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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 19, 2017 2:07am-4:00am EST

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welcome back, everybody. in our "entertainment tonight" birthdays, who worked as a bus driver giving tours of celebrity homes? that is kevin costner who turned 62. what a nice tour guide. >> yeah. grammy awards will air sunday february the 12th on sunday. we're talking about john legend, carrie underwood. >> tomorrow, everything from our coverage of the people's choice award will be backstage with the winners, and on the red carpet for all the fashion. you do not want to miss that. >> we'll see you then. bye,
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success in business. but i really would like to see more of this issue of what america stands for. >> your mind's not made up then? >> no. >> what are your concerns for the trump administration going forward? >> primarily russia right now. he continues to say things about how we can improve things with russia and putin's not so bad, those kinds of things. look, i've watched three presidents, scott. all came to the presidency saying, "we'll have a new arrangement with russia." vladimir putin understands strength, and we have to show him strength and that the price for him to pay for further aggression exceeds whatever gains he may make. that's how we won the cold war. >> john mccain. in our poll, americans are evenly split on president-elect
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about 39% approve, 40% disapprove. nancy cordes reports some of the nominees are getting a tough grilling. >> we're a compassionate society. >> no, we are not a compassionate society. >> reporter: democrats interrogated two of the nominees so intensely today, that one one of them briefly mistook the hearing room for a courtroom. >> are you aware of those? >> yes, your honor-- yes, senator. >> reporter: oklahoma attorney general scott pruitt was grilled about the 14 lawsuits he filed against the agency he now wants to lead, the epa. >> do you acknowledge you presented a private oil company's position rather than a position developed by the people of oklahoma? >> senator, with respect, i disagree. the efforts that i took as attorney general were representing the interests of the state of oklahoma. >> earlier you said-- >> there was a concern. >> no, no, excuse me, i'm asking the questions. >> reporter: his hearing came on the same day that government scientists declared 2016 the hottest year on record.
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warming is a hoax? >> i do not, senator. >> reporter: but he would not concede that man is primarily to blame. >> this paradigm that we live within today that if you're pro energy you're anti-environment, if you're pro environment you're anti-energy is i think is a false narrative. >> reporter: at the other end of a crowded hallway, democrats were coming down hard on georgia congressman tom price. >> i am very frightened about what you are going to do. >> reporter: as secretary of health and human services, price would implement the gop's currently unformed replacement for obamacare. >> i believe and i look forward to working with you to make sure every single american has access to the highest care possible. >> has "access to" does not mean that they are guaranteed health care. i have access to buying a $10 million home. i don't have the money to do that.
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>> reporter: mr. trump's pick for secretary of defense became the first nominee today to get a "yes" vote from his committee and it now heads to the full senate. democrats and republicans currently negotiating, scott, over how many cabinet member also be confirmed on inauguration day. >> nancy cordes for us on capitol hill. the people who put mr. trump in office, of course, will be expecting results, and anna werner has been talking to some of them in kannapolis, north carolina. >> i never knew what it was not like for the city to revolve around a textile mill. and then in one day, it's gone. >> reporter: pastor dean hunter remembers the day 14 years ago when the largest sheet and towel manufacturer in the world shut down. it was the end of an era, more than 4,000 jobs vanished, along with the mill itself. >> there's a lot of people that never really emotionally recovered from that. >> i miss them days. >> reporter: like dan johnson. he worked at the mill over 30 years. so when he and his wife, vicki,
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heard donald trump say this -- >> we're living through the greatest jobs theft in the history of the world. >> reporter: -- it resonated. >> i just felt like he was going to help us. >> well, as long as he's done what he said he would do, like him, i would be very happy. >> reporter: already, they think they've seen progress in the trump transition. >> the man hasn't even got in office yet, and he's already saved some jobs. >> reporter: that impressed you? >> that impressed me. i think he's doing good. i like a lot of his cabinet picks. >> reporter: dean hunter believes mr. trump will act quickly one of his top priorities, appointing a conservative supreme court justice. but as for the man himself -- you weren't sure? >> no. >> reporter: are you more sure now? >> i'm more sure now than i was a year ago. if it comes out that he has done or not done some things that he has said he hasn't or has, that's a cause for concern. >> we want to see something different. >> reporter: former democrat, tony hall,s
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into action from both parties. >> he may end up being a great president. he may end up being a lousy president. what do you have to lose? he just may do something. >> reporter: you're rolling the dice. >> we're rolling the dice. i'm not a betting man, but i guess i'm a betting man on this one. >> reporter: the question for those here: will the bet pay off? anna werner, cbs news, kannapolis, north carolina. in houston, about a half foot of rain fell turning roads into rivers. dozens were rescued from cars. severe thunderstorms also hit along the 80-mile stretch of hill country from san antonio to austin. coming up next, a band battles a trademark many consider racist. and later, we'll hear from a young woman kidnapped at birth. when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours.
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ex lasts 12 hours. let's end this.
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it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. today a rock band took the stage at the supreme court, hoping to trademark its name. jan crawford takes a listen. ♪ >> reporter: the slants call their music "chinatown dance rock." ♪ we sing for japanese and the chinese ♪ >> reporter: with a name founder simon tam says is a key part of the message. >> i was ridiculed as a kid for having slanted eyes. now it's -- i'm saying it's something that i can be proud
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it's not something to be ashamed of. >> reporter: the trademark office denied the slant's application saying its name disparages asian americans. at the supreme cout, tam said that violates his first amendment rights. >> if the government truly cared about fighting racist messages, they would have canceled the registrations for numerous white supremacist groups before they even approached our case. >> reporter: the government has awarded trademarks to groups like the ku klux klan, as well as other bands that refer to race in their name, like nwa, and uncle kracker. ♪ follow me, everything is all right ♪ >> reporter: in court, some of the justices clearly were troubled. justice ruth bader ginsburg asked, "does it not count at all that everyone knows that the slants is using this term not at all to disparage but simply to describe?" but they also seemed concerned about a broad ruling. justice elena kagan said since the government registers and publishing trademarks, that may
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leeway" to regulate them. for the slants, it's the principle. ♪ never gonna settle, never gonna settle, no ♪ >> reporter: now, the case could have far-reaching implications. the government, for example, has canceled the trademark of the washington redskins, saying that name is also disparaging. but, scott, that case on hold while the court considers the slants. >> jan crawford on the steps of the court. thanks. coming up, a young woman kidnapped at birth shares her story. baa baa black sheep, have you any wool? no sir, no sir, some nincompoop stole all my wool sweaters, smart tv and gaming system. luckily, the geico insurance agency recently helped baa baa with renters insurance. everything stolen was replaced. and the hooligan who lives down the lane was caught selling the stolen goods online.
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a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. 18 years ago, a woman stole a newborn there a florida hospital and raised her as her own in south carolina. well, today, the victim, now a young woman, shared with our manuel bojorquez her story of forgiveness. >> reporter: how would you describe what you've been through? >> just overwhelming. >> reporter: growing up, alexis manigo had no idea the woman who raised her, gloria williams, would be arrested for allegedly dressing up as a nurse and kidnapping her from the hospital. >> i have no hatred for her. i love her. >> reporter: how are you so easily able to forgive her? >> when you have lived the life i have, when you have been loved the way i have, you'll understand why.
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>> miss williams, have been charged with kidnapping. >> reporter: that was clear when she saw williams at a court hearing and sobbed. >> mama. it was hard. it was very hard. >> reporter: today in jacksonville, a judge denied williams bond. authorities say her story began to unravel when some of alexis' documents appeared to be fake. the parents who last saw her as newborn kamiyah mobley, shanara mobley, and craig aiken, reunited with her this weekend. she assured them that despite how her life began and that the person she calls mother is behind bars, the last 18 years have been good ones. >> now i'm thinking of all the memories we did. that's what's keeping me going with her, you know. >> reporter: what about the memories your biological parents didn't have, though? >> i'm definitely remorseful for that. and i plan on giving them memories from here on out. >> reporter: the investigation is ongoing, and, scott, according to police, a witness said alexis may have started to learn the truth more than a year ago.
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>> manuel bojorquez. coming up next, barack obama's final message.
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as veterans, we committed to protect our country. we served and sacrificed for the things that mattered most. those experiences shaped our lives. now we're husbands, wives, parents, and friends. and sometimes we forget that the biggest challenge can be asking for support. the veterans crisis line is here for veterans. dial 1-800-273-8255 and press 1. it matters.
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in our poll, 62% of americans are telling president obama "well done." and at his final news conference today, he told them don't worry. >> i believe in the american people. i believe that people are more good than bad. i believe tragic things happen. i think there's evil in the world, but i think that at the end of the day, if we work hard and if we're true to those things in us that feel true and feel right, that the world gets a little better each time. it is true that behind closed doors i curse more than i do publicly. [ laughter ] and sometimes i get mad and tr
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does. but at my core, i think we're going to be okay. >> when he first took office, mr. obama said, "i didn't come here for small steps. i came to provide sweeping change." well, today, with eight years of experience, he said if we're true to the things that feel right, the world gets a little bit better, and that's what this presidency has been about. presidents always come to washington to change history, but history always changes them. that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news, and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning" from the national mall here in washington. until then, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm michelle miller. president obama went before the white house press corps for the final news conference of his administration. he thanked the reporters saying having them in the building "has made this place work better." president-elect trump has mentioned that he might kick the press corps out of the white house. margaret brennan asked the president about his controversial decision to commute the sentence of convicted leaker chelsea manning. >> first of all, let's be clear that chelsea manning has served a tough prison sentence. so the notion that
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person who was thinking about disclosing vital classified information would think that it goes unpunished, i don't think would get that impression from the sentence that chelsea manning has served. it was a busy day on capitol hill where confirmation hearings continued for president-elect trump's confirmation hearings. the armed services committee voted 26-1 for james mattis. two others did not have it so easy. nancy cordes has more. >> we're a compassionate society. >> no, we're not. >> reporter: democrats interrogated two of the nominees so intensely today, that one one of them briefly mistook the hearing room for a courtroom. >> are you aware of those? >> yes, your honor-- yes,
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senator. >> reporter: oklahoma attorney general scott pruitt was grilled about the 14 lawsuits he filed against the agency he now wants to lead, the epa. >> do you acknowledge you presented a private oil company's position rather than a position developed by the people of oklahoma? >> senator, with respect, i disagree. the efforts that i took as attorney general were representing the interests of the state of oklahoma. >> earlier you said-- >> there was a concern. >> no, no, excuse me, i'm asking the questions. >> reporter: his hearing came on the same day that government scientists declared 2016 the hottest year on record. >> do you agree that global warming is a hoax? >> i do not, senator. >> reporter: but he would not concede that man is primarily to blame. >> this paradigm that we live within today that if you're pro energy you're anti-environment, if you're pro environment you're anti-energy is i think is a false narrative. >> reporter: at the other end of a crowded hallway, democrats were coming down hard on georgia congressman tom price. >> i am very frightened about what you are going to do. >> reporter: as secretary of
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would implement the gop's currently unformed replacement for obamacare. >> i believe and look forward to working with you to make sure every single american has access to the highest quality care and coverage that is possible. >> has "access to" does not mean that they are guaranteed health care. i have access to buying a $10 million home. i don't have the money to do that. former president george h.w. bush, as well as his wife barbara, are hospitalized this morning in houston. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: today, president bush offered the bushes hisest wishes at his final press conference. >> they have been a constant source of friendship and support and good counsel for me and michelle over the years. they are as fine a couple as we know. >> reporter: just this past saturday, mr. bush was treated for shortness of breath. despite his health
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92-year-old has remained active. but one place he will not be is at the upcoming inauguration. he wrote a letter saying -- >> reporter: president-elect trump tweeted his thoughts saying -- >> reporter: the former first lady will remain in the hospital for observation. former president george bush will be at the inauguration. the slants tried to trademark their name, but the trademark office refused, saying the term is derogatory. jan crawford spoke with the band
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about the controversy. >> reporter: the slants call their music "chinatown dance rock." ♪ we sing for the japanese and the chinese ♪ >> reporter: and it traveled the world, reaching out to asian-american communities, even entertaining u.s. troops over seas. but to the patent and trademark office, their name is racist. >> i decided to name a band called the slamts. >> reporter: 25-year-old simon tan founded the band in 2006. the name was a key part of the band's message. >> we have an
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racial slur that he want to turn into something powerful. i was ridiculed as a kid for having slanted eyes. now i'm saying it's something i can be proud of. >> to the trademark office, you were what? >> to the trademark, we're racists. >> reporter: the government refused to give tam a trademark and argues nothing in the first amendment requires congress to encourage the use of racial slurs. >> there are thousands of gross trademarks out there, and no one thinks the government is associating with or endorsing those vulgar, kind of gross, sometimes silly trademarks. >> reporter: first amendment lawyer megan brown points to other bands that refer to race in their names whose trademarks have been approved. like nwa and uncle cracker. ♪ follow me, everything is all right ♪ as proof the government's definition of what may be offensive is inconsistent. >> lots of people are
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government selectively and subjectively trying to make these judgment calls about what the legal standard is and who is going to be offended and how offended. >> reporter: the case could have far reaching implications. using the same reasoning in 2014, the government canceled trademark protection for the washington redskins. ♪ never going to settle, never going to settle ♪ >> reporter: for tam and the slants, it's now up to the supreme court. >> i'm hoping that after wednesday, we can go back to being a band. not the band that's fighting the trademark office, but the band who releases music and can communicate a positive message for their community. ♪ we sing from the heart >> reporter: tam said if they lose here at the supreme court, the band is not going to change its name. but without a trademark, it's almost impossible to get a record deal or even to protect the band from impostors. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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at his only news conference after the election, president-elect donald trump refused to take a question from cnn. he pointed to the network's reporter and said "you are fake news." well, fake news is not new to the american political scene. here's our senior correspondent ted koppel. >> folks, i've been told this by high-up folks, obama and hillary both smell like sulfur. >> reporter: there's nothing new about using media to commit political slander. 1796, an editorial accused thomas jefferson of cowardess, running away from the enemy. our founding fathers could sling
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mud with the worst of them. it's not the nastiness that's new, it's the delivery systems. a radio talk show host by the name alex jones can be heard nationwide spreading the manure that fertilizes conspiracy theories all over the internet. >> pizzagate, as it's called, is a rabbit hole that is horrifying to go down. >> reporter: the charge that hillary clinton and her campaign manager, john podesta, were running a child pornography ring out of the basement of a washington pizza restaurant did not, as best we can tell, originate with jones. the accuser remains anonymous. but that story had real consequences. >> 28-year-old edgar welch, after driving from north carolina, entered the pizzaria entered the restaurant and fired shots. he told police he came to rescue child victims. >> reporter: for weeks, people have been accusing
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smuggling children from their bookstore, politics and prose, to the pizza restaurant. >> are the threats over? no, they're not. they continue online and on the phone. >> i really call it the weaponization of social media and the internet. what it's entitling or enabling people to do is to take completely false information, make up whatever they want with no accountability. >> reporter: so what do you do? you call the police. the fbi. >> turns out there's quite a high bar that's required for police and the fbi to take action. thanks to our first amendment protections. >> has that made you rethink whether the first amendment needs some modifications, given the age in which we live? >> it certainly has. my father actually lost a job in defense of the first amendment back in the mccarthy
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so i'm pretty sensitive to that issue. however, we live in a different world now, and it's a brave, new world that we have not figured out. the purveyors of this stuff have been able to run ram pant and do damage freely. >> hold on, though. we love the first amendment, free speech, the right to criticize our leaders. protection among other things for our cartoonists, comedians, satirists. >> testing, testing. gina, gina. >> reporter: until recently, the targets of satire were required to grit their teeth and bear it. but the shape of the battlefield has changed. >> google, what is isis? >> reporter: many more people received donald trump's tweet, reacting to the alec baldwin impression, than those who saw the original skit on nbc. >> ted koppel, you've been doing this for a
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the average american could never have gotten to you and said hey ted koppel, you know, you missed this point. >> reporter: glenn beck has among the most popular radio shows in the nation. >> now there's parody on social media. the downside is, there is no gate keeper. and there's not a real feeling of personal responsibility online. >>teeporr: in his time, beck promoted some of the wildest right wing conspiracy theories out there. >> in the president's life, as you will see, is pure fiction. >> reporter: this is the new, revised glenn beck. >> since really in the last year, and since the election, there are as many sources as i can to beg the media to learn from my mistakes. you know, sometimes you have a road to damascus moment. i've had my road to damascus moment, and if we don't change this, if we can't find ouray
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to get worse. >> reporter: which puts glenn beck on roughly the same page as pope francis. his holiness compared media's obsession with scandal and ugly things to the sickness. if you're just finishing breakfast, just look it up later. it's nasty. it can, however, be profitable. margaret sullivan is media correspondent for "the washington post." >> there is now an industry out there of people who are producing things that are untrue and that are highly shareable, which is the magic word. it's engagement. it's all about engagement. if you can get things shared, you may be able to make money from it. >> how does it work, so that a fraction of a penny for every hit that you get? >> yes, yes. buzzfeed reported this, that there was a group of teenagers in macedonia who were doing nothing b
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news stories. they set up their own sites and they register to attract add verytizing through facebook. they put these sries out there, made up to be wrong. but sounded believable enough that people started sharing them. and they could make pretty good money for teens in macedonia. >> reporter: just this week, facebook implemented a new policy that will make it more difficult for the purveyors of fake news to get paid. but fake news is far from being the greatest threat. so one of your correspondents comes to the editorial board of "the washington post" and says, here's this story, which was leaked by the russians to wikileaks and wikileaks has just leaked it to us. and we've checked on it and it turns out to be true. what do you do with that? >> well, we
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choice throughout the past few months. >> exactly. so if it's true, you run it. >> well, if it's news worthy. >> reporter: josh earnest is white house press secretary. what is the russians did is take information that was stored privately, hack into it, and release it selectively over the course of many, many days in an effort to politically damage or at least erode confidence in our political system in a way that did damage one candidate for president. >> the russians have been engaged in trying to delegitimize one candidate, aid one candidate, that comes close to a belligerent act, doesn't it? >> obviously, it's an unwelcome one. that's why you've seen such a robust response from the u.s. government. >> well, i haven't seen a robust response. >> you've seen a robust response in terms of basically making
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>> i've heard a lot of talk. has there been any response? a robust response? >> well, talk matters. what also matters -- >> it only matter it is you follow it up with action. >> reporter: and before leaving hi vacation, president obama nted broadly that action was either forthcoming or had already been taken. the president also urged us to look in the mirror. >> if fake news that's being released
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it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together.
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most americans aren't familiar with the presidents carved into the mountain at mt. rushmore. mark albert has this story from the black hills of south dakota. >> reporter: a monument to native american legend crazy horse is taking shape. for nearly 70 years, crews have been blasting millions of tons of rock off the mountain. construction began here in 1948. the work grew the attention of la cota chief standing bear. "60 minutes" profiled him in 1977. >> he said, my fellow chiefs and i would like the white man to know the red man -- >> this is crazy horse's arm. >> reporter: his daughter monique oversees the rk
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>> you're still going seven decades later. >> we are, yeah, we are. >> why is it taking so long? >> that's a big mountain. >> reporter: crazy horse's face was completed in the '90s. they're working now to shape the head and outstretched hand. finishing just the hand will take years. >> drilling a lot of holes and take out one block at a time. >> reporter: caleb is the third generation of his family to work on the rock. >> it is hard to see the changes. since the time i started, this hand area has changed immensely. >> everyone wants to know when is this going to be finished? >> that's a hard question to answer. i don't have an exact day. but if you love something and you get to work on it the rest of your life, that is an honor. >> reporter: native americans say whenever it's done, it will provide a valuable education and ensure crazy horse's place i
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history. mark albert in the black hills of south dakota.
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president-elect donald trump has been loudly critical of the $4 billion price tag for a pair of new air force one aircraft. after meeting with the president-elect, the ceo of boeing said he's working to bring down the cost. travel editor peter greenberg has a look at the traveling white house. >> reporter: one of the most recognizable symbols of american power, air force one tells the world the president has arrived. but air force one isn't just a ple. it's a military designation for any air force plane the president might be flying. the first plane called air force one carried president eisenhower in 1959. but it was jfk who brought the plane into the jet age. the current fleet is comprised of two modified boeing 747s. first
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h.w. bush in 1990. the two planes have carried every president since, from clinton to president obama, at a cost of $180,000 per hour. >> it's still the white house and it's in constant contact and he's still the commander in chief. now, to say you couldn't do that on president-elect trump's aircraft, i wouldn't say that. it just seems to me you would have to do an awful lot of retro fit. >> reporter: trump's plane is also made by boeing, entering service in 1991 with sterling airlines. a low-cost danish airline. it then flew for a mexican charter company before being sold to the co-founder of microsoft who sold it to trump in 2010. that's when the real refurbishment began. >> it's got the donald trump touch. >> reporter: greg lo's
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company sky theater designed the plane's entertainment button. >> he has a special tea button designed just for him that overrides everybody else. >> reporter: it can only fly up to 4400 miles and carry 43 passengers. air force one can fly 7800 niles with 70 passengers. it contains state of the art defenses that include in flight refueling capabilities, anti-missile system and blast resistant outer skin. and while air force one has an on board hospital, trump's 757 boasts 24 carat gold, and a entertainment center. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news will continue.
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later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center here in new york city, i'm michelle miller. two days to trump. negative polls, but positive thoughts. >> the president-elect and our whole team are ready to go to work. >> i'm not a betting man, but i guess i'm a betting man on this one. >> at my core, i think we're going to be okay. also tonight, trump nominees under fire. >> did you propose to cut $1 trillion from medicaid? >> do you agree that global warming is a hoax? >> it sounds like you just raised a moral objection to rex tillerson, who has been nominated for secretary of state. a former president in intensive care. and she forgives the woman who kidnapped her because she's the only mom she ever knew. >> when you've been loved the
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way i have, you understand why. this is the "cbs overnight news." reporting tonight from washington. donald trump's first battle as president may be to convince the people that he is as popular as he says he is. a cbs news poll out tonight finds only 32% of americans have a favorable opinion. no president-elect has rated that low since we first asked that question in 1981. "cbs this morning" co-host charlie rose talked today with the vice president-elect, mike pence. >> reporter: you enter this white house and this city with the lowest approval ratings of any person who's assumed the presidency. what kind of challenge is that? and at the same time, how important is it to double the efforts to reunite because of that? >> i think the american people
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are going to see a president inaugurated this friday who is going to keep the promise he made on election night, to be president of all of the people of this country. i have to tell you that the polls weren't always right during the election year, so i am a little skeptical about the polls going into inauguration, but i can tell you that the president-elect and our whole team are ready to go to work and really just advance the kind of policies that -- to borrow his phrase -- will make america great again. >> don't miss charlie's interview first thing tomorrow on "cbs this morning." what will mr. trump say in his first speech as president? well, our chief white house correspondent major garrett has learned some of the details and joins us this evening. major, what do you know? >> reporter: scott, that slogan "make america great again," the speech is going to be about defining what that means, two big broad goals for the country in pursuit of renewal. more economic growth defined not just by more jobs but better paying jobs, especially in the manufacturing sectnd
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security, reducing, if possible, the fear about terrorism with a concentrated effort to beat isis, broad goals defined in action words and not a lot of soaring rhetoric. and as much as possible, nonpartisan and populist. the draft put together by steve miller, the policy director for the trump campaign and the transition team now being worked over by the president-elect, kellyanne conway, steve bannon, reince priebus also involved in it. runs 20-25 minutes. it's getting a bit longer because as more people contribute, speeches tend to get longer, not shorter. >> now mr. trump has promised immediate change. what's one thing we can look for on day one? >> reporter: fascinating. when they gave him a schedule for inauguration he said he wanted to skip the luncheon and go right to the white house and start signing things. they prevailed upon him to stick with tradition. we can look for executive orders on three big topics, taking away some aspects of obamacare through executive action, expanding energy exploration through executive action, and taking away some othe obama adminiti
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immigration. >> major garrett, thanks. today, the trump nominee for ambassador to the united nations distanced herself from the president-elect on russia. south carolina governor nikki haley told senators "i don't think we can trust them." for about a week, we've been reporting here on that supposed russian dossier on mr. trump that detailed completely unproven tales of sexual misconduct. the dossier fell into the hands of the u.s. government months ago, and now charlie d'agata has found the man who gave it credibility. >> anybody has reason to be concerned if they think the future president of the united states is somehow under russian or any other tutelage. >> reporter: it was the persistent rumors of the dossier that had sir andrew wood most concerned, explosive material that could allow the russians to blackmail the president-elect. the retired ambassador to russia was concerned enough that he met with senator john mccain at a security conference last
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november. >> it seemed to me that it was right, knowing that i had the chance to see him, to speak to the senator, that it was only right for me to say, "this does exist." >> reporter: the dossier contains unverified allegations of mr. trump's sexual behavior and potential bribes. mr. trump says it's complete fabrication. the report was compiled by former british spy christopher steele. you know him. what kind of man is he? >> he's an honest professional. and nobody in his position would wish to make this sort of stuff up. it, after all, is potentially dangerous for him. >> reporter: steele has now fled his home southwest of london and has gone into hiding. wood told us he doesn't know if the allegations are true, but the tactic of sexual entrapment by russia's intelligence services, the fsb, is widespread. >> it's just a very common practice.
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for the fsb to say they never use it is-- laughable. returned to moscow for the miss universe pageant and used the occasion to try and develop other business ties. >> no one i suppose knew that he was going to become president then, but why not give it a go and stick it away for possible use later? >> reporter: because that's what russians do. >> yes. >> reporter: wood told us he's not surprised christopher steele has gone to ground, scott. aside from journalists trying to track him down, there will be a number of russians wanting to know his sources and where he got his information. >> charlie d'agata reporting from london. former president george herbert walker bush was moved today into intensive care in a houston hospital. he's 92 and has pneumonia. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: today, president obama offered the bushes his best wishes at his final press conference. >> they have been a constant source of friendship and support
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and good counsel for michelle and me over the years. they are as fine a couple as we know. >> reporter: just this past saturday, mr. bush was treated for shortness of breath. despite his health issues, the 92-year-old has remained active. earlier this month he was spotted at an nfl game in houston. but one place mr. bush will not be is the upcoming inauguration. he wrote a letter to president-elect trump explaining why. it read in part -- my doctor says if i sit outside in january it likely will put me six feet under. same for barbara. i wish you the very best. president-elect trump tweeted his thoughts saying, "looking forward to a speedy recovery for george and barbara bush, both hospitalized. thank you for your wonderful letter." the former first lady will remain in the hospital for observation. scott, former president george w. bush, their son, will be at the inauguration.
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because she had a cough and as a precaution.
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mccain is chairman of the armed services committee, and he told us that he has not decided whether he can support mr. trump's nominee for secretary of state, former exxon mobil ceo rex tillerson. >> i am very concerned about someone who took a friendship award from vladimir putin, who is a butcher. and actually what vladimir putin is, he's a kgb agent. that's all. he wants to restore the russian empire. >> you cannot support tillerson's nomination? >> i have concerns and i've had several conversations with him, and he has made a strong case that his job as the -- one of the world's largest corporations is very different from that of our secretary of state. and, frankly, i have a tendency to believe him.
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obviously, he's been a great success in business. but i really would like to see more of this issue of what america stands for. >> your mind's not made up then? >> no. >> what are your concerns for the trump administration going forward? >> primarily russia right now. he continues to say things about how we can improve things with russia and putin's not so bad, those kinds of things. look, i've watched three presidents, scott. all came to the presidency saying, "we'll have a new arrangement with russia." vladimir putin understands strength, and we have to show him strength and that the price for him to pay for further aggression exceeds whatever gains he may make. that's how we won the cold war. >> john mccain. in our poll, americans are evenly split on presidenec
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trump's cabinet picks. about 39% approve, 40% disapprove. nancy cordes reports some of the nominees are getting a tough grilling. >> we're a compassionate society. >> no, we are not a compassionate society. >> reporter: democrats interrogated two of the nominees so intensely today, that one of them briefly mistook the hearing room for a courtroom. >> are you aware of those? >> yes, your honor-- yes, senator. >> reporter: oklahoma attorney general scott pruitt was grilled about the 14 lawsuits he filed against the agency he now wants to lead, the epa. >> do you acknowledge you presented a private oil company's position rather than a position developed by the people of oklahoma? >> senator, with respect, i disagree. the efforts that i took as attorney general were representing the interests of the state of oklahoma. >> earlier you said-- >> there was a concern. >> no, no, excuse me, i'm asking the questions. >> reporter: his hearing came on the same day that government scientists declared 2016 the hottest year on record.
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warming is a hoax? >> i do not, senator. >> reporter: but he would not concede that man is primarily to blame. >> this paradigm that we live within today that if you're pro energy you're anti-environment, if you're pro environment you're anti-energy is i think is a false narrative. >> reporter: at the other end of a crowded hallway, democrats were coming down hard on georgia congressman tom price. >> i am very frightened about what you are going to do. >> reporter: as secretary of health and human services, price would implement the gop's currently unformed replacement for obamacare. >> i believe and i look forward to working with you to make sure every single american has access to the highest care possible. >> has "access to" does not mean that they are guaranteed health care. i have access to buying a $10 million home. i don't have the money to do that. >> reporter: mr. trump's pick for secretary of defense became the first nominee today to get a "yes" f
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and it now heads to the full senate. democrats and republicans currently negotiating, scott, over how many cabinet member also be confirmed on inauguration day. >> nancy cordes for us on capitol hill. the people who put mr. trump in office, of course, will be expecting results, and anna werner has been talking to some of them in kannapolis, north carolina. >> i never knew what it was not like for the city to revolve around a textile mill. and then in one day, it's gone. >> reporter: pastor dean hunter remembers the day 14 years ago when the largest sheet and towel manufacturer in the world shut down. it was the end of an era, more than 4,000 jobs vanished, along with the mill itself. >> there's a lot of people that never really emotionally recovered from that. >> i miss them days. >> reporter: like dan johnson. he worked at the mill over 30 years. so when he and his wife, vicki, heard donald trump say this --
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>> we're living through the greatest jobs theft in the history of the world. >>orr:- it resonated. >> i just felt like he was going to help us. >> well, as long as he's done what he said he would do, like him, i would be very happy. >> reporter: already, they think they've seen progress in the trump transition. >> the man hasn't even got in office yet, and he's already saved some jobs. >> reporter: that impressed you? >> that impressed me. i think he's doing good. i like a lot of his cabinet picks. >> reporter: dean hunter believes mr. trump will act quickly one of his top priorities, appointing a conservative supreme court justice. but as for the man himself -- you weren't sure? >> no. >> reporter: are you more sure now? >> i'm more sure now than i was a year ago. if it comes out that he has done or not done some things that he has said he hasn't or has, that's a cause for concern. >> we want to see something different.
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tony hall, says he heard too many promises that didn't turn into action from both parties. >> he may end up being a great president. he may end up being a lousy president. what do you have to lose? he just may do something. >> reporter: you're rolling the dice. >> we're rolling the dice. i'm not a betting man, but i guess i'm a betting man on this one. >> reporter: the question for those here: will the bet pay off? anna werner, cbs news, kannapolis, north carolina. in houston, about a half foot of rain fell turning roads into rivers. dozens were rescued from cars. severe thunderstorms also hit along the 80-mile stretch of hill country from san antonio to austin. coming up next, a band battles a trademark many consider racist. and later, we'll hear from a young woman kidnapped at birth.
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today a rock band took the stage at the supreme court, hoping to trademark its name. jan crawford takes a listen. ♪ >> reporter: the slants call their music "chinatown dance rock." ♪ we sing for japanese and the chinese ♪ >> reporter: with a name founder simon tam says is a key part of the message. >> i was ridiculed as a kid for having slanted eyes. no's
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something that i can be proud of. it's not something to be ashamed of. >> reporter: the trademark office denied the slant's application saying its name disparages asian americans. at the supreme court, tam said that violates his first amendment rights. >> if the government truly cared about fighting racist messages, they would have canceled the registrations for numerous white supremacist groups before they even approached our case. >> reporter: the government has awarded trademarks to groups like the ku klux klan, as well as other bands that refer to race in their name, like nwa, and uncle kracker. ♪ follow me, everything is all right ♪ >> reporter: in court, some of the justices clearly were troubled. justice ruth bader ginsburg asked, "does it not count at all that everyone knows that the slants is using this term not at all to disparage but simply to describe?" but they also seemed concerned about a broad ruling. justice elena kagan said since the government registers and publishes ad
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leeway" to regulate them. for the slants, it's the principle. ♪ never gonna settle, never gonna settle, no ♪ >> reporter: now, the case could have far-reaching implications. the government, for example, has canceled the trademark of the washington redskins, saying that name is also disparaging. but, scott, that case on hold while the court considers the slants. >> jan crawford on the steps of the court. thanks. coming up, a young woman kidnapped at birth shares her story. (coughs) cough doesn't sound so good. take mucinex dm. i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. but just one mucinex lasts 12 hours. let's end this.
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or a lot. k-y yours and mine. two sensations that work together, so you can play together. 18 years ago, a woman stole a newborn from a florida hospital and raised her as her own in south carolina. well, today, the victim, now a young woman, shared with our manuel bojorquez her story of forgiveness. >> reporter: how would you describe what you've been through? >> just overwhelming. >> reporter: growing up, alexis manigo had no idea the woman who raised her, gloria williams, would be arrested for allegedly dressing up as a nurse and kidnapping her from the hospital 18 years ago. >> i have no hatred for her. i love her. >> reporter: how are you so easily able to forgive her? >> when you have lived the life i have, when you have been loved the way i have, you'll understand why.
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>> miss williams, you have been charged with kidnapping. >> reporter: that was clear when she saw williams at a court hearing and sobbed. >> it was hard. it was very hard. >> reporter: today in jacksonville, a judge denied williams bond. authorities say her story began to unravel when some of alexis' documents appeared to be fake. the parents who last saw her as newborn kamiyah mobley, shanara mobley, and craig aiken, reunited with her this weekend. she assured them that despite how her life began and that the person she calls mother is behind bars, the last 18 years have been good ones. >> now i'm thinking of all the memories we did. that's what's keeping me going with her, you know. >> reporter: what about the memories your biological parents didn't have, though? >> i'm definitely remorseful for that. and i plan on giving them memories from here on out. >> reporter: the investigation is ongoing, and, scott, according to police, a witness said alexis may have started to learn the truth more than a year ago.
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>> manuel bojorquez. coming up next, barack obama's final message.
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in our poll, 62% of americans are telling president obama "well done." and at his final news conference today, he told them don't worry. >> i believe in the american people. i believe that people are more good than bad. i believe tragic things happen. i think there's evil in the world, but i think that at the end of the day, if we work hard and if we're true to those things in us that feel true and feel right, that the world gets a little better each time. it is true that behind closed doors i curse more than i do publicly. [ laughter ] and sometimes i get mad and frustrated, like everybody else does.
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but at my core, i think we're going to be okay. >> when he first took office, mr. obama said, "i didn't come here for small steps. i came to provide sweeping change." well, today, with eight years of experience, he said if we're true to the things that feel right, the world gets a little bit better, and that's what this presidency has been about. presidents always come to washington to change history, but history always changes them. that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news, and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning" from the national mall here in washington. until then, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm michelle iller. president obama went before the white house press corps for the final news conference of his administration. he thanked the reporters saying having them in the building "has made this place work better." president-elect trump has mentioned that he might kick the press corps out of the white house. margaret brennan asked the president about his controversial decision to commute the sentence of convicted leaker chelsea manning. >> first of all, let's be clear that chelsea manning has served a tough prison sentence. so the notion that the average
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person who was thinking about disclosing vital classified information would think that it goes unpunished, i don't think would get that impression from the sentence that chelsea manning has served. it was a busy day on capitol hill where confirmation hearings continued for president-elect trump's cabinet nominees. the first to sail through the process was marine general james mattis, mr. trump's choice for defense secretary. the armed services committee voted 26-1 in favor. two others did not have it so easy. nancy cordes has more. >> we're a compassionate society. >> no, we're not. >> reporter: democrats interrogated two of the nominees so intensely today, that one one of them briefly mistook the hearing room for a courtroom. >> are you aware of those? >> yes, your honor-- yes, senator. >> reporter: oklahoma attorney general scott pruitt was grilled
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about the 14 lawsuits he filed against the agency he now wants to lead, the epa. >> do you acknowledge you presented a private oil company's position rather than a position developed by the people of oklahoma? >> senator, with respect, i disagree. the efforts that i took as attorney general were representing the interests of the state of oklahoma. >> earlier you said-- >> there was a concern. >> no, no, excuse me, i'm asking the questions. >> reporter: his hearing came on the same day that government scientists declared 2016 the hottest year on record. >> do you agree that global warming is a hoax? >> i do not, senator. >> reporter: but he would not concede that man is primarily to blame. >> this paradigm that we live within today that if you're pro energy you're anti-environment, if you're pro environment you're anti-energy is i think is a false narrative. >> reporter: at the other end of a crowded hallway, democrats were coming down hard on georgia congressman tom price. >> i am very frightened about what you are going to do. >> reporter: as secretary of health and human services,ce
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currently unformed replacement for obamacare. >> i believe and look forward to working with you to make sure every single american has access to the highest quality care and coverage that is possible. >> has "access to" does not mean that they are guaranteed health care. i have access to buying a $10 million home. i don't have the money to do that. former president george h.w. bush, as well as his wife barbara, are hospitalized this morning in houston. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: today, president obama offered the bushes his best wishes at his final press conference. >> they have been a constant source of friendship and support and good counsel for me and michelle over the years. they are as fine a couple as we know. >> reporter: just this past saturday, mr. bush was treated for shortness of breath. despite his health issues, the 92-year-old has remained active.
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er yerl this month, he was spotted at an nfl game in houston. but one place he will not be is at the upcoming inauguration. he wrote a letter to president-elect donald trump explaining why. it read in part, my doctor says if i sit outside in january, it will likely put me six feet under. same for barbara. i wish you the very best. president-elect trump tweeted his thoughts saying -- >> reporter: the former first lady will remain in the hospital for observation. former president george bush their son, will be at the inauguration. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments concerning an asian-american rock band called the slants. the slants tried to trademark their name, but the trademark office refused, saying the term is derogatory. jan crawford spoke with the band about the controversy.
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formed this all-asian rock band hoping to inspire and encourage young asian-americans he thought that were underrepresented in the entertainment industry. and he thought the band's name "the slants," was something to be proud of. but the government disagreed. they call their music "chinatown dance rock." ♪ and they've traveled the world, reaching out to asian-american communities, even entertaining u.s. troops overseas. but to the patent and trademark office, their name is racist. >> almost a quarter of my life has been spent in court over this name because i decided to name a band called the slants. >> reporter: 25-year-old simon tam founded the band in 2006. the name was a key part of the band's message. ♪ >> we have an outdated, obscure racial slur that he want to turn
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i was ridiculed as a kid for having slanted eyes. now i'sayingt's something i can be proud of. not something to be ashamed of. >> to the trademark office, you were what? >> to the trad mark office, we're racists. >> reporter: the government refused to give tam a trademark and argues nothing in the first amendment requires congress to encourage the use of racial slurs. >> there are thousands of gross trademarks out there, and no one thinks the government is associating with or endorsing those vulgar, kind of gross, sometimes silly trademarks. >> reporter: first amendment lawyer megan brown points to other bands that refer to race in their names whose trademarks have been approved. like nwa and uncle cracker. ♪ follow me, everything is all right ♪ as proof the government's definition of what may be offensive is inconsistent. >> lots of people are uncomfortable with the government selectively and
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these judgment calls about what the legal standard is and who is going to be offended and how offended. >> reporter: the case could have far reaching implications. using the same reasoning in 2014, the government canceled trademark protection for the washington redskins. ♪ never going to settle, never going to settle ♪ >> reporter: for tam and the slants, it's now up to the supreme court. >> i'm hoping that after wednesday, we can go back to being a band. not the band that's fighting the supreme court or the band that's been fighting the trademark office, but the band who releases music and can communicate a positive message for their community. ♪ we sing from the heart >> reporter: tam said if they lose here at the supreme court, the band is not going to change its name. but without a trademark, it's almost impossible to get a record deal or merchandising agreements or even to protect the band from impostors. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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at his only news conference after the election, president-elect donald trump refused to take a question from cnn. he pointed to the network's reporter and said "you are fake news." well, fake news is not new to the american political scene. here's our senior correspondent ted koppel. >> folks, i've been told this by high-up folks, obama and hillary both smell like sulfur. >> reporter: there's nothing new about using media to commit political slander. 1796, an editorial accused thomas jefferson of cowardess, of running away from british troops. the unidentified author -- the current toast of broadway. >>
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>> our founding fathers could sling mud with the worst of them. it's not the nastiness that's new, it's the delivery systems. a radio talk show host by the name alex jones can be heard nationwide spreading the manure that fertilizes conspiracy theories all over the internet. >> pizzagate, as it's called, is a rabbit hole that is horrifying to go down. >> reporter: the charge that hillary clinton and her campaign manager, john podesta, were running a child pornography ring out of the basement of a washington pizza restaurant did not, as best we can tell, originate with jones. the accuser remains anonymous. but that story had real consequences. >> 28-year-old edgar welch, after driving from north carolina, entered the pizzaria and fired shots from a semiautomatic rifle. no one was hurt. he told police he came to rescue child victims. >> reporter: for weeks, people have been accusing others of
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smuggling children from an underground tunnel from this bookstore to the pizza restaurant. >> are the threats over? no, they're not. they continue online and on the phone. >> i really call it the weaponization of social media and the internet. what it's entitling or enabling people to do is to take completely false information, make up whatever they want with no accountability. >> reporter: so what do you do? you call the police. the fbi. >> turns out there's quite a high bar that's required for police and the fbi to take action. thanks to our first amendment protections. >> has that made you rethink whether the first amendment needs some modifications, given the age in which we live? >> it certainly has. my father actually lost a job in defense of the first amendment back in the mccarthy era. so i am
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issue. however, we live in a different world now, and it's a brave, new world that we have not figured out. the purveyors of this stuff have been able to run rampant and do damage fairly freely, with no accountability. >> reporter: hold on, though. we love the first amendment, free speech, the right to criticize our leaders. protection among other things for our cartoonists, comedians, satirists. >> testing, testing. jina, jina. >> reporter: until recently, the targets of satire were obliged to grit their teeth, grin, and bear it. but the shape of the battlefield has changed. >> google, what is isis? >> reporter: many more people received donald trump's tweet, reacting to the alec baldwin impression, than those who saw the original skit on nbc. >> ted, you've been doing
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the average american could never have gotten to you and said hey ted, you missed this point. >> reporter: glenn beck has among the most popular radio shows in the nation. >> now there's parody on social media. the downside is, there is no gatekeeper. and there's not a real feeling of personal responsibility online. >> reporter: in his time, beck promoted some of the wildest right cwingironspthacy eories out there. >> in the president's life, as you will see, is pure fiction. >> reporter: this is the new, revised glenn beck. >> since really in the last year, and since the election, i've been to as many sources as i can to beg the media to learn from my mistakes. you know, sometimes you have a road to damascus moment. i've had my road to damascus moment, and if we don't change this, if we can't find our way to each other, it's only going to get worse.
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>> reporter: which puts glenn beck on roughly the same page as pope francis. his holiness compared media's obsession with scandal and ugly things to the sickness of copafala. if you're just finishing breakfast, just look it up later. it's nasty. it can, however, be profitable. margaret sullivan is media correspondent for "the washington post." >> there is now an industry out there of people who are producing things that are untrue and that are highly shareable, which is the magic word. it's engagement. it's all about engagement. if you can get things shared, you may be able to make money from it. >> how does it work, so that a fraction of a penny for every hit that you get? >> yes, yes. buzzfeed reported this, that there was a group of teenagers in macedonia who were doing nothing but coming up with fake news stories.
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they set up their own sites and they register to attract advertising through facebook. they put these stories out there, made up to be wrong. but sounded believable enough that people started sharing them. and they could make pretty good money for teens in macedonia. >> reporter: just this week, facebook implemented a new policy that will make it more difficult for the purveyors of fake news to get paid. but fake news is far from being the greatest threat. so one of your correspondents comes to the editorial board of "the washington post" and says, here's this story, which was leaked by the russians to wikileaks and wikileaks has just leaked it to us. and we've checked on it and it turns out to be true. what do you do with that? >> well, we actually faced that choice throughout the past few
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months. >> exactly. so if it's true, you run it. >> well, if it's news worthy. >> reporter: josh earnest is white house press secretary. >> what the russians did in the context of the election was to take information that was stored privately, hack into it, and release it selectively over the course of many, many days in an e. to try to politically damage or at least erode confidence in our political system in a way that did politically damage one candidate for president. >> the russians have been engaged in trying to delegitimize one candidate, aid another candidate, undermine the electoral process, that comes dangerously close to a belligerent act, doesn't it? >> obviously, it's an unwelcome one. that's why you've seen such a robust response from the u.s. government. >> well, i haven't seen a robust response. >> you've seen a robust response
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clear publicly and in private -- >> i've heard a lot of talk. has there been any response? a robust response? >> well, talk matters. what also matters -- >> it only matters in you follow it up with action. >> reporter: and before leaving on vacation, president obama hinted broadly that action was either forthcoming or had already been taken. the president also urged us to look in the mirror. >> if fake news that's being released by some foreign government is almost identical to reports that are being issued through partisan news venues, then it's not surprising that that foreign propaganda will have a greater effect. >> is this an area where the
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test. >> reporter: a monument to native american legend crazy horse is taking shape. for nearly 70 years, crews have been blasting millions of tons of rock off the mountain. construction began here in 1948. the work grew the attention of lakcota chief standing bear. "60 minutes" profiled him in 1977. >> he said, my fellow chiefs and i would like the white man to know the red man -- >> this is crazy horse's arm. >> reporter: his daughter monique oversees the work. >> you're still going seven decades later.
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>> we are, yeah, we are. >> why is it taking so long? >> that's a big mountain. that's big mountain. >> reporter: crazy horse's face was completed in the '90s. crews are now working to shape the horse's head and crazy horse's outstretched hand. in some spots, crews have just a few feet of rock left to remove. finishing just the hand will take years. >> drilling a lot of holes and take out one block at a time. >> reporter: caleb is the third generation of his family to work on the project. >> it is hard to see the changes from a mile away down there. since the time i started, this hand area has changed immensely. >> everyone wants to know when is this going to be finished? >> that's a hard question to answer. i don't have an exact day. but if you love something and you get to work on it the rest of your life, that is an honor. >> reporter: native americans say whenever it's done, it will provide a valuable education and ensure crazy horse's place in history. mark albert in the black h
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[female narrator] even if you're not planning on getting pregnant now, you should know that foods rich in folic acid like white bread and leafy greens can help prevent some birth defects before you even know you're pregnant. and my home . [male narrator] don't let the fear of foreclosure make you the victim of a loan modification scam. did you know it's illegal for most companies to charge fees in advance, if you're paying money to a company promising help, you may get scammed. to get free help from a hud-approved counseling agency or to report a scam, call 1-8-8-8, 9-9-5, hope. or visit loan scam alert dot org. brought to you by neighborworks® america. has been my life long mission for almost 40 years. nutrition is the hallmark of good health and pairing nutrition with an active lifestyle and educating our children on those values
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ally change the face of the disease in the future. i view my life differently now, because i no longer felt alone anymore. i saw all the little kids with diabetes just like me. with good exercise and good nutrition diabetes can get easier and life can be long lived. speaker 1: noises like that used to make me hit the deck. but now, i can keep going. speaker 2: don't get me wrong, i still don't love crowded places. but it's good to get out again. speaker 3: transitioning from the military can be tough. but many veterans are facing similar challenges. visit maketheconnection.net to watch our stories, and learn ways to create the story you want to live. make the connection.
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, january 19th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." 24 hours after earthquakes triggered an avalanche in italy, rescue crews are still struggling to get to a ski resort where many are feared dead. the president-elect and our whole team are ready go to work. >> but before they get down to business, the pomp and circumstance of the trump inauguration officially begins. >> we're a compassionate society. >> no, we're not a compassionate society. >> grilled by lawmakers, things

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