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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 9, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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a treacherous journey to safety. in thailand, four boys are now free and recovering at a hospital. but the rescue mission is on hold as crews reset, leaving the other eight boys and their coach anxiously waiting. also tonight, a diver who specializes in rescue missions explains just how complicated the operation is. >> you can't make a horror movie that would even compare. >> and the rush by president trump's legal team to resolve a possible interview with special counsel robert mueller before paul manafort or michael flip. >> i have no concerns that michael cohen is going to do anything but tell the than 70
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wildfires burning in the western states, but the weather is cooperating, allowing firefighters to get many under control. and one of the victims of the newspaper shooting in annapolis, maryland is being remembered as a hero. how wendi winters charged the shooter and saved many lives. welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. officials in thailand say the operation to rescue the 12 boys and their coach is going better than expected. so far, four boys have been taken out of that flooded cave. officials say they were chosen to go first because they are the healthiest. in this photo, emergency personnel are taking one of the boys to the helicopter on the left. there were several ambulances at the scene. emergency personnel were lined up ready to help. the ambulances later arrived at a hospital in chang rye. ben tracy isesm eave are
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nore in thealted the next threee days. this is also where they will be reunited with their families. as soon as they got out of the cave, they were first put on helicopters and air lifted from the scene. they were then transferred to ambulances and brought here to this hospital where they will be medically evaluated. now, the head of this rescue operation says that all of this went very smoothly, that it went better than they had even expected. he said that now the next part of the operation is is that they have to go back into the cave. they have to replace all of the oxygen tanks that line the evacuation route so they can do this again. keep in mind they have four boys out of the cave, but there are still eight boys left in there, plus their soccer coach. they tell us that roughly within the next ten hours we could see the next batch of young boys come out of that cave if everything goes smoothly. so, so far so good. they feel verynt tha they he go
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first phase of this operation, but they know there is a lot of work to do and they say they are still racing time and the weather because they don't want that cave to flood again before they get everyone out. elaine? >> ben tracy, thank you. meg oliver spoke with the cave diving expert about why the thai rescue mission is considered one of the most complicated ever. >> reporter: after more than two weeks trapped in this dark cave, eight boys and their soccer coach are waiting their turn for the risky escape. >> this is the most scary situation that i think a person could go y c'take a horror movie that would even compare a iolver 30 yhinkofhat was >> reporter: the path out is a dangerous one. 13 foreign and five thai dafrs have to navigate tight passage
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ways filled with murky water and strong currents. two will accompany one child as they stick to a cave line that stretches the entire mile and a half distance. divers have trained the boys with scuba equipment for the areas they must swim under water for extended periods. >> the trust factor between the children and the divers is probably 90% of what gets them out of the cave. >> reporter: an international team has taken shifts, bringing them food, medical supplies, and comforting letters from their parents. >> the good news is the first phase was successful. they had an opportunity to show it works, it's still dangerous but much better odds for the remaining kids to come out now because of the initial ones. >> reporter: after pumping out water for days experts say the window to rescue the boys is closing and it is now or never. it's possible that everyone could be rescued within 48
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hours. >> such a perilous operation. meg oliver, thank you. president trump's legal team is once again attacking special counsel robert mueller's investigation. they are also saying t this is a cbs news special report. i'm john dickerson in new york. multiple sources say a second rescue operation at the cave complex in northern thailand has just brought another boy to the surface. the rescue came several hours after divers resumed their effort to lead eight boys and their soccer coach out of the cave. ben tracy is outside the cave in chiang rai, thailand, where more rain is adding to the urgency of the r ben, good morning. >> reporter: john, so there's been considerable activity at the cave site within the last
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hour and a couple of eyewitnesses say they have seen a boy on a stretcher taken out of the cave now being treated on site at field hospital that has been set up and is set to soon board a helicopter. he'll go to a hospital. he'll join the others who were rescued from the cave last night. if this is another boy, this would be the fifth one coming out of the cave and this would be ahead of schedule. the authorities told us they started this operation a couple of hours ago and we should expect good news about four hours from now. so they're clearly ahead of schedule if this is another one of the boys. we'll have to make sure that is the case. all indications are the fifth boy has been rescued from the cave and we're also hearing from ourix b islose exiting the cave is call
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chamber 3 inside the cave. the significance of that is that weather is cooperating here. there's no heavy rain. so the cave is not flooding anymore. they're trying to take every opportunity they can to take every opportunity they can while they have weather like this because that operation is much safer when water and rain is not pouring into that cave. john? >> ben, remind us again if there was a delay, how bad it could get, and also do you know anything about the order in which the boys are being taken out? >> reporter: in terms of if there was a delay, if there are monsoon rains and flooding would beheld have to shut down this operation or this operation becomes extremely dangerous. so you could have the situation you have the remaining people in there, let's say it's five or since and the soccer coach, they're then cut off from this operatnd there's no sense
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of knowing how long that could last because these rains in thailand could go on for days and that could only go on for days. they're on a small pete of real estate right now. if it floods again, it could get as small as 100 feet. they're trying to amp up this operation today. they've added five more divers to this team of elite divers that's going in there to rescue these boys. so the fact that the fifth one is out or appearing to be out could be a sign that putting more resources in there is really quickening the pace of this operation here, john. >> all right, ben. good news. thanks so much. we'll have much more from thailand on "cbs this morning" starts at 7:00 a.m., and our coverage will continue throughout the day on your local cbs news station. exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being
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overnight news. >> the president says he will be introducing his supreme court nominee monday evening. jeff glor will anchor our live coverage of that announcement right here on cbs at 9:00 eastern time.
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exposed to the nerve agent o novichok has died. 44-year-old dawn sturgis and her partner were hospitalized in aims bury last week. charlie remains in critical condition. novichok was made in the soviet union during the cold war. british officials believe the two were exposed after an ex-russian spy and his daughter were attacked in march. now to the wildfires in the west. more than 2300 firefighters are battling a huge blaze on the california/oregon border. there are currently 60 wielz fires burning across the western states. here's manuel. >> reporter: the fast-moving fire near the oregon border has now destroyed 72 structures and is threatening hundreds more as it spreads over 30,000 acres. the flames killed one person and injured two firefighters including brandon feller, who
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suffered severe burns when his engine caught fire. th b near san diego burned captain mike fazzio's ears. >> as soon as the heat hit me i knew i was burned, but it wasn't that bad to where i was going to go down. >> reporter: he returned to the fire fight in alpine where the flames destroyed homes and vigored evacuations. more than a dozen wildfires are burning in california and there are spot fires like this, too, sparked under oppressive heat and dry conditions. >> i was in the house and i saw flames rise above the golf course and we were scared to death. the flames the came right up to my back lawn. >> >> reporter: near santa barbara, others recounted the rush to save their animals. >> we were driving through a wall of flames. every time i see a fire, i get the horses and the trailer out early. >> reporter: as if the flames weren't enough, heavy rains triggered mudslides like this
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one in san bernardino county where the scorched earth couldn't hold back the water. and across the region, the weekend's triple digit heat overwhelmed the power grid leaving crews scrambling to restore electricity to thousands. those record breaking temperatures subsided today, but not by much and there are red flag warnings across much of the west, including nevada and oregon. elaine? >> manuel bajorcas, thank you. coming up, the at-home fertility test for women who waited to have children. does it work? and later, a look at the a-team, the cave divers thai officials called as soon as they heard the soccer team was missing. ♪
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you are free to go. cdc figures show that for the first time ever, women in their 30s are having more children than those in their 20s. but putting off child bearing can affect a woman's chances of getting pregnant. so a san francisco-based start-up launched an at-home hormone test. maria villareal shows us how they work. >> reporter: lauren is a life-style blogger and actress. >> if you won't do it, i will.
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>> reporter: she said she was so focused on her career that having children didn't cross her mind until she turned 30 last year. >> and that's when i started thinking oh, maybe i should freeze my eggs, look at my options. >> reporter: because eggs decrease in both quantity and quality with age, an increasing number of women are choosing to freeze their eggs during their prime reproductive years. denim wanted to know whether she should move forward now or wait, which is what led her to modern fertility. the company referred us to denim to hear her story. after a woman orders the test online, she ricks her finger, places drops of blood on a test strip and sends it back to an accredited lab where it's tested for nine hormones. the company then sends back a physician-reviewed online profile. it explains how her hormone levels may affect the number of eggs she has left. if she's ovulating normally. >> what about these cards? >> reporter: they cofounded
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modern fertility last year. they wanted it to be easily available to women everywhere. >> we're speaking to women much earlier in life who know that a career may be important and they may want children down the road, but want to be able to check in proactively. >> reporter: why use this product, why not go to a fertility clinic, then? >> we're working with women before they get to a doctor's office and giving them this information so that they can have a more informed conversation with the doctor. >> reporter: industry experts say getting this testing done and consulting with the doctor through a clinic costs an average of $600 compared to the $199 test offered by modern fertility. the doctor is the director of ob/gyn at ucla medical center santa monica. he says it's important to remember that hormone levels alone cannot predict whether a woman will be able to conceive naturally, and worries women may misinterpret their test results. >> patients will be led to conclusions that may be incorrect because if the test results show all the levels are
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normal, it doesn't mean that they're fertile necessarily. >> there are critics that will say you are not doctors. this could give people a false sense of hope. how do you respond to them? >> there are many things required for a successful pregnancy and at modern fertility, we're focused on education. the only way to tell you're fertile is to have a baby. but there are tests you can take to learn more about what is going on in your body to make decisions for you. >> reporter: they recommend consulting with the doctor about the test results. denim's profile showed low levels of a key hormone that affects the number of eggs she's producing that prompted her to meet with her gynecologist who recommended redesking her hormones in a few months. she's chosen to increase certain vitamins and supplements and is researching freezing her eggs within the next three months. >> i still don't know if i want kids but i know i want the choice. so this is me being proactive to hopefully have that choice. >> reporter: maria villareal,
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cbs news, san francisco. >> coming up, the first divers to make contact with the missing soccer team inside that flooded cavern in thailand. where the british duo that is called the a-team. find the remote yet? nah. honey look, your old portable cd player. my high school rethainer. oh don't... it's early 90s sitcom star dave coulier... cut...it...out! [laughing] what year is it? as long as stuff gets lost in the couch, you can count on geico saving folks money. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
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the world knows the young soccer players in thailand are alive because of two men who rescue people all over the globe. here's jonathan vigliatti with their story. >> reporter: their flashlights broke nine days of darkness. their distinct british accents broke the silence. >> how many are it there? 13? brilliant. >> reporter: that's the voice of jonathan. he and partner rick pictured here in 2004 may have looked and sounded more alien than hero, but the 12 boys and their coach knew help had arrived. out of their wet suits, 47-year-old john is an i.t. consultant. 57-year-old rick a retired firefighter. >> when people landed on the moon they had a map, they knew where they're going. in a cave if you're beyond the known limit of the cave, nobody knows where it goes. you never know what will happen around the corn earn.
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>> reporter: together they designed their own equipment and use it to assist rescues in france and even mexico where rick helped save six people tramd trapped in a cave by teaching somehow to dive. it is an achievement later honored by the queen. when the soccer team first went missing last month, thai officials called on the a-team to assist in the search. >> they are very organized, extremely disciplined, and consummate professionals. >> reporter: but this rescue is far from over. jonath jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, thailand. >> up next tragedy into art.
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we end tonight with a story of a wounded warrior. his injuries helped him discover a talent he never knew he had, and led him to a world he never would have imagined. david martin has the portrait of the artist. >> reporter: peter damon turns out about 30 paintings a year and sells them for between 250 and $1500. that is not enough to make ends meet, but it has made him whole again. >> painting with my left hook -- >> reporter: after he lost both arms in iraq. >> having this skill that even able bodied people find difficult is something that really gave me a boost. it sort of made me feel like i fit in more in the world. >> reporter: he was an army helicopter mechanic working on a landing gear in 2003 when pressurized gas blew it apart,
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killing one soldier and gravely injuring him. >> i lost my right arm above the elbow, about 3 inches above the elbow, and my left about 6 inches below. >> reporter: he was a blue collar guy who had been an electrician before he joined the army. >> how am i going to make a living and take care of my family? i always worked with my hands. >> reporter: then with this simple little drawing, a new future opened up. >> that was done very -- right after i lost my arm, so i was still at walter reed. >> reporter: what was it like discovering that you had this way out? >> it was kind of miraculous in a way. something was telling me to focus on this and everything will be all right. >> announcer: notice he doesn't have a state of the art prosthetic arm, just a plain old hook which he finds works best. >> i'm still struck by your prosthetic, which seems like a fairly crude device and what you can produce with it. >> it may be crude, but it's some of the best technology i
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think there is out there. this just feels like it's more of a part of me. >> reporter: he and his wife jan run an art gallery in a small new england town where he showcases the work of local artists. with his disability check from the v.a., he can afford to be a starving artist. >> it had a lot of the element i like to paint. >> reporter: he is a man doing what he wants with his life. most people who saw you on the street would say, boy, that guy got a tough break. >> yeah, i don't see it that way. suffering an injury like this sort of has a way of making you fo focus on what's important in life. >> reporter: he believes his best work is still ahead of him. with his depictions of simple american scenes, peter damon has already produced his most extraordinary work. david martin, cbs news, at the true grit gallery in middle borrow, massachusetts. >> true inspiration. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues.
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for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. /s >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. officials in thailand say the operation to rescue the 12 boys and their coach is going better than expected. so far, four boys have been tarik taken out of that flooded cave. officials said they were chosen because they were the healthiest. in this photo emergency personnel is taking one of the boys to the helicopter on the left. there were several ambulances at the scene. emergency personnel were lied up ready to help. the ambulances later arrived at a hospital in chiang rai. ben tracy is there and following the latest developments. >> reporter: elaine, those four boys that were rescued from the cave are now here at this
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hospital in chiang rai where they will be evaluated the next three to five days. this is also where they are going to be reunited with their families. now, as soon as they got out of the cave, they were first put on helicopters and air lifted from the scene. they were then transferred to ambulances and brought here to this hospital where they will be medically evaluated. now, the head of this rescue operation says that all of this went very smoothly, that it went better than they had even expected. he said that now the next part of the operation is that they have to go back into the cave. they have to replace all of the oxygen tanks that line the evacuation route so they can do this again. keep in mind they have four boys out of the cave, but there are still eight boys left in there plus their soccer coach. they tell us that roughly within the next ten hours, we could see the next batch of young boys come out of that cave if everything goes smoothly. so, so far so good. they feel very confident that they have gotten through this first phase of this operation,
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but they know there is a lot of work to do and they say they are still racing time and the weather because they don't want that cave to flood again before they get everyone out. elaine? >> ben tracy, thank you. meg oliver spoke with the cave diving expert about why the thai rescue mission is considered one of the most complicated ever. >> reporter: after more than two weeks trapped in this dark cave, eight boys and their soccer coach are waiting their turn for the risky escape. >> this is the most scary situation that i think a person could go through. >> reporter: he is the national coordinator of the national cave rescue mission. >> you can't make a horror movie that would even compare, and i've been involved in cave rescue for 30 years and i cannot even think of one that was this complicated. >> reporter: the path out is a dangerous one. 13 foreign and five thai divers have to navigate dark and tight passage ways filled with murky
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r cuents. child as they stick to a cave line that stretches the entire mile and a half distance. divers have trained the boys with scuba equipment for the areas they must swim under water for extended periods. >> the trust factor between the children and the divers is -- makes it. it's probably, you know, 90% of what gets them out of the cave. >> reporter: an international team has taken shifts bringing them food, medical supplies, and comforting letters from their parents. >> well, the good news is that the first phase was successful. they've had an opportunity to show it works. it's still dangerous, but it's much better odds for the remaining kids to come out now because of those initial ones. >> reporter: after pumping out water for days, experts say the window to rescue the boys is closing and it is now or never. it's possible that everyone could be rescued within 48 hours. >> such a perilous operation. meg oliver, thank you.
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president trump's legal team is once again attacking special counsel robert mueller's investigation. they are also saying they're not worried about michael cohen flipping. here's errol barnett. >> reporter: as president trump's three-day visit to his new jersey golf club wraps up, his legal team is pushing the special counsel investigation to also come to an end. >> this is the most corrupt investigation i have ever seen. >> reporter: rudy giuliani, the president's personal lawyer, publicly slammed the probe on three networks sunday while pressuring robert mueller to show his hand in order to speak with the president. >> we would not recommend an interview for the president unless they can satisfy us that there is some basis for this investigation. >> reporter: giuliani has cited concern that an interview with the special counsel may be a perjury trap should president trump's answers contradict any existing testimony. giuliani was asked if he thinks cohen will flip on the president. >> if he tells the truth, we're
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home free >> reporter: giuliani also cites anti-trump texts from investigators dismissed from the special counsel's team last year as -- showing a particularized need, quote, we could easily have a subpoena squashed. elaine? >> errol barnett, thank you. >> the president says he will be introducing his supreme court nominee monday evening. jeff glor will anchor our live coverage of that announcement right here on cbs at 9:00 eastern time. in england, the woman who was exposed to the nerve agent novichok has died. 41-year-old dawn sturgis and her partner were hospitalized last di novichok was made in the soviet union during the cold war. british officials believe the two were exposed after an
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ex-russian spy and his daughter were attacked in march. the department of homeland security has until tomorrow to reunite all the children 5-year-old and undertaken from their migrant parents at the border. the trump administration says it needs more time to verify who the parents are and where the children should be sent. maria villareal has the story. >> reporter: after more than 50 days apart, angelica garcia and her 8-year-old daughter were reunited in boston thursday afternoon. the pair seeking asylum from violence in guatemala were separated and detained in arizona after crossing into the u.s. illegally. it's like having someone who you know has died and they're not coming back to life, and then suddenly they appear in front of you. gonzalez garcia said. the department of health and human services has until tuesday to reunite children under the age of 5, and july 26 for
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children between the ages of 5 and 17. h.h.s. secretarial exazar said his office will meet the deadlines ordered by a u.s. district judge who called the family separations a chaotic circumstance of the government's own making. azar said more than 230 people are working over time to connect minors with verified parents including using dna swabs to speed up the process. despite the administration's reunification efforts, tensions remain high. for the second time this week, police in philadelphia arrested protesters for clashing with officers outside immigration and customs enforcement office. reunited, but far from safe, angelica gonzalez garcia and her daughter will now join the backlog of more than 3,000 pending asylum seekers. maria villareal. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
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>> announcer: this is "the cbs overnight news." >> over of the past ten years, over 10,000 foreign nationals have achieved u.s. citizenship by enlisting in the armed forces, but the white house has now canceled that program and it's been quietly discharging many immigrant recruits and reservists without cause. jurika dunk an spoke to one of them. >> the feeling was just like getting kicked out of your own home. i was so shocked and there were so many tears in my eyes that my hands couldn't move fast enough to wipe them. >> reporter: this pakistani man is describing his u.s. military. he doesn't want his identity shown in fear of reprizal if he has to return to his home country.
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his recruiter called him to say the 22-year-old will be discharged. that despite the fact that he says he passed a military background check. >> i hope this is a mistake and mistakes happen. >> reporter: in 2016 he enlisted in the u.s. army with hopes of becoming a legal u.s. citizen through a program known as mavne which stands for military acsessions vital to the national interest. the program began in 2008 as a way to find people with special medical and language skills. in return, the foreign-born recruits were promised a path to citizenship. last year the department of defense suspend the the program and announced new changes for foreign recruits which included increased background checks. reportedly several foreign born reservists and recruits have been discharged without any real explanation. u.s. army officials issued a statement to cbs news saying any recruit to include those recruited through the mavni program who receives an
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unfavorable security screening is deemed unsuitable for military service and is administratively discharged. tom porter is with the iraq and afghanistan veterans of america. >> what exactly is happening, who is getting deported, why are there active duty service members caught up in this. a lot of questions and not enough answers so far. >> reporter: as for the pakistani recruit, he forwarded cbs news part of what he said was from his military record. it states, he has such a deep long-standing loyalty to the u.s. >> in england, the woman who was exposed to the nerve agent novichok has died. 44-year-old dawn sturgis and her partner were hospitalized in anes burry last week. he remains in critical condition. novichok was made in the soviet union during the cold war. british officials believe the two were exposed after an ex-russian spy and his daughter
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werehe hospital in salisby, poisoning victim dawn sturgis the day before she fell gravely ill, buying alcohol for a summer's evening unaware that within 24 hours both she and partner charlie rowly would be fighting for her lives after being exposed to the deadly nerve agent novichok. the same kind of toxin used in the poisoning of double agent sergey skripal and his daughter yulia four months ago. >> he's my younger brother. i love him. i don't want to think anything to happen to him. and yet it has. >> reporter: what's not known or police won't say is where the couple came into contact with the nerve agent. today police are scouring areas in a race to figure out where that nerve agent came from before it harms anyone else. they have sealed off six sites. by this morning they had erected
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new barriers around rowley's house. worryingly, the public was warned not to pick up any foreign objects, though a local health official was in no mood to elaborate. there might be something they shouldn't be touching in relation to what is going on no? >> well, i think we are working with the best information we've got available, and i'd just like to keep reiterating we've only seen two members of the public come forward with symptoms that require treatment. >> reporter: only two people exposed to military-grade nerve agent somewhere, not exactly a reassurance to people we spoke to. >> this is a quiet little town, so you wouldn't think this would happen here. >> shocked really. ♪
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was a resurrection. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: the headliners were america's biggest rock band, the fu fighters. whose 49-year-old frontman, dave, will go to any extreme to keep rock's flame burning. >> i can just go, yeah, you know. and the stadium goes, yeah, back. >> reporter: case in point, during a gig in sweden two years ago, he fell from the stage, broke his leg and dislocated his ankle. what did you guys think when that happened? >> that there was going to be a lot of time off. [ laughter ] >> reporter: but keyboardist, drummer and the band kept going while he was treated back >>okay, i'm ready. >> reporter: for two hours, he
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played from a chair while a medic tended his leg. did they give you painkillers? how did you do that? >> the adrenaline of the stadium. also the obligation. i broke it in the second song. i felt like all of these people have come all that way. >> reporter: the tour was interrupted for the surgery. but he returned in a custom-built throne of his own design, which was the star attraction last fall at the cal jam museum. a tent filled with memorabilia from the fu's 25 year history including their grammy collection. they've won best rock album four times. and won best rock song this year from their latest album, concrete and gold. >> it's weird. i mean -- >> reporter: what's weird about it? >> well, ages ago when i was a
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kid, my dad said, you know this isn't going to last, right? save every check like it's the last one you're ever going to make. every time we make a fu fighter were the last one, we had a good run, it would have been great. >> reporter: you grew up here. >> yeah. >> reporter: he came up through the punk scene in washington, d.c. and its suburbs. >> you know , it's just a sleep neighborhood. >> reporter: at 17 he dropped out of the high school where his mom taught english. you were okay with that. >> i was. he just didn't like it. and he was -- it was a really great writer and such a great spirit. he said, i'm going to europe to tour. with scream. go, great. can i go, too? [ laughter ] ♪ ♪ >> reporter: a few years later, he w invited to join an up and
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coming seattle grunge band after its frontman curt cobain caught his act. ♪ ♪ >> when most people think of nirvana, they think about a video or a song on the radio. to me it was a personal experience with some friends that went from sleeping on floors to then being the number one band on the charts. and so this is my first-ever platinum record. >> reporter: with your mom's name. >> she got the first one. she was the first one to get it. still to this day whenever i see a new artist that's young, that blows up and becomes gigantic overnight, i kind of get worried for him. i don't think anybody is cut out for it. >> reporter: how did you do up there? >> i was the kid with long hair in my face behind drums that looked like washing machines.
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i could walk in the front door of a nirvana gig and not get noticed. so i didn't have to suffer a lot of the pressures that curt did as the frontman. >> reporter: it was a four-year rocket ship ride aboard what became one of the biggest bands in rock history. at the height of it all, in 1994, cobain took his own life. ♪ ♪ >> i went through a really dark period where i couldn't really even listen to the radio because it broke my heart just to hear music. >> reporter: but quietly, the 25-year-old began to write and record songs of his own, playing all the instruments. >> i went to the cassette place down the street, could you make 100 of these? made a little card to go in it and i just started giving it out to people. i called it foo fighters. i wanted people to think it was the group. >> reporter: he took the
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military name from ufos. >> i've always been a ufo nut. it sounded like a gang, like a karate gang. it worked. >> reporter: in 1995, those songs were released as the first foo's album. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: how would you describe the dynamic of this band? >> dave's the leader and our job as the band is to make sure whatever is in his head gets on the tape. >> reporter: along the way he recruited hawkins and jaffe. >> everybody is speechless. >> reporter: ship let on lead ga tar, men dahl on base, and i go ta -- guitarist the lead guitar. was it nirvana dave's approach
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to the band? >> yeah, he was smart enough to say, i'm going to do things like this and look at the bad and say i'm not going to do this kind of stuff. >> reporter: have there been moments this band has been in trouble? >> oh, god, yeah. 2001. >> reporter: that year taylor hawkins nearly died after a heroin overdose. he spent two weeks in a coma and grohl did not leave his side. were you aware he was there every day? >> it was a heavy time but he was always there and he's always been there. >> that's when you forget about the band. >> reporter: doesn't matter any more? >> that's when it gets real. >> reporter: dave himself gave up drugs when he was 20. it's one reason the foo fighters fight on. >> when i tell people that i've never done cocaine in my life, they think i'm lying. but i love music and i love life. ♪ ♪
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and to me, survival is the game. that's the hardest part. i just want
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steve hartman now with a story of determination that he found on the road to the pool. >> reporter: they were the bad news bears of swimming. in fact, coach alex in arlington texas says you can't overstate their under achievement. >> our goal every meet was to finish the race. >> reporter: get across the pool? >> get across the pool. really we measured our success on not getting disqualified. >> reporter: because that was the standard, four years ago gerald hodges made the team. perhaps the only kid to ever make a high school swim team without a clue how to swim. >> we had to get anybody. it didn't matter. he didn't know how to swim. he couldn't get across five yards, let alone 25 yards. >> reporter: was there really nobody better? >> no. >> come on, gerald.
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come on, gerald. >> reporter: eventually he at least learned how to not drown and even finish some races, albeit long after the other competitors were done and towelled off. >> push it, come on. >> reporter: yes, he was that bad. which is interesting. because on dry land gerald is a remarkable athlete. could you have made the basketball team? >> i think so. >> reporter: could you have made the football team? >> pretty sure. >> reporter: soccer team? >> pretty positive. >> reporter: so why swimming? >> i felt like if i couldn't handle not being good at something, then how could i consider myself, you know, successful person? >> reporter: that quote bears repeating. if i couldn't handle not being good at something, then how could i consider myself a successful person? to gerald, setting yourself up for failure is actually the key to future success. especially if you can somehow manage to master your weakness. and by the start of his senior year, gerald had actually improved a lot. but no one really knew how much he'd improved until a big
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regional meet earlier this year. it was the 200 yard medley relay. top two teams qualify for state and as usual, he was pretty much in last place with 50 yards to go. and that's when gerald jumped in the water. keep in mind, at this level, making up any significant time is nearly impossible. unless maybe you've got something to prove. unless maybe there's an extra drive deep within anyone who knows what it's like to be dismissed. whatever it was, the kid who couldn't swim just sent his team to state. >> man, we were ecstatic. i could barely contain my energy, go get this medal. i'm sitting here freaking out. >> you're having a hard time now. >> yes. i've come so far. >> reporter: from now on, whenever you think anything is impossible, think of gerald. whenever you think the easiest path is the best, think again.
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>> that's the overnight news for this monday. from the cbs bro ♪ it's monday, july 9th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." as the world watches, waits and prays, crews in thailand prepare to rescue the nine remaining soccer players trapped in a cave. president trump is expected to unveil his pick for the next u.s. supreme court justice today. he says an exceptional person will be chosen. we take a look at the possible final four contenders, and wildfires spurred by drought and hot temperatures rage on in california.

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