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tv   U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  November 12, 2009 5:00pm-7:59pm EST

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breaking news just hours ago an arrest in the kidnapping of a 5-year-old girl cute little shaniya. witnesses tell police the mom's boyfriend was seen driving off with the little girl. he's now behind bars but where is little shaniya. plus this incredible story, a teenager, look at the smile on his face off the streets of memphis, abandoned, homeless, brutal childhood yet overcomes the odds from homeless to an nfl star. now his life is a hollywood movie. i have the honor to talk to offensive tackle michael oher. an exclusive interview so
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emotional and inspiring sure to make you stop and take a hard look at your own life. that's coming up. call in. you know the number 1-877-tell-hln. e-mail us or text us at hlntv, start your message with the word "prime" your chance to be heard. welcome this is "prime news" i'm mike galanos beginning with breaking news. police in fayetteville, north carolina have made an arrest in the disappearance of a 5-year-old girl, little shaniya davis reported missing tuesday morning from her mobile home. now witnesses tell police her mom's boyfriend, clarence coe, seen driving off with her, the 30-year-old charged with first degree kidnapping. again still no sign of little shaniya. joining me to talk about this barbara daven rdz port manager of the sleepy hollow mobile home park where little shaniya lives.
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barbara thanks being with us. barbara, did police come to you as this was unfolding tuesday morning when mom is reporting little shaniya missing? >> caller: yes, absolutely. i was called at my residence early in the morning and asked to please come to my office as soon as possible so that investigators could go through my surveillance video. >> all right. have you seen the surveillance video, barbara? >> i went through -- i went through most of the video with the police here tuesday, yes. >> what did you see? >> caller: we were looking for anything and, you know, i mean, any foot traffic, any vehicle traffic, anything in the time frame that the mother was specifying and when we went -- really weren't finding anything there we started going back a little further and a little further. we did see just a couple of things that piqued our interest, such as a male figure walking away from the residence where the blanket was found in a
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garbage can. >> what time was that, barbara? let me get everyone on to speed on the timeline. the way we know it 5:30 in the morning the mom says she put shaniya on the couch and an hour later 6:30 in the morning notice she is missing and calls police at 7:00. you are looking at surveillance tape. what time frame you are talking about when you see a male figure walk away from the home and go a garbage can where we believe little shaniya's blanket was found? >> caller: now, it's just the opposite. >> oh. >> caller: what i saw was a male figure walking away from the area of that garbage can back towards shaniya's residence. >> what time was this, barbara? >> caller: that was approximately 3:00 a.m. >> 3:00 a.m. okay, barbara i don't want to put you in a difficult position but i believe you're pretty familiar with the residents there. is there another resident who claims she heard something about that time, 3:00 in the morning? >> caller: no, that would have been the woman whose garbage can the blanket was found in, to my
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knowledge. >> okay that's andrea moore. >> caller: correct. >> what is she saying, barbara? >> caller: basically what she told me was that approximately 3:00 in the morning, the way she puts her garbage cans -- garbage had just been picked up monday afternoon. once the garbage has been picked up most of the tenants pull their garbage can back in to wherever they normally store it. here is is in a little cubby-hole between her deck and her mobile home. now, there's like a -- like a ledge on the siding of the mobile home and she wedges it so tight to the side of the mobile home that if you don't pull it a little to the side, if you're just trying to open the lid straight up, it's going to scrape against that -- that ledge and make a noise. and she said hindsight being 20/20, that is the noise she heard outside her trailer at approximately 3:00 a.m.
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>> okay. so, we have that and we talked about that a little bit yesterday. >> caller: right. >> barbara, what do you know about this home where little shaniya lived who lived there, do you know anything about clarence coe? there is a lot floating around out here, barbara, can you clear things up for us? >> caller: well, actually, the more i look at mr. coe's photograph, the more convinced i am that he is the individual that i had a confrontation with a couple months back. he had been banned from the park for violation of park rules. he assured me at the time i banned him that he would not come back. and three days later, he came back. and i confronted him and asked him what he was doing back on the property. he became very belligerent. he got out of his vehicle and approached me as if he were going to assault me. i found out what residence he
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went to, which was the davis residence. i called the tenant at that residence, you know, the woman who rented it, brenda davis. >> the mom's sister. >> caller: mom's sister, correct. >> yeah. >> caller: i asked her who this individual was. she gave me some nickname. and i said, no, what's his real name? and she said, oh, well, i don't know. that's my sister's boyfriend. and i said is your sister living with you and she said, oh, no, no, no, no she's at my trailer right now because she's watching my little boy but she doesn't live with me, no. >> okay. >> caller: and she assured me she would provide me with this individual's information so i could go downtown and take charges on him and she never did. >> thanks again, barbara davenport, close to this situation. we'll keep you updated we know we have an arrest in the kidnapping of little shaniya, 5 years old. we'll keep following that for you. barbara, thanks again. . coming up this brutal story, family of five, dad and four
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sons accused in heinous sex abuse stories of sex acts forcing children to marry relatives. three of the men ministers. it gets worse. more on that coming up.
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welcome back this next story is brutal. i have to warn you the details are graphic so get the kids out of the room. what we're talking about here, five family members in missouri charged in i have to say this one of the worst child sex abuse cases i've ever heard of, a father and his four sons accused of raping one of the son's six children, boys and girls and
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doing it for years. here are some of the charges we're talking about, forceable sodomy, rape with a child younger than 12, use of a child in a sexual performance, forcing kids into fake marriages, finally a 26-year-old woman recently came forward she claims she was forced to have an abortion at age 11 and says these crimes took place from 1988 to 1995 and it could get worse investigators are searching what used to be the family's property searching for a body or bodies, plural. we'll take your calls 1-877-tell-hln. joining us to talk about psychologist michelle golland, also bill grady reporter from kmb seize covering this story, bill starting with you. so we could have murder, as well, in this story, bill? >> reporter: well, that is the speculation right now. and these are -- a lot of this is based upon the victims that have come forward and some of the stories that he had have told and among those stories
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there are written accounts in jars buried at various points on the property and perhaps a body or two and so police are playing this one really close to the vest. they don't want to taint the investigation but back out searching the property today and unconfirmed report perhaps a sixth suspect has now been identified. >> how many sons does this man have, just the four sons? >> reporter: he's got the four sons and extended family. this guy was very active in his church. very well known in his communities. and so, it looks, right now, like it is going to be strictly a family issue but, you know, we have to keep in mind that these are charges not convictions and i just talked to one of his cousins minutes ago about ten minutes ago and he said that burrell mohler literally in court today looked like a broken old man. he was shocked because he knew him to be a good guy, upstanding member of the church and had a difficult time wrapping his mind around all this. >> i think we all are, bill.
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did we describe that correctmy one of the son's children are the victims here? >> caller: well, what we are doing just to be on the safe side and error on the side of caution and reading through the probable cause statements is not specifically identifying how these folks were connected because, if you say a son or a daughter it's going to be pretty easy for someone out there to connect the dots, trying to protect, you know, the victims themselves because in all likelihood, they've been through enough already. >> yeah, exactly. let's listen to the sheriff. you mentioned, bill, talking about the kids and the way we understand it is these children as victims were being told put your bad thoughts, write them down and put them in a glass jar. let's listen to the sheriff talk about that. >> the children were told at a very young age that if they had bad things happen to them or bad memories to write them down and put them in a jar and bury them and those bad memories will go away. obviously, they didn't. >> michelle golland, i don't
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even think we can put into words the pain. >> no. >> -- these children endured here. >> it's horrific. and i think what is also really frightening is that, you know, these victims say that the abuse stopped in '95. but, we know people who abuse children sexually and sadistically like these men did, they didn't stop. so, i would assume there are more victims. >> let's get a call in. john's with us from north carolina. go ahead. >> caller: this is joan. >> oh, joan, i'm sorry. go ahead, joan. >> caller: hey, mike, thank you for taking my call. >> yeah. >> caller: my primary question it's horrifying we turn on the news and all we see one child after another we live close to fayetteville where this little girl is missing. my first question is where were the mothers and grandmothers of these children, what kind of women are these to allow this to go on and they had to know it was going on. also, these are under the umbrella of church men? what kind of religion do these
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people practice? and when are we going to be able to stop this, mike? it has to stop. >> you're right, joan two, great questions, joan. bill, are any of the moms coming forward, any women in the lives of these men? >> caller: what i can tell you, mike, basically to repeat what the law eninvestigators told me in that they have numerous leads. i was told today earlier that there was more evidence that surfaced but no one is being terribly specific on it because of the gravity of these charges trying to file all this case as best as possible. now, speaking to that and sort of a general sense we have an organization here in kansas city called moxa an advocacy group for victims of sexual abuse especially as results to families and their executive director told me within the last hour, there really isn't common at all for someone to it wait years and even decades to come forward and report this because of the extreme trauma that can consider. >> bill, real quick, we just had the question, we have about 15 seconds, the church, a lot of
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people wonder what kind of church would this be? >> reporter: this is the former rlds, reorpgnized latter-day saints and became the communities of christ about six or seven years ago. they got ahead of the curve and came out and made a statement and said these guys no longer have any connection with the church, not doing anything in any kind of counseling or voluntary capacity. >> bill grady, thank you so much. michelle, always a pleasure to have you on, as well. coming up, a georgia teacher says she was forced to resign over photos and expletive on her facebook page. you see that photo, sipping a beer. is that enough to force her to resign? also this, you don't want to miss this incredible story. i had the honor and privilege to talk with baltimore ravens offensive tackle michael oher. this young man goes from homeless to being welcomed into a family to nfl star now a movie is going to be made about his life, my exclusive interview with michael oher coming up.
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here's one for you a former teacher in barrow county, georgia says the school district forced her to resign other some photos and an scle tiff on her private facebook page, she taught english and said she was blindsided in august when a
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parent had complained about her picture from her trip to europe. there's the picture, one of them anyway, sipping beer at the top of the guinness brewery in dublin. pretty tame photos not a wild party scene swinging from a chandelier. she says the pictures are not bad, just having a beer. is that enough to force someone to resign? joining us to talk about it, we have ashley paine with us along with her attorney richard stores and joining us attorney tanya acker. ashley, what am i missing here, some photo we're not seeing? they look pretty tame to me. >> i don't think so. i was never actually shown the photo that is in question so i'm not exactly sure which one they're talking about. i can just back at my own facebook page and know the only ones that i had posted of myself were of the nature that you see there in these pictures on the air. they're just pictures of me having drinks in europe with friends. >> that's it.
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>> that's it. >> so the principal approached you. what did he say? >> he told me that a parent had called in and complained about a message that i had posted on my facebook account and about some pictures of me with alcohol and he just asked me if i had those things and i said, yes, i've got some pictures from my trip to europe this summer that a co-worker and i winter on with some other friends. it was completely non-school related and i told him that i had those things up there and he said that, with the language and the pictures, that was enough to warrant a suspension and he represented that the decision to suspend me had already been made by himself and the superintendent. >> so, there was no investigation, there was no chance for you, you didn't state your side of the story? >> no, there was no investigation. i was stopped on the way into the school that morning and brought into the assistant
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principal's office. i had no advance notice of what the complaints were. and i was railroaded into resigning right there on the spot before i left that office. i wasn't given any time to think about it and come back to them with my decision. >> okay. let me read a portion of their statementing i believe they have a code of ethics and part of the policy deals with employees using social networking sites like facebook, myspace. talking about inappropriate personal information such as but not limited to provocative photographs, sexually explicit messages, use of alcohol. i guess that's what they are talking about. -- their case will be investigated by the school. we wonder if there was an investigation and the district and if warranted will be disciplined up to and including termination for the severity of the offense. was it that severe? we'll take your calls on this one, 1-877-tell-hln.
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welcome back for this incredible story a. kid, teenager in tennessee living off the streets but against all odds he goes from being homeless, he's taken in by a well-to-do family now an nfl star. his life a powerful message i'm talking about the life of michael oher. i had the honor to speak with him in my exclusive interview but first let's play a clip from the movie inspired by his life warner brother's new film "the blind side." >> who was that? >> big mike. he goes to high school here. >> what is he wearing? it's below freezing. do you have any place to stay tonight? don't you dare lie to me.
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>> was this a bad idea? >> what's the big deal, it's just for one night. it is just for one night, right? >> tell me just one thing, i should know about you. >> i answer to "big mike." >> another one of your charities? >> need to find out more about his past. >> he's been enrolled in seven different institutions his grade point average begins with zero. >> he needs to do better in school. >> i'd love to work with him. >> this is mine? >> yes, sir. >> never had one before. >> what, a room to yourself? >> a bed. >> what a story. and i had the honor now to talk with michael oher, offensive tackle baltimore ravens. thanks for joining us, a true pleasure to talk to you about your inspiring story. you know, as we talk, yeah, football fans know your story but now with the book and movie coming out everybody's going to know your story. do you ever stop and think, from not long ago homeless michael oher, to football star michael
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oher and movie made about your life. can you believe this has all come to pass? >> it's unbelievable. you know, i've came a long way, you know, it's been a tough road and, you know, to do something i love, something i have a passion for, it's unbelievable to be able to, you know, step on the field and pad up in the nfl. so, i think, you know, i think about it every day. >> we look at your story and look back. do you have memories of -- i mean, we laid it out there you never knew your father, he was murdered. your biological mom, drug issues. do you have early memories being with your brothers, being homeless and that fight for really survival at an early age? >> of course, you know. i have a lot of memories of all kinds but, you know, i chose, you know, to forget about all those, all the bad memories, all the, you know, not having no anything to eat or, you know,
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struggling here and there but you've got to move on and, you know, if i would have, you know, dwelled on the past, i don't think i would have made it this far. you've got, to you know, put everything behind and trust in, you know, the people who want to help you and, you know, do things for you and, you know, i think that's what, you know, got me here, you know, forgetting about the past and just making it out a positive and moving forward and, you know, just working hard every day. >> michael, that's one of the many things i love about your story is that you talk and there always seem to be hope with you, even the pictures that i've seen with you as a child, there's a smile on your face, even though you are going through what you're going through. how did you keep hope alive? >> i've always wanted to be a -- you know, make it to the nfl and, you know, just be something in life. i knew -- i always figured, you know, there was, you know, a better way of life and a better way to do things and so i've
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always tried to be the best i can be in, you know, always wanted to go to school and, you know, do all -- i went to school on my own and did a lot of things on my own so i always knew that, you know, if i worked hard and, you know, did everything that i possibly can do, you know, i'd make it, i'd be something. >> was there ever a point where your life and your struggles were getting to you? i mean, i'm reading stories about how birthdays weren't celebrated, christmas was waking up christmas morning and watching other kids in the neighborhood play with their toys. did you ever -- did it ever get to you, michael? >> oh, yeah. i mean, because, you know, i -- you ask yourself a lot of the times growing up, you know, why, why -- what does it have to be this way for you? but, you know, you take all that type stuff like i said and make it into a positive. you work hard and, you know, you try to better yourself and, you know, better your surroundings and you tend to want more in
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life. so, you know, you take all that type stuff and you make it into a positive and, you know, keep going. >> you've done that. i mean your teammates describe you, great player, passionate, intense but also another player just flat-out said michael's a joy to be around. which do you like better. >> who said that? >> matt burke. >> oh, yeah, veteran. that's a veteran guy watching you as a player and as a man. which do you take more pride in? >> i mean, i have to take it in both, because, you know, i work hard on the field and, you know, all my teammates, we have a great group of guys. you know, i love being around them. i just love, you know, being part of an nfl organization and be around a guy like matt birk, who all he does is go to the pro bowl and just to be around those type guys, guys like ray lewis and, you know, guys i grew up watching and, you know, knowing that, you know, i've always been a big fan of this game, you know, i've -- it's always been
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can't wait, you know, until september comes around to hear that da-da-da sound, you know all that type stuff. it's unbelievable. >> yeah. your story's unbelievable. and when we come back, we're going to talk with michael more and talk more with michael about the family he mentioned, the tuoy family who stepped up and helped him out and gave him that, just that push to get him over the pump and now again is an nfl star and movie about his life. more with michael oher. >> i don't know if i'm an nfl star. >> that's what we're hearing. more with michael oher coming up.
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michael's grades have improved enough he can go out for spring football in march. >> 1, 2, 3, 4 -- >> this team is your family, michael. when you look at him, you think of me. how you have my back. are you going to protect the family, michael? >> yes, i am. >> jay, you're going to want to get this. >> who's the big guy eating with your little brother. >> it's his big brother. >> i think what you're doing is so great. >> sandra bullock. >> you're changing that boy's life. >> no. he's changing mine. >> powerful statement there. there again from the new movie "the blind side" the story of
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michael oher's life, my honor and privilege to talk to michael offensive tackle baltimore ravens and, michael, as we hear that and we hear that was sandra bull luck playing the part of your mom, leann tuoy in interviews, you were more of a blessing to them than they were to you. how does that make you feel? >> words can't even describe it. that means a lot to me knowing that, you know, what they did for me and the kind of -- the amount of love that i have for them and, you know, to -- for them to bring me in their home and just for me knowing right off the bat that they care about me as a person and, you know, they want the best for me. >> wow. let's listen, not to sandra bullock but leanne tuoy talking about you being a part of their family. >> there was just never really a defining moment that we said that we were going to take this young man in. he was there. we were there.
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he had needs. we had a potential to fill them. we'll tell stories that happened before we had michael and he'll, you know, throw in, i go, you weren't even here, you know, but he think he's always been there and we think he's always been there so we don't really know life without michael anymore. i know that's hard for people to understand but it's just, you know, that's just how it is. and so, there really wasn't a defining moment it just kind of happened and it was just a great thing that happened to us and he blessed us far more than we probably could have ever have blessed him. >> michael, did you think it would last, that from that meeting you would become a member of the tuoy family? >> oh, definitely, because, you know, just it's a feeling you get, you know, i got that feeling right away. you know, collins and sean, jr., they just welcomed me with open arms. there wasn't a problem, you know, somebody coming into their home and, you know, they just took me in like i was part of the family and that's what i love about them and they just --
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did everything i asked them to do and more. so, you know, without them, i wouldn't be here today. >> collins being your sister, sean, jr., your brother and sean your father. >> collins is the best, by the way. she's unbelievable. >> sounds like you guys are really close. >> oh, yes, i watched over her four years in college and whatever she need you know from me i do for her and the same with her. she's -- and s.j., as well. you know, without them, you know, i don't know. >> man, i can just, as i see you and you're talking, just there's a love that's exuding from you and as the story goes, leig leigh anne told you she loved when you were 18. was that the first time you heard that, and what did it do to you? >> uh, i mean, it just, you know, it showed me that, uh, you know, it is possible to, you know, to be loved. you know, i never heard that
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before. and, you know, just for her to express that and, you know, i knew then that i was, you know, a part of the family and, you know, and that i was going to stick around. >> when, again, you're welcomed into the family and hear "i love you," as you take this and you're going to be a father some day. what kind of dad are you going to be? i bet you the words "i love you" will be coming out non stop from you. >> you know, i'm definitely going to, you know, teach -- teach my kids everything that i wasn't taught. i'm going to show them, you know, that it's better to give than receive because you know people gave me a second chance and, you know, raising them the right way and give them everything that i couldn't have, you know, and just take great care of them, don't let them out of my sight. >> that's g. all dads should hear that. michael, how special was it on draft day when the tuoy family,
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altogether one big family as you're drafted by the baltimore ravens? how special was that? >> that was -- that was a big day. the day i've been waiting for -- i've been waiting for, you know, forever. and, you know, it finally came true and it was -- it was us unbelievable. i just couldn't believe my name was called in the nfl draft, you know, all my hard work had paid off and just to be on a team and, you know, whatever happens after that, you know. i did everything i could to get to this level. so, that was, you know, unbelievable -- >> we're all just reveling in this as we see the pictures of you with the tuoy family and all celebrating. do you realize how big this story is in the sense of the inspiration that it has become not only to football fans but to a watching world that a family took you in, you were persevering through a rough childhood and now we have this story of victory? has that part of it soaked in
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for you, michael? >> uh, a little bit but, you know, the thing that people can take from this is, you know, if you reach out and lend a hand, you know, i know so many people that, you know, have more talent than i have that's, you know, didn't get that opportunity that i got. and, you know, if they were to get that opportunity, you know, it would be more people, you know, in the nfl, in the nba, you know, with so many other skills, you know, just doing other things, doctors or lawyers, anything. but they didn't have somebody to show them that there was another side, you know, to life. >> michael, very well put and i'm sure as people hear your story, see this movie, that they might be a little more willing to reach out and make that difference for somebody else. michael oher, a pleasure, continued success with your football career and with life. thanks again. >> thank you. thank you for having me. >> what a story. your thoughts on it. e-mail me cnn.com/primenews and
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now this story carri carrie prejean back in the news to promote her book but also dealing with a saeks tape out there on "larry king" live last night and things got a little awkward. we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln.
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welcome back. carrie prejean front and center once again. here's the tight rope act she's trying to walk on a media tour promoting her new book yet this sex tape out there. there's going to be questions about that and, sure enough, cnn's larry king asked about that sex tape and, also, why she settled with the pageant. things got a little awkward. let's watch. >> in mediation it was discussed why were you mediating. >> larry, it's completely confidential and you're being inappropriate.
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>> okay. >> okay? you're being inappropriate. >> inappropriate king live continues. >> yes. >> detroit, hello. >> caller: hi i'm calling from detroit. >> yes. >> caller: i'm a gay man and love pageants. i'm sure that you, carrie have great gay friends that helped you possibly win. what would you give them as advice if they wanted to get married? >> did you hear the question, carrie? did she hear the question? all right, want to point out that she did continue the show and larry king apologized later because the show had agreed that she would not answer any viewer phone calls. regardless, though, i don't think this is what you want when you are out promoting a book that was awkward, not fun to watch. we'll take your calls on this, 1-877-tell-hln. joining us to talk about it, rachel campos-duffy, blogger and author of "stay home, stay happy" and also kelly zinc host of celebtv.com.
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first off how are you selling this book "still standing" a tight rope act trying to sell a book "still standing" are being attacked and yet you're going to answer questions about a sex tape at the same time? you can't do it. your thoughts? >> well, i mean, look, i think, first of all, that that moment was very awkward on larry king and i've seen people walk off the set. i've never seen one take off their microphone and then stay on the set. it was very, very bizarre. but i think that it's kind of not fair that just because she's a christian, and the sex tape came up, it's sort of like people now say, well she's a hypocrite. as far as i know the only requirement for being a christian is being a sinner. as long as she's acknowledging what she did and she's turning it into a lesson to young girls about, look, these sex tapes, these sex scenes, these, you know, pictures they come back and haunt you, don't do it,
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don't get involved in it. i think it could be a positive message. i think it remains to be seen if she stays on message. >> right. >> and doesn't do so many weird interviews if that message will get out. >> i agree with you on that front. i mean, there's no one perfect. and she even states that. but i just, the timing is off. i just don't think she's being handled correctly. it's you put the book tour on hold and deal with this sex tape controversy. then, i mean, because the message of the book is lost. your thoughts, rachel? >> you know, it could be that's true. but then again, it probably a bigger message that she can give is this message of to young girls. and in the middle of a book tour i think might be a good time to do it. it all depends on how she's being handled. you know, she says that conservatives -- >> you think she's being handled well? >> yeah, but both sarah palin and her had -- >> we've got to take a break. @@
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breaking news, just hours ago an arrest in the kidnapping of a 5-year-old girl. witnesses tell police mom's boyfriend was seen driving off with shaniya davis. he's now behind bars. but where's the little girl? plus an incredible story. kid, teenager, off the streets of memphis, abandoned and homeless. yet he overcomes the odds. goes from homeless, taken in by a well-to-do family. now he's an nfl star. and his life has become a hollywood movie. we'll have the honor and privilege to talk to offensive tackle michael oher. an exclusive interview, so emotional, so inspiring, it will
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make us all take a good, long look at our life and are we reaching out to help someone in need. love to hear from you. taking your calls at 1-877-tell-hln. e-mail us cnn poin kom sl.com/p text us. >> controversy, opinion, your point of view, this is "prime news." welcome once again this is "prime news." i'm mike galanos. breaking news for you. police in fayetteville, north carolina have made an arrest in the disappearance of a 5-year-old girl. shaniya davis was reported missing tuesday morning from her mobile home. now witnesses tell police her mom's boyfriend, clarence coe, was seen driving off with the little girl. the 30-year-old is charged with first degree kidnapping but there's still no sign of shaniya. moments ago i had the chance to talk with the manager of shaniya's mobile home park about four surveillance cameras that she set up around the neighborhood. >> i went through most of the
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video with the police here tuesday, yes. >> what did you see? >> we were looking for anything and, you know, i mean, any foot traffic, any vehicle traffic. we did see just a couple of things that piqued our interest. such as a male figure walking away from the residence where the blanket was found in a garbage can. >> detectives have confirmed little shaniya's blanket was found in that trash can. joining me now to talk about this, hln law enforcement analyst mike brooks. also with us michelle segona, investigative journalist who's been covering this story extensively. michelle let's start with you. we have an arrest. any sign of little shaniya? >> not at this point, mike. i can confirm that i just spoke with investigators about an hour ago, again touching base with them. and they're still out, they're still following up with all the leads. not just been the sleepy hole he will community. but also throughout the town, for that matter. they are bringing in extra reinforcement. extra law enforcement, extra hands on deck to help with this
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amber alert that is now all across the nation looking for little shaniya. i do want to mention that inside that sleepy hollow community, barbara does also confirm, that was barbara davenport that your audience heard talking a little while ago, there are 98 units inside of there. and investigators had been through pretty much all of them at this point. >> mike brooks, is this surveillance footage, is that the key here? sounds like they got some good material to work with. >> yeah, does. we heard from barbara, too, that there were apparently some witnesses that saw him early hours near this trash can where this blanket was found. witnesses also say that they saw the little girl -- him drive off with the little girl in his car. so there's a lot of evidence here. number one, do we have this guy's car? if they do you're going to find something in there. and the blanket, mike, it was -- it had feces on it and there were feces also in the area around there. so you can get, it's not the best source of dna, but you can get nuclear dna material from feces.
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so who does it belong to? is it the little girl's? is it coe's? is it someone else? was he acting aloan? these are all questions that remain unanswered and only he knows. >> michelle, we don't want to go too far afield on that. >> right. >> but it's -- it's -- there's some nastyness around that mobile home park, right, as we look at this situation? speaking to mike's point in the sense of well what -- what was on the blanket, and also we're hearing from, what, a neighbor that says she thought she heard someone at 3:00 in the morning being beaten? can we confirm that? >> well, here's what i can tell you. i can confirm that investigators do say that shaniya was actually seen in mr. coe's car before she was reported missing. they won't state if it was the night before or if it was in the early morning hours. but she was, in fact, seen at that point inside of his vehicle. and investigators did have probable cause, based on witness accounts and also interviewing folks and kind of piecing this case together to be able to
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arrest mr. coe, and charge him with first degree kidnapping, and that's where he is, this is where we are right now at this particular point. again he is innocent until proven guilty. >> okay. dottie is with us from south carolina. dottie, go ahead. >> caller: hi, mike, how you doing? >> good, dottie. >> caller: i've been keeping up with this and it just seemed like it seems kind of weird to me that i'm just kind of curious as to why the mom moved her from wherever she was sleeping, i would think in i guess on her bed, and into the living room on the couch. it almost sounds like she was making something a little convenient. there's just so many people out trying to profit from all these fake kidnappings and stuff. and the real ones are getting put on the back burner because of so many of these fakes. >> all right, mike this time line has got to make you question as an investigator. mom says 5:30 she puts little shaniya on the couch and notices her missing an hour later. yet we're getting some either surveillance footage or a
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neighbor saying she heard trouble at 3:00 in the morning. what do you make of that? >> you know, exactly. putting together this time line is very important, but there's a lot of gaps in it right now, mike. you know, and two of the callers question about why she moved from the bedroom to the living room. we're talking about a single wide trailer here, mike. we're not talking about a big house. so there's not much distance between that bedroom and the living room in a trailer like this. so, you know, very, very accessible. >> yeah, michelle, talk about that. it's a small -- and a lot of people live there from what we're gathering. >> a lot of people live there. this is a 12x40 trailer. it's only two bedrooms. the only people according to barbara that were supposed to be living inside that trailer were brenda davis and her son. the ones on the application. antoinette, shaniya's mom, was also living there. shaniya. shaniya's brother. an infant. and also a boyfriend i guess was supposedly in and out. whether that boyfriend is, in fact, clarence or not, we're not too sure. investigators aren't releasing
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that information. so this is a very small, close quarters for all of these people to live inside of this particular home. and i do want to mention that antoinette's son, i can confirm to you, that investigators did tell me that he is in foster care with the department of social services right now. >> okay, thanks for that update.
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welcome back. this next story, it is brutal. i have to warn you the details are graphic so get the kids out of the room. what we're talking about here, five family members in missouri charged in i have to say this one of the worst child sex abuse cases i've ever heard of, a father and his four sons accused of raping one of the son's six children, boys and girls and doing it for years.
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here are some of the charges we're talking about, forceable sodomy, rape with a child younger than 12, use of a child in a sexual performance, forcing kids into fake marriages, finally a 26-year-old woman recently came forward she claims she was forced to have an abortion at age 11 and says these crimes took place from 1988 to 1995 and it could get worse. investigators are searching what used to be the family's property searching for a body or bodies, plural. we'll take your calls 1-877-tell-hln. joining us to talk about psychologist michelle golland, also bill grady reporter from kmbz covering this story. bill starting with you. so we could have murder, as well, in this story, bill? >> well, that is the speculation right now. and these are -- a lot of this is based upon the victims that have come forward and some of the stories that he had have told and among those stories
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there are written accounts in jars buried at various points on the property and perhaps a body or two and so police are playing this one really close to the vest. they don't want to taint the investigation but back out searching the property today and unconfirmed report perhaps a sixth suspect has now been identified. >> how many sons does this man have, just the four sons? >> reporter: he's got the four sons and extended family. this guy was very active in his church. very well known in his community. and so, it looks, right now, like it is going to be strictly a family issue but, you know, we have to keep in mind that these are charges not convictions and i just talked to one of his cousins minutes ago about ten minutes ago and he said that burrell mohler literally in court today looked like a broken old man. he was very shocked at what happened because he knew him to be a good guy, upstanding member of the church, and just had a difficult time wrapping his mind around all this. >> i think we all are, bill.
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did we describe that correctly? one of the son's children, they are the victims here? >> well, what we are doing just to be on the safe side and err on the side of caution and reading through the probable cause statements is not specifically identifying how these folks were connected because, if you say a son or a daughter it's going to be pretty easy for someone out there to connect the dots, trying to protect, you know, the victims themselves because in all likelihood, they've been through enough already. >> yeah, exactly. let's listen to the sheriff. you mentioned, bill, talking about the kids and the way we understand it is these children as victims were being told put your bad thoughts, write them down and put them in a glass jar. let's listen to the sheriff talk about that. >> the children were told at a very young age that if they had bad things happen to them or bad memories to write them down and put them in a jar and bury them and those bad memories will go away. obviously, they didn't. >> michelle golland, i don't even think we can put into words
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the pain. >> no. >> -- these children endured here. >> it's horrific. and i think what is also really frightening is that, you know, these victims say that the abuse stopped in '95. but, we know people who abuse children sexually and sadistically like these men did, they didn't stop. so, i would assume there are more victims. >> let's get a call in. john's with us from north carolina. go ahead. >> caller: this is joan. >> oh, joan, i'm sorry. go ahead, joan. >> caller: hey, mike, thank you for taking my call. >> yeah. >> caller: my primary question it's horrifying every day we turn on the news and all we see is one child after another. we live very close to fayetteville where this little girl is missing. my first question is where were the mothers and grandmothers of these children, what kind of women are these to allow this to go on and they had to know it was going on. also, these are under the umbrella of church men? what kind of religion do these people practice?
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and when are we going to be able to stop this, mike? it has to stop. >> you're right, joan two, great questions, joan. bill, are any of the moms coming forward, any women in the lives of these men? >> caller: what i can tell you, mike, basically to repeat what the law investigators told me, in that they have numerous leads. i was told today earlier that there was more evidence that surfaced but no one is being terribly specific on it because of the gravity of these charges trying to file all this case as best as possible. now, speaking to that and sort of a general sense we have an organization here in kansas city called moxa an advocacy group for victims of sexual abuse especially as results to families and their executive director told me within the last hour, it really isn't uncommon at all for someone to wait years, and even decades, to come forward and report this because of the extreme trauma that can occur. >> bill, real quick, we just had the question, we have about 15 seconds, the church, a lot of
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people wonder what kind of church would this be? >> reporter: this is the former rlds, reorganized latter-day saints, and became the community of christ about six or seven years ago. they got ahead of the curve and came out and made a statement and said these guys no longer have any connection with the church, not doing anything in any kind of counseling or voluntary capacity. >> bill grady, thank you so much. michelle, always a pleasure to have you on, as well. coming up, a georgia teacher says she was forced to resign over photos and an expletive on her facebook page. you see that photo, sipping a beer. is that enough to force her to resign? also this, you don't want to miss this incredible story. i had the honor and privilege to talk with baltimore ravens offensive tackle michael oher. this young man goes from homeless to being welcomed into a family to nfl star now a movie is going to be made about his life, my exclusive interview with michael oher coming up.
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here's one for you a former teacher in barrow county, georgia says the school district forced her to resign over some photos and an expletive on her private facebook page. ashley payne taught english at ap latch yeah high and she said she was blindsided in august when a parent had complained
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about her picture from her trip to europe. there's the picture, one of them anyway, sipping beer at the top of the guinness brewery in dublin. pretty tame photos not a wild party scene swinging from a chandelier. she says the pictures are not bad, just having a beer. is that enough to force someone to resign? joining us to talk about it, we have ashley payne with us, along with her attorney, richard stores. also joining us attorney tanya acker. all right, ashley, what am i missing here? some photo we're not seeing? they look pretty tame to me. >> i don't think so. i was never actually shown the photo that is in question so i'm not exactly sure which one they're talking about. i can just look back at my own facebook page and know the only ones that i had posted of myself were of the nature that you see there in these pictures on the air. they're just pictures of me having drinks in europe with friends. >> that's it. >> that's it. >> so the principal approached you. what did he say?
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>> he told me that a parent had called in and complained about a message that i had posted on my facebook account and about some pictures of me with alcohol and he just asked me if i had those things and i said, yes, i've got some pictures from my trip to europe this summer that a co-worker and i went on with some other friends. it was completely non-school related and i told him that i had those things up there and he said that, with the language and the pictures, that was enough to warrant a suspension and he represented that the decision to suspend me had already been made by himself and the superintendent. >> so, there was no investigation, there was no chance for you, you didn't state your side of the story? >> no, there was no investigation. i was stopped on the way into the school that morning and brought into the assistant principal's office. i had no advance notice of what the complaints were.
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and railroaded into resigning right there on the spot, before i left that office. i wasn't given any time to think about it and come back to them with my decision. >> okay. let me read a portion of their statement, i believe they have a code of ethics, and part of this policy deals with employees using social networking sites like facebook, myspace. and here it is. talking about inappropriate personal information such as but not limited to provocative photographs, sexually explicit messages, use of alcohol. i guess that's what they are talking about. use of alcohol. it goes on to talk about drugs or anything students are prohibited from doing must understand that a student's parents or employees obtain access to such information their case will be investigated by the school. we wonder if there was an investigation, and the district if warranted will be disciplined up to and including termination for the severity of the offense. was it that severe? we'll take your calls on this one, 1-877-tell-hln. y8
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welcome back for this incredible story. a kid, teenager in tennessee, living off the streets. but against all odds, he goes from being homeless, he's taken in by a well-to-do family, now he's an nfl star. his life a powerful message i'm talking about the life of michael oher. i had the honor to speak with him in my exclusive interview but first let's play a clip from the movie inspired by his life warner brother's new film "the blind side." >> who was that? >> big mike. he goes to high school here. >> what is he wearing? it's below freezing. do you have any place to stay tonight? don't you dare lie to me.
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>> was this a bad idea? >> what's the big deal, it's just for one night. it is just for one night, right? >> tell me just one thing, i should know about you. >> i answer to "big mike." >> another one of your charities? >> need to find out more about his past. >> he's been enrolled in seven different institutions. his grade point average begins with a zero. >> he needs to do better in school. >> i'd love to work with him. >> this is mine? >> yes, sir. >> never had one before. >> what, a room to yourself? >> a bed. >> what a story. and i had the honor now to talk with michael oher, offensive tackle baltimore ravens. michael, thanks for joining us. it is a true pleasure to talk to you and talk to you about your inspiring story. you know, as we talk, yeah, football fans know your story but now with the book and movie coming out everybody's going to know your story. do you ever stop and think, from not long ago homeless michael oher, to football star michael
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oher and movie made about your life. can you believe this has all come to pass? >> it's unbelievable. you know, i've came a long way, you know, it's been a tough road and, you know, to do something i love, something i have a passion for, it's unbelievable to be able to, you know, step on the field and pad up in the nfl. so, i think, you know, i think about it every day. >> we look at your story and look back. do you have memories of -- i mean, we laid it out there you never knew your father, he was murdered. your biological mom, drug issues. do you have early memories being with your brothers, being homeless and that fight for really survival at an early age? >> of course, you know. i have a lot of memories of all kinds but, you know, i chose, you know, to forget about all those, all the bad memories, all the, you know, not having no anything to eat or, you know,
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struggling here and there but you've got to move on and, you know, if i would have, you know, dwelled on the past, i don't think i would have made it this far. you've got, to you know, put everything behind and trust in, you know, the people who want to help you and, you know, do things for you and, you know, i think that's what, you know, got me here, you know, forgetting about the past and just making it out a positive and moving forward and, you know, just working hard every day. >> michael, that's one of the many things i love about your story is that you talk and there always seem to be hope with you, even the pictures that i've seen with you as a child, there's a smile on your face, even though you are going through what you're going through. how did you keep hope alive? >> i've always wanted to be a -- you know, make it to the nfl and, you know, just be something in life. i knew -- i always figured, you know, there was, you know, a better way of life and a better way to do things and so i've
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always tried to be the best i can be in, you know, always wanted to go to school and, you know, do all -- i went to school on my own and did a lot of things on my own so i always knew that, you know, if i worked hard and, you know, did everything that i possibly can do, you know, i'd make it, i'd be something. >> was there ever a point where your life and your struggles were getting to you? i mean, i'm reading stories about how birthdays weren't celebrated, christmas was waking up christmas morning and watching other kids in the neighborhood play with their toys. did you ever -- did it ever get to you, michael? >> oh, yeah. i mean, because, you know, i -- you ask yourself a lot of the times growing up, you know, why, why -- what does it have to be this way for you? but, you know, you take all that type stuff like i said and make it into a positive. you work hard and, you know, you try to better yourself and, you know, better your surroundings
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and you tend to want more in life. so, you know, you take all that type stuff and you make it into a positive and, you know, keep going. >> you've done that. i mean your teammates describe you, great player, passionate, intense but also another player just flat-out said michael's a joy to be around. which do you like better. >> who said that? >> matt burke. >> oh, yeah. >> veteran. that's a veteran guy watching you as a player and as a man. which do you take more pride in? >> i mean, i have to take it in both, because, you know, i work hard on the field and, you know, all my teammates, we have a great group of guys. you know, i love being around them. i just love, you know, being part of an nfl organization and be around a guy like matt birk, who all he does is go to the pro bowl and just to be around those type guys, guys like ray lewis and, you know, guys i grew up watching and, you know, knowing that, you know, i've always been a big fan of this game, you know, i've -- it's always been
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can't wait, you know, until september comes around to hear that da-da-da sound, you know all that type stuff. it's unbelievable. >> yeah. your story's unbelievable. and when we come back, we're going to talk with michael more and talk more with michael about the family he mentioned, the touhy family who stepped up and helped him out and gave him that, just that push to get him over the hump. and now again he's an nfl star and there's a movie about his life. >> i don't know if i'm an nfl star. >> that's what we're hearing.
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michael's grades have improved enough he can go out for spring football in march. >> 1, 2, 3, 4 -- >> this team is your family, michael. when you look at him, you think of me. how you have my back. are you going to protect the family, michael? >> yes, ma'am. >> s.j., you're going to want to get this. >> who's the big guy eating with your little brother. >> it's his big brother. >> i think what you're doing is so great. >> sandra bullock. >> you're changing that boy's life. >> no. he's changing mine. >> powerful statement there. there again from the new movie "the blind side" the story of
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michael oher's life, my honor and privilege to talk to michael offensive tackle baltimore ravens and, michael, as we hear that and we hear that was sandra bullock playing the part of your mom leigh anne touhy, she said that in interviews, that you're more of a blessing to them than they were to you. how does that make you feel? >> words can't even describe it. that means a lot to me knowing that, you know, what they did for me and the kind of -- the amount of love that i have for them and, you know, to -- for them to bring me in their home and just for me knowing right off the bat that they care about me as a person and, you know, they want the best for me. >> wow. let's listen, not to sandra buttock but to leigh anne touhy talking about you being a part of their family. >> there was just never really a defining moment that we said that we were going to take this young man in. he was there. we were there. he had needs.
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we had a potential to fill them. we'll tell stories that happened before we had michael and he'll, you know, throw in, i go, you weren't even here, you know, but he thinks he's always been there and we think he's always been there. so we don't really know life without michael anymore. i know that's hard for people to understand but it's just, you know, that's just how it is. and so, there really wasn't a defining moment it just kind of happened and it was just a great thing that happened to us and he blessed us far more than we probably could have ever have blessed him. >> michael, did you think it would last? did you think that from that meet being you would become a member of the touhy family? >> oh, definitely, because, you know, just it's a feeling you get, you know, i got that feeling right away. you know, collins and sean, jr., they just welcomed me with open arms. there wasn't a problem, you know, somebody coming into their home and, you know, they just took me in like i was part of the family and that's what i love about them and they just --
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did everything i asked them to do and more. so, you know, without them, i wouldn't be here today. >> collins being your sister, sean, jr., your brother and sean your father. >> collins is the best, by the way. she's unbelievable. >> sounds like you guys are really close. >> oh, yes, i watched over her four years in college and whatever she need you know from me i do for her and the same with her. she's -- and s.j., as well. you know, without them, you know, i don't know. >> man, i can just, as i see you and you're talking, just there's a love that's exuding from you and as the story goes, leigh anne told you she loved when you were 18. was that the first time you heard that, and what did it do to you? >> uh, i mean, it just, you know, it showed me that, you know, it is possible to, you know, to be loved.
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you know, i never heard that before. and, you know, just for her to express that and, you know, i knew then that i was, you know, a part of the family and, you know, and that i was going to stick around. >> when, again, you're welcomed into the family and hear "i love you," as you take this and you're going to be a father some day. what kind of dad are you going to be? i bet you the words "i love you" will be coming out nonstop from you. >> you know, i'm definitely going to, you know, teach -- teach my kids everything that i wasn't taught. i'm going to show them, you know, that it's better to give than receive because you know people gave me a second chance and, you know, raising them the right way and give them everything that i couldn't have, you know, and just take great care of them, don't let them out of my sight. >> that's good. all dads should hear that. michael, how special was it on draft day when the touhy family,
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you guys are all together, one big family, as you're drafted by the baltimore ravens. how special was that? >> that was -- that was a big day. the day i've been waiting for -- i've been waiting for, you know, forever. and, you know, it finally came true and it was -- it was unbelievable. i just couldn't believe my name was called in the nfl draft, you know, all my hard work had paid off and just to be on a team and, you know, whatever happens after that, you know. i did everything i could to get to this level. so, that was, you know, unbelievable -- >> we're all just reveling in this as we see the pictures of you with the touhy family and you all are celebrating. do you realize how big this story is in the sense of the inspiration that it has become not only to football fans but to a watching world that a family took you in, you were persevering through a rough childhood and now we have this story of victory? has that part of it soaked in for you, michael?
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>> oh, a little bit. but, you know, the thing that people can take from this is, you know, if you reach out and lend a hand, you know, i know so many people that, you know, have more talent than i have that's, you know, didn't get that opportunity that i got. and, you know, if they were to get that opportunity, you know, it would be more people, you know, in the nfl, in the nba, you know, with so many other skills, you know, just doing other things, doctors or lawyers, anything. but they didn't have somebody to show them that there was another side, you know, to life. >> michael, very well put and i'm sure as people hear your story, see this movie, that they might be a little more willing to reach out and make that difference for somebody else. michael oher, a pleasure, continued success with your football career and with life. thanks again. >> thank you. thank you for having me. >> from that uplifting story to
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this. a promising tv anchor murdered in little rock arkansas, her nip anne pressly. horrifically attacked in her own home. she was raped, beaten until she was barely recognized by her own mom. and now, a jury is deciding whether her killer will live or die.
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finally, justice for anne pressly. promising tv anchor, murdered in little rock, arkansas. remember this face? this story. anne pressly just 26. horrifically attacked in her own home. she was raped, beaten until she was barely recognized by her own mom. jurors found curtis lavell vance guilty of murder. right now they're deciding what he'll get, life in prison or the
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death penalty. look at this video, both the killer and the victim's families very emotional leaving court. anne pressly's mom found her daughter unconscious, barely breathing, she was in a coma then died five days later. listen back then when anne's mom spoke to abc's "good morning america." >> this monster stole my daughter's innocence. he took her life. he took her identity. he took -- he took our lives. our lives have radically changed as a result of what's happened to anne. >> you see the hurt, then, and obviously now as we saw video from just yesterday. joining me to talk about this, jane velez-mitchell, host of "issues" coming up at the top of the hour. jane, this one just shocked us. it was hard to come to grips with this one. and this really kicked off your war on women, didn't it? >> it did. >> as we wrestled with this story. tell me your feelings now as we
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have justice for anne pressly. >> well, this was the first case, mike, where we really announced on "issues" a war on women. because in so many cases, people would say, well, if if she hadn out drinking or well, if she hasn't been out hiking by herself. this was a young woman at home by herself in her home not doing anything. so it just disproves this whole theory that women have to watch themselves, that why should women modify their behavior? why don't we modify the behavior of violent criminals? and so, this is the ultimate example of what i call the psychological burqa that all women in america have to wear. we point our noses down at other cultures where women have to wear burqas and certainly i think that's hideous and awful but what about wearing a psychological burqa where there's nowhere to run or hide.
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even their own home this woman was home by herself when somebody broke in and brute isized her, shattered her face. virtually every bone in her face was completely shattered. that is an ob sen night it's obscene, jane, no shame from the killer as we watched this angry about the verdict. let's watch that. >> it's a corrupt system, that's what it is. you already know. >> corrupted system? i don't even know where to begin on that, jane. >> well, in the penalty phase, his mother took the stand, began weeping and saying that she had drug problems than she abused him. referring to that. i do believe. >> jane, we'll be watching issues. >> yeah.
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tonight, a gruesome discovery in missouri. five grown men accused of sexually abused, raping and sodomizing at least six young children from their own family. allegations include rape, fake marriages and forced abortions. that's just the beginning of this unbelievably twisted story. get this three of the men arrested are lay ministers. now cops are searching the property for possible bodies. they're also searching for buried glass jars which may contain handwritten letters from the children detailing their family nightmare. how many more victims could be out there? and justice for anne pressly. this beautiful tv anchorwoman
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was brutally raped and beaten to death while sleeping in her own bed, beaten so badly, nearly every bone in her face was shattered. will her killer face the death penalty? this is the tragedy that first inspired "issues" to focus our attention on the war on women. tonight, we'll talk to those closest to ann about tonight's big issue. what's being done to change our blood-drenched culture. >> plus, new developments in the murder of smor thompson abducted and killed while walking home from school. now her mom says she's getting hate mail. how is that possible? we'll talk to her devastated mother's attorney about the new twist in this investigation and how sor's mom believes she's destined to become a crusader against violence for children. tonight, unspeakable horror as details of sickening sex crimes and toxic family secrets come spilling out. take a look at these five men,
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three of them lay ministers at their local church as you contemplate the evil acts they are accused of committing 15 years ago. a missouri grandfather named burrell moehler and five of his adult sons allegedly raped and sodomized children in their own family. cops say a 26-year-old female victim has come forward to say she and her five siblings were brutalized sexually as children. for example, she says the kids were forced to participate in, get this, bestiality. according to a criminal complaint, the young woman said she became pregnant and was made to have an abortion at age 11 1/2. she also charge that had she and her siblings were forced to participate in fake wedding is ceremonies with their adult relatives before sex. plus in, graphic detail, much too disturbing for television, she describes a rape that the uncle allegedly committed and his chilling words beforehand,
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quote, he told her that they would become one person." cops say the children were told to write down their bad memories, put them in a jar and bury them. so yesterday, investigators began digging up the ground at the missouri farm in search of those jars and other possible victims of this allegedly sick family. >> the well, there's are class a felony forcible rape of a child less than 12 years old and we believe that there are other victims out there. and we believe that people in the public can give us more information on each and every one of these suspects. who could these other possible victims be? are they even alive? or are they buried underground in the earth? and how could this alleged vial activity be kept under wraps for so many years? tonight's big issue, toxic family secrets. i know you at home have something to say about this. give me a call, 1-877-586-7297.
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straight out to my fabulous panel, stacy hon knowwitz from the sex crimes unit in the florida prosecutor's office, dr. dale archer, clinical psychologist, boy, do we need you tonight, doctor. we're delighted to have judge alex fer repair, host of the show "judge alex" and pleased to have with us debra burris, a former neighbor of the 77-year-old suspect. she has requested to appear in shadow tonight in order to maintain her privacy. we'll talk with her in a moment. first, bill grady reporter with knbz, kansas city is, missouri, what is the very latest? >> we just talked with some investigators here a short while ago. what they tell us is that sometime this evening, announcement will be made by the investigative agencies. they also preface it had by saying there won't be any interviews granted this evening. it is just something we're going to release in the form of an actual news release. we know this property has been
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scoured all day long today. it's over 55 acres. so we don't know the exactly what it's going to be. we'll be here till it's made. >> how did this all come to light, this 26-year-old woman who says she was brutalized by these men when she was a child? she has siblings. did they all go at once to the cops or how did it come out? >> our understanding is that this case, the investigative arm of it started several months ago and the 26-year-old lady was the first to come forward. now, also i've got to tell you, jane, that the sheriff has made it very clear he is quite sure there are a number of victims out there and likely they could be in various parts of the country. a couple minutes ago we spoke with an fbi agent here in town who said as of now, the fbi has not been called into the case. we did discern the information a computer was seized from the farm property and it's going to be september for computer forensics. >> just yes or no, did the siblings of this 26-year-old woman also come forward and say
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yeah, they did it to me too? >> that's information that i don't have. and that's something that i know the sheriff has been very careful about releasing because he's very concerned about protecting the identities of these people, as you can well imagine. it would be pretty easy to connect the dots and figure out who the people were and in sex crimes, everyone wants to be a little careful about that. >> tonight's big issue, toxic family secrets. how could this vial alleged secret remain under wraps while it was happening for more than 15 years until now? among other horrific crimes alleged in their complaint, cops say the moehler family committed "sexual intercourse with a child less than 12 years old as well as the use of a child in a sexual performance." three of the men are lay ministers. the church now says they've suspended their licenses but boy, you have to wonder, debra burris, you are a neighbor of the 77-year-old grandfather,
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burrell moehler senior. how this could have been going on, these allegations, without anybody know knowing it. you're the neighbor. did you know that this 77-year-old man had these four sons? >> no, i didn't, jane. i never knew he had any sons. >> well, you're his neighbor for how many years? >> i think he's lived there probably 15 or 16 years. >> and so did you ever talk to this guy? how could you not know that he had four sons? >> well, i actually, i don't live next to him. i live across the street up one house. but my grandchildren's bus stop was in front of his house, and we spoke almost daily. when the kids were living with us going to school. they will no longer live with us. but he was just a private person. she would see him out in the yard. and we would speak. his name was. >> did he seem like a creep to
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you? >> no. >> did he seem like a nut ball, a chock full o nuts crazy person? >> no, he seemed like a normal grandfatherly type pep used to walk his little dog up and down the street. he would be in his little bermuda shorts with white knee socks. he just looked like a little grandfather. he was soft spoken. he was friendly. he was helpful. >> wow. >> look at these people. i mean, look at these men. these are grown men, judge alex fer repair, it's horrifying for me to look at the faces of these bearded men and to imagine what is being allege that had these big gigantic heavy bearded men were sexually torturing allegedly young children, girls, and you know, one of the allegations, and it's almost nauseating for me to say it, i just -- honestly can't even get it out is that one of these children says they were forced to have sex with a dog. okay, we've put it out there. it's that bad.
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what do you make of it. >> obviously, it's horrible horrible facts and if they are guilty of those, they're definitely going to get what's coming to them because in missouri, there's talk about possibly there being bodies buried in the field of children that were actually killed. i certainly hope that's not true. the children who lived through this have enough scars on their own. but if it's murder, they're going to look at the death penalty because missouri does have the death penalty. even if it's not, those crimes carry penalties up to life in prison. i can't imagine a judge giving them less than life in prison. however, their bond is 30,000 to $75,000. how they were given such a low bond, i can't imagine a greater flight risk than facing these charges and given a 30,000 to $75,000 bond. i can imagine them taking off and never being found again. that bond should have been ten times that. >> i 100% agree with you judge. here's more what the sheriff said during yesterday's news conference. listen to this. >> the children were told at a
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very young age if they had bad things happen to them or bad memories to write them down and put them in a jar and to bury them and those bad memories will go away. >> stacy honowitz, you're the sex crimes prosecutor. does that is ring a bell, that kind of behavior? >> sure, jane. i think we're talking about, you're asking the other guests did you suspect anything. pedophilia child rape, these guys would never be pinpointed. that's why sew it's so interesting when people try to profile them. because the first thing you always hear is that didn't look like the type of person. look what happened to phillip garrido. >> he looks kind of like garrido, this 77-year-old dad. >> you hear people say -- pedophilia is secretive. it's secrets among families. and thankfully, these siblings, if in fact it is siblings, came forward all these years later to talk about what was going on and hopefully, if in fact, it's
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true, they will be convicted and punished for these horrific crimes. >> we will ask again, why it took so long for this to come out. these crimes allegedly stopped 15 years ago. more on this unthinkable alleged crime spree in just a bit. a very sick family it's being alleged. we're taking your calls on this and toxic family secrets, 1-877-jvm-says. the brutal and i mean brutal murder of anne pressly sparked our coverage of the war on women. now her killer is headed to jail. but what's being done to make sure this doesn't happen again? but first, five men suspected of doing unthinkable things to young children. their own flesh and blood. so horrific, we can't even talk about them on tv. cops now searching for bodies on their property. neighbors said we had no idea. >> we've lived in this neighborhood for years, and he's been a neighbor for years, and who would ever suspect that. you know? it's just, it's amazing.
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i believe that there is, and i think every investigator here after seeing the facts believes there's more victims. >> why do you believe there's more people from a professional's point of view. >> all training i've had that pedophiles don't stop with one. they keep going on. >> authorities tonight reaching out to the public asking anybody with information that could lead to more arrests or more victims, the tip line number is going to be on your screen throughout this segment. phone lines lighting up on this horror. becky, illinois, your question or thought. >> caller: well, i have the
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question of the -- i wasn't sure what the bestiality was. but you did answer that. thank you very much for that. >> yeah, it was unfortunately with a dog allegedly, which is beyond comprehension. but what are your other thoughts, becky? >> well, i just kind of wanted to share with you is, i did have a situation or you know, a sexual abuse type thing going on when i was a child. and i just think that a lot of times people don't want to believe that that happened. you know, i know when i told my mother or when my sister told my mother, she didn't believe us. and. >> really? >> caller: yeah. i think it's just that it's that horrible of a thing that people don't want to believe it. you know what i mean? >> first of all, becky, thank you for having the courage to speak about that. they say you're only as sick as your secrets. i think it's very courageous and healthy of to you speak up and talk about your past without any shame because it's certainly not
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your fault. bill grady, you're the reporter. i'm not understanding elements of this. there's four adult men and then the grandfather, 77 years old. where are the women? where are the mothers? where are the females in this picture? >> and again, jane, this is one of these situations that the is the sheriff and all the investigative agencies, including the western missouri major case squad rural case squad have all been very very good about trying to keep this information under wraps with regard to these people giving the statements and making the probable cause statements. >> but wasn't there, i read something about the grandmother died and then the children were going to sleep with the grandfather and that's when it started? >> that's one of the allegations and one of the probable cause statements. i don't know if you have copies of them you but they will do get to be very detailed about what happened, what was said. you know, a timeline and it is
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disturbing to say the very least. >> yaerk the horrific crimes took place 15 years ago. listen to this. >> well, time factor always comri complicates a case but when memories of this come out from the victims, as you talk about it, more comes out. we're still trying to pursue on with these victims to get more information and with suspects to get more information. >> dr. dale archer, psychiatrist, a victim who came forward came forward on behalf of herself and five siblings. she's now 26. will investigators have a problem with arguments of the this is false memory, repressed memory issues? >> no, i really don't think so because it's not only her but apparently the rest of them have all stepped forward, as well. i think that an issue here that needs to be addressed is that it is very, very hard for a woman who come forward because of what the caller indicated. they often aren't believed and then they have to not only face the shame of being abused, but
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also they somehow feel guilty and responsible because no one believes them and they're left to suffer in silence. >> so many times they're threatened about, you know, ped filial, it's such a sickness and so many times the perpetrator will tell the person, no one's going to believe you if you tell your mother, if you tell your grandmother or somebody else in the family. if you will do choose to tell somebody, i will kill you and hurt you and hurt other members. that's why it's so important for educators, for parents to talk to their children and to tell them that will if you are being abused, you must come forward without the fear of the threats or else something like this is going to take place. someone's going to live with these horrific crimes for years and years before they come forward. >> judge alex ferrer, given so much time has passed is that why they're searching for those bottles because if they could confirm they were put in the ground many years ago, then that would be a confirmation that
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whatever happened happened those many years ago? into that will be additional evidence. it's not necessary. i mean, all crimes don't require some additional physical evidence to support them. for example, you can have sexual battery. that's not usually a crime committed in front of a stadium of people. so you often have the word of the victim against the defendant. in this case, you've got a lot of apparent either victims or witnesses. the jars is just that much more of a nail in the coffin of these guys. if those are found, it's going to really corroborate their story. but we're not dealing with kids, 8-year-olds make allegations. sometimes you get into the problem have they been pushed by another relative to make false allegations. >> we have to leave it right there, those photos are making me nauseous just thinking about this. thank you, fantastic panel. moving on, peta exposing the alleged brutal treatment of lab animals on a college campus. how is this happening in university science labs? also beaten and raped to
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death inside her bedroom. the murder of anne pressly sparked our war on women coverage. now the man who killed this beautiful tv anchor headed to prison. >> today was justice for ann and it's taken a year to get it and nobody's more grateful than the parents and all of us as friends.
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in the spotlight tonight, another blockbuster undercover investigation by people for the ethical treatment of animals, the peta operation was conducted at two the university of utah biomedical research labs and ended just last month. during the eight-month covert investigation, peta says it collected hundreds of hours of video allegedly capturing miserable conditions and neglect of animals including monkeys kept constantly thirsty so they would cooperate during experiments just to get a few drops of water. listen. >> water. depriving water, you're always
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going to be. >> wow. that seems kind of sad. >> it's the extreme. it is sad. i don't like it. and it messes with your ethics and your morals, kind of, in your head because you're just like, you know what, i don't agree with this. >> we reached out to the university of utah for comment, have not heard back. joining me now ingrid newkirk, president of peta. what did your investigator say she witnessed. >> she witnessed so many things, jane. but she's animals just in their cages out of sheer frustration in their tiny boxes left for days without veterinary care. a rabbit sitting in the hall for four days with people going past this poor animal and not a drop of water, not a drop of food, nobody noticed. we even have little kittens who have chemicals injected into their brains when their mother gave birth to them. this is not something useful. of course, monkeys kept in isolation with holes drilled in their heads.
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this is the 21st century. and this university needs to be brought to task. it's a closed shop. and the public isn't going to buy that anymore. they need to be open up. >> in response, university of utah officials released annual inspection reports that say the labs passed usda inspections. the university insists its labs are in full compliance with government guidelines but peta argues the trouble usda has nowhere near enough inspectors to do anything more than a cursory check. meantime, the university of utah has reportedly admitted to buying dogs and cats from animal shelters to use in research. ingrid, tell us about peta's charge that these homeless pets, once somebody's pets were used in cruel and invasive experiments. >> yes, well at the university of utah, they can get animals from many of the shelters. imagine you go on holiday. you go on vacation and your dog or your cat gets out of the house. gets to the pound and when you come back from holiday that, animal has been experimented upon, has had some horrible
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invasive surgery. this has to stop. this is a betrayal of the public trust, a betrayal of the animals. you know, they're in bad enough shape when lost or unwanted. they don't need to be cut open in the lab. there's a wonderful dog called remington who ended up in this lab and a cage card at the pound said can sit, is good with other dogs. a wonderful loving animal. and, of course, they cut him up at the university of utah. >> oh, my gosh. so this dog was somebody's pet and ended up being used in research. that's what your undercover investigation found out? >> yes, it is. as for the inspections, of course, they may be inspected once a year. it's a cursory inspection, usually announced and what happens for the 364 other days, no inspector ever sees. and the public has a right to know. we have a right to protect these dogs and cats and all the government inspections need to be shaken up. >> power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely. thank you so much, ingrid
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newkirk, we must keep an eye on the situation in the labs. anne pressly, an beautiful journalist killed next.
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justice for anne pressly. this beautiful tv anchorwoman was brutally raped and beaten to death while sleeping in her own bed, beaten so badly, nearly every bone in her face was badly shattered. now her killer is headed to jail. tonight we'll talk to those closest ann. plus, blood boiling have you developments in the murder of somer thompson, the 7-year-old was abducted and killed while walking home from school. now her mom says she's getting hate maile. we'll talk to her mother's attorney about the new twist in in investigation and how somer's mom believes she's destined to
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become a crusader to stop violence against children. >> the savage rape and brutal murder of anchorwoman of anne pressly is the tragic case that first got our show "issues" talking about the war on women. tonight, justice for ann, curtis la very vance found guilty of her murder. right now as we speak, a jury is deciding whether or not to give him the death penalty. prosecutors showed the jury two photos, ann's head shot and then a horrifying image of ann after the beating. the jury agreed the dna evidence proved vance was the killer. that he left ann barely alive. her mom found her unconscious, hardly breathing. anne's dev state mother spoke to abc's "good morning america." listen. >> he came into her bedroom and i found anne right here and i just could not take in what i was seeing. >> it was pretty bad. >> it was very bad. >> and were you able to speak to her? >> i said anne, anne, anne. mama's here.
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what's happened. i said anne who, did this to you? >> anne never recovered to answer. she died five days later. a medical expert testified her face was shattered "like an egg." a nurse testified she had never seen anyone so badly wound still alive. vance admitted he battered anne with a piece of wood he found in her yard. anne's mother says she ripped up her family photos because she has no one to give them to now. what a heartbreaking and completely senseless crime. i know you at home have something to say. give us a call. straight out to my expert panel, also joining us, former fbi special agent in charge, don clark and with us on the phone, melissa dunbar gates, anne's best friend. melissa, thank you so much. i know this has to be unimaginely difficult for you. what is your reaction and the reaction of anne's family to this verdict of guilty? >> it was an absolute huge sigh
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of relief. i guess i didn't realize and until the verdict came how it feels like i haven't breathed in a year. and when this verdict came, i felt like i could finally -- it was just a huge relief of tension. >> a lot of people who have never experienced crime don't really understand why a verdict is a relief and a consolation and brings closure, but when you are a victim of crime, it all makes sense. and when you're the friend of a victim of crime, it all makes sense. it puts the pieces together, does it not, melissa? >> yes, absolutely. and what happened to anne was so horrific and so violent, that this man needed to be stopped. and because she fought back and punched him and got his dna on her left hand, he was caught,
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arrested, convicted. and now we're hoping for the maximum penalty tonight. >> yes, they are debating whether or not to give him the death penalty as we speak. now, the defendant has spoken out on his own behalf. he voices his anger over the conviction. listen to this. >> it's a corrupt system. that's what it is. you already know. >> corrupted system? our affiliate kark is reporting in the death penalty portion of the trial, going on right now as we speak, the killer's mother begged for her son's life. she took the stand and went trying to shift the blame to herself. she admits she was a crack head and that she abused her son. she said she slammed his head into a brick wall when he was 7 years old. melissa, does this in any way sway you? >> no, it's sad the way he was raised. it's sad that his mom said she was addicted to drugs and abused alcohol and saying she abused her kids. that is sad. but curtis vance made decisions.
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he chose to not finish high school. he chose to not get a job and he chose to murder my friend. no, nothing that is sad in his childhood makes any of this okay. >> my big issue tonight, no safe zone for women. it seems when there's a brutal crime against a woman, women are lectured on protecting themselves. remember the woman last seen leaving a manhattan bar. women were told that have case don't drink alcohol and walk home alone. mir digit was murdered while hiking on georgia's blood mountain. but anne pressly was in her own home and she was still brutally attacked. this why i talk about the psychological burqa american women are forced to wear. we are condemned to living in fear because there is no safe zone for women. when they can be attacked even in their own home. you know, we put down our noses at these cultures where women
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are forced to wear burke kaz. it is awful. i put one on once and i thought i was going to die. but we have a psychological burqa because there is no place for us to feel safe when a woman is in home, in her home by herself and she is attacked. so, let me ask this question, don clark. why are we always talking about modifying the behavior of women? why don't we talk about modifying the behavior of violent criminals? >> jane, i couldn't agree with you more. and whatever that will person just said about corrupt system, corrupt system or not has nothing to do with that type of behavior that causes people to attack and murder somebody in the ways that she is things take place and abuse these women. here's the other thing too is that we also should be proud and happy and try to continue people to enhance the law enforcement capabilities. i mean, with dna, with scientific efforts with, technology and all of these
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things, it is enabling the law enforcement community to reach out beyond their borders and take and try to help solve some of these crimes. >> you raised dna. it will linked vance to another attack, the rape of a teacher 100 miles away. kristin edwards was brutalized in her home in april of 2008. here she is on abc's 20/20. >> knowing that the person hop attacked me was capable of so much more than did he to me as horrible as what happened to me was that it could have been so much worse. >> now, here's the tragedy of this. if they had found the dna, if they had link this had man to the dna sooner in that initial rape, this guy might have been behind bars and unable to attack anne pressly, judge ferrer. that's why i think the system has to give higher priority to rape cases. >> well, i mean, the reality is that there is such a backlog on dna that you know, they can
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barely get the dna done on murder cases to get it ready for trial. i agree with you. it would be great to have the resources because dna is the future. it's the present and future. it is going to convict all these people. but this guy getting on television and saying it's a corrupt system, unfortunately the jurors don't get to see that because that totally plays against the whole picture the defense is making is about oh, poor guy, he was slammed against the wall when he was a child. no, you see him. what he is is a vicious animal. >> i don't want to call him an animal. animals are not responsible for any of this. as an animal protection.ist, i don't like to demonnize animals because of the behavior of human beings. it's a phrase i hate. i hate that phrase. i'm just saying, it's just my thing, okay? diane, minnesota, your question or thought. >> caller: jane, i just wanted to thank you for often addressing the war that the attack that's just being waged on women.
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i just wonder as a society and community, when do we take a stand and say enough is enough and how do we begin to fight back? >> stacy honowitz, that's an excellent point, diane. >> i think that's a great question. i think you've been trying to address that for months now. unfortunately, you know, we do all these cases, we sit here and talk about that you can't be safe anywhere and jane, although you say we try to modify the behavior of women, there is one thing you have to remember. you still do have to try to protect yourself. i'm not saying you shouldn't be safer in your own home. you still do have to take precautions because you see what goes on. i think there needs to be longer sentences when we have violent attacks on women. women have to know they have to come to court if something happens to them so that these guys go away. the reason why they are one of the aggravating factors in seeking the death penalty in this case is the fact that he had that prior vicious attack on the other woman. hopefully they'll be able to get it. >> up next, the steve phillips
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love saga starts a new chapter. his ex-lover saying she's the victim. plus disturbing new developments in the search for somer thorpe son's killer. and we're taking your calls, 1-877-jvm-says. >> i will never thought in my -- in all of my life that i would ever have to -- to do this, be even know anybody. i don't want to see another parent feel empty. i will not sleep until this person is found. nininininininini
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and let's meet today's winner, joe from virginia runs a hardwood floor sanding company and at 64, he still does most that have back breaking work himself. his wife is disabled and he knows, he says he's got to stay seasoner to provide for her. he's going to celebrate 31 years sober tomorrow. way to go, joe. joe says when he was young, not only did he get a coup duis but get this is, got sfoped for riding his horse drunk through town. uh-oh. joe, for your colorful story of recovery, you'll get an ought graphed copy of my new book i want" plus a chance to visit me
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on the set of "issues." i don't know if you can bring your horse, but we'd love to have you. if you are struggling with addiction or nobody somebody who is is, check out my new book spi want." it might be able to help. a little girl kidnapped and murdered on her way home from school. we'll talk to her mom's attorney in a moment, but first top of the block tonight. well, add a new chapter to the steve phillips sexual affair. the former espn sports analyst was fired after caught having an affair with a co-worker. this whole affair blew up when brooke hundley drove had his house to give his wife a letter giving her the details of their relationship spelled out. now hundley is telling abc's "good morning america" she never stalked phillips and instead claims, hey, i'm the victim here. >> i was in a situation where i
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felt like if i didn't do what was asked of me, then everything i had worked for for the past six years, everything i had done to establish myself as a successful media professional could be gone like that. >> hundley went on to say phillips need to grow up. he is in sex rehab. so, she has to, too, as well. i mean come on, let's face it, people, she had sex with a married man and knew it. this story is such a mess all the way around. they can both claim to be victims but phillips' wife and kids are the only real victims and did nothing to deserve this spotlight. that is tonight's "top of the block." turning now to a mother's gut-wrenching hunt for her daughter's killer. somer thompson was murdered three weeks ago, her small body dumped in a georgia landfill. the killer snatched her as she walked home from school. tragically her twin brother and
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sister had been walking with her but somer ran ahead of them. now her devastated mom is not only grieving for somer but trying to reassure her other kids it's not their fault. here she is on nbc's "today" show. >> because i don't know the right words to say. so we pretty much let the counselors handle that. we do talk some, but i never want them to feel any guilt because this is not their fault. >> now, diena is on a crusade to keep her daughter's name in the headlines and completely focused on finding her daughter's killer. she had this message for him. >> i want you to know that i will not sleep until this person is found. i hope they get you. and i hope they make you pay. for a long, long time. >> i think we can all agree with that. i want to hear your theories on this case. give me a call 1-877 oi 8 7 7 1.
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miking fried, thank you so much for joining us. i know you're helping this family that is suffering so much and helping to find the killer, as well. what's the latest on the investigation? i mean, we've been hearing about the con construction workers at the house where somer was last seen. what do you know? >> we know they're making progress. there's not a lot of detail being offered and that's painful for diena and her family but we respect that the clay county sheriff's office is doing a great job than they need to keep that information close to the vest. we do know that they're looking at scientific evidence at this point and sending various information to the labs. and they have not identified as we understand it, any suspects or even people of interest, but we will know that there's people that they're looking at and there's evidence they're looking at to try to tie some of those people to this horrible crime. >> i know this is something you don't want to focus on, neither
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do we. we want to put it to rest once and for all. diena says she's been getting hate mail from people who blame her for letting her daughter walk alone. on the "today" show, she recounted some of these nasty messages. >> basically i should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law for child abuse for letting my children walk. however, in my school district, if you live further or closer than two miles to the school, you have to walk. i live 0.9 miles from the school. >> michael, what is wrong with people? and how is this compounding the suffering that your client is experiencing? >> yeah, well, i mean it, pales in comparison to the outpouring of support and love and you know, just support in every way imaginable that's been there. with that, comes some crazy people and you know, it's not so different from your last story. there's just this penchant in the community and in america to occasionally blame the victims. this is a good family.
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diena is a great mother and she's a single mother whose children walked home from school like a lot of children did, and that certainly doesn't excuse this horrible crime. and doesn't doesn't excuse this horrible crime and doesn't make diena in any way responsible. >> and she was with an older sibling. how are the siblings coping? >> they're doing well. diena's and her family are doing what hey can to make thing as normal as they can be. obviously dealing with, not just the loss, but of course the media and the investigation and the opportunities to be a voice for causes for children. that's a lot of new stuff for someone who was an anonymous, simple person up until this time. and so trying to keep things normal and level for the kids is number one priority for diena and for her parents, who are very helpful and very involved in their life. >> well, i have to say, she has handled this unimaginable situation with utmost courage, utmost grace, everything from
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the moment. i mean you cannot even imagine anybody dealing with this, and yet she's managed to stay strong and speak out and do everything she can to find her daughter's killer. thank you, michael freed. we're going to stay on top of this one. not letting it go. we're going to have more on a mother's search for a killer right after the break.
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watching this broadcast right now and i don't want to tell that suspect what the we're doing. >> understandable. >> but i will tell him this, we're going to come to get him. we're going to find who did this and we're going to bring that fornjustice. >> let's pray that he is right. and an all-out hunt for the killer of little somer, who was doing nothing except walking home from school when her life was taken from her and her family's life shattered. phone lines lighting up. mary jane, new hampshire, your question or thought, ma'am? >> caller: yes. i was wondering if they're checking all possibilities, like
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are they looking into -- besides looking for sex offenders. are they looking for like someone that she knew that's close or a neighbor or anybody in the area that lives around the area? >> well, stacey honowitz, it would seem that it's just like searching for a needle in the hay stack, the possibilities. where do you begin? >> well, listen, i'm not privy to anything that's going on in the investigation but i can tell you in a missing child case, or, for that matter,, any crime, they are taking any lead that they have and going on it. and if it means talking to neighbors, talking to friends, talking to the construction workers, anybody who might have any pertinent information. it is like a needle in a haystack, but very often, you find that little chip and you're able to go on. so hopefully investigating every possible person, any possible contact that this child might have had with anybody out dollar. >> now we're also wondering if somer's murderer had killed before. john walsh the host of "america's most wanted" thinks there could be a link to to a
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string of kidnappings years ago. jacksonville, the site of those cold cases. walsh referred to. is about seven miles from orange park, where somer was kidnapped. police say they've interviewed nearly 100 sex offenders in the area but have no leads. judge ferara, what do you think of the theory that the murderer who maybe who has killed years ago and is starting back up again? >> i think it's a very solid theory and i respect john walsh to no end. i think that he's absolutely right. people don't usually step up to you plate in their majorlies for their first kidnapping/murder of a child. it usually builds from other events and usually get away from it and it emboldens them and try it again. and also the strength, the possibility, that somebody who knew the child because it make it a lot easier to get the child into the car in that way but i am sure that the police are all over both of those. >> you know i have to say every time i cover a case like this and we always talk about, well, there's not enough money funding on a prevention side. it just blows my mind. i mean stacey honowitz, if we had more cameras, we would solve
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half these cases right off of the bat because we could say, okay, a vehicle was in that area at that time and we know how many vehicles left that area. and i think the time has come to really just saturate the country with cameras because we would solve half of these crimes. >> well, you make a fabulous argument. we argued this a couple of weeks ago with the issue this happened at school dance when the girl was gang raped and the girl had lobbied the school to have cameras there so that we could see what was going on and until you do these types of shows like you're doing every single night and get these cases on the news, because we just cover a couple of main -- big media cases. there are cases every single day. missing children where they're looking for people. and you're right, if we the funding, if we had the equipment, then certainly cameras being out there would lead the investigators without being a needle a haystack. putting money into prevention is really imperative at this point.
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>> leave it right there. let's put money into the prevention as or posed to after the fact. you're watching "issues" on hln.
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