Skip to main content

SHOW DETAILS
up-solid down-solid
eye
Title
Date Favorited
Creator
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 3,620
favorite 2
comment 1
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 1 reviews )
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 2,147
favorite 4
comment 0
In the most memorable, and even notorious, of Tissot’s images, Christ looks out at the crowd of spectators arrayed before him: Mary Magdalene, in the immediate foreground, with her long red tresses swirling down her back, kneels at his feet, which are clearly visible at the bottom center of the composition. Beyond her, the Virgin Mary clutches her breast, while John the Evangelist looks up with hands clasped. The artist here adopts the point of view of Christ himself. Few painters have...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 1,610
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 1,502
favorite 3
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 1,196
favorite 3
comment 0
Although Tissot gave exacting attention to archaeological detail, providing what he intended as historically accurate backdrops for the narrative of Christ’s life, he also pursued the mystical. At the pool known as the Piscina Probatica, the infirm gather around the edge of the water in the hope of being healed. According to John, an angel stirs the pool, activating its curative powers; the next person to step into the water would be delivered from affliction. Tissot’s image features two...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 1,097
favorite 2
comment 0
Mary Magdalene, meeting the resurrected Christ, falls to the ground “thinking to resume her old place at the feet of Jesus and to embrace them,” as Tissot notes. While Christ had encouraged the Magdalene’s ministrations in an earlier scene, The Ointment of the Magdalene , now he counsels caution, warning, “Touch me not”; the time for such familiarity has passed. The Magdalene’s prostrate body and full, flowing hair provide a clear visual cross-reference, effectively linking the two...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 1,008
favorite 4
comment 0
As earlier temptation episodes foretold, the devil left Jesus “for a season” but reappeared time and again to test him in the form of possessed outcasts. Here, in a barren landscape pocked with caves and tombs—a terrain familiar from Tissot’s sketches of the Valley of Hinnom—Jesus encounters two men afflicted with demons, while a herd of swine wanders on the horizon. Tissot notes that the Gentiles, sometimes in the employ of Jews, tended swine in these lands, despite Jewish tradition,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 983
favorite 6
comment 0
With this scene, Tissot continues to explore Mary’s role in the “Divine plan,” as the artist called the biblical narrative. Mary prays or “sings” her praise of God for giving her a part to play in humankind’s redemption. While The Annunciation underscored the Virgin’s humble station and modesty, here she stands with head and hands raised to the sky as she utters what Tissot characterizes as a “quiet, reverent, whispered expression of a spirit moved to its very depths.” Her...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 666
favorite 2
comment 0
Betrothed but still unmarried, Mary and Joseph do not yet live together, making the news of her unexpected pregnancy a cause of deep concern for Joseph. Ordinarily industrious, as the curled wood shavings around his feet attest, the carpenter hunches over his bench, lost in thought and unable to work. In the hope of catching a glimpse of Mary, he gazes out at the street as women pass carrying jars filled with the day’s water. Although traditional representations of Joseph show a man of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 476
favorite 3
comment 0
Gathered around Jesus, the disciples ask him to teach them to pray. With arms opened wide and hands upraised in a gesture of humility, Jesus begins his prayer with an acknowledgment of God’s power in heaven and on earth. (Tissot places Jesus between the color-streaked sky and the ground on which his disciples sit, further signifying Jesus’ place between the human and the divine.) This invocation became the foundational prayer for his followers. Object metadata can change over time, please...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 443
favorite 2
comment 0
In the third temptation, the devil carries a passive Jesus up to a high pinnacle of the Temple, where he is challenged to jump and prove his protection by God’s angels. However, Jesus steadfastly retains his faith and refuses to test God. This image demonstrates bravura watercolor technique, contrasting the transparency of the devil’s horned, clawed, and winged body with the solid masonry of the Temple. Moreover, as a matter of storytelling skill, note that this bird’s-eye view looks down...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 423
favorite 1
comment 0
When Jesus heals a man with a withered hand on the Sabbath, he flouts rules against work and further upsets the devout. Although Jewish law permitted the saving of lives on the holy day, Jesus defies the rigid rules of the Sabbath by extending his help to a man afflicted but not threatened with death. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 422
favorite 3
comment 0
In an image that recalls centuries of precedents, Christ’s loved ones have gathered to draw down his body for burial. Each nail is carefully removed, Tissot explains, before the legs are swathed in linen and the body, held in a long band of material, is slowly lowered into the upraised arms of the Virgin Mary, who is clad in blue. She is joined by the Magdalene, who once more wipes the feet of Jesus, and Saint John the Evangelist, who stands at the foot of the cross holding the shroud with...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 414
favorite 2
comment 0
From Solomon’s Porch in the Temple complex, Jesus berates a large crowd of the devout for the killing of the prophets and predicts their rejection of him. Tissot paints Christ with his back turned to the viewer, an isolated figure. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 413
favorite 2
comment 0
Although Matthew, Mark, and Luke all describe Christ’s temptations by Satan, Tissot cites only the version given by Luke. For reasons that remain unclear, he changes the order of the tests given by Luke. In Tissot’s first image, Satan abducts Jesus and soars to a precipitous height—emphasized by the low, bright horizon line in the distance. The shadowy darkness of the claw-toed devil contrasts with Jesus’ pristine white cloak. From their great height, Satan tempts Jesus with the many...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 411
favorite 2
comment 0
Following the death of his friend Lazarus, Jesus goes to Bethany to comfort Martha and Mary Magdalene for a loss that he also felt keenly. Both women lament that Jesus was absent when Lazarus took ill, knowing that he would have prevented the death with his healing powers. Affected by the loss, Jesus weeps. Led to the darkened tomb of Lazarus, Jesus commands the removal of the stone covering the opening and, after a prayer to God, resurrects the dead man before witnesses who gasp in...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 381
favorite 3
comment 0
According to Matthew, Jesus travels from Galilee to Judaea to be baptized by John the Baptist in the Jordan River. Although John humbly protests and suggests that it is he who should be baptized by Jesus instead, Jesus insists. Here, a dove descends from the heavens as Jesus emerges from the water, while a voice from above calls him “my beloved Son.” Perhaps in reference to earlier passages in the Gospels relating the curiosity and suspicion John’s desert ministry inspired in some...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 366
favorite 2
comment 0
Paying his usual rigorous attention to researching the settings for his interpretation of the narrative, Tissot places the episode of Jesus’ birth in one of the caves in the mountains in and around Bethlehem, a departure from visual tradition, which often locates the Nativity in a stable. Unable to find rooms in the town, Mary and Joseph take shelter here. In his commentary, Tissot explains the presence of animals who gaze upon the newborn Jesus by noting that shepherds often used these caves...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 351
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 333
favorite 3
comment 0
As Jesus continues on his route to Calvary, a woman now known as Saint Veronica approaches to offer momentary respite. Kneeling before Jesus, she gives him linen to wipe his face of the sweat and blood from his exertions and wounds. Taking the cloth in both hands, he presses it to his face, leaving a likeness of his features, which Veronica cherished as a memorial to him. In his commentary, Tissot notes that this relic was later taken to Rome for safekeeping by the Church. Object metadata can...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 330
favorite 2
comment 0
In this chapter of Matthew, Jesus teaches frequently with parables, or fables—a strategy that frustrates his disciples, who ask him why he uses this challenging method of preaching. To explain his pedagogy, Jesus invokes yet another parable, the fable of the sower. The sower scatters his seeds on inhospitable terrain—rocky, thorny, and dry—seemingly to no effect. But many of the seeds do find fertile ground, producing a plentiful harvest. For Jesus, his words are like the seeds of the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 329
favorite 3
comment 0
For the Passover feast, the apostles (dressed in traveling clothes, like the Jews of the Old Testament book of Exodus, Tissot explains) meet in a room decorated with garlands. During the meal, Jesus reveals that he will be betrayed by one of his disciples; many of them worriedly ask, “Is it I?” In this image, Jesus hands the sop, or dipped bread, to Judas Iscariot, identifying him as the traitor. Jesus later dismisses him from the company, urging him to be quick about his business. Here,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 320
favorite 2
comment 0
Although the Gospels are silent on the years between Christ’s childhood and his ministry—providing no specific indication of his training or education—Tissot adheres to tradition and depicts Jesus as a faithful son to his earthly father, assisting Joseph with the work of the carpentry shop. In his commentary, Tissot spurned apocryphal legends of wondrous doings by the Christ Child, insisting that such deeds would have aroused attention, whether awe or suspicion, and would have been...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 313
favorite 2
comment 0
As Jesus expires on the cross, he utters the words “It is finished.” In this image, the spirits of the Old Testament prophets hover around the transverse bar of his crucifix, welcoming him into their company. Within the six-pointed Star of David, Tissot has painted the Hebrew word for Lord, further underscoring Christ’s role in the divine plan. Asserting that their “prophecies are accomplished,” the artist shows the hovering prophets triumphantly holding scriptural scrolls above their...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 308
favorite 2
comment 0
This scene depicts a wedding at Cana, where Jesus performs his first miracle before his disciples and his mother, Mary. Although this feast was amply supplied with water—a necessity for the frequent purifications demanded by Jewish ritual, Tissot notes— the celebration had run out of wine, as Mary points out to her son. Jesus then turns jars of water into wine, much to the astonishment of his host and fellow guests, who curiously peer over the table to look into the vessels. Though already...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 305
favorite 3
comment 0
Although Herod had imprisoned John the Baptist for speaking against his marriage to Herodias, the ruler admired the Baptist as a wise and righteous man. On the occasion of Herod’s birthday, Salome, the daughter of Herodias, dances before the guests, pleasing the host so much that he promises her anything she wants. Tissot notes that he found inspiration for his image of Salome’s acrobatic dance in ancient reliefs from sources as diverse as Egypt, India, and Persia as well as the reliefs of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 298
favorite 2
comment 0
As Jesus continues on his route to Calvary, a woman now known as Saint Veronica approaches to offer momentary respite. Kneeling before Jesus, she gives him linen to wipe his face of the sweat and blood from his exertions and wounds. Taking the cloth in both hands, he presses it to his face, leaving a likeness of his features, which Veronica cherished as a memorial to him. In his commentary, Tissot notes that this relic was later taken to Rome for safekeeping by the Church. Object metadata can...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 297
favorite 2
comment 0
Apart from Jesus, Mary Magdalene is the only individual in Tissot’s series accorded more than one study, or portrait—an exception that announces her importance, not only to the narrative itself but also to the artist. As scholars have suggested, Tissot appears to have modeled the Magdalene’s features after his late mistress, Mrs. Kathleen Newton, who had died of tuberculosis in 1882. Like many in the nineteenth century, the painter was particularly interested in the occult, and he had...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 296
favorite 3
comment 0
In this parable, a young man leaves the comfort of family, wanders foreign lands, and resorts to begging after wasting a fortune through debauchery. Returning, he receives the embrace of his father, who warmly welcomes him home despite his mistakes, prompting the young man to repent the rejection of his family. Tissot had treated the Prodigal Son subject several times before, first in the guise of early historicizing scenes that helped establish his career and then, in the early 1880s, as a...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 289
favorite 2
comment 0
According to John, while the Roman governor continues to find Jesus blameless, he accedes to pressure from the priests and decides to “chastise” him through scourging. Jesus is bound, defenseless, to a marble column and whipped before a crowded court as Pilate looks on from the palace loggia in the background. Christ’s tormentors perform a punishment most likely inflicted, Tissot tells his readers, with leather whips weighted with pieces of bone. Object metadata can change over time,...
Topics: art, European Art
Although Matthew, Mark, and Luke all describe Christ’s temptations by Satan, Tissot cites only the version given by Luke. For reasons that remain unclear, he changes the order of the tests given by Luke. In Tissot’s first image, Satan abducts Jesus and soars to a precipitous height—emphasized by the low, bright horizon line in the distance. The shadowy darkness of the claw-toed devil contrasts with Jesus’ pristine white cloak. From their great height, Satan tempts Jesus with the many...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 280
favorite 2
comment 0
As Christ ascends to heaven, several witnesses shade their eyes from the blinding view overhead. According to Tissot, the Ascension completes the “original idea of Creation,” which was “redemption through Christ”; now humanity, too, is permitted to share in divine glory. “The cloud which ‘received Christ from sight’ is like the curtain which falls at the close of a drama,” he comments. In the foreground of the image, Christ’s two footprints remain pressed into the earth as...
Topics: art, European Art
To help guide the reader through the narrative of the Passion in his published Bible, Tissot repeatedly depicts two angels holding a dial, or clock, indicating the specific hour at which each event occurs. The tapers in their hands, Tissot tells us, signify purity and light: behind them, the sky is dark, but countless stars recall the promise of eternity. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 259
favorite 5
comment 0
Following the deprivations in the wilderness, Jesus receives the care of angels who restore his strength. Rejecting art-historical traditions in which Jesus takes material sustenance in the form of dates and pomegranates, Tissot insists on otherworldly agency. Here blue-hued, flame-haired angels extend their fingers to touch the prostrate form of the spent Jesus, who appears to assume a cross-like position. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 255
favorite 2
comment 0
Exclaiming “Behold the man!,” Pilate shows the beaten and bloodied Christ to the crowds. The people gathered in the court below urge his execution, with pointed fingers raised in accusatory gestures. On the loggia before the assembled crowd, Pilate—convinced of Jesus’ innocence and impressed by his dignity, according to Tissot’s account—publicly washes his hands on the loggia before the square, symbolically distancing himself from the execution to follow. Object metadata can change...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 255
favorite 3
comment 0
Following the Last Supper, Jesus and the apostles retreat to Gethsemane (an olive grove) on the Mount of Olives. While his disciples rest, Christ prays alone, asking God if it is possible to let his sufferings pass him by, yet reaffirming his commitment to submit to God’s will. Luke writes that an angel comes to strengthen him, though in his anguish Jesus sweats blood, a graphic detail that, unusually, Tissot omits. While Luke’s account says that Christ receives comfort from the angel,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 254
favorite 2
comment 0
Forty days after the birth of Jesus, the Holy Family travels to Jerusalem to initiate the child into the service of God at the Temple and to offer a modest sacrifice: the caged pigeons or turtledoves held here by Joseph. Taking the infant into his arms, the aged priest Simeon acknowledges the child as the Christ, or Messiah. Throughout his commentaries, Tissot refers to both historical and modern sources to demonstrate his extensive knowledge of the Temple precinct in ancient Jerusalem. He...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 252
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 245
favorite 2
comment 0
According to Luke, an angel appeared to Mary and announced that she would bear the Son of God. Tissot adhered to art-historical precedents for this biblical episode, placing the Angel Annunciate at left and Mary at right. Her white robes, symbolizing purity, set her apart from the pattern-on-pattern furnishings that the artist used to signal the “authenticity” of the exotic Eastern setting. Mary sits on the floor with head bowed and hands open, humbly accepting her role. In a later passage...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 239
favorite 2
comment 0
Complementing the narrative of the venerations by the humble shepherds, the Magi, guided by a moving star, traveled separately from their individual lands in the east in search of the newborn Jesus. Tissot depicts the Magi at the moment when their retinues meet in the vast, arid landscape of the volcanic hills on the shores of the Dead Sea between Jericho, the Kedron Valley, and Jerusalem. In his commentary, the artist notes that their flowing saffron robes—a luxurious counterpoint to the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 237
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 231
favorite 3
comment 0
Although Herod had imprisoned John the Baptist for speaking against his marriage to Herodias, the ruler admired the Baptist as a wise and righteous man. On the occasion of Herod’s birthday, Salome, the daughter of Herodias, dances before the guests, pleasing the host so much that he promises her anything she wants. Tissot notes that he found inspiration for his image of Salome’s acrobatic dance in ancient reliefs from sources as diverse as Egypt, India, and Persia as well as the reliefs of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 229
favorite 2
comment 0
Tissot renders the technical elements of the Crucifixion with a profusion of unforgettable details intended to encourage viewers to contemplate the method of Christ’s execution on a visceral level. Although Tissot follows celebrated artistic predecessors such as the Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) in his depiction of the brute physical exertions required of those who raised the cross, he also adds further nuances to the visual tradition, depicting the elaborate system of...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 227
favorite 2
comment 0
In Luke’s telling, Jesus returns to Nazareth, the town of his childhood, and goes to the synagogue on the Sabbath. Reading a passage from Isaiah, he declares himself the fulfillment of the prophet’s words, as the means of redemption and healing for the marginalized, afflicted, and oppressed. Those gathered in the synagogue react with wonder to find the prophecy realized in one of their own—“Joseph’s son,” as the group calls him. However, Jesus warns that his path promises hardship,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 221
favorite 2
comment 0
Speaking to those who challenge his teachings and his deeds, Jesus likens himself to the good shepherd, pictured here, who devotes his life, and sacrifices his own well-being, to protect the sheep in his care. This analogy anticipates the ultimate sacrifice that Jesus will make for his “flock” of followers and humankind. Tissot notes that this parable is among the most beautiful in the Gospels—and, indeed, one with an enduring visual history. The artist cites the earliest examples in the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 221
favorite 2
comment 0
Sitting astride a donkey, Jesus enters Jerusalem during the Passover season in triumph, receiving the acclamation of his followers, who call him the prophet of Nazareth and place garments or other textiles in his path, a homage typically reserved for kings. The multitudes also register their respect with bowed heads, outstretched arms, and clapping hands. Several of his followers celebrate his arrival with palm fronds, a symbol of victory in Jewish tradition. These palms subsequently gave the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 213
favorite 2
comment 0
Following the death of the good (or penitent) thief crucified at Golgotha, his soul is taken up to heaven, fulfilling the promise made by Jesus on the cross; as Tissot notes, he is the very first to “reap the benefits of the Redemption of mankind.” With eyes wide open in wonder, the good thief floats upward, supported by six-winged angels who bear perfume censers. Far below lies the earth, its continents and seas clearly discernible. Object metadata can change over time, please check the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 212
favorite 2
comment 0
Invited to Bethany, where the siblings Lazarus and Martha reside, Jesus finds respite from his ministry and peace to converse with friends. Intent on listening to Jesus, the Magdalene takes a place at his feet—much to the frustration of Martha, who expects her help with the guests, Tissot relates. The Magdalene’s devoted discipleship proves unflagging throughout the narrative from the ministry to the Passion and the Resurrection; and, accordingly, her posture here at the feet of Christ...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 212
favorite 2
comment 0
This episode reveals Jesus’ concern for the outcasts of society: in this case, those afflicted with leprosy, a chronic disease. The leper kneels in the center foreground of the image—dramatically making his plea to Jesus with his bandaged arms upraised. Referring to ancient laws regarding the lepers, Tissot writes that the man occupies the center of the road to permit the healthy to pass with ease on either side of the path. In the Gospel text, Jesus later urges the healed man to keep quiet...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 208
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 207
favorite 2
comment 0
In the ninth hour of the Passion (three o’clock in the afternoon), Jesus “gives utterance to that cry of anguish, the most heartrending which ever resounded upon this earth,” Tissot writes. In his commentary, Tissot indicates that Christ’s words—the title of this work—are derived from the opening verse of the 22nd Psalm, a text that begins with a lamentation on God’s seeming absence or desertion. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 207
favorite 3
comment 0
Jesus appears with his hands folded over his heart, his gaze direct, his expression composed. As Moses commanded in the Old Testament books of Numbers and Deuteronomy, Jesus wears a prayer shawl as a sign of his adherence to the rituals of Judaism. Tissot derived this image from a larger watercolor in the series in which Jesus gives his last discourse to his disciples after the departure of Judas. He urges them to love one another as he has loved them. Object metadata can change over time,...
Topics: art, European Art
Already weak from beatings and the labor of carrying his heavy cross, Jesus falls for a second time. A man named Simon of Cyrene, a resident of North Africa, is pressed into service to help with the burden. Taking him roughly by the shoulders, the guards urge Simon, clothed in a short blue tunic, to carry the long central beam, as Jesus lies motionless on the cobbled street. Following the procession, a boy carries the title that will be affixed to the Cross. Spelled out in Hebrew, Greek, and...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 203
favorite 2
comment 0
In the biblical narrative, Mary and Joseph live in Nazareth but must journey to Bethlehem, the ancestral home of Joseph’s family, to be counted in a census imposed by the Romans. On their arrival in the town, Joseph searches for lodgings without success. Tissot contrasts Joseph’s anxious plea—calling up to townspeople in hopes of finding accommodation—with the Virgin Mary’s quiet resignation. Tissot’s expeditions to the Middle East in the 1880s provided rich source material for his...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 199
favorite 2
comment 0
In the passage illustrated here, Jesus again retreats to a mountaintop, with his disciples Peter, James, and John, to pray. He is transformed before the eyes of his companions in the course of his prayers; his robes emit a blinding white light. Moreover, the Old Testament prophets Elijah and Moses suddenly appear to converse with him. In Tissot’s rendering, one apostle shields his eyes from the brilliant glow, while another covers his ears as God’s supernatural voice declares Jesus his...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 198
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 197
favorite 2
comment 0
Mary Magdalene kneels before Christ and anoints his feet, wiping away the excess oil with her hair, a gesture of deference and devotion. The disciples—especially Judas Iscariot, Tissot notes, in a commentary based on John’s account—are indignant at the gesture’s expense, asking could not this costly ointment be sold and its profits given to the poor? However, Jesus defends Mary’s prescience: “She did it,” he tells them, “for my burial.” Object metadata can change over time,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 195
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 192
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 190
favorite 2
comment 0
Complementing the narrative of the venerations by the humble shepherds, the Magi, guided by a moving star, traveled separately from their individual lands in the east in search of the newborn Jesus. Tissot depicts the Magi at the moment when their retinues meet in the vast, arid landscape of the volcanic hills on the shores of the Dead Sea between Jericho, the Kedron Valley, and Jerusalem. In his commentary, the artist notes that their flowing saffron robes—a luxurious counterpoint to the...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 185
favorite 2
comment 0
After the disciples dine together, the company passes into another chamber, the artist notes, where Jesus washes the feet of his followers, an act of selflessness and humility that presages his later sacrifice for the sins of mankind. Although Peter, sitting at center with his hands at his head, protests his unworthiness, Jesus insists on the physical and spiritual necessity of the cleansing act. Hinting at his knowledge of his future betrayal by Judas, by saying that not all of his apostles...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 184
favorite 2
comment 0
While crossing the Sea of Galilee in a ship during the night, Jesus and his disciples are overtaken by a storm. Tissot omits any sign of landfall, heightening the sense of danger in the rough, stormy sea. Awakened by his followers, who fear for their lives, Jesus quiets the tempest with a dramatic and dynamic gesture and rebukes his companions for their lack of faith. Tissot’s commentary connects this shipboard miracle with the miraculous draught of fishes, noting: “It was in the same boat,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 180
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 179
favorite 2
comment 0
Tissot opens the section on Jesus’ ministry by introducing John the Baptist, who prophesied his coming, urged repentance, and practiced the cleansing rite of baptism. Calling out from the vast, rugged deserts of Judaea, the Baptist here throws his arms up in the air. In his commentary, Tissot notes the resounding echo effect in the rocky valleys the Baptist inhabited, heightening his emphatic call to “make straight the way of the Lord.” The artist’s commentaries, which at times read...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 178
favorite 1
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 173
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 173
favorite 2
comment 0
Warned of impending danger in a dream, Joseph escaped Bethlehem and fled with his family to Egypt, evading Herod’s murderous plan. Carrying Jesus in her arms, Mary resumes the chores of daily life—here, fetching water—against the backdrop of the Egyptian landscape, distinguished by the palm trees and the island of Rhodes, which Tissot had sketched on one of his research trips to the Middle East in the late 1880s. Mindful of connecting the narratives of the Old and New Testaments, Tissot...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 172
favorite 2
comment 0
Emerging out of a tomb sealed with a large stone and guarded by watchmen, Jesus miraculously rises from the dead. His face shines forth and the wounds on his head, hands, feet, and chest glow bright white. The guards shook and “became as dead men,” Matthew says, at the sight of the risen Jesus, falling backwards in abject terror. Glowing more brilliantly than the guards’ lanterns, an angel visible just inside the tomb at right will later reassure Mary Magdalene and the other holy women...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 172
favorite 2
comment 0
When Tissot first debuted his series in Paris in 1894, he preceded the earliest narrative scenes with this mysterious image of Jesus peering through a delicate screen. The artist provided the following verse from the Song of Solomon to accompany this unusual composition: “Behold, he [the beloved] standeth behind our wall, he looketh forth at the windows, showing himself through the lattice.” As scholars have noted, the vines heavy with fruit and the sunflowers—traditional Christian...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 170
favorite 2
comment 0
As Christ and the thieves condemned to die along with him hang on their crosses, one mockingly demands that Jesus, as the Christ, relieve them of their sufferings. The other criminal reminds his fellow of the justness of their punishments, in contrast to the innocence of Jesus. “Touched,” Tissot writes, “by the divine gentleness of the crucified Saviour,” the penitent thief then asks Jesus to remember him when he comes into his kingdom; Jesus replies that today the thief will be with...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 170
favorite 2
comment 0
As they continue to plot against Jesus, the chief priests warn against acting during the feast of Passover, fearing a possible uprising at a time when Jerusalem’s population swelled dramatically, with many visitors in town to celebrate the holiday. While a young man keeps watch, the priests speak closely together, stroking their beards and scowling in an almost caricatural fashion, in Tissot’s rendering. Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 167
favorite 2
comment 0
Jesus now has a significant following, demonstrated visually by the crowd stretching along narrow paths from the distant shores of a lake all the way to the peak of the mountain; he preaches with hands upraised to a group of men, women, and children. In the episode illustrated here, often called the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus enunciates many of the key moral and ethical tenets of his ministry. In the beatitudes, he identifies the blessed among the community— including the meek, the righteous,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 166
favorite 2
comment 0
Object metadata can change over time, please check the Brooklyn Museum object record for the latest information.
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
by James Tissot
image
eye 164
favorite 2
comment 0
While Jesus retreats to the mountain to pray, his disciples travel ahead of him, sailing once more across stormy waters. Seeking to calm the frightened apostles, Jesus walks across the sea, but this further terrifies them as they momentarily believe him to be a ghost. Tissot attempts to explain the fears of the disciples, in a commentary that melds his interests in scientific observation and in legend: noting the early hour designated by the Gospel account—3 a.m.—and the weather conditions,...
Topics: art, European Art
Brooklyn Museum
image
eye 163
favorite 2
comment 0
In Luke’s account of the calling of the first apostles, the fishermen return empty-handed after a long night of fishing in their boats. At Jesus’ command, they lower their nets once more and harvest more fish than their boats can hold, prompting Peter to confess his unworthiness in Jesus’ presence. While the other fishermen struggle with their hefty catch, Peter bows on bended knees before Jesus, a gesture that underscores his primacy among the disciples in Luke’s Gospel. In response to...
Topics: art, European Art