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TATT ERSALL'S CLUB 




THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF TATTERSALL'S CLUB SYDNEY 



VOL. 49 No. 7 

SEPTEMBER, 1977 











COMMITTEE MEMBERS 


Chairman: J.V. Comans 
Treasurer: P.W. McGrath 

D. DRANSFIELD, J. L. HICKEY, 
G.P. HURST, B.W. McHUGH, 
J.R. McKELL, A.R. McCAMLEY, 
A.V. MILLER, K.H. MOREMON 

Secretary: N.C. Smith 

Telephone No. 26-6111 


CLUB COMMITTEES 


HOUSE: j.V. Comans (Chairman), P.W. 
McGrath (Treasurer), j.L. Hickey, G.P. 
Hurst, A.V. Miller, K.H. Moremon. 

RACE MEETING: J.V. Comans (Chairman), 
P.W. McGrath * (Treasurer), G.P. Hurst, 
B.W. McHugh, j.R. McKell. 


SPORTS OFFICIALS 


SWIMMING CLUB: A.S. Block (Hon. 
Secretary), Bill Debney (Assistant Hon. 
Secretary), A.R. McCamley, J.V. Comans, 
A. McLelland, F.L. Bowes and M. Sernack. 
HANDBALL: P. Ashby (Secretary), J. 
Barnes (Assistant Secretary), A.S. Block, 
A.R. McCamley, N.R. Rogers, M. Sernack. 

BOWLING CLUB: Dr. H.K. Porter 
(President), P.W. McGrath (Hon. Secretary/ 
Treasurer), S. Green (Publicity Officer). 

BILLIARDS AND SNOOKER: J P. O’Neill, 
P.W. McGrath, J.H. Peoples, S.J. Lane, 
H.J.W. Lobb 

GOLF CLUB: I.G.L. Bell (President), 

A.C. Black (Vice-President), R.M. Fisher 
(Hon. Secretary), V.N. Vadas (Hon. 
Treasurer), O.L. Bates, K.J. McCann, 
W. Hunt, K.R. Humphery, P.G.L. King. 
SKI CLUB: R.S. Debney (President), 
R.l. Fairley (Social Secretary), M.P. Burrows 
(Treasurer), G. Andrews, K. Finn, M. Frawley, 
A. Patterson, B.B. Phillips, J. Stigter. 

EPICUREAN CLUB: V. Vadas (Chief), 

N. Amy(Deputy Chief), A. Hickey (Registrar), 
M.W. Sellen, W. Tyler, B. Phillips, P. Ashby, 
(Public Relations Officer), R. Swinbourne. 

T.C.M. EDITOR: O.L. BATES 


AFFILIATED CLUBS 


AMARILLO CLUB .Amarillo, Tex. 

COLLEGE CLUB .Seattle, Wa. 

DENVER ATHLETIC CLUB . Denver, Col. 

HONG KONG CRICKET CLUB. 

Hong Kong 

LOS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB. 

Los Angeles, Cal., Allied with the Los Angeles 
Athletic Club, Riviera Country Club. 

LANSDOWNE CLUB.London 

NEW YORK ATHLETICCLUB. 

New York, N.Y. 
OLYMPIC CLUB .... San Francisco, Cal. 

TANGLIN CLUB. Singapore 

TERMINAL CITY CLUB . Vancouver, B.C. 
OUTRIGGER CANOE CLUB . . Honolulu 

KONA KAI CLUB.San Diego 

NATIONAL LIBERAL CLUB . . .London 


Chairman's Message 


There is a well worn cliche which states “that self praise is no recommendation”. Fair 
enough, then let us read what others write about Tattersall’s Club. The “Australian Hotel 
Association Review” a magazine with a large circulation writes as follows - “The Wholesale 
Wine and Spirit Merchants Association Annual Dinner Dance held at Tattersall’s Club turned 
out to be a happy and enjoyable occasion for everyone present. Tattersall’s is, of course, 
one of Sydney’s grand old Clubs and provided a fine setting for the evening. The food was 
superb and the service was, well Tattersall’s and it does not come much better than that”. 

Now an extract from the “Rotary Club of Sydney Bulletin” - Attendance has improved 
significantly for the month of July. It is interesting to note that attendances on Tuesdays 
have been higher since we moved too Tattersall’s Club”. Both of these articles refer to our 
1st Floor Club Room which is quickly establishing a top reputation for banquets, wedding 
receptions, conventions, luncheons, company and club meetings. 

I note on the Committee agenda for our next meeting “Dining Room”. Your Committee 
will have done their homework and the discussion should resolve around, purchase of food, 
the cooking and the presentation to members. The “atmosphere” of the Dining Room will be 
discussed. Are the lights too bright! Should they be dim? Candles on the table (could be 
removed by request). Brighter coloured napkins etc, etc. As I sit in the chair weighing up 
the various submissions of my Committee I will think of the common cold “sometimes the 
eyes have it and sometimes the nose”. 

Received a letter from a member requesting me to write more articles in the magazine 
on racing. He stated that until he read the article in percentage betting, he dit not realize 
that a bookmaker called 3/1 means that the horse has three chances of losing and one chance 
of winning making a total of four. Divide that into one hundred and the result is 25/1. The 
bookmakers board must always total over 100% or you could back every horse in the race 
and beat him. However, it is a matter for our Editor, if he provides the space I will write 
another article. Remember it is the duty of the Editor to separate the wheat from the chaff 
and see that the chaff is printed. For the present a piece of free advice and always remember 
that advice is worth what you pay for it. 

(a) A good horse and a bad jockey — a fair bet 

(b) A bad horse and a good jockey — a bad bet 

(c) A bad horse and a bad jockey — no bet 

(d) A good horse and a good jockey — a good bet 

As promised the painting of the first, second and third floor is progressing according to 
schedule with the least inconvenience to members. 

As usual a few members have complained. They must appreciate that it is the duty of the 
Committee not only to maintain and improve the decor of the Club but to preserve its assets. 
There has been nothing but praise for the new look Billiards and Snooker Room whilst the 
Championship Snooker looks perfect. What a great job Jack O’Neil, Sid Lane and Henry Lobb 
are doing for the Snooker Calcutta. Once again it looks as though a third floor contestant has 
sneaked under the guard of the handicapper viz., Gordon Salier. Following his win over Phil 
Hase the odds on Gordon have shortened considerably. 

Tattersall’s has always been a great card playing Club. The Card Room in one section 
of the Club that has maintained its usage over the years. Card players have a natural attraction 
for me with their dedication and endurance. Norm Rogers one of their leaders always says 
“A great Club Tattersall’s you can trust everybody”. Nevertheless he always insists on cutting 
the cards. 

After careful consideration by your Committee we have now affiliated with three 
additional Clubs. The Lansdowne Club in London, the Hong Kong Cricket Club and The 
Tanglin Club of Singapore. These Clubs are modern with top class dining rooms, athletic 
department and sporting facilities. Enquiries re same should be made at our Club office. 

The new summer dress reform commences on the first of October and remains in force 
until Easter Monday 1978. A brief resume of the rule is as follows. Short or long sleeved 
safari jacket with or without applicable collar or tie may be worn. Exception: After 5.00 p.m. 
on the First and Fourth Floors it is safari jacket collar and tie. 

Always remember 

As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons, Speak your 

truth quietly and clearly; 

Listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; 

They, too, have their story. 

With every wish, 


Chairman 



September, 1977 


2 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 



















AJC Plans In Action Will 
Benefit Racing 


MAJOR GENERAL (JIM) NORRIE ATTACKING PROBLEMS 



Randwick Racecourse, that tranquil 
haven for horseplayers in Sydney’s 
busy metropolis, is buzzing with 
activity. 

And not only because many of the 
best horses in the land are preparing to 
compete for $530,000 in prize money 
at the coming A.J.C. Spring Carnival. 

Major-General J.W. (Jim) Norrie, 
A.O., O.B.E., is attacking the task of 
being chief executive of Australia’s 
senior racing club with a rare brand of 
vigour and enthusiasm. 

Major-General Norrie took up 
office as Secretary/General Manager 
of the Australian Jockey Club early in 
April, shortly before the start of this 
year’s Sydney Cup Carnival, and he 
has not let the grass grow under his 
feet. 

One of Major-General Norrie’s first 
moves was to convene Master Planning 
Meetings for both Randwick and 
Warwick Farm Racecourses. These 
meetings have been attended by 
representatives of owners, trainers, 
jockeys, farriers, breeders, bookmakers 
and the press — in fact everyone 
interested in the advancement of 
racing. Many worthwhile ideas have 
been proposed in lively discussion and 
a Master Planning Committee has been 
formed to follow the ideas through. 


“It is my role to look at what is 
needed to improve the courses for 
participants and patrons and to listen 
to as many ideas as possible,” Major- 
General Norrie said. “However, it will 
be the A.J.C. Committee who will 
make the policy. Many of the 
suggested plans would cost the Club a 
fortune to implement. But we must 
look to the future and not just keep 
adding bits and pieces like a 
patchwork quilt”. 

Suggestions being considered in the 
early stages of the Master Planning 
include a horse swimming pool and a 
veterinary hospital on Randwick 
Racecourse. 

The Club must examine all suggested 
innovations at Randwick in the light 
of its policy to provide more stable 
accommodation on the racecourse. 

Improvements are currently being 
carried out in the St. Leger enclosure 
at Randwick, where the cafeteria and 
bar area under the grandstand is 
receiving a $100,000 facelift. This will 
result in an attractive bistro type area 
where patrons will enjoy improved 
dining, drinking and T.V. viewing 
facilities. A new ladies’ toilet block is 
also under construction in the St. 
Leger, adjacent to the betting ring. 

As a result of the installation of the 
new computer totalisator, the old 
totalisator building in the centre of the 
course has been demolished and this 
area is to be landscaped and beautified. 

The Club also intends to extend the 
“B” grass training track to improve 
training facilities for the large number 
of horses — presently in excess of 550 
— in work at Randwick. 

Since the commencement of 
operations totalisator turnover has 
increased by 30% compared with the 
corresponding period last year. It is 
anticipated that turnover will continue 
to increase as the experience and 
understanding of both patrons and 
totalisator operators develops. 

Continued on page 5. 



ANYONE FOR THE EXTRA 
PETROL AND OIL BILL? 


The total number of kilometres 
travelled by all vehicles including 
trucks, during the year was about 
162.6 million km. 

An Australian car or station wagon 
is driven an average of 15,700 km 
a year, according to statistics. 

A motor cyclist on average travels 
much less — about 5,600 km — while 
people with utilities and panel vans 
drive more (18,500 km). 

Cars and station wagons in Austra¬ 
lia travelled a total of 80,279,300 km 
in the 12 months to last September. 
• 

UP HONOLULU WAY 

Aussie food broker, Len Cope, told 
me he has landed a contract for 
supply of three million “Hot Dogs” 
for schools. Local kids gobble them 
up as free lunch. It means children 
from poorer quarters will get one 
good meal a day. School breakfast 
is served too at a charge. Interesting 
point he added, there is a senior 
citizens table at all schools — a meal 
costs 25 cents. 

• 

DINNER TALE 

Recent food hassle reminded me 
of a war time story. A little old lady 
joined a queue not knowing what it 
was all about, so she tagged along. 
“What are they selling?” she asked 
her queue-mate. “Tales of Hoffman” 
the gent snapped. “Oh well” sez the 
L.O.L., “I’ll get a couple — my 
husband eats almost anything!” 

• 

BRITAIN NOT STUMPTED! 

Is it the triumphs on the cricket 
field which have lifted morale? 

A rare mood of optimism has been 
spreading in Britain that the nation 
may not, after all, be tottering 
towards some abyss. 

The pound, which has been a 
bargain-basement currency for most 
foreigners, so cheap abroad as to 
bring record millions of tourists to 
Britain. fifl 



My design for cricket stumps to be used 
in future. The dollar is to keep the 
stumps and the game together. 

_ ... os. bates _ 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


3 


September, 1977 











WINING , DINING and CLUB NOTES 


We were delighted with Morton 
Brewster presence at the club along 
with ( a happy gathering of his 
good friends. Members included Bill 
Stack, Bill Lander, Ian McDougall, 
Jack Monro, Harry Thorn. Visitors 
who also gathered to enjoy seeing 
Mort were Peter Lloyd, Frank Browne, 
Bill Taylor, John Campbell and Alan 
Hallett. Hope we see a lot more of 
Mort with his large circle of friends. 

* * * 

Swimming Club member, Derek 
Jackson, and wife, Norma, held a small 
family party to celebrate the 21st 
Birthday of their new daughter-in- 
law, Eva, and also to wish bon voyage 
to grandparents Sid and Thelma 
Jackson as they leave for a holiday 
in the Greek islands. Helping celebrate 
were son, Ian, daughter, Fiona and 
Eva’s parents, Eva and Egon Navratil 
with daughter, Judy. 

* * * 

Mike Lawrence, Resident Manager 
of the French Government agency in 
Australia, Bureau de Recherches 
Geologiques et Minieres, is in France 
for six weeks to participate in a 
reunion. He will also sneak time off 
to attend the International Wine and 


Food Convention Celebrating the 
Andre Simmons Centenary, in his 
cover identity as the fearless food 
writer for the working man’s gourmet 
magazine “Wine and Spirit Buying 
Guide”. 

* * * 

A Party of 26 hosted by Neville 
O’Neill welcomed Mr. John Mac 
Gowan and his wife Kit and daughters 
Nancy and Holly from San Jose, 
Saratoga, California. It was Mrs. 
MacGowans birthday which happily 
coincided with their 2 year old colt 
“Kristy Lanes” birthday too. 

* * * 

Robert Weatherdon staged a family 
party. His four daughters invited their 
boyfriends too — all named Robert — 
so there.was some confusion when one 
of the members said “Pass the Sugar 
Please Robert”. 

* * * 

John & Robert sons of Mr. & Mrs. John 
Gilder celebrated the school holidays 
from Scots College. They joined at a 
joyous family meal in the dining room. 
John Snr. no doubt hopes one of the 
boys will break through in cricket. He 
was a fine bowler in the Paddington 
Grade side — especially when the 
wicket was “doing a bit”. 


Heard from John McCleau who has 
just completed the trip across the 
Nullabor and I quote “It is no such 
a bad trip at all’ John will be able to 
give us a first-hand report from 
Broome on the earthquake and tidal 
wave effect, as a normal tide rises at 
least 30 feet. 

* * * 

Sam Block arrived back from 
Honolulu, said noticed many members 
of “Tattersalls” enjoying the glorious 
sun and relaxed atmosphere of that 
marvellous tropic isle. 

Among the visitors were STC 
directors Don Storey and George 
Benyon, Tony McSweeney, Geoff 
Clubb, (Bricky) Williams and Tom 
and Dick Smith were in the swim too. 

* * * 

The inimitable Arthur O’Connor 
arranged a small club party for his 
son Rory. Reason was to say happy 
sailing to Rory and his Sydney High 
School mate who will wander the 
world in a 30 foot yacht. Arthur 
arranged for all phone calls from 
across the world to be reversed 
charged to the editor! “That’s Arthur!” 
— agreed Norm Rogers and Chas. 
Robinson who helped wave the boys 
away. 


FIESTA HAWAII 


1. HONOLULU SPREE - 22 nights, Royal Hawaiin Hotel 

2. HONOLULU HOLIDAY - 14 nights, Royal Hawaiin Hotel 

3. HONOLULU & MAUI - 20 nights 

14 nights Royal Hawaiin Hotel - 6 nights Sheraton Maui 

4. WEST COAST BONANZA - 22 nights 

inc. Los Angeles — Disneyland — Las Vagas — San Francisco — Honolulu 

5. HAWAIIN ADVENTURE - 13 nights, Royal Hawaiin Hotel 

6. GAMBLERS SPECIAL-21 nights 

4 nights Beverley Wilshire L.A. — 4 nights Caesers Palace inc. New Years Eve Ball 
— 13 nights Kahala Hilton 


>dstrsnaut 

~ ■ 222 Pitt St., Sydney. Phone: 26 6102 


$1390 

$1195 

$1390 

$1595 

$1160 

$1550 



Contact Bob Lavigne 
at Tattersall’s Club 
or Astronaut. 


September, 1977 


4 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 





A.J.C. Racing continued from page 2. 

For patrons, the new totalisator 
offers accurate odds, displayed widely 
around the racecourses on the new 
Ferranti Packard indicators and 
television monitors. The odds are 
shown as dividends payable for $1.00 
and are recalculated and updated every 
15 seconds. 

After each race the dividends are 
written electronically to all indicators. 
Patrons can then see that the dividends 
paid correspond precisely with the 
odds offered before the race. This 
accuracy has engendered a high level 
of confidence in the totalisator. 

Odds are available not only for Win 
& Place betting, but also for Quinella, 
Consecutive Doubles and Special, 
Extra and Daily Doubles and Forecast 
betting for local and interestate races. 

The ticket issuing machines are 
capable of issuing tickets for any bet 
type for any race and for any bet value 
on either Sydney, Melbourne or 


Brisbane races. 

Ticket selling windows have been 
colour-coded to indicate the preferred 
function of the window. For example, 
blue windows sell only Win & Place 
bets. This technique was introduced as 
a transitional procedure to promote a 
rapid public understanding of the new 
system and to promote more gradual 
training of totalisator operators. 
Selling windows are now being 
converted to provide completely 
flexible ticket selling in all areas. These 
new, ALL-BETS windows already have 
been tested and have proved to be 
both effective and popular. The new 
totalisator, designed largely by P.A. 
Consulting Services Pty. Ltd., was 
constructed by and is operated by 
Amalgamated Wireless (Australasia) 
Ltd. 

The totalisator consists of two 
identical computer systems housed in 
two separate mobile trailers which are 
moved between the four Sydney race- 


SYDNEY TURF CLUB SPRING CARNIVAL 
ALL ROUND HELP TO RACE GOERS 


The opening day of the S.T.C. three- 
day Spring Carnival was held on 
Saturday, 3rd September, with the 
running of the Canterbury Guineas 
and the weight-for-age Canterbury 
Stakes. With the first stage of the 
Clyde Kennedy Stand completed, 
Canterbury Park Racecourse now 


boasts the most modern public stand 
in Australia today and this new stand, 
along with the improvements to the 
course proper, has made the track very 
popular with Metropolitan racegoers. 

Highlight was the breathtaking 
finish of the Canterbury Stakes when 
Romantic Dream defeated Luskin Star. 



Canterbury Clyde Kennedy Stand 


courses as required. Each of the 
computers is capable of handling an 
entire race meeting of up to 36 races 
conducted at three separate 
racecourses. 

The system, which cost $5 million, 
processes about 50 bets per second. 
The response of the system to the 
operator, appears to be instantaneous. 

The 240 selling machines and 8 
indicators, each 35 feet long, are also 
moved between racecourses as 
required. The large infield indicators 
and all television displays have been 
permanently installed on site. The 
mobility of the smaller and more 
expensive items of equipment 
provided a reduced capital cost by 
comparison with fixed equipment at 
each racecourse and an improved 
equipment utilisation factor. 

The new totalisator further provides 
various management facilities which 
are of considerable benefit to the 
totalisator operators and to the Clubs. 


The second day of the Carnival, was 
on Saturday, 17th September, the rich 
Rosehill Guineas day. Top three-year- 
olds from all over Australasia run in 
the event which is the traditional lead- 
up to the A.J.C. Derby. Many top-class 
horses contest the Theo Marks Quality 
Handicap, is the preparation for the 
Epsom Handicap, as leading 
contenders for the Metropolitan 
Handicap start in the Rosehill Cup. 

Final day of the S.T.C. Spring 
Carnival is on Saturday, 24th 
September, when the Hill Stakes and 
the Sydney Turf Club Cup are the 
feature events on the programme. 

The Sydney Turf Club has made 
substantial improvements to totalisator 
facilities in the Paddock Enclosure at 
Rosehill. Two new buildings, one an 
Interstate Tote House and the second 
servicing mainly Sydney events, have 
already been completed. The Club’s 
Chairman, Sir Clyde Kennedy, said 
“The final stage of redevelopment of 
the Rosehill Paddock will involve the 
demolition of the old, main Tote 
House, located at the rear of the 
Members’ Stand, and the building of a 
new Garden Bar and a third Tote 
House. This work is expected to be 
completed before the end of this year.” 

Tattersall’s members join the 
popular Chairman and his Committee 
in their progressive approach to racing. 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


5 


September, 1 977 













Heroic defeated Gloaming in the Chelmsford.. .1924 


TATTERSALL’S MEMBER, TRAINER LEO O’SULLIVAN 
TELLS ABOUT THE 1924 CHELMSFORD STAKES 

Heroic’s first race as a 3 year old was in the W.F.A. Warwick Stakes of six furlongs which was run at Randwick. 

He refused to jump away with the field and was left half a furlong. 

During the week before the Chelmsford Stakes permission was given for the colt to have a special trial out of the barrier 
from the seven furlongs on the “A” Grass at Randwick. This trial took place after breakfast one morning and special 
precautions were taken to ensure him jumping away. The colt behaved well and amazed his trainer by running a record gallop. 

When the field lined up for the Chelmsford Stakes on the Saturday, Gloaming was favourite but Heroic was heavily backed 
to beat him and duly won the race in then Australasian record time for nine furlongs.” Leo O'Sullivan. 


Newcastle Jockey 
Club Cup Carnival 
Great Success! 

Chairman Roy Mahony said “1977 Cup 
Carnival week must rate as one of the 
most memorable in Newcastle racing. 
“White Horse" Cameron Handicap was 
a thriller." He went on to say 
“Rothmans sponsorship of the 
Windfield Cup lifted the prize money 
to the greatest stakes raced for outside 
the metropolitan area. I’d like to 
thank all the Sydney racegoers for 
their support too." 




For people who appreciate 
tailor made suits — 
come and see Parisi. 

The best Italian and English material 
and the latest style. 

CRICKET HOUSE 
First Floor 

254 George Street, Sydney 
27 2329 


September, 1977 


6 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 














by Ken Finn 


1977 WEEK AT “ROSLYN” 

As was anticipated with the early 
arrival of good snow, this ski season is 
the best for at least a decade. Our Ski 
Club commenced its activities with a 
memorable week at Thredbo as the 
guests of “Roslyn” Lodge members. 
The comforts and convenience of this 
lodge were extolled by us last 
year and this year left nothing to 
be desired. Many thanks to the A.A.C. 
directors and members for the 
hospitality. 

None of us could recall a week 
of such uninterrupted perfection in 
the weather as was experienced 
on this occasion. No wind, blue 
sky, warm sun and temperature 
ranging from — 8° to —1° with 
resultant dry powder snow EVERY 
DAY! 

Sue Phillips produced similar 
Cordon Bleu delights as last year 
with one highlight being the “4th 
of July” fare in the best American 
tradition. 

Among those coming and going 
during the week were Peter and 
Shirley Evans (Shirley had an 
uncomfortable leg muscle injury in 
the latter part of the week this is 


now well on the mend). Marie Hodges 
(not long back from skiing in 
Yugoslavia, Tony and Carole Westhoff, 
Alan and Kay Connelly (Alan had to 
return to Sydney early in the week 
and became trapped in the office). 
Gavin and Candy Thompson along 
with Basil, Pam and Joanne Phillips 
were able to be with us in the early 
part of the week whilst Peter Burrows 
and Robyn Fraser joined us for the 
latter part. Peter donned the langlaufs 
for the first time and together with 
yours truly “attacked and conquered” 
Koscuisko. A passing aeroplane full of 
sightseers “buzzed us” as we stood by 
the trig on the summit — well, 
someone had to acknowledge it! 

BUCKS' WEEK AT 
“WIRRUNA” 
PERISHER VALLEY 
6-13 AUGUST 1977 

by Mike Fraw/ey 

All the fellows who turned up for 
this week enjoyed fabulous skiing on 
fresh powder snow. Conditions at 
Perisher, particularly on the Inter¬ 
national Run, the Olympic and Sun 
Valley, were perfect for the down- 
hillers, while the main range provided 
plenty of challenge for our cross¬ 
country pair, Ken Finn and George 
Andrews who alternated with the 
downhill. 

Things were great back at the lodge 
too. “Wirruna” is a fine-lodge by any 
standards, and although we lacked ten 
culinary expertise of Suzie Phillips 
(as enjoyed by our confreres at 
“Roslyn”) the boys handled them¬ 


selves very capably in the kitchen — 
leaving aside Mike O’Dea’s breakfast 
porridge, which was strictly for the 
hardy! High point of the week was 
George Andrew’s Chinese night. 

We don’t have the Tattersall’s 
Cup competition this year but the 
concensus is that Lee Marshall, Ian 
Corban and Mike Tressider were the 
ones to beat. Most energy was 
expended by the “Downhill Dread- 
naughts”, Phil King and Mike O’Dea. 
A more sedate pace was maintained by 
Peter Evans, Pete Perry, Russell 
Debney, Nick Greiner and Mike 
Frawley, while Nick Heath and Dave 
Barnett supplemented their training 
for the City to Surf race by running 
up and down the road to Smiggin 
Holes — much to the amazement of 
the skiing fraternity. 


OBITUARIES 


BRADSHAW W.J. 

Elected 27/6/60 Died 18/7/77 

MURRAY A.F. 

Elected 24/1/77 Died 10/8/77 


VALE 

It is with regret that we record 
the passing of an old friend grand 

sportsman and club supporter in 

W. (Bill) Loughnan. Our sincere 

sympathy and condolences are 

extended to his family. 



USA or EUROPE 1978 
with PAUL READER 


USA/34 DAYS 

Paul Reader, Former National Title 
Holder will take you to:— 

VAIL 

ASPEN 

JACKSON HOLE 
SUN VALLEY 


EUROPE/27 DAYS 

Karl Berchtold top instructor at 
Thredbo, St. Moritz, Sun Valley 
will take you to:— 

ZURS 

ST. MORITZ 
VAL D’ISERE 


FOR BROCHURE - Ask Rick Donaldson, Laurie McNally 


KEY TRAVEL 140 William Street, Sydney — Phone No. 358-2311 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


7 


September, 1977 












An Interview with 
Club Member 
JIM RUSSELL M.B.E. 
Brilliant Cartoonist — 
Tennis Administrator — 
Travel Executive — 


It seemed a simple question we put 
to Jim Russell, who has been a Club 
member for over 25 years, and who is 
well known, Australia wide, as the 
creator of the daily and Sunday 
weekly comic strip, “The Potts”. 

“Jim”, we asked, “would you tell 
us something about how you work?” 

“In which field?”, he asked back 

“Travel, tennis, Olympics.or 

cartooning?” 

That was when it got a bit 
complicated because, as well as being 
so well known both here and overseas 
as a cartoonist, Jim operates three 
successful travel agencies in the 
Southern suburbs of Sydney, is a 
Director of the Australian Federation 
of Travel Agents, (has been for the 
past nine years and is Immediate 
Past President, having just served 
two years as Federal President of 
AFTA, and is a member of the 
National Executive of the Australian 
National Travel Association (ANTA). 

But then Jim is also Vice President 
of the NSW Lawn Tennis Association 
and has been on the State Council for 
27 years, as well as holding the 
Presidency of the prestigious White 
City Club for 15 years. In between 
times he was Public Relations Officer 
for the Australian LTA for 15 years 
and was Captain-Manager of two 
Australian teams to New Zealand. 

He also regularly figures in the 
fund-raising campaigns for sending 
Australia’s Olympic Games Teams 
away, as Publicity Officer and was 
appointed Press Liaison Officer to the 
Olympic Games Team to Mexico 
in 1968. 

So it must have been a little 
confusing to Her Majesty, Queen 
Elizabeth, when she awarded him an 
MBE last year for, as the Citation 
read: “. . his services to Sport and 
Tourism.” Sadly, it seems, his main 
claim to fame as an internationally 
known cartoonist didn’t get a mention 
at Buckingham Palace. 



But we decided that it was in this 
field of endeavour, as a cartoonist, 
his fellow Club members would like 
to know more about his work. Jim 
told us: 

“I started drawing “The Potts” in 
“Smiths Weekly” in January 1940 
after Stan Cross had been drawing it 
under the title of “You and Me” 
from 1921 till the end of 1939. 

The strip continued in weekly form 
in Smiths until 1950 when the paper 
closed down but that same week he 
signed a contract with the Melbourne 
Herald to produce a daily strip for 
them, to be syndicated throughout 
Australia. 

By good luck The Melbourne 
Herald had sold the NSW rights of a 
new strip to be created by him to the 
Sydney Morning Herald. 

It was an immediate success and 
later expanded its field as a Sunday 
strip in 1953. 

To-day “The Potts” is recorded as 
the longest ever running strip in 
Australia and one of the three longest 
running in the world. 

Jim started his art career as the 
office boy to the artists at Smiths 
Weekly in 1924 and here he met and 
worked for all the star name cartoonists 
of the day, including his hero, Stan 
Cross. 


“It was Stan Cross who created the 
funniest cartoon I have seen”, says 
Jim. “It was the famous “For Gawd’s 
sake stop laughing, this is serious.” 
For those younger members who 
have never seen it, the scene shows 
two building workers hanging from a 
girder, high above the street. One 
clutches the girder for dear life while 
the other is hanging on to his mate’s 
pulled-down trousers showing bare, 
hairy legs. His shirt-tail makes it 
printable. It is left to the imagination 
of the reader what a view the under¬ 
neath bloke gets looking up at his 
mate, and his roars of laughter at the 
sight above him endangers both their 
safety. Hence the plea: “For Gawd’s 
sake stop laughing, this is serious.” 

“Smiths Weekly had the greatest 
team of comic artists held by any one 
newspaper in publishing history,” Jim 
tells us “There were Cecil Hartt, Stan 
Cross, George Finey, Syd. Miller, 
Lance Driffield, Charles Hallett, Virgil 
Reilly and Joe Jonsson. Later they 
were joined by Joe Lynch, George 
Donaldson, Frank Dunne, Joan 
Morrison, Les Dixon and numerous 
others. 

Jim, himself was the Art Editor 
between 1940 and 1950. 

Art Conference days were hilarious 
affairs as the various artists presented 
their ideas for next week’s issue and 
every one chipped in ideas to develop 
the gags. 

After the Conference all trooped 
down to the Assembly Hotel next 
door or across the road to the Tudor. 
Later they could go on to the Durban 
Club Hotel in Elizabeth Street. 

With Kenneth Slessor and a group 
of brilliant writers as drinking mates 
they could have produced another 
issue of ‘Smiths’ from the ideas which 
flowed at the same rate as the taps. 

There was even a serious suggestion 
of buying the Assembly Hotel and 
putting a pipe line into the Art Room. 

“That’d be no good”, a serious 
minded journalist warned. “Your 
blokes wouldn’t pay for your beer!” 

“For goodness sake!” roared the 
little barrel-chested Swede, Joe 
Jonsson, “What der hell’s der use 
of owning a pub if you’ve got to pay 
for the beer?” 


September, 1977 


8 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 






A “THIS IS YOUR LIFE " TRIBUTE TO JIM 


Left to right: Sir Edgar Tanner , Dawn Fraser, Jim Russell and Frank Stewart, M.P. 


Those and dozens of other 
reminiscences of the great team of 
artists flow easily, tap-like, from 
Jim Russell, who is at present writing 
a book on the incredible days of 
‘Smiths’ Art Staff. 

Jim inherited Mr. and Mrs. Pott and 
their cobber, Whalesteeth from Cross 
but all other characters in the strip 
are his own creation. 

Uncle Dick has, over the years, 
become the star of the strip. “In fact”, 
Jim tells us, “in the USA where it is 
syndicated, the feature is known as 
“Uncle Dick and his family.” 

Where does Jim Russell get his 
ideas? 

“I mix with funny people,” he 
quips. And that, after all, isn’t so 
strange. Could you imagine getting 
funny ideas at the Annual Meeting 
of the Society of Sourpusses? 

His great friend, Stan Cross, who died 
a few weeks ago at the age of 88, told 
how he got his ideas: “I have a bloody 
good laugh, then thing backwards.” 

His ideas come by sitting on his sun 
deck at his Kangaroo Point home, 
overlooking the Georges River and 
checking through notes he has made 
previously, while being in the 
company of “funny people”, and 
reading through newspapers and 
magazines. An item will catch his eye 
and he can see the humour of a twist 
on a word, or a situation. Anything 
he thinks has a funny side he jots 
down and then he starts the job of 
refining them into usable jokes. 
Often he will think of the final words 
first and then, as Stan Cross said, 
“think backwards.” 

Jim goes his merry way setting new 
longevity records every day that will 
take some erasing in the future. 


Publicity, of course, is a necessary 
part of a cartoonist’s life, but Jim 
received more publicity than he 
bargained for last year when on a 
Pacific Cruise, he was stricken ill and 
spend the first four days in the ship’s 
hospital. On reaching Port Vila he was 
rushed off to the English hospital for 
an emergency operation. 

Trouble was there was no way of 
getting him back to Sydney by normal 
air or shipping services so the RAAF 
was called in. They were willing, and 
ready, but the drama started when 
the French Authorities refused 
permission for an Australian Army 
plane to fly into their military area. 

Hours went by and Jim’s condition 
worsened so much that the RAAF 
medical squad decided to take 
desperate measures. Meanwhile the 
Australian press, radio and TV took 
up the running. There were front 
page stories, editorials and news 
flashes. It was even featured in 
European papers because of the French 
connection. 

Eventually the RAAF moved in, 18 
hours later and, without the necessary 
landing papers, came in, picked up the 
patient, his wife Billie and his daughter, 
Judith, (who had been flown in by 
Quantas on a mercy dash) landing in 
Sydney at 1.00 a.m. 

He survived, of course, although 
losing 414 stone in weight, is now 
fighting fit and as busy as ever. 

“I used to be fat and forty,” he 
says. “Now I’m thin and thirty”. 

Recently he was featured on a 
session of the popular “This is Your 
Life” and the string of celebrities 
who turned up to pay tribute to his 
versatility was indicative of his breadth 
of interests. 


His wife swears that he is the 
original of Uncle Dick, and she should 
know. But Jim says if she repeats 
such a slander publicly he’ll sue her for 
a million dollars. Which seems to prove 
that at least there is some of Uncle 
Dick in Jim Russell, cartoonist, sports 
administrator. Travel entrepreneur and 
Tourist official. 

“In fact”, Jim adds, “he’s got a 
little bit of every one of us in him.” 

“He isn’t based on any one person 
in particular,” says Jim. “He’s a mix- 
up of all the lovable scoundrels we all 
know. He borrows money and doesn’t 
pay his debts, loves to drink, smoke 
cigars and gamble and doesn’t like 
work. He is a great planner of big 
deals, developments and any other 
schemes that can net him a million 

dollars.providing someone else 

finds the capital”. 

Jim is critical of Australian news¬ 
papers for their lack of interest in 
developing local comic strips. 

“They are more interested in 
buying cheap, imported comic strips 
from overseas,” he says. “They do this 
because they are chaper than the 
lowest award for Australia’s creative 
artists, although the Sydney Sun- 
Herald and the Melbourne Herald 
both try, from time to time, to 
encourage new Australian strips but 
the artists are not well paid and new 
features are rare.” 



TattersalPs Club Magazine 


9 


September, 1977 










H.A. McGlynn, B. W. McHugh and D. Dransfield 


Jim Comans ^ 

Tattersall’s Club Chairman 
congratulates Jockey Rod 
Quinn. Background is Mr. 
Peter Barnes & Secretary 
Norman Smith with Mr. 
Ron Dawson. 



A.J.C. Clark and N. Solomon 


A.J.F. Rofe and G.P. Hurst 



TATTERSALL'S CLUB SEPTEM 


The Tattersall’s Club spring meeting at Randwi 
the James Barnes Plate and the Chelmsford Stakes. 

Rodney Quinn rode the double, a unique perfo 
stairs of success. In fact Rodney Quinn is fast bee 
allowance when he landed Bazza a runaway winner in 

Conditions of the race precluded any apprentic 
Quinn’s allowance. 

And the boy repaid their faith in his ability with 
Bazza was Quinn’s 14th winner for the seasor 
showing the way to senior riders in the jockeys’ prem 

Bazza (9-2) dashed to the front before the hon 
run home. 

He beat Tod Bay (16-1) by three lengths with P< 
Major Battle, the 10-9 favourite, once again left 

Flirting Prince won the Chelmsford (turn bad 
by Mr. K. Edge, Mr. & Mrs. G. Forster and T.J. Smith 

Punters were well on target and $60,000 was v 
to the winner — his first win at weight for age. 

A happy Chairman, Jim Comans, who loves h 
presentations in excellent style. Mr. Peter Barnes was 
There is a thought for next year to stage a p 
and their friends is forthcoming the idea will no dout 
It could be a good “pipe opener” for a happy d; 

J.P. O’Neill, Dr. R. Dakin and J. Mann J. Burrell, T. Hughes, W.J. Sinclair and A.B. Browning 




J. Garrity, Maj. Gen. J. Norrie & G.P. Hurst A. W. Clarkson, Terry Smith and K. W. Goodwin 



















ELMSFORD STAKES DAY 


ACE MEETING RANDWICK 


E. Raisbeck and J. W. Hayes 


P. Barnes, J. Hickey, Rev. Fr. L.F. Tosi and G. A. Eastment 


R.W. Auswild, QBE, J.R. McKell and T.A.D. Kennedy 


Dr. C. J. Cummins and J. Baker 


Id fine club representation to see the feature races, 

broves that this young rider has his foot well on the 
| boom apprentice of racing, had no need for his 
iBarnes Plate, 2000m. 

ibut the Bart Cummings stable was happy to forgo 
ride. 

I taking a leaf out of Malcolm Johnston’s book by 
ring his rivals struggling, and was untroubled in the 



D.J. Holman, J. Garrity, D. Fullerton and N.R. Rogers 


Os. Bates, M. Lynch and R. Davis 


land (11-1) third, two lengths away, 
j the training track. 

ifor a nostalgic 1924 look). It is owned co-jointly 
trained him. 

wagers. It was a weak WFA field but full credit goes 

slcomed the sporting fraternity and conducted the 
his genial manner and warm personality. 

dinner at Tattersall’s Club. If support of members 
d. 

sail's Club that follows. 



R. Chambers, B. Robinson and G.D. Hardman 


B. Upcroft, H. Bute/, W.T. Morck and D.C. Hall 



dering Eyes (GB) - So-A mi) wins the plate handsomely. 


B. O’Connor, MBE, and E.J. Vandenberg Les Hodskinson, E. Smith and "Ernie” Tattersall’s popular Steward 

is giving a-mtssage to Norman Smith, Tattersall’s Club Secretary. 


^ffiUPnr 













dll tip Kill’s [lorses 

FINE SPORTING PRINTS AND PAINTINGS 


The Derby & St. Leger Winners 


Announcing the finest 
selection of old, engraved 
racehorse prints ever to be 
made available in Australia. 


The pick of my large collection of 
fine sporting prints, these superb 
hand-engraved and hand-coloured 
prints are all of limited edition, very 
rare, and all are in excellent condition. 


Engraved from the original paintings 
by such renowned sporting artists as 
John Frederick HERRING, 

Sir Alfred MUNNINGS and 
J. N. SARTORIUS, these works are 
all imported, and are true collector’s 
items. 

This special series includes: — 
“SMOLENSKO” — J. N. Sartorius 
“TARRARE” — David Dalby 
“JACK SPIGOT” — J. F. Herring 
“CHARLES Xllth” — J. F. Herring 
“HUMORIST” — A. J. Munnings 


All the works have been traditionally 
framed in either “bird’s eye” maple 
or cedar, and the prices are inclusive. 

By appointment only 

Your inspection is both recommended 
and welcome. Please telephone 
Paul Enemark on (02) 660 3514. 


ALL THE KING’S HORSES 
Fine Sporting Prints & Paintings 
284 Annandale Street, Annandale 
N.S.W. 2038, Australia 












Pool Splashes 

J5^v by Sam Block 


No doubt there has been some 
quiet training by the dedicated who 
are reluctant to let existing form slip, 
or are anxious to build up improving 
performances for the coming season. 

The swimming season will com¬ 
mence on Thursday October 6. Brace 
Relay event over 40 yards. 

New members will be particularly 
welcome, all that is necessary is a 
time trial which they can arrange at 
a time to suit their convenience with 
any of the swimming officials. 

Winding up the 1976-77 season 
the Swimming Club will hold its 
Presentation Evening on Tuesday, 25th 
October, which will be held in the Club 
Room with drinks etc. from 6.30 p.m. 
to 8.00p.m. followed by a Dinner Dance 
in*the Dining Room until midnight. 

As bookings are limited it is 
suggested that reservations be made 
as soon as possible. 

To club supporters who donated 
trophies, A. J. (Tony) McSweeney, 
Jack Mandel, Tom Powell, M.W.R. 
(Mick) Bartley, Mrs. M. Tidmarsh, 
Ian Joyce and Arthur McCamley got 
the thanks of the members.. 

Personally, I would like to express 
my sincere appreciation to the 
members of my Committee, Club 
Chairman, Jim Comans, Arthur 
McCamley, Leigh Bowes, Max Sernack 
(starter and honorary photographers), 
Bill Debney and my right hand 
assistant Alec McLelland for their 
hearty co-operation, also Norm Rogers, 
Bryan Mortensen, Charles Coppa for 
their generous assistance at all times. 



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Phone or call in to Capitol’s 
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194 William Street, Sydney. 3584644 

(V4 mile from Tattersall’s. Cnr. William & Dowling Sts.) 




QUEENSLAND 
SUNSHINE COAST 

For BUSINESS INVESTMENT 

For LAND DEVELOPMENT 
For RETIREMENT 
JACKSON REAL ESTATE 

(Member, Real Estate Institute Q’land) 

31 Duporth Avenue, Maroochydore, 4558 
Phone: Len Jackson 071-431331 (A.H. 43-1219) 

RETIREMENT SPECIAL 

BUDERIM: "The roof top of the Sunshine Coast”. Queensland Colonial Residence 
(former Home of Sam Fullbrook, Artist). This spacious 4 Bedroom Home, with a touch 
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MEMBERS' 

BENEFIT 


YACHTING CLUB 


LIMITED MEMBERSHIP available up to 20 persons. Annual 

Your attention is drawn to 
the extended Dining Room 
hours. 


fee of $100.00 which will enable all members to sail on a 
brand new 36ft. sloop Swanson Bermuda rigged cruising 
yacht. Cost will be $10.00 per person per day and the yacht 


is moored at Mitchells Marina, Church Point. Those 

FOR YOUR 


interested to join the Club please ring R.G. Hackett Snr., on 

CONVENIENCE 


481262 before 10 a.m. daily. 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


13 


September, 1977 




























SPECIALISTS 

demand 

SPECIALISTS 



MALWYN'S MANAGING DIRECTOR, NORMAN W. PACK 


MALWYN 

PTYLTD 

LEADING COLLECTION 
AND CREDIT CONSULTANTS 


Comprehensive services include 

Confidential representation • 
Speedy operation • 
Low commission rates • 
Reporting Bureau • 
Credit checking • 
National & international coverage • 
Monthly accounts • 


Clients include 


• Australia’s major banks 

• Doctors, dentists, chemists 

• Hospitals, clinics 

• Engineers 

• Finance companies 

• Public Relations firms 

• Retail stores, service stations 

• Credit unions 


MALWYN PTYLTD 

Member of the American Collectors’ Association 

Lakemba Arcade 132 Haldon Street, 
Lakemba. 2195 

p.O. Box 130, Lakemba. 2195 
Phone 759-8299 (24 hours, 7 days) 


September, 1977 


14 


TattersalPs Club Magazine 







Epicureans 

by Peter Ashby 

It was a night of spirit (and spirits) 
at Tattersall’s Epicureans Traditional 
Scottish Night. 

Hosted by Basil Phillips in the 
grand manner (we never did learn what 
a Scotsman has beneath his kilt) we 
soon discovered that Athol Brose is 
not always the name of a Scot and 
that Spotted Dog need not be a four 
legged friend (or foe). And how 
enjoyable was the opening skirmish 
with a wee drappie of Athol Bose and 
to my perculiar way of thinking it was 
far too wee a drappie. This will prove 
to be a never to be forgotten thirst 
quencher, the most delightful liquid 
mixture ever concocted, a gloriously 
rich, tasty, creamy, smooth potion. 

The happy throng was piped into 
the Dining Room, yes, real Scottish 
pipes and drums, of course, and the 
festivities commenced with the 
Selbink Grace. 

The Canapes Carnoustie were of a 
high standard and the Scotch Broth 
was rich thick and thankfully hot. 

During these concupiscible proceed¬ 
ings I was testing the various servings 
of McLaren Vale Dry White and Red, 
mainly to satisfy myself of any 
variation in the standard of bottlings. 

The Highland Beef followed the 
trout (with further wine testing) and 
a welcome to all by Epicurean Chief, 
Victor “Mac” Vadas. 

Colin and Kay Campbell certainly 
enjoyed the evening with Alexander 
and Heather Brennan. Heather re¬ 
counted a tale of her grandmother at 
breakfast saying, “The scrapings of the 
muckle pot are better than the we’en 
fu'll.” 


ATHOL BROSE RECIPE 

Ingredients: 

1-bottle of Scotch 

2y 2 -oz medium ground oatmeal. 

1-lb honey 
1-pint fresh cream 

Soak oatmeal for 40 hours in scotch. Strain 
off kernel. Add honey, mix thoroughly 
and allow to stand for 48 hours. Add 
cream and mix thoroughly and allow to 
stand in fridge for minimum of 24 hours. 

It was stated that the mixture would 
last indefinitely while stored under 
refrigeration. Not with my friends, it 
wouldn’t last through the mixing process. 

Epicurean dates to remember: 

11th OCTOBER - NIGHT IN SINGAPORE 

29th NOVEMBER - DINNER DANCE 
XMAS SPECIAL 


MEMBERS STAGE YOUR 
FUNCTION AT 
TATTERSALL’S CLUB 


Tattersall’s Members and their 
friends have ideal rooms for all 
celebrations. 

Successful functions recently held 
at Tattersall’s Club proves members 
are aware and enjoying the facilities 
with all the professional and intimate 
service management offers. 

Outstanding gatherings are listed to 
illustrate the recently well attended 
functions at your Club. 

1. Mr. J. Moon’s Wedding Reception in 
the Club Room (150 guests.) 

2. Mr. S. Priestley’s Dinner for Acrow 
Ltd. (101 guests.) 

3. Wholesale Wine & Spirit Merchants 
(160 guests.) 

4. Mr. David Landa’s Club Room 
Cocktail Party (300 guests.) 

5. Mr. Joe Aboud’s birthday party for 
son John’s 21st Birthday in the 
Club Room (110 guests.) 

It can be readily appreciated the 
service and attention is of the highest 
order. Full co-operation is guaranteed. 

Office help and all details is readily 
obtainable. Secretary Norman Smith 
and his staff will be pleased to help. 

You will be helpirrg our Club to 
function to its fullest by using these 
rooms. 


SPACE AND CAPACITY 


Clubroom 1st Floor 

4930 Sq. Feet 

■ 


■ 

”6 

o __ 


m 

a 

■ 


■ 

■ 

STAGE 



87.1 1 


Meetings 

maximum 

400 

Cocktail Party 

400 

Luncheon/Dinner 

300 

Dinner Dance/ ” 

180 


Wedding Reception 


Sportsmans Room Basement 
1050 Sq. Feet 



Luncheon/Dinner ” 60 


Function Room 2nd Floor 
850 Sq. Feet 



Luncheon/Dinner ” 40 


AIRPORT PARKING 

GRIMES VALET PARKING RATES 

$1.80 PER DAY 

80c Valet Service Charge, 1st Day Only 

CONTROL CENTRE - KEITH SMITH AVENUE 
SYDNEY DOMESTIC AIR TERMINAL PHONE 669 6163 

CITY PARKING 

GRIMES GEORGE ST. GRIMES MACQUARIE ST 

GRIMES CIRCULAR QUAY GRIMES SUSSEX ST 

GRIMES KENT ST. GRIMES WYNYARD 

Permanent and Casual Space Available PHONE 27-3715 

GRIMES PARKING STATIONS, SYDNEY 

(EST 1919) 

Managing Director: V J. CHALWIN Genera! Manager: I N. OUBAND 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


15 


September, 1 977 























BOWLING by Fuzz Porter 

GEORGE MORROW 
NEW SINGLES CHAMPION 

After a number of unavoidable 
postponements the long awaited final 
of the Singles Championship of the 
Club was played at Double Bay. The 
opponents were George Morrow and 
David Cohen. If my memory serves 
me right neither of them had reached 
the final of the Singles in the past. 
However, it was not surprising for they 
had both won their way to the final by 
consistent good bowling and their 
supporters were evenly divided and the 
experts all tipped an even match. 

George Morrow had entered the 
final by defeating the holder of the 
title, Ron Relton. As was to be 
expected this was closely contested 
with George eventually winning 31/27. 

David Cohen had won his way into 
the final winning his semi-final match 
against Horrie Abbott 31/16. 

On his way to the final George had 
wins against Eric Crittenden 31/23, 
Fuzz Porter 31/17, Jack McKell 31/24 
and Ron Relton 31/27. 


In the other section of the draw 
David accounted for Harold McKay 
31/26, Peter McGrath 31/15, Lou 
Malouf 31/14 and Harrie Abbott 
31/16. In a word a close final was in 
order. 

The match began with David 
scoring one spot on the first end only 
to see his opponent win the next six 
ends with 3.3.2.1.1. shots and run 
away to a lead of 11 to 1 with seven 
ends played over the next seven ends 
David was able to win four to three 
by George and reduce the defecit 9 to 
15. Maintaining form he was able 
to repeat the performance, again to win 
four of the seven ends to trail 15 to 
19. With a further shot on the twenty 
second end and a further three shots 
on the twenty third end he had 
levelled the score at 19 all, only to 
see George pick up three shots on the 
next end to move into the lead once 
more. With the score 22 to 19 in his 
favour George maintained his 
advantage when the twenty eight end 
had been left behind to still be m front 
24 to 21. The next end a vital one for 
each player enabled George to win the 
end by three shots and race away to a 


lead of 27 to 21. Not to be out done 
David hit back once more and with 
thirty one ends played still trailed 25 
to 29. The end came with only one 
more end needed as George with three 
shots decided the issue winning 31 to 
25. Congratulations to both. To 
George on his win and to David on 
his hard fight back. 

With the colder months coming to 
an end an appeal is made to all 
members to put in an appearance at 
our Thursday games for attendances 
over the last two months have been 
far from encouraging. 


Note 

THE CLUB WILL BE 
CLOSED ON 
PUBLIC HOLIDAY 
MONDAY, OCTOBER 3RD 



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Ring owner for inspection at: 231-6649 or 30-8861 A.H 


September, 1977 


16 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 






HANDBALL 
NOTES 


by Peter Ashby 


OPENING ROUND IN 1977 
TATTERSALL'S PLATE 

Somnolent inaction again epitomised 
the various handball competitions 
awaiting decision on the famous 
Tattersall’s Handball Courts. 

Fortunately the opening rounds in 
Tattersall’s Plate have been completed 
with Michael O’Dea, Ron Tubb and 
Ron Rogers versus Gary Stubbs in the 
semi-finals. The final will be decided 
in October prior to the presentation 
night in the Sportsman’s Room. 

There were some surprises in the 
first round with the old adage that 
handball is an old man’s game proven 
to have some foundation in fact. Old 
men of the game, Tony Brown, Ron 
Tubb, Gary Stubbs and Ray Hopkins 
were all successful over younger and 
more favoured opponents. 

In my opinion, the really great 
father of the game, Michael O’Dea, 
will again have a big year. 

Tony Brown, ex-Australian Rugby 
League five eighth, paying for Bondi 
Icebergs, beat one of the favourites, 
John Mclnerney, in an exhilarating 
display by both contestants. John, a 
relative newcomer, but one of great 
promise, plays an enterprising, hard 
hitting game but while he enjoys the 
uncertainty of shot making and speed, 
to certainty and steadiness, he must be 
prepared to take second place to the 
oldies who have perfected an approach 
to matches that produces victories. 

Ron Tubb beat Bondi stalwart, 
Reg Chappell, 31-21. If the score was 
completely disregarded the result 
would have been a dead-heat because 
of the evenness of general play. Ron 
went to an early lead and he managed 
to control the game throughout but 
Reg never gave up his attempt to gain 
the lead. It was a long game and with 
an ounce of luck Reg would have 
made it a very close one. 

Ron Rogers started very scratchily 
against Noel Vella from Bondi but as 
soon as he was able to sight the ball 
properly played some of his best shots 
at blistering speed. Noel is no slouch at 
the speed game but on the night was 
no match for the winner of the first 
two Tattersall’s Plates. 


CLUB CHAMPIONSHIPS 


A Grade 

Charlie Robinson caused the upset 
of the round by beating Ray Hopkins. 
The first set was a runaway 21-9 but 
Ray bounced back to take the second 
set 21-18. The third and decider set 
proved a cliff hanger, 21-19. Neil 
Rogers beat Bill Sellen in a stutterer, 
21-14, 21-14. Club champion Michael 
O’Dea beat Bob Callaghan 21-17, 
21-14. Ron Rogers took Malcolm 
Fuller in two sets and Bill Hannan 
beat Norman Rogers in an exciting 
marathon 21-19, 22-24, 21-19. 

B Grade 

Charles Griffiths and Bill Blakemore 
received forfeits. Bill Orme defeated 
John Barnes 21-10, 24-22. Rod Fisher 
beat Sam Kay by two sets to nil and 
John Byrne accounted for Peter Ashby 
by a similar margin. Tony Bain beat 
Stan Heaton and Martin McCurrich 
caused the upset of this grade by 
gaining the decision against Ven 
Hrouda. 

C Grade 

Arthur O’Connor, Max Sernack 
and Clive Milliken were victors by 
walkovers and Steve Larkin enjoyed 
the luxury of a bye. Gordon Salier 
beat the improving Les Hams 21-9, 
21-18. Neville Amy beat second 
favourite Paul Vrachress 21-19, 21-19. 
Richard Horne beat David Castle 
21-19,21-12. 

D Grade 

Walkovers were credited to Tim 
O’Donnell-Maher, Nick Virag, Michael 
Frawley and Brian Mortensen. In what 
was perhaps the final, Stan Droder 
beat Doug Salier in two close sets and 


John Reid chalked up a similar victory 
at the expense of Dick Fairley. Bill 
Debney showed that practice is 
essential in beating Bill Hannan Jnr. 
2 sets to nil. 


Tattersall's Club 
Trading Hours 

LOUNGE: 

Mon. — Fri. Noon - Midnight 

Saturday 5 pm - Midnight 

DINING ROOM: 

Dinner: Mon. - Thurs. 6pm-8.30pm 

Thurs. — Sat. 6pm—9.30pm 
(Dinner Dance — Saturday) 


Luncheon: Mon. - Fri. 12.30-2.1 5pm 
Breakfast: Daily 7.30-9.30am 

No Luncheon on Public Holidays 
ATHLETIC DEPT. 

Mon. & Sat. 10.30—7pm 
Tue.-Fri. 9.30-7pm 
Children (Male): Tues. 2.30-4.30pm 
(1 2 years and upwards) 
Sat. 9am—Noon 
(Boys all ages) 

BUFFET: 

Mon. — Fri. 10.00am—5.00pm 

SECOND FLOOR BAR: 

Mon. - Fri. 11.30am-11.00pm 

Fri. night 11.30pm) 


BILLIARDS ROOM: 

Mon. - Fri. 10.00am-11.30pm 

(Fri. night 11.30pm) 
Saturday 1 0.00am-11.30pm 

(Card Room facilities available) 

MAIN BAR: 

Mon. - Thurs. 1 0.30am-7.15pm 

Friday 10.30am-8.00pm 

SAFE DEPOSIT: 

Mon. - Fri. 9.00am-4.30pm 

SETTLING: 


Monday 11.30am-1.00pm 

(Tuesday following Holiday meeting) 


Telephone: 26-6111 


Ladies Fourth Floor only from 3.00pm 
Mon. — Fri. 5.00pm Saturday. 


PHQC brothers 
m\\JDd pty. ltd. 

(Established 1862) 

545 7 KENT STREET • SYDNEY • N S W. 
Telephone: 26 6778. Telegrams and Cables: "Rossprint Sydney" 

GENERAL PRINTERS 
. STATIONERS. 
BOOKBINDERS 


LABELS AND CARTONS FOR ALL PURPOSES 
Printed in Colours - Embossed - Varnished 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


17 


September, 1977 















GOLF 

PLEASANT DAY AT 
PENNANT HILLS 

Pennant Hills Golf Club was the 
scene for a happy Tattersalls Club 
Golf Club day in August. The 
challenging course held no terrors for 
Bill Hunt and Partner Bill Moore. 
They combined well to win the 
four ball event with 44 points. 

Bill Firkin and Rob Elvy were 
close on their heels with 43 points. 
Visitor Firkin certainly played well 
he scored 40 points (11/8) Producing 
excellent Golf. 

On the basis of one prize one 
player he elected to receive the runner 
up prize in the fourball. 

Ken Wright (14/11) with 37 
became the winner of the Visitors 
Singles. 

The ever consistent and smiling 
Steve Zappia won the Members. 

Course notes include new member 
Hughie Gage — covered the course 
well. His Horse Black and Gold was 
included in the conversation and you 
can be sure it will run well in The 
Spring. 

Basil Phillips (not wearing his kilts) 
had some “Good News and Bad News” 
scoring 27 points. 

Messrs Pearce, Wall, Upton and 
Hackett had a battle royal with former 
pair winning in a fun packed game. 

Bill Dave Emanuel and Ken Wright 
scoring 40 points accounted for John 
Claremont (of Pymble Club) and Bill 
Tunbridge. 


COMING EVENTS 

GOLF CLUB - Thursday, 20th 
October, Strathfield Golf Club. 

HANDBALL CLUB - Thursday, 
20th October. Presentation Night, 
Sportsmen’s Room. 

SWIMMING CLUB -Tuesday,25th 
October. Dinner Dance Presentation 
Night. 


City to Surf... 

THE RACE OF THE 
CENTURY 

It was a glorious sunny day and 
15,000 enthusiastic runners faced the 
starter and at least 11,000 finished the 
gruelling epic. 

Tattersall’s have always had a number 
of entries and usually acquiet themselves 
in a successful effort. 

Our top performer this year was 
popular Nick Heath on 58-18, Robert 
Barnes 58-30, Warren Duncan 58-56, 
David jackson 59-00, David Barnett 
59-48, John Mclnerney 63-46, Paul Landa 
64-40, Philip King 64-46, Geoge Andrews 
70-14, Brian Carpenter 70-20, Peter 
Burrows 70-30, Russell Whitmont 70-52, 
George Lawson 72-18, Robert Tobias 
74-38, Ian Foulsham 75-04, Len Blanket 

76- 10, Stan Heaton 76-10, Cliff Carpenter 

77- 06, Roger Falkner 81-48 and Geoff 
Tapperell 78-30. 

* Sam Block provided names of 
members taking part and said any 
omission is due to failing eyesight, so 
please accept his apologies if he missed 
you. 


SAVE TAX 


1829 acres, 30 km. Barraba, near main bitumen road, 
sound basalt, undulating, 350 acres cultivated inc. 200 acres 
sown lucerne, permanent water, creeks, bores, dams, nice 
cottage with power, sewerage, can produce $20,000 worth of 
wool, crops and vealers. Supering would greatly increase 

income and value. c?c\r\ r\f\r\ 

Asking pyU,UUU 


Full details 

PITT SON & BADGERY LTD. 

Ph. 233-5166 (day), 43-4467 (night) 


Billiards & 

Snooker by Sid Lane 


The 1977 tournaments are progress¬ 
ing and are commanding a lot of 
attention from players and spectators 
— especially the gamblers, who like to 
have an interest in every match 
irrespective of the players’ reputations. 

The very fact that so many favoured 
players take a tumble in these “out 
frame” contests add to the risks that 
have been taken by optimistic bidders 
at the Calcutta auction, as evidenced 
by some of the following results. 

George Bloomfield (an expensive 
purchase) succumbed to Lester Lill 
who was knocked down rather 
cheaply. 

Jack Chown was defeated by his 
very old friend Roy Bryden - they 
also shared the ownership of each 
other in the Calcutta - luck of the 
draw! 


Peter Holohan defeated Bobby Lavigne 
Nick Layton ” John Lavigne 

Peter Twigg ” Nick Shehadie 

John McSweeney ” Stuart Adams 

Angus Foster ” Clive Milliken 

Peter McGrath ” Richard Horne 

Bob Bradshaw ” Tony Murphy 

Arthur O’Connor ” Steve Brown 

Digger Lobb ” John Peoples 

Bill Henneberry ” Colin Cain 

Ken Upton ” Neil Rogers 

Ben Gerakiteys ” John Stratton 

Rod Fisher ” John Gratton 

Norman Rogers ” Peter Dind 

Lee Bluett ” Steve Brown 

Bruce Cox ” Colin Cain 

Many stories could be told about 

these matches, but space is limited. 
Nevertheless I must tell you about 
Phil Hase. He got the worst of the 
draw, having to meet Barry Doyle in 
the first round: Warren Simpson (45 
behind) in the second round; and 
Warren Foster (5 behind) in the third 
round. Phil stayed like the true scratch 
player that he is and eliminated these 
three very worthy opponents. As a 
matter of interest Warren Simpson 
went to a lead of seven points before 

^ 11 4-La L-1/-I koon rlo^rprl hilt Phil 


hung on an eventually potted the 
black to tie. The black was then re¬ 
spotted — Warren won the toss and 
sent Phil “in” - after the “break” 
Warren tried a very difficult pot which 
he just missed, leaving beaming Phil an 
easy shot to win. 


September, 1977 


18 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 












SEPTEMBER 

18 


L.R.K. LORENZ 
A.G. MELICK 

J. E. o'SHEA 

K. A. PURSER 


G. BEGHE 
F.R. JEFFCOAT 
P.W.L. WHITE 
P. BODOR 
P.J. BARRETT 


19 


K.C. VAN DE WATER 

J.B. TART 

D.H. MC LELLAND 

G. P. HURST 
J. HAMMOND 

H. T. JACKSON 


20 

DR. K.J. BYERS 
W.J. AITKENHEAD 
R . A . ARCHER 
D.J. ISRAEL 
P L. TRESIDDER 
H.J. MC CARTHY 
C.C. BRANSON 
P.V. PERUMAL 
J.E. MONAGHAN 

J. P. COOPER 
S.E. MARTIN 
S. A CARROLL 

K. J. WHERRY 


21 


T.R. ROBSON 
K. A . WEBB 
D.G. LESNIE 
P.L. KELLAWAY 
T. NICHOLSON 
J.W. MC ADAM 
A.G. LEGGE 
G.R. IRELAND 
R.H. AITKEN 
A. CRAWFORD 
A. W. GUNDRY 


22 


R.C. HARRIS 

A. B . BALL 

E.V. PUCKLE 

REV. FR. L.F. TOSI 

A. J. GURNER 

DR. F. LEVENTHAL 

R.L. COWAN 

L.J. MOREN 

G.G. KING 

D.E. WILLIAMS 

L. A. DEWITTE 


23 


J. A . MC HUGH 
T.H. CAMERON 
C.E.R. ALLISON 

K. R. SIEVERS 
J.R. MAYBURY 
R.N. THORNETT 
J.B. DEERY 
M.T. SMITH 
B.F. EGAN 


24 


C. T. 
R.K. 
A. C . 
DR . 
R.M 

D. B 

G. A 
T. R. 

H. V 
A. IV 


MC CARTNEY 
GLASSOP 
OZOUX 
A. ADEY 
COWLEY 
EAR 

NDRONICUS 
M ACH ATTIE 
ANDYKE 
U RQUHART 
MARSDEN 
STEELE 


25 


30 


W.H. SELLEN 
W.J. CHEESEMAN 
W.J. MEEHAN 
R.G. HILL 
G.W. DENOVAN 
G.R. PURKIS 
A. H . WATTS 
R.T. RICH 

D. J. CHILDS 
R. LORD 
V.M. SHORE 
T.G. REECE 

M.D. HEFFERNAN 
J.C. HIDDLESTON 

E. G. CHANT 


OCTOBER 


C.S. PEARCE 

J. V. SMITH 

L. F. BEAUMONT 
A. D. ROBB 

C.H .C. JONES 

K. B. O DONOHUE 

M. S. DIAMOND 
H.F. DRANE 
K.J. PARDY 
K.F. LEWIS 
R.H. HORNE 

R . A . ROLF E 


2 


DR. H.M. OWEN 
W. R. ALEXANDER 
J. N. PENFOLD 
P. HALSE 

O. FABRIS 

P. J. MURRAY 
E.L. CLARKE 
J.B. STOKES 

H. O SHANNESSY 
E.A. O KEEFE 
P.D.R. ISHERWOOD 
DR. D.A. FOX 


DR. R.A.A.F. DE 
B RYON-F AES 
A. R . MEIKLE 
M.J. GUTHRIE 
J.R. CHARODY 
A.R. TWIST 


3 

P. FLITCROFT 
S.J. CALLINAN 

J. K. MC KINNEY 
B.T. PAYTEN 

R. RILEY 

B.C. RICHARDS 

R.S.J. MC GOWAN 

B. M. THOMAS 
W . A. WILSON 

C. S. OERTEL 

L. R. HARRISON 
B.E. WALKER 
R.S. DEBNEY 
B.H . TAYLOR 

K. L. MC INTOSH 

D. FAY 

B.D. SULLIVAN 
P. EVANS 

M. G. SOFFER 
B.D. GOULD 


K.F. WILLIAMS 
T.H. BARRELL 
T.B. MC INERNEY 
D.l. DONALDSON 
R.E. WALKER 
P. LIPPMANN 
R.G. JONES 
J.l. MOORE 
F.C. HARGRAVES 
J.C. FRIEND 


26 


C.H. OSWALD-SE ALLY 

R.P. TRUMAN 

E.C. SLATTER 

H.V. ROACH 

R.W. WEATHERDON 

J.T.C. BURRELL 


27 


F. A. M C CURE 
C.E. FORREST 
P.J. WALL 

J. L. NICHOLS 

K. B. DOYLE 
P.W. PEMBROKE 
R.J. WALKER 
C.J. FERGUSSON 
W. A. PATTERSON 
J.W. COULSON 
R.G. COOTE 

G. F. RICHARDSON 

28 


T. A. FIELD 
E. SIDDINS 
C. CAMPBELL 
C.D. ANDRONICUS 

B. J. MURPHY 
J.R. FITZPATRICK 

C. W. MC MONNIES 
R.C. PLUCK 

J.L. JONES 

D. COWAN 
B. A . LEVITT 


29 


L.R. HOOKER 
P.J. WESTH OFF 
J.H. GRIFFITHS 
D.J. SAMER 
P.R. JOCOBSON 
C. HELLIAR 


J. A. 
DR. 

R. H 
P.C. 
G.E. 
J.B. 
DR. 

S. R. 

J.J. 


. LAWTON 
DOUGLAS 

F. FISHER 
• W. WINCH 

L. JONES 
MC CAULEY 
GIBSON 

G. W. ALLMAN 
HARVEY 

MEAGHER 
.STRATTON 
. M AGNO 


N.J.D. STOREY JNR. 
C.R. GARDNER 
H. PLANT 
C. CHONG SUN 
G.T. DATE 
C.W. BLAKE 
P.J. RYAN 
A. CROCKER 
P.W.A. PURCELL 
S.J. WOODS 

C. M. DIMOND 

D. J. THOMPSON 


W.G. HARRIS 

J.O. NORTH 

J.J. WEBB 

R.M. BRYCE 

P.K. RICHARDSON 


C. G. WHITMONT 

G. N. NOCK 

A. MC LELLAND 

L. G. RUSSELL 

M. S. MASON 

B. J. BYRNE 
L.M. CAMERON 
F. WILSON 
J.L. HUNTER 
A.M. SAWYER 

D. B.S. TULLOCH 
R. A . PRINCE 

C. E. HAYES 
R.W. MC KELVIE 
W.L.H. TREGEAR 

H. H. RYAN 


DR. R. MACKEY 
N.H.JOSEPH 
E.H. LAND 
E.L. LUCAS 
J.J. AUSTIN 
H.W. BAINES 

R. J. SULLY 
J.F. BOLAND 
M. AVRAMIDIS 
C.P. ABOTOMEY 

S. H. CHISOLM 
W.M. DAVIS 


9 


H.C. ROWELL 
M.J. WHITMONT 
S.C. HODGSON 
E.C. MANN 
A . J . KELLY 
G.E. LAWSON 

A. R. DOUGHTY 
J.F.C. SMALL 

B. J. MULCAHY 
D. HUTCHISON 
R.M.STEVENSON 
A. F . MURRAY 


M. HARRIS 
W. A. NAGEL 
G.F. OVERALL 
E.A. LANE 
D.E. GUERNSEY 
A. D . DIAMOND 
S.W. FOX 


19 


R.E. CALLAGHAN 
C . A. FAY 
G.W. SAMPLE 
B.F. CAMERON 
R.R. RELTON 


SIR NORMAN RYDGE, 
CBE 

R.S. MAYER 
B.C. STRIBLEY 
P. HAIGH 

J.F. O HALLORAN 
W.P. MC NAMARA 
R.F. BLANN 
A. MARTIN 
L.R. RITCHIE 
J.M. POWER 
J. DICKINSON 


10 

B. TRIMNELL-RITCHARD 
F.S. DEACON 
P.J.R. WAKEFIELD 

O. S. DZIUBINSKI 
W. SHALLALA 

P. J. MC EWWN 
L.L. MOATE 
R.H. SWANSON 
D.E.J. NEWLAND 

D. W. GROSVENOR 
N.M.POLLARD 
K.M. DUNN 

E. S. COUTTS 
E.H. HOCKEY 
E.J.O. GREENWOOD 

1 1 


G.M 

S.P. 

L.D 


. WICKS 
HORLEY 
HATCH 
.LANDA 

SI. N.K. WRAN QC., 
LA 

. CARR 
.STEPTO 
. TOLTZ 
. RYAN 
P. KEHOE 


20 

E.J. 
N.J. 
W.J. 
D.T. 
DR. 
OR. 
J.W. 
T.B. 
M . W 
B.S. 
J.W 

21 


MILLAR 
CAMPBELL 
gately 
CROFTS 
E.H. BASTIAN 
W.P. LENNON 
HUMPHREYS 
TIER 
.SELLEN 
B UTLE R 
A. WOOLLARD 


W.K. FAGAN 

J. W. MELVILLE 

DR. J.C. STACKPOOL 
D.G. LANE 
C.V. MURRAY 
I.W. FOULSHAM 
B.J. TY QUIN 
L. SHADDOCK 

A. J. LANE 

K. M. RODGERS 

B. A. MULLANE 
R.E. BUCKNELL 

22 


12 


J.H. HOLMAN 
J.B . QU INL AN 
P.W. ASHTON 
M.B. GROVE 
DR. T.E. BARAT 
J.L. HAYES 

I. LANGFORD-BROWN 

J. M. CLUGSTON 
R.L.E. MUIR 


H.J. HENDY 
D.G. HOGAN 
P.W. ROBINSON 
K.J. LYNCH 
J.E. HODGKINSON 

H. T. THACKERAY 
R.W. TOBIAS 

I. M. CAMPBELL 

F. LOWY 
N.F. SEDDON 
R . A. WILES 

G. A . O BRIEN 


13 


23 


W-R. WHITNEY 
J.A.I. GILDER 
J.F.A. LYON 
W.G. KENDELL 
G.L. ADAMS 
D.D. FISCH ER 
T.G. TA IT SNR. 
P.T. PRENTICE 
N.D. LUCAS 
N.V. BUCHANAN 
P. MAGNUS 
J.E. DAVIS 
A. SAUL 
L.S. HUNT 


14 


F.H. HUNTINGTON 
J.D. DEBNEY 
J. GISSING 

L. B. GRAHAM 
J.G. BECKENHAM 
J.W.D. COOPER 
J.G. STORRY 
B.G. GAPES 

E. H. DAVIDSON 
T. A. GUTHRIE 

I. A. MORGAN 
D.A. HISCOCKS 
P.G. MOSES 

F. KERNKER 

G. J. MARISH 

M. N. ROSE 


W.G. DICKEY 
J. A . WOODS 
T.G. WHITBREAD 

J. C. BELL 

K. K. CLARENCE 
J.G. LUSH 

H. GOLD 

G.C. MC ELVENNY 
D.J. DOBBIN 


15 


CARPENTER 
HARRIS 
SERNACK 
k/. ARMSTRONG 


16 


E. W. CURTIN 

R. E. MERRIN 
G.G. MARSDEN 

F. A. STARR 
J. A. BAKER 
J.D. SHAW 

J. WAINWRIGHT 
P.S. UTZ 

P.D.W. STEDMAN 
A. J. MACDONALD 

G. J. HEIDTMAN 
W.L. PENN 

S. B. AUSTIN 

H. W. DEWEESE 
G.J. WARD 


17 


3.HENDERSON 
V. BURNEY 
I. SCHMITZER, SNR. 
r. HUDSPETH 

V. GRIFFIN 
'. SHARAH 

*. O LOUGHLIN 
ATTNEAVE 

W. R. BARTLEY 
I. FEARON 

.. COOMBS 


24 


D.S. ORTON 
P.S. HAWSE 

DR. B.C. MENDELSOHN 

R. J. SPANSWIC K 

J. F.T. DOWN 
L.G. MEDLEY 

K. T. EASTER 
J.W.M. NOLAN 

L. N. READING 

S. L. SIMMONS 

J.F. FURLONG, JNR. 

25 

D. G. LAKE 
P.F. THOMAS 
W.C. WOOD 

T. WONG 
R. FINES 

E. M. ABBOTT 
R.B. LAMBLEY 

J. P. MC SWEENEY 
A.G. ABRAHAMS 
G.F. RAINNIE 
L.M. LUTTERAL 

K. G.B. ROBILLI ARD 
A.R. BUSHELL 


26 


B.E. SCHAAF 
G. SHEHADIE 
REV. A.R.E. THOMAS, 


D.J 

J.F 

J.G 

DR 

J.F 

J.X 


COLLINS 

FLITCROFT 

VALE 

B.D. SHEPHERD 
WEARNE 
GIBSON 
DOHERTY 
SMITH 
BRYCE 
.RUSSELL 


27 


18 

J. C. YARAD 

K. L. KEMP 

H. H ARDING-AUSTIN 


G. WELLS 
T.R. ROSSI 
T.S. DUCKMANTON, 
HON. M R. JUSTICE 
J . A . KELLEHER 
R. HILLIERS 


H.W. HOLMES 
P. A . BROWNE 
N.W. NEWBON 


28 

HIS HON. JUDG E 
F.C. HIDDEN 

J. ALLISON 
C.G. TERREY 
R.R. RHEUBEN 
W.C. TYLER 
E.L. O LOUGHLIN 

K. K. MATHEWS 
R.J. BOOTH 

A. B . GOW 
M. BUSCH 
J. ADAMS 
R . A. NIES 
R.J. GLENN 
T.N. COUTTS 
M.C.N. HENRY 


29 


R.G. SPENCER 
G.J. SHEPHERD 
E.R. KINSMAN 
P. HODGSON 
N.A.S. BROWNE 
J.C. CANFIELD 
J.P. BEATTIE 
V.E. MAY 
J.J. HOLLMAN 
R.H. SMITH 
G.J. LINNEGAR 
R.J. MULLINS 


30 


D. G. COHEN 
T.B. ABERNETHY 
R.W. STEVENS 

E. C. BRITT 
R.M. FISHER 

E.A. CHRISTENSEN 
R.W. NAISH 
L.R. BULLEN 


31 


D.J. ROBERTSON 
A.M. BORTHWICK 
W.H. ANDREAS 

A. G. LOUDON 
G.D. BOW 

B. A. MALPASS 
R.M. M C GRATH 
P.C. JOSEPH 

D. J. LECKIE 
M.B.E. MC CAULEY 

E. F. CHARLTON 
B. GLOWREY 


NOVEMBER 


.. MOSES 
I. LAMBERT 
3. ROGERS 
*. PU RVES 
:. WATSON 
WANG 

I. ROBINSON 
’. SAUNDERS 
3. LEVEY 
B. WILSON 
'. WARHURST 


2 

G. CLUB B 
F.P. MARTIN 
A. MILLER 

R. E. SHEA 
J.R. HIGSON 
W.N. JEFFRESON 
P.C.B. LARCOMBE 
J.L. CLAREMONT 
R . A. FLOWERS 
I.C. IVERSON 

S. M. GAZAL 

DR. J.M. MALOUF 


C.S. CLIFTON 

W.J. SINCLAIR 

H.H. MASON 

G.A. COURTNEY-SMITH 

K.W. MC FARLANE 

A.R. BINGHAM 

A. W. JOSEPH 

B. E. GLEESON 
B.O. GALLAGHER 
R.E. BOLIN 

G.A. HAINES 


C. G. KEMP 
R.M. SYMONDS 
DR. F. STACKPOOL 

D. W. PIDCOCK 
A. V . SIMMONS 


K. J. POLKINGHORNE 
E.J. VANDENBERG 
H.C. NICHOLAS 
R.D. LAVIGNE 

L. KLEIN 
D.P. HOOKER 
D.M. NEY 
R.J. TANNER 
L.P. HARRIS 
P.C. DRUCE 
J.J. CULLEN 
DR. L.R. KITSON 
J.P. CLARK 


O. D. SPERLING 
J. A. TANNER 

F. J. KAVANAGH 
DR. L.B. LILLEY 
W.R. BURGE 

P. H.C. C OM MINS 

G. R. COGROVE 
P. DUERDEN 


R.C. TERNES 


E.N. WING 

P.K. FITZGERALD 

R. G. WINDLE 

S. E. COSTIGAN 
C.F. BROOKS 
G.B. VEITCH 
R. BULL 


R.W. RODEN 

M. G. BARBOUTTIS 

N. J. JONES 

C. F. GUTHRIE 
M.E.J. LYONS 
H.S. EPSTEIN 

D. E. SCHAHINGER 
P.C. HEATH 

R.D. KLINGER 


9 


DR 


R. 

M. 


. C.J. CUMMINS 
.MULDOON 
i.G. ROGERS 
3. TANCRED 
.. MAZEY 
. RICHARDSON 
.. KINSMAN 
ROSEMAN 
HULL 


10 


J.C. LAFOREST 
H.W. LEWIS 

J. G. MALOUF 
G.H. BLOOMFIELD 
W.M.W. WOOD 
M.F.P. DC STOOP 
S.E. GOW 

L.M. DALY 
D.J. SULLY 
R.F. JOHNSON 

K. R. STRANG 


W.A.V. WEST 

M . A . DOWD 

J.M. O'DEA 

R.H. OSWALD-SEALY 

M.GREEN 

E.B. UPCROFT 

J.P. PERRY 

G. OAKES 

12 

SIR ALBERT SAKZEWSKI 

E.A. POLLY 

B.O. FRENCH 

G.W. GLENWRIGHT 

G.T. HORTON 

J.W. SHAW 

J.B . ALLAN 

J.H. BARNES 

D.B. MACK 

D.J. LOVEJOY 

G. J. WILLIS 

H. B. MENELAUS 
D.A. CHUDLEIGH 

13 


J.P. RYAN 
D. SOLOMON 

A. R. EVERETT 
N.R. SHEAD 

R. JEWELL 
F.S. GLENNON 
S . A . CAMPBELL 
J. BENEDEK 
R.V. TURNBULL 

B. P. SCHMARR 
A.G. DEW 
J.W. KENNY 
J.N. MURRAY 


14 


T.M. PRICE 

L. F. MOORE 

H. R.P. STRATTON 
DR. B.C. SPROULE 

M. A.P. SAUNDERS 
R.R. PIERCE 

J.H. ELLIS 
P.B . LENDRUM 

I. J. GONDA 

15 

E. D. SHAW 

SIR NICHOLAS SHEHADIE 

J. W. NOLAN 
D.J. CULLEN 

C. K. HYLAND 
J.J. WATSON 
T.M. HALE 

F. F. WHITE 

D. J. NEGRI 

C.S.A. LINDROOS 

I. D. STRATHDEE 

J. C. GREAVES 


16 


W.L. HUNT 

D. E. SMOKER 
W.D. WEIR 

R . A. HUMPHERY 

G. W. OSBORNE 
DR. G.N.B. STOREY 

E. T. SOMERVILLE 
P. A. LEARY 

A.A. TURNER 

H. TAFT. 

D.C. CLEARY 
J.K. MESSICK 
R.S. FOUNTAIN 
N.P. O TOOLE 


17 

F. MC GLYNN 
D. GREEN 

J. W.B . MC KENZIE 
R. MC K. STREET 
I.H. LANDON-SMITH 
F.G. MC INERNEY 
D.L. DON 

R. B. MERCER 

K. E. COWLEY 
D.J. HIGGS 
M.FORREST 

S. FITZ-ALAN 


Tattersall’s Club Magazine 


19 


September, 1977 







YOU WILL GET BETTER ODDS FROM 
THESE MEMBERS—AT YOUR SERVICE 


H. J. W. LOBB RAILS ALL COURSES 

: 


ERIC CRITTENDEN 

E.S. (Ted) MARTIN 

OWEN DURHAM 

Member of Tattersall’s Club, Sydney 

RANDWICK 

PADDOCK - ALL COURSES 

DOUBLE SPECIALIST 

PADDOCK ALL OTHER 


PADDOCK - ALL COURSES 

COURSES 

ARTHUR BROWNING 

NORMAN JACOBS 

W.j. (Bill) McHUGH 

Credit betting privileges offered to all 

RAILS - ALL COURSES 

LOCAL EVENTS 

members 

Member of Tattersall's Club, Sydney 


RAILS ALL COURSES 

RANDWICK - WARWICK FARM 

BRUCE W. McHUGH 

INTERSTATE 

Member of Tattersall’s Club, Sydney 

S.T.C. COURSES 

INTERSTATE EVENTS 

RAILS - ALL COURSES 


TASSIE j. STAVRIANOS 

J.K. WATERHOUSE 

L. G. BURKE 

INTERSTATE RAILS 


CREDIT BETTING PRIVILEGES 

All Metropolitan and Provincial tracks 

PADDOCK - ALL COURSES 

OFFERED TO ALL MEMBERS 

PADDOCK - ALL COURSES 

Credit privileges extended 
to all members 


Member of Tattersall’s Club 

Box 174, P.O., Lane Cove, 2066 

Tel. 428 3011 

MEMBER OF TATTERSALL’S CLUB 




ROBERT BLANN 

HOMER JONES 

ARTHUR SING 

RAILS ALL COURSES 

RAILS 

INTERSTATE 

CREDIT BETTING PRIVILEGES 

RAILS - ALL COURSES 

PADDOCK - ALL COURSES 

EACH WAY BETTING 

OFFERED TO ALL MEMBERS 

Member of Tattersall’s Club, Sydney 

MEMBER OF TATTERSALL’S CLUB 


GEORGE ROHANNA PADDOCK - INTERSTATE