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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 8, 2020 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello, good morning. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines for you. a damning review into three medical treatments for women says that many lives have been ruined because of an arrogant culture that dismissed serious concerns as "women's problems". mesh as "women's problems". has robbed me of the per used mesh has robbed me of the person i used to be. my life is completely different. i want to issue a full apology to those who have suffered and their families. also, a £2 billion fund to help unemployed under 25s get a work placement and a stamp duty holiday for home buyers. the latest measures aimed at boosting the economy. and if you are between 16 and 2a — what do you think of the chancellor's plan to help
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you get into some kind of work? do let me know victoria@bbc.co.uk or email victoria@bbc.co.uk. angry crowds in serbia storm the parliament building in protest at the re—introduction of lockdown measures. millions in melbourne are ordered back into lockdown for six weeks. and jimmy anderson talks about cricket returning for the first time this summer — and how they're honouring nhs and care staff. good morning. many lives have been ruined because health officials did not listen to the concerns of women — just one of the findings of a scathing review which has spoken to more than 700 patients
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over two years. the investigation, headed by baronessjulia cumberlege, focused on pelvic mesh, the hormone pregnancy test primodos and an anti—epilepsy drug called sodium valproate. victims have told us over years of the chronic and debilitating pain mesh has caused them while the medicines seriously harmed their unborn babies. the scale of the mesh scandal first came to light on the victoria derbyshire programme three years ago. every time i walk, it feels like something sharp it's inside me. the tape had come through my regina, so it was protruding through. my husband has turned into my carer. he is less of my husband. we can't have sex. is less of my husband. we can't have sex. over the last five years, i counted i have had over 53 admissions because of agonising pain. i phoned my husband and i
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said, ijust can't pain. i phoned my husband and i said, i just can't live pain. i phoned my husband and i said, ijust can't live any more, i can't through this. i'm starting to believe the doctors, i think it is in my head. that was back in 2017. anna collinson reports on today's damning report. we are spending an afternoon with a group of women who were all strangers before they experienced complications following mesh repairs. having lost trust in the medical community, they turn to each other for support. this was the last time they were allowed to meet before lockdown. hello! i'm anna from the bbc. how are you all doing? thank you so much for having me today. people don't like to talk about their bottom or their vagina oi’ about their bottom or their vagina or anything like that, and now we have this unwritten rule that we can't talk about anything. was it
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ha rd to can't talk about anything. was it hard to open up about that?” can't talk about anything. was it hard to open up about that? i found it very embarrassing. now some of the things we talk about our unreal! the pain experienced when a pelvic mesh repair goes wrong has been likened to splinter the glass. it is estimated one in ten women experienced complications following the procedure, which is used to treat incontinence or prolapse. it is currently paused on the nhs. mesh has robbed me of the person i used to be. your life is completely different. pelvic mesh was used to treatjill hedley‘s incontinence. she also experienced complications after a bowel mesh removal. major surgery after a bowel mesh removal. major surgery is required, and doctors have warned there is a risk she could die. started to think i could end up dead, so what about my kids? my end up dead, so what about my kids? my kids are like my friends. i
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couldn't stand the thought of leaving them. i am so scared to have the operation, but until i have it, i can't live my life the same way. two medicines and one medical device, all designed to improve women's lives over six decades, but many weren't warned of the risks. now baroness cumberlege's review is recommending ways to support victims. it has looked into the anti—epileptic drug sodium valproate and the historic pregnancy test primodos. the review says both are associated with birth defects in unborn babies. it takes 270 pages to list the failings, missed opportunities and the pain inflicted on tens of thousands of people. baroness cumberlege says all families affected deserve an immediate apology from the
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authorities, and financial support. she has also made a list of several recommendations to prevent future harm, and is adamant they will happen. i am with this for a very long time, i recognise that. i have heard the stories. i will take them to my grave. i can't abandon these women. i want to issue a full apology to those who have suffered and their families for the frustration, for the time that it has taken, that they've taken, to get their voices heard. and now their voices have been heard, it's very important that we learn from this report. the review has not recommended a complete ban, something many campaigners wanted. instead it has set out conditions which must be met before the pause can be lifted. even then, it says mesh should be seen as a last resort. before that mesh is put in,
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the woman should be told the truth of what can go wrong. and if it is still mesh that is put in for life without being able to be taken out, it is in permanent, i think the patient should be really, really made aware of what that actually entails. the baroness's review is focusing on vagina mesh, so how does that affect you, you have had the hernia mesh? i want hernia mesh to be included, iwas hernia mesh? i want hernia mesh to be included, i was told without it, lam be included, i was told without it, i am finished, i am left to rot. esther has had two hernia mesh repairs, but experience life altering complications after the implant attached to her bowels. the doctor say the only way her large hernia can be fixed is by yet more mesh, prospect can't bear.|j
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hernia can be fixed is by yet more mesh, prospect can't bear. i go to bed on a night knowing that i have got nobody to fix me, and i wake up in the morning with no hope. sol wear bright colours, i cover myself up, and that is what they have done to me. they have made me a freak. sorry. don't apologise. that's howl feel. you don't have to apologise. we can talk to kath sansom, founder of campaign group sling the mesh, and carl heneghan, professor of evidence based medicine at university of oxford. hello both of you. such an important day today with the release of this report. how do you react to it? it isa report. how do you react to it? it is a huge success, we know it is not a band but that was never going to happen, this is as close as you can get. they have made the condition is tough to meet so that it can be used
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again, but also the day is tinged with such great sadness knowing that so with such great sadness knowing that so many with such great sadness knowing that so many women have with such great sadness knowing that so many women have been named by this operation unnecessarily and then not listen to. —— harmed by this operation. the report says that women were harmed and it was avoidable, they won't believe it when they complained, there was a lack of awareness who to complain to, how to report. the struggle to be heard, dismissive and unhelpful attitude on the part of clinicians. a sense of abandonment, life changing consequences, breakdown of family life, loss of jobs, changing consequences, breakdown of family life, loss ofjobs, financial support. sometimes they lost their home. and it goes on. it has been an absolute scandal, especially when women have been talking about this and trying to get the regulator to listen to them for years. absolutely. it makes for such a harrowing read, and it puts into clear black—and—white what i have
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seen clear black—and—white what i have seen overseeing a clear black—and—white what i have seen overseeing a page of thousands of people for years. it has taken a huge emotional and impact on all of us huge emotional and impact on all of us seeing so huge emotional and impact on all of us seeing so many huge emotional and impact on all of us seeing so many people suffer, knowing that people like the nhra, they have miserably failed in their duty to regulate medical devices and medicines, and these women have had their lives affected irreversibly. surgeons, there was a mass institutional design —— denial across all colleges. a couple of weeks ago i saw a surgeon downplaying mesh problems are little niggles. these women have lost marriages, sex lives, jobs. to have such harsh and serious words spoken by baroness cumberlege on how bad this is has been celebrated with tea rs this is has been celebrated with tears and sadness on the page in the early hours of this morning. you mean your facebook page? let me bring in professor carl heneghan. it
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is not just about bring in professor carl heneghan. it is notjust about implants, it is all also about pregnancy hormone tests, which are thought to be associated with birth defects and miscarriages. and also about an anti—epileptic drug called sodium valproate which causes physical malformations, autism and developmental delay and many children when it is taken by their mothers during pregnancy. why do you think it has taken so long for this kind of review into these awful drugs and devices? let's be clear, this review wouldn't have happened if it wasn't for the tenacity, the persistence, of people like kath who have campaigned for many years. i think this has been a problem where there have been two major issues. 0ne there have been two major issues. one is, when we develop the intimations, there hasn't been the evidence available. women have not been informed about the harms. and more importantly, when it has gone wrong, they have not been listened
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to, they have been dismissed. and the system has been very defensive. and as you said, if you read this report, it is devastating, the words, the language that baroness cumberlege and her team have put forward. and it is a real moment for a sea change where we have to implement all of these recommendations now in full. and they include specialist mesh centres for women who need to get the mesh removed because it is expanded or degraded or caught up in their bladder. it also calls for an apology, which we have heard matt hancock give overnight, and it calls foran hancock give overnight, and it calls for an independent patient safety commissioner, what you think of that idea? when you speak to a lot of these women, in the early days it was difficult for them to know where to turn to, where can they get help and advice? and many women like kath
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have become experts in helping these women, so we have become experts in helping these women, so we need have become experts in helping these women, so we need a have become experts in helping these women, so we need a patient safety advocate and a team that helps people understand the information, and when harms occur,, we need a syste m and when harms occur,, we need a system in place to make sure more women are not harmed in the intervening years while we have talked about it. and for many of these interventions it has been 20 years to get to this point where we recognise there are serious harm is being caused, to notjust a few women but tens of thousands of women. one thing that struck me, there were so many horrific things in the report, kath sansom, but this recommendation. doctors and co nsulta nts recommendation. doctors and consultants should register their interest and declare any payments from manufacturers. what people may not realise is for example with one kind of the mesh implant, there was a swedish professor who did some
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research into mesh and he reported a high cure rate with low levels of complication, and then he sold the rights to this particular mesh to a subsidiary ofjohnson & johnson. rights to this particular mesh to a subsidiary ofjohnson &johnson. as pa rt subsidiary ofjohnson &johnson. as part of that process, he was paid $400,000. no one knew about that. exactly, and we had a more recent case in scotland where a consultant trialled two particular types of mesh, he was paid £100,000 for that trial by one of the makers of the mesh, and that trial came out favourable for that mesh that he was paid for, and he was only caught out when someone blew the whistle to the gmc. if we had this register, as patient campaigners and patients ourselves, we could go in search up, my doctor has recommended this treatment, let's just check if he's had any financial ties to it, because no matter what people think, if your doctor is paid, that affect the decisions they make in their treatment, it affects their
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decisions and how they present any research they are doing, and it introduces heavy bias. and i think what is so sad, in 2005, the health select committee recommended that this is set up, and nothing happened, and i think what is really important, these recommendations cannot be left to sit on a piece of paper. we have to push forward and make sure they are implemented, because and people cannot be harmed in their droves like this ever again. eu medical devices like mesh are not licensed, instead they are certified to show that they meet legal requirements when it comes to safety, a device can be marked certified by the manufacturer, and that allows it to be sold throughout the eu without any further checks at
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all. and the vast majority of pelvic mesh products were pushed out onto the market this way. explain a little bit more about that our audience. people when you understand the device regulation system will be truly shocked about how lax it is. what you can do with a medical device like mesh is basically say, my device is similar to devices already on the market, therefore i would like to put the mark on it and make it available. you can go to one country and once it is improved in one country in europe, it is across the system. and as what happened throughout the mesh and what they we re over throughout the mesh and what they were over 100 different mesh products on the market, and the vast majority had no clinical evidence to support them and they were all using this equivalence. and it is important to understand that medical devices are different to drugs, where you require clinical trials. you can get away with a review of the evidence. the other important thing about devices, it isn't like a
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drug where you canjust thing about devices, it isn't like a drug where you can just stop thing about devices, it isn't like a drug where you canjust stop it. when you say there is a problem, the operations to remove them require specialist centres, and it can be a huge operation which can be life—threatening because of the significant complications that occur when the mesh starts to erode or get infected. kath, baroness cumberlege has not recommended that mesh be banned, which you have always called for. but you would like to think the demand will drop off the cliff, wouldn't you ? demand will drop off the cliff, wouldn't you? i also need to point out, she has been very clever in setting the bar very high in what conditions need to be met before the suspension can be lifted, and one of those conditions is that a database has to be set up to log any future mesh operations, and that database has to be linked into the nhra reporting yellow card system. we are two years down the line into the suspension, they are nowhere near that database being ready. i'm
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hearing that they are worrying about how they're even going to link up their reports with this database? is that condition even going to be met, so that condition even going to be met, so is this a back door band? when women get to it, they will have heard the media reports, they will have to have a strict process of consent which will be the same across the uk. it is written in the report that they will have to have physiotherapy first, non—mesh surgery physiotherapy first, non—mesh surgery next and only when that fails a mesh operation. so even if all these boxes are ticked, it is going to be a really, really tiny number of women that will have mesh. cani number of women that will have mesh. can ijust number of women that will have mesh. can i just mention number of women that will have mesh. can ijust mention at this point how broken the health care system is, because while we have had a massive review into the mesh, as i speak today there is a study called the master trial, and it is into men's mesh. these are slings put into men who have had prostate cancer and are suffering urinary incontinence after having a prostatectomy. the slings
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are being put in as part of a trial and they are not being given any warnings whatsoever about mesh publications. that seems outrageous to me that this could be happening. absolutely. thank you very much, kath sansom, absolutely. thank you very much, kath sa nsom, incredible absolutely. thank you very much, kath sansom, incredible work from you over the years, thank you for talking to us again, and professor carl heneghan, thank you very much for your time. you can get in touch if you have been affected, you are always welcome. send us an e—mail or message me on twitter. it is 9:20am on wednesday morning. the headlines on bbc news. a damning review into three medical treatments for women says that many lives have been ruined because of an arrogant culture that dismissed serious concerns as ‘women's problems‘ a £2 billion fund to help unemployed under—25s get a work placement and a stamp duty holiday for home buyers. the latest measures aimed at boosting the economy. angry crowds in serbia storm the parliament building in protest at the re—introduction
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of lockdown measures. the chancellor's going to announce a £2 billion scheme to try to help under—25s on universal credit get back to work, as part of plans to boost the economy after lockdown. if that might apply to you, if you are between 16 and 24 and you receive universal credit, what do you think of this plan? rishi sunak is also expected to confirm a temporary stamp duty holiday for home—buyers in england and northern ireland, as our political correspondent, helen catt reports. the economy has started to open up again, but things are very different to how they were before. there are warnings that unemployment could run into the millions. so when the chancellor delivers his update in the commons later, his focus will be on jobs. there are particular worries about young people. in hard—hit industries like retail and hospitality, they make up one third
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of the workforce. as of may, almost 500,000 under—25s were claiming universal credit. so the chancellor wants companies to create job placements for 16—24—year—olds who are receiving the benefit. the treasury will pay their wages for 25 hours a week at the national minimum wage for six months. it has set aside £2 billion for the scheme, which it's thought could create more than 300,000 placements. the policy has been welcomed by business groups as a step in the right direction. labour, too, says the scheme should help — but says the government will need to do more for hard—hit areas and older people who lose theirjobs. we know that many businesses are struggling, and we need the approach change so that good businesses can come through this crisis, that we stop people losing theirjobs, that we keep people in work and see a
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much greater focus on creating jobs too. the chancellor is expected to make other changes, including to stamp duty to boost house sales, and there is speculation there could also be cuts to vat. ministers have previously said they cannot protect everyjob, but the pressure is now on the chancellor to save as many as possible. h, bbc news. s let's talk to norman. will the chacnellor‘s plans work? this is a six month scheme, and when we have had previous schemes like this, gordon brown and alistair darling trialled a very similar scheme after the financial crash in 2008. it kept people in work for a period, but a lot of it didn't translate into long—term jobs. that's not to say it's pointless, very farfrom it, that's not to say it's pointless, very far from it, it that's not to say it's pointless, very farfrom it, it is better to have people getting into the routine, getting into the
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environment, earning a wage, job opportunities opening up rather than sitting at home. so there are short—term benefits. ithink sitting at home. so there are short—term benefits. i think the popein short—term benefits. i think the pope in government circles is it will at least by time, and may be down the road, six months, nine months, the economy will have started to revive, will have started to go out and spend money again, firms will start recruiting. in other words it will be a bridge to when the economy is on much firmer footing and when companies are in a position to start taking people on again. if you look at the option of doing nothing, that is frankly so alarming given the current forecast of potentially half a million youngsters facing unemployment, it is absolutely terrifying, so i think there is a view that something has to be done. thank you very much, norman. you will be able to see the
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chancellor deliver his mini budget and some people are calling it at 12:30pm here on the bbc news channel and on bbc politics live, jo coburn with politics live will be taking over with the run—up to the pmqs and the announcement. with me is simone roche, ceo and founder of northern power women. isa is a business woman, would this encourage you to take someone on? we absolutely welcome the stimulus to the economy, and we have spent our lockdown journey at northern power women talking to thousands of women, and we are really passionate that we wa nt and we are really passionate that we want rishi, we are asking for an entrepreneur led recovery, and we wa nt to entrepreneur led recovery, and we want to make sure that employability
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isa want to make sure that employability is a massive worry, unemployment is scaling, so as we say, we welcome this, we think it is great having newjob opportunities, this, we think it is great having new job opportunities, but this, we think it is great having newjob opportunities, but we have got to wrap more around it. we can't just have young people coming in for six months. we have spoken to hundreds of young people we have heard their worries and concerns. people don't want to be forgotten, and our employers and small businesses want to take them on, but we have got to take it easy. so we are asking for a seat at the table to be involved in these discussions. we wa nt to be involved in these discussions. we want young people at the table, female leaders in female business leaders at the table as well to be pa rt leaders at the table as well to be part of this recovery, otherwise we arejust going to part of this recovery, otherwise we are just going to do the same as we have always done, and this has to be inclusive. we have got great entrepreneurs out there doing amazing things, we have a young employer over at teesside who is inhibited in this crisis. she is in the green sector, she is making and
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recycling wind turbines, and she is going to have 50 jobs out there at all levels for apprentices up, but we just need a care package around this as well, making sure that our businesses are easily able to access the funding. it is funding for all. and it is because people are suffering a little bit of burn—out now in the business world. so there has to be not much red tape and bureaucracy in order to make sure employers and bosses go for this? but i'm just wondering, at the end of six months, obviously the hope is that the bosses will take them on full time, but it is not a guarantee? it is not a guarantee, and we can't give false hope. so i think we have got to be really intentional if we are going to take on these young people and give them
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hope and give them a future path and a career. we have got to be intentional about it. they are not about cheap labour, filling a gap. i have got to be part of our new way of working. there is a time now to change a look at how we are working. the lockdown has proved that we can work agile, we can work more flexibly. we have all got to look at the culture of business to see who and what way we are going to work, but we want to encourage people, so we have to look at these young people, but look inside as well, look at your own businesses and to make sure you are building, notjust for six months, but to thrive, because we need this future talent to help us grow. we want to thrive, we wa nt to help us grow. we want to thrive, we want to grow, we want to innovate and we need this talent and we need to invest. thank you very much,
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simon. we were also going to talk to tanika walsh, but technical problems meant that we were not able to do that. loads more reaction from people of all ages through the morning. carol kirkwood has the weather. hello, again. for southern parts of the uk today, it's going to be fairly cloudy and also wet. move further north, we've got sunnier skies in scotland, part of northern england and northern ireland, but there will be one or two showers around. temperature is 12 in the north and 19 in the south. through this evening and overnight, the band of rain clips northern ireland, moves across parts of england and wales, clearer skies across scotland, and it will be quite a cold night, especially in sheltered glens. the temperatures you see on this chart indicate what you can expect in towns and cities. tomorrow we say goodbye to that band of heavy rain,
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but for england and wales, we have got a lot of cloud, some drizzle and spots of rain, northern ireland dryer with one or two showers, and scotla nd dryer with one or two showers, and scotland seeing sunshine and showers, but some of those showers could be heavy and thundery.
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hello, this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines... a damning review into three medical treatments for women says that many lives have been ruined because of an arrogant culture that dismissed serious concerns as "women's problems". mesh has robbed me of the person i used to be. my life is completely different. i want to issue a full apology to those who have suffered and their families. a £2 billion fund to help unemployed under—25s get a work placement and a stamp duty holiday for home buyers —
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the latest measures aimed at boosting the economy. angry crowds in serbia storm the parliament building in protest at the re—introduction of lockdown measures. millions in melbourne are ordered back into lockdown for six weeks. for most schoolchildren, the lockdown has meant staying away from the classroom and learning online instead. a bit, anyway. but research shows hundreds of thousands of children in the uk are being left behind because they don't have access to the internet or to a computer or tablet. fiona lamdin reports. you want a pen as well? the holgate family from swindon. six children sharing mum's phone to home—school. but, six weeks ago, a viewer donated a tablet. what difference has it made having another device in the house? we've been able to do loads of homework and we've been sharing better, so it's made a big difference
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because now i can produce better work. because when it was just the phone, they were always arguing, "it's my turn next, it's my turn." before they didn't know whether they were going to have their slot at the end of the day, because there was not enough time, before bedtime, sort of thing. now there's two, it just makes it a lot easier. the department for education has promised 200,000 laptops to children most in need and, today, gloucestershire fire service are out delivering some of them. wales, scotland and northern ireland are running similar schemes. thanks a lot, it's really appreciated. there's a growing digital divide and access to it is an issue for a number of our students. when we've looked at the way students are accessing work, we know about 50% of them are using their phones. they've been given seven, but the reality is there are hundreds of students here that need them. so members of the public are now donating devices they no longer use.
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so far, this company has refurbished 150. so what we're doing here, we've got a laptop, it comes with one of these discs, this would have the data on it from anyone, so we're replacing it with this one so there's no possibility of any bank details on here. according to research gathered by bbc children in need, almost three—quarters of a million students have missed out on schoolwork because they don't have a computer. i'm finding it very, very stressful and, to be honest, sometimes i find it too much so i just don't do any work at all. 14—year—old charlie, who is doing his gcses next year, is doing all his work on his phone. i'm worrying a lot about going back to school, having detentions after detentions for not doing the work. his foster carer chris is worried he's slipping behind. we talk a lot, he talks about his stresses and his worries and he's quite concerned, because it's a very important year for him next year and he wants to fulfil his dreams. the government said it's committed to reopening schools in england in september.
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but many families are worried that, by then, the gap will be too big. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the charities and companies who've set up schemes to accept donations of old laptops, tablets and phones are now being recognised through the bbc local radio make a difference campaign. one of those charities is business2schools, and we're joined by its ceo lindsey pa rslow. and we're alsojoined by austen hindman, the headteacher of bishop luffa school, one of the headteachers that has been benefiting from the scheme. and i think, austen, most things in your office have been donated by businesses, is that right? that is right, my colleagues are very jealous of my office, it doesn't look like a normal school office, it looks like somebody‘s in london, which is fantastic. what kind of
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things have been donated? literally every bit of furniture in here, it isa every bit of furniture in here, it is a quality we couldn't afford. you couldn't spend taxpayer money on this kind of furniture. lindsay knows the names of all the different things i have got in here but they are not seen in normal state schools. i even have my own hatstand, which, again, you wouldn't be so frivolous to spend school money on that. lindsey, you visited a school lately and they had computers that were 20 years old, which is obviously not good for pupils, is it? the school computer replenishment is around ten years and one of the things we identified with mac at a later businesszschools is that business computers are replenished every five years, so at this particular school, they had an it class where the computers took ten minutes to load, which meant that all of those children were losing, on average, 400 minutes of learning a year and they were losing six lessons. we were so fortunate that businesses have really got
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behind our charity and they are donating their thing is that they are due to replenish or upgrade, and then we are able to put those directly into schools. so before the coronavirus outbreak and the desperate need for laptops, we had been working on sustainability, looking at the economic and environmental goals that businesses need to start working towards, so if business donate things they don't need to a school, that is a great measure of that sustainability. and how lovely for children to be able to learn from the day they start school, and all the things have been donated from a company upgrading or refurbishing things they don't want. it is such a simple idea. i wonder, austen, if you didn't have these things donated by local businesses, rather than them chucking them out, you just wouldn't have some equipment. i think it is about
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quality here. we can't afford the quality here. we can't afford the quality that these businesses can afford, so even their second—hand furniture is a huge upgrade for us. plus, they upgrade their equipment every few years, we upgrade our equipment over decades, so, for our teachers, getting a new chair, it is a special day in your life and it has allowed us to value our staff and it has made them feel as though there are people out there who care about them. there will be some watching you know who say you shouldn't have to rely on the big ha rd shouldn't have to rely on the big hard sun the good charity of local business, this should be paid for by central government —— the big hearts and the good charity. central government focusing on the most vulnerable and that is absolutely right. it is interesting with their la pto ps right. it is interesting with their laptops during lockdown, clearly they have targeted a specific group of children and i think most people will agree with that but the digital divide does affect pretty much everyone. in your previous report, many parents will be sitting at home
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agreeing with that, there will be a number of children sharing one tablet, one laptop at home, so what business2schools has enabled us to do is reach out beyond just the most vulnerable into people who are not necessarily struggling but don't have the advantages that may be the top five or 10% have. have the advantages that may be the top five or 1096 have. i have a statement from the department of education. "we know being in school is vital for children's education "and wellbeing, which is why we have announced "that all pupils should return to the classroom in september. "the government has been clear in its commitment that no child "should fall behind as a result of coronavirus, "which is why we have provided over £100 million to support children "to learn at home, including delivery of over 200,000 laptops "and tablets for the children who need them most." although the last time i heard from the education minister, he told bbc radio that only 100,000 have been distributed to local authorities at the moment, so still not the full 200,000. lindsey, in terms of any
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businesses who might want to donate, how should they get in touch? you can get in touch on our website and also through ourjust giving. it would be absolutely fantastic if businesses would reach out with the things they don't need. it is a wonderful example of continuing the circular economy. furniture from businesses should reach the end of its purposeful life and those are the things we are putting into schools, so a child will grow up learning that the furniture isn't just discarded when a business has finished with it, that children grow up finished with it, that children grow up learning the names and the brands of companies that have donated and a typical example is, just before lockdown, we had a donation of 240 desks from tesco's that went into nine schools. they contacted us on friday, they have a 320 upgrade for their monitors for their office and those will be going to schools this week. thank you both very much for
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your time. good luck. thank you for your time. good luck. thank you for your messages about mesh, there are many, let me read this. i am involved in ruined by light, pain, lack of mobility, erosion, bloating, sepsis, nerve damage, no sex life, the medical professionals would not believe me and my husband said he took the complaints with a pinch of salt as he had heard it before. thank goodness for the review today. in serbia, there have been angry protests against the re—introduction of lockdown measures. there were clashes with riot police as thousands gathered outside the country's parliament. that's despite serbia recording its highest single day of covid—related deaths. paul hawkis reports. chanting. anger outside the serbian parliament in the capital, belgrade. thousands stormed the building, chanting for the president to resign
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after announcing the reintroduction of lockdown measures this weekend. translation: the situation in belgrade is critical, therefore we will take the following measures. after consulting with dr kon and the whole team, we decided to ban all gatherings of more than five people in public places and to impose a long curfew from friday to monday. then we'll see what to do next. pet owners, mothers with children, and pensioners will be allowed out of their homes at certain times. on tuesday night, serbia announced 13 covid—related deaths in the past 24 hours. its highest daily death toll, bringing the total number of deaths to 330 with over 16,000 cases. it went from having one of europe's strictest lockdowns at the start of the pandemic in easter to a near—complete reopening at the beginning of may.
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no phased reopenings here, with shops, restaurants, bars, and hairdressers opening up simultaneously. thousands of serbian football fans packed out stadiums while the rest of europe played in front of empty stands. there was even a parliamentary election, won by the president's party, who campaigned on the way it's handled the pandemic. now, however, the president feels the lockdown measures were relaxed too much. many serbians disagree. paul hawkins, bbc news. thanks for your messages about the chancellor's likely announcement at lunchtime today that there will be a £2 billion fund to help those under the age of 25 on universal credit get some kind of work placement for six months, and they will pay the wages, effectively, of the company's
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it says how about those of us over the age of 24 and out of work? bob says when they scrapped years ago because of exploitation by corporations using kids for next to nothing? and lara runs a wedding business and says there is no point putting job schemes in place if you are not going to support the business, their businesses. 0nce are not going to support the business, their businesses. once the furlough scheme ends, we will have no choice but to make redundancies. let's talk to nicky morgan, former education secretary, former culture secretary and now conservative peer. baroness morgan, good morning to you. unemployment in this country hit a you. unemployment in this country hita3 you. unemployment in this country hit a 3 million under margaret thatcher's premiership in the mid—19 80s. will the chancellor's plans avoid that? the chancellor, the treasury, the government are doing everything they possibly can to make sure that unemployment is kept as low as it possibly can be and, today is the next step in that programme.
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we have already seen the government spend over £120 billion on a combination of the furlough scheme to support the self employed, loans to support the self employed, loans to businesses and today is obviously very much about supporting young people. lastly, the prime minister was talking about investment in infrastructure which, again, obviously means people working in those fields and i think there will be more to come but i think undoubtedly we have been through a massive crisis, whereby the lockdown has had a huge impact on economy and we also have to see, as we open up the economy in as safe a way as possible, what that days in terms of consumer spending, consumer confidence, that will help people to stay injobs confidence, that will help people to stay in jobs and people to getjobs in the future. will there be any conditions attached for businesses taking part in the scheme, so that for example, bosses don't axe staff i'll need to hire dozens of free young people —— only to hire.|j
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think we will have to wait and see the details. when the chancellor stands up at the prime minister's questions today, the treasury will then obviously release the documents. i think it is a good documents. i think it is a good document that has been made and, obviously, it is a question of trying to cater for everybody, so trying to cater for everybody, so trying to cater for everybody, so trying to keep people who did have jobs, often in companies that were com pletely jobs, often in companies that were completely viable before all this happen, helping them to stay in work whilst also making sure those, particularly the young, unemployed or leaving school or college this summer, get those opportunities to not get too far from the labour market. what we have seen from other schemes giving money to businesses, conditions have been attached relating to senior pay, for example, or payments through dividends, so i think the government is very aware of the fact that, in receiving government support and doing the right thing, actually, we want to make sure that everybody benefits. right thing, actually, we want to make sure that everybody benefitslj make sure that everybody benefits.” mean, ijust don't know how you
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would police that, even if there are conditions attached. how would you stop employers getting rid of people in order to have the free under 25s? well, i think obviously in terms of people applying for the money, there will be forms and information that has to be given. i mean, i think one of the things we have seen from this crisis is clearly, as i say, businesses... there has been an acceleration of change so there are some businesses that will stay in business but they will be doing things differently and that will inevitably mean that they may need a different skill set, employees with different skill set, employees with different skill set, employees with different skill sets, so there may be times when you have to say to some employees, actually, the future isn't with this business and we need different people with different skills, but that is where we have to trust employees could lead employers running these businesses to make the extremely difficult decisions and the challenge then, and i think we
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have done this over the last few yea rs have done this over the last few years with job centre plus and were coaches, is making sure that anyone who does lose theirjob is not out of the labour market for very long. so if they need retraining or reskilling, they get that support from the government. at the end of the six month work placement, and it isa the six month work placement, and it is a work placement, it is not a job, will there be a job for that young person? well, again, i think much obviously will depend on what happens in terms of their health, in terms of the containment of the virus, in terms of economic confidence, but, yes, one would obviously hope... it won't happen in every case but, in many cases, employers will think i've got a great young person here who has done incredibly well, i can see how they are going to benefit my business, make a great contribution and we wa nt to make a great contribution and we want to keep them on. of course, as i say, that's not going to happen all the time but there will be young people who at least have no skills,
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though six months of employment, in order to use that in another work setting. so it is about making sure that people stay as close to the labour market and don't fall out and end up not in education or employment or training at all. why isn't the chancellor going to cut national insurance, which critics say is a tax on jobs? well, i don't know the details of the statement today. i'm sure the treasury... i mean, that has been suggested by a number of people in think tanks. i'm absolutely certain the treasury will have been looking at that and obviously it is something the previous governments have done, particularly after the financial crisis, in order to encourage people, as you say, to take people on or to keep people in work, so i'm certain that is something that has been looked at. whether it is announced today, we will have to wait and see. these plans are not universally welcomed by all conservatives. senior tory sir edward leigh is quoted as saying he
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wa nts to edward leigh is quoted as saying he wants to hear " less edward leigh is quoted as saying he wants to hear "less about high spending lefties like president roosevelt and more about good conservatives like margaret thatcher." well, i understand those views expressed by sir edward and others but i don't think it reflects the reality of where we are today. the crisis we are facing, the economic crisis, we are facing is very different to the changes that need to be made to our economy and industrial sectors in the 1980s and i think what people want to see, in light of what has happened in the last few months, is financial support forjobs, last few months, is financial support for jobs, people's livelihoods and certain sectors that have been very badly affected. you have been very badly affected. you have sectors you saw beginning to reopen like retail and hospitality, they are reopening and the success of their reopening is not dependent on sweeping away lots of red tape at the moment, it is actually about
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making sure that people have got money in their pockets, confidence in the health measures taken that they can go out and spend, and that's extremely different from, you know, other times in our history where we needed to stimulate our economy in a different way. thank you very much for talking to us. five million people living in the australian city of melbourne have been told to stay at home for six weeks, after a surge in coronavirus cases. they can only leave home for work, food or exercise. the state borders between victoria and new south wales have also been closed and are being patrolled by the army. 0ur correspondent shaimaa khalil is at the border between the states. up up until last night, this was an open road. now it is a checkpoint. police and military personnel have been manning it for hours now, stopping cars and checking their permits before allowing people to cross from victoria into the new south wales border. this has been a
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big logistical challenge. there are many checkpoints across the border and they are using drones and planes. now, i say the word "border," but what it means for tens of thousands of people who have been crossing here for years is essentially driving from one end of a highway or bridge across the river into another, for family, work, or school. and it is a very different picture now, there is a lot of confusion and we saw long lines of cars, big delays as people get used to what that means for them, crossing in and out of the states with this closure. we have also spoken to local business owners who said, for example, their staff live in victoria and couldn't cross the border into new south wales today to go into work, so they are concerned about what that will mean for them and their businesses. this is also a step backwards for australia which, until very recently, has had a good handle on controlling the spread of covid—19. all of this, of course, is
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happening because of the spike of coronavirus cases in victoria's capital city melbourne. 134 cases in the last 24 hours. the city itself is getting ready to go back into lockdown in a few hours. we will switch to bbc two at ten o'clock. the wait is over — cricket returns later as england take on the west indies. before the game, england's players will wear training shirts featuring the names of some of our key workers. one of those to feature will be nurse tom field — and sally nugent has been catching up with him, and got music. congratulations on your name being picked for this fantastic honour, to be on the back of one of the cricketers‘ shirts. yeah, it's amazing, thank you very much.
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now, you've been working really hard during the pandemic. what have you been doing? so, i'm a nurse practitioner at st george's hospital in tooting. i work for a team of nurses that work purely overnight for the hospital night service, we review the sickest patients in the hospital. during the pandemic, a lot of those patients have unfortunately been covid—19 patients. it's been difficult. i think the most difficult thing about it is it's been something completely brand—new, whereas, when we're dealing with acutely unwell patients normally, we're quite used to the presentations, whereas this is something that's completely brand new, so we've had to deal with it head—on and the ever—changing things, so literally daily we would have new advice from the experts about what we'd have to do and that was the most difficult thing, but, actually, i think everyone pulled together brilliantly and we were surprised at how positive everyone was that was working in the hospital. sorry to interrupt you, tom, i don't know if there's a technical problem here, just hang on a sec, i've just got a message on my screen. just one sec. 0h, hello, jimmy anderson!
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laughs. how's the body? not too bad, thanks, yeah, i've been going well. so fingers crossed i'll be all right to get through this week and then hopefully the next few weeks. we're all hoping you can because we're all hoping for a 3—0 win. yeah, same here, same here. tom's one of thousands of people who've put their own health on the line to help other people. all that sort of added up and allowed us to be able to get to where we are now and that is to actually play some live cricket, which we're all really excited about. do you know, jimmy, that cricket is being held up now as an example of potentially the way forward for many different sports. in your experience so far in the last two weeks, how well do you feel it's going and how do you think people will cope with this type of lockdown, in a sense, going into this bubble? we still have distancing as much as possible in the hotel,
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wearing ppe when we go to dinner. a few of the guys are doing their own, you know, changing their own bed sheets, and similarly in the dressing room, we've got to keep that distance, not putting saliva on the ball, no big celebrations, no hugging or anything like that, so, yeah, just a bit different. what emergency rations did you bring with you into the bubble? not a lot, really. sparkling water was the big one for me. sparkling water and green tea, which makes me sound a bit of a health freak but i'm not. we're lucky that there's a golf course at the back so a lot of the lads, pretty much all the lads, have brought their golf clubs to try and also exercise and keep fit, so that's been the main things for me. thank you for your messages about mesh. dear victoria, watching your report in tears this morning. i am starving to death because of bowel
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mesh, i can't eat solid food and i haven't been able to for two years. i weigh six stone and have been fighting for years to get answers. the pain is horrendous and i'm so depressed. finally, igo the pain is horrendous and i'm so depressed. finally, i go into hospital in gateshead mid—july to have a colonoscopy and other tests to see if i need to have my bowel removed. this is so scary. whereas liz says, good morning, ijust wa nted liz says, good morning, ijust wanted to give another side to your discussion on mesh implants. i had the operation seven years ago and i have to say i haven't had any problems. if you want to e—mail, it is victoria@bbc.co.uk or you can message me on twitter. carol kirkwood has the weather. hello, again. we got a real difference in the weather north to south today. in the north, we are looking at a brighter, sunny skies at brighter, sunny skies with a few showers whereas further south, it's going to be fairly cloudy and wet for much of the day. that rain on and off. not great news, of course,
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for the cricket. it's because we've got various weather fronts moving across our shores and, then, later on, as the second weather front comes in, it will pep up the rain, especially so across wales. so, this afternoon, a lot of cloud around. england and wales, still the rain here across southern areas and then we've got the second boost of rain coming in across wales later on. for scotland, though, and for much of northern ireland for a lot of the day, we are looking at sunny skies, bright skies with just a few showers and temperatures ranging from 12 in the north to 19 in the south. through this evening and overnight, you can see how the rain clips parts of northern ireland, goes through northern england, wales and the midlands, down towards the south—east. a lot of cloud associated with this and, as it clears, it will leave spots of rain and some drizzle, but, in the north of the country, we will see clearer skies and that will allow the temperature to tumble, especially so in rural areas. for thursday, we still do have some of those fronts moving across parts of england and wales, so come on thursday, so, on, thursday, we are looking at a fair
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bit of cloud once again. the main band of rain moves away but we will see some spots of rain and generally dank conditions. northern ireland, you will have a fairly decent day in terms of sunshine, quite a bit of it, with an isolated shower and, in scotland, they will also be some bright spells or some sunny skies, but some sharp showers that could be thundery. you could catch some of those across north—west england as well. then, thursday into friday, this low pressure pulls away. we open the gates to more of a north westerly, which will feel cooler but we will also have high pressure so, all that translated, means sunnier skies coming in from the west. there will still be some showers, some of those quite heavy and, despite the amount of sunshine, it won't feel that much different than it's going to in the next couple of days because of the north—westerly wind. temperature wise, we're looking at 12 in the north to about 20 as we push further south. into the weekend, high pressure will be with us, though, so things settle down. there will be a fair amount of sunshine, it will be a little bit warmer but we could see a bit more cloud and may be some
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rain in the north—west.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm victoria derbyshire. a £2 billion fund to help unemployed under 25s get a work placement in the uk, and a stamp duty holiday for home buyers. the latest measures aimed at boosting the british economy. the world health organization says there's evidence that covid—19 may be spread by tiny particles suspended in the air. a damning review into three medical treatments for women in england says that many lives have been ruined because of an arrogant culture that dismissed serious concerns as ‘women‘s problems‘. mesh has robbed me of the person i used to be.

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