Skip to main content

tv   U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  November 5, 2009 5:00pm-7:59pm EST

5:00 pm
incredible details just coming in, baby shannon missing five days now found alive under a bed. the infant locked in a chest for 12 hours and at this hour her babysitter is behind bars and ex-con even served prison time for child abuse and cops say mom and dad are not off the hook. charges coming for all three. we'll have that and this. gossip girl really going for it now. gossip girl the next episode will have a threesome. you know, i don't care what they say who their target audience is, kids are watching this, teens and this is the raunchy behavior we want them emulating?
5:01 pm
we'll talk about that and talk your calls on ft. hood and update that. call in, 1-877-tell-hln. e-mail us cnn.com/primenews or text us at hlntv. start your message with the word "prime." your chance to be heard. welcome once again this is "prime news." breaking news out of ft. hood, texas, a massive shooting, 12 are dead, at least 12 are dead. up to 31 wounded. the entire base is under lockdown. three suspects believed behind this assault, one is dead, two of them now in custody. the army say they were all u.s. soldiers, all three involved u.s. soldiers. the shootings happened at two different locations, what we have sofa. ft. hood is the army's largest u.s. post there. are about 40,000 troops stationed there. texas governor rick perry will speak about this breaking story in about a half hour and we'll keep you updated on all the breaking details.
5:02 pm
at this point sadly to say 12 dead, one of the dead, a gunman, one of the alleged three gunmen at this point and 31 wounded at this point. we'll keep you posted on that. now this story following other news, baby girl found and found alive she was missing for five days. it even brought veteran cops to tears. >> we are the proud papas of a little girl. this is shannon lee dietrich. we found her safe. we do not usually get the happy endings that we have happened here today. if you want to seen a bunch of grown men cry, tonight, we rushed her to the hospital and we was all calling homes to our wives to let them know we'd found this baby safe. >> yes, tears of joy, happy ending in shipley, florida but frightening. cops say they found the baby lying in a two-by-three-foot
5:03 pm
cedar box shoved under a bed stashed there for 12 hours. the babysitster/aunt is charged in this. she has a violent criminal past and now we are hearing hours ago cops filed charges against the baby's mom who reported her missing halloween day. joining us to talk about this michelle segona. first off how is the baby doing, shannon doing. >> the baby is doing great, mike. this is awesome news, able to locate her, thankfully brought her right to the hospital and she's healthy, she's happy, she is eating, laughing, doing really well. that's the best news in all this. unfortunately, mike, though, more than 3500 manhours were spent trying to find baby shannon after, you know, after this sort of arrangement took place. >> okay. "arrangement." you know, we hear these details you're like, what? the babysitster slash aunt and mom's involved here spell out what we know so far, michelle.
5:04 pm
>> this is what we know. we have a babysitster, susan baker, and this -- all of this again is according to investigators in the area. and then we have baby shannon's mother. apparently, they had some sort of meeting on october 30th in the late evening hours where they decided that susan was going to take over custody of the child. and so, at that point, they decided to have an arrangement around 1:30 in the morning on halloween and that's when the child was passed over, this again is what investigators believe and then a police report was filed by shannon's mother so the disturbing part in all of this, mike, is that this family sat back and actually came forward and spoke out to the media while investigators and volunteers and people were combing the ground and, you know, going through the sky and jumping on horses and doing everything they could to try to find baby shannon for all of those days before investigators got to this point to where they found her. and i can walk you through that, also, if you'd like.
5:05 pm
>> okay. let's hit all the major players. you've got a mom transferring, well, i wouldn't say custody, that's a legal term. >> right that, is a legal term. >> but talking about babysitster slash aunt is going to take over. what about the father, where's he, is he involved in this, as well? >> investigators are trying to figure out his role, as well. they detained him last night, he was in questioning and they released him. from one of the investigators i spoke to recently what she told me is that, you know, there could possibly be more charges filed in this. they are still trying to work out all the details. i do have a list of all of these charges according to an official press release at my website on the crime wire so everyone can take a look at that if you'd like. >> okay. well, you mentioned it. we are talking about a seven-month-old locked in a cedar chest, two by three. >> yes. >> for about 12 hours. how are authorities able to find her under a bed? >> this is what happened. they bring susan baker in for questioning. she sits down and answers all of her questions and they say, you
5:06 pm
would mind if we took a look through your house? and susan allegedly gave them permission and so investigators went into the residence and started searching around and in less than two hours, combing through everything, they were able to find the child. now, again, according to -- according to one of the public information officers i spoke with probably four or five hours ago, what she told me was that they backed out, they received a search warrant, they went back in to gather more evidence. so, they did find baby shannon underneath of a bed covered around in things and they were able to bring her out and rush her to the hospital. >> okay. we'll take a quick break and have more on. this you are not going to believe the criminal past of this babysitter slash aunt who was going to take over and raise little baby shannon. it will send chills down your spine believe me. the latest on that and updated the tragedy at ft. hood. we know at least 12 dead, 31 wounded. stay with us for the latest.
5:07 pm
5:08 pm
5:09 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln continuing our conversation, so thankful seven-month-old baby shannon dedrick is alive and doing well but details how she was taken by her babysitster slash aunt just chilling not only the babysitster/aunt facing charges but her mom, as well, as they concocted this scheme so she could take over. john lucich, former criminal investigator, john, the first -- well one of many disturbing notes in this story, little baby shannon, there was allegations of abuse when she was two weeks old, right. >> yeah, complaints started coming in right away two weeks after this baby's born. if you look at this woman's background, going back to 1987,
5:10 pm
you are going to see this is not the first time she's done this and again this is too many cases, mike, the government continues to let us down. the process, judicial system this woman received ten years in jail and got suspended to 80 days. >> let's get the background on that. michelle when we look at this, the babysitster, not the mom, the babysitster susan elizabeth baker there are horrific allegations and charges facing what she did with children in her midst back in 1987 and begins with what was her 3-year-old step-son who vanished and we still don't know what happened to him, right. >> no, we don't know what happened to him. i pulled some information off of there's a website called the charlie project and they cover a lot of missing kids. earlier today when i was looking at it they have information on paul leonard baker who is, in fact, susan baker's stepson. back in 1987 she claims she put him to bed and he simply
5:11 pm
vanished but unfortunately investigators were combing through a lot of that information and they were able to find out that he may have possibly have been abused and there could have been some other things that were going on inside of that house at the time. so, when this happened, with baby shannon, investigators said that, hey, susan was one of the first people we looked at right away, based on her criminal history. >> right. you've got not only the 3-year-old but then we also have her 6-year-old daughter, who was also abused let me read some of the charges. this lady was convicted of assault and battery with intent to kill her 6-year-old daughter had broken hands, sores on her back and the sentence, again, john i'll go to you on this 10-year sentence suspended to 80 days? how does that happen? >> it shouldn't happen but it did. this is just a recurring event in a lot of these cases that you're covering, mike, a lot of these cases throughout the united states, i really do believe something has to be done at the legislative process where it mandates these judges to do something. tying their hands and having to
5:12 pm
give these people real sentences, because this goes on -- when it goes on for two decades like this and little children continue to be victimized like this in such horrific ways something has to be done. >> exactly. michelle do, we know a lady like this we don't know what happened to the 3-year-old, vanished, we don't know what happened, she was convicted of assault and battery with intent to kill her 6-year-old. was she monitored after that, after her 80-day sentence? >> that's one the questions i have right now awaiting for investigators to call me back on. the ones in south carolina that, is. the ones in florida i'm in touch with a lot but i think they are all piecing everything together. i do know there is an investigator that drove down from south carolina and arrived in florida not long ago to sit down with those investigators and put their notes together to figure out her timeline, her background, exactly what took place here and how they are going to move forward as a team. >> again, we are thankful baby shannon is okay but we want justice against those accused.
5:13 pm
guys, thanks so much, john, michelle. coming up, another story that's equally infuriating the allegedly accused serial killer in ohio anthony sowell, now some other victims, potential victims who survived his attacks are coming forward. we'll get you that and the latest on the tragedy at ft. hood coming up.
5:14 pm
5:15 pm
5:16 pm
some of you might have heard, there has been a tragic shooting at the ft. hood army base in texas. we don't yet know all the details at this moment. we will share them as we get them. what we do know is that a number of american soldiers have been killed and even more have been wounded in a horrific outburst of violence. my immediate thoughts and prayers are with the wounded and with the families of the fallen. >> moments ago president barack obama expressing his condolences to victims of this horrific attack at ft. hood, texas, massive shooting, 12 killed. the gunmen -- one of the gunmen included in that number. up to 31 wounded, two of them said to be in very serious
5:17 pm
condition. the entire base under lockdown. three suspects are believed behind this assault. again one dead, two now in custody. the army says the suspects are all u.s. soldiers and the shootings happened at two different locations, a u.s. terrorism official says it is still way too early to tell whether this is in any way linked to terrorism. we know ft. hood is the army's largest u.s. post there. are about 40,000 troops stationed there. governor rick perry will speak about this breaking new story in about 13 minutes bottom of the hour. we'll update any new details throughout "prime news" so stick around for that. we continue to follow this story, more shocking as the days go on, 11 human remains, possibly more at an accused serial killer's home in cleveland, ohio, a second victim identified today and we're hearing from one woman who says she got away from anthony sowell. her incredible story of escaping this sex offender, gladys wade, her name, says he attacked her
5:18 pm
last year. she says he punched her face, dragged her inside his home, kept twisting her neck. she said she could see demons in his eyes and fought back and feels guilty for surviving and not speaking up sooner. >> why me? wasn't my time, i suppose. maybe this is why. so i could speak up for them. >> all right. again, this just in to headline news another victim identified by the coroner's office. let's bring in our expert panel sorting through all. this welcome robin sachs, sex crimes prosecutor and stacey kaiser psychotherapist and mark puentes, as well, on this since day from the "cleveland plain dealer" clarify we have a second victim identified? >>s that tha is correct. officials identified the second victim today, talicia fortson, from east cleveland, ohio.
5:19 pm
her mother reported her missing in june and called police in east cleveland saturday after she read about the bodies being removed from mr. sowell's house. >> that's the second. we know pastors in the neighborhood have told people submit dna to identify the dead. mark, being there, any sense how quickly we could have more identifications? >> well, the coroner said last night he needs more dna victims from biological children and maternal relatives of potential missing victims. they said they had a couple of leads but still need more dna to determine the rest of the identities of the victims. >> okay. the search continues at the home, mark? >> they were out there today. it's unclear what they're doing. you can't see inside the house but they did stress, that yesterday they had to go back in the yard and dig deeper for more remains. >> okay. you look back at this and sowell's alleged killing spree could have begun right after he got out of jail in june 2005. we want to listen to more of
5:20 pm
gladys wade, the woman you heard from talking about her struggle and as you think about it could be a struggle for survival. let's listen. >> he just kept twisting my next, twisting it, twisting it, twisting it. and i was gouging his face. at the same time, i was trying to take his eyeballs out. >> wow. what a struggle there. mark, real quick, how many other victims have we heard from? there's gladys wade and a tania doss from '05 any others sofa far? >> a couple others we have talked to and we've gotten calls from other women who don't want to leave their names for whatever reason. more coming forward and some have filled out police reports. >> that's two there and you say two more, we could be at four or five who luckily survived. let's bring in stacey kaiser, our sky co therapist. people hear this and say why wouldn't these women come forward. tell us, what is the mind-set there when they faced really could be death in anthony sowell? >> i mean, the kind of reasoning that i hear usually comes in two
5:21 pm
different directions. either they don't want to re-live it, they've had a traumatic experience, they don't want to have to go through the specifics of it all over again and the other reason they really feel embarrassed they don't know there are other people involved. they feel very alone and don't want to shame themselves. >> yeah. robin, i know you've dealt with sex crimes victims n. this case here, are we talking about young ladies that may have had a run-in with the law and that factors in, as well? >> absolutely. this is a classic case victims, unfortunately, make good victims. people who have been victimized before and people like sowell spend their time targeting people who are going to be least likely to report. the most appear bad in terms of law enforcement. and they may be shamed for their own criminal record and own past. >> all right. more on this coming up and also updating the tragedy at ft. hood. we know at least 12 there. stay with us. @@@@@@@@@"
5:22 pm
5:23 pm
5:24 pm
5:25 pm
5:26 pm
5:27 pm
5:28 pm
5:29 pm
5:30 pm
on hl, back to breaking news updating the massive shooting at ft. hood, texas, 12 dead including a gunman, up to 31 wounded, two said to be in very serious condition. the entire base is under lockdown. three suspects believed behind this assault. again one of them is dead. two of them are in custody. the army is saying that all were u.s. soldiers. the shootings happened at two different locations. ft. hood, the army's largest u.s. post, about 40,000 troops stationed there. we are waiting a press conference from texas governor rick perry. when that takes place we'll take you there and hear what he has to say.
5:31 pm
meantime we want to talk to a military spouse, her husband deployed in iraq and she and her family set to move back to ft. hood this week. i couldn't imagine the emotions you are going through right now. take us through that, your reaction when you heard about this tragedy. >> well, when i first heard about it, i was in shock. to -- to think that the place where i felt safe amongst the families that go through what i'm going through, deployments and, you know, trainings and being away from our husbands and then to be, also surrounded by soldiers. you know, we have this view of them as being heroes and for them to be able to do this to their own men, to men that will sacrifice their lives when they're over in iraq for them is just -- this is heartbreaking, it is shocking. >> are you -- have you lived at ft. hood before? >> yes, i lived there for a year and a half. >> so, tell us about -- give us a sense of the size of this place and, in the locations
5:32 pm
you're hearing, how far apart are they and how this could have went down. what can you tell us? >> well, the base is really big. there's different villages, you know, the neighborhoods what they call them villages like mcnair village comanche, so on, so forth much each place, the dome that was shot up -- >> it was a readiness center and also a theater conference center, as well. >> yeah, those i think are -- those are like several miles away, from my understanding. i haven't been to those. i was confusing those with like the cochlin center. i stay around the neighborhood area or px or commissicomissary >> what is security like? how hard is it to get in and out? >> security, you go in -- okay if you are a military person, spouse, family, you go in, you have a sticker on your car,
5:33 pm
there's also -- like an express lane, the whole process to get it but you show your i.d., military i.d. if you are not from the post you need to go to the visitors' center to receive a visitor's pass. i mean, they do -- they'll check your car. you go through like a gate, they'll check your car, check what's inside and if they suspect something they will pull you over and they will, you know, literally go into your car and check it out. >> okay. let's bring in michael boar, woai radio covering this. do you have late information on this? >> we confirmed the name of the soldier apparently the gunman in this major malik abdul hassan, from virginia according to the public affairs officers up there at ft. hood in killeen, texas all at the soldier readiness center. there were no shootings outside of that area there. are two suspects they are believe are also soldiers, they
5:34 pm
are suspects not sure if these people were shooting, as well but according to the eyewitnesses may be involved in this shooting. the fbi is up here in ft. hood speaking with those men and, as you can imagine, that's not going to be a pretty place tonight with the fbi and the military asking some very difficult questions. >> michael, to be clear the gunman you just identified major malik abdul hassan is the gunman who is dead, your primary shooter? >> he is. about 1:30 this afternoon he pulled out two handguns in the readiness center at ft. hood, started shooting and started this incredibly tragedy that's shaken up this whole area of texas. you know, this area is a very small community. everybody is involved with the army post in one way or another. it's really shaken up the area. >> i'm sure. let's get a call in. jackie from louisiana, your thoughts on this tragedy? >> caller: i am upset. i'm sad. i was married to a military man
5:35 pm
from ft. hood and i tried to get him all the help that i could get him. this man tried to commit suicide. he tridz to kill me. he kicked me in my stomach, he choked me. he abused me not only that, he was married before and i had to go to his ex-wife to get help. she was the one that told me leave, leave while you can. >> so, it sounds like you've been through a difficult situation there, jackie, thanks for the call. one more call, richard with us from texas government ahead. >> caller: how are you doing? >> okay. >> caller: you know this kind of stuff right here, doesn't surprise me any. these guys right here just come back from war and they probably said i'm not going to go back, i'll die first and probably shot their way out of it. >> well, there's a lot of speculation at this point. michael, is there any word on motive at this point? >> no, that's what we are trying to figure out what the fbi and investigators are trying to figure out but if you want to play junior detective at this moment the shooting happened in
5:36 pm
the soldier readiness center at ft. hood either the first stop people shipped out to war get a final checkup or when they come home from war to get a final checkup when they get back to the states. it does speak to the mind-set of the person if they were just heading out to a war zone, you know, that speaks of the mindset of the person, if they just got home from war, you can imagine the type of emotions you get in this place in your life. >> it's striking when we see this is a major, major malik nadal hasan, identified as the gunman. mariana, are you still with us? we lost her. again, a military spouse who's shocked, as we are, that heroes that protect us, defend us, fight for us, have been shot and killed by their own as we're finding out, u.s. soldiers are involved, they are the alleged gunmen at this point. we'll keep you posted o this. again, at this point, 12 dead
5:37 pm
including the gunman, two others could have been involved in this also in custody. at least 30 wounded at this point. we'll keep you posted on that and updating this story chimpanzee attack remember that a woman mauled by her friend and neighbor's pet chimp. a brutal attack. her family is suing the state of connecticut for $150 million, contention is the state knew this chimp was a ticking time bomb.
5:38 pm
5:39 pm
5:40 pm
on hln. you might remember the story, a vicious animal attack a woman mauled by a pet chimp. well now, her family is suing the state of connecticut, wants them to pay a lawsuit of $150 million lawsuit. here's the story remember travis the chimp attacked its owner's friend earlier this year, charla nash. she suffered traumatic facial brain injuries, she lost her hands. the 911 call from that day so frightening it still brings chil chills. >> the voice of the owner, sandra harold. she was not dead but could have
5:41 pm
been. this was not the first time travis had snapped. check out this video from six years ago, the chirch escaped from its owner's car led police on a wild chase in downtown stamford for hours. cops caught him but connecticut never took the chimp away. we'll take your calls on this, 1-877-tell-hln. joining me to talk about this michael nash, again the victim, char lar nash's twin brother. his attorney is with us, as well. william monaco. barry silver with us, civil and animal rights attorney and monica potts, reporter "stanford advocate." michael starting with you how is your sister doing? >> my sister is doing very well. she's in strong spirits. she wants to get fixed. she has a lot of injuries. she's -- she is blind. she lost two hands and her face and her scalp was ripped off. so, there's a lot of damage.
5:42 pm
it's in a stable situation right now, but now things have got to move forward to get fixed. >> do you believe the state's at fault here, michael? >> oh, i believe that. there was a law. they didn't enforce it. there's been several incidences and nobody did nothing about it. there was even a warning as late as last october that this was a time bomb ready to go off. >> let's bring in your attorney, william monaco, is that the basis of your case the state knew travis was an accident, ticking time bomb waiting to happen and did nothing? is william with us? william is not with us. let's bring in monica potts "stamford advocate" that's been following this. what incidents are we talking about? we showed the video of the
5:43 pm
incident in 2003. what other warning signs did we have travis, again, may snap. >> well, after 2003, it really took about two hours for police to get travis to return to the suv that day. after 2003 the animal control officer told the herolds, travis was going to get harder to control as he got older. after that according to department of environmental protection records members of the pub blig were expressing concern the animal was increasingly out of control. we also know that a state biologist in an internal memo to the dep last october said that as the animal reached maturity, it was going to get harder to control. after the attack on miss nash, we heard a number of people who said the animal scared them or one woman who said the animal bit her on the hand. but, nothing that we know of that really caused the police to get involved. >> let's bring in barry silver,
5:44 pm
civil and animal rights attorney. barry, again, we have a biologist warning state officials that this could happen. travis could seriously hurt somebody. sounds like it bodes well for the family's case. >> it would and apparently said the animal might get out of control but didn't say it might hurt somebody, certainly a difference between the two. a tragic, tragic situation and you have to decide whether the state did something rendering it at fault or rendering it legally liable. they say it is good to be king and create whatever laws it wants, one is vo vern immunity and with that the state can decide when it can be sued and under what circumstances. it can only be sued if it feels like it wants to be sued or agrees it can be sued. so, connecticut is one of these states apparently where it is very difficult to sue. >> let me read the statement real quick from the state of connecticut. attorneys for the nash family
5:45 pm
filed papers seeking to make a claim against the state of connecticut. the connecticut department of environmental protection will of course cooperate fully with the state claims commissioner and office of the attorney general in any way necessary to help resolve this matter. okay want to get their statement out there. we'll come back. i'll challenge barry one thing he said that out of control versus hurt somebody i would think a chimp out of control would hurt somebody but we'll hash through that and take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln.
5:46 pm
5:47 pm
and i saw what was going on and i hollered at him and he was just grabbing her and then i went and got the shovel and i was trying to, you know, hit him with the shovel to stop it and it wasn't working so i went and i had to get a knife. >> and you stabbed him. >> i had to. he looked at me like, mom, what
5:48 pm
did you do? >> again, that's sandra herold, owner of travis the chimp on the nbc "today show" after this tragedy unfolded. we'll take your calls 1-877-tell-hln. bringing back monica potts, "stamford advocate" we just heard from the owner. is the nash family taken action against -- she's gone. michael, you are still with us? >> yes, i am. >> michael are you taking action against her? >> yes there, is a pending lawsuit against sandra. >> okay. barry silver is still with us as we listen to that. let me challenge you on the point i made before the break about a chimpanzee out of control versus a chimpanzee that could hurt somebody. you know, common sense would say an out-of-control chimp coop hurt somebody. will that language be parsed like that to where that could, you know, the state is off the hook because of that specific language? >> it certainly should not be. you're right.
5:49 pm
a chimpanzee out of control could kill somebody or seriously hurt someone, as we have seen tragically in this situation. but, the dep should have said not only that this could be an out-of-control chimp. it should be this could be an out-of-control chimp that could kill shb. by the way they shouldn't allow people to be owning animals that belong in the wild, allowing people to bring animals into the home and treated like a pet. it's not good for the animal or the environment where we need endangered species to be where they belong and it's not good for people. but, this is an act of omission, not an act of commission. it's hard to hold an agency legally responsible when it fails to act as opposed to if it does act. phonies the dep does not properly monitor greenhouse gases or water going into lakes. if they don't monitor and the lake is polluted and someone eats a polluted fish and die, is the epa responsible? i would say they should be. >> right. >> but unfortunately they are not. >> the incident in 2003, we had
5:50 pm
complaints, we had a biologist, the state knew, should have acted. >> absolutely. they were reckless. >> yeah, they were reckless, somebody should have done something. >> they were reckless. >> we agree nobody should >> it's a horror environmentally and for the family. my heart goes out to them but the dep and government should not allow people to take animals out of the wild and treat hem like a domestic cat or dog. it's just wrong. >> bring in michael nash. charla nash's twin brother as his sister continues to recover. was your sister fearful of travis? >> she never went over there when she moved back to connecticut. she never went over there when he was out of his cage. and to get back to the state, there is a law against having those animals. >> yeah. you think that your family, your lawsuit -- just sounds like you have a very good case, but we'll
5:51 pm
see how it play out. tracy is with us in indiana. tracy, go ahead. >> caller: i have worked in a wild animal park before with chimpanzees. that was the first thing that they told us, that they are very dangerous creatures and they're wild animals and to keep them as a pet is ridiculous. i see this more as this woman's fault than the fault of the chimpanzee itself. it's just doing what it does. that's what does as an animal. that's what they do. >> so you were saying it's the state's fault because they should have acted? >> caller: well, the state should have acted, but she should have never had the thing as a pet. >> oh, the lady, sandra herald. there's so many wrong here and our thoughts and prayers with charla nash as she continues to recover. michael nash, thank you again. we appreciate your time. we'll have more on the tragedy at ft. hood coming up.
5:52 pm
5:53 pm
5:54 pm
5:55 pm
5:56 pm
5:57 pm
5:58 pm
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
welcome once again. this is hour number two of "prime news." i'm mike galanos. breaking news, the mass shooting at the ft. hood army post in texas. 12 people are dead, including the gunman. moments ago authorities identified that alleged gunman as major malik nadal hasan from virginia, 3, 40 years old, one of three soldiers believed to be behind this assault. two other suspects are in custody and it's not clear if they fired weapons as well. 31 are wounded. michael board of woai radio just reported that 12 of the wounded are in critical condition. cnn has not confirmed that as of yet. we are learning from the army that that building where some
6:01 pm
soldiers were killed is a processing center, one of the last stops before and after deployment. some of the victims were heading off to war, others returning home. right now, the entire post is under lockdown. we're going to keep you updated on any late-breaking details on this tragic story at ft. hood. meantime, this story. a baby girl that -- we were following the story, baby girl months old missing five days now found alive and well. and this brought veteran cops to tears. >> we are the proud papas of a little girl. this is shannon lee dedrick. we found her safe. we do not usually get the happy endings that we have that happened here today. if you want to see a bunch of grown men cry, tonight when we rushed her to the hospital -- and we as all calling hoax to our wives to let them know we had found this baby safe.
6:02 pm
>> indeed happy ending there in chipley, florida. but it's also frightening. cops say they found baby shannon dedrick lying in a 2x3 foot cedar box shoved under a bed. she was there for 12 hours. the sitter/aunt is charged in this. she has a violent criminal past. we're also hearing just hours ago cops file charges against baby shannon's mom, the won that reported the baby missing halloween day. let's bring in michelle, an investigative journalist. clear things up for us as we know -- thankfully little baby shannon is okay. >> thankfully. >> mom and aunt/babysitter were in on this? >> they were in on this the whole time. apparently there was a meeting october 30th, the night before halloween. and they decided -- this is shannon's mom and also the step -- actually -- it's a little bit complicated.
6:03 pm
susan baker, who is also in relation to the family, as well as a half-sister. so they decided that they were going to pass off not custody but, i guess, visitation or whatever to be able to take care of this child to susan baker. and then at that point, they decided that this meeting would take place at 1:30 in the morning. so they met about 1:30 in the morning. according to investigators. and shannon's mom then passes the child off to susan baker at that particular time and then goes and files a police report. so you have a lot of investigators joining forces. earlier today, i did confirm that about 3500 man-hours were put into finding baby shannon. you have susan baker talking out about the case hoping to find the child. you have the parents sitting back. you have obviously susan baker sitting back just waiting and watching everything unfold and not coming forward. that is, until she let authorities search her home. >> and they found -- then authorities found little baby
6:04 pm
shannon in the box under a bed? >> she was in a box. she was underneath the bed for possibly more than ten hours. so what had happened was investigators called susan baker and they said, hey, could you come in for questioning, we need to question you. and they had already decided that she may possibly be involved somehow because susan has a past history. susan actually was involved with the case of paul leonard baker back in march 5th of 1987. and this is a child that was living in her home, her stepson. and she was the last person to see this child go missing and we haven't seen him since. so they bring her in for questioning at that point, and they say, hey, susan, would you mind if we went inside of your house and just kind of looked around? she says, no, go right ahead. she thought she had covered the baby up enough. but when they looked update the bed that's when they found her. >> bring from a sex crimes prosecutor. we go back and the fear factor in this just escalates.
6:05 pm
we find out 1987 not only was she indicted on the disappearance of the 3-year-old -- charges never came about, by the way, but the 3-year-old was never found. she was also convicted in 1987 of assault and battery with intent to kill her 6-year-old daughter who had broken hand, source on her back and sentenced to ten years. how long was the time served? 80 days? robin, i mean, i mean it's like a broken record, isn't it, robin? >> it certainly is. it's despicable what it is. i heard your earlier guest talk about how there's problems with the legislature and there is. but the problems really lie with the judges and the prosecutors that allow these sentences to happen. we need to separate the worst from the worst, stop dealing with the marijuana plants and start dealing with the safety of our children. >> john lucich, you look at this. let's get back to we're infewer rated by '87 this woman would have baby shannon under the bed. but we find out she would be
6:06 pm
abused at 2 weeks old. >> they don't change and they have a past. i agrees with rob bin because the judges are one of the biggest problems letting the people go. i think it will only be solved at the legislature creating a law that requires and mandates judges to certain sentencing guidelines. that's the only way to fix this. otherwise, judges are at will to take a ten-year sentence and exchange it for 80 days? makes no sense. and it absolutely creates more victims. >> let's go back to michelle sigona. there's so much here. i'm sure baby shannon is in protective culls towed. what about her father, the biological father? was he in on this? what do we know about that? >> well, that's something else that investigators are looking into at this time. now, susan's husband was taken into custody last night. he was detained. he was questioned. and he was released. at this particular moment they don't feel he's involved. however, the investigators i spoke to earlier said that could of course change as they start to talk to people and start to
6:07 pm
close in this time line. so now, mike, as you know, this time line will expand back to 1987. i know there is an investigator from the case in 1987 that is in florida right now meeting with those investigators so they can match up notes and cross timelines to be able to figure out where susan has been, what is going on, and why we are at this point right now. >> let's clear this up. susan baker has a husband. he's under questioning. the mom, there's got to be a biological father? what's his deal? do we know? >> that is something that investigators are looking into as well. we don't know exactly where he stands in all of this. we do know that there is some relation from him to susan baker at this time. and so it's kind of -- it would be very odd if he was in the home maybe at the time that this was going on or at the time that this plan was taking place and then to be able to maybe know
6:08 pm
about this meeting? i'm not saying that he did or that he was or anything like that. but at this point we do have two people charged, and this would be shannon's mother and also susan baker. >> okay. thankfully baby shannon found alive and well and hopefully taken out of this garbage and maybe have a chance at a decent life. guys, thanks again, rob and john, michelle, we appreciate it. more "prime news" coming up.
6:09 pm
6:10 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln. continuing a conversation, we're so thankful 7-month-old baby shannon dedrick is alive and doing well. but the details of how she was
6:11 pm
taken by her babysitter/auptd is chilling. not only the babysitter/aunt facing charges but her mind as well as they concocted this scheme so she could take over. want to bring you john lucich former criminal investigator. one of many disturbing notes in this story is little baby shannon, there was allegations of abuse when she was just 2 weeks old. >> complaints came in right away two weeks after being born. if you look at this am would's background which goes back to 1987, year going to see this is not the first time she's done this. again, this is too many cases where the government continues to let us down. the process, judicial system, this woman received ten years in jail and got suspended to 80 days. >> let's get the background on that because, michelle, when we look at that, we're talking -- this is the babysitter, not the mom. susan elizabeth baker. there are horrific allegations and charges facing what she did with children in her midback in
6:12 pm
1987 and begins with her 3-year-old stepson who vanished and we still don't know what happened to him. >> no, we don't know what happened to him. i pulled some information off of -- there's a website called the charlie project and they cover a lot of missing kids. so earlier today when i was looking at it, they have information on paul leonard baker, who is, in fact, susan baker's stepson. back in 1987, she claims that she put him to bed and that he simply vanished. but unfortunately, investigators were kind of combing through a lot of that information and they were able to find out that he may have possibly been abused and there could have been some other things that were going on inside of that house at that time. so when this happened with baby shannon, investigators said that, hey, susan was one of the first people we looked at right away based on her criminal history. >> so you've got not only the 3-year-old, but we also have her 6-year-old daughter who was also abused. let me read off some of the charges. and this lady was convicted of assault and battery with intent
6:13 pm
to kill. her 6-year-old daughter had broken hands, sores on her back. and the sentence, again -- john, i'll go to you on this -- ten-year sentence suspended to 80 days. how does that happen? >> it shouldn't happen, but it did. and this is just a recurring event in a lot of these cases that you're covering, mike, that a lot of the cases throughout the united states. i really do believe that something has to be done at the legislative process that mandates the judges to do something, tying their hands and having to give these people real sentences, because this goes on -- when it goes on for two decades like this and little children continue to become victimized like this in such horrific ways, something has to be done. >> exactly. michelle, do we know -- a lady like this, who, again, we don't know what happened to the 3-year-old, vanished. >> right. >> she was convicted of assault and battery with intent to kill a 6-year-old. was shimon torrid after that, after her 80-day sentence? >> that's one of the questions that i have right now and i'm
6:14 pm
waiting for investigators to call me back on, the ones in had south carolina, that is. the ones in florida i'm in touch with a lot but i think they're piecing it together. i know there is an investigator who drove down from south carolina and arrived in florida not too long ago to be able to sit down with those investigators and put their notes together to figure out her timeline, her background, exactly what took place here and how they're going to move forward as a team. >> we're thankful baby shannon is okay, but we want justice against those accused. guys, thanks so much. john, michelle. coming up, another story that's equally infuriating. the alleged accused serial killer in ohio, anthony sowell. now more potential have i been tims who survived his attacks are coming forward. .
6:15 pm
6:16 pm
6:17 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln. 11 human remains and possibly more at an accused serial killer's home in cleveland, ohio. second victim identified today and we're hearing from one woman who says she got away. her incredible story of escaping sex offender anthony sowell. gladys wade says he attacked her last year. she says he punched her, dragged her inside the home and twisted her neck. she said she could see demons in his eyes and fought back but now feels guilty for surviving and
6:18 pm
not speaking up sooner. >> why me? it wasn't my time, i suppose. maybe this is why. so i could speak up for them. >> just in to "headline news," another victim identified by the coroner's office. robin sax, sex crimes prosecutor and also stacy kyser, psychotherapist, michael fuentes with us, a reporter for "cleveland plain dealer." we have a second victim identified? >> that is correct. officials identified the second victim today as at thatlisha forts, 31 years old from cleveland, ohio. her mother reported her in missing in june from that city. her mother called police saturday after she read about the bodies being removed from mr. sowell's house. >> we know pastors in the
6:19 pm
neighborhood have said submit dna so they can identify the dead. are you getting a sense of how quickly we can have more identifications? >> the coroner said last night he needs more dna victims from children and relatives of potential missing victims. they said they had a couple of leads but still need more dna to determine the rest of the identities of the victims. >> does the search continue at the home, mark? >> they were out there today. it's unclear what they're doing. you can't see inside the house but they did stress that yesterday they had to go back in the yard and dig deeper for more remains. >> you look back at this. sowell's alleged killing spree could have began after he got out of jail this june of 2005. want to listen to more of gladys wade, the woman you heard from talking about her struggle and really as it turns out could be a fight for survival with anthony sowell. >> he just kept twisting my neck, twisting it, twisting it,
6:20 pm
twisting it. and i was gouging his face at the same time. i was trying to take his eyeballs out. >> wow, what a struggle there. mark, how many other victims have we heard from? gladys wade. tonya does from '05. >> there's a couple other one we talked to. we've gotten a few calls from other women who don't want to leave their names for whatever reasons. but more people are coming forward and some have filled out police reports. >> there's two there, you said two more. we could be at four or five who luckily survived. let's bring in stacy kyser, our psychotherapist. people hear this and wonder why wouldn't these women come forward? what is the mindset there when they have faced really could be death in anthony sowell? >> i mean, the kind of reasoning that i hear usually comes in two had different directions. either they don't want to relive it. they've had a traumatic experience. they don't want to have to go through the specifics of it all over again. then the other reason is that they really feel embarrassed
6:21 pm
that -- they don't know there are other people involved. they feel very alone and don't want to shame themselves. >> robin sax, i know you've dealt with sex crimes victims. in this case are we talking about young ladies that maybe have had a run-in with the law and that factors? >> absolutely. this is a classic case. victims unfortunately make good victims, people who have been victimized before. people like sowell spend their time targeting people who are going to be least likely to report. the most appear bad in terms of law enforcement. and they may be shamed for their own criminal record and their past. we're keeping you updated on the tragedy at ft. hood. y8
6:22 pm
6:23 pm
6:24 pm
6:25 pm
6:26 pm
6:27 pm
6:28 pm
6:29 pm
6:30 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln. we're getting new video from the defense department as this tragedy unfolded at ft. hood, the army post in texas. here you see reinforcements come as the shooting has already taken place. such a frightening scene when you think -- and we know the numbers. 12 dead, including the alleged gunman here. there you see obviously some shaky video here, because i'm sure people are trying to gather themselves and wonder what's going on here. 12 dead, including the gunman. two other suspects are in custody. we're not sure if they fired weapons as well. we also know 31 wounded. now, we've had different reports
6:31 pm
on numbers. we had heard early on there were two that were very serious. michael board from w oddai radio covering this. he told us that there were 12 in critical condition. cnn has not been able to confirm that as there you see people tending to the wounded. you can imagine what was going on here as you see the sirens, hear the sirens. you see the lights. and as they try and restore order there at ft. hood. it's a scene that's hard to fathom here as we talk to people -- some of you called in, people familiar with ft. hood, lived at ft. hood about a place that you feel so secure would turn into a place of tragedy and fear as 12 lives have been taken. and we can only hope and pray that more lives aren't taken because of this tragedy. continuing to look at -- again, this video just coming in to us, this video from news 8 in austin. we had video come to us from the u.s. defense department. so we have our experts standing
6:32 pm
by as, again, we come to grips with this tragedy at ft. hood. 12 dead, 31 wounded. we'll take your calls. 1-877-tell-hln. joining us to talk about it, stacy kaiser, psychotherapist. john lucich is with us as well, former criminal investigator. we begin the investigation. tom canness with us, former military attorney, j.a.g. your reaction as we hear what happened and the numbers dead. >> you know, it's just absolutely awful. having served overseas and served on several military bases, to think that this sort of tragedy could occur at a place where we all, you know, expect our soldiers to be the most protected. it's just absolutely mind boggling. it's horrific and hearts and thoughts and prayers go out to everyone involved. >> yeah. we echo that, tom. tom, here's what we're getting. some brief information, new
6:33 pm
information about the alleged gunman. he's a psychiatrist malik nadal hasan, a major, 39, 40 years old. previously worked at walter reed, worked at ft. hood. what do you make of that? we're talking about a psychiatrist who could possibly be responsible for this? >> again, it's mind boggling. a couple of things that jumped out at me. obviously, you hear his last name and it appears to be a name of islamic descent, which calls into memory the case in 2003 where the soldier was convicted of throwing grenades into a tent in kuwait and killing two fellow officers and injuring 14 other soldiers. that raises a flag, in addition to the fact this is a major, a field grade officer. that's three stems away from general. it kind of raises a red flag and it makes you think that perhaps there's more involved. at this point, my understanding,
6:34 pm
we don't know what the ranks were of the other officers involved. but if it's a situation where you have three high ranking military officers involved in something this horrific, then of course you have to wonder, hey, is this in any way connected to something larger, i.e. international terrorism. >> you're right, those are the questions a lot of our viewers have. let me hit on something real quick with you, tom, as well. again, thanks for taking time. when you talk about high ranking officers, would someone like this have had easier access to be able to walk around? we're not sure what type of weapon he was brandishing. but your thoughts on that. >> that's a great point. here's the thing. i mean, if he's part of the medical corps, they're not considered combatants. they're generally doctors and so forth in the military aren't issued arms the way an ordinary soldier and infantrymen or a tanker or really any other general ranking soldier or officer is. so in a lot of ways, it would be
6:35 pm
unusual for them to be handling weapons, at least military-issued weapons. now, on an installation the size of ft. hood, it's not uncommon for soldiers to have their own personal weapons, own personal arms, assuming that they're registered and legal and out there, if they're living in a barracks situation, they have to keep them in an arms room. in a situation with a high ranking officer, if he's a medical professional, he could have his own personal arms in his home or in his living quarters. but it almost -- it raises more of a red flag to have a situation where you have a doctor or a medical professional who ordinarily is not considered a combatant carrying arms on base. >> all right, tom. thanks again. we're going to continue to follow this. again, the tragedy at ft. hood. there you're seeing the new video just coming in to us from news 8 in austin and the u.s. defense department.
6:36 pm
6:37 pm
6:38 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln. you might remember this story, a vicious animal attack, a woman mauled by a pet chimp. now her family is suing the state of connecticut, wants them to pay. the lawsuit, $150 million lawsuit. here's the story, travis the chimp attacked its owner's friend earlier this year, charla
6:39 pm
nash. she suffered traumatic facial, brain injury. she lost her hands. the 911 call from that day so frightening, it still brings chills. >> that's the voice of the owner, sandra herald. now, she was not dead but she could have been and this is not the first time that travis had snapped. check out this video from six years ago. the chimp escaped from its owner's car, led police on a chase in downtown stanford forever. cops caught him but connecticut never took the chimp away. take your calls on this 1-877-tell-hln. joining me to talk about this, michael nash. again, the victim, charla nash's, twin brother. his attorney is with us as well, barry mon could he.
6:40 pm
monica potts, reporter and stamford advocate. michael, start with you, how is your sister doing? >> my sister is doing well. she's in strong spirits. she wants to get fixed. she has a lot of injuries. she's -- she is blind. she lost two hands and her face and her scalp was ripped off. so there's a lot of damage. it's in a stable situation right now, but now things have got to move forward to get fixed. >> do you believe the state is at fault here, michael? >> i believe that. there was a law. they didn't enforce it. there's been several incidences. and nobody did nothing about it. it was even a warning as late as
6:41 pm
last october that this was a time bomb ready to go off. >> let's bring in your attorney, william monaco, that the state knew it was a ticking time bomb waiting to happen and did nothing? is william with us? william is not with us. let's bring in monica potts, stamford advocate. what has happened? we showed the video of 2003. what are the warning signs that travis again may snap? >> well, after 2003, it really took about two hours for police to get travis to return to the suv that day. after 2003, the animal control officer here told the herolds, according to her that travis was going to get harder to control's got older. after that, according to department of environmental protection records, members of
6:42 pm
the public were expressing concern that the animal was increasingly out of control. we also know that a state biologist warned in an internal memo to the dep last october, said that as the animal reached maturity, it was going to get harder to control. after the attack on ms. nash, we heard a number of people who said that the animal scared them or one woman who said that the animal bit her on the hand. but nothing that we know that really called the police to get involved. >> okay. let's bring in barry silver, civil and animal rights attorney. barry, again, we have a biologist warning state officials that this could happen, travis could seriously hurt somebody? sounds like that bodes well for the family's case. your thoughts? >> it would. and apparently the biologist said that the animal might get out of control but didn't say the animal might hurt somebody, so there's a huge difference between the two. what a tragic, tragic situation. you also have to distinguish between whether the state did something which renders it at fault or whether the state did
6:43 pm
something rendering its legally liable. they say it's good to be king and the king can create the laws that it wants and one is sovereign immunity. the state can decide when it can be sued and under what situations. connecticut apparently has a sovereign immunity statute which protects it to a large extent and can only be sued if it feels like it wants to be sued or can be sued. connecticut is one of these states apparently where it's very difficult to sue. >> let me read the statement real quick from the state of connecticut. attorneys for the nash family filed papers seeking to make a claim against the state of connecticut. the connecticut department of environmental protection will of course cooperate fully with the state claims commissioner and the attorney general in any way necessary to help resolve the matter. now this story. singer rihanna opening up for the first time about being beaten up by her ex-boyfriend chris brown. says she was humiliated and going back to him was a big mistake, sending the wrong message to young girls.
6:44 pm
what do you think of these revelations? call in 1-877-tell-hln.
6:45 pm
6:46 pm
welcome back to "prime news" on hln. update now on the breaking news we've been covering, the massive shooting at the ft. hood army post in texas. there again new video from the u.s. defense department. 12 people are dead, including a shooter. just minutes ago, authorities identified that alleged gunman as major malik nadal hasan, a psychiatrist licensed in virginia. we're trying to find out more about his background, but we understand he was practicing at a medical center at ft. hood. the military says the shooter fired with two weapons, both handguns and here's his picture. again, that is the alleged gunman in the massacre at ft. hood. he's one of three soldiers believed to be behind this
6:47 pm
assault. two other suspects are in custody. they were also soldiers. stay with us for more updates. and now this story. singer rihanna opening up about old wounds publicly speaking for the first time about being beaten by her ex-boyfriend chris brown. rihanna says she was humiliated. said going back to him was a big mistake because it sends the wrong message to young girls. what are your thaufts on rihanna, stepping back and stepping away from chris brown? do you applaud her being an advocate, thinking outside of her sfl in this case, using her fame to send the message to young girls not to go back to an abusive situation? we'll take your calls 1-877-tell-hln. joining me to talk about this, jane velez-mitchell, host of "issues with jane velez-mitchell" coming up at the top of the hour. senior editor for "in touch weekly" and stacy kaiser. before we delve into this, let's listen to rihanna, part of an interview with abc news. it will be played in full friday night on "20/20."
6:48 pm
here's re hanna. >> when i realized that my selfish decision for love could result into some young girl getting killed, i could not -- i could not be easy with that part. i couldn't be held responsible for telling them, go back. even if chris never hit me again, who's to say that their boyfriend won't? who's to say that they won't kill these girls? >> an emotional rihanna there. want to bring in jane. jane, i applaud her. you can hear the emotions that she would -- as she said, it was a selfish decision to go back but she peeled herself out of that for the good of others who may have followed suit. >> i totally applaud her as
6:49 pm
well, mike. when she first went back to chris brown after the beating, after we saw that horrific picture of her face just bruised and battered, there was an outcry. and she really became the poster child for a while for battered women's syndrome. so she has turned that around, and it's clear she's done a lot of thinking. i think she was knee-jerk reactive at first but now has had a chance to process the entire experience and she is starting to sort of get clarity about it and see it objectively as others were seeing it. and she's realizing that she made an error and trying to rectify it. and i applaud her for that, because there's so many big stars who will refuse to ever admit that they made a mistake. she is essentially admitting she made a big mistake going back to him. >> to kim serafin. update us. what happened after the attack? when did they go back together? was it weeks, months after? >> it was just a few weeks but remember there were those photos
6:50 pm
of chris on the water ski and glancing at other women. and then, also, we found out throughout chris' trial or his court dates that there had been some incidents in the past. so the thingpast. so the thing that happened the night before the grammys wasn't the first time there was an altercation between the two of them. there have been violence in their relationship before. she went back after the pregamy incident but things that happened leading up to that so i think she's having second thoughts obviously. look, i think it's great she has come forward and it was kind of unfair that a lot of people were saying a month, two months, three months why isn't she coming forward doing psas. this is a 21-year-old woman was taking her own time to process it. she is had time to get a perspective on it and now she can come forward and talk about it in a good way. >> stacy kaiser, how powerful is it for her to step up and send that message it's not okay to go
6:51 pm
back to an busive relationship. >> i think it's tremendously powerful. it's so rare you see celebrities step out as a role model and my girls look up to her. i'm grateful as a parent and as a psychotherapist that she's come out and told young girls they need to get out of situations like this and not go back if something happens. >> jane, it's a selfless act here. she pulled herself out of it. >> she's also coming out with a new album. let's be real. we have to realize this is not just an individual talking. this is a superstar way career. she's got a new album and new sing. >> good point there. jane, we'll be watching "issues" coming up top of the hour. we'll be talking further about this, kim and stacy. are going to stay with me here and take your calls. 1-877-tell-hln.
6:52 pm
6:53 pm
6:54 pm
6:55 pm
6:56 pm
6:57 pm
6:58 pm
6:59 pm
7:00 pm
tonight, breaking news. a shooting rampage rips through a u.s. army bay, ft. hood, texas. at least 12 people have been killed. dozens more injured. police say at least one gunman dressed in military uniform opened fire in an area used to prepare soldiers for deployment. "issues" is all over this story. we will have the very latest breaking developments. and the face of the devil. hellish new details in cleveland's house of horror with 11 bodies and counting. another woman claims she was attacked. she says his eyes were glowing. you could see demons inside him.
7:01 pm
a community has been rocked by the gruesome discovery. clergy members converge for an emergency prayer service. why wasn't this nightmare, all these bodies discovered sooner? also, insight into rihanna's toxic relationship. the pop singer finally talks publicly for the first time about her abusive relationship with chris brown. she says she's embarrassed to have ever fallen in love with him and regrets returning to him after he beat her. tonight we will have her new warning to other young women. plus, disturbing new insight into lindsay lohan's drug addiction. highly emotional tapes reveal her parents struggle to get her help. we will play the tapes as she sobs uncontrollably over the phone. is her life spiraling out of control? why is her dad releasing these tapes? is it to get lindsay help or to get him publicity?
7:02 pm
"issues" starts now. tonight, an sun imaginable massacre at ft. hood army base in texas in a horrifying rampage, at least one gunman opened fire hours ago killing 11 victims and injuring 31 other people. two others were also taken into custody. all three suspects are reportedly u.s. soldiers. >> at this time, the numbers that we're looking at are 12 dead and 31 wounded. and they're dispersed among the local hospitals here in the area. again, the extent of injuries varies significantly. and again, we're getting great cooperation from the central texas medical facilities. among the 12 dead is believed to be the primary shooter. he had two weapons, both handguns and he was reportedly shot dead by responding law enforcement. he has been identified as a u.s.
7:03 pm
army major by the name of malik nadal hasan. about 40 years old from virginia. he was reportedly an army mental health professional. that's right, a psychiatrist. two other suspects are in custody and presumably being interrogated even as we speak. at least one gunman opened fire. reports say they believe this all happened at the old sports dome. this file footage shows the relatively small area containing a large number of people. could that have made it easy to shoot so many people at one time? now let's move outside. here are cnn's tom foreman and wolf blitzer with a look at the general area where this massacre occurred. >> it looks like we're really talking about a focused area here. remember, we had reports throughout this about some activity near the howz se theater, activity at the softball fields and reports what might have gone done down at the
7:04 pm
px further away. i know from my experience around big shootings like this, that's also not uncommon that people start fleeing. people get nervous, things happen. and many people see all sorts of things that they report which may or may not have anything to do with it. it may all be contained in this readiness center here. >> dr. dale archer, clinical psychiatrist, jayne wine trub, criminal defense attorney, tom kenneth, commissioned officer in the jaguar corps and a former prosecutor and todd jeffries news director, 590 klbj. i want to start with you, todd. clarify this question of how many suspects were believed to be involved in this actual shooting. we've heard this army major was the primary shooter. did witnesses report seeing anybody else firing shots? >> no, witnesses here on the team say he was the primary shooter. they did say that they did
7:05 pm
apprehend two other soldiers in uniform an in nearby buildings there in the readiness compound. it's very possible as this unfolds that those two guys may have just been running away and appeared to be suspects. we're still waiting for confirmation from general cone who spoke to us earlier. >> i have to talk to dr. dale archer, you are a clinical psychiatrist. i almost fell off my chair when i got the news that the suspect, the suspected shooter who was shot dead is not just a u.s. army major by the name of malik nadal hasan, but he is a doctor. he was assigned to darral army medical center in ft. hood, and he was a fellow in disaster and preventive accessory. this is a 39 or 40-year-old man from virginia. we do have his photo. we'll show it to you again in a second who allegedly opened fire
7:06 pm
on his fellow soldiers. and we understand that the horror and the irony of this is that his speciality was preventive accessory and disaster accessory, dr. dale archer. >> yeah, when i heard the thing just as you, jane, i was stunned and shocked. i think that the important point to look at here is to do an analysis and say okay, first of all, it's very unlikely that this was a schizophrenic or psychotic condition because this has on set in the late teens and early 20s. if he was acting alone, then we're looking at a stress overload situation, was he having problem with a wife, kids, a financial situation that got to be much and he snapped. if he wasn't acting alone, then we're looking at an ideological condition because he had to have a cause he believed in and had to be charismatic enough to convince others to join him to this cause to this horrific end. >> there's so much information
7:07 pm
that is just coming in, and we've got also lieutenant general russel honore with us are, cnn contributor, deputy commander. you were with the first cavalry for two years in ft. hood. so you know this area. ft. hood is the largest military base by size in the entire world. it's like a city. now, texas senator kay bailey hutchison spoke to cnn's wolf blitzer. >> there's a lot of family members, young kids and spouses on the base, as well. >> oh, absolutely. there are big housing complexes and housing facilities. there are nine schools on the base. >> now, lieutenant general what, senator hutchison went on to say was that there are reports that the suspect was complaining about being deployed to iraq. what are your thoughts? >> well, i cannot confirm or
7:08 pm
deny that, but these soldiers that he was working with or about to deploy with, many of them have been deployed many times. we don't know if we've got a mental issue here or what this soldier's problem was or whether it was ideology. and i'm sure that will come out in the investigation. >> well, you raise an interesting point about ideology because tom kenneth, you're the former j.a.g. officer. senator hushison said they are going to have to investigate motive and among the possibilities they're going to have to see if there was any group trying to infiltrate our military given this wasn't necessarily the act of a lone gunman, there may have been more than one person involved. >> yes, given the fact that it's a high-ranking officer, a major which is only a couple of grades away from a general and given the fact that you know, when you
7:09 pm
first hear the story you wonder, gee, is this a couple of soldiers or a few soldiers who came back from multiple deployments and maybe were suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and just snapped. this is a situation where you're dealing with a medical doctor within the army. they're not considered combatants. they're generally not carrying firearms when they're in deployed environments and you don't associate them with suffering the same sort of battle stress that a soldier perhaps an infantry soldier who is deployed in iraq or afghanistan might feel. >> what do you make of this tom? you are a former j.a.g. officer. what do you make of a u.s. army major who is a psychiatrist, a mental health professional taking this kind of action when he is specifically trained in preventing disasters? >> well, it's ironic. it's bizarre. it's tragic. to me, if i had to kind of give an educated guess as to what the
7:10 pm
motive might be here, it smacks a lot more towards ideology than anything else or sort of stress or so forth again, because this is someone with a medical degree. this is someone who's not out there on the frontlines of the war suffering the same sort of battle stresses that a lower enlisted person would be dealing with. you know, given the fact that the reports are that he seems to have a name of islamic descent, it reminds me a lot of the akbar case back income 2003 where he will threw a grenade into a tend in kuwait and killed two officers and injured several other soldiers. it's too early to draw any sort of conclusion, but based on what we know so far, it seems to me to gravitate something that may be nor idea logically motivated. >> we have to make sure we don't jump to any conclusions whatsoever because we do not know right now. all we know is that 12 people died, including the suspected gunman. and 31 have been wounded, 12 of
7:11 pm
them in very critical condition. so this tragically this death toll could conceivably rise. this is a horror story. we're going to stay on top of it. everybody stay right where are you. "issues" is all over the story. we're going to have more on this massacre in ft. hood, texas, right after the break. we are taking your calls on t s this. it is a very sad day for ft. hood, for texas and for the united states of america. here is texas governor rick perry. >> the state of texas has had a significant loss today with a tragedy at ft. hood, and i think along with all texans, anita and i are keeping those affected today in our prayers and hope that each of you would do the same. 1-877-586-7297.
7:12 pm
7:13 pm
7:14 pm
7:15 pm
it's difficult enough when we lose these brave americans in battles overseas. it is horrifying that they should come under fire at an army base on american soil. >> we are back talking about the obscene shooting rampage at ft. hood. 12 people dead tonight. one of them the man believed to be the gunman. 31 wounded we're told. at least 12 are in critical condition. so the toll could rise. two other suspects are in custody. all three of the alleged suspects at this point soldiers, which is pretty scary right there. now, texas senator kay bailey
7:16 pm
hutchison spoke to wolf blitzer of cnn just a short time ago by phone. listen to what she had to say about the dead suspected shooter. >> all i can say is that i know he was scheduled to be deployed and appeared to be upset about that. >> now, the pentagon has asked the media not to speculate on motive, but we're here to talk and we can certainly hypotheticalize about possible motives for a major in the army, a medical doctor to open fire on his colleagues, perhaps even some of his patients. who knows? case i jordan, criminologist, have you been listening to all this. and senator hutchison went on to say we're going to have to see if there's any group trying to infiltrate our military. it's something they'll have to explore. >> they'll explore it, absolutely. but this is very unprecedented as we look at case studies of
7:17 pm
other mass murder. i will be very surprised to -- if the other two suspects in custody are actually linked to the gunman. it would be very rare although cases of what we call master dee dee sizeple murder do happen. just because he's a health care professional does not make him immune from all the other stresses, especially predeployment stresses of war. in fact, if his job is listening to all the other soldiers' stories and helping to deprogram them after they come back and resetal into normal life, he carries a lot of the weight of all of the other soldiers' anxiety and stress on his shoulders in an everyday work world. none of this excuses his actions but to explain it, we need to look at the big picture. >> at this point, we have no dale why this happened. we do know many of the soldiers at ft. hood have experienced significant stress. brook baldwin spoke to a soldier
7:18 pm
about the incidence of suicide at ft. hood. >> he did talk about how he has definitely noticed, we've talked to barbara starr talking about the increased sentences of suicide at ft. hood. he said absolutely, he has noticed a difference between before his deployment and now, increased to mitigate ptsd among soldiers. he is just back iraq, went through the re-entries likely at that same facility and he told me when it comes to sitting down with a counselor, he said you know what, this place is huge and a lot of people tend to fall through the cracks. he said the counseling he received was not incredibly aggressive. >> again that, reporter is not talking about the suspect. she's talking about a young soldier that she will spoke with and that soldier was saying hey, a lot of the soldiers coming back and going out, some of them have been several tours and there is a lot of stress. here is something very, very strange. dr. dale archer this gunman it turns out is a graduate of
7:19 pm
virginia tech, which as we all know is infamous for the massacre that occurred there that left 33 dead, including that gunman. so this guy who was shot dead who was believed to be responsible for the massacre at ft. hood went to virginia tech where there was also a massacre. what does that say? >> you know, i guess it's a shocking coincidence, jane. i want to talk about the suicide angle for a bit. folks need to understand that suicide is incomprehensible to someone who doesn't have a psychiatric condition, typically depression. you have to have a hopeless condition. >> nobody committed suicide here unless you want to talk about suicide by kopp. this was homicide, mass homicide. we were mentioning the suicide rates because it gives you an idea of some of the stress levels at this particular facility. >> and that's what i wanted to -- i was going to make that point. so basically, you have to be in a hopeless situation where you feel you will never get better. therefore, if your life is going
7:20 pm
to go on, you're better off dead. so that type of stress level can, of course, manifest itself in different ways in different individuals. so it is possible that the stress that might lead one individual to a suicide could lead another individual to become a gunman and to go on a rampage. >> jeff in michigan, your question or thoughts, sir? >> caller: yeah. i'm just a regular joe six-pack american. and i think america is the best country in the world. but with all our tax dollars and everything, why can't these people figure out that you got loonies right inside the service? i mean, co-workers, people underneath him, above him, i mean, i'm sure there were signs before in that, you know, something was not right. >> well, that's for sure, sir.
7:21 pm
something is absolutely not right in this case. we cannot jump to conclusions. we don't have the answers but we are going to stay on top of it. thank you, fantastic panel. oh, we'll have more on this breaking news in a minute. and gut-wrenching new developments in the alleged cleveland serial killer, 11 bodies. horrifying video fro
7:22 pm
7:23 pm
7:24 pm
undercover humane society investigation documents hideous animal cruelty. thankfully it, resulted in the shutdown of the slaughterhouse specializing in killing bob veal. this is tonight's spotlight segment. those are male dairy calves just days old. we have to warn you, the footage you're about to see is extremely disturbing. >> for three weeks, humane society of the united states investigator was employed as a floor cleaner at a veal calf slaughter plant in vermont. what he documented on video is particularly cruel and inhumane treatment of calves.
7:25 pm
animal who are too weak even to walk to their own slaughter. [ bleep ]. get up. [ bleep ]. >> being kicked. being electrically producted. >> come on, get up. there ain't nothing wrong with you. you can walk. lookie there. >> now, believe it or not, we have selected the least graphic images to show you. so you could only imagine the hideously cruel treatment these babies, these male calves days old actually endured. if you want to see the whole thing, go to cnn.com/jane. joining me is paul shapiro for the humane society of the united states. paul, the usda is supposed to prevent these horrors. what did your investigation reveal about the usda inspector
7:26 pm
here? >> this new investigation from the humane society of the united states uncovered really problematic areas of inspection with the u.s. department of agriculture. basically, workers were skinning a calf alive directly in front of a usda inspector who on our hidden camera tells another worker if another inspector saw him doing this, they would be shut down. in another case, the same inspector again on hidden camera tells our investigator not to let him know when he finds live calves on piles of dead animals because otherwise he could shut them down. there was a breakdown in the modest rules that we will have to protect farm animals at these slaughter plants. it was disturbing. >> let me tell you something, u.s. government, usda, i hope you're watching. you're not doing your job. you are not doing your job. shame on you! this slaughterhouse was certified as organic. most consumers think that means
7:27 pm
humane. it really means they're not raising the animals with hormones or chemicals. what changes did the humane society want to see in the wake of this who arer. >> we need to recognize this is not just a case of one rotten egg. investigation after investigation after investigation has shown that cruelty till to animals is far more systemic in the meat, egg and dairy industries that many people are likely to believe. what we need to see from usda is two importantly critical reforms. the first is to ban the slaughter of calves too weak even to stand and walk to their own slaughter. >> absolutely. >> earlier this year, president obama admirably banned the slaughter of downer cattle but there was a loophole to allow for young calfs to go to their slaughter even if they can't stand up. >> look at this baby. he can't stand up and they're dragging him because when they get him to stand even for a second, then they can slaughter them. these animals are a couple days old and do not deserve to be treated like this.
7:28 pm
paul shapiro, thank you. usda shame on you. 12 people gunned down in ft. hood. we'll have the latest next.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
all right. excuse me there. the latest on the dead alleged shootner that horrific mass shooting at ft. hood army base in texas. this just in. the two people initially detained have been released. but there is one other person in custody. this is getting more and more perplexing, and then of course, there is the alleged shooter, deceased. he is dr. nadal malik hasan. todd jeffries from austin,
7:31 pm
texas. we have on the line marty from virginia. marty, i understand that your husband is in lockdown in ft. hood. tell us about that. >> caller: yes, jane, that's correct. i got a telephone call from him this afternoon around 4:00, 4:30 saying that the entire fort was on lockdown, that nobody could get on or off the fort, that everybody was locked down in the buildings there. and that they will had shut down all the air conditioning systems in case this was a terrorist attack and there was any, you know, germ warfare or anything like that involved. >> wow. so they are terrified at the initial point where the shooting erupted and now it seems that this situation is contained, although we're hearing some new information about two of the suspects who originally caught and released.
7:32 pm
marty what, do you make of the fact that the person they believe is the primary shooter who is now dead is a u.s. army major, malik nadal hassan, assigned to the darnall medical center at ft. hood. he's actually a psychiatrist himself. what do you make of that as a person who has a loved one on this military base? >> well, i think it shows the stress that goes on with not only just the soldiers there, but the doctors, the psychiatrists, everybody that's involved. and granted, he has to listen to these people each and every day and i'm sure he must take that home with him at night. and you know, i'm sure the stress. i mean, that's the only thing i can think of. >> well, i want to thank you, and i certainly hope that your husband is okay. it sounds like he's all right. and -- >> caller: he's going to be fine. he said he would call me as soon as the lockdown was over and that he could get off base. >> wow. this is -- this is rough.
7:33 pm
it's rough for these people. todd jeffries, you've been covering this. what do you know about this sort of mix-up now where they're saying, oh, the two sbukts that they will originally arrested that survived this thing have been released but they've gone for a third suspect. >> yeah, that's correct. what we're getting here on the base is that the shooter may have walked into this facility with a couple of people. he may have known some of the soldiers that were there inside the readiness center. it is like a hub and civilians know it very well. it's a community center. there's concerts here. they often greet returning soldiers here with big celebrations. but you touched on something earlier that is a common theme here in this central texas military community. there is a growing frustration of being deployed and deployed and deployed. and that could be the situation. that could be the tension or the
7:34 pm
emotions or the frustration that this major was going through himself. >> yeah, but then we're hearing, casey, from the senator hutchison, and again we cannot jump to any conclusions that he may have been upset about being deployed himself. we only have a couple of seconds. >> yeah, i think he was upset about being deployed himself because he's heard firsthand from all the returning soldiers the horrors he would face being over there. you can't overlook that his name indicates he's of middle eastern descent. that would cause all kinds of internal conflict that you can't discount as part of the picture how this man may have snapped. >> wow. we'll stay on top of this in the days and weeks to come. we is learn more about the motive, about the why. meanwhile, our condolences to everyone impacted at ft. hood. thank you, panel. turning to a chilling tale of survival from a woman who escaped the accused cleveland serial killer.
7:35 pm
police say anthony sowell hid the bodies of at least 11 women in his home. gladys wade said last december, sowell beat her senseless inside his house of horrors. lis. >> and he just kind of twisted my neck, twisting it, twisting it, twisting it, and i was gouging his face at the same time. at the same time, i was trying to take his eyeballs out. it was like the devil, you know? eyes glowing. you can tell he was demonnic or something. you can just see the demons in him. >> gladys says she fell down the stairs through a window and then ran away. she was one of the lucky ones. of the 11 bodies found, only three have been identified. just identified moments ago, the relatives of local missing women are now holding their breath. >> something in my heart is telling me that my sister is one of the victims. i don't want it to be true. i pray and i cry and i pray and
7:36 pm
i cry and i talk to someone. i miss her. i just miss her. >> tonia carmichael was the first victim identified. her family says when she went missing, police showed no urgency because she was a drug addict. is that true? we will ask a community leader. and how did sowell's grizzly secrets go undetected for so long? didn't the entire neighborhood catch the stench of death pouring from his home? straight out to my fantastic panel, and i also want to welcome reporter dan haggerty from hln affiliate wews in cleveland city councilman zack ril. zack, thank you for joining us, sir. the question everybody's asking, how could he have 11 bodies in there and people complaining about the stench for at least two years. and numerous women as we've heard racing from the home for their lives and nobody goes there to see what's happening until 37 days after one of the surviving victims claims she was
7:37 pm
raped. >> that's a darn good question. that's why i think we need to have an independent investigation so that we can get to the reason to athens question. that's a very good question. >> well, what kind of independent investigation do you want? i know the community's up in arms. everybody's gathered there. what's the con sense news what do you think? >> well, i think if you look at the fact that now i believe i was the first public entity to understand -- to see exactly what happened here in the sense that i got a call on june 29th, 2007, from a resident across the street from this location that said councilman, there's a foul odor across the street, and it smells like a dead person. i then contacted the health department who subsequently went out, looked, evaluated and because it's adjacent to a sausage factory, we all just believed believed it was the
7:38 pm
sausage factory. it comes now, we were completely wrong. wow. unbelievable. we will have more now of gladys wade's chilling story. she's certain sowell intended to kill her the night he beat her inside his house. >> yeah. >> i could have actually been one of them. so i feel for the families of the ones that are gone now. and if they won't have let that man go, them people would be here. they let him go. they let that man go, and that wasn't right. >> it's not clear if wade ever reported sowell to the police. another woman, tonya dawes claimed he beat and strangled her. she said she never report it had because she had been to jail on drug charges and just assumed cops wouldn't believe her. dan, is one of the factors in all this his being undetected for so long that he targeted women who were drug addicts
7:39 pm
perhaps or in some other kind of trouble? >> well, that's kind of what police are hinting at right now. that's what people in the community think, but they've only identified three people right now. one of those victims, their family said that they were known to use drugs. that part of the investigation is still coming out, but gladys wade, i sat down and talked to her yesterday. she did file a police report after she escaped from that house, she ran across the street, called police, ran down the street some more, found a patrol car, talked to police there. in the report, everything she said was in that police report. she went to the hospital. had stitches put in her hand rather near her thumb. she had wounds to her neck that were taken care of, as well. we're still trying to figure out why nothing happened after that. they had that police report, but sowell was never arrested. >> i guess they never heard of the war on women down there. >> okay. who's that? jump in whoever you are. >> it's jaynie. i have to tell you, jane,
7:40 pm
there's only one way to stop these registered sex offenders from killing more women. and we will need to have emergency legislation in the united states to get the sex offenders and group them and prioritize dangerous violent sex offenders from people that are just looking at pictures on the internet. and that way, maybe we can rationalize and we can donate and get people and money and arm our troops to get together and stop and eradicate these homicides. how many more cases do we have to do on tv about women being killed in groups? if president barack obama can bail out companies, jane, we need to bail out our citizens and the women and children in our own states, and every governor should get legislation on the books right now to prioritize and group sex offenders that are violent and dangerous. >> i agree with you 100%. we can't just lump everybody
7:41 pm
into this one phrase sex offender. let's get the serious ones on our radar. thank you, fantastic panel. ryian na finally talking about her toxic relationship with chris brown. why did she go back to him after the beating? and what's her new warning for young girls? plus lindsay lohan's dad begging her to go rehab and now releasing shocking new phone calls that prove lindsay needs help. do you believe him? we're talking your calls. call me.
7:42 pm
7:43 pm
7:44 pm
>> but now i want to hear from you. >> send your e-mail or i-report to jane and tell her about your story.
7:45 pm
could you win an ought graphed cope of her new book and get a chance to meet her in new york. go to cnn.com/jane for details and pick up your copy of "i want" today at book sell sers everywhere and don't forget to catch jane every night at 7:00 eastern. >> let's meet today's winner, wanda from chicago. what a great story. after she wrote in seeing our coverage of the cleveland house of horrors, she says she lived a similar life to some of the victims. forced into prostitution by her own brother so he could feed his habit, she admits she was an addict when she had her son but now he is an honor constituent. in 2003, she quit on her own after what she calls a divine intervention. she went home and slept for three days and now getting ready to take the test to become a drug and alcohol counselor. way to go, wanda. what a fabulous story of recovery. for sharing your story, you'll
7:46 pm
be getting an autographed copy of my new book, plus a chance to win a trip to new york city and visit me on the set of "issues." we're going to have a sober good time. you can order my book by going to cnn.com/jane. if you have a problem with drugs or alcohol, it can help. moving on to a related subject perhaps, two troubled starlets on the outside, they're living lavish lifestyles. on the inside, battling demons. the world watched as rihanna became the post ter child for domesticchild violence and has lindsay succumbed to addiction. first, rihanna opening up about her violent relationship with pop star chris brown. here she is on abc's "good morning america." >> i'll say that to any young girls who going through domestic violence. don't react off of love. f love.
7:47 pm
come out of the situation and look at it third person. and for what it really is and then make your decision. because love is so blind. >> we'll have much more from rihanna's shocking first interview. also, lindsay lohan fighting rehab sobbing uncontrollably and allegedly punching her mom in the faces? what? her dad says she's hooked on drugs and needs help. his latest tactic, releasing is recordings of private family conversations. this one posted on radar online. listen to mom, dina lohan. >> hmm.
7:48 pm
that was 2008. lindsay had already been to rehab three times. lindsay tweets, my father is such a loser. sick just picture her saying that. can these stars save themselves? straight out to my fabulous panel, attorney and blogger russell wetanson, alisha quarrels, entertainment reporter for the associated press, great to see you, girl and host of sex rehab with dr. drew on vh-1, dr. drew pinsky. dr. drew, let's start with lindsay lohan. she's lashing out at her dad for talking publicly about what should be a private matter but dad says, i tried to reach out privately with no success. >> dad is desperate as many codependent and parents are. the fact is, it's a sad situation. he's reaching for any means he has at his disposal. he's gone to what you might say are extraordinary means but he's trying desperately. lindsay has severe addiction. she jected treatment, she
7:49 pm
doesn't want sobriety. you've got to want it in order to get well. she's not hit the bottom yet in terms of her own thinking and she is getting sicker and sicker and they believe she's going to die. then one day hopefully she will be sober. >> she's been arrested twice. her dad release this had recording of lindsay sobbing into despair. it was on radaronline. >> oh. wow. alisha quarrels that's what i call a real pity party. >> that is a pity party. my heart goes out to her. i've been interviewing lindsay for probably the past six years
7:50 pm
and a month ago, i was at a fashion show and she sat right next to me. i was shocked because this girl was one of the most beautiful women in hollywood and i was looking at a shell of a person. it's just really, really sad. again, i don't know what she'sr really sad. again, i don't know what she's doing, if she's doing anything. but she needs to get it together. it's very sad. >> she really does. dr. drew pinsky, what is her status? i mean, we've all watched her arrest. we've all watched her going in and out of rehab. whoa, ho. >> that was interesting. >> i'm still here. >> i'm here. >> do we have an earthquake in los angeles? >> i feel luke i'm on "star trek." you know how it is? live long and prosper, everyone. but basically, i mean, dr. drew, can we confirm for sure she's just not sober or cannot we not say that. >> listen, jane, please i do not know lindsey personally but i know that she was treated well for a sustained period of time and whenever you have somebody
7:51 pm
with severe enough addiction to need that kind of an intervention who is not active if their recovery and behaving strangely and looking sick, they are using, period, end of story. and -- >> all right. >> and somebody who needs six months of residential treatment who is actively using life in danger. >> rihanna up next. stay right there.
7:52 pm
7:53 pm
7:54 pm
>> what is wrong with you, that's what i was thinking with myself. so that's my thoughts are basically now, it's just okay how do we get past it? how do you, chris, like talking to myself. how do you, chris, going to point "a" to point "b"? in order to make a mistake, turn interesting a positive and help other people with the situation. and at the end of the day become -- become the person that you want to be. >> it always worries me when people refer to themselves in the third person. that was pop star chris brown speaking out about abusing his then-girlfriend rihanna. and today rihanna finally
7:55 pm
breaking her silence. here she is on "gma." >> even if chris never hit me again who's to say that their boyfriend want? who's to say they won't kill these girls? and these are -- these are young girls? and i could not -- i just didn't realize how much of an impact i had on these girl's lives until that happened. until that happened. it was always -- it was a wake-up call for me. >> dr. drew, we often discuss addiction and code dependency in terms of alcoholism and drug addiction and it can also occur with violence, can it not. >> it can concur can violence and it can concur with relationships. one of the ways to conceptualize is what she is describing it love addiction. she's built this guy into a bigger-than-life fantasy. attached to that fantasy. feels like she cannot live without and it's a pseudo
7:56 pm
intimacy that they're established. a classic patd ern of abuse where someone is abused and has the distinctive thinking, my goodness, this guy loves me so much. look at how his love for me upsets him and in fact he's at an ultra state and abusing her when he's in that state. >> and i think something called addiction to drama. i know because i'm a recovering drama addict myself. rihanna says she now knows chris attacking her wasn't her fault. listen to her on abc's "gma." okay, we don't have it. alicia, essentially what she says, this happened to me. i didn't cause this. i didn't do this. this happened to me and it can honanybody. and i think that's a very good realization but why did it take her so long to make that realization? >> well i think it's a powerful message but you've got to also understand her album is coming out very soon, her single has dropped. so she's going to are to do
7:57 pm
interviews to promote this album. now is the time to finally speak about this issue. she's been quiet so long and people saw that her silence, she was almost siding with chris brown so it's nice to hear her saying, he was at fault. it was not my fault and she wants to be a role models to the little girls who look up to her. >> you have to treat people like this. it's some sort of strategy that they're following. there maybe more opportunities to go bot public when something is about to happen like a records dropping or something, but fact is usually they've had some treatment. and i suspect she's had enough treatment, talked to somebody sufficiently to gain some objectivity, to look at how sick this situation is, and to realize in fact that she does have an impact on a lot of young women and this is not okay. >> well, i applaud her. i applaud her for the change that she made because shy was the poster child for battered women's syndrome when she first went back to chris brown after the beating and now she has turned that ship around and she can once again be a role model for young girls.
7:58 pm
thank you to my fabulous panel for joining me tonight and the guy who we vaporized, too. you are watching "issues" on hln.
7:59 pm

155 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on