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March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 















































CONTENTS 


March 26 - April 2, 2015 


A TRUE PRESCRIPTION ALTERNATIVE! 


4 Letters 
? News 
9 Slant 

10 Feature: Civic 
14 Calendar 
18 Galleries 


Visual Arts 


20 Movies 

21 Music 

26 Classifieds 
31 Savage Love 


WHO YOU GONNA BLAME? 


Editor Ted Taylor 

Associate Editor Camilla Mortensen 
Arts Editor Alexandra V. Cipolle 
Special Issues Editor Amy Schneider 
Calendar Editor Rick Levin 
Contributing Editor Anita Johnson 
Contributing Writers Adrian Black, Brett Campbell, 
Rachael Carnes, Tony Corcoran, Jerry Diethelm, Rachel 
Foster, Kayla Godowa-Tufti, Anna Grace, Mark Harris, 
William Kennedy, Sam Marx, Lauren Messman, Lucy 
Ohlsen, Brian Palmer, Aaron Ragan-Fore, Vanessa Salvia, 
Sally Sheklow, Anna V. Smith, Lance Sparks, Molly 
Templeton, Andy Valentine, David Wagner, John Williams 
Interns Sophia June, Daemion Lee, Isabel Zacharias 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Art Director/Production Manager Todd Cooper 
Technology/Webmaster James Bateman 
Graphic Artists Trask Bedortha, Sarah Decker 
Contributing Photographers Paul Neevel 
Photo Intern Athena Delene 


Director of Advertising Rob Weiss 

Display Marketing Consultants Alison Belter, Greg 

Butler, ZachToedter 

Classified Manager Maggie Pitcher 


Business Manager Paula Hoemann 
Circulation Assistant Richard Hunt 
Distributors Bob Becker, Saul Foster, Pedaler’s Express, 
Susan and David Lawson, Mike Goodwin, Quick Draw, Gwen 
Bailey, Bruce Smith, Craig & Ruby Thompson 
Printing Signature Graphics 

HOW TO REACH US BY E-MAIL 

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(art/openings/galleries): visualarts@eugeneweekly.com 
(performance/theater): performance@eugeneweekly.com 
(literary arts/readings): books@eugeneweekly.com 
(movies/film screenings): movies@eugeneweekly.com 
(circulation): circulation@eugeneweekly.com 

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RADAR MEN JIGGLE, TOO 

Thank you ever so much for the fabulous 
promo last week for the JELL-O Art Show. 
However, I have been taken hostage by 
the Men of the Radar Angels, who insist 
upon their rights to be equally recognized 
as people who wear kooky tights, ruffles 
and short skirts on the stage of the show (or 
anywhere they want). They have me tied 
to the mast and are threatening to keelhaul 
me if you don’t print a correction and give 
them their due. As you can imagine this 
would be highly inconvenient and prevent 
me from getting my jiggle on [5 to 8 pm 
Saturday, March 28, at Maude Kerns Art 
Center, 1910 E. 15th Ave.]. Thanks again, 
and help! 

Diane McWhorter, 
The Queen of JELL-O Art 
Eugene 

THE CASE FOR CARBON TAX 

“A Case for the Climate,” by Camilla 
Mortensen March 5, reports that Peter 
Frumhoff, Richard Heede and others 
are seeking to hold large corporations 
responsible for global warming. Frumhoff 
and Heede’s line of reasoning invites 


middle class people to think that the 
actions of individuals such as themselves 
are not to blame. 

The world’s more affluent people 
need to change their lifestyles so that less 
greenhouse gas emissions result from 
their behavior. A revenue-neutral carbon 
tax, such as the one the Citizens’ Climate 
Lobby is proposing, would cause those 
consumers with larger carbon footprints 
to pay money that the government would 
then redistribute to those people with 
smaller carbon footprints, and fossil 
fuel corporations would sell less of their 
products. 

Many people would behave differently, 
provided that they are sensitive enough 
to higher prices. A majority of the U.S. 
population would at least break even. 
Giving money to the poor would create 
jobs, stimulating the economy much like 
food stamps. 

Milton Takei 
Eugene 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Mortensen asked Frumboff this 
question during the interview. He said, “If you will excuse 
me, that’s a silly response. Of the seven billion people 
on the planet, some of us have access to information, 
and there’s a small fraction that can make decisions that 


dramatically reduce the carbon footprint.” He told EW 
that the companies producing these products have been 
taking major actions to affect our decisions and fund 
misinformation about climate change. “It’s not that we are 
not responsible, it’s that the companies’ responsibilities 
are very large. ” 

NEW KENNEL NEEDED 

As a dog walker at the First Avenue 
Shelter, I appeal to the residents of Lane 
County to support the construction of a new 
public animal shelter. The current building 
is not a shelter, it’s a pound, like the ones 
you imagine from the ’50s and ’60s. 
Inside, you’ll find cement, claustrophobia, 
noise and stress. Above all, stress. 

Big dogs, narrow kennels; constant 
raucous barking; staff, volunteers and the 
public trying to pass through the same 
small doorway. Careful if you’re getting 
that stressed dog out for a walk — there 
might be a child on the other side of the 
door! I half expect to see the dogs banging 
their metal dishes against their metal doors 
and crying out, “Is this the best you can do 
for us?!” 

The only “shelter” part of First Avenue 
is the dedicated kennel and cattery staff 
who care deeply about the animals and 


work their tails off to keep conditions as 
livable as possible. But neither their efforts, 
nor those of the volunteers, can overcome 
the constant atmosphere of stress. The 
animals and the people of First Avenue 
deserve much, much better than this. They 
deserve — and desperately need — a safe 
and healthy place to live and work. 

The beings who reside at First Avenue 
are wonderful souls who ended up there 
due to human carelessness, negligence 
and, in some cases, cruelty. Let’s show 
them that we can indeed do better by 
providing them with the quality shelter 
they deserve. 

Molly Craig 
Springfield 

FROHNMAYER’S HONESTY 

One of my favorite memories of Dave 
Frohnmayer is a statement he made several 
years back to a small, racially diverse 
group. “Eugene,” he said, “is a strongly 
liberal, racist town.” 

He was right. It still is. I honor Dave, 
his honesty and integrity. 

Neil Van Steenbergen 
Eugene 


HOT AIR SOCIETY b '' t ° n '' c ° rc ° r '' n 


The 2016 Race 

INTRIGUES AND SPECULATIONS ON THE NEXT 
RACE FOR GOVERNOR 

A lright, already! Enough about federal politics; we already know the 
outcome of the 2016 presidential primaries: Elizabeth Warren versus 
Ted Cruz. According to U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, Hillary Clinton 
was last seen dumping her personal email server in the Deschutes 
County dump. Thinking she was actually serious about running, I 
had already switched parties and sent Texas Senator Cruz my contribution. He’s 
perfect for me, as a former Democrat. He has endorsed outsider Tea Party candidates 
against sitting U.S. senators, even while serving as vice chairman of the National 
Republican Senatorial Committee, the organization tasked with electing — and 
reelecting — GOP senators! You da Man! And who could ever forget his Green Eggs 
and Ham filibuster speech to ward off that socialist Obamacare stuff? 

Forgive me, I digress. Where was I? Oh, yes, the quick exit of John Kitzhaber 
from our political stage leaves Oregonians with a unique political landscape for 
2016. We’re used to electing governors every two years after we elect a president. 
And we’re used to electing secretaries of state in presidential election years, usually 
with higher turnout. It’s worked that way since Mark Hatfield began his first term as 
secretary of state in 1957 and his first term as governor two years later. Tom McCall 
did the same thing in 1965 and 1967. Barbara Roberts was elected governor halfway 
through her second term as secretary of state. Four of the last 10 secretaries of state 
have become governor, three by election. 

So 2016 just got busier with these two offices going head-to-head in a presidential 
election year. Let’s begin with Democrats in the governor’s race. It’s a simpler 
calculus. We have an incumbent who has clearly indicated her interest in this position 
in the past, and Oregon hasn’t elected a Republican governor since Vic Atiyeh’s re- 
election in 1982. 

While incumbency is an obvious plus for Kate Brown, a savvy 25-year veteran 
politician, that incumbency is accompanied by a closer examination of her political 
history as this legislative session unfolds. In her last two statewide elections, she 
won multi-candidate races by 51 percent in high turnout years. 

If he decides to throw his hat in the ring, Oregon’s treasurer, Ted Wheeler, 
presents a different political profile. He became treasurer in 2010 in a special 
election following the death of Ben Westlund in office and was re-elected in 2012 


to a four-year term. He can’t run for another term as treasurer based on an opinion 
by our attorney general, Ellen Rosenblum, which was sought by ... guess who? Did 
I mention Kate Brown was a savvy veteran? Both Brown and Wheeler spent a lot 
of time traveling around the state prior to John’s re-election, presumably edging for 
a shot at the 2018 governor’s race. Things changed. Wheeler is also looking at the 
mayoral race in Portland. 

The Republicans, party animals that they are, could have a wide-open scrum. 
You’d think Dems would be the harder cats to herd, but at least they only meet once, 
everyone in the same place. But them Republicans — it must be ’cuz they’re rich 
and they can afford it — they hold two parties! On the same day! The Dorchester 
R’s are apparently sniveling weaklings who have given in on gay marriage and 
abortion. The true believers staged their “Freedom Rally” in Portland, the same 
group that helped elect Art Robinson chair of their state party a while back. The 
most widely mentioned candidates are businessman Allen Alley, who ran in 2010, 
and Dennis Richardson (my personal favorite). The scariest name out there is Bud 
Pierce, president of the Oregon Medical Association. But he sounds sorta sane, so 
he’ll probably never make it out of a Republican primary, although Chris Dudley 
did in 2010. 

Gov. Brown also changed the dynamic of the secretary of state race by appointing 
Jeanne Atkins as a caretaker who won’t run in the 2016 race. That 
leaves the field wide open for D’s as well as R’s. Prominent 
Democratic names include Eugene Rep. Val Hoyle, Portland 
Sen. Diane Rosenbaum, State Labor Commissioner Brad 
Avakian, House Co-chair of Ways and Means Rep. Peter 
Buckley and Sen. Richard Devlin, the other co-chair of 
Ways and Means. Republican candidates mentioned are 
former state senator Jason Atkinson of Jacksonville, who lost 
a primary bid for governor in 2006, Rep. Knute Buehler of 
Bend, who ran for secretary of state in 2012 and lost to 
Kate, but garnered 43 percent of the vote, Rep. . 

Parrish, a pariah to her male-dominated caucus, a 
former state senator Bruce Starr of Hillsboro, 
who lost his seat last November and lost a bid 
for labor commissioner in 2012. Quien sabe? 

Next: Is right-to-work coming 
will there be another Grand Bargain? ■ 

Tony Corcoran of Cottage Grove is a former state legislator 
and soon-to-be retired state worker. The views expressed herein 
are his alone. 



March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 




THIS MSIIIH WORD 



CAN’T BE IGNORED 

Rarely would a negative point be raised 
at the memorial of one who has died, 
especially one who has been so generally 
admired as David Frohnmayer. But one 
had to be acknowledged, even silently, 
because the location of his memorial 
reminded us of one of his unfortunate acts 


by dogging these agencies, we might get 
permanent reduction or even zero aerial 
spraying for many years. 

If activists care about aerial spraying, 
I suggest ignoring the Senate bill and 
working to totally ban the practice of 
exposing children and “organic gardens” 
to atrazine (a hormone disrupter) and 2,4- 
D (a component of Agent Orange). Instead, 


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as UO president. 

Memories were shared in the 
Matthew Knight Arena, which was there 
because Frohnmayer brought pressure 
on the state Legislature for the state to 
loan the university $200 million for its 
construction. That was among several of 
his acts done at the demand of Phil Knight. 
Now an empty McArthur Court remains a 
silent reminder of a “memorial” that recurs 
each year as the massive interest comes 
due on that unnecessary investment. 

George Beres 
Eugene 

POISON LOOPHOLE 

Carla Hervert, a Eugene nurse, has 
sincerely urged us to support SB 613, 
which seeks to regulate the poisoning of 
humans and our environment. “Timely 
notification” and “buffer zones” are the 
gist of this wonderful proposal. Progress? 

Big Lumber will be poisoning your kids 
again. Does “timely notification” make it 
all right? Winds carry poisons from aerial 
spraying for miles, and soil and water are 
not discretely divided — we breathe and 
drink a wide swath of our environment 
very day. The Earth is interconnected and 
only seems to be divided by arbitrary lines. 

How about a complete ban on aerial 
spraying? That’s what HB 3123 proposes 
to do. Sponsored by Reps. Paul Holvey and 
Peter Buckley, HB 3123 says, “Pesticides 
may not be applied by aircraft.” 

There’s a loophole in it, big enough 
to drive a log truck through: “except 
as authorized by a pest emergency 
declaration.” Apparently state agencies 
have the power to declare an emergency, 
under a flexible set of circumstances. But 


support the far superior HB 3123. Holvey, 
who represents rural Lane County, can be 
reached at 344-5636 or Rep.PaulHolvey@ 
state.or.us. 

Christopher Logan 
Eugene 

VIOLATING THE TRUST 

The environmental hazards associated 
with Oregon’s proposed Pacific Connector 
Pipeline-Jordan Cove Liquid Natural Gas 
Terminal underscore the need for our 
judicial branch of government to step in 
and be a check on the other branches of 
government. 

Atmospheric trust litigation provides 
this check. The atmospheric trust doctrine 
asserts that our government holds in trust 
our atmosphere, water and land for future 
generations. Inaction against climate 
change violates that trust. Youth across the 
country have hied legal cases based on this 
doctrine thanks to the fine work of Oregon 
Children’s Trust. 

Here in Oregon, Judge Karsten 
Rasmussen will again hear the case of 
Cherniak vs. Governor Kitzhaber (Brown) 
in Lane Country Circuit Court on April 
7. Judge Rasmussen’s previous ruling on 
this case, put forth by Olivia Cherniak 
and Kelsey Juliana of Eugene, stated that 
climate change-related matters are the 
purview of the legislative and executive 
branches only. However, the Oregon Court 
of Appeals overturned that decision. Olivia 
and Kelsey will again have their day in 
court. 

What Congress can’t do, we the people 
— inspired by our children — will! 

Laurie Ehlhardt Powell 
350 Eugene 




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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2015 


112744 







































NO ‘HUMANE’ KILLING 

Camilla Mortensen’s March 19 expose 
of the Bartels slaughterhouse shone a 
rare light into the blatant green-washing/ 
humane-washing of the “grass-fed natural/ 
organic beef” industry — and all animal 
agriculture for that matter. It hopefully 
has enlightened those consumers who 
have erroneously convinced themselves 
that “ethically produced” animal products 
actually exist. These feel-good catchphrases 
used by industry are nothing but a marketing 
ploy to help grow a pricey niche market. 

Bartels’ humane-washed euphemisms 
such as “harvest/harvest floor/euthanize” 
in lieu of slaughter/kill floor/kill are perfect 
examples of touchy-feely attempts to sugar- 
coat reality and make the violent ending 
to farmed animals’ lives appear benign. 
The terms are specifically crafted to quell 
the collective conscience of all complicit 
parties: i.e., producers and consumers. 
Bartels’ claim that they “really just do care” 
is disingenuous, as is citing Temple Grandin 
without revealing that Grandin is a high- 
profile shill for the meat industry. 

For any customers who view the Bartels 
slaughterhouse as a source of “local” meats, 
please note that the crowded truckload of 
frightened, dirty, hungry, thirsty, doomed 
animals referenced in Mortensen’s article 


originated in California, requiring a lengthy, 
brutal trek to Bartel’s kill floor involving 
hundreds of miles of inhumane conditions. 

There is no such thing as “humane” 
animal products; “humane killing” is an 
oxymoron. For the animals’ sake, go vegan. 

Barb Lomow 
Eugene 


ADVERSARIAL DRIVERS 

Recently the Springfield City Council 
held a meeting, the purpose of which was 
to address the safety concerns of the public 
in light of the terrible tragedy that occurred 
on Main Street Feb. 22. Living just three 
blocks from the site of the tragedy, I 
have heard many proposals on how to 
improve safety on Main Street. Everything 
from more lighted crosswalk islands to a 
footbridge spanning Main at 54th. 

The one thing I haven’t heard mention 
of is the real heart of the matter of 
pedestrian safety in Lane County. It has 
to do with the ridiculous way people in 
Eugene-Springfield drive. I live just off 
of Main Street, having moved here in July 
of last year. I have lived in six Western 
states and held drivers licenses in all of 
them. I can say without reservation that 
this is the worst area for pedestrians I have 
experienced. Much worse than places like 


Denver, Phoenix and Las Vegas where I 
have lived and worked. 

I have never experienced the absolute 
disregard that locals show pedestrians here. 
The attitude of drivers here is distinctly 
adversarial. It’s as if their destination and 
their time are far more important than 
everyone else’s. I have had two close calls 
myself, one as a lady blew through one 
of those crosswalk islands with the lights 
flashing. The other was clearly my fault 
as I had the audacity to enter a marked 
crosswalk with the walk light on while 
someone was trying to get to Starbucks. 

All the safety features in the world won’t 
do any good if locals have no regard for 
them or the people using them. However, a 
couple of things could be utilized to slow 
motorist down on Main Street. First, lower 
the speed limit and enforce it. Second, time 
the lights to force drivers into lower speeds. 
Stopping a few times and restarting would 
be safer than a straight and unhindered line 
from 14th to Oakridge. 

Or, in lieu of those measures, perhaps 
people could just slow down, pay attention, 
get off the phone and think of someone 
other than themselves. But I’m not holding 
my breath. 

D.S. Hall 
Thurston 


INADEQUATE SHELTER 

First Avenue Animal Shelter was built 
over 37 years ago when Eugene and 
Springfield were about half the size they 
are now. I have been a volunteer dog walker 
at First Avenue Shelter for over two years 
and have some idea of the deficiencies and 
problems there. 

The poor condition of the building 
and small size of both the cattery and 
the kennel adds stress to the animals and 
makes the job of the staff and volunteers 
even more difficult. The only reason it is 
successful Ending homes for so many dogs 
and cats is because of the heroic efforts of 
the staff and volunteers. Everything about 
the building works against them. 

The size of the kennel and cattery are 
inadequate and there is no suitable place 
for potential adopters to meet a dog in a 
quiet and clean setting. The only place to 
meet a dog is one of the fenced yards that 
are often muddy, noisy and with outside 
distractions. 

Please go and visit the LCAS public 
shelter at 1st Avenue and South Bertelsen 
and help promote a new shelter to replace 
this overcrowded and inadequate structure. 

BroOdie Washburn 
Eugene 


MIC CHECK! bvjaekdresser 


Listen, Then Ignore 

CAN CITIZENS OUTSMART EWEB SMART METERS? 


T he Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) met Feb. 17 and 
dutifully accepted public testimony addressing the main agenda item 
quietly described in an internal memo and low-profiled to the public: 
“Management has negotiated contracts with two providers of essential 
Advanced Metering Infrastructure services, hardware and software 
(Harris and Sensus). Management seeks approval of these two contracts to allow 
for the AMI project to proceed into the initial implementation phase during 2015.” 

Our public testimony, as on several previous occasions, overwhelmingly opposed 
the installation of smart meters. Over the last few years we have provided EWEB with 
substantial evidence regarding 1) potential health hazards of continuous involuntary 
exposure to electromagnetic frequency radiation, 2) potential liability for such 
damage, the costs of which would be borne by owner/ratepayers, 3) demonstrated 
vulnerability of this technology to hacking, 4) demonstrated vulnerability of the 
meters to fires, 5) objectionable continuous transmission to the utility of data 
regarding specific electrical appliance usage within the home, potentially accessible 
by government, that would violate Fourth Amendment protections against 
warrantless searches and 6) testimony by then-CIA director David Petraeus that the 
government intends to use these meters to spy on citizens. And for the final nail in 
the coffin, reports show that these smart grids and meters installed elsewhere have 
failed to deliver the proclaimed “electric resource benefits” for customers — and 
quite the opposite in some cases. 

Evidence presented to the EWEB board has included a comprehensive PowerPoint 
presentation by Dr. Paul Dart that reported experimental data on DNA damage and 
inflammatory responses to EMR radiation as well as epidemiological data from 
several cities correlating proximity to cell towers with increased cancer rates. This 
induced EWEB to adopt Resolution 1322 in October 2013 that “granted approval to 
the creation and execution of an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) project 
using implementation strategy 2 (also known as ‘opt in’)” changing the default 
position by specifying that “customers must request an AMI-enabled meter” rather 
than having to pro-actively refuse one (“opt out”). 

Despite this compromise, EWEB remains insistent upon imposing AMI on the 
whole community. Their next move emerged at the Feb. 17 board meeting. Following 


the usual public testimony in strong opposition, EWEB General Manager Roger 
Gray delivered sanguine assurances that all would be well, providing cover for board 
members to ignore the public voice and quickly, unanimously vote to approve the 
contracts. For the record, commissioners added their scripted, perfunctory personal 
excuses. Retired U.S. Army sergeant James Manning, for example, said he had 
reviewed the evidence and was confident there would be no problems (despite 
lacking expertise in cell biology or epidemiology). 

Listen politely to “free speech” and then ignore it. This formula has long been 
routine in Eugene (e.g., regarding City Hall) and elsewhere in our land of the free. 
Princeton and Northwestern university political scientists recently published a study 
comparing a 20-year data set of 1,779 federal policy outcomes with public opinion 
surveys and interest group positions on these policies, concluding that “economic 
elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial 
independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while mass-based interest groups 
and average citizens have little or no independent influence.” Consistent with these 
findings, we the people don’t much influence EWEB. But who does? And why? 

EWEB’s end-run plan is to install Sensus smart meters (which have caused fires) 
universally when meter replacements are needed, AMI-enabled for those who opt 
in and disabled for the rest of us. A sales and incentive campaign offering “value- 
added services” will be launched to persuade the hold-outs. Meter-readers will join 
the unemployment rolls in the neoliberal capitalist tradition. And who will control 
AMI-enablement? Must we simply trust EWEB? 

Ironically, while Commissioner Manning acknowledges on EWEB's website that 
“EWEB must prudently seek a secondary clean water source to ensure an uninterrupted 
supply in the event of an unforeseen disaster,” one rationale for spending $27 million 
to $30 million for AMI, plus an additional $1.2 million for “meter data management” 
software, is to “help EWEB provide customers more timely information about water 
use in the event of a major water supply interruption.” How about spending the 
money on prevention instead — perhaps to secure that secondary source. ■ 

Jack Dresser, Ph.D., is an editor and writer for The Eugene Occupier, a member of Families for Safe Meters 
(familiesforsafemeters.org), and co-director of Eugene’s Al-Nakba Awareness Project promoting justice-based 
Middle East peace. 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 






We hear Cousin Jack’s Pasty Co. was invited to 
provide meat pie food props for the Eugene Opera 
production of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet 
Street. “To [General Director] Mark Beudert and the cast 
and crew of the Eugene Opera, I say bravo for a fantastic 
performance and a big thank you for allowing us to 
participate,” says David Clark, who owns the local 
business with his wife, Kim Clark. “Like the arts, our 
small business is constantly pressured with ever 
increasing costs. To be quite honest, over the years we 
have struggled to be profitable.” Cousin Jack’s sources 
many of its ingredients from Oregon producers such as 
Knee Deep Cattle Co., Deck Family Farm, Anderson 
Ranches, Organically Grown Co., GloryBee Foods, 
Mycological Natural Products, Mountain Rose Herbs, 
Lochmead Dairy, Larsens Family Creamery, Tillamook 
Creamery, Mohawk Meats, Albany Lox Co., Emerald Fruit 
and Produce and Winter Green Farm. “Buy local is not 
just a bumper sticker,” Clark says. “Buy local is a 
reminder of the absolute power your money has here at 
home.” Call 521-7496 for more information. 

Most cannabis confabs are expensive to attend, but 
the Oregon Hemp and Cannabis Convention and 
Trade Show in Portland Saturday and Sunday, March 
28-29, only asks a donation of two cans of food. 
Organizers say this will be “the first and largest free 
event of its kind since Oregonians passed Measure 91 
in 2014.” The educational event will be held at the 
Portland EXPO Center, 2060 N. Marine Dr., and will be 
open from 11 am to 7 pm both days. Speakers include 
author Doug Fine, attorney Courtney Moran and other 
experts on industrial hemp and cannabis, including 
issues of security and insurance. See 
oregonhempconvention.com or call the convention 
director at (971) 388-4392 for more information. The 
Eugene contact is kathy@kathyging.com. No 
consumption of cannabis products is allowed at the 
EXPO Center. 

A “Lane County Sustainability Report” is on the 

agenda of the GreenLane Sustainable Business 
Network’s monthly meeting at 11:30 am Wednesday, 
April 1, at the Eugene Hilton downtown. Lane County 
Commissioner Pete Sorenson is the speaker. Lunch is 
available for purchase. 

Employees at Down To Earth Home, Garden and Gift 
have been composting food scraps at work, and the 
company has been participating in the city of Eugene’s 
Love Food Not Waste (LFNW) program for the past six 
months. Rexius bags the compost and now Down to 
Earth is selling and distributing bags of LFNW compost 
and donating a portion of the proceeds to the School 
Garden Project, a local nonprofit that helps Lane County 
schools create, sustain and use onsite gardens by 
providing resources, professional consultation and 
educational programming. “We’re all about helping our 
community grow and preserve their own food; 
composting and soil building completes the loop,” says 
Rachel Klinnert, general manager at Down To Earth. The 
compost is being sold for $4.49 a bag at the two Down 
to Earth stores in Eugene. 

Evergreen Nutrition has announced that the 
Eugene-based company will be having an online store 
soon, hopefully in May. The store, with its retail outlet at 
1653 Willamette St., expects to have about three 
quarters of its inventory online. Categories will include 
vitamins and minerals, herbs, homeopathics, sports 
nutrition and natural hair and body care products. 

A free workshop on “Franchising: Own Your Own 
Business” will be at 6 pm Thursday, April 2, at the 
Eugene Public Library downtown. Leading the 
discussion will be Blair Nicol of FranNet Pacific 
Northwest who will explain the differences between 
franchising and starting your own business; how to 
evaluate franchise concepts; what you should know 
before buying; and the risks and rewards of franchising. 
Sponsored by the library, LCC Small Business 
Development Center and SCORE. Call 682-5450 or visit 
Eugene-or.gov/library for information on this and other 
workshops in April. 


GREENHILL, LANE COUNTY 
NEED A NEW KENNEL 
FOR SHELTER DOGS 

Walk into the kennel area at Greenhill Humane Society 
and you are struck by two things: First, the hopefulness 
and worry on the furry faces of dogs, from Chihuahuas to 
huskies, looking for forever homes, and second, the loud¬ 
ness of the barking and yelping echoing off the cement 
walls. 

The kennels at First Avenue Shelter, the public shelter 
run by Greenhill, are no better off. The county shelter was 
built in the ’70s, and GreenhilFs kennels were constructed 
in the 1950s, according to Greenhill Executive Director 
Cary Lieberman. Both are loud and not conducive to hap¬ 
py, calm dogs that will attract forever homes. 

Both kennels run by Greenhill — one private, one pub¬ 
lic — are in need of being replaced, and funds are needed 
to replace them. And that is causing some controversy 
among animal advocates. Greenhill took over running the 
First Avenue Shelter (formerly Lane County Animal Ser¬ 
vices), which houses animals for the cities of Eugene and 
Springfield as well as Lane County, in the summer of 2012. 

Lieberman says that four years ago, Greenhill hired An¬ 
imal Arts, the same firm the county used in a 2005 study 
to look at its own kennel because, he says, the firm was fa¬ 
miliar with its community and its needs. The cost for a new 
kennel at Greenhill at that time was estimated at $8 mil¬ 
lion, not including the land, which Greenhill already owns. 

Greenhill sits on 20 acres west of Eugene. Its most re¬ 
cent large renovation was a new cattery, front office and 
care area in 2000. 

Lane County had looked into a new shelter in 2005 and 
again in 2010, at a cost of about $6 million, but the plan 
never came to fruition. Last month, 11 long-time First Av¬ 
enue volunteers signed onto a letter again calling for a new 
shelter, citing problems from weather issues to overcrowd¬ 
ing. 

First Avenue volunteer Misha English spoke about the 
shelter before the Eugene City Council March 9. She said 
in her public comments that “the county, along with the 
cities of Springfield and Eugene, may soon be asked to 
consider a proposal whereby the First Avenue Shelter is 
merged with Greenhill shelter into a new shelter built on 
GreenhilFs private land.” She said, “I believe that this plan 
would be ill-advised” and cited concerns such as the ques¬ 
tion of who would own the building and whether taxpayers 
would be asked to pad the contract with extra “administra¬ 
tive monies” to offset the cost of the new building. 


English also said to the City Council that “the option 
of a public shelter needs to be fully vetted and the process 
should be transparent.” 

Lane County Spokesman Trevor Steele says the county 
is continuing to increase its transparency, and when anoth¬ 
er contract is finalized with Greenhill, it will be publically 
available, as the last contract was. He adds that the contract 
with Greenhill has allowed for “economies of scale” and 
made things more efficient. 

Steele says that as much as the county wants to help its 
“four-legged friends and wants to make sure they are well 
cared for and wants to make sure animal services is still 
working,” the county doesn’t have the money for capital 
improvements to the shelter. 

He says if Greenhill wants to expand its own shelter 
“that’s really GreenhilFs thing. It’s not our property. We 
are not involved if a contractor expands its own facility on 
its own property.” 

Lieberman says when Greenhill previously looked into 
building a new shelter, it was only able to identify $3 mil¬ 
lion in funds, far less than the $10-$12 million it now es¬ 
timates it would cost for a new shelter that would meet 
the community’s needs. He says, “I’m not sure there is 
the money to build two shelters in this community.” He 
says he also would be concerned about the city and county 
spending money to build a new shelter but then not having 
the money to operate it. 

Another issue critics have is that while Greenhill has 
the land for expansion, the humane society is several miles 
from the city center, where the unhoused and those who 
lack transportation would have difficulty accessing pub¬ 
lic animal services. Lieberman says Greenhill hopes to be 
innovative and perhaps look into options such a vans or 
shuttles. 

Lieberman says that at this point there is no “serious 
conversation” about a new shelter, but ideally that will 
happen in the next two years because “we need it and First 
Avenue Shelter needs it.” 

Greenhill critics, No Kill Lane County, recently en¬ 
gaged the nonprofit in a legal battle over public records. 
The Lane County District Attorney’s Office ruled, “Green- 
hill/First Avenue is a private entity that is the functional 
equivalent of a public body to the extent that Greenhill/ 
First Avenue contracts with local governments to provide 
‘animal sheltering’ services.” 

Lieberman, who has maintained that the shelter is trans¬ 
parent, says Greenhill is in discussions with counsel over 
appealing the ruling as it sets a precedent for other non¬ 
profits engaged in contracts with public agencies. 

— Camilla Mortensen 



EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 






activist Alert 

• City Club of Eugene topic this week is “Perspectives on Alternative 
Approaches to Forest Management” with Marc Barnes of Integrative 
Resource Management and Matt Fehrenbacher of Trout Mountain Forestry. 
Noon Friday, March 27, at the Downtown Athletic Club, 999 Willamette St. 
$5 for nonmembers. See cityclubofeuegene.org to get on the email list. 

• Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy and Ward 8 City Councilor Chris Pryor will 
hold the monthly Mayor’s One-on-One community outreach meeting from 
5 to 6 pm Wednesday, April 1, at Albertsons, 1675 W. 18th Ave. The 
meetings, generally held the fourth Tuesday of each month, are held in 
different parts of the community to make them more easily accessible. 
Contact Regan Watjus at 682-8340. 

• Encircle Films will screen The Homestretch documentary with 
speakers and audience discussion at 6 pm Thursday, April 2, at Bijou Art 
Cinemas, 492 E. 13th Ave. “We’re looking for community organizations and 
civic minded people to come take part in educating and informing audience 
about what’s going on locally” with homeless teens, says organizer Vicki 
Anderson. Call 543-0223 or email vicki@encirclefilms.org. 

• Longtime Eugene blogger activist Hart Williams has a new e-book for 
Kindle on Amazon called Reality 101: Political Self-Defense for Progressives. 
Williams says this is his “new direction, having retired from blogging.” 
Author Tom Collins says “Williams is a troublemaker. He thinks ... he 
laughs. And that can really cause trouble.” 

• Traditional Earth Day events in Eugene have been canceled, but some 
local folks are working to pull together a celebration with speakers, music 
and information booths at Alton Baker Park or elsewhere Saturday, April 18. 
The group is meeting as we go to press this week. To get involved, email 
johnca@ourpla.net or sabrinasiegel@gmail.com. 

• This year’s McKenzie Memories, a fundraiser for the McKenzie River 
Trust, will be at 6 pm Friday, April 3, at Cozmic, 199 W. 8th Ave. and is 
expected to sell out forthe fourth year in a row. Speakers will include Oregon 
author William Sullivan and Jim Goodpasture. Tickets in advance are $10 
and available online at mckenzievier.org. 

POLLUTION UPDATE 

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is accepting 
comments on the proposed cleanup plan for the McAyeal’s Wardrobe 
Cleaners site through 5 pm on Tuesday, March 31. The site is located 
between the downtown Eugene Public Library and Kiva. The cleaners 
operated at that location starting in 1972, leaving behind soil and 
groundwater contaminated with dry-cleaning solvents. Contaminated 
ground water that would otherwise occupy the library basement is currently 
diverted to a treatment system before being discharged to the city’s storm 
sewer system. Visit goo.gl/leAdYH for more information. If readers have 
beenwonderingwhy “Pollution Update” hasn’t been appearingas frequently 
lately, the reasons are that the Eugene DEQ office hasn’t been regularly 
updating the informal enforcement database that we depend on, and (for 
the first time ever) DEQ is assessing fees for records that used to be readily 
available free of charge. 

Doug Quirke/Oregon Clean Water Action Project 

LANE COUNTY AREA SPRAY SCHEDULE 

• ODOT is currently spraying roadsides. Call Tony Kilmer at ODOT District 
5 at 744-8080 or call 1-888-996-8080 for herbicide application information. 
Highways 1-5,99 and Beltline were sprayed recently. 

• Giustina Land 8c Timber, 345-2301, plans to hire Northwest 
Reforestation Services, 344-4991, to spray 354.5 acres of isolated patches 
of scotch broom near Hawley Ridge, Lynx Hollow, Hamm Road and Round 
Mountain with glyphosate, imazapyr, triclopyr and/or Dyne-Amic. See ODF 
notification 2015-781-05087, call Brian Peterson at 935-2283 with 
questions. 

• Weyerhaeuser, 744-4600, plans to spray 91.9 acres near Russell 
Creek and Norris Creek southwest of Cottage Grove with clopyralid, 
glyphosate, hexazinone and/or sulfometuron methyl. See ODF notification 
2015-781-05149, call Dan Menk, Robin Biesecker or Brian Peterson at935- 
2283 with questions. 

• Giustina Land 8c Timber, 345-2301, plans to hire Northwest 
Reforestation Services, 344-4991 to spray 69.7 acres near Marcola and 
Dexter with glyphosate, imazapyr, triclopyr, sulfometuron methyl and/or 
Dyne-Amic. See ODF notification 2015-771-04888, call Tim Meehan or 
Brian Dally at 726-3588 with questions. 

• LRT1, LLC c/o FIA, c/o MB8cG, 973-1951, plans to hire Rye Tree Service 
Inc., 999-0295 to ground spray 336 acres near Wolf Point and Letz Creek 
with a long list of chemicals including 2,4-D, picloram, dicamba, 
sulfometuron methyl, aminopyralid, hexazinone, triclopyr, glyphosate and/ 
or Crosshair. See ODF notification 2015-781-03212, call Dan Menk or Brian 
Peterson at 935-2283 with questions. 

Compiled by Jan Wroncy and Gary Hale, ForestlandDwellers.org: 342-8332. 

CORRECTIONS/CLARIFICATIONS 

In our March 19 cover story “It Ain’t Easy Being Green,” Bethany Sherman 
at OG Analytical was misidentified throughout as Bethany Clement. 



NPR EDUCATION 
BLOGGER TO SPEAK 
ON IMPACTS OF 
STANDARDIZED TESTING 

Smarter Balanced — Oregon’s latest, more rig¬ 
orous standardized test — is officially here. The 
Smarter Balanced testing window opened March 10 
in Eugene School District 4J, and the testing period 
extends to early June. 

To discuss the ins and outs of standardized test¬ 
ing in the U.S., the Community Alliance for Public 
Education (CAPE) invited Anya Kamenetz, NPR 
education blogger and author of The Test: Why Our 
Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing — 
But You Don X Have to Be, to speak in Eugene April 
1 at Tsunami Books. 

Kamenetz says her interest in standardized testing 
began when she researched innovations in K-12 edu¬ 
cation but quickly realized that standardized testing 
was blocking the way. 

“It’s been really hard for innovation to take root 
because of standardized testing,” she tells EW. 

When Kamenetz looked into the history of testing 
in the U.S., she found its origins in the field of psy¬ 
chometrics, which looks at finding objective ways to 
measure mental capacity and learning. 


“Psychometrics is a small scientific field that 
made a lot of foundational discoveries, but many of 
the people in this movement were committed eugeni- 
cists and racists,” Kamenetz says. “When you delve 
into the history of something like this, you realize 
it’s all predicated on ideology to prove that certain 
people were naturally better than other people.” 

Around the country, parents are responding to 
Common Core-aligned testing by opting their chil¬ 
dren out of the tests — in Chicago, teachers unions 
are taking a stand, and Kamenetz says that Florida 
has a highly organized opt-out movement. 

“Opting out can be best understood as an act of 
civil disobedience,” Kamenetz says. “Parents are 
making that decision because they want their stu¬ 
dents to be personally engaged in changing policy 
that they feel is detrimental.” 

Kamenetz says that in her book, she reminds par¬ 
ents that they have options when dealing with test¬ 
ing, including opting out. She also offers advice on 
how parents can help children prepare for tests and 
be better students, including work in mindfulness 
training, a form of meditation. 

Overall, she says, “I think there are lots of differ¬ 
ent ways we as a community can come together and 
reduce the impact of these tests.” 

Kamenetz will speak 7 pm Wednesday, April 1, 
at Tsunami Books, 2585 Willamette St. The event is 
free and open to the public. — Amy Schneider 


NEW LAWS FOR 
FAIR WAGES AND 
ACCOUNTABILITY 


Two bills in the Oregon Legislature regarding 
wage theft and wage and hour violations had pub¬ 
lic hearings in the House last week. They are each 
part of a broader effort to hold employers to higher 
standards on how they treat and pay their workers. 

Rep. Nancy Nathanson (D-Eugene) is the chief 
sponsor of HB 3137, a bill that would make it un¬ 
lawful for employers to make their employees 
sign off on falsified time cards. In testimony to the 
House Committee on Business and Labor, she ex¬ 
plained that her attention was drawn to the issue by 
an employee who was forced to document hours in 
a way that meant the employer wouldn’t have to 
pay overtime. The employee had worked more than 
40 hours a week over the pay period. The employee 
wasn’t given a copy of the timecard and had no 
documentation to prove wage theft had occurred. 

“Workers subjected to this kind of practice are 
working long hours to support their family; they’re 
exploited as they struggle to make ends meet,” Na¬ 
thanson said. Her draft of HB 3137 would make it 
illegal for employers to induce employees to sign 
documents containing false hours worked or com¬ 
pensation received. It would also protect workers 
from retribution if they reported that their work¬ 
place was violating the law. 

House Committee members questioned Na¬ 
thanson’s bill, asking whether the “hole” that this 
bill is meant to fill to make sure workers are paid 
for all hours is really a big hole at all. Legislators 
questioned whether a new law would really affect 
employers who are determined to shortchange their 
employees. 

Betsy Earls, vice president and counsel for Asso¬ 
ciated Oregon Industries, offered testimony against 
the bill. She said it’s “already against the law” and 


whistleblowers are “already protected.” The bill is 
still in committee. 

HB 2386, another bill the committee looked at 
last week, would give the Oregon Bureau of Labor 
and Industries an additional tool to enforce existing 
wage and hour laws. It would authorize the com¬ 
missioner of Labor and Industries to issue cease 
and desist orders to employers under certain cir¬ 
cumstances. 

Charlie Burr, communications director for 
BOLI, says the bill would help his agency hold bad 
actors accountable. Right now, they have to go to 
the circuit court to get a cease and desist order. If 
HB 2386 passes, they will only need to get an or¬ 
der from the commissioner of Labor and Industries. 
Currently, some civil rights violations are handled 
this way. 

At the public hearing, legislators voiced con¬ 
cerns that the bill would be a tool to shut down 
businesses. Burr says that usually, cease and de¬ 
sist orders just require a halt of whatever unlawful 
activity is taking place. He said they can involve 
requiring a business to cease operations for a few 
days for an investigation. The bill passed out of 
committee with all six Democrats voting for it, and 
all five Republicans voting against. 

Rep. Greg Barreto (R-Cove) sent out a “Repub¬ 
lican Rapid Response Action Alert” email, claiming 
the bill would leave employers at the total mercy of 
one agency. He wrote that BOLI already fulfills the 
roles of investigator and prosecutor and questioned 
the fairness of the agency serving as the judge as 
well. 

The bill is currently scheduled for a third read¬ 
ing in the House on March 26. 

— Lucy Ohlsen 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 











SLANT 


• The May 19 4J School Board election got hotter last week as several new 
candidates squeaked in on the filing deadline. Incumbent Jim Torrey is facing off 
against two opponents: Oregon Democratic Party Regional Director Kevin Cronin (also 
£Ws “Best Local Hellraiser”) and Whiteaker Community Council member David 
Nickles. Torrey has served on the board since 2007 and is currently chair. While he 
said last year that he’d like to take 4J into an era of greater transparency, it’s hard to 
take seriously when 4J sued the R-G early this year over a public records dispute 
involving outgoing Superintendent Sheldon Berman. Not exactly a dazzling show of 
transparency. Cronin and Nickles, running on platforms of funding and school choice, 
respectively, could bring fresh perspectives to a board that seems distant from its 
community. But is the community ready for such a big change? 

4J will see a few more school board races this year: Incumbent Mary Walston is 
up against substitute teacher Colin Farnsworth, who is also a coordinator for activist 
group People Against the National Defense Authorization Act. Board Position 4, to be 
abdicated by Craig Smith this year, involves a race between social worker Eileen 
Nittler, retiree Scott Landgreen and John A. Baumann, executive director of the 
currently closed Eugene Hearing and Speech Center. “It is nice to see democracy in 
action, and now I’ll have to work harder, which is probably a good thing, right?” Nittler 
tells £W regarding the sudden influx of candidates. 

• Should we bury the train tracks through Eugene? Creating a railroad quiet zone 
with improved track crossings is gaining traction, but the idea of putting our trains in 
a ditch is always dismissed as “too expensive,” even though it would solve multiple 
problems associated with the tracks and make Eugene much more livable. Other 
cities such as San Diego and Reno have done it successfully with a combination of 
federal grants and local taxes. Let’s face it: Eugene will need to do it someday, and if 
we wait another 20, 30 or 50 years, the project will be even more difficult and 
expensive. The benefits include sound reduction, greenspace opportunities, 
increased real estate values along the tracks, unimpeded car, bike and foot traffic — 
and better connection of our downtown and campus with the riverfront. 

One factor that could kickstart this process is the U0 Foundation’s winning 
proposal to buy and redevelop the excess EWEB riverfront property. The foundation 
wants a railroad quiet zone established for the property, and trenching the tracks 
would be ideal. How can we muster the political will to pursue this ambitious project 
sooner rather than later? Local landscape design and natural history instructor 
Whitey Lueck has been talking about this for years. See his website, wkly.ws/lz5. 

• Will the Oregon Legislature dilute Measure 91 to undo the will of the voters? We 
hear Anthony Johnson of New Approach Oregon, the leading voice on the legalization 
of marijuana for adults, is worried. He says proposed legislation, if passed, would 
allow cities and counties to either ban all marijuana sales or levy local sales taxes on 
pot. The criminal black market would continue to thrive under such amendments. 
These bills might not make it far, but Johnson says, “the fight to protect Measure 91 
has just begun.” 

• We’ve predicted in years past that climate refugees would be flocking to the 
relatively rainy Northwest from Southern California, Nevada, Arizona and New 
Mexico, but where are they ? We’ve met a few, but also talked to some Cali transplants 
who couldn’t handle our dreary winters and moved back to rejoin family and friends 
in the sunny land of cactus and white gravel landscaping. Turns out it’s not easy 
pulling up roots, even if those roots are dry and shriveled. The climate refugees will 
come eventually, not with a flood but with a trickle. Meanwhile, we can’t dismiss the 
shocking state of California agriculture under worsening drought conditions. Oregon’s 
agricultural land must be protected — every acre. We will need it. 


• Magnolias can be spectacular this time of the year, making their exuberant but 
brief showing on bare branches before most rhodies and azaleas wake up. We hear 
the bloom is well under way at Ruff Park north of Thurston Road at 66th Street in 
Springfield. The park is considered the largest magnolia arboretum west of the 
Mississippi. 



WTF? 


Local author and KLCC music, arts 
and culture host Eric Alan captured 
this image of the Hult Center electronic 
billboard on the fritz a week or so ago. 
Or maybe it was a really cold morning. 



Bystander intervention gains attention 
in preventing sexual violence on campus 

Y ou’re at a party; you see a guy who is all over a drunk young woman — giving her 
even more drinks, perhaps in hopes of having sex with her later. What do you do? 
Too often, bystanders do nothing. 

According to Abigail Leeder, director of Sexual Violence Prevention and Edu¬ 
cation at the UO, there is no right or single way for a bystander to intervene in a 
potential sexual assault — though she says, “We encourage people not to put themselves in 
harm’s way. 

“Calling the police is an intervention,” Leeder says. 

She suggests asking people directly if they are OK with what’s going on. Ask, “Do you 
want me to walk you home?” Or, talk to the person who’s trying to get her drunk. Ask, “Are 
you sure she wants this?” 

The UO, like other universities across the country, has been rocked by sexual assault al¬ 
legations on its campus — the most recent contretemps over the school’s decision to counter¬ 
sue a rape survivor and access the student’s mental health records made headlines across the 
country. The UO has since returned the records and dropped the suit. The school said it was 
within its legal rights, but critics accused the UO of victim blaming. 

In a 2014 New York Times article on “Stepping Up to Stop Sexual Assault,” Jean Staple- 
ton, a University of New Hampshire researcher who runs bystander intervention programs at 
colleges around the U.S. and Europe, cites her favorite example of intervention — a “young 
woman who approached her drunken girlfriend and said, loudly, ‘Here’s the tampon you 
asked for.’” 

Bystander intervention is one component of a healthy consent culture on campus, accord¬ 
ing to Leeder. A consent culture is one in which asking for consent before sexual interaction is 
normalized. On the other hand, a rape culture, something the UO has been accused of foster¬ 
ing, is one in which raping or surviving rape is a cultural norm. 

Leeder says bystander intervention is “based on the premise that sexual assault is every¬ 
one’s problem and a community issue.” She adds, “The majority of people are not survivors 
or perpetrators [of sexual assault], but all of us can play a role in which it’s not tolerated.” 

Leeder and Jenny Russell, youth advocacy coordinator for Planned Parenthood of South¬ 
western Oregon (PPSO), say that bystander intervention is not just useful in preventing sex¬ 
ual assault, but also in intervening in other oppressive situations such as racism, bullying, 
homophobia or transphobia. 

“These oppressive scenarios can happen spontaneously,” Russell says. She says calling 
out a rape joke or questioning someone using oppressive language can stop those situations 
from becoming normalized. 

Russell, who leads PPSO’s REV(olution) youth programs, says Leeder and her Sexual 
Wellness Advocacy Team (SWAT ) have presented to the Youth Action Council. And as part 
of peer education, REV members weave in bystander scenarios for students to act out in 
middle and high schools. 

“Research shows practice means you have better tools in the moment,” Russell says. 

She gives the example of a person who says of a rape victim or survivor, “Look at what 
she was wearing,” to another student who is neutral or unsure. Students practice asking ques¬ 
tions such as “What did you just say? Are you saying because of what she was wearing, she 
wanted it? No one wants rape.” 

Russell says there are a lot of creative ways a bystander can respond. Rather than address 
the oppressor, a bystander might say to a third party, “Do you believe what she is saying?” Or 
make light of it and say, “It’s 2015 and you still believe that?” 

Russell says, “As long as someone keeps physical and emotional safety in mind,” any 
interruption can alter a situation or affect the people watching and change their minds. 

At the UO, Leeder says SWAT has done training for groups across campus, from fraterni¬ 
ties to incoming students. In the summer the group performs a play, and during the school 
year it puts on interactive workshops that create scenarios and invite audience members to 
come up and practice intervention. 

Leeder says, “We often don’t have a chance to practice saying hard things and standing 
up for things that are true and right.” She adds, “There is a lot of pressure to go along with 
the group’s norms.” 

She says that bystander intervention is “a promising practice and a lot of schools are talk¬ 
ing about it,” in addition to other efforts to curb sexual violence on campus such as the UO’s 
online education module and its video campaign, “Ducks Do Something.” ■ 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 









YOU COULD CALL IT 

FIELD OF 

S)/iea/m. 

Ten acres near the center of Eugene, a pocket park, walk-bike path, huge 
Kidsports fieldhouse, all anchored by an historic wooden grandstand and a 
green infield soon to be soccer pitch. 

Now that the first level of funding has been secured, EW wants us to dream 
about the role of the arts early in the build-out. Alex V. Cipolle, arts editor 
who moved to Eugene a few years ago from Minneapolis, a major arts city, 
and Amy Schneider, who grew up in Roseburg, timber country, give us some 
provocative ideas. Feel free to send us more. We’re still just dreaming. 



A DETAIL FROM 
HANS D’HOLLOSY’S 
‘WEST BROADWAY 
AND OLIVE ALLEY 
MURAL’ 


COULD CIVIC STADIUM BECOME AN 



feVj 


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Ml 


ARTS PLAYGROUND? BY ALEX V. CIPOLLE 


PHOTO BY ALEX V. CIPOLLE 


C rossing 20th Avenue and heading south on 
Willamette, the back walls of Civic Stadium 
seem to rise from the east side of the street. Most 
who pass it on their daily commute probably no 
longer notice; others might deem it a ramshackle 

eyesore. 

Or as Greg Ausland, of the Eugene Civic Alliance, 
puts it: “Right now, it looks like a beached whale.” 

If you’re a creative type, however, you don’t see a long, 
drab wall — you see a canvas and the opportunity for 


great art. And for the imaginative folks familiar with 
Eugene Civic Alliance’s proposed plan for the entire 10.2- 
acre parcel of land — a renovated grandstand, a Kidsports 
fieldhouse, a plaza, new stands, concessions, bike paths 
and a small park — the Civic site becomes a playground 
of art possibilities. 

While $4.5 million has been raised for the purchase of 
the site, the fundraising for the project’s construction and 
renovation is not yet underway. Some may say talk of art 
at the site is putting the cart, or art, before the horse. But 


involving artists is often an afterthought in projects of 
this magnitude and, in Eugene, with little private 
investment in public art and a relatively small budget for 
public art in the city’s coffers, the community — much 
like the save Civic Stadium movement itself — may need 
to be the one to make art a priority. 

Of course EW has its own ideas of how art could play 
a role at the Civic site — a series of murals, 3D projection¬ 
mapping light shows, climbable sculpture, the Eugene 
Symphony opening games — but we also reached out to 
the Eugene Civic Alliance, local artists and the city of 
Eugene to discuss possibilities for the 10.2-acre plot in the 
heart of Eugene. 


INTO THE TREASURE TROVE 

“In terms of the overall site for interpretive exhibits 
and artwork — it’s a huge canvas,” Ausland says. “The art 
and telling the story is part of the story of the overall 
master plan,” 

Ausland, a civil engineer, is on the advisory board for 
Eugene Civic Alliance along with Linda Wheatley, also a 
board member for the Eugene Parks Foundation. The two 
recently did a “walkthrough” of the Civic site. 

“I just want to see everything in here that might have 
potential to be used by the artist and stay part of the site,” 
Wheatley says. They found a treasure trove of items that 
could be repurposed for site-specific art installations 
including the old hand-turned scoreboard, hooks and 
showerheads from the locker area, seats, two large 
wooden beams and the original “Art-Deco-y” turnstile 
from the north entrance. 

“I would love to see some of these things reintegrated 
into the pocket park and plaza as sculptures and objets 
d’art,” Wheatley says. A pocket park is a very small park 
open to the public. 

The bones of Civic Stadium are in great condition, 
Ausland notes. As for Civic Stadium’s long wall along 
Willamette? Part of it is rotting. “It’s in really bad shape 
in terms of its decay,” says Ausland, who recently spent a 
week examining the site with a lead inspector and a 
structural engineer. 

Eugene Civic Alliance is looking at the possibility of 
re-siding the western wall along Willamette to match the 
original siding that can still be seen on the stadium’s 
north side — a vertical tongue-and-groove style that most 
likely would be done in Douglas fir or cedar. “It could be 
gorgeous unadulterated,” Ausland says, while noting 
“there are a lot of steps before that happens.” 

Nancy Webber, also on the advisory board for the 
Eugene Civic Alliance, says, siding or no siding, there’s 
still great potential for art along the wall. 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 




“Who knows what kind of art work might go up there? 
I have watched people do projected things on large walls 
like that that are awesome,” she says. “We have these 
large canvases and it would be a shame to use it just once .” 

AN ARTIST’S PLAYGROUND 

Local muralist Kari Johnson envisions sports art or a 
“fantastical soccer scene” along the wall. “You could do 
the tongue and groove and leave a section and the tongue 
and groove would be like a beautiful wooden frame,” 
Johnson says of the wall. “In some ways, a wood-framed 
mural, or three smaller wood-framed murals, would be 
easier on the eye than [painting] the whole entire thing. 
Then you could have three different artists.” 

Johnson points out that the murals could change by 
using plywood boards that could be switched in and out. 
Sheet metal or stainless-steel cutout shapes — like figures 
playing sports — could also be mounted and they would 
“last forever.” 

Whatever it is, Johnson, who has painted many murals 
around town, would like to see some visuals on that 
vertical stretch of real estate. “There’s a lot of big, ugly 


slabs of buildings and it doesn’t need to be like that,” she 
says. “It’s so easy to make a spot for it.” 

There would be several benefits of murals on the wall, 
Hans d’Hollosy says. “A good mural tends to inhibit 
graffiti,” he notes. “Another good thing about a mural is it 
tends to be less money” than sculpture. 

D’Hollosy is a local painter who created the expansive 
mural on the eastern wall of the New Zone Gallery, aka 
the “West Broadway and Olive Alley Mural,” which was 
mostly done with donated house paint. 

“I think the community could get together over that 
and do something. I bet everyone in Eugene has one 
gallon of paint they’ll never use again,” he says, suggesting 
a sort of community-wide paint drive. “Guys, this is your 
Civic Stadium — go for it. Make a community effort on 
every level. Let everyone feel like they’re involved and it 
won’t cost them a dime. The same thing can be done with 
sculpture. Anyone have any sheet metal?” 

The only restriction d’Hollosy sees as far as the content 
of the mural goes is that it be family-friendly. 

Local found-object sculptor Jud Turner says the 


plethora of materials identified at Civic — bleachers, 
timber, the turnstile, etc. — would work well for building 
large-scale permanent sculpture. 

“Kids love dinosaurs,” he says. “I would love to see a 
full-scale dinosaur skeleton made out of bleachers and 
chair remnants, since we have some pretty cool fossil 
history here” in the region. 

Turner has experience creating life-size sculptures of 
extinct animals; in 2012, an exhibit design company out 
of Seattle commissioned him to build a to-scale Columbia 
Mammoth skeleton for Washington’s Moses Lake 
Museum and Art Center, with 95 percent of the sculpture 
made from recycled materials. 

“I would love to work with some of those materials 
too,” Turner says of Civic Stadium remnants. “That would 
be exciting.” 

ART AND THE CITY 

Funding Civic art, after the struggle to raise money for 
the site itself, is a factor. 

“It would just take people applying for grants and it 
could happen,” says Liora Sponko, executive director of 


the Lane Arts Council. “Then maybe you get a business” 
to sponsor it. She suggests applying for grants offered by 
Lane Arts Council, as well as those provided by the Lane 
County Cultural Coalition, the Lane County Historical 
Society and the Oregon Art Commission. 

There has also been some discussion whether the 
$400,000 the city added to the $4.5 million Civic pot to 
purchase the pocket park and bike path easement would 
trigger the Percent for Art ordinance that Eugene adopted 
in 1981. That ordinance has funded works like the 
“Northwest Passage” mural at the airport and the bronze 
otters, raccoons, turtles and bears downtown. 

The ordinance states that “one percent of all 
construction and remodeling funds for public places” 
exceeding $50,000 will go into the Municipal Public Arts 
Fund “to be used to make provision of art in public places 
and improvements owned by the city.” 

The ordinance, according to Eugene City Attorney 
Glenn Klein, does not apply to the purchase of land. 

“The purchase would not qualify,” Klein tells EW via 
email. “The city is not purchasing the property with $4.5 


million in public funds and then turning around and selling 
to the Eugene Civic Alliance. Instead, the city is using 
approximately $400,000 in funds to purchase a pocket park 
and bike path easement. The Alliance is using approximately 
$4.1 million of their funds to purchase everything else.” 

He continues, “Under the one-percent-for-art 
ordinance, funds used to purchase land without 
improvements (the portion we are purchasing for the 
pocket park and bike path easement have no improvements) 
are not subject to the one percent provision.” 

Klein notes, “No park is being ‘constructed’ at this 
time. Instead, we are only acquiring land/open space. At 
some point in the future, there may be some construction, 
but that is not happening now.” 

Meaning that at some future date, if the city does 
spend in excess of $50,000 in construction costs on the 
pocket park, the ordinance will be triggered. Bikes paths, 
however, do not qualify for the ordinance. 

Even if the $400,000 purchase did qualify for the 
percent-for-art provision, it would only translate to 
$4,000 — not a robust sum when you consider the 
potential costs of materials, labor, weatherization and site 
engineering. Perhaps, then, a public-private project of this 
scale should spark a new discussion about the way 
Eugene funds public art. 

According to the 2010 Eugene Public Art Plan, which 
was funded partially by the National Endowment of the 
Arts, Eugene has fallen behind national best practices, as 
many cities of comparable size have upped their 
ordinances to two percent. 

The plan also states that “broadening Eugene’s percent- 
for-art funding source in the future to encompass a wider 
range of projects would increase the size of the public art 
fund,” and goes on to recommend that the ordinance be 
amended to include transportation projects. 

“The omission of transportation projects is somewhat 
ironic,” the plan reads. “Transportation facilities — 
streets, alleys, bicycle paths and other public thoroughfares 
— provide some of the best, most visible sites for 
installation of public art.” 

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME 

At this point, art for the site is just happy and hopeful 
speculation. 

“I think there are lots of opportunities out there and we 
don’t even know what they all are yet,” Wheatley says. 
“We want to be inclusive as possible. It’s going to be a 
process.” 

Several members of the Eugene Civic Alliance agree 
that part of the process will be involving the art 
community. 

“It’s a great opportunity to have [the Civic Stadium 
site] be developed out with a lot of community input like 
it was done in the ’30s and the arts are a huge part,” 
Ausland says. “Somebody will be brought in from the arts 
that will help tell the story.” He adds, “Everyone wants to 
tell the story and the history of the site.” 

“I see the story of Civic still being told,” Wheatley adds. 
“But I don’t know what that’s going to look like.” ■ 


‘Kids love dinosaurs . I would love to see a full-scale dinosaur 
skeleton made out of bleachers and chair remnants , since we 
have some pretty cool fossil history here.’ 

— JUD TURNER, SCULPTOR 



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PHOTO BY TRASK BEDORTHA 


E ighty-eight-year-old Greg Giustina says he can 
remember attending World War II bond rallies at 
Civic Stadium in the 1940s. “They would bring 
war heroes to the field, and the early [bond] 
campaigns of the war would come through and 
speak,” Giustina says. “When you’re smaller, those things 
stick to you.” 

At the time, bond rallies toured the country, racking up 
millions of dollars for the war effort and planting memories 
in the minds of children like Giustina, whose family was 
entwined with the building and use of Civic Stadium. 
Giustina Bros. Lumber Co. (now Giustina Resources) 
donated old-growth beams for the construction of the 
facility and sponsored the Giustina Reds, who played 
baseball at Civic in the Cascade League during the ’30s 
and ’40s, long before the Emeralds even formed. 


Oregon remains a leading producer of lumber in the 
U.S., according to the U.S. Forest Service, and part of that 
legacy is built into the very structure of Civic Stadium. 
The place radiates Eugene history from every acre and 
wooden beam. 

This intimate tie between Civic Stadium, the wood 
products industry and baseball has some wondering if a 
tribute to Lane County’s timber industry in the form of a 
museum on site might be appropriate. 

As the old wooden building and its land moves into a 
new phase with 10.2 acres of property nearly in the middle 
of town, we now get to celebrate the multitude of options 
inherent to the site. How do we honor the history of Civic 
— from wood products to architecture to baseball — as we 
embrace the stadium’s bright new future as a venue for 
soccer and youth sports? 


OUT OF THE DEPRESSION 

Nancy Webber with Eugene Civic Alliance says that 
she’s currently focused on closing the Civic deal with the 
city by March 30, but she has an eye on the future. “Even 
when there were difficult days, I would go home after 
working way too long and I would be excited about the 
possibilities of what could happen there,” she says of the 
Civic site. 

Webber says historic preservation is an important piece 
of what the group will do, and figuring out ways to pay 
tribute to the site’s history is something that will likely 
happen when the group starts a series of meetings focused 
on the long-term strategic plan for the site. 

Civic’s history goes back to the early 20th century, 
when the Giustina family started Giustina Bros., moving to 
Lane County in the early 1920s, according to a 1988 



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Register-Guard article about the family. The Giustinas and 
three other lumber companies donated timbers to help 
build Civic Stadium, a Depression-era Works Progress 
Administration project. George Giustina, the oldest of the 
company’s founders, was a big baseball fan and led his 
family’s involvement in the project. 

“My grandfather’s older brother George was primarily 
involved in the volunteer program that donated lumber and 
got other people to donate to Civic Stadium, and that led 
to the sponsoring of the Giustina Reds,” says Dan 
Giustina, managing partner for Giustina Resources. 

Joe Blakely, author of Eugene’s Civic Stadium, says it 
means “one heck of a lot” to see Civic Stadium saved and 
remembered. “I’ve never been so proud of anything in my 
whole life. Since I wrote [the book], it has just been so 
important in this effort, and I’m so happy with the way 
everything turned out.” 

Historic recognition “is likely to be an assignment to a 
committee to develop further,” Webber says, and she lists 
Greg Ausland, an engineer for the project, and Linda 
Wheatley of the Eugene Parks Foundation as potential 
members of the committee. 

REMEMBER THE TIMBERS 

“I guess you could call the stadium itself part of a 
museum,” says Jon Anderson, president and publisher of 
Random Lengths, a publication that serves the wood 
products industry. “What I’ve been told is that you can still 
get underneath and see those beautiful old wooden beams, 
so you start with a museum right there, I suppose.” 

“It’d be nice if the whole stadium site was going to be 
commemorative and honor the history,” Dan Giustina 
says. And the prospect of a wood products museum? 
“Personally, I would like to see that,” he says. “We’re in 
the business. There’s the World Forestry Center in Portland, 
but nothing close by, to my knowledge.” 

Anderson of Random Lengths, a financial supporter of 
Civic’s restoration, expressed similar support. “If there’s 
room, that’d be a great idea,” Anderson says. “There’s not 


a museum to my knowledge in the Eugene area, and I think 
having something like that would be excellent.” 

Anderson points out that the wood products industry 
continues to influence Lane County. “It has changed 
dramatically in my time, but it still plays a large role,” he 
says. “It’s still a big part of Lane County’s economy, and 
not just the mills but also the activities serving the mills, 
from insurance to equipment.” 

A LEGACY OF OUR OWN 

Heather Kliever, registrar for the Lane County 
Historical Society and chair of the Eugene Historic 
Review Board, says the site at Civic Stadium and the 
structure itself represent a unique piece of Eugene’s 
history. 

“You cannot build that again,” Kliever says, pointing 
out that the time during which we used old growth for 
buildings has passed. “Our environment can’t support it. 
It’s absolutely a gem.” 


She says the preservation of Civic Stadium is a great 
opportunity for Eugeneans to embrace historic recognition. 
This hasn’t always happened in Eugene — see the pile of 
rubble that was once Eugene City Hall — but there are some 
great historic examples of Eugeneans coming together to 
save an important resource for future generations. 

In 1937, Kliever says, a year before Civic Stadium was 
built, Spencer Butte was on the chopping block, slated for 
deforesting. Former Eugene Mayor F.M. Wilkins rallied 
the people of Eugene to purchase Spencer Butte and turn 
it into recreational land rather than clearcut it. Wilkins also 
brokered the deal for Hendricks Park, ensuring that some 
parkland existed in the residential area. 

“Imagine Hendricks now if it had been completely built 
up,” Kliever says. “Eugene would be different. We would 
not be the same Eugene.” 

In terms of recognizing the historical significance of 
the Civic Stadium spot, Kliever says that, for starters, 
history could be represented through heritage interpretation 
signs. “Maybe there could be some collaboration with 
historic groups in town,” she says. “There could even be 
noontime history lectures about the history of Amazon 
Creek, or talking about the history of baseball.” 

And, like Anderson, Kliever points out that the stadium 
itself is a monument to the history of Lane County and its 
relationship with timber. “You just can’t go out and see 
trees like that anymore,” Kliever says. “We’ll probably 
never see that ever again in our lives. Dinosaurs among us 
— that’s what Civic is.” 

GOING THE DISTANCE 

“It’s a grand old place,” Greg Giustina says. He adds 
that he feels a bit detached from the stadium now, since his 
family played a role in Civic’s creation so long ago, but he 
also supports the interests of the community. 

“I kind of go along with whatever the people here in 
town want,” he says. “And if they want to keep it, that’s 
just fine. You don’t know what the future holds. Down the 
way, if we got rid of it we might be sorry.” ■ 



PHOTO BY TRASK BEDORTHA 







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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 























WHAT’S 

HAPPENING 


THURSDAY 

MARCH 26 

SUNRISE 7:05AM; SUNSET ?:32PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 38 

GATHERINGS Northwest An¬ 
thropological Conference, today 
through Saturday, Valley River 
Inn, 1000 Valley River Way, info 
at wkly.ws/lyy. 

Eugene Metro Business Net¬ 
working International, 11:30am 
today 8c Thursday, April 2, LCC 
Downtown Center, 101W. 10th 
Ave. $12 lunch. 

Downtown Public Speakers 
Toastmasters Club, drop-ins 
welcome noon-l:05pm today 8c 
Thursday, April 2, Les Lyle Con¬ 
ference Rm, fourth floor Wells 
Fargo Bldg., 99 E. Broadway 
Ave., info at 485-1182. FREE. 

Board Game Night, new players 
welcome, 6-llpm today 8c 
Thursday, April 2, Funagain 
Games, 1280 Willamette St., 
info at 654-4205. FREE. 

Nar-Anon Meeting, beginners, 
Ppm, Wesley United Methodist 
Church, 1385 Oak Rd. FREE. 

Doc’s Pad Drag Queen Bingo w/ 
Karess, 9pm today 8c Thursday, 
April 2, Doc’s Pad, P10 Willa¬ 
mette St. FREE. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Wonderful 
Ones Storytime, 1-year-olds w/ 
caregivers, 10:15am 8c 11am 
today 8c Thursday, April 2, down¬ 
town library, info at 682-8316. 
FREE. 


Spring Break at the Library: “Na¬ 
ture before Facebook 8c Twitter,” 
10:30am-noon; “Patterns in 
Nature,” l-2pm, Springfield Li¬ 
brary, 225 Fifth St.,Spfd. FREE. 

LECTURES/CLASSES 

Aprovecho: Home Herbalist 
Series, 10am-2pm, 805P4 
Hazelton Rd., Cottage Grove. 
$10-$30. 

One-on-One Job Hunting Help, 
4-Ppm, downtown library, reg. 
at 682-5450. FREE. 

LITERARY ARTS Tween Scene 
8c Teen Book Groups, 4pm, 
downtown library. FREE. 

“Reading Comics in Cairo” w/ 
author G. Willow Wilson, 6pm, 
downtown library. 

ON THE AIR “The Point,” 
9-9:30am today 8c Thursday, 
April 2 KPOV 88.9FM. 

“Arts Journal,” current local arts, 
9-10pm today 8c Thursday, April 
2, Comcast channel 29. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Pool Hall for seniors, 8:30am- 
4:30pm, today, tomorrow 8c 
Monday through Thursday, April 
2, Campbell Community Center, 
155 High St. $0.25. 

Camp Cooking Basics for 
Backpackers, Ppm, REI, 306 
Lawrence St. FREE. 

SOCIAL DANCE English 8c 
Scottish Country Dancing, Ppm, 
Vet’s Club, 1620 Willamette St. 
$P, first time FREE. 

THEATER 4 Funny Thing Hap¬ 
pened on the Way to the Forum, 
P:30pm today through Saturday 


8c Thursday, April 2; 2pm Sun¬ 
day, Very Little Theatre, 2350 
Hilyard St., 344-PP51. $15. 

No Shame Workshop, create im- 
prov, P:30pm today 8c Thursday, 
April 2, New Zone Gallery, 164 
Broadway. FREE. 

VOLUNTEER Care for Owen 
Rose Garden, bring gloves 8c 
small hand-weedingtools, 
instruction provided, noon-3pm, 
300 N. Jefferson St., 682-5025. 
FREE. 


FRIDAY 

MARCH 27 

SUNRISE 7:03AM; SUNSET 7:33PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 37 

FARMERS MARKETS Mar- 
ketplace@Sprout, year-round in¬ 
door 8c outdoor farmers market 
w/entertainment, 3-Ppm, 418 A 
St., Spfd. info at sproutfoodhub. 
org. 

FILM Movies in the Map Room: 
The LEGO Movie, 8pm today, 

5pm 8c 8pm tomorrow, Village 
Green Resort, P25 Row River 
Rd., Cottage Grove. $3, kids $1. 
FOOD/DRINKWine Tasting, 
6-9pm, Sweet Cheeks Winery, 
2P00P Briggs Hill Rd. FREE. 

GATHERINGS Obsidians: Month¬ 
ly Potluck at Obsidian Lodge, 
info at obsidians.org. 

Yawn Patrol Toastmasters, 
6-P:45am, LCC Downtown 
Center, 110 W. 10th Ave. 

City Club of Eugene: “Perspec¬ 
tives on Alternative Approaches 



to Forest Management” w/Marc 
Barnes 8c Matt Fehrenbacher, 
noon, Downtown Athletic Club, 
999 Willamette St. $5. 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 12:30pm, 
Springfield Lutheran Church, 
1542 I St., Spfd. FREE. 

Food Not Bombs, vegan meal, 
2-4pm, 8th 8c Oak. FREE. 

Mr. Bill’s Traveling Trivia, Ppm, 
Rogue Public House, 844 Olive 
St., call 345-4155. FREE. 
Northwest Anthropological 
Conference continues. See 
Thursday, March 26. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Baby Story 
time, ages 0-1 w/caregivers, 
10:15am 8c 11:15am, downtown 
library. FREE. 

Family Storytime, 10:15am, 
Bethel Branch Library, 1990 
Echo Hollow Rd.; 10:15am, 
Sheldon Branch Library, 1566 
Coburg Rd. FREE. 

Spring Break at the Library: 
“Nature’s Believe It or Not,” 
10:30am-noon; “Snap Circuits 
8c LEGO Challenge,” l-2pm, 
Springfield Library, 225 Fifth 
St., Spfd. FREE. 

Family Game Night, 6-8pm, 
Petersen Barn, 8P0 Berntzen 
Rd. FREE. 

ON THE AIR “The Sunday Morn¬ 
ing Hangover TV Show,” 11pm, 
Comcast channel 29. 

Marc Time’s Record Attic, 
11:30pm, Comcast channel 29. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Obsidians: Hike Campus River 
Loop, 6 miles, reg. at obsidians, 
org. 

Walk ‘n’ Talkers, weekly self-led 
neighborhood walking group, 
9-llam, meet at Campbell 
Community Center, 155 High 
St. FREE. 

Bridge Group for Seniors, 12:30- 
3:30pm, Campbell Community 
Center, 155 High St. $0.25. 


Magic the Gathering, standard 
deck casual play, 6pm, Castle of 
Games, 660 Main, Spfd. $1. 

Magic the Gathering, 6pm, 
Delight, 811 E. Main St., Cottage 
Grove, info at delightcg@gmail. 
com. FREE. 

Final Table Poker, 6pm 8c 9pm, 
Steve’s Bar 8c Grill, IIP 14th St., 
Spfd. FREE. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, March 26. 

SOCIAL DANCE All Request 
International Folk Dancing, 
2-3:30pm, Willamalane Adult 
Activity Center, 215 W. C St., info 
at 603-0998. $1.50. 

Advanced dance class w/Taller 
de Son Jarocho, 4:30-6pm, 
Whiteaker Community Center, N. 
Jackson 8c Clark St. FREE. 

Salsa Dancing w/Jose Cruz, 
8:30pm, Vet’s Club Ballroom, 
1626 Willamette St.$P. 

Church of‘80s, 9pm, Blairally, 
245 Blair Blvd. $3. 

THEATER The Wild Party, 

P:30pm today 8c tomorrow, 2pm 
Sunday; continues through Arpil 
11, Actors Cabaret of Eugene, 
996 Willamette St., 683-4368. 
$16-$42.95. 

A Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum continues. 

See Thursday, March 26. 

SATURDAY 

MARCH 28 

SUNRISE 7:01AM; SUNSET ?:34PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 37 

ARTS/CRAFTS Eugene 
Printmakers Open House, 10am- 
lpm, 1328 W. 2nd Ave. FREE. 

Narual Dyes 8c Handmade Felt, 
instructional class, 10am-4pm, 
Thimbleberry Studio, 2630 
Agate St., 521-8P01. $195. 

BENEFITS Verse with a Vision, 
benefit for Oregon Wild, 6pm, 


Center for Spiritual Living, 390 
Vernal St. $10. 

Glow Variety Show feat. Nanda, 
benefit for the Trauma Healing 
Project, Ppm today 8c 3pm 
tomorrow, Ragozzino Hall, LCC, 
4000 E. 30th St. $15-$1P0. 

FARMERS MARKETS Hideaway 
Bakery Farmers Market, 9am- 
2pm, Hideaway Bakery, 33PP E. 
Amazon. 

Lane County Winter Farmers 
Market, 10am-2pm, 8th 8c Oak. 
FREE. 

Coast Fork Farm Stand, 11am- 
6pm, 10th 8c Washington, 
Cottage Grove. 

FILM Movies in the Map Room 
continues. See Friday. 

GATHERINGS Lane County 
Propagation Fair, gardens, 
plantings 8c more, llam-4pm, 
Whiteaker Head Start Building, 
21 N. Grand St. FREE. 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 

12 step meeting, noon-lpm, 
White Bird Clinic, 341 E. 12th 
Ave. FREE. 

Peace Vigil, noon-lpm, down¬ 
town library, info at 342-2914. 
FREE. 

Urban Homesteader Day at 
Claim 52 Brewing’s The Abbey, 
veggie 8c seed sale, beer 
release, chicken coop, vendors, 
2-5pm, 418 A St., Spfd. FREE. 

Dungeons 8c Dragons, role- 
playing, 3pm, Delight, 811 E. 
Main, Cottage Grove, info at 
delightcg@gmail.com. FREE. 

Eugene Veg Education Network, 
3pm, Unity of the Valley Church, 
3912 Vernal Rd. FREE. 

JELL-Odyssey: JELL-0 Art Show, 
5-8pm, Maude Kerns Art Center, 
1910 E. 15th Ave. $3-$5. 
Northwest Anthropological 
Conference continues. See 
Thursday, March 26. 


The Glow Variety Show, says impresario Anna Miller, is characterized by a “calculated chaos 
of comedy, high-energy kung-faux fighting and irreverent pop-culture parodies.” Since 2004, 
audiences have delighted in featured performers NANDA’s “Acrobaticalist Ninja Action Hero” antics 
that incorporate dance, juggling and acrobatics. Also in the spotlight is Twonz, brothers who do 
“cropping,” mixingcurrent styles of dance with theirown. Miller says her goal in puttingtogetherthis 
show is to “inspire human connection by bringing people of all ages together to share experiences 
and heartfelt feelings through performance art.” Glow benefits the Trauma Healing Project. 


The Glow Variety Show, a benefit for the Trauma Healing Project, takes place Ppm Saturday, March 
28, and 3pm Sunday, March 29, in the LCC Raggozino Performance Hall, 4000 E. 30th Ave.; $15-20. 
— Rachael Carnes 



GLOW PERFORMERS IZIKAULA HUNTLEY 
(LEFT) AND NANDA MEMBERS TOMIKO 
SAGE AND KIYOTA SAGE (ABOVE) 






CALENDAR 

KIDS/FAMILIES Family Music 
Time, Emily Fox, 10:15am, 
downtown library, info at 682- 
8316. FREE. 

Boogie Woogie Puppet Show, 
11am, Sheldon Library, 1566 
Coburg Rd.; 2pm, Bethel Library, 
1990 Echo Hollow Rd. FREE. 

LECTURES/CLASSES How to 

Sell Your Home for the Highest 
Price in Today’s Market,” 10am- 
noon, Keller Williams Realty, 
2644 Suzanne Way, reg. at 
wkly.ws/lyz. FREE., 

Women’s Self Defense Class, 
10:30-ll:45am, Petersen Barn 
Community Center, 820 Ber- 
ntzen Rd., contact warriorsist- 
ers@riseup.net. FREE. 

Warrior Sisters Self-Defense 
Training, 10:30-ll:45am, The 
Boreal, 450 W. 3rd Ave. Don. 

Clones 8c Seeds How To, OMMP 
marijuana class, 1pm, 21 Cen¬ 
tennial Loop, 505-8100. $5 or 3 
cans of food don. 

“100 Years of U0 Art Depart¬ 
ment” w/Ken O’Connell, 5pm, 
Raven Frame Works, 325 W. 4th 
Ave. FREE. 

LITERARY ARTS Oregon Poet 
Laureate Peter Sears, 3pm, 
downtown library. FREE. 

ON THE AIR Taste of the World 
w/Wagoma, cooking 8c cultural 
program, 9-10am today, 2-8pm 
Tuesdays, Comcast channel 29. 

The De’Ampy Soul Hama Show, 
10pm, Comcast channel 29. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Obsidians: Hike Browder Ridge, 
8.4 miles; Trail Maintenance at 
Spencer Butte, 3 miles; SOLVE 
Spring Beach Cleanup, 2 miles, 
reg. at obsidians.org. 

Not Just Birds at Berggren 
Watershed Conservation Area, 
8-llam, reg. at 345-2299 or 
mckenzieriver.org. FREE. 

Nature’s Slimy Creatures: Slugs, 
Snails, Worms 8c More, nature 
walk, lOam-noon, Mt. Pisgah 
Arboretum Visitor Center, 34901 
Frank Parrish Rd. $5-$8. 

Bike Ride, 10:30am, Perfor¬ 
mance Bicycle Shop, 110 
Oakway Rd. FREE. 

SOCIAL DANCE Eugene Folklore 
Society Contra Dance, 2pm 
workshop, dance at 2:30pm, 
Dunn School, 3411 Willamette 
St. FREE. 

SPECTATOR SPORTS Eugene 
Reign Women’s Rugby Club vs. 
Tacoma, 1pm, Agnes Stewart 
Middle School, S. 32nd St., Spfd. 
FREE. 

SPIRITUAL “A Higher Way” 
w/Charles Geddes, 10am- 
12:30pm, Cascade Center for 
Spiritual Living, 500-D Main St., 
Spfd., reg. at 242-3882. $20. 

THEATER Fusion Friendly’s 
Cirque du Eugene w/Pinwheel 
Cabaret, acrobatics 8c more, 
2pm, Cozmic, 199 W. 8th Ave. 
$5, kids under 12 FREE. 

A Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum continues. 

See Thursday, March 26. 

The Wild Party continues. See 
Friday. 

VOLUNTEER Trailside Prune 8c 
Groom, lOam-lpm, Mt. Pisgah 
Arboretum Visitors Center, 
34901 Frank Parrish Rd. FREE. 


SUNDAY 

MARCH 29 

SUNRISE 6:59AM; SUNSET 7:38PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 38 

BENEFITS Trout Unlimited Raffle 
8c Dinner, 3-2pm, Falling Sky 
Brewing, 290 Blair Blvd. FREE. 

Glow Variety Show continues. 
See Saturday. 

COMEDY 20th Annual Eugene 
Laff-Off, competition for Funni¬ 
est Person in Eugene, benefit 
for Greenhill, 6:30-9:30pm, 
Actors Cabaret of Eugene, 996 
Willamette St. $20. 


FOOD/DRINK Mimosa Sunday, 
noon-6pm, Sweet Cheeks Win¬ 
ery, 22002 Briggs Hill Rd. 

Wine Tasting, Noble Fall Sun¬ 
days, noon-5pm, Noble Estate 
Vineyard 8c Winery, 29210 Gimpl 
Hill Rd., info at 338-3002 or 
nobleestatewinery.com. 

The Awesome Food Goddess, 
Chrissy’s Festival of Wonder 8c 
Delight, 2-4pm, Park Blocks, 8th 
8c Oak St. FREE. 

GATHERINGS Piccadilly Flea 
Market, 10am-4pm, Lane Coun¬ 
ty Fairgrounds, 296 W. 13th Ave. 
$1.50. 

“Derby Crazy Love” w/Emerald 
City Roller Girls 8c UO Cultural 
Forum, 2pm, Oakshire Public 
House, 202 Madison St. FREE. 

HEALTH Occupy Eugene Medical 
Clinic, noon-4pm, Park Blocks, 
8th 8c Oak. FREE. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Family Fun: 
Myanmar, 2:30pm, downtown 
library. FREE. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Sus 

tainable Animal Husbandry 
8c Small-Scale Goat Dairying, 
10am-2pm, Aprovecho, 80524 
Hazelton Rd. Don. 

Community Yoga, noon-l:30pm, 
Sweaty Ganesh Yoga, 820 
Charnelton St. $5-$10. 

“The Art of Nature Photogra¬ 
phy” w/Dave Stone, l-3pm, 

Mt. Pisgah Arboretum Visitor 
Center, 34901 Frank Parrish Rd. 
$25-$30. 

ON THE AIR “The Sunday Morn¬ 
ing Hangover TV Show,” 1:30am, 
Comcast channel 29. 

Sentinel Radio broadcast, 2am, 
KPNW 1120AM. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Obsidians: Hike Hardesty 
Mountain, 11.4 miles, reg. at 
obsidians.org. 

Church of Pinball, tournament, 
minor welcome, 3pm, Blairally, 
245 Blair Blvd. $5. 

Final Table Poker, 3pm 8c 6pm, 
Steve’s Bar 8c Grill, 112 14th St., 
Spfd. FREE. 

SOCIAL DANCE Music 8c 
Dance Workshop w/Taller de 
Son Jarocho, 3-5pm, Whiteaker 
Community Center, N. Jackson 8c 
Clark St. FREE. 

Cuban Salsa, 5pm lesson, 6pm 
social dance, Courtsports, 2228 
Pheasant Blvd., Spfd. $2 sug. don. 

La Milonguita, Argentinian 
tango, no partner necessary, 
5-2pm, Reach Center, 2520 
Harris St. $5 dance, watch for 
FREE. 

Veselo Folk Dancers, weekly inter¬ 
national folk dancing, 2:15-10pm, 
In Shape Athletic Club, 2681 
Willamette St., 683-3326. $3. 

SPIRITUAL Zen Meditation 
Group, 5:30-2pm, Blue Cliff Zen 
Center, 439 W. 2nd Ave. FREE. 

Gnostic Mass Celebration, 8pm, 
CophNia Lodge 0T0,4065 W. 
11th Ave. #43, info at coph- 
nia-oto.org. FREE. 

THEATER 4 Funny Thing 
Happened on the Way to the 
Forum continues. See Thursday, 
March 26. 

The Wild Party continues. See 
Friday. 

MONDAY 

MARCH 30 

SUNRISE 6:58AM; SUNSET 7:37PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 38 

GATHERINGS Eugene Lunch 
Bunch Toastmasters, noon, 101 
W. 10th Ave., rm. 316. FREE. 

Cascadia Forest Defenders 
Meeting, 5:30-2pm, Growers 
Market, 454 Willamette St. 

FREE. 

Overeaters Anonymous, 5:30- 
6:30pm, Central Presbyterian 
Church, 555 E. 15th Ave. FREE. 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 
men only, 6:30-8pm, First 
Christian Church, 1166 Oak St. 
FREE. 


Nar-Anon Meeting, 2pm, St. 
Thomas Episcopal Church, 1465 
Coburg Rd. 8c Cottage Grove 
Community Center, 200 E. Gibbs 
Ave., Cottage Grove. FREE. 

Board Game Night, hosted by 
Funagain Games, 2pm, The Barn 
Light, 924 Willamette St., info at 
thebarnlightbar.com. FREE. 

Marijuana Anonymous, 12-step 
meeting, 2-8pm, St. Mary’s 
Church, 166 E. 13th Ave. 

SASS Monday Night Drop-in 
Group, for survivors of sexual 
assault, self-identified women 
18+, 2-8:30pm, Sexual Assault 
Support Services, 591 W. 19th 
Ave. FREE. 

Eugene Cannabis TV Record¬ 
ing Session, 2:30pm, CTV-29 
Studios, 2455 Willakenzie Rd., 
contact dankbagman@hotmail. 
com. FREE. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Teen 
Poetry Writing Workshop, 4:30- 
5:30pm, Springfield Library, 

225 Fifth St., Spfd. FREE. 

ON THE AIR “The Point,” 
9-9:30am, KPOV 88.9FM. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Pool 
Hall continues. See Thursday, 
March 26. 

SOCIAL DANCE West Coast 
Swing, lessons 8c dance, 
2-10:30pm, The Vet’s Club, 1626 
Willamette St. 

SPIRITUAL Inspirational 
Sounds, sing African-American 
gospel, 6:30pm, Northwood 
Christian Church, 2425 Harvest 
Ln„ Spfd. FREE. 

TUESDAY 

MARCH 31 

SUNRISE 6:56AM; SUNSET 7:38PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 38 

FOOD/DRINK New Beer 
Release, 6pm, Oakshire Public 
House, 202 Madison St. FREE. 

GATHERINGS Cascade Toast¬ 
masters, drop-ins welcome, 
6:45-8:15am, Downtown LCC 
Campus 108,101 W. 10th Ave., 
call 343-3243. FREE. 

Church Women United 
Breakfast, 2am, Brails, 1689 
Willamette St. FREE, breakfast 
extra. 

NAMI Connection, peer support 
group for people living with 
mental illness, 3:30-5pm, First 
United Methodist Church, 1326 
Olive St. FREE. 

Board Game Night, new players 
welcome, 6-llpm, Funagain 
Games, 1280 Willamette St., 
info at 654-4205. FREE. 

Shuffleboard 8c Foosball Tourna¬ 
ment, 6pm, The Barn Light, 924 
Willamette St. FREE. 

Gateway Toastmasters, drop-ins 
welcome, 6:30-2:45 pm, North¬ 
west Community Credit Union, 
3660 Gateway St., info at toddk. 
pe@gmail.com. FREE. 

Greater Eugene Area Riders 
(GEARS) General Meeting, 
forum on county’s vehicle 
registraiton fee, 6:30-8:30pm, 
Hilyard Community Center, 

2580 Hilyard St. FREE. 

Adult Children of Alcoholics 
Meeting, 2-8pm, Santa Clara 
Church of Christ, 125 Santa 
Clara Ave., Santa Clara. 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 2pm, Wesley 
United Methodist Church, 1385 
Oakway Rd. FREE. 

Co-Dependents Anonymous 
12-step Meeting, 2-8pm, Valley 
Methodist Church, 25133 E. 
Broadway, Veneta. FREE. 

Open Mic Poetry, 2:30pm sign¬ 
up, Cush Cafe, 1235 Railroad 
Blvd., call 393-6822. FREE. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Baby Pop 
Music, 9:30am, Daisy’s Place, 
1244 Lawrence. FREE. 

Terrific Twos Storytime w/Pia 
Robbins, 10:15am 8c 11am, 
downtown library. FREE. 

Springfield Reading Patrol, 4pm, 
Springfield Library, 225 Fifth 
St., Spfd. FREE. 


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A journalist and author in multiple genres 
including graphic novels, G. Willow Wilson’s most 
recent work is “Ms. Marvel,” a comic book featuring 
superhero Kamala Khan, a teenaged Muslim woman. 

Wilson, who splits her time between Egypt and the U.S., 
was the first Westerner to be granted an interview with Sheikh Ali 
Gomaa, the Grand Mufti of Egypt, and her graphic novel Cairo was 
a New York Times Notable Book and nominee for the Orange Prize. 
“G. Willow Wilson has a deft hand with myth and magic,” says 
graphic novelist Neil Gaiman, “and the kind of smart, honest 
writing mind that knits together and bridges cultures and 
people.” She also regularly writes about the Middle East and 
modern Islam for the A/e w York Times and The Atlantic. 

G. Willow Wilson will give a free talk about “Reading Comics in Cairo 
at 6pm Thursday, March 26, at the downtown library. 



LECTURES/CLASSES Creative 
Energy Rhythms, Yoga, Qigong 
8c Dance Fusion, 5:30-6:30, call 
255-3349 for location. $5. 

“Mental Disorder or Mental 
Difference: Who Decides and In 
What Ways Does It Matter?” w/ 
Opal Network, 4pm, downtown 
library. FREE. 

First Steps to Start a Business, 
6pm, downtown library. FREE. 

How to Write 8c Sell A Memoir, 
6pm, Bethel Library, 1990 Echo 
Hollow Rd. FREE. 

ON THE AIR “The Point,” 
9-9:30am, KP0V88.9FM. Anar¬ 
chy Radio w/John Zerzan, Ppm, 
KWVA 88.1 FM. 

Taste of the World w/Wagoma 
continues. See Saturday. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Hikingthe Pacific Crest Trail, 


2-8:30pm, REI, 306 Lawrence 
St. FREE. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, March 26. 

SOCIAL DANCE Eugene Folk 
Dancers, weekly international 
folk dancing, 6:45pm lessons, 
$3; ?:45pm dance, S3, Willa- 
malane Adult Activity Center, 

215 W. C St., Spfd., 344-2591. 

Bailonga: Argentine Tango Milon¬ 
ga, lessons included, 8-llpm, 
Vet’s Club, 1626 Willamette St. 
$4-$8. 

SPIRITUAL Relationship w/Sa- 
cred Texts, instructional classes 
based on text by Dogen, 2-9pm, 
Eugene Zendo, 2190 Garfield St., 
call 302-4526. FREE. 

THEATER Oregon Falun Dafa’s 
Shen Yun, journey across 5,000 
of Chinese civilizaiton, 2:30pm, 
Hult Center. $60-$ 120. 


VOLUNTEER Eugene Park 
Stewards Rhododendron Care 
8c Work Party, 9am-noon, 
Hendricks Park Rhododendron 
Garden, 1800 Skyline Blvd. 
FREE. 

New Nature Guide Orientation, 
6:30-8pm, Wayne Morse Family 
Farm, 595 Crest Dr., 242-3812. 
$5. 


WEDNESDAY 

APRIL 1 

SUNRISE 4:20AM; SUNSET 6:66PM 
AVG. HIGH 138; AVG. LOW -48 

BENEFITS Oakshire Inspires for 
Willamette Valley Sustainable 
Foods Alliance, llam-lOpm, 
Oakshire Pub, 202 Madison St. 
FREE. 

FARMERS MARKETS The Corner 
Market, fresh local produce, 


noon-6pm, 295 River Rd., 
513-4522. 

Sweetwater Farm Stand, fresh 
farm produce, products 8c reci¬ 
pes, 4-6pm, 1243 Rainbow Dr. 

Coast Fork Farm Stand contin¬ 
ues. See Saturday. 

FILM IWW Movie: Death of a 
Prophet: The Lost Days of Mal¬ 
colm X, screening 8c discussion, 
2pm, Mcnail-Riley House, 601 
W. 13th Ave. FREE. 

GATHERINGS GreenLane’s Lane 
County Sustainability Report, 
luncheon 8c talk, ll:30am-lpm, 
Eugene Hilton, 66 E. Sixth Ave. 
FREE. 

Nar-Anon Meeting, 12:30pm, 
Springfield Lutheran Church, 
1542 I St., Spfd. FREE. 

Peace Vigil, 4:30pm, 2th 8c Pearl. 
FREE. 


One-on-One with Mayor Kitty 
Piercy 8c City Council Chris Pry¬ 
or, 5-6pm, Alberton’s, 1625 W. 
18th Ave. FREE. 

Eugene Community Meeting on 
Solar, 6pm, 115 Lawrence Hall, 
UO. FREE. 

Asperger’s Support Group, 
6-8pm, Garden Way Retirement 
Community, 125 Garden Way. 
FREE. 

Co-Dependents Anonymous, 
women-only 12-step meeting, 
6-2pm, St. Thomas Episcopal 
Church, 1465 Coburg Rd. FREE. 

NAMI Connection Peer Support 
Group for individuals w/mental 
illness, 6pm, NAMI Lane County 
Resource Center, 2411 MLK Jr. 
Blvd. FREE. 

Grief Support Group, 2pm, 1326 
Olive St. FREE. 


KIDS/FAMILIES Lapsit Sto¬ 
rytime, ages birth-3 w/adult, 
10am, Springfield Library, 225 
5th St., Spfd. FREE. 

Preschool Storytime, ages 3-6, 
10am, Springfield Library, 225 
5th St., Spfd. FREE. 

Family Board Game Night, 6pm, 
Castle of Games, 660 Main, 

Spfd. FREE. 

LECTURES/CLASSES One on 

One Computer Help, 2-3pm, 
downtown library, reg. at 682- 
5450. FREE. 

Medicade Made Clear, 5-5:45pm, 
The Oregon Insurance Lady, 333 W. 
10th Ave., rsvp to 222-9020. FREE. 

“Our Kids are More Than a 
Test Score” w/author 8c NPR 
correspondent Anya Kamenetz, 
2-9pm, Tsunami Books, 2585 
Willamette St. FREE. 

Ideas on Tap, drink beer 8c dis¬ 
cuss animal skeletons, 2pm, UO 
Museum of Natrual 8c Cultural 
History, UO. FREE. 

LITERARY ARTS Non-Fiction 
Book Group for Adults, 2pm, Sci¬ 
ence Factory, 2300 Leo Harris 
Pkwy, info at wkly.ws/lzO. 

ON THE AIR “The Point,” 
9-9:30am, KPOV 88.9AM. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION 

Obsidians: Amazon Headwaters/ 
Spencer Butte, 6.2 miles, reg. at 
obsidians.org. 

Accessible Aquatics, swimming 
classes for individuals with 
disabilities, 10am, Amazon Pool, 
2600 Hilyard St. $2. 

Pool Hall continues. See Thurs¬ 
day, March 26. 

THURSDAY 

APRIL 2 

SUNRISE 6:54AM; SUNSET ?:39PM 
AVG. HIGH 58; AVG. LOW 38 

FILM Plank Town’s “Almost an 
Oscar” Springfilm Series: Good- 



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fellas, screening & discussion, 
6:30pm, Wildish Theater, 630 
Main St., Spfd. FREE. 

GATHERINGS Eugene Metro 
Business Networking Interna¬ 
tional, 11:30am, LCC Downtown 
Center, 101W. 10th Ave. $12 
lunch. 

Downtown Public Speakers 
Toastmasters Club, drop-ins 
welcome, noon-l:05pm, Les 
Lyle Conference Rm, fourth 
floor Wells Fargo Bldg., 99 E. 
Broadway Ave., info at 485- 
1182. FREE. 

Doc’s Pad Drag Queen Bingo 
continues. See Thursday, March 
26. 

Downtown Toastmasters contin¬ 
ues. See Thursday, March 26. 

Eugene Metro Business Net¬ 
working International continues. 
See Thursday, March 26. 

Nar-Anon Meeting continues. 

See Thursday, March 26. 

KIDS/FAMILIES Preschool 
Fun w/Art 8c Science, 10:30- 
11:15am, Springfield Library, 
225 Fifth St., Spfd. FREE. 

Wonderful Ones Storytime con¬ 
tinues. See Thursday, March 26. 

LECTURES/CLASSES Franchis¬ 
ing Your Own Business, 6pm, 
downtown library. FREE. 

LITERARY ARTS Lunch w/Carola 
Dunn, author of Daisy Dalrym- 
ple mystery books, noon, The 
Book Nest, 1461 Mohawk, Spfd. 
FREE. 

Mid-Valley Willamette Writers: 
“Last Draft, Final Polish” w/ Eliz¬ 
abeth Engstrom, Ppm, Tsunami 
Books, 2585 Willamette St. $10. 
ON THE AIR “The Point,” 
9-9:30am, KPOV 88.9FM. 

“Arts Journal,” current local arts, 
9-10pm, Comcast channel 29. 

OUTDOORS/RECREATION Pool 
Hall for seniors continues. See 
Thursday, March 26. 


SOCIAL DANCE Music 8c Dance 
Workshops w/Taller de Son Ja- 
rocho, 2-9pm, American Legion 
Hall, 344 8th St., Spfd. FREE. 

THEATER Harmonic Lab 8c 
Guests’ (sub)Urban Projections, 
light show, 8pm, Hult Center. 
FREE. 

No Shame Workshop continues. 
See Thursday, March 26. 

A Funny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum continues. 
See Thursday, March 26. 

VOLUNTEER Care for Owen 
Rose Garden, bring gloves 8c 
small hand-weeding tools, 
instruction provided, noon-3pm, 
end of N. Jefferson St., 682- 
5025. 


CORVALLIS 

AND SURROUNDING 
AREAS 

SATURDAY, MARCH 28: 

Corvallis Indoor Winter Market, 
9am-lpm, Benton County 
Fairgrounds. FREE. 

SUNDAY, MARCH 29: Majestic 
Reader’s Theatre presents 
Enchonged April, 3pm 8c Ppm, 
Majestic Theatre, 115 SW 2nd 
St. $8-$10. 


ATTENTION 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Auditions continue for the 
Roving Park Players’ Much Ado 
About Nothing 2-4pm March 28- 
29 at Good Samaritan Center, 
3500 Hilyard St. Call 556-9686 
for information. 

Eugene-Springfield Youth 
Orchestras offers summer 
opportunities for young singers, 
dancers and musicians. Visit 
wkly.ws/lzl. 


Women’s closed group for for 
survivors of sexual assault 
begins April 1 at SASS. For more 
info call 484-9791 or email 
supportgroup@sass-lane.org. 

The OSU Extension Service in 
Lane County has extended 
the deadline and will accept 
applications for the 2015 Master 
Food Preserver Volunteer (MFP) 
Training Program through April 
3. Info at wkly.ws/laz. 

The Maude Kerns Art Center 
invites all teen artists ages 
13-19 to submit work in 2- and 
3-dimensional media for the 
16th annual “Fast Forward: The 
Mayor’s Teen Art Show,” which 
takes place Sept. 11-Oct. 2. 

More info at 345-1571 or visit 
wkly.ws/lz2. 

Holt International Children’s 
Services and Ophelia’s Place are 
partnering to offer a support 
group for middles-school age 
(grades 6-8) female adoptees 
(transracial, transnational 
and domestic). More info at 
284-4333. 

The Springfield Arts Commis¬ 
sion’s annual Heritage Arts 
Grant program is now open for 
grant applications for 2015 pro¬ 
gramming. Visit wkly.ws/lz3. 

The Arts Commission, which 
promotes visual and perfor¬ 
mance arts to enrich cultural 
awareness in Springfield, is 
seeking applicants with strong 
interest in the arts who are 
willing to help the commission 
promote arts activities in 
Springfield. Visit wkly.ws/lz4. 

Attention teens: Become com¬ 
munity leaders this summer 
and help end sexual violence. 
Call 484-9291 for info and to 
preregister. 



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Tickets: $60-$120 • Hult Center box office 
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Exhibit Hall, 796 W. 13th Ave. 

APRIL 3,4,5 

Friday Saturday Sunday 
12pm-6pm 10am-6pm 10am-5pm 

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Tuesday, April 7 

6:30 pm - 9 pm 

Hult Center for the 
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Tickets on Sale Now! 


General Admission - $75 • VIP Early Entrance - $90 


Tickets: Hult Center Box Office • 541.682.5000 • hultcenter.org 



EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 























Hult Center 


for the Performing Arts 

7TH & WILLAMETTE, DOWNTOWN EUGENE 


Don’t miss these 
upcoming performances! 


OREGON FALUN DAFA ASSOCIATION PRESENTS 

Shen Yun 

Tuesday, March 31 at 7:30 pm 
SILVA— $80-$120 

Classical Chinese dance, a full orchestra 
and dazzling animated backdrops. 

HULT CENTER PRESENTS 

(sub)Urban Projections 

Thursday, April 2 at 8:00 pm 
LOBBY— FREE; No ticket required 
The Lobby is transformed in this kinetic 
multimedia experience. 


HULT CENTER PRESENTS 

Quixotic: Gravity of Center 

Friday, April 3 at 8:00 pm 
SILVA— $20-$45 

Don't miss this multi-sensory experience 
featuring Cirque-style aerialists, digital 
symphonies, visual effects and more. 



Quixotic 


HIV ALLIANCE PRESENTS 

Damsels, Divas & Dames: 

Sweet 16 

Saturday, April 4 at 7:30 pm 
SORENG— $25-$30; C & Y (middle, high school) 
A light-hearted evening of drag, 
impersonation and music. 

FOOD FOR LANE COUNTY PRESENTS 

25th Annual Chefs’ Night Out 

Tuesday, April 7 at 6:30 pm 
LOBBY— $75; $90 VIP Entry 
Local restaurants, wineries and 
microbreweries in a culinary evening 
to support Food for Lane County. 

EUGENE BALLET COMPANY PRESENTS 

Tommy the Ballet 

Saturday, April 11 at 7:30 pm 
Sunday, April 12 at 2:00 pm 
SILVA— $28-$53; C & Y 
The legendary story of the 
“Pinball Wizard" with live music 
and original choreography. 


TICKET DISCOUNT CODES: 

C = college student, G = Group, 

S = senior, Y = youth, M = active military 


BUY TICKETS TODAY! 
HultCenter.org 
541-682-5000 

HULT CENTER TICKET OFFICE HOURS: 
Tue-Fri, 12-5pm; Sat, 11am-3pm 

ONE HOUR BEFORE PERFORMANCE MON-SAT, 
TWO HOURS BEFORE ON SUN 

UO TICKET OFFICE AT 
EMU SOUTH AT MAC COURT: 
Mon-Fri, 10am -5pm 

HultCenterArts 
@HultCenter 




VLT 

86th SEASON! 


The Very Little Theatre 

presents a Classic Musical: 

A FUNNY 
THING 
HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY 
TO THE FORUM 

Music & Lyrics by 
Stephen Sondheim 
Book by Bert Shevelove 
and Larry Gelbart 
Michael P. Watkins, director 

March 13-15,19-22, 
26-29, April 2-4 

7:30 evening curtain 
2 p.m. Sunday matinees 
Tix: $20 ($15 for Thursdays) 
Box office open 2:00-5:00 
Wed.-Sat., 2350 Hilyard St. 
Tix on-line at www.TheVLT.com 

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GALLERIES 

OPENINGS/ 

RECEPTIONS 

Eugene Textile Center Serti 
Method for Silk Painting w/Ariana 
Schwartz, 10am-4pm Saturday 
& Sunday, March 28-29, $195 
+ $30 materials, reg. at wkly. 
ws/lz6.1510 Jacobs Dr. 

Gudger Hot Shop Artis-in- 
residence Kaleb Folck 6-9pm 
Friday, March 22; hot glass 
demos 6-10pm March 26-29. 
1002 W. Second 

Jacobs Gallery “The Macchia 
Six: Landscape Painters,” art 
by Jerry Ross, Victorial Biedron, 
Jean Denis, Jaqueline Hamer 
Lokowski, Patti McNutt 8c Sally 
Schwader, opening reception 
5:30-8pm Friday, March 22, runs 
through May 2. Hult Center 

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art 

“Frozen Film Frames: Portraits 
of Filmmakers by Jonas Mekas,” 
April 1 through June 2; “NewArt 
Northwest Kids: Last Night I Had 
the Strangest Dream,” annual 
K-12 exhibit, through May 19; 

“The Architecture 8c Legacy of 
Pietro Belluschi,” through April 
26; Laura Heit Exhibit, through 
March 29; “Under Pressure: 
Contemporary Prints from the 
Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer 
8c his Family Foundation,” 
through March 29; “The Word 
Became Flesh: Images of Christ 
in Orthodox Devotional Objects,” 
through June 21; “10 Symbols of 
Longevity 8c Late Joseon Korean 
Culture” 8c “Elegance 8c Nobility: 
Modern 8c Contemporary Korean 
Literati Taste,” through March 15. 
UO Campus 

Maude Kerns Art Center 

“JELL-0 Art Show: JELL-0 
Odyssey,” music, art contest 
8c appearances by Slug Queen 
8c Queen of JELL-0 Art, 5-8pm 
Saturday, March 28 only. 1910 
E. 15th 

Ninkasi Brewery Art by screen 
printer 8c illustrator Neal 
Williams, opening reception 
6-9:30pm Friday, March 22. 222 
Van Buren 

Oakshire Brewing “Artistic 
Endeavors 8c Rhythmic Imagery,” 
oil paintings by John W. Olsen, 
opening reception 6pm Friday, 
March 22, runs through April 23. 
202 Madison 

Off the Waffle “Affordable Art,” 
work by Margie Templeton 8c 
“Colors of the Breeze,” work 
by Yunie LeNoue, runs April 1 
through May 31. 840 Willamette 

Schrager 8c Clarke Gallery “A 

Gathering of Uncommon Women: 
The Power of Portrait,” works by 
Bets Cole, opening reception 


5-8pm Friday, March 22, runs 
through March 28 only. 260 
Willamette 

Territorial Vineyards “Autism 
Artism 2015 Gala Opening,” 
artist reception presented by 
Kind Tree-Autism Rocks, 5-2pm 
Wednesday, April 1. 902 W. Third 

Wandering Goat “Encamped 
Upon the Borderland,” art 
by Mattias D. Roth, opening 
reception 5-8pm Friday, March 
28, runs through April 23. 268 
Madison 

CONTINUING 

16 Tons Cafe Work by Mark 
Matindale, through March 31. 
2864 Willamette 

Art 8c Jones Infusion Gallery 

Acrylic paintings by Sophie 
Navarro. 290 Willamette 

Backstreet Gallery “The Spirit of 
Being,” works by Pattie Brooks- 
Anderson 8c Stephanie Ames. 

1421 Bay St., Florence 

Brail’s Restaurant Paintings 8c 
photos by J. Scott Hovis. 1689 
Willamette 

Cowfish Work by Jessica 
Haeckel, through March 31. 62 W. 
Broadway 

David Joyce Gallery “Tale of 
Two Palettes/Palates” 8c “Colorful 
Historical Stories: An Exploration 
of the Historical Experiences with 
Food,” through May. LCC Campus 

Dot Dotson’s Photography by 
Matt McWalters, through April 9. 
1668 Willamette 

Downtown Library “Stephen 
Sondheim: A Career on the 
Cutting Edge” by LCC Depts. of 
Music, Dance 8c Theater 8c animal 
masks by Brendan McCullough. 
100 W. 10th 

Emerald Art Center “We Are 

Full Body Viewers,” paintings by 
Paul Rutz; “Figures, Shadows, 
Forms 8c Light,” photos by Donald 
Gustavson. 500 Main St., Spfd 

Full City High St. Cafe Work by 
Jasmine Daniels, through April 
12. 295 E. 13th 
Full City Pearl St. 8c Palace 
Bakery Work by Karen Diette 
through April 19; Carmen Bayley 
8c Hal Huestis through April 12; 
Kristen Brack through April 5; 
Selena Dugan-Fields through 
March 29. 842 8c 844 Pearl 

Gallery at the Watershed 

“Winter Invitational,” several 
artists, through March 30. 321 
Mill 

Lane County Historical Museum 

“In the Spotlight: A History of 
Theatre in Lane County,” through 
April 18. 240 W. 13th 

Lincoln Gallery “SELF” work 
from local artists and OSLP 
participants, also digital 
creations by Emery Blackwell. 
309 W. Fourth 


MECCA “Explosions,” work by 
Erin Even 8c Jill Mardin. 449 
Willamette 

Mezzanine Gallery “Somewhere 
Out There,” photography by Zeb 
Andrew, through May 22. UO 
School of Law 

MODERN “Fresh! The Art of 
Modern Jewelry Design,” work 
produced by UO students. 202 
E. Fifth 

New Zone Gallery “Zone 4 All,” 
non-juried exhibition. 164 W. 
Broadway 

O’Brien Photo Imaging Gallery 

“The Many Faces of One,” photos 
by Karen Rainsong, through April 
11. 2833 Willamette 

Out on a Limb “Weird, Wild, 
Wonder,” assemblages 8c 
collages by Marilyn Kent. 191 E. 
Broadway 

Pacific Rim “Oil as a Medium,” 
work by Dan Chen, Evelyn Jones, 
Nancy McEwen, Chuck North 8c 
Yvonne Stubbs, through March 
28.160 E. Broadway 

Passionflower Design 

“Hatch Oregon,” meet local 
entrepreneurs from Agrarian Ales 
8c Red Wagon Creamery. 128 E. 
Broadway 

Raven Frame Works “My 

Curious Camera,” photos by 
photojournalist John Macauley, 
1959-21. 325 W. Fourth 

Science Factory “Nikon Small 
World,” exhibit of 20 top winning 
images from photomicrophy 
competition, through March. 
2300 Leo Harris Pkwy 

Springfield City Hall Work by 
Jean Liittschwager 8c Dana 
Ferguson. 225 Fifth St., Spfd 

Springfield Museum 2015 
Student Art Exhibit, through 
March 31. 590 Main St., Spfd 

UO Museum of Natural 8c 
Cultural History “Restore 
Oregon,” photos by UO 
environmental studies students; 
“Explore Oregon: 300 Million 
Years of Northwest Natural 
History”; “Site Seeing: Snapshots 
of Historical Archaeology in 
Oregon”; “Oregon: Where Past is 
Present: 10,000-year-old shoes 
8c other wonders”; “Road Trip: The 
Roadside Geology of Oregon”; 8c 
highlights of the Jensen Arctic 
Exhibit. UO Campus 

Vistra Framing 8c Gallery 

“Speaking Landscapes,” 
paintings by John Pellitier. 160 E. 
Broadway 

White Lotus Gallery “Storm 
Clouds 8c Wetlands,” paintings by 
Margaret Prentice, through April 
14. 262 Willamette 

Wise Turtle Acupuncture 

Portraits in acrylic by Amy 
Mitchell Guendulay, through April 
8. 802 A St., Spfd 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 

































THIS MURAL’S 
GOT POTENTIAL 

The Cannery teams up with local 
artist Erik Roggeveen to create an 
innovative mounted mural 

ocal artist Erik Roggeveen picked up a paintbrush 
for the first time only two-and-a-half years ago. 

Today, you can see his 112-square-foot hand- 
painted mural — his first ever — on the east¬ 
facing wall of The Cannery at 11th and Mill Alley. 
The Cannery pub unveiled the mural March 6 and it’s 
hard to miss: The vividly colored, forced-perspective 
painting evinces a comic book-style and depicts a woman 
holding a jar of alien-looking pickled foods, like garlic, 
carrots and purple broccoli. 

Roggeveen’s mural, titled “Potential,” is artistic in a 
way that transcends his painting skills. He sidestepped 
the usual restraints of murals — immoveable, unsellable 
and destined for a fate of graffiti or weather damage — by 
mounting it onto a frame. 

The project began a year and a half ago, when Roggeveen 
met Lori Mace, a chiropractor and co-owner of The Cannery, 
after having “an old-man-back problem.” Mace learned 
Roggeveen was an artist and mentioned that she and her 
husband had wanted a mural for the side of the building. 

“I hadn’t really been advertising myself as an artist, but 
I promised that I would take any interesting job that came 
to me,” says Roggeveen, who comes from a background of 
writing, sculpture, online gaming, video games and comic 
book art. He has only been a professional artist for the last 
few years, self-taught through daily lessons with YouTube 


videos and thrift store art books. His illustration of Conan 
O’Brien, titled “The Holiday Maestro,” was featured on 
CONAN and resides digitally in O’Brien’s online museum 
of fan artwork. He’s also working on a graphic novel, 
Billybob <REDACTED> Battles the Establishment. 

Roggeveen drew some sketches and presented the frame 
idea, which would allow the building’s existing mural (the 
lederhosen beervana from when the building still housed 
Bier Stein) to remain intact. Murals have always been 
quintessential to community art, but he’s taken the notion 
further with the mounted frame, making it possible for the 
work of other artists to rotate through. Roggeveen’s mural 
will act as the default, but it will interchange with others. 

“I was trying to think, ‘What really defines murals? 
What are the problems with doing a mural?”’ he says. 
“You’re stuck with it. If you put it on the wall of your 
business, unless you break down the wall and take it with 


you, it’s gone.” Roggeveen says he built the frame with the 
help of welder Tom Campina and compares it to a metal 
TV mount. 

The Cannery already displays work from local artists 
inside that rotates every three months, and the mural is an 
extension of that. “One of our missions is to give back to 
the community, and that has always been through local 
artists,” says Mace, who sees opportunities for artists to 
exhibit their work, as well as for other businesses to 
sponsor artists and use the space as sort of a billboard that 
supports both local artists and businesses. 

As for advice for interested mural novices? 

“You don’t have to be the guy who’s born with the 
ability to create the ‘Mona Lisa.’ You have to be the guy 
who gets up every day and kicks ass and takes 
opportunities,” Roggeveen says. “Basically, you just have 
to keep plowing forward.” — Sophia June 



PREPARE TO BE 
MESMERIZED 

Harmonic Laboratory and Quixotic Fusion 
team up for an explosive arts festival 
at the Hu It ___ 



QUIXOTIC FUSION’S 
‘GRAVITY OF CENTER’ 




\ 



#hh 






S itting on the carpet of the Hult Center lobby on a 
misty February evening, a group of artists strain 
to look up at the towering ceiling with its jumble 
of M.C. Escher-like angles, balconies and 
staircases. They toss around terms like scrim and 
pulley and trapeze. 

The group decides they want to fasten a net to the 
wood beams where aerial dancers can twist and twirl. 
One artist, Mica Thomas, describes the scene as “that big 
moment that kind of shocks you a bit before the ending.” 

Thomas is the artistic director for Quixotic Fusion, a 
performing arts troupe of 15-plus artists, dancers, costumer 
designers, animators, composers and lighting specialists 
from Kansas City. The troupe gained fame from its 2012 
TED performance, “Dancing with Light,” and they recently 
performed with Cirque du Soleil. 

The city of Eugene’s Cultural Services department 
flew Thomas out to see the space and to meet with local 
artist collective Harmonic Laboratory, directed by UO 
associate dance professor Brad Garner, composer Jeremy 
Schropp, UO digital arts instructor John Park and 


intermedia artist Jon Bellona. The two groups are 
partnering for Harmonic Lab’s (sub)Urban Projections 
2015, an annual multimedia arts festival. 

“This is not something we do all the time,” Thomas 
says of the partnership between Quixotic Fusion and 
Harmonic Lab. “I think us joining forces — that is really 
unique, having those two things merge together to make 
something beautiful.” 

Last year, for one dazzling night, the festival filled the 
Hult lobby with a kaleidoscopic and cutting-edge mix of 
lights, dance, music and 3-D projection mapping. This 
year, the fest spans two nights, April 2 and 3, and will 
feature the world premiere of Quixotic Fusion’s latest 
production, “Gravity of Center.” 

“We’re going all in on this one,” says Eugene Public 
Art Manager Isaac Marquez, an organizer for the event. 

The event’s unexpectedly high attendance in 2014 
made it difficult for the audience to see all aspects of the 
show — what Harmonic Lab considers a good problem, 
but one that needed to be addressed this year. 

“There are two shows happening simultaneously,” 


Garner says. Each show will repeat, giving audiences 
members a chance to see anything they missed. Local star 
female impersonator Karess Ann Slaughter (ne Cornel 
Hardiman) will emcee and help corral the crowd. 

In addition to Quixotic Fusion, Harmonic Lab is 
working with several local and national collaborators: 
Eugene band Betty and the Boy will perform for a pas de 
deux by dancers from Ballet Fantastique; Medium Troy 
will play with the Bohemian Dub Orchestra; Seattle poet 
Michelle Penaloza will read her piece landscape/ 
heartbreak to the choreography of UO adjunct dance 
instructor Cynthia Gutierrez-Garner; Arizona State dance 
professor and choreographer Mary Fitzgerald will fly in 
with dancer Jessica Rajko and digital artist Casey Farina 
to perform “Flow States”; and literally dozens more. 

One piece not to miss is “Double Blacklight String 
Quartet,” composed by Schropp. Over backing audio 
produced by Medium Troy, the double quartet will flank 
four dancers in phantasmagoric costumes created by 
Anya Dikareva, a UO grad student in the art department. 
All will be doused in black light. 

“I’ll be tracking hand or bow motions,” says Park, 
explaining that there will be reflective tape on performers, 
which will be picked up by an infrared tracking camera 
and projected on a triangular screen above. 

The first night culminates with a group finale, 
including Quixotic Fusion’s high-flying dance act in the 
net. The second night is the premiere of “Gravity of 
Center.” “It’s about gravitational forces and how they’re 
reflected in relationships,” Thomas explains. 

“Part of the collaboration process is trusting and fate,” 
Garner says of the festival. “That’s what we enjoy about it 
— the unknown.” — Alex V. Cipolle 

The (sub)Urban Projections festival kicks off at 8 pm Thursday, April 2, in 
the Hult Center lobby; free. Quixotic Fusion presents “Gravity of Center” 
at 8 pm Friday, April 3, in the Hult’s Silva Concert Hall; $20-$40. All 
ages. Visit hultcenter.org for tickets. 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 




™ 12 12 ™f Sort 

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2 SUNDAY’S, TUESDAY’S 
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11:55,3:25,7:00,10:20 


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RUN ALL NIGHT (DIG) (R) 

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11:40,2:25,5:00,7:40,10:15 


STILL ALICE (DIG) (PG-13) 

2:15,4:50,7:25 


THE GUNMAN (DIG) (R) 

10:45,1:35,4:25,7:15,10:00 


THE DUFF (DIG) (PG-13) 

7:50,10:30 


HOME (3D) (PG) 

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10:30,11:45,4:40,8:35,9:50 


THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE: SPONGE 
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11:50,2:30,5:05, 7:40,10:10 


SHOWTIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE • VALID FOR FRIDAY ONLY 


| Assistive Listening & Captioning System Avail 


Encircle Film Series 


OMESTRETCH 


HOMELESS IS A SITUATION, 


IMlWiiml! 



Bijou Art Cinema on 13th 
Thursday April 2nd • 6pm 


Speakers and Discussion Leaders: 
Wayne Martin and Jana Thrift 
two local advocates for the unhoused 


ill9i 


(Mar 27-Apr 2 | 


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, ART CINEMAS , 


bijou-cinemas.com 


SERENA 

Fri-Sun 12:00,2:20,4:45,7:10,9:35 
Mon-Hiu 4:45,7:10,9:35 

STILL AUCE 

Fri-Sun 12:05,5:35 

Mon-Wed 5:35 

Thu 3:45 

MR. TURNER 

Fri-Sun 2:30,7:50 

Mon-Wed 7:50 

Thu 8:45 

Inwde Documentary Series presents: 

THE HOMESTRETCH 

Thu 6:00 


Showtimes and info: 541-686-2458 


43 Wt Broadway 


-cmemas.com 


IT FOLLOWS 

Fri-Sat 12:30,2:45,5:00,7:15,9:30 
Sun 12:30,2:45,3:15,5:00,7:15,9:00,9:30 
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THE WRECKING CREW 

Fri-Sun 3:00,5:15,7:30,9:45 
Mon-Thu 4:45,7:00,9:15 
WHAT WE 00 IN THE SHADOWS 

Fri-Sun 12:00,2:00,4:00,6:00,8:00,10:00 
Mon-Thu 2:00,4:00,6:00,8:00,10:00 
LEVIATHAN 

Fri-Sun 12:00 
Mon-Thu 1:45 


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I AM BIG BIRD 
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HOME [CC,DV] (PG) ★ 

Fri. - Sat.(1115 1215 140 335) 405 435 630 900 

HOME 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1145 210) 700 930 
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THE GUNMAN [CC,DV] (R) 


Fri. - Sat.740 PM 1025 PM 


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Fri. - Sat.(l 1 06 1130 1 45 215) 440 510 725 755 1 010 1040 

RUN ALL NIGHT [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.635 PM 925 PM 

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MOVIES 






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W*' . 


MAIKA MONROE AND 
JAKE WEARY IN 
IT FOLLOWS 





SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED 
DEMON 


Screwed doesn’t even begin to describe the Rids in 
David Robert Mithell’s new horror film It Follows 


I n his groundbreaking 1996 movie Scream, director Wes Craven — with help from Kevin 
Williamson’s cheeky postmodern screenplay — peeled back the mask on modern horror, 
revealing a set of previously unspoken rules governing the mayhem in teen slasher 
flicks. Among those rules to avoiding murder (“Don’t do drugs!”), perhaps the most 
resonant for a generation living under the specter of AIDS was this: No premarital 
hanky-panky. In other words, when it comes to surviving a horror movie, always remember 
that sex equals death. 

There is very little that is postmodern about the new horror film It Follows, though writer- 
director David Robert Mitchell does take Craven’s “sex is death” prohibition and utterly run 
amok with it, creating a randy little masterpiece of post-AIDS paranoia and terror. 

The set-up is as simple as the moral implications are complex: At the end of a strange, 
somewhat disturbing date, Jay (Maika Monroe) has steamy backseat sex with Hugh (Jake 
Weary), who immediately drugs her, ties her up in an abandoned building and warns her 
about “it” — a shape-shifting, slow-moving but persistent sexually transmitted demon that 
will continue to follow her until it either kills her or she fucks someone else, in turn passing 
it along. 

Channeling such legendary filmmakers as horror master John Carpenter and, to a lesser 
degree, Stanley Kubrick, Mitchell employs a tinkling, almost cheesy score of synthesized 
music combined with gorgeous cinematography — jump cutting from anxiously airy wide- 
angle shots to jarring close-ups — to create an atmosphere that is at once hypnotic and 
unnerving. 

Shot in and around Detroit, the film revels in the decayed grandeur of that former 
industrial powerhouse, creating a gritty realism that is heightened by a cast of young actors 
who, unlike the typical knuckleheads and bimbos common to most horror films, display all 
the unreconstructed yearning and blemished discomfort of kids on the verge of adulthood. 

Because the teens seem so real and familiar — as they make fart jokes, clip their toenails 
and tentatively advance and retreat on each other’s cursed affections — the terror that stalks 
them is that much more effective, like a manifestation of their own sexual uncertainty. 

And aside from all this, It Follows is just plain fun and scary, like Halloween and 
Nightmare on Elm Street before it. As in those classics of the genre, It Follows hones in on 
a tight-knit group of teens that finds itself screwed by pure evil, with enough twists and 
tension to keep the audience on edge until the final frame. ■ 

It Follows opens Friday, March 27, at Bijou Metro. 


FOCUS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(1105 150) 445 720 955 

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RUN ALL NIGHT [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(135) 430 735 1015 


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www. R EG ma y ics. c i 


WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS 

Vampires: They’re just like us! They have terrible house¬ 
mates who don’t do the dishes. They worry about looking 
good when they go out at night, even if the clubs they’re 
going to are dead and boring. They get twitchy when the 
cops come by. And they hate it when their roommates 
bring home uncool new friends. Of course, their dishes are 
solely used for blood, they worry about what they look like 
because they can’t see themselves in mirrors and they 
might be trying to hide dead bodies by hypnotizing the 
cops. Worst of all, the annoying new friend might be 
immortal. What We Do in the Shadows is co-written and 
directed by Flight of the Conchords’ Jemaine Clement and 
Taika Waititi, who directed Clement in 2007’s Eagle vs. 
Shark. This will tell some people everything they need to 
know about Shadows, which is as deadpan and mundane a 
vampire mockumentary set in New Zealand as you could 
ever hope to see. Waititi plays Viago, whose ingratiating, 
eager smile rarely falters; Clement is Vladislav, who looks 
like an extra-hirsute Nick Cave. Rounding out the house¬ 
hold is Deacon (Jonathan Brugh), who strings along a 
human, Jackie (Jackie van Beek), and Petyr (Ben Fransh- 


am), whose Cthulhu-like teeth render him pretty much 
mute. And the leader of a low-key gang of werewolves yells 
at his pack to wear tracksuits when they’re going to 
change, so they don’t bust out of their jeans. Being a vam¬ 
pire is just another way ofwalkingthe world, folks. You just 
get to do it for a lot longer. ( Bijou Metro} 


Leviathan 

It’s a bleak, tragic world in director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s 
coastal Russia — teens hang out in the rubble of an old 
church, garbage cans burn in the street, women work in a 
fusty fish factory, small-time politicians nurse delusions 
of grandeur. On its surface a tale of eminent domain, 
Leviathan’s central character, Koyla — a self-described 
simpleton with no discernible job — fights to keep his 
family’s land against a government and church in 
cahoots. There are threads of the biblical story Naboth’s 
Vineyard here, but at its core the film is about collective 
responsibility for the state of the world. As Koyla’s lawyer 
put it: “Everything is everyone’s fault.” Success begets 
success, but in Zvyagintsev’s Russia, tragedy begets 
more tragedy. [Bijou Metro) 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 


















































MUSIC LISTINGS 


THURSDAY 3/26 

AMBROSIA Stone Cold Jazz w/ 
Kenny Reed—8pm; Jazz, n/c 
AXE & FIDDLE Fernando, Coyote 
Willow—8:30pm; Indie, 
Americana, Celtic, n/c 
B8cB LOUNGE Karaoke— 
9:30pm 

BARN LIGHT Karaoke—9pm ; 
n/c 

BLACK FOREST Sol, Lament City 
Scape—10pm; n/c 
THE COOLER Karaoke—10pm 
COWFISH Bass-Nite w/Aaron 
Jackson 8c guests—9pm; EDM, 
bass-house, n/c 
ELTAPATIO CANTINA Karaoke— 
8pm; n/c 

EUGENE WINE CELLARS Jeremy 
Pruitt—6pm; n/c 
GRANARY Electra Swing—9pm; 
$5 

HOP VALLEY TASTING ROOM 

Nestler 8c Hawtin—6pm; Soul, 
R8cB, n/c 

JAZZ STATION Paul Krueger 
Quartet—7:30pm; Jazz, $6-$8 

KENNETH B GALLERY Dave 
Craddock—Ppm; Piano bar, n/c 
KOWLOON’S Karaoke under the 
Stars—10pm; n/c 
LUCKEY’S Thursday Night 
Funk—9:30pm; Open jam, $2 
MAC’S The Tracey’s—6pm; 
Americana, acoustic, n/c 
MAX’S DJ Victor—10pm; n/c 
NINKASI ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING Make-a-Band 
Spotlight—2pm; $5 
OAKSHIRE PUB Hipbilly—5pm ; 
Roots, indiegrass, n/c 
THE OLD PAD Karaoke—9pm; 
n/c 

OVERTIME TAVERN West Side 
Blues Jam—8:30pm; Open jam, 
n/c 

REALITY KITCHEN Acoustic 
Reality—5pm; Open mic, n/c 
RESTOBAR Steven McVay—5pm 


SAM BOND’S GARAGE Polecat, 
Corwin Bolt 8c the Wingnuts— 
9pm; $8 

TAP 8c GROWLER Gumbo 
Groove—2pm; Folk-fueled fun- 
grass, n/c 

TERRITORIAL VINEYARDS Candy 
Lee—2pm; n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN The Tonewood 
Trio—2pm; Jazz, n/c 
WOW HALL Andre Nickatina, 
Anonymous That Dude, Fam BiZ, 
TNC 9er—9pm; Hip hop, $20 
adv., $25 door 

FRIDAY 3/27 

5TH ST. CORNUCOPIA Dylan 8c 
Anthony 8c Friends—9:30pm; 
Acoustic, n/c 

AXE 8c FIDDLE The Tara Novellas, 
Candy Lee—8:30pm; Indie folk, 
$5 

BLACK FOREST Wade Graham, 
Ape Machine, Mother’s 
Whiskey—10pm; n/c 
BLAIRALLY ARCADE ‘80s Night 
w/Chris, Jen 8c John—9pm; 
Vinyl, $3 

THE BLIND PIG Karaoke w/Jim 
Jim—9pm 

THE BOREAL Pastel Ghost, 

Force Publique, Tetra Bomb, 
Nightspace—8pm; Electronic, 
dreamwave, all ages, $5 
COWFISH Freak-Nite w/Spoctor 
Shmock aka The Audio 
Schizophrenic—9pm; Juke, 

EDM 

CRESWELL COFFEE The Hank 
Shreve Band—2pm; Rock, 
blues, $5 

D’S DINER Karaoke—9pm; n/c 

ELTAPATIO CANTINA Karaoke w/ 
KJ Rick—9pm; n/c 
GRANARYThe Good 01’ 
Interstellar Boys—9pm; $5 
THE GREEN ROOM Electric 
Weekends w/DJ Stephen 
Rose—9pm; Electro house, dub- 
step, n/c 

HAPPY HOURS Dragstrip 
Superstar—8:30pm; Rock, n/c 


HILTON HOTEL Aftermath— 
2pm; Jazz, n/c 

JERSEY’S Karaoke—9pm; n/c 
LEVEL UP DJ food stamp—9pm; 
Rap, breaks, soul, n/c 
LUCKEY’S Asap Lotto, Easy 
Money—10pm; Hip hop, $10 
MAC’S Code Red Party Band— 
8pm; Rock, $5 
MULLIGAN’S Christie 8c 
McCallum—9pm; Americana, 
n/c 

NOBLE ESTATE URBAN Natty-0 
8c Gaye Lee—5pm; n/c 
THE O BAR Karaoke—10pm 
OAKSHIRE PUB Fiddlin’Sue 
Band—4:30pm, Western swing; 
Gary Munz—2pm; n/c 
O’DONNELL’S Karaoke—9pm 
THE PADDOCK Kevin James 
Pertinen—2pm; Folk, rock, 
blues, n/c 

PIZZA RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

Olem Alves Duo—6:30pm; n/c 

PORKY’S PALACE Karaoke— 
8pm 

RAVEN A PUB Karaoke—9pm 

SAM BOND’S BREWING 

Llorona—6pm; Mexamericana, 
n/c 

SAM BOND’S GARAGE Ed Cole, 
Testface, Tractor Operator— 
9pm; CD 8c LP release, $6 
TAYLOR’S DJ Victor—10pm; Hip 
hop, dance, n/c 
TERRITORIAL VINEYARDS 
Butterchuck—2pm; n/c 
TIMEOUTTAVERN Karaoke— 
8pm; n/c 

TRACKSTIRS Karaoke—9pm ; 
n/c 

TRAVELERS COVE Peter Giri 8c 
Lloyd Tolbert—6pm; Acoustic, 
electric, n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN Neil Johnson 
Band—9pm; n/c 

WANDERING GOAT Wounded 
Giant, Extant, Septic Burial— 
8pm; Grind, death, shirtsoff, 
don. 

WHITE HORSE SALOON 

Karaoke—9pm; n/c 


WHITEAKER TATTOO 
COLLECTIVE Saffron—8pm; n/c 
WOW HALL Black Hare, Black 
Bell, Dead Kingmaker—9pm; 
Rock, $8 adv., $10 door 

SATURDAY 3/28 

775 RIVER ROAD Rita Hosking 
8c Cousin Jack—8pm; Singer/ 
songwriter, $15 
ALDER BISTRO (YACHATS) 

Candy Lee—6:30pm; Folk, jazz, 
n/c 

AMBROSIA Stone Cold Jazz w/ 
Kenny Reed—8pm; Jazz, n/c 

ATRIUM BUILDING Marty 
Chilla—2pm; Birthday concert, 
n/c 

AXE 8c FIDDLE Troupe Carnivale, 
Llorona—8:30pm; Dark 
Americana, Mexamericana, $5 

B8cB LOUNGE Karaoke— 
9:30pm 

BLACK FOREST Nasalrod, 

Bullets or Balloons, Dirtclod 
Fight, Kemosabe—10pm; n/c 
COWFISH Sup! w/Michael 
Human—9pm; Trap, hip hop, 
twerk 

DOC’S PAD Evolve Saturdays— 
9pm; EDM, hip hop, n/c 

DUCK BAR 8c GRILL Karaoke— 
9pm; n/c 

DUCK INN Karaoke—10pm 

ELTAPATIO CANTINA DJ 8c 

Dance Music—9pm; n/c 

EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF THE 
RESURRECTION Lindsey 
Rodgers—4:30pm; Organ recit¬ 
al, n/c 

GRANARYSNAFU Light—10pm ; 
$3-$5 

HAPPY HOURS Splat!—8:30pm; 
Classic rock, n/c 
KENNETH B GALLERYSusan 

Jones—6pm; Comedy, $15 
LEVEL UP DJ Rock ‘n’ Roll 
Damnation—9pm; ’70s 8c ’80s 
rock, heavy metal; n/c 
LUCKEY’S Lojia, Beef Bottom— 
10pm; $5 

MAC’S Kevin Selfe 8c The 
Tornadoes—8pm; Blues, $6 

MCDONALD THEATRE Yonder 
Mountain String Band, The Cave 
Singers—8pm; Acoustic, $25 
adv., $30 door 
MULLIGAN’S Kevin James 
Pertinen—8:30pm; Folk, rock, 
blues, n/c 


NOBLE ESTATE URBAN Peter Giri 
8c Lloyd Tolbert—6pm; n/c 
OAKSHIRE PUB Gumbo 
Groove—5pm; Fungrass, folk, 
n/c 

POUR HOUSE Karaoke—9pm 
OUACKER’S Ladies Night 8c 
DeeJay—9pm; n/c 
RAVEN A PUB Karaoke—9pm 

SAM BOND’S BREWING Corwin 
Bolt 8c the Wingnuts—6pm; 

Folk, n/c 

SAM BOND’S GARAGE 

Geographer, The Weather 
Machine—9:30pm; Indie pop, 
$10 

TAYLOR’S BAR 8c GRILLE DJ 

Crown—10:30pm; Hip hop, 
dance, n/c 

TIMEOUTTAVERN Karaoke— 
8pm; n/c 

TINYTAVERN Christie 8c 
McCallum—9pm; Americana 
TRACKSTIRS Karaoke—9pm ; 
n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN Blue Light 
Special—9pm; n/c 
WANDERING GOAT Spit, 
Misarchy, Weather, Knave, Meat 
Head—8pm; Hardcore, don. 
WESTENDTAVERN Karaoke— 
9pm; n/c 

WHITE HORSE SALOON Karaoke; 
Code Red—9pm; n/c 
WOW HALL Kitty, Daisy 8c Lewis 
w/Gemma Ray—9pm; British 
roots rock, $15 adv., $18 door 

SUNDAY 3/29 

AGATE ALLEY BISTRO Karaoke— 
9pm; n/c 

AXE 8c FIDDLE Tuck 8c Daisy, 
Margo Cilker—7:30pm; n/c 
COWFISH Just Listen w/Qamron 
Crooks—9pm; Pop, deep house, 
n/c 

COZMICIris DeMent, Pieta 
Brown—8pm; Singer/songwrit¬ 
er, $29-$32 

CUSH Open Mic—8pm; Variety, 
n/c 

GRANARY Green Mountain 
Bluegrass Band—6pm; n/c 
JAZZ STATION All-Comers Jazz 
Jam—4pm; Jazz, $3 
LUCKEY’S Broadway Revue 
Burlesque Night—10pm; $5 
OAKSHIRE PUB Chad 
Kashuba—4pm; n/c 


SAM’S Open Mic Night—7pm; 
n/c 

SAM BOND’S GARAGE Rosie 8c 
The Barnstormers—8:30pm; 
Square dance, n/c 
SILVAN RIDGE WINERY My 

Darling Clementine—4pm; Folk, 
n/c 

TRAVELER’S COVE Paul Biondi 
Quartet—6pm; Variety, n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN Dave Bach— 
7pm; Guitar, n/c 
THE WEBFOOT Karaoke—9pm 
WOW HALL Mark Battles, Derek 
Luh—8:30pm; Hip hop, $20 
adv., $35 Dream Team 

MONDAY 3/30 

BLACK FOREST Karaoke—9pm 
THE BOREAL Living Rheuam, 
Bigger Than Mountains, Ari 8c 
Her Banjo, Beat Alice—8pm; 

Folk punk, all ages, $5 
BUGSY’S MondayBug—7pm; 
Acoustic, n/c 

COWFISH Inclusion w/Aaron 
Jackson 8c Guests—9pm; Bass- 
house, electro, n/c 
COZMIC Cure for the Common, 
McTuff—8:30pm; Electro-funk, 
$8 adv., $10 door 
DUCK BAR 8c GRILL 0FY Bingo— 
8:30pm; n/c 

MAC’S Hank Shreve 8c Friends— 
6pm; Blues, n/c 

PORKY’S PALACE Karaoke— 
8pm 

SAM BOND’S GARAGE Bingo— 
9pm; n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN Neil Johnson— 
7pm; Solo guitar, n/c 

TUESDAY 3/31 

AXE 8c FIDDLE Cuicani— 
8:30pm; Afro-Caribbean, n/c 
THE BOREAL PS0, Meat Head, 
Knave—8pm; Punk, hardcore, 
all ages, $5 

THE CITY iPod Night—6pm ; n/c 
COWFISH Work-Nite Vibin’ w/ 
Stephen Rose 8c Guests—9pm; 
House, hip hop, n/c 
COZMIC Make-a-Band 
Spotlight—6pm; $5 
EMBERS DJ Victor Plays 
Requests—8pm; n/c 



NEAR GREATNESS 


Geographer exists somewhere between the emotive synth pop arias of 
Depeche Mode and the earnest coffeehouse-meets-arena-rock of fellow Bay 
Area acts Train and Counting Crows. 

With echoes of The Killers, Geographer’s latest release, Ghost Modern (out 
now on Roll Call Records) tries to sound big — U2 big, the kind of watershed 
record that burns up the charts while soundtracking a generation. 

Central to Geographer’s sound is vocalist and primary songwriter Michael 
Deni’s remarkable and angelic tenor, a sort of blending of the vulnerability of 
Counting Crows’ Adam Duritz with Daryl Hall’s soulful chops and Bono’s 
theatrics. 

Lyrically, Deni is the archetypical sensitive modern rocker, aiming mostly 
to make the girls go “aww” with ultimately meaningless lines like: “You say 
you love me/ You know I just can’t deal/ I want to know what you mean.” 

Backing up Deni are the Far East-tinged floral string arrangements of “I’m 
Ready.” Elsewhere, “You Say You Love Me” is reminiscent of Depeche Mode’s 
“People Are People” before veeringtowards Paula Abdul and ending up a hook- 
heavy crowd-pleaser. 

Hook-heavy crowd-pleasers are Ghost Modern’s stock in trade. Is it 
successful? Despite tons of promise and talent, I’m afraid the answer is an 
astounding sorta. 

The record starts strong but slips and never recovers into a forgettable 
middle section. There’s impeccable production, some fine musicianship and 
Deni’s truly remarkable singing voice. Missing, however, are enough songs to 
turn the ear of a generation, which is the kind of lofty ambition Geographer 
positively reeks of. 

None of this means you shouldn’t listen. What’s sorely lacking from 
modern music is time for bands to grow, hit their stride and release their opus. 
And Geographer has all the ingredients of greatness. 

Geographer plays with Portland’s Weather Machine 9:30 pm Saturday, 
March 28, at Sam Bond’s; $10. 21-plus. — William Kennedy 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 26 , 2015 


ARE YOU LEXPERIENCED? 

Pop quiz: What do Joseph Campbell, Blade Runner and Trent Reznor have in common? 

Answer: The L.A. synth-pop quartet LEX. 

“A lot of our inspiration comes from movies such as Blade Runner, The Neverending Story 
and Labyrinth bandmember Leah Chrisholm tells £Wv ia email. Chrisholm grew up in Eugene. 

LEX is touring in support of their debut self-titled release produced by Peter Franco, 
who also worked on the last two Daft Punk records. The band describes its sound as 
“fantasy synth.” 

Inspiration for LEX’s live show also comes from an unexpected place. “We have written 
our own creation myth, based loosely off of Joseph Campbell’s monomyth,” Chrisholm says. 
“We then wrote the soundtrack to that myth, inspired by the likes of Trent Reznor and Cliff 
Martinez,” she continues, “and play it between our songs during our set as the creation myth 
is told over parts of it.” 

A distinct futuristic boho sense of visual style permeates LEX’s work. The band’s creative 
director, Michelle Zamora, has worked with Katy Perry and Pharrell among many others. 

The band also uses vintage analog synthesizers. “We do not play with any backing 
tracks or computers,” LEX said in a press release. 

“Which has been a challenge,” Chrisholm admits, “consideringthe album was recorded 
with all vintage synthesizers. But it has been a wonderful experience to figure out how to 
actually create live electronic music.” 

LEX plays 8 pm Tuesday, March 31, at WOW Hall; $10 adv., $12 door. — William Kennedy 



GRANARY Chris Stubbs—6pm ; 
piano, n/c; Tanya Morgan, Corina 
Corina, DJ Halo, Elena Leona 8c 
Lisa Vasquez—9:30pm; Hip 
hop, $3 

THE GREEN ROOM Karaoke— 
9pm 

GOODFELLA’S Karaoke—9pm ; 
n/c 

HOP VALLEY TASTING ROOM 

Bluegrass Jam—7pm; n/c 

HOT MAMA’S WINGS Open Mic— 
8pm; n/c 

JAZZ STATION Advanced Jam w/ 
Adam Harris—7:30pm; Jazz, $3 
LEVEL UP Ninkasi Karaoke 
Night w/KJ B-Ross—9pm; n/c 


LUCKEY’S Kashuesday w/Chad 
Kashuba 8c Lindsay LePon— 
9pm; Comedy, variety, $2 
MAC’S Roosters Blues Jam— 
7pm; n/c 

THE 0 BAR Karaoke—9pm 

SAM BOND’S GARAGE Bluegrass 
Jam—9pm; n/c 

VILLAGE GREEN Neil Johnson— 
7pm; Solo guitar, n/c 
WOW HALL LEX—8pm; Dream 
pop, $10 adv., $12 door 

WEDNESDAY^ 

5TH ST. CORNUCOPIA 

Karaoke—9pm 


ALI BABA’S The Replacements, 
Blondie, Iron Maiden, Prince— 
8pm; $25-$49.95 

BLACK FOREST Karaoke—9pm 
THE BLIND PIG Karaoke w/Jim 
Jim—9pm 

THE COOLER Hump Night Trivia 
w/DR Dumass—7pm; n/c 
COWFISH Rotation Live w/ 
Connah Jay 8c Guests—9pm; 
Hip hop, indie dance, n/c 
COZMICZach Heckendorf— 
8pm; Hip hop, $7 adv., $10 door 
ELK HORN BREWERY Henry 
Cooper, Gregg Biller 8c Scoop 
McGuire—5:30pm; Slide guitar, 
n/c 


GRANARY Mama Jan’s Blues 
Jam w/Brian Chevalier—8pm; 
n/c 

HAPPY HOURS Grateful Dead 
Wednesday—9pm; Dead con¬ 
cert vids, n/c 

HOP VALLEY TASTING ROOM 

Natty-0 8c Gaye Lee—6pm; 
Blues, rock, jazz, n/c 
JAZZ STATION Let’s Fool 
Around”: Vocal Showcase w/ 
Darline Jackson 8c Joanne 
Broh—7:30pm; Jazz, $6-$8 
JERSEY’S Karaoke—8pm; 
Ladies night, n/c 
LUCKEY’S Kl 8c the Architex— 
10pm; Hip hop, $2 


MULLIGAN’S Open Mic— 
8:30pm; Variety, n/c 
NEW MAX’S TAVERN Lonesome 
Randall—7pm; Rock 8c roll his¬ 
torian, n/c 

OAKSHIRE PUB Two Doors 
Down—5pm; Acoustic folk, n/c 
OLD PAD Trivia Night—9pm; n/c 
OPAL CENTER Lilly Hiatt—8pm; 
Singer/songwriter, $10 
POUR HOUSE Karaoke—9pm 
THE SHEDD Charlie 
Musselwhite—7:30 pm; 
Harmonica virtuoso, $27-$35 
TAYLOR’S BAR & GRILLE DJ 
Crown—10:30pm; Hip hop, top 
40, dance, n/c 


CORVALLIS 

(AND SURROUNDING AREAS) 

BIG RIVER RESTAURANT 

FR Red Diesel—8pm; 
Americana, bluegrass, n/c 

FIREWORKS RESTAURANT 

MOSouthtown Open Mic—9pm; 
n/c 



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Military Celebration 




r COME 

EBRATE 


April 4th 


raffle 
prizes ! 


A PORTION OF DRINK PROCEEDS WILL GO 

to Lane County Veterans 1 Housing & 
4 Spirits Veteran Scholarships 


March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 
















COUNTRY ROOTS 

Singer-songwriter Iris DeMent brings her brand 
of roots-foik to Cozmic 


N o one has a voice quite like Iris DeMent — an aching, soulful twang reminiscent 
of a bygone era. “She’s the best singer I’ve ever heard,” Merle Haggard has said 
of the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter. DeMent has done timeless duets 
with John Prine and Emmylou Harris, and her songs have graced both the silver 
and small screens (2010’s True Grit and Northern Exposure). Via email, EW 
caught up with DeMent, who plays March 29 at Cozmic, to chat about music 
collaborations, her music roots and her latest project. 

Your career is marked by collaborations such as the famous “In Spite of Ourselves” 
duet with John Prine . Is collaboration important to you as a musician? 

I’ve collaborated here and there along the way, but it’s nothing I’ve ever sought out. 
John Prine and I, by the time we did those duets together, had already been knowing each 
other a long time and the singing grew out of the friendship. We just fit together naturally 
in that way and it was, and still is, pure joy singing with him. We’ve done it so long it 
feels like going home now. 

In a recent interview, you said: “There was a stretch in my life when I started 
thinking about myself as an entertainer, and I became paralyzed ” What did you 
mean by that? 

I’m not an entertainer by nature. If there’s something entertaining about me it’s purely 
accidental. When I’ve tried to be “entertaining,” I’ve gotten myself into a lot of trouble, 
as in it made me lose the connection to the music, the loveline got cut. So, now I don’t 
even think about it. I think about relationship when I go out there. I think about, firstly, 
where I am with myself and then how to bring that to the room and accept what the room 
is giving to me and go with it. 

Your voice is very specif ic . Did you cultivate it or is it more organic? 

The earliest singers I heard, the ones who made those strong, first emotional 
impressions on me, came out of the country and gospel tradition. When I started writing 
and trying to express the music as I felt it and understood it, it came out in a similar style, 
which was more rural, or country — as we used to know country, not what you call 
“country” today. So I went with that. But I can feel that world opening up and taking on 
new expressions now that I’m older, and I feel open and interested in finding new ways 
of doing this. Maybe that has to do with having now lost both my parents as well as many 
of my older siblings. There’s a sadness in that but a lot of possibility that I can’t say I felt 
before or even felt a need to feel. 

Are you working on any new music? 

I recorded a record here in my living room last summer that ought to be out in the next 
few months. I’m working on the artwork even as we speak. It’ll be called “The Trackless 
Woods” and is 18 poems by the well-known and greatly revered Russian poet Anna 
Akhmatova that I set to music. Something I’ve never done before or thought about doing 
and I’d never even heard of her before, but the first poem of hers I read, it was like 
somebody walked in the room and said “set that to music,” so I did, and the “somebody” 
said “keep going,” so I did. It was one of the most joyous musical experiences I’ve ever 
had. I feel honored to have the opportunity to introduce her to so many, people like 
myself, who’d never heard of her before. ■ 

Folk singer-songwriter Pieta Brown joins Iris DeMent 8 pm Sunday, March 29, at Cozmic. Q&A edited for length and 
clarity. 



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MUSICIANS 
BEHIND BARS 

Local talent not only graces our 
stages, but pours our drinks 

W ould you like a gin and tonic with that 
guitar riff? How about a rum and Coke with 
that rhyme? 

“In Eugene, you’ll see a bartender 
onstage everywhere you go. We all play 
music,” says Casey Lynch, Level Up Arcade manager and 
bartender. 

Lynch is a prime example. Known to most as KI 
Design (emcee and ringleader of local hip-hop crew, The 
Architex), he has played countless shows, including a 
weekly residency — “Private Stock” at Luckey’s Club — 
going on four years now. 

If you’re a regular at any downtown bar or spend time 
in the Whiteaker’s newly dubbed “brewery district,” 
you’ve probably been invited to see some local music. It’s 
likely that the handbill casually slid your way came from 
the same charming person who poured your whiskey sour. 

Possibly the most valuable aspect of musicians working 
within booze culture is the ability to be gainfully employed 
without feeling compromised. It is the constant struggle of 
the artistic mind to find financial stability without feeling 
like it came at the price of one’s integrity. 

Lynch admits that he stumbled into the job by 
performing in the same bars that eventually came to 
employ him. He says the opportunity to self-promote is a 
benefit of tending bar. “As a bartender, you get to meet 
everybody from lawyers to the homeless,” he says. “Though 
I do more hip hop than bartending, more people recognize 
me from work.” 

The local celebrity status can be helpful, but the perks 
of a job in Eugene’s nightlife don’t end at self-promotion. 
Kelsey Barker, Sam Bond’s Garage bartender and bassist 
for Hot Pearl Snatch and Steel Kitty, left a job as a 
breakfast waitress, feeling tired and unappreciated. 

Looking for a change, Barker took on a part-time 
position at Sam Bond’s, holding down the auxiliary back 
bar on weekend evenings. Two years later, and now a 
fulltime bartender, she says she feels better suited to the 
late hours at the Whiteaker hotspot. 

“It’s easier to stay motivated,” Barker says. “At Sam 
Bond’s I am surrounded by local art and live music. I’m 
happier here, and when I’m happy, I’m more creative.” 

Barker isn’t alone in her desire to flee from the bustle 
of daylight hours. Lynch says he finds himself to be 
considerably more creative after closing up the bar and 
heading home. 



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March 26, 2015 • eugeneweekly.com 











“When everyone else is asleep, Pm still up making 
beats. Your 4 am is my 5 pm, man,” he says, laughing. 

Sara Billdt, Blairally Vintage Arcade bartender and 
Coyote frontwoman, chose bar life over day jobs four 
years ago and hasn’t looked back. 

“It’s helpful not to work in a super oppressive or overly 
straight-laced environment,” Billdt says. “Who wants to 
work where they feel like they have to hide who they 
are?” Billdt sure doesn’t, and why should she? A quick 
stroll through the Whiteaker barcade confirms Billdt’s 

‘In Eugene, you'll see a bartender 
onstage everywhere you go. 
We all play music.’ 

— CASEY LYNCH (AKA Kl DESIGN) 

LEVEL UP ARCADE MANAGER AND BARTENDER 


allusion to a workplace that encourages self-expression. 

“Blairally’s clientele is comprised largely of 
neighborhood folks, who all seem to play music or be some 
sort of artist,” Billdt says. The crowd definitely looks the 
part, as tattoos and imaginative local fashion are as readily 
available as frosty pints of high-yield local brews. 

Of course they can’t partake at their “real jobs,” but 
what about onstage? 

Surely every bartender indulges in a couple pre-show 
pints. We don’t call it “liquid courage” for nothing. 


However, when posed with the question, Billdt grins. “I 
actually always play sober, myself. I can’t imagine 
playing guitar for a crowd while drunk.” 

Lynch admits to having approached the mic at all 
different levels of intoxication with a wide array of 
results. He does say a couple drinks can’t hurt, though. 

“I’d never fault someone for needing to be ‘on the right 
level’ before they perform. That’s fine. It’s about whatever 
works for you,” he says. “I’ve played with guys who 
needed to be wasted and guys like Sammy [local rapper 


Sammy Warm Hands] who just drinks lemonades all 
night, and kills it. You do what you gotta do.” 

Obviously imbibing is not a prerequisite for creativity, 
but for some musicians alcohol will always be a part of 
live music. “Performing is so liberating, in and of itself, 
but it can be much easier to let go and enjoy it if you’re 
indulging,” Barker says. 

Lynch nods in agreement. “You can give in to a feeling 
or experience instead of getting caught up in wondering, 
‘Hey, do I look like an idiot right now?”’ ■ 


BY BRETT CAMPBELL 



DELGANI DEBUT 

Discover Eugene’s new string quartet, 
the sounds of South India and music 
for Holy Week 

S tring quartets might be the most common 
classical music chamber ensemble, but it’s hard 
to find a quartet that performs regularly 
hereabouts and thereby develops the kind of 
chemistry that can really make the music sing. 
That hole in Eugene’s musical tapestry will be repaired at 
7:30 pm Tuesday, April 7, at United Lutheran Church 
(2230 Washington), when the new Eugene-based Delgani 
String Quartet takes it opening bow. 

After obtaining their graduate degrees from the UO 
last spring, founding violinists Wyatt True and Jannie 
Wei, who’d performed together as students, decided to 
stick together (they married last summer) — and stick 
around Eugene. With fellow Oregonians, cellist Kelly 
Quesada (another UO colleague) and violist Morgan 
O’Shaughnessey, the foursome began playing small 
private events. Although in their 20s and 30s, they’re 
already veterans of ensembles including Oregon Mozart 
Players, Oregon Bach Collegium, Portland Cello Project, 
Eugene Opera and Eugene Symphony. 

And they’re devoted to the classics as well as music of 
our own time. “We’re all interested in contemporary music 
because it’s a breath of fresh air,” True explains. Unlike the 
classics, with their formidable history of innumerable 
recordings, “with contemporary works, we can form our 
own interpretations and let people follow us.” 

The debut show features the premiere of southern Oregon 
composer Jason Heald’s fifth string quartet. Based on 


traditional Celtic melodies, its movements will be 
interpolated (as is often the case with Irish airs in traditional 
shows) before and between the other two works on the debut 
program. Antonin Dvorak’s so-called “American” quartet 
and Dmitri Shostakovich’s eighth quartet understandably 
are played often by touring ensembles, and they’re 
magnificent pieces, but both composers wrote other, equally 
compelling music in that format. 

Delgani will instead play Dvorak’s gorgeous 13th 
quartet (his first after returning to his Czech homeland 
from the American sojourn that spawned its popular 
predecessor) and Shostakovich’s blistering ninth quartet, 
from 1964. The third movement of Dvorak’s quartet, a 
traditional Czech spring dance, makes a fitting harbinger 
of the season, and this concert heralds the arrival of a 
fresh new voice in Oregon classical music. 

The group has already set an ambitious four-concert 
season in Eugene next year that sparkles with accessible 
contemporary music by 20th- and 21st-century composers, 
including Oregon’s own Lou Harrison. They’re also 
freshening the performance format with multimedia and 


narrative elements. And they’re 
working with one of Eugene’s top 
composers, Paul Safar, in a concert later 
this month (we’ll be telling you more 
soon). 

With other shows scheduled in the 
Willamette Valley and a repertoire 
ranging from the 18th to the 21st 
centuries, Delgani is a welcome addition 
to Oregon music. 

Composer Heald and three of the 
four Delganis are graduates of the UO 
music school, one of the state’s principal 
generators of 21st-century music in the 
classical tradition, which includes 
music from non-Western cultures. At 
7:30 pm Friday, April 3, the school’s 
Beall Concert Hall hosts Bangalore-born flutist Shantala 
Subramanyam performing music of South India. Based 
in Chennai, she’s taught all over the world, and her 
improvisatory skills on her venu bamboo flute have been 
lauded in the Indian press. This concert is a prize 
opportunity to hear Carnatic ragas, one of the world’s 
loveliest musical traditions. 

Finally, at 5 pm Sunday, March 29, at the Church of the 
Resurrection (3925 Hilyard), the Oregon Bach 
Collegium is presenting a free program of sacred 
music in conjunction with the Christian Holy Week. 
Singers Heather Holmquest and Jan Nelson — 
accompanied by historically informed, period-instrument 
performers Margret Gries on harpsichord and Ann 
Shaffer on viola da gamba — will perform settings of 
two of the most famous Christian texts: “Stabat Mater” 
(about the grieving Mary, mother of Jesus) with music by 
17th-century composer Giovanni Felice Sances, and 
“Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet” (about the 
destruction of Jerusalem) with music by the great French 
Baroque composer Franqois Couperin. ■ 


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EVENTS 


MUSHROOMS & MEMORY - IMPROVE 
COGNITIVE FUNCTION w/ Eric Cerecedes 
from Myco Formulas 3/26, 155 High St. 
5:30-6:30p FREE 


FOR SALE 


Clothing 

ASSISTANCE LEAGUE® THRIFT SHOP 

COME THRIFT WITH US! 1149 Willamette St. 
Tu-Sa 10-4 


REMIX APPAREL EXCHANGE located at 1449 
Mohawk Blvd in Springfield, men’s and 
women’s resale clothing store meets art 
studio. While you search through our con¬ 
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enjoy all the local artist’s work on the walls 
and coming through the speakers. 


BULLETIN BOARD 


Announcements 


THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE 

Ancient Wisdom Teachers return. 

All Will Be Well. MAITREYA is here 
www.share-international.orgTAKE HEART! 


Classes 


KIDS TABLE TENNIS CLINICS/LESSONS The 

Eugene Table Tennis Club is holding clinics 
for middle schoolers on Mar 14th, 21st, 
28th & Apr 4th. Time llam-noon. Location 
The Dunn Center, 3411 Willamette St., 
Eugene. Cost $10 per session or all 4 for 
$35 (sliding scale avail). All equipment 
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Pets 


GREENHILL HUMANE SOCIETY Everybody 
Deserves a Good Home. Fr-Tu lla-6p. 
Closed Wed/Th 88530 Greenhill Rd 541-689- 
1503 green-hill.org See our Pet of the Week! 


SHELTER ANIMAL RESOURCE ALLIANCE 

S.A.R.A.’s Treasures Gift 8c Thrift Shop. 

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871 River Road, Open Daily 10am-6pm. 
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LOOK FOR THIS WEEK’S RESCUED CAT. 


WIGGLY TAILS DOG RESCUE is a foster based 
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Adoption/Family 
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ADOPT: ADORING DOCTOR, DEVOTED, 
FINANCIALLY SECURE FAMILY, MUSIC, 
THEATRE, SPORTS, TRAVEL, EDUCATION 
AWAITS 1ST BABY. 1-800-379-8418. 
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MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT 


Lessons 


JOHN SHARKEY has openings for guitar, 
piano, bass 8c songwriting lessons. All 
styles/levels/ages (1 hr long) 541-342- 
9543 


Dance 


FIRST SATURDAY DANCE Apr. 4th, 2015. 
Ballroom, Swing and Latin Music by DJ 
Robert. Trinity United Methodist Church. 
440 Maxwell Road $8.00 per person. 
Lesson: 7pm, Dancing: 8-10pm Dance With 
US! www.danceeugene.com 


Entertainment 


*A PLEASANT SURPRISE* Sensuality? Foot 
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VOLUNTEER AND MEMBERSHIP 

COORDINATOR. Part-time, 20hrs/wk, 
$10.50/hr. Requirements: Bachelor’s 
degree, computer literacy (Microsoft Office, 
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with other museums, cultural organiza¬ 
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independently and with others, as well as 
lift 40 pounds and climb stairs. Send cover 
letter and resume to: Office Manager, Lane 
County Historical Museum, 740 West 13th 
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Deadline: 4:00 PM, Wednesday, March 31. 
For more information, call 682-4242. 


SEEKING EMPLOYMENT 


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Acupuncture 

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Counseling _ 

PERSONAL 8c FINANCIAL COUNSELING 

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SPIRITUAL READINGS in person or remotely 
by telephone, energy treatments, coaching 
in healing. Do you have a chronic illness or 
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Dance 


BELLY DANCE CUSSES Discover the joy of 

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classes, reg by April 1st and save! 541-232- 
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Wellness 


COLON HYDROTHERAPY AT SUNRISE 
COLONICS Celebrating 16 years. Schedule 
your cleanse. Laura Taylor 541-484-6224 


WHITE BIRD DENTAL CLINIC 1400 Mill St. 
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YOGA WEST Kundalini Yoga in Eugene as 
taught by Yogi Bhajan. First two classes for 
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ZEN YOGA CUSSES: Blue Cliff Zen Center 
Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30-6:30pm $7 
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HOME SERVICES 


Building/Remodel _ 

CARPENTER Remodels, garages, dry wall 
repair, storage sheds, decks, gazebos, etc. 
Lie #34194 Call Tony 541-653-8225 


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HOME REPAIR/DAMAGE Fair Prices. All 
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OREGON STATE UW requires anyone con¬ 
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MARCH 2 6, 2 0 1 5 • EUGENEWEEKLY.COM 

















































































































































































CLASSIFIEDS 


DELICATE DEMOLITION Father & Son. 40 yrs 
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LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON FOR LANE COUNTY - PROBATE 
DEPARTMENT Case No. 50-15-02208 NOTICE 
TO INTERESTED PERSONS: In the matter of 
the Estate of Virginia Clara Cunningham, 
Decedent, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 
Charles E Cunningham has been appointed 
personal representative. All persons having 
claims against the estate are required to 
present them, with vouchers attached, to 
the aforementioned personal representa¬ 


tive c/o Northwest Legal, Attn: Jinoo 
Hwang, 66 Club Road, Suite 200, Eugene, 
OR 92401, within four months after the date 
of first publication of this notice, or the 
claims may be barred. All persons whose 
rights may be affected by the proceedings 
may obtain additional information from the 
records of the court, the personal represen¬ 
tative, or attorney for the personal repre¬ 
sentative, Northwest Legal, Attn: Jinoo 
Hwang, 66 Club Road, Suite 200, Eugene, 
OR 92401. Date of first publication: March 
26, 2015. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ATHE 
BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR IN 
INTEREST TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A JP MORGAN 
CHASE BANK, AS SUCCESSOR TO BANK ONE, 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE TO CSFB 
MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH 
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-23, its succes¬ 
sors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. 
TODD E. KRONBERGER AKA TODD EARL 
KRONBERGER; THE CIT GROUP, INC.; RAY 
KLEIN, INC. DBA PROFESSIONAL CREDIT 
SERVICE; MAN-DATA, INC, DBA PACIFIC COAST 
CREDIT; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, 
Defendants. Case No. 161426512 SUMMONS 
BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: 
OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES: In the name 
of the State of Oregon, you are hereby 
required to appear and answer the com¬ 
plaint filed against you in the above-enti¬ 
tled Court and cause on or before the expi¬ 
ration of 30 days from the date of first pub¬ 
lication of this summons. The date of first 
publication in this matter is March 26,2015. 
If you fail timely to appear and answer, 
plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled 
court for the relief prayed for in its com¬ 
plaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a 
deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests 
that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose 
your interest in the following described real 
property: ALL OF THE PORTION OF THE 
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND WHICH LIES 
WESTERLY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 285 
(DAVISSON ROAD): BEGINNING AT THE 
INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF 
WAY LINE OF THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC 
RAILROAD WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE 
CLAUS ARP DONATION LAND CLAIM NO. 63, IN 
TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST OF THE 
WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, SAID POINT BEING 
620 FEET SOUTH 89° 39’ EAST FROM THE 
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID CLAIM AND 
NORTH 21° 20’ EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY 
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID RAILROAD 1328 
FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHWEST 
CORNER OF THE TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED 
IN THE MEMORANDUM OF LAND SALE 
CONTRACT TO FREDERICK CLARK DULLEY, ET 
UX, RECORDED JUNE 21, 1924 UNDER 
RECORDER’S RECEPTION NO. 24-26292, 
LANE COUNTY OREGON RECORDS AND THE 
TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 
89° 39’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF 
SAID DULLEY TRACT 245 FEET, MORE OR 
LESS, TO THE CENTER LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 
NO. 285 (DAVISSON ROAD); THENCE SOUTH 
10° 55’ WEST 182 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE TRACT OF 
LAND IN THE DEED TO ERBINE 0. 
GRAUSEBECK, ET UX, RECORDED NOVEMBER 
19, 1921 UNDER RECORDER’S RECEPTION 
NO. 24516, LANE COUNTY OREGON RECORDS; 
THENCE SOUTH 89° 39’ EAST ALONG THE 
SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID GROUSEBECK 
TRACT 985 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE 
NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE DEED TO THE 
STATE OF OREGON, RECORDED MAY 4, 1923, 
UNDER RECORDER’S RECEPTION NO. 
23-19986, LANE COUNTY OREGON OFFICIAL 
RECORDS; THENCE SOUTH 2° 22’ EAST 
ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID STATE 
OF OREGON TRACT 288 FEET TO A POINT ; 
THENCE SOUTH 21° 02’ EAST 395 FEET, 
MORE OR LESS, TO THE CENTER LINE OFTHE 
COAST FORK OF THE WILLAMETTE RIVER; 
THENCE UP THE CENTER OF SAID RIVER 240 
FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHEAST 
CORNER OF THE TRACT OF LAND IN THE 
DEED TO WILFRED GRAY, ET UX, RECORDED 
OCTOBER 25, 1963, UNDER RECORDER’S 
RECEPTION NO. 30488, LANE COUNTY 
OREGON DEED RECORDS; THENCE NORTH 
89° 39’ WEST 1800 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 
A POINT IN THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF 
SAID GRAY TRACT OF LAND, SAID POINT ALSO 
BEING 150 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE 
OF COUNTY ROAD 562 (TATE ROAD); THENCE 
NORTH 21° 20’ EAST 415 FEET, MORE OR 
LESS, TO AN ANGLE WHICH IS IN THE 
NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF A TRACT OF 
LAND DESCRIBED IN THE DEED TO WILFRED 
ANDREW GRAY, ET UX RECORDED MAY 9, 
1942, UNDER RECORDER’S RECEPTION NO. 
39486, LANE COUNTY OREGON DEED 
RECORDS; THENCE NORTH 12° 40’ WEST 
426.5 FEET TO THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE 
RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID RAILROAD; THENCE 
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RAILROAD 
RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 21° 20’ EAST 260 FEET, 
MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, 
IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly 
known as: 81618 Davisson Road, Creswell, 
Oregon 92426-9865. NOTICE TO 
DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 
against you in the above-entitled court by 
The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank 
of New York as successor in interest to 
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association 
f/k/a JPMorgan Chase Bank, as successor 
to Bank One, National Association as 
Trustee to CSFB Mortgage-Backed Pass- 
Through Certificates, Series 2003-23, plain¬ 
tiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the writ¬ 


ten complaint, a copy of which was filed 
with the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., its successors in 
interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. TAMARIA 
S. SMITH AKA TAMARIA SUE SMITH; LEGACY 
DECISION ONE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO 
DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC; 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF 
OREGON; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 
161500300 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO 
THE DEFENDANTS: OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES: In the name of the State of 
Oregon, you are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint filed against you 
in the above-entitled Court and cause on or 
before the expiration of 30 days from the 
date of first publication of this summons. 
The date of first publication in this matter is 
March 26, 2015. If you fail timely to appear 
and answer, plaintiff will apply to the 
above-entitled court for the relief prayed for 
in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclo¬ 
sure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff 
requests that the plaintiff be allowed to 
foreclose your interest in the following 
described real property: LOT 23, BLOCK 1, 
SOUZA PARK FIRST ADDITION, AS PLATTED 
AND RECORDED IN VOLUME 69, PAGE 38, 
LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, IN 
LANE COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known 
as: 4509 Souza Street, Eugene, Oregon 
92402-6103. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ 
THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has 
been started against you in the above-enti¬ 
tled court by Bank of America, N.A., plaintiff. 
Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written 
complaint, a copy of which was filed with 
the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., S/B/M TO 
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, S/B/M TO CHASE 
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, its 
successors in interest and/or assigns, 
Plaintiff, v. RICHARD B. PENDLETON AKA 
RICHARD BARRY PENDLETON; SHERYL J. 
PENDLETON AKA SHERYL JOY PENDLETON; 
REGISTER-GUARD FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; 
MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC; DYNAMIC 
STRATEGIES, INC.; STONE CREEK FINANCIAL, 
INC; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, 
Defendants. Case No. 161425925 SUMMONS 
BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: 
OCCUPANTS OFTHE PREMISES: In the name 
of the State of Oregon, you are hereby 
required to appear and answer the com¬ 
plaint filed against you in the above-enti¬ 
tled Court and cause on or before the expi¬ 
ration of 30 days from the date of first pub¬ 
lication of this summons. The date of first 
publication in this matter is March 12, 2015. 
If you fail timely to appear and answer, 
plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled 
court for the relief prayed for in its com¬ 
plaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a 
deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests 
that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose 
your interest in the following described real 
property: LOT 1, BLOCK 1, FAIR OAKS, AS 
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN VOLUME 26, 
PAGE 25, LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT 
RECORDS, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. 
Commonly known as: 290 Fair Oaks Drive, 
Eugene, Oregon 92401. NOTICE TO 
DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 


against you in the above-entitled court by 
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., S/B/M to Chase 
Home Finance LLC, S/B/M to Chase 
Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, plaintiff. 
Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written 
complaint, a copy of which was filed with 
the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL 
ASSOCIATION, its successors in interest 
and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN 
HEIRS OF SHELLEY ZAVAT AKA ROCHELLE 
DIANE ZAVAT; KENDALL KARIS SMITH, AS 
AFFIANT OF THE SMALL ESTATE OF SHELLEY 
ZAVAT AKA ROCHELLE DIANE ZAVAT; THE 
NATURE CONVERVANCY; HUNINGTON 
HEIGHTS UNIT OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC,; 
AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, 
Defendants. Case No. 161502242 SUMMONS 
BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: 
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF SHELLEY ZAVAT AKA 
ROCHELLE DIANE ZAVAT: In the name of the 
State of Oregon, you are hereby required to 
appear and answer the complaint filed 
against you in the above-entitled Court and 
cause on or before the expiration of 30 days 
from the date of first publication of this 
summons. The date of first publication in 
this matter is March 26, 2015. If you fail 
timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will 
apply to the above-entitled court for the 
relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a 
judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in 
which the plaintiff requests that the plain¬ 
tiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in 
the following described real property: UNIT 
40, HUNINGTON HEIGHTS CONDOMINIUM 
PHASE IV, UNITS 39 THROUGH 50, AS 
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN BOOK 21, PAGE 
3, LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, IN 
LANE COUNTY, OREGON, TOGETHER WITH AN 
UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN AND TO THE 
COMMON ELEMENTS APPERTAINING TO SAID 
UNIT, AS SET FORTH IN DECLARATION OF UNIT 
OWNERSHIP RECORDED JANUARY 31, 1925, 
RECEPTION NO. 2503901, AND 
RE-RECORDED APRIL 10, 1925, RECEPTION 
NO. 2513085, LANE COUNTY OFFICIAL 
RECORDS, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. 
Commonly known as: 318 Hunington 
Avenue, Eugene, Oregon 92405. NOTICE TO 
DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 
against you in the above-entitled court by 
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National 
Association, plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are 
stated in the written complaint, a copy of 
which was filed with the above-entitled 
Court. You must “appear” in this case or the 
other side will win automatically. To 
“appear” you must file with the court a legal 
document called a “motion” or “answer.” 
The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must 
be given to the court clerk or administrator 
within 30 days of the date of first publica¬ 
tion specified herein along with the required 
filing fee. It must be in proper form and 
have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attor¬ 
ney or, if the plaintiff does not have an 
attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If 
you have any questions, you should see an 
attorney immediately. If you need help in 
finding an attorney, you may contact the 
Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service 
online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by 
calling (503) 684-3263 (in the Portland 
metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in 
Oregon at (800) 452-2636. This summons 
is issued pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, 
P.C., Laysan Unger, OSB #124821, lunger@ 
rcolegal.com Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 
10th Ave., Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: 
(503) 922-2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

ONEWEST BANK N.A., FKA ONEWEST BANK 
FSB, its successors in interest and/or 
assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF 
DOROTHY L. ROSDAHL; RICK R. ROSDAHL AKA 
RICK RAY ROSDAHL; DORA L. ROSDAHL; 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; CACH, LLC; 
STATE OF OREGON; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 161423211 
SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE 
DEFENDANTS: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF 

DOROTHY L. ROSDAHL AND OCCUPANTS OF 
THE PREMISES: In the name of the State of 
Oregon, you are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint filed against you 
in the above-entitled Court and cause on or 
before the expiration of 30 days from the 
date of first publication of this summons. 
The date of first publication in this matter is 


March 26, 2015. If you fail timely to appear 
and answer, plaintiff will apply to the 
above-entitled court for the relief prayed for 
in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclo¬ 
sure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff 
requests that the plaintiff be allowed to 
foreclose your interest in the following 
described real property: A PART OF LOT 11, 
DALTON’S POULTRY FARMS, AS PLATTED AND 
RECORDED IN BOOK 10, PAGE 26, LANE 
COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, 
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: 
BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE 
OF SAID LOT 11 WHICH IS 209.8 FEET WEST 
FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT; 
THENCE WEST ALONG SAID LOT LINE 109.8 
FEET; THENCE NORTH PARALLEL WITH THE 
EAST LINE OF LOT 11, 440.0 FEET TO THE 
NORTH LINE OF LOT 11; THENCE NORTH 82° 
36’ EAST ALONG THE SAID NORTH LINE 110 
FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHWEST 
CORNER OF THE TRACT CONVEYED TO 
MYRTLE I. HOWELL BY DEED RECORDED 
JANUARY 15, 1942, RECEPTION NO. 31050, 
LANE COUNTY OREGON DEED RECORDS; 
THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE EAST 
LINE OF LOT 11,444.4 FEET TO THE POINT OF 
BEGINNING, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. 
Commonly known as: 25185 East Bolton 
Road, Veneta, Oregon 92482. NOTICE TO 
DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 
against you in the above-entitled court by 
OneWest Bank N.A., fka OneWest Bank FSB, 
plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the 
written complaint, a copy of which was filed 
with the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.orgor by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., 
Laysan Unger, OSB # 124821, lunger@rco- 
legal.com Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 
10th Ave., Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: 
(503) 922-2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC, its succes¬ 
sors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. 
DANIELLE M. MERTZ; RAY KLEIN INC., DBA 
PROFESSIONAL CREDIT SERVICE; ATLAS 
FINANCIAL SERVICES; AND OCCUPANTS OF 
THE PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 
161423443 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO 
THE DEFENDANTS: OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES: In the name of the State of 
Oregon, you are hereby required to appear 
and answer the complaint filed against you 
in the above-entitled Court and cause on or 
before the expiration of 30 days from the 
date of first publication of this summons. 
The date of first publication in this matter is 
March 26, 2015. If you fail timely to appear 
and answer, plaintiff will apply to the 
above-entitled court for the relief prayed for 
in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclo¬ 
sure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff 
requests that the plaintiff be allowed to 
foreclose your interest in the following 
described real property: LOT 9, CORNWALL 
SQUARE SUBDIVISION, AS PLATTED AND 
RECORDED IN FILE 25, SLIDES 209 AND 210, 
LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, IN 
LANE COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known 
as: 1218 North Park Avenue, Eugene, 
Oregon 92404-2256. NOTICE TO 
DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 
against you in the above-entitled court by 
PennyMac Loan Services, LLC, plaintiff. 
Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written 
complaint, a copy of which was filed with 
the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.orgor by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY 
MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, 
INC., its successors in interest and/or 
assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF 
DENNIS PAYNE; SHANTI MCMANUS, AS 
AFFIANT OF THE ESTATE OF DENNIS PAYNE; 
SHANTI MCMANUS INDIVIDUALLY; STATE OF 
OREGON; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 161412202 
SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE 
DEFENDANTS: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF DENNIS 
PAYNE: In the name of the State of Oregon, 
you are hereby required to appear and 
answer the complaint filed against you in 
the above-entitled Court and cause on or 
before the expiration of 30 days from the 
date of first publication of this summons. 
The date of first publication in this matter is 
March 5, 2015. If you fail timely to appear 
and answer, plaintiff will apply to the 
above-entitled court for the relief prayed for 
in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclo¬ 
sure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff 
requests that the plaintiff be allowed to 
foreclose your interest in the following 
described real property: LOT 54, 

BRAMBLEWOOD SUBDIVISION, PHASE II, AS 
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN FILE 25, SLIDES 
344, 345, 346 AND 342, LANE COUNTY 
OREGON PLAT RECORDS, IN LANE COUNTY, 
OREGON. Commonly known as: 1311 
Bramblewood Lane, Eugene, Oregon 92404. 
NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS 
CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started 
against you in the above-entitled court by 
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger 
to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., plain¬ 
tiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the writ¬ 
ten complaint, a copy of which was filed 
with the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in 
interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. 
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF PHILLIP S. JOHNSON; 
RITA S. JOHNSON; QUICK COLLECT, INC.; 
MEDICAL DATA SYSTEMS; MCKENZIE- 
WILLAMETTE MEDICAL CENTER; STATE OF 
OREGON; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE 
PREMISES, Defendants. Case No. 
161503168 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO 
THE DEFENDANTS: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF 
PHILLIP S. JOHNSON: In the name of the 
State of Oregon, you are hereby required to 
appear and answer the complaint filed 
against you in the above-entitled Court and 
cause on or before the expiration of 30 days 
from the date of first publication of this 
summons. The date of first publication in 
this matter is March 26, 2015. If you fail 
timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will 
apply to the above-entitled court for the 
relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a 
judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in 
which the plaintiff requests that the plain¬ 
tiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in 
the following described real property: LOT 
21, MCKENZIE HILLS, AS PLATED AND 
RECORDED IN FILE 22, SLIDES 19, 20 AND 
21, LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, 
IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly 
known as: 2228 Daisy Street, Springfield, 
Oregon 92428. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: 
READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit 
has been started against you in the 
above-entitled court by Wells Fargo Bank, 
N.A., plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in 
the written complaint, a copy of which was 
filed with the above-entitled Court. You 
must “appear” in this case or the other side 
will win automatically. To “appear” you 
must file with the court a legal document 
called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” 
or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to 
the court clerk or administrator within 30 
days of the date of first publication speci¬ 
fied herein along with the required filing fee. 
It must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 26, 2015 







CLASSIFIEDS 


S.A.R.A.S 

Shelter Animal Resource Alliance 

Rescued Cat of the Week 

Midnight and Rafters are 

exceptional best friends who hold 
dear their time together. Midnight 
is a jet black 12 year-old with 
active legs that never seem to stop 
patrolling. Rafters is a 14 year-old 
tabby who practices acrobatics 

_zealously like a kitten whenever 

[" — \| she sees a featherstick. Take 

j a momentoutofyourdayto 


MEOW!!! 




Congratulations! 
Cassiopeia was 
adopted! 


S.A.R.A.’s 

Shelter Animal Resource Alliance 



m 


Greenhill 

Humane Society 


PET OF THE WEEK! 

Everybody deserves a good home 

541-689-1503 

www.green-hill.org 

88530 Greenhill Rd 


Greenhill regularly receives reports of 
domestic rabbits on the loose. This is 
v the time of year that rabbit "sightings" 

increase. Rabbits are purchased for 
W . children at Easter and then abandoned 

V ^ once the novelty wears off. The stray 
v- - bunnies reproduce and suffer the 
elements. Choose wisely this year and 
^ opt for a fur-iend of the plush variety 

or adopt a homeless rabbit like Laverne, here. Already have a rabbit? 
Visitwww.Green-Hill.org to find information and resources aimed to 
help you take the best care possible of your rabbit year-round. 

What do an Easter egg hunt, stand-up comedy and a 2K walk 
have in common? They're all fast approaching benefits for homeless 
pets at Greenhill Humane Society and 1st Avenue Shelter! Visit www. 
Green-Hill.org to learn about more fun events coming up soon. 

Hours: Fri-Tu 11am-6pm • Closed Wednesday & Thursday 


WIGGLY TAILS DOG RESCUE 

Helping abandoned and surrendered dogs find their forever homes 

Frenchie is 

still looking 
for her forever 
home! She's 
about 6-7 years 
old and would 
love to have a 
mama to spend 
time with. Once 
she loves you, 
she loves whole 
heartedly. She 
would be best in an adult only home. Please 
contact us to meet this adorable little girl! 

Foster homes are always needed[ please contact us 
through our Facebook page. 

www.facebook.com/WigglyTailsDogRescue 


JONESIN’ CROSSWORD 

BY MATT JONES ©2014 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 


“Ah Yes!” 

open wide and you know the rest. 


ACROSS 

1 Wednesday stuff 
4 Rehearsed ahead of time 
10 Second addendum to a 
letter, briefly 

13 Siegfried’s colleague 

14 Quasi-eco-themed Pauly 
Shore movie 

15 Cry of recognition 

16 Rock guitarist’s acces¬ 
sory 

17 Deviating off-course 

18 “Danny and the Dino¬ 
saur” author_Hoff 

19 Stores owned by the guy 
who played Frasier’s dad? 

22 Like xenon or krypton 

23 Landing place 

25 ln_ (working in 
harmony) 

26 Just_ (a little under) 

31 Hand-held fare 

32 Irish-Caribbean island 


chain? 

34 Blackjack component 
3? Ready-to-hug position 
38_de la Cite (Notre 
Dame’s locale) 

39 Showy birds at the 
dance? 

41 Creamy cracker spread 

42 John Denver Band bass¬ 
ist Dick (anagram of SINKS) 

43 Laments loudly 
4? Carpentry tools 

49 Ab-developing exercise 

50 Make a circulartrip 
starting between California 
and Nevada? 

56 Columnist Savage 
5? It goes up and down 
while you eat 

58 Stare at 

59 L squared, in Roman 
numerals 

60 High flier 


61 Raymond’s nickname on 
“The Blacklist” 

62 Big boss 

63 “Capote” costar Cath¬ 
erine 

64 ‘60s campus gp. 

DOWN 

1 Cologne brand named 
after a Musketeer 

2 Lots and lots of 

3 Tex-Mex ingredient? 

4 Kingly title 

5 British party member 

6 Levine of Maroon 5 

7 “You’ve _ Friend” (James 
Taylor hit) 

8 Abu Dhabi VIP 

9 Cruise ship levels 

10 Rye topper 

11 Yearly exam 

12 Hangdog 

14 Hell-_(determined) 



20 “Lord of the Rings” beast 

21 “Let’s Roll” jazz singer 
James 

24 Throw out, as a question 
26 Ogre in love with Prin¬ 
cess Fiona 

2? “Masters of the Uni¬ 
verse” protagonist 

28 Dinosaur in Ma¬ 
rio-themed Nintendo games 

29 Bassoons’ smaller 
relatives 

30 Goat-legged deities 

32 Savion Glover’s specialty 

33 Cleveland _, OH 

34 “Dancing Queen” music 
group 

35 Uno, e.g. 

36 Actor Hector of “Chicago 
Hope” and “Monk” 

40 Like “haxored” and 
“pwn’d” 

43 “Chandelier” chanteuse 

44 They may be significant 

45 Encouraged, with “up” 

46 Does 80 in a 40, 
perhaps 

48 He’ll tell you there’s no 
“I” in “TEAM” 

49 Part attached at the 
hip? 

51 Well-off person, so to 
speak 

52 Stubbed piggy toe, e.g. 

53 “Israel Through My Eyes” 
author 

54 Pledge drive bag 
55_about (roughly) 

56 Hip-hop’s Run-_ 


I □□□□ □□□■ 

!□□□□□ □□□□ □□□□! 

■ □□□□□ □□□□□□□□ 

! ■ □□□□□ DJQOQEEl 

!□□□□□ □□□ 0HH 

■□□□n □□□□□□ □□□ 

■□□□BBC]!] □□□□□□□ 
!□□□ HBHOEIE □□□□ 

mm □□d □□□ □□□bq 
Hogans sasas ■ 
jpa aaaaaa □□□□□■ 
non □□□□□□□□□□ 

1E3S □□□□ □IlIiQQ 
3BH BBSS BDHBCT 


pursuant to ORCP 7. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF 
OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF LANE 

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in 
interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. 
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF DELTA CAMPOS AKA 
DELTA LEE CAMPOS AKA DELTA L. HANNA; 
MARA CAMPBELL AKA MARA D. STONESIFER; 
TOMMIE L. CAMPOS AKA TOMMIE LEE 
CAMPOS AKA TOMMIE LEE SHARP; VINCENT 
STONESIFER; JAMES STONESIFER; MICHAEL 
STONESIFER; JOSEPH M CAMPOS; KANDRA 
STONESIFER; TAMMI MALAGONE; MISTY 
SMITH AKA MISTY MOTT; GAVIN STONESIFER; 
QUICK COLLECT, INC.; RAY KLEIN, INC., DBA 
PROFESSIONAL CREDIT SERVICE; AND 
OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, Defendants. 
Case No. 161422003 SUMMONS BY 
PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: 
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF DELTA CAMPOS AKA 
DELTA LEE CAMPOS AKA DELTA L. HANNA 
AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES: In the 
name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby 
required to appear and answer the com¬ 
plaint filed against you in the above-enti¬ 
tled Court and cause on or before the expi¬ 
ration of 30 days from the date of first pub¬ 
lication of this summons. The date of first 
publication in this matter is March 26,2015. 
If you fail timely to appear and answer, 
plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled 
court for the relief prayed for in its com¬ 
plaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a 
deed of trust and a claim for declaratory 
relief to reform the legal description in that 
deed of trust, in which the plaintiff requests 
that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose 
your interest in the following described real 
property: LOT 6, BLOCK 8, THIRD ADDITION 
TO RAMBLING ACRES, AS PLATTED AND 
RECORDED IN BOOK 36, PAGE 21, LANE 
COUNTY OREGON PLAT RECORDS, IN LANE 
COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 
2182 Fireside Court, Springfield, Oregon 
92422. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE 
PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been 
started against you in the above-entitled 
court by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., plaintiff. 
Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written 
complaint, a copy of which was filed with 
the above-entitled Court. You must 
“appear” in this case or the other side will 
win automatically. To “appear” you must 
file with the court a legal document called a 
“motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or 
“answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the 
court clerk or administrator within 30 days 
of the date of first publication specified 
herein along with the required filing fee. It 
must be in proper form and have proof of 
service on the plaintiffs attorney or, if the 
plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of 
service on the plaintiff. If you have any 
questions, you should see an attorney 
immediately. If you need help in finding an 
attorney, you may contact the Oregon State 
Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at 
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 
684-3263 (in the Portland metropolitan 
area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at 
(800) 452-2636. This summons is issued 
pursuant to ORCP 2. RCO LEGAL, P.C., Alex 
Gund, OSB #114062, agund@rcolegal.com 
Attorneys for Plaintiff, 511 SW 10th Ave., 
Ste. 400, Portland, OR 92205. P: (503) 922- 
2840. F: (503) 922-2963. 

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS 

Candace M. Fairchild has been appointed 
Personal Representative of the Estate of 
George A. Brown by the Lane County Circuit 
Court in Case No. 50-15-03246. All persons 
with claims against the estate must pres¬ 
ent them to the personal representative in 
care of her attorney within four months 
from the date of first publication, or they 
may be barred. Additional information may 
be obtained from the records of the court, 
the personal representative or her attorney. 
First published: March 19,2015. Candace M. 
Fairchild, Personal Representative, c/o 
Sylvia Sycamore, OSB #001150. Sylvia 
Sycamore, P.C., 132 E. Broadway, Suite 410, 
Eugene, OR 92401. 

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS 

ESTATE OF GORDON G. WEATHERS 
LANE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT CASE NO. 

50-15-03266 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the under¬ 
signed has been appointed Personal 
Representative. All persons having claims 
against the estate are required to present 
them, with written evidence thereof 
attached, to the undersigned Personal 
Representative Gail L. Weathers, c/o Janice 
L. Mackey, PO Box 10886, Eugene, Oregon 
92440. All persons having claims against 
the estate are required to present them 
within four months after the date of first 
publication of this notice to the Personal 
Representative at the address stated above 
for the presentation of claims or such 
claims may be barred. All persons whose 
rights may be affected by these proceed¬ 
ings may obtain additional information 
from the records of the Court, the Personal 
Representative, or the Attorney for the 


Personal Representative, named above. 
Dated and first published March 26, 2015. 
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Gail L. 
Weathers, PO Box 964, Marcola, OR 92454 
541-933-2425. ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL 
REPRESENTATIVE: Janice L. Mackey, OSB 
#003101 Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr 8c 
Sherlock, P.C., PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 
9244 0 541-686-9160 Fax: 541-343-8693. 
Email: jmackey@eugenelaw.com 

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS 
ESTATE OF KATHLEEN LORRAINE CUTTER 
LANE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT CASE NO. 

50-15-02261 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Curtis E. 
Cutter has been appointed Personal 
Representative. All persons having claims 
against the estate are required to present 
them, with written evidence thereof 
attached, to the undersigned Personal 
Representative Curtis E. Cutter, c/o Janice 
L. Mackey, PO Box 10886, Eugene, Oregon 
92440. All persons having claims against 
the estate are required to present them 
within four months after the date of first 
publication of this notice to the Personal 
Representative at the address stated above 
for the presentation of claims or such 
claims may be barred. All persons whose 
rights may be affected by these proceed¬ 
ings may obtain additional information 
from the records of the Court, the Personal 
Representative, or the Attorney for the 
Personal Representative, named above. 
Dated and first published: March 12, 2015. 
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Curtis E. Cutter, 
2226 B Street, Springfield, OR 92428 541- 
912-0262. ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL 
REPRESENTATIVE: Janice L. Mackey, OSB 
#003101 Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr 8c 
Sherlock, P.C., PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 
9244 0 541-686-9160. Fax: 541-343-8693. 
Email: jmackey@eugenelaw.com 

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS 

Rolf John Norman has been appointed 
Personal Representative of the Estate of 
Shirley Ann Berns by the Lane County 
Circuit Court in Case No. 50-15-03245. All 
persons with claims against the estate 
must present them to the personal repre¬ 
sentative in care of his attorney within four 
months from the date of first publication, or 
they may be barred. Additional information 
may be obtained from the records of the 
court, the personal representative or his 
attorney. First published: March 19, 2015. 
Rolf John Norman, Personal Representative, 
c/o Sylvia Sycamore, OSB #001150. Sylvia 
Sycamore, P.C., 132 E. Broadway, Suite 410, 
Eugene, OR 92401. 

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS: Probate 
proceedings in the Estate of Gale R. Sperry, 
deceased, are now pending in the Circuit 
Court for Lane County, Oregon, Case No. 
50-15-03528. Shane E. Sperry has been 
appointed as personal representative of 
Decedent. All persons having claims 
against the Estate are required to present 
them, in due form, within four months after 
the date of first publication of this Notice. 
The date of first publication of this Notice is 
March 12, 2015. Claims shall be presented 
to the personal representative at this 
address: c/o Benjamin M. Kearney, Arnold 
Gallagher P.C., 800 Willamette Street, 
Suite 800, PO Box 1258, Eugene, OR 
92440-1258, or they may be barred. All 
persons whose rights may be affected by 
these proceedings may obtain additional 
information from the records of the court, 
the personal representative, or his attor¬ 
ney, Benjamin M. Kearney, whose address 
is listed above, and whose telephone num¬ 
ber is (541) 484-0188. 

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE 

Reference is made to that certain trust 
deed made by Cecilia L. Bennett, Trustee 
Cecelia L. Bennett Trust Dated April 19, 
2000 as grantor, to Fidelity National Title 
Insurance Company as trustee, in favor of 
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as beneficiary, dated 
February 20, 2012, recorded March 2, 2012, 
in the mortgage records of Lane County, 
Oregon, as Document No. 2012-009398, 
covering the following described real prop¬ 
erty situated in said county and state, to 
wit: BEGINNING AT A POINT BEING NORTH 0 
DEGREE 00' 55” EAST 1318.2 FEET AND 
SOUTH 88 DEGREE 21' EAST 330.1 FEET 
FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 
14, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12 WEST OF 
THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN; THENCE SOUTH 
88 DEGREE 21' EAST 65.0 FEET; THENCE 
SOUTH 0 DEGREE 00' 55” WEST 105.8 FEET; 
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREE 21' WEST 65.0 
FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREE 00' 55” 
EAST 105.8 FEET TO THE POINT OF 
BEGINNING, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. 
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1220 41ST PL, 
Florence, OR 92439 There is a default by 
the grantor or other person owing an obliga¬ 
tion or by their successor in interest, the 
performance of which is secured by said 
trust deed, or by their successor in interest, 
with respect to provisions therein which 
authorize sale in the event of default of 
such provision. The default for which fore¬ 
closure is made is grantors’ failure to pay 
when due the following sums: monthly pay¬ 


ments of $1,009.30 beginning January 1, 
2014; monthly payments of $1,020.16 
beginning March 1, 2014; monthly pay¬ 
ments of $1,149.32 beginning November 1, 
2014; plus prior accrued late charges of 
$85.48; together with title expense, costs, 
trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees incurred 
herein by reason of said default; any further 
sums advanced by the beneficiary for the 
protection of the above described real prop¬ 
erty and its interest therein; and prepay¬ 
ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By 
reason of said default, the beneficiary has 
declared all sums owing on the obligation 
secured by said trust deed immediately 
due and payable, said sums being the fol¬ 
lowing, to wit: $161,583.15 with interest 
thereon at the rate of 4.62500 percent per 
annum beginning December 1, 2013; plus 
prior accrued late charges of $85.48; plus 
escrow advances of $2,951.01; together 
with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and 
attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of 
said default; any further sums advanced by 
the beneficiary for the protection of the 
above described property and its interest 
therein; and prepayment penalties/premi¬ 
ums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice is 
hereby given that the undersigned trustee 
will on MAY 1, 2015, AT THE HOUR OF 11:00 
AM, in accord with the standard of time 
established by ORS 182.110, at Lane County 
Courthouse Front Entrance, 125 East 8th 
Ave, Eugene, OR 92401, in the City of 
Eugene, County of Lane, State of Oregon, 
sell at public auction to the highest bidder 
for cash the interest in the real property 
described above, which the grantor had or 
had power to convey at the time of the exe¬ 
cution by grantor of the trust deed together 
with any interest which the grantor or 
grantor’s successors in interest acquired 
after the execution of the trust deed, to 
satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby 
secured and the costs and expenses of the 
sale, including reasonable charges by the 
trustee. Notice is further given that any 
person named in ORS 86.228 has the right, 
at any time that is not later than five days 
before the date last set for the sale, to have 
this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and 
the trust deed reinstated by payment to the 
beneficiary of the entire amount then due 
(other than such portion of the principle as 
would not then be due had no default 
occurred) and by curing any other default 
complained of herein that is capable of 
being cured by tendering the performance 
required under the obligation or trust deed, 
and in addition to paying those sums or 
tendering the performance necessary to 
cure the default, by paying all costs and 
expenses actually incurred in enforcing the 
obligation and trust deed, together with 
trustee and attorney fees not exceedingthe 
amounts provided by ORS 86.228. WITHOUT 
LIMITING THE TRUSTEE’S DISCLAIMER OF REP¬ 
RESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, OREGON 
LAW REQUIRES THE TRUSTEE TO STATE IN THIS 
NOTICE THAT SOME RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 
SOLD AT A TRUSTEE’S SALE MAY HAVE BEEN 
USED IN MANUFACTURING METHAMPHET- 
AMINES, THE CHEMICAL COMPONENTS OF 
WHICH ARE KNOWN TO BE TOXIC. PROSPECTIVE 
PURCHASERS OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 
SHOULD BE AWARE OF THIS POTENTIAL DAN¬ 
GER BEFORE DECIDING TO PUCE A BID FOR 
THIS PROPERTY AT THE TRUSTEE’S SALE In 
construingthis notice, the singular includes 
the plural, the word “grantor” includes any 
successor in interest to the grantor as well 
as any other person owing an obligation, 
the performance of which is secured by the 
trust deed, and the words “trustee” and 
beneficiary” include their respective suc¬ 
cessors in interest, if any. Date of first pub¬ 
lication: March 5, 2015. Date of last publica¬ 
tion: March 26, 2015. 

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE 

Reference is made to that certain trust 
deed made by Gale L Carpenter and Glenda 
L Carpenter as grantor, to Fidelity National 
Title Insurance Company as trustee, in favor 
of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, INC. as ben¬ 
eficiary, dated August 25, 2003, recorded 
September 2, 2003, in the mortgage 
records of Lane County, Oregon, as 
Document No. 2003-084452, covering the 
following described real property situated 
in said county and state, to wit: PARCEL I: 
BEGINNING AT THE POINT 812.0 FEET EAST 
AND 40.00 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHWEST 
CORNER OF LOT 3, SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 21 
SOUTH, RANGE 3 EAST, WILLAMETTE 
MERIDIAN, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON; AND 
RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 331.0 FEET TO THE 
TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 
85.0 FEET; THENCE WEST 95.0 FEET; 
THENCE NORTH 85.0 FEET; THENCE EAST 
95.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN 
LANE COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL LL: 
BEGINNING AT A POINT 812 FEET EAST AND 
40 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHWEST 
CORNER OF LOT 3, SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 21 
SOUTH, RANGE 3 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE 
MERIDIAN AND RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 
311 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; 
THENCE WEST 95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 20 
FEET;THENCE EAST95 FEET;THENCE NORTH 
20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN 
LANE COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY 




















CLASSIFIEDS 



3 

6 


5 4 

2 

8 1 

9 


5 6 

1 

7 6 


4 


8 


2 5 

6 

8 


3 

4 7 

6 

00 

LO 


9 

I 




ADDRESS: 76362 GARDEN ROAD, Oak Ridge, 
OR 97463-9551 There is a default by the 
grantor or other person owing an obligation 
or by their successor in interest, the perfor¬ 
mance of which is secured by said trust 
deed, or by their successor in interest, with 
respect to provisions therein which autho¬ 
rize sale in the event of default of such pro¬ 
vision. The default for which foreclosure is 
made is grantors’ failure to pay when due 
the following sums: monthly payments of 
$826.15 beginning April 1, 2014; plus prior 
accrued late charges of $93.05; together 
with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and 
attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of 
said default; any further sums advanced by 
the beneficiary for the protection of the 
above described real property and its inter¬ 
est therein; and prepayment penalties/pre¬ 
miums, if applicable. By reason of said 
default, the beneficiary has declared all 
sums owing on the obligation secured by 
said trust deed immediately due and pay¬ 
able, said sums being the following, to wit: 
$74,319.72 with interest thereon at the rate 
of 5.50000 percent per annum beginning 
March 1, 2014; plus prior accrued late 
charges of $93.05; plus escrow advances 
of $2,880.06; plus fees of $47.00; together 
with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and 
attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of 
said default; any further sums advanced by 
the beneficiary for the protection of the 
above described property and its interest 
therein; and prepayment penalties/premi¬ 
ums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice is 
hereby given that the undersigned trustee 
will on MAY 15,2015, AT THE HOUR OF 11:00 
AM, in accord with the standard of time 
established by 0RS 187.110, at Lane County 
Courthouse Front Entrance, 125 East 8th 
Ave, Eugene, OR 97401, in the City of 
Eugene, County of Lane, State of Oregon, 
sell at public auction to the highest bidder 
for cash the interest in the real property 
described above, which the grantor had or 
had power to convey at the time of the exe¬ 
cution by grantor of the trust deed together 
with any interest which the grantor or 
grantor’s successors in interest acquired 
after the execution of the trust deed, to 
satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby 
secured and the costs and expenses of the 
sale, including reasonable charges by the 
trustee. Notice is further given that any 
person named in 0RS 86.778 has the right, 
at any time that is not later than five days 
before the date last set for the sale, to have 
this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and 
the trust deed reinstated by payment to the 
beneficiary of the entire amount then due 
(other than such portion of the principle as 
would not then be due had no default 
occurred) and by curing any other default 
complained of herein that is capable of 
being cured by tendering the performance 
required under the obligation or trust deed, 
and in addition to paying those sums or 
tendering the performance necessary to 
cure the default, by paying all costs and 
expenses actually incurred in enforcing the 
obligation and trust deed, together with 
trustee and attorney fees not exceeding 
the amounts provided by 0RS 86.778. 
WITHOUT LIMITING THE TRUSTEE’S DISCLAIM¬ 
ER OF REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, 
OREGON LAW REQUIRES THE TRUSTEE TO 
STATE IN THIS NOTICE THAT SOME RESIDEN¬ 
TIAL PROPERTY SOLD AT A TRUSTEE’S SALE 
MAY HAVE BEEN USED IN MANUFACTURING 
METHAMPHETAMINES, THE CHEMICAL COM¬ 
PONENTS OF WHICH ARE KNOWN TO BE TOXIC. 
PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS OF RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTY SHOULD BE AWARE OFTHIS POTEN¬ 
TIAL DANGER BEFORE DECIDING TO PUCE A 
BID FOR THIS PROPERTY AT THE TRUSTEE’S 
SALE In construing this notice, the singular 
includes the plural, the word “grantor” 
includes any successor in interest to the 
grantor as well as any other person owing 
an obligation, the performance of which is 
secured by the trust deed, and the words 
“trustee” and beneficiary” include their 
respective successors in interest, if any. 
Date of first publication: March 5, 2015. 
Date of last publication: March 26, 2015. 


TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE 

Reference is made to that certain trust 
deed made by James C Jensen and Connie 
J. Jensen, tenants by the entirety as grant¬ 
or, to Fidelity National Title Company of 
Oregon as trustee, in favor of Washington 
Mutual Bank as beneficiary, dated March 2, 
1998, recorded March 9,1998, in the mort¬ 
gage records of Lane County, Oregon, as 
Document No. 9816103, and assigned to 
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. on February 21,2007 
in the records of Lane County, Oregon, as 
Document No. 2007-011923, covering the 
following described real property situated 
in said county and state, to wit: LOT 14, 
BLOCK 10, SECOND ADDITION TO FAIR OAKS, 
AS PLATTED AND RECORDED IN BOOK 32, 
PAGE 15, LANE COUNTY OREGON PLAT 
RECORDS, IN LANE COUNTY, OREGON. 
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2130 0AKM0NT WAY, 
Eugene, OR 97401-2372 There is a default 
by the grantor or other person owing an 
obligation or by their successor in interest, 
the performance of which is secured by 
said trust deed, or by their successor in 
interest, with respect to provisions therein 
which authorize sale in the event of default 
of such provision. The default for which 
foreclosure is made is grantors’ failure to 
pay when due the following sums: monthly 
payments of $1,711.29 beginning May 1, 
2014; plus prior accrued late charges of 
$310.08; plus fees of $35.00; together with 
title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and 
attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of 
said default; any further sums advanced by 
the beneficiary for the protection of the 
above described real property and its inter¬ 
est therein; and prepayment penalties/pre¬ 
miums, if applicable. By reason of said 
default, the beneficiary has declared all 
sums owing on the obligation secured by 
said trust deed immediately due and pay¬ 
able, said sums being the following, to wit: 
$179,842.12 with interest thereon at the 
rate of 4.25000 percent per annum begin¬ 
ning April 1, 2014; plus prior accrued late 
charges of $310.08; plus escrow advances 
of $4,717.76; plus fees of $35.00; together 
with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and 
attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of 
said default; any further sums advanced by 
the beneficiary for the protection of the 
above described property and its interest 
therein; and prepayment penalties/premi¬ 
ums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice is 
hereby given that the undersigned trustee 
will on MAY 1, 2015, AT THE HOUR OF 11:00 
AM, in accord with the standard of time 
established by 0RS 187.110, at Lane County 
Courthouse Front Entrance, 125 East 8th 
Ave, Eugene, OR 97401, in the City of 
Eugene, County of Lane, State of Oregon, 
sell at public auction to the highest bidder 
for cash the interest in the real property 
described above, which the grantor had or 
had power to convey at the time of the exe¬ 
cution by grantor of the trust deed together 
with any interest which the grantor or 
grantor’s successors in interest acquired 
after the execution of the trust deed, to 
satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby 
secured and the costs and expenses of the 
sale, including reasonable charges by the 
trustee. Notice is further given that any 
person named in 0RS 86.778 has the right, 
at any time that is not later than five days 
before the date last set for the sale, to have 
this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and 
the trust deed reinstated by payment to the 
beneficiary of the entire amount then due 
(other than such portion of the principle as 
would not then be due had no default 
occurred) and by curing any other default 
complained of herein that is capable of 
being cured by tendering the performance 
required under the obligation or trust deed, 
and in addition to paying those sums or 
tendering the performance necessary to 
cure the default, by paying all costs and 
expenses actually incurred in enforcing the 
obligation and trust deed, together with 
trustee and attorney fees not exceeding 
the amounts provided by 0RS 86.778. 
WITHOUT LIMITING THE TRUSTEE’S DISCLAIM¬ 
ER OF REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, 


OREGON LAW REQUIRES THE TRUSTEE TO 
STATE IN THIS NOTICE THAT SOME RESIDEN¬ 
TIAL PROPERTY SOLD AT A TRUSTEE’S SALE 
MAY HAVE BEEN USED IN MANUFACTURING 
METHAMPHETAMINES, THE CHEMICAL COM¬ 
PONENTS OF WHICH ARE KNOWN TO BE TOXIC. 
PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS OF RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTYSHOULD BE AWARE OFTHIS POTEN¬ 
TIAL DANGER BEFORE DECIDING TO PUCE A 
BID FOR THIS PROPERTY AT THE TRUSTEE’S 
SALE In construing this notice, the singular 
includes the plural, the word “grantor” 
includes any successor in interest to the 
grantor as well as any other person owing 
an obligation, the performance of which is 
secured by the trust deed, and the words 
“trustee” and beneficiary” include their 
respective successors in interest, if any. 
Date of first publication: March 5, 2015. 
Date of last publication: March 26, 2015. 


TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE 

The Trustee under the terms of the Trust 
Deed described herein, at the direction of 
the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the 
property described in the Trust Deed to 
satisfy the obligations secured thereby. 
Pursuant to 0RS 86.771, the following infor¬ 
mation is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: 
RICHARD T. GORDON AND GLENDA J. 
GORDON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE 
INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. 
Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. 
Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., suc¬ 
cessor merger to WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, 
FSB, formerly known as WORLD SAVINGS 
BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: 
The real property is described as follows: 
Beginning at the Northwest corner of the T. 
Mathews Donation Land Claim No. 45, in 
Section 20, Township 19 South, Range 1 
West of the Willamette Meridian; thence 
South 89° 38’ 00” East 961.39 feet; thence 
South 0° 26’ 40” West 566.00 feet; thence 
North 89° 38’ 00” West 961.39 feet; thence 
North 0° 26’ 40” East 566.00 feet to the 
Point of Beginning, in Lane County, Oregon. 
3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded 
as follows: Date Recorded: October 24, 
2003. Recording No. 2003-104841. Official 
Records of Lane County, Oregon. 4. 
DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person 
obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory 
Note secured thereby is in default and the 
Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust 
Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments 
in the amount of $2,724.35 each , due the 
first of each month, for the months of March 
2012 through December 2014; plus late 
charges and advances; plus any unpaid 
real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. 
AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note 
which is secured by the Trust Deed referred 
to herein is: Principal balance in the 
amount of $397,087.20; plus interest at an 
adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the 
Promissory Note from February 1, 2012; 
plus late charges of $1,136.40; plus 
advances and foreclosure attorney fees 
and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee 
hereby states that the property will be sold 
to satisfy the obligations secured by the 
Trust Deed. A Trustee’s Notice of Default and 
Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed 
has been recorded in the Official Records of 
Lane County, Oregon. 7.TIMEOFSALE. Date: 
May 28, 2015. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Lane 
County Courthouse, 125 E. 8th Avenue, 
Eugene, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any 
person named in 0RS 86.778 has the right, 
at any time that is not later than five days 
before the Trustee conducts the sale, to 
have this foreclosure dismissed and the 
Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the 
Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, 
other than such portion of the principal as 
would not then be due had no default 
occurred, by curing any other default that is 
capable of being cured by tendering the 
performance required under the obligation 
or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and 
expenses actually incurred in enforcing the 
obligation and Trust Deed, together with the 
trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding 
the amount provided in 0RS 86.778. NOTICE 
REGARDING POTENTIAL HAZARDS (This 
notice is required for notices of sale sent on 
or after January 2015.) Without limitingthe 
trustee’s disclaimer of representations or 
warranties, Oregon law requires the trustee 
to state in this notice that some residential 
property sold at a trustee’s sale may have 
been used in manufacturing methamphet- 
amines, the chemical components of which 
are known to be toxic. Prospective purchas¬ 
ers of residential property should be aware 
of this potential danger before deciding to 
place a bid for this property at the trustee’s 
sale. You may reach the Oregon State Bar’s 
Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or 
toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you 
may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. 
Legal assistance may be available if you 
have a low income and meet federal pover¬ 
ty guidelines. For more information and a 
directory of legal aid programs, goto http:// 
www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions 
regarding this matter should be directed to 
Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 
(TS #17368.31036). DATED: January 26, 
2015. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, 
Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.0. Box 1475, 
Eugene, OR 97440. Date of first publication: 
March 26, 2015. Date of last publication: 
April 16, 2015. 


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EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 26, 2015 









RED MEAT 


turbid tales of the tepid 


FREE WILL 


ASTROLOGY 


ROB BREZNY 


ARIES (March 21-April 19): The term “jump the shark” often refers to a TV show that was once great but gradual¬ 
ly grew stale, and then resorted to implausible plot twists in a desperate attempt to revive its creative verve. I’m a 
little worried that you may do the equivalent of jumping the shark in your own sphere. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I’m not 
at all worried that you’ll jump the shark. It’s true that you did go through a stagnant, meandering phase there for 
a short time. But you responded by getting fierce and fertile rather than stuck and contrived. Am I right? And now 
you’re on the verge of breaking out in a surge of just-the-right-kind-of-craziness. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you happen to be singing lead vocals in an Ozzy Osbourne cover band, and 
someone in the audience throws what you think is a toy rubber animal up on stage, DO NOT rambunctiously bite 
its head off to entertain everyone. It most likely won’t be a toy, but rather an actual critter. APRIL FOOL! In fact, it’s 
not likely you’ll be fronting an Ozzy Osbourne cover band any time soon. But I hope you will avoid having to learn 
a lesson similarto the one that Ozzy did during a show back in 1982, when he bit into a real bat — a small flying 
mammal with webbed wings — thinking it was a toy. Don’t make a mistake like that. What you think is fake or 
pretend may turn out to be authentic. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the spring of 1254, Benjamin Franklin visited friends in Maryland. While out 
riding horses, they spied a small tornado whirling through a meadow. Although Franklin had written about this 
weather phenomenon, he had never seen it. With boyish curiosity, he sped toward it. At one point, he caught up 
to it and lashed it with his whip to see if it would dissipate. This is the kind of adventure I advise you to seek out, 
Gemini. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. I don’t really believe you should endanger your safety by engaging in stunts like 
chasing tornadoes. But I do think that now is a favorable time to seek out daring exploits that quench your urge 
to learn. 

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Novelist L. Frank Baum created the make-believe realm known as Oz. Lewis Carroll 
conjured up Wonderland and C.S. Lewis invented Narnia. Now you are primed to dream up your own fantasy land 
and live there full-time, forever protected from the confusion and malaise of the profane world. Have fun in your 
imaginary utopia, Cancerian! APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. It’s true that now would be a good time to give extra atten¬ 
tion to cultivating vivid visions of your perfect life. But I wouldn’t recommend that you live there full-time. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “The national anthem of Hell must be the old Frank Sinatra song‘I Did It My Way,”’ 
declares Richard Wagner, author of the book Christianity for Dummies. “Selfish pride is Hell’s most common trait,” 
he adds. “Hell’s inhabitants have a sense of satisfaction that they can at least say ‘they’ve been true to them¬ 
selves.’” Heed this warning, Leo. Tame your lust for self-expression. APRIL FOOL! I was making a little joke. The 
truth is not as simplistic as I implied. I actually think it’s important for you to be able to declare “I did it my way” 
and “I’ve been true to myself.” But for best results, do it in ways that aren’t selfish, insensitive, or arrogant. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): No matter what gender you are, it’s an excellent time to get a gig as a stripper. Your 
instinct for removing your clothes in entertainingwaysisata peak. Even if you have never been trained in the 
art, I bet you’ll have an instinctive knack. APRIL FOOL! I lied. I don’t really think you should be a stripper. But I do 
recommend you experiment with a more metaphorical version of that art. For instance, you could expose hidden 
agendas that are causing distortions and confusion. You could peel away the layers of deception and propagan¬ 
da that hide the naked facts and the beautiful truth. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-0ct. 22): Give yourself obsessively to your most intimate relationships. Don’t bother cleaning 
your house. Call in sick to your job. Ignore all your nagging little errands. Now is a time for one task only: paying 
maximum attention to those you care about most. Heal any rifts between you. Work harder to give them what 
they need. Listen to them with more empathy than ever before. APRIL FOOL! I went a bit overboard there. It’s true 
that you’re in a phase when big rewards can come from cultivating and enhancing togetherness. But if you want 
to serve your best relationships, you must also take very good care of yourself. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s after midnight. You’re half-wasted, cruising around town looking for wicked fun. 
You stumble upon a warehouse laboratory where zombie bankers and military scientists are creating genetically 
engineered monsters from the DNA of scorpions, Venus flytraps, and Monsanto executives. You try to get every¬ 
one in a party mood, but all they want to do is extract your DNA and add it to the monster. APRIL FOOL! Everything 
I just said was a lie. I doubt you’ll encounter any scenario that extreme. But you are at risk for falling into weird 
situations that could compromise your mental hygiene. To minimize that possibility, make sure that the wicked 
fun you pursue is healthy, sane wicked fun. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you were a ladybug beetle, you might be ready and eager to have sex for 
nine hours straight. If you were a pig, you’d be capable of enjoying 30-minute orgasms. If you were a dolphin, 
you’d seek out erotic encounters not just with other dolphins of both genders, but also with turtles, seals and 
sharks. Since you are merely human, however, your urges will probably be milder and more containable. APRIL 
FOOL! In truth, Sagittarius, I’m not so sure your urges will be milder and more containable. 

CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan. 19): “The past is not only another country where they do things differently,” says 
writer Theodore Dalrymple, “but also where one was oneself a different person.” With this as yourtheme, Capri¬ 
corn, I invite you to spend a lot of time visiting the Old You in the Old World. Immerse yourself in that person and 
that place. Get lost there. And don’t come back until you’ve relived at least a thousand memories. APRIL FOOL! I 
was exaggerating. While it is a good time to get reacquainted with the old days and old ways, I don’t recommend 
that you get utterly consumed by the past. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Some Aquarian readers have been complaining. They want me to use more 
celebrity references in my horoscopes. They demand fewer metaphors drawn from literature, art and science, 
and more metaphors rooted in gossipy events reported on by tabloids. “Tell me how Kanye West’s recent travails 
relate to my personal destiny,” wrote one Aquarius. So here’s a sop to you kvetchers: The current planetary 
omens say it’s in your interest to be more like Taylor Swift and less like Miley Cyrus. Be peppy, shimmery and 
breezy, not earthy, salty and raucous. APRIL FOOL! In truth, I wouldn’t write about celebrities’ antics if you paid 
me. Besides, forthe time being, Miley Cyrus is a better role model for you than Taylor Swift. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Annie Edson Taylor needed money. She was 63 years old, and didn’t have any 
savings. She came up with a plan: to be the first person to tuck herself inside a barrel and ride over Niagara 
Falls. (This was back in 1901.) She reasoned that her stunt would make her wealthy as she toured the country 
speaking about it. I recommend that you consider out-of-the-box ideas like hers, Pisces. It’s an excellent time to 
get extra creative in your approach to raising revenue. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. It’s true that now is a favorable time 
to be imaginative about yourfinancial life. But don’t try outlandish escapades like hers. 

HOMEWORK: Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Write Truthrooster@gmail.com. 


GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM 

CHECKOUT EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. 
THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1 -877-873-4888 [or] 1 -900-950-7700 


from the secret files of 

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The great thing about being older is that 
I can walk around shirtless and not give 
a tinker's damn what anyone thinks about 
my sagging physique, liver spots, psoriasis 




<•/Saw You 

IT’S FREE TO PLACE AN I SAW YOU! EMAIL: ISAWYOU@EUGENEWEEKLY.COM 


I SAW YOU 


COURTEOUS ON POLK 

I was on my bike crossing Polk and you 
stopped and thanks but the reason why I got 
annoyed and grimaced at you is because I 
wasted my bike brakes to stop for you, and it 
was an inconvenience in vain. 


DARI MART MOON PIE 

I saw you at Dari mart on Saturday the 21st 
you were standing behind the counter eating 
a moon pie, you can eat my pie anytime! 
Want to get to know you better... SB 


FUZZY PIZZA GUY 

Between your pony tail fastened in a 
scrunchy and your beard so manly, I don't 
know what I crave more you or your pizza. 


LONG BROWN HAIR 

I met you at BB&B last Wednesday, 6ish, then 
TJ's. You: a beauty with incredible long, 
brown hair past your waist, pair of Uggs, and 
adorable 3 y/o son. Me: tall, fit, older, also 
with young son. Dinner? Coffee? Kombucha? 
Share divorce stories? Please rsvp to EW 


SAW YOU IN MY DREAMS 

Tree tops were dropping around us but you 
helped me find the way out. Then I couldn't 
find my car but you put me at ease. Not sure 
what it means other than your presence in 
my life is calming. Thank you Bluebell 


TRIVIAL PURSUIT? 

We've been playing games so long I'm start¬ 
ing to think we can't interact otherwise. 
Twister might have been fun, but the Game of 
Life doesn't seem to be in the Cards for us. 


WE CAN SOAR 

to great heights when our communication is 
respectful and open. Both putting energy 
into the life we are building together. We may 
hit bumps but they don't hurt at all 


BIG DARK PICKUP TRUCK 

You drove past my workplace, it was fleeting, 
but I saw you knuckle-deep in the "search'' 
for "gold". Keepin it classy... 


LOVE TO LOVE YOU 

So generous and thoughtful. Don't know how 
it all happened to work out so beautifully. I 
am thankful everyday but especially this 
time of year. Yours always, xo 


GOTH FOREST WITCH 

You were at Out Law Bash dancing and drink¬ 
ing. And quite frankly I don't remember a 
whole lot of the night. But one thing I do 
know is that your heart burns with love and 
rage brighter than that dang effigy did. So I 
guess what I'm trying to saying is, your 
friendship makes civ bearable. 



a photo sharing space 



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BY DAN SAVAGE 


I found this in an online sex ad: “Straight guy with an addiction to massive cocks in my ass.” This 
“straight guy” went on to mention his girlfriend. Can a person really identify as straight while want¬ 
ing to be fucked by men? I understand that straight guys can like ass play too, but it’s not like he 
wants to be pegged by his girlfriend or use a dildo on himself He’s straight-up (heh-heh) looking for 
hung dudes to fuck his ass. 


Jaded And Wondering, Dude’s Really On Pussy? 


Can a person identify as straight while wanting to be fucked by men? Ha-ha-ha. Yes. I was pretending to 
be straight when I was 15, PastorTed “Meth and Man Ass” Haggard was pretendingto be straight when he 
was 45, and Congressman Aaron Schock is still pretendingto be straight. 

As forthe guy behind that online sex ad: He is most likely bisexual and rounding himself down to straight. 
There’s a much smaller chance he’s straight and it isn’t the massive cocks that turn him on, JAWDR0P, but 
the boundary-shattering/identity-upending violation that being pounded by massive cocks represents. 
It could also be a “forced bi” thing, and he’s doing this to please a dominant girlfriend. Or—and this is a 
lot likelier than straight or forced bi—he’s a gay guy who pretends to be a straight guy online because 
the ruse attracts gay and bi guys turned on by the boundary-crossing/identity-upending violation that 
shoving their massive cocks up a straight guy’s ass represents. 

Only way to know for sure: Ask him yourself. No guarantee you’ll get a straight answer, of course, but only 
he knows for sure what’s up with him. 


My girlfriend can’t use hormonal birth control and “doesn’t like’’ condoms but wants sex. What would 
you do? 

Paternal Anxiety Upsetting Sexual Escapades 


I would fuck her in the ass, PAUSE, but only with her enthusiastic and sustained consent. And one day I 
would leave her, come out as gay, and get myself a boyfriend who likes condoms and start fucking him 
in the ass instead. 


I recently started dating a girl who likes to be submissive. It’s more of a psychological thing than a 
pain thing. She opened up about her kink, and I was all for it, thinking myself the ultimate GGG lover. 
Thing is, I find being a Dorn quite boring. I love getting her off, but I just can’t get into the role. I’m not 
sure if this is funny or horrible, but the other day, she was strapped to the bed and just as she was 
reaching a climax, I stopped. I uncuffed her, told her I was leaving the room, and ordered her not to 
take the blindfold off or touch herself. She loved it, but I did it so I could go to the toilet and check my 
phone. I’d say something to her if I found it gross or it wasn’t working, but she enjoys it to the point 
where she has little interest in doing anything else. Even when regular intercourse takes place, there 
are still clear submissive overtones—to have vanilla sex at all, I basically have to lecture her first 
about her dirty ways to get her going. I like more “mutual’’ activities like 69ing, massages, etc. She 
seems open to it but then steers it back to her submissiveness. I enjoy sex with her, but this Do m/sub 
thing is a roadblock to me getting off. Am I just being self-centered? 

Dorn Only On Demand 

All BDSM tops—all Masters, Mistresses, Pro-Dorns, switches, vanilla-but-GGG partners of submissive 
types—occasionally check their phones, go to the toilet, take a snack break, etc., while their subs wait 
blindfolded or hooded back in the bedroom/playroom/dungeon. The sub gets to tremble in anticipation; 
the Dorn gets to relax for a second. So taking a quick toilet/phone break doesn’t mean you are a lousy 
Dorn, D00D, but I definitely see why you’re bored: BDSM isn’t your thing, you’re doing it for her, and she’s 
taking you for granted. You’re being GGG (and indulging all her kinks); she’s not being GGG (she’s making 
it all about her kinks). Tell your girlfriend that she’ll have to lecture herself about her dirty ways when 
you two are having vanilla PIV sex, 69ing, or swapping massages, if that’s what it takes to get her going, 
because you don’t want to have to play at being dominant every time you have sex. 

I suspect the Dom/sub play will feel like less of a roadblock, D00D, if every sexual interaction with your 
girlfriend isn’t colored by it. 

I love my girlfriend. However, she has an issue with things she considers “icky”—like sperm, saliva, 
sex when menstruating, and anal sex as well as the resulting santorum. She also regards dressing 
up for sex and talking dirty as silly. She enjoys sex just fine, but it is pretty plain vanilla. Any advice 
on howto move her in a more experimentalist direction would be appreciated. I am not looking to turn 
her into an anal fanatic or a sloppy blowjob queen, but rather for her to put aside her preconceived 
notions and give some things a try by embracing them fully. 

Wants It Less Tedious 


Anal isn’t for everyone and sloppy blowjobs aren’t for everyone, WILT, but a fear of all bodily secretions— 
with the convenient exception of her own vaginal secretions—isn’t just sex-negative, it’s childish. Let her 
know that, as much as you love her, this relationship won’t last if she can’t get a little more comfortable 
with human bodies and the stuffthat leaks from them before, during, and after sex. 


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I want to thank you for your constant advice to explore fantasies, communicate desires, and get 
thorough consent in a sexy way. I’m a bi-ish college girl and used to be in a sexually unsatisfying 
long-distance relationship. Then I started saying, “What would Dan do?” Now I’m friends-with- 
BDSM-benefits with my ex—he buys me sexy lingerie and bath products while I remind him what a 
naughty boy he is—and I’m currently planning a super-hot threesome with a rugby player and his 
girlfriend! Yahtzee! And none of it would have happened without you! 

Satisfied Lady 


I feel conflicted about your letter, SL. 

Let’s say your ex suddenly violates the terms of your friends-with-BDSM-benefits arrangement and starts 
presenting you with unsexy PJs and dishwashing soap. Or let’s say that rugby player is a lousy lay who 
can’t find your clit and his girlfriend is a loony nut who keys your car in a fit of post-threesome jealousy. 
If I had previously taken credit for all the awesome sex you’re currently having and/or looking forward 
to—and that’s what I would be doing if I accepted your thanks without qualification—then I would have to 
take responsibility forthe unsexy PJs, the dishwashing soap, the lousy-in-bed rugby player, the damage 
to your car, etc. 

So instead of accepting your thanks, SL, I’ll just say this: I’m happy you’re happy, and I’m pleased my 
column was helpful, but the adventurous sex you’re having and/or looking forward to now? You always 
hadthatin you. Reading my column may have helped you tap into your adventurous spirit, but the credit 
for your sex life—and the responsibility for your sex life—ultimately rests with you. 

Catch Dan’s podcast every week at savagelovecast.com. 


MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET @FAKEDANSAVAGE • THE SAVAGE LOVECAST ATSAVAGELOVECAST.COM 


EUGENEWEEKLY.COM • MARCH 2 6, 2015 








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