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Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011

In 2011, Pacifica Radio Archives received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to preserve 150 programs from our vaults, with preservation assistance from George Blood Audio and Video in Philadelphia, PA. The resulting collection encompasses an eclectic array of programs, some of which were only very recently discovered by PRA staff. Among some of the many highlights of the collection are a WBAI interview with Andy Warhol about his film Chelsea Girls shortly after the film’s release ...



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Documentary on San Francisco's Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) that examines the principal issues surrounding the safety of BART's automatic control system and the relationships between BART's technology and the social goals of those who planned it. The program takes a critical look at the planning and implementation of BART in light of a recent transit accident in Fremont. Features the voices of John Volpe, Secretary of Transportation under President Nixon; A. Alan Post, California legislative...
Source: KPFA
Recording of lesbian poets reading as part of Gay and Lesbian Alliance (GALA)'s Lesbian Pride Week celebrations, recorded on June 28th, 1980. Jane Creighton reads "Song for Love Has No Object", "Ceres in an Open Field", "Thinking About Her", and "Naked and Rosy"; Fran Winant reads from her book Looking at Women two poems, "Happy New Year", "Letters by Eleanor Roosevelt"; Lorraine Currelley reads "Intercourse", "Midnight...
Source: WBAI
A radio adaptation of Monique Wittig's surrealistic drama about militant feminist consciousness transformed into action. The play imagines a literal battle of the sexes in which women, having taken up arms, triumph against an army of men. Contains recorded music. Adapted from an English translation of Les guérillères , trans. David Le Vay (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1971).
Source: KPFK
Jane Fonda of the Indochina Peace Campaign talks with Paul McIsaac about Haskell Wexler's Introduction to the Enemy , a film she co-produced with Tom Hayden about North Vietnam. Fonda discusses why she set out to make the film and the film's "gentle" approach to the issues it portrays. Fonda talks about the ramifications of the implementation of the Paris Peace Accords for both North and South Vietnam. They discuss Fonda and Hayden's easy passage between North and South Vietnam and...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Barbara Gittings and Charles Pitts talk with two young lesbians, Donna and Kathy. They talk about how young lesbians can enter the lesbian social world, the link between physical and emotional attraction between women, what high school is like for young lesbians, and the lack of lesbian establishments in NYC. Gittings gives out contact info for homophile organizations at the end of the program. News and reviews edited out of program.
Source: WBAI
An hour of music and talk with the The Red Star Singers, one of the San Francisco Bay Area's best political/anti-war music groups of the early 1970s. Music includes some songs not released widely by the group, and therefore, rarely heard outside the bay area. The members include Gary Lapow, Bonnie Lockhart, Mike Margulis, and Ron Rosenbaum. Lapow speaks about their music, process of creation, and the environment that inspired them. The some of the songs played throughout the recording include...
Source: KPFA
Christopher Alexander, a world-renowned progressive architect, discusses the directions of contemporary design at his home in Berkeley. His talk discusses the need for architects to take into consideration the needs of the people for whom they are building. Alexander believes that wholeness and beauty are not vague notions and that buildings should be relevant to their cultural as well as physical landscape. Alexander talks about how non-experts can take control of their own affairs and that...
Source: KPFA
Pacifica Radio Archives
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A discussion about the history and present-day of Christopher Street in New York's Greenwich Village, including its centrality to gay life, with guest Jimmy Ryan, street peddler and publisher of the Warehouse Newsletter. Ryan discusses what Christopher Street was like before the Stonewall riots, the increasing openness of its gay residents after the start of the gay liberation movement, and the kinds of communities that exist in and around the area. The guests and host talk about Christopher...
Source: WBAI
"The Harder They Come" is a criminal film produced by Perry Henzell starring Jimmy Cliff and was filmed in Jamaica in 1972. The film tends to defy classification and provides insights to the black Jamaica, not tourist Jamaica. The main character, Ivan, goes to Kingston to find fame but finds himself in difficult situations. This film's soundtrack played an important role in popularizing reggae in the United States. Singer, songwriter and actor Jimmy Cliff discusses his career and how...
Source: WBAI
"Little" Jimmy Scott is interviewed by hosts Bill Barlow and Jerry Washington before Ruth Brown's performance at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. Brown performs "Secret Love" (00:06:08), introduces the band and performs "Looking Back" (00:11:09), "5-10-15 Hours" (00:17:57), "Be Anything, But Darling Be Mine" (00:22:51 with extended intro), "Teardrops from My Eyes" (00:34:28), "This Bitter Earth" (00:38:36 with extended...
Source: Pacifica National Program
Novelist Ishmael Reed, musician Ortiz Walton, and painter Joe Overstreet discuss the traditions of Black art at the San Francisco Black Writers Workshop in 1970. They talk about the history of blacks being discouraged from participating in the arts in the United States, the co-optation of black cultural forms by white people and the difficulty black artists have in getting recognition or grants for their work. Walton mentions the protest of the New York Philharmonic for not hiring black...
Source: KPFA
The second of two symposia sponsored by the Esalen Institute on the value of psychotic experience, entitled "The Poetry of Madness", recorded July 31, 1968 at the Longshoremen's Memorial Hall in San Francisco. Panelists are John Perry, a San Francisco-based psychiatrist; Claudio Naranjo, a psychiatrist from Chile; Allen Ginsberg, poet; and Alan Watts, philosopher and writer; discussion is moderated by Julian Silverman, general manager of the Esalen Institute. Perry discusses Plato's...
Source: WBAI
Ruth Witt-Diamant, Mark Linenthal, Stan Rice, Thomas Albright, Mark Green, and Dr. Francis Rigney discuss the poetry scene in the Bay Area. The panelists talk about Allen Ginsberg's relationship to the current poetry scene, the influence of Black Mountain poets, the multiple dimensions of a poem, and the poetry found in Bob Dylan and the Beatles. Produced by students from San Francisco State College.
Source: KPFA
Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton and her "Hound Dog Blues Band" perform at the Museum of Modern Art's "Jazz in the Garden" series on July 22, 1971. The first eight minutes of the recording are a warm-up by Thornton's backing band. David Giorgio introduces Thornton and her band. On this portion of the tape she performs "Mother-in-Law Blues"; "Rock Me Baby"; "Shake, Rattle and Roll"; "Hound Dog"; and "Swing on Home, Big...
Source: WBAI
KPFK's Jude McGee presents a two-hour special for International Women's Day on women composers in classical music with in-studio guest JoAnn Falletta, conductor of the Women's Philharmonic. Falletta talks about the great women composers from the baroque period through to contemporary times and her work with the National Women Composers Resource Center. The Women's Philharmonic plays Ellen Zwilich's "Concerto grosso 1985", Marianna Martines' "Sinfonia in C", Camilla de...
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Source: KPFK
Writer and activist Rita Mae Brown (1944 - ) delivers a speech at the Women's Building in Los Angeles on July 4, 1976. Brown talks about the way both men and women suffer under the patriarchy through pornographic violence and nostalgia in the mass media. She tells the audience that "you've got to become an actor, not a reactor" and that the Equal Rights Amendment is a "worn-out issue" meant to distract from more pressing issues. Brown also calls for the feminist movement to...
Source: KPFK
Pianist Jay McShann and Bruce Ricker, lawyer and producer of "Last of the Blue Devils", a documentary about Kansas City Jazz. Ricker speaks about his influences and how the film evolved. The film takes place in the late 1970s and musicians of the Pendergast era would get together to jam at the union hall.
Source: WBAI
Diane DiMassa, creator of the cartoon character Hothead Paisan, discusses how her addiction to television and alcohol fueled the development of that character. She talks about how women of color and queer women feel and express rage in ways which are not acceptable to the dominant white culture. She discusses her appreciation of other cartoonists, and the creation of Zine Scene and Hothead's friends. She discusses her fans, male therapists, academics, alcoholism, and getting into fights with...
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Samuel Beckett's radio play Embers directed by Ira Wall and with performances by Stacy Keach and Sudie Bond.
Source: WBAI
Second part of Jude McGee's special presentation for International Women's Day about women composers, with in-studio guest JoAnn Falletta, conductor of the Women's Philharmonic. Falletta talks about audience responses to the music performed by the Women's Philharmonic and how women are usually overlooked in the history of classical music. The Women's Philharmonic performs Gwyneth Walker's "Open the Door", Chen Yi's "Duo Ye", Maddalena Laura Lombardini Sirmen's "Violin...
Source: KPFK
Bob Lederer reports on an ACT/UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) protest at a "Quack-Busters" conference in Kansas City, Missouri. The protest intended to counter the widespread suppression of homeopathic and alternative treatments by the Food and Drug Administration. Carola Burroughs, a member of ACT/UP NY, speaks on the history of this suppression and the rise of the American Medical Association. David Belyeu[sp?], a Kansas City-based chiropractor, describes how the AMA directed...
Source: WBAI
KPFK's Claire Loeb interviews Rudi Gernreich, the terror of the fashion world. He explains why his models carry guns, expresses his sympathy with embattled women, proclaims the end of fashion, and elaborates his views on unisex. He also castigates the coercive practices of the fashion industry, particularly the Press and Women's Wear Daily. Recorded January 18, 1971The recording begins with the song "I've Got Five Dollars" and ends with "Island in the West Indies" both sung...
Source: KPFK
Don Sortor reads chapters 1 and 3 of Grendel , John Gardner's 1971 re-telling of Beowulf from the monster's point of view. (New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1971). Chapter 1 begins at start of tape. Chapter 3 begins at 00:16:12. This recording does not have Erik Bauersfeld intro.
Source: KPFA
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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34 year-old American bass opera singer Elfego Esparza, born in Texas, discusses his opera training and career. He began singing at the age of 17. After being advised to train in Europe, he went to Germany to study, then returned to the United States to further his training. He has performed at the Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera Company, and several opera houses throughout Europe.
Source: KPFA
David Rothenberg interviews Chris Babcock and Kathy Underhill of the People With AIDS Coalition. Babcock and Underhill talk about the resources that PWAC offers to people with AIDS.
Source: WBAI
The second of two symposia sponsored by the Esalen Institute on the value of psychotic experience, entitled "The Poetry of Madness", recorded July 31, 1968 at the Longshoremen's Memorial Hall in San Francisco. Question-and-answer session with audience. Panelists discuss the philosophy of George Gurdjieff, whether there's been any success in treating chronic schizophrenics, Scientology, whether anyone's proven that reality exists, "re-educating old ideas versus assassinating...
Source: WBAI
Charles Ruas and Karen Achenbach talk to filmmakers Albert Maysles and Ellen Hovde about their documentary Grey Gardens . They talk about the origins of the film and how Maysles came to meet the Beales. They describe living conditions in the Beales' mansion. Maysles discusses the acceptance of eccentricity as a character trait in American society. They talk about their shooting schedule, the Beales' own involvement in the direction of the film, and the relationship between the directors and...
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Source: WBAI
Barbara Londin speaks with geologist Sidney Horenstein about the natural features of the New York City borough of Queens. Horenstein explains how all of Queens' parks lie on top of a terminal moraine, how at one point all of the Great Lakes emptied out through the Hudson River, and the evolution of Queens' wooded areas. Horenstein also talks about the proliferation of plant nurseries in Queens in the early part of the 19th century and the pollution of Jamaica Bay.
Source: WBAI
Clare Loeb interviews Claes Oldenburg in Maurice Tuchman's office at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art prior to the opening of the "Art and Technology" show on April 26, 1971. Oldenburg talks about the genesis and creation of his giant writhing icebag sculptures, one of which was exhibited in the show. He talks about the humor in his work, Marcel Duchamp, the sexuality and "Oriental" nature of his sculptures and the link between factory production and technologies of war.
Source: KPFK
The third and final part of Pacifica Radio's live coverage of Day 3 of the United States Senate Armed Services Committee's hearings on military policies concerning gay and lesbian service in the armed forces. Witnesses include Dr. David Segal, Dr. Charles Moskos, Dr. Judith Stiehm, and Lt. General Calvin A.H. Waller. Junette Pinkney and Bert Wyler offer a recap of the day's proceedings at the end of the recording. Producer Bill Wax pitches for the Pacifica National Fund Drive.
Source: Pacifica National Program
KPFK's Barbara Cady and Los Angeles Free Press reporter Helen Koblin interview Jill Johnston, Village Voice columnist and author of Lesbian Nation . Johnston explains her views of lesbianism as the only true radical feminist position. She discusses the purported link between lesbianism and madness, her relationship with her children, and whether the lesbian feminist struggle is equivalent to the oppression of Third World peoples.
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Source: KPFK
WBAI's Paul Wunder asks Woody Allen why there are no black people in his movies at a press conference for Mighty Aphrodite .Excerpt from a longer recording. Full interview published in November 2, 1995 issue of Arts Magazine.
Source: WBAI
Casse Culver and Willie Tyson, two lesbian folk singers, perform at an unknown venue. They perform "The Bloods", "Don't Put Her Down", "Truck Drivin' Woman", and "Levee Blues." Extract from a longer performance.
Source: WBAI
William Mandel talks about the variety of Soviet newspapers and periodicals. Mandel explains how magazines such as Literaturna gazeta provide a major forum for Soviet citizens to discuss public affairs. Periodicals are printed in a wide variety of languages, such as Armenian, Ukrainian and Yiddish. Mandel also reports on CIA activity in the Soviet Union and takes phone calls where he addresses the general opinions of the USSR on Solzhenitsyn, Stalin, and homosexuals.
Source: KPFA
Part 3 of Bob Fass' interview with the cast of the Broadway musical Doonesbury . Fass and Levy takes phone calls from listeners. Levy explains how the actors had to imbue the cartoon characters they represent on stage with human qualities.Music edited out of program. Sound quality varies.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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This is a documentary which includes interviews and actuality gathered in the streets of Houston, Texas. Individual modules explore the conditions and problems facing the homeless. An abused mother talks about her drug-addict boyfriend who she left and found support in a shelter. Sharon, another victim of abuse, speaks about her experiences as a drug addict and prostitute and her urge to turn her life around. Several others speak about their home life and the reasons for being led into the...
Source: KPFT
Hosts Bill Barlow and Jerry Washington interview blues singer and pianist Charles Brown (1922 - 1999) before his performance at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. The Rhythm & Blues Foundation's Howell Beagle introduces Brown. Brown performs "I Stepped in Quicksand" (00:12:30), "Save Your Love for Me" (00:19:00), "Seven Long Days" (00:24:34), "Just the Way You Are" (00:29:24), "Black Night" (00:33:59) and "So Long" (00:39:50)....
Source: Pacifica National Program
Excerpts from a reading by women whose work appears in Nice Jewish Girls: A Lesbian Anthology , ed. Evelyn Torton Beck, published by Persephone Press (Watertown, MA), 1982. Recorded June 16, 1982 at WomanBooks in New York City. Irena Klepfisz introduces the evening with a message about the crisis in the Middle East. Features readings by Bernice Mennis, Evelyn "Evie" Beck, Irena Klepfisz, Gloria Greenfield, and Melanie Kaye. Produced by Shelley Messing. Contains sensitive language.
Source: WBAI
New York University's Loeb Student Center's Art Committee joins with the Fine Arts Museum of the Women's Interart Center in presenting a series of special events to salute 1975: Women and Art. Tuesday, May 13, 7pm panel discussion on "Art, Women and the Establishment." Alloway discusses the contributions contemporary women artists have made and coins the term "post-stylistic homogeneity" as it applies to women artists. Gillespie talks about Ivan Karp and how the artists with...
Source: WBAI
Poet Amiri Baraka reads several poems at UCLA: "Raising the Roof", "Wailers", "Linguistics", "Reflections", "Sounding". Recording cuts off mid-poem. Contains sensitive language.
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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An informal discussion between nine lesbians, all in their early-to-mid-twenties, recorded at an apartment in New York City's Greenwich Village and moderated by Charles Hayden (later Randolfe Hayden "Randy" Wicker). The women discuss how one becomes a lesbian, their relationships with their parents, and how they relate to gay and straight men and women. They talk about how the straight world perceives them, comparing lesbian relationships to those of heterosexual and gay male couples,...
Source: WBAI
Jane Fonda speaks at the University of California in Berkeley on January 29, 1973. She gives an anti-war speech at a rally for Pat Chenoweth, a soldier facing charges of mutiny in Vietnam. The tape is courtesy of the Chenoweth Defense Committee. She speaks about the Mekong Delta, Nixon's role, and the resilience and strength of the Vietnamese. Fonda reads a few excerpts from one of the chief negotiators of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of South Vietnam in Paris which talks about the...
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Source: KPFA
The recording is of a benefit concert for the Sunset Hall retirement home in Los Angeles, which provides housing for senior citizens who have dedicated their lives to social action movements. The host provides a brief history and purpose of Sunset Hall. Ross Altman begins by singing "The Ballad of Sunset Hall". Pete Seeger sings "Abiyoyo", "We Shall Not Be Moved", "Stay on Freedom", "Soon Mama", "My Whole World", "Viva La Quince...
Source: KPFK
Three Staten Island residents, Frank Pacifico, Bernard Dacue, John Quinn and a reporter for the Staten Island Register, Joe Quelin, discuss with Nick Egleson their opposition to a tank farm for LNG - Liquid Natural Gas - near their homes. The dangers are unquenchable fires and explosions, and the benefits seem to be only in the form of profits for the four international corporations involved in the operation. They include the Cabot Corporation and the national oil company of Algeria.
Source: WBAI
Opens with music from Anderson's 1979 Cabrillo College Music Festival performance: untitled tape-bow violin performance; Closed Circuits"; "Born, Never Asked"; and "The Language of the Future". Laurie Anderson talks with Susan Sailow about how shaping time is at the core of her art, her studio, electronics and how performing is just like playing at home to her. They discuss the interaction between visual and aural elements of her art. Anderson talks about using printing...
Source: KPFA
Vito Russo, author of The Celluloid Closet , in discussion with journalist Marcia Pally and Jim Fouratt from ACT/UP NY. The guests talk about the media's disproportionate focus on heterosexuals in the AIDS crisis and how the most prominent voices, like Cardinal O'Connor, are fighting against teaching safe sex. Russo talks about the assignation of blame between the "innocent" (i.e. children born with HIV or people who acquire it accidentally through transfusion) and the...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Al Gene Besser reviews the art, anti-art assemblage exhibit at the Civic Center Museum which consists of 200 works. He describes the difference in the styles of Dadaists, cubists, surrealists, and futurists and speaks about the influence in the art pieces.RECORDED: Mar. 1962. BROADCAST: KPFA, 8 Apr. 1962.
Source: KPFA
Singer-songwriter Judy Collins discusses her music, her politics and her career with KPFK's Barbara Cady. She talks about her artistic process, her prison reform activism, the emergence of women's music, and firing her manager. She also talks about music venues ripping off audiences with expensive ticket prices.
Source: KPFK
Erika Seastrom, a member for 20 years of the Printers Union, describes her life working under terrible conditions in an almost entirely male trade. Seastrom describes the working conditions in New York City print shops, the extreme health hazards to employees, and the way in which she was harassed by men because she wore a skirt to work.Contains sensitive language. Contains recorded music.
Source: WBAI
Women's news with Judy Pasternak for the week of March 7, 1985, incorporating KPFA's Majority Report. Subjects discussed: Katherine Davenport reports on a new law in Montana requiring insurance companies to charge men and women the same rates for the same coverage, including an interview with Ann Brodsky of the Women's Lobbyist Fund in Helena, Montana (00:04:42); Ginny Burson and Karen Sondheim on women's occupational safety and health issues (00:11:23); interview by Mimi Rosenberg with Eileen...
Source: WBAI
Alex Paul talks with Studs Terkel (May 16, 1912 - October 31, 2008) about his new book "American Dreams: Lost and Found." Terkel speaks to a Miss America winner, farm kids, city kids, a KKK member, and immigrants about what they consider to be their American Dream.
Source: WBAI
A dramatic presentation of the personal correspondence of Vincent Van Gogh to his brother, Theo, adapted from The Complete Letters of Vincent Van Gogh (Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society, 1958). Produced by David Rapkin, adapted by Bonnie Bellow and Terry Shtob with musical direction by James Irsay. Performed by John Lithgow and Co.
Source: WBAI
WBAI's Rich Schrader interviews actor John Cullum and Admiral Gene La Rocque from the Center for Defense Information about the controversial post-apocalyptic TV movie "The Day After". Schrader expresses his own dissatisfaction with both the film and the post-film roundtable that included Henry Kissinger, William F. Buckley, Jr., Robert McNamara, George P. Shultz and Carl Sagan, among others. Cullum discusses what makes the film resonate with audiences and the pressures placed on the...
Source: WBAI
Dr. William Jennings Bryan Henrie (1896-1972), a country doctor turned abortion rights activist after being convicted in 1962 for performing abortions, speaks at the Conference on Abortion and Human Rights on January 9, 1966 in San Francisco under the auspices of the Society for Humane Abortion. Henrie calls for a more liberal view toward abortions, declaring that eventually "all will realize that abortions are necessary and grant its freedom."
Source: KPFA
Collection of David Rothenberg's "Koch Watch" reports from WBAI. Begins with great piece of music written for the mayor. 1) Coverage of anti-apartheid rally in Central Park where Koch was booed after calling certain members of the crowd "Marxist-Leninists"; 2) The resignation of Victor Botnick, the controversial Chair of the Health and Hospital Corporations; 3) Koch's hypocritical participation in Hands Across America benefit on Memorial Day, 1986; 4) The rebuilding of...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Blues musician Koko Taylor (1928 - 2009) is interviewed by WBAI by phone from Chicago. Taylor talks about her religious upbringing, her musical influences, and why young people don't know anything about blues music.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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WBAI's Janet Coleman speaks with Yoko Ono by phone about her latest album, Blueprints for a Sunrise . She talks about how the events of September 11th, 2001, the women's struggle and the experience of war have informed her creative process.
Source: WBAI
Sonia Sanchez, teacher poet, essayist, dramatist, and storyteller, delivers two short talks for Black women students: "Development of Social Values and the Birth of a Poet" and "Women in Search of Truth" at the first annual meeting of Associated Women Students Commission (AWSC) of Cal State Long Beach. The talk is introduced by Ujean Uwaymah[sp?] and Sanchez is introduced by Diana Sanchez, student president of the AWSC. On this tape, Sanchez reads from her paper "Social...
Source: WBAI
This program is a conversation between Painter Larry Rivers (August 17, 1923 - August 14, 2002) and Poet Kenneth Koch (February 27, 1925 - July 6, 2002) about their collaborative artwork. It was taken from a panel discussion at the Conference of Editors and Writers at the Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines held on May 10, 1975 in New York City. The two artists' comments constitute an informal history of collaborative artwork in New York during and since the 1950s. More importantly,...
Source: WBAI
WBAI's Karen Berg interviews Cyril Jordan and Roy Loney, the chief songwriters of American rock band The Flamin' Groovies. They talk about the economics of being in a rock band, including the cost of equipment and the inevitability of getting ripped off. Jordan and Loney also discuss the origins of the band's name and some of their memorable gigs.Contains sensitive language.
Source: WBAI
Fred Goldhaber interviews Gary Adler, a new york city elementary school teacher, and Steve Askinazi, owner of the Ballroom, a social worker, and a member of community board on Passover night. Adler and Askinazi speak about their experiences as gay Jewish men and the challenges they faced with their family and community.
Source: WBAI
Sonia Sanchez, teacher poet, essayist, dramatist, and storyteller, delivers two short talks for Black women students: "Development of Social Values and the Birth of a Poet" and "Women in Search of Truth" at the first annual meeting of Associated Women Students Commission (AWSC) of Cal State Long Beach. On this tape, Sanchez relates a tale from her father about Black pilots in the '40s. and makes an urgent plea for education to empower young people to meet today's realities....
Source: WBAI
Continuation of live coverage of the anti-Gulf War demonstration in Washington, D.C., hosted by WBAI's Amy Goodman and Robert Knight. Goodman reads more of the day's news from the Middle East. Pamela Michaels from KPFA reports live from a San Francisco anti-war rally. Robert Knight reports that the rally site has been changed to the Washington Mall from the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library. Dr. Michio Kaku, professor of nuclear physics at CUNY City College of New York, joins Knight in...
Source: Pacifica National Program
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Robert Sklar speaks with Lizzie Borden, director of the American independent political film "Born in Flames". The film is based on a post-revolutionary atmosphere in New York. Issues of sexism, racism, and class continue to bedevil the society. Borden and Sklar have a great discussion about women figures in the film and the impact of socialism.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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A group of people discuss the News and Reviews by opening up with a letter written by a 14 year-old male asking questions about homosexuality. They also address other topics such as a murder case. Kermit introduces the topic of meeting places and lists public areas such as 3rd Ave., Central Park West, and small local spots such as Brooklyn Heights and park around Riverside Dr. They talk about the history of private clubs and gay bars and the tie in to the mafia. Charles Pitts sits in host Baird...
Source: WBAI
Pete Wilson hosts a special "Gay Rage" edition of Gay Pride. Program begins with news announcements. Wilson vents his frustration with the journalist Arthur Bell over his article "Hostility Comes Out of the Closet" in the June 28, 1973 issue of the Village Voice. He takes Bell to task for his portrayal of the queer liberation movement and for refusing to talk to him about the article on his show. Wilson takes listener phone calls. One caller reports that transgender activist...
Source: WBAI
Author and historian Stuart Ewen discusses the Cabbage Patch Kids doll phenomenon in the United States. He describes his attempts to contact Coleco to interview a Cabbage Patch doll. Ewen decries the attention lavished on these dolls when "charity for other human beings seems to be at an all-time low" and presents an unverified anecdote about a child receiving a "death certificate" for their broken doll. Ewen elaborates on how the dolls are mass-produced, on labor conditions...
Source: WBAI
Owner Moe Moskowitz of Moe's Books, a second-hand bookstore in Berkeley, discusses running a small business near a radical university. He is one of Berkeley's best known merchants and keen observer of campus radical life from his viewpoint (and storefront) on Telegraph Avenue, just a few doors south of Fred Cody's bookstore, and the center of the Free Speech Movement. Moskowitz conducts a thriving business in used books and records and in this interview with Byron Bryant of KPFA, he talks about...
Source: KPFA
Christopher Alexander, a world-renowned progressive architect, discusses the directions of contemporary design. In the second half of this program he elaborates on his conception of wholeness. Alexander argues against people conceptualizing themselves as being "mechanisms" inside of a larger sphere. There are objective differences between "good buildings" and "bad buildings" contrary to what architects have been taught. Saatkamp reads an excerpt from...
Source: KPFA
David Rothenberg interviews singer-songwriter Michael Callen, a long-time survivor of AIDS and one of the founders of the People With AIDS Coalition. Callen talks about his AIDS diagnosis, the various diseases he's contracted and the role of promiscuity in the spread of the AIDS epidemic. He also talks about his experiences working with Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, who developed the multifactorial model of AIDS. Callen expresses his doubts that HIV is the single cause of AIDS and that its spread may...
Source: WBAI
Poet Bernadette Mayer (1945 - ) reads selections from her two recent books, "Utopia" and "Mid-Winter Day" at the Ear Inn in NYC on June 7th, 1986. Mark Weiss introduces her. She reads "Dear amended return acknowledgee" (00:01:28), "The tragic condition of the Statue of Liberty" (00:02:50); "People get ready blow ups happen, or Mikhail Gorbachev's premature ejaculation"(00:04:52); "The presence of one who sometimes leaves a place"...
Source: WBAI
Jack Spicer's delivers his first Vancouver lecture, "Dictation and 'A Textbook of Poetry'", recorded at Warren Tallman's house in 1965. A complete transcript of this talk is available in Peter Gizzi, ed., The house that Jack built: the collected lectures of Jack Spicer (Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1998, 4-19).
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Source: KPFA
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2011
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Program that explores moments in the lives of the members of Blackhearts, a gay African-American collective based in NYC. Poet Michael Jared Alexander Mintz[sp?] hosts. Contains performances by and interviews with jazz flautist Fred Carl, poet and author Cary Alan Johnson, and poet Arthur Wilson. Carl talks about performing love songs for another man and his desire to see more out gay black musicians. Johnson reads from his novel Going Places and his poem "Nana" and talks about his...
Source: WBAI
The program features the story of Karen Silkwood, a labor union activist. Silkwood was a worker at Kerr-McGee Plant in Crescent, Oklahoma that made fuel rods for plutonium, which is the most fatal of radioactive substances. After compiling a stack of documentation explaining the dangers of the radioactive substances, she was killed in a car accident and the documents which she was going to present to the New York Times, were removed. The host interviews a Shemis Johannes (sp?), an herbologist...
Source: WBAI
Writer-director Woody Allen (1935 - ) discusses the difference between intercourse and oral sex and President Clinton. Excerpt from longer interview.
Source: WBAI