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Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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This is one of a group of paintings illustrating parables told by Jesus to his followers, rather than episodes from his life. Here, a rich man amasses possessions, taking pride in their accumulation rather than praising God for their plenitude and use. Dazzled by the goods that surround him, he remains oblivious to the threat of death hovering behind him in the form of a sword-bearing angel. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 83
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 87
favorite 2
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 228
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Following the death of the good (or penitent) thief crucified at Golgotha, his soul is taken up to heaven, fulfilling the promise made by Jesus on the cross; as Tissot notes, he is the very first to “reap the benefits of the Redemption of mankind.” With eyes wide open in wonder, the good thief floats upward, supported by six-winged angels who bear perfume censers. Far below lies the earth, its continents and seas clearly discernible. Object metadata can change over time, please check the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 123
favorite 2
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 120
favorite 2
comment 0
For his narrative of the life of Christ, Tissot created a “harmony” of the Gospels, combining the separate accounts of Jesus’ life attributed to the apostles Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. These four New Testament texts differ from one another in theological emphasis and tone. A harmony, a literary form traced to the second-century Christian writer Tatian, seeks to reconcile the differences among the four Gospels and to piece together one continuous chronology of Jesus’ life, verse by...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 236
favorite 2
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Speaking to those who challenge his teachings and his deeds, Jesus likens himself to the good shepherd, pictured here, who devotes his life, and sacrifices his own well-being, to protect the sheep in his care. This analogy anticipates the ultimate sacrifice that Jesus will make for his “flock” of followers and humankind. Tissot notes that this parable is among the most beautiful in the Gospels—and, indeed, one with an enduring visual history. The artist cites the earliest examples in the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 146
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While Mark devotes just a single verse to the act of crucifixion, Tissot describes the process in exacting detail in four images and his accompanying published commentaries. Following first-century Roman sources, he considers the physical restraints the executioners probably employed to bind Jesus securely to the cross. He concludes that ropes must have been required, in addition to nails, to keep the elevated body from collapsing under its own weight. At right, the Virgin Mary and others look...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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As Christ and the thieves condemned to die along with him hang on their crosses, one mockingly demands that Jesus, as the Christ, relieve them of their sufferings. The other criminal reminds his fellow of the justness of their punishments, in contrast to the innocence of Jesus. “Touched,” Tissot writes, “by the divine gentleness of the crucified Saviour,” the penitent thief then asks Jesus to remember him when he comes into his kingdom; Jesus replies that today the thief will be with...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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In this chapter of Matthew, Jesus teaches frequently with parables, or fables—a strategy that frustrates his disciples, who ask him why he uses this challenging method of preaching. To explain his pedagogy, Jesus invokes yet another parable, the fable of the sower. The sower scatters his seeds on inhospitable terrain—rocky, thorny, and dry—seemingly to no effect. But many of the seeds do find fertile ground, producing a plentiful harvest. For Jesus, his words are like the seeds of the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Convicted of blasphemy by the high priests—a crime punishable by death—Jesus is led away, as the crowd of witnesses pulls his hair, scratches his face, and rains both insults and blows on his body in what Tissot describes as a “diabolical fury.” Having blindfolded Jesus, his tormentors now mock his status as a prophet by demanding that he divine which among them has hit him. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
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Complementing the narrative of the venerations by the humble shepherds, the Magi, guided by a moving star, traveled separately from their individual lands in the east in search of the newborn Jesus. Tissot depicts the Magi at the moment when their retinues meet in the vast, arid landscape of the volcanic hills on the shores of the Dead Sea between Jericho, the Kedron Valley, and Jerusalem. In his commentary, the artist notes that their flowing saffron robes—a luxurious counterpoint to the...
Topics: art, European Art
Although Luke devotes just two verses to the betrothal of Mary and Joseph, their formal promise of future marriage, Tissot inventively elaborates on the event, calling on his extensive research into ancient Jewish ritual. Before a sea of onlookers, Joseph, with staff still in hand, and Mary stand with heads bowed beneath a painted canopy held aloft by attendants who grasp lushly garlanded poles. Tissot crams this tiny work with a multitude of details, from the patterned robes of Mary and Joseph...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
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Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 89
favorite 2
comment 0
Standing on a raised platform before the Court of the Gentiles outside the Temple, Jesus first considers asking God to save him from his impending sacrifice; but then, recognizing its necessity in the divine plan, he instead glorifies God’s name. The Lord responds from the heavens: some in the crowd hear thunder, others the voice of an angel. Jesus acknowledges his forthcoming death to those gathered. With this image, Tissot again blends his interest in historical accuracy with a sense of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 155
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Jesus drives the merchants from the Temple, among them moneychangers as well as those who sell animals for sacrifice and food for worshippers. He scatters their goods—in a dramatic flurry of flapping doves’ wings—as he wields a whip devised from his own belt, Tissot notes in his text. (This last detail comes from the account in John, though Tissot chose not to cite those verses in his Bible.) The sheer bulk of merchants with their wares and animals had grown so large, Tissot explains,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 87
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Mary Magdalene kneels before Christ and anoints his feet, wiping away the excess oil with her hair, a gesture of deference and devotion. The disciples—especially Judas Iscariot, Tissot notes, in a commentary based on John’s account—are indignant at the gesture’s expense, asking could not this costly ointment be sold and its profits given to the poor? However, Jesus defends Mary’s prescience: “She did it,” he tells them, “for my burial.” Object metadata can change over time,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Paying his usual rigorous attention to researching the settings for his interpretation of the narrative, Tissot places the episode of Jesus’ birth in one of the caves in the mountains in and around Bethlehem, a departure from visual tradition, which often locates the Nativity in a stable. Unable to find rooms in the town, Mary and Joseph take shelter here. In his commentary, Tissot explains the presence of animals who gaze upon the newborn Jesus by noting that shepherds often used these caves...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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As news of Jesus’ teachings and deeds spread, his followers grew in number. Without adequate provisions to feed them, Jesus gathers five loaves and two fishes from a young boy in this large company, and after giving thanks to God, distributes them, managing to feed all who are hungry. Tissot offers an expansive view of the scene, one so broad that it becomes difficult to distinguish Jesus himself, at the upper right. However, this compositional strategy emphasizes the magnitude of the miracle...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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For this scene, Tissot directly integrated one of the motifs from his extensive sketching campaigns in Palestine into a finished composition for the Gospel narrative. Here, a large boulder the artist had drawn by the Sea of Tiberias becomes the rock on which Jesus sits as he preaches to his followers. Such direct correlations between the sketched motif and the Gospel narrative evoke Tissot’s claim for what he termed hyperaesthesia —a combination of direct observation of his surroundings and...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 59
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 202
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 63
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 97
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Jesus receives numerous requests for healings, creating a crush of supplicants. Eager to reach him, after he has retired to the privacy of a home, four men lower a paralytic through the roof into the welcoming arms of Jesus—a powerfully dramatic image. Tissot heightens the sense of the sick man’s helplessness with his flailing, outstretched arms, a counterpoint to Christ’s controlled gesture of acceptance. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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When Jesus dines in the house of one of the Pharisees, he does not wash his hands though Jewish ritual demanded it. When reproached by his host, Jesus, in turn, indicts the Pharisees for their hypocrisy: their emphasis on the appearance of righteousness through ceremony rather than true belief. In Tissot’s painting, Jesus condemns this group—much to their dismay and protest—with a dynamic gesture. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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This painting illustrates a parable in which Jesus likens those who ignore his teachings to the blind leading the blind. Holding on to one another but without informed guidance, the blind are vulnerable to danger. In his commentary, Tissot asserts that during his stay in Jerusalem he observed the following practice: “In the streets of Jerusalem numbers of blind men may still sometimes be seen, walking one behind the other in files, and clinging to each other, under the leadership of one of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Following Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, the chief priests and scribes meet to discuss their response to the challenge of his increasing popularity: they resolve to find a way to destroy him. Once more, Tissot focuses on the costumes of the priests, with their elaborately woven and draped textiles (fringed with fur, in the case of the white-bearded priest at center), and the lavish building materials of the Temple complex, with its marble columns topped with carved capitals. The...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 150
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 120
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 88
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 91
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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While crossing the Sea of Galilee in a ship during the night, Jesus and his disciples are overtaken by a storm. Tissot omits any sign of landfall, heightening the sense of danger in the rough, stormy sea. Awakened by his followers, who fear for their lives, Jesus quiets the tempest with a dramatic and dynamic gesture and rebukes his companions for their lack of faith. Tissot’s commentary connects this shipboard miracle with the miraculous draught of fishes, noting: “It was in the same boat,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 101
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 359
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 86
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Jesus further shows his acceptance of those rejected by society by inviting Matthew—a publican, or toll collector—into his ministry, as he passes his booth. Not only were these tax collectors considered unscrupulous, but they were also particularly loathed by devout Jews for their status as representatives of the ruling Romans. Tissot has included camels and the hint of a wide-arched gate to underscore Matthew’s location at a geographical (and perhaps, spiritual) crossroads, as well as...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 102
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 136
favorite 2
comment 0
For his narrative of the life of Christ, Tissot created a “harmony” of the Gospels, combining the separate accounts of Jesus’ life attributed to the apostles Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. These four New Testament texts differ from one another in theological emphasis and tone. A harmony, a literary form traced to the second-century Christian writer Tatian, seeks to reconcile the differences among the four Gospels and to piece together one continuous chronology of Jesus’ life, verse by...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 114
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 91
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 86
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 241
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Drawing on a story from the apocryphal Protoevangelion of James, Tissot depicts the expectant mood in the Temple as eligible bachelors await the sign that will determine the identity of the Holy Virgin’s betrothed. In Tissot’s image, the high priest emerges from an inner sanctuary into a richly appointed area with patterned rugs and marble columns to give each man a staff. Ranging in age from fresh-faced youths to white-bearded old men, the suitors look expectantly at the priest as he...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 105
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 91
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 129
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Following his presentation to the crowds from the loggia, Jesus is taken from Pilate’s palace—at half past eleven in the morning, Tissot precisely notes—to the public square where he will be officially condemned to death. Made a figure of mockery, Jesus is forced to wear the crown of thorns as well as the short scarlet cloak and carries a reed, meant to evoke a royal scepter. Focusing on the injuries suffered by Jesus, Tissot also notes that, at every step, the woolen cloak would have...
Topics: art, European Art
Already weak from beatings and the labor of carrying his heavy cross, Jesus falls for a second time. A man named Simon of Cyrene, a resident of North Africa, is pressed into service to help with the burden. Taking him roughly by the shoulders, the guards urge Simon, clothed in a short blue tunic, to carry the long central beam, as Jesus lies motionless on the cobbled street. Following the procession, a boy carries the title that will be affixed to the Cross. Spelled out in Hebrew, Greek, and...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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Mary Magdalene, meeting the resurrected Christ, falls to the ground “thinking to resume her old place at the feet of Jesus and to embrace them,” as Tissot notes. While Christ had encouraged the Magdalene’s ministrations in an earlier scene, The Ointment of the Magdalene , now he counsels caution, warning, “Touch me not”; the time for such familiarity has passed. The Magdalene’s prostrate body and full, flowing hair provide a clear visual cross-reference, effectively linking the two...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 102
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 130
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comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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In the third temptation, the devil carries a passive Jesus up to a high pinnacle of the Temple, where he is challenged to jump and prove his protection by God’s angels. However, Jesus steadfastly retains his faith and refuses to test God. This image demonstrates bravura watercolor technique, contrasting the transparency of the devil’s horned, clawed, and winged body with the solid masonry of the Temple. Moreover, as a matter of storytelling skill, note that this bird’s-eye view looks down...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 84
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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eye 126
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Following reports of Jesus’ early miraculous deeds, including healing the sick and exorcising demons, others of the afflicted soon seek his help. Borne on makeshift litters or kneeling in the streets outside the home of Peter, the supplicants eagerly reach out to be touched by Jesus. In this image, the winding, narrow alleys of an ancient city intensify the impression of jostling crowds of followers. Tissot’s commentary takes particular note of the use of arches in the construction of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 69
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Jesus begins his ministry to the people by calling disciples, or apostles, those who will help him spread his teachings. Peter and Andrew, fishermen on the Sea of Galilee, heed his call at once, leaving behind their nets. Their immediate acceptance of his call to a new life sets the tone for discipleship. Intent on giving a wealth of practical detail, Tissot in his commentary on this image describes the method of fishing with nets in the shallows near the shoreline, a practice that would have...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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eye 179
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Warned of impending danger in a dream, Joseph escaped Bethlehem and fled with his family to Egypt, evading Herod’s murderous plan. Carrying Jesus in her arms, Mary resumes the chores of daily life—here, fetching water—against the backdrop of the Egyptian landscape, distinguished by the palm trees and the island of Rhodes, which Tissot had sketched on one of his research trips to the Middle East in the late 1880s. Mindful of connecting the narratives of the Old and New Testaments, Tissot...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
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Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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Exclaiming “Behold the man!,” Pilate shows the beaten and bloodied Christ to the crowds. The people gathered in the court below urge his execution, with pointed fingers raised in accusatory gestures. On the loggia before the assembled crowd, Pilate—convinced of Jesus’ innocence and impressed by his dignity, according to Tissot’s account—publicly washes his hands on the loggia before the square, symbolically distancing himself from the execution to follow. Object metadata can change...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 127
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Jesus further shows his acceptance of those rejected by society by inviting Matthew—a publican, or toll collector—into his ministry, as he passes his booth. Not only were these tax collectors considered unscrupulous, but they were also particularly loathed by devout Jews for their status as representatives of the ruling Romans. Tissot has included camels and the hint of a wide-arched gate to underscore Matthew’s location at a geographical (and perhaps, spiritual) crossroads, as well as...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 72
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comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
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While Jesus retreats to the mountain to pray, his disciples travel ahead of him, sailing once more across stormy waters. Seeking to calm the frightened apostles, Jesus walks across the sea, but this further terrifies them as they momentarily believe him to be a ghost. Tissot attempts to explain the fears of the disciples, in a commentary that melds his interests in scientific observation and in legend: noting the early hour designated by the Gospel account—3 a.m.—and the weather conditions,...
Topics: art, European Art
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art