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i 







ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



VOL. XI. 



AUBURN. ALABAMA. MONDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1904. 



ITS OLD, BVT STIIX 
SOUNDS GOOD 

The Passing of the Pigskin Sea- 
son of 1904 



Nearly a month has passed 
away since this event to be told 
later on occurred, but "lest we for 
gei" we will print it jfct And a 
re view of how Auburn put the 
last game, of an uribeateo! season, 
(<> the good is like Dr. ftoW dog) 
tail story, bound to occur. 

On last Thanksgiving afternoon 
Auburn iuid tleorgia t i up as 
follows : 

AI'IUKN 

Oenter "Doc" Butler. 
Right Guard "Hit" M(M)ii. 
I<eft Hoard '"Rig" Hraswell. 
Right Tackle Hughes. 
Ubti tackle "Easy" Streit. 
Right Hud Wilketsnn. 
Loft End -Hogy" Paterion. 
Quarter Ibnk -Squire" Per 
fins. 

Rlghl Half -Frit Reynolds. 
Ml Hall -I mp" Foy. 
Full Buck "IMiil" Lneey. 

< IE0RH i A. 

(tenter Rrowu. 
Right Ouarg Richie. 
Ia'H < iimrd Black ■Mocir. 
Right Tackle - Rosseter. 
U>\\ Tackle Hoke. 
Right End Moore 
l/>ft End Sullivan 
(Quarter Bad Horsey. 
Right Half Woolen. 
Qafl Half- Martin. 
Full Back Sage 
fu turf parlance we may 



Seore: Auburn. 5 ; Cleorgia. 0. 

The first tune is played in 7 
minutes and 7 seconds. 

Reynolds kicks off for Auburn 
and (he ball clears the cross bar 
of the goal posts. Georgia kicks 
from 2." yard line and Perkins 
fortune* the ball, but fails to get 
a grip. Oeorgia then gets her 
finger in the pudding for '•> %-% 
yards. Rossi ter fails to gain. Sul- 
livan goes around right end for US 
yards and Mimic gets 4 \ards. 
Mmi I in yards. Wad ley 6 yards. 
Sullivan 4 yards. tVadley makes 
first down. After Martin 
Fiills to gain Moure {(lenses Geor- 
gia with 3 yards to the left of the 

center* Martin sn ips off 1-' yards. 
Moore I yard and Horsey plays to 
the tune of • nothing doing. " 
then Sullivan kicks the ball. 
• icoigia I urns a pretty trick and 
shows her hand for ii touchdown. 
Sullivan fails at goal. Score: 
Auburn, .i; Georgiil 

Sullivan kicks off to Patterson 
and l!i»' ball is returned H> yanK 

Fov fp'ts :> pel' cent of .1 yaw's. 



fail- gain over Sullivan. Lacey ; is sery plain that Auburn Ester- j AVWJRN'S STAR , 
get* 4 yards, and then tak> • ruinated somebody's Foot kill aspi j RE-INSTATED WJ S. I. A. A. . 



other 7> yards. I^arey gets .*> yards 
easily for a touchdown, and then 
Reynolds kicks a pretty goal. 
Score: Auburn. 17: Georgia. 5. 

Sullivan kicks off for 30 yards 
to Auburn and the ball is return 
ed 10 yards. Moon batters Geor- 
gia's line for 4 yards and follows 
with 1 yard. Foy gets :i yards on 
a double pass ; Reynolds bucks the 
line for 3 yards, then is presented 
with 7 yards more. Lacey ham 
mors away for <> yards; Auburn 
gets ."> yards more and Lacey •*! 
yards more. Lacey and Reynolds 
then get 8 yards a piece, and Key 
nobis follows with a gain of :! 1-'-' 
yards. The ball then goes over to 
< leorgia on downs. 

Georgia makes two trials and 
goes onh - yards. Sullivan then 
kicks to Foy. who advances the 
ball IU yards. Moon goes through] 
tor 9 yards .Auburn continues/the 
lory for '■'> yards more and |Fo\ 
lakes b* yards and 11 yards in - 
buck*- The game J^lheti called 



rations but did not Hurwd in 
exterminating the supply of Hoi j 

Air. 



Onh two wem left. Auburn 
Yauderbilt. Yanderbilt put S«-w 
anee's Tige>-> out of business 
Thanksgiving. Auburn stored 
away !7 against Georgia's 5 on 



Tackle Jonss is Relieved of thv 
Cha #e of Professionalism By 
Executive Committee. 

As a result of the rcviil «•<»«' 
ntttee meeting of the s f, A. 4 
held Saturday in Birnvinglr.iu. 
Ala.. Frank JoneS, Auburn's ?U-i 
tackle the early part of the 



the same day. So the race ftffl^phaJj campaign, wa.s unam 
the championship was ctit down ^ n , ons j v ^.instated and relieved* ut 

and «Sj f | u , ct,,,,.^. f pn<fessionalisii, 



to two on Turke\ da,\ 
destined to ivmain that way un- 
til next vear. 



rgjn plays off side. Auburn on account of darkness after ti 1 '2 
dikes g yards more. Foy is thrown honrs plav. the ball being iij Au- 
bt Sullivnn and loses 2 1 - \nrds. burn's possession in the middle of 
Reynolds uains 1 van! and Fay the held 



This charge was brought again- . 
bv Alabama Fniversit.v . a'u»l 

i-ather than have any COU*en*i*M« 
And Krank Jones is released, j ^ ^ Auhnru< will , nrtv 

acpiitied or whatever handle vnu j ^ ^ ^ pt|T|1 slH)r ,smi>usbie 
want to use. Thought so! ^ ^ ^ ^ xvi(i 

drew their nmu |»enditig an InvCR 
tigiltion b> the S. I. A A. co:.. 
mittec 

The fads iii the ease wert 
'these: .!onf> came i" Anburo 
froie St. Albans prep, school. Tl. 
i was regarded not onb ns the hef?l 
| man on Auburn - team. hn« Efe 

'who had seen him p¥a\t 



The next issue of the orange 
and Blue » s^ -Ik t 

tion for the year 1004 



Phil Lace\. Captain 1005. Hon'l 

that sound gOOd? Hope he gets 
a ticket on the same road "Will 
Tut'' did. The road that tuns 
straight through the season with 
(Hit ;t single defeat. 



kicks to vnrds to ITforsey. Geor- 



ains 



yards, then l yard. 

and l>orse\ 



gia 

She kicks the oval 

uiiikes a touchback. 

Auburn kicks from the 25 yard 

line and Georgia advances the 

ball 5 yar<ls. Sullivan gets - 1-2 

\ards. and ;igain 2 12 yards for 

the tirst down. Sullivan takes 5 

,vards for the first do\yn. Sulli 

i van takes 5 A ards. Kossiler dt»es 

the iriek for 'A vards and Wad 
•thev were off in a bunch wituj * 

! lev gams 2 yards. Moore fads to 
the Orange mul Ulue well to the " , 

^ : gain. Sullivan repeats and then 

'Molasses" ran slow and 



October he was !ornull.\ pr< 
been «fc *>> AlttbHJJtt ami i>.mdiufi t& 
I,/ charges o1 prot.ssiona lisn. 



sav 



lead," 

•Whiskers'' scored by 4 el« 
<have. Putting (Georgia -the 
worvl filial to Molasses and 
Whiskers we hare condensed 
story of* '-all about the trouble" 
or "how Aubmu piled up 17 
',H>ints againat Georgia's i 

Anyway Ol*pt . Reynolds won 

he loss and with all the eyes of 
the Macon smart set upon him 
put his foot into the oval fOr 25 
em. Roasiter the ^Jig" Sa 
vaunah i>olieemau, Wafke« his 
ijeat for two yard*, with the lit 
tie yeltaw prisoner under his arm. 
Ou the next trip he fumbled and 
Auburn takes the ball. Foy sub 
scrihie, * and 6 oa two tries. La 
cey plants for 1 12 and Foy an- 
oexes 4. Laety gets first down, 
Reynolds second. Easy Strait 
first d*« n, aiid goes orer 



Getngi.i kn-ks the ball. Lacey 
gets 4 t-2 yards for Auburn, then 
1 2 1-2 more, and does the other 2 
12 vards for a touchdown. Rev 
nobis kicks goal, easy sailiug. 
Scoiv :it end of first half : An 
burn. 1 1 ; Georgia. 5. 

SECOND HALF. 

Georgia starts the seeond half 
with a kiekoff to Auburn. Tn two 
trials Auburn only gets a slice 2 
yards thick. Foy kicks to Horsey, 
who advance* the ball yards. 

Georgia rains three times 
against Auburn wall, but fails. 
Sullivan punts lo Auburn and 
Moon gains 4 yards. Reynolds 
makes dashing ran for 25 yards 
over Georgia's right, and Foy 
makes it first down. Btreit gains 
8 yards, Reynolds bucks again 
for 15 yards against Georgia. An- 




If we are Farmers we are proud 
of it aad aa far aa the Externiaat 
^toat goaL|%o«i clips off Wyards more. Foy|i»g pajrt goes they are correct. It 



Thus crnlei h the last game of I he 
scuson t»l i',KI4. 

Referee. Butler. <'." I'm 
pire. P.rowii. ICniorv. HeiidJines 
man. i>«.rs« \ . Timekeejiers. "Fat" 
( ImmlK is. <d Auburn, and Heaver, 
of Georgia. Halves. ;;."> minutes. 
Time of game. 2 1 - hours. 
The man behind, the man l»euind. 
The man behind the hue. the man 

behind the ball. 
The man behind them all. 

Who? that's who. 

H-O-X A-U-F E. 



The follo» r mg bo<>ks ha 
received : "How to Yei 
Ari<- Klsobrook ; "A Three Hours' brought agaiusi him wa^ *fS6t« 

Review of Faeh Game Played* **** ***** ** 
by Jioil.v J>awkins: "The Trw 
"Lotier." b\ Ralph Hudlev. pr«» 
fusel\ illustrated, by < Jo. Booper; 
'•Latest Jokes," Buddy Noll. 



A CARP. 



the loot-ball c 

II is case was brought Wore tji* 
(>x«m uti\c board :it Mirunnghno 
Saturday ami ihe riuumlttae m> 
animousl.v ttiletl that -lones wan 

eligible to |day. Or. Koss, At* 

burn s reprownta f ive. did W>t *fl 

We w ish u» apologize to UK 

, . in the Bearing. A' Hie eoacluBiac. 
boys for the delay m getting this 

issue of the paper out. But for 

various reasons we have b*^n nn- 



F1LL3M 



With a. Little Dope a.nd RjM 
Chewing Thrown in. 

i 

What? 

That's what. 

What's what '.' 

That's what the\ ail say. 

What do they alt say? 

■ •Tuakaioosa .lint." 



avoidably de!a\e<l. Now that it 
is out it will doubt lesM be a disap- 
pointment ro those that pxperred 
to see a special iswue. 

The aforesaid reataaa have also 
pn-vented us fnuu naKing ?his a 
Special issue and we will have to 

make our first issue after the hol- 

, „ , Hev*«n and the prospects - 
idays our Special Football Iapsad 

; I rhar»pionsh i p -**ai»on are the • 



of the rerdtct Antrum?* fncalt? 
was warmly ( omipeaded by fftfeen 
tire committee for their sports* 
manlike stand in the . ase. .ff«*w* 
will l»e <>ne of Animm's basenol? 
stars this spi-ing :ind- -vi!' refere 
to college a&Ci Q»H ami 1-esdaM 
plaee at tackle on 'lj^ i'«K»tbaTl 
ifpsaf' This mean* .u^t Aubanr 
will return uru*" <»f ber great lfJ^K 



this issue is probably rather 



. l»rightest in her history. 



now, but in case you have any re- 
marks to make just make them tj» 
yourselves and oblige. 

THE BOAKO OF EDITORH. 



THE TRUTHFUL SPIRIT. 



A« cording to the <h>pt^ artist on 
the C. and W. ? "»:on«- and Went," 
better known as the Crimson and 
White, we are a hutch of Farm-j \\>ii." snapped Saint Petfr. 
ers and the O. and B. is. known toj^ijat have you to say for yo«r> 



Aubwn's stand in the .faaet- 
caw shoo Id b** an example to b/ 
nutter eolkges and one to he fc> 
lowed in sueh: mafters — Athltttaf 
-Journal. 

A OA AO 



them a» tlie Mosquito Ex-termina- 
tor's Hot Blast. 



seifr* 

"4 am nat.a go«d 
the a ppl i ca nt; 



We want lu impress it upon ifc* 
tstadsat ho&T, an<* especially the new 
re |it^a#| a>, that tbe Oras«e sa4 BJoe ir 
a college paper aarf mort br- 
by *,he bora. Unteaa awry 
for the papar 
Oaar 





4', . 







ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



VOL. XI. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. MONDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1904. 



ITS OLD, BUT STILL 
SOUNDS GOOD 



The Passing of the Pigskin Sea- 
son of 1904. 



Score: Auburn. 5; Georgia, 0. j fails to gain over Sullivan, Lacey 
The first tune in played in 7 gets 4 yards, and then takes an 



Nearly a month has passed 
away since this event to be told 
later on occurred,. but "lest we for- 
get" we will print it yet. And a 
review of how Auburn put the 
last game, of an unhealed season, 
to the good is like Dl'J Ross' dog 
tail story, bound to occur. 

On last Thanksgiving afternoon 
Auburn and Georgia lined up as 
follows: 

AUBURN. 

Center — "Doc*' Butler. 
Right Guard— 'Tit" Moon, 
l^eft Guard— "Big" Braswell. 
Bight Tackle — Hughes. 
Left Tackle— "Easy" Streit. 
Bight End — Wilkerson. 
Left End — "Hogy" Paterson. 
Quarter Back— "Squire" Per- 
kins. 

Right Half— Frit Reynold^. 
"Left Half — "Imp" Foy. 
Full Back— "Phil" Lacey. 

. GEORGIA, 

< 'enter — Brown. 
Bight Guard— Richie. 
, J>'ft Guard — Black-Moore. 
Bight Tackle — Rosseter. 
Left Tackle— Hoke. 
Bight End— Moore. 
Left End— Sullivan. .. 



minutes and 7 seconds. 

Reynolds kicks off for Auburn 
and live ball clears the. cross bar 
of the goal posts. Georgia kicks 
from 25-yard line and Perkins 
touches the ball, but fails to get 
a grip; Georgia then gets her 
linger in the pudding for 3 1-2 
yards, Bossiter fails to gain. Sul- 
livan goes' around right end for 15 
yards and Moore gets 4 yards, 
Martin 8 yards. Wadley <*> yards, 
Sullivan 4 yards, Wadley makes 
the first down. After Martin 
fails to gain Moore pleases Geor- 
gia with :? yards to the left of the 
center. Martin strips off - yards, 
Moore 1 yard and Horsey plays to 
the tune of ••nothing doing." 
Then Sullivan kicks the ball. 
Georgja turns a pretty trick and 
shows her hand for a touchdown. 
Sullivan fails at goal. Score: 
Auburn, .">; Georgia, 5. 

Sullivan kicks off to Patterson 
and the ball is returned 10 yards. 
Roy fjota a par <:ent of -l y fl rtls . 
Georgia plays off side. Auburn' 
takes 5 yards more. Foy is thrown 
by Sullivan and loses 2 \ - yards. 
Reynolds gains I yard and Fo.v 
kicks 40 yards to Horsey. Geor- 
gia gains - yards; then 1 yard. 
She kicks the* oval, and Horsey 



Quarter Back — Dorsey. ' 
Bight Half— Wooten. ' 
. Left Half— Martin. 
5 Pull Back— Sage. . 

In turf parlance we may say 
"thev were off in a bunch with 
the Orange ant! Blue well in the 
lead," "Molasses" ran slow and 
"Whiskers" scored by a close 
shave. Putting Georgia — the 
word— equal to Molasses and 
Whiskers we have condensed 
story of "all about the trouble" 
or "how Auburn piled up 1^, 
points against Georgia's 5. 

Anyway Capt. Reynolds won 
the toss and with all the eyes of 
the Macon smart set upon him, 
put his foot into the oval for 25 
of 'em. Rossiter the "Big" Sa- 
vannah policeman, walked his 
beat for two yards, with the lit 
tie yellow prisoner under his arm. 
On the next trip he fumbled and 
Auburn takes the ball. Foy sub 
scribes. 7 and 6 on two tries. La 
cey plants for 1 1-2 and Foy an- 
nexes 4. Lacey gets first down, 
Reynolds second. Easy Streit 
first down, and "Phil" goes over 
"de" line. Reynolds fails at goal 



makes a touchback. 

Auburn kicks fronj^tiie 2") yard 
line and Georgia advances the 
ball 5 yards. Sullivan gcts*2 1-2 
yards, and again 2- 1-2 yards for 
the first down. Sullivan takes 5 
yards for the first down. Sulli- 
van takes -5 yards, Bossiter does 
the trick for 3 yards and Wad- 
ley gains 2 yards. Moore fails to 
gain. Sullivan repeats arid then 
Georgia kicks the ball. Lacey 
gets 4 1-2 yards for Auburn, then 
2 1-2 more, and does the other 2 
1-2 yards for a touchdown. Rey- 
nolds kicks goal, .easy sailing. 
Score at end of first half: Au- 
burn. 1 1 ; Georgia, "a." 

SECOND HALF. 
• Georgia starts the second half 
with a kickoff tp Auburn. In two 
trials Auburn only gets a slice 2 
yards thick. Foy kicks to Dorsey, 
who advances the ball 6 yards. 

Georgia rams three times 
against Auburn wall, but fails 
Sullivan punts to Auburn and 
Moon gains 4 yards. Reynolds 
makes dashing run for 25 yards 
over Georgia's right, and Foy 
makes it first down. Streit gains 
8 yards, Reynolds bucks again 
for 15 yards against Georgia. Au- 
burn clips off 10 yards more. Foy 



other 5 yards. Lacey gets 5 yards 
easily for a touchdown, and then 
Reynolds kicks a pretty ? goal. 
Score: Auburn, 17; Georgia. 5. 

Sullivan kicks off for 30 yards 
to Auburn and the ball is return- 
ed 10 yards. Moon batters Geor- 
gia's line for 4 yards and follows 
with 1 yard. Foy gets 3 yards on 
a double pass ; Reynolds bucks the 
line for 3 yards, then is presented 
with 7 yards more. Lacey ham- 
mers away for (5 yards; Auburn 
gets "> yards more and Lacey 3 
yards more.. Lacey and Reynolds 
then get 8 yards a piece, and Rey- 
nolds. follows with a gain of 3 1-2 
yards. The ball then goes over to 
Georgia on downs. 

Georgia makes two trials and 
goes only 2 yards. Sullivan then 
kicks to Foy. who advances the 
ball 10 yards. - Moon goes through 
lor 9 yards .Auburn continues the 
-tory for '". yards more and Foy 
lakes «> yards and yards in 2 
bucks. The game fothen called 
on account of darkness after 2 1-2 
hours play, the ball being in "Au- 
burn's possession in the middle of 
the field. | 

Thnsendeth the last game of the 
season of 15)04. •„ 

Referee, Butler, "X. <'." 1'm- 
pire. Rr.nwn. Emory. Headlines- 
man, Dorsey. Timekeepers, "Pat" 
Chambers, of Auburn, and Beaver, 
of Georgia. Halves. 35 minutes. 
Time -of game. 2 1-2 hours. 
The man behind, the. man behind, 
The man behind the line. the. man 

behind the ball. 
The. man behind them all. 
Who? that's who, 
DONAHUE. 



is very plain that Auburn Exter- 
minated somebody's Football aspi 
rations but did not succeed in 
exterminating the supply of Hot 
Air. 



Oujy two were left. Auburn- 
Yanderbilt. Vanderbilt put Sew- 
anee's Tigers out of business 
Thanksgiving. Auburn stored 
away 17 against Georgia's 5 on 
the same day. So the race for 
the' championship was cut down 
to two on Turkey day and is 
destined to remain that way un- 
til next year. 



AUBURN'S STAR 

RE-INSTATED BY S. I. A. A*» 

Tackle Jones is Relieved of the 
Cha-Je of Professionalism By 
Executive Committee. 

; -J 



And Frank Jones is released, 
acquitted or whatever handle you 
want to use. Thought: so! 



Phil Lacey. Captain lOOS.'Don'l 
thai sound good? Hope he gels 
a lickei on the same road '"Will 
Tut" did. The road that runs 
straight through the season with- 
out a single defeat. 

The next issnV of the Orange 
an. J mS * M-i k> h ,\V ¥<X) ih f & 4 i& ~ 
lion, lor the Vear HI04. 



SPACE FILLING 



With a. Little Dope a.nd Rag 
Chewing Thrown in. 

What? 

That's what. 

What's what ? 

That's what they all say. 

What do they all say? 

"Tuskaloosa aint." 



According to the dope artist ou 
the C. and W.. "Come and Went," 
better known as the Crimson and 
White, we are a bunch of Farm 
ers and the O. and B. is known to 
them as the Mosquito Extermina 
tor's Hot Blast. 



If we are Farmers we are proud 
of it and as far as the Exterminat- 
ing part goes they are correct. It 



The following books have been 
received : "How to Yell." by 
Arte Elsobrook: "A Three Hours' 
Review of Bach (tame Played." 
by Holly Hawkins; "The True 
'"Loner." by Ralph. Rfidley. pro- 
fusely illustrated, by Co. Booper: 
Latest Jokes," Huddy Noll. 



A CARD. 



We wish to apologize to the 
l>oys for the delay in getting this 
issue of . the paper out. But for 
various reasons we have been un- 
avoidablydelayed. Now that it 
is out it will doubtless be a disap- 
pointment to those that expected 
to see a special issue. 

The aforesaid reasons have also 
prevented us from making this a 
special issue and we will have to 
make our first issue after the hol- 
idays our Special Football Issue. 
Some of the "news" contained in 
this issue is probably rather old 
now. but in case you have any re- 
marks to make just make them to 
yourselves and oblige. 

THE BOARD OF EDITORS. 



\s a result of the recent cohj. 
mittee meeting of the S. T. A. A— 
held Saturday in BirmlngfKxvv 
Ala.. Frank Jones; Auburn's' star 
tackle the early part of the pas*.: 
baseball campaign, was unani- 
mously reinstated and relieved <rf" 
the charge of professionalism 1 . 

This charge was brought again** 
Jones by Alabama University, a .art: 
rather than have any contention: 
in the matter, Auburn, with nceV- 
regard for pure sportsmanship • 
and the ethics of the game, wi«U 
drew their man pending an inveW 
ligation by the s. t. A. A. con*-, 
mittee. 

The facts in the case \\cv< 

these: Jones came to Auburn 

fijoin St. Albans prep, school. II.- 

was regarded not" drily asjhe best; 

man on Auburn's team, but: tfu- 

best_ huklc jnj he South by .utua< 

who had seen him play. Late itt , 

v . te — ' ' 

October he was formally protest 

ed by Alabama and pending -tut.- 
charges of professionalise 
brought against- him was tcvtft. 
drawn during the remainder <\< » 
the football campaign. 

His case was brought before EH? 
executive board at Birmingmtjtii 
Saturday and I lie committee uw 
animously ruled that Jones, was? 
eligible to play. Dr. Ross, Au- 
burn's uepEesenttitive, did not sit." 
in the hearing. At the conclusion 
of the verdict Auburn's faeuftv.- 
was warmly commended by the cru 
tire committee for their sports- 
manlike stand in the case. Jones* 
will be one of Auburn's baseball 
stars this spring and will return 
to college ne\t fall and resume hi? 
place at tackle on the, football . 
squad. This means that Auburn i 
will return -uiue of her great 1904 ! 
eleven and the prospects for n - 
championship season are . th<- - 
brightest in her history. 

Auburn's stand in the- Jonet. 
case should be an example to he- 
sister colleges and one to be fol- 
lowed in such: ^matters.— Atlanta- 
Journal. 



THE TRUTHFUL SPIRIT. , 

"Well." snapped Saint Feter, 
"what have you to say for your- 
self?" 

"I am not a good man," replied 
the applicant; "but I didn't go 
about making apologies for myself 
on earth, and I don't intend to be- 
gin now." 

And he got in. 



A CA.-ID. 



We want to impress it upon th* 
student body, and especially the new 
men, that the Orange and Blue If- 
strictly a college paper and must he- 
supported by the boys. Unless every 
man subscribes for the paper and 
pays his subscription, they cannot ex- 
pect a good periodica). 

Business Manager- 







ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



VOL. XI. 



A V BURN, ALABAMA, MONDAY. DECEMBER 21. 1904. 



ITS OLD, BUT STILL 
SOUNDS GOOD 



The Passing of the Pigskin Sea 
son of 1904. 



Nearly a month has passed 
away since this event to be told 
later on occurred, but "lest we for- 
get" we will print it yet. And a 
review of how Auburn put the 
last game, of an unbeated season, 
to the good is like l>r. Koss' dog 
tail story, bound to occur. 

On last Thanksgiving afternoon 
Auburn and Georgia lined up as 
follows: 

A V BURN. 

Center — "Doe' Butler. 
Right Guard— 'Tit" Moon. 
Left Guard— "Big" Braswell. 
Right Tackle— Hughes, 
l^eft Tackle— "Easy" Streit. 
Righ t End— Wi lkerson . 
Left End— "Hogy" Paterson. 
Quarter Back— "Squire" Per- 
kins. 

Right Half— Frit Reynolds. 
Left Half— "I mp" Toy. 
Full Back— "Phil" lLcey. 

f 

GEORGIA, 

Center — Brown. 

Right Guard— Richie. 

Left Guard— Black-Moore. 

Right Tackle — Rosseter. 

Left Tackle— Hoke. 

Right End — Moore. 

Left End— Sullivan. 

Quarter Back— Horsey. 

Right Half— Wooten. 

Left Half— Martin. 

Full Back— Sage. 

In turf parlance we may say 
"they were off in a bunch with 
the Orange and Blue well in the 
lead," "Molasses" ran slow and 
"Whiskers" scored by a close 
shave. Tutting Georgia— the 
word— equal to Molasses and 
Whiskers we have condensed 
story qf "all about the ,trouble" 
or "how Auburn piled up 17 
points against Georgia's 5. 

Anyway Cnpt. Reynolds won 
the toss and with ail the eyes of 
the Macon smart set upon him, 
put his foot into the oval for 25 
of 'em. Rossiter the "Big" Sa- 
vannah policeman, walked his 
beat for two yards, with the lit- 
tie yellow prisoner under his arm. 
On the next trip he fumbled and 
Auburn takes the ball. Foy sub- 
scribes. 7 and 6 on two tries. La- 
cey plants for 1 1-2 and Foy an- 
nexes 4. Lacey gets first down, 
Reynolds second. Easy Streit 



«de" line. Reynolds fails at goal 



Score : Auburn. 5 ; Georgia, 0. 

The first tune is played in 7 
minutes and 7 seconds. 

Reynolds kicks off for Auburn 
and the ball clears the cross bar 
of the goal posts. Georgia kicks 
from 25-yard line and Perkins 
touches the ball, but fails to get 
a grip. Georgia then gets her 
linger in the pudding for 3 1-2 
yards. Rossiter fails to gain, Sul- 
livan goes around right end for 15 
yards and Moore gets 4 yards, 
Martin 3 yards. Wadley 6 yards, 
Sullivan 4 yards, Wadley makes 
the first down. After Martin 
fails to gain Moore pleases Geor- 
gia with .'I yards to the left of the 
cen ter. Ma rtin strips off 2 ya rds, 
Moore 1 yard and Horsey plays to 
the tune of "nothing doing." 
Then Sullivan kicks the ball. 
Georg|a turns a pretty trick and 
shows her hand for a touchdown. 
Sullivan fails at goal. Score: 
Auburn, 5; Georgia. 5. 

Sullivan kicks off to Patterson 
and the ball is returned 1.0 yard*. 
Foy {<ots a pee cont of -l yawls, 
Georgia plays off side. Auburn 
takes 5 yards more, Foy is thrown 
by Sullivan and loses 2 1-2 yards. 
Reynolds gains 1 yard and Foy 
kicks 40 yards to Dorsey. Geor- 
gia gains 2 yards, then 1 yard. 
She kicks the oval ami Horsey 
makes a touchback. 

Auburn kicks from the 25 yard 
line and Georgia advances the 
ball 5 yards. Sullivan gets 2 1-2 
yards, and again 2 1-2 yards for 
the first down. Sullivan takes 5 
yards for the first down. Sulli- 
van takes 5 yards, Rossiter does 
the trick for 3 yards and Wad- 
ley gains 2 yards. Moore fails to 
gain. Sullivan repeats and then 
Georgia kicks the ball. Lacey 
gets 4 1-2 yards for Auburn, then 
2 1-2 more, and does the other 2 
1-2 yards for a touchdown. Rey- 
nolds kicks goal, easy sailing. 
Score at end of first half: Au- 
burn, 11 : Georgia, 5. 

SECOND HALF. 
Georgia starts the second half 
with a kickoff to Auburn. In two 
trials Auburn only gets a slice 2 
yards thick. Foy kicks to Dorsey. 
who advances the ball 6 yards. 

Georgia rams three times 
against Auburn wall, but fails. 
Sullivan punts to Auburn and 
Moon gains 4 yards. Reynolds 
makes dashing ran for 25 yards 
over Georgia's right, and Foy 
makes it first down. Streit gains 
8 yards, Reynolds bucks again 
for 15 yards against Georgia. Au- 
burn clips off 16 yards more. Foy 



fails to gain over Sullivan, Lacey 
gets 4 yards, and then takes an- 
other 5 yards. Lacey gets 5 yards 
easily for a touchdown, and then 
Reynolds kicks a pretty goal. 
Score: Auburn, 17; Georgia, 5. 

Sullivan kicks off for 30 yards 
to Auburn and the ball is return- 
ed 10 yards. Moon batters Geor- 
gia's line for 4 yards and follows 
with 1 yard. Foy gets 3 yards on 
a double pass ; Reynolds bucks the 
line for 3 yards, then is presented 
with 7 yards more. Lacey ham- 
mers away for 6 yards; Auburn 
gets 5 yards more and Lacey 3 
yards more. Lacey and Reynolds 
then get 8 yards a piece, and Rey- 
nolds follows with a gain of 3 1-2 
yards. The ball then goes over to 
Georgia on downs. 

Georgia makes two trials and 
goes only 2 yards. Sullivan then 
kirks to Foy. who advances the 
ball 10 yards. - Moon goes through 
for 9 yards .Auburn continues the 
tory for 3 yards more and Foy 
takes 6 yards and :'. yards in 2 
bucks 

on account of darkness after 2 1-2 
hours [day. the ball being in Au- 
burn's possession in the middle of 
the field. 

Thuscndeth (he last game of the 
season of 1S>04. 

Referee, Butler, "X. C.f Um- 
pire. Brown. Emory. Headlines- 
man, Horsey. Timekeepers, "Pat" 
Chambers, of Auburn, and Beaver, 
of Georgia. Halves. 36 minutes. 
Time of game, 2 1-2 hours. 
The man behind, the man behind, 
The man behind the line, the man 

behind the ball, 
The man behind them all. 

Who? that's wjio. 

D O N A H l Mi 



is very plain that Auburn Exter 
minated somebody's Football aspi- 
rations but did not succeed in 
exterminating the supply of Hot- 
Air. 



Only two were left. Auburn 
Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt put Sew 
anee's Tigers out of business 
Thanksgiving. Auburn stored 
away 17 against Georgia's 5 on 
the same day. So the race for 
the championship was cut down 
to two on Turkey day and is 
destined to remain that , way un- 
til next year. 



And Frank Jones is released, 
acquitted or whatever handle you 
want to use. Thought so! 



Phil Lacey. Captain 1905. Don't 
thAt sound good? Hope he gets 
a ticket on the same road "Will 
Tut" did. The road that runs 
straight through the season with- 
out a single defeat. 



The next issue of the Orange 
The game^then called ^ nhH ., vifH , r m~m&m&m& 



SPACE FILLING 

With a Little Dope and Raj 
Chewing Thrown in. 

What? 

That's what. 

What's what? 

That's what they all say. 

What do they all say? 

"Tuskaloosa aint." 

According to the dope artist on 
the C. and W., "Come and Went," 
better known as the Crimson and 
White, we are a bunch of Farm- 
era and the O. and B. is known to 
them as the Mosquito Extermina- 
tor's Hot Blast 



If we aw Farmers we are 
of it and as far as the Exterminat- 
ing part goes they are correct. It 



Hon for the year 1004. 



The following books have lnjen 
received: "How to Yell," by 
Aric Elsobrook; "A Three Hours' 
Review of Each Game Played.'" 
by Holly Hawkins; "The True 
"Loner." by Kalph Rudley. pro- 
fusely illustrated, by Co. Hooper; 
"Latest Jokes." Huddy Noll. 



A CARD. 



We wish to apologize to the 
boys for the delay in getting this 
issue of the paper out. But for 
various reasons we have been un- 
avoidably delayed. Now that it 
is out it will doubtless be a disap- 
pointment to those that expected 
to see a special issue. 

The aforesaid reasons have also 
prevented ns from making this a 
special issue and we will have to 
make our first issue after the hol- 
idays our Special Football Issue. 
Some of the "news" contained in 
this issue is probably rather old 
now, but in case you have any re- 
marks to make just make them to 
yourselves and oblige. 

THE BOARD OF EDITORS. 



THE TRUTHFUL SPIRIT. 



"Well," snapped Saint Peter, 
"what have yon to say for your- 
selfr 

"I am not a good man," replied 
the applicant; "bat I didn't go 
about making apologies for myself 
on earth, and I don't intend to be- 
gin now." 
And he got in. 



AVBURN'S STAR 

RE-INSTATED BY S. I. A. A»~ 

Tackle Jones is Relieved of tfw 
Chape of Professionalism By 
Executive Committee. 

As a result of the recent cotes 
mittee meeting of the S. I. A. 
held Saturday in Itinuinghtnnv. 
Ala.. Frank Jones, Auburn's ?t»r 
tackle the early part of the pas*.; 
hasehall campaign, was unani- 
mously reinstated and relieved 1 
the charge of professionalism. 

This charge was brought again** 
.Tones hy Alabama University , a ad 
rather than have any eonteu.li»m 
in the matter, Auburn, with rarr*- 
regard for pure sportsmanship 
and the ethics of the game, will- 
drew their man pending an intves 
tigation by the S. I. A. A. com 
mittee. 

The fa» ts in the case weir 
these: Jones came to Aubtrr« 
from St. Albans prep, school. D> 
was regarded not only as the best 
man on Auburn's team, but the 
best tackle in the South by man* 
win* had seen him play. Late fn 
October he was formally protest 
ed by Alabama and pending the 
charges of profes«ionnlisn« 
brought againsl him was wfxlf 
drawn during the remainder nV 
the football campaign. 

His case was brought before tir* 
executive board at ItirmiDghwi* 
Saturday and the committee 
animously ruled that Jones 
eligible to play. Dr. Ross> Ao> 
burn's representative, did not sit 
in the hearing. At Jhe conclusion 
of the verdict Auhum's faculty 
was warmly commended by theory < 
tire committee for their 
manlike stand in the case, 
will be one of Auburn's 
stars this spring and will 
to college no\t fall and resume has 
place at tackle on. football 
squad. This meant* thai Auhanr 1 
will return nine of her great I9W ! 
eleven and the prospects for a - 
championship season are the- 
brightest in her history. 

Auburn's stand in the .Toner 
case should be an example to he- 
Bister colleges and one to he fol- 
lowed in such:i matters.— Atlanta: 
Journal. 



A CAM). 

We want to impress It 
student bodr, mad espeeisllr the 
mat, tast the Oraasje sad Has far- 
strictly a eoUctje p a p e r sad mast se- 
ar the bars. Unless «vwir 




I' 



Orange and Blue 



r df Editors from the Senior 

V*s*ooated to the general interest 
College. 



. BoanV 




SibMscaRiFsaoN Rates, *1.00 Phk Yf.ar 
SB4>A3iD OF EDITORS. 

r • 

. Jff. Ti_ "PseES-RSON Montgomery, Ala. 

Editor in-Chief. 

IX. G. Wtt.kinson Gastonburg, Ala. 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief. 

K. H.<Ca*aniss Birmingham, Ala. 

Business Manager. 

• *». E. Young. Selma, Ala. 

Assistant Business Manager. 

8. P. Boyd Montgomery, Ala 

f,ocal Editor. 

i>- G. Bwisc Lowndesboro. Ala. 

Exchange Editor. 

i-^5iexBO«N Boyd Montgomery, Ala. 

Athletic Editor. 

ESL L. Forrester Cowarts, Ala. 

\3K.SL Samvord .. Opelika, Ala. 

Associate Editors. •■ 



Address all matter intended for pub- 
1 action to -the Editor-in-Chief. 

IJBjas'inesS'Communications should be 
• vmt te the Business Manager. 

' ■Contributions for ORANGE AND BLUE 
oMMfc&e in the hands of the Editors 
r at later than Saturday before week 
. fci issue. 



IKRATERNITIES. * 
Alpha Tau Omega, Kappa Alpha 
' Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Alpha Epsi 
Ma, Sigma Nu, Pi Kappa Alpha and 
. Kappa Sigma. 



CHURCH DIRECTORY. 
' Presbyterian Church— Services sec- 
vnd Sunday in each month, morning 
. ..end evening. Rev. E. P. Davis, D. 
i O.vpastor. Sunday school 9:30 a. m 
T T?^T^«W^^.^*^^lTr^ , itpeT^ 
i jtexdent. 

'"'•Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
*--C. R. Cornell, pastor. C. C. Thach 
!>■"•; s-n-d ay Schcl Superintendent. 
: i*ireaching services each Sunday at 11 
c/a. in. and 7 p. m. Sunday School at 
' :*:30 a. m. ' Devotional Meeting of Ep- 
v worth League Sunday 6:30 p. m 
i Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening 
; it 7:30 o'clock. 

Aub lrn Baptist Church -C. C. Pugh, 
pastor. Prof, J. -F. Duggar, Sunday 
S rVJhool -Superintendent. Sunday 
J . -ichoot 9:30 a. m. DivMiP Services 11 
i t j m. and 7 p. m. Youn„' People's 
i «€H0* 4 :10 p. in. V .i, r Mjeinj 
•j «ri. Wednesday afternoon. 

i.Ptotecstant Episcopal Holy Innocents 
v '-^t«bpel -^Services ivery Sunday at 11 

ju«ri.^tod'.7 p. m. Ho'y Communion 
'..T-te e. an. .every Sunday except the 
I ■Swst Soadavin each mjtith. Evening 
• prayer «everv Friday at 4:30 p. m. 
•dSmmA ay ■School 9:^1 a. m.,S. L. Toom- 
. -r. Superintendent 

'•"Cillege Y. M. iC, A. — Sunday 3 p. 
-^n,"Y. Jfi.C A. Hall.CoHege Building. 



Aahurn! Auburn! is our cry, 
V-IC-T-O-R-r. 



"What can't Donahue do? 
Once again after a lapse of 
. xhiw years, the Auburn Tiger 

i*a* returned from the tield of 
XAMttle with a hunch of scalps at 
\ 'MUi l>eli, -and his own resting safe- 
iiiTWUL turn head. And if we consid- 
w.»r.»-hai tin has done, it will doubt- 
i<M*>c..jr'ive. v* much satisfaction. 

jEaMy in the season, according to 
— -«iperts," we were rank ontsid- 
rers.wlieji it came to the champion- 

khip tclass. Our . material was 

Tijghi. slow and new. .-.Besides our 
• «*ach was also new. Howver, we 

oconld probably test Hhe; strength 



of some of the better teams of the 
South." We are glad to say now 
t ha t a U^ofthe^ teains we met -•••^ 
sil jjnequal To the test, 
(fut of the . aforesaid "light, 
and new material," our 
has constructed a team 
which has sent five inter-collegiate 
teams into the class of the "would- 
be's." 

Our team has broken several 
records this year. They defeated 
Clemson on her own campus for 
the first time in the history of her 
foothall team; for the first time 
in ten years, or in a total of 10 
games played. Heismau's was 
not allowed to make first down. 
And we did it. During the entire 
game the total number of yards 
gained by the Techs was eight. 
What's the matter with Auburn? 

We also took revenge on some 
teams that had beaten us in the 
past. Clemson had beaten us 18 
to the last time we played them. 
But we evened matters up. We 
bearded the mountain lions of 
Carolina in their dens. Then came 
Nashville, who had in October, 
1901, trounced us to the tune of 
23 to 5. But we paid him back 
with interest by walloping them 
to the tune of 10 to 0. The score 
Joes not indicate the extent of the 
walloping, but they were unable 
to make first down during the 
game. Next on the revenge list 
was Alabama and she shared the 
jhine fate. Last came old (ieor- 
gia. but we couj d n't r evenge on 
her so she followed the others. 



The games will be played din- 
ing the last two weeks of January. 

the fact that baseball practice 
should and will now commence 
early in February. Baseball prat 
tice as has l>een beiOTe stated, will 
commence early in February 
Heretofore we have been too late 
in commencing our practice. But 
this year the prospects are bright 
for a good team and it is the inten- 
tion, of Captain Hall to have the 
team in good form before the sea 
son actually commences. There 
are plenty of good candidates for 
each position and the man that 
makes the team will have to hus- 
tle. The schedule has not yet been 
entirely arranged, but will include 
some hard games with , the best 
teams in the South. The teams 
that we will probably meet are 
Mercer, Georgia, Alabama, Techs. 
Sewanee, Yanderbilt, and if possi- 
ble, Tulane and Baton Rouge. 



THE ALL-SOVTHERN TEAM. 



By J. W. Heisman, Coaxh Geor- 
gia. School of Technology. 



Term examinations are about 
over ami the holidays are at hand. 
We hope each boy can go home 
with the feeling that he has done 
liis best, also that he will enjoy 
the holidays to their fullest ex- 
tent and return to work with re- 
newed vigor. If you haven't done 
well this term return with the de- 
termination to make up for the 
time wasted. And if you have 
done well let the good work go 
on, only improve tf^ittle, for there 
is always room for improvement. 



Just after Christmas we have 
the class football games. Accord- 
ing to the rulings of the Athletic 
Advisory Board, no man who has 
made his "A" can take part in 
these games. Ho that the class 
teams will consist of men who 
have scrubbed aud, undeveloped 
material. The greatest interest is 
always taken in these games and 
the keenest rivalry exists between 
the di Helen t classes. So let every 
man that is able come out and aid 
his class team. You. may not 
think that you can play football. 
Hut remember it is a bad principle 
for a man to Iwliere that he can't 
do a thing even before he attempts 
it. Come out aud try. If you fail 
no- harm is done. If you succeed 
you have won a great victory. If 
you are small just remember '"the 
race is no* to the swift, etc." 



FIRST TEAM. 
Center — Stone. Yanderbilt. 
Right Guard — Brown, Yander 
hilt. 

Left Guard — Phillips, Sew- 
anee. 

'Right Tackle— Brown, Tech. 

Left Tackle — Derrick, Clemson.. 

Right End— W. Wilson, Tech. 

Left End— Beane. Tennessee. 

< f , " p ) - — 

Quarterback — Searbrough, Sew 

a nee. 

Right Hall— Craig. Vauderbilt. 
Fullback — Holland, Clemson. 

SUBSTITUTE ELEVEN. 

< 'enter — Smith. Cumberland. 
Right (iuard — Sartain, Ala- 
bama. 

Left Guard— Braswell, Auburn. 
Right Tackle— Graham, Yan- 
derbilt. 

Left Tackle— Streit, Auburn. 
Right End— Manier, Yanderbilt 
Left End — Sullivan, Georgia. 
Qua rterba ck — Kyle, Vanderbilt. 
Left Half— Foy. Auburn. 
Right Half— Burke, Alabama. 
Full back — Hamilton, Y ander- 
bjlt. 

Note — These men tire selected 
from S. I. I, A. teams only. 

Reynolds Tichenor, in Atlanta 
News, gives practically the same 
teams with the exception of Foy, 
at fullback, in Holland's place. 
And Moon at guard on the second 
team. Both Tichenor and Heis- 
man declare Jones to be the first 
tackle of the year, the question of 
his eligibility bfting the only iea 
sou why he was not placed on the 
all-Southern. .Now that all doubt 
as to his l>eing eligible is removed, 



tackle of the South. "Made 
Auburn." 



We have recently received from 
those well known publishers. 
Hinds, Noble" and Eldredge, a 
copy of "The Most Popular Col 



THE BANK OF OPELIKA, Opelika, Ala. 

Capital Stock, $100,000.00 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIYEI TO AUBURN BUSINESS 



You can make your deposits or have your checks cashed 
right in Auburn with our representative, 
Mr. W. B. Gulattk 



R. M. GREENE 
Prksiuent 



J. B. GREENE 
Vich-Prf.sidhnt 



JOS. H. SMITH 
Cashier 



Furniture and Furnishings 

For Fraternity Halls, Club Houses, Etc. 

Before buying any kind of Furniture, 
give us a call. We carry a large and 
well-selected stock and can please you in 
quality and price. :: ; :: :: :: 



FREDERICK * CROSSLET 

South 8th Street, Opelika, Ala. 



F. KELLY HAYNIE and G. HARDAWAY FRAZER 
Two old Auburn boys, are with . 

Smith &*Crossley 

THE LEADING DRUQQ1STS OF OPELIKA 

IT - , 

Come to see us, boys. The best in the shop is yours. 



-ANYTHING YOU NEED IN' 



Shoes, Hats and Men's Furnishings 

You Can Find In Our Store. Come to See Us. 

SAMFORD & DOWDELL 

SOUTH R. R. AVENUE OPELIKA, ALA. 



Don't fait to visit Thomason's Druj Sfr^^.-Jieu in OpeHka, and make our 
place your headquarters. Best stock of Drug- Sundries, Pipes and Smoking 
material. We solicit your patronage. 

Thomason's Drug Store 



South Railroad Avenue 



Phone No- 30 



J. C. CONDON 

OPELIKA, ALABAMA 

Dealer in Jewelry, Watches, Etc. 



A full 1 ine of Cuff and Collar Buttons, Stick Pins, and everything in t 
'first-class Jewelry House. Fine watch repairing- a specialty. Any design of 
pisn or badges made to order. - ? 



THIS IS THE PLACE E&S£E2~ 

men. Hart, Sohaffner & Marx, and Fechheimer-Kishel Clothing, Manhattan 
Shirts, Clapp's Shoes. 

R. M. GREENE, JR. 

South Railroad Ave. OPELIKA, ALA. 



lege SongH," one of their best 
publications. 

TheHe songs, selected as they are 
from songs of all the colleges, rep- 
resent the most popular songs in 
use today by the many (Jlee Clubs 
and male quartettes. 

The songs in this collection are 
up to date and most of them are 
comparatively easy to learn, which 
adds considerably to their worth. 
-4a the eollection-are a number 
of famous old songs familiar to 
all, but of the kind that seem to 
gain popularity instead of los 
ing it. 

Taken as a whole the collectioi. 
is first class in every respect. 




COPYRIGHT 



When you want a nice school suit or a 
nice dress suit, call on 

J. A. GRESNE, Thh Tailor 

Opelika 



i. 



I 



Orange and B 



l-^Alished every two weeks by 
- Editors from the Senior 



to the general interest < »f 
College. 



ue 



Sou i d 



v a So; 



4id 



the 



r^bwwcakxfxjos Rates, £1.00 Pek Year 



£B#ARD OF EDITORS. 

.JR. "H. "PSeferson Montgomery, 

Editor in-Chief. 

IX CL Wtukinson Gastonburg 



Ala. 
Ala. 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief. 

H.Omaniss Birmingham, Ala. 

Business Manager. 

*1.E. Young I Selma, Ala. 

Assistant Business Manager. 

..Montgomery, Ala 
Local Editor. 

, C Eving LOwndesboro. Ala. 

Exchange Editor. 

Boyd Montgomery, Ala. 

Athletic Editor. 

SE. V.. Forrester Cowarts, Ala. 

\W.ML Samhord Opelika, Ala. 

Associate Editors. 



ft. P. BOVD 



v Address all matter intended for pub- 
Zzmtvui to the Editor-in-Chief. 

; Justness communications should be 
~*mat *• the Business Manager. 

► Contributions for Orange and Blue 
•rsoBSfcbe m the hands of the Editors 
nns* later than Saturday before week 
.fc£4«sue. 



^FRATERNITIES. 
Alpha Tau Omega, Kappa Alpha 
-Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Alpha Epsi 
Jam, Sigma Nu, Pi Kappa Alpha and 
..Kappa Sigma. 

CHURCH DIRECTORY. 
' Presbyterian Church— Services sec- 
snd Sunday in each month, morning 
md evening. Rev. E. P. Davis, D. 
I D.vpastor. Sunday school 9:30 a. m 
'Vac-y mSZS&i c'-'-A. Ui v, aupci- 
i Jiteoodent. 

'^Methodist 'Episcopal Church, South 
^-C R. Cornell, pastor. C. C. Thach 
rV5««.day Scho„: Superintendent. 
I Preaching services each Sunday at 11 
c; i. tn. and 7 p. m. Sunday School at 
• :»:30 a. m. ! Devotional Meeting of Ep- 
% worth League Sunday 6:30 p. m 
I Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening 
. at 7 JO o'clock. 

Awb lrn Baptist Church— C. C. Pugh, 
»T pastor, P«rf- *■ F - Duggar, Sunday 
t Sdkoel -Superintendent. Sunday 
■* School 9«30 a. m. Div^n* Services 11 
. • aild -7 p. m. Youn,: People's 

I fftrib* 4:40 p. m. P a> :r M;e in ? 
- V ~^«V Wednesday afternoon. 

iPwtashmt -Episcopal Holy Innocents 
v ;^h«p*l— ■Services e-very Sunday at 11 
■, j*r*n.**&~~ p. m. H«tfy Communion 
::7~Mm.. on. every Sunday except the 
I ^ hMfM'in each *nj»th. Evening 
- pe»yer -ewenr FriiUv at 4:30 p. m. 
; SMflsy School 9:*» a. niUs! L. Toom- 
■h <r, Super iatendent 

~C*Uege Y. M. C. A.— Sunday 3 p. 
TBSf^T. MCA. H*il, College Building. 



of some of the better teams of the 
South." We are glad to say now 
that all of the trains we met prov- 
»d ( jin<Hjual to the 
<#*it of the afo 
*low and new 
coach has co 
which has sent five inter-collegiate 
teams into the class of the "would- 
be'*." 

Our team has broken several 
records this year. They defeated 
Clemson on her own campus for 
the first time in the history of her 
football team; for the first time 
in ten years, or in a total of 10 
games played. Heisman's was 
not allowed to make first down. 
And we did it. During the entire 
game the total number of yards 
gained by the Techs was eight. 
What's the matter with Auburn? 

We also took revenge on some 
teams that had beaten us in the 
past. Clemson had beaten us 18 
to the last time we played them. 
But we evened matters up. We 
bearded the mountain lions of 
Carolina in their dens. Then came 
Nashville, who had in October, 
1901, trounced us to the tune of 
23 to 5. But we paid him back 
with interest by walloping them 
to the tune of 19 to 0. The score 
does not indicate the extent of the 
walloping, but they were unable 
to make first down during the 
game. Next on the revenge list 
was Alabama and she shared the 
same fate. Last came old Geor- 
gia, but we eouldn't revenge on 



the fart that 
light, should and wil 



material " oar early in Februat 
tructed a team fice as has l>een 



The games will be played dur 
ing the last two weeks of January 
the change Iteing made because of 



eball pnutiy 
now commeBV 
. Baseball prac 
i*fore st 

in February 



commence early 
Heretofore we have been too late 
in commencing our practice. But 
this year the prospects are bright R . M . GREE NE 
for a good team and it is the inten- Prksidks-i 
tion of Captain Hall to have the 
team in good form before the sea 
son actually commences. There 
are plenty of good candidates for 
each position and the man that 
makes the team will have to hus- 
tle. The schedule has not yet been 
entirely arranged, but will include 
some hard games with the best 
teams in the South. The teams 
that we will probably meet are 
Mercer, Georgia, Alabama, Techs. 
Mewanee, Vanderbilt, and if possi- 
ble. Tulane and Baton Rouge. 



her so she followed the others. 



Term examinations are about 
over and the holidays are at hand. 
We hope each boy can go home 
with the feeling that he has done 
his best, also that he will enjoy 
the holidays to their fullest ex 
tent and return to work with re 
uewed vigor. If you haven't done 
well this term return with the de- 
termination to make up for the 
time wasted. And if you have 
done well let the good work go 
ou, only improve a little, for there 
is always room for improvement. 



. fobum.' Auburn/ is our cry, 
V-IC-T-O-R-r. 

"What can't Donahue do? 
Once again after a lapse of 
three years, the Auburn Tiger 
returned from the field of 
**ith a bunch of scalps at 
r hUMrvnid his own resting safe 
t*i_r«a:iji* head. And if we consid- 
*t what Ae has done, it will doubt 
&hv*,gtve as much satisfaction. 
lEsHy an the season, according to 
-rwpertsV' we were rant outsid- 
it came to the champion- 
{Qur : material wan 
J^it. slow and new. . .Besides oar 
, was also new. Howver, we 
probably tost aVvttrengtb 



.fust after Christmas we have 
the class football games. Accord- 
ing to the rulings of the Athletic 
Advisory Board, no man who has 
made his "A" can take part in 
these games. Bo that the class 
teams will consist of men who 
have scrubbed and undeveloped 
material. The greatest interest is 
always taken in these games and 
the keenest rivalry exists between 
the different classes. So let every 
man that is able come out and aid 
his class team. You . may not 
think that you can play football. 
But remember it is a bad principle 
for a man to believe that he can't 
do a thing even before he attempts 
it. Come out and try. If you fall 
no. harm is done. If you succeed 
you have wow a great victory. If 



THE ALL SOUTHE RN TEAM. 

By J. W. Heisman. Coach Geor- 
gia, ScKjoI of Technology. 

FIRST TEAM. 

Center— Stone, Vanderbilt. 
Right Guard— Brown, Vander- 
bilt. 

Left Guard— rhillips, Sew 
anee. 

Right Tackle— Brown, Tech. 
Left Tackle— Derrick, Clemson.. 
Right End— W. Wilson, Tech. 
Left End-s-Beane, Tennessee. 



Quarter! fek—Sca rbrough, Sew 
anee. 

Right Half— Craig, Vanderbilt. 
Fullback— Holland, Clemson. 

SI FBSTITUTE ELEVEN. 
Center— Smith, Cumberland. 
Right Guard— Sartain, Ala- 
bama. 

Left Guard— Braswell, Auburn. 
Right Tackle — Graham, Van- 
derbilt. 

Left Tackle— Streit, Auburn. 
Right End— Manier, Vanderbilt 
Left End— Sullivan, Georgia. 
Quarterback— Kyle, Vanderbil t . 
Iieft Half— Foy. Auburn. 
Right Half— Burke, Alabama. 
Fullback— Hamilton, Vander- 
bilt. 

Note — These men are selected 
from S. 1. 1. A. teams only. 

Reynolds Tichenor, in Atlanta 
News, gives practically the same 
teams with the exception of Foy. 
at fullback, in Holland's place. 
And Moon at guard on the second 
team. Both Tichenor and Heis- 
man declare Jones to be the irsl 
tackle of the year, the question of 
his eligibility being the only rea- 
son why he was not placed on the 



race is not to the swift, etc' 



he stands fourth as the p 
tackle of the South. 
Auburn." 



We have recently received from 
those well known publishers, 
von ore small jaat remember "the Hinds, Noble and EWredge, a 



copy of "The Most Popular Col- is first class jn every 



THE BANK OF OPELIKA, Opelika, Ala. 

1,000.1 



Capital Stock, 

SP2CUL ATTEITIOM tt¥ 

stated, will You can make your deposits 




fl BUSINESS 

your checks cashed 



right in Ajuburn with our representative, 
\1r. W. B. Gulatte 



J. B. GREENE 
Vice-President 



JOS. H. SMITH 
Cashier 



_ 



Foririture and Furnishings 
For Fraternity Hills, Clob Houses, Etc. 

■ 

Before buying any kind of Furniture, 
give us a call. We carry a large and 
well-selected stock and can please you in 
quality and price. :: :: " 



FREDERICK ft GROSSLET 

South 8th Street, Opeuka, Ala 



F. KELLY HAYNIE and G. HARDAWAY FRAZER 
Two old Auburn boys, are with 

Smith & Crossley 

THE LEADING DRUOQISTS OF OPELIKA 

Come to see us, boys. The best in the shop is yours. 



-ANYTHING YOU NIIO 



I N< 



Shoes, Hats and Men's Furnishings 

You Can Find In Our Store. Come to See Us. 

SAMFORD & DOWDELL 

SOUTH R. R. AVENUE OPELIKA, ALA. 



~DoiTt fa.il to Visit Thotnason's Dru ; Store when in Opetika, and make our 
place your headquarters. Best stock of Drujf Sundries. Pipes and SmokitiR 
material. We solicit your patronage. 

Thomason's Drug Store 

South Railroad Avenue Phone No. 30 



J. C. CONDON 

OPELIKA, ALABAMA 

Dealer in Jewelry, Watches, Etc. 

A full line of Cuff and Collar Buttons, Stick Pins, and everything in a 
first-class Jewelrv House. Fine watch repairing a specialty. Any design of 
pi*n or badges made to order. 



rnrfTC TO TH17 *DT Ari? To get the best io Clothing. 

J.O IHXj rLA^Xi Furnishing Goods, and Shoes for 

men. Hart, Sehmffner A Marx, and Fechheimer-Fishel Clothing. Manhattan 

Shirts, Clapp's Shoes. 



GREENE, 



South Railroad Ave. 



OPELIKA, ALA. 



lege Hongs/' one of their be«t| 
pnhlu-ationn. 

Thene Bongs, selected as they are 
from songs of all the colleges, rep- 
resent the most popular songs in 
use today by the many Glee Clubs 
and male quartettes. 

The songs in this collection are 
up to date and most of them are 



all-Kouthern. Kow that all doubt comparatively easy to learn, ^hich 
«s to hi. being eligible is removed, **** considerably to their wWth 



In the collection are a number 
"Made in of famous old songs familiar to 
all, but of the kind that seem to 
popularity instead ©1 los- 

L 

Taken as a whole the coltectioi. 




When you want a nice school suit or a 
nice dress salt, call on 



J.A.G 



The T 



I 



! 



t 




The impromptu dame given 
November 28th, was very much en- 
joyed. Those present were: Mrs. 
Waikley, chaperone^ Misses Har 
vey, Lottie Lane, Kate Lane, 
A< ills, Averyt, Waikley, Parrish, 
oi Virginia, and Veasey, of Mis- 
sissippi, Messrs. John McDuffie, 
Wbi taker, F. Renfro, L. W. Mont- 
gomery, Wilkinson, T'alerson, 
Could, Young, O. E., CenaeH, Cro- 
zier, Marks, Matsor:, Wat kins, 
Boyd, K. P. 

Miss Kate Wills has returned, 
after a pleasant visit to Birming- 
ham and Sylacauga. • . 



On Friday night. November ^7,^ o., 

> in rttrri > ITT I 

honor of Miss Davis. Progressive 



Mr. John McDuffie, '04. attend 
ed the Georgia game and spent 
several days in Auburn on his way 
home. 

Mr. J. R. Searcey, '04, now of 
Pensacola, spent Thanksgiving in 
Auburn. 



Mr. Walker Willis was in town 
last week. 



Miss Floiirnoy and Miss Dp- 
j»ing. of Columbus, Ga., were the 
charming guests of Misses Lane 
last week. „_ 



The K-.A. Fraternity gave a de- 
lisrhtful German last week in lion- 

Q M 

w of Miss Flournoy and Miss Bp- 
ping, of Columbus, Ga. 



' Miss .4jiee Fra/.er entertained a 
number of her friends Thanksgiv- 
ing night. 



Mr. Peabody. of Birmingham, 
was in town last week. 



Miss Veasey. of Mississippi) is 
the guest of Miss Clara Waikley. 



Miss Martha O'Hara is the 
guest of her cousin. Miss Ella 
O'Hara. 

Miss Emma Harvey spe?.t a 
few days of last week in Colum- 
bus, Ga. 



On November 30, Mrs. F. A. 
Wills entertained in honor of Miss 
Parrish, of Virginia. Pr>»git?a3ive 
games were played, and after de- 
lightful refreshments were served, 
the prizes were awarded. The 
prizes were won by Miss Averyt, 
Messrs. Matson, Spain and Wills. 

t - 

Invitations arc out announcing 
the marriage of Prof. G. N 
Mitchem, of this place, and Miss 
Julia Traylor, of Gabbcttsville, 
Ga., December 21. Prof. Mitchem 
is Professor of Geology and Min- 
ing Engineering in the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute. Miss Tray- 
lor has visited Auburn and has a 
large number of friends here. 



dominoes was the game of the 
evening. After delightful refresh- 
ments were served the prizes were 
awarded by Prof. Boss. The la- 
dies' prize, a piece of drawn work, 
was won by Miss Marion Ander- 
son. The gentlemans' prices, a 
paper knife, was won by Mr. 
Whitaker. • 



Mrs. Beeman, of Kt. Albans, Vt., 
sister of Dr. O.'J). Smith, is vis- 
iting her relatives in Auburn. 

Misses Florence entertained a 
number of their friends last week 
in honor of Miss Davis. 



Mr. Mat Sloan. '01, is in town. 



Mr. Win. M. Turnley is in 
town. 



The football season was closed 
here Saturday night, December 10. 
by iierhaps the most delightful af 
fair of its kind ever held in Au- 
burn, the anuual football supper 
given by the faculty to the footbaU 
.men. The Y. M. C. A. Hall was 
beautifully and artistically de v- 
iated for the occasion, and the 
supper, served by the ladies of 
the faculty, was enjoyed by eighty 
five guests. The following toi'sts 
were responded to: Address oi 
Welcome. President OlmS. 
Thach; "Our Alumni." by Hon. T. 
I). Sainford, of Opelika; "Real 
Athletics." by Dr. ( >. D. Smith," 
-The Team of 1904," by Cap'. H. 
S. Reynolds; "The Scrub." by 
Prof. G. N. Mitchem,'' "YaK" In 
Coach H. J. Donahue; "Some 
Reminiscences," by Dr. J. T. An- 
derson : "The Ladies." by Mr. Tom 
Bragg. Dr. George Petrie presid- 
ed as toast master. 



The annual debate between the 
Wirt and Websteriau Literary So- 
cieties was held December 12. A 
large and appreciative audience 
was in attendance. The subject 
discussed was, "Resolved, Thai: 
Japan rather than Russia should 
control the Far East." The Wirt 
Society, represented by C. K. 
Gould, of Mobile, and J. A. Mil 
Ier, of Calhoun, upheld the affirm- 
ative, and the Westerian Society, 
represented by J. M. Poyner, of 
Dale, and' C. C. Certain, of Madi- 
son, spoke for the negative. The 
committee of judges, composed of 
Rev. C. C. Pugh and Profs. J. R. 
Rutland and A. Bogard, rendnr 
ed the decision in favor of the af 
firniative. • 



THE SEASON'S AFTERMATH. 

Now we may see ourselves as 
others see us. Here is the rank 
ing of the teams in the South as 
made by Coach Heisman of the 
Georgia School of Technology : 

1. Vanderbilt., 

2. Auburn. 

■ 




(!. Cleinson. 

7. Tennessee. 

8. Alabama. 
!i. Tulane. 

10. Georgia. 

11. Nashville. 

12. Mississippi. 
— Atlanta Constitution. 

Here we have what he thinks of 
Auburn's team. We agree with 
him ill everything with the excep- 
tion of our being pastry for Van- 
derbilt. We believe that Vander- 
bilt would have suffered from in- 
digestion after tackling the kind 
of ""paktrv" our team was made 
of. 

AUBURN. 

Auburn and Tech have furnish- 
ed the surprises of the year— the 
former in her rehabilitation, from 
past greatness after a gloomy 
spell of middle age darkness; the 
latter in jumping from nowhere to 
nearly any old where at a bound. 
Auburn's renaissance is due to 
plenty of fast, heavy, veteran ma- 
terial, excellent coaching and a 
revived, second-wind spirit which 
served to brighten up her earst- 
while splendid traditions. The 
presence the whole season of 
Mitcham, one of the bright twink- 
lers in Auburn's constellation of 
bygone days, must have contribut- 
ed not a little. But there is no 
doubt that Auburn reached her 
height too soon, and by Thanks 
giving day had ginu 1 some steps 
backward. Yes, there can 'be no 



doubt today she would be pastry 
for Vaiiderbilt. When she de- 
feated Tech 12 to she was prob- 
ably at her height. Today Tech 
would like, if she could, to get 
another try. and thinks the result 
might be different. But it might 
not. and the victory was decisive 
enough to put Auburn ahead of 
Tech without a word of argument 
left . — Atlanta Constitution. 

It is with great pleasure the 
university learns thai the leading 
athletic editors of three of the 
most prominent journals in the 
country, namely, the New York 
Sun. Herald and Tribune, have 
conceded C. Huston Carpenter, 
the Tar Heels' next captain and 
great right halfback equal to any 
halfback in the republic. So Car- 
olina rightly lays claim to its 
first all-American star. This 
should be gratifying not only to 
everybody in this State, but in the 
South, as it is the first all-Ameri 
can football player the South has 
produced. — Atlanta Journal. 

We also rejoice with Nlrth Car- 
olina over the above fact. It is a 
great victory for the South. It 
shows that football in the South 
can compare favorably with that 
of the North! The great and 
howling need of football in the 
South is the existence of prepa- 
ratory schools where a boy is 
taught the rudiments of football 
before he enters college. The ex- 
istence of a number of these in 
Tennessee, Carolina and Virginia 
iccount for the excellence of the 
teams produced by institutions in 
those States. 



We say, "Muse's and the young men" in particular because so many 
stores, you know, are not particular when it comes to young men's clothla!;. 
Perhaps they think it's not worth tr.eir while. 

They don't know young mt;. as Muse's does— don't know that they 
are the most exacting and fast Jk us of clothes buyers. 

But Muse's knows. 

Young Men's Suits 

$IO.OO tO $25.00 r i 

HATS— These are swell thi-ias fbr this season's wearing. Bread brlrti 
fellows with crowns t owear in any shape— and the derbies, toe. Write fer 
Our Hat Book. 

SHOES— Boyden's and Muse's Specials. Swing lasts and new leather. 
Novelties galore. Our New Shoe Catalogue shews them all. 

fl USE'S ATLANTA 



Fine*Stationery 
and Printing : 



We make a specialty of high-grade printed Station- 
ery for fraternities aud other college organisations. 
The best papers aud latest styles of type. :: :: 



THE POST PUBLISHING CO. 

804 North Railroad Ave.. OPELIKA, ALA. 



R. W BURTON 

Bookseller and Stationer 

Auburn, Ala. 

In the business 33. years, and am not worth but a million dollars vet- 
hardly so much in fact. 

Am not selling- all my goods at cost, but I will give you the worth of your 
money any time. 

Sole agent in Auburn for the L,. E. Waterman Ideal Fountain Pen, the 
Parker Fountain Pen, and the best makes of Drawing Instruments and ma, 
terial. 

Thanks to my many customers for a fine fall trade. 



DR. 0. M. STEADHAM, 

PHYSICIAN 

And Dealer in Drugs, Toilet Articles and All Kinds of Cold Drinks 



Phillips, Yarbrough & Allen 

Opelika, Alabama 

Sporting Goods, Hardware and Cut Gfass 



"flM Raaf" Fruit stand an <l 
UIU DCai Grocery Store 



ALSO RUN PUBLIC HACK. Your Patronage Solicited 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



AUBURN STUDENTS, ATTENTION! 
FOOTBALL PICTURE8, CLASS PICTURE8. 

Individual Portraits a Specialty. Call and see samples. 
Main Studio, South Eighth street, Opelika, Ala. Branch, opposite Boss 
Flanagan's, Auburn. Open Friday of each week.' 



W. R. ABBOTT 



r 



tffeses riar 
lev, Pan-inn, 



• LOCALS 
l — * 

111.- impromptu dance gjven 
November 28th, was rcry much en 
I d, Those preseil were.: Mrs 

\ iiikicy, chaperone 

(> , Lottie bane, 
\< ills, Averyt, Walk 
of Virginia, and Veas«v, of Mis 
hiwippit Messrs. .h>Uu McDuffifi, 
Whi taker, F,-fiettfro[ Li H\ Mont 
gomery, Wilkinson, T>aterson, 
Uould, Voting, O. R., IVnaelt. Cro- 
mer, Marks, Matson, WaikiuH, 
Boyd, B. i'. 

MisH Kate Wills ha* returned, 
after a pleasanl visit to Birming- 
ham mikI H.vlarauna. 

Mr, John McDuffie, '04* attend- 
ed the Gteorgia game i,ml H i MMlt 
several days in Auburn on his way 

home. 



Mr. .1. It. Bearc|ey, '04, now of 
IVnsaeola, spent Thank«giving in 
Auburn. 

Mr. Walker Willis was in town 
hist week. 

MlSfl Flournov and Miss Ep- 

ping, t ,f Columbus, <»»., were the 
charming firsts of Misses Une 
lust week. 

he 

<„. of Miss Flournov and Miss Bp- 
ping, ,»f Columbus, Ga. 

Miss Alice Fraser entertained a 
imn) ber of her friends Thanksgiv- 
ing night. 



On Friday night. November 27, 
Mrs. Lipscomb entertained in 
honor of Miss l>»i\i«. Progressive 

dominoes was tine game of (lie 
evening. After delightful refresh- 
ments were served the prizes were 
awarded! by Prof. Koss. The la 
di»*s' prize, a piece of drawn wort, 
was won by Miss Marion Ander- 
son. The gentleinaus' prices, a 
l«t|M'r knife, was won bv Mr. 
WHi taker. 



Mrs. Beeirtan, of St. Albans, Vt. 
ulster of Dr. 0. D. Hmith, is vis 
[ting her relatives in Annum. 



Misses Florence entertained 
number of their friends last wee 
in honor of Miss Davis. 



k 



Mr. Mat Sloan. '01, is in town 



M r. 
town. 



Wm. M. Turn ley is 



in 



The football season was closed 
here Saturday night, December 10. 
by inn-haps the most delightful af 
fair of its kind ever held in Au- 
burn, the anuual football* supper 
given by the faculty to the footbali 
men. The Y. M. C. A. Hall was 
beautifully and artistically de- » 
rated for the occasion, and th» 
supper, served by the ladies of 
the faculty, was enjoyed by eighty 
five guests. The following tWftS 
were responded to: Address of 
K. A. Fraternity gave a de- Welcome, President Cans. C 
lightful German last week in hon- ThacU; "Ogr Alumni." by Hon. T. 

l>. Samford. of Opelika; "Jteal 
Athletics,!' by Dr. O. D. Smith." 
• The Team of P.>04." by Capt, R. 
S. Reynolds "The Scrub." by 
Prof. G. X. Mircheni." "Yah-," bj 
Coach 11. .1. Donahue; "Some 
Reminiscences," by Dr. J. T. An 
derson: "The Ladies." by Mr. Tom 
Bragg. Dr. George Petrie presid- 
ed as toast master. 



Mr. Peabody. of P.inninghani, 
was in town last' week. 



Miss Veasey, Of Mississippi, is 

the guest of Miss Clara Watkley. 



Miss Martha O'Hara is the 
miest of her cousin. Miss Ell* 
< I'Hara. 



Miss F.mmn Harvey spe*! a 
few days of last week ill Colum- 
bus, (Ja. 



prises were awarded. The 
ses weir won by Miss Avery t. 



The annual debate between the 
Wirt and Websterian Literary So- 
cieties was held December 12. A 
large and appreciative audience 
was in attendance. The subject 
discussed was, "Resolved, Thai 
Japan rather than Russia shou'd 
control the Far Fast." The Wirt 
Society, represented by C. K. 
Gould, of Mobile, and J. A. Mil 
ler, of Calhoun, upheld the affirm 
On November 30, Mrs. F. A. ative an( i tue Westerian Society, 
Wills entertained in honor of Miss wppplieIltw i by J. M. Poyner, of 
Parrish, of Virginia. PrugrUMrvs , )ah , alld * r a certain, of MadJ 

hghtful wtrr^ots ClnlttL of jndgea^^posed of 

Kev. C. C. Pugh and Profs. J. K. 
Rutland and A. Bogard. render 
ed the decision in favor of the a' 



the prises 

prises 

Messrs. Matson, Spain and Wills. 

Invitations arc out announcing 
the marriage of Trof. G. N. 
Mitchem, of this Md Miss 
Julia Traylor, of Gabbettsville, 

ing Engineering in the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute. Miss Tray 
lor has visited Auburn and has a 



lativtv 



large number of friends; t*W. 



1 J ft t ; 



THE SEASON'S AFTERMATH. 
1 

Now we may see ourselves as 
Ithers ib^lpi Sfeftatls? rank 
iiig of it'UanirtA^WBth as 
made by Coach Heieman of the 
Georgia School of Technology : 

1. Vanderbilt, 

2. Atrtrort. 



« \Ah*u> »i*l»n* *to»it> 



:>. Sewanee. 
4. Tech. 
5'. Cumberland. 

6. Clemson. 

7. Tennessee, 
s. Alabama. 
!». Tulane. 
10. Georgia. 
LI. Nashville. 
12. Mississippi. 

— Atlanta Constitution. 

Here we have what he thinks of 
Auburn's team. We agree with 
him in everything with the excep- 
tion of our lieing pastry for Yan- 
derbilt. We believe that Vander- 
bilt would have suffered from in- 
digestion after tackling the kind 
of "pastry" our team was made 
of. 

AUBURN. 

Auburn and Tech have furnish- 
ed the surprises of the year — the 
former in her rehabilitation from 
past greatness after a gloomy 
spell of middle age darkness; the 
latter in jumping from nowhere to 
nearly any old where at a bound. 
Auburn's renaissance is due to 
plenty of fast, heavy, veteran ma- 
terial, excellent coaching and a 
revived, second-wind spirit which 
served to brighten up her earst- 
while splendid traditions. The 
presence the whole season of 
Mitcham, one of the bright twink- 
lers in Auburn's constellation of 
bygone days, must have cont ribut- 
ed not a little. But there is no 
doubt that Auburn reached; her 
height too soon, and by Thanks 
giving day had gone some steps 
backward. Yes, there c an Ik* no 
doubt today she would be pastry 
for Yanderbilt. When she de- 
feated Tech L2 to she was prob- 
ably at her height. Today Tech 
would like, if she could, to get 
another try. and thinks the result 
might be different. But it might 
not, and the victory was decisive 
enough to put Auburn ahead of 
Tech without a word of argument 
left .—Atlanta Constitution. 

it is with great pleasure the 
university learns that the leading 
athletic editors of three of the 
most prominent journals in the 
country, namely, the New York 
Sun, Herald and Tribune, have 
conceded C. Huston Carpenter, 
the Tar Heels' next captain and 
great right halfback equal to any 
halfback in the republic. So Car- 
olina rightly lays claim to its 
first ail-American star. This 
should be gratifying not only to 
everybody in this State, but in the 
South, as it is the first all-Ameri- 
can football player the South has 
produced. — Atlanta Journal. 

We also rejoice with N^rth Car- 
ina over the above fact. It is a 
great victory for the South. It 
shows that football in the South 
can compare favorably with that 
of the North. The great and 
howling need of football in the 
South is the existence of prepa- 
ratory schools where a boy is 
taught the rudiments of football 
before he enters college. The ex- 
istence of a number of these in 
Tennessee, Carolina and Virginia 
vecount for the excellence of the 
teams produced by institutions in 
those States, 



l - T " ""." V 



. 4 . . ' A 4k • 





1 k 



ri „ r\ nr tir 



t* Muse's and 



Young 




f 1 1 



Men 



Copyrighted. 1904, 
by E. 1* .B. & Co. 

We say, "Muse's and the young men" in particular because so many 
stores, you know, are not particular when it comes to young men's clothlajj. 
Perhaps they think it's not worth tceir while. 

They don't know young me;, as Muse's does— don't know that they 
are the most exacting and fast Jkus of clothes buyers. 

But Muse's knows. 

Young Men's Suits 

$10.00 to $25.00 

HATS — These are swell things for this season's wearing. Bread briSi 
fellows with crowns t owear in any shape—and the derbies, tee, Write fer 
Our Hat Book. 

SHOES — Boyden's and Muse's Specials. Swing lasts and new leather. 
Novelties galore. Our New Shoe Catalogue shows them all. 

1*1 USE'S ATLANTA 



Fine Stationery 
and Printing : 



We make a specialty of high-grade printed Station- 
ery for fraternities and other college organizations. 
The best papers and latest styles of type. i'i :: 



THE POST PUBLISHING CO. 

804 North Railroad Ave.. OPELIKA, ALA. 



R. W BURTON 

Bookseller and Stationer 

Auburn, Ala. 

In the business 33 years, and am not worth but a million dollars yet- 
hardly so much in fact. 

Am not selling all my goods at cost, but I will give you the worth of your 
money any time. 

Sole agent in Auburn for the L. E. Waterman Ideal Fountain Pen, the 
Parker Fountain Pen, and the best makes of Drawing Instruments and ma* 
terial. 

Thanks to my many customers for a fine fall trade. 



OR, 0. M. STEADH AM , 

PHYSICIAN 

And Dealer in Drug-s, Toilet Articles and All Kinds of Cold Drinks 



Phillips, Yarbrough & Alten 

Opelika, Alabama 



• ! 



Sporting Goods, Hardware and Cut Glass 



99 Fruit Stand and 



"Old Bear" KiTSS. 



1 

ALSO RUN PUBLIC HACK. V** Bstrsif 




AUSUftN STUD* NTS, ATTENTION! 
FOOTBALL PICTURCt, CLAM PICTUHM. 

IadlTidual Portrait* S Spsdslty. Call.saf 
Main Studio. Soot* Eight*. «»«. Opsllka, 
Klanagaa a, Aaburm. Open Wday of 





Dealer In 



STABILITIES and 

FESTIVITIES 



Exchange bought and sold. 




VALUE IN SHOES 

Your shoe money goes a 
long way when invested in 

ERICA |S& 

They are made on precisely 
the same stylish lasts and 
in the same leathers as 
shoes costing a doJIar more. 
The wear is perfect. They 
are made especially for us 
as a leader and sold ven 
close as such. 
If you are a man who ap. 
predates a trim shoe anal 
are not against saving a 
dollar buy the Erica. . 
Cood shoes higher an« 
lower in price. 

T. A. FLANAGAN, Auburn. 



e Department j 



or AUBURN. 



The sunshine's over bright; 
Life's burdens l>ear the lightest 

In Auburn. 
The Co-ed's ejs are bluest. 
Their little hearts are truest, 
And ugl.v girls are fewest 

In Auburn. 

Tile streets are the roughest ; 
Beef steak is ihe toughest 

In Auburn. 
Laundry iiills are the highest, 
And dangers always Highest, 
Hut the boys are the liiest 
In Auburn. 

Examinations come of test; 
But by ho means the softest 

In Auburn. 
The professors are keenest, 
Reports pome out meanest . 
And poekets enipty cleanest 
•In Auburn. 



WOLILOQUY-HAMLET 
The cadet sat on an Auburn 

a, 

porch, 

His head- ti«S^ji; 
His eyes and mouth were full of 
hair, 

And his arms were full of girl. 



"Yes," said Ihe dealer, "this 
hammock will hold two persons, 
but it will be a tight squeeze.'' . 

'•Oh ! that will be all right." 
Send around a couple of 



A GREAT LOSS. 

The. New Cook — What time do 
you have breakfast? 

Mrs. Highblower — At • seven 
thirty. 

"Well, Oi'm sorry <>i can't be 
wid re." 



Chickens roost the highest, 
And the "cop" is always uigliest 

J u Auburn. 
Hai*d hooks are Ihe thickest. 
.Money goes the quickest. 
Debts are made the slickest 
In Auburn. 



L. G. PARK 

The Auburn Laundry 



Our work 
Will Please You 
Give us a 
Trial. 



The cats are the meanest, 
Because the "rats" are greenest 
In Auburn. 



BY NO MEANS. 

Millie — Was it a quiet spot 
where you kissed Tillie? 

Willie — No, it was on Ihe 
mouth! 



There is a good deal that might 
go without saying, but very little 
that does. 



A a I A T 1 1 1 : M A T 1 C A L ST I • X T. 
One added to one equals one. 
But of course the one must he. 
won ; 

Then add a divorce — 
That's easy, of course — 
And one minus one equals one. 



Paddled boys get thftjjiaddest. 
Their tender hearts' are saddest . 
But uniforms made theni gladdest 



In Auburn. 

O. 



T. K 



•0« 



Bob and Sydney Foster 

Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 

First-class service at mod- 
erate prices. 



Choice line of Fruits and 
Confectioneries. 



lue Barber Sbop 



I express my gratitude to all for 
their past patronage, and earnest- 
ly solicit your trade in the future. 
Razor honing a specialty. .". 



E. 



POMP FOSTER 



When you want a nice, clean Shave, 
or an up-to-date Hair-cut, give me a 
Call. I can please you. 



A HOY'S ESSAY OX WATER. 

A very original essay on water 
by a very small boy is quoted, by 
a contemporary. He divides all 
water into four subheadlings — 
rain water, soda water, holy water 
and brine. "Water," he continues, 
is used for a good many things. 
Sailors use water to go to sea on. 
Water is a good thing to fire at 
boys with a squirt gun and to 
catch fishes in." But the Strang 
est of all uses for water is this 
"Nobody," he says, "could be sav- 
ed from drowning if these wasn't 
water to pull them out of." One 
is here reminded of a similar es 
say on pins, in the course of which 
the boy writer said taht pins had 
saved many lives by people not 
swallowing them. — Rain's Horn. 



Judge — Why don't you answer 
the question put to you? 

Hobo — -Well, gimme time, can't 
you? 

Judge — Certainly; 90 days 
Next case. 



Have Your SHOES Repaired by 



COLBY 



Prompt and satisfactory service at 
low prices. 



"So You think the country's go- 
ing to de bad?" said Weary Wil- 
lie. 

"Sure ting," said Meandering 
Mike. 

"What's the trouble?" 
"To many free libraries and not 
enough free lunch." 



Oh. may it comfort you a tritie 
To know, if doubt your bosom 

fret, 

Flint, though these kiss<-s choke 
and stifle, 
They are ihe only kind I get ! 

— Madeline Bridges. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

rn, Alabama ■"■r* 



Courses ok Instruction: The courses of instruction include the Phy- 
sical, Chemical and Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agriculture, 
Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Civil and Electrical Engineering, Min- 
ing Engineering, Drawing, Fnglish, French, German and Latin Languages, 
History, Political Economy, Mental Science, Physiology, Veterinary Science 
and Pharmrfcy. 

Laboratory Instruction: Laboratory instruction and practical work 
are'given in the following departments: I, Chemistry; II, Engineering, Field 
Work, Surveying, etc.; III. Agriculture; IV, Botany; V, Mineralogy; VI, Bi- 
ology; \UI, Technical Drawing; VIII, Mechanic Arts; IX, Physics; X, Elec- 
trical Engineei ii.g: XI, Veterinary ^Science; XII, Mechanical Engineering; 
XHI.JPharmacy; XIV, Mining Engineering; XV, Horticulture. 

Attendance- |The attendance last year was 480, representing nine 
States and three foreign countries; 54 counties of Alabama being represented. 

Location: The College is located in the town of Auburn, sixty miles 
east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

Boarding: The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with families of tfie town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all the protecting 
and beneficial influences of the family circle. 

ExPKNSK:^There is no charge for tuition for residents of Alabama. In- 
cidental fee per half session, $2.50; Library fee per half session, $1.00: sur- 
geon's fee per half session, $2.50; lS^atory fees in junior and senior years, 
$5.00 per session; board per month, $12.00 to $15.00. At houses rented by the 
College, board can be secured at $9.50 per month. These fees payable on ma- 
triculation. 

CHAS. C. THACH, M. A., President. 



WJB CROW | 
FOR TUB ! 



1m 




Yes and we are {justified ir? so doin§£ We are con- 
vinced by experience. The continued satistaction 

3.SO 




Shoes 



EASY. 

Miss Kaudford — Yes. Mr. Field- 
er, I. will be youTS on one condi- 
tion. 

Fielder— Oh, that's all right. I 
entered Harvard with six. 




One Way Colonist Rates 
From Birmingham 
$11.00 

to All Points in Oklahoma and Indian 
Territory 



913.50. 

To Te^s Points, including Dallas, 
Ft. Worth, Aamrillo, Dalhart, Quanah, 
San Angelo, Waco, San Antonio, Hous- 
ton, Corpus ChrUtl, Kerville and all 
Texas points east thereof. 

Tickets on sale Dec. 13th and 27th. 



have given our tTSde enables us to j>ay feartec--!y 

that they are not excelled in style, fit or wear by any 

shoes at anything like the price. 

When shoeing again-just look. 

Then we have good honest shoes at lower prices. 

Shoes that are satisfying. 

Every good thing in shoes can be had here at low- 
est prices. * 

T. A. Flanagan, Auburn. 



Will Yon Give Us Your Order? 

We call your attention to the fact that we are still representing 
The Continental Tailoring Co., one of the best of Chicago. Fit and 
' ' workmanship guaranteed. 



One fare plus $2 for the round trip 
to all points in the Southwest. 

Tickets on sale first and third l ues- 
days of each month until April, 190D. 

For full information write 

J. N. Cornatzar, Gen. Agt., 

Memphis, Term. 
F. M. Griffith, T. P. A., 
Birmingham, Ala, 

■ ■ " 



Red and White, 
Will treat you right; 
Come and try. 
Will surely buy. 



The "Regal" Shoe gives both comfort and service. 

STATIONERY ■ 

A full assortment of picture moulding just received; also a beau- 
tiful line of ready framed pictures. 

WRICHT BROS. II 

;: 



S. L. TOOMER 

(Successor to LAZARUS ft TOOHER) 

AUBURN, ALABAMA 

LEADING PHARMACIST 

AND DEALER IN PATENT MEDICINES AND DRUG- 
GISTS' SUNDRIES, DRUGGISTS' FANCY AND TOILET 
ARTICLES, HAIR, TOOTH AND PAINT BRUSHES 

Prescriptions Filled by us Contain Only the Purest Ingre- 
dients and are Compounded by a Skilled Pharmacist. 



WlGullatte 



Dealer In 



B1LIT1ES and 
FESTIVITIES 



Exchange bought and sold 

_ 








VALUE IN SHOES 

Your shoe money goes a 
long way when invested in 

ERICA fig 

They are made on precisely 
the same stylish lasts and 
in the same leathers as 
shoes costing a dollar more. 
The wear is perfect. They 
are made especially for us 
as a leader and sold very 
close as such. 
If you are a man who ap 
predates a trim shoe and 
are not against saving a 
dollar buy the Erica. 
Cood shoes higher ant 
lower in price. 

T. A. FLANAGAN, Auburn. 

L. G. PARK 

Toe Auburn Lanndry 



: Exchange Department 

_______ 

IN AUBURN. 

The Munshiue'H ever bright; 
Life's burdens bear the lightest 

In Auburn. 
The Co ed's eys are bluest. 
Their little hearts are truest, 
And Iglv girls are fewest 

In Auburn. 

The streets are the roughest; 
Beef steak is the toughest 

In Auburn. 
Laundry hills are the highest. 
And dangers always nighest. 
But the boys are the ttiest 

In Auburn. 

Examinations come oftest; 
Kut by no means the softest 

In Auburn. 
The professors are keenest, 
Repen ts come out meanest, 
And pockets empty cleanest 

In Auburn. 

Chickens roost the highest, 
And the vop" is always nighest 

In Auburn. 
Hard books are the thickest. 
.Money goes the quickest, 
Debts are made the slickest 

In Auburn. 

The cats are the meanest. 
Because the "rats" are greenest 

In Auburn. 
Paddled boys get the maddest. 
Their tender hearts are saddest, 
But uniforms made them gladdest 

In Auburn. 

(i. T. E., W 



SOLILOQUY HAMLET. 
The cadet sat on an Auburn 
porch. 

His head was in a whirl; 
His eyes and mouth were full of 
hair, 

And his arms were full of girl. 



"Yes," said the dealer, "this 
hammock will hold two persons, 
but it will be a tight squeeze." 

"Oh! that will be all right." 
.Send around a couple of 



A GREAT LOSS. 

The New Cook— What time do 
you have breakfast? 

Mrs. Highblower— At seven 
thirty. 

"Well, Oi'm sorry Oi can't be 
wid ye." 



BY NO MEANS. 

Millie— Was it a quiet 
where you kissed Tillie? 

Willie— No, it was on 
mouth! 



spot 



the 



There is a good deal that might 
go without saying, but very little 
that does. 



Our work 
Will Please You 
Give us a 
Trial. 



Bob and Sydney Foster 

Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 

First-class service at mod- 
erate prices. 



Choice line of Fruits and 



Confectioneries. 



Orange tad Blue Barber Sbop 

I exprels my gratitude to all for 
their pajst patronage, and earnest- 
ly solicit your trade in the future. 
.-. Ratbr honing a specialty. .% 

E. Reafro . . . . Proprietor 



POMP FOSTER 



A HOY'S ESSAY ON WATER. 

A very original essay on water 
by a very small boy is quoted by 
a contemporary. He divides all 
water into four subheadlings — 
rain water, soda water, holy water 
and brine. "Water," he continues, 
is used for a good many things. 
Sailors use water to go to sea on. 
Water is a good thing to fire at 
boys with a squirt gun and to 
catch fishes in." But the strang- 
est of all uses for water is this: 
"Nobody," he says, "could be sav- 
ed from drowning if these wasn't 
water to pull them out of." One 
is here reminded of a similar es- 
say on pins, in the course of which 
the boy writer said taht pins had 
saved many lives by people not 
swallowing them. — Ram's Horn. 


Judge— Why don't yoti answer 
the question put to you? 

Hobo — Well, gimme time, can't 
you? 

Judge— Certainly; 90 days. 
Next case. 



When you want a nice, clean Shave, 
or an up-to-date Hair-cut, give roe a 
Call. I can please you. 



iifi tar 8MB IpM U 

COLBY 

Prompt and satisfactory service at 



"80 You think the country's go- 
ing to de bad?" said Weary WU 
tie. 

•Sure ting," said Meandering 
Mike. 

"What's the trouble?" 
"To many free libraries and not 
enough free lunch." 



be 



A MATHEMATICAL STUNT. 
One added to one equals one, 
But of course the one must 
won ; 

Then add a divorce — 
That's easy, of course — 
And one minus one equals one. 



Oh, may it comfort you a trifle 
To know, if doubt your bosom 
fret. 

That, though these kisses choke 
and stille, 
Thev are the onlv kind T get ! 

— Madeline Bridges. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Auburn, Alabama 

Courses ok Instruction: The courses of instruction include the Phy- 
sical, Chemical and Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agriculture. 
Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Civil and Electrical Engineering, Min- 
ing Engineering, Drawinp, Fnglish, French, German and Latin Languages, 
History, Political Economy, Mental Science, Physiology, Veterinary Science 
and Pharmacy. 

Laboratory Instkuction: Laboratory instruction and practical work 
are "given in the following departments: I, Chemistry; II, Engineering, Field 
Work, Surveying, etc.: Ill, Agriculture; IV, Botany; V, Mineralogy; VI, Bi- 
ology; VII, Technical Drawing; VIII, Mechanic Arts; IX, Physics; X, Elec- 
trical Engineeiii.g; XI, Veterinary Science; XII, Mechanical Engineering: 
XIII,;Pharmacy; XIV, Mining Engineering; XV, Horticulture. 

Attendance? |The attendance last year was 480, representing nine 
States and three foreign countries; 54 counties of Alabama being represented. 

Location: The College is located in the town of Auburn, sixty miles 
east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

Boaroing: The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with families of the town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all the protecting 
and beneficial influences of the family circle. 

Expense: - iThere is no charge for tuition for residents of Alabama. In- 
cidental fee per half session, $2.50; Library fee per half session, $1.00: sur- 
geon's fee per half session, $2.50; laboratory fees in junior and senior years. 
$5.00 per session; board per month, $12.00 to $15.00. At houses rented by the 
College, board can be secured at $9.50 per month. These fees payable on ma- 
triculation. 

CHAS. C. THACH, M. A., President. 



J |L WE CROW J' ( 

FOR THE 



Yes and we are justified in so doing. We are con- 
vinced by experience. The continued satisfaction 

w_frn-i 3.50 




EAS5T. 

Miss Snndford— Yes, Mr. Field- 
er, I will be yours on one condi- 
tion. 

Fielder— Oh, that's all right. 1 
entered Harvard with six. 



One Way Colonist Hate. 
From Birmingham 
91140 

to All Points in Oklahoma and Indian 
Territory 

»1M0. 

To Telus Points, including Dallas, 
PL Worth, Aamrillo, Dalhart, Quanah, 
San Angeto, Waco, San Antonio, Hous- 
ton, Corpus Christi, Kenrllle and all 
Texas points east thereof. 

Tickets on sale Dee. 18th and 17th. 



One fare plus |2 for the round trip 
to all points in the Southwest. 

Tickets on sale first and third Tues- 
days of etch month until April, 1*06. 

For full iaforssatkm write 

4. N. Cernatwr, Sen. 

Mnapali, T 
F. M. OrMNfcf T. P. A* 



have given our tf_de enables us to say fearlessly 

that they are not excelled in style, fit or wear by any 

shoes at anything like the price. 

When shoeing again— just look. 

Then we have good honest shoes at lower prices. 

Shoes that are satisfying. 

Every good thing in shoes can be had here at low- 
est prices. * 

T. A. Flanagan, Auburn. 



Red and White, 
Will treat you right; 
Come and try. 
Will surely buy. 



Will Yon Give Us Tour Order? 

We call your attention to the fact that we are still representing 
The Continental Tailoring Co., one of the best of Chicago. Fit and 
workmanship guaranteed. 

BOOKS 

The "Regal" Shoe gives both comfort and service. 

STITHMDT 

A fall assortment of picture moulding just received; also a beau- 
tiful line of ready framed pictures. 



WRIGHT BROS. 

»» f i n 1 »» 



i sat MM •••• 



S. L. TOOMER 

HUI nail M LAZARUS * TOOflER) 

AUBURN, ALABAMA 

LEADIfe PHmMIST 

AMD DEALER « PATENT MEDICINES AMD DRUG- 
GISTS' SUMDMHMJ, DRUGGISTS' FAMCY JJ*»JTO*LET 

TOOTH AMD PAINT — «— - 




PMtadl 1r/ bo