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"The Influence of Increasing Difficulty of Reading Material upon Rate, Errors, and Comprehension in Oral Reading" is an article from The Elementary School Journal, Volume 18 . View more articles from The Elementary School Journal . View this article on JSTOR . View this article's JSTOR metadata . You may also retrieve all of this items metadata in JSON at the following URL: https://archive.org/metadata/jstor-994339
Source: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/994339
Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Archive
by ERIC
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This article describes the visual nature of the reading process as it relates to reading speed. It points out that there is a physical limit on normal reading speed and beyond this limit the reading process will be different from normal reading where almost every word is attended to. The article describes a range of activities for developing reading fluency, and suggests how the development of fluency can become part of a reading programme.
Topics: ERIC Archive, Reading Fluency, Reading Skills, Reading Processes, Reading Rate, Reading...
This article examines the concept of simplification in second language (SL) learning, reviewing research on the simplified input that both naturalistic and classroom SL learners receive. Research indicates that simplified input, particularly if derived from naturally occurring interactions, does aid comprehension but has not been shown to facilitate acquisition. Several studies demonstrate that providing learners with opportunities for communicating in a classroom setting leads to vocabulary...
Topics: ERIC Archive, Classroom Environment, Educational Media, English (Second Language), Foreign...
PubMed Central
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This article is from Frontiers in Psychology , volume 4 . Abstract In two experiments, subjects responded to on-task probes while reading under dual-task conditions. The secondary task was to monitor the text for occurrences of the letter e. In Experiment 1, reading comprehension was assessed with a multiple-choice recognition test; in Experiment 2, subjects recalled the text. In both experiments, the secondary task replicated the well-known “missing-letter effect” in which detection of e's...
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3787250
PubMed Central
by Mossbridge, Julia A.; Grabowecky, Marcia; Paller, Ken A.; Suzuki, Satoru
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This article is from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , volume 7 . Abstract Reading comprehension depends on neural processes supporting the access, understanding, and storage of words over time. Examinations of the neural activity correlated with reading have contributed to our understanding of reading comprehension, especially for the comprehension of sentences and short passages. However, the neural activity associated with comprehending an extended text is not well-understood. Here we...
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3819048
This article is from Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences , volume 5 . Abstract Objective: The current research tested the differences in reading attitude and reading comprehension in the dyslexic students between the control group and the experimental group following the Barton intervention program.Methods: Dyslexia screening instrument and reading text were employed in order to identify dyslexic students. The population of the study included 138 dyslexic students studying in...
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939955
PubMed Central
by Hasko, Sandra; Groth, Katarina; Bruder, Jennifer; Bartling, Jurgen; Schulte-Korne, Gerd
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This article is from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , volume 8 . Abstract Intervention is key to managing developmental dyslexia (DD), but not all children with DD benefit from treatment. Some children improve (improvers, IMP), whereas others do not improve (non-improvers, NIMP). Neurobiological differences between IMP and NIMP have been suggested, but studies comparing IMP and NIMP in childhood are missing. The present study examined whether ERP patterns change with treatment and differ...
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4071643