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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 30, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: people with covid symptoms in england are expected to be told to self—isolate for ten days instead of seven to help avoid a spike in cases. good morning. with spanish holiday hopes dashed, what if you try to transfer to a uk break? bookings have been booming — what's that done to availability and prices? care home owners say they felt pressured into taking patients who had not been tested for coronavirus at the height of the pandemic. it makes a few angry because they
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should have protected us. they should have protected us. they should have, from day one. a quarter of britain's native mammals, including red squirrels and hedgehogs, could be at risk of extinction. one game away from the premier league, brentford are closing in on a return to the top flight for the first time in over 70 years! that is as they say farewell to their home ground. and july may not have lived up to its billing as one of the warmest of summer months so far, but a big surge overheat is on its way. i'll have all the details on breakfast —— surge of kids. —— heat. good morning. it's thursday the 30th ofjuly. our top story. the self—isolation period for people showing symptoms of coronavirus in england is expected to be extended. currently, those who think they may have the virus are told to stay at home for at least seven days. that's now expected to be
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increased to ten days, in a bid to avoid a spike in cases. let's speak now to our political correspondent, leila nathoo, who joins us from westminster. this comes as the government comes under increasing pressure to rethink its 14 under increasing pressure to rethink its 1a day quarantine policy. this is about the number of days people need to self—isolate, and it feels like quite a significant change? it is. it does bring us more into line with other countries around the world, and he of whom have longer isolation periods requiring ten days or m days —— plenty of whom, they will be questions as to why this change is happening now, why wasn't it a more cautious approach taken from the start? clearly what the government is pointing to is there is an evolving picture, new evidence emerging about how infectious the
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virus is once you start developing symptoms. so these extra three days clearly are important now that national lockdown is coming to an end, when there are far fewer chances of us interacting with other people. now the onus is on individuals to get tested if you have symptoms are now to isolate for ten days, up from seven days previously. that will be the new guidance, we expect. but clearly this is going to be a little bit more disruptive now as the government also tries to urge people to get back to work, clearly, more time at homejust to get back to work, clearly, more time at home just is an example of this tricky balance government is now trying to strike between getting people back out there, getting the economy moving while also not risking a surge in new infections stop and also later on the issue of quarantine, the question is about which countries should be included in the list from which you have the quarantine? yeah, the government merely keeping a very close eye on what is happening, —— clearly, especially in european countries. we
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had from borisjohnson about this risk of a second wave in infections in europe, and there are plenty of countries on the watchlist, if you like, in addition to spain. so we know like and belgium have been countries of concern in particular —— luxenberg and belgium. we believe luxembourg could be m days and belgium being closely monitored. the government clearly saying there is no alternative to this 1a day quarantine period, despite pressure from some of his own mps, lots of tory mps questioning why that needs to be the policy at the moment. and the airline industry as well as the spanish government have been outraged by the abrupt imposition of the quarantine measure across the country. but i think goes to show anyone having a holiday abroad this summer anyone having a holiday abroad this summerjust anyone having a holiday abroad this summer just needs to anyone having a holiday abroad this summerjust needs to be mindful that
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things can change very quickly and they should be really prepared to go to quarantine for 14 days, wherever they end up going. thank you very much. the number of rape convictions in england and wales has fallen to a record low, according to figures seen by bbc news. the national police chiefs' council say it's getting harder to achieve the standard of evidence required to take cases to court. the crown prosecution service said it is "working hard to reverse the trend". zoe conway reports. courtney, not her real name, alleges she was the victim of a violent sexual assault. she reported it to the police in 2016. she says her case was not taken seriously enough by prosecutors. i'vejust case was not taken seriously enough by prosecutors. i've just had, almost a decade of —— we have just had a decade of austerity and they cannot afford to prosecute crime anymore. my case... there were witnesses on the night of the assault, there is a potential second victim and none of that mattered.
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prosecutors asked for access to yea rs' prosecutors asked for access to years' worth of her social media accounts. courtney refused. she said it would have been dehumanising, and she said she had no choice but to drop the case. latest figures seen by the bbc show that in the last year 11139 rape suspect were convicted of rape or another crime, thatis convicted of rape or another crime, that is half the number of three yea rs that is half the number of three years ago. they also show that the police referred to,000 7117 cases to the crown prosecution service for a charging decision —— 27117, that is 40% over the same period. the cps is the drop in prosecutions is a major focus for them and they have launched a new strategy which is being piloted in the south—east of england to boost the number of rape and sexual offences that make it's a —— make it's a court. prosecutors deny they have been weeding out wea ker deny they have been weeding out weaker cases. we scrutinise the
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cases very carefully but you will see certainly our charging rate has improved considerably. we are not being risk averse. the national police chiefs' council is that it is very concerned by these new figures. it is police officers have told them it has become harder to meet standard of evidence required by the cps in order to charge a suspect and get a case into court. zoe conway, bbc news. some hospital trusts in england have told the bbc‘s panorama programme that 75% of the patients they discharged into care homes from early march to mid—april weren't tested for coronavirus. in all, 25,000 people were moved at the height of the pandemic — a policy described by some mps as reckless. 71 out of 124 care providers that panorama contacted said they felt pressured into taking patients who hadn't been screened. alison holt has more.
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this is each step blakely, a specialist immense home on the outskirts of manchester. i'lljust ta ke outskirts of manchester. i'lljust take your temperature. through the height of the pandemic, panorama followed staff, residents and families here. it only takes one minorslip alike, to families here. it only takes one minor slip alike, to get covid in the next room for someone to have contact. nearly half of the residents showed signs of the virus and nine died. it makes me feel angry, because they should have protected us. they should have, you know? from day one. the nhs, yeah, they get protected but care homes? most of the care providers that in two contacted felt pressurised to ta ke u ntested two contacted felt pressurised to take untested patients from hospitals, and that it was difficult to get health support in homes. hospitals, and that it was difficult to get health support in homeslj love that one. where he is in the garden with the uelese on. brian was one of bla kely‘s
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garden with the uelese on. brian was one of blakely‘s residents who died with the virus. his death was difficult and his family would have liked a home to have more medical support in his final hours.|j liked a home to have more medical support in his final hours. i know they were very busy in the hospitals, but we should have had someone hospitals, but we should have had someone to be there in the homes to help them, even if it is only to help them, even if it is only to help give them advice. local authorities pay the fees are most of the residence here, and the boss of the residence here, and the boss of the charity that runs blakely says coronavirus has made the need for reform of the whole care system crystal clear. you can't have a disconnected health and social care system. it has to change. it cannot be left to local authorities whose budgets are being cut. and even have to think about who gets guarantee doesn't, and they haven't got the money to pay what takes. —— who gets ca re money to pay what takes. —— who gets care and who doesn't. we have to decide how important our elderly and our vulnerable people are. the government says social care was not an afterthought, but homes have had
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extra funding and extensive help as well as access to comprehensive health services. alison holt, bbc news. bbc panorama: the forgotten frontline is on bbc one at 9:00pm tonight. it is 6:10am. a quarter of britain's native mammals are now at risk of extinction. yes, they've been added to the uk's first official red list — a review of species including hedgehogs, red squirrels and water voles. the report, put together by charity, the mammal society, calls for urgent action. here's our science correspondent, victoria gill. familiar characters that are becoming increasingly rare sides. while the uk is a natural home for dozens while the uk is a natural home for d oze ns of while the uk is a natural home for dozens of mammals, including reds wheels, dormice and hedgehogs, many of those species are now in danger of those species are now in danger of disappearing. this first red list of disappearing. this first red list of threatened species put together by the conservation charity mammal
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society has shown a quarter of all of the uk's native mammals were under threat of extinction. so, what we've done is a really competitive review of all the evidence we have available on things like how the populations are and how isolated those populations are —— comprehensive review. we've come up with this list of 11 of our d7 native species being classified as threatened. —— native species being classified as threatened. "1147. native species being classified as threatened. —— 1147. an for them we have to act right now, we cannot carry on the current trajectory. the scottish wildcat population has not recovered on decades of persecution. for the red squeal, disease and competition from introduced grace grills have driven decline. something conservation scientists agree on is we need to be more wild space for the species to recover.
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there are pockets of good habitat, like this red squirrel reserve in thornbury, but that is exactly what this is, and isolated pockets of good, natural habitat for red squirrels. and what conservationists say is we need that to be a connected network of wild space across the landscape. here is my little foxy moxie. people shared videos of animal encounters in urban settings during lockdown. now scientists they we need to find sustainable ways to share our environment with nature. victoria gill, bbc news. nasa is planning to launch its latest mission at lunchtime, with the aim of finding life on mars. the rover named perseverance is part of a multi—billion—pound, decade—long effort to bring rock samples from the red planet back to earth. it will arrive in february, landing on an ancient lake bed that scientists believe could hold traces
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of past microbial life. so, that is around lunchtime today. we will probably see images tomorrow morning. let's take a look at today's papers. the telegraph leads with the reported changes to the self—isolation rules for people with coronavirus symptoms in england. the paper says the move to increase the period from seven days to ten will be announced later today by the deputy chief medical officer. the daily mirror's front page focuses on the investigation into the disappearance of madeleine mccann. it leads on reports that a secret cellar has been found by police on an allotment, where the main suspect lived in hanover. the daily mail leads on a survey showing that only one in ten people are having face—to—face gp appointments. it claims the majority of them are being done over the phone or online. and online, one of the most read stories on the bbc website reveals one of stonehenge's best kept secrets. the origin of some of the giant stones have been uncovered after thousands of years.
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we'll be finding out more about that later on in the programme. did you notice this morning when he got into the office that all of a sudden it has gotten dark? got into the office that all of a sudden it has gotten dark7m got into the office that all of a sudden it has gotten dark? it is noticeably darker at 4am in the morning. really. we can embrace that because my instinct is always to get a little bit down about it, now days are getting shorter. but it's a chance to see stuff in the sky. and there is this comment nearby and in there is this comment nearby and in the next few days according to the times, now is the chance to see it as it is heading into the outer solar system. there is the chart, i have tried to figure out how to use this chart, but what you do as you hold this chart up in the direction you are looking at... yeah, i can't figure it out. no, carry on. to use this chart you hold it up so the direction you are looking at is at the bottom of the chart. so that, i don't understand in the first place. does that make sense to you? not
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really. it's a good time to enjoy that. the bottom edge of this chart will represent the horizon, the centre represents the point that is directly overhead and the view on the chart is correct for the uk at midnight on august one 11pm gmt. yes, it's confusing, but maybe you can figure it out. , —— comet neowise. stars of a slightly more obvious variety. it is bafta ‘s time. ceremonies cannot take place stop what you do instead? they have got the people nominated or involved in the various programmes to pose at home. so we have what looks like a fa ncy home. so we have what looks like a fancy garden shed for sranjones. here is a nice comfortable chair.
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looking at the very comfortable looking leather chair. that would be nice ina looking leather chair. that would be nice in a garden shed, wouldn't it? there would be a lot of concern about it you like that.|j there would be a lot of concern about it you like that. i would be worried about idham. it is in the garden. it is not the same as being indoors. that is an exuberant thing to put in a shed, a leather chair. if you have something better in your shed, that is a picture we would like to see. i would like to see. glenda jackson, for example, got a nice cup of tea, looking up at the... maybe she is looking up at the... maybe she is looking up at the consolation you were describing earlier on. who knows? maybe. here is something more explainable, perhaps. this is joe is something more explainable, perhaps. this isjoe margus, the loftiest hill of ice in antarctica. —— dome argus. the scientists have
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found it is where the stars twinkle the least. that means you get the best view of the night sky. there is a phenomenon called seeing, literally just seeing, a phenomenon called seeing, literallyjust seeing, seeing beyond the twinkling of the stars of. in a moment we have to enjoy pictures like that rather than seeing the real thing, where was that, iceland? antarctica. is nina is going to tell us antarctica. is nina is going to tell us right now, people are thinking about whether they will go away, can you go away, what you do when you come back? good morning. such an anxious time for thousands of people. thank you so much to all of you have been in touch. we will a nswer you have been in touch. we will answer some of your questions about later. but what if you cancel your spanish break and are trying to go to uk break? booking .com have told us to uk break? booking .com have told us that saturday's announcement had
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a massive impact, and 85% drop in spanish bookings compared to the year before. that was piled on top ofan year before. that was piled on top of an already very busy market. there is a problem here, more of us holidaying here, the fewer the options, and, in some cases, the fewer the options, the higher the prices. the uk countryside is calling. with reception somewhere we can calling. with reception somewhere we ca n fly calling. with reception somewhere we can fly to and concerns about coronavirus, many are holidaying closer to home. we would normally be abroad now. adding on a play now, lots of restrictions, being trapped there is not my idea of fun. we wa nted there is not my idea of fun. we wanted to be out of the open, staying close to home. we are not going to go abroad, not intending to going to go abroad, not intending to go abroad anywhere. there are too many people abroad. it'sjust not worth it. we did last year go to abroad. but with the current situation, no. iwould abroad. but with the current situation, no. i would stay in this
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country. these lodges nestled in m0] and mallory have been empty for months, now there are just a handful of dates left before christmas. we could have done with three times the amount of lodges and we have got at the moment. we're probably twice as busy, twice as many bookings for next summer as we would have had this time last year. from luxury lodges to caravan past, here demand is also through the roof. with an hour of the rules all being changed, the phone started ringing. people as close as northampton just wanted to come to get out into the countryside. and it's the same story in yorkshire, where if you want to stay in one of these, well, you will have to get on a waiting list. we've not only got a waitlist for this year, we are full from march until september next year. i've even got 14 weeks booked for 2022. never have we had bookings two years in advance. they even have four weeks booked for 2023. that is just unheard of. it is good news for the
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businesses who have weathered the lockdown storm. but for consumers disappointed about losing a break abroad and desperate for a uk alternative, they might find their options are limited. some enviable looking trips. pippa jacks is the editor of travel industry trade magazine the travel trade gazette. evidence that spots are running out across august. i'm afraid in august, it is always difficult to find the best quality accommodation and the best quality accommodation and the best options in a normal summer. this summer it is fair to say it is difficult to find what you are looking for now in august, u nfortu nately. looking for now in august, unfortunately. some people have been in touch and said prices have gone through the roof for uk breaks, but actually staycations have always been surprisingly expensive. is there evidence it has gone up? the government cut vat for hospitality businesses, which meant hotels and accommodations were able to make a
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saving that in some of it passed that onto guests. so some prices have perhaps come down little. there is definitely supply and demand with holiday accommodation in the uk and the places which are booking up fast, you'll tend to see prices might creep up a little bit. maybe it is understandable if they are trying to recoup money lost over the last couple of months. are there any spots that might be worth considering? there are obvious hats —— hotspots of devon and cornwall and north wellesley get snapped up weekly. give us some insider tips on where we could go? -- north wales. there are glorious beaches in northumberland and norfolk and the scottish coast as well. and think a bit more imaginatively about the kind of holiday you want to do. cottages tend to book out very, very quickly. you could go is on a cycling to go glamping or a boat holiday. there has been a surge in those. think about what you do as well as where you stay and you might find more options open up. you know, have been on the scottish coast and
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norfolk and they have opened my eyes to the british coastline. gail is typical of those. here is what she told us. i was looking forward to go on holiday on saturday, a much longed for and awaited holiday in majorca. we expected to go. it may sound a year. we watched the news on the turn of events and we really started to believe that we were going. arena to blatantly say we will still run the flights, whether you are on them or not, you have paid your seats, tough, is actually quite appalling —— for rae lamb. and they can't understand how that hasn't been challenged. pepper, what people want to know is how is this allowed if advice is not to fly to spain, why are flights and package deals are still going? airlines don't have to follow the foreign 0ffice advice. they're still able to continue to fly and they do have
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reasons to do that as well. sometimes bringing customers back, they might carry cargo, although some allies dojust they might carry cargo, although some allies do just seem to want to keep the flights on to avoid cancellations. there is evidence of that in some cases. unfortunately, u nless that in some cases. unfortunately, unless you have booked a package holiday with a tour operator you are not entitled to get your money back. this is why it is so important, now more than ever, to book a package and book it with a travel agent and make sure that if the situation changes and it is moving fast, you will get a full refund and that will be done promptly. some package providers are still providing that holiday saying they can't get the money back for the flight and so it will go ahead. what would you say to consumers then? are they definitely entitled to get the full money back from that package deal? they should be. if it has been booked as an aduu be. if it has been booked as an adult protected packages, then if a trip has to, if you are not able to go on that trip because of the foreign office advice you should be able to get a refund eye would be concerned about a package holiday
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provider who said they were not able to get a refund back in that situation. people are wondering about october, christmas, what would be at the forefront of people's mines? it is a very worrying time and we have going into the winter season, so the canaries, it would be different by then. for immediate travel, by all means booked to go away in september or october, as long as you are booking a package with a travel agent, but you need to have a flexible approach, actual you are booking with a company that will give your money back quickly if the situation changes. and be ok with the fact that quarantine could suddenly be introduced while you are awake and you need to be able to respond to that and cope with that. if it is going to be a massive, massive problem for you it might be best to not go ahead and press the button for a holiday in august, may be, because the situation is changing so fast. absolutely. pippa jacks, many thanks. as we have seen
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over the past week things change so quickly. it is making people nervous about looking future holidays as well. so cautious. thank you very much. it's been a month since residents in leicester were placed back into lockdown, after coronavirus infections increased across the city. a government review of the current measures will take place later, as cases have now reduced to less than half their previous levels — although with 200 new cases in the week to wednesday — the city still has the third highest number of infections in england. phil mackie has more. it feels like a very different world to the one most of us are living in. a month ago, when the rest of england was getting ready to go out to the pub, leicester was sent back into lockdown. how is the lockdown with your patience and everything? it's been tough. an essential business which has stayed open. pharmacists are on the frontline of the pandemic and worry about how the prolonged outbreak is affecting the city. the lockdown has meant a loss of fear. it's like using a blood tool, you know, the whole of
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leicester, bank, is now under lockdown. when, really, the data should have been used properly and in science we are always told evidence—based. in science we are always told evidence-based. a few non-essential businesses have been allowed to reopen since the last review two weeks ago. but if you live in the lockdown area and you still can't go on holiday and get a haircut. businesses are really struggling and what the government to offer more financial help. we know lots of our customers have gone elsewhere to local villages, local towns. so we're now going to suffer for a longer period of time now because of that. so this hurts us massively. lester claims it is the victim of its own success. it must testing regime is showing up many asymptomatic cases that would otherwise go undetected. these are some of the 500 volunteers who have been going door to door taking those bags full of tests with them to try to get to the bottom of how many
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people have got the disease in leicester. in fact, the city says it is so good at testing its results are therefore much, much higher. but in the long run, they think, that is the best way to contain the virus. 0ne the best way to contain the virus. one of the things that is really struck me as been about the response of the people of leicester, taking the personal responsibility for them as individuals and as families and communities. and i've had that comment in a number of places where the people safe i actually feel safer in leicester because everyone is taking it so seriously. heading back out on the streets, lessons learned here will help deal with outbreaks elsewhere. you are watching bbc breakfast. still to come: nasa are launching a rover to mars later, aimed at searching for signs of past life on the red planet. we'll speak to the woman charged with analysing what it brings back. more on that shortly and we'll bring you the latest news. more on that shortly and we will bring you the latest news. it is 27 minutes past six.
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now let's get the weather with matt. it feels warm this morning. here is enjoying some sunshine. aren't you? good morning. good morning, naga, good morning, charlie. i'm enjoying some sunshine at the top are broadcasting house in london. we are talking about staycations on this morning. if you have been staying at home recently you may be underwhelmed by july's weather. july so far has been a month that has not really lived up to its summer billing. if you take a look at what delay has been doing so far, it has been a case of temperatures have been a case of temperatures have been below what we would expect —— july. perhaps the coolest conditions since 2007. a little wetter than normal, especially across north—west england and northern parts of wales and a good deal cloudier. that will change over the next couple of days. we will see him today build across france, up to 40 degrees across the south was this afternoon. as winds go southerly for us in the uk will
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tap into some that tomorrow. a brief surge of heat, 34 in the south—east of london, 26 in the north of scotland. 0utbrea ks of of london, 26 in the north of scotland. outbreaks of rain more extensively northern england, putting into scotland in the morning. turning lighter and patchy. some rain in northern ireland for a time and then regaining itself again for a while. here is bryson up as we go into the second half of the afternoon. much of the far north of scotla nd afternoon. much of the far north of scotland will stay dry but the rest of mainland scotland, cloud and patchy rain on and off through the day. northern england will brighten up day. northern england will brighten up this afternoon and certainly south of the m62. looking at blue skies forjust south of the m62. looking at blue skies for just about all through this afternoon with temperatures here getting up into the mid—if not high 20s compared to the teens across scotland and northern ireland. but of a north— south split today. across southern areas they will push northwards as we go through tonight. most places becoming dry. quite a mild night though across the board, temperatures in double figures. some sitting in the teens, maybe 16—17 in
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the south—east of england. it does me tomorrow more they start with sunshine on friday. they want start as well. temperatures rocketing under the blue skies. it will somewhat across northern ireland as we go through the day and we could see a few isolated dhomps breakout across england and wales as the temperature is widely hit the 30 ‘s, 34 in the south—east corner, could hit 26 in glasgow. more in the way of storms just to finish friday, particularly across central and eastern england and is in places stop not everyone will see them. quite a few will stay dry. as we go through into the weekend we will start to see a change. with which winds from a southerly to a westerly direction. that will bring a plan to go back in. on saturday it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers, showers across northern and western areas. southern and eastern areas will stay dry and warm enough in east anglia and the south—east for highs of 25 or 26. 0therwise temperatures closer to normal. the next update is just before seven
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a.m.. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll speak to craig revel horwood and none other than paul chuckle to find out if pantomimes are likely to be back by christmas. also this morning — they've been a mystery for thousands of years, but now scientists think they've uncovered the origin of stonehenge's giant sarsen stones. we'll be there in just under an hour. and later, we'll be talking more about travel — what your rights are when it comes to scuppered plans, and your options for booking a getaway at home or overseas. it is now 6:31am. people with coronavirus in england are expected
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to be told they must isolate for longer. going from seven to ten days. and up to 14 days. 0urgpjoins us 0ur gp joins us now. dr farrah sheikhjoins us from her home in cheshire. we've been referring to this report that we might be expecting an announcement today on a change in the days that you have to self—isolate, if you have symptoms. are you clear on what the situation is now? do you think it is clear? it's not that clear, but i think it is because we know that we are learning new things about the most nearly everything good day. there was possibly because we know the infectivity period can last longer than we had originally expected. so you might still have symptoms after
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the seven days. 0r, you might still have symptoms after the seven days. or, you mate to be infected after the seven days, so thatis infected after the seven days, so that is why we have asked —— or you might be infected, and that is why it has been suggested this extension goes from seven to ten days. so some would have to stay up till 14 days. it is an extra three days to stay at home. the who has always that it was 14 days, anyway, if you had the symptoms. and seven here. what would you be saying to patients if they had symptoms or thought they had symptoms? i would say you really need to err on the side of caution and if you can stay home for 14 days then definitely do that instead. we know there has been a slight increase in the cases over the last few weeks, so it is potentially
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possible we are in a second spike. maintain social distancing, maintaining good hand hygiene. this can help to reduce our risk overall, but if you can stay at home, that would be the best thing for you overall. there has been a spike of cases in trafford, where your surgery is based. are you surprised by that? what have you noticed in the region you are operating in? yes, we're very by this. we had quite a low number of cases in trafford throughout the majority of the time, but recently we have noticed an increase in the youngsters, 17—23 —year—olds presenting with coronavirus and symptoms and positive testing. so this could possibly be because more people are being tested, we are now spending more time outdoors, but again, it would be a taste of trying to maintain that social distancing as much as possible and maintaining hand hygiene —— a test of trying to
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maintain distancing. there are lots of apps maintain distancing. there are lots ofapps and maintain distancing. there are lots of apps and technology you can use to maintain contact with your friends and family members, and i would advise that. you think there is some fatigue in that age group?” think there is lockdown fatigue in every age group, particularly teenagers, they haven't been able to experience those last few months of school and now there is lockdown during summer. i can totally empathise with them, but if you think about it from a patient safety point of view, the safety of the population, then a little bit longer, just do it for the rest of the population. it's interesting, isn't it? we have spoken with a lot of gps who have people shielding and they have a lot of anxiety about returning to, in the loosest sense of the word, normality. what have those who have been shielding say in terms of anxiety and concern? there
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has been a significant number of these patients who are feeling very anxious about returning to some degree of normality. you've got to remember that they have been shielding forfour remember that they have been shielding for four months and have not had any normal aspect of their lives for four months, so stepping into the big, bad wide world for them is going to take a lot of courage. again, iwould recommend that they just try and keep it safe if they possibly can. if they are experiencing symptoms, get tested, if they can work with potential employers to make their workspace covid says, that would be absolutely fantastic. but if they are feeling very anxious about this we have services available that they can contact —— covid safe, their gp or social prescribers linked to gps in the community to help them feel more confident in returning to work. the community to help them feel more confident in returning to workm has almost been a week since face masks orface has almost been a week since face masks or face coverings, i should say, have been mandatory in retail outlets. what have people been saying to you? there are lots of
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reports of people who are unable to wear them because of genuine reasons, but the list appears to be quite fluid as to who is exempt? yes. there is a number of lists that i have seen that don't seem to have any kind of medical backing as to why they would potentially be exempt. we were getting quite a few requests prior to this announcement, requesting exemption letters. but due to social media campaigns and yourselves mentioning this, that gps are not able to write these letters and you can just get an exemption ca rd if and you can just get an exemption card if you are entitled to be exempt online, that has cut our work lowdown, which is great. but the majority of people seem to be wearing masks, which is a good idea, because it will help to prevent the spread and hopefully prevent a second spike. it's great for you to join us. i hope you have a lovely day today as well. thank you. it is
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6:37am. mike is on standby with sport two floors down but ready to go. good morning! great to see you both. brentford move to a new stadium and it could be a premier league stadium. the last time they played in the top flight of english football as well was 73 years ago. but now they're just one win away from reaching the promised land of the premier league. they were a goal down going into the second leg of their play—off semi—final against swansea, but within 15 minutes, they'd scored twice, to take the lead in the tie. emiliano marcondes with the second and then in this last—ever game at their griffin park ground, bryan mbeumo, made sure they'll be at wembley next tuesday, for a final against fulham or cardiff, who play tonight. fulham lead 2—0. an exeter rugby supporters group is furious with the club's decision to keep their ‘chiefs' name and logo despite a campaign to have them
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remove their native american branding. the premiership club's board, met yesterday to discuss a petition, signed by more than 3,700 people, and they did agree that their mascot, ‘big chief,‘ could be regarded as disrespectful and they've retired him. but the club voted against other changes and the fans group, exeter chiefs for change, have described the board as "tone—deaf". we'll see the first crowds back at the horse racing on saturday at goodwood. and i'll be there for breakfast! and glorious goodwood is already well under way. mohaather won yesterday's feature race — the sussex stakes. the 3—1 shot, ridden byjim crowley, managed to sneak round the rest of the runners on the outside, in the finalfurlong to take the win. another sport welcoming back crowds this weekend is snooker, with 300 people at the crucible for the world championship, but the sport's biggest star isn't happy about it. five—time winner ronnie o'sullivan, here with the trophy in 2013, has been critical of the decision,
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saying he's heard snooker players being described as "lab rats". but another former champion shaun murphy, can't wait to have fans back. the other option is to never go to a live sport event again. stay inside, don't come out. that's the extreme end of that conversation, which i don't think anyone wants. so i get their fears, don't think anyone wants. so i get theirfears, i don't think anyone wants. so i get their fears, i understand don't think anyone wants. so i get theirfears, i understand and i sympathise with it, but is a pilot at the end of the day. it's a trial. and we've got to move on. we've had boxing bouts in empty casinos and tv studios during the covid—19 pandemic, but on saturday night, it finds another new home — a garden in essex! ok, it's not your average garden, though, these are the grounds of promoter eddie hearn's estate, headquarters of matchroom sport. he's put up a boxing ring and he's had fighters quarantined in a nearby hotel, all to help keep the sport in the spotlight. this is a dogfight at the moment,
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not with other promoters, with other sports, to get their attention and say we are back, don't worry. everything that has happened, we are stronger than ever. and you see this kind of project when you turn in, you will believe me. if the viewer doesn't fall in love with this new normal, then we will be in big trouble. that is why we have worked so hard to engage with the viewers and fans and say what's this, because right now, who knows what is going to happen? but we can'tjust sit on our backsides and say we'll just wait for crowds. well, what's more, eddie hearn says anthonyjoshua has been training in the garden and would be happy to fight there, too. to be honest, the garden — well, estate — is as big as any stadium. and the surroundings are much prettier. you just have to use your imagination with the tools you have got and what is around you. we have all done creative things in our gardens and homes when it comes to fitness and family. why not have a boxing bout with stands and grandstands and everything like that? it does put sue's garden shed
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to shame. did you see that earlier? the shed? i don't think so, no. i did get beaten in a tv presenter‘s competition, an award, by a man who made a series about sheds. i've never forgotten that. i made a series about sheds. i've neverforgotten that. i have made a series about sheds. i've never forgotten that. i have always had a thing about shed ever since. there are people with fascinations of shared. —— with sheds. see see you later. it is 6:42am. one in every 14 of us in britain has previously been infected with coronavirus, according to new research. a study from uk biobank measured the antibodies of 20,000 people from across the country, and found that the rates of infection vary significantly across different sectors of society. to tell us more about the findings is their chief scientist, naomi allen. a very good morning to you. should we start with some of the basics on
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this one? 20,000 people, what procedure did you do, and what was it you are testing for? good morning. so, we recruited 20,000 individuals from uk by a bank, a large study of about 500,000 people aged 50 and over —— from uk biobank, but in order to increase representation across wider age groups, we also recruited adult children and grandchildren of those participants in order to recruit 20,000 individuals across a broad range of age, socioeconomic deprivation, uk regions, ethnicity, in order to monitor the extent of past infection of coronavirus across the uk in different population subgroups by measuring blood levels of antibodies to coronavirus. so, you take a blood test and then this is the antibody test? so what you
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then discover is how many people have had coronavirus. and is it fair to extrapolate that number up? you had 20,000 people, people are doing the maths and then saying therefore x number of people in the uk have had coronavirus, does that work? well, not exactly. this study of 20,000, they are not nationally representative of the uk population, but what this study does do is it enables you to compare different rates of past infection across different subgroups of the population, which was the real purpose of the study. what we found was while overall, in the study population, the rate of past infection was about 7%, what we did find was it buried quite considerably by age. so, for example, it was twice as high as those aged over 30 compared with those aged over 30 compared with those over 70 —— it varied by age.
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higher in london, 11% in london, less tha n higher in london, 11% in london, less than 5% in those living in the south—west of england and wales and scotland. and it was higher in ethnic minorities, so it was 11% in people of black ethnic origin, 9% in south asians and 7% in people of white ethnic background. what the study enabled us to do was to really compare the rate of past infection of coronavirus across different population subgroups. this the use of this information will be in the longer term, is that right, you will carry on monitoring people to see how the changes over time? that's right. i think that's the real value of this study is that not only are we collecting information on blood antibody levels on 20,000 individuals in the general population, we are asking those participants to provide us with blood samples that they have taken
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in their own home, using a little micro lands at a device for a fingerprint amount of blood, every month for at least six months, so we can monitor changes in the rate of past infection as we come out of lockdown, so as people are changing their behaviour is, what does that do to the rate of infection across the uk and different population subgroups? can ijust ask the uk and different population subgroups? can i just ask you, the uk and different population subgroups? can ijust ask you, naomi allen, looking at this statistic you mentioned a moment ago, but amongst participants, the 20,000 you tested, over the age of 70, just 5.4% had positive antibody tests. so compare that to under 30 and that's10.8%. so that is one in ten of under 30s. we know politicians say they are led by the science, what conclusions can you draw in terms of what usefulness does that information have in terms
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of how you may be address different age groups? yeah, it is really interesting. so you are absolutely right. rates more than twice as high in those under the age of 30 compared to over the age of 70. and we don't exactly know the reasons why, probably because they are going out and about a bit more and therefore more like to be exposed to therefore more like to be exposed to the virus. what we are also doing is collecting information on symptoms of coronavirus. and every month for at least six months. and once we analyse those data we will be able to provide information about what proportion of these 20,000 individuals are asymptomatic or not, so don't have symptoms. and if we find that that changes by age, if those under the age of 30, over 10% of them have got antibodies, but actually most of them are not
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symptomatic, then that has real implications in terms of the transmissibility of the virus and social distancing and on herd immunity and how we should actually come out of lockdown measures, because those who are walking around who are young and perhaps going out a lot more than the elderly don't actually know that they are carrying the virus. so it does have real implications for policy. it is very interesting. we will keep an eye on the developments as it progresses. naomi allen, thank you. naomi allen is the chief scientist from uk biobank. it is 12 minutes until seven. good morning to you. thanks for joining seven. good morning to you. thanks forjoining us. a multibillion dollar, decade—long effort to bring rock samples from mars back to earth gets under way today as nasa launches its latest rover. the six—wheeled robot, called perseverance, is tasked with deploying a mini helicopter, testing out equipment for future human missions and searching for traces of past life. rebecca morelle reports.
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getting ready for mars — the final tests for the most advanced rover that nasa's ever built before it heads to the red planet. it will be collecting samples of martian rocks from an area that was once a river bed, and the hope is it will answer the key question — was there ever a life on mars? we now know mars had an enormous amount of water in its past. if ancient life was on mars, we have a good bet that we might be able to find it in these sediments. so this is really a life detection mission. the rock samples will be stored and brought back to earth on a future mission. but this mission is also taking something back to mars — a piece of martian meteorite. it's from the natural history museum's collection. it blasted off the surface of the red planet more than half a million years ago. now, it's heading home. we really know what meteorite is made from, we can use it
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to compare that meteorite with the new rocks, that unknown rocks that we're looking at for the first time on mars and see how similar or different they are. also on board is a miniature mars helicopter that, for the first time, will attempt to fly in the extremely thin martian atmosphere. nasa wants to test this technology for future missions. america's spacecrafts is the last of the trio heading to the red planet. china and the united arab emirates are already on their way. if they all succeed, it will mean a giant leap in our understanding of mars. rebecca morelle, bbc news. we can now speak to sarah stewartjohnson, who has worked for nasa on previous mars programmes, and has written a book about the red planet. it's lovely to have you with us. i have got so questions. let's through them. why now? what is this window of opportunity that there's a rover is going to be travelling now? so we only have opportunities to go to mars every 26 months, when the
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planets swing together on the same side of the sun. and we have a very short opportunity, just about three weeks, we can launch missions and ta ke weeks, we can launch missions and take the 45 million mile difference we have as the planets have in their orbits. what are you chasing? it's about water. if you are thinking about water. if you are thinking about signs of life, am guessing what is pretty crucial. yes. so we have done all of this work in the community with all of these past missions and we really understand that the context for life was there. we know mars was a habitable world. it has all the building blocks required for life as we know it, all the essential elements, and it does have water. we have been following the water and we found swimming pools' worth of water. so we are now taking the next step. we knows mark —— no mars was a habitable world. it inhabited? are going to try to find that out. you have a short window,
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this window of opportunity. the team is working on this, how are their working day is going to look? obviously different daytimes and cycles on ma rs obviously different daytimes and cycles on mars compared to earth. yes. the rotation of mars isjust cycles on mars compared to earth. yes. the rotation of mars is just a slightly longer than earth. so very similar. just about half—an—hour longer. it means once the mission lands the first 90 days the team will be living what we call on mars time, which is in sync with the distin well so you can maximise the science the rover is able to do. it means waking up later and later every day and trying to stay in sync. this kind of the worst kind of jetlag you can imagine. 0k. sync. this kind of the worst kind of jetlag you can imagine. ok. we are grateful to them by taking that on. why was reading the research notes and it seems you will be leaving letter or there will be litter left on mars. i'm talking about these cigar size capsules for future rovers. tell me about that. yes. at this mission is doing is it is
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kicking off this breathtakingly ambitious campaign to bring samples from mars back to earth and so dozens from mars back to earth and so d oze ns of from mars back to earth and so dozens of these pen like tiny little samples will be drilled out of rocks, the kinds of rocks we think are most likely to harbour those signs of ancient life and it will be a huge paradigm shift in how we do our work. i'm a huge paradigm shift in how we do ourwork. i'm an a huge paradigm shift in how we do our work. i'm an astro biologist, very interested in this question of whether we are alone in the dark night and we will be able to have the samples in our own laboratory where we will be able to hit them with everything we have got. it is going to change everything. instead of waiting for remote data to come back we will be able to actually work with these samples.” back we will be able to actually work with these samples. i am loving your enthusiasm with this. thank you for explaining all of those issues. sarah stewartjohnson. enjoy watching that. good luck with the jetlag. by am sure you will be following it as closely as the team working on it. assistant professor at georgetown university. thanks for having me. it is fascinating.
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looking ahead a little bit. we may be five months away from christmas, but, ordinarily, plans leading up to the british pantomime season would be well under way by now. although theatres in england will be able to open again from saturday — there's fears new restrictions will mean many productions won't be able to go ahead. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been investigating. all around the uk pantomimes are on pause and time is running out. we do a show and it's a quiet audience, we hated, don't we? yeah. so imagine how weird it would be if you were performing to sparsely space our... she was roxie mitchell in eastenders. she should be taking pa rt eastenders. she should be taking part in her sixth panto and loves playing buddies. but she believes the only booing this time will be when it's cancelled. panto can often be the thing that notjust for
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theatres, but actors, fulcrum, eve ryo ne theatres, but actors, fulcrum, everyone built up a little nest egg for the year and they go on and do the other gigs or auditions or whatever. panto is, for many, many actors, it is your bread and butter. it is certainly my bread and butter. bob golding has been sold a lot of pa nto bob golding has been sold a lot of panto at st albans for a decade but says planning for this year's mother goose has been impossible due to confusion over what restrictions might be enforced. there's talk of possibly a gauze being flown in, a gauze meaning a see—through piece of scenery gauze meaning a see—through piece of scenery in front of the actors between, as a barrier. the other things are, i've seen some stuff written down about nobody allowed to shout to say no, you can't do that. it is taking away a massive chunk of the genre. and many theatres that usually hold pa ntomimes the genre. and many theatres that usually hold pantomimes are still shot, including the radlett centre in hertfordshire and it's where the very in hertfordshire and it's where the very man in hertfordshire and it's where the very man they are waiting to hear directives from, the secretary of
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state for the dcms, also holds his constituency surgeries. tomorrow night there was supposed to be a little mixed tribute act. but there is no date for when it reopens. let me make it clear. our position at the moment is we don't know if we are going ahead or not. last year we had our bestselling data moam ever. we play to about 97% capacity —— pantomime. and some local schools have been coming here for 20 years and this is the first year that they can't come. we are in our warehouse, this is the brains of the operation. normally there would be 18 people in their working, pulling scenery, costumes, props together. we've got 30 productions in storage in here and this year, they would be getting ready to go out on the road. steve bowden's company produces 15 pantomimes a year and provides the costu mes pantomimes a year and provides the costu m es for pantomimes a year and provides the costumes for dozens more. literally you are witnessing a building that was abounded in march when we went into lockdown and all of our staff we re into lockdown and all of our staff were furloughed. these props should
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be sprinkling fairy dust, instead they are gathering dust in this warehousing commentary. as an industry collectively realise that the start of august access to absolute limit where we could possibly react. beyond that pantomimes as we know it cannot happen this year. we are then looking at what our alternatives are. cinderella knew all about the dangers of the clock striking 12. for britain's 2020 pantomime season, the deadline is about to be reached. callu m the deadline is about to be reached. callum patterson, bbc news, coventry. a really difficult time for those people. it is three minutes until seven. it is time to talk to matt who was enjoying a lovely bit of sunshine at new broadcasting house in london. good morning, naga. good morning, all. some of you are probably cursing me because in the northern half of the country is raining quite heavily. that really sums up whatjuly has been for some
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of you. so far this month, considering it as a summer month, it has been cooler than normal also that bit wetter for north—west england and northern parts of wales. not a sunny either. we are about to change that as we just see the month out, a brief burst of heat. that heat today is across parts of france, 40 degrees possible, may be hired was this office. as we go into tomorrow, a southerly wind in the uk will bring more of the keith galloway. get 34 degrees in the south—east corner, up to 26 celsius in parts of northern scotland. not quite there yet. raining heavily in northern england at the moment. it will improve. slowly turning drier and brighter through the day. ran on and brighter through the day. ran on and off times in northern ireland and off times in northern ireland and things right up later. it will push across maine and scotland. the heaviest bursts for many of you will come this afternoon. far north of scotland, probably just a come this afternoon. far north of scotland, probablyjust a stay dry, the brightest conditions around orkney. the temperatures only in the mid teens for the vast majority.
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heaviness of rain across glasgow and an bright was the evening rush hour. drier northern ireland and much of england. still some rain in county durham. feeling pretty warm already. temperature is widely mid to high 20s. temperature is widely mid to high 205. 28 temperature is widely mid to high 20s. 28 celsius in the london area through the second half of the day. we finished the day with sunshine and heat. the clearest guys will eventually work northwards as we go through this evening and overnight. my through this evening and overnight. my20 through this evening and overnight. my 20 for a time on the west of the uk through today. the winds will ease a little bit and more southerly as we go into tomorrow morning. while most will turn dry and clear it will be quite a warm night. temperatures dropping 16— 17 degrees in south—east england, most places in the teens to start friday. friday will be your peak of heat forjust about all. northern ireland probably the exception in that we will see cloud and rain spreading from the west after a dry and sunny start. damages in the low 20s. elsewhere, isolated thunderstorms for england and wales into the afternoon, but we
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will see temperatures widely into 30 degrees. 26 in glasgow. the storms across central and eastern parts of england and scotland more rubble into the first part of the night. your rentalfor one or into the first part of the night. your rental for one or two. clearing through into saturday and then we see atlantic winds gradually push their way in. that will bring a drop in temperature for the weekend stop it all felt quite warm in the sunshine across east anglia and the south—east. for many it will be such and showers, showers mainly in the north and west. temperatures back down to where they should be for this time of year, if not a little bit lower. most places in the high teens, low 20s. that cooler weather continues into sunday with a mixture of sunshine and showers. that is how your forecast is looking. naga and charlie have your headlines next. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: people with covid symptoms
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in england are expected to be told to self isolate for ten days instead of seven to help avoid a spike in cases. care home owners say they felt pressurised into taking patients who had not been tested for coronavirus at the height of the pandemic. it makes me feel angry because they should have protected us. the nhs, yeah, right, they get protected, but so should other care homes. every care home. a quarter of britain's native mammals, including red squirrels and hedgehogs, could be at risk of extinction. good morning. exeter rugby club upsets campaigners. they retire their mascot, but stick with their ‘chiefs' branding, despite claims that it's offensive to indiginous people. good morning. it's thursday the 30th ofjuly. our top story. the self—isolation period for people showing symptoms of coronavirus
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in england is expected to be extended under new government plans. currently, people with a new and continuous cough, a high temperature, or a loss of smell or taste are told to stay at home for at least seven days. that's now expected to be increased to 10 days in a bid to avoid a spike in cases. household members not showing symptoms should continue to remain at home for 14 days. it comes as the government comes under increasing pressure to rethink its 14—day quarantine policy for travellers returning from spain. let's speak now to our political correspondent, leila nathoo, who joins us from westminster. leila, how significant could this change in policy be? good morning. it does bring us into line a little bit more with other countries around the world, with who guidance. that the isolation period should be extended for ten days rather than seven now. and it is worth remembering there have been because of the soul along, so clearly questions now as to why the decision is being made at this
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point. now, the government will clearly point to an evolving body of evidence, we are learning more about the virus, how infectious it is once symptoms start to develop as time goes on. clearly now we are out of national lockdown there are far more opportunities for interacting with people outside of your household, this sort of thing becomes more important and the onus is placed on individuals. now, to get a test if you have enough symptoms and to isolate for ten days. but it is quite a big change. we have been used to the seven—day guidance for some time, and it will prove, i think, more disruptive for people as the government tries to start encouraging people to go back to work. if there are three more days at home, people isolating, whether they come down with a fever a cough or loss of taste or smell, that will prove more disruptive for people thanif prove more disruptive for people than if the government tries to balance this message of going back to work, getting the economy going while also trying to urge caution to avoid another surge in infections.
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leila nathoo, thank you very much. we will be talking to matt hancock a little bit later, the health secretary. holiday hopes for thousands of families were dashed at the weekend when 14—day quarantine rules were reintroduced for those returning from spain. meanwhile, the government says it's monitoring the infection rates of other countries in europe and that further restrictions could be introduced if required. we'll speak to our correspondent nick beake in brussels shortly, but first let's cross to gavin lee who's in majorca this morning. bring us right up to date. we are watching people enjoy the beach behind you, we can see the attraction, but these restrictions are making people think twice? yes. and the reality is now spain is increasing its measures to tackle coronavirus as of today with madrid becoming the last region to make it mandatory that in all public areas, including outside on the streets,
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you have to wear a mask. so every pa rt you have to wear a mask. so every part of spain, that applies to now. what's interesting is you but 7 million people who come to the islands, and the incidence rate here islands, and the incidence rate here is so different. we got the latest figures last night, cases across spain are increasing, 1500 in a day with 900 the day before, that is a worry. the biggest amount in the northwest, northeast, ishould worry. the biggest amount in the northwest, northeast, i should say in other gone, catalonia. there was one case in majorca, seven cases in the canary one case in majorca, seven cases in the ca nary islands. one case in majorca, seven cases in the canary islands. this is what officials have said, it is very small, less chance than in the uk of catching covid, they believe, but they stopped diplomatic efforts. there are two thoughts here that are a concern for people on holiday: one, people travelling with jet too, we are hearing they may have to come home earlier on repatriation flights and some saying no, they have missed their flights and that has put concern over that. secondly, a
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number of hotels are closing in the past few days since the quarantine principle, since quarantine came into force, and their telling customers to go elsewhere. and we're told that is ruining people's holidays. we spoke a family about that. it is a moving here and obviously advice days that all but essential travel to the islands and mainland spain should be avoided. our correspondent nick beake is in brussels for us. nick, we know belgium is being monitored by the british government. that's in terms of whether people would have to be quarantined when they return home. good morning, yes. the number of new cases here in belgium have shot up by 70% over the past week, and that has led the government here to warn that maybe a second complete lockdown is needed. we are in the grand class this morning, it's pretty quiet and yes, it is early. but in years gone by this would have been seeming with british tourists, and there is, as you say, speculation now that
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belgium willjoin the uk quarantine list. in other words, following the likes of spain. people travelling from the uk, maybe they will have to quarantine when they get to the uk. also speculation luxembourg next door may be put on that list as well. it's really difficult for these countries to work out what the best plan is, because they are looking nervously at their own covid rates but also those of countries nearby and further afield. we know this coronavirus is something that doesn't respect orders in any way. so, difficult decisions to be made. the impact not just so, difficult decisions to be made. the impact notjust the people of this country, visitors and lots of governments thinking about how to protect their economies, too. so, difficult times, naga and charlie. next, quick question. how are authorities responding? if you see a rise of 70%, what are they putting it down to and defending it with? it doesn't work well with tourism quarantine was coming in. —— quarantine was coming in. —— quarantine laws was that if you talk
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to people indulge in belgium they are acutely aware they have the highest mortality rate when coronavirus was making its devastating way across europe a few months ago during this first wave stopped for example, in antwerp, an hour north of here, they put in an overnight curfew. to give you some sort of context, that is the first time they have done that since the second world war. so, really, authorities bringing out all the measures they think i needed to try and arrest this alarming rate —— are needed. although it is on at it was a few months ago people are desperate to do everything they can. while thinking about the economy, they want to avoid a second lockdown wherever they can. next, thank you very much there. nick beake in brussels. and we will be speaking to matt hancock later. the health secretary. the number of rape convictions in england and wales has fallen
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to a record low, according to figures seen by bbc news. the national police chiefs' council says it's getting harder to achieve the standard of evidence required to take cases to court. the crown prosecution service is setting out a five—year strategy to try to improve conviction rates. the proposals include allowing more alleged victims to pre—record their evidence to avoid having to attend trial. german police have completed the latest stage of their investigation into the disappearance of madeleine mccann. they've been searching an allotment in hanover believed to have been rented by the prime suspect in the case — a convicted paedophile who's in prison in germany. it's reported the foundations of a garden house were discovered at the site and a hidden cellar room was found. a quarter of britain's native mammals are now at risk of extinction. they've been added to the uk's first official red list — that's a review of species including hedgehogs, red squirrels and water voles. the report put together by charity the mammal society calls for urgent action to prevent their loss.
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now, it's not an uncommon sight to see therapy dogs and cat in some hospices and care homes. but what about a family of ducks? what could they do? well, this mum and her two ducklings made a surprise visit to a hospice in leicester yesterday, quickly making themselves at home in the staff room. why wouldn't you ? why wouldn't you? that is where the tea and biscuits are. they weren't content with just waddling around the office though — they also paid a visit to the wards. staff said the unscheduled animal drop—in brightened up the residents' day. i think, you ithink, you know, why i think, you know, why wouldn't you? the other of the staffroom committee and biscuits, why not? that is sweet. i want to know where they ended up stop i'm imagining there was a pond or a lake outside and they came in from there. it is 7:10am. some hospital trusts in england have told the bbc‘s panorama programme that 75% of the patients they discharged into care homes from early march to mid—april
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weren't tested for coronavirus. so in all, 25,000 people were moved at the height of the pandemic — a policy described by some mps as reckless. alison holt has more. this is eachstep blackley, a specialist dementia home on the outskirts of manchester. and i'll just check your temperature. through the height of the pandemic, panorama followed staff, residents and families here. it only takes one minor slip, like, to get covid in the next room or for someone to have contact. nearly half of the home's 55 residents showed signs of the virus, and nine died. as in many care homes, they felt the government saw them as an afterthought. it makes me feel angry, because they should have protected us. they should have, you know? from day one. the nhs, yeah, right, they get protected, but so should other care homes. every care home. most of the care providers that panorama has contacted felt pressurised
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to take untested patients from hospitals, and that it was difficult to get health support in homes. i love that one. where he's in the garden with the wellies on. brian was one of blakely‘s residents who died with the virus. his death was difficult and his family would have liked the home to have more medical support in his final hours. i know they were very busy in the hospitals, but they should have had someone to be there in the homes to help them, even if it's only to go and give them advice. local authorities pay the fees are most of the residence here, and the boss of the charity that runs blackley says coronavirus has made the need for reform of the whole care system crystal clear. you can't have a disconnected health and social care system. it has to change. it cannot be left to local authorities whose budgets are being cut. and they then have to think about who gets care and who doesn't, and they haven't got
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the money to pay what takes. we have to decide how important our elderly and our vulnerable people are. the government says social care was not an afterthought, that homes have had extra funding and extensive help as well as access to comprehensive health services. alison holt, bbc news. let's speak to mark adams, from community integrated care, a charity that provides ca re services across england and scotland. what does your organisation do? we we re what does your organisation do? we were set up 31 years ago to help people either living with dementia, or to support people with autism, down syndrome, mental health or other issues. and we operate around 450 locations in the uk. so this
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evidence the panorama programme has looked at the pressure organisations felt to accept patients who were not tested. what are your thoughts on that? you can see the impact in terms of the incredibly high death rate. in february, before we really got our act together, we saw a massive loss of life in washington and in care homes. we saw in early march the same in spain italy. it was very march the same in spain italy. it was very obvious that you are going to get the same coming over with covid coming over into the united kingdom. and we hear the government talk about a ring of steel put around care homes, and i think as the public health committee said yesterday or tonight's panorama programme will show, we didn't even have a ring of tissue around the system. people will look at the time line here. you made reference to the point from which there was, if you like, a known risk, to the point in
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time where anything tangible was done to protect those people in care homes. 0h, done to protect those people in care homes. oh, i think done to protect those people in care homes. 0h, ithink they done to protect those people in care homes. oh, i think they came out very clearly again with the public committee. you had the government from the beginnings anglicare the elderly and supported care homes was an equal priority to the nhs —— beginning care homes. and the committee saying to the government yesterday that the care sector was effectively thrown to the wolves. there is a bit of an inconsistency between those two statements. what we do know is that the nhs went on to its highest form of alert, on january 30 but now from the public accou nts january 30 but now from the public accounts committee scrutiny, we know there wasn't a plan for adult social ca re there wasn't a plan for adult social care in still april 15 —— until april 15, i would like to ask matt hancock and his colleagues what happened between the 30th of january and the 15th of april, when everyone
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else could see this coming but the government seem else could see this coming but the government seem to —— didn't seem to? ina in a readout you are right to reply. they say it is completely wrong to suggest care homes were an afterthought. it is an affront to the countless people who have been working to protect their homes since the start of the pandemic. they go on to say that throughout the pandemic we have been working closely with the sector, public health experts, to put in place guidance and support for adult social care. what do you make of that? well, again, ithink social care. what do you make of that? well, again, i think we will have to beg to differ. i would ask your viewers to please watch the panorama programme tonight because they think it is not for chief executives are locked away protecting my family from covid to comment. i think it is for the frontline care workers who have gone and every single day, even knowing that covid is in the building and
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see what they say and see how they feel. the reality is that public health england, yes, it has given plenty of advice to the kazakh, but it has revised that advise over 100 times. so you start the week saying to your team this is what we should do and by the end of the week you are changing it. that isn't singularly helpful. we started off you don't need to wear ppe in a care home stop it safe to have hospital tra nsfers home stop it safe to have hospital transfers into a care home. this is clearly a nd transfers into a care home. this is clearly and obviously wrong. and as a charity we made a decision that we wouldn't take anyone from hospital u nless wouldn't take anyone from hospital unless they had been tested and we wouldn't take a covid person back into ourand —— wouldn't take a covid person back into our and —— into any of our homes unless they were coming back toa homes unless they were coming back to a home that already had covid on the household and we had the necessary measures to make sure everybody else was safeguarded and protected. and inu, nationally, that lots of operators were put under
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immense pressure because initial government instruction was clearly hospitals in preparation for new vic terms of covid, let's stick them into ca re terms of covid, let's stick them into care homes where they can be looked after and then we can have spare capacity —— victims. we focused on the nightingale hospital, we focused on ventilators, what we should have been focusing on was pcr testing machines and making sure that everybody got tested at the earliest possible juncture. where we we re earliest possible juncture. where we were as a charity, we have most of our losses between the beginning of april and the beginning of may and the peak around the 15th of april. at that time we had no testing whatsoever and on the 15th of april matt hancock stood up and offered us a green badge. you know, we didn't have funding, we didn't have ppe, and we didn't have testing. that would have been a lot more useful. mark, that thank you for that. mike adams from integrated care.
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we talked to michelle and chelsea. good morning to you. we were just hearing mark respond to the government's statement saying that it didn't feel that care homes were an afterthought. how did you feel at the start of the pandemic in terms of what you are doing regarding patients who were referred to from hospitals? we were being very clear that we were asking for people to be tested. as long as they had had a negative test result. if as long as we could meet the needs and then we we re we could meet the needs and then we were accepting people and keeping them or trying to keep them in isolation for two weeks thereafter. but it wasn't a comfortable situation. how have you been coping in terms of relatives and visitors, because obviously that has been very limited, who were obviously so
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concerned about the safety of their loved ones? yes, and rightly so. we have tried to do our best to keep in touch with people regularly. so chelsea and the team have been doing skype calls and whatsapp videos, sending photographs... just liaising with them. and trying to reassure them as best we could that we are trying to do the best to keep everybody safe. and what is the reaction you have now from the residence themselves? i imagine not all are completely aware of what is happening in terms of the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, chelsea? there have been changes in behaviour. they are aware something is going on. we just try to keep them as calm as possible and continue daily life as we would without covid. and what about you
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both? what about your safety? we have spoken to care home workers who have spoken to care home workers who have decided to move in in terms of protecting their families, but also being committed to the job, protecting their families, but also being committed to thejob, how protecting their families, but also being committed to the job, how have you two been coping? it's been very emotional and challenging. but we have had a duty of care to support the individuals in our care at this ha rd the individuals in our care at this hard time. i think for me, very early on, we had conversations about what it could look like, before we even locked down when covid first came about. i think it felt very real, very early on. it was more about when it was going to happen for me. so we discussed with the tea m for me. so we discussed with the team about how do you think it would work if we moved in? how we could set things up. in practical terms, ina set things up. in practical terms, in a service as big as this with almost 100 employees, that wasn't going to work, really. but personally i've packed a suitcase.
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it is still here now. that could have been an option. i was prepared for that and so was my family.” know that the club for carers has been going on, of course, and people have been applauding, rightly so, those who work for the nhs. but for you guys as well, let me personally safe ta ke you guys as well, let me personally safe take you to what you are doing, protecting and caring for so many people's loved ones, particularly at these difficult times. so chelsea and michelle, thank you very much your time this morning. thank you. it is 7:22am. lots of people have driven past stonehenge. even if you look at it from a distance, you can't think how did that happen?m isa can't think how did that happen?m is a mystery. has been for thousands of years. in some ways are like the fa ct of years. in some ways are like the fact this is a mystery. don't you? but scientists finally think they've uncovered the origin of stonehenge's giant sarsen stones. we already know that the small,
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blue horizontal stones on top of the monument came from wales, but little has been known about the vertical structures until now. duncan kennedy is at stonehenge and can tell us more. are you going to break all the magic for us, duncan? good morning. laughter. good morning, naga, good morning, charlie. i'm going to in a minute. we do know the origin of these stones here. before i get to any of that, let me say that english heritage have given us, the bbc, special permission to be a little bit closer to these magnificent stones here this morning. there is also, you might see behind me, a party of german meditators who got special permission to be in there this morning and watch the sunrise. so we have got to keep our voices down a bit because they booked to be inside the stones and we have been allowed a little bit closer but not quite inside the stones this morning, which is where they are meditating right now. you may even hear a meditating right now. you may even heara drum start meditating right now. you may even hear a drum start to strike up in a second, because that is part of
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their meditation process. these stones are at the centre of the story this morning. particularly, as you said, these vertical stones known as the sarsen stones. the monument has been around for about 4500, 5000 years and people have never known quite exactly when the stones have come from. there has been spiculated everywhere from devon to norfolk, but now a team have come together and they have pinpointed where these sarsens came from. it's stood here for 4,500 years, but where did the stones of stonehenge come from? we have known since 1923 that these are small blue stones in the circle brought from wales. but what about the other 52 massive sarsen stones? well now, finally, we have the answer. it's 50 miles away from stonehenge at a place called westwards in wiltshire. the area is
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now covered by trees, but impressed direct times sarsen stones were everywhere. experts say it is here the builders of stonehenge game. everywhere. experts say it is here the builders of stonehenge gamem is really exciting to know that westwards is the source of the stones for stonehenge. because, first of all, gives us that focus, gives us the answer, but it also means we can do some more work. we know where to come now so by the story of how the stones were located goes back to 1958 and an engineer called robert phillips, on the left ear. he was given one of the stone rods extracted or during repairs, which he then took to florida. but two years ago, aged 89, he decided to have the rod back to stonehenge, that allowed chemical test to be carried out and pinpoint where the stones came from. i think you would have been delighted to know that through his husbandry of this important artefact that it has been able to be used to make this great
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discovery and pinpoint the location of where the stones have come from. x—rays were also taken as stonehenge bya x—rays were also taken as stonehenge by a team from the university of brighton. they too showed that all the sarsens came from one place. final proof for the source of these 20 ton giants. what i was told the news and received the jar —— draft paper was really excited, kind of shaking. it's one of those moments where you know something that people have been asking questions about for so have been asking questions about for so long and we finally got an answer. finding the exact source of the sarsens have been a goal of archaeologists for decades. until now it was thought the sarsens of stonehenge could have come from anywhere between devon and norfolk. the fact they have now pinpointed this one location in wiltshire is a major scientific and archaeological achievement. robert phillips didn't live to see the discovery. he died injanuary live to see the discovery. he died in january aged 91. live to see the discovery. he died injanuary aged 91. but his stone rods sample that he kept as in
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office souvenir has helped enlighten our knowledge of this pre—eminent prehistoric monument. sad news about mr phillips who didn't live to see what his discovery found. but his son is extremely proud of that stone will be available to other scientists and archaeologists to examine and carry out more experiments if required. but what does all this mean just how exciting is it to finally discover where these sarsens come from? they enjoyed by the senior historian and english heritage. susan, you have been part of this monument for a long time, how excited are you to finally know where these big stones have come from? it is an exciting piece of research. finally we actually have an answer to a question that an adequate 400 years ago,john question that an adequate 400 years ago, john aubrey, suggested it might be the mulberry downs. . we did not know for certain it was there. now we know specifically it was west
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woods. it is a great answer to the question. what does it tell us, what we now had to ask as a result of knowing this? what will it throw up for us? now we know the location we can look at options as to which route the sarsen stones were brought over to bring them to stonehenge and we can search for evidence of exactly where the stones were instructed from. there is lots of 19th—century south and working in that area to that needs to be investigated. one of the co—workers on the paper, katie whitaker, is doing that research now. like any good research opens up lots more questions. thank you very much. they have just had the drums are striking up have just had the drums are striking up behind me from the german meditators in amongst the stones this morning. they have the beautiful view here this morning is like we have on salisbury plain this morning. they may well be asking questions about what happens next in terms of research for this beautiful monument. indeed. duncan, it was well worth the magic being broken, slightly, to hear that story. thanks very much. such a beautiful scene with the bluescope. it looks
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magnusson. 7:28. —— magnificent. still to come: nasa is launching a rover to mars later, aimed at searching for signs of past life on the red planet. we'll speak to the woman charged with analysing what it brings back. also, in a few minutes we'll be speaking to the health secretary matt hancock. matt is on the roof at new broadcasting house. you said lots of people would be cursing you today. i believe the sentence just there. i suppose the caveat is, where you are, beautiful sunshine this morning. it is not the picture for everyone, is it? you are being slightly boastful this morning. not great if you are outdoors at the moment. a very good morning to you across parts of northern england, southern scotland, a thoroughly wet start here. of course we have been talking about stay—at—home vacations in the programme so far today. if you have been holed up in the uk, in
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july, well, so far it has been rather underwhelming. especially in north england and north wales and less sunshine. coming up, we are about to briefly change that, a surge of heat is heading its way. that kid at the moment is across parts of fronts over 40 degrees towards the south—west today, and as we pick southerly wind tomorrow we bring some of that once our way, 34 degrees in the south—east corner, maybe 26 in scotland, which is a big departure from what you have got this morning —— what he degrees in france. our breaks across much of northern england, northern ireland, much of southern scotland, happier times do, it is going to terminator and patcher as it does make it is going to terminator and patio. sunshine was slowly move its way north, so brighter conditions into northern ireland in northern england later. somewhere, the best weather will be in caithness and orkney, blue skies and times here. a cool 14- 15 blue skies and times here. a cool 14— 15 degrees day, whereas southern scotland, my heavy rains come this afternoon. as i said, northern ireland dries up, growing up in
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northern england to come if you stretches of england in and around parts of cumbria, northumberland and cou nty parts of cumbria, northumberland and county durham. south of the m6 to do, please go this afternoon and feeling hot already. 35 degrees to 28 degrees. wins strongest towards the west of the country. —— south of the west of the country. —— south of the m62, a nice day. most places north becoming dry as well, but it is going to be a cold nights in oakham attempt is higher than last night holding it16— oakham attempt is higher than last night holding it 16— 17 degrees across south—east england widely into the teens as we start tomorrow morning. —— nota into the teens as we start tomorrow morning. —— not a cold night tonight overnight. there will be country later edging into the west of northern ireland on friday and we will see a few isolated thunderstorms were england and wales. under that sunshine, as avery mentioned, it will be a hot one. england and wales widely into the 30s, england and wales widely into the 305, 35 england and wales widely into the 30s, 35 celsius in london, 26 in glasgow and aviemore as well as
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inverness in the afternoon. but it isa inverness in the afternoon. but it is a one—day burst of widespread here because the time we get back to saturday after some funder storms during friday evening working their way eastwards, very much hit and miss, saturday is going to be a story of sunshine and showers, as i was mainly to the north and the rest of the country, draped on sunniest of the country, draped on sunniest of the country, draped on sunniest of the south and east, and we could see highs a pretty fable 26 in east anglia or south—east england. your headlines are next. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning to you. in a few moments we will talk to the health secretary, matt hancock. before that, we need to know what is going on with the sport. mike? good morning. a big day in rugby, the exeter chiefs have said they will not change the name or logo after a campaign was launched by some fans calling for the club did dig all of their branding related to native americans. earlier this month,
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washington's american football team chose to drop its controversial redskins name and logo. in devon, the exeter chiefs have decided to retire there big chief mascot, but exeter fa ns retire there big chief mascot, but exeter fans seem divided. retire there big chief mascot, but exeterfans seem divided. on one side, a more needs to be done, and more from that is a member of exeter chiefs for change. good morning, alix. you card is top of the league, there is going to bea is top of the league, there is going to be a restart of the season, the clu b to be a restart of the season, the club say they have considered both sides and are willing to get rid of the big chief mascot. what you feel that is not enough? it's incredibly disappointing to see the club throw away an opportunity to show itself as inclusive. they have ta ken the to show itself as inclusive. they have taken the easiest route byjust getting rid of something that effectively doesn't make much difference to the running of the clu b difference to the running of the club and monetary value, and the
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branding has been proven to harm and defend indigenous people. you say that. can you understand the club's position? there are some who say it isa position? there are some who say it is a celebration of native american culture. have you spoken to representatives from that community on that petition? i think the main problem here is the fact that we are listening to people based here in devon, with no connection to the indigenous communities, when the people being harmed by the branding, by what the club are doing, are being ignored. they are the people whose voices need to be listened to, and they are the voices we are amplifying with our campaign. 0k, alix, thank you for your time. i'm sure the debate will go right up until the start of that new season ina until the start of that new season in a couple of weeks deposit time. thank you for now. mike, thank you very much. we will speak to see you later. it is 7:34am. let's speak to
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the health secretary, matt hancock. good morning to you, mr hanckel, live from central london this morning with blue skies there. i look to get through this morning. cani look to get through this morning. can i ask you first of all, there is a suggestion that there is to be a change in the self—isolation rules, the timetable which is appropriate there. can you explain what is happening? welcome the chief medical officer is going to set more details later today on the question of for those who test positive, how long they need to self—isolate for? as they need to self—isolate for? as the science on this has been developing, and also because we want to ta ke developing, and also because we want to take a precautionary approach, to make sure that we can keep people in this country as safe as possible. and we can see sadly a second wave of coronavirus that is starting to roll across europe with many european countries whose number of cases is going up again, and we want
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to do everything we possibly can to protect people here and protect people from that wave reaching our shores. i want to ask you very precisely about what you first mentioned them about self—isolation. yep. as it stands, if you show symptoms, are you advised to isolate the seven days and members of your household advised to isolate for 14 days, is that changing? the chief medical officer will set out the details later. but there is one really important adjustment of this ifi really important adjustment of this if i made. no, no, iam going to finish this answer. -- if i made. if i made. no, no, iam going to finish this answer. -- if! made. it is so important to say this to every single one of your viewers. if you have symptoms, then yes, you must self—isolate, but you also must get a test. because finding where the people are who test positive is the
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single most important thing that we must do to stop the spread of the virus. there are many other things you do as well, that is incredible important. 0k. you do as well, that is incredible important. ok. i appreciate that. that message very important. for the sake of clarity, there is an announcement today, later in the day, which will change those guidelines. is that correct? the chief medical officer will be setting out details on these guidelines later today. it's very important it is a led decision. this is an area where the science is co nsta ntly is an area where the science is constantly improving, and i want to leave it to the chief medical officer to set out the science. what iam officer to set out the science. what i am saying is we will be guided by that science, and crucially, that we wa nt to ta ke that science, and crucially, that we want to take a precautionary approach because of the concerns that we have of the potential of a second wave that is clearly coming
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in some countries across europe. second wave that is clearly coming in some countries across europem it is the case that self—isolation is going up from seven to ten days, and opiate use at that announcement is to be made later, if that is the case, a lot of people will immediately ask if that is right now, surely it was right sooner, earlier on, especially given the well health does make world health organization were recommending it should always have been 14 days. so why were we recommending seven days? no. the world health organization we re no. the world health organization were not recommending that. the a nswer to were not recommending that. the answer to the question which is a perfectly reasonable one, is that we have been constantly learning throughout this crisis. you know, there has not been a pandemic like this before, and this disease, we didn't even know about it until the end of december. and we didn't identify as a coronavirus and still
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january —— and stilljanuary. so we are constantly learning through this. and as we see things change, so we this. and as we see things change, so we will change what the country needs to do. this is true, for instance, of the data we are seeing in europe, where we are seeing countries that did have a very, very low rate of new cases, that rate is starting to rise, and in some cases quite sharply. and so i think people, i know for a fact, that the vast majority of people understand that we are dealing with a virus that we are dealing with a virus thatis that we are dealing with a virus that is completely new and we are doing a huge amount of scientific research into it. we are looking at what happens in countries all around the world, and then taking the best decisions we possibly can to keep people here safe. that is how we approach it, and that is — we are much less interested in, you know, who did what when, sort of questions. we are much more
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interested in what we can do to keep people safe. are you about to change the quarantine guidelines for people coming back from countries like rain? which are currently 14 days? —— like spain. rain? which are currently 14 days? -- like spain. we are working on testing people during that quarantine. it is safe to then be able to release them earlier. again, this is a really important, essentially scientific clinical question. that is something we're working on but not imminently making an an announcement on it. because we, that work is not concluded. and until it is absolutely safe to make that sort of change, then we won't do so. but it is something we are working on and there are some — again, there are some countries in the world who do that, but you've got to be absolutely certain that you can check the people who come m,
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you can check the people who come in, make sure you get the test results and crucially that the likelihood of them having incubated it for longer than before you do the second test, that likelihood is very, very low. so there is a whole series of essentially scientific questions and we have our scientists to do work, and they are doing at work, but we're not ready to change that policy was that i can understand that is clearly relevant toa understand that is clearly relevant to a lot of people's liza decisions but when they are going away. of course. is a days or weeks in that scenario? we will not be making changes on that in the next few days, i understand the impact of this and all the other decisions we take. look, as health secretary, i have had to either partake or be pa rt have had to either partake or be part of decisions that affect people in an extra ordinary way in ways you would never want to as a politician or as would never want to as a politician orasa would never want to as a politician or as a citizen. unfortunately, many of these decisions are necessary in order to keep people in order to
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keep people safe. in the current circumstances, as we are now, as people come back from a country like spain, how many checks have taken place as to whether or not people are abiding by the quarantine they are abiding by the quarantine they are obliged to stick to?” are abiding by the quarantine they are obliged to stick to? i don't have an answer to that question. 0k, cani have an answer to that question. 0k, can i ask you another question? i would like to get to a couple. how many people are doing the job of checking? yes, i was going to answer. the point is the vast majority of people, according to the work that we're doing, they are undertaking the quarantine ellipses how do you know that? because we check it, because we survey.” thought you said you didn't know how many people who chat.” thought you said you didn't know how many people who chat. i don't know the exact number. but i do know the vast majority people are following the advice. that is an assumption.
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no, it is not an assumption. you ask people? this is unclear to me. if you have contacted them and said yes, we are abiding, or you haven't contacted them? you ask me precisely how many people we contacted. they don't have that figure at hand. but what i do know is we check this and the vast majority of people do abide by the rules. in the same way the vast majority of people abided by the social distancing rules and lockdown when we brought that in. i mean, one of the positive things about this terrible epidemic is that when people are given advice of what they need to do to protect others, they need to do to protect others, theyin they need to do to protect others, they in a large part follow it. i'm terribly sorry i don't have the precise number of people we have beenin precise number of people we have been in contact with, the size of that piece of work, but i do know the work is going on. so, at heathrow, there is a test centre already established. it's a car park that has been converted into a test
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centre, as you well know. why is it not possible or immediately, for those people coming in from overseas, to be taken immediately to the test centre to have a test done? well, the question isn't whether that could happen, the question is what is the consequence of that test was denmark because what a test does is it tells you something more about someone. “— is it tells you something more about someone. —— what is the consequence of that test? the problem with testing at the border, the scientific challenge and biological challenges that you can incubate this disease for many days without displaying any symptoms and that wouldn't show up in a test. so if people get off a plane coming from somewhere that has a high degree of disease and therefore they have to quarantine, if you get the test and the test result comes back negative, you could still have the disease just incubating. if you test positive, then you have to isolate,
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but you have to isolate anyway. so it doesn't make any difference to how people would then behave. so, you know, iam not how people would then behave. so, you know, i am not against testing immediately when you get back, but there is no positive purpose to it. well, it sounds as if in a way, because you cannot test, cannot prevent everyone coming in with covid—19, there is no point in testing anyone? no, that is not what iam saying. testing anyone? no, that is not what i am saying. what i am saying is because of the biology of this virus, because the fact it incubates inside our bodies without revealing itself, whether as symptoms or as a test, that means that if you do test people immediately, they will still have to go through the isolation. so, there is no purpose to that immediate test. there is a different question, which is the one that we are working on, which is if you test people sometime after they get back,
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then can that reduce the level of quarantine? and that is a scientific question on which we are doing the work. very similarly to the answer gave me previously, in terms of days or weeks, you say we are working on various approaches, when make those changes happen? what kind of tame are we looking at? wasjust going to come onto this —— timescale. those rules will not be changing in the next few days in terms of the number of people who come back who have to quarantine and you have to use testing to reduce the quarantine. we are doing the work that the rules will not change in the next few days. that's absolutely clear. and there is a reason for that. that is that we have to keep people safe and we have to try to stop a second wave coming from those countries in europe where it has risen sharply.
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and that's why we had to take the action so rapidly that we did for people coming back from spain because of the number of cases in spain absolutely shot up. they ask you, health secretary, about those countries were on the list from which you have to quarantine. there are reports that a number of countries will be added to that list. can you explain which countries they are and what's changing? we are constantly looking at the date of all those countries that are exempted from the quarantine arrangements and checking that it still safe for people to come here and not quarantine and thatis come here and not quarantine and that is a constant process. we are looking at all of the countries. there are some mentioned in the newspapers. as soon as there are some mentioned in the newspapers. as soon as we see a problem that we need to act on them we will do so and we will announce it. in the same way we did for spain in the same way for serbia ten days
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or so ago, because we saw a in the same way for serbia ten days or so ago, because we saw a spike in the number of cases. for your viewers, thinking about whether they go on holiday, we want to keep these exemptions in place but we will not keep them in place if it isn't safe. cani keep them in place if it isn't safe. can i ask you, health secretary, there is a lot of talk about second wave and i know we are careful with our language around this, but what will be the indicators? they know you are looking at europe and seeing a second wave there, what would be the key indicator that we may have reached that point in the uk? there area reached that point in the uk? there are a whole range of indicators. the number of people who test positive is important, so is the percentage of people who test positive. so of course of the surveys we have. we have some of the best surveys going, including from the office of national statistics. we also look, we look at hospital admissions, although thankfully that has lagged. that doesn't happen as early, obviously, the first thing you see is the number of people who test
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positive. how close are we to that point was yellow well, we review the data all the time. so it's impossible to predict that and if we have learned one thing over this crisis we have learned that predicting the future is much harder when you have a pandemic that is affecting the whole world than in normal times. matt hancock, thank you very much your time this morning. good to be on. 11 minutes to eight is the time. coach companies say they haven't received the same financial support from the government as bus companies to cover loss of earnings during the coronavirus pandemic. the confederation of passenger transport says more than 20,000 jobs are under threat. it's calling for clearer guidance over when they can resume leisure breaks. richard galpin reports. across the uk there's a fleet of 30,000 coaches which provides employment for 42,000 people. but for months now most of the nationwide fleet has been standing
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idle. like at this company here in cheltenham. nothing has moved here since march. they spend £10 million ona since march. they spend £10 million on a new green fleet of coaches to cut emissions, all paid through with finance deals. we don't anticipate that income stream to return until march 2021 at the earliest and then probably only at a proportion of what he would have expected in our projections for next year. with fears the industry could collapse, drivers took to the roads recently heading to parliament square in london for a noisy protest to highlight their predicament. their message to the government, keep us afloat financially amid all the uncertainty. back at base in luton, the mood was sombre. we can only go as far as we can. and when it is up it needs to go. i don't want to go. they have been working ten years to be where i am today and to lose what
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i've worked for 13 years will be heartbreaking. in the offices of the coach highview company in luton they have seen bookings plummet, but are trying to keep going. it is really frightening the number of businesses that could just easily collapsed, because if there is no income how do you because if there is no income how do y°u pay because if there is no income how do you pay for offices and businesses like this? how do your paperwork ships and all the stuff? we would normally have 60 people here. if there is no income, we have onejob in ourdiary in there is no income, we have onejob in our diary in november. that's it. dozens of coaches from across the north of england and the midlands gathered recently in another protest at the situation. officials say they need £62 million a month from the government to keep the industry afloat. the treasury, though, has highlighted its job retention afloat. the treasury, though, has highlighted itsjob retention and furlough schemes and £10 billion of gra nts to furlough schemes and £10 billion of grants to businesses. but eight—year—old fear, his mother and father own applegate coaches in gloucestershire, has written a letter to the queen asking her to help persuade borisjohnson to tackle the problem. well, with the
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queen, i would like it to go to borisjohnson to say can we have a meeting to meet with him so we can talk and say, right, why won't you help us? and we need help. that's right. because we are the coach industry, not us. not boss, coach. they are now waiting for a response. richard galpin, bbc news. jenna rush is the managing director at north east coach travel and joins us now. thank you very much for your time. eye can see it is raining there. thank you for standing outside in the rain for us to talk to us this morning. tell us what is happening at your company. basically, we are the same as every coach company in the same as every coach company in the uk. 98% of the coaches are parked up and have been parked up since march and that is likely to stay that way until easter next
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year. we are a seasonal industry and we rely on our busy summer months to help make our winter payments. u nfortu nately, help make our winter payments. unfortunately, we're looking an 18 month long winter and companies will not survive that. so what are you asking forfrom not survive that. so what are you asking for from the government? because it has provided the job retention scheme incentives for companies to keep staff. there are mortgage holidays that have been offered by the banks under the instructions of the government. what more do you need? well, the job retention scheme has been a very welcome scheme stop at lieke have just said, for us, we won't move until easter next year. we will be laying off and making staff redundant. this point even happen by the end of october for the fellow scheme ending. this will happen now. even with the balance back loans, we are taking on massive amounts of finance to finance these coaches and bounce back loans just aren't enough. personally, and a normal month, i would enough. personally, and a normal month, iwould have enough. personally, and a normal month, i would have £40,000 worth. and bounce back is not enough. even
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with the other loans, we are taking on debt to pay debt and we will not be able to make those repayments back. jenna, can you ed slater mi, i don't know the coach industry, what are these outgoings? what are you paying for the costs so much each month? —— can you explain to me. paying for the costs so much each month? -- can you explain to me. the biggest outgoing is the finance. every com pa ny biggest outgoing is the finance. every company has invested heavily in theirfleet, every company has invested heavily in their fleet, especially with the government introducing clean zones across the country. so when we are buying a coach it is costing us between £250,000 buying a coach it is costing us between £250 , 000 and buying a coach it is costing us between £250,000 and £400,000. we are making repayments over a five year period. as you can guess, the figures will be astronomical everything on month and we can't meet this finance. most coaches are paid between £3000 of £4000 every month. asking the for support because coaches are being repossessed at the moment and what people won't know is we take personal guarantees on this finance so personal guarantees on this finance so that because of the depreciation in the coaches that when the company repossessed the coaches and the shortfall is that they will come
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after us personally and possibly ta ke after us personally and possibly take our houses. so, basically, you have coach drivers who have taken out loans to pay for a coach that is up out loans to pay for a coach that is up to half £1 million. they are responsible for that debt now. what are they doing? how are they coping? what are they saying to you? an operator wanted to come to blackpool u nfortu nately had operator wanted to come to blackpool unfortunately had his coach repossessed on that morning and now the finance company have said even though he owes £150,000 in finance, they have sold the vehicle at £75,000 and they are going up impersonally for the semi £5,000 shortfall. he has messaged me and said this company is going into liquidation tomorrow and he is declaring himself bankrupt because he cannot afford to pay the £75,000 back. it is a very sad time listening to the stories and there will be many more if governance support doesn't come and it doesn't come fast because, as i said, people
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can't survive much longer. the government has said, a treasury spokesman has said, and a laid out some of these packages earlier, the treasury spokesman said we have provided a generous and wide—ranging package of support for businesses, thejob retention scheme has been extended until october, it has been going for eight months, we have introduced packages of other support measures. there has been the announcement by the chancellor, the second part support for the economy through his plan forjobs, giving businesses the confidence to retain and higher and provide people with the tools they need to get better jobs. do you feel your industry is ina jobs. do you feel your industry is in a position to do that? what will happen to your industry? we are absolutely not in a position to do that. at the moment the statistics show that by the end of this year companies will be laying off 20,000 staff right across the industry and those figures will raise before next year. i would like to mention when the government stating they have ——
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that we have access to grants, that isn't the case for coach companies. we have been excluded from the leisure and hospitality sector. so what they said was the local authorities would use their discretion and only 15% of coach operators have the background so far. jenna rush, thank you very much for talking to us. you have painted a clear picture of what is going on with the coach travel industry. jenna rush there. standing out in the rain for us in newcastle. until the rain for us in newcastle. until the picture of what is happening the country this morning. absolutely. a grim picture. it is 7:57am. matt has the weather and we have a divide between the lovely son you have there and other places. we could hear the rain there quite heavily. asa hear the rain there quite heavily. as a north— south split this morning as far as the weather is concerned. overall, if we look at whatjuly has been like so far can love the country together and being a little bit cooler, wetter, substantially so for some in north—west england and
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north wales. a little assigning as well. a brief hit of summer is on the way to most parts of the country during the next 36 hours. today we will see temperatures in france get above 40 degrees the south and south—west. as we get southerly winds to take us into tomorrow we will bring some of that warms our way. south—east england could hit 34 degrees on friday afternoon. northern parts of scotland up to 26. a big contrast with what we have this morning. they would start across much of northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland. the heavy rain working northwards and shining light aperture for a time but another burst of wet weather coming through northern ireland and putting it towards scotla nd ireland and putting it towards scotland as we head through the afternoon. far north of scotland, around skegness and orkney, something drier and brighter through the day with some sunny spells. staglon = here, 14— 15 degrees, maybe 15—16 across inverness or aberdeen. this is where it will be about 10 degrees warmer through tomorrow. burst of rain this
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afternoon through scotland. drying out, writing up for northern ireland and much of northern england. a little rain across cumbria and northumberland and county durham. from the m62 suffers, blue sky throughout the afternoon and already starting to feel some of that warmth. temperatures widely around 25- 28 warmth. temperatures widely around 25— 28 degrees. going through this evening and overnight, that clearer, drier, and warmer weather will push northwards. tonight temperatures for most will be in double figures. some in the teens. maybe 16—17 in the south—east corner. the gusty wind we have in the west of the uk will gradually start to ease a little bit. it is a southerly winds tomorrow and we start the day with lots of sa rgen tomorrow and we start the day with lots of sargen around. it is going to bea lots of sargen around. it is going to be a warm one. rain spreading to the west of northern ireland later on and there could be isolated thunderstorms for england and wales as we see temperatures climb into the 30s quite widely, peaking at around 34 degrees in the south—east around 34 degrees in the south—east around the london area. could get to 30-31 around the london area. could get to 30—31 as far north as leeds.
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glasgow, inverness, up to 26— 27 celsius through the afternoon. we could see a few more storms to finish friday cross essentially some parts of england, is in scotland, torrential thunderstorms at that. hitand miss torrential thunderstorms at that. hit and miss as most of you will stay largely dry. the stumps will get out of their way into saturday morning and into saturday we get atla ntic morning and into saturday we get atlantic went through change. that is good to get rid of the heat. warm in the south—east corner, 25—26, likely dragomir shovel to the north and west stop temperatures back into the teens. naga and charlie have your headlines next.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. people with covid symptoms in england are expected to be told to self—isolate for ten days instead of seven to help avoid a spike in cases. could there also be a reduction in quarantine time for those returning from abroad? as the holiday chaos continues, we ask what can be done to rescue the flailing industry, and your summer break. the secrets of stonehenge revealed. the mystery surrounding the origin of the stones has been solved. good morning. it's thursday the 30th ofjuly. our top story.
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the self—isolation period for people showing symptoms of coronavirus in england is likely to be extended, under new government plans. currently, people with a new and continuous cough, a high temperature, or a loss of smell or taste are told to stay at home for at least seven days. that's now expected to be increased to ten days, in a bid to avoid a spike in cases. household members not showing symptoms should continue to remain at home for 14 days. it comes as the government comes under increasing pressure to rethink its 14—day quarantine policy for travellers returning from spain. let's speak now to our political correspondent leila nathoo who joins us from westminster. we spoke to matt hancock a few minutes ago and asked him directly if this is going to change in terms of the days. he was reluctant to say anything before we get an announcement from the chief medical officer. yes, we are expecting confirmation of that later this morning but matt hancock really pointing to an idea of the science
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involving on this of how many days you can be infectious after having develop symptoms of coronavirus. now, the guidance so far has been seven days and we expect that to go up seven days and we expect that to go up to ten days, which brings us into line with many other countries around the world. there have been calls for this more cautious approach to have been taken all along. but this is what matt hancock had to say a little earlier. very important that it is a clinically led decision. this is an area where the science is constantly improving andl the science is constantly improving and i want to leave it to the chief medical officer to set out the science. what i am saying is that we will be guided by the science and crucially, that we want to take a precautionary approach, because of the concerns that we have of the potential of a second wave that is clearly coming in some countries across europe. so clearly, the
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message from matt hancock is that they are very cautious about a possible surge in infections in other european countries, now that we're out of national lockdown, clearly, there's far more chance of us interacting with people outside of our own households and the onus now is on individuals to take a test if you develop symptoms and isolate for ten days, but of course, there is now some tension between the new guidance, going up to ten days, and the message to get out there, get back to work and get the economy moving. and of course, there is the whole debate about travel quarantine times as well and how that is going to work, obviously in light of what we have just heard about spain and other countries getting longer lists. matt hancock was very clear earlier there would not be changes to those quarantine rules in the coming days. he was clear he did not think testing on arrival was a viable strategy because it would not pick up all infections because you
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could be carrying the infection back from another country and not reveal that in a test on arrival but then the infection can develop days later. but there is pressure on the government to rethink this, the abrupt reimposition of quarantine on spain has certainly raised hackles in spain, among the airline industry and among tory mps, too. but i think the government's position now is thatis the government's position now is that is the only viable strategy for the moment. other countries on the watch list, we know luxembourg, belgium for example, there is concern in government about those countries. but clearly, in terms of people wanting to go on holiday, it is worth just remembering that things can move very quickly, restrictions can be reimposed at very short notice, so it is worth bearing in mind, wherever you have holiday plans. thank you forjoining us. some hospital trusts in england have told the bbc‘s panorama programme that 75% of the patients they discharged into care homes from early march to mid—april weren't tested for coronavirus.
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in all, 25,000 people were moved at the height of the pandemic, a policy described by some mps as reckless. the government says homes were provided with extensive guidance and support. german police have completed the latest stage of their investigation into the disappearance of madeleine mccann. they've been searching an allotment in hanover, believed to have been rented by the prime suspect in the case, a convicted paedophile who's in prison in germany. it's reported the foundations of a garden house were discovered at the site and a hidden cellar room was found. nasa is planning to launch its latest mission at lunchtime, with the aim of finding life on mars. the rover, named perseverance, is part of a multi—billion—pound, decade—long effort to bring rock samples from the red planet back to earth. it will arrive in february, landing on an ancient lake bed that scientists believe could hold traces of past microbial life.
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we were speaking to matt hancock a moment ago and one of the questions i asked was about international travel, holidays. nina is taking a look at that this morning. in amongst lots of confusion over quarantine rules, for example, other issues about getting your money back if you have booked already. guess, and matt hancock was knocked explicitly clear about reducing the quarantine time about coming back from foreign countries but i tell you what, our inbox in the past few days has been so busy, i would say even busier than when lockdown verstappen because people are so worried about their holidays. good morning and thank you to everyone who has been in touch, there's been a few recurring themes in the inbox and we have been taking a closer look at some of those issues. hello, i'm nick hope. i'm liz hope. and we have literallyjust got married, as you can see. and we were supposed to go on our honeymoon on friday morning very early to spain. my name's liam whitehead. i'm one of a group of 14 people due to go to the algarve on saturday the 1st of august.
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hello, my name isjulie miftari. i booked a package holiday to tenerife. we were supposed to be getting married in may, in spain, but obviously, that all went out of the window and didn't happen. so we have rebooked and rebooked and rebooked until we could actually get married. we booked a villa in october, a villa only holiday with villa plus, and we booked our flights in january. we paid up in full in may for the villa and the flights were paid for in january. since then, we've had nothing from villa plus, and they've changed their own policy just yesterday from offering cash refunds. i contacted my travel provider, on the beach, by messages. they have advised me that as the flight is still going ahead, that they will not cancel my package holiday. 99.9% sure that we are not going to get any refund at all from the ryanair flights that we have booked because they are continuing with the flights. if they run the flight and we choose not to go on the flight, it'sjust hard luck.
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i myself am a single parent with my daughter who is seven. it has been... a big amount to save up for this holiday. this is a really frustrating time for us, not knowing if we are going to get any money back. so, ultimately, iam frustrated with two companies, rya nair for not cancelling. they should be cancelling if sco advice cancelling if fco advice is against all but essential travel. it is just gutting isn't it, but first and foremost, nick and liz, congratulations, you look absolutely gorgeous! alex neill is the chief executive of the free complaints website resolver and shejoins me now. let's start with those people who has been in touch with us, nick and liz wanted to go on holiday, it didn't happen, any chance of getting cash back from ryanair?” didn't happen, any chance of getting cash back from ryanair? i am afraid it is very, very unlikely. so if the flight it is very, very unlikely. so if the flight is going ahead, then they don't have to buy law give you your money back. so in this case, and
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u nfortu nately money back. so in this case, and unfortunately come of all the airlines, ryanair is taking the ha rd est airlines, ryanair is taking the hardest line of this one —— budget airlines. they are saying use it or lose it, and if you don't know, you can rebook but if you booked awhile ago, then you have to pay to change it and often the fees can be really high. that is so upsetting sony people. julie said her on the beach package deal is going ahead, how unusual is this, for a package deal to go ahead against foreign and commonwealth advice and should she be able to get our money back? you would have thought she would be protected. yes, you would and it is really unusual, most of the big package providers have already cancelled and are giving people full refunds which is what you are entitled to under the package travel regulations. what i would say is to go back to them and say can they confirm it definitely is a package? this is a real grey area so she needs to make sure they confirm it isa needs to make sure they confirm it is a package and if so, the rules we re is a package and if so, the rules were that if the foreign & commonwealth office say you should not travel, you should get a free refu nd not travel, you should get a free
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refund —— a full refund. i would push them on both of those points if i were her, and see if you can get anyjoy. i were her, and see if you can get any joy. so definitely worth pushing. similarly, liam booked his villa only, but that has gone from a cashback policy, they have switched it after he booked to only a voucher policy. is that allowed? yes, again, i think you are at the mercy of the terms and conditions of the provider, because technically speaking, you could get there and the villa is open. i think i would properly push them again on the point of saying, when i booked, the terms and conditions and the terms of the contract i signed with you we re of the contract i signed with you were different. i think they will struggle. the other area to look at is if they have got a travel insurance policy that was taken out before march and is there an opportunity there to use that? otherwise, it looks like they may have to accept a voucher. ok. talk us through, step—by—step, what can we do? lots of people are nervous about booking future holidays so how
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can we mitigate against these risks? people maybe don't mind not going away because they understand the safety but how do we protect our money? yes, it is a really tricky area so money? yes, it is a really tricky area so if you have not already booked, i think you have to weigh up what is your risk appetite, really. there is no fail—safe way of guaranteeing you will get to go away or you won't lose any money. it is kind of up to you as to what kind of risk you are willing to take. if you have already got something booked, i would be getting in touch with your travel provider, make sure that you can have a conversation. if you are unsure if you have got an atoll protected holiday, so the package eve ryo ne protected holiday, so the package everyone is talking about, try to establish that because that'll give you confidence that should a situation like this happen again, you will be covered. otherwise, getting in touch your insurance provider and understanding what levels of cover you have got. our correspondent in mallorca this morning has said summer days have been amended once people have left, things like a different hotel and even return flights being brought
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forward because the provider has said it is exceptional circumstances. is that allowed? yes, under the rules, you have to be quite reasonably these situations. but also, the alternatives they may offer you, a different return flight ora offer you, a different return flight or a different hotel, do need to be reasonable if suitable turn to. for a subtle, if you booked a five star hotel, they can't stick you in a two staff because it's not a suitable sanity. they can change the date of the flight time and again, that is pretty reasonable in the circumstances because as we are seeing, flights are getting cancelled. if that happens to you and you have booked a package, you should get some money back. there's a lot value there from the holiday, and you are entitled to some form of refund, so again, you should get touch with your provider if that happens to you. thank you for joining us. and as we say, time after time, be crystal clear about your insurance policy. what we have
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learned over the last few days, as alex was saying, it is a most likely policies are trying to catch up with a moving target. it is virtually impossible but just be a moving target. it is virtually impossible butjust be absolutely clear about your insurance policy for any eventuality if you're going away. that is why you can understand people being so much more cautious. absolutely. people who booked maybe even last year with full insurance for any eventuality are still seeing their flights and holidays going ahead they are being told their insurance is not valid. it doesn't feel fair, does it? no, insurance is not valid. it doesn't feelfair, does it? no, it doesn't. isaid nisa, feelfair, does it? no, it doesn't. i said nisa, i feelfair, does it? no, it doesn't. isaid nisa, i have no feelfair, does it? no, it doesn't. i said nisa, i have no idea why, a mix between nina and lisa but i don't know who lisa is. anyway, nano, see you later! see you, paga. 8:14am, that is the real time on thursday. it's been a month since residents
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in leicester were placed back into lockdown, after coronavirus infections increased across the city. a government review of the current measures will take place later. cases have now halved from previous levels, although the city still has the third—highest number of infections in england. phil mackie reports. it feels like a very different world to the one most of us are living in. a month ago, when the rest of england was getting ready to go out to the pub, leicester was sent back into lockdown. how is the lockdown with your patients and everything? it's been tough. an essential business which has stayed open. pharmacists are on the front line of the pandemic and worry about how the prolonged outbreak is affecting the city. the lockdown has meant a lot of fear. it's like using a blunt tool, you know, the whole of leicester, bang, is now under lockdown. when, really, the data should have been used properly and in science, we are always told, you know, evidence—based.
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a few nonessential businesses have been allowed to reopen since the last review two weeks ago. but if you live in the lockdown area, you still can't go on holiday or get a haircut. businesses are really struggling and want the government to offer more financial help. we know lots of our customers have gone elsewhere to local villages, local towns. so we're now going to suffer for a longer period of time now because of that. so this hurts us massively. leicester claims it's the victim of its own success. its mass testing regime is showing up many asymptomatic cases that would otherwise go undetected. these are some of the 500 volunteers who've been going door to door, taking those bags full of tests with them, to try to get to the bottom of how many people have got the disease in leicester. in fact, the city says it is so good at testing, its results are therefore much, much higher. but in the long run, they think that is the best way to contain the virus.
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one of the things that's really struck me has been the response of the people of leicester, taking the personal responsibility for them as individuals and as families and communities. and i've had that comment in a number of places where the people say, "i actually feel safer in leicester because everybody‘s taking it so seriously." heading back out on the streets, lessons learned here will help deal with outbreaks elsewhere. phil mackie, bbc news, leicester. the time is 8:17am. thank you for joining us. when was the last time you saw a red squirrel? i genuinely can't remember. gray's girls all the time but i can't remember. when did you last see a beaver? white maggots probably been a while, if ever. 11 british mammals are now officially at risk of extinction. that's according to a new red list report. its authors are calling for urgent action to prevent their loss, as our science correspondent
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victoria gill reports. familiar characters that are becoming increasingly rare sights. while the uk is a natural home for dozens of mammals, including red squirrels, dormice and hedgehogs, many of those species are now in danger of disappearing. this first red list of threatened species put together by the conservation charity the mammal society has shown that a quarter of all of the uk's native mammals were under threat of extinction. so, what we've done is a really comprehensive review of all the evidence we have available on things like how big the populations are or how isolated those populations are. we've drawn all that together and it's come up with this list of 11 of our 47 native species being classified as threatened imminently. and what this is clearly saying
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is we need to be acting right now. we don't, we can't carry on with the current trajectory. different animals face different threats. the now critically endangered scottish wildcat population has not recovered from decades of persecution. for the red squirrel, disease and competition from the introduced grey squirrels have driven it decline. but something conservation scientists agree on is that we need to leave more wild space for these species to recover. there are pockets of good habitat, like this red squirrel reserve in formby, but that's exactly what this is. this is an isolated pocket of good, natural habitat for red squirrels. and what conservationists say we need is for that to be a connected network of wild space across the landscape. here's my little foxy loxy. during lockdown, many people shared pictures and video on social media of animal encounters in quite urban settings. now scientists say we need to find sustainable ways to share our environment with nature. victoria gill, bbc news.
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we can cross now to breakfast‘s tim muffett, who's at the british wildlife centre in surrey. so, tim, i havejust had it explained to me that you are in an enclosure and in theory, we are hoping we're going to see some wild animals with you? what is going on? that is right, live television and animals obviously, they don't appear on cue but we are at the british wildlife centre, in the wild cat enclosure but a few minutes ago, the wildcats made an appearance and hopefully now you can see some of those pictures. these are amongst the most endangered in britain. some people think there could be as he was 20—30 wild cats left in scotland, the numbers aren't entirely clear but as we had in the report, it features on a watch list, a read list of british mammals which do face the real risk of extinction. —— a red list. david runs the
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centre, tell us about the work you do and what you think could be done to help these species? well, we breed wild cats, hopefully to go back into the wild. we breed red squirrels as well. we put all the british mammals except tears, that is the only ones we have not got, —— except hares. when you come to the centre, you can see all the wild animals we have living in britain today. what do you make of this list, the species that are endangered, how worried are you and what can be done? the problem is, factory farming, industrialised farming is not good for wildlife. if you go back a generation, and farm the way we used a farm, then it was much better for wildlife. it is loss of habitat, mainly, unfortunately, and also the increasing population. here we are in this enclosure and obviously, we saw some of the wild cats a little earlier. what
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realistically can be done? are you saying that more parts of the countryside should look like this crisply welcome it would be nice if it was but people have to beat. we have got to produce food. it can do if you have certain parts of the countryside, yes, and if you farm sympathetically with nature, you can create habitats which would be suitable for the wildlife. we are breeding wild cats here which will go back into possibly scotland. they call it the scottish wildcat but in fa ct, call it the scottish wildcat but in fact, it is the european wildcat, really, but we call it the scottish wildcat because the only place you can find them is in scotland. there are plans afoot to possibly reintroduce them into england. the vincent wildlife trust and natural england have located a couple of sites in the west country where this is going to happen in the next two or three years. another issue is what happens when species are introduced, so for example, red squares, the native species, their
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numbers have been decimated partly because of grey squirrels. now, you breed red squirrels, here. could we see growing numbers of red squirrels, do you think? what can we do to help that come about? there are about 2 million plus gray's girls ina are about 2 million plus gray's girls in a country, introduced from north america about 1870 —— grey squirrels in the country. there's possibly about 120,000 red swirls left. the grey squirrels carry a disease which is lethal to the red swirls. and also, they compete for food. —— to the red squirrels. there are plans afoot by the red squirrel survival trust for a contraceptive for grey squirrels so if you can introduce that and reduce their numbers naturally, not by killing them but by naturally not breeding, then hopefully the red squirrels can be reintroduced into areas where there are fewer grey squirrels. we have bred them here and our most
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successful introduction was on the isle of tresco in the scilly isles. we have also done an island off the temperature coast. if you put them on islands with suitable habitats and no grey squirrels, you have got nuclei colonies that you can draw on in the future. so many distinct points raised, david. thank you for joining us. as we heard, one thing can lead to another, things you might want to happen so when the gray's wearables first came in, probably no one knew the effect they would have on red squirrels would be so would have on red squirrels would be so dramatic so lots to discuss. earlier, the wildcat was on that post but sadly she's being a pitch like the moment. we have a moment and this is your opportunity to go with your camera and search and we will follow you and can you give us a look around? ok, we are being asked to search for the wildcats, david, so let's have a look, we are live. ok. earlier, she was around here. she was, yes. i guess the nature of animals like this, they love this habitat with lots of
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places to hide. indeed. what kind of food would you give them? there it is, over there. she has made an appearance. she is right over the other side. there you go. private, i don't know if you got a bit of that. can you expect when you are looking? can you expect when you are looking? can you expect when you are looking? can you look again? we try to feed emma nuttall diet... sure, let's come over here, in for a penny, but andy, the cameraman, is giving me dirty looks, by the way. where was she? was she up there? they are pretty curious animals and they were making an appearance earlier. oh, dear, live tv! there you go, just over there. look! let me push this back. there she is. can you see her? know, we can't see her. there you go. there she is! oh! that's
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brilliant, tim! thank you so much. who is your camera person? that's brilliant. winging it, lie. who is your camera person? there she goes. andy is doing a greatjob.” your camera person? there she goes. andy is doing a great job. i heard andy is doing a great job. i heard andy was frowning at you for making him do that but it is brilliant. we are so him do that but it is brilliant. we are so chuffed, honestly, we were all leaning into their screen and we saw it. brilliant. very good. 8:26am, now. you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come. we'll speak to craig revel horwood and none other than paul chuckle to find out if pantomimes are likely to be back by christmas. it is hard to imagine christmas without them. they'll be with us in a few minutes. we will have the headlines for you. now let's get the weather with matt. you have got a tale of two parts of the country, i'm looking at that lovely sunshine there but not everywhere. i was wondering what it
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was like up here? can we sit this money because it was raining quite heavily and then we were in newcastle and it was tipping down, lots of people messaging, saying it is all very well for you with all of that sunshine but not so great in the north. oh no, it is a bit of a north—south split with plenty of heavy rain to come today but we are evening things out tomorrow, which is probably welcome news to those on a staycation at the moment because july has been rather underwhelming weather—wise, really. it has been cooler than normal and a bit wetter, particularly in north—west england and north wales, and it has been cloudy so not as sunshine around. but as i said, a brief taste of summer on but as i said, a brief taste of summer on the way, to see out the month. today, temperatures in france going up into the low 40s across southern and western areas. we will start to see it warm up across the south this afternoon but by tomorrow, with a southerly wind, we tap into more of the heat of the near continent, 34 towards the south—east, could get up to 26 in parts of scotland. a big departure
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from this money, with rain in northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland, heavy in places as well, slowly pushing northwards, turning light and patchy at another burst of heavy rain working through northern ireland into southern scotla nd northern ireland into southern scotland through the afternoon. it means northern england will gradually brighten up and turn dryer. in the far north of scotland, caithness, orkney sort of error, not a bad day, some sunny spells throughout but it will feel rather cool with temperatures in the teens compared to what we will see through tomorrow. still some rain around in the southern half of scotland, particularly through the likes of glasgow, edinburgh, and the forth clyde valley as we go to the second half of the day. turning driver northern ireland, maine across cumbria and northumberland and cou nty cumbria and northumberland and county durham but not much compared to this morning and most of northern england starting to see the break—up, south of the m62, by this afternoon, lots of sunshine. temperatures anywhere between 25—28, which is 82 in fahrenheit. that warm airand clearer which is 82 in fahrenheit. that warm air and clearer weather will push northwards as we go through tonight. if you start the night wet, mostly
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will be dry by the morning. quite warm and muggy with temperatures widely in the teens, may be 16 or 17 in south—east england as we start friday. this is the brief surge of summer friday. this is the brief surge of summer heat friday. this is the brief surge of summer heat across friday. this is the brief surge of summer heat across the country on friday, sunshine for many. in northern ireland, after the morning sunshine, cloud and rain spreading in from the west. across england and wales, a few isolated thunderstorms in the afternoon but note the temperatures, widely into their 30s, 34 in the london area, could get to about 26 in the likes of glasgow, aviemore and also inverness, so a big change from what you had today. but the upshot could be some severe storms in central and eastern england, eastern parts of scotland, too. they will get out of the way as they go through friday night and into saturday, back to sunshine and showers, still warm in east anglia and the south—east but cooler for all and temperatures in the teens in western areas. your headlines are next. hello, this is breakfast with
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charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we may be five months away from christmas but, ordinarily, plans leading up to the british pantomime season would be well underway by now. although theatres in england will be able to open again from saturday, there's fears new restrictions will mean many productions won't be able to go ahead. our entertainment orrespondent colin paterson has been investigating. # we were victims of the night... all around the uk pantomimes are on pause and time is running out. we do a show and it's a quiet audience, we hate it, don't we? yeah. so imagine how weird it would be if you were performing to sparsely spaced out... rita simons was roxy mitchell in eastenders. she should be taking part in her sixth panto and loves playing buddies. however, she believes the only booing this time will be when it's cancelled. panto can often be the thing that —
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not just for theatres, but actors, for crew, but for everyone that builds up a little nest egg for the year and then they go on and do the other gigs or auditions or whatever. panto is, for many, many actors, it's your bread and butter. it's certainly my bread and butter. bob golding has been stalwart of panto at st albans for a decade but says planning for this year's mother goose has been impossible due to confusion over what restrictions might be enforced. there's talk of possibly a gauze being flown in, a gauze meaning a see—through piece of scenery in front of the actors between — as a barrier. the other things are, i've seen some stuff written down about nobody allowed to shout to say, "no," sorry, you can't do that. it's taking away a massive chunk of the genre. and many theatres that usually hold pantomimes are still shut, including the radlett centre in hertfordshire. it's where the very man they're
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waiting to hear directives from, the secretary of state for the dcms, oliver dowden, also holds his constituency surgeries. tomorrow night there was supposed to be a little mixed tribute act. but there's no date for when it reopens. let me make it clear. our position at the moment is we don't know if we're going ahead or not. last year we had our bestselling pantomime ever. we played to about 97% capacity. and some local schools have been coming here for 20 years and this is the first year that they can't come. we're in our warehouse, this is the brains of the operation. normally there'd be 18 people in here, working, pulling scenery, costumes, props together. we've got 30 productions in storage in here and this year they would be getting ready to go out on the road. steve bowden's company produces 15 pantomimes a year and provides the costumes for dozens more. literally you're witnessing a building that was abounded in march when we went into lockdown and all of our staff
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were furloughed. these props should be sprinkling fairy dust, instead they're gathering dust in this warehousing in coventry. as an industry collectively realised that the start of august takes us to out absolute limit where we could possibly react. beyond that pantomimes as we know it cannot happen this year. we're then looking at what our alternatives are. cinderella knew all about the dangers of the clock striking 12. for britain's 2020 pantomime season, the deadline is about to be reached. colin paterson, bbc news, coventry. we're joined now by two pa nto regulars. strictlyjudge craig revel horwood and paul chuckle. good morning to you both. lovely to see you. craig, i suppose this time last year you were preparing for a snow white in manchester. now, this time this year, what are the plans? yeah, well i have a long time to
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prepare, darling, it seems. hoping, and keeping my fingers crossed, that pa nto and keeping my fingers crossed, that panto season does go on. and as you said in that report, it is a lot of people's bread and butter. it is something the whole family can enjoy and look forward to at christmas. and it is all about christmas and having fun. so there's got to be ways of putting pantos on if it is going to be covid safe. what guidance have you been given in the hope that a yes, families do enjoy this but it is safe, because that is what everybody is concerned about? well, the uses of masks, obviously, that you can get from the theatre. and of course the distancing. but the problem is, you see, you need to have over 65% capacity in order to
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make any money to pay all the staff. imean, we're make any money to pay all the staff. i mean, we're notjust talking about the actors, like myself, we are talking about the technical staff, we are talking about lighting, front of house staff, people showing us to our seats, the cafes, the restau ra nts. our seats, the cafes, the restaurants. i am our seats, the cafes, the restaurants. iam meant our seats, the cafes, the restaurants. i am meant to be performing with debbie mcgee in cinderella at the mayflower theatre in southampton this year. and at the moment the tickets are on sale to go ahead, but the producers need to know by the 3rd of august because so many things have to be put in place, like costumes, lighting, sound equipment, all of that. the scenery. there are so many people involved. let's say good morning to paul chuckle. speaking to us from catalonia and greece. good morning, paul. good morning, mate. a very nice to be on here this morning. given what we are talking about, this is your livelihood we are talking about, isn't it? what is the
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reality for you like? it's very hard, as craig was saying, for everybody involved in pantomime. this year would have been my 54th pantomime. my third on my own. the first one i did on my own was with craig. good morning, craig. hope you are well. good morning gorgeous! i've not had any work at all since february. the way it is going i can't see any more work for the likes of me until next year. pantomime is a big part for everybody involved, for the theatres, for the artists, it is going to be sorely missed by everybody this year. we have spoken to quite a few actors and performers who are facing genuine hardship right now. and i don't know what your circumstances are, and i wouldn't pry too much, but that is a reality, isn't it? this is income,
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this is work and money that he would normally get and it's not going to be there? exactly. it's a massive chunk of your yearly earnings pantomime. it is so busy. it is the biggest earnings for most theatres in the country and keeps them going for the rest of the year. let's hope the theatres don't have to close down. craig, i suppose what is so important as well, you alluded to this, about how the theatres will look in capacity. it is the audience participation as well. it is the booing for the baddies etc. how will that change in terms of keeping the energy up? about the shouting thing, imean, we energy up? about the shouting thing, i mean, we all still speak through the mask anyway. so there is no reason why you still can't upload and there is no reason why you still can't scream and shout into a mask. i don't see that that is going to be a significant problem. i now
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certainly in no and places like that, and denmark, —— norway, they have tried perspex greens between people, which seems to work. we will see. there is a long investment as well. getting the show out there is the main priority, i think, because it is something i look forward to every year. and i'm sure, you know, it introduces children to theatre. which, of course, is a really important art form. it may lead to them going on to see other theatres as well when they are grown up. i think it is a really important thing to do. plus, it is educational as well, as well as being really christmassy. i would be devastated if they want to go on. plus, when you consider there are at least 36 productions go on every year to huge
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crowds, theatres are well 2000 seats, generally sold out, it is an enormous loss not only to the theatre industry but to every person involved. as paul was saying, there area involved. as paul was saying, there are a lot of people that have been out of work since february, since theatres closed down. it would be devastating. i really think that could really put people and i theatres in danger of closing forever. the last thing we want are theatres turning into housing or car parks. it is serious, what we are talking about, but i can't resist the temptation to talk about what is behind you on your backdrop. just over your left shoulder are devilishly handsome fellow. and on the right, is that you in your pantomime dame outfit? yes, this one is, yeah. i didn't set the studio
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up, darling. this is how this actually lives. this is the first glimpse into my private office live. there you are. we are privileged. what role was that you are playing? that is the wicked queen, darling.” should have known that. i know you have worked together. what is craig like to work with in panto? a fabulous guy to work with. he has a good singing voice, his dancing abilities, his comedy, absolutely everything about him, acting. this ability, perfect. done two seasons with him and i love the man. and i miss new year's eve this year. you are going to have to tell us what thatis are going to have to tell us what that is about then? the last one, darling, paul was dressed in my wedding dress! we all dress up. it is the only time that everybody got because we are away from our families, panto is a season to be celebrated. you get christmas day
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of, and there is a new year's eve party for the whole of the panto company. we raid the dress up box and paul found a fantastic wedding dress in my drag bag. he wore that down to the luncheon.” dress in my drag bag. he wore that down to the luncheon. i feel like we have had a fantastic insight into the goings on, all sorts! lovely to see you both. on a serious note, everybody is hoping that things change and theatres can get back into business. thank you both very much for your time this morning. good to see you. good to see you. good to see you. good to see you too. goodbye. i feel bereft i don't have a drag bag. i will have to create one. you can borrow something from it you want. thank you very much. a multi—billion dollar, decade—long effort to bring rock samples from mars back to earth gets under way today, as nasa launches its latest rover. the six—wheeled robot, called perseverance, is tasked with deploying a mini helicopter, testing out equipment for future human missions and searching for traces of past life.
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rebecca morelle reports. getting ready for mars — the final tests for the most advanced rover that nasa's ever built before it heads to the red planet. it will be collecting samples of martian rocks from an area that was once a river bed, and the hope is it will answer the key question — was there ever a life on mars? we now know mars had an enormous amount of water in its past. if ancient life was on mars, we have a good bet that we might be able to find it in these sediments. so this is really a life detection mission. the rock samples will be stored and brought back to earth on a future mission. but this mission is also taking something back to mars — a piece of martian meteorite. it's from the natural history museum's collection. it blasted off the surface of the red planet more than half
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a million years ago. now, it's heading home. we really know what meteorite is made from, we can use it to compare that meteorite with the new rocks, that unknown rocks that we're looking at for the first time on mars and see how similar or different they are. also on board is a miniature mars helicopter that, for the first time, will attempt to fly in the extremely thin martian atmosphere. nasa wants to test this technology forfuture missions. america's spacecrafts is the last of the trio heading to the red planet. china and the united arab emirates are already on their way. if they all succeed, it will mean a giant leap in our understanding of mars. rebecca morelle, bbc news. we can now speak to professor caroline smith at the national history museum in london, who will be analysing what the rover brings back. good morning to you. thank you so much forjoining us. the picture is
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not brilliant but it is good enough to explain all that stuff behind you. is that of the stuff that is going to be used to analyse the stuff that comes back from mars? there is a lot of stuff going on. there is a lot of stuff going on. there is a lot of stuff. we've actually got a concert tonight, a live concert you can join online, by dermot kennedy. so we've got a concert going on tonight and we've got some people coming in and we are just telling them to go away!” got some people coming in and we are just telling them to go away! i see. thank you for putting a pause on the preparations. the matter that is going to be analysed, what are you hoping firstly it will be, and secondly, it will tell you? so, the perseverance rover, due to launch today, is going to a really interesting place on mars, which has rocks of the right age and the right type that we think might have the best chance to show evidence of past life on mars. so the rover is also
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going to do analyses of those rocks on mars. give us some really interesting information. and it also has the capability to actually collect pieces of those rock which hopefully, in ten to 15 years, will be returned to earth and we can study them in the museum to really conclusively say, do those rocks show evidence of past life on mars? it is an extremely ambitious mission, extremely exciting and now is the time to do it, we are in the right time to do this. so professor, good morning, you are someone so professor, good morning, you are someone who follows the science, ok? but you are also a human being and you might have hunches and you might have feelings about this. if i were to ask you on a scale of one to ten whether you think there is or has been life on mars, where would you been life on mars, where would you be on that gail, maybe a scientifically, and b, hon schweiz? —— scientifically. i know it is not
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very scientific but i do go by hunches. i think there is a reasonable to good chance there was past life on mars. maybe six or seven out of ten for past life on mars. current, present life, iam less convinced of, but i never say never, so less convinced of, but i never say never, so i would say maybe two or three out of ten. i'm holding onto that seven out of ten first answer. what did that life look like in your seven out of ten scenario? well, it didn't look like little green men running around mars. if life existed on mars and its ancient past, 4 billion years ago, it would have been very simple, maybe single cellular life, so just very basic life, but it still would have been life. and if we find evidence of that past life on mars, that will be one of the most fundamental questions that we have been able to answer, because it shows us that we are not the only life in our solar system. there is life somewhere else, or there was live somewhere
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else, or there was live somewhere else, so it would be an amazing discovery if we could prove that. there are something like around 150 martian meteorites that have hit earth, no evidence of that hunch, evidence of life with those. what is different in terms of the samples and the material that you will be collecting, compared to those meteorites that have already hit that have not shown us anything yet? that is a great question. the issue with the martian meteorites, and they are brilliant, some of my favourite types, they are the wrong rock type and the wrong age to actually be able to show us evidence, conclusive evidence, of past life. that is why we are going to the crater, which is exactly the right type of rock type, it has sedimentary rocks laid down in water, and we know that water is one of those fundamental things you need for life, and those rocks are very
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old. they are in the right timescale for if did start on mars, it would have started in that time period when those rocks were being formed on mars. so we have got a double chance there because we are looking the right types of rocks of the right age. unfortunately, the meteorites are not the right type of rock and they are the wrong age, so thatis rock and they are the wrong age, so that is why we are going to the crater with the perseverance rover, and the amazing payload on that rover to get is focused into find those exciting rocks that we will hopefully get back in ten to 15 yea rs. hopefully get back in ten to 15 years. going back to your hunch, if life on mars did exist, and if, in the crater, you did find something that proved there was live, like a cell or something, what could you do with that on earth? ? well, you would study it. i don't think we would study it. i don't think we would find a live cell. it would be a fossil. just like we have amazing fossils here at the museum. we can do so much with even fossil evidence of life, so you can work out may be
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how that thing lived, how it functioned, how it metabolised, what did it eat, did it breathe, how did it reproduce? so you couldn't take a cell out of it and create something living, like they do in the films? no. no, that is not real. no, it would not be like marsjurassic park! one of the things we have to be conscious of, and there are international laws and protocols, because there is a slim chance that mars might have life on it now, as i said, maybe two out of ten, we have to assume that the rocks we bring back from mars have life in them, even though we don't think they do, you have to assume they do. and you also have to assume that that life could pose a hazard to the earth's biosphere. we have strict protocols in place to handle this material safely and securely, to stop anything from mars getting out, and
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similarly anything from either getting into those rocks, to contaminate them with earth stuff. sorry, can i just contaminate them with earth stuff. sorry, can ijust interrupted there? charlie said it was all made up, the idea that you could... no, you did! let's ask the professor. so professor, if you have to assume there is a risk to our biodiversity, our bio system, then surely the implication is that something could be active? so they is the thing. we don't think there is anything active, but we can't never say never, so active, but we can't never say never, so that is why we have to assume there is and we have to put in these precautionary measures to make sure that we don't accidentally release anything that could accidentally be there and could accidentally be there and could accidentally pose a risk to the earth's biosphere. but this is taken very seriously. and as i was saying,
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we have a wonderful team of international experts from the united states, europe, canada and japan, microbiologists, hazardous materials experts, working on how we can actually, once we get a samples back, we can actually make sure that we are maintaining their scientific integrity and they are safe and secure. integrity and they are safe and secure. so if in the very, very slim chance there is something alive in those rocks, and i would be don't think there is going to be, and if there is something alive, the very slim chance that is hazardous to the earth's biosphere, we are making sure we keep those rocks contained and they will be no hazard. we have mitigated the hazard. i think the chances are incredibly slim. it is not something i am worried about what we have to be careful. as you said, never say never, what we have to be careful. as you said, neversay never, professor caroline smith, that is what i am taking away from what you said. really interesting talking to you. thank you for that. never say never, charlie. what is it, you keep it in a cage? just in case. mysteries are
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up a cage? just in case. mysteries are up there, mysteries closer to earth. they've been a mystery for thousands of years, but scientists finally think they've uncovered the origin of stonehenge's giant sarsen stones. we already know that the small, blue horizontal stones on top of the monument came from wales, but little has been known about the vertical structures until now. duncan kennedy is at stonehenge and can tell us more. morning, duncan. it looks so beautiful. itjust feels magical when you're close to it anyway. what have we learned? absolutely, naga, you are absolutely right. particularly in the sunlight when the whiteness of the stones come out. i should just say we have got special permission from english heritage to be this close. we are going to go closer in a second. normally the public are not allowed here but on this one occasion we have been allowed to closer. what do we now? we know this monument is
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about 4500 years old. what we hadn't known is about these massive sarsen stones. look at these. somewhere between 20 and 30 tonnes in weight, including the ones on the top. there are 52 of them all around stonehenge. they simply haven't known definitively where they have come from in the past. what we do know is that these small blue stones here, since 1923 we have known this, have come from a place in wales and we re have come from a place in wales and were brought to stonehenge in a very exacting way. they are a little bit smaller. but what about these giants, these sarsen stones which move all around in this circle? how and earth would they be able to not only move them, but also where would they source all of these stones? a tea m they source all of these stones? a team of academics from the universities of brighton, reading and ucl in london, have now done a yea r‘s and ucl in london, have now done a year's bit of research and have finally come up with an answer.
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it's stood here for around 4,500 years, but the question's always been — where did the stones of stonehenge come from? we've known since 1923 that these small blue stones in the circle brought from wales. but what about the other 52 massive sarsen stones? well, now, finally, we have the answer. it's 50 miles away from stonehenge at a place called west woods in wiltshire. the area is now covered by trees, but in prehistoric times sarsen stones were everywhere. experts say it's here the builders of stonehenge came. it's really exciting to know that west woods is the source of the sarsens for stonehenge. because, first of all, it gives us that focus, it gives us that answer, but, secondly, it also means we can do some more work. we know where to come now. the story of how the stones were located goes back to 1958 and an engineer called robert phillips, on the left here.
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he was given one of the stone rods extracted during repairs, which he then took to florida. but two years ago, aged 89, he decided to give the rod back to stonehenge — that allowed chemical test to be carried out and pinpoint where the stones came from. i think he would have been delighted to know that through his husbandry of this important artefact that it's been able to be used to make this great discovery and pinpoint the location of where these stones have come from. x—rays were also taken as stonehenge by a team from the university of brighton. they too showed that all the sarsens came from one place. final proof for the source of these 20 tonne giants. what i was told the news and received the draft paper i was really excited, kind of shaking. you know, it's one of those moments where you know something that people have been asking questions about for so long and we've finally got an answer. finding the exact source
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of the sarsens have been a goal of archaeologists for decades. until now it was thought the sarsens of stonehenge could have come from anywhere between devon and norfolk. the fact they've now pinpointed this one location in wiltshire is a major scientific and archaeological achievement. robert phillips didn't live to see the discovery. he died injanuary aged 91. but his stone rod sample that he kept as in office souvenir has helped enlighten our knowledge of this pre—eminent prehistoric monument. well, it's not often that academics get really excited about a finding like this but this is one of those where we sense they are extremely excited about their find. it's not often you can be definitive about a monument like this, a monument that goes back 4500 years and finally, they have an answer as to where these giant stones come from. i am
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joined by the chief historian from english heritage. an incredible discovery? it's really exciting to finally have an answer to the question of where the stones come from. something that has been bugging archaeologists for more than 4000 years. the fact they were 50 miles away all along, this is remarkable? yes, we always thought probably the downs, because that is the nearest source, but it occurs across any chalk area of england. the blue stones already came from wales but they could have come from anywhere. just exactly how did they find the precise location? they sampled 20 locations across southern and, including six across the marlborough downs. they were looking for the best match. basically fingerprinting the chemicals within the stone. the best match turned out to be westwards. they could compare the natural sarsen stones with
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nondestructive sampling of the stones. briefly, what do we now do with this knowledge? like all good research, it opens a whole lot of new questions. some more research needs to be done about west woods. thank you. there was cause stones you saw in my report, they will be made available to other scientists so made available to other scientists so they can carry out further experiments. they have actually discovered another cornerstone drilled out from underneath the sarsen stones. that has been in a museum all these years and they didn't know they had it. but genuinely, a major achievement they have come across and some more research to be done to add extra fa cts research to be done to add extra facts and extra information. to not only where they came from but how they ended up here. it is fascinating. you are very privileged to have such close access. thank you very much. looks beautiful. very beautiful. how did they get there. lots of questions we've asked but hopefully a nswer to questions we've asked but hopefully answer to this morning. thank you for joining answer to this morning. thank you forjoining us. thank you forjoining us.
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breakfast will be back tomorrow morning from six. enjoy the rest of your day. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at nine. new guidance for people showing symptoms of covid. officials are expected to extend the isolation period from seven to ten days in england over fears of rising case numbers in parts of europe. we are looking at what happens in all other countries around the world and then we are taking the best decisions that we possibly can to keep people here safe. at 9.30, we'll get new data from the uk's official statistics body comparing mortality figures across europe. and before 10, we'll answer your questions about travel restrictions and quarantine. tou can contact me on twitter at annita—mcveigh or use the hashtag bbcyourquestions.

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