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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 19, 2020 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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communities across the united states are marking ‘juneteenth', an unofficial annual holiday commemorating the official end of slavery. after weeks of protests against racism and police brutality, this year's events have taken on a renewed significance. the uk's coronavirus alert level has been lowered from 4 to 3 — after a steady decrease in cases in all four nations. it means there could now be a gradual relaxation of lockdown restrictions. the uk government has announced that all children in england will go back to school in september. but headteachers have complained about a lack of information, and say social distancing presents a huge challenge. the world health organization says coronavirus is still spreading fast and the pandemic is accelerating. on thursday alone, the who reported 150 thousand new cases with half
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the author and journalist yasmin alibhai—brown and the telegraph's assistant comment editor madeline grant. tomorrow's front pages, starting with. .. the times says it's seen plans that suggest beer gardens in england will be patrolled, to enforce social distancing — hotels will leave room service at the door and restaurant tables will not be set in advance as the government looks to reopen the hospitality sector. the daily telegraph says boris johnson is preparing to end lockdown with a raft of announcements to reopen england in the next fortnight — after the official threat rating from coronavirus was reduced. meanwhile the daily express predicts foreign holidays for brits could begin again within days —
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as the uk government prepares to make a key statement on overseas travel. the ‘i' carries the results of a poll — that says 76% of those questioned think lockdown was imposed too late — and it shows the prime minister's approval rating collapsing from +38% to minus 7% — in the space of two months. the guardian reports that ministers have been accused of playing down the gravity of the coronavirus pandemic after it emerged that more than 1,000 people died every day in the country for 22 consecutive days — in stark contrast with the daily tolls announced by the government. according to the daily mirror, the queen has given shops a boost — as they hope to bounce back from weeks of closure with the monarch quoted as saying she wishes "all the businesses every success. " and the financial times takes a look at the minority of companies that have shone in the coronavirus crisis, from tech groups riding the home—working wave to retailers with busy online order books. so, let's begin. welcome back to you both. let's
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start with the daily telegraph, the end of lockdown is in sight and it has a lot of details about what is going to be happening next. take us through the. the government is likely to liberalize england over the next fortnight after the official threat rating of the virus was reduced and so all eyes were turned over to the fourth date when we are expecting the reopening to begin. we have not discussed this yet but it is so important. but the government plans to do for schools isa government plans to do for schools is a report that they plan to ease some of the social distancing requirements by increasing the a cce pta ble requirements by increasing the acceptable size that is required by the government allowing the kids to be kept in a bubble of 15 peoples. and they want to increase this to 30 and this is a big step because the 15 bubble, the 15 size represents a huge problem because not all of them have classrooms big enough or venues
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generally big enough to accommodate so generally big enough to accommodate so many different classes going on and it puts schools at a particular disadvantage because they often do not have the sports halls and the facilities that they can simply take over to accommodate all of these peoples. so inadvertently, the bubble has had a very unequal effect on schools and i suspect that any relaxation will really introduce schools as they reopen safely according to the government's guidance. ever since a lot of problems, doesn't it? particularly for state schools and secondary schools of an awful lot of kids who move around buildings with not that much space and how they maintain them ina much space and how they maintain them in a bubble when they go from one lesson to the next. they do not seem to have all the answers yet. and i think it was remarkable that money was formed for nightingale hospitals so quickly and these
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buildings were moved which were not used. really, that we can't do the same for state schools into temporary new spaces get the private schools which have huge amounts of land to share that land with state schools in the neighbourhood, there could be a lot of things done but i still don't understand, madeleine, why we are liberalizing when it's not the threat level that is being reduced, it is what mrjohnson and his people call the alert level, which i don't begin to understand. what does it mean alert level four and level three. it what does it mean alert level four and levelthree. it is what does it mean alert level four and level three. it is nonsense, isn't it? i know what it means. 0bviously, isn't it? i know what it means. obviously, we individuals cannot know for sure, we have to trust what
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the expert guidance and saying, i suppose. but when i think they mean is they need less transmission in the community and that the outbreaks more likely to be localised in particular customers. they still require us to be vigilant and be more vigilant in a targeted way than having the indiscriminate lockdown, when in fact the virus is not actually passing through much of society and in some parts of the country, they're society and in some parts of the country, they‘ re not society and in some parts of the country, they're not reporting hardly any new cases at all. i think it means we need to improve our tracing systems and test more widely so we tracing systems and test more widely so we know when these clusters appear. but it is a step in the right direction. and what does alert mean, who was to be alert? the citizen was mac the headmaster? who is to be alert in the situation? let us is to be alert in the situation? let us stick with the front page, because i think we could go down the rabbit hole here. it is confusing and we have heard that word a lot in the past few months about being
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alert and lots of question marks over really what that means. but we do know that the end of lockdown is in sightand do know that the end of lockdown is in sight and we do know that the two metre rule is probably going to be relaxed and we know this could be an announcement next friday and much more detail about getting the hospitality industry, which has been absolutely crippled back on its feet. i'm not sure but, the idea that pubs and i'm not sure but, the idea that pubs a nd restau ra nts i'm not sure but, the idea that pubs and restaurants should be allowed to serve customers on the pavement and outside spaces, the industry desperately needs this, doesn't it? it does, but i do not think we can just go with what an industry needs, we have to keep people safe. but the interesting thing is the telegraph or the times was that this was all going to be regulated. so, what was going to be regulated. so, what was going to be watching out to see that these new sets of for complicated rules are going to be followed. the police have already completely
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stretched, as are going to be involu nta ry force stretched, as are going to be involuntary force was was going to be watching out to see that people obey? we all are. and the papers are attempting to answer some of them. they be patrol this britain faces a new normal. it is a good point, it is not going to be the police doing this, i think a lot of pubs and restau ra nts this, i think a lot of pubs and restaurants are going to have to self regulate, aren't they?” suspect that is true., who was going to be the garden patrol. may show volunteer for that job. to be the garden patrol. may show volunteerfor thatjob. not to be the garden patrol. may show volunteer for that job. not a particularly fun shop but i think they're much more fun things to do than patrol it. and they did hire a large number of people to be involved in the track and trace scheme, but they did have some fines
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in the way that you cannot sell drinks to underaged youngsters and things like that. but on the inside of the papers, there rooster and a drill down the details in the specific guidance that is been given to hospitality some businesses of the try to grapple with the new normal and it is going to be a very interesting experience, notjust for the patrol but for people that are ordering their drinks on phone apps rather than go to the bar so, no more chatting with the regulars of the bar. it is much as possible, they want to keep people outside because we know the spread of the virus is much lower and there is kind of a revolution heading our way and there will even be sappy fewer options on the menu and restaurants, chefs believe that if they can minimise cross—contamination that way, then they should. so it's a
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less fu n way, then they should. so it's a less fun version but some pop is better than no pub. it's notjust pubs but they're talking about nightclubs, hotels theme parks and other attractions. it is a level of attraction that they're getting involved in that must be present a huge headache for them.” involved in that must be present a huge headache for them. i pity the poor civil servants and all of this. really, it is hard enough. but also another really important thing to ask is this. say this because i had. and say there is a break—out in a particular locality where people start going into these beer gardens. what the government be legally accountable for doing something that endangers the lives of people. could there be cases taken out. do these places get insurance? the way they always did before. there is so much of the details that they have to
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consider as well. let us move on to the guardian front page. the true scale of covid—19 death toll, which is far higher than has been officially reported. it is. not quite clear with the figures, they have lead with the news that the true death toll encompassing death in hospitals, care homes and at home may be higher than the official estimate. i have seen that in statistics. and it is very alarming and you know, it may as well be the case that we are not alone in this. i know many other countries that we have been comparing ourselves to have been comparing ourselves to have not necessarily included care home deaths in their figures, have not necessarily included care home deaths in theirfigures, but thatis home deaths in theirfigures, but that is quite telling, isn't it? is a very alarming figure and i suspect when we've seen a a very alarming figure and i suspect when we've seen a more a very alarming figure and i suspect when we've seen a more detailed breakdown of it and in fact, when the official inquiry comes looking
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back on what this country got right and what he got wrong, i expect these figures will really show the absolute tragedy of our failure to adequately protect care homes to protect capacity in the nhs. in patients who were positive for the virus, just got discharged directly to ca re virus, just got discharged directly to care homes and a group of the most vulnerable people imaginable and highly tra nsmittable environments, and quite certain that they will be seen as the single most catastrophic mistake that the government and other public health authorities were working on this made. of the past months, there's been a lot of talk over the official death toll was counted and the lazy bear, doesn't it. and over 22 consecutive days, a thousand people
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died and on one particular day, in april, 1400 people died. my daughter works in the national health service and she has always felt that numbers we re and she has always felt that numbers were higherand and she has always felt that numbers were higher and the inquiry thing really bothers me because by the time we get this inquiry, capital hundred quid down, borisjohnson will be gone, doing whatever he does next. inquiry take such a long time, i hope there is a judicial review to challenge some of the things that we re challenge some of the things that were done and were badly done. because i think, for each of these deaths, there are dozens of people affected. and people who could not even say goodbye because as madeline said, they were in care homes. i
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cannot see her. as you say, inquiry may take years but madeleine, in the meantime, the i had to look at the prime minister's paul rate index dropped significantly from plus 30% to 9-7. therefore the public section as to how they've handled the crisis and it is not looking good for them at all. 55% of people are nothing but the government is not handled the crisis well compared to just 32% who are supportive and a staggeringly high 76% of people believe that the lockdown was imposed too late. i can understand why public opinion has slumped in this way. it is felt like there's been weeks of apathy and indecision at the top and many important issues have been neglected by the government there've been major failures as we talked about care
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homes, testing, contact tracing and so on. homes, testing, contact tracing and so on. but i also think that partly contributing to this is the fact that lockdown has gone on a lot longer and people believe lockdown was imposed too late. but i also think people believe lockdown will bea think people believe lockdown will be a lot shorter than it was, and we re be a lot shorter than it was, and were told that they were temporarily closed and now they are finding that we're not yet sure whether all stu d e nts we're not yet sure whether all students will be back at school by september. by the that happens, there was vital six months out of there was vital six months out of the education of our kids and i think that the reality of the lockdown has not necessarily accorded with what people believed at the time we went into. so it is only natural that people would start to, on top of their specific grievances with the failures of the government, will also feel malaise about the whole thing. and even though the inquiry may take a long time elections come around inevitably and this paul rating is
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pretty damning for the government. but they have for years. i think the most important thing is, i have been, ithink most important thing is, i have been, i think the people, most important thing is, i have been, ithink the people, i have been, ithink the people, i have been really amazed at how willing people were to do what was asked of them when it was very difficult and they're still doing it. they are still being sensible, keeping distance, doing the right thing and i think some of them feel quite betrayed that they did the right thing and a lot of them are not actually wanting these stores to be flung open. they're quite nervous about it. what if, they do step out and something happens after three or four months of sacrifice? will it have been worth it? and there is a huge gap i think between what the people were willing to do in good
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faith and the number of times they feel they're being let down and i'm not sure that is going to go away too soon, really. 0ne one of them, the story about women being overlooked in the recovery plan. government is being warned and women have for the brunt of lockdown as theyjuggle careers, kids, cleaning, etc, etc. on one hand we know women are less likely to die from coronavirus and less likely to have severe repercussions, but while health—wise they have been less likely to suffer. in terms of keeping the country going in terms of bearing the burden of duties at home, sister of disproportionately affected the women. an open letter from a group of highly influential
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women in public life, i think it began by the city heavyweights, and that people like amber rudd and top sports women likejessica hill and gabby logan and they have come together to urge the government to ta ke together to urge the government to take a very careful look at how the coronavirus has weighed unequally on women. into working sectors and jobs that have had to either shut down during the pandemic, or be put on furlough and at home, they tend to be disproportionate and helping to ca re be disproportionate and helping to care for the children in the absence of childcare. so, they seem to be really losing out in the situation on multiple fronts and, if the government, if the lockdown persists, then it is very likely that we are going to see lots of the
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progress of esau in recent decades, organic and reducing the gender pay 93p- organic and reducing the gender pay gap. lots of that i must lockdown can happen or thinking about policies that can help women. looking at green lights within days. the story saying that the closest striking deals that show low or similar infection rates so that we can all have holiday. do not have a low infection rate and we will not for quite a long time. looking out for quite a long time. looking out for the number, isn't it? they're talking about this a lot. can we go on holiday and i completely understand, god, wouldn't it be night to go on holiday at the moment. but i don't think so. i think conjure up where were the
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numbers are coming down, like in italy and so on, we are highly infected nation, maybe numbers, some numbers have started coming down, but not as dramatically as they are saying. them he ask madeleine whether or not she'll be hopping on a plane the summer anywhere, anywhere with a sunnier climate than oui’s. anywhere with a sunnier climate than ours. it is very tempting, isn't it? i would deftly go on holiday. but it is mentioned earlier, 27 and very unlikely to be badly affected by the virus indefinitely i would like to go abroad, but i'll be careful and ta ke go abroad, but i'll be careful and take precautions. but i think ultimately, i have to take the opportunity for normality as we can. we may never get the virus, we may have to live with the. thank you very much for being with us this evening and taking us through the papers. that is it for the papers tonight. many thanks to yasmin
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and madeline — goodbye. good evening. here is the round up from the bbc sports centre. he struck with football but there were two more games in the premier league tonight and entertaining contest between tottenham and manchester united which ended in a one all the draw. not looking good for norwich as they mark their attempt to action with a home defeat to southhampton, more now from oui’ with a home defeat to southhampton, more now from our correspondent natalie. it is said that actions speak louder than words and in the pen drop silence, this now familiar gesture spoke volumes. this was no game of thrones but his actions have seen regal of late, forcing the government policy change to stop children from going hungry this summer, but there was nothing he could do about this. stephen tearing
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through his team—mates to put spurs ahead. a great run at a fair shot. he should have done better, but spurs fans rather enjoyed it. rejuvenated united and hugo needed to be nimble. what a wonderful safe. his body tired, the clumsy tackle handed united a penalty. in the equaliser. late trauma some ham erupt as another penalty was given, his mood was placated when va are overturned the decision. a match for closer to the football we love. the same cannot be said for the earlier match where norwich was fighting for their premier league existence, six points adrift. the manager says we need a little miracle, but they are running out of time. southhampton third in the second half. slides and in. 3- neil. the game has come to
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confess, including the merseyside derby on sunday, but history will be made at bournemouth is the bbc airs its first ever life premier league match. if future pop quiz question no doubt, once we are all allowed back. as the penultimate day of royal, race, the commonwealth cop. to the bottom of your screen you will see the golden horde written by adam kirby purchased the fire shot. the charge on demand. into second. he did enjoy success in the race before, he was writing the fanny logan with stakes, it was his third winner of the meeting and impressive 70th and total at royal ascot. and harley doyle became only the third female jockey to ride at royal ascot, dragon was a 33 to one shot in the duke of edinburgh and
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callaway, on the ascot role of honour. they have announced that they will be reviewing the use of they will be reviewing the use of the songs swing low sweet chariot at england games. rugby football union says many fans do not know the songs links with slavery, song when the members plane to twickenham because his nickname is chariot. you use something negatively or positively, i choose to use it positively. i don't think
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