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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  November 19, 2009 3:28am-4:30am EST

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we can never be too careful when giving our kids over-the-counter cough and cold medicines. i'm chandra wilson, and i'm a mother of three. children's cough and cold medicines are safe and effective,
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but like all medicines, they can have real risks if misused or stored incorrectly. research shows that most overdoses from otc cough and cold medicines happen when parents give the wrong dose or kids get into the medicines. here are a few simple rules all parents should follow when treating their kids with otc cough and cold medicines. always keep medicines out of the reach and sight of children. never give more than the recommended dose, and always use the enclosed measuring device. do not use these medicines to make your child sleepy, and follow new recommendations to not give otc cough and cold medicines to children under the age of 4. as always, if you have questions, talk to your doctor. to learn more, visit otcsafety.org, because as parents, we're in charge of our kids' health. political divide. senate democrats and their
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health care reform bill. what makes it so different, and why republicans are angry. attacked again. pirates off africa take aim at an american cargo ship. >> it's not shocking me. you know. it seems to me like it's open season over there. >> dramatic defense in the high seas. and, play it again. the classic video game super mario brothers and its high-tech comeback. it's thursday, november 19th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> i feel like i had such a sheltered childhood. a couple of weeks ago i admitted to never having played tetris. i've never played that either. >> i think i still have my old school one from the 1980s, '90s, when was that? >> '80s i think. >> it's a solid game, you should check out the old version and the new one as well. >> bring it in, we'll bust it out. all right. good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm jeremy hubbard.
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>> i'm vinita nair. as president obama returns from asia today there is an important development on capitol hill. >> the senate version of health care reform has finally been made public. now let the debate begin. john hendren has the details from washington. good morning to you, john. >> reporter: good morning, jeremy and vinita. after weeks of negotiations, senate democratic leaders unveiled their health care reform plan. they'll have to corral every supporter to get it to the president's desk. president obama called senate democrats' new health care reform bill a critical milestone. >> tonight begins the last leg of this journey that we've been on now for some time. >> reporter: the total cost is pegged at $849 billion over 10 years. they claim it would cut the deficit by $127 billion over that period. while ensuring coverage for 94% of americans, including 31 million people who now have no coverage. >> and there's one sign that i think not only defines this
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moment, but also is going to define what's going to happen in the next month. it's a very simple sign. you've all seen it before. it's like this. it's victory. and that's what we're going to have with health care. >> reporter: reid gathered democrats to discuss the bill, which combines earlier bills. >> we're going to get it over the finish line. because failure is not an option. >> reporter: even before democrats had met, republicans, hearing leaks, declared health care reform dead on arrival. >> partisan reform designed behind closed doors will bankrupt this country. in effect, committing generational theft. >> reporter: ask how he squared a promise to strengthen medicare with cutting the program, reid was philosophical. >> any time you have a program there's fraud, waste and a you get rid of that, it you get henhe pm at, it the g biter: what's actually in it includes an optional public health care plan which allows states the option to opt out or 39ing to participate. it requires individuals to buy
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insurance. it's paid for by a medicare payroll tax on those earning over $250,000 and a tax on pricey insurance plans. jeremy and vinita? most americans are not taking government advice to get the swine flu vaccine. according to our new poll. two-thirds of adults say they do not plan to get the vaccine. 45% say they will not have their children vaccinated either. availability continues to be an issue. 52% of parents said they tried to get their child vaccinated but could not find the shots. 46% say they haven't even tried. health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius stepped into the controversy over new recommendations for mammograms. an expert panel as you know by now on preventative medicine concluded that women do not need routine mammograms until they're 50, and then only every two years. some critics of health care reform say the new guidelines amount to rationing. that's a charge the secretary denied. >> united states preventive services task force have done what they've been asked to do
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which is routinely review data and look at preventive services across the board and make recommendations. they don't make policy. >> panel members said the recommendations did not consider cost and were not politically motivated. sebelius urged women to keep doing what they're doing, talk to their doctor and then decide what's best. overseas in pakistan. a suicide car bomb exploded outside the main court building in the regional capital of peshawar this morning. at least 16 people were killed. the courthouse is near the parliament and army commander's residence. peshawar has seen a spike in bombings since the army b offensive against the tal the nearby border region with afghanistan. for the second time this year theargo mae alabama" has been attacked in the indian ocean. in april a ragtag group from somalia boarded the ship and took its captain hostage. this time the crew was prepared. here's jim sciutto. >> reporter: the "maersk alabama" was saling from to kenya 560 miles off the somali coast, when four men in a skiff
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sped toward the vessel firing automatic weapons. the ship took evasive action and in a new tactic deployed a long-range acoustic device emitting ear-splitting sounds. when the pirates didn't back off a private security team on board fired warning shots in the air. when that didn't work they aimed right at the attackers, forcing them to turn away. >> if they really value the cargo, then having that embarked security team is that best, last line of defense. >> reporter: seven months ago, pirates successfully boarded the "maersk alabama" and held captain richard phillips at guoint in a lifeboat until navy snipers killed three attackers. the fourth is awaiting trial in new york. shane murphy was on board then and says at least one of his former crew mates was on the ship again. >> it's not shocking me. you know. it seems to me like it's open season over there. something needs to be done. >> reporter: 23 ships from 15 different countries are now patrolling the waters off somalia. reducing attacks but pirates
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have responded by operating further and further out to sea. >> ultimately we're only working on the prevention effort at sea. and the real solution is ashore on somalia itself. >> reporter: for now, though, these waters remn very dangerous. jim sciutto, abc news, london. the federal government could now be liable for billions of dollars in damages after a landmark ruling in new orleans. a judge decided that mismanagement by the army corps of engineers led directly to widespread floods from hurricane katrina. the ruling could open the way for judgments against the government by up to 100,000 property and business owners who filed claims against the corps. >> that is a big ruling. here's your thursday forecast. stormy weather continues in the northwest. mostly washington. with rain,ty winds and heavy mountain snow up there. showers from the great lakes to new york and down to virginia. late-day rain across texas. >> 70 in dallas. 69 in new orleans. 84 in miami. near 60 for much of the
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northeast. 40s across the upper midwest. 54 in omaha. 55 in kansas city. 52 in seattle. 45 in salt lake city. 76 in phoenix. they cannot come home for the holidays so a little bit of home is coming to them. >> hundreds of american troops serving overseas will soon be getting a package of holiday cheer. mini christmas trees donated by the daughters of the american revolution. each it will-inch tree will be delivered along with a card and, what's, a bag of christmas candy. >> organizers in milwaukee say it is their way of letting the troops know how much they are missed and appreciated. >> small slice of home. we'll be right k wi cost to. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ...
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your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scooter store is your best shot at qualifying for a scooter that costs you little to nothing. hi i'm doug harrison. pay little to nothing out of pocket. how do we do it? we know what it takes to get you your power chair it's our strength. it's our mission. and we back it up with the scooter store guarantee. if we qualify you and medicare denies your claim for a new powerchair or scooter, i'll give it to you absolutely free. i paid into medicare all my life, and when i needed it the benefit was there for me. the scooter store made it so easy. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. the scooter store got me back out in the world again.
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talk to. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. improve you've gotta wash this whole room! let's wash it with febreze! whoa! [ sniffs ] [ male announcer ] for all the things that you can't wash, wash it with febreze. welcome back.
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afghan president hamid karzai begins his second term under intense international pressure. secretary of state hillary clinton is among those attending today's inauguration. clinton is warning karzai continued u.s. support would depend on his ability to develop
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a strong arm gr and root out government corruption. as president obama wraps up his asia trip white house officials are defending his present. critics say the president has little to show for the time and jet fuel spent. david axelrod told reporters it was not about immediate gratification but the long view. said the u.s./chinese nt obama relationship is deepening. >> he said on top of trade and economic ties the relationship now involves security, environmental and other concerns. >> in shanghai yunji de nies looked at those economic ties. >> reporter: americans and chinese. two peoples half a world apart, growing closer with every day, every dollar, every yuan. >> the two economies have combined and become so intertwined and interdependent they're functioning as one economic system. >> reporter: the buzz is building.
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the u.s. owes china more money than any other country. $800 billion. it's not just cash. chinese investors own stakes in american companies like hummer and ibm. along with american banks and private equity firms. >> two bedroom, three bath -- >> reporter: the weak u.s. housing market has inspired chinese real estate buying tours. even american sports teams like the nba's cleveland cavaliers are partially chinese-owned. the newest frontier? small american businesses like power line, once a thriving auto parts maker in south carolina. when the company fell on hard times chinese businessman jao jiru bought it, renamed it, and relocatemanufacturing to china but kept distribution and some jobs in spartanburg. >> translator: this is the biggest consumer market and china has the biggest production base. the two countries together, i think economically we can grow together. >> reporter: employees are navigating what it really means when the boss is in china but
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they're thankful to be working. >> right now the chinese market is a lot better than our market. and they're not afraid to invest what needs to be invested to make a company succeed. >> reporter: gsp products are manufactured in china. jao sends the products and paychecks to south carolina. but while he's employing americans, all the profits are coming right back here to china. it's a model american investors have used for years. but today, who's on top? >> i would have said two years ago, the americans probably felt like they had the upper hand. and i think now americans feel like china has the upper hand. >> reporter: with the economy so intertwined, success may lie not in having the upper hand but moving forward together. a rocky but increasingly inevitable path. yunji de nies, abc news, shanghai. >> but it makes you wonder if the future's going to be as rocky as the past has been. the premier in the wake of president obama's visit has said that he feels like we are on a better path now after the visit. we're really on the cusp of moving forward with this
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relationship is what he said. >> it's hard not to notice the differences that remain and seem like they will remain for a long time in terms of money. china has a huge trade surplus. they have a staggering amount of u.s. bonds. so that deficit continues to grow. we just hope it can continue to shrink. >> in a lot of ways it does feel like they are in the driver's seat. in a moment what janet jackson and her family tried to do to help their brother. >> her grief and her regrets after michael jackson's death. it's next in an abc news
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welcome back to "world news now." as you know we have heard very little from michael jackson's family since his death in june. >> now his sister, janet, has broken her silence in an exclusive interview with robin roberts. >> she talks about growing up jackson and places blame for michael's death. ♪ >> reporter: she's part of music royalty. the youngest of the nine jackson children. one of the most famous musical families in the world.
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this summer, america saw janet jackson as we've never seen her before. a bereaved aunt.ster. >> i just wanted to say -- >> speak up, sweetheart, speak up. >> reporter: after the memorial, she walled herself in silence. >> i think it's important for everyone. your little get-away, your little safe haven, your little hole in the wall. everybody needs that. >> reporter: here, in this starkly elegant beach house in malibu, she spoke to us for the first time about loss, love, and what remains. who were you closest to when you were growing up? >> mike. we were incredibly close. >> reporter: what was the last time you had seen him? >> two days before my birthday. >> reporter: what do you miss most about him? >> for me, his silliness. his love. how much fun we used to have together. we'd practically do everything together. from morning to night. every day. >> reporter: it was a hot summer
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day in june when michael was preparing for the most grueling concert tour of his career. on the morning of june 25th, dr. conrad murray had just administered a cocktail of sedatives that may have stopped michael jackson's heart. across the country, his sister janet was beginning a day that at first seemed just like any other. >> i was at my house in new york. you know, another day. another morning. and i get a call. >> reporter: it was her assistant who told her that michael had collapsed. >> "your brother's been taken to the hospital. it's on cnn right now." >> apparently michael jackson suffered cardiac arrest. >> reporter: that afternoon, michael jackson died from an overdose of propofol. a potent anesthetic. over the years he had developed a dangerous dependency on drugs. although his friends and family
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knew about his addiction he resisted their attempts to intervene. was there a time as a family that you thought, we need to do something here? did you do anything? >> of course. that's what you do. those are the things that you do when you love someone. you can't just let them continue on that way. and we did a few times. we weren't very successful. >> reporter: how did he react to the interventions that you all conducted? >> how do i say this? understood that it was out of love. because of caring. but when it's something like that, people can tend to be in denial. >> was michael in denial? >> i wish he could answer this question for you and not me. >> reporter: were you aware of the propofol, that he was using that to help him sleep? >> no. no. >> reporter: when you first heard that, did you -- what did
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you think when you first -- >> that was -- that was a shocker to me. it just -- that's serious. that's heavy. that's heavy. >> reporter: so it was even more than you were aware of? >> uh-huh. any of us. none of us knew to that extent. >> reporter: have you ever met dr. conrad murray? >> no. >> reporter: do you hold him responsible for michael's death? >> he was the one that was administering. i think he is responsible. >> reporter: do you think any others are responsible? >> i really don't know. maybe. the truth always prevails. that's the way that i see it. >> reporter: with dr. murray, what would you like to see happen to him? do you think he should be practicing based on -- >> no, i don't. not at all. so this could happen to someone else? another family?
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>> when you hear her speak there she certainly looksutterly composed. but during the interview she tells robin roberts just seeing a trailer, bite catch her by surprise, it would really make her emotional. to date she hasn't seen the movie by choice. she says she doesn't know she's ever going to see it, given how strong their tie was. >> she talks about intervention teams. but that's got to be impossible. how do you tell somebody like michael jackson, hey, you've got to get help. he surrounded himself by people who told him what he wanted to hear. i'm guessing that wasn't easy for the family to try to step in and do that. >> janet jackson says she is returning back to work now. she's got the new song coming out. she's also making an appearance at american music awards coming up. >> the greatest hits came out on tuesday so go to the store and pick that up. [/+
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finally this half hour, you remember donkey kong with mario dodging all the barrels and all that stuff. how far he has come over the years. >> his latest incarnation is the just-released super mario brothers for wii. michael thompson of ign.com has played it and here is his review. >> reporter: mario, nintendo's pixel lated plumber, has entered the pantheon of great animated characters populated by popeye, bugs, and yes, even mickey mouse. his latest starring role is in new super mario brothers wii. one look and it's easy to catch the similarities between it and the smash breakthrough that made mario a superstar. 1985's super mario brothers.
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with new super mario brothers for wii they've taken that basic design and they've added something that doesn't really seem initially like it's that big of an improvement but winds up being pretty dramatically game-changing whicis the addition of four player and multi-player. >> reporter: you can play with up to three other people at the same time, which adds an entirely new perspective to this classic. you can choose to help each other out. or be competitive. and giving your friends a hard time can turn out to be pretty rewarding. >> there's something genuine and sort of irreplaceable about having that experience in the same room with somebody else. >> reporter: after almost a quarter century, the experience remains a blast. because the glue that holds all the fun together is the meticulous focus on running and jumping. the characters move in time with music. and there is a constant sense that all the tragedy that happens to little mario along his journey to save a princess is all for comic effect. >> oh, no!
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>> he'll sort of look directly out from the screen and kind of mug at you for a second. like he's disappointed with you, rather than actually having some terrible rendering of the suffering that would happen to a real person if they were really crushed in between two giant slabs of concrete. >> reporter: the only major problem is that you'll find yourself letting little mario down too often. >> oh, no! >> reporter: but then again, suffering alongside game characters is all part of the fun. and it makes victory so much sweeter. >> oh, yeah! >> reporter: michael thompson in new york. >> i know you've never played the original but i have to say based on that, that looks a lot like the original. >> i guess i'm missing out.
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we can never be too careful when giving our kids over-the-counter cough and cold medicines. i'm chandra wilson, and i'm a mother of three. children's cough and cold medicines are safe and effective, but like all medicines, they can have real risks if misused or stored incorrectly. research shows that most overdoses from otc cough and cold medicines happen when parents give the wrong dose or kids get into the medicines. here are a few simple rules all parents should follow
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when treating their kids with otc cough and cold medicines. always keep medicines out of the reach and sight of children. never give more than the recommended dose, and always use the enclosed measuring device. do not use these medicines to make your child sleepy, and follow new recommendations to not give otc cough and cold medicines to children under the age of 4. as always, if you have questions, talk to your doctor. to learn more, visit otcsafety.org, because as parents, we're in charge of our kids' health. no deadline. why south korea's president will not rush into a nuclear deal
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with the north. this morning's development after president obama's visit. then, secret prison. what went on inside a cia jail hidden in a lithuanian horse stable. it's an abc news exclusive. and gold rush. what's pushing up the price of precious metals. >> that is pure gold. one kilo of pure gold. >> it's thursday, november 19th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> it's surprising to hear how high gold is right now. if you have gold laying around your house or pieces of jewelry you don't wear, this is apparently the time to trade it in. >> if you watch our commercial breaks there's lots of sponsors encouraging you to do just that. >> lots of different opportunities to get your cash out and get some gold. good morning and thanks for being with us. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm jeremy hubbard. president obama is warning iran and north korea over their
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nuclear weapons this morning. >> this comes as the president wraps up his asian trip in south korea. abc news' karen traverse joins us now from seoul. good morning, karen. >> reporter: good morning, vinita and jeremy. president obama is en route back to washington. before he left seoul, south korea, he announced next month he is going to be sending a high-level envoy to north korea for direct talks with the regime there. president obama met with president lee today at the blue house. that's south korea's version of the white house. at the top of the agenda, how the two nations can work together with allies to push north korea to abandon its nuclear ambitions. president obama expressed today impatience with the lack of progress and effort by the north koreans. >> president lee and i both agree on the need to break the pattern that has existed in the past. in which north korea behaves in a provocative fashion, it then is willing to return to talks, it talks for a while, and then leaves the talks seeking further concessions and there's never
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actually any progress on the core issues. >> reporter: to jump start the six-party talks mr. obama's going to send an envoy to north korea next month. this is the first time there will be one on one meetings with the regime since president obama took office in january. in seoul president obama was greeted by friendly crowds and a colorful welcome ceremony which he called the most spectacular reception of any so far on this asian trip. president lee said mr. obama, of course, saved the best country for last. also today, president obama addressed 1,500 u.s. troops here at osan air base in seoul, and he said his greatest privilege as president is serving as commander in chief. jeremy and vinita? >> karen traverse reporting live from seoul this morning, thank you. afghan president hamid karzai is inaugurated for his second term today under intense scrutiny. secretary of state hillary clinton is in kabul for the inauguration.
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she says other nations are willing to support president karzai but clinton says karzai must build up afghanistan's security and provide more benefits to the poor. a suicide bomber targeted a courthouse in northwest pakistan this morning killing at least 16 people. the explosion was near the regional parliament building and an army residence. today's blast is the latest of many attacks in peshawar since the army launched an offensive against the taliban in the tribal areas bordering afghanistan. when president obama ordered guantanamo shut down he ordered the cia to close secret prisons where it interrogated terror suspects. one of them was in lithuania. at what was once a fancy riding school. chief investigative correspondent brian ross got an exclusive look. >> reporter: in order to keep it secret, the cia built its prison inside this huge horse barn, a building within a building, according to current lithuanian and former u.s. government officials. where wealthy lithuanians once rode show horses and accepted
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drinks at a cafe, cia officers used harsh tactics to interrogate as many as eight suspected high-value al qaeda figures. >> the activities in that prison were illegal. they included various forms of torture, including sleep deprivation, forced standing, painful stress positions. >> reporter: it's not known which of the suspected terrorists was in lithuania. but 9/11 mastermind khalid shaikh mohammad was moved out of his secret cia prison in poland just before the lithuanian facility was opened. lithuania agreed to allow the cia prison after president bush visited the country in 2002 and the u.s. pledged support for lithuania's efforts to join nato. >> the new members of nato were so grateful for the u.s. role in getting them into that organization that they would do anything the united states asked for during that period. >> reporter: documents provided to abc news by lithuanian officials show the paper trail of what they call the cia front
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company that bought the facility. washington, d.c. and supposedly owned by another company in panama. the cia took over the riding academy in march 2004. the same month lithuania formally joined nato. the cia moved out of the stables after only a year and a half because of news reports in "the washington post" about the secret prisons. even though they did not name lithuania. the building is now owned by the lithuanian intelligence service. the cia says its program has ended and it does not comment on where or where not its facilities existed. brian ross, abc news, new york. the senate has released its version of a health care reform bill. the total cost, $849 billion over 10 years. senate democrats claim it would cut the deficit by $127 billion. they promise coverage to 94% of americans. the democrats say taxes on cosmetic surgeries and higher
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payroll taxes on the rich will help pay for it. floor debate could start as early as this week with bitter opposition from the republicans. the federal government could be liable for billions of dollars in damages after a landmark ruling in new orleans. a judge has ruled the floods from hurricane katrina were due to mismanagement by the army corps of engineers. the ruling could open the way for judgments against the government. up to 100,000 property and business owners have filed claims. utah residents were treated to an extraordinary sight, if they were awake to see it. security cameras took pictures of a burning meteor as it flashed in the sky just after midnight wednesday. scientists say it was likely part of an unexpected annual meteor shower. the burning rock was probably about the size of an oven and it was traveling about 80,000 miles an hour as it fell down to earth. >> people checking their calendars to make sure it's not 2012, the end of the world. here's look at your weather. another stormy day in the
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pacific northwest, bringing steady downpours today. gusty winds and heavy mountain snow in places like washington state. late-day rain today from dallas to corpus christi. periods of rain in chicago, detroit, milwaukee, new york, and washington. >> at or above normal for most of the country. 50s from boston to baltimore. 66 in atlanta. shy of 50 in chicago and indianapolis. a wet 52 in seattle. 48 in billings. 62 in sacramento. he went to capitol hill the same year president eisenhower took office, and he has been there ever since. >> lawmakers paid tribute to senator robert byrd as he became the longest-serving member of congress in history. there he is waving the arms. they cast a resolution to mark this big milestone. byrd has nearly 57 years of service and 18,000 votes under his belt. >> in an emotional moment, the 92-year-old said he knows his wife is smiling down from heaven reminding him not to get a big head. >> and he's no stranger to emotion on the senate floor as we know.
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how about that, what a milestone. 11 presidents he's served under. >> we'll be right back with more "world news now."
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the recession has had a profound impact on americans, their investments and their jobs. >> now it's having an impact on heavy metal, and we don't mean ac/dc, we mean gold. trading at record highs, over $1,100 an ounce. >> as david wright reports that has plenty of people cashing in. >> reporter: it's the alchemy of recession. when times are tough, we turn to that most malleable of metals. the bedrock of bling. number 79 on the periodic table of elements. >> that is pure gold. one kilo of pure gold. >> how much is that worth?
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>> about $35,500 today. >> reporter: alchemists tried to transform worthless metal into something of enduring value. not all that different from ed mcmahon. but these days it's not just the insomniacs watching infomercials who are looking to cash in. >> i can get cash for this gold medallion. >> reporter: it's high-end folks as well. check out the latest display at harrod's department store in london. there's a bona fide gold rush going on. walk down 47th street and everyone seems to be prospecting. but the prices people pay vary greatly. so seller beware. >> it's a serious chain. >> reporter: places like u.s. gold buyers of new york city pay 96% for 24 karat gold. >> this is the highest concentrated, 22 karats. >> he's in luck? >> he's in luck. >> reporter: this one gold chain
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turns out to be the mother lode. >> $11,628. >> are you serious? >> congratulations. >> 11,000? >> you want a cash or check? >> i'm going to call my parents. >> reporter: not a bad payout for a single piece of bling. just across 47th street in a nondescript building up on the sixth floor, we visited devere and stoller refining. right here on the sixth floor. they fire up the furnace. and melt it right down. in less than five minutes, the treasures of a lifetime are gone. in their place, cold, hard cash. well, not quite cold. that's amazing. >> now we wait a couple of minutes. it will cool. the metal is solid underneath there already. >> all of this in midtown manhattan. >> reporter: what's driving all this. to find out, we went to the new
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york mercantile exchange. traders in this pit and others like it around the world determine what an ounce of gold is worth right now. the process is baffling. but the price is now at a record high with huge volatility. in terms of the value of trades that you're making, how big of a difference is it at this moment? >> it's dramatic. i've never seen the volatility like this. >> reporter: he explains what's going on with gold is in some ways a measure of people's uncertainty about the rest of the economy. when your house seems like it might be a shaky investment, when stock prices seem like they're not to be trusted, when the government seems to be spending money so fast it might not be worth the paper it's printed on, gold starts to look pretty good. where do you see the price going? >> i think $1,200 by the end of the year, absolutely. >> reporter: crucially, it's not just small investors who are buying. earlier this month, the reserve bank of india purchased 220 tons of gold to offset its foreign
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currency reserves. many analysts took that to be a sign india is hedging its bets. at some level does this become bad news for the u.s. treasury? >> i think it is bad news. i think the government is in a little bit of a pickle and that's why people are worried about holding dollars. they're going to be buying gold. >> reporter: the romance of gold. ♪ gold fever >> reporter: the sex appeal of the stuff. that's for the movies. it's gone the way of james bond. >> the girl's dead. she's covered in paint. gold paint. >> reporter: folks in the trade told us even the jewelry stores are probably just biding their time, waiting out one last christmas shopping season. after that, much of what's still left on the shelves will end up in places like devere and stoller. in the old days it might have been turned into jewelry again. in the alchemy of recession it's an unromantic lump of cash. turns out that little scrap was only 55% pure, worth a little over 1,200 bucks.
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more than it was ever worth before, except perhaps when it was still someone's anniversary present. i'm david wright in new york. >> it is kind of sad to see these little mementos be melted down by the smelter on the sixth floor in the diamond district. >> it's human nature when you hear those trade rates to think, do i have any pieces of gold? should i be sending them in an envelope somewhere? >> a lot of people are doing it, that's for sure. uncle sam wants some money from "girls gone wild." like that! how they do it. i think. i haven't seen one of the videos but i've heard it's kind of like that.
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"people" magazine is out with their sexiest man alive. was it jeremy hubbard? >> was it? >> not this year. >> oh.
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>> but it was johnny depp who you might recall has graced the magazine before and he again is 2009's sexiest man of the year. of course, he is 46 years old now. the father of two. they basically said that he is one of a kind. beloved by 15-year-olds as well as older women. so that's sort of the reason they decided to vote him as the sexiest man alive. the other people he beat out, a laundry list of guys that you have certainly seen before. hugh jackman was last year's winner so there was talk he could get it again. he did not. this is a huge win. these are the other guys who were sort of up for consideration. i will say, not that this is my pulpit, it's a little upsetting to me that for women, when you look at who's the sexiest woman and fhm's the only one who does it, it's a 25-year-old. >> oh! i guess i was one of the candidates. how about that. >> that was very generous of sandy, wasn't it? >> i didn't even know. anyway, you were saying. i didn't mean to interrupt --
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>> that's fine. i think, why isn't the sexiest woman alive never, ever going to be 46? >> men get better with age like wine. so do women. i know. i do see your point. it is sort of sexist. >> i know you're excited to be in that video. he's going to say, dub that down. >> i do want a copy of that as evidence. i did meet johnny, not to name drop, i met johnny depp once. he's very cool. and so i can see -- >> i think he's sexy beyond sexy. my issue isn't with him at all. >> it's just the whole notion. >> it's just society. >> so we talked about the "girls gone wild." apparently joe francis, the guy who started all of this, has been spending too much time staring at naked coeds and not paying his tax bill. because the irs is after him for some serious money. they have filed a lien against him for, listen to this, $33.8 million. according to some documents obtained by tmz. now, they're saying, the irs is saying he owes the money for three years of back taxes.
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2001, 2002, 2003. they say that each of those years, he didn't pay almost double-digit tax money. $17 million the first year. he's saying he got out of a tax problem a couple of weeks ago by copping a plea and avoiding prison. he is saying that this is retaliation. he says, i have no idea what this is, he doesn't know what the money owed is all about, it's total retaliation for him beating them in court, he says. >> he's had legal troubles before, too. >> yes. >> which is -- >> he's been behind bars before. he's had some troubles. >> i'm surprised when you said "girls gone wild" you didn't do your show and tell one more time. >> i could if you want. they do this a lot, according to people who have seen those videos. >> always a pleasure to sit up here. robert pattinson. this is actually funny. you know when stars are doing meet and greets someone will come towards the table, they'll have ten seconds to say hello. he's saying he gets tired of saying, how are you doing. did all these people.
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one young lady walks up to the front of the desk and says, what can i do to get your attention? he says, just take your clothes off. next thing she's frantically starting to take off all her clothes. she ends up getting dragged out by security. and he says he just felt absolutely awful. he says he never intended for any of this to hap he shared this "th it's just funny. also in case you're wondering in terms of his body he says he does bare a little bit in "the new moon" movie. he says it's the first time he's ever been proud of his physical appearance in his entire life. -- really hit the gym and worked out hard to be the heartthrob in "new moon." >> he's in good shape. so chaz bono, big exclusive coming up on "good morning america" later today. chaz bono, the son now of sonny and cher, is going to talk about the change going on you see on the left, that's chas been undergoing some treatments. now it's chaz bono going to talk about sort of the changes going on there. 1 o ,
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your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scoot store is your best shot at qualifying for a scooter that costs you little to nothing. hi i'm doug harrison. pay little to nothing out of pocket. how do we do it? we know what it takes to get you your power chair it's our strength. it's our mission. and we back it up with the scooter store guarantee. if we qualify you and medicare denies your claim for a new powerchair or scooter, i'll give it to you absolutely free. i paid into medicare all my life, and when i needed
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it the benefit was there for me. the scooter store made it so easy. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. the scooter store got me back out in the world again. talk to. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. (rooster crow) ...still tired the next day too? when you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep... remember 2-layer ambien cr.
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the first layer helps you fall asleep quickly. and unlike other sleep aids, a second helps you stay asleep. when taking ambien cr, don't drive or operate machinery. sleepwalking, and eating or driving while not fully awake with memory loss for the event as well as abnormal behaviors such as being more outgoing or aggressive than normal, confusion, agitation, and hallucinations may occur. don't take it with alcohol as it may increase these behaviors. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath, swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and in rare cases may be fatal. side effects may include next-day drowsiness, dizziness, and headache. in patients with depression, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide may occur. if you experience any of these behaviors or reactions contact your doctor immediately. wake up ready for your day- ask your healthcare provider for 2-layer ambien cr. here are some stories to watch today on abc news. defense secretary robert gates
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may name a former defense official today to investigate the suspected ft. hood gunman. former alaska governor sarah palin's book tour stops in ft. wayne, indiana, today. palin followers spent hours in line at her first stop in michigan. the so-called food police crack down on popcorn and sodas sold at theaters. the center for science and public interest claims a typical movie snack has as many calories as three mcdonald's quarter pounders with 12 pats of butter. >> large popcorn has something like 900 calories or something. >> that's covered in popcorn too in terms of their research. >> yeah, must be. finally this half hour, stripped-down advertising. not really stripped down because it does involve putting clothing on. >> that clothing article is a simple t-shirt with a company's message on it. as gregory simons reports it's pretty simple after that. >> reporter: jason sadler is a man to watch in 21st century advertising. he doesn't use billboards. he's become one.
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>> i'm like a walking human jumbotron. >> reporter: a facebooking, twittering, youtubing jumbotron, that is. sadler gets dressed and the rest is strictly digital. >> i wear t-shirts for a living. and people pay me to wear their shirt on a day and i promote them through social media. >> reporter: it starts on iwearyourshirt.com. pull it up, pay up, ship your shirt and sadler takes it from there. >> usually i throw the shirt on, get my first photo of the day, put that photo on flickr, change my facebook profile to that photo, tweet it out to my followers, then i write up a blog post. >> reporter: hundreds of people a day watch his live interactive web cast. >> this is a band from northern philadelphia and they've got a cd, "vitamin sea," very clever. >> reporter: his customers say this approach does things conventional advertising can't. >> what jason does is it creates a unique connection between his
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fans and his followers and our brand. and because of that direct connection there's an element of authenticity. >> reporter: authenticity with minimal cost on either side. >> my overhead is hangers. >> reporter: as traditional advertising models fade, sadler's profits are soaring. >> i want to change the advertising genre on the web, i want to be a small niche people can go to that don't have a big budget. >> reporter: it seems the guy in the t-shirt is a success. sadler says he's making more than $80,000 a year being a digital billboard. >> you can save a life giving away defibrillators. >> reporter: gregory simmons, abc news, washington. >> i applaud him for the idea. i want to know who's watching. who thinks every day, i want to
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