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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 19, 2016 3:00am-4:01am PST

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breaking news. zaza gabor dead at 99. we remember the hungarian beauty who took hollywood by storm. >> winter jumps the gun. the last weekend of autumn ends with subzero temperatures and blasts of deadly ice and snow. >> also tonight, tragedy at a california park. as a tree falls on a wedding party taking pictures. >> i helped pull a lady out. the mother of the bride. >> and the electoral college prepares for tomorrow's final vote. with trump electors under pressure to flip their votes. >> the entire nonsense about the electors trying to use the russian hacking issue to change the election results is really unfortunate.
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♪ ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. hollywood mourning the death of zaza gabor. the hungarian american actress and socialite passed away on sunday. she was 99 years old. ben tracy looks back at a life story made for hollywood. >> what is wrong with me? other than finding love and happiness, i find only -- >> but you find it so often. >> reporter: zaza gabor seemed to know what she wanted. sunny parlayed her beauty as miss hungary to win over hollywood. >> what sort of men are they? >> over 40 years she appeared in more than 40 films and 40 tv shows, everything from "gilligan's island." >> are you a blond under 25?
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>> she seemed most comfortable plague herself on game shows, and in films, a very brady sequel and in a beverly hills courtroom. in 1989, zaza was sentenced to 72 hours behind bars for slapping a police officer during a routine traffic stop. >> i can't not listen to all those lies. i just scan not listen. >> reporter: zaza wrote the script on being famous for simply being famous the a role now played by paris hilton. in fact, zaza was once married to hilton's great grandfather, conrad hilton, the hotel magnate. one of her nine husbands. >> this is a famous painting from a russian artist, whose name i can never pronounce. zaza equipped she was a good housekeeper after every di vrs she kept the house. the last few years were difficult. car accident in 2802, and hitch replacement at 93 left her in frail health. now that she is gone, zaza will not be forgotten. after all, she was always larger than life. ben tracy, cbs news, los
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angeles. another big story tonight is the arctic air. howling from the midwesto the east. it follows a deadly wave of ice and snow that swept the country over the weekend. here's jamie yuccas. >> reporter: this united plane slid off the run way at chicago o'hare airport early sunday. wintry weather canceled hundreds of flights there this weekend forcing some to sleep at the airport. steep herbert was trying to get to las vegas. >> our trip got pushed back two hours and four hours, now canceled. icy roads caused at least 200 car crashes in the indianapolis area this weekend. two people were killed. in baltimore, authorities are still trying to clean up after one of the worst accidents in the city's history. [ bleep ]. more than 60 vehicles and a tanker were involved in a pileup that killed two and injured dozens. >> yo! jesus christ, yo.
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>> didn't know what was going on on the road. >> this man recorded this cell phone video on the i-95. >> once it hit the guardrails or the shoulder it caught on fire. and flipped over. and, and, dropped. >> it was one of the coldest home games ever for the chicago bears. with a wind chill of 3 below zero. the record was set in 2008 with the temperature of 13 below. in kansas city, fans braved a wind chill of negative 5 degrees. the vikings and the colts played inside. but cold weather didn't stop tail gaters like michael. >> staying warm? >> not really. my beard froze. >> reporter: eric wore four lay tires plain being bag toss. >> people in florida watching going no thank you. >> either call us brave or stupid. probably a mix of both. >> mark nelson kept warm by makingburgers. >> if you can survive this, you can survive anything. yeah, works out great. >> it got so cold in minneapolis
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today, this ice skating rink was forced to close. some areas of the twin cities saw low temperatures as cold as 30 degrees below zero. elaine, that means frostbite can settle in in less than ten minutes. >> jamie yuccas, thank you. monday, the 538 members of the electoral college meet in state capitols across the country to formally elect the next president. last month, president elect trump, won 306 electoral votes. well over the 270 needed to win the white house. but he lost the popular vote by 2.8 million votes. the recent debate over russian hacking and how much it influenced the election put the electoral college in a new spotlight this year with trump electors under pressure to change their final volts. >> reporter: when americans cass their ballots last month they technically voted for members of the electoral college asewsed
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pew thto then vote for the candidate. in texas where trump's victory over hillary clinton theoretically won 38 electors one says not so fast. >> the first time in america's history where we have some one clearly unfit for office. chris supran the only republican electoral to publicly say he won't vote for mr. trump. >> i see my role a little look a jury, or a judge and jury, where the jury made a decision. but judges can set ate side. and, unfortunately, i feel that's my responsibility this time. >> reporter: since the election democratic activists have tried to pressure other electors to flip. some offering free legal help and petition on change.org has gotten nearly 5 million signatures. when it comes to laws governing how look tors vote, the constitution leaves its in state's hands. texas among the 21 states that lets electors vote as they wish. 29 states plus d.c. have rules binding electors. the punishments however are
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misdemeanors, carrying fines up to $1,000. and despite the heightened passions of 2016, new york university law professor, richard pildis says not to expect a constitutional crisis come monday. >> individual electors do go their own way. there are about 115 occasions or so in american history that's the case. but never to the point where -- it's been systematic enough to change the outcome. >> mr. trump would need to lose 37 electors to swing this election. while that is highly doubtful, if it even were to happen, the election would head to the house of representatives, where republicans are in control. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. ,,,,,,,,
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♪ here is my handle and here is my spout. ♪ ♪ when i get all steamed up then i shout! ♪ ♪ tip me over ♪ ♪ and pour me out. ♪ it only takes a moment to make a moment. cheers, pinkies out. take time to be a dad today. [tires screech] [car horn beeps] [texting keystrokes]
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on face the nation, the president elect's senior adviser, kellyanne conway said efforts to use the russian hacking issue to change the result, undermine our democracy. errol barnett has more on the controversy overshadowing the trump transition. >> the campaign is over. this man is the president. >> on cbs, president elect donald trump's transition adviser, kellyanne conway called for proof of the hacking during the elect tuion to be made publ. >> if there is evidence, let's see it. >> not much happens without vladamir putwin. >> before departing, president obama said a conclusive report on the hacks is due by trump's inauguration. >> we will provide evidence that
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we can safely provide. that does not compro is my sources and methods. >> the assessment from the cia, fbi and director of national intelligence, found the e-mail accounts of democrats, were hacked to in flfluence the elecn including those of john podesta. he wondered to day how much the trump campaign knew. >> one of trump's foreign policy advisers went to russia. so i think really, not, what mr. trump knew, but what did trump inc. know and when did they know it. >> reporter: mr. trump's chief of staff said the leaks made no difference. >> let's assume it is true. no evidence the outcome of the election was changed because of a couple of dozen, john podestae drk mails out there. >> john mccain called for a bipartisan subcommittee investigation into russian hacking. well, today, elaine he went
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further, recommending a cyberwarfare select committee because of what he called a lack of strategy in combatting such attacks. >> errol barnett. thank you. police in little rock, arkansas, are searching for a man who shot and killed a 3-year-old boy in an alleged road rage incident. police say the boy was shopping with his grandmother yesterday, they were at a stop sign when another driver got out of his car. apparently angry that they were slowing him down. and opened fire. the boy died at the hospital. >> it was a wedding day tragedy near los angeles yesterday. family and friend were taking pictures in a park when a tree crashed down on them. one person was killed. mireya villarreal has the the latest. >> dude, i watched this thing collapse. on a whole wedding party. >> reporter: in an instant the joyous occasion turned into tragedy. >> two minutes later this tree we hear it collapse. i helped pull a lady out. the mother of the bride. >> reporter: witnesses like the man who shot this video tried to save people, trapped underneath
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the giant eucalyptus tree until emergency responders arrived. firefighters used chainsaws to clear branchers so rescuers could reach victims pinned underneath. the wedding party watched from a sidewalk. one woman's dress stained with blood. >> i got multiple victims. i have hey child. that is about 4 years old rounsiroun unresponsive. that 4-year-old girl was transferred to a nearby hospital in critical condition. l.a. county deputy fire chief, john tripp. >> we have seen this happen throughout southern california. drought conditions. trees are stressed. some reason that that tree failed. >> reporter: firefighters believe recent rainfall in california may have contributed to the tree collapse. the city has hired an arborist who will come in for the next few days examine what is left of the tree. the park will be closed until all trees have been examine ford
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safety reasons. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. recent survey of more than 1800 airline pilots found more than one in ten may be dealing with depression. the harvard university study says some pilots even reported having suicidal thoughts. here is transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> pilots identify with -- their job, with who they, it is a part of us. >> reporter: in 2008, airline pilot collin hughes said he made the decision to ground himself after being scribed depressants. he told us he is flying again but says depression is still a topic the industry doesn't look to talk about. >> pilots are people too. we have feelings and emotions just look everyone else. >> reporter: new research found 12% of airline pilots surveyed met the flesh hold for clinical depression. 4% admit to having suicidal thoughts. >> the current system is set up and designed all around krefl report. >> harvard university professor,
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joseph allen worked on the study published in the journal "environmental health." >> for many of us, people in the general population they can seek treatment or counseling. whereas pilots, if they do so, they run the risk of severe impacts to their career. >> seeking treatment or pa pilot being grounded.esult in since 2015, the faa started working with airlines and pilots union to increase the understanding of mental health issues in the symptoms while trying to reduce the stigma of self reporting while improving treatment options. butter use look depression, are believed to remain underreported. >> pilots not fit to fly should not fly. we need to make pathways for them to come back to work when their issues are resolved. >> sully sullenberger is a cbs news, aviation and safety expert. sullenberger worked to reduce the stigma of mental health issues after his father took his own life after a battle with depression.
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>> i probably have flown with some one. self reporting is important. >> the faa stopped short of issuing routine psychological screening for pilots. the trade group representing the airlines declined to comment. airline pilots association stresses air travel is still the safest form of transportation. kris van cleave, cbs news, reagan national airport, virginia. up next, reducing the amount of wasted food by cutting the confusion caused by labels. ♪ the itsy bitsy spider went up the waterspout. down came the rain and clogged the gutter system creating a leak in the roof. luckily the spider recently had geico help him with homeowners insurance. water completely destroyed his swedish foam mattress. he got full replacement and now owns the sleep number bed.
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his sleep number setting is 25. call geico and see how much you could save on homeowners insurance. can this much love be cleaned by a little bit of dawn ultra? oh yeah one bottle has the grease cleaning power of two bottles of this bargain brand. a drop of dawn and grease is gone.
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that cough doesn't sound so good. well i think you sound great. move over. easy booger man. take mucinex dm. it'll take care of your cough. fine! i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! ah! david, please, listen. still not coughing.
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not fair you guys! waffles are my favorite! ah! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. this past week the u.s. department of agriculture released food labelling guidelines aimed at reducing the good food that threats thrown out because people think it has gone bad. here is majerle hall. >> just about every package product in the grocery store has a date on it. some say best by, used by or sell by. >> a date with no word. >> sasha staswick with the resource council says nine out of ten shoppers are skun fused by the different dates. >> the average family is throwing away about 1,500 a year in food that is perfectly good
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to eat. >> to clear up confusion, the u.s. department of agriculture now wants just one label. best if used by. it is asking egg, meat and dairy manufacturers, to use it. >> the grocery manufacturers association would not say if they plan to adopt the label. they did tell us the food and consumer products industry is committed to providing consumers with the information to make informed decision for the safety and quality of the product they purchase and consume. current labels and the new best if used by stamp are not an expiration date. >> typically those dates are just a manufacturer's best guess. at when that food will be at its peak quality. they're really not indicator of the safety of the food. she says, many foods if stored properly can last longer. milk a week past the printed date. eggs can still be good three to five weeks after you buy them. >> 2017.
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>> this shopper uses her own senses to determine if something has gone bad. >> by smell. you look inside the container. if it starts getting moldy. guess what? time to throw it out. cuts down on food waste. and, saves her money. majerle hall, cbs news, new york. still ahead, have researchers discovered the secret to a longer life? ugh, it's only lunchtime
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and my cold medicines' wearing off. i'm dragging. yeah, that stuff only lasts a few hours. or, take mucinex. one pill fights congestion for 12 hours. no thank you very much, she's gonna stick with the short-term stuff. 12 hours? guess i won't be seeing you for a while. is that a bisque? i just lost my appetite. why take medicines that only last 4 hours, when just one mucinex lasts 12 hours? start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. you love the soft feel when you take care of them. and at amopé we love it too. but that annoying hard skin just keeps coming back. and always way, way, way too soon. no matter what you do. amopé presents pedi perfect... a new level of hard skin removal. it removes hard skin thoroughly yet effortlessly and reveals the silkiest smoothness you can rely on. because it lasts, and lasts, and lasts. this holiday season give the gift of long lasting smoothness. amopé. love every step.
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new study in the british medical journal find the more you enjoy life the longer you may live. here is terry okita. >> with christmas fast approaching, ted rodgers is preparing for a gift exchange. quality time with family and friends. >> that makes me happy. i mean -- keeps a little bit younger i think. rodgers may be right. a new study suggests a link between sustained life enjoyment and longevity. >> what we found is that older men and women who enjoy their lives for a longer period of time are likely to survive into old age than those who enjoy their lives less. >> a team at university college london followed nearly 10,000 men and women, aged 50 and older more than a decade. they found 24% rarely or never experienced enjoyment. about 40% said they were hostly happy. and when the two groups were compared the death rate for the
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positive participants dropped by almost 25%. more women than men reported sustained enjoyment as did people who were married, well educated, wealthier, younger, and employed. researchers found making and maintaining social relationships are keys to living longer. >> relationships are things you have to invest in, work at them, and, this will pay off in the longer run as you get older. >> ted rodgers can attest to that. he leaned on his family during a recent battle with cancer. and kept a positive outlook. >> you look forward. and you have to think, there is always hope. around the corner. >> at 68, rodgers formula for a long, happy life. terry okita, cbs news, london. when we return, something sweet is cooking in collette's kitchen. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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when jim axelrod is working an investigation for cbs news. he is one tough cookie. we close with a young woman whose story brought out his sweet side. >> reporter: like any other budding entrepreneur, she guards her proprietary information quite carefully. >> this is the recipe. >> it is. >> secret? >> yes it is. >> we can't. >> no. >> but collette, born 26 years ago with down in syndrome is no like any other entrepreneur. >> it's your dream. >> her kitchen always made her happy. but when she kept getting rejected for jobs she decided it was going to make her money. and her cookies was born.
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>> schchocolate chips and money. >> money, honey. >> rosemary alfredo is her mother. >> i think all that rejection for her made her say, i'll show them. >> so there she was a couple weeks ago, selling 100 cookies a week at the golden goose. >> give me a smooch. whose owner, steve deangeles was the only grocer to give her shelf space. >> the entrepreneur started a cookie business. >> reporter: then the cbs station ran a story that went viral. now she has to fill 4,000ed or orders from around the country with a dozen per order, collette has to bake 50,000 cookies. >> we have to scoop it. and pat it down look this. >> reporter: the commonwealth kitchen, nonprofit business incubator stepped in to help her scale up. and colette is closer to her real dream. your successful company will be
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a model for other people with disabilities. >> exactly. >> if colette can do it. they can do it. >> reporter: turns out the secret ingredient she bakes into her cookies is not such a mystery after all. its the secret ingredient you have been protecting so much, is it love? >> yes it is. always, always been love. >> it is good. it's strong. >> which makes both the cookies and the special young woman baking them. about as sweet as they come. >> that was so good. >> yes. >> jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >> and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the brought cast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. the 538 members of the electoral college meet today in state capitals across the country to formally elect the next president. last month, president-elect trump won 306 electoral votes. well over the 270 needed to win the white house. but he lost the popular vote by 2.8 million votes. the recent debate over russian hacking and how much it influenced the election has put the electoral college in a new spotlight this year. with trump look tore electors pressure to change their final votes. >> when americans cast their ballots last month they
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technically voted for members of the electoral college supposed to then vote for the candidate who won their state. their ballots last month they technically voted for members of the electoral college asewsed to then vote for the candidate. in texas where trump's victory over hillary clinton theoretically won 38 electors one says not so fast. >> the first time in america's history where we have some one clearly unfit for office. chris supran the only republican electoral to publicly say he won't vote for mr. trump. >> i see my role a little look a jury, or a judge and jury, where the jury made a decision. but judges can set ate side. and, unfortunately, i feel that's my responsibility this time. >> reporter: since the election democratic activists have tried to pressure other electors to flip. some offering free legal help and petition on change.org has gotten nearly 5 million signatures. when it comes to laws governing how look tors vote, the constitution leaves its in state's hands. texas among the 21 states that
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lets electors vote as they wish. 29 states plus d.c. have rules binding electors. the punishments however are misdemeanors, carrying fines up to $1,000. and despite the heightened passions of 2016, new york university law professor, richard pildis says not to expect a constitutional crisis come monday. >> individual electors do go their own way. there are about 115 occasions or so in american history that's the case. but never to the point where -- it's been systematic enough to change the outcome. >> mr. trump would need to lose 37 electors to swing this election. while that is highly doubtful, if it even were to happen, the election would head to the house of representatives, where republicans are in control. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. on face the nation, the president elect's senior adviser, kellyanne conway said efforts to use the russian hacking issue to change the result, undermine our democracy. errol barnett has more on the controversy overshadowing the
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trump transition. >> the campaign is over. this man is the president. >> on cbs, president elect donald trump's transition adviser, kellyanne conway called for proof of the hacking during the election to be made public. >> if there is evidence, let's see it. >> not much happens without vladamir putwin. >> before departing, president obama said a conclusive report on the hacks is due by trump's inauguration. >> we will provide evidence that we can safely provide. that does not compro is my sources and methods. >> the assessment from the cia, fbi and director of national intelligence, found the e-mail accounts of democrats, were hacked to influence the election including those of john podesta. he wondered to day how much the trump campaign knew. >> one of trump's foreign policy
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advisers went to russia. so i think really, not, what mr. trump knew, but what did trump inc. know and when did they know it. >> reporter: mr. trump's chief of staff said the leaks made no difference. >> let's assume it is true. no evidence the outcome of the election was changed because of a couple of dozen, john podestae drk mails out there. >> john mccain called for a bipartisan subcommittee investigation into russian hacking. well, today, elaine he went further, recommending a cyberwarfare select committee because of what he called a lack of strategy in combatting such attacks. >> errol barnett. more now on the russian election hack. kel kellyanne conway discussed it on facing the nation. >> the entire nonsense about the electors trying to use the russian hacking issue to change
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the election results is unfortunate. i think that actually undermines our democracy more than any other conversation that we are having right now. >> mr. trump is skeptical the russians were involved. leaving aside the question of whether it affected the election or not. you have the cia, fbi director of national intelligence, number of republicans saying it is clear that the russians hacked. that just is a basic premise is clear. mr. trump since late september has said that he doesn't think that's the case. he still says that now. what does he know that all intelligence officers don't know. >> john, where is the evidence? why when cia officials were invited to a house intelligence briefing did they refuse to go. they're talking to the media. that undermines our national security and intelligence operations >> does he himself having evidence that suggests this isn't the case? >> well the president elect receives intelligence briefings that i am not privy to. let's focus on -- on the issue at hand which is if the cia,
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director brennan and others at the top are serious about turning over evidence to we the american people. they should do that. they should show up when the house intelligence committee invites them to brief them. but you know that is a closed door meeting not so exciting and tantalizing you can't leak it to the media. they should not be liking to the media. if there is evidence. let's see it. i would note, president obama himself the other day stopped short of sag what many pundits on tv are saying. they would have no idea. sure they don't get intelligence briefings. tell you what unintelligence briefing we know is. hillary clinton and her team spent $1.2 billion. lost an election they should have within. didn't seep us co us coming. got help from people in the media trying to fight the last r wa. >> we are not going to get any insight into the president elect's thinking here. let's try this. did anyone involved in the trump campaign have any contact with russians trying to meddle with the election? >> absolutely not. i discuss that with the president elect just last night. the conversations never happened
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the i hear people saying it like it is a fact on television. that is just not only inaccurate and false it is dangerous. >> does the president elect -- approve of president obama's decision to retal yalt against the russians for, for hacking into the election? >> the president elect respects the ability of president obama to do what he sees necessary in, in any different, any number of different arenas. it does seem to be a political response at this point. seems like the president is under pressure from team hillary who can't accept the election results. >> sorry, kellyanne -- i want to understand, you said the president is retaliating because he is doing it for political not national security reasons? >> john, what i am saying is that the president elect respects the ability of, right of president obama to do what he wants. he is the president for the next several weeks. we believe in sanctions that work. not just sanctions for sanctions sake. it its very clear that president obama could have "retaliated"
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monthed ago if they were concerned about this and kurn serkurn looking for balance in your digestive system? try align probiotic. for a non-stop, sweet treat goodness, hold on to your tiara kind of day. get 24/7 digestive support, with align. the #1 doctor recommended probiotic brand. now in kids chewables. that cough doesn't sound so good. well i think you sound great. move over. easy booger man. take mucinex dm. it'll take care of your cough. fine! i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! ah! david, please, listen. still not coughing. not fair you guys! waffles are my favorite! ah! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. start the relief. ditch the misery. let's end this. thope to see you again soon.. whoa, whoa, i got this. just gotta get the check.
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triple am estimates that 94 million americans will hit the road this holiday week. as dean reynolds reports, they're likely to find more >> at the marathon service station in naperville, illinois, gasoline prices are cause for concern. >> well they have definitely gone up. >> jody is bracing for what's down the road. >> it will impact us. we are dprieriving to iowa for christmas. so we are definitely going to feel it. >> in naperville, the price of a gallon has risen between 20 and 3 cents in over two weeks. patrick dehan is senior petroleum analyst at gas buddi.com. >> what's going on with gas prices? >> they're headed north in every community across the country. starting to see gas prices go
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up. >> bay city, michigan, up 42 cents. evansville, indiana, up 33 cents. lake county, illinois, up 31 cents. 39 cities across the country. up 25 cents in the last month. the reason is classic sa play and demand. opec, the oil producing cartel, decided to cut production last month. and because less supply means greater demand. prices at the pump started rising. but for the last couple of years, opec had been going in the opposite direction. overproducing and driving prices down. hoping lower profit would eventually price american suppliers out of the market. but the u.s. producers in north dakota, texas and louisiana, have proven far more resilient than opec anticipated. so, now, opec's influence is diminishing. >> u.s. producers will turn the key. that will act to limit oil prices from increasing too high. >> for now the expectation of
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oil market experts is that gasoline prices will probably rise gradually well into 2017 and could reach as high as $3 a gallon in some areas. saw. >> the roulette wheels are spinning in las vegas's first new casino in five years. lucky dragon caters to the growing flood of asian tourists. one chinese air lane has even begun the first nonstop flights from beijing to las vegas. john blackstone reports. >> lucky dragon hotel and casino isn't as much as east meets west, as east comes west. at the edge of the las vegas strip. >> trying to do something authentically for our asian guests. it is a very steady and -- growing group of customers that come here. >> reporter: the chief operating officer says while other ka see nose on the strip have long courted high rollers from asia, lucky dragon is aiming to win over china's growing middle-class. which is now beginning to travel. >> it is the largest growing
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international travel market on the planet. we want to be part of that. >> reporter: the first new ka see know to open in six years. the hotel its betting the new nonstop flights from bay sthng to las vegas will bring a surge in tourism. according to the department of commerce, in 2015, nearly 2.6 million chinese travelers visited the u.s. by 2020, that number is estimated to grow to 5 million. while other vegas hotels have lavish theaters, featuring famous entertainers, the hottest acts at lucky dragon are in the show kitchen. here they make authentic chinese cuisine, which often bears little resemblance to the chinese food americans are accustomed to. >> it is very authentic. >> yes. >> instead of show girls, this ka see kn ka s casino has dragons. symbol of good fortune. the casino bar is eight sided.
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also a seen of good fortune. what are the odds at any casino in las strvegas, bloody mary wo come withchicken foot. a delicacy in china. take a chance. instead of cocktails, chinese prefer tea. so the hotel offers traditional tea service. >> you are from china? >> absolutely, yes. >> she now lives in las vegas. >> style, design, people so nice. >> the department of commerce estimates chinese travelers spend 6,000 to 7,000 per person per trip. ranking the chinese as the highest spending group of international visitors. lucky dragon isn't alone in trying to cash in on the chinese travel boom. a malaysian company has plans to develop resort world las vegas. and an enormous asian themed hotel and casino complex scheduled to open in 2019. while lucky dragon is designed to attract asian tourists in
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particular, the hotel also figures other visitors to vegas will find some adventure here. and they want to step out of their comfort zone hand have an experience. >> reporter: while much about the vn up en up is authenticall asian. when you've got an uncontrollable cough, take delsym, the #1 12-hour cough medicine. it helps control the impulse to cough for 12 hours. which means, you're controlling your cough on your morning commute. and later when you're joking with beth... even when most cough medicines stop, delsym is still working. ♪ and when your days' over, your cough is still under control. thanks to the #1 12-hour cough medicine. delsym. the cough controller.
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a vintage plane that helped win world war ii is back in the skies. lee cowen has the story of the man who brought the b-29 silver ghost become to life. >> this particular airplane is the last restorable b-29 in the world. >> a b-29. sleek, silver goil ghost of wor ii. a bomber that haunted and obsessed tony nearly three decades. >> part of the greatest generation. we want to keep the memories alive. >> swarms of b-29s, and task forces carry destruction to the japanese homeland. >> reporter: neck named the super fortress. the b-29, the most advanced bomber in the world at the time. >> one day, august 5, 1945, one b-29 left on a special mission. >> the most famous of course, was the enola gay. >> dropped the first asttomic
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bomb. tony was a flight engineer on a b-29 during the korean war. and then, the jet age had nearly rendered the legendary bomber obsolete. those who hadn't been lost in comb battle were usually scrapped. or sent to the china lake naval weapons center in the california mojave desert. where the once proud bombers were used for target practice. >> they were just millions of pieces. >> reporter: kind of undignified end. >> it is to quite an historic aircraft. >> reporter: everyone told tony any b-29 worth saving had been saved already. there were none left. >> but they were wrong. >> i could see the silhouette on the horizon getting larger and larger. and my, my heartbeat was getting faster and faster. >> reporter: out in that desert bone yard he found a b-29 named
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doc. defiantly, inexplicably stillen one piece. as if it had never given of the will to fly. it was a sanctuary for some of the desert birds. and critters. you know. with the help of a few dozen bomber buffs, slowly, peace by giant peace, it was shipped back to the former boeing plant in wichita, kansas. >> they were building the mightiest aircraft in history. >> the very same plant where doc rolled off these assembly lines back in 1945. >> my mother, father, grandmother all worked on the. -- them. my mom started the day after she turned 16 years old. >> an airplane mek canning from a long line of b-29 mechanics. and doc became his patient. >> forced turning.
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his job wasn't just to make the plane a static displayen a museum. no, what he had to do seemed impossible. to get doc flying again. and they kept coming. >> out towards the wing. by the hundreds. >> i think we are in now. >> we probably some of these things here. >> reporter: some older than doc itself. like, connie palasio. >> kind of hard to believe that i would be here. >> at 91. connie is one of the original rosie the riveters who worked here at the boeing plant during
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world war ii. in fact, she put the rivets in doc herself. >> from that section down to hear. >> all those are yours? >> uh-huh. >> they're still as the good as the day sunny put them there. >> yeah, really proud of this plane. mae it means a lot to me. >> connie and the rest of the volunteers, known collectively as doc's friends, spent hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours. and hundreds of thousand of donated dollars to get doc ready for its hometown debut. after it was rescued. few were as awe-struck as army corps veteran, charles chauncey. 92. a former b-29 pilot. >> i don't know how many are left of us. but it is getting pretty small.
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>> reporter: he flew 35 missions over japan. >> what does it feel look when you are in there and start up all four engines. >> noisy. it was the day of doc's first test flight. and it finally arrived. and the air in wichita was thick with nervous anticipation. i'll be right up. smart -- >> yeah. >> tony, chaupsy, everybody was there. connie too. appropriately dressed as rosie. >> just hope everything goes okay.
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as doc lumbered by, there were more than a few tears. >> wonderful day. >> tony joined connie at the end of the runway to wait. >> just thrilled to death. and to watch. it had been 60 years since the plane left the ground. and then -- it happened. >> if the's up! it's up! >> that's all tony could say. >> it's up, by god, it's up. >> tony had done it. there it was. a b-29, back among the clouds. a tangible piece of flying history. but tony's real gift was to veterans.
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like chauncey. who quietly, away from all of the pomp and circumstance, said,
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we end with uniformed officers and an undercover santa to preserve and protect the spirit of the season. here's steve hartman. >> reporter: this week the kansas city police department was on the take. each officer in this room got at least $1,000. courtesy of the anonymous wealthy businessman i know only as secret santa. >> this is the day for you to just have fun. >> we ready to roll? all right. >> their assignment was to go into the community stand fiend people who could look like they could use an extra hundred this season. people like gwendolyn jones. >> told my family we are not going to do christmas this year. i don't have the money to diet. >> reporter: didn't have the money to do it.
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until now. and that's how it went. benjamin after benjamin. armed assault after wonderful armed assault. most of the people they just happened upon. but some they sought out. officer james turny knew of a homeless woman, staying at the hotel with her two young children. >> hi, crystal. >> in fact, turny is paying for their room out of his own pocket. >> here is $1,000. yeah. he gave her everything. >> you make me a better person. >> thank you. >> there are men and women, that wear the badge, and they stay on the line to protect us and serve. >> no coincidence, secret santa chose the kansas city kansas police department to give away his money this year. from around here. this relatively small department, lost two officers in the line of duty. just ten weeks apart. allowing them this privilege was meant as a reminder, of the
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inherent goodness in people. >> it's really neat. they see that you are a human being too. just look them. and, i think the uniform goes away. and, you just realize that we're ought same people. and that's the gift to me. for this. >> oh, baby. >> reporter: in the end the officers gave out nearly $30,000 to random strangers and special causes. >> thank you so much. >> absolutely. >> those on the receiving end will no doubt have a merrier christmas. while those who gave it away got to keep something each better. a message. for a happier new year. >> we have angels in the heaven. but here, you are the angels, you can, you can touch us. >> reporter: you can take that to the bank. steve hartman, on the road, in kansas city, kansas. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm elaine quijano. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, december 19th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." sealing the deal. today, the electoral college casts its vote for president. the last-minute long shot attempts to block donald trump's election. having a grown-up in the white house who can say to you in times of crisis and turmoil, hey, it's going to be okay. >> first lady michelle obama and her hopes for the future. more from her final interview in the white house. and as evacuees finally escape the atrocities in aleppo,

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