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Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Archive
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Animals familiar to the northwest region of California where Hupa Indians reside are depicted in this coloring book which belongs to a series of materials developed to promote the use of the Hupa language. Each page contains a bold pen and ink drawing of an animal and the animal's name in the Unifon alphabet used for writing the Hupa language. There are no English translations. Each animal is presented in its habitat, e.g., a bear is by a stream where he has just caught a fish, a hummingbird is...
Topics: ERIC Archive, American Indian Education, American Indian Languages, Animals, Basic Vocabulary,...
Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Archive
by ERIC
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Lessons used in a Hupa bilingual class during the 1986-87 academic year are compiled in this manual, which was generated cooperatively by the Hupa teachers. The lessons are arranged in a progression from easier to harder and cover vocabulary, conversations, verbs, holidays, and stories. The first two chapters present basic vocabulary terms for numbers, body parts, clothing, animals, colors, musical instruments, weather, time, and talking about one's self--family members, places, pets, favorite...
Topics: ERIC Archive, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indian Languages,...
This paper describes the cultural communication proficiency method of indigenous language instruction, developed at Humboldt State University's Center for Indian Community Development (California), and demonstrates the method with five Hupa lesson plans. The method is based on three principles: that Native American students learn by doing, learn in ways compatible with their culture, and learn in stages. Cooperative learning, communication-based instruction, and total physical response...
Topics: ERIC Archive, American Indian Education, American Indian Languages, American Indian Literature,...
Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Archive
by ERIC
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A description of how the Karuk Indians of northwestern California gathered and prepared acorns for food includes illustrations and Karuk words for utensils and processes. The booklet explains how women of the tribe gathered, dried, stored, cracked, ground, leached, and cooked acorns to make acorn soup. Illustrations supplement descriptions of storage baskets, pestles, sifters, and cooking techniques. (LFL)
Topics: ERIC Archive, Adult Education, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indian...
A description of the American Indian Bilingual Teacher Credential Program offered by Humboldt State University (California) provides background information on the linguistic groups served by the program. Accompanying the program descriptions are lists of lower and upper division requirements, descriptions of competency exam, program schedule, course descriptions, and student and fieldwork information and evaluation forms. The linguistic groups served include four tribes of northwestern...
Topics: ERIC Archive, American Indian Education, American Indian Languages, American Indians, Bilingual...
The 25 papers collected in this book represent the thoughts and experiences of indigenous language activists from the United States, Canada, Mexico, and New Zealand, and are grouped in six categories: tribal and school roles, teaching students, teacher education, curriculum and materials development, language attitudes and promotion, and summary thoughts about maintaining and renewing indigenous languages. Papers are: "Keeping Minority Languages Alive: The School's Responsibility"...
Topics: ERIC Archive, American Indian Education, American Indian Languages, Bilingual Education, Community...
Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Archive
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A description of basket weaving techniques and materials used by the Karuk Indians of northwestern California includes illustrations and Karuk language terms so that the booklet may be used to enrich Karuk bilingual classes as well as to interest knowledgeable basketweavers. A section on materials discusses identifying, gathering, and preparing willow and hazel sticks; sugar pine, pine, and willow roots; bear grass; woodwardia and maidenhair ferns; porcupine quills; and alder bark and moss for...
Topics: ERIC Archive, Adult Education, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indian...