behaviour, certainly not across a wide range of products. we know that some of the big supermarket chains were having to put contingency plans in place in the event of eight no—deal brexit, but that has been pushed out of the end of the enoh. similarly, i suppose, your members when a similar position? absolutely, so similar in some ways, but it is about bringing in stocks so that you can put that in stores and out to the consumers at that time. slightly different products affected. a lot of the concern around no deal brexit was the short shelf life products. but in terms of the ambient product coming through, there is more stock in the supply chain, so it again emphasises there is no need for
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customers to behave any differently at the moment. and you don't need to wait for a crisis to use your shops. of course. we are an incredibly important part of the communities we serve. that is your advert! thank you very much indeed. 96 countries and territories now have confirmed cases of coronavirus — cameroon, serbia, peru and the vatican have reported their first cases today. the netherlands has reported its first virus—related death, and the number of cases has gone up drastically in iran , with more than 1200 new infections. let's take a look at the latest numbers. there are over 100,000 cases around the world so far. more than 3,400 people have died. but almost 56,000 people who had the virus have recovered. last month, dozens of homes in the east yorkshire communities of snaith and east cowick were flooded, when the river aire overflowed. many of the properties still cannot be reached, and the water is taking a long time to recede. 0ur correspondent danny savage has been back to east cowick,
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to see how people there are coping with the flooding. it's still here. even though it hasn't rained for days, the draining of certain east yorkshire streets is taking time. the idea that flood waterjust comes and goes in a short space of timejust space of time just isn't the case here. we're over a week now and there are still properties that can't be reached, because the water is too deep. you can see where people have put in their own flood defences, in the hope of holding back the water, but they were overwhelmed. look at that window — you can see on the line there just how high the water came. on monday, we visited mick in his flooded bungalow. so it's come up in a big hump? it's notjust the carpet it's... the whole floor? the water here has gone, now comes the plan for the future. grim.
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it will be six months at least, we are trying to get a caravan on front lawn, so that we're here on site. so, you're going to move into a caravan on the front garden probably? we're hoping to, but... that's not going to be much fun for six months, is it? better weather's coming! across the road, tony also talked to us a few days ago. you think you're going to get away with it and then when it actually goes in, you can relax, yeah, it's done, it's finished. he's been told by his insurers he can't move wet furniture out of the house, but the loss adjusters won't be here until next friday. it's getting wet upstairs now, damp, because there is all this rubbish in the bottom. and they don't want you to move the furniture and things out? no, nothing, no. so, it's got to sit here for another week? yes, as it is. it is already beginning to feel a bit mouldy and damp? and smelling and upstairs smells now, it's getting through the whole house. work to fix things here is under way, but there is a lot to do. they haven't even started on some houses. flooding was never meant to happen here, but lines of defences were overwhelmed.
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they're hoping these blue skies last. danny savage, bbc news, east cowick. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. and in sport, england's defeat to the usa and the she believes cup opener was damaging to their title defence according to manager phil neville. england lost 2—0 in 0rlando. liverpool goalkeeper alisson could miss the next three matches with a hip injury. he has been ruled out of tomorrow's game and the visit of atletico madrid in the champions league next week. kneeling and johanna konta is into the last eight of the monterey open,
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beating tatjana maria of germany in straight sets. and i will be back with more on those stories after 4:30pm. see you then. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai, sheikh mohammed, after a family courtjudge ruled that he was responsible for the separate kidnappings of two of his own daughters. in a series ofjudgments, the court overruled the sheikh's efforts to keep the findings of the case secret. sheikh mohammed has said that the judgment has only given one side of the story. 0ur correspondent frank gardner has been telling me more about this case. this is a very bad news story for sheikh mohammed bin rashid al maktoum, and not a great story for dubai either, because it cast him in a very negative light. remember, this is a british court, the high court, that has taken ten months to gather all the statements, and hear both sides of the story. whatever the sheikh says, it has heard both sides of the story. he chose not to represent himself in court. he hired very expensive lawyers, as did his former wife,
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princess haya, and the court has come down on her side of events, which is to basically make public the very serious allegations that he, sheikh mohammed, kidnapped or abducted and rendered back to dubai his own daughters, one of whom was then subjected to inhumane and degrading treatment, as we saw on the video that was played in court and used a testimony. so it is a pretty serious allegation. is it going to bring criminal charges? no, i doubt it. he's head of state, he's a british ally, and it is not something that the british government i'm sure is going to want to pursue, because raf warplanes use dubai's air bases, a million britons go there every year. it's a massive global trading hub as well as tourism infrastructure, biotech, you name it. but it's certainly, it'll probably make people think twice about what is going on behind palace walls. indeed, all that opulence, luxury and privilege, and yet we're seeing that this very
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concerning underside to it. just for new readers, start here. to very briefly recap what this is about. the court heard and stood up the allegations as true that on two separate occasions, sheikh mohammed of dubai abducted or ordered the abduction of two of his wayward daughters, princesses who had tried to escape the family. in his view, wayward. exactly, yes indeed, sorry, fair point. so in one case, sheikha shamsa, when she was 18 she fled the family estate in surrey and was recaptured in cambridge by men working for sheikh mohammed. according to her testimony, she was injected, sedated, bundled onto a helicopter, taken to france and put on a plane back to dubai and hasn't been seen since in public or hardly seen since. certainly not a public figure,
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and she is held incommunicado according to the court. the other princess, sheikha latifa, she tried to escape nearly 20 years ago, was imprisoned for three and a half years, mistreated and then tried to escape again two years ago by boat, recaptured, brought back to dubai and is currently being held incommunicado. his youngest wife, now divorced, princess haya ofjordan, who was involved in this case, it started as a custody case over their children, because she was horrified by what she found out had happened to these two princesses, and feared it would happen to her or her children, so she fled with them to london, and according to her, he told her in may last year, you and the children will never be safe in england. in other words, he's got a pretty long reach. now, it's paradoxical, this, because sheikh mohammed is hugely popular in his own country. he's this built massively successful global entrepreneur which is dubai, it is a popular destination, it is in arab terms a pretty freewheeling liberal place.
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yet clearly when it comes to his own family, he is an old—style patriarchal autocrat. frank gardner. well, and the last few minutes, cambridge police have put out a statement, and in it they say an investigation into the alleged abduction of sheikha shamsa was carried out by cambridgeshire co nsta bula ry was carried out by cambridgeshire constabulary in 2001. with the evidence that was available to us, this was insufficient to take any further action. a review took place in 2017, and it was again concluded there was insufficient evidence to ta ke there was insufficient evidence to take any further action. this is no longer an active investigation, and we are not in contact with the victim. the statementjust released by cambridgeshire police. almost a hundred allies of priti
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patel have written a letter in the daily telegraph defending her and saying that she is fair. lynton crosby is among them. homes and businesses have been evacuated in luton after a suspicious device was found in car. an army bomb disposal team was called to dunstable road in bury park. one man was arrested at the scene and a second man was arrested shortly afterwards. 50 people were taken to a local community center. bedfordshire police have said the device was "not viable". the duke of sussex has been to silverstone, to open a new museum that tells the story of british motor racing. harry toured the venue with the formula one champion, lewis hamilton, and was shown how wheels are changed in the pit. james waterhouse reports. it is not a bad person to get a lift off — his royal highness, until the end of the month, plays passenger to lewis hamilton. they're opening this new £20 million
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motor sports museum at silverstone. this visit is one of duke of sussex's lastjobs as a royal, before he steps down in april. with the clock ticking... the world champion tries out to gun that is used to change wheels in the pit. no danger of a job change coming soon, then. bloody hell! the prince chats to younger fans alongside the exhibition, which documents british racing over the years. i now officially open the silverstone experience. for lewis hamilton, there is no stepping back as he goes for a seventh world title. for harry and meghan this is their last engagement as senior royal family members is on monday.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. good afternoon. we are seeing an improvement in the weather, but there are still some showers to come across eastern areas. they will fade overnight and we will be left with clear skies, cold enough thrust across eastern areas initially before cloud spreads in from the west and we start to see rain edging in as well. as the cloud moves in, temperatures will rise later in the night, so by dawn we are looking at temperatures of six or 7 degrees for plymouth and belfast. saturday sta rts plymouth and belfast. saturday starts off on a wet note, for scotla nd starts off on a wet note, for scotland in particular, and we are forecasting some very heavy rain here, 20—30 millimetres quite widely in the west, but up to 70 over the mountains where combined with snowmelt it brings the risk of localised flooding. rain will also get into northern ireland and also parts of north—west england through the afternoon, it is across central and eastern england and at times eastern scotland that will stay
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mostly fine and dry. that is your latest weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. what we're announcing today is a £46 million package of investment in uk science, which will in time to deliver a vaccine, some say about a
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year, perhaps around that scale. when the water won't go away — the enduring misery of an east yorkshire village flooded for more than a week. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. in the last few minutes, cambridgeshire police has defended the thoroughness of its investigation. sport now on afternoon live with sarah mulkerrins. a very disappointing night for england's women's footballers and criticism of their manager. absolutely, some come down for england and phil neville since they reach the world cup semifinals in france last summer. the loss to the usa, the eventual champions. it has been six losses in the last nine
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games, they won the she believes cup cup last year. that is the tournament now. phil neville said he wa nted tournament now. phil neville said he wanted the england overtake the usa to be the top team in the world but overnight, a bit of a reality check in florida. they lost to the usa and neville described it as another damaging defeat for his team. it was goalless at half—time but the world champions scored twice in three second—half minutes. christian press with the first then this from carli lloyd, her hundred and 23rd international goal. england will face japan international goal. england will facejapan in international goal. england will face japan in the next match on sunday. these girls in america, they live in and out of each other‘s pockets, they are encamped time. it is more prioritised, here the league is more prioritised, here the league is fantastic but we have to make sure players form and the league is transitioning into a national team, because i think it is suffering at
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the moment. one other thing to show you, the pre—match handshakes. a little bit different at the moment, elbow touching, it gives us an insight into what we think will become commonplace in sport with the spread of coronavirus. we are seeing many different football leagues and associations putting that into place. the football league have said today they are following on from the premier league, that they are dropping handshakes at the start of games. men's football now, after being invincible for quite a while, liverpool, they had a difficult week. now they have lost one of their key players. iam not their key players. i am not sure anybody really knows what is going on, liverpool looked unstoppable for over a year but we have seen them lose three of their last four matches. they will be looking to turn that around. they have bournemouth at home tomorrow in the premier league but they will have to do it without their star goalkeeper because he has picked up a hip injury in training
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this week. he will now miss the next three matches so that is definitely out at the home game against bournemouth, and then the return leg, the visit of atletico madrid in the champions league next week, they are down in that tie. he may even miss the merseyside derby against everton on march the 16th. elsewhere, the worcester warriors could win his first cap under gregor townsend. duncan weir has been named on the bench. there has been three changes to the starting line—up. nick haining is in at number eight, fraser brown as hooker and grant gilchrist will start in the second row. just one other line because england's decision to exclude this player as a precautionary measure against coronavirus was unnecessary, according to public health england. he has trained with his club saracens this week and will start in their game against leicester in the
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premiership this saturday. johanna konta is wary of the russian teenager head of the opening quarter final tonight. the british number one said the 18—year—old's age will make her fearless. kerber one said the 18—year—old's age will make herfearless. kerber reached her first make herfearless. kerber reached herfirst quarterfinal of make herfearless. kerber reached her first quarterfinal of 2020, beating a german player in straight sets —— konta. it is the first time she has won back—to—back matches since last september. that is all the sport for now. we've seen the number of cases of coronavirus in the uk rise to 163 this week. let's take a look now at the picture across the country. in a moment we'll hearfrom tomos morgan in cardiff and keith doyle in belfast. but first to james shaw in glasgow. just since yesterday the number of cases in scotland has risen from six to 11, so it has almost doubled in those 24 hours. two of the new cases
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are in fife, one is in grampian, both on the east coast of scotland, one each in forfar and lothian in the central belt of scotland. previous cases were in other parts, tayside, ayrshire, greater glasgow and clyde. what that means is of the 14 health board areas in scotland, seven now have confirmed cases of coronavirus. it is the areas that are away from centres of population, the highlands, the scottish islands, the highlands, the scottish islands, the western isles, 0rkney and shetland, in those areas down in the south, dumfries and galloway and the scottish border, which are at the moment, free of the coronavirus. the chief medical officer in scotland has said the number of cases could rise rapidly in the coming days but never the less, she has said she is absolutely convinced that at the moment, large—scale events can go ahead, especially if they are in the open airso ahead, especially if they are in the open air so that does mean, as we
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understand things, the scotland france game this weekend at murrayfield can still go ahead. and now over to my colleague in cardiff. thanks, in wales the number of people being tested in wales has risen by over a hundred overnight and now stands at 643 being tested. we are still in the containment phase in wales, not in the delay phase. there are only two confirmed cases, the second was confirmed yesterday by the chief medical 0fficer here. he also said in his press co nfe re nce 0fficer here. he also said in his press conference yesterday that that individual is actually being treated within wales, the first case was taken to england so they could conduct further research to learn more about the virus. but any more it seems will be kept in wales, looked after in a clinical environment or a quarantine place, possibly even at home. the advice here, just like anywhere else, if you have flu—like symptoms, not to
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go to public spaces, in hospitals. 0ne go to public spaces, in hospitals. one other development is in north—east wales, a drive—through chronic virus testing centre has been launched in wrexham. in response the welsh government has said 90% of the test so far have beenin said 90% of the test so far have been in home and as the number of cases is expected to rise, the number of tests expected to rise, you need to develop different types of testing which is why this has been put in place. that is the situation in wales. let's go over to belfast. thank you, in the last couple of hours we have had an update from the public health agency, that update really is no update because the number of confirmed cases is still at three. there has been hundred 86 tests carried out an of them, three have been positive here in northern ireland. the real developed has been south of the border where there has been an almost doubling of the numberof been an almost doubling of the number of cases to 13 and now we see the virus has got positive cases in
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all four corners of the island of ireland. 0ne all four corners of the island of ireland. one of the most significant developments is one of those cases in court, the large city on the south coast, that has been transferred, a community transfer. someone has caught it who has not been into one of the areas of the world where this virus has been passed on or been in touch with anyone who has been in one of those areas. that is obviously causing concern. there are 60 staff from the cork university hospital where the person is being treated, they have been told to self—isolate. there has also been a case in limerick that another fairly large city on the south—west coast, six hospitals there have had outpatients, routine operations cancelled and all visitors have been cancelled, they are not allowed to have visitors to those hospitals either because of a
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case they are. right in the centre of dublin, the famous trinity university college, parts of that have been closed off because of a confirmed case they are. before i hand back, let me show you this poster by the public health agency. this is available on their website, it is an updated poster and they would like people to print these off and put them in a school places of work, just giving updated information on when you should seek help. the updates on that is now instead of being people who have come from a part of italy, it is the whole of italy and various other bits of information. that is available on the public health agency site to print out and they are encouraging people to do that. i will hand back to you in the studio. thank you very much all. we are just hearing that facebook is saying it is closing its london offices until monday after an employee who is usually based in singapore was
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diagnosed with coronavirus, having visited the london offices on the 24th to the 26th of february. facebook closing the london offices asa facebook closing the london offices as a consequence until monday. the number of people have tested positive for the disease in the uk has risen 263, an increase since yesterday. over 20 thousand people have been tested so far. the vast majority of people who contract coronavirus will recover quickly, and won't need hospital treatment. most will experience nothing more than flu—like symptoms, and children in particular seem to be only mildly affected. but for some patients, the virus is more dangerous. 0ur health correspondent, james gallagher, has this assessment of the risks. how deadly is the coronavirus? it's a really simple question but the answer is actually quite elusive. if you look at confirmed cases and deaths, then you get a figure of 3.4% dying.
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so that's between three and four in every 100 people but that number is actually quite ropey. first, some of these patients are still being treated and could yet die. that would make the virus seem more deadly but, at the same time, there are huge numbers of mild cases going unnoticed. that could mean the death rate is actually much lower. so when scientists take all of this into account, they estimate a death rate of 1%. one in 100 infected people dying. that is higher than a typicalflu season, which kills closer to one in 1,000 or 0.1%. but wait a minute, doesn't flu kill more people? well, yes, it does. around about half a million people every year, while coronavirus has killed just over 3,000. the reason is flu infects hundreds of millions of people every year, while coronavirus is only just taking off. if that number soars, deaths will too. if coronavirus does start spreading more widely, who should be most worried? this is all data based on china but it suggests the death rate
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is quite low through to middle age. but look what happens over the age of 50. the deaths go up and up. as we get older, our immune systems get weaker and our bodies frailer — this puts us at more risk. there is also a danger for people who are already sick. if you are struggling with say a weak heart or lungs, then your body is less able to fight off an infection. there is also an interesting difference between men and women. it could be down to differences in the immune system, or the fact that men are more likely to smoke, that explains why actually men have a higher death rate than women. there is still uncertainty about all these figures but remember, for most people, coronavirus will be a mild infection. now on afternoon live, it's time to get answers to some of your questions on the coronavirus. joining me to answer
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them is dr lindsay broadbent, virologist from queen's university in belfast and i'm also joined by dr peter hotez, dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine in texas. thank you for your time. let's begin, a couple of questions for lindsay. this from john scully. if one member of a flatshare or family home decides he or she needs to self—isolate, must other occupants self—isolate, must other occupants self—isolate as well? i mean, this could be the case of a child becomes ill, watch the rest of the family do? this really depends if the person is choosing to self—isolate under their own decision or if they have been recommended to self—isolate because they have been in contact with someone that has tested positive for covid—19. if they have been in contact or they
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themselves have tested positive that means their immediate family or housemates will probably have to self—isolate, unless you can guarantee that you have your own bedroom and your own bathroom away from the other residents in the house. that is quite straightforward, thank you. james asks, if i am sci—fi slating, and i still able to my dog? —— self isolating. can i leave the house at all? very similar to what i said, if you are self isolating because you have tested positive or been in contact with someone who has tested positive, best to play it safe and not leave the house. you do not know if you will come into contact with someone while you're out walking your dog or if you will touch something. however, if you are self isolating out of your own cautiousness, you can pull the dog if it is ina
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cautiousness, you can pull the dog if it is in a rural area, very non—very non—populated, isolated area. before we speak to peter, one more question from bill roberts. he says, is it safe to use air hand dryers and public areas like restau ra nts dryers and public areas like restaurants or sport centres or can they spread the virus if it is on your hands? it is very unlikely they will spread the virus. you would like to think most people using a hand dryer have washed their hands previously, so it should mostly be clea n water previously, so it should mostly be clean water that is being blown off your hands by the hand dryer. another thing people are often worried about is the sea dirty hand dryers, those are usually due to bacteria and fungus. not viruses. viruses are not alive and they cannot survive long outside the body without having cells to infect. that is very helpful, thank you. doctor peter, morris has been in touch saying, iam peter, morris has been in touch saying, i am 81 years old, while the annualflu jab saying, i am 81 years old, while the annual flu jab i had
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saying, i am 81 years old, while the annualflu jab i had recently give me some limited protection? thanks for that, certainly it will provide protection against influenza but as faras we protection against influenza but as far as we know the flu vaccine does not cross protect against this coronavirus and for that, we are going to need a new vaccine which is at least a year, maybe two years, away. an important point to emphasise from the previous, which previously showed, is that our experience in the united states is that unfortunately older individuals over the age of 70, certainly over 80, are at high risk of severe disease, so whether it is 1% or 2%, that number means a lot less than the fact china where learning ten — 50% of older individuals could succumb to this illness. this is the population we have to work the
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hardest to protect. we have had a terrible experience in the last two weeks here in the us where immunity transition began in the seattle, washington area. the virus went to a nursing home of about a hundred people and so far resulted in 11 deaths. it is more or less confirming the observations in china. the big advice to uk authorities, as i am sure they already know, is we need to protect our facilities where there are residents who are older, assisted care, what we call nursing homes in the united states, that is the real risk area right now for us. thank you. that is a concern around the world, that particular group. peter robinson asks you, can we have some information on those recovering from the virus? are they now immune to it? we think so. but again, with a new virus agent it can sometimes
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ta ke new virus agent it can sometimes take months or even years to totally understand what is going on, so the thinking is currently that if an individual is infected with the virus eventually they develop an antibiotic response, and that is protected. however, we have also seen waxing and waning illness, so people think they are getting better then they suddenly feel worse and often that is confused is being reinfected where in fact we have seen this with flu and other respiratory viruses. penultimate question to you, before i go back to lindsay, mark asks, should those who are more vulnerable due to medical conditions or perhaps taking immunosuppressant medication, take any additional precautions? that is any additional precautions? that is a very good question. we don't really have a lot of data on those taking immunosuppressant medicines,
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such as antibodies against t and f receptors, intuitively we think they could be at risk. yes, i think especially if there is transmission going on in your community and you know about it, such individuals probably want to avoid crowded areas and maybe even avoid airline travel to an area where there might be transmission under way. potentially, you are at greater risk. that is a very good question. thank you. lindsay, steve says, during the swine flu epidemic, people were offered antiviral drugs, but they haven't been mentioned this time around, why not? he is quite right, during the swine flu epidemic a lot of people were prescribed a drug which help to shorten the length of the illness. we don't have any specific antiviral treatments for this covid—19 as of yet, however there are several in development but it will take time to test those and
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make sure they are safe. there has been some mention i think of an antimalarial drug, what use might that be? i don't think it would be of much use. again, all of this research is incredibly new. however, there has been developments that they have found an inhibitor for the receptor that is already licensed for treatment of another disease and they may be pushing that through quite quickly for clinical trials. back to peter. christine asks, although the pneumonia vaccine does not protect you against coronavirus, does it give you any protection against the pneumonia which seems to follow on from the illness that is caused by the virus? there is a possibility that in association with your viral pneumonia that you get from the sars coronavirus, especially if you are at risk, potentially you could get a secondary bacterial infection on top
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of that so there might be some protection but the important thing is if you have your vaccine and europe flu vaccine, you take those diseases of the table so it makes the diagnosis potentially more straightforward if you don't have to worry about influenza. there is an reason in itself to get the vaccine and the vaccine together because if authorities have to fight a triple epidemic, influenza, the sars coronavirus and a third, whether it is measles or a actuarial pneumonia, that just makes is measles or a actuarial pneumonia, thatjust makes their work so much difficult —— bacterial. thatjust makes their work so much difficult -- bacterial. while i have got you both ear, let me take you advantage in asking the same question. peter, if there was one discovery about coronavirus that you could have, what would it be to
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radically improve your understanding of it? if i could radically improve your understanding of it? if! could pick two, i will do so. i think one of them is we have got a lot of confusion in diagnostic testing, because we are seeing a numberof diagnostic testing, because we are seeing a number of individuals who are symptomatic initially test negative, and then only later test positive. so is that a question of thatis positive. so is that a question of that is not enough virus in rounds of the test is not sensitive enough? and then we see the opposite of individuals who are positive and become negative, and then are positive again. even though they have no symptoms, is that because they are still with the virus around or not? there's a lot of what seemed like false positives or negatives. clarifying that is, as you can imagine, we try to make decisions on who needs to be isolated. the other
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big question is mode of transmission. we we want to know how far it travels in the air, we will eventually figure this out but if you have that information in hand now, especially in the absence of a vaccine when you are using all the more classic methods to contain this virus, it would sure be nice to have that information. would be top of your wish list? i would love to know why children seem to have such good protection and how they can really fight this disease so well. if we knew that it may help to shape treatment and vaccine options. that is really one of the big questions i still have around this virus.|j is really one of the big questions i still have around this virus. i wish i could wave my magic wand and provide that for you, don't we all?
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we are provide that for you, don't we all? we a re really provide that for you, don't we all? we are really glad that you joined us this afternoon, thank you very much for your time. in a moment egon is going to bring us the latest business news. it is you, you never know who might sneak in. the number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk has risen to 163. the prime minister promises more government money to fund urgent work on coronavirus, including research on a new vaccine against the disease. campaigners say the government must bring to justice the ruler of dubai — sheikh mohammed — after a uk court ruled he was responsible for the kidnappings of two of his daughters. in the last few minutes, cambridgeshire police has cambridgeshire police has defended the thoroughness of its investigation. here's your business
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headlines on afternoon live. stock markets have suffered steep falls because of fears about the spread of the coronavirus. investors are concerned that companies are losing business because of the outbreak. banks and airlines are especially under pressure. starbucks is to stop serving coffee in reusable cups brought in by customers because of the virus. it's a temporary move, and follows similar action by train company lner. there's been a data breach affecting almost a million virgin media customers. their personal details were left unguarded online for ten months. the firm's blaming a technical glitch. the markets are continuing to feel the impact of the coronavirus. the environment secretary is meeting all sorts of interested parties,
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notably the supermarkets, offering studying words. he said he is be reassured supermarkets have contingency plans in place to prevent food shortages and monitoring their stock levels and their supply chains. he said they have well established contingency plans. 0nce have well established contingency plans. once again, has said nobody needs to stockpile. whether that would study things down —— study things down. a bit late for today, there is the idea that could be a recession because of the coronavirus. really steep losses throughout the week really, apart from a couple of days, because of fears that businesses are really suffering because of the coronavirus. the fact that dowjones are still down, despite the fact there was good news on jobs in america says a lot.
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let's talk to james hughes, chief strategist at scope. what are the most runnable sectors that we are seen as a result of this scare with the coronavirus? —— vulnerable. we are looking at the majority of sectors being hit at the moment, that is why we have seen such massive falls on the stock market. there are the obvious ones, you have got the likes of airlines, travel companies, financial companies and big retail companies are being hit hard as well. this is are being hit hard as well. this is a wide reaching thing, this is hitting markets across the board and really sectors are it really paying too much attention away from anything else. this isjust a major news which is hitting every sector out there. if you look at how markets move, if you look at the massive falls we have seen in the dowjones this week, there have not necessarily been stock specific or sector specific, it is the
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uncertainty which really drives markets. that is what we have got with this at the moment. with coronavirus outbreak, we don't know how hard it is going to hit economies, we don't know the overall numbers, it is hard to gauge official numbers. that uncertainty really rattles markets. it is more an unsettling side of this, which is moving markets to the downside. it is why it is so far—reaching and not necessarily sector specific. let me ask you this, regular influenza kills a lot of people. why do we not see a kills a lot of people. why do we not seea similar kills a lot of people. why do we not see a similar reaction from the markets to that sort of problem? because influenza happens on a yearly basis, this is not something that we necessarily focus too much on. of course, it is because this gather is so much media attention, thatis gather is so much media attention, that is one of the reasons we see this. you have to rememberfinancial
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markets are natural human breathing things, they are run by people that create algorithms, yes, but really fundamentally they are run by human beings and human beings look at the news, look at these fundamental stories which are driving markets, they look at the number of people which are being affected and of course, that drives fear. it really is fear in the markets rather than anything else. this is almost a human aspect which is driving these markets, not necessarily anything around figures or the amount of people that are being diagnosed with this illness, it is the human side of fear which drives markets to fall like they are at the moment. i don't think you can necessarily say well, influenza kills as many people, why don't markets move on that every year? because influenza doesn't gather so much media attention. we are ina gather so much media attention. we are in a situation as well with these markets where they have been going up for such a long period of
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time, a lot of the time artificially boosted by the federal reserve or central banks, so when something like this happens it doesn't take much to turn markets from a real positive side, if they are being artificially stimulated to fall quite aggressively. that is the thing we are getting. we are running out of time, but thank you so much for those on sites. that's all the business news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. we are seeing a vast improvement in the weather, especially across angular. there are some shares to come across western areas. they will fade overnight and we will be left with clear skies, cold enough frost across eastern areas initially before cloud spreads in from the west and we start to see rain edging in as well. as the cloud moves in, temperatures will rise later in the night, so by dawn we are looking at temperatures of six or 7 degrees for plymouth and belfast. saturday starts off on a wet note,
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for scotland in particular, and we are forecasting some very heavy rain here, 20—30 millimetres falling quite widely in the west, but up to 70 over the mountains where combined with snowmelt it brings the risk of localised flooding. rain will also get into northern ireland and also parts of north—west england through the afternoon, it is across central and eastern england and at times eastern scotland that will stay mostly fine and dry. that is your latest weather.
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today at five — the number of coronavirus cases around the world tops 100,000. in the uk, in the biggest one day jump, 163 people are confirmed to have the virus. the prime minister says the government is working to keep supermarkets stocked. we are working to ensure that we have every possible provision in place but as i say, at the moment, we are in the contained phase of our response to the outbreak. more than 140 british nationals are stranded on board a cruise ship along with thousands of others and are in quarantine off the coast of california. as the race to develop a vaccine continues — the government pledges £46 million for research.

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