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tv   New Day  CNN  November 9, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PST

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offense regarding stories of his past. rubio is providing information on his finances and trump, getting in digs for both of them hoping hoping their troubles will stick. >> reporter: dr. ben's carson's attacks on the media infence infencefying, unleashing a verbal firestorm. >> show me somebody who is 100% accurate at everything they say. >> you said this when you were in kindergarten. give me a break. >> reporter: politico and "the wall street journal" calling into question aspects of carson's life story published in his book. politico wrote carson's campaign changed their version of a story about receiving a full
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scholarship from west point. the military academy doesn't charge admission. he never applied nor was granted admission to west point. >> it was offered, i didn't say i accepted it. >> many other people who are politically experienced tell me they've never seen it before. >> reporter: gop rival donald trump calling it the beginning of the end of carson's campaign. >> when you say hitting your mother over the head with a familiar hammer, stabbing someone, that's a serious statement when you say you have a pathological disease. as i understand it, you can't really cure it. >> look at this guy. >> reporter: meanwhile, trump was all laughs as host of "saturday night live." >> enrique. >> i brought you the check for the wall. >> reporter: garnering the highest ratings the show's had in years.
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"snl" didn't pull any punches. the cast tackled most of the criticism including accusations of racism, his immigration policy and questions around president obama's birth certificate. we also learned this weekend in jon meacham's new book, 836-page biography of george h.w. bush that trump was interested in the vp slot. a southeastern yore adviser came to him and said that he'd be great, trump says. it didn't go much further than that. chris, alisyn. >> how much further does it have to go? let's discuss. we have jackie kucinich and political anchor at new york one, errol louis. let's keep going with donald trump. what was our feeling about how he did this weekend? errol louis, did you think it was worth it, different, what's the plus/minus? >> it was probably worth it for him. i didn't think it was all that funny. the cast didn't really go at
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him. the jokes weren't that interesting. comedy is personal. i personally didn't find it funny. >> is it because he wasn't approving some skits? why didn't they go after him more. >> i don't know. when they went after sarah palin really hard. trump if you think they have a liberal sensibility, not their kind of guy, they just happened not to go after him. i think, though, it didn't do much for him. i'm trying to imagine somebody who didn't know before donald trump. he has high name recognition. based on seeing this would say i like that. i i don't know if that's what it was intended to accomplish but there's almost no way it could have accomplished that. it was a fun evening for donald trump. the people who hate him will continue to hate him, the protesters outside i'm sure were very happy and life goes on. >> what do you think, jackie? the protesters outside couldn't be happy because they didn't want him on at all.
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they didn't get what they wanted. what do you think this means going forward for his campaign? >> i don't know that it has a deeper meeting. it was interesting the whole skit where they made fun of his entire platform. it raised an eyebrow. he had one line where he said, you didn't tell us how you were going to do that. if you ask, it's magic, it falls into place. which has been a criticism of him. he doesn't have meat on the bones or details of how he says he's going to get all these things done. you wonder if that's going to be fodder for someone who might want to attack him later on down the line. >> the onus is not on the cast of "snl" about how he's going to take care of it. ben carson, errol, let's put it this way. is it even a question as to whether or not when somebody's central narrative about how they became who they now are comes into question, that they have to answer those questions? >> well, one would hope so.
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in this case, ben carson, great interview, he doesn't want to ask any questions. he wants to turn and attack the question and attack the questioner and ask people where were you in 2008? i started thinking back, i was part of the team that had to go out to chicago and sort of look into president obama's background and went to his church and all of this kind of stuff. all of that stuff is so irrelevant. just as you say, if your biography is all about what you did and you were detailed about it and you say it again and again and again, it's the job of the press to ask you the details. the fact that nobody can corroborate several of the key stories is something he'll have to answer. owe has to answer because that narrative then starts to fall apart. >> jackie, he has turn this around and said this is an illustration of how the media is going after him and what's wrong with the process. let me play for you what he said yesterday in puerto rico to reporters about how sick this process is.
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>> vetting is a normal part of the process. did you not expect this? >> i have always said that i expect to be vetted. but being vetted and what is going on with me, you said this 30 years ago. you said this 20 years ago, this didn't exist. you know, i just -- i have not cena with anyone else. >> that was interesting that wasn't the one i was hoping for where he talked about how the process was sick. >> blame the media. >> i blame the control room. what about that, jackie, is he being vetted more than other people? >> no. that's crazy. that's ludicrous. he doesn't have a legislative record. he has a book that he's based his entire -- it's his autobiography, how he tells his story. why wouldn't the media, why wouldn't any of us want to fact check that? it is the central part of his candidacy. it's why people trust him. that deserves to be looked into.
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and the idea that going back into someone's past is off limits, i mean, how many times have we gone into the clinton's past, into -- we were looking at when joe biden was talking about running, into what he did with the crime bill. this is part of the process. george bush -- i'm sorry, jeb bush's governorship, this is all fair game. this is part of the process. welcome to the big leagues. >> the problem is, is that we've said many times on this show, everybody is saying, this happens, especially with the gop on the right side, they came come off the media, make the media an enemy. all politicians do it when they're under siege. i feel this is different, errol. i think the media has become made an opponent in a way that will damage our ability to cover this election going forward, because i wasn't surprised that alisyn took heat for the interview. that's the nature of the game. it was the fact she was asking questions at all that she was getting attacked. not like i didn't like your attitude, you wouldn't let him go, you were rude.
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none of that. it was, you shouldn't evening asking. i think it has traction with that base right now. >> it's entirely possible. dr. carson will probably find out, even after he answers the questions, it won't damage his standing. >> it may help it. >> i was a little wrong about this, it was 50 years ago. tell us the truth. >> he raised $3.5 million because of the heat on all this. >> i don't doubt it. what do you want people to do? never check anything you've said and clap for you and let you give a speech and we'll have an election? is that what you think politics is? he's new to the game. maybe that's what he thinks it's supposed to be. >> jackie makes a very strong point. carson is largely a creation of his only personal life, his genius as a surgeon, his fate, the way he came after president obama. >> his transformation he talks about from angry -- >> that's what makes him likable and desirable for people. that's the weird part about this for me. of course that's going to be
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what we come after, jackie. when you have seen this not happen? >> i'm sure you'd have some on the right that say maybe the media doesn't check the elect in some ways. when it comes to presidency, it really is a gauntlet. we check every "t" and every "i." that's the process. that is what happens. but, you know, this attack against the media is a time honored tradition on both sides. ben carson raised a lot of money. i'm sure in the short term this will help his campaign. down the road i would be surprised if you can attack the media all the time and all the way to the white house. >> look, one of the differences -- go ahead. >> let's be honest. it makes it somehow easier to say he attacks the media. it's an attack on journalism. let's call it what it is. journalists ask questions. that's the process. and if you don't like journalism, we should talk about that with presidential candidates.
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we will have that opportunity to do so. we'll have the opportunity to ask all of the questions you have posed because ben carson's business manager and friend, armstrong williams, will be here with us later. also we'll have republican presidential candidate chris christie. meanwhile, an emergency meeting will be held today at the university of missouri to deal with mounting racial tensions on that campus. the school's football players refusing to play until the university's president resigns or is fired. cnn's sports correspondent coy wire joins us live with the latest on what's happening at mizzou. >> students on campus are making brazen move so their voices are heard and it's working. they've caught the attention of jay nixon, missouri's governor. now with the members of the football team taking a stand. the spotlight on missouri's racial incidents is burning brighter than ever. the university of minnesota governing body just hours away from a special meeting to
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address the campus unrest as its racial climate comes to a boil. missouri football's african-american players joining the deafening call demanding mizzou president tim wolf resign over the way they say he's failed to handle matters of alleged racism and discrimination at the university. the athletes tweeting they would boycott football activities until wolf is removed. their coach, gary pinkel, tweeting this photo with his players, arms locked in unity with white students. mat zhu family stand as one. we are united, behind our players. one grad student even beginning a hunger strike against the school's president. >> my body is literally shutting down. with each passing moment and each passing day it gets a little worse. but that's not what i like to focus on. >> black students are not being heard. on campus. from those in power. >> reporter: wolf giving no indication he intends to step down but meeting with several university officials sunday night, hours after release a statement that read in part, it
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is clear to all of us that change is needed. my administration has been doing a tremendous amount of reflection on how to address these complex matters. tensions on campus brewing for months. escalating since september after protesters say wolf failed to respond to several alleged incidents of racial abuse, including students openly using racial slurs. missouri's next football game is saturday against byu. the football team brought in over $30 million in revenue last year. we'll see now if the bold actions of the players will be the impetus for positive change where many on campus feel it's needed. >> thank you, coy. questions continue to swirl about what led two police officers to fatally shoot a 6-year-old boy during a police chase. the officers are expected in court today as the louisiana community mourns that young victim. cnn's nick valencia is live in marksville, louisiana with the latest. this is such a terrible story, nick, what have you learned.
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>> reporter: such a tragedy, alisyn. good morning to you. nearly a week since the shootig of the 6-year-old jeremy mardis. that 6-year-old was buckled into the passenger seat of his father's car when police opened fire, hitting him at least five times in the head and chest, fatally killing him. those officers as you mentioned are expected to make their first court appearance later today. we have been looking into the history of those officers and at least one of them has a troubled history. 32-year-old derrick stafford was indicted on two counts of aggravated rape back in 2011. a year later with, those cases were both dismissed. neither norris greenhouse jr., and derrick stafford have never been convicted of a crime. perhaps to make this case even more bizarre, a source with knowledge of the investigation tells me that norris greenhouse jr., knew the victims prior to the shooting. how well he knew the victims and the extent of their relationship, investigators will be focusing a lot on that.
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meanwhile, later today in hattiesburg, mississippi, the funeral for the 6-year-old little boy is expected to happen at 1:30 p.m. local. >> thank you. we'll speak live with the superintendent of the louisiana state police who's very involved in this case about what he knows. an official says the u.s. is 99.9% certain a terrorist bomb broke down flight 9268. the fbi is in talks to help with the investigation. as of now, no plans to send a team to the region. meanwhile, russian officials have arrived in egypt conducting security checks at sharm el sheikh airport themselves. >> president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu meeting today for the first time in a year. they are expected to discuss increasing u.s. military aid to israel and the nearly two-month wave of violence between palestinians and israelis. the destruction in this
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video is shocking. take a look at this. it's a massive sinkhole, opening up in an i-hop parking lot. the hole is about 50 feet wide, 600 feet long. it swallowed more than a dozen cars. >> that's insanity. >> that is insanity. >> that's not even a sinkhole. the earth opened. >> yes. no one was hurt i'm happy to report. >> that's amazing that no one was walking to her car or sitting in the car. that's drone footage. it shows incredible -- >> whoa! >> i don't think i've ever seen anything like that. >> we report on sink holes all the time but not to this level. >> stathat's stupefying. >> that kraf crevice instabilit there. two louisiana police
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officers facing second degree murder charges for the shooting death we told you about a moment ago of a 6-year-old boy. why did they open fire on that young boy's father's car? we'll take a closer look at the story when "new day" continues. the great beauty of owning a property is that you can create wealth through capital appreciation, and this has been denied to many south africans for generations. this is an opportunity to right that wrong. the idea was to bring capital into the affordable housing space in south africa, with a fund that offers families of modest income safe and good accommodation. citi got involved very early on and showed an enormous commitment. and that gave other investors confidence. citi's really unique, because they bring deep understanding of what's happening in africa.
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two louisiana deputy marshals are expected in court facing second degree murder charges after allegedly killing a 6-year-old boy when they opened fire on his father's car. joining us now to talk about this is britain stoynn stole fo advocate" as well as matthew horace, senior vice president of fjc security services. let me start with you, brynn. what are you learned about the events leading up to the moment when these law enforcement officers opened fire? >> well, there's a number of things that still aren't entirely clear. for example, why these deputy
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marshals began chasing 25-year-old christopher few. it ended on an "l" bend in the road. a third vehicle responded. the marksville city police officer and these two deputy marshals are believed to have fired a total of 18 rounds into the vehicle, killing the 6-year-old boy and critically wounding the driver. >> matthew, what -- nothing makes sense in this story, to my ears. nothing makes sense. 18 rounds, shooting a 6-year-old boy five times? what's going on here? >> this -- alisyn, this entire incident seems reckless and haphazard. when you draw your weapon from the holster you have to have a
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reasonable belief that you may have to use it. if you point it at someone, you have to know you will use it. with that, we have to have target acquisition. >> our reporter nick valencia just suggested that one of the marshals may have known the dad. do you know anything about that relationship or their background? >> i'm not sure entirely sure about that. it is a very small town. a town of about 5,700 people here in central louisiana. wouldn't be at all surprising if they did. i'm not entirely sure about that. >> matthew, when i heard this story, i'm not a police officer but i thought this wreaks of revenge. it wreaks of anger. they said they were trying to serve a warrant. there was no arrest warrant out for this dad. something is going on here. when i heard nick valencia say there was a suggestion that one of the officers knew the father,
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there has to be a back story. >> there often times is a back story. i'm sure over the next several days colonel edmonson and the louisiana state police will get to the bottom of it and figure out what was behind this traffic stop. it was a bad stop. it was a bad shoot with a horrific ending. >> colonel edmonson will be on our program. he will talk about why he so quickly filed charges when he saw the evidence. listen to what he had to say. >> it is the most disturbing thing i've seen. i will leave it at that. jeremy mardis, 6 years old. he didn't deserve to die like that. >> bryn, when colonel edmonson said it is the most disturbing thing i've seen, i believe he's talking about video that he saw of a body camera one of the officers was wearing. do we know what's on this video? >> that's right. we don't know exactly what's on that. i've asked the colonel several times. he won't describe exactly what's
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captured on the video. he will say that the body camera was worn by the on-duty marksville police officer. the fourth officer to arrive on the scene. and he arrived just prior to the shooting starting. we do know that. what exactly it captured, they won't say, although you have heard colonel edmonson's pretty grim description of apparently what is on the video. >> matthew, both of these marshals who first responded or who first fired the shots have been looked at in use of excessive force in the past. if you have something on your record about excessive force, why would you be paired together? >> i don't know that organizations, particularly small irorganizations, even look at that in terms of how they assign officers to work. this may be something we look at in terms of their past. as it relevants to this incident, it's looking more and more like number one, this is out and out criminal.
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number two, it brings into light training standards. >> shouldn't that be looked at? if you have a claim of excessive force, shouldn't you be with somebody who is known as a conciliator, not an escalator. >> certainly. that's what people have been calling for for years, hiring, retention, and training. >> bryn stole, matthew horace, thank you for the information. we'll be speaking with that commander coming up on "new day." stick around for that. >> the big revelation will be in the officers knew there was a little boy strapped into the vehicle. the russians and the u.s. may wind up fighting isis together after all, amid feelings that 9268 was a terror attack, russia asking the u.s. for help. what they want and where it may lead. we're live in sinai with the latest.
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- ends sunday. - ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ dr. ben carson says he does not have to prove his stories about his past are true and his supporters agree. carson says he had a spike in fund-raising as a result of the media onslaught as he calls it,
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$3.5 million last week alone. donald trump for one is not buying in. he's. >> referee: carson, saying the veracity issues are disturbng. that carson could have an incurable anger problem and this may end his campaign. the fbi now in talks to help investigate the flash of metrojet flight 9268 as russian forces arrive at egypt's sharm el sheikh airport to conduct security checks. we are live at the airport with the latest details for us. >> reporter: what we're looking at here is what so much of the concern and speculation and the reporting has been evolving around, what exactly that sound heard in the last second of the cockpit recording before it was cut off. the fbi is saying if they do come in, that will be one of theous pekts they're focusing on. all this comes as 100 victims bodies have been identified in russia. it's been an extraordinarily
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difficult time. the memorial service on sunday drew hundreds to st. petersburg's cathedral and state media in russia is reporting that in the very near future, they could be getting the results of tests done to determine if whether there is any explosive on the fragments of that missing plane. it could be as long as two weeks but it could be in the very near future they're saying. hopefully, some respite for the families of the victims. >> please keep us posted as to what they find. police are investigating a fiery crash that left four people dead, including a child. at least 14 other people seriously injured when a pickup truck crashed into a church van in hyattsville, maryland. they believe the truck lost control and veered across the highway, crashed into the van and exploded. the driver of the truck was also killed. all right. what's the number one movie in america? bond, james bond. $73 million in its opening
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weekend, the second biggest domestic debut for a bond film after the last one, "sky fall." it's 294th bond film, probably the last for actor daniel craig. i seen it. >> did you? >> i did. >> i think daniel craig is an excellent bond. >> the villain is very well played. >> scary. >> it was not scary. it is action packed. >> i love that. >> a good popcorn flick. i'll see it. >> he has high pants, though. is that the new look? >> like high waters? >> they're a little high. is that the style? >> that's the style. he'll be wearing them tomorrow. dallas cowboy player greg hardy on the cowboys roster and on the field last night after the release of shocking photos of an alleged domestic violence incident against his exgirlfriend. coy wire has more in this morning's "bleacher report." frustrating as a former player because sometimes in the
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nfl, playmakers are more important than principles. these photos were released on friday and on saturday hardy was on twitter having to address the shocking photos. just had to say i express my regret for what happened in the past and i'm dedicated to being the best person and teammate i can be. he follows that but mostly i'm grateful for the opportunity to play in the nfl. here are the pictures hardy is talking about. i'll reminded you, they are disturbing. they show his then girlfriend in 2014 battered abruised with red marks on her body, including her back. it's raised more questions as to whether or not the cowboys should have signed greg hardy in the first place and whether or not they should continue to employ him. hardy was still on the team, suited up last night when dallas hosted the eagles. this prime time game became an overtime game and sam bradford finds jordan matthews who's streaking across the middle, toasting and coasting on into the end zone for the
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game-winning score, giving the cowboys their sixth straight loss, their worst losing streak in 26 years. eagles win, 33-27. cowboys coach jason garrett talked about his team's reasoning to continue to play greg hardy. listen. >> we don't condone domestic violence. we take the issue very, very seriously. we knew when we signed greg hardy there would be criticism. we decided to give him a second chance. he's worked hard for our football team up to this point. he knows the expectations and standards. we'll hold him accountable to those. >> despite the release of photos, garrett essentially echoing that which cowboys leadership has been saying all along, ever since they signed hardy to a one-year contract that pays him almost $1 million per week this season. back to you. >> coy, thank you. >> you're welcome. bernie sanders lagging behind hillary clinton in the latest polls but why won't he publicly criticize the democratic front-runner? cnn went one-on-one with bernie sanders. we'll play you that, next.
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if anyone tells you politics is [ bleep ], you should not get involved, i want you -- i want you to ask them why it is that the coke brothers and other billionaires are spending 900 million bucks on this election. they think it's pretty important. and if they think it's pretty important, your friends should think it's pretty important. >> senator bernie sanders making an impassioned police to voters in las vegas last night.
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he continues to lag behind front-runner hillary clinton. that is certainly not discouraging him. cnn chief political analyst gloria borger sat down with mr. sanders over the weekend and joins us now. he was fired up in vegas. >> he was fired up in vegas and when i met with him in south carolina, he was fired up there. this past summer, bernie sanders was beating hillary clinton in the polls in both new hampshire and in iowa. now with joe biden not running clinton is leading sanders nationally by more than 30 points. so i asked the senator whether the magic from the summer was gone? >> nope. absolutely not. let's go back six months and let's look at bernie sanders announcing his candidacy and being 3%, 4% in the polls. no money in his campaign, no volunteers, no political organization. running against a woman who is enormously well known whose husband was president of the united states. >> that would be hillary
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clinton. >> i didn't want to say so. if you say it, i'll agree. >> okay. >> we started off six months ago, be honest gloria, what did the media consider bernie sanders, a fringe candidate, right? not a serious candidate. be honest. that was the case. you are saying you haven't fight won this thing yet. that tells me we've made real progress in six months. >> hillary clinton has 31 endorsements from people in the senate. >> yes. >> you don't have any. >> yes. >> what does that show. >> one of us is a candidate of the establishment, one of us is involved in establishment politics and establishment economics and it says that maybe the other candidate is prepared to take on the establishment. >> that would be you? >> that would be me, yes, i think that's probably right. >> before we get to the contrast between you and clinton, i want to talk about hillary clinton's damn e-mails, to quote you. >> the american people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn e-mails. >> thank you.
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>> same thing. what i said during the debate, same thing. the american people get tired of seeing front page stories from the media day after day about e-mails. they want to know why their kids can't afford to go to college or why they can't afford health care. why we have a grotesque level of income and wealth inequality. >> they want to know about thinks presidential candidates. >> of course they do. but day after day after day? that's why i said enough with the e-mails. now, there is a process under way. there is a process, an investigation. let it take its course. i'm not involved in that. >> what is legitimate for the process to investigate? >> i honestly don't know. >> national security? >> all of those issues. it's not something i have paid a whole lot of attention to. >> there are issues of trust with hillary clinton. and you sort of gave her a pass during the debate. do you regret that? >> no. i do not regret that at all. i mean, i cannot walk down the
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corridors in capitol hill without being really begged by the media to attack hillary clinton. they want to make this personal. it's easy to cover. i choose not to do that. let's talk about the economy. let's talk about wall street. let's talk about climate change. let's talk about education. frankly, that is what the american people want to hear discussed. >> let me talk to you about the issues between you and hillary clinton. >> yes. >> because she has recently come to oppose the pacific trade deal, come to oppose keystone as the president opposes keystone. >> yes. >> has vowed to take on big banks. how should voters view these changes? >> fair question. >> good question. >> thank you. how should voters view those change? >> what you should see is how do you feel about u.s. trade policies? that's the first question. do you think it's good? the question is who is out front on this issue? who has consistently been opposed to trade policy. the answer is pretty obvious.
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i am glad by the way, let me be frank, that hillary clinton came on board in opposition. >> does it tell you anything about her? >> that's what the american people have to decide. >> what do you think? >> i'll let the american people decide. i'm not voting for hillary clinton. breaking story here, i am supporting bernie sanders. >> as he continues to draw the contrast between hillary and himself, as you pointed out, he refuses to criticize her, refuses to attack her. we know he's been unconventional, taking it right to the people. is this unconventional way of his, is it going to work for him down the line? >> i think it's very difficult. people need to make a choice. >> sure. >> he says you have to choose just on the issues. and that's fine. but people need to know a little bit more about him, in contrast with her. he doesn't like to talk about her personally. says he likes her personally. so the minute you start attacking another candidate, you become a conventional politician.
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and he doesn't want to be a conventional politician. so it's very difficult terrain for him to navigate and as you can see in this interview, he's having a bit of a tough time with it and blaming the media very much for continuing to raise the hillary clinton question although i don't see how we don't raise it given the fact she's his toughest competitor in this race. >> right. look, all of this resonates with a large portion of his base. and with the certain part of the electorate. it's going to be interesting to see how that develops as the days proceed. do you have a second part to this interview? >> i do. >> you sit down with the woman who stands business his side, mrs. sanders. >> jane sanders be who was by the way, once it's had chief of staff, once his communications director, sat down with us with her husband to sort of talk about how he decided to get into this race and whether he's really a grouch. you'll be surprised at what she says.
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or maybe not. >> i think he has good humor. he's able to poke fun at himself and we saw him dance with ellen. >> oh, yes. >> the second part of that coming up in the 8:00 hour. get in on the conversation by joining us on social media. "new day" cnn is the hash tag on twitter or post the comments on facebook. chris? we go from ben carson who says he doesn't want to get into personal attacks to ben carson saying there's been too many attacks. he says the media never wants to go after a candidate like we're going after him. is ben carson a victim? his business manager will make the case. my constipation and belly pain have my stomach feeling all knotted up. i've tried laxatives... but my symptoms keep returning. my constipation feels like a pile of bricks... that keeps coming back. linzess can help. once-daily linzess treats adults with ibs with constipation or chronic constipation. linzess is thought to help calm pain-sensing nerves and accelerate bowel movements.
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did you see alisyn's interview with ben carson? it was a major pivot point. >> this is a bunch of lies. that's what it is.
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it's a bunch of lies, attempting, you know, to say that i'm lying about my history. i think it's pa net ek. you guys in the media just stop for a minute. and ask yourself, am i actually doing a good thing? >> seems like the answer to that is a an >> seems like the answer to that is a unqualified yes to me. but i'm biased because i love alisyn and i think i understand journalism pretty well. listen, tina, i'll start with you. i get that attacking the media is a good thing. i grew up in a household that did it all the time. i get that it has currency and politics. i get that the election is more of a popularity contest than i've seen recently. what am i missing? what is being asked that is unreasonable here? >> absolutely nothing. i thought it was a fantastic enter view that alisyn did. it just kept on probing the
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crazy illogic of carson's position. even when alisyn asked him about his education ideas, he behave had as if it was a big deal. he couldn't answer it. i think it's because he has no ideas or policies. every time he's probed he says you guys are attacking me. but they're not. they're just trying to get who he is. >> there's plenty of room for criticism. i receive it all the time. a lot of times it's warranted, that it gets combative, debate. this is just, you say you stabbed a guy. you didn't give us the right name, didn't tell us you were using a different name, you said it was a friend, now you're saying it's a family member. now you're saying your mom remembers it. >> this guy is an outsider candidate. that's what he's billed at. he has no experience with this. most politicians have done this as they've gone along and they've been vetted. they understand that's part of
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the process. >> that this is his resume, his faith, conviction, all about this one story. >> he never ran for office. now it's being looked at. every politician goes through this. it's normal. it's what happens. >> what is not normal, i would submit, please, you tell me because you're both better minds on this than i am. i think this race, is this is a reflection of the popularity contest this has become. when it is this popularity contest, the media does catch a lot more flack, let's say, because they're measuring these guys on how much they're liked. >> of course attacking the media is -- >> we heard it on the other side. i don't buy it what "the new york times" did about the bipartisan nature of lying and this political cycle. the clintons came after the media as well. >> in a sense trump himself
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redefined the rules of the race he's owned hyperbole, he's own excessive statements about himself. which everybody know are hyperbo hyperbole, shameless, keeps on doing it, doesn't feel deterred. he always has to redefine the game so everybody is now in a world where you can say what you want and you keep on saying it's true. the media will attack you but then you can say the media are biased. this is a cycle of fairy stories being perpetrated on the stump. it's really very dangerous. >> that creates a different question for me. are we reaping what we've sewn here with trump because we let him say what he says, because it's so entertaining, now when we apply typical scrutiny, it gives another candidate an opportunity to say, what's this about? >> people are challenging trump. he doesn't flinch from it. he might say it's unfair, not a good question but he comes back for more. it sounds weird in a way that
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carson feels like it's illegitimate even to ask the question. if you ask the question, you're out of bounds. i think this is interesting, too, you used to work for fox news. how can you ask that? he's used to kid glove treatment from that part of the media. when somebody comes at him with something that isn't part of his policy, he may react like it's unfair. >> i actually think bill has made a very good point there. >> really? >> yes, i do. the thing about this current race, these republican candidates truly live in their own bubble. they look at fox news, talk radio all the time. they really believe that they're in this closed world. then when somebody from the real world comes out and asks them a question, they're completely taken aback. this has never happened before. >> i have to believe they're more savvy than that. we'll have governor christie on. you know when you have a pundit on and she's listening like, oh,
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would y wow. what i'm saying is it's going to be, what is this election about ultimately? look, let's shift topics from this. because carson is saying what he's saying. the media is saying what they're saying. trump goes on "saturday night live." it gets boffo numbers. did they give him a pass? that's what we assess. he gets the biggest ratings anywhere he goes. is that what we saw on "saturday night live"? is that the proof of why he's popular in the first place? >> he's a celebrity already. he gets atension for that. i don't think that affects the race at all. i think people have made too much of it in a way. that's not going to bring him more voters or lose voters. i think it was established going in. if you like him you'll be entertained, if you don't like him, you won't be entertained. the show didn't make a difference, i don't think. >> the other side is that
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popularity is enough. that's the question. if it's enough in this cycle, why would be it? because of disaffection, diz enfranchisement of the voters. could popularity be enough? >> i think it's getting that way. largely i think because the volume of media that people have to digest, the velocity makes people check out. and only a personal who can kind of cut through that noise actually gets people's attention for more than two seconds. trump can gain people's attention by being unpredictable. we don't know what he's going to say every time he comes out. i don't think trump knows what he's going to say either. what was amusing to me on sunday was that he was statesman like with george stephanopoulos on the phone. he's just as carson is coming off. suddenly trump was behaving like a statesman. >> relatively.
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i have to tell you, hitting his mother in the pace, hitting the guy with the lock and stabbing the guy in the stomach, he's a real concern. >> that is trump's version of being statesman-like. >> he's trying to score points. the funny thing is, theodore roosevelt said something about being in the arena, you'll wind up getting marred by the dust and sweat and blood. you have to expect that, i think. i think trump does expect it. i think he kind of sort of relishes it in a way. carson is just not used to it. if he's going to stay in the race, the press won't let up on him. >> let's not forget about what lbj said, the guy has played football without a helmet. ford as well, i'm a ford, not a lincoln. there was ease with the dustup. which carson doesn't have. >> they weren't blaming the media back then. maybe it's better when they insult each other. bill carter, tina brown, thank you, as always.
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there's a lot of news. let's get to it. stop and ask yourself, am i st - actually doing a good thing? >> when you talk about hitting a friend in the face with a padlock and stabbing someone, that's a serious statement. campus unrest as its racial climate comes to a boil. missouri's football african-american players joining the deafening call demanding mizzou president tim wolf resign. >> black students are not being heard on campus from those in power. >> i accept your nomination. >> this say glimpse behind the veil of the real george herbert walker bush. >> you don't get to be president of the united states by just being sweet. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. has anyone said it here? >> all yours. >> good morning, welcome back to your "new day." up first, dr. ben carson ramping up his attacks on journalism. he says no other candidate is getting the media scrutiny he's
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facing and it's working for him. in just the last week, he has raked in millions of dollars in campaign donations. >> you know who's not buying it? donald trump tossing fuel on the fire. he says carson's stories about his violent past are disturbing even they're as true as carson says they are. trump himself are coming off a highly rated hosting gig on "saturday night live." he says all the media attention could spell the end of to ben carson. let's bring in cnn national correspondent suzanne malveaux, live from washington. good morning. >> good morning, chris. it's clear that gop candidates want to get some things out before tomorrow's republican debate in milwaukee. it's about going from defense to offense regarding stories about his past. for rubio it's about providing more information about his finances and for trump, well, it's about getting in those digs at both of them, hoping their troubles will stick. >> the burden of proof is not going to be on me to corroborate everything that i've ever talked about in my life.
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>> reporter: over the weekend, dr. ben carson's tack on the media intensifying. the gop presidential contender unleashing a firestorm of verbal attacks on reporters who have challenge his stories about his past. >> show me somebody, even from your business, the media, who is 100% accurate in everything they say. >> you said this when you were in kindergarten. give me a break. >> reporter: recent reports in politico and "the wall street journal" calling into question aspects of carson's life story published in his book. politico wrote carson's campaign changed their version of a story about receiving a full scholarship from west point, the military academy doesn't charge tuition. in response, carson's campaign clarified that he never applied nor was granted admission. >> it was offered, i didn't say i accepted it.
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>> reporter: they say he's seens aa threat. >> many other people who are politically experienced tell me they've never seen it before. >> reporter: gop rival donald trump calling it the beginning of the end of carson's campaign. >> when you say hitting your mother over the head with a hammer, when you talk about hitting a friend in the face with a padlock and you talk about stabbing someone, that's a serious statement when you say you have pathological disease. as i understand it, you can't really cure it. >> look at this guy. >> reporter: meanwhile, trump was all laughs as host of "saturday night live." >> enrique. >> i brought you the check for the wall. >> reporter: garnering the highest ratings the show's had in years. "snl" didn't pull any punches. the cast tackled most of the criticism regarding trump including accusations of racism, his immigration policy and questions around president obama's birth certificate. we also learned this weekend in jon meacham's new book, 836-page biography of george h.w. bush that trump was interested in the vp slot.
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trump said on "state of the union" this week it was the other way around. that they came to him and said he'd be great. if you can imagine it, a bush/trump '88 ticket. >> thanks so much, suzanne. let's bring in armstrong williams, dr. ben carson's business manager and close friend. armstrong, thanks so much for being with us this morning. >> always. good morning, alisyn. >> we've heard dr. carson's frustration over the last several days with journalists asking questions and delving into his past and his stories he and i as i'm sure you know, had a bit of a heated exchange on friday in an interview we did he here on "new day." what was it that he objects to? what question did i ask or any journalists ask him that he thinks are unfair? >> alisyn, this is a new process. dr. carson was a celebrated
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theatric neurosurgeon by the mao eddia, by institutions all over the world. you know, they just loved him. all of a sudden he has decided to enter this thing called a presidential race. what he has to understand is that when you enter a presidential race and you don't have a legislative record, the only record you have is your personal biography and extraordinary record as a pediatric neurosurgeon, people are going to challenge everything you've said, everything you've uttered. they'll challenge it. it's not an issue of whatever they're trying to prove, for those of us who know dr. carson, we know he's good, decent and well meaning. that's in a vacuum. >> that's right. >> not everyone knows dr. carson is being vetted. >> yes. >> i think it's a very good thing that dr. carson is being vetted, that dr. carson is being
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tested, that dr. carson is having to answer these questions. in my opinion and the opinion of many others, it's best that he address these issues early on and get them out of the way. >> sure. armstrong, it is interesting to hear you say that. you feel that way. it doesn't appear that he feels that way. are you telling him that this is the process, this is what journalists do? they don't just accept stories as the gospel trij, they attempt to verify themp this we go and source them and that his objection to this is, you know, his sort of casting journalism in the light of being unfair, this is what our job description is. what doesn't he understand about that? >> alisyn, alisyn, in all fairness, some journalism and some reporting is unfair, even cnn had to debunk the political story saying that carson's campaign admitted he fabricated a story. >> no, no, hold on a second.
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hold on, armstrong. if you're talking about -- >> they debunked the story. >> are you talking about west point? >> what politico said. dr. carson never said he was accepted at west point and he never applied. it was in his book. >> didn't he say that he was offered a full scholarship to west point? >> and he was. >> okay. because that's open to interpretation. >> no, it's not. i don't think so. let me address that. >> all the students who go to west point get it paid for. >> may i address that? >> go ahead. >> let's go back 40 or 50 years, alisyn. you have a young kid who happens to be an american black kid with incredible grades, high scores. it comes to the attention of general westmoreland and others while they were at this detroit banquet. you know without a doubt they wanted this kid at west point and the fact it may have been a
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wink, wink, this 14-year-old kid said if you apply, you will get the full scholarship. dr. carson never applied because he only had $10 for one application. his ambition was to become a medical doctor. there is no doubt anybody in that position, 50 years ago today would have believed they would have gotten a full scholarship. he told the truth. >> okay. let me move on to something. i know dr. carson prides himself on his tone and temperament. in fact, that's what voters say they respond to. he has said he doesn't want to engage in the school yard taunts that donald trump has in this campaign. so let me play for you a portion of our interview from friday and get you to respond on the other side. listen to this. >> all you have to do is look at what's happened since the great society programs of lyndon johnson. you have to be kind of stupid to look at that and not realize
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that that's a failure and to say we just didn't do enough of it. are you honestly telling me you didn't know what i was talking about when i said that? are you honestly telling me -- because if you are, you might fit in that category. >> now, armstrong, donald trump likes to call people stupid also. how is this any different? interview. i watched the - i heard the remarks. and sometimes when you're someone like dr. carson who is very calm, i mean, look, the guy is fighting for his good name as anybody would fight for it. >> yes. implying -- >> there are sometimes when you say things, it's not always intentional to offend or to hurt. i love the fact that you brought out the fire in his belly, the fight, you brough out a man defending himself, defending his reputation, for so many years, his credibility. sometimes when you're in that
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line of fire, those are the kind of things that are often said. >> implying that an iner to viewer is stupid for asking a question, is that the tone of civility that we can expect from dr. carson? >> alisyn, to us it was not uncivilized. this is what happens when you use your network around the clock, in his opinion, to sully his reputation and he has an opportunity to come on your show, obviously, you cannot expect it to be a picnic. >> no. but armstrong, using a network to sully his reputation, there again, i think that we have a difference of opinion about what journalism is. is dr. carson not expecting journalists to go back and look through what -- as you pointed out, he didn't have a political record. we go back and look at his life record. it's on display in his autobiography and elsewhere in interviews. is he expecting us to ask
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questions or is that out of bounds for his campaign? >> alisyn, i think what dr. carson asked and he asked you about the process and how you're going to do this, if you're going to speak to nine people, you want to make sure those nine people were there and could be testimonial to exactly what he's advocating in his book. i saw something that buzz feed sent us last night, dr. robert prince from hopkins university, told a story 30 years ago they were in the examination room, 3:00 a.m. in the morning and he asked dr. carson, how did you get to this point of becoming a neurosurgeon? he said dr. carson told him the exact story about the knife and the belt buckle. you would think that cnn would corroborate the stories with people who are legitimate. this was 30 years ago. he had no political ambition. it's interesting that the people you select to give credibility --
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>> there you go. you just gave us the first name of someone who might have the same story from 30 years ago as today. but as you know, our reporters called you and called the campaign and said, hey, we'd like to look into the book, can you help us? they started with you. >> alisyn, i respect you. you didn't hear me. i got it from buzz feed. they sent it to me, the 5:19 clip. i listened to it early this morning. i just heard it. if buzz feed and others can find this, why can't your reporters do the same. >> our reporters went back to carson's hometown. they didn't say he was fabricating anything. they said they couldn't find anyone who remembers his accounts. that's fair. that's truth. they also were open to hearing from you and dr. carson if there was an avenue they should be pursuing. that's what journalists do. armstrong, listen, i know we're in agreement about this and that
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you believe that he is -- we should vet him and that we are asking fine questions. >> listen, he needs to be toughened. he needs to know exactly what is expected. this right now is just a walk in the park. it is going to be more intense. dr. carson has to show he has the fortitude, the character to withstand scrutiny. hopefully you will start vetting him on what really matters to the american people on policies that he's advocating. >> yes. >> so we can go knee deep into his policies so if he does win the gop nomination, if he does win the white house, how does he expect to govern and how does he separate himself from everyone else. >> there you go. armstrong williams, appreciate you being on "new day." we'll talk more about this next hour with republican presidential candidate chris christie. over to chris. breaking news in new york city. police are investigating a deadly shooting near penn station. this is a live look at the scene right now. here's what we know. three people shot, one person died. two others injured.
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one was shot in the leg, the other the stomach. the stomach obviously a far more serious wound. the status of the shooter or shooters unclear right now. we'll bring you more information as it becomes available. israeli police fatally shot a woman they say was trying to attack a security check point in west bank with a knife. one of the incident captured on video, you'll see it here, shows a palestinian woman pulling a knife from her bag. you'll see it happen in a second and attacking an israeli guard. >> well, all of those violent stabbings are sure to come up when president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu meet at the white house. it will be their first face-to-face in more than a year and the first since clashing over the iran nuclear deal. here with the latest is cnn senior washington correspondent joe johns. what are we expecting?
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>> good morning, alisyn. the visit of prime minister netanyahu to washington being seen as an opportunity to get back to issues of common ground after his last visit here, that very contentious visit, including a controversial speech before congress. so what is on the agenda, one of the big things, of course, is aid to israel and whether that number that exists right now, probably around $3 billion, might be raised, not a lot of hints from the administration as to how far up they might go. sec, obviously on the list is that big issue of the two-state solution, palestine and israel co-existing, the third of course something that's been going on here in washington. the issue of the syrian crisis and how to handle it. three big issues, many others to be discussed. this is a time where the administration is trying to emphasize the notion that there
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is common ground and anytime israel and the united states have differences, they always come back together. we do expect to see the prime minister here at the white house around 10:30 eastern time. of course this will be a visit that does not have all of the bells and whistles that often accompany a state visit. very sensitive time here in washington. the prime minister also expected to address the american enterprise institute and some other groups trying to reach across party lines and, perhaps, heal some wounds. >> no question this is a critical point. let us know what happens. appreciate it. top u.s. officials are growing ever more confident that a terrorist bomb took down flight 9268. one official tells cnn they are now 99.9% certain of that. meantime, russian forces are arriving at egypt's sharm el sheikh airport. they're going to conduct their own security checks. that's only the beginning, they say, as well. more security experts are leaving moscow to check all major airports in egypt. >> racial tensions are boiling
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over on the university of missouri campus, dozens of blook football players joining a student protest, refusing to play unless the university's president is out. we'll take a closer look at what's going on, next. milk has f high-quality protein. which could be the difference between just living life. and milking it. start every day with the power of protein and milk life. technology empowers us it pushes us to go further. special olympics has almost five million athletes in 170 countries. the microsoft cloud allows us to immediately be able to access information, wherever we are. information for an athlete's medical care, or information
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racial tensions are running high at the university of missouri, the school's football players are boycotting games as calls grow louder for the school's president to step down or be fired.
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i want to bring in cnn sports correspondent coy wire. mark lamont hill is also here, a cnn political commentator and host of b.e.t. news. i think it's important to give context to folks of what's been happening here at mizzou. there's been a number of incident on campus involving students and racial tension. give us a primer here. >> yes, you're talking about a school with approximately 35,000 students. 7% of that population is african-american. and in recent weeks, as you have mentioned, there have been disturbing occurrences of racial discrimination at one point there was a swastika written with feces in a dorm. clearly disturbing. there are students protesting the actions and inaction of the school's president, tim wolf. they're out on campus in tents. there's one student who's been on an eight-day hunger strike so their voices can be heard. now with the football team stepping in and saying they're not going to play or practice
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until something is done about that and furthermore, that president resigns, that's a big, bold statement. >> we know there's a 10:00 a.m. emergency meeting of school officials scheduled for this morning. what does that president need to do? do i don't you think he needs to go or can he repair this situation? >> well, i've been part of many actions as a student myself for 20 years i've been an activist. when we make a list of demands, this group made eight major demands. sometimes you want all eight met, sometimes you want six or seven. i wouldn't be surprised if the resignation was something that was high on negotiable. he probably needs to meet all seven things in dramatic fashion to get out of it. really talking about systems of repression, the resources he's going to devote to repair the damage that's been done. >> we demand immediate removal of tim wolf as um assistant president up until yesterday he
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said he was not going anywhere. they want to see more conversations being had an an active plan to be to increase diversity, awareness and acceptance on campus. it's interesting, coy, when you look at what's happening with the team, the coaches who are operate dedominantly and even the white players are publicly supporting. we have a tweet from the team, saying the mizzou family stands as one. i've understood there's some espn reporting of dissension among the ranks that some of the players are not real happy about this boycott. >> i can imagine if some are not real happy if some aren't going to be able to play. the bottom line is that the coach, not only the head coach of the team publicly supporting his student athletes, the entire athletic department also released a statement saying they stand behind their student athletes as well. why is this significant for the football team? we talked about that 7% of the entire student population is
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african-american. well, 42 of the 64 football players, 65%, are african-american. they're making a bold statement about something that needs to clearly be done. >> let's talk about the fact that there is a lot of money on the line, too. we know how much college football brings into a school. they're saying if they miss this game on saturday, that's $1 million of lost revenue potentially for the school. obviously this has financial ramifications as well, which is interesting to see the football players come in and say no, mark, we're going to make a stand. it's very interesting to see social issues coming up in a locker room. >> it absolutely is. that says a lot about the campus community. often times football players are seen as being disconnected from the political and social life of a campus. it seems these students are very much tapped into it. it's a bold and courageous move, high stakes move for their careers and scholarships. also for the campus itself. that's part of what makes the removal of the president a
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curious demand to me. i support their action. if what's at stake is the campus losing money, them losing potential donors, that doesn't affect the president if he resigns. he has no incentive to do this stuff. >> good point. >> i would like to see that demand be bracketed and others be supported not because i have an investment. just because it will get done. >> last question for you, what are the repercussions to are some of the players on the team? i've been hearing there have been calls for some of them to lose their scholarships. is there a concern that will affect their futures? >> i don't think that's the case. when you have the head coach coming out and sporting his players and the entire athletic department. i think you're okay. you mentioned the numbers, michaela, two years ago the athletic department as a whole brought in $76 million for the school. last year that rose to 83 million. the football department accounting for well over 30 million of that. this is big dollars we're talking. this is very important to this school. as mark brought up, a great
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point, the entire student body as this affects the school and its operations. >> within you have dollars and cents on the line, it gets people's attention and quick. always greet to have your voices in our conversation. thanks for joining us. i'll send it back over to alisyn an chris. >> important conversations to be having and we'll continue to have them. missouri senator claire mccaskill, she obviously represents the state where mizzou is. she went there herself. she put out a statement. does more need to be done? we'll also talk politics. mccaskill is all in for hillary clinton. thinks bernie sanders is unel t unelectab unelectable. why? vo: know you have a dedicated
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no question, hillary clinton is dominating the latest national polls on her side of the fence. 25-point lead over bernie sanders. meanwhile, a prominent senator has gone so far as to call clinton's competition unelectable. who's that? not me. senator claire mccaskill. just as important as this morning's conversation, she's
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lan alumna of the university of missouri. let's talk about that. it's a flash point. do you believe you and other electeds need to do more to fix what's going on on that campus. >> i want to say how proud i am of the young people on the campus who have decided they are going to make a stand. i'm proud of our football team, frankly. if you remember, this is the same football team that where michael sam came from, one of the first athletes that went through the nfl draft as -- >> openly gay. >> openly gay. >> yes. >> i believe good things will come to this because of the passion and commitment of these young people. we need to be part of it, too. the challenge for the university obviously is to -- at the board of curators meeting make a decision about the leadership of the university going forward. >> that's indirectly talking about who the president is.
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my curiosity, if the football team is doing the right thing, if these kids are doing the right thing, that means wrong things are happening on campus. i don't hear enough of that. i thought you and governor nixon, your statements were supportive but general. if these kids are doing the right thing, that means the wrong thing has been going on on the campus. where's the accountability for that? >> there has been not enough prioritization on this issue on camp campus. i think frankly, candidly, i don't think the student body would have elected a black student body president back when i was on campus. they have at the university of missouri in columbia. i don't think these young people believe, i think they're probably right, that this leadership has not prioritized some of the issues that african-american students face on campus in terms of being marginalized in various ways. >> do you have a different
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understanding of this piece of video of the president, president wolf saying to the kids, when they ask about systematic discrimination, it exists because you don't think you're getting the opportunities to succeed. how do you explain those communities? >> i think it was -- i don't know if he misspoke. i think he was probably doing this off the cuff and obviously didn't do it well. i don't believe that this president is in the dark at this point about how bad things are. i think he realizesed huge mistakes have been made and changes need to be made. >> he's not in front of it. >> that's for sure. that was a ham-handed way to address these young people. it's not their fault or perception. there is systemic racism and it's important that we look at from top to bottom, on university campuses and the
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criminal justice system, in the workplace. i believe that the university is going to turn the page today and we're going to see some changes that i hope will allow us to go forward and fix this issue, at least do a much better job than we have done. >> we'll be on the story, in contact with the office. thank you for discussing that. it matters. let's talk politics. >> sure. >> you say you're with hillary, all in, bernie sanders, nice guy, unelktable. he would say, crazy talk. hillary sun electable. she's hiding on the negatives. she won't even come on "new day." why back her and not bernie sanders? >> i've said an awful lot of good things about bernie sanders and the conversation he's having with america. i think it's really important. he's my friend and i admire him for what he's doing. >> is it the socialist thing, senator? >> i'm from missouri. and you know, he is not identified as a democrat. he does identify as a socialist. i think that's very hard -- >> says democratic socialists.
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>> but he says socialist. >> every time. >> every time. so i think the problem is, in a state like mine, it's very hard to get past that. for a lot of voters. and, you know, the idea that america is founded on the basis of that anybody can make it. obviously we've got work to do with the middle class in income inequality. bernie is highlighting those issues very well. i think hillary clinton is a better candidate because of it. i think her challenge by bernie sanders has made her a stronger candidate, a more aggressive candidate. i think she's working very hard to earn it. and ultimately i believe she will earn the nomination and be elected president. >> what do you do with the big built-in negative? how does she broaden the tent? we have a third of them. they're going to love her. she's the democrat. you have a third of them, they're going to hate her. she's the democrat. with that high built-in negative, everything swarming around with the ancillary issues to actual policy, how does she broaden the tent?
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>> the contrast between her policies and the republican policies. one is about the everyday man, about the family struggling to figure out if they can send their child to college or whether they can afford to retire. the other policies are about going backward to, oh, if we just give tax cuts to the top 1%, we'll all have unicorns and ra rainbows. i think the contrast will become clear. that's when she'll win over the independent voters, the middle voters. i do not think they want to go back to the trickle down economic policies that have never worked when they've been embraced by republicans in the white house. >> the voters choose when they trust. senator mccaskill, we'll stay on the missouri story. >> thank you very much. >> alisyn. colorado high school students implicated in a sexting scandal with explicit pictures being exchanged like trading
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we have breaking news for
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you, two americans shot and killed by a jordanian police officer this morning at a police training facility outside jordan capital of amman. according to the news agency, this is what happen. two other americans were wounded as well. details are sketchy. we'll have information as we get it. stick with cnn for that. dr. ben carson doubling down on his attacks on adjournlism, slamming the media, claiming he's being unfairly scrutinized more than any other candidate. millions of dollars in donations pouring into the carson camp in just the past week. donald trump stirring the spot. he calls carson's stories about a violent childhood, quote, disturbing. a texas state judge is recovering after she was shot outside her home. police say judge julie kaserik
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was shot over the weekend. a garbage can was left in front of her security gate, forcing her to get out of her car and move it when shes would show the. >> a sexting scandal is rocking a small community in colorado. the photos were distributed through something known as a ghost app or vault app. let's bring in cnn's ana cabrera. this is a story we are starting to hear all too often. what's going on this time? >> it's an issue that is focused around the country right now, different law enforcement agencies, different school districts. i can tell you a little more than 1,000 students attend canyon city high school, the only high school in this small colorado town. authorities say there are possibly hundreds of students here at this school who have been involved in this sexting situation. including but not limited to many of the high school football players. in fact, because of this investigation, the high school
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football team here had to withdraw. they had to forfeit their final game of the season over the weekend as police are now investigating. authorities say they have at least three cell phones that have been turned over. they're conducting a forensic analysis of those phones that they say include pictures of students 8th through 12th grade. they believe there are hundreds of pictures showing nude body parts as well as students in undergarments. they say these students were sharing and saving the pictures using a number of different apps including snapchat and photo vault. photo vault disguises itself on the surfaces is a calculator or media player on the phone. once a user enters a pass word, they have access to a whole world of hidden pictures. we talked to one student who says back when she was in eighth grade, about three years ago or so she was asked to send photos by a couple of boys.
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she didn't but says she knows this is something becoming more and more common here. >> it's just become something not like everybody was doing so nobody really saw something really bad about it. like i personally just knew morally it was wrong but i didn't know legally to the extent of how wrong it was because nobody ever really told us. >> reporter: she says this has been a huge learning experience for all the students here. they don't want it to define them or the school. a wakeup call for the principal, the staff at the school as well. the district attorney will ultimately decide whether any criminal charges will be filed here. felony charges are possible. even possibly requiring some students to register as sex offenders although so far, guys, nobody is rushing to prosecute this investigation is continuing. >> a wakeup call for everyone, the idea that it could be -- live on forever. anna, thanks so much for that
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story. meanwhile, bush 41 revealing family secrets. this is all part of a new biography. it's set to hit bookshelves tomorrow. cnn talks with the author to get a sneak peek at what is inside those pages when "new day" returns.
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president george h.w. bush's biography continues to make headlines before it's even released tomorrow. destiny and the power of american odyssey of george herbert walker bush makes startling revolutielations abou president's health while in office. our special correspondent joins us with more. tell us what's inside the pages, jamie. >> this book reveals so much about his thoughts, his frustrations, his struggles. there is some very surprising news about his health. for the first time, this is a heart incident that was never made public until now. and revelations about whether he really wanted to run for reelection. we start by listening to these
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extraordinary diaries. george bush in his own words. >> this is a terribly serious problem, perhaps the most serious problem i have faced as president. because the downside is so enormous. >> immensely private man, this is a bliglimpse behind the veil the real george herbert walker bush, dictating his feelings about the lead up to the persian gulf war. >> if the iraqis went in and got ahold of saudi arabia and our objective then was to free saudi arabia, we'd really be involved in something that would have the magnitude of world war. >> reporter: in the end, desert storm was one of the highlights of his presidency, but a historian reveals for the first time, after the war, bush suffered from a post-war let down. and his diagnosis with graves disease, a thyroid condition,
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was much more add than was firs known. >> his doctors had shifted the thyroid medicine, trying to get him more energy. in 1992, he seemed to be out of it, out of touch. part of that was the thyroid. part of it was the fact that he was not firing on as many pistons as he had. >> they hadn't balanced the medication properly. >> right, which is a hard thing to do. in the third week of july 1992, he has another episode. it passes very briefly. it did not affect his fitness for office, but it unquestionably affected his mindset and zeal with which he jumped into a campaign. >> people said about his reelection over and over again, doesn't look like he has his heart in it. is it the health problems?
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>> his heart was in the race. his thyroid wasn't, i think. >> you think there was a serious connection between the graves disease, the thyroid, the leath campaign? >> i don't know how you come to another conclusion. >> reporter: the diaries provide a unique view into the frustrations and doubts that bush wrestled with. including whether or not he really wanted to run for reelection. >> he did say, i'm just not sure i want to run again. he says this in the hospital the first time. >> do you think he ever seriously considered not running, or do you think these are his musings as he's struggling with the health problems? >> i think it was therapeutic. i think that he talked himself to that ledge and then talked himself back. because the way the diary entries were, he'll say, i'm going to go into the press room,
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surprise them all. it'll be action all the way, see who gets it. we're going back to a&m, back to texas. often in the same entry, he'll say, but the work isn't finished. i'm better than the rest of these guys who want this job. i've just got to stick to it. >> what i hear you saying is something that someone once said to me about, you would never want to play poker with him. >> oh, lord, no. no, no, no. if there is a wasp, it's bush. you don't get to be president of the united states by just being sweet. let's be very clear here. he did things, he could be ruthless. he did it charmingly so, often, your pocket would be picked and he'd be halfway down the road before you realized it. but this was a tough man. determined always to prove he was tough.
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so the bush code was, always look ahead, always drive ahead. he told me that in his living room in houston. he said, my goal has always been to be number one, to be the captain of the team, punching the air. these were the two parts of bush that came together to create this complicated man. the competitor and the man devoted to serving others. what links it is that he knew he had to compete brilliantly to win the power, to shape the lives of others. that's the definition of a great political life. george h.w. bush led that life. >> i love that, a wasp. you wouldn't want to play cards with him because he had a great poker face, i said. he was meant to be director of the cia. but it's important because he could keep a secret, which is
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one of the reasons this book is so extraordinary. for the first time, we're really hearing his inner true thoughts. i've spoken to people who worked in his cabinet, worked very closely with him, who were there during these historic events, and this is the first time they really are understanding how he felt about these things. and to hear it in his lifetime. sometimes, these things come out afterwards, but to know about it right now in real time is extraordinary. >> of course, it's fascinating to hear them happening during a presidential campaign that involves his son. it's just all so interesting to revisit this and see how he was thinking. jamie, thanks so much. >> thank you. coming up, ben carson's crusade against journalism. what do the other candidates think about him? we'll talk to chris christie about that live, and about how he feels about being demoted to the undercard debate now.
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chris christie will be here, straight ahead. and i didn't get here alone. there were people who listened along the way. people who gave me options. kept me on track. and through it all, my retirement never got left behind. so today, i'm prepared for anything we may want tomorrow to be. every someday needs a plan. let's talk about your old 401(k) today.
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ben carson is coming after the media. >> the burden of proof is not going to be on me. >> pathological disease. serious statement, as i understand it. you can't cure it. >> no question, i'm getting special scrutiny because, you know, there are a lot of people who are very threatened. >> are you a politician? >> check the record and find if there is anybody in the united states senate who has anything like this in history. we are in this race to win. >> jeremy morris didn't deserve
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to die like that. a 6-year-old boy shot and killed by two marshalls. >> he was just an innocent little boy. >> he was the moit was the most thing i've seen. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alison camerota and michaela pereira. it is 8:00 in the east. ben cars so >> ben carson is turning scrutiny from the media into a fundraising campaign. the more he slams us, the more the money rolls in. carson ramping up the attacks, insisting he's been unfairly subjected to more media scrutiny than any other candidate. >> trump is saying it could doom carson's candidacies. trump calls carson's stories about his violent childhood, quote, disturbing. let's bring in suzanne malveaux,
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live from washington. a lot happened over the weekend. tell us the latest. >> a lot did happen. it's clear all these candidates, the gop candidates, they want to get things out before tomorrow's republican debate in milwaukee. for dr. carson, it was about going from defense the offense regarding the stories about his past. for rubio, we saw it was providing more information about his finances. for donald trump, it seems to be about getting digs in at both of them, hoping their troubles are going to stick. >> burden of proof is not going to be on me to corroborate everything i've ever talked about in my life. >> reporter: over the weekend, dr. carson's attacks on the media intensifying. unleashing a fire storm of verbal attacks on reporters who challenged his stories about his past. >> show me somebody, even from your business, the media, who is 100% accurate in everything they s say. you said this when you were in
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kindergart kindergarten. give me a break. >> reporter: calling into question aspects of carson's life story published in his book. "politico" wrote his campaign changed their version of a story, about receiving a full scholarship from west point. the military academy doesn't charge tuition. in response, carson's campaign clarified that he never applied, nor was granted admission to west point. >> i said it was offered. i didn't say i received it. >> reporter: carson saying he's facing harsher scrutiny than any other candidate because he's seen as a threat. >> i've never seen this before, and many other people who are politically experienced tell me they've never seen it before either. >> reporter: donald trump calling it the beginning of the end of carson's campaign. >> when you say hitting your mother over the head with a hammer, when you talk about hitting a friend in the face with a lock, padlock, you know, you talk about stabbing someone, serious statements when you have a pathological disease.
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as i understand it, you can't really cure it. look at this guy. >> reporter: meanwhile, trump was all laughs as host of "saturday night live." >> i brought you the check for the wall. >> reporter: garnering the highest raters the show has had in years. >> "snl" didn't pull any punches. they tackled most of the criticism regarding trump, including racism, immigration policy and questions around president obama's birth certificate. this weekend, he also learned from the biography of george h.w. bush that trump was interested in the vp slot. he said, it was the other way around, that the senior adviser came to him, said he'd be great. didn't go any further than that. we're all imagining a bush-trump '88 ticket. >> absolutely. this is also, in terms of trump's ratings, do we know yet how big it was? remember, he was predicting it was going to be the biggest
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"snl" ever. it turned out not to be in that category. >> i don't think it's the biggest ratings ever, but it certainly was a boost from months they've seen previously, giving him bragging rights, as he certainly likes to do. >> fantastic. thanks so much for all of that. >> sure. >> we are going to talk with governor chris christie who, of course, is running for president, about this, and so much more as soon as i toss over the governor has been seated now. >> stretch armstrong has nothing on you. we have republican presidential candidate governor of new york chris christie. thank you for joining us. the political headline is obviously because of how they do the poll popularity ratings, you'll have to move off the main stage to the other stage. you say, i'm no complainer, but what does this mean? >> not much, as long as i perform well. bottom line is, if i do a good job tomorrow, you'll be talking about me wednesday morning. that's all that matters.
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>> you think there is a competitive advent? >> could be. again, it's up to you as the candidate. if you're talking about things people care about and talk about it in a way that connects with the american people, the folks watching, you'll do just fine. >> what's working best? >> listen, it's hard work. >> you're in new hampshire. people only look at the national polls. you spent a lot of time in new hampshire, 46 days. >> yes, sir. >> you like that i knew that, right? >> yes. >> come after the media. >> work, baby, work. >> you're at 8% in the latest poll that came out. you'll hang on that hard. what do you think gives you the bump? >> i think what it does is you start working hard up there, talking about things people care about. >> like what? >> drug addiction obviously is a huge concern in new hampshire and around the country. $19 trillion debt, people are asking about all the time. isis and what's going on around the world is a big concern. student debt, chris, is a huge concern. we're talking about those things and i think it's connecting with folks in new hampshire and iowa
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which, as you know, is where they'll be making the initial decisions here. >> the viral nature of the video, you talking about addiction, were you surprised? >> sure. first of all, i said these things a month huffington post put it on a week ago. we've gotten 7.7 million views. >> i'm happy. it's a problem in all parts of society. let's play a taste of what governor christie said about addiction. >> when i sat there as the governor of new jersey, at his funeral, and looked across the pew at his three daughters, sobbing, because their dad is gone, there but for the grace of god go i. it can happen to anyone. so we need to start treating people in this country, not jailing them. we need to give them the tools they need to recover because every life is precious. >> talking about someone you
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knew, making it relatable. can you be successful in politics, wanting to do what you suggested there? you know there is a climate of judgment. >> of course there is. >> especially when it comes to, if you commit a crime under addiction. you know, they see crime not under the influence. >> sure. i think we have to change people's point of view on that. if someone is committing violence, they have to go to jail. if they're dealing drugs and putting this poison in the neighborhood, they have to go to jail. what i'm talking about are people who are every day people who have made a bad choice and commit petty crimes to support their habit. they don't need to be in jail. they need to be treated so they can rebuild their families and lives. there's not a family who is watching out there today, not one, who hasn't had this touch them. >> no question. it leads to mental illness and other stuff. one, i think it matters to the campaign. two, why don't you have your arms more around what the president is doing with changing
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the population in prisons? >> i don't like the way the president is doing it. he's done nothing for seven years. now, he's getting interests. we've been doing this in new jersey for the last four years. >> at least he's doing it and involving the system. usually, you criticize him for doing things unilaterally. takes more time and you're giving him heat. >> he just started seven years into the presidency. i started this the beginning of my governship. it's a key, important issue to me. just allowing people to be released, he hasn't done the vetting on the people. it's a pardon system he should be using that completes vetting of this. he's not using the system. he's doing something that's absolutely broad brush. >> he says the time it's taking is a function of the vetting, that it takes time. that's why he doesn't want to do what you're saying, just let them out all at once. >> he's making a broader statement. that's his choice.
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you're asking why i disagree with him. i'd do it in a different way. the fact is, we need to be able to make sure on the federal level, one thing he's not talking about, let's have drug courts in every district court in the country. of course it costs money, but you know what, chris, the bottom line is it'll save money in the long run. in new jersey, $49,000 a year to incarcerate someone. $24,000 a year for drug treatment. we're not only rebuilding lives and putting people back as functioning taxpayers and good moms, dads, sons and daughters, but also, it cost $25,000 a year to give them treatment. why not try. it's not going to work every time. we save a life and rebuild a family. >> on the politics side, you know what is going on with dr. ben carson. not on me to prove what i said, says carson. if you have something about your
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life, you have a record, okay. you were a prosecutor. you were a governor. but if there is something you see central to who you are today as a person, and i asked about it, and people can't verify the story. is the burden toon me or you? >> on me. i've said this all along about dr. carson. we're responsible for our own personal stories. we are responsible for our personal stories. we bring that to you and the media to say, this is me. this is why that makes me qualified, unique for a particular position i'm seeking. it is, of course, his burden. i heard him this morning say he's been more scrutinized than anybody in the race. is he kidding? >> no, he's not. >> did he watch what i went through in january of 2014 for months and months of relentless attacks from people in the media and in the democratic party, when it turned out i did absolutely nothing wrong? i haven't gotten a note of apology from anyone. a couple days being asked about
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something you put in your books, i have to tell you, i don't have a lot of sympathy. he should answer the questions forthrightly and directly. if he does, the american people will accept it. if he doesn't, he's got a problem. >> you can come at people for how they do the job, but even with what was going on with you with the bridge in jersey, you know it was an issue. it had to be looked at on a governmental level and media level. you may not like how it was done but it was legit. >> that's my point. >> but this is equally legit, right? >> it's your personal story. if you're going to make it part of your qualification, and everyone would have to, for president of the united states, it is open to scrutiny. everybody understands that. my point before was him saying, no one has ever been treated like this. i have to tell you the truth, i did nothing wrong regarding the bridge situation, and i got the scars all over my back to prove that a lot of people jump to conclusions. my point is not that i shouldn't have been looked at, of course,
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but people jumped to conclusions about guilt and innocence. we shouldn't be doing those things. that's why i say about dr. carson, come out and tell us exactly what went on. >> does it matter to you whether or not this story about him stabbing someone in the stomach is true, whether the things he says is true? does it matter? >> stories themselves do not matter. whether they're truthful or not does matter. he's got the responsibility for it. it's his responsibility. he put the story out there in the first place. he has the responsibility to back it up. if he does, believe me, chris, we'll move on next week to something else. if you don't, it lingers. he's got to be able to do and say what all of us are responsible for in this business, which is to be responsible for our own personal story. >> i know something that we will follow up on, from the team, you are working now because you're getting this residence with addiction about what needs to be done and how you'd do it. when you're ready, let's talk about it. it matters to too many people. >> appreciate it.
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emergency meeting is set for this morning as racial tensions boil over on the university of missouri campus. football players boycotting games unless the college's president resigns or is fired. we're joined live for the latest on the meeting set to happen in a few hours' time. >> students on campus are making moves so their voices are heard and it's working. they've caught the attention of missouri's governor. concerns must be addressed. with the football players taking a stand, the spot lulight on missouri's incidents are burning brighter than ever. >> reporter: the university of missouri's governing body hours away from a special meeting to address the campus unrest as the racial climate comes to a boil. the african-american football players demanding the president tim wolf resign over how they say he's failed to handle
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situations of racism at the university. they'll boycott until the president is removed. players armed locked in unity with white students. we are united. we are behind our players. one grad student even beginning a hunger strike again it's school's president. >> my body is literally shutting down, and each passing moment and passing day, it gets worse. >> black students are not being heard on campus from those in power. >> reporter: wolf giving no indication he intends to step down, but meeting with university officials sunday night, hours after releasing a statement that read, in part, it is clear to all of us that change is needed. my administration has been doing a tremendous amount of reflection on how to address these complex matters. tensions on campus brewing for months, escalating since september after protesters say wolf failed to respond to several alleged incidents of racial abuse, including students
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openly using racial slurs. >> missouri's next football game is saturday against byu. the team brought in $30 million last year. we'll see if this will be the impetus for positive change on campus. we could learn more about what led to the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old boy with autism during a police chase in louisiana last week. two officers charged in the shooting are due in court today. nick valencia is live in louisiana with more. >> good morning. tomorrow is one week since the shooting death of 6-year-old jeremy. there are still two big questions that remain unanswered, why would marshalls pursue his father and why would they use lethal force? the 6-year-old was buckled into the passenger seat of his father's truck. five of the shots hit the little
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boy, killing him. we have been looking into the officers' history. they're scheduled to make a court appearance, police telling me the first court appearance will happen between 8:00 and 9:00. at least one officer has a troubled history. in 2011, the 32-year-old, derreck stafford, was indicted on two counts of aggravated rape. the cases were dismissed. as far as we could tell, neither officer charged in this murder of the 6-year-old boy has been convicted of a crime. to make this more bizarre, what we learned yesterday from a source with knowledge of the investigation is greenhouse, one of the marshalls, knew the victims prior to the shooting. how well he knew chris and his girlfriend is still unclear. the extent of the relationship also is still unclear. that is a big part of the louisiana state investigation here. today, also, the funeral for the 6-year-old boy to happen in mississippi, where the family is from. this community here in louisiana, just shaken to the
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core. very angered, outraged at what happened to this 6-year-old. they want closure and they want justice, chris. >> the answers need to come, and we know you'll stay on it for us. check back when you have something. thank you very much, nick. also following breaking news this morning. one person killed, two others injured in a shooting near new york's penn station during the height of morning rush hour. we have breaking details. >> a lot of panicked moments earlier this morning. 6:15, a gunman opened fire, killing one man and injuring two others. the two men in serious condition. it happened near penn station. we're told by a source in a subway station, the ace line, which runs up and down central park west, it's a major line there. police not releasing the circumstances of the shooting, what may have happened. it is an active situation as they investigate to see why the men were there, whether they were caught in some cross fire or whether they were targeted.
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the amtrak trains, penn station being a major transportation hub, the trains are still running. right now, they believe it was an isolated incident, adjacent to penn station. >> concerning when that happens in the middle of rush hour, too. >> terrifying. we're going to have more on the tragic shooting of the 6-year-old boy caught in the cross hairs of a shootout. two officers have been arrested. how did it happen? we'll try to get answers from the head of the louisiana state police. prepare for challenges specific to your business by working with trusted advisors who help turn obstacles into opportunities. experience the power of being understood. rsm. audit, tax and consulting for the middle market.
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this morning, those two louisiana deputy marshalls who allegedly shot and killed a 6-year-old boy are expected to face second degree murder charges. the family of the little boy will bury him later this afternoon. how did this happen? joining us is colonel michael, the superintendent of the louisiana state police and they're leading the investigation into this shooting. thank you so much for being on "new day." this is a disturbing story. can you tell us what your investigation has found thus far into why these two deputies would fire these 18 rounds into the car? >> well, that's certainly a mystery, as far as their concerning of it. i think what was so compelling about the tape, one of the most disturbing things i've seen is the fact that a 6-year-old boy, jeremy, i mean, he didn't deserve to die like that. that situation is just almost
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unbelievable. what caused those two police officers at that point to pursue that vehicle and to stop the vehicle and open fire is something we're certainly trying to find out. they have not spoken to us yet. they go before the judge this morning, sometime within the next couple hours. we'll learn more and more as we move forward. our investigation is not over. there's a lot of moving parts. we still have people to interview and talk to and more information to find out. we are moving forward on it. >> colonel, when you say what you saw, i believe you're referring to the video -- the tape from a body camera, a responding officer's body camera has a video tape you watched. you're right, you're quoted as saying, i've been a police officer for 35 years, as a father, much less than a state police officer, it was one of the most disturbing scenes i've ever seen. can you tell us what you saw on that video tape? >> trying to figure out exactly
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why they opened fire. it didn't seem to make sense at that point. the vehicle was perpendicular to them. you saw it backing up in the frame. you certainly saw images in the vehicle that he was driving. then the officers just opened fire on him. then sitting in the seat next to him was jeremy. trying to figure out why that happened, why they did that, is something extremely interesting to us. as a father, i didn't understand that. certainly, they couldn't tell the little boy was in there, hopefully not. it's somethng that should not have happened. we have still got work to do. we have to put this stuff together. it's a complex case. nothing is more important than the integrity of the investigation. nothing is more important as a police officer. it's why we wear this badge here. a lot of work ahead of us, but still compelling to me as an individual, to why this happened. >> colonel, you're telling us
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something new. it is your sense that they may not have known that the boy was in the car? it's your sense they may not have seen the boy was in the front seat? >> i would certainly have to hope that. i can't imagine opening fire, knowing there is a small child inside that vehicle, something like that. that's something that's so disturbing. you certainly see it in the tape afterwards, of people just walking around and that type of deal. our job, i have to deal with facts. i have to deal with what we know. i have to deal with what we can pull together. that will be read aloud in a courtroom this morning with the judge as they move forward with any type of bond set on these two individuals and where we move from there. >> colonel, our reporter has learned from a source that one of the -- at least one of the deputy officers might have known the father. they might have had some sort of relationship. what is your investigation undercovering about a back story between these men? >> well, you're dealing with a small town like this. by the way, this is a good town.
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my grandfathmother was born and raised here, so these are good people. it's a small town, everyone knows everyone. certainly, we've heard the same things. we believe they've had some type of relationship, where they met each other, knew each other. certainly, as it progresses, we'll find out more information. i think in a town like this, everyone knows each other. certainly, you've heard that here. a lot of rumors. we have to deal in facts. >> i don't want to engage in rumors but i want to hear your police instincts. when somebody fires 18 rounds into a car, doesn't that suggest some sort of revenge? >> well, we certainly need to find out why. we can use all those words, and they could be appropriate, but why they fired 18 rounds, that's something that we need to find out. that's a lot of rounds to be fired at a car that certainly had no rounds being fired back. there was no gun in the car.
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trying to find a reason they stopped. there was no warrant. that's what we were told originally. they had a warrant, trying to effect an arrest. that simply wasn't true. we need to find out why. we need to be able to put the pieces together. that family, that town, jeremy deserves that. >> quickly, colonel, i want to put up what we know about the two deputies who will be charged today. first, he was indicted in 2011 for aggravated rape but those charges were dropped. he was named in five civil lawsuits, including the use of excessive force still pending. so was his colleague, fwregreene jr., who was named in two civil suits including use of excessive force. what do you know about their past of excessive force or violence? >> we certainly know all those things. whether that is pertaining to this particular case is something we have to put aside.
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it's unfortunate, those things, they happen and how they happen and why they happen are certainly important, but it really speaks to the fact of why did they follow the vehicle? why did they open fire? that is something that we've got to maintain our presence on and mindset. that's what is important to this particular case right here. i believe as we move forward, those things will be important. maybe the mindset sets that up. why did this happen at 9:30 on that tuesday evening? that's something that we've got to put our minds to, to put the pieces together. it'll be important in this case. >> counsellonel, you have a bus. thank you for taking time for "new day." we'll follow this story, obviously. >> thank you very much. bernie sanders, a one-time political outsider, now quite a cultural phenomenon. his feel the bern merchandise flying off store shelves. cnn sits down with the man himself to find out what fuels g the bern.
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democratic presidential candidate bernie sanders has
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been considered a political outsider because of his views as a democratic socialist. what motivated him to run for the highest political office? cnn chief political analyst gloria sat down with bernie sanders and his wife, jane, over the weekend. i see you had quite a conversation with them. >> i did. you know, it's always interesting to interview the political spouse. in this case, i asked jane sanders whether she really always wanted her husband to run for the presidency. because like many political spouses, her answer was, not really. >> i kept on saying, isn't there another way you can come up with getting the issues out on the table? >> for jane, the turning point was, we were in denny's having breakfast one day in vermont, and a veteran came over with tears in his eyes. he thanked me for some of the work we'd done to help him and urged me to get in the race.
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>> after saying go inin ining g, i give up, you have to do it. >> did it surprise you when you took off on college campuses and feel the bern, and there's sales of bernie sanders underwear? >> oh, my god. we have created a t-shirt and underwear revolution in america. but no, it's resonated a heck of a lot faster. >> there's a buzzword we use in campaigns, and that's authenticity. we talk about authenticity. >> he's very authentic. what you see is what you get. he's been consistent on the issues. i know one of the things that people in vermont feel is that we get support from republicans in vermont. they say, i disagree with you on many, many things, but i know you're saying what you believe and you will do what you say. >> is this an authentic haircut? cost me $2,000 to go to a hair stylist to create this. >> somehow, i don't believe that to be the truth.
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the "new york times" has said, and i'm sure you read it, that bernie sanders has a grumpy demeanor. makes the case you're not a great schmoozer. >> am i grumpy? i suppose so. >> he does doom and gloom speeches. you have to bring it back to the hope at the end, i tell him. he's not grumpy really. except when the media doesn't pay attention. >> if the question is, am i much into small talk, am i a good schmoozer, back slapper with other politicians, no, i'm not great at that. do i enjoy retail politics? the answer is, i really do. i love going out. >> some people say they won't vote for you because you're a democrat iic socialist, and socialist is a loaded term in this country. what can you do to sway people about the socialist label here?
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>> i like the way ygood. >> i like how you approve my question. good one, bad one. >> not all your questions. >> i know. >> some of them, select few. what it means is to pick up on some very important federal programs that we don't have. one is social security. it's a socialst program that says our elderly people and disabled people should be able to live with dignity. what is medicare? a single payer health care system for the eldlderly. it comes down to creating a government that works for the middle class and working families, rather than large campaign contributors and millionaires. >> even if you don't win, will it have been worth it to have had this debate? >> well, we were in this race to win. by the way, my favorables are high up there. grumpy, though i may be, people do like me, kind of. at least compared to other politici politicians. >> are you a politician? >> i think of him as a public
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servant. >> but check the record and find if there is anybody in the united states senate who has the political history i have. i ran for the united states senate way, way back. first race on a third party. you know what percentage of the vote i got? 2%. then 1%, 4%, 6%. in other words, what motivated me? you think 30 years ago, i talked to jane, i'm going to become president. let's plan it out. 30 year route to become president. people do that, you know. >> i've heard, yeah. >> i don't. i grew up in a 3.5 room rent controlled apartment. my parents were both deceased, would not believe i would be running for president of the united states. beyond their imagination. i think it is fair to say my life has been motivated from way back when i was a kid for the fight for social and economic justice. that's what motivates me. took me into politics. i guess i'm a politician. >> do you ever get him confused with larry david? >> no. >> the only people i like are my
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seven adorable grandchildren. >> joy of my life. >> do you do al larry david imatioi imitati imitation? >> what have i been doing the last half hour? >> fresh off another "snl" where larry david played bernie sanders perfectly. even he talks about how he knows he's not the back slapper, what have you. do you get the sense he's comfortable with the spotlight that running for the presidency and the notoriety it brings? >> i think he's having a great time, michaela. i don't think he expected his campaign to take off the way it did. he said to me during the course of the interview, you folks in the media thought i was a fringe candidate. guess what? i'm turning out thousands of people at my rallies. he had a pretty good summer. i think he's kind of scratching his head about it, but i think he loves every minute of it. the question is, of course, how can he turn all of that
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enthusiasm among younger voters into votes in iowa and new hampshire? >> between you and i, get me a pair of the feel the bern briefs to put in chris cuomo's stocking. no one needs to know. >> disturbing on many levels, michaela. thank you for that. starbucks is stirring up a christmas controversy. why these new cups have some customers seeing red. >> they are red. >> there's another reason. [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts,
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whether it's building the world's most advanced satellite, the space station, or the next leap in unmanned systems. at boeing, one thing never changes. our passion to make it real. ♪ >> announcer: five things to know for you new day brought to you by boeing. where the drive to build something better inspires us every day. all right. the five things to know for your new day. number one, ben carson renewing his attacks on the media for excessive scrutiny. in the last week alone, his campaign raked in $3.5 million in donations. two american contractors shot and killed by a jordanian police officer this morning at a police training facility. a south african contractor was also killed. the can shooter was killed by
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security forces. u.s. officials are growing more confident that a terrorist bomb was planted on the boomed metro jet flight 9628. this as russian forces examine security measures at egypt's sharm el sheikh airport. a funeral service will be held for jeremy, who was fatally shot last week. two officers are facing murder charges and are due in court today. emergency meeting today as racial tensions run high at the university of missouri. football players boycotting games until the school's president resigns or is fired. you can get more by visiting new day cnn.com. now, it's time for cnn money now. alison kosik looking at the markets for us. >> good morning. the fed is going to raise interest rates next month. that's after a better than expected jobs report came out friday. today, there's concern as the top organization downgraded its forecast for economic growth
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around the world. starbucks stirring up controversy with their plain red christmas cups this holiday season. the company deciding to remove the reign deer and ornaments from the cup. starbucks wants to issue in the season with a pure design that creates a culture of belonging, inclusion and diversity. who knew a paper cup could cause so much controversy? >> no one says inclusion like others wanting everyone to observe the same things they do. red cup, i get it. donald trump brings "snl" their biggest ratings in years, but how was his performance, his dancing? what will this mean to your vote? we have all the ups and downs from those who measure these things when we come back. this is brad.
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to communicate exactly the content that people want to see. it will help people connect to their passion of living real madrid. the front runner republican donald trump hosted "snl" this weekend. his popularity pulled in the ratings. he even gets an assist from larry david.
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take a look. >> you're a racist! >> who the -- i knew this was going to happen. who is that? >> trump's a racist! >> it's larry david. what are you doing, larry? >> i heard if i yelled that, they'd give me $5,000. >> as a businessman, i can fully respect that. >> did he get his $5,000? >> who knows. but he was right. there was an offer out there. let's discuss, how was he? distributor for the daily beast, also worked for "snl" eight years. brian, host of reliable sources. so, what did you think? >> i thought it was funny at times. "saturday night live" has been on since 1975. you have really good sketches of the cold open, funny. part of the monologue, funny. some things, not that funny. that's the nature of the show. donald trump made the show safer
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than it had to be. he rejected sketches. on some level, they say, we'll pitch it and he'll say no. it hurts his campaign perhaps. he said people in iowa won't like this. i think he hand strung the writers. the show was a cookie cutter show. >> was he funnier than last time? >> watch the monologue from 2004. so much funnier. >> felt handcuffed now that he's a politician, the word he was unwilling to embrace for a while. larry david is being offered the $5,000, by the way. the group that put out the offer, $5,000 if you can interrupt trump. they said, even though it was a joke, we'll offer larry david the $5,000. >> not that he needed it. >> is that the way the show should have handled it? >> i think it was offensive to the protesters who want to be taken seriously, and it was made into a joke. i think trump is lucky no one did interrupt. that could have been the dominant moment of the show, if an actual protester --
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>> but it is a comedy show. they address social issues and controversies with comedy. >> they did a good job of that on weekend update. >> that was the only place they kind of -- >> really going after trump then he didn't appear. it was a wasted opportunity for trump to come on, i think, and comment on that criticism. >> did they go after him less than they have gone after other politicians who have been in his position on the show? >> to be honest, al sharpton is to only one who was a candidate running who hosted in 2003. i think al made fun of himself more. they're going to make fun of trump week in and week out after this. what they did on weekend update was reversed it. michael made fun of trump, i want to make america great again -- >> i enjoyed this. >> my negro sensibilities are tingling now. here's the reality, in "snl," weekend update is its own world. they have their own producer, write their own things together. the host is very, very little input in that. the rest of the show, the host
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has input. >> you got the sense they were doing on their own or going off script. >> i thought there were moments when the cast members didn't want to be there. they were uncomfortable being with trump. i doubt that would have been the case if hillary clinton or bernie sanders hosted the show. no doubt "snl" has a liberal sensibility in comedy. that said, politics, you can make fun of everybody. there's a lot to make fun on both sides. >> let's play a moment where they made fun of the wall he wants to build. >> the president of mexico is here to see you. >> that's great. send him in. >> donald. >> enrique. >> i brought you the check for the wall. consider it an apology for doubting you. as history shows us, nothing brings two countries together like a wall. >> what's the upshot of him having gone on? does it have lasting effect on his campaign? >> i think the voters like seeing him on the show were already inclined to support and like him. i doubt the other 70% of the gop
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base that's supporting other people in primary polls is actually going to be persuaded to support trump as a result. i think there's a chance when the history books are written, we'll look back on trump on "snl" and say, that's the moment when everyone realized he wasn't in it for the white house. not for sure. if we look back, this might be the moment. a guy hosting an entire comedy show instead of being on the trail, in new hampshire or iowa. >> you don't agree? >> i think donald trump being on the show, he wins because for the entire week, what did most people in the media talk about? not policy, unemployment going to 5%, it was donald trump. next, he'll do something else to get us off the agenda of policy. maybe go on "game of thrones." >> that can only go on for so long. two more months till the first primary. >> he's winning on popularity. not to disparage those who support him and say he doesn't know anything about policy. i'm saying, his popularity is his engine. as long as it is an engine,
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you're going to see him and you'll see carson at the top of the polls. they are more popular than sitting politicians right now. i think it feeds his fuel. anything he does that reinforces his popularity. >> get a sense that he bragged they'd be the best ratings from "snl." the numbers have been strung. >> best in three years. weren't huge but they were %-p. he pointed out there were few protesters outside. he was happy about that. i think he thinks the reviews were better than they were. they were pretty bad. he says they were pretty bad. that's donald trump. >> do you think last week and the weekend was dominated by carson objecting to journalists asking questions about his past? how much further does this go? >> i'm glad the journalists are standing up and saying, this is our job. this is what we're supposed to be doing. we're supposed to vet all the men and women and we have to continue to do that. i'm glad we've heard that from journalists. we heard armstrong williams say
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tovetting is a good thing. that's a change of tune from the carson campaign. smart tactic to take. claiming these are lying was not working. >> we should trust politicians, don't question them at all. >> the final word. great to see you. thanks for being here. >> good stuff, coming up. what makes this simple salad the best simple salad ever? heart healthy california walnuts. the best simple veggie dish ever? heart healthy california walnuts. the best simple dinner ever? heart healthy california walnuts. great tasting, heart healthy california walnuts. so simple. get the recipes at walnuts.org. i'm mary ellen, and i quit smoking with chantix. i have smoked for thirty years and by taking chantix, i was able to quit in three months.
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>> announcer: the good stuff brought to you by "the 33." discover the untold true story, "the 33," only in theaters. good stuff. wednesday is veterans day. remember that. the good folks of san antonio remembered that. fighting questi ining females ak of a new mission. they were moms to be. they had this great baby shower for 30 military families. several groups donated diapers, all the stuff you need, the baskets, even car seats. >> babies. >> military moms say they are grateful and ready for the new deployment. >> it kind of makes me happy. >> it's one of those things where you're going to have the baby so you have to suck it up
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and do it. >> that's what i'm talking about. >> some of the moms will hardly see their little ones between assignments. a reminder of the sacrifice our fighting men and women and their families make. thank you in advance for all you do for us. >> absolutely. amen and amen. time for newsroom with carol costello. happy monday. >> happy monday, an oxymoron. >> what'd you call me. >> have a great day. >> nothing, chris. "newsroom" starts now. >> announcer: this is cnn breaking news. good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you for joining me. we begin with breaking news. two americans are among the dead after a shooting at a police training facility in jordan. he's what we know now. according to the country's official news agency, the incident happened outside the capital city of amman. the gunman, reportedly a jordanian police officer. the prime minister's office says the shooter is now dead after being killed by security

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