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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 6, 2020 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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police under beijing's new security law. these include the right to search people's homes without a warrant, restrict suspects‘ movements, and force internet service providers to remove information. doctors in some american states are warning that their hospitals just won't cope with the soaring number of coronavirus infections. texas, florida and arizona are just a few of the latest covid—19 hotspots, after fourth ofjuly celebrations. ghislaine maxwell, who's been charged with helping the convicted paedophilejeffrey epstein to groom underage girls for sex, has been moved to a jail in new york. she'll appear in court later this week. she has previously denied any wrongdoing. and one of the world's most acclaimed composers, those are the headlines here on bbc news.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are rachel cunliffe, comment and features editor at city am and the political writer and academic, maya goodfellow. welcome back to you both. let's have a look at some of the papers that we've already got in. the mail leads on the row over huawei and says its seen a dossier that accuses china of trying to manipulate key establishment figures in the uk. the times reports on the warning from china's ambassador that britain will "have to bear the consequences" of making an enemy of the country — if the uk removes huawei from its 56 network. the telegraph leads on a warning from police chiefs to ministers that pubs selling takeaway alcohol could spark street violence and disorder.
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the guardian writes that care leaders, unions and mps are rounding on boris johnson for appearing to shift the blame for the high death toll from covid—19 in care homes onto their management. the metro reports on the trial of former mp charlie elphicke
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let's kick off at the times, the new reality of going to see your gp. yes, this is the rope college of gps that has come up with a proposal putting out that one of the places where people are quite likely to catch any virus, coronavirus, is in agp catch any virus, coronavirus, is in a gp waiting room. it's when you go to see the doctor, therefore, it may make sense to have a triage system where you get an appointment first via skype or over the phone, then they decide what the next steps are. it is being framed in quite a negative way, this is the only way to make gp surgeries safe, but actually, one of the great success stories of the last three months has been the way that primary care adapted in a tremendous follows people seeing their doctor's face to face and an increase in the use of
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technology, they nhs has been trying to use and have indeed been encouraged to use for many years now. if you think about it, why should you have to turn up and wait ina waiting should you have to turn up and wait in a waiting room where you could catch goodness knows what when you could get assessed by skype, remote medicine. so, there is a real positive site here that may be that technology, that technological shift has been kick started. obviously, we will wait and see what actually happened. maia, the problem will be for the elderly, perhaps those who are not literate when it comes to new technology coming people who will perhaps think, oh, i don't want to bother the doctor by ringing. you know, who won't be able to use this new way forward. yeah, i think this has sort of come out of what's happened over the past few months of getting discouraged of going to our gp surgeries and this has being as a success, a success by gp surgeries and this has being as a success, a success by the royal couege success, a success by the royal college of general practitioners, ofie college of general practitioners, one of the things towards the end of
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the article is the college said that itioi'e the article is the college said that more research needed to be done whether this system would actually increase or decrease the burden on gp's, increase or decrease the burden on gp's, but as you mentioned committing research, looking at how this might impact different constituencies of people how it would be rolled out and what it would be rolled out and what it would look like in terms of making sui'e would look like in terms of making sure that everyone is able to access the medical care that they need, in particular, as you say, older people who would maybe struggle with some of these technological barriers, also, i think this routine that we know, in terms of going to see our gp and how that works, and whether we gp and how that works, and whether we would end up, i know, in terms of it happening with my gp, using an online system and then sort of not really following up or it being more difficult to access my gp to just try and see if i even need an appointment. sol try and see if i even need an appointment. so i think some of those naughtier questions, it is such an early suggestion that some of these naughtier issues will definitely need to be really thought
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about carefully so it doesn't have a detrimental impact on people who work in the health care profession but also patient. 0k, work in the health care profession but also patient. ok, let's look at the main splash onto that brilliant picture of those two dogs, cocker spaniels up on the cliffs near blackpool, blown away by the wind. but the main story is which way and the trade will suffer. this relationship becoming much more acrimonious between the uk and china about the threat to pull out or pull huawei completely out of the network now. so, this is off the back of the decision to not allow huawei telecom equipment from next year and the chinese ambassador has said the language is really interesting. britain should be wary of making an enemy of the chinese, well, that's not really the language that you use when talking about a trusted ally or partner. it has certainly been
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interesting the last couple of months to see the tide turned against huawei. obviously, theresa may made the controversial at the time decision to allow huawei to build parts of the uk 5g network, very strong resistance from parts of the conservative party and i think everything that we have seen in the last couple of months, notjust with coronavirus and whether or not the chinese government could've alerted the world sooner, but also with the controversial new security line hong kong, the way china has been behaving i think has just increased anti—beijing sentiment across the world this decision to say, actual, we are world this decision to say, actual, we are going to a site but the americans, when i could do put our telecoms infrastructure at risk and evenif telecoms infrastructure at risk and even if it's meant to be very expensive to make that is just a symbol of how far the pendulum has swung against china. maya, think the government originally said that huawei could be responsible for 35% of the 5g network, as the british was thinking of the payments are out
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ofa was thinking of the payments are out of a lot of pressure now, and the china research group not to go ahead with that. whether president trump is making it impossible now for britain to actually use huawei because of the restrictions he's putting on the company. yeah, and i don't think, i mean, generally, in terms of president trump's history of making declarations about international affairs, of making declarations about internationalaffairs, i of making declarations about international affairs, i think he doesn't have, it's an understatement to say he doesn't have a good record on this, but i think a lot of people will be watching what elsa said from officials but also chinese officials within the uk. one of the things in this story is sort of knowing that there is chinese companies that have invested last year over $1 billion in the uk, and one of the things that's being set as they are all watching what happens here. i am not convinced. we will see what is going to happen in terms of this kind of
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language in this kind of pressure being applied to the uk government, but i suppose, in a way, they have got it coming from both sides. sol think there will be a lot of eyes on this to see exactly what happens and how this unfolds in the next few weeks. 0k, in the next few weeks. ok, the story which is dominating a lot of the front pages in the next few hours, rachel, the ft here, dominic raab, foreign secretary, giving that statement on the so—called acts in parliament today, championing human rights and targeting people who are floating human rights in the uk by denying them access or the ability to buy property, but the story here dominic raab under pressure to turn new sanctions regime against china as well because, today, he was talking just about russia, saudi arabia and couple of burmese generals as well. yes, there were 49 people on the list of sanctions as it currently stands, and this is really britain's statement that it wants to lead the charge against human rights abuses
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and really come down very very hard on those individuals and bar them from, you know, no luxury shopping at harrods, no parking your investment in multi—million pound properties in london, just really, sort of making a statement that they are not welcome here. obviously, no chinese individuals on the list. pressure particularly for carrie lam, the chief executive of hong kong who is british, overseeing, and that law came into force basically overnightjust that law came into force basically overnight just eliminating that law came into force basically overnightjust eliminating political freedom of speech, freedom of political disagreement overnight, and the mounting pressure on what other countries can do. one thing the uk can do and has considered and openly talked about is granting citizenship, british citizenship or artisan citizenship for the residents of hong kong. another thing it could do is put its chief
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executive on the banned list. —— band list. maya, briefly, before we move on, do you think this goes far enough, or do you think it should be brought into? actually come i think the focus on individuals and organisations, it means that the narrowness is organisations, it means that the narrowness is sort organisations, it means that the narrowness is sort of interesting here. we are dominic raab talking about human rights abuses. i do think it is really important that the uk government reflects on its owfi arms the uk government reflects on its own arms sales. if you look at the arms sales that have gone to saudi arabia and the campaign in yemen which is resulting in thousands of people dying. humanitarian crisis. the uk government has been supplying those arms for those human rights atrocities. it's an issue here at home, it's worth noting that last year, it said the uk government should not continue to sell arms to saudi arabia and that they were found to be, it was found to be unlawful, given what was happening
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in yemen, and there was a new story around two weeks ago in the garden that suggested that there was still soitie that suggested that there was still some forms of sales going on, some licenses continuing to operate, which allows for the export of fighterjet which allows for the export of fighter jet components and which allows for the export of fighterjet components and aircraft maintenance to saudi arabia. sol think when we are talking about this and hearing the foreign secretary talk about human rights abuses, it also really necessary to talk about this in the uk and their complicity. let's go to the mail, rachel, china again on the front page of the mail, sparking huawei storm, what is interesting about this is the dossier was put together by christopher steele who we know from previous eat —— previous dossiers. yes, if that name sounds familiar, thatis yes, if that name sounds familiar, that is because he is behind the infamous dusty air about donald trump's linked with the russians that included some accusations denied and obviously unproven about what donald trump may or may not have been up to with some russian women in hotel rooms. this is another dossier though, how beijing sought to find influential
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individuals in the uk and sway them and make them advocates for huawei's cause. talk about prominent individuals, politicians, academics, public figures, and then tantalizingly, it says some of them have been named, and we don't know who they are. i think, actually, depending on what is, well, obviously, we will see how explosive it is, but the idea that a government might try and find sympathetic figures within another country and get them to advocate on its behalf, i'm not necessary —— necessarily sure that that is news. maya, this is a story that's been around in terms of people working for or being part of a group of people of influential businessmen, formal politicians or whatever who have been encouraged, perhaps, to look at china's influence in the uk. yeah, ithink look at china's influence in the uk. yeah, i think we really need to see itioi'e yeah, i think we really need to see more about this. there were other reports about the dossier that says ofie reports about the dossier that says one of the things it really sort of talks about is this determination to
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get british politicians and others to get them to participate in stage and radio interviews, with fake fiews. and radio interviews, with fake news. @ suppose you could say was an extension of soft power, really, couldn't you 7 extension of soft power, really, couldn't you? i will be interesting to see what's actually in it, because allegedly, this is reported in the guardian that one of the people who were targeted was a lib dem pa who sat on the advisory board for huawei. sol dem pa who sat on the advisory board for huawei. so i think i want to wait to see what's in the detail of the dossier that is quite important. let's move on then, because let's look at the guardian, rachel, care homes. now, as soon as forrest johnson made those comments saying that the care homes perhaps should ta ke that the care homes perhaps should take some of the blame, maybe they didn't follow procedures as they should have done, it's pretty clear that that was going to be a backlash that, wasn't a? —— borisjohnson. ca re that, wasn't a? —— borisjohnson. care workers and nhs workers are national heroes of the moment. and
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have been facing huge problems in finding out what the correct safety guidance are. they are getting ppe, we guidance are. they are getting ppe, we have known that the reason that britain's death count is so high is one huge factor is the outbreaks in care homes that weren't adequately protected, and weren't given the right guidance or the right equipment, the right staff, agency staff, may be between care homes, spreading the virus. the official inquiry obviously we'll have to wait and see what that says, but we already know that these are the problems. so for the prime minister to then say, welcome you know, part of the problem was that care homes didn't follow the guidance they'd we i’e didn't follow the guidance they'd were given from it as adding insult to injury. ijust get the impression that he wasn't thinking, that isn't what he meant it was a slip of the tongue, but he has to be very aware that the public mood at the moment is going to seize on comments like that. the care sector... so you think he misspoke because he did say, the crucial thing about this, they need more money. so he did address maya, what everyone has been saying for the last 20 years,
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really. yeah, i mean, ithink that ofie really. yeah, i mean, ithink that one of the reasons one of the many reasons i think these comments are unacceptable, whether they are intentional or not does that care workers are people who are underpaid, often incredibly poorly treated and also people who are dismissed and have been dismissed, including by borisjohnson's government as low skilled. actually, it's incredibly important, incredibly skilled work that people are doing. a very significant proportion of the workforce are people who have migrated to the uk from abroad and who tend to be denigrated in our political discourse. i think as rachel has pointed out, it's really, really important that there is proper reflection on the fact that it's believed around 25,000 patients were discharged into care homes without being tested for coronavirus. so there seems to have been a systemic failure, and in this particular guardian article, it's noted that public health officials proposed a itioi'e public health officials proposed a more radical lockdown of care homes at the height of the pandemic, but this was actually, the guardian
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claims it was dismissed by the government. sol claims it was dismissed by the government. so i think as we move forward , government. so i think as we move forward, because the pandemic is not over, there is a lot of talk about a second spike, the lessons really must be learned about what government got wrong, what it could've done differently, and what it needs to do, testing, tracing to my sleeting is quite clearly part of that. ensuring people in care homes are protected as well as being looked after and aren't just left to die at think it's really, really important. i think the majority of 80, perhaps, he might, if he wants to be in position to do something about that, which he says he does. we are running out of let's look at the front page. i willjust read that out. the chancellor urged to cut stamp duty this week. there is an announcement that maybe he will do it later in the year, people are asking him, a lot of pressure for him to do it now, because it could pa ralyse him to do it now, because it could paralyse the housing market for months if he doesn't. then the telegraph here, just under a picture every she soon, i think he's of the globe, isn't she, in london here, —— rishi sunak looking had to a
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statement on wednesday, followed by the governor of the bank of england, andrew bailey, he is going to be addressing the 1922 committee, rachel, which is pretty unusual. addressing the 1922 committee, rachel, which is pretty unusualm is unusual. it's also very awkward timing. we should stress that the timing. we should stress that the timing of the meeting following this piece is a coincidence, but rishi soon because going to announce a lot more “— soon because going to announce a lot more —— rishi soon can infrastructure package, greenjobs, more government spending, more government borrowing, and the first question i imagine from the conservative mps to the government is going to be, do you support this? to think it's the right call,, and that puts him in quite an awkward position, because either he has to back the government, which might raise questions about the bank's independence, or he has to come out against the government, which is something that i imagine no governor in this particularly delicate situation is going to want to do, so awkward timing there stifles ——. situation is going to want to do, so awkward timing there stifles --. the last governor to address this was eddie george, and he left in 2003. what do you make of the new money
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for the green projects which we think rishi sunak echoes going to on wednesday. yes, it seems like it's about 3 billion, including for insulation and what's being talked but his green jobs. insulation and what's being talked but his greenjobs. i think it's really necessary. we need that kind of investment. if you look at our economy, it's built on unstable cracks foundations, and a lot of prepared to, but it is also not an economy that is fit for thinking about addressing the climate crisis, but if you look at this in comparison to other countries around the world, what you have seen is just under 40 billion package with this green investments, and if we really, really are serious about this, we are going to have a huge crisis of unemployment. we need to see a crisis of unemployment. we need to see a proper crisis of unemployment. we need to see a proper green economy, crisis of unemployment. we need to see a proper green economy, that means stopping funding fossil fuels, with the government does more than it does for the renewable industries. in 2019, there was a report that came out of the european union that's at the uk actually gave the most subsidies to the fossil fuel industry in europe, and what we need to see that not happening and
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what we need is proper investment in renewables, proper creation of green jobs, and making sure that they are decentjobs, jobs, and making sure that they are decent jobs, well— paid, jobs, and making sure that they are decent jobs, well—paid, good, jobs, and making sure that they are decentjobs, well—paid, good, decent rights to people. that requires a major overhaul of the way our economy functions. but when he to understand that the climate crisis is so serious and we need a proper investment package that takes that seriously and make sure that people are treated with the dignity and respect they deserve at work. these plansjust don't respect they deserve at work. these plans just don't go far enough yet. 0k, plans just don't go far enough yet. ok, right. we are almost out of time, just want to show the front page of the yorkshire post which we don't always do, despite this huge splurge of money from the chancellor and the government, there splash that the prime minister stands by the tax freezes, despite the £120 billion cova 19 hit. a picture of him up in school in yorkshire today, where he has been speaking to people up where he has been speaking to people up there and indeed giving press conferences. we are out of time. great to see you both. thank you rachel and maya.
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that's it for the papers tonight. hello, i'm jane do hello, i'mjane do go hello, i'm jane do go with your latest sports news. tottenham have jumped to eight in the table after beating everton1—0 north london. but it wasn't everton own goal that gave spurs all three points. a shot from giovanni ricocheted after everton's michael - sending
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