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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 7, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: a green deal — hundreds of thousands of homeowners could receive vouchers of up to £5,000 for home improvements to help kickstart the economy. after reopening at the weekend a few pubs have shut their doors after customers test positive for coronavirus while others continue to crunch the numbers i'll hear from owners concerned that sales are too low to be sustainable. as the easing of lockdown continues, hotair as the easing of lockdown continues, hot air ballooning returns to the skies above england. we will watch
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them fly. frustrations boil over at tottenham as two of their players are kept apart in their premier league win over everton. managerjose mourinho said it's what his team needs to grow up. good morning. we got rain already northern ireland, it's going to be pushing eastwards through the course of today. something drier and brighter. i will have all the details later. it's tuesdayjuly the 7th. our top story. hundreds of thousands of households in england are to receive grants of up to £5,000 for energy—saving home improvements such as insulation. it's part of a wider £3 billion green investment by the government, which aims to create thousands ofjobs across the uk in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. insulating homes gives a triple benefit. it saves on people's bills, it cuts carbon emissions from heating and crucially, as the uk
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heads toward recession, it creates thousands of jobs for tradespeople crawling in attics and measuring d raft crawling in attics and measuring draft proofing. england can't reach its climate targets without a major refit of housing stock but until now the treasury has been reluctant to help because it means transferring cash from the public purse to private books and mortar. now the jobs factor has swayed its opinion. from september, homeowners will be able to apply for vouchers of up to £5,000 for workers certified by an approved builder. the treasury says more than half of the £2 billion allocated go to the poorest households which will pay nothing. the uk has the most energy inefficient housing stock in the whole of western europe and one of the worst poverty rates. to make all 30 million uk homes energy efficient will require investment from the government of east £18 billion. labour approves of the investment but says it doesn't do enough to
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help people in cold rented homes. it also says the programme must be carried on year after year to keep thejobs and carried on year after year to keep the jobs and increase the emissions savings. roger harrabin, bbc news. let's get some more detail on the plans from our political correspondent nick eardley. nick this is part of the governement‘s plan to try and rescue the economy from the fallout of coronavirus. we are talking yesterday aboutjobs andi we are talking yesterday aboutjobs and i think jobs we are talking yesterday aboutjobs and i thinkjobs are a big part of what we hearing today again. it's all part of green package that the chancellor is going to announce tomorrow in an emergency coronavirus statement. trying to get elements of the economy moving again, things like housing, by putting this money into installation but at the same time creating somejobs into installation but at the same time creating some jobs because of those fears, the furlough scheme, that could be a rise in
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unemployment. the government wants to make sure there are jobs that the people to take up. we're going to hear a lot of this this week, there be even more tomorrow, debate about whether there is enough, if it will do enough to stop the rise in unemployment but jobs up do enough to stop the rise in unemployment butjobs up front and centre and what everybody‘s talking about in westminster, trying to pick ourselves up after the lockdown. we've spoken a lot about care homes in recent weeks and months and the prime minister has come under some fierce criticism for the comments he's made about care homes. he has. the impact of coronavirus has been devastating, roughly 40% of the recorded deaths in the uk have been in care homes. there is a big debate about social care, there has been for years, but the way it's funded.
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c about what this crisis taught us. we discovered to medicare homes didn't really follow procedures on the way they could have. one of the most important things is to fund them, another £600 million into covid—19 compliant care homes. them, another £600 million into covid-19 compliant care homes. those comments about to medicare homes not following the guidance of because the real row, the national care forum saying they are insulting, labour saying they could have done a lot more to help care homes, things like ppe. i think number ten is trying to rollback those comments about saying the prime minister thinks care homes have done a great job. don't think number ten wants to be seen to be blaming people but the comments speak for themselves and they've angered a lot of people overnight. nick, thank you very much. we are speaking to the government at 730 this morning on the programme.
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several pubs in england have temporarily shut down again after customers tested positive for coronavirus. at least three pubs announced their closures just days after they were allowed to re—open on saturday. andy moore has more details. the opening of pubs in england on saturday was a major step in the easing of lot down. here in soho, there were big crowds on the streets to mark the event. at thousands of pubs up and down the country, they we re pubs up and down the country, they were much more modest celebrations but now some pubs are having to close their doors again just days after reopening. the lighthouse kitchen and carvery at burnham—on—sea in somerset is one of them after a mail customer tested positive. the pub posted a message on its facebook page, saying:
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other pubs such as the fox and hounds in baddeley west yorkshire have had to post similar facebook messages. the pub said it will be deep cleaned and opened again as soon as deep cleaned and opened again as soon as possible. the village home pub in alba/ gosport said it told its customers it didn't need to isolate unless they were contacted by official traces. it hopes to open again on saturday. this is the best thing since sliced bread. any group going to a pub in england to leave a contact number so that should make it easier to trace the customers who have been to a pub that needs to close down. andy moore, bbc news. the duchess of cornwall has said that missing her grandchildren has been the worst part of her lockdown experience. she made the comments on bbc radio 5 live's emma barnett show, which she will be guest—editing later this morning. here's our royal
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correspondent daniela relph. taking charge of the microphone. the duchess of cornwall‘s test edit will highlight issues that matter to her. she spoke to five live's emma barnett about the stresses and strains of lockdown. she said this socially distanced royal engagement last month to take hospital staff felt different, not quite the same and she spoke personally about the reunion with her grandchildren in recent weeks. you eventually get to meet them and you are so excited because i haven't seen them for 3.5 months, you know, yourfirst reaction is to run up and hug them and you have to sort of up their hands and it's a very odd deal. i shall look forward to the day when i can really give them a huge hug again. camilla's radio added to roll today will focus on the subject she campaigns on, particularly the anguish of domestic violence. she said she believed lockdown would see
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an horrific spike in the numbers suffering abuse at home. you are there, you can't get out, you've probably got children there. that is the worst, so you feel you can't leave because you must take the children. you've probably got a telephone but you can't get to it. probably the abuser is feral. where do you go? the programme today will look at the work a number of charities camilla does work with as well as some insights on loneliness and her husband who she describes as the just man of her age that i know. that showed she is guest editing is on later. it starts at ten o'clock on later. it starts at ten o'clock on five live this morning. spain's running of the bulls festival in pamplona has been cancelled for the first time since the spanish civil war because of fears over the spread of coronavirus. the festival was made famous in ernest hemingway's novel the sun also rises and draws thousands of visitors every year. animal rights campaigners have
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welcomed the cancellation. should we go outside for the moment? take a look at these beautiful pictures from the scottish highlands. for the past few weeks we've been following the the story of louis and aila — two ospreys nesting at loch arkaig pine forest. we now know that their chicks are two males and a female. the woodland trust is asking for suggestions on what to name them. i love this next bit. the woodland trust is asking for suggestions on what we should call the chicks. two girls, two boys. we need three names. send in your suggestions. we
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both got it wrong. two boys and a girl. send in your suggestions and we will pass them onto the woodland trust. anyone who falls ill with coronavirus would be forgiven for hoping they're one of the comparatively lucky ones — who suffer the effects forjust a few days. but now there's evidence that up to one in ten victims are living with ongoing symptoms — like headaches, crippling fatigue and nerve pain — for weeks on end. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes has been to meet some of those who have become known as the covid "long—haulers". post viralfatigue, post viral fatigue, they call it, i understand. for more than three months now, professor paul garner, an expert in infectious diseases, has been documenting his own day—to—day struggle with recurring systems after falling ill with
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covid—19. systems after falling ill with covid-19. i can hardly breathe so to put words together, i had to com pletely put words together, i had to completely fog it up. 0ver diet. there does seem to be this difficulty with symptoms that we know. as being ill with it. and whether we are being believed. it also messes with your mood. and i had very severe mood swings. i was in bed waking up in the morning, totally devastated and my eyes were just full of tears. i wasn't actually crying but ijust felt just full of tears. i wasn't actually crying but i just felt so awful. headaches, extreme fatigue, pain, shortness of breath, the list goes on. to live with such a strange and bewildering array of symptoms for so long has been really
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frustrating for paul that what's extraordinary is he's not alone. here in liverpool on the stream same street he lives on, one of his neighbours has been to pretty much exactly the same thing. helen's whole family fell ill with covid but she was hardest hit. so we'll, she was hospitalised twice. helen is really struggle to get back on her feet and all this with two young children in her own business to run. 0na good children in her own business to run. on a good day, you sort of think it will be fine. 0n the low day, you think, is this how life is now? and my psychology, i don't tend to give up my psychology, i don't tend to give up easily but i run with my daughter for about 30 seconds, i was in bed for about 30 seconds, i was in bed for about 30 seconds, i was in bed for a week after that. it's not so much frustrations, is that you can't understand why you keep getting sick. exactly how many are in during his long haul symptoms is unclear but the team behind a widely used app which tracks the disease believes it could be more than a quarter of a million people. we know
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the average duration of the whole population is around ten days and somewhere between one in ten and one in 20 people are having symptoms that last over a month. it's showing this ageing individuality of response that is the most striking about this disease and in a way the most worrying because it means there may not be one way to treat it. pain in the chest. it feels like there is a pressure on the test. brain fog, forgetfulness. muggy, muggy head. a kind of had pain all here. this virus is still springing unpleasant surprises, leaving tens of thousands of people with a terrible legacy. really extreme fatigue. in total exhaustion. dominic hughes, bbc news, liverpool. a further indication of how this virus has affected people in so many different ways. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the guardian focuses on criticism
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of borisjohnson after he said many care homes "didn't really follow the procedures", leading to high numbers of coronavirus deaths. that was described as "a huge slap in the face" by one industry representative. the telegraph leads on police chiefs warning that allowing pubs to serve takeaway drinks will lead to violence and disorder. it has a picture of the chancellor rishi sunak at shakespeare's globe theatre — and says the stage is set for a 3 billion pound "giveaway" to the arts sector. the i also reports on the chancellor's plans, saying that rishi sunak is being urged to make an immediate cut to stamp duty. the paper quotes economists who warn that announcing a cut for the autumn would paralyse the housing market until then. and wales 0nline has some welcome news — that yesterday there were no reported deaths from coronavirus in wales for the first time since march the 19th. that is really and to here. cricket
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returns this week. test cricket returns this week. test cricket returns and there is a lot to talk about after last weekend the prime minister said cricket no. so will recreational cricket return? england meet the west indies and talking about the virus, we used to family bubbles but they are using everybody involved is a big bubble. it is really interesting. anyone involved in the cricket this summer, whether thatis in the cricket this summer, whether that is players, coaching staff, administration staff, broadcasters, those we work with every day, they have gone into what they call a bio secure bubble. they are all in the same place in the same hotel and they are tested regularly and temperatures ta ken once they are tested regularly and temperatures taken once a day. cricketers go off and train and do that stuff but all the people around them stay in the bio secure " some of them probably for all of the summer. and as you move to a
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different venue, everyone stays together and they are tested again and they stay together. it is such a goodidea and they stay together. it is such a good idea because it means the cricket can happen but it also means eve ryo ne cricket can happen but it also means everyone is away from their family for weeks and weeks and weeks on end. but it is being used now as a model for other sports going forward because so far so good. a good way to try and keep things safe. you're speaking tojimmy to try and keep things safe. you're speaking to jimmy anderson to try and keep things safe. you're speaking tojimmy anderson today aren't you? yes and we will show that tomorrow. i have a brilliant piece inside the telegraph. 0ne o'clock and how it could be wood for your brain. —— wine 0'clock. somewhere between ten and 1a units of wine per week actually improves your memory and retention. they say it is moderate drinking. so if you
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area it is moderate drinking. so if you are a regular moderate drinker, researchers suggest that that could be good for your brain although if you go slightly above that, that is then associated with the hippocampus shrinking. and you do not want that. a bizarre one. enjoy this. how to stop elephant from entering where you do not want them. nojoke. how do you keep an elephant in the right place? i don't know. this is botswa na. place? i don't know. this is botswana. because elephants are intelligent and you build an electric fence they work out how to get around it by using their tasks or they will take wood from elsewhere, and use that to get over the fence. so in botswana which has a huge elephant population, to try and keep them off land they tried barking dogs and all sorts of things. they have put up disco
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lights and apparently it is working. thousands of elephants, there are 130,000 elephants in the country, they compete with humans for space and water. the disco lights have stop them is a perfect deterrent from going onto land where they are trying to keep them away from. the music is not there. just the lights. and one doctor says elephants are intelligent and can adapt behaviour. we have to adapt and use solutions no matter how bizarre there. we have to adapt and use solutions no matter how bizarre therelj wonder who thought of trying disco lights! a farmer started flashing a torch at the elephants and they thought it seemed to work so they developed it further and thought what if we use disco lights? and it has in successful. i love it! now, if you like me havejust has in successful. i love it! now, if you like me have just put on your make—up, let's give you a warning for your mascara at this point.
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you're about to meet some care home staff whose sacrifice and dedication may well bring a tear to your eye. they've spent the last 12 weeks living on site to keep their residents safe — and that means they haven't been able to see their own families. until today. 0ur reporter fi lamdin can tell us more — she's in somerset. good morning. what is happening there? all of us have had our lives slightly restricted during lockdown in many ways but i would suggest that no—one has had a long down quite like this team over there. can you imagine not being able to go to the shops, and nor see family nor go for a walk after work or a run, being unable to get in the car. literally, this team of people have beenin literally, this team of people have been in this building and these grounds since easter and that seems like such a long time ago. they have been here every day 2a hours a day seven days a week for the last three months. i have been looking back at their lockdown. locked in and locked down. this team have been inside for 84 days.
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protecting the 22 residents who live at this care home in somerset. we believe that we have saved the lives of the residents. we saw what happened at local care homes and so far we believe we have kept them alive. but it comes at a cost. chris has not been home to see his wife or his four—year—old daughter for months. happy good morning, daddy, i miss you so much. i didn't think we would get through a couple of weeks, it was really tough. tina is a care assistant who has been sleeping in the stockroom. this is our bathroom. she has not had a shower for 12 weeks to take so we have no washing facilities, we just have a ladies down the corridor which is our bathroom and toilet so we have a little wash in the sink. good morning and night time. happy
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anniversary, you too! before locked down, the longer she had spent away from her husband was five nights. came in on tuesday on a saturday on my husband's birthday so that was another milestone that i missed and then three weeks later it was our wedding anniversary. 26. for three months, staff have become temporary residents of this care home. day—to—day life alongside celebrating easter... ve day and many celebrating easter... ve day and any celebrating easter... ve day and many many birthdays. and they have kept the virus out. but after 12 weeks, they finally feel it is safe to go back home. well, come and meet the team. firstly i will introduce you to gary. he has been the chef here. gary, how many days have you been here? hundred and 15. and how many meals is that? just over 8000
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meals. what is his best recipe? fish and chips! and we will come back to you ina and chips! and we will come back to you in a moment. now let's meet paula who has just come off night shift and has been working through the night. tell me, how many nights? six nights a week for the last 12 weeks. still looking fresh as always. you do look amazing. now, julie, you moved in with everyone but not by yourself. let's meet your friend. this is poppy and poppy, i have two dogs here, poppy and rosebud roses nervous. they have loved being in here. and the residents have loved them. poppy goes around and meets everybody and they enjoy her. those who do not see p°ppy they enjoy her. those who do not see poppy inside the home watching them tearup and down
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poppy inside the home watching them tear up and down up here. lovely to meet you and, marie, tell of the sacrifices. what have you missed the most? going out for war, seeing the world, basically. we go down there by their and we wavered the world go past. if we can spin around you can see the boundary and this is the walk they do every day. they go round and round the garden. that is the most you can do to do you just have not let. now, jane, let me tell you about jane. how many days you worked here before you moved in?” think it was about one week. so you did not even know anyone really well? and you went from that to... living with somebody with whom i had not met and working with these lovely people. and today you will meet your partner? hopefully he can
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this morning. married for 16 years and you'd never been apart. what has it been like? it has been emotional. very emotional. what has been the ha rd est very emotional. what has been the hardest thing? cuddling and missing my partner quite a lot. i am getting a little upset now. just to give him a little upset now. just to give him a hug and a cuddle to yeah. easter was ages ago! hopefully not long now. now, donna, i hearyou have done all the haircuts. how many has that been? quite a few. residents and staff. and chris, chris is the boss. chris, you made huge sacrifices. tell us, you never expected to be in here for 12 weeks, did you? it wasjust for easter and we we re did you? it wasjust for easter and we were seeing coronavirus spread through the world and coming into this country and starting to spread
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and julie and i sat down and felt what are we going to do to keep it out? and the answer came up quite quickly, that the only thing we could do is lock ourselves in here so we asked the staff if they wanted to do it and selflessly they all jumped in with two feet. let's had now to tina because it is your moment and very exciting. tina, your husband who we just saw in that piece, you have been married for 26 yea rs, piece, you have been married for 26 years, keep your eyes closed. your husband is around the corner and i can see him. we will cross the line, if you could just cross the line and open your eyes now and, look! there you go! applause
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i felt like someone ifelt like someone in i felt like someone in a pantomime! 0h, i felt like someone in a pantomime! oh, dear... you can cuddle again. it is amazing. i have waited for this moment for so long. and it has finally come. 26 years and five nights apart. has it been hard? it has been tough to do the rollover at night and no—one is there stop but it has been 0k. she is a strong woman so it has been 0k. she is a strong woman so i knew she could cope. i am very proud of her. i am speechless now. i can't believe it. very proud of her. i am speechless now. ican't believe it. ican't believe it either. we will let you have a bit of time. thank you very much and through the morning we will see other reunions here stop i will let these guys have some time. it is really quite emotional. 0h, oh, what
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0h, whata oh, what a lingering hard. 0h, whata lingering hard. a oh, what a lingering hard. a long time in the making their stop that isa time in the making their stop that is a really special moment. many people who have been to an awful lot over the last few months and trying to make sure that they keep themselves and others safe by moving into ca re themselves and others safe by moving into care homes and preserving the life of others and it all boils down toa life of others and it all boils down to a moment like that.|j life of others and it all boils down to a moment like that. i liked when we saw him waiting around the corner and he did not know we were looking at him. you could see him wondering why he was there so early. six minutes 28 —— 28 minutes past six and we are a minute late for carol but i think she will understand why. what a gorgeous sunrise stop this is sentin what a gorgeous sunrise stop this is sent in by our weather watchers and this is in north yorkshire. another wa nt to this is in north yorkshire. another want to show you as well from healing. beautiful, lovely sunrise and there is a lot of them. if you have any pictures you want to send,
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please do, we love to see them. today's forecast is wet for some of us today's forecast is wet for some of us and it is already raining in northern ireland and generally speaking compared to the last few days we do have lighter winds. the jetstrea m days we do have lighter winds. the jetstream is more or less across us at the moment that an area of low pressure from the atlantic reducing afair bit pressure from the atlantic reducing a fair bit of rain in northern ireland. if you follow the cloud all the way back into the atlantic, various weather fronts are all coming our way so it will remain u nsettled, coming our way so it will remain unsettled, particularly across england and wales for the next few days. there is even an old tropical storm embedded in there as well which will bring us some damp conditions but nothing too sinister. the rain already in northern ireland pushes eastwards after a dry and relatively bright start and you can see whether rain is headed across parts of northern england, wales, the midlands, getting in towards norfolk. south of that in southern england there is cloud but the further we travel south through the
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english channel coastline, the channel islands, the more you can see longer spells of sunshine. north of the rain in scotland we have a weather front, a weak one, of the rain in scotland we have a weatherfront, a weak one, sinking south and bringing rain with it turning showery as it does so. in between sunshine but cool. 11—16 in the north. 16—20 maybe 21 in the sunshine around the south—east. through the evening and overnight if anything that weather front sinks further south taking cloud and rain with it and behind it will be clear skies with a couple of showers but temperatures will be lower so note in the north and with overnight lows in london on 16th may 15 degrees. tomorrow we start with all the cloud and rain in southern areas and there will be pulses of heavy rain as it rattles through and then we will see it wax and wane through the course of the day and behind that if we push further north we look at brightest guys and this takes us
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into thursday as well. 14 degrees in aberdeen, 20 degrees once again as we push down towards the south. for friday we will have the dregs of the weather front, friday we will have the dregs of the weatherfront, producing some showers in some eastern areas but for most of us it will be a dry and bright day with more sunshine, a few showers as high—pressure or original bid at least starts to come in. and if you are wondering, the first half of the week for most of us looks dry but on sunday there may be low pressure coming in from the south—west bringing —— south—west bringing rain to northern ireland and scotland. today it's just gone 6:30am. you're watching breakfast with sally and dan. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. the hospitality firm whitbread
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employs more than 35,000 people in chains like premier inn hotels and beefeater restaurants. we'll be hearing from its boss — alison brittain — about her plans to bring the business back out of hibernation. you can get your hair cut in england now but not your legs waxed, your nails done or your tan topped up. we'll be talking to one of the many beauty salon owners who are campaigning to get their industry back on its feet. and hot air balloons have been given the green light — in england, at least — to get off the ground. we'll be live in bristol to see one take flight in just a few minutes. good morning, i have a very strict waxing regime. hundreds of thousands of homeowners in england will be able to apply for vouchers worth up to £5,000 for energy—saving home improvements like insulation. it's part of a wider "green investment" package due to be announced by the chancellor, rishi sunak, tomorrow. but labour says renters have been left out — and it has called for a "broader and bigger" plan
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to cut carbon emissions. several pubs in england have temporarily closed down after customers tested positive for coronavirus. the prime minister said he didn't know what direct plan was at the start of the crisis in relation to ca re start of the crisis in relation to care homes. many deaths have been linked. several pubs in england have added temporarily close down after customers tested positive for coronavirus, east three venue saying they would shut their doors again after opening at the weekend. the pubs of all said they would reopen when it's safe to do so. let's find out what's happening and talk to our gp to get the latest insights.
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doctor richard bircher, is in stockport. good morning to you. i want to start with a story that actually we spoke about on bbc breakfast today about a real concern from panorama amongst doctors and patients in the number of cancer cases that haven't been spotted during the last 3— four months. what is your take on that and are you seeing the screening system starting up again? the screening system certainly in england, it's been rumbling on. it needs to pick up pace. from my point of view as a gp, there are plenty of reasons why. reducing the number of people being referred to hospital. the major reason is that people did follow the advice to give us some breathing space when the pandemic started. meant that some people with
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symptoms unknown to them, and the symptoms unknown to them, and the symptoms they held onto were subtle ones. for example, if you got up in the morning and went to the toilet and past blood, you'd be onto the gp straightaway but if it's things like feeling teague, weight loss, changing your bowels or increasing pain, you might stay away a bit longer. what would you say to people who are watching us this morning and it isn't perhaps specific but maybe a vague set of symptoms. it isn't perhaps specific but maybe a vague set of symptomslj it isn't perhaps specific but maybe a vague set of symptoms. i would say loud and clear, general practices opening and functioning well. it's a bit different at the moment because we are doing a lot of the work by video or phone call but general practices opening if you have those concerns, we want to see it. what about with. if we go to the gp and
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have a concern that he perhaps found something that is bothering you, what is the backlog for referrals and appointments from a consultant. about ten years ago, the nhs brought in what we call the 2— week wait and it means that if you have the right sort of symptoms, you would be seen rapidly. that system never ground to a halt. we've been relocated to the wards with covid are now covid is much more under control, those services have been ramped up again. have you seen increased cases of coronavirus? i don't think any body wa nts coronavirus? i don't think any body wants that. we been prepared. and
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don't bring about a new search. crowds of people on the weekend, they look like they are too close together. what is the sensible advice about if you want to go to a pub. what is the sense of way to do that. if it's too busy, don't go in. maintain your distance, don't go to the bar, wait for services. where i work at my practice, we all wear masks, and a meeting room. doing a lot of particular people around you,
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mainly the other people around you. what about mental health issues. are you still seeing an increase in people coming into you with anxiety and depression as a result of what's been going on over the last few months. you hit the nail on the head. an awful lot of mental health out there. before covid, lots of people were living lives that they we re people were living lives that they were comfortable —— uncomfortable with. they have financial difficulties. lots of reasons why people are struggling. people have a whole range of different mechanisms. there might be able to see them are more go out with friends. whatever it is, whatever suits them in order to cope with their lives but of course, when covid came along, all those coping mechanisms were put on hold the people were locked in their houses. 0n the other side to it is covid itself caused an awful lot of stress for people. people worried
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about relatives, their finances, people have to go to work and expose themselves to the virus. it was scary philosopher people. i've seen a lot more mental health implications recently. thank you very much indeed, interesting to hear from very much indeed, interesting to hearfrom ourgp at very much indeed, interesting to hear from our gp at this time of the day. nice and early in the morning. it's 6:40am. john is here with the sport. a strange spat during a match between two players you would least expect to have a binding on the pitch for spurs last night. when it comes to arguments between team— mates comes to arguments between team—mates on the field. perhaps when things aren't going so well, such as a tottenham, incidents like this dominate the headlines. son and hugo lloris the two players involved. and you might be surprised to learn they were leading at the time thanks to giovani lo celso's
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deflected effort — it went down as a michael keane own goal. then came the most interesting action of the night — which says a lot about the game — hugo lloris angry with son and a perceived lack of effort. jose mouinho says it's just what his team needs. i asked the players to demand more from each other, i asked the players not to be passive, don't accept what the others were giving, to get more from each other. i was asking them. everything from that, and i'm really happy because now i understand that the players can also have that mentality. different kind of drama as 0xford reached the league one play 0ff final beating portsmouth 5—4 on penalties after they drew both legs of their semi—final — cameron brannagan the coolest man in the ground scoring the decisive spot kick.
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they will play wycombe who drew last night with fleetwood, but were 4—1 up from the first leg. and are nowjust one wil away from reaching the second tier for the first time. could snooker be the first sport to allow crowds back in? the world championship starts later this month and could take place in front a limited number of spectators at the crucible theatre in sheffield. fans who've bought tickets have been asked to register their interest. 0rganisers want to try and allow in 300 people per session and are in talks with the government. and lastly — what would you do with £403 million? that's the sum reportedly being paid to american footballer patrick mahomes after he signed a new contract with the kansas city chiefs. he took them to the superbowl last year and has now committed to the nfl franchise for another 10 years. it's the most lucrative contract in the history of american it's £40m a year.
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£2.3 million for each game he plays — providing he plays every game over the length of the 10—year contract. it's an astonishing figure. an astonishing amount of time. he is 24 yea rs astonishing amount of time. he is 24 years old. going almost £500 million guaranteed. it's a pretty co mforta ble guaranteed. it's a pretty comfortable position to be in. well looked after next decade. eyeing that extension. you can cover everything with that, can't you. all that covered, wow. it's a lot of dosh. we're still being urged to avoid
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using buses and trains at the moment — but there are plenty of other transport options available. you can walk, cycle or — since saturday, in england — hop in a hot air balloon. breakfast‘s john maguire is in bristol to tell us more. i'm not sure to me people using hot balloons to commute. since saturday, pilots have been able to apply them once again in the skies over england. it is an industry that is regulated by the civil aviation authority so the rules have been very carefully worked out. we will talk to a little bit about the sort of precautions that the pilots are having to take in just a second. ashton court, this large area is the venue of the bristol balloon fiesta. sometimes you get up to 150 balloons taking off at one time. this morning we had just a couple and i'm delighted to say one of the balloons
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taking off piloted by clive bailey with a couple of passengers on board, what's it like to be back. we arejust off board, what's it like to be back. we are just off the ground. very exciting. we are doing a test run. it's a bit of an unknown. 0n social distancing and masks and getting into the habit of what we have to do. foot-and-mouth was 20 years ago, you are grounded for that. how has this been? it's terrible. we feel for the people who have suffered physically but it's difficult for every business now. it's going to be for some time to come. enjoy the flight for some time to come. enjoy the flight today. i'm not sure if you're allowed to say good luck. you will see the guys are back to back. 0bviously breathing outward. as time flies this morning. how are your emotions? excited and terrified in glad to this amazing opportunity. any doubts about flying considering the pandemic? no, just keeping safe.
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ijust the pandemic? no, just keeping safe. i just lost you for a little the pandemic? no, just keeping safe. ijust lost you for a little bit. what are your emotions and thoughts. absolutely thrilled to be going up. it's beautiful. it's really exciting. i will remember this for the rest of my life. giving you at home the best pictures of the balloon. we will see clive inflating it. adding more hot up inside. can only steer it to a certain extent. what were going to endeavour to do is to chase the balloon and hopefully capture the landing life you later on. seeing how they are getting on. the pilots allowed to take. you can see obviously that
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they are wearing masks. clyde doesn't need to wear masks because he talks to air—traffic control. the airspace around here is often very tightly controlled. especially if you've never been to the balloon fiesta. maybe around the world around the uk stop despite me talking all over it, it's a very serene talking all over it, it's a very serene and quiet site this morning. it does bring all sorts of questions about what you are able to do and what is not on the list. we will discuss that later because there are elements to the beauty industry that are not up and running but you can have a hot air balloon trip. and you can go to the pub. some pubs in england have had
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to shut up shop already after customers tested positive for coronavirus. many bars and restaurant owners are still looking at whether the weekend's sales are sustainable. sean was at a pub yesterday and is back in the studio with us this morning — for the first time in months! good morning! you have kept it in good condition. it is nice to be back. yes, a pub yesterday in the rain but warm today, talking about developments of pubs again. at least three pubs that we know of in somerset, west yorkshire and hampshire have closed because a customer at each got in touch to say they'd tested positive. guidance says it's not necessary to close the business or workplace or send any staff home unless you are advised to do so following investigation by nhs test and tracein some parts of the country — notably soho in london — people appeared not to be following social distancing. what do you make of this, rob, if a
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customer got in touch with you about testing positive for coronavirus, would you close your bars on back of that? maybe for 24 hours for a super deep clean and to make sure everything is sanitised, test the staff, do whatever the guidance and suggestion is so that we can reopen as quickly as possible. we are expected to take contact details and we could let our customers know from the relevant day and try and sort this out but it is only three pubs and many thousands opened on the weekend so it is a small amount. the virus is out there, it has not gone yet so it is bound to happen at some stage it isjust yet so it is bound to happen at some stage it is just really how the industry and individual operators respond when this happens and it sounds as if they are dealing with it in the best way they possibly can. it is a small number and an example of what people like yourself have to deal with at the minute. weekend sales, use or how many people where they are, you will have
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things like this to deal with as you go along. how do you feel about it? super saturday was underwhelming for the industry, it was as we expected. around half of hospitality venues opened on the weekend and sales levels were around about half what they should normally be out. so there was not this big mad rush to there was not this big mad rush to the pub that everyone was expect in. there were a couple of easy parts in the uk but generally much of that was people gathering where other people gathered. they were buying ta keaway people gathered. they were buying takeaway from supermarkets and corner shops and it was not really the venues themselves that created the venues themselves that created the gatherings. it was a little underwhelming and it is a long road back for our industry. we employ over 3 million people and there is a huge concern at the moment about how many of those jobs will be left at the end of the year. there is a lot to do and we need to try and get customers confident to visit our venues because they are safe spaces.
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we have new cleaning protocols and if we can continue that way i'm sure people will return. this idea that pubs may have to close briefly, one of these pubs said she is closing for a couple of days and expects to reopen on saturday. does that affect how you think about your business if that may be on the cards? yes, it does. and in many cases some operators when you open more than one side will not open venues that are not profitable. if there is a risk of a second hour break or a second spike or a risk of another lockdown or whatever, i think many business owners are deciding to never again reopen certain venues because the business risk is not worth it. thank you very much, jonathan, for being with us this morning. that was jonathan who jonathan, for being with us this morning. that wasjonathan who runs a few bars in london reflecting on the different things that many hospitality people have to take into account. thank you very much, sean.
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it is interesting that super saturday was not as super as they had expected. baby steps at this stage, isn't it? things are changing all the time and we're trying to keep your cross it on bbc breakfast. six couples will start a high court challenge today to demand legal recognition for humanist weddings in england and wales. in a moment we'll speak to a pair who have delayed getting married for the last ten years to wait for a change in the law. first let's hear from jamie and meghan, who had a humanist wedding but could only legally call themselves man and wife when they backed it up with a civil ceremony. it isa it is a shame that it was not legal so we it is a shame that it was not legal so we had to organise for a separate ceremony to take place in the house where we got married shortly after, to make it legal. in an infinite universe with an infinite number of stars, it is frightening to stop and think of how big it is and how small and insignificant we are on earth.
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but right now, in this very moment, i feel but right now, in this very moment, ifeel bigger than but right now, in this very moment, i feel bigger than the universe because i don't need an infinite number of stars, i just because i don't need an infinite number of stars, ijust need one and she is standing right in front of me. it seems incredible that you can do so much nowadays. we have so much freedom to be creative and do lots and lots of different things and it almost seems a little silly nowadays that you can't be married through a humanist ceremony. at the end of the day a wedding is a celebration of two people it does not matter what the day looks like, it is important to the couple. more so now than ever before. it has been heartbreaking to see my friends having to rearrange their weddings or postpone the because of coronavirus and i think by opening things up and making humanist weddings legal you are only helping with that flexibility and being able to rearrange next year and change your plans. you may now kiss the bride. cheering and
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applause cheering and applause kate harrison and christopher sanderson — one of the couples taking part in today's legal challege — join us now from louth in lincolnshire. good morning to you both and thank you forjoining us live on the programme. everson idea, talk us through way it is important to you to have a humanist wedding and not to have that separate civil ceremony to make sure it is fully legal. well... i am a humanist, christopher is a humanist and we have been a humanist for a very long time and it feels absolutely critical to me that if we ever get married it has got to be in a way that reflects our humanist beliefs in the same way that i could get married if i had a religious belief, which i do not. and i'm
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afraid that i said to christopher that unless there were changes, i am not prepared to get married to him. so it is important to us. christopher, that is quite a thing! you have to wait now for the law to change. what is it about a humanist ceremony that is different from a civil ceremony? can you explain that to us? i have been waiting quite a long time, actually, 14 years. i have had time to think about this but the main difference is that it is freedom. you're not restricted by some other people's choices about how you do things. you can do it in your own way, you can have who you wa nt your own way, you can have who you want is your celebrant, you can get to know the celebrant in some depth, notjust 15 minutes with to know the celebrant in some depth, not just 15 minutes with someone with a checklist and decide what questions you are going to be asked. you have a free a day, a day that
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you can really enjoy. it is much more personal. it would be unique to us more personal. it would be unique to us because we could write the whole thing ourselves if we want to and we would know that the celebrant shared our beliefs as well which is very important. it is the biggest day, one of the biggest days in most people's lives and i think it is high time that we are able to do it ina way high time that we are able to do it in a way that we want to. and also in line with how the rest of the united kingdom is able to now celebrate marriage. sorry tojump in thatis celebrate marriage. sorry tojump in that is what i wanted to ask you about. we're saying she does not wa nt to about. we're saying she does not want to get married until either your legal challenges successful all the law changes but have you suggested to kate that you go to scotla nd suggested to kate that you go to scotland or northern ireland where humanist veronese are legal? how is the conversation gone? we don't want to put pressure back on gretna
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green. i think what we want to do is we want to try and make it something that gets it moving forward for everyone. 0k, just one couple and we could run away and say we will fall to whatever pressure society puts on us, we will cheat our way into a wedding but we do not want to do that. we want to do it fair and square and honestly and we want to make a future for everyone else. and if the legislation changes, what is your plan for your wedding? what do your plan for your wedding? what do you want? at the moment, in our garden or the back garden of another friend. or garden or the back garden of another friend. 0ra garden or the back garden of another friend. or a wonderful beach along the lincolnshire coast where we have done weddings for other people and
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they got to show off and go to the register office. it would be good if we could stay on the beach all day. sounds like a lovely plan and we wish you both the best of luck. thank you. thank you for talking to us on the programme this morning. i don't quite know what the weather is like a lincolnshire at the moment. let's find out from carol. i know i throw that out you and i don't expect a detailed report for lincolnshire. what is the general picture? for lincolnshire today it is a dry stumble they do have some rain coming their way and this morning there is some beautiful sunrises. look at this picture from wigan. for most, it will be wet. we have a band of rain coming in from the west and moving across central areas and either side of it is something driver the common denominator is light winds compared to what we have seen over light winds compared to what we have seen over the last few days. a weather front moving south across scotla nd weather front moving south across scotland and producing showers at
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the moment but this is an area of low pressure bringing rain to northern ireland and also western scotland. this will drift eastward through the course of the day and you can see it nicely here on the pressure chart look at the weather front draped around this area. those all the way back to the atlantic so for england and wales, over the next few days we will see cloud and rain. today here comes the rain, moving from northern ireland into parts of england and wales and the weather front heading southwards turning showery so there will be sunshine and bright skies annually across scotland. warming appetite across northern ireland and you can see where we have the rain, north—west england getting in through wales and midlands, towards lincolnshire and then as we head for the south, the further south you travel, closer to the coastline, into the channel islands we will see some sunshine. temperatures are disappointing for this stage injuly, only 11 to 21 in
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any sunshine as we pushed down towards the south—east. through the evening and overnight, band of cloud and rain —— cloud and rain sinks. north of that, in northern ireland and scotland there will be areas of cloud and clear skies. further south, for some it will feel quite humid. tomorrow we start with all this cloud and pulses of rain on and off through the day and temperatures could be heavy. to the north, again, bright skies with areas of cloud, some sunshine, some showers with temperatures of 12—20 and the headlines are next.
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good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: a green deal — hundreds of thousands of homeowners could receive vouchers of up to £5,000 for home improvements to help kickstart the economy. backlash over comments by borisjohnson on care homes — he's accused of insulting workers. after pubs are having to shut up to customers test positive, i will speak to the owner of two companies about what they are doing after lock down. frustrations boil over at tottenham as two of their players are kept apart
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in their premier league win over everton. managerjose mourinho said it's what his team needs to grow up. it's tuesdayjuly the 7th. our top story. hundreds of thousands of households in england are to receive grants of up to £5,000 for energy—saving home improvements like insulation. it's part of a wider £3 billion pound "green investment" by the government, which aims to create thousands ofjobs across the uk in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. insulating homes gives a triple benefit. it saves on people's bills, it cuts carbon emissions from heating and crucially, as the uk heads toward recession, it creates thousands ofjobs for tradespeople crawling in attics and measuring draft—proofing. england can't reach its climate targets without a major refit of housing stock but until now, the treasury has been reluctant to help because it means transferring cash from the public purse to private bricks and mortar. now the jobs factor has
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swayed its opinion. from september, homeowners will be able to apply for vouchers of up to £5,000 for workers certified by an approved builder. the treasury says more than half of the £2 billion allocated go to the poorest households which will pay nothing. the uk has the most energy—inefficient housing stock in the whole of western europe and one of the worst energy poverty rates. to make all 30 million uk homes energy efficient will require investment from the government of at least £18 billion. labour approves of the investment but says it doesn't do enough to help people in cold rented homes. it also says the programme must be carried on year after year to keep the jobs and increase the emissions savings. roger harrabin, bbc news.
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ca re care home charities have accused borisjohnson care home charities have accused boris johnson and insulting care home charities have accused borisjohnson and insulting the sector after he said some homes didn't follow procedures during the pandemic. see what he said yesterday. one of the things the crisis has shown is that we need to think about how we organise. i think, we've discovered. we are learning lessons the whole time. ca re learning lessons the whole time. care homes are said to have followed guidance to the letter. in the prime minister talks about procedures, it's really is important what is going on at the time. care homes across the country are dealing with an extraordinary amount of different guidance that was coming out from government on an almost daily basis.
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for the suggestion that they weren't following procedures is made out, it's totally inappropriate and hugely insulting. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. huge reaction this morning. i think it's angered a lot of people in the care set the from the national care forum now. it's called a big political row was well because a lot of people are looking at what happened over the last few months and saying care homes are working as hard as they could in difficult circumstances and feeling a bit like they'd been left behind while the nhs was getting loads of funding. numberten while the nhs was getting loads of funding. number ten has sought to clarify the prime minister ‘s comments, saying he thought they did an excellentjob, comments, saying he thought they did an excellent job, the comments, saying he thought they did an excellentjob, the people were work working hard and what he meant
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was that not everybody knew what the correct procedures were because there was so many asymptomatic cases but look, there definitely has been some damage done in the relationship by those comments from borisjohnson yesterday and this all comes in the context of the government wanting to come up with a long—term plan to the social problem. the question of how you funded in the future, an ageing population and this doesn't do much ofa population and this doesn't do much of a relationship between the sector and government and there are fears that already there is a blame game starting. we'll be putting some on that subject and talking about the government's greenjobs that subject and talking about the government's green jobs proposal. the business secretary alok sharma live at 7.30. several pubs in england have temporarily shut down again after customers tested positive for coronavirus. at least three pubs announced their closures just days after they were allowed to reopen on saturday. andy moore has more details.
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the opening of pubs in england on saturday was a major step in the easing of lockdown. here in soho, there were big crowds on the streets to mark the event. at thousands of pubs up and down the country, there were much more modest celebrations but now some pubs are having to close their doors again just days after reopening. the lighthouse kitchen & carvery at burnham—on—sea in somerset is one of them after a male customer tested positive. the pub posted a message on its facebook page, saying: other pubs such as the fox and hounds in baddeley, west yorkshire, have had to post similar
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facebook messages. the pub said it will be deep—cleaned and opened again as soon as possible. the village home pub in alverstoke, gosport said it told its customers it didn't need to isolate unless they were contacted by official tracers. it hopes to open again on saturday. this is the best thing since sliced bread! any group going to a pub in england has to leave a contact number, so that should make it easier to trace the customers who have been to a pub that needs to close down. andy moore, bbc news. two parts of spain — in galicia and catalonia — are under local lockdown following a spike in covid—19 cases. meanwhile, a state of emergency has been declared in the serbian capital belgrade, and sweden is introducing tougher social distancing rules. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in brussels. gavin, these flare—ups suggest we have a long way to go until the virus is
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brought under control. we're talking first of all, spain, more than a quarter a million people now back under the rear position of lot done in catalonia. about 150 miles west of barcelona. there was an outbreak as a number of fruit picking and free packaging farms in a hostile and elderly people's homes. we are seeing a rise of around 100 cases a day. now they are putting controls in place. border police are people can't leave and go in. there is a place called a marina, right on the coast, a popular tourist hotspot especially for spanish tourist. there were three bars right on the port whether staff became ill. they sing about
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100 cases in the last few days but they are calling it block down light. things are still open, trying to balance the economy, they kept bars and to balance the economy, they kept bars a nd restau ra nts to balance the economy, they kept bars and restaurants and cafe is open. they can reduce the hours that they have served. sweden is interesting. we cannot be within a metre of each other to get bars, restau ra nts a nd cafe metre of each other to get bars, restaurants and cafe ‘s. it's been monitored. authorities can close you down. the police federation in the uk seeing its crystal clear that drunks cannot socially distance. that is a challenge for the swedes. 14 non—eu countries that the eu was saying are safe travel zones. they are saying belgrade, the capital is an emergency. 100 cases per day, now 350 per day. one of the interesting factors as they have opened up
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sports like very few other countries to which fans can go and watch all matches. that's being seen as one of the contributing factors. the greek government closing the borders there. stopping travel to and from serbia. those localflareups there. stopping travel to and from serbia. those local flareups and how it's been dealt with, interesting to see. the duchess of cornwall has said that missing her grandchildren has been the worst part of her lockdown experience. she made the comments on bbc radio 5 live's emma barnett show, which she will be guest—editing later this morning. here's our royal correspondent daniela relph. taking charge of the microphone. the duchess of cornwall‘s guest edit will highlight issues that matter to her. she spoke to 5 live's emma barnett about the stresses and strains of lockdown. she said this socially distanced royal engagement last month to thank hospital staff felt different, not quite the same, and she spoke
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personally about the reunion with her grandchildren in recent weeks. eventually get to meet them and you are so excited because you haven't seen them for 3.5 months, and, you know, yourfirst reaction is to run up and hug them sort of...it‘s a very odd deal. i shall look forward to the day when i can really give them a huge hug again. but camilla's radio editor role today will focus on the subject she campaigns on, particularly the anguish of domestic violence. she said she believed lockdown would see an horrific spike in the numbers suffering abuse at home. you are there, you can't get out, you've probably got children there. that's the worst, so you feel you can't leave because you must take the children. you've probably got a telephone but you can't get to it. because robably the abuser is there. i mean, where do you go?
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the programme today will look at the work of a number of charities camilla does work with as well as some insights man of his age that i know." daniella relph, bbc news. take a look at these beautiful pictures from the scottish highlands. chick cam! they are so well camouflaged. how many are in there? we've been following the the story of louis and aila — two ospreys nesting at loch arkaig pine forest. we now know that their chicks are two males and a female. the woodland trust is asking for suggestions on what to name them. do send them in. we will read out some of those. you're always very
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good at this. looking forward to that. if you're leaving the house today you'll probably take your keys, phone and wallet or purse without even thinking about it. but now one of the uk's top scientists says we should be packing another item as standard — a face covering. professor sir venki ramakrishnan is president of the royal society — which represents some of the world's most eminent scientists — and he says the current guidance on face coverings is too patchy. sir venki joins us now from cambridge. this is something we talk about a lot on this programme. use of strong opinions on this. what are your feelings about this latest research. and how we should use them. evidence
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is building that masks are a very useful tool. you can call them face coverings. they have stopped the droplets that emerge from our mouths when we breathe and that is when the primary routes in someone else. and you don't know when you are infectious. you become infectious long before you know it. sometimes you never show symptoms and you recover throughout that time, you've been infectious for several days. so i think it is used broadly by the public, that is to say, with a high degree of compliance, we have a good chance of reducing the rate of transmission. why is this important? it's important because we are trying to open up the economy. we are trying to get people out into public
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spaces and restaurants, at cetera, shops especially, public transport. so if we want to do that without co nsta nt so if we want to do that without constant fear of new surges, but he just had on your programme, some pub had to close. lester went into public lot down. that is very disruptive, both economically and psychologically. if we can avoid that, by taking a simple precautionary measure to reduce the likelihood. it's not a 100% thing. but it will reduce the likelihood of that happening, then why not do it? it's like seek belts in cars a couple of decades ago. it's essentially normal to do that. we recognise its value. it's like putting a seatbelt on. how do we change this as a culture? it's more
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normalised. in the uk, we don't seem to be in the state of the moment. when you leave the house, it's part of something you take with you. the countries that we think of as culturally different such as east asian countries, they did not wear masks 50 years ago. they haven't done it for centuries, it is not a normal thing to do but they did it because of several epidemics that hit those regions and they realised the public health benefit. now western european countries have adopted mask wearing because the governments have made the mandatory. for example there are about 63% compliance in many western european countries like italy and france and spain and the us, one of the most libertarian countries of all, the wild west if you like, has 63%
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compliance in mask use more importantly, mask use was very common in the us during the 1918 flu pandemic. so this depends on strong messaging. the public has shown that people listen to the government when they believe it is in the public interest. look how great the endurance to the lock down was. huge compliance. so if the government we re compliance. so if the government were to say that this is for the benefit of all of us and it will prevent, it will reduce, not prevent, it will reduce, not prevent, but reduce periodic disruption, it will help the economy get back on track so we should all be doing it, then i think, you know, the public will listen to that. i know many friends who will not do it because they say the government does not require them to so they won't. 0n not require them to so they won't. on that issue, the confusing advice that our readers and viewers are
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getting, some scientists might say that faith coverings do not protect you, they only protect others from you, they only protect others from you spreading it and then you listen to the world health organization and their position seems to change and has changed recently and there is that level of confusion and it is not like the scientific world is saying this is what we all say. can you understand why it may be difficult to make that decision?” do completely understand. i do completely. and what i would say is that the evidence has been shifting. at the beginning we did not know about asymptomatic transmission and many of these studies on masks have not been definitive. we now have good animal studies from animals using corona bask —— coronavirus to show the effectiveness of them. they protect you as well is prevent you from infecting other people. the evidence
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is mounting. there are a few scientists who are sticklers and say that there are no randomised trials to show effectiveness. but this is mythological fetishism. —— methodologicalfetishism. —— methodological fetishism. with mask use, clinical trials are difficult because it depends on compliance. but there are many other procedures which also do not depend on randomised trials for adoption. for example hand washing or surgeons wearing masks or even the two metre rule. no—one did have randomised trial for that so many things depend on very good evidence of other types
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and that is where the mask falls in. soi and that is where the mask falls in. so i think there is no question in my mind, having seen all of the evidence, that masks have a very important role to play in trying to control the epidemic. fascinating to hear you this morning. thank you very much for your time and for being with us on breakfast this morning. quite a lot to think about there. we'll hear more tomorrow about how the government plans to minimise the economic impact of coronavirus — when the chancellor rishi sunak delivers his "summer statement". that's the official name for his emergency mini—budget, which will set out the next steps as the furlough scheme starts to be wound down. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been speaking to some of the people whose livelihoods are on the line. rebecca is a pastry chef. she is supposed to be working at wimbledon but the tennis is cancelled so she is at home. normally i would be at wimbledon and obviously that is not happening this year so that is why i
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am baking. i think it has been tough for people in hospitality and i think that the government could step ina think that the government could step in a little bit more. is this pandemic has shown, when one sector is hit, others also suffer. when you hear about certain sectors receiving funding, what goes through your mind? some people don't always appreciate the scale of the challenge because they don't know what goes on behind closed doors. you don't want to lose this amazing restau ra nt you don't want to lose this amazing restaurant and these amazing chefs and we need to keep fighting to help them stay open. rebecca's putting her time at home to good use, making case cakes for nhs workers and doing a bakerfont case cakes for nhs workers and doing a baker font to case cakes for nhs workers and doing a bakerfont to raise case cakes for nhs workers and doing a baker font to raise funds for the aquarium in plymouth. but for her and others in hospitality, the heat is on. many people are worried and uncertain and will the restaurants reopen again? life events are the
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bread—and—butter of stephen page's business. we supply sound systems, lighting systems, systems for live events all over europe and beyond. although we have 56 full—time members of staff we probably employ upwards of 100 freelancers and self—employed people to work with us. self—employed people to work with us. how tough have things been for your business? since about march 22 we have had no work. so normally our business would be turning over between six and £7 million a year. currently we have no income whatsoever and we don't expect that situation to change anytime soon. stephen normally keeps a close eye on the concerts he helps to design. but tomorrow his focus will be on the chancellor's economic statement. i would like him to say that there will be some kind of sector specific extension to the furlough scheme for
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those companies, like my own, who are unable to work because the places where we would normally be working a band or prevented from happening under the covid—19 restrictions. how worried are you about the future? i am mostly concerned about companies like mine and there are many of us in the country that will fall through the cracks. this has been incredibly stressful because we have gone from being a successful and profitable, well—run company that has been growing and doing well for more than 20 years and overnight, not only has all of our work stopped but all of the people we work with and work for, their work has stopped. kaylee worked in recruitment and hr. normally she would be doing the hiring. but not now. i have been unemployed since the second of april. i have probably applied for about 120 different roles. i've
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never been unemployed for this long. at the beginning i suffered a lot with anxiety because i am so used to getting up for work on a monday morning and i very much had doubted myself for so long i had been defined by what myjob title is and now i am without that and i went through a period of reflection and contemplation thinking who am i? so if lockdown has done anything it has allowed me to connect with myself more and understand that i am not merely defined by what i do in the company i work for and hopefully that mentality will take me in a positive step forward in the new role that i secure. she does have some interviews lined up many fear the competition for jobs some interviews lined up many fear the competition forjobs is about to become incredibly tough. we're joined now by steve turner,
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assistant general secretary of unite which represents more than a million workers across the uk. good morning to you. ijust want to share with you some news we had in the last hour from the mirror and daily express newspaper owners that have just announced in the last half hour or so there will be plans to axe around 550 jobs, 12% of its workforce. this is something that we are hearing daily now and you must be incredibly concerned. we are. that is just the latest announcement of many, of course and we have been wanting for some time now have a com plete wanting for some time now have a complete tsunami of job wanting for some time now have a complete tsunami ofjob losses through the course of the summer and as we front into the end of the job retention scheme in october and the comments made by rebecca and steve in that package, we sully that. we see that in hospitality. they are waiting for issues to be addressed.
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and the government have forced the closure of these businesses because they simply cannot continue to operate right now and therefore tomorrow we are looking for real and practical measures to support those sectors, of course, but also to support the wider economy. when you factoring sectors such as aerospace and automotive, that demand will return to. they are good as nurses. transitioning businesses right now but they do need support beyond 0ctober but they do need support beyond october by way of sector specific packages to ensure that their viability continues but, also, an extension of phase two of the furlough, i suppose you could call it, where we supportjob sharing short time working and job rotation to keep everybody and work that may be only 50% of the hours previously, until such time as demand returns, and it will, so that we can simply increase the hours at the point. you have to up skill people, like they do in germany and france. it is not viatical, it is not rocket science.
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ijust want viatical, it is not rocket science. i just want you to talk a little about the fact that furlough is eye watering lee expensive. employers have made £25.5 billion with the furlough claims by just last have made £25.5 billion with the furlough claims byjust last week and the bell is estimated to go to eventually 80 billion pounds. how do you expect the government, and therefore taxpayers, to fund that? unemployment is expensive as well. a colla pse unemployment is expensive as well. a collapse in the economy is expensive. if the automotive and aerospace sectors collapse, that is tens of thousands of skilled jobs in high—value sectors of the economy that bring revenue in at the sorts of levels that are required for the government to complete its infrastructure project that they spoke about last week, to support public services, the nhs, to get social care into a framework in which we can all be very proud of it rather than the very ad hoc and precarious one we have right now. these are important decisions and i understand the difficulties that the
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chancellor has. we welcomed fellow and fought hard for it and we continue to fight for the changes that have been introduced recently. but there now needs to be steps taken to support those sectors of the economy, not powerplants, but those set is where the government have continued to force closure on a business, so that is not the fault of the business nor the workers, or where demand and confidence is not quite there yet it will be there. in france and germany they have been increased 24 months, there furlough protections. that will save hundreds of thousands of jobs. steve turner, assistant general secretary of the unite union. thank you very much stop and shortly we will have alex sharma on the programme. now let's get the weather with carol. is it isita is it a mixed bag for the next few days? a good way to summarise it. yes it is. good morning. a mixed bag
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as well this morning as some of us will see rain and some will see sunshine or bright skies but all of us are sunshine or bright skies but all of us are looking at light winds and lighter than the last few days. we watched the rain come across northern ireland this morning, it is going to be steadily pushing its way eastward through the day and at the same time we have a wet weather front sinking south across scotland turning showery all the time. so the culprit for that is this weather front here and you can see it moving from the west towards the east but if you follow it all the way back into the atlantic, it will be with us, as dan said, for a couple of days bringing us unsettled conditions across some parts of the country. first thing this morning we have had some beautiful sunrises, a lot of dry weather but it is not long before the rain sweeps eastwards. 0ur weather front south across scotland, a weak feature but you can see the chop shower this afternoon from that in between bright skies with sunshine. rain starting to move out of northern ireland leaving a residue of cloud but here is all that rain across
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wales, north—west england, heading through southern midlands towards the north sea coastline, building towards the east. south that you can see variable amounts of cloud but also sunshine, particularly as you move along certain parts of the english channel coastline for example and also down into the channel islands full of the temperatures today range from about 11 in the north to 21, maybe in any sunshine further east. through the evening and overnight the band of cloud and rain sinks southwards leaving clear skies behind for northern england, northern ireland and scotland with just a few showers so and scotland with just a few showers so here it is going to be a cool night than the rest of england and wales. they are looking at double figures and some will feel quite humid. into tomorrow we start with the cloud and rain from liverpool and it is a weather front so rain will be on and off that weather front during the day. north of that line from liverpool to hold,
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brighter skies. yes the areas of cloud, particularly sunny skies as well with a few showers knocking around. averages 18 degrees in glasgow and cardiff, 20 degrees in london being the top temperature. 0n thursday we still do have a weather front, remember, we have that succession coming in from the atla ntic succession coming in from the atlantic so it will still produce some rain across southern england wales and the channel islands. low cloud across northern england but for northern ireland and scotland, you will see sunny areas with a few showers and highs of up to 20 degrees. it's hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. we arejoined on we are joined on the programme as promised by the business secretary alok sharma. thank you very much for your time. lots to talk about. we'll talk about the government's greenjobs scheme. but we'll talk about the government's green jobs scheme. but i wanted to start morning the issue of care
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homes. we are liable to care home this morning. some have been staying there for 12 weeks to gather the vulnerable and some of the figures i'm sure you are aware of his 20,000 deaths in care homes have been linked to coronavirus over the last few months and with all that in mind, iwant few months and with all that in mind, i want to play what the prime minister had to say yesterday when he was in yorkshire. this into this. 0ne he was in yorkshire. this into this. one of the things that the crisis has shown is that we need to think about how we organise our social ca re about how we organise our social care package better, if you remember, how we make sure we look after people better were in social care. we discovered too many care homes didn't really follow the sieges in the way they could have but we are learning lessons the whole time. is he right? is that why so whole time. is he right? is that why so many people died in care homes, because they failed to follow procedures? well, down, ithink because they failed to follow
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procedures? well, down, i think our homes have done a brilliantjob throughout this pandemic in terms of dealing with this whole issue around the coronavirus. what i would say is what the prime minister was pointing out is that nobody knew what the correct procedures were because we know that the extent of the asymptomatic cases was not known at the time. we provided detailed guidance and extra funding, and £600 million that went in as well for dealing with infection in care homes. and of course with and had a testing regime. from april, everyone ina care testing regime. from april, everyone in a care home setting was able to be tested. we have done our best to be tested. we have done our best to be around the care home sector. every single death is an absolute tragedy. just going back to the question i asked you, the prime
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minister said if care homes are followed those procedures. well, as the prime minister made clear, the correct procedures word actually known at the time. and throughout this process, learning more and more about this virus in terms of different settings. these are learning. this is important. you say would be learning about this virus. why you been doing that, there are people there who had been living at that care home. while you been learning. and you been doing that to protect the vulnerable people you ca re protect the vulnerable people you care for and last night and this morning, they have this prime minister, the most senior politicians say that if they followed the guidelines. firstly i
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wa nt to followed the guidelines. firstly i want to thank them for what they've done. but the point the prime minister was making is that nobody at the time knew what the correct procedures were. we didn't really know the extent of that transmission that was taking place. nobody knew that was taking place. nobody knew that at the time. that's why we put in place the support in terms of ppe and made sure there was a proper testing regime. no—one is saying ca re testing regime. no—one is saying care homes haven't done a greatjob. and i want to thank all those people who are working on the care sector. yes, i think the prime minister. to. 0n yes, i think the prime minister. to. on many occasions. in the prime minister has made the point on many occasions. that we want to step forward and support the care sector.
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and thanking people for in the nhs. the point that he was making is the procedures weren't clear to anyone at the time. this is the case. i think that's why guidance was put in place. there is a lack of awareness. he said that this would be a kafkaesque rewriting of history by the prime minister. that is certainly not what the prime minister was saying. you know the support we put in place of business is, i've talked to a little bit about the support we got in place in terms of care homes and will continue to put our arms around business and around the healthcare sector. do you think the prime
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minister should apologise for what he said? there's clarification from number ten but does he require an apology, bearing in mind the anger that it apology, bearing in mind the anger thatitis apology, bearing in mind the anger that it is caused? not dan, the prime minister was saying was the support were providing. the level of support were providing. the level of support were providing. the level of support were provided in terms of hunting and testing. and i com pletely hunting and testing. and i completely accept and that's why we accelerated it and that's what we provided support and that's why we have managed to make a lot of progress. i've also got to speak to this morning the government's green jobs plan. tell us a bit more about the voucher scheme and how that it sickly will work. this is part of a £3 billion package this is about energy efficiency in public
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buildings. what this will mean, people in poorer households, up to £10,000 in terms of putting insulation into their homes. putting in place double glazing. it means lower bills. and it's very good news from the environment as well. when will it come in? the scheme in terms of households is launching in september. in terms of greening their homes and making it more energy—efficient. a list of accredited supplies on that. this is going to be very good news for local tradesmen. is it going to be means
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tested ? tradesmen. is it going to be means tested? those who are on there, the government will cover up to £10,000 of all costs and for other households, we are talking two—thirds of costs up to £5,000 being covered but ultimately done, this is about saving people money and putting money in pockets. it's aboutjobs being and putting money in pockets. it's about jobs being supported and putting money in pockets. it's aboutjobs being supported which is incredibly important to this point. of course thirdly, also supporting the environment in terms of making us greener the environment in terms of making us greener and part of our drive towards net zero emissions by 2050. the labour party appointed towards the private rented sector and said there is nothing towards the 8 million people who rent in that sector, the worst energy efficiency standards. what is being done now? there is a separate pilot running to the social care sector and we want to see whether based on the pilot at
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scale, we can retrofit homes to make them more. that particular home is refurbished. it will reduce their bills as well. in your manifesto, many people remember there will be £9 billion spent. there are 9.2 billion set out in the manifesto. spending review taking place in the autumn. £3 billion now is incredibly important in terms of supporting the economy, particularly supporting jobs. as a government we have provided over £124 billion of support to make sure jobs are protected, 9 millionjobs rejected asa protected, 9 millionjobs rejected as a result of the furlough scheme. we wa nt as a result of the furlough scheme. we want businesses to be in a place to bounce back. there is one other
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issue want to talk about. this issue of stamp duty. several reports seeing the chancellor may announce a stamp duty holiday later this year. can you give us any details about that? there are lots of people who post lockdown are thinking about buying a house, and there is a concern that if it was to be announced for august or september, it might actually hold the housing market a little bit. will have to wait and see what the chancellor says. and not the mean is business secretary. i certainly understand the interest. there is an suggestion that will be announced this week. will have to wait and see what the chancellor says on wednesday. might come back to you maybe. john is here
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with the sport and spurs players not very happy. 0ne incident dominating the headlines — the argument between son and hugo lloris at half time. managerjose mouinho praised them for it. you might be surprised to learn spurs were actually leading at the time. thanks to giovani lo celso's deflected effort that went down as a michael keane own goal. then came the most interesting action of the night — which says a lot about the game — hugo lloris angry with son and a perceived lack of effort. the two had to be pulled apart but settled their differences ahead of the second half as tottenham held on to win. we've had some fascinating insight
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into don sibley. he lost 12 kg in a bid to trim down and meet the demands of being an elite cricketer. you can see the difference. he said seeing how fit some of the other members of the england squad are prompted him to make a change to his physique. in sri lanka, ifelt in sri lanka, i felt a in sri lanka, ifelt a little bit for the first time in my career, a bit self—conscious about my physique and my weight and doing lots down, we can approve anywhere. it was an opportunity. haven't done anything about it when it was younger. it was probably overdue, a wake—up call. really interesting to speak up openly. and finally could snooker become the first sport in the uk to allow crowds back in? the world championship starts later this month and could take place in front a limited number of spectators
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at the crucible theatre in sheffield. fans who've bought tickets have been asked to register their interest. 0rganisers want to try and allow in 300 people per session and are in talks with the government. snooker is one of the first sports to return during lockdown. it's quite a transformation, isn't it? the same way we were talking about brightness in golf, you have don sibley going the other way stop it's funny how much physique matters. and it's true that brightness deschambeau bulk data. and don sibley feels that he has to trim down. to be the player that he wants to be. and it's interesting to hear him speak so eloquently and
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candidly. you see comparisons between the two sports. it's interesting to see the differences between that. thank you, john. do you remember phil taylor, who was a don superstar. that is my excuse as well. that is why i'm not going to bother in case it affects my darts. some pubs in england have had to shut up shop already after customers tested positive for coronavirus. many bar and restaurant owners are still looking at whether the weekend's sales are sustainable. sean's looking at this today and he has the boss of one of the country's biggest hospitality companies with him now. what a few days for the hospitality industry and dealing with the fallout. so, whitbread run hermia in hotels as well as beefeater and some
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others as well and the company says it is on track to open all venues by the end of this month that we heard this morning about the three different pubs that have already closed because customers tested positive for coronavirus. let's have a chat now with the boss of with red. good morning. good morning. so you are steadily reopening your restaurants and your hotels. its focus on the restaurant because that is what changed for many people in their lives on the weekend. how was it for you? we had a good weekend this weekend. we opened 24 pub restau ra nts a nd this weekend. we opened 24 pub restaurants and it was the first round of openings and we were testing everything that we were doing in those 24 pub restaurants to see if we felt we were operating salt safely and appropriately. we had a good weekend trade and we were able to test everything uncomfortable with it. our guests and our staff are behaved dutifully
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with each other and responsibly. so now we are on track to start reopening all of our pub restaurants over the course of the next four or five weeks in a steady and controlled way. how hotels will open for. we have 270 premier inns open up for. we have 270 premier inns open up and down the country already and by the end of this week we will have 400 open, about half our estate and we expect to be fully reopened in the whole 800 premier inns by the end ofjuly. i will ask you more about the hotels in a moment. what we're hearing this morning about three pubs scattered around england, different circumstances but they heard from customers who were with them on the weekend that they tested positive for coronavirus and now they have closed for varying length of time. would you close one of your restau ra nts of time. would you close one of your restaurants if a customer had been there and then tested positive? we follow the protocols. we do take people's details, the lead booker in
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our restaurant gives their details of the party and we expect people to use the track and trace system and if we therefore have people who work in our restaurant who contact by track and trace they will have to self isolate and go into quarantine for the required period. we are set up for the required period. we are set up to manage the process and the reason that is so important is because we all want to be safe and we wa nt because we all want to be safe and we want to avoid a national lockdown. we already had a local lockdown. we already had a local lockdown in leicester last week and so we lockdown in leicester last week and so we know that that is likely to happen, that there may be local spikes through the country, but we all want to avoid a national position where we return to how we we re position where we return to how we were for the last three months. have you had to deal with that situation with your hotels? they have been open for key workers for a time. have touched —— have customers tested positive? we were open
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throughout the entire crisis, as you say, for key workers and nhs staff with 39 hotels open in big cities near two hospitals, for the most part. that is why we are so confident in our safety protocols in the hotels because we had three months of testing and we have not had any cases of transmission between guests and staff in that period. so we are confident that the protocols we have in place will keep staff and guests safe that will react to any incident as and when it occurs. and the next few months, what do they look like? were getting bookings in and you can tell where people are looking to book and where they are less confident. in the short term people have pent up demand a break so we are seeing what you would call the traditional regional locations, bucket and spade holidays, seafront locations, countryside breaks are really popular and a lot of bookings there.
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we see less popularity in big metropolitan areas and i suspect that that will take until september when we get back to work and back to school feel about the country again before they come back. but we do have people planning ahead so people are booking already for christmas and planning to spend time with family and friends during the festive season full of people really are thinking about enjoying themselves again and doing it safely is critical for all of themselves again and doing it safely is criticalfor all of us. themselves again and doing it safely is critical for all of us. we have the chancellor talking tomorrow, do you expect to hear anything from him? you sound positive, perhaps you don't need anything? within the whole sector, the hospitality sector, it has been a difficult few months. the results this morning, being closed completely with no revenue but all of our outgoings for rent and supplier payment and staff payment, even with fellow we topped 100%. it would be helpful to have
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demand stimulated, so anything you can do in the fiscal side, anything with vat relief for guests and customers would be great. anything on rates relief because business rates holiday was important for the sector and if we could extend that longer that would be equally helpful to us. thank you. a spotlight there on what is going on across the country. there is some positivity. they are taking things slowly. hot air balloons, would you believe, now allowed to fly over england again and just over an hour ago we watched as one took off over bristol. com plete as one took off over bristol. complete with a socially distanced pilot and passengers. go tojohn now who has been monitoring its progress. is there anything to show us? we can show you a landed balloon. it landed about five or ten
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minutes ago and here it is. a decent landing, ithink, let's minutes ago and here it is. a decent landing, i think, let's ask the pilot. no, iwill ask landing, i think, let's ask the pilot. no, i will ask the passengers about the landing. good morning to you, how was it to be back in the area? it was beautiful. to go across the city is one our favourite flights and it looked lovely. a few clouds about, quite nice. and what of the last few months been like? really tough. i think it will be a tough few months for a lot of people in business, for the rest of the year and it will be for us. but this morning, amazing to be back in the sky. it was like remembering why we do this. and why you have done it for so long so now, the golden question, what was the landing ught? question, what was the landing light? safe as houses. judged long a little bit and it was at the end when clive said we're not sure, we thought what was wrong but there we re thought what was wrong but there were some cow pats in the field. and
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when we spoke to you before the flight when we spoke to you before the flight you were wearing masks and doing this within the grips of a pandemic to a certain extent. any concerns from your perspective? this was your first flight, right?” enjoyed it, it was exhilarating, scary but incredible. thank you for what is it like a? an interesting perspective to see everyone go about their lives and they can't see you but you can see them. amazing how many people have trampolines in the back gardens. we did say that when we we re back gardens. we did say that when we were up back gardens. we did say that when we were up there. clive, we know that the balloon fiesta later on in august has been cancelled. that is a major event with 150,000 people. half a million over the weekend. so thatis half a million over the weekend. so that is desperate for the city of restore. it rings millions of pounds into the economy and that is a great loss for business. but we have to do a fly past with balloons, just like this morning but with many more
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balloon sometime in august. foot and mouth affected your industry 20 yea rs mouth affected your industry 20 years ago, wasn't it? but you managed to bounce back from that. i guess this is much more widespread. it is tough. home—based nurses such as ours, it has been tough and we have fallen between the cracks for grants. it is tough for business in general but we will get through it. it is 25 years in business and we intend to celebrate it. we will still be here next year. for people who are not watching earlier, as we have seen right throughout everything, hospitality, all sorts of different sectors in modern life, the steps that have had to be taken to ensure that we are as safe as possible when we are partaking in businesses or hobbies. take us through some of the criteria that you had to get used to with this flight. you had to get used to with this flight. the department of transport and civil aviation authority put
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together guidelines, similar —— similarto together guidelines, similar —— similar to other guidelines. and we spent a week doing method statements and risk assessments, walking through what we were doing to see if we we re through what we were doing to see if we were happy with it and we if we felt that passengers would be safe and this morning was a test flight to see if it would work. there are bit and pieces where you wonder if it will work or if it will be tricky and we will modify it but we felt quite safe. luckily we have a decent sized basket here. we're not breathing all over other, you are in the open, we are on a radiator air traffic so we don't wear a mask that passengers have to do. and you are not flying this for 72 hours you don't have to clean it. wipe the top and handles and we will wipe vehicle out afterwards and it will be kept clea n out afterwards and it will be kept clean and sterile until we go out again full thank you for sharing your flight with us this morning and i hope you had a wonderful time. as they were all saying, back in the skies in england at least and a chance for this industry, as with so many others, to take a step back to
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life as we used to know it. it looks beautiful there. how lovely to see those pictures there this morning from bristol. it does look lovely there. i am worried about carol this morning. she is under attack from a massive cat sitting watch out, carol! good morning everybody. look at this beautiful pussycat. gorgeous. but look at the sky behind it. blue sky around today, this was taken this morning by one of our weather watchers in cambridgeshire for some of us it is not blue skies today, it will be rain but the commons and across the whole of the uk is that we will all have lighter rain than we have seen in the last few days. so we have rain already in northern ireland and scotla nd rain already in northern ireland and scotland and their will push across parts of northern england, wales and into the midlands through the course of the day, eventually reaching eastern areas. to the north we have a week with a front producing some showers and to the south, bright
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skies, particularly the further south you travel. so the channel islands, the english channel coastline. but then we have all this rain so there will be surface water and spray on the roads to watch out for and then the rain pushes out of northern ireland and then for scotland, looking at a mixture of bright spells some sunny spells and also some showers to temperature wise, 11 in the north, 20 possibly 21 in sunshine further south and east. through the evening and overnight the weather front reducing all this rain sinks a bit further south taking is clad with it as well. leaving clear skies for northern england, northern ireland and scotland bar a few showers. we are also looking at a cooler night in the north compared to the south and infact in the north compared to the south and in fact in some southern areas it will feel quite humid. tomorrow we start with all this cloud from liverpool towards hull and all through the rain and remember, this isa through the rain and remember, this is a weather front so the rain will be pulsing along it as we go through the course of the day with some heavy birth on and off. move north
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of the band of cloud and into northern england, northern ireland and scotland, yes, you too will see areas of cloud but equally there will be sunny intervals as well and just a few showers. 18 in glasgow and cardiff at the top temperature is likely to be in london. 0n thursday, we still have weather fronts affecting southern counties, still producing all this cloud and also some rain on and off through the course of the day. for northern england, north wales, northern ireland and scotland, again there will be areas of cloud floating around but we will see holes in the cloud and some sunny intervals developing and also a few short sharp showers. temperatures reaching 20 degrees in london. as we head on into friday we will start off with some bright showers, particularly in eastern areas. these the dregs of weather front. but then there will bea weather front. but then there will be a lot of dry weather coming in, that happens on friday as high pressure starts to build in and settle things down. so we see more
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sunshine, temperatures reaching about 20 towards london. and that is for the weekend, that high pressure will still be with us when saturday with one or two showers but most of us with one or two showers but most of us will be dry and on sunday it looks very much like we have low pressure coming in to the north—west. now if this forecast goes as we think it will that means it will see some rain coming in across northern ireland and western scotla nd across northern ireland and western scotland but for the rest of the uk, well, it will be dry, fine, sunny and on sunday we could see temperatures just nudging in towards the low 20s did it that takes us into early next week and after that, things will change. that's all for me now and the are coming up next.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: an angry backlash over comments by borisjohnson on care homes — he's accused of insulting workers. a green deal — hundreds of thousands of homeowners could receive vouchers of up to £5,000 for home improvements to help kick—start the economy. a number of pubs have shut their doors after customers test positive for coronavirus. the spat at spurs. two of their players have to be separated in the premier league — but managerjose mouirnho calls it beautiful.
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it's tuesdayjuly the 7th. our top story. care home charities have accused borisjohnson of insulting those who work in the sector, after he said some homes "didn't follow procedures" during the pandemic. let's hear what the prime minster said yesterday. one of the things that the crisis has shown is that we need to think about how we organise our social care package better and how we make sure we look after people better who are in social care. i think we discovered too many care homes didn't really follow the procedures in the way they could have, but we are learning lessons the whole time. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. this has produced quite a reaction from the care homes sector, and as is often the case, there has now been clarification for number ten after the prime minister said something, and one of his chief
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ministers is trying to clarify what he said this morning. absolutely, down, there is an almighty row this morning. the care sector is furious at what the prime minister said yesterday. we have heard health charities this morning saying that his comments were clumsy, that the government seems to be trying to rewrite history and blaming the care sector. as you say, there has been an attempt from number 10 to roll back on what was said yesterday, to clarify the prime minister's comments and say he wasn't trying to blame anybody, he thinks the care sector has done a greatjob, but he was talking about the fact that we didn't know everything about the virus at the time. have a listen to the business secretary alok sharma on breakfast. the point the prime minister was making was that nobody at the time knew what the correct procedures were because we didn't know the extent of that asymptomatic transmission that was taking place. that is why we put in place the guidance and the support in terms of getting ppe to care homes, that is why we have made sure there was a proper testing regime and that is
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why we provided further funding. no one is suggesting that care homes have done a greatjob in really difficult circumstances, and i want to thank all of those people working in the care sector. that thanks there from the business secretary. he didn't want to apologise for what the prime minister had said yesterday, and i think probably because of that, this row is going to go on today, because there are some, as i say, who are quite frankly furious at what the prime minister said yesterday, whether it was calculated or whether it was a mistake in the words he used. you have to see it in the context of the big reform that is needed in the social care sector. the government is planning to come up with some sort of strategy over the next few months for long—term funding of the social care sector in england. but at the moment, the relationship is not ina at the moment, the relationship is not in a good place. nick eardley,
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thank you for that assessment. hundreds of thousands of households in england are to receive grants of up to £5,000 for energy—saving home improvements like insulation. it's part of a wider £3 billion pound "green investment" by the government, which aims to create thousands ofjobs across the uk in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. insulating homes gives a triple benefit. it saves on people's bills, it cuts carbon emissions from heating and crucially, as the uk heads toward recession, it creates thousands ofjobs for tradespeople crawling in attics and measuring draft—proofing. england can't reach its climate targets without a major refit of housing stock, but until now, the treasury has been reluctant to help because it means transferring cash from the public purse to private bricks and mortar. now the jobs factor has swayed its opinion. from september, homeowners will be able to apply for vouchers of up to £5,000 for workers certified by an approved builder.
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the treasury says more than half of the £2 billion allocated will go to the poorest households which will pay nothing. the uk has the most energy—inefficient housing stock in the whole of western europe and one of the worst energy poverty rates. to make all 30 million uk homes energy efficient will require investment from the government of at least £18 billion. labour approves of the investment but says it doesn't do enough to help people in cold rented homes. it also says the programme must be carried on year after year to keep the jobs and increase the emissions savings. roger harrabin, bbc news. several pubs in england have temporarily shut down again after customers tested positive for coronavirus. at least three pubs announced their closures just days after they were allowed to re—open on saturday. andy moore has more details.
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the opening of pubs in england on saturday was a major step in the easing of lockdown. here in soho, there were big crowds on the streets to mark the event. and thousands of pubs up and down the country, there we re pubs up and down the country, there were much more modest celebrations. but now some pubs are having to close their doors again just days after reopening. the lighthouse kitchen and carvery in burnham—on—sea and somerset was one of them, after male customer tested positive. the pub posted a message on its facebook page saying, this isn't the message we wanted to write so isn't the message we wanted to write so soon, but the lighthouse will be closed due to a customer testing positive to covid—19. we are slowly getting through our list of customers that were in the pub on saturday. all our staff are going to be tested and we will reopen again when the time is safe to do so. 0ther when the time is safe to do so. other pubs such as the fox and hounds in batley, west yorkshire,
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have had to post similar messages. the pub said it will be deep cleaned and opened again in soon as possible. the village home pub in arbor stoke, gosport, told its customers they don't need to isolate u nless customers they don't need to isolate unless they were contacted by official tracers. it hopes to open again on saturday. this is the best thing since sliced bread. any group of people going to a pub in england now have to leave a contact number, so now have to leave a contact number, so that should make it easier to trace customers who have been to a pub that needs to be closed down. andi mohr, bbc news. australia's second—largest city melbourne has gone back into lockdown, because of a spike in covid—19 cases. the city's five million residents will have to stay at home for the next six weeks, unless they're going to work, school, or limited activities, including exercise. almost 200 cases have been confirmed in the state of victoria in the last 24 hours. take a look at these beautiful pictures from
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the scottish highlands. for the past few weeks we've been following the the story of louis and aila — two ospreys nesting at loch arkaig pine forest. they have woken up! we now know that their chicks are two males and a female. the woodland trust is asking for suggestions on what to name them. as usual, you have produced the goods. what have we got? forgive me for our pronunciation, everybody. bria, even. speckled, swift, and verti, derived from virtue. graham has gone with snap, crackle and pop, ron, harry and hermione. this one, why don't we call them furlough,
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lockdown and freedom. then we can associate them with the year of their birth. i'm not sure he has put them in inverted commas, everyone talks about the unprecedented time. and we can follow their progress, but they can be a permanent reminder of 2020. are we going to go? no. i thought we were going to see the first flight there, live on bbc brea kfast. first flight there, live on bbc breakfast. that is beautiful, isn't it? that is furlough in the middle, i think. it is nine minutes past eight. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. if you were watching breakfastjust after six o'clock this morning, you might have seen a reunion between a very dedicated care home worker called tina and her husband ray. they hadn't seen each other properly for more than three months, because tina had chosen to protect her residents by living with them on site. we'll speak to tina and ray shortly, but first let's go to fi lamdin. she's at the care home in somerset with news of another reunion that's about to take place. good morning. it really is
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emotional. i don't know what you're lockdown has been like, but i would suggest it hasn't been as severe as for this group of people over here. this team have not left this building, not left these grounds, they haven't been for a walk, in a car, to the shop, seen their families, for three months. it up i can take you over here, the other side of that wall and their families waiting to see them. and if you can just see over the other side of the road, you will hear the musicians who have been faithfully playing every thursday evening to encourage the carers to keep going. i have been taking a look back at what lockdown has been like for this group of carers. locked in an lockdown, this team have been inside for 84 days, protecting the 22 residents who live at this care home in somerset. we believe that we have saved the lives of the residents. we have seen what happened at local ca re have seen what happened at local care homes, and so far we believe we have kept them alive. but it comes
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ata have kept them alive. but it comes at a cost. chris hasn't been home to see his wife or four—year—old daughterfour months. see his wife or four—year—old daughter four months. happy good morning, daddy, i miss you so much. i don't think we thought we would even get through a couple of weeks. it was really tough. teen is a care assistant. she has been sleeping in the stockroom. here we are in our bathroom. she hasn't had a shower for 12 weeks. we have bathroom. she hasn't had a shower for12 weeks. we have no bathroom. she hasn't had a shower for 12 weeks. we have no washing facilities, we have just got a ladies down the corridor, which is our bathroom and toilet. so we have a little wash in the sink. morning and night time. happy anniversary, you two! before lockdown, the longest she had spent away from her husband was five nights.” longest she had spent away from her husband was five nights. i came in on the tuesday, it was my husband was my birthday on the saturday, so that was another milestone that i missed, and then obviously three
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weeks later it was our wedding anniversary. and how many years was that? 26. for three months, staff have become temporary residents of this care home. day—to—day life alongside celebrating easter, ve day and many, many birthdays. and they've kept the virus out. but after 12 weeks, they finally feel it is safe to go back home. this is quite a moment. chris, you have been here as a team, you are the boss, for many days, weeks and months. borisjohnson the boss, for many days, weeks and months. boris johnson has the boss, for many days, weeks and months. borisjohnson has been criticised for saying that care homes didn't follow procedure. after everything you've done, what would your reaction be to that?” everything you've done, what would your reaction be to that? i think these guys are testament to how much we do care and what we will do to protect our residents. we were lucking on guidance at the beginning, and made a lot of the key decisions on instinct, that is how
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it all worked. well, chris, this is the moment. we are going to bring you forward. you haven't seen your wife or your four—year—old daughter since easter, and they are going to come in, look. just turn around and have a little luck, because they are ready for you. give me that biggest cuddle that you promised me. the biggest squeeze on the world ever. i have missed you so much. 0h, the world ever. i have missed you so much. oh, my goodness, that is the biggest squeeze ever, isn't it? i love you. are you going to say hello to fiona? what is it like giving daddy a cuddle? good. what have you
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missed the most about daddy? cuddles. and you are four, aren't you? that cuddles. and you are four, aren't you ? that is cuddles. and you are four, aren't you? that is a long time not to have seen you? that is a long time not to have seen daddy for three months. we have been looking forward to this moment, haven't we? we have been looking forward to this for so long. we have. what is it like a screen unbelievable. in so many ways, it just feel such a long time, 12 weeks isn't long in the scheme of things, but it feels like about a hundred weeks, to be honest. come here, come here. and he can come home. i'm not sure how we are going to cope, really! because we have had it to ourselves for such a long time. and you have in looking after your daughter and doing home—schooling. has it been lonely? yes, extremely lonely. the first were eight weeks or so lonely. the first were eight weeks or so where you couldn't travel or see family or friends, that was
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really tough. but yes, as it has been easing, the last three or four weeks, it has been lovely. we have seen weeks, it has been lovely. we have seen edith's grandparents for the first time, some friends, socially distanced, so it has been a real blessing, it has got me through this period. and what have you missed the most? obviously chris. i have missed having adult company, if i'm honest. we will come back to you guys in a moment. i have missed my daughter chloe as well, she is 22. there are many other families that need to be reunited. gary, paula, julie. come. applause
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band plays. it feels so rude to interrupt, i'm so sorry. it feels so rude to interrupt, i'm so sorry. this is your fiance, introduce us. all it has been on a night shift all night. i'm elliott, and that is paula. is itjust amazing to cuddle again? yes. i have missed her so much. the last time i came over, i got a bit emotional, but i'm trying to be brave now! well done, it is over. we arejust but i'm trying to be brave now! well done, it is over. we are just going to come over and to meet gary. gary has been the chef here, cooking thousands of meals, 100 days without a day off, and you are back with yourfamily. a day off, and you are back with your family. this is lucy, and she
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is four years old. that is a long time as well. what is it like being back with daddy? pretty overwhelming! let's meet your wife. i'm claire, it has been very difficult, very up—and—down and emotional. you must be so proud of what he was a family have sacrificed. definitely. that has been a massive sacrifice for all of you. how have you found it without dad? it is really difficult, it is a bit weird not having him around. who cooks when he is not here? mum! what are you looking forward to the most? just to have him around, it will be better. and just tell us about how your lockdown has been. very emotional. i have been a bit of a mess. but it is all about the future, and building on getting things back to normal, really. well,
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thank you for your sacrifice. it feels like we are just intruding, sorry. it is so lovely to see it all. coming over to you, this is your daughter, isn't it? it is. how is it to be back together? well, we have both started crying! first time for everything. it is really lovely, because we have seen one another at a distance when she has dropped me off bits and pieces, but to be able to hold her is lovely. but we haven't got the dog! she has been out and gone back in, hasn't she? we met poppy earlier. tell us how proud you are of your mum. she always says, where there is a will, there isa says, where there is a will, there is a way. well, this is the way, i suppose. i'm proud, yeah. what have you missed the most about her? oh, well! i've quite enjoyed not being bothered all the time! but i have
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missed the days out in the meeting up missed the days out in the meeting upfor missed the days out in the meeting up for coffee and we both love food, so we up for coffee and we both love food, so we haven't been able to do that too much. and knowing all the time her sacrifice has kept coronavirus out of this care home, kept to the residents safe. totally, and i think you have had quite a ball, really. i think you have enjoyed it! but they have done amazing, absolutely amazing, so well done. thank you. thank you. we will come back and just have a look at all of you, because you have all done, obviously we need to keep you all safely distanced, but chris, just coming over to you, there are tears, and just look at your staff now and seeing what you guys have achieved, and saying this is the moment you have all been dreaming about.” and saying this is the moment you have all been dreaming about. i am so have all been dreaming about. i am so proud of all of the staff, they have been amazing. they took this decision easily, and they haven't moaned ground at all during the whole time, absolutely fantastic. they are testament to all the carers
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in this country, absolutely brilliant. and what is the first thing you are going to do when you get home? my wife is going to a puttanesca, my favourite meal.” have a massive to—do list, as long as yourarm! have a massive to—do list, as long as your arm! every morning, ed has been facetiming me, but now to see her, to see edie's face coming on in the morning is going to be amazing. i love you so much. it is going to be brilliant. it's been a great experience for all of us, a real privilege to do what we have done. and hands up who has got to come back to work today? so they are going to be home tonight, sleeping at home tonight, but obviously there is still a care home, residents in the hope behind us to keep safe and to look after, and so many of these
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amazing, dedicated team and the team behind us, behind the line, they will be meeting family in a bit. they will be back at work today, but most of them will be going home, hopefully, tonight. thank you very much for that, that is lovely. i know a lot of you were enjoying watching that, and so many comments coming in about chris, about his little daughter edith who he hasn't seen for three months. three months! it shows you the dedication. and all those tears this morning after all of that hard work, and the interview we have coming up next, the timing of this is interesting, because we are staying with the care homes story. let's return now to the comments the prime minister made yesterday about how care homes have handled coronavirus during the pandemic. his words have been strongly criticised by the sector. various people talking about that this morning, but what was said, and whether the prime minister should apologise for what he has said rather than the clarification.
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you asked alok sharma to explain what those words meant. mark adams is the chief executive of community integrated care, a health and social care charity. i'm just going to read out the quote from borisjohnson yesterday. he said that some care homes didn't really follow procedures the way that they could have done. your reaction to that? well, i think the juxtaposition with your last feature really sums up the difference. you have got the best of social care and the worst of political leadership. it is very disappointing. all those weeks ago, before we really knew the extent of the pandemic, how much information did care homes have about procedures and what was coming? every care home is regulated either by the cqc in england or the ca re either by the cqc in england or the care inspectorate in scotland, and there are pages and pages and pages
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of processes and procedures we have to follow all of the time. in an unprecedented crisis like this, everybody are scrambling for information on looking at what can we do. you tend to rely very heavily on public health england and on the guidance that they provide. 0ver on public health england and on the guidance that they provide. over the last three months, there have been over 100 revisions of guidance coming out of public health england that the sector has had to respond to, so we are telling our 6000 care workers on a monday to do something, and then telling them on a thursday to stop doing it and to do something else, and every care operator in the country has followed that guidance to the letter. and so for the government to be critical of the sector and infer that any of the losses and problems are as a result of social care is a massive untruth, and the fact is it is a chronic
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failure of government leadership where we have had a litany of m ista kes where we have had a litany of mistakes since the beginning of the crisis, and we should be getting an apology for the prime minister from that —— an apology from the prime minister for that, that —— an apology from the prime ministerfor that, not that —— an apology from the prime ministerforthat, not some that —— an apology from the prime ministerfor that, not some kind of slight curve ball where the sector is blamed. we have just seen from the picture is a moment ago, people who work in care homes are a different breed in lots of ways, because they are not necessarily just looking after people in a hospital setting. they are looking after every type of need that they have, it is literally a home for the most vulnerable people. how demoralising is it for those people who work in that industry to hear this? you have summed it up, and the previous feature couldn't have put it better. these are miniature homes from home, they are adopted families. you are not dealing with strangers, you're dealing with people that you become incredibly fond of, and where we have had a crisis, where covid is an invisible enemy has got through the door, it
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is not a failure of the care workers who have put their own health and their own families' health at risk to provide that care, it is a failure of the testing regime. the world health organization at the beginning of the crisis in february said testing, testing, testing, is the only way to deal with the pandemic, and we gave up on our testing. care homes didn't start getting tested routinely until the end of may. and we have had a situation where the gps. visiting, the district nurses have stopped visiting and the fantastic front line care workers, many of whom are on minimum wage with no sickness benefits, have really held the line in the fight against covid, and the government's leadership has been singularly missing. i want to give you the line of clarification that came from the government last night, this is what they said. the prime minister was pointing out that nobody knew what the correct procedures were because the extent of asymptomatic transmission was not
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known at the time. your reaction to that clarification moving on from the words that borisjohnson said? borisjohnson went off piste, and i think he gave an element of how he truly felt about the situation, and thatis truly felt about the situation, and that is very revealing and very damning. i'm sure that everybody in the back office, all of his pr advisers were absolutely aghast at what he said, and this smacks of a kind of dominic cummings rewrite. it wasn't a clarification. but obviously you have said yourself you appreciate that these were unprecedented times with the advice changing day—to—day. you must be able to see that things were so difficult to predict that it was impossible to get this 100% right.” disagree. i think injanuary and february it was very clear what was happening in care homes, in washington, in america, in italy and spain, we were going to have the brunt of covid in the care home
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sector. most of the care home sector went into lockdown around about the first to the 10th of march. the prime minister was still going to cheltenham gold cup on the 13th of march and allowing lots of spaniards to come overfor the march and allowing lots of spaniards to come over for the liverpool atletico madrid game. you could see this problem building, and almost the last people to react where the government. mike adams, chief executive of community integrated care, thank you very much indeed. thank you. it is 8.27, it has been a really busy hour this morning. we have been speaking to the business secretary, alok sharma, ben live to cheddar to see the reunion of those families who haven't seen each other for three months. the pictures of chris seeing his daughter edith and his wife alison for the first time have got a lot of our viewers in tears, understandably. it is just dedication. now let's get the weather with carol. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning, everyone. the weather
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is mixed as we go through the course of the day, but look at this beautiful picture, the sky in bedfordshire this morning. there is some brightness around, but there is also some rain in the forecast for some of us, and some of that will be heavy. but all of us are looking at lighter winds compared to what we have seen in the last couple of days. the rain has steadily come in through northern ireland in western scotland, we have got some showers courtesy of a week where the front, sinking south across scotland. what is happening is we have got this little amount of weather fronts here, if you follow this trickle along for the atlantic, you can see what i'm talking about, and they are all going to be bringing rain for the next couple of days. here comes the next couple of days. here comes the rain pushing steadily eastward through the day. as you go north, we look at a mixture of bright skies, with cloud around at times, sunny intervals and sharp showers. the
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rain pushing out of parts of northern ireland through the day, heavyin northern ireland through the day, heavy in places. if you are travelling, they will be surface water on the roads. the further south you travel, the more likely you are to run into some sunny skies. the south midlands, southern parts of wales, hanging on to a fair bit of cloud. temperature's, looking at 11 in the north, highs of 21 further south. through this evening and overnight, the weatherfront producing all this rain, takes further south, taking this cloud with it, leaving clear skies for northern england, northern ireland and scotland, so under those clear skies it is going to be a clear night, and for some it will be a humid night. if we draw a line from liverpool to hull tomorrow, all points south will be cloudy, but the weather front will have pulses of rain just weather front will have pulses of rainjust pushing weather front will have pulses of rain just pushing through weather front will have pulses of rainjust pushing through it weather front will have pulses of rain just pushing through it through the course of the day, and some of those could be heavy at times, and
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we have brighter skies, some cloud, some sunny intervals in just a few showers. temperatures 12 to about 19 or20, and showers. temperatures 12 to about 19 or 20, and even on thursday, these areas still producing cloud and also some rain on and off through the course of the day. for north wales, northern england, areas of cloud, some showers, brighter skies across northern ireland with a high of 16 degrees. 20 or 21 likely to be the top temperature. as a ridge of high pressure builds in, things will start to change. there will still be a few showers knocking around, but for most it will be dry, with our temperature range 12 in the north to 20 in the south, and that high pressure will be with us on saturday, so a lot of dry weight around with sunshine, just one or two showers on sunday that will still be with us in the south, but it looks at the moment as if we are
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going to see low pressure coming in, and we could well see some rain in western scotland and northern ireland. so a lot to play for yet. carol, thank you very much. have a good rest of the day. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. anyone who falls ill with coronavirus would be forgiven for hoping they're one of the comparatively lucky ones — who suffer the effects forjust a few days. forjust a few days but now there's evidence that up to one in ten victims are living with ongoing symptoms — like headaches, crippling fatigue and nerve pain — for weeks on end. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes has been to meet some of those who have become known as the covid "long—haulers".
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post—viral fatigue, they call it, i understand. for more than three months now, professor paul garner, an expert in infectious diseases, has been documenting his own day—to—day struggle with recurring symptoms after falling ill with covid—19. i can hardly put words together, my head's completely foggy, i'm over—tired. there does seem to be this difficulty with symptoms that we knowa as being ill with it, and whether we are being believed. it messes with your head and it also messes with your mood. and i had very severe mood swings. i was in bed waking up in the morning, totally devastated and...and my eyes were just full of tears. i wasn't actually crying, but i just felt so awful. paul's lived with a huge range of problems, physical and mental. headaches, extreme fatigue, pain, shortness of breath, upset stomach. the list goes on. to live with such a strange and bewildering array of symptoms for so long has been really frustrating for paul, but what's extraordinary is he's not alone.
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here in liverpool, on the same street he lives on, one of his neighbours has been through pretty much exactly the same thing. helen's whole family fell ill with covid, but she was hardest hit. so ill, she was hospitalised twice. helen's really struggle to get back on her feet and all this with two young children and her own business to run. on a good day, you sort of think, "it'll be fine." on a low day, you think, "is this how life is now?" and my psychology, i don't tend to give up easily, but i ran around with my daughter for about 30 seconds, i was in bed for a week after that. it's not so much frustrations, it's that you can't understand why you keep getting sick. exactly how many are enduring these long—haul symptoms is unclear, but the team behind a widely used app which tracks the disease believes it could be more than a quarter of a million people. we know the average duration
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of the whole population is around ten days, and somewhere between onein ten and one in 20 people are having symptoms that last over a month. it's showing this amazing individuality of response that is the most striking about this disease and, in a way, the most worrying because it means there may not be one way to treat it. pain in the chest. it feels like there is a pressure on the test. brain fog, forgetfulness. muggy, muggy head. a kind of head pain all here. this virus is still springing unpleasant surprises, leaving tens of thousands of people with a terrible legacy. really extreme fatigue. and total exhaustion. dominic hughes, bbc news, liverpool. let's now speak to dr zudin puthucheary from queen mary university of london. just watching that tape there and people who have been suffering with
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coronavirus, what kind of other conditions are you seeing from people who have perhaps been in intensive care? so patients with coronavirus are actually no different from any of the other intensive care patients we look after. if i became critically ill, i would lose a kilo to two kilos of muscle mass. as a result when i get out, i would struggle with simple things like going to the toilet, getting out of bed. if you couple that with some of the problems we have with post—traumatic stress disorder and anxiety and depression, it is no surprise people struggle to go back to work and half of our patients don't return to work in a year. the muscle wasting and the anxiety and depression cause a bunch of symptoms that your patients talked about. we are hearing from
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people who have had covid—19, perhaps in a more mild version and haven't gone to hospital, but as we heard, reporting problems with their memory, problems with their breathing and huge problems with energy. is this similar to other post viral energy problems you may see? i'm not sure if it is similar to the post viral problems, but intensive care is just a place, to the post viral problems, but intensive care isjust a place, a room that we treat sick people. these people were all really sick and never came to intensive care. so they will have the same problems. you can hear them talking ake difficulty going back to —— about difficulty going back to —— about difficulty going back to —— about difficulty going back to work. many doctors and nurses had coronavirus and struggled to go back to work. they didn't make to it intensive care, but it doesn't mean their problems are less. what is the a nswer problems are less. what is the answer for problems are less. what is the answerfor them, is problems are less. what is the answer for them, is the answer now com plete answer for them, is the answer now complete and total rest or trying to slowly build up to some kind of
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normal living? so sally the answer is unfortunately there is no one solution that is going to work for everybody. everybody needs, if you have been sick like this, you need to be rehabilitated, you won't be able to do it easily by yourself. you need help and the type of help will depend on how the infections had affected you. what you need is a personalised rehab to get your back to your normal life. how difficult is it to deal with the mental health problems that come from is in, because it must be so —— come from this, it must be frustrating and you think, when will i have the sort of energy i used to have? so this is a real struggle for us in the field, we don't really have good treatments for the mental health issues, but what we do know is it is difficult for patients to manage this and control this by themselves. what i
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would say to all our patients, anybody that is listening, is you're not the first to have this, you're not the first to have this, you're not alone and you need to seek help. now, we know that actually you've had covid yourself and it was a mild case, but did you notice that your recovery took longer than you might have expected, are you still suffering now? well, i don't think so. suffering now? well, i don't think so. i had a very mild case and i think many of my colleagues, i mean it took me a week or two to get back to work. it took many of my collea g u es to work. it took many of my colleagues just as long if not longer to do so. so we appreciate this isn't a simple disease. i think the long—term effects that we are seeing in people, so—called mild cases, is coming to light now and we will know more about this in the next few months. thank you very much. some really interesting interviews this morning. john is
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here with the sport. when you see a few players having a bit of a spat, some may say it is disgraceful, but the manager said he was happy to see it. yes i know. we often see disagreements between players on opposing teams, not usally on the same side. but there was a bust up between son and tottenham goalkeeper hugo lloris in tehir game against everton last night. and interestingly manager jose mourinho praised them for it. it happened at half time, lloris angry about a lack of effort shown by son in the first half. they were leading at this point. the two had to be kept apart. and jose, who wants his players to show more fight, said it was beautiful to see and just what his team needs to grow up. england cricketer dom sibley has been really honest about how he felt he needed to lose weight to cut it at the top of his sport. this is him on the left
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during the tour of sri lanka in march and how he looks now on the right ahead of england's first test against the west indies which starts tomorrow. he says hes lost 12 kilograms — that's almost two stone. and he's been really candid about how he feels he needed to make a change. in sri lanka, ifelt a little bit, for the first time in my career, i felt a little bit self—conscious about my physique and my weight and during lockdown when we couldn't improve anything sort of cricket—related, it was an opportunity for me to improve that side of my game. i've had taps on the shoulders before and haven't done anything about it when i was younger and i think it was probably a bit overdue me having that sort of little, you know, a bit of a wake up call. never easy talking about the subject of your own weight, but something he felt he needed to do to make some improvements on the field and it will be a fascinating day tomorrow
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with england playing the west indies. we were talking about sports like golf and some players putting on weight to hit the ball further. it shows how your physique can affect your performances. you put on two stone. sally talked about the cricket bubble, the biobubble around the test team. they have to sign up for the whole thing and they're away from family, friends, all live together, all get tested regularly. have their temperatures tested. that is everybody and notjust have their temperatures tested. that is everybody and not just the players, but the staff, coaches, physios, the broadcasters. the broadcasters we know have gone into this biobubble they're calling it and so far it seems to be working well. it will be interesting when they take to the field, because there will be changes. you can't use
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there will be changes. you can't use the saliva on the ball to polish the ball. you could see you know penalty ru ns ball. you could see you know penalty runs being implemented as a result and it is such a natural thing that cricketers do to shine the ball. it is noticeable how many changes the sport has to go through on and off the ball. other sports will keep an eye on it. i'm glad we don't have a brea kfast eye on it. i'm glad we don't have a breakfast bubble. as much as i enjoy spending time with you, three hours is enough. do we drive each other mad? you stay there on the ground floor, john. i think we would be fine. in our bubble? we would great. all of us, charlie and naga as well? we arejoking! let's take another look at these beautiful pictures from the scottish highlands.
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for the past few weeks we've been following the the story of louis and aila — two ospreys nesting at loch arkaig pine forest. we now know that their chicks are two males and a female. the woodland trust is asking for suggestions on what to name them. what we we got one has conunconventional. two boys and a girl, he has gone for tom, dick and harry. named after the tunnels built in world war two. this is good. or n,h in world war two. this is good. or n, hand in world war two. this is good. or n, h and s. that would work. tracy says, i would like to suggest the following names for the chicks, she has gone down the famous fames from literature. 0scar, edgar and has gone down the famous fames from literature. 0scar, edgarand louisa. bonnie, prince and charlie. very
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nice. thank you for the suggestions. we will pass them on and nobody, i don't think anybody‘s gone for birdie mcbird face. 0r chicky mcsporran. not until now. i'm blaming you. people tend to go down that road when we ask to name anything, it goes back to that boat. beauty salons and nail bars re—opened in northern ireland yesterday, but in the rest of the uk they remain closed. now, beauty industry leaders are warning of huge job losses unless they can get back to work within two to three weeks. we'll hear more on that in a moment. first, our reporter keiron tourish visited a nail bar in derry—londonderry to see how its re—opening went. hello, how are you? it's the moment eileen has been waiting for — a visit to her local beauty salon to have her nails manicured. for more than three months,
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this business has been in lockdown. the owner admits her clients do have concerns about coming back. yes, i think there is going to be apprehension, but i do think as time goes on, people's confidence will grow. we are doing absolutely everything we possibly can to get our business and our economy back up. it is a bit different, because people have to wear face masks and we're two metres apart and use hand sanitiser and stuff we use, but it's really good to be back. other customers appreciate the effortsing with made , being made by businesses to keep them safe. well it's good and it gives the customer that wee bit more confidence. this city centre nail bar was inundated with requests for appointments, all keen to take advantage of yet more easing of the lockdown measures across northern ireland. there is no doubting the popularity of this sector and while there' mains some apprehension out there, for many it's just great to be back in the salon.
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we can speak now to sam marshall, who owns a beauty salon in manchester. and to millie kendall, who is head of the british beauty council. shejoins us from north london. sam, ifi sam, if i can start you with you, how did you feel when you heard that beauty salons were not part of re—opening package when hair dressers could re—open? re—opening package when hair dressers could re-open? we were just absolutely devastated. i mean, from the start, we thought we were grouped together and then suddenly we are cut out of it. so it was just, it was a false start. we had our clients ready to go and nearly at the last minute we had to cancel them all. do you think salons are ready to go once they get the go ahead? yeah, tinge beauty and nail sallons have been more —— salons have been more prepared than anyone in our sector, they're reknowned for being safe. what would you say,
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let's talk about the practical stuff, hair dressers are mostly, they're not face to face, they are mostly behind you, what would you say to people concerned about the more face to face nature of butte you salons —— beauty salons. more face to face nature of butte you salons -- beauty salons. that is the argument from government that it is face to face, but there are higher risk zones, so a facial would be considered high risk, whereas nails and feet are probably not as high risk. i think the next stage would be to look at what is high risk and what is medium risk and what is low risk in terms of bringing our workforce back. that is not ideal, but it seems like a sort of compromise. carry on. no, ijust, i think the problem for us, particularly the british beauty
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council is that you can have podiatry, but not anything else. there has been mixed messages from government across the board. it is notjust government across the board. it is not just about the proximity, but the job that we are doing. which is maybe not deemed as important as a chiropodist. that has been a challenge. sam, let me bring you in, milly was talking about high and low risk what, measures have you put in place to make sure you're safe? we started by learning a lot, learning more probably about health and safety that we have ever learned before. we are on forums and groups, i have done a full risk assessment and i'm paying to get it checked by and i'm paying to get it checked by an official, i don't know his title, but someone who does risk assessments and the only real extra
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ppe we have got are these visores. es. we are already a safe industry. how important is the sector to the economy as a whole? the beauty industry is worth 23.4 billion to britain's gdp. 27.2 billion in consumer spending. so it is pretty relevant. the services sector is around nine billion. contribution to gdp. 50 around nine billion. contribution to gdp. so sit is pretty viable. and this is a predominantly female industry, particularly the beauty services sector, a lot of microbusinesses so, this is really a dangerous time and this is their peak season. they can take 50% of
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their annual turn over peak season. they can take 50% of theirannualturn over in peak season. they can take 50% of their annual turn over in the summer. their annual turn over in the summer. how much of a hit has the last few months before for you sam? well, i haven't earned any money, so it is massive. we are consistent where we are, but it is our peak season, especially with things like waxing and holiday treatments. we have had no takings whatsoever. and also a lot of us have fallen through the gaps with the support we can get from the government. i've not been given enough money to pay everything. so i've ended up using savings or getting out loans. sam, i was speaking to a hair dresser and the guy in london said he had 2,000 people waiting for an appointment. i imagine there are people desperate to get treatments when you're ready to get treatments when you're ready to go. absolutely, i've got a whole load of people that i keep moving them forward a couple of weeks at a time. and i'm constantly in contact
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with them. so, all we need is a date. we just need some hope. we need something to work towards, so we can say, fine, we have two weeks, 0k we can say, fine, we have two weeks, ok let's get going. but they're leaving us in limbo and we feel like we are a forgotten industry. we feel like we're undervalued. sam and milly, thank you both very much. a lot of small businesses, independent businesses. you have done well getting a hair cut. i've failed. businesses. you have done well getting a hair cut. i've failedm has gone a bit short. but it has to sawers viiv for —— survive for five weeks. more suggestions for the osprey chicks, nick knowles said birds should be called, alan, win and jones. win can be the goal. he
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isa and jones. win can be the goal. he is a big rugby fan. alun winjones captain it is the 0spreys. is a big rugby fan. alun winjones captain it is the ospreys. and also a bbc breakfast viewer. good morning alan. good morning. we are doing him individual hellos. there was good news for the performing arts industry yesterday when the government announced a rescue package worth more than one and a half billion pounds to be shared between theatres, galleries, independent cinemas and music venues. but some comedians say they've been left out. we'll speak to two of them in a moment — shazia mirza and kiri pritchard—mcclean, but first let's take a look at them in action. my name is kiri, i'm going to talk about myself a bit — which i love! i've had a weird year, so the first thing that happened, big life change for me, me and my partner of eight years separated. now, i haven't got used to talking about it on stage. i feel very vulnerable every time i talk about it, but i thought that's the reason you should talk about it and i think other people in the audience will have been through what we went through.
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basically, i woke one morning, we were in bed together and looked over at him and after eight years together, i just sort of had this realisation that i could pay the mortgage on my own! i was at a show the other night, this man was introducing, this old white man, he was really worried about how to say my name, because he didn't want to offend me. my name is shazia mirza, he said to me, "how do i say this? how do i say this, is it shirzia, is it shizia? is it shiraz? how do i say it?" he said, "urkkkk! krrrr! krrr! is that all right." i said, "just don't worry about it, all right? just go stage and just go on stage and introduce me as shhh... shirley bassey! " let's now speak to both shazia mirza and kiri pritchard—mcclean, who joins us now. good morning to both of you. we were speaking about the beauty industry and how that has been affected, i
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imagine both of you would feel that comedians have been ignored in these processes to try and invest money backin processes to try and invest money back in the arts? well, yeah, because for us, the comedy club is important. nobody goes and performs straightaway in a two ,500 theatre. we start in small come by clubs and try our material, for stand up and sitcoms and it is important to play in front of 50 people or 100 people. these small clubs and comedians who ply their trade there, we have been ignored, because no money has been pumped into these small clubs. how has lock down been for you? really difficult. you know, there is a fear about even's health on top of that —— everyone's health and on top of
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that your income disappears, i was four days into my tour and it disappeared and i'm one of the lucky ones, because of working on the comedy circuit five or six nights a week, there is nothing for you and yourjob will be the last thing to return to normal. i think that this, it is obviously brilliant that the arts are being given any money, but it feels like it isjust going to rescue big visible institutions and you're going to forget about the all the individuals that actually make the individuals that actually make the arts happen. i suppose the benefit is this time has given you all comedians a lot of material, but the other thing is will the industry ever be the same when it gets back? yeah, i guess it has given us material, but nothing makes you less funny than a global pandemic and you're worried about your family dying. it is hard to spice that one up. i don't think there will be an industry to go back to. i think we
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are lucky, the people giving this money don't understand how the industry works, we have one of the best comedy circuits in the world, because we have so many brilliant clubs and you can gig several types a night and —— times and get great at what you to. if the institutions are not being helped, the venues, where you learn how to be a comedian thatis where you learn how to be a comedian that is good enough to be to do theatres, then our, it disappears and we stop being world leaders in this. shazia, how important in comedy is the live audience in terms of you feeding off them and them reacting to you? it is totally a live event, stand up. it is about direct communication between you and the audience. you're telling them things and you see their eyes, you see their responses, you see their reactions. before the pandemic i was about to start my tour and one of the last shows i did in shropshire,
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half the audience didn't turn up, because they were worried and the virus and the other half were made to sit three seats apart and when people are spread out like that, you don't get the same weight of the laughter. comedy is a thing where people sit together and they laugh together and you as a comedian feel the impact of that. so people sitting three seats apart and only like four people on a row, you don't, it doesn't feel the same and not for them and not for us is the comedians. i see kiri nodding, i know you have tried virtual gigs, but it is not the same? no, we have been lucky with our gig, it has been well received, but it is a different art form. it doesn't replace one. you don't go, i love live comedy and now i will watch online. there is nothing like sitting in a room with
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a low ceiling and all these strangers sharing a moment. we don't know when that can come back. they have made it a priority to make sure people can sit next to each other on planes, but not that they can go out and have some catharsis. comedians are some of the few groups holding to power to account and giving people a chance to laugh at this stuff and we're not allowed to do ourjobs. thank you to both of you. good to talk to you both. before we go. a look back at some of reunions we brought in cheddar over the programme. staff having self—isolating and they have moved in fror three months in —— for three months in total. here is ray and tina. who were giving each other a long cuddle after a long time away. and we can see chris. that is his wife alison and four—year—old edith.
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he looks after 12 staff members. they moved in three months ago. a lovely moment. edith did not let go. we will see you tomorrow from six. bye.
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when this is bbc news with the latest headlines. an angry backlash from social care leaders over borisjohnson's suggestion that "too many" care homes didn't follow procedures during the coronavirus pandemic. for the government to be critical of the sector and infer that any of the losses and problems are a result of social care is a massive untruth. the point the prime minister was making is that nobody at the time knew the correct procedures because we didn't know the extent of the asymptomatic transmission that was taking place. hundreds of thousands of homeowners in england will get grants of up to £5,000 for energy—saving improvements. at least three pubs in england which reopened their doors on saturday for the first time
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in months close again

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