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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  September 20, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at six: liz truss says she is prepared to be an unpopular prime minister to help the economy grow. speaking on a visit to new york — she explained why she is willing to consider unpopular decisions, like allowing bigger bonuses for bankers. if that means taking difficult decisions which are going to help britain become more competitive, help britain become more attractive, help more investment flow into our country, yes, i'm absolutely prepared to take those decisions. also on the programme: rail workers resume strike action in october — affecting the conservative party conference and the london marathon. the inquest opens into the death
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of molly russell, the 14—year—old who took her own life after being exposed after being exposed to harmful content online. health officials warn of a second disaster in pakistan as they see a sharp increase in diseases after the country's devastating floods. and tv viewing figures for the queen's state funeral peaked at more than 26 million yesterday as the procession made its way through london. i coming up in sport on the bbc news channel, england's cricketers are playing in pakistan for the first time in 17 years. we playing in pakistan for the first time in 17 years.— playing in pakistan for the first time in 17 years. we will have the latest. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the prime minister, liz truss, says she is prepared to take difficult and unpopular decisions to help get the uk economy growing. in her first bbc interview
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since she became prime minister, liz truss said by focusing on economic growth the uk will be more attractive to investors. and she defended plans to lift the cap on bankers' bonuses at a time when cost—of—living pressures are increasing. she was speaking during her first foreign trip as prime minister as the government prepares to make a series of major announcements now the official period of mourning for the late queen is over. from new york, here's our political editor chris mason. within hours of the queen's funeral liz truss flew out of the country, her first overseas trip offers her to bringing new york for a gathering of world leaders at the united nations. she has been prime minister forjust a fortnight, and what a fortnight. at the top of the empire state building she reflected on her opening days in downing street. it has been a very momentous time for
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our country and i was hugely honoured to be asked to form a government by her majesty the queen. and i think the news of her death was a shock to me, as it was a shock to the nation. was a shock to me, as it was a shock to the nation-— to the nation. after ten days of reflection. _ to the nation. after ten days of reflection, politics _ to the nation. after ten days of reflection, politics is _ to the nation. after ten days of reflection, politics is roaring i reflection, politics is roaring back. expect a blitz of announcements in the coming days with a focus on growing the economy, evenif with a focus on growing the economy, even if some of the ideas for doing that will cause a row. lots of families at the moment are really struggling and they will see that one of the things you are happy to see happening is that bankers will get bigger bonuses. whose side are you on?— are you on? what i want to see is a curowin are you on? what i want to see is a growing economy. _ are you on? what i want to see is a growing economy, so _ are you on? what i want to see is a growing economy, so everybody . are you on? what i want to see is a growing economy, so everybody in| are you on? what i want to see is a i growing economy, so everybody in our country has the high paid jobs that they deserve, the investment into their town, the new business is being set up. that's the kind of britain that i want to see. find being set up. that's the kind of britain that i want to see. and if that means _ britain that i want to see. and if that means the _ britain that i want to see. and if that means the rich _ britain that i want to see. and if that means the rich get - britain that i want to see. and if that means the rich get richer. that means the rich get richer that's fine? if
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that means the rich get richer that's fine?— that means the rich get richer that's fine? . . , ., ~ that's fine? if that means taking difficult decisions _ that's fine? if that means taking difficult decisions which - that's fine? if that means taking difficult decisions which are - that's fine? if that means taking l difficult decisions which are going to help britain become more competitive, help britain become more attractive, help more investment flow into our country, yes, i'm those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular _ those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular things _ those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular things if _ those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular things if you - those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular things if you think i those decisions. you are willing to do unpopular things if you think it | do unpopular things if you think it can contribute to a bigger economy? that's right. and i will always make sure to work that we are helping those who are struggling, and that's why we took the action we took on energy bills, because we didn't want to see households facing unaffordable bills. ., . u , unaffordable bills. labour accused the government _ unaffordable bills. labour accused the government of— unaffordable bills. labour accused the government of having - unaffordable bills. labour accused the government of having the - unaffordable bills. labour accused l the government of having the wrong priorities in wanting to lift the cap on bankers' bonuses. the pound has been tumbling, interest rates rising, some prices are soaring. do you accept that despite your interventions times are going to be tough for people this winter? we are facin: tough for people this winter? we are facing incredibly _ tough for people this winter? we are facing incredibly tough _ tough for people this winter? we are facing incredibly tough economic - facing incredibly tough economic times. i'm here in new york at the united nations. we have had the invasion of ukraine which has pushed
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up invasion of ukraine which has pushed up energy prices. we are still sealing the after—effects of covid. what is very important, as well as growing our economy, we are also protecting our economic security. the conservatives won the last election with one prime minister, borisjohnson, and are now led by another chosen only by party members. so what will change? i will be m own members. so what will change? i will be my own prime _ members. so what will change? in ii be my own prime minister, and i wouldn't compare myself to any predecessors and the times we are in are different from the times predecessors have been in. we are entering a new era. it is a more insecure era and what my government is about is about delivering four people, making sure that people have the jobs, people, making sure that people have thejobs, the opportunities people, making sure that people have the jobs, the opportunities and the future that they can rely on. this afternoon the _ future that they can rely on. this afternoon the prime _ future that they can rely on. this afternoon the prime minister met the french president emanuel macron. insecurity abroad, insecurity at
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home, a problem not unique to the uk. the prime minister and president meeting in the last hour, welcoming what they call impressive advances by ukrainian forces in the ongoing war. and certainly as far as liz truss is concerned, in comparison with borisjohnson, on the issue of ukraine, she wants to be the continuity prime minister, saying that the government will match or exceed the amount spent on military aid in ukraine next year, as was the number this year, £2.3 billion. but make no mistake, beyond that, the difference between this prime minister and the previous one will be really stark. firstly, stylistically, liz truss answers questions directly, and it is fair to say that wasn't always the experience interviewing her predecessor. and then there is this whole vision on the economy, trying to boost economic growth, and two big questions for liz truss. one, will it work at, and secondly, will
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the methods used beat sufficiently popular? chris mason, our political editor in new york, thank you. the focus for the government this week will be firmly on the cost of living and the economy with more big announcements to come. our economics editor faisal islam is here — so what are we expecting? it is back to business and it is an immediate early test of the truss administration's skills in economic management and if they get it right we should have a shorter recession, lower inflation and if they get it wrong it could be higher borrowing costs, interest rates, and although a lower peak of inflation it could be around for some time to come. three big days. tomorrow we have the announcement of the business energy support package. remember, they were promised equivalent help to that offered to households. it really matters what the detail is there. where does that help kick in in terms of the size of the business and exactly how much help is there? there are plenty of businesses that cannot handle this astronomic oh energy bills that are coming through
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so it will be important to get the detail on that tomorrow. then on thursday we have another decision from the bank of england where it is inevitable that interest rates will go up. will they go up by the biggest amount in a single day that we have seen in 33 years? that's the question. and will that be seen as a response to some of what the government is planning? and the possible inflationary impact of that. and then on friday, we will get the mini budget, they are calling it a fiscal statement, the government, and we'll get more detail on the energy package and detail on the energy package and detail of significant tax cuts too. what we won't get is a forecast from the independent adviser to the government, the office for budget responsibility. they said they could have done a version of a forecast for the government to see where borrowing was going. we didn't get that. we are getting some movement in markets that we can show you here, the long—term interest rates, effectively charged to government, is going up across the world but for the uk that's an 11 year high of 3.3%. that interest rate matters for
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mortgages and business lending. a lot of moving parts and a big test for the government until the end of the week. thank you, faisal islam. railway workers are resuming their strike action next month in their long running dispute over pay, jobs and conditions. two more strike dates have been announced by the drivers' union aslef on saturday 1st and wednesday 5th october. the rmt union says its members at network rail and 1a train operators will also strike on october 1st — meaning travel chaos for the start of the conservative party conference, and for tens of thousands of people travelling to the london marathon. here's our transport correspondent, katy austin at euston station. that's right, train strikes in recent months have already brought trains to a halt, there were more scheduled this month but they were called off following news of the queen's death. now it has been confirmed that 9000 train drivers at 12 companies, 12 train companies,
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who are members of the aslef union will walk out on saturday the 1st of october, that's the same day that more than 40,000 rail workers in the rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take part rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take part in rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take part in strike rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take part in strike action, rmt union who work for network rail and 14 train companies will also take part in strike action, plus members at a couple of other train companies in separate disputes. it is understood the tssa union is expected to join is understood the tssa union is expected tojoin in is understood the tssa union is expected to join in strike action that day but they have not publicly confirmed it. that looks set to be the most disruptive day of strike action so far. i understand as little as 10% of normal services may be able to run of that means 90% will be effectively cancelled. then on wednesday the 5th of october there is another strike, this time just by train drivers in the aslef union, and the 12 train companies affected by that will most likely be able to run very few services, or none at all. so these two strike dates will book end the conservative
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party conference, and they will affect travel for people taking the train to get to the london marathon on sunday the 2nd of october because of the knock—on impact of the action on the saturday. why is this all happening? well, the aslef union says a lot of train companies just haven't offered anything in terms of pay that will help members cope with high inflation that we are seeing at the moment, and the rmt union says it's dispute is over pay and it is about working conditions, and it is about working conditions, and it is aboutjob about working conditions, and it is about job security. about working conditions, and it is aboutjob security. the rail industry, for its part, says employers do want to give a pay rise but they say reforms and modernisation is must be agreed for that to be able to be affordable, and so far talks still haven't produced any breakthrough. katy austin with the latest there, thank you. the inquest has opened into the death of a teenage girl who took her own life five years ago after being exposed to harmful content online. 14—year—old molly russell viewed large numbers of
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social media posts about depression, suicide and self—harm. angus crawford has been at the hearing in north london. a family wanting answers — why did molly die, and what part did social media play? ahead of them, two weeks in court, hundreds of pages of evidence containing many thousands of images, some too distressing to broadcast. a bright, apparently happy teenager, molly was just 14 when she took her own life. going through her social media accounts, herfather, ian, discovered she was being bombarded with content about suicide, depression and self—harm, on instagram, pinterest and other apps. this is an inquest. no—one's on trial. the aim — to find out why a child ended her own life. but, for the first time, executives from two social media companies will have to give evidence under oath about what they do to protect their young users online.
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it contained some material that i'm sure is going to be very upsetting. ahead of them, a forensic look into molly's use of social media. ian, with his legal team, have already seen much of that evidence — files full of it. there was just no let—up for molly. this is relentless. i remember my disbelief when i saw my lifeless youngest daughter. over the years, ian has become a high—profile campaigner for internet safety. the corporate culture at these platforms needs to change... ..addressing mps... and to be proactive rather than reactive. even meeting prince william. hoping that his campaigning and what the coroner decides here will make social media a safer place for all young users. this is both an intensely private moment for the family, hoping to find answers, but also a very public
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inquiries into the impact of social media on young minds. and with the online safety bill making its way through parliament, it is sure that this inquest will be slow done that closely watched in westminster and silicon valley. tomorrow the court will hear from silicon valley. tomorrow the court will hearfrom iain russell silicon valley. tomorrow the court will hear from iain russell himself delivering something called a pen portrait, that's an insight into the bright, happy teenagerthat portrait, that's an insight into the bright, happy teenager that he knew and loved. studio: angus, thank you. just a reminder that if you or anyone you know have been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find help and support from organisations listed at bbc.co.uk/actionline. police in leicester say arrests could go on for months after the violent scenes in the city on saturday involving men from sections of the south asian muslim and hindu communities. nearly 50 people have already been arrested in the past few weeks since the problems began. today leaders from both faiths in leicester have come together to appeal for calm. our midlands correspondent navteonhal reports.
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the sight of a city being damaged — notjust its streets and property but also its reputation. leicester has prided itself on being a place where people from different backgrounds live peacefully side by side. on saturday night, after weeks of incidents and arrests involving mainly young men from parts of the south asian hindu and muslim communities, large—scale disorder broke out in the city. for the first time, it has left people living here feeling worried. have you ever seen anything like what happened here on saturday night before? to be honest, no, no. this is very, very a surprise, to be honest. because just recently, two weeks ago or three weeks ago it started. people around here are feeling scared? yeah, people are scared. i'm living here 20 years. i've never seen here like this. sikhs have got the gurdwara, hindus have got temples, . muslims have got mosques. you know, everybody, l they are doing their own things, you know, not.
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fighting with each other. the reasons why things came to a head here on saturday night are complicated. we've spoken to lots of people in this city in recent days, and they've cited everything from disinformation on social media to tensions in indian politics playing out on the streets of leicester. there have also been concerns about people from other cities coming to leicester to fan the flames of conflict. today, hindu and muslim leaders appealed for calm outside a local mosque, delivering a statement on behalf of both communities. we together call upon the immediate cessation of provocation and violence, both in thought and behaviour. meanwhile, the police have faced criticism for not being better prepared for saturday's disorder. were you caught on the hop on saturday night? looking at what we knew, what we were facing, and the declining threat at that time, i think we had the right resource for what we knew at that time. and i suspect these arrests
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will go on for several weeks, if not months, in relation to this, so i am anticipating we are in this for the medium to long haul to see this all the way through. dozens have already been arrested over the past few weeks, some of them from outside the city. and a 20—year—old man has been sent to prison for ten months in connection with the unrest on saturday. but the fear and concern following recent events here will take time to address. navteonhal, bbc news, leicester. the time is 6:17. our top story this evening: liz truss says she is prepared to be an unpopular prime minister to help the economy grow. and england play cricket in pakistan for the first time in 17 years. coming up on sportsday on the bbc news channel: with exactly two months to go until the start of the football
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world cup in qatar, we will look at how the home nations are warming up. health officials in pakistan say they've seen a sharp increase in diseases like malaria and dengue fever in pakistan after the devastating floods which saw a third of the country submerged. the head of the world health organization has warned the rapidly rising numbers could become a second disaster. more than 1500 people lost their lives in the floods and 33 million people have been directly affected. our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan has been to sindh province, where families are in desperate need of aid. and just a warning, this report contains upsetting images from the start. already in pain, pakistan's living through a never—ending nightmare. ten—month—old saeed lost
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his home in the floods. now he's fighting for his life. as his mother noohr watches on, doctors give him and urgent blood transfusion. he is suffering from a severe case of malaria. translation: we are really poor. i'm worried for my child. i feel helpless that i can't do more for him. our homes were flooded. since then, everyone seems to be getting malaria. including two—year—old saima, whom we meet in the next bed along. her grandfather brought her to hospitalfrom his submerged village far away. translation: you can see i'm really worried. | we are struggling to get proper treatment. she has had diarrhoea and she has a fever all over her body. almost everyone on this ward has fled from the floods, and almost every patient here is a young.
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the floods, and almost every patient here is young. and this child, this patient, this is our five—year—old female child. as doctor ashfaq explains, living in the open has left thousands even more vulnerable, displaced and in distress. all of this surrounding water, there are so many mosquitoes. not only this malaria but they are spreading dengue as well. we have too much burden now of these malaria cases. and now we have malaria treatment only for three days. pakistan's health care system is struggling to cope with an influx of waterborne diseases. a country already ravaged by the floods is now facing a medical emergency. and even when these patients recover, many don't have a home to go to. not far from the hospital, large swathes of this province remain under water. rural sindh is the
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worst affected area. and one of pakistan's poorest. hundreds of thousands have set up shelter on this river bank. families who came here seeking sanctuary, now struggling to stay alive. the risk of disease, the latest burden to those who have already been left with nothing. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, sindh province. now a look at some other stories making the news today. performance on waiting time targets at scotland's hospital a&e units has hit a new low. figures for the week ending 11th september showed just 63.5% of patients were dealt with within four hours. the scottish government's target is 95%. scotland's health secretary humza yousaf said the figures were "not acceptable". the parents of madeleine mccann have lost the latest stage of a legal battle in their libel action over claims made by a portuguese
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police detective. kate and gerry mccann appealed to the european court of human rights about the portuguese court's judgment. goncalo amaral alleged in a book that they were involved in the disappearance of madeleine, who vanished from a holiday resort in the algarve 2007. the government in wales is pressing ahead with delayed plans to ban single—use carrier bags and plastic drinking straws. england and scotland have already banned plastic straws, cotton buds and stirrers though nowhere in the uk has stopped the sale of single—use carrier bags. around 28 million people were watching on television as the procession carrying the queen's coffin passed through parliament square after the service at westminster abbey yesterday. that was the peak television audience, but huge audiences continued watching throughout the day, the vast majority on the bbc. today, flags on british government buildings around the world are back at full mast at the end of the
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official period of national mourning. daniela relph reports. after the public mourning of the past 12 days the king has returned to scotland, arriving at aberdeen airport and heading to balmoral, the royal estate where his mother died. in the peace and beauty of deeside he will escape the glare of the last week. he will be working here viewing government papers and taking phone calls of condolence. across the uk, flags are now returning to full mast, as national mourning is now over, and the country adjusts to life with a new head of state. the grandeur and precision of yesterday's funeral was an intense experience for those directly involved. lieutenant coloneljames shaw, in the bearskin in the centre
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of the screen here, led the gun carriage procession. the significance of what he did is sinking in. it was the proudest moment of my life, the most important duty of my military career. emotional. i think we haven't had much time to reflect on her majesty's passing, and i felt very sad last night reflecting for the first time. and still the people and flowers keep coming. on the long walk in windsor the crowds may be on the long walk in windsor the crowds may be smaller but the feelings of loss remain strong for some. on the long walk in windsor the crowds may be smaller but the feelings of loss remain strong for some. it'sjust so peaceful. it's completely different after all the crowds and everything yesterday. it's the emptiness, the whole emptiness, it's not normal. l it'sjust we are all in limbo. sorry... yesterday was just so amazing, beautiful service, it was an absolutely fitting farewell, wasn't it? but yeah, the sense of bereavement in a strange sort of way.
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and at buckingham palace too there has been a steady stream of tributes throughout the day. the royal family is still in a period of mourning for the next week. they won't be carrying out any official engagements. when the king returns here to buckingham palace, the focus will be on his autumn schedule and it will include his first international tour as monarch. at the end of the funeral day, the royalfamily released this photo of the queen from the early 70s. she was at balmoral where her son now privately grieves. daniela relph, bbc news. david sillitoe is with us now. let's talk about those television viewing figures, just the once for the uk. they were huge. i don't think anyone will be surprised.— will be surprised. extraordinary. let's choose _ will be surprised. extraordinary. let's choose one _ will be surprised. extraordinary. let's choose one moment, - will be surprised. extraordinary. - let's choose one moment, 12:25pm, the funeral procession is going through parliament square, heading
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towards whitehall. 19.5 million people were watching on bbc one moment, 12:25pm, the funeral procession is going through parliament square, heading towards whitehall. 19.5 million people were watching on bbc one alone. then you've got 50 plus other channels in the uk all showing it. add it together, its about 28 million, but what i think is even more extraordinary is that from ten o'clock in the morning until five extraordinary is that from ten o'clock in the morning untilfive in the evening, the figures on bbc one alone never go below ten or 11 million. if you think of the number of people who dipped in and out through the day, that 28 million is just the beginning. there will be so many more there. if you just think about it, at 12:25pm, 28.6 million were watching tv altogether. that means more than 95% of the tv audience was watching the same thing at the same time. it almost never happens, a true landmark moment. david, thank you. for the first time in a cricketing generation, england are playing a game in pakistan.
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their 17 year absence from the country has been based on security concerns. some in cricket field they would never return, so the start of the t20 series in karachi has been warmly welcomed. the match is well under way and joe wilson is there. the love of cricket prevails in pakistan. it's the great distraction and entertainment through troubled times. in a karachi park matches overlap and intertwine, while at the national stadium they wait — the plans, the protection — for england to finally play here again. in 2009, a bus carrying sri lankan cricketers came under attack elsewhere in pakistan. here in karachi this is a security convoy which escorts the players of pakistan and england from their hotel to the stadium every time. and all of this so that cricket matches can be played. pakistan's players wore special shirts, on the back the numbers are half submerged to symbolise
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floods to express solidarity. and then the captain gave the crowd a reason to cheer. babar azam, few in the world bat better. although maybe mohammad rizwan does. there are so many talented players, but pakistani cricket needs teams to tour here, and a sense of gratitude spans from fans to the coach. all the boys, all the players, they have a very strong and long relation with each other, and the cricket, i always say it brings the people, the communities, the countries close to each other. but make no mistake, the job is to compete, that's england's captain moeen ali dispatched the six as pakistan built their total. —— dispatched for six. but england had their moments too. commentator: bowled him! that's new boy luke wood. 159 for england to win. here is an old boy back in the team. alex hales batting after three years when he didn't fit in. phil salt is building his international career. admire the shot until you see the catch. admire that even more. held right on the edge.
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tight situation, tight game. but as england continued their chase, the connection lost for a cricket generation had been remade, and that's the true value of this match. joe wilson, bbc news, karachi. time for a look at the weather. matt taylor is here. and you've got some dramatic weather there. where is that? the some dramatic weather there. where is that? ., , ., is that? the other side of the atlantic, hurricane _ is that? the other side of the atlantic, hurricane fiona - is that? the other side of the - atlantic, hurricane fiona affecting the caribbean, the first major one of the season, devastating puerto rico and the dominican republic, now a category three storm with winds of 130 mph. it is set to move north and could get close to bermuda, having an effect there. noticeably, it could still be a hurricane when it reaches eastern canada later this week, before heading with unusually warm air towards the arctic. back home, things have been quieter but also cooler. these weather fronts
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approaching, south—westerly winds picking up, tonight, it will be much milder, temperatures of 11—14 c. coldness towards the south of england, six celsius, and could be mist and fog patches in the morning. this area of cloud is the one front, gradually introducing milder air further south through the day. a few showers dotted around across southern scotland, northern england, made the isle of man. it will feel warmer tomorrow. the biggest change is in the north and west of scotland, outbreaks of rain coming and going through the day, and here we will see the wind really pick up, touching gale. perhaps by the end of tomorrow afternoon. tomorrow evening and night, notice how rain develops more widely across scotland, northern ireland, pushing south towards the isle of man and potentially cumbria. clearer skies later in the night. a drier night forfurther later in the night. a drier night for further south later in the night. a drier night forfurther south in england and wales. thursday, a good dry with sunny spells for many, but outbreaks
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of rain clearing away from north and

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