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Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and Pacifica station listeners, this one-year project brings to life fragile and deteriorating reel- to-reel tapes of national significance. Three categories of tapes were selected that highlight some of the strengths of our collection:



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Kris Welch interviews Bishop Desmond Tutu, a South African activist and the first black Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town. Welch mentions his book, "Rainbow People of God : Making of a Peaceful Revolution" which is a chronological documentary collection of his speeches, sermons, and letters from 1976 to 1994.
Source: KPFA
David Rothenberg interviews Harvey Fierstein who is an actor and playwright. He is a Tony-award winning author of and actor in "Torch Song Trilogy". Fierstein talks about his background in theater and writing. His first performance was in New York's off-broadway theater La MaMa which was in Andy Warhol's play, Pork. Fierstein is also a gay civil rights activist.
Source: WBAI
Kris Welch and Chuy Varela interview Bobbie McFerrin, an African-American singer, songwriter, and conductor, for KPFA Morning Show. They talk about his new release, "Circlesongs" circa 1998.
Source: KPFA
This is a special recording that has been made inside and outside the supervisor's chamber in San Francisco City Hall where the house subcommittee is in session. The recordings are excerpts of events of the 1970s which include Black Panthers, Robert Kennedy's assassination, Attica prison riot, Wounded Knee, South Africa, and genetic engineering. Other speakers include George Carlin, Dr. Sol Gordon, and Fran Lee.
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Marc Coleman, member of the Berkeley Peace Brigade, discusses his efforts to set up an anti-draft table in front of the local draftboard. He was arrested on July 15, a month and a half after he started the nonviolent protest.
Source: KPFA
Recorded live on Saturday night, December 17, 1977, the Women's Coffeehouse put on a benefit for the WBAI Women's Programming. Rebecca Tron introduces the singer Suni Paz with cellist Martha Siegal, poet Sharon Thomson, poet Alice Walker, and musician Lynn Messinger. Eileen Zalisk, a women's health and science programmer, gives a brief biography about the Argentinian-born folksinger Suni Paz. She begins by singing an Argentinian song, "Cancion de la Ternurna" or "Song of...
Source: WBAI
Ganienkeh, also known as the "Land of the Flint," is the ancestral territory of the Mohawk Nation which is located in the New York Adirondack Preserve. Speakers examine the treaties, incidents, and struggles amongst the traditional Mohawk community.
Source: WBAI
Edited actuality of student protests against new campus rules at University of California, Berkeley. Demonstrators await outcome of negotiations between Savio and other student leaders, Berkeley Chancellor Strong, and University President Clark Kerr. They prepare for possible confrontation with police. Among the events captured in this recording are discussions of strategies for passive resistance; demonstrators singing various Civil Rights Movement songs including "We Shall...
Source: KPFA
Art Goldberg reports on the conference with Clark Kerr at the Greek Theater and the refusal to allow Mario Savio to speak. Savio gives a brief summary of the free speech issues. He commends the proposal which was read by Professor Hirsch [see AZ1393], but then lists the problems involved with the proposal. He calls for a "ceasefire" until the Senate meets and responds to the faculty proposal. Following, Savio is interviewed about why he was not allowed to speak at the Greek Theater...
Source: KPFA
Judith Malina, Joseph Chaikin, Richard Schechner and Julian Beck discuss theatre in New York. Recorded at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) in Brooklyn, New York, April 23, 1975, broadcast on WBAI, May 19, 1975.
Source: WBAI
Actuality of student protest against new campus rules at University of California, Berkeley. Actuality of student protest against new campus rules at University of California, Berkeley. Listeners can hear altercation over microphone by pro- and anti- free speech movement activists, as well as student heckling of anti-FSM activists. Craig Burton and Mario Savio debate the use of democratic process in bringing about change. Fraternity students decry student movement. Julie Blake describes her...
Source: KPFA
Burton White calls an emergency faculty meeting. The members assembled urge that the following actions be taken immediately: 1. the new and liberalized rules for campus political action be declared in effect and enforced, pending their improvement, 2. all pending campus action against students for acts occurring before the present date be dropped, and 3. a committee selected by and responsible to the Academic Senate be established to which students may appeal decisions of the administration...
Source: KPFA
Actuality of student protest against new campus rules at University of California, Berkeley. Contains excerpts from the days events. Following are excerpts from the days events. Fraternity brothers arrive and surround the demonstrators. Fire engines come and demonstrators fear the use of high pressure hoses being used. Mario Savio argues with the fraternity group. Dusty Miller leads students in "We Shall Overcome". ASUC Vice-President Jerry Goldbein asks all to disband. Father Fischer...
Source: KPFA
National Lawyers Guild Executive Division Catherine Clark discusses Military Recruitment". She mentions the national hot-line that has been started for people with questions about discharge options and risks that people may face when they've been told to report to duty. Several of the calls have been from Puerto Rican women. "
Source: KPFK
Unsigned lesbian musicians perform their original material with host Lori Medigovich. Artists and their songs include Donna Wade "I'm your friend," Gina Acuna "Worry me," Sharon Kutcher "Part of me," Pope Joan "Elaine," Susan Lira[sp?] "Everyone knows when she's there," Carol Simpson "You've got nothing to lose," Laura Domingo "Mystic melody," and Phoenix Rising "Politically correct potluck song."
Source: KPFK
Rebroadcast of Dorothy Healey's Marxist commentary, an interview with William Sennett (b. 1941), a veteran of the Spanish Civil War and activist, about his observations of political conditions and communism in Italy shortly after his visit for the Abraham Lincoln Brigade reunion.
Source: KPFK
Actuality of student protests against new campus rules at University of California, Berkeley. Mario Savio reports on university administration's continuing unwillingness to negotiate ("...Strong and Kerr were 'not contactable.'"); Savio expresses concerns about further violence against the demonstrators and possible police actions to break the rally; urges solidarity: "Please be here tonight!" He later announces a Joan Baez concert to be held that night. Folksinger Barbara...
Source: KPFA
French-Cuban Author Anais Nin (1903-1977) reads excerpts from her memoirs "The Diary of Anais Nin" which she began writing at the age of 11and continued to write until her death. She is also the author of "Cities of the Interior" and is aslo well known for her erotica literature.
Source: KPFA
Robert Krulwich hosts the Washington Report live from Washington, D.C. Episode contains a speech by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a review of President Ford's decision making process, and a dramatization of Ann Blackman interviewing President Ford's daughter, Susan, performed by Paz Cohen as Susan Ford and Robert Krulwich as Ann Blackman. Krulwich also reviews current events including the Senate Select Committee on Government Intelligence. Broadcast on WBAI on April 9, 1975.
Source: WBAI
Recording contains dramatic readings from Rosalyn Drexler (born 1926), accomplished Pop-Art painter, author and playwright's books "I am the Beautiful Stranger," "One or Another," "To Smithereens," and "The Cosmopolitan Girl," interspersed with interview footage of Drexler discussing her life and writing. Readings performed by Drexler herself, Jan Albert (Producer), and David Rapkin (Technical producer).
Source: WBAI
With each new election year, it seems as if the race card is dealt more frequently in political campaigns. This program will look at why American politicians use race as a way of dividing citizens in order to attract certain voters. The show will also provide stories of how the race card has been used in campaigns throughout U.S. history. Guests will peer ahead at the election year to project what racial code words and issues, like 'immigration' and 'welfare reform' will be used as candidates...
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Report and actuality of the student strike and Free Speech Movement at University of California, Berkeley. An explanation is given by the administration for calling the police on the sit-in. The reason the police were called was because the protest was being led by non-students, the bookstore was not able to function, amnesty was offered to students but was refused, and no evidence was given that they were planning on leaving. Demonstrators are given a chance to ask questions and get answers...
Source: KPFA
WBAI fundraiser "Dizzy Gillespie Day" held at the Village Gate in New York City on August 30, 1977. This recording contains part one of the event, an interview with Dizzy Gillespie's guitarist Rodney Jones and the music of jazz pianist Rio Clemente. See IZ0991 for part two of this event, Dizzy Gillespie performing at the Village Gate.
Source: WBAI
Russell Means (1939- ) , American Indian Movement leader, discusses the Indian in U.S. history, the occupation of Wounded Knee, and the attitude of South Dakota toward its Native American inhabitants.
Source: KPFK
Carol Brightman (editor of Viet Report magazine), Mike Klare (associate editor of Viet Report magazine), Mike Locker (lecturer), and Paul Rockwell discuss the role of American Universities in the Vietnam War. Universities are involved with actual military operations in Vietnam by applying social sciences and technological research which were used for propaganda and technologies.
Source: KPFA
The speaker begins by giving a tour of the Union complex called 40 Acres where they are training farm workers various skills. He talks about the history, activity, struggle, and impact of the United Farm Workers in Delano. Part one includes interview with Dolores Huerta, first vice-president of the U.F.W., and Ben Maddoc, head of the organizing department.
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Several voices come together to tell the four part documentary on the life and influence of Nelson Mandela, South African president who served from 1994-1999 and the first president to be elected in South Africa by a representative democratic election. Sandra Radley is the producer, writer, and narrator. Bill Wax is the executive producer.
Source: KPFA
Open Journal episode concerning reports of the CIA employing newsmen for information gathering and dissemination, including CIA director William Colby's testimony before the House on Intelligence Commission on utilizing foreign news agencies for planting false stories. Episode begins with Robert Krulwich's report, which includes a speech by journalist Stuart Loory on the three dozen reporters discovered on the CIA's payroll. Broadcast on KPFK in 1975.
Source: KPFK
This program features extended excerpts of a live discussion recorded in mid-November, with an open debate about the role that race, gender and class play in our country in keeping people from finding their shared interests and how we might overcome barriers to work together for social change. Participants include essayist and author Barbara Ehrenreich, author and activist Clarence Lusane, Mary Matsuda who is professor of law at Georgetown University, Cornel West who is professor of...
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Molly Ivins (1944-2007), an American newspaper columnist, commentator, and best-selling author, presents a compelling, insightful and humorous lecture on the state of U.S. politics running up to the presidential elections this same year. Her keynote address was for the 48th Annual World Affairs Conference in Boulder, Colorado. She covers several topics including immigration, campaigning finances, women's rights, bilingual education, Telecommunications Act, and more. After the address, she is...
Source: KPFK
Larry Kropp, a Math TA at U.C. Berkeley, describes the protesters' and police officers' behavior at Sproul Hall during the arrests. He says that the protesters were peaceful and did not resist arrest. The U.C. campus police and Berkeley police were peaceful and professional, but certain members of the Oakland and Alameda police were unprofessional and unnecessarily brutal. He goes on to describe the brutal treatment by a police officer on one protester on the bus after the arrests. Dec. 6, 1964.
Source: KPFA
The program offers various positions that are being put forth in regard to jury nullification. Paul Butler, associate professor of law at George Washington University, has written 'There is an increasing perception that some African American jurors vote to acquit Black defendants for racial reasons, sometimes explained as the juror's desire not to send another Black man to jail. There is considerable disagreement over whether it is appropriate for a Black juror to do so. I now believe that for...
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Highlights from the Southern California Palestinian and Jewish Women in Dialogue conference, Women Speak Out Against Occupation, held February 21, 1988 in Los Angeles. Question and answer session with speakers Nadia Said[sp?] Bettendorf, Nava Sonnenschein, and Angela Odeh. Produced by Lucia Chappelle.
Source: KPFK
Writers in Performance Poetry Series is an evening of extraordinary women who read their works which include poetry, fiction, and personal essay. In part three, Jana Harris, who was director of the Writers in Performance for six years, reads several of her manuscripts which include "Manhattan is a Second Language". Bette Howland is another American poet and literary critic who reads several of her poems.
Source: WBAI
The program features new fiction from Lynne Sharon Schwartz, Nelson Canton, and Jamaica Kincaid. Janet Sternberg, executive producer of the series, introduces the writers. Schwartz is an American writer from New York who has written several novels. She has received several grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the New York State Foundation for the Arts. She reads "Life is an Adventure with Risks". Nelson Canton is another American writer from...
Source: WBAI
Recording contains interviews and speeches regarding CIA misconduct and former CIA agents speaking out against the organizations' activities. Pt.1. Tim McGovern interview of former CIA agent Philip Agee about his book and experiences in Latin America (from TSR 8/17/75). Includes a report on the Rockefeller Commission --Pt.2. Dave Boxall reads an excerpt from the Rockefeller Commission report to the President on the CIA's activities within the U.S. Excerpt is a report on "Operation...
Source: KPFK
Judy Chicago (b. 1939) discusses "The Dinner Party," and women in the arts with Ann Stubs. Chicago's 5 year, 500 person collaboration, "The Dinner Party," a tribute to women's history and achievements, is on view at the Brooklyn Museum through Jan. 18, 1981. Chicago tells how she sees art and feminism as indivisible and sees her long term struggles in the light of women's history.
Source: WBAI
Arthur Waskow, Director of Shalom Jewish Peace Center in Philadelphia, talks with Joel Gamon about Chanukah as both a religious and a political event. He traces the history of Chanukah, from the 100 BC Maccabee's liberation of the Holy Temple from Syrian and Solukian Empires. Chanukah emerged from those events at the darkest time of the year. It means a re-dedication of the desecrated temple, and 8 days of light during the darkest part of winter. The program continues with Charles Bell...
Source: KPFK
Andrea Natalie, lesbian feminist cartoonist, author, creator, and artist of three cartoon series collections "Stonewall Riots," "The Night Audrey's Vibrator Spoke," and "Rubyfruit Mountain" interviewed by Josy Catoggio of Feminist Magazine. They discuss her work, other lesbian feminist cartoonists, and her life.
Source: KPFK
A report is given on the union picket line around University Hall in Millman's Union. Joan Baez sings "All My Trials", "There But for Fortune", "Donna Donna", and "Blowing in the Wind". In between songs, an announcement is made about the FSM delegation of five which has been seated in the room for the Regents meeting. The delegation of five includes Mario Savio, Steve Weissman, Mona Hutchin, Mike Rossman and Ron Anastasi. Anastasi reports on Kerr's...
Source: KPFA
Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) reads Chapter 1 of Sean O'Casey's autobiography "I Knock at the Door", Gerard Manley Hopkins' poem "The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo, and Wilfred Owen's poem "Strange Meeting"(cut off) at the YM-YWHA Poetry Center on 92nd Street Y in New York City on May 15, 1952. Thomas is a Welsh-born poet and writer short stories and film and radio scripts.
Source: KPFA
Recording contains dramatic readings from Rosalyn Drexler (born 1926), accomplished Pop-Art painter, author and playwright's books "I am the Beautiful Stranger," "One or Another," "To Smithereens," and "The Cosmopolitan Girl," interspersed with interview footage of Drexler discussing her life and writing. Readings performed by Drexler herself, Jan Albert (Producer), and David Rapkin (Technical producer).
Source: WBAI
Philip Maldari interviews Edward Said, Palestinian-American literary theorist and Palestinian rights activist, after the publication of his book, "Out of Place, A Memoir", which was winner of the 1999 New Yorker prize for non-fiction. They talk about Israel and Palestine and the criticism of the book.
Source: KPFA
A tribute to and celebration of great American men and women, known and unknown, who dared and suffered to speak truth to power. The long and ongoing struggle to put an end to war and the causes of war, and to imagine a better world, is celebrated in story and song, poetry and reminiscence, montage and collage - weighted in the present but rooted in and drawing from the fibers of an American tradition. Those who, like many of us, cut their teeth in the sixties will find poignant reminders of a...
Source: WBAI
Recorded reports on the Mississippi Voter Registration are done by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). SCOPE, Summer Community Organization and Political Education, consists of students from UCLA who are working on voter registration in Bib County, GA. The city of Macon has most of the property. Joe Maizlish.
Source: KPFA
This program features extended excerpts of a live discussion recorded in mid-November, with an open debate about the role that race, gender and class play in our country in keeping people from finding their shared interests and how we might overcome barriers to work together for social change. Participants include essayist and author Barbara Ehrenreich, author and activist Clarence Lusane, Mary Matsuda who is professor of law at Georgetown University, and Cornel West who is professor of...
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Aircheck of the Firesign Theater program "Dear Friends: Let's Eat." Firesign Theater is an American comedy group which consists of Phil Austin (Nick Danger), Philip Proctor, Peter Bergman, and David Ossman.
( 1 reviews )
Source: KPFK
Gore Vidal is an America novelist, playwright, and critic. He wrote a collection of essays called "The United States 1952-1992" which won the 1993 National Book Award. Maldari announces that Vidal will be the featured speaker at Zellerbach Hall in Berkeley on February 14, 1994.
Source: KPFA
Four gang members from opposing gangs--Spud and Jason(Belok) of the Bloods, and Cedric(Baby Nerve) and Nate(Caliber) of the Crips, talk about the Rodney King beating and the civil unrest that followed the police aquittals, the relationship of gangs to the police, relationships between Koreans and African-Americans, the systematic oppression of African-Americans in the United States, and creating unity with the black community. Recorded in Los Angeles, May 1992.
Source: KPFK
June Jordan: Affirmative Acts. A Celebration of the Writing, Teaching, and Activism of June Jordan (1936-2002) recorded in Berkeley, California. A celebration in honor of the publication of Jordan's twenty-fifth book and her career. Speakers on this recording (Part 2 of 2) include: Angela Davis (who also reads tributes by Toni Morrison and Alice Walker), Adrienne Torf who performs and talks about their collaborations, Barbara Brenner, Pratibha Parmar speaks and shows a clip of her film, Xochi...
Source: KPFA
Elsa Knight Thompson and U.C. Berkeley student movement leaders Mario Savio, Bettina Aptheker, Frank Bardacke, and Reese Erlich, discuss the report entitled "Culture of the University, Governance and Education: the Report of the Study Commission on University Governance" by the University of California, which describes the role of the students on campus. Broadcast on KPFA on February 7, 1968.
Source: KPFA
Improvisational comedy duo Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara perform as The Barretts of Bleecker Street in the WBAI studio. BROADCAST: WBAI October 1962 and 4 Apr. 1966 and KPFA November 1962 and January 1963.
Source: WBAI
Victor Marchetti was a high ranking CIA official who resigned and criticized the agency. He discusses his novel "Rope-Dancer" which was published in 1971. The novel is about a high ranking agent who goes to work for the Soviet Union and presents a realistic portrait of life at the CIA headquarters in Virginia. Marchetti discusses the CIA's role in foreign and domestic affairs, and what it is like to work in the organization.
Source: WBAI
Leonard Weinglass, Bella Abzug, Morton Halperin, Daniel Ellsberg, Victor Marchetti (former CIA agent), Ramona Ripston, Senator Alan Cranston, John Burton, Congressman Michael Harrington, and Lillian Hellman discuss the Central Intelligence Agency and the American Civil Liberties Union. Stanley Sheinbaum moderates. Recorded at at Fairfax High School in Los Angeles, CA on April 26, 1975. Broadcast on KPFK on May 5, 1975. See also KZ1146.13 ."
Source: BC
Four veterans from the Abraham Lincoln Battalion discuss their experiences as American volunteers fighting against Franco in Spain. The four volunteers include Steve Nelson (1903-1993), Robert "Bob" Steck (1912-2007), Lawrence "Larry" Cane, and Maury Kolow. The Abraham Lincoln Battalion, also know as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, consisted of about 2,800 American volunteers who went to Spain to fight for the Spanish Republic and to stop facism. The interviews are introduced...
Source: WBAI
Children of several of Hollywood's blacklisted entertainment professionals discuss their families' experiences and the effects of their parents being blacklisted. Hosted by Larry Ceplair. Panel includes Stephen Carnovsky, Emily Corey, Dan Bessie, Becca Wilson, Chris Trumbo, and Tom Levitt. Recorded at the Los Feliz theater in Los Angeles. Broadcast on KPFK, ca. Apr. 26, 1977. Panel presented as part of the Retrospective on the Blacklist Period at the Los Feliz theater in Los Angeles, likely on...
Source: KPFK
A tribute to and celebration of great American men and women, known and unknown, who dared and suffered to speak truth to power. The long and ongoing struggle to put an end to war and the causes of war, and to imagine a better world, is celebrated in story and song, poetry and reminiscence, montage and collage - weighted in the present but rooted in and drawing from the fibers of an American tradition. Those who, like many of us, cut their teeth in the sixties will find poignant reminders of a...
Source: WBAI
Andrea Dworkin is a well-known radical American feminist, anti-pornography activist, pro-women activist, writer, and poet. She is author of "Pornography : Men Possessing Women", "Women Hating", and several other titles. They talk about her newest novel, "Mercy", which is a chronological story of a woman who has been raped.
Source: KPFA
Tim McGovern discusses the range of techniques, including torture, used in the Western Hemisphere by counterinsurgency groups such as the Green Berets and Latin American military and police forces. McGovern and a series of guests illustrate how US taxpayer money helps fund groups such as the Agency of International Development who employ these techniques, and examines the practice of torture and wrongful detainment of political activists in Latin American and Third World countries. Features...
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010
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Oedipus was presented by Performance Group of New York City in December of 1977 and January of 1978. The play was written by Roman playwright, philosopher, and political adviser, Lucius Annaeus Seneca in 50 A.D. and was based on the classical Greek play, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles written 500 years earlier. It was performed at the Performing Garage in the Soho area of New York. The play was adapted by Ted Hughes from a translation by David Anthony Turner, and directed by Richard Schechner
Source: WBAI
Robert Dussault, coordinating chairman of USLO, is interviewed about his intention to return the university to a state of normalcy so that affairs can be conducted. Susan Trupin, a sit-in participant discusses her arrest and gives a report on the numerous students who were placed in solitary confinement and the police brutality she witnessed. Bob Mackray [sp?] USLO committee member speaks at an anti-FSM group rally. Departmental Chairman is also interviewed. KPFA reporter Bruce Hensdale reports...
Source: KPFA
According to the interim report, Academic Senate Emergency Executive Committee meets with regents on December 17, 1964. On December 18, 1964, Regents declared that advocacy or content of speech will not be restricted beyond the purview of the First and Fourteenth Amendments. Regents establish a committee that will meet with students and faculty regarding matters of campus political activity, with the intent of providing maximum freedom with responsibility. Also included in Advice of Emergency...
Source: KPFA
Meg Christian performs at the Women's Music Festival just after the release of her album Turning it over, on Olivia Records.
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Source: KPFK
Bill Sokol talks with Oakland Congressman Ron Dellums about several documents he produced before the House Select Committee related to project "Inlet" and alleged wrongdoing by the FBI. Broadcast on KPFK May 30, 1975.
Source: KPFK
This five-part series on race and democracy includes compelling conversations and speeches that explore where issues of race and democracy collide. The series looks at how racism and racial realities pose a challenge to our democracy. Hate-related violence topics include the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma, the assassination of Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin, and the torching of a store in New York, which have all been traced to inflammatory speech. Citizens are asking if...
Source: Pacifica National Programming
Highlights from the Southern California Palestinian and Jewish Women in Dialogue conference, Women Speak Out Against Occupation, held February 21, 1988 in Los Angeles. Produced by Lucia Chappelle.
Source: KPFK
Top Secret radio. Recording begins with an interview about developments in the Middle East. Katherine Ferguson reports from a conference for retired CIA agents and staff in Arlington, VA and interviews David Philips, founder of the association for retired intelligence officers. Ferguson and Krulwich report on and re-enact the debate in the House of Representatives on an initiative by Connecticut congressman Robert Giaimo making the CIA budget available to the public.
Source: KPFK
Program includes a report on the steps the CIA took to overthrow the Allende government, as reported in the New York Times, a report on perjury charges that maybe facing CIA director Richard Helms, and the Washington Report on events affecting the CIA with Katherine Ferguson and Robert Krulwich. Broadcast on KPFK in 1975.
Source: KPFK
Benjamin J. "Ben" Legere, 1887-1972, actor, playwright, and labor leader in both the American and Canadian Labor movements as an I.W.W. organizer and as a member of the General Executive Board of the Canadian One Big Union, discusses his life. This recording is likely source material used for the series "Reminiscences of a Rebel: the autobiography of Benjamin J. Legere," which broadcast on WBAI in October 1966 (from KPFA).
Source: KPFA
Reporter, Bert, collects miscellaneous student commentary from around the UC Berkeley campus, then reads the handbill from University Student for Law and Order. He reads "Machiavelianism" posting and criticizes Clark Kerr's handling of student protesters. Following at the Greek Theater podium, Mario Savio expresses his thoughts on Kerr's attempt to preempt the Academic Senate, which voted to support the Freedom of Speech Movement (FSM). Faculty representatives and Kerr then take...
Source: KPFA
Judy Pasternak interviews Margo St. James, self-described prostitute and sex positive feminist who is the founder of COYOTE (Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics), which is a sex worker activist organization. She discusses the stigma of pornography and prostitution and the attempt to change the stigma by reclaiming the words "dike" and "whore" as well as her goal to decriminalize prostitution and pimping.
Source: WBAI
Performance of Katz's documentary play about the resistance of fugitive slaves in Christiana, Pennsylvania on September 11, 1851. Broadcast on WBAI, May 16, 1968.
Source: WBAI
The program features new fiction from Lynne Sharon Schwartz, Nelson Canton, and Jamaica Kincaid. Janet Sternberg, executive producer of the series, introduces the writers. Schwartz is an American writer from New York who has written several novels. She has received several grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the New York State Foundation for the Arts. She reads "Life is an Adventure with Risks". Nelson Canton is another American writer from...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010
audio
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Oedipus was presented by Performance Group of New York City in December of 1977 and January of 1978. The play was written by Roman playwright, philosopher, and political adviser, Lucius Annaeus Seneca in 50 A.D. and was based on the classical Greek play, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles written 500 years earlier. It was performed at the Performing Garage in the Soho area of New York. The play was adapted by Ted Hughes from a translation by David Anthony Turner, and directed by Richard Schechner.
Source: WBAI
A tribute to and celebration of great American men and women, known and unknown, who dared and suffered to speak truth to power. The long and ongoing struggle to put an end to war and the causes of war, and to imagine a better world, is celebrated in story and song, poetry and reminiscence, montage and collage - weighted in the present but rooted in and drawing from the fibers of an American tradition. Those who, like many of us, cut their teeth in the sixties will find poignant reminders of a...
Source: WBAI