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1555. 




>appy*Iew#Tear. » 



E SINCERELY WISH TO THANK YOU for ihe liberal pal- 

ronage bestoWed upon us in ihe past, feeling assured 
thai oiti -unfitting efforts to supply all With the best 
quality of merchandise has met With approbation; and With 
our method of fair and square dealing, We belieVe that the 
majority of our customers are satisfied. 
It is our aim to merit a continuance of f aVocs from all -Who haVe heretofore 
dealt With us, as well as to add many neW names to our already large list of 
customers. To this end Wz shall siriVe to be courteous, obliging, prompt, and 
to serVe all With the best quality of eVery article offered for sale, alWaVs en- 
deavoring to haVe all matters satisfactory. 

AS TO THE HANDLING AND CARE of the seeds after arriving at our establish- 
ment, We Would say that the seed department receives the undivided attention 
of one member of the firm, With a competent corps of seedsmen, all of Whom 
haVe been educated and thoroughly trained in the business, Who make it their 
sole duty to attend to the Wants of this department, so thai our customers Will 
find that We haVe a complete seed-store, and maybe assured that they Will re- 
ceive seeds, plants, etc., second to none, and all orders Will haVe the attention 
and care in filling thai might be expected from houses thai engage in the 
1 trade only ; and, by combining orders for iools, machines, etc., a saving 
made in time and money. 



REKD HBOUT OUR S66DS. 




All Seeds tested as to germinating qualities before sending out. 
This work is carried on in the Greenhouses, and by one of 
the largest practical market gardeners of Arlington, Mass. 

We shall continue io sell the best quality of seeds io be obtained. 
Que prices Will be made io meet all fair competition Where honest seeds are 
jsold. 

Que long experience has taught us hoW, When, and Where to obtain Seeds 
and their cost. We mean the kind ihat giVe satisfactory results as to germin- 
ating, irueness io name, superiority in quality, and abundance of crop. . 

For the most part , our seeds are groWn by noted careful individuals Who 
make a specialty of a f eW kinds of seeds only, and produce those in perfec- 
tion. 

We haVe neVer feared, and ii giVes us pleasure, to haVe the product of 
• our seeds compared With ihat produced from any other source in the World. 

Thai What We here say is fully Vouched for by the hundreds of old as 
Well as neW customers Who gather about us each year, many of Whom 
haVe expressed in Writing their appreciation of our efforts, While others by 
iheir continued purchases express their pleasure ai our counters. 

Be assured We shall continue in this beaten path io success Which We knoW 
can noi be attained Wiihoui quality of seeds at fair market prices. We 
need a continuance of your kind faVors, and Will thank you io acquaint 
others of our efforts to please. 

i 



ONE TRIAL OF OUR SEEDS WILL CONVINCE 
YOU THAT FOR QUALITY THEY HAVE 
NEVER BEEN EXCELLED. 

Warranting" Seeds. — We shall always be willing to do for our patrons, and grant them all 
the inducements offered by other seedsmen. It has always been our mode of dealing, where seeds 
have been properly planted, and have failed to germinate through any cause that could be at- 
tributed to the quality sold by us, to re-fill the order without charge : this we shall always be willing 
to do ; but, in such cases, it must be proved beyond a doubt, that said failures are not caused by 
unforeseen freaks in nature, mode of culture, or to seasons of drought or of too much moisture. 

Guaranty. — Though our stocks are carefully selected and thoroughly tested, and should 
give satisfaction, yet failure is sometimes the lot of the most careful and experienced. Let the 
seeds be ever so fresh and pure, climatic and other influences may cause a total failure of the 
crop. To protect ourselves against this possibility, we wish it distinctly understood by pur- 
chasers of our seeds, that, while we exercise the greatest care to have all seeds pure and reliable, 
we do not warrant the same, and are not in any respect liable or responsible for any loss or 
damage arising from any failure thereof in any respect. 

Seeds by Mail. — All seeds ordered at ounce or packet prices are sent free. When ordered 
in larger quantities, postage must be added at the rate of 16 cents per pound. Beans, Peas, and 
Corn require 15 cents per pint, 25 cents per quart, extra, to cover postage ; small ears of Sweet 
Corn 5 cents, large ears 10 cents, and Field Corn 10 cents per ear, extra, for postage. 

How to send Money. — It can be sent safely by post-office money order, postal note, by 
bank draft, express money order, or by registered letter. The expense of sending either way may 
be deducted from amount sent, and we will return full amount in seeds. It is unsafe to send 
money in letter, and only small amounts of one dollar or less should be so sent. Postage-stamps 
may be sent for moderate amounts. If the above directions are followed, we guarantee the safe 
arrival of all money sent us. ' 

Sign your Name. — Very often we receive letters containing orders and money, which we 
cannot fill, on account of party sending having failed to sign any name, and the post-office address 
is often omitted ; the postmark being blurred, we are unable to fill the order, no matter how much 
we desire to do so. Please use our order sheet and envelope in all cases where you have them, 
and fill up the blanks, and sign your name ; and you will have no occasion to censure us. 

Bag's used in packing*, if returned within sixty days from date of purchase, will be received 
at prices paid for them, provided they have not been used for meal or other purposes. The fol- 
lowing prices, which cover cost only, will be charged : one-eighth bushel, 8 cents ; one-fourth 
bushel, io cents; one-half bushel, 15 cents; one bushel, 20 cents; two bushels, 25 cents. Please 
see that the requisite amount for bags is included in your remittance. 

Gardeners' Situations. — We have, at all times, names of gardeners of integrity and ability 
On our register, whom we shall be glad to recommend to parties requiring their services. 

We call your hind attention to the Ag-ricultnral Implement, Machine and Wooden 
Ware Department of this Catalogue, which contains illustrations and prices of a few of the 
most seasonable goods. We carry a very complete stock of all varieties of kindred articles, and 
shall soon issue a complete Implement Catalogue. We solicit correspondence, and assure prompt 
response to all inquiries. 

Hoping 1 to have the pleasure of serving many new customers, as well as those who have 
favored us with their commands in the past, we remain, yours truly, 

PARZEE <Sc WOOD. 

2 




PRINGLE'S NEW PROGRESS OATS. 

This new and distinct variety of Oats was made by Mr. 
Pringle several years ago, by crossing the Excelsior with the 
Chinese Hulless. In it we have a combination of good qual- 
ities which cannot fail to please, — a short, stiff straw, and 
a long, full head or panicle. It is a mistake to suppose that 
a tall-growing variety will produce more grain than a short 
one, because much of the vigor of the plant will be used in 
producing the straw. In the " Progress " we have a head 
averaging as large as the largest of the taller varieties, well 
filled, and only two-thirds as much straw. Being so much 
shorter it does not lodge. In our trial plot of about 20 va- 
rieties of Oats, the Progress matured the first of all. In 
the spring of 1886 we drilled in one and three-fourth bushels 
on a rather poor soil, and harvested from this 162 bushels, 
thresher's measure. We believe if the farmer prefers grain 
to straw, the Progress will suit every time. Horses seem 
to like these Oats much better than most sorts, probably 
because of the thin and tender shuck. The annexed illus- 
tration shows a cluster of the heads, grown with ordinary 
cultivation. Price, per packet 15; per peck, $1.00; per 
bushel, $3.00. 

HORSFORD'S MARKET GARDEN PEA. 

This new wrinkled Pea introduced several years ago, is the 
result of a cross between the Alpha and American Wonder. 
It grows from fifteen to thirty ins. high, is very stocky, and 
requires no bushing. Each vine throws out from fifteen to 
twenty-five laterals, ten to fifteen inches long, and on some 
of the best plants over 150 pods have been counted. Twenty 
bushels have been grown from thirty-five pounds of seed, 
and it has yielded at the rate of over fifty bushels per acre. 




Pringle's Progress Oats. 




Horsford's Market Garden Pea. 



Its habit is such that a small amount of seed will plant 
a large plot of ground. The seeds can be planted 
from three to six inches apart in the drill. It ripens 
about with McLean's Advancer, and those who have 
eaten it pronounce it one of the sweetest they have 
tasted. Price per quart, 30 cents ; per peck, $2.00. 

FARQUHAR'S FIRST-CROP SUGAR CORN. 

Said to excell all other varieties in earliness. We 
quote what the introducers say of it, ar.d can add 
that we know of several parties who gave it a trial 
last season, and found it one of the earliest varieties 
ever grown, and the quantity excellent. We recom- 
mend it as in every respect the best very early 
Sweet Corn yet before the public. It is of low 
growth and productive ; ears eight-rowed, of good 
size and fit for table use several days before any oth- 
er variety ; kernels quite large, white, and of deli- 
cious flavor. All who plant the First-crop Sugar 
Corn may have this delicious vegetable on their ta- 
bles several days earlier in the season than ever be- 
fore, while growers for market will find the variety 
most profitable to raise. Price, ears each, 10 cents ; 
by mail 15 cents. Per quart, 30c; by mail, 25c. 
extra. Peck, $2.00. 

3 



^arfier & Wood* Spggiatties,*888* 




HENDERSON'S EARLY SNOWBALL CAULIFLOWER. 

To accommodate some of our customers who prefer to use seed sent out by the introducers,, 
we shall keep in stock, 25-cent packages; quarter ounce, $1.25; half ounce, $2.50 ; one ounce, $5. 

Customers will find our own seed 
of this variety described on page 39,, 
and there is no truer or better stock 
to be secured. Price per ounce, $3.50.. 

BECKETT'S DWARF CHAMPION 
TOMATO. 

Mr. Beckett, introducer of " Char- 
tier " Radish, says of this new toma- 
to, that it is entirely distinct in habit 
of growth and foliage from any sort 
ever produced. The vines are dwarf 
and compact in habit, grow stiff and 
upright, with thick and short-jointed 
stems. The compactness of habit is 
retained in all stages throughout the 
season ; foliage dark green in color. 
Heavy manuring tends to increase the 
abundance and size of fruit instead of 
ruining the vine. It has proven itself 
remarkably early, ripening fruit as 
early as July 1st. It will yield double 
the quantity of extra early fruit per 
acre that can be obtained from any 
Beckett's Dwarf Champion Tomato. other tomato, 

probably unsurpassed, and will, owing to the f 
smaller amount of space required between the \^%s^ W 

plants, yield more to the acre than any other " 
variety. In form and color the fruit closely re- 
sembles the Acme; it is always smooth, sym- 
metrical, and attractive in appearance ; the skin 
is tough, and the flesh solid; ripens well close 
round to the stem, and is not so much subject to 
crack as some other sorts. 25c. pkt., 5 for $1. 

NEW OAK-LEAVED LETTUCE. 

A distinct and new variety, with leaves 
shaped like those of the oak, thus giving it a 
unique appearance, which is retained during all 
stages of growth. The leaves are light green, 
slightly curled, and set very close together, form- 
ing compact heads ; is very tender and slow to 
run to seed. Is well adapted for forcing or open 
culture. Per pkt., 10c. ; per ounce, 25cents. 




As a cropper, it is 




New Oak-Leaved Lettuce. 



1?ar fter & Wood* Specialties, 188 8* 

BAY STATE SQUASH — Has Come to Stay. 

Every one pleased with this new Squash 
last season. Seed we offer comes direct from 
the originator. 

The excellent features are its extreme 
solidity, heavy weight, fineness and dryness 
of grain, and sweetness of flavor. Is a trifle 
earlier than the "Hybrid," crop averaging 
smaller in size and more in number, making 
the productiveness in weight about the same. 
It possesses an extremely hard, flinty shell, 
giving assurance of being an excellent keeper. 
The color of the shell is a blue shade with a 
greenish tinge. The flesh is of a beautiful 
bright golden yellow, and exceedingly sweet 
and tender in quality. The average weight of 
the squash is about 10 pounds, thus being 
peculiarly adapted for retail trade. Those; 
who have tested the eating qualities speakilf 
in the highest terms as to its merits. Price, '"~ 
per pkt., 10c; per oz., 25c; per lb., $1.75. 

UPLAND CRESS. 

This new vegetable is destined to become 
a most valuable and important acquisition, 
for the reason that it supplies a long-felt want 




Low's New Bay State Squash. 




"f - '} ^z 



mm 




for something green to satisfy a craving ap- 
petite so natural in early Spring. Happily 
this plant possesses very many desirable qual- 
ities. It is a hardy perennial, thriving on any 
soil, wet or dry. In early Springit is the first 
to make its appearance, grows with surprising 
rapidity, unequalled by any other plant, so that 
in afew days it is ready to use. The young and 
tender leaves may be eaten raw, or as a salad. 

The Upland Cress, besides its varied 
uses as a vegetable, may at the same time 
prove of much benefit otherwise, resembling 
as it does the Water Cress in taste. Price, 
ioc. per pkt. 

THE SIBLEY SQUASH, 

The introducers say of it : " A grand sur- 
prise to those connoisseurs who have hith- 
erto held the belief that to eclipse the Hub- 
Upland Cress, bard was an absolute impossibility ! " 
The form, accurately represented here, is 
obviously entirely new, having the stem at 
the swelled end. The seed alone, being of very 
peculiar shape and color, brands the squash as 
entirely original and distinct. The shell is pale 
green in color, very hard and flinty, being at the 
same time so very thin and smooth as to occa- 
sion the least possible waste in baking. The 
flesh is solid, thick, vivid brilliant orange in col- 
or, and is possessed of rare edible qualities, 
being dry and really wonderful for fineness of 
grain and the rich and delicate flavor pecu- 
liarly its own. The weight ranges from eight 
to eleven pounds. In point of productiveness 
it has the advantage of either the Hubbard or 
the Marblehead, and ripens its fruit so evenly 
that nearly the whole crop may be gathered 
at one picking. As a keeper it excells all, re- The Sibley Squash, 
maining in a good, dry cellar, perfectly sound until the last of March, improving in flavor and 
quality. The^ardness and flintinessof the shell render the Sibley Squash one of the finest 
shippers in existence. Price per pkt., 25 cents. 




Farfier & Wood. Specialties, *888. 
UNLEHCHED CHNHDH HSHES. 

Mixture for a Perfect Fertilizer, spread on barn floor a layer of ashes, then a layer of 
bone meal, at the rate of two tons ashes and five hundred pounds bone meal; moisten as you 
place it ; in a week turn and moisten again. In one month the bone will be cut up, with no 
danger attending, as there is in using acids, and at a cost of only $17 per ton for a fertilizer 
equal to any you can buy at double the cost. If a little too moist, dry it with land plaster or 
road dust. 

Quantity used for seeding land or lawns: plow up in August or September, and harrow; 
sow on two tons of ashes, and harrow again ; then sow your seed, and bush. 

Quantity used, per acre, for top dressing: sow on one ton, with a little grass seed, and 
harrow in with a horse-rake. 

Quantity used for Cultivated Crops: sow on two tons and harrow in'; at first hoeing, sow 
on half a ton more. If the bone and ashes are used, one and a half tons will do. 

We are in a position to receive orders for carload lots of ashes. Cars contain about fifteen 
tons, or 700 bushels, about fifty bushels to the ton, four bushels in a barrel, ten barrels to a ton. 
These are approximate figures. Price, car lots, delivered track Boston or at places where the 
freight is the same as from Canada to Boston, $12.00 per ton in bulk; put up in barrels, (about 
150 barrels to car), per ton, $16.00. 

Price, small lots, at our Store, (about four bushels to the barrel,) $2.00 per barrel. 

Price, per ton, at our store, packed in barrels, $18.00. 

THE "QUEEN" MUSK MELON. 

The originator says of it : — "This melon is neither ex- 
treme in size, but a fair average ; oval in shape ; thickly 
netted surface ; with a rich green flesh, charged with an 
almost superabundance of saccharine elements, and com- 
bining the most luscious edible qualities to be found in the 
musk melon family. It is, without exception, the finest 
melon, all points considered, that I have ever grown, and I 
unhesitatingly send it forth with confidence that it will take 
care of itself, and need no advertising after it has been 
thoroughly distributed." Price, 20 cents per packet. 

EARLY PROLIFIC MARROW SQUASH. 

This new Marrow Squash appears to be a valuable 
acquisition ; for while it is remarkably productive, no 
(variety can compete with it for earliness, it being 
about twelve days ahead — s 
of the Boston Marrow. ' 
Its color is most attract- 
ive, a brilliant orange- 
red. Quality excellent. 
A good keeper. 

Mr. E. L. Coy, one of 
the largest squash grow- 
ers in the United States, 
pronounces it " the earli- 
est and finest fall vari- 
ety." Per lb., post-paid, 
$2.50; ounce, 30 cents; 
packet, 5 cts. 



Early Prolific Marrow Squash. 

BECKERT'S CHART1ER RADISH. 

The^ originator claims that this radish, unlike most other va- 
rieties, is of American origin, and is undoubtedly by far the best 
variety, for all purposes, now in cultivation, possessing almost 
every good quality than can be desired. It is perfectly adapted 
for very early growth as well as summer and fall crops. In 
quality it is unexcelled, being sweet and very tender, with hardly 
the least perceptible pungency. It continues growing for a long 
time without getting pithy or going to seed, and in many instances 
remains in good edible condition till late in the summer, after 
having grown to a very large size. In color it is deep crimson at 
the top, shading to pure white at the tip. Packet, 5 cents ; ounce, 
20 cents; pound, $1.25. 5 






Chartier Radish. 




Copyrighted k PARKER wood. 1887 

YELLOW GLOBE DANVERS ONION SEED. 

Buxton's 1887 crops of Danvers Onion Seed, as well as that of all other Essex Co. growers, 
proved nearly an entire failure, we have however to offer our customers seed that hereafter will 
be known as Our Superior Stock, and we offer it knowing that it will disappoint no one as to 
earliness, crop, shape or quality. 

The same quality of stock has been produced for many seasons past by this same noted 
grower, so that we are well acquainted with the seed and know of its productions, the onions 
comparing always with the best brought to market. 

Massachusetts-grown Danvers Onion Seed is considered superior in quality to that grown 
elsewhere ; will give larger crops, is best in shape, and much surer to germinate. It is largely in 
demand this season, as good onion seed is very scarce. Beware of Californian grown seed, very 
plentiful this season. Price, per package, 5 cents ; per ounce, 40 cents ; per pound, $5.00. If by 
mail, add 16 cents per pound for postage. . ' 

We can supply a limited quantity of seed grown by Buxton, to those 
who order early, price upon application. 

DANVERS CARROT. — True Danvers-Crown Seed. 

Above we give a faithful illustration of the true types of Danvers Onion and Carrot, as 
grown in Danvers and vicinity, photographed from nature. 1 

Carrot seed grown in Danvers is very scarce, and is always more or less every year. 

There were only three parties in Danvers, Peabody or Essex Co., that with a 
thorough search, we can find who grew any seed the past season. Buxton grew a crop especially 
for us, we having just received the entire crop for 1887, and we can state that no better seed can 
be secured. Price per oz., 40 cents ; per lb., $2.25. 16 cents extra per lb. if sent by mail. 

We also secured the entire limited stock of one of the other parties, which we know 
to be first class seed in every respect, not having paid so much for it, we give our customers 
advantage of our trade and offer it at, per oz., 40 cents, per lb. $1.75; 16 cents extra per 
lb. if sent by mail. We sold nearly 100 lbs. last season of above quality of seed. 

Danvers Carrot Seed, very best quality, as offered by the general trade, grown espe- 
cially for us from Danvers grown carrots. Price, per oz., 15 cts. ; per lb., $1.50; 16 cts. extra 
by mail. 

* 7 



J?ar fier & Wood* S j* eciatttes, x 8 8 8 f 

~ ORIGINAL TRUE EXTRA EARLY CROSBY SWEET CORN. 

We use the words " Original True, simply to give our, customers the knozvledge that we have the 
seed of Crosby Sweet Corn that will produce ears in size, and corn in earliness and quality, as was 

produced when the Crosby Corn was first introduced. In 1885 we 
were the only house who catalogued this variety zvith the above 
heading, hit it seems a brother seedsman had been selling without 
cataloguing for a number- of years unbekn&wn to us corn grown by 
fosiah Crosby, who no doubt was the originator of this variety, a 
fact of little conseque7ice in this case, as after many years of cultiva- 
tion, he probably could stipply seed no nearer to the original variety 
than John Crosby, a relative from zvhom we obtained our seed. And 
there are several other Arlington gardeners who have seed of equal 
originality. We advertised plainly that John S. Crosby grew our 
seed, ignorant of who the originator was. We knew we offered as 
stated original Crosby Corn, had we obtained otir stock from 
Peter Kelley, we should have so published it, but it only hap- 
pened his name was Crosby, and zve endeavored to convey no other 
idea ' in the world than what we state in the beginning of this 
letter. Yours respectfully, 

PARKER & WOOD. 

We have a few hundred ears one year old, of John S. Cros- 
by's growing, and we will guarantee that it is as near like the 
Crosby Corn, as first produced, as any ever offered in America. 
Price per ear 10 cents, per dozen ears, 60 cents. For sale on the 
ear only. 

ORIGINAL TRUE CROSBY SWEET CORN. 

One year removed from parent stock. Grown last year on con- 
tract especially for us, we furnishing the stock obtained of Mr. 
Crosby, paying $8.00 a bushel for the seed stock. Great care has 
been taken in the growing and curing. No early varieties of corn 
grown within a mile of it. Price, 10 cents; per dozen ears, 40 
cents; per quart, 30 cents, per peck, $1.25; per bushel, $5.00. 




THE, ECLIPSE BEET. 

This excellent sort is . steadily growing in favor, and is 
ered by all to be a great addition to our list of beets 
earlier than the 



consid- 
; being 



Egyptian, and J 
smoother, of fine JjF 
color, globe- 
shaped, with 
small top. Skin E _. 
True Crosby Sweet Corn. and flesh intense 
Ted, very fine grained and sweet, a large cropper. §f| 
Very popular with market-gardeners. It still J§§ 
shows a tendency to sport; but we have 111 
this season been able to obtain our stock _ 
from a seed-grower, who, to the best of our fijjf 
knowledge, has the truest strain to be obtained - 
in the country. Price, per packet, 5 cents; 
ounce, 15 cents; pound, $1.00. 



CODDARD or BOSTON FAVORITE BEAN. _ 

An attractive, quick-selling bean. Somewhat fiBl 
resembles the Dwarf Horticultural, being fully" 
as early ; the vines, pods and beans grow about 
one-third larger. The beautiful red pods are 
very attractive, and do not spot. For a green I 
shell bean, nothing in this market has ever come I 
up to it. They are very productive. They I 
should be planted in hills two and one-half feet g 
apart, and three feet between the rows, with il 
three beans in a hill, or if in drills, about eight J % 
inches apart. Price, packet, 10 cents ; quart, 30 ■ 
cents; peck, $1.25. 




Eclipse Beet. 




A staminate (or Self-Fertilizing) variety. 

Description of Belmont Strawberry. — It does well on both heavy and light soils. The 
vigorous growth of the plant enables it to carry high, and mature an abundant crop o{ fruit, 
which can remain a long time on the vines Without injury. It is not liable to rust or blight, and 
being a staminate variety, will be found a reliable fertilizer for late pistillate sorts. It possesses a 
hardy constitution, and being one of the latest, it escapes the spring frosts which are so fatal to 
many early varieties ; is a large cropper. From 10,700 feet of ground, or scarcely a quarter of an 
acre, the originator realized the net sum of #596, a portion of the crop being retained for home 
use. 

The berryis large, crimson in color, oblong in shape, very solid and sweet, and of extra flavor 
and quality. : Its texture is exceedingly fine, having no hard or unripe spots • it colors evenly 
and perfectly, and is quite remarkable as a carrier and keeper. 

Price : Layer Plants, Spring of 1888, single plants, 10 cents each, post-paid; 75 per dozen, 
post-paid; $1.75 per hundred, postage 50 cents extra; $1 5.00 per thousand, by express. Not less 
than one-half dozen plants sold at dozen price post-paid; not less than 50 plants at the hundred 
price, postage 30 cents extra; not less than 500 plants sold at the thousand rate. 

Bay your Plants at Headquarters, and of the Introducers. 

The Belmont is the leading Strawberry. It has proved a successful berry in all kinds of soil, 
and in all climates where Strawberries are grown. Plants were, sold and sent to all parts of the 
United States, and the testimonials to date show the results to be most favorable in all quarters. 

The Jewell. One of the finest varieties, and is very productive of large-size, high-colored 
fruit. Season, medium ; color, bright red to crimson ; berry, solid and firm. Layer plants, 50 
cents per dozen ; $1.75 per ico. 

The Gold. This new berry is a seedling from the Jersey Queen, and is noted for its fine 
quality. It has proved to be a strong grower, averaging well in this respect, with the best, as 
it also does in the yield, the color is light with gold seeds, very sweet, fine flavor, season long, 
from medium to late, making new plants rapidly. $2.00 per doz., $8.00 per 100. 

Crimson Cluster. This new Strawberry was first introduced last season, and from 
the description given by the introducer, it proves to be very productive. Berries large, rich 
crimson color, and borne profusely in clusters. The habit of the plant is vigorous, and the 
berries are carried high above the ground. Layer plants, $1.00 per doz., $6.00 per 100. _ 

The Henderson. Firm, solid flesh of exquisite flavor, color crimson, of large size, good 
form, and productive. Berries are borne well above the ground. This we consider a good berry 
for family use or market. Layer plants, 75 cents per doz. ; $4.00 per 100. 

Parry. A splendid variety of large size, beautiful color, and excellent flavor. Berries 
are very solid, fine shape, and uniform in size, very productive. Layer plants, 30 cents per doz. ; 
$1.00 per 100. . 

Jersey Queen, One of the best, light variety, productive and of large size, uniform m 
shape. The fruit commences to ripen with the earliest varieties, and continues till the latest. 
Layer plants, 30 cents, $1.00 per 100 ; $5.00 per 1,000, 

9 



t<Wfcer& Wood. Spectatttes, %SS$. 



KING OF THE GARDEN LIMA BEAN. 

A vigorous grower, bearing profusely large pods, ranging in 
.length from 5 to 8 inches. Beans, when in a green state, are 
much larger than the Lima; as the vines grow luxuriantly, two 
are sufficient to each pole ; do not plant too closely, and beans 
will set early, and continue bearing until killed by frost. The 
quality of the Beans is unsurpassed ; very attractive and sale- 
able. Price, packet, 10 cents; quart 50 cents. 

TESTIMONIALS, P. & W.'S MAMMOTH 
PERFECT ENSILAGE CORN. 

Woodstock, Vt., Dec. 5th, 1887. 
Messrs. Parker & Wood. 

Sirs: The Mammoth Ensilage corn I had from vou last 
spring germinated the best of any I ever had on our best ground. 
It averaged about twelve feet high, grew well and was fully as 
early as Blunt's Prolific, which we have planted before ; came 
up *a. great deal better. There were ears nearly large enough 
to roast on some of it when I cut it. If I plant any Ensilage 
Corn next year I shall want more. M. M. Lincoln. 

Messrs. Parker & Wood. Greenville, N. H., Nov. 14th, 1887. 

Gents: It is with pleasure that I add my testimony to the value of Parker & Wood's 
Mammoth Ensilage corn. Scarcely a kernel failed to germinate. Although planted rather 
late, nearly every stock had from one to two good sized ears, many of which were large 
enough to boil. The stocks averaged about twelve feet high, and the yield very heavy, but 
did not weigh any of it. I only had a small field compared with other years, but had to build, my 
silo larger to hold it all. Should think there was certainly twenty-five tons per acre. It grew on 
the poorest field on my farm. Manure spread with Kemp's Spreader, at rate of fifteen loads 
per acre, with no other fertilizer used. Planted with horse-planter and cultivated with Thomas 
smoothing harrow, and I. X. L. horse-hoe. Truly yours, 

G. W. Goddard, Pleasant View Farm. 

Messrs. Parker & Wood, Boston, Mass. Gloucester, Nov. 22d, 1887. 

Gentlemen: — I would say the "Mammoth Ensilage Corn" which you sent me this year 
gzxz good satisfaction. We planted it on our lowest land, an old reclaimed meadow, and some 
of it grew to most enormous height, reaching to fifteen and a half feet. We used on part of this 
land barn manure, and on the balance Glidden & Curtis Pacific Guano. We prefer barn manure 
to any guano that we can find, believing it will produce a larger yield per acre than guano. 

The corn germinated well, and we had a good crop, cutting twenty-five tons to an acre, the 
corn growing rapidly, that is, most of it, when it was not too wet, and we can with pleasure ad- 
vise any one wanting a good reliable article of " Ensilage Corn " to plant Parker & Wood's 
Mammoth Ensilage " and they will find it reliable. We are with respect, your's truly, 

D. C. M. Balson. 

Messrs. Parker &Wood:— Kensington, N. H., Nov. 14th, 1887. 

We had good success with the Parker & Wood Ensilage Corn, bought of you. It ger- 
minated well. Should say every grain was fertile. The growth was rapid, early, and yield per 
acre we estimate at twenty-five to thirty tons, which is considered to be more than the average 
yield ; here stalks were twelve feet high and very uniform. We put on fifteen loads manure 
per acre, with Kemp's Spreader, which is a fair quantity, not heavy. We used several kinds of 
fertlizer, with about the same result. We feel much satisfied with the Corn and will give you 
an order next season. Yours truly, Dow Brothers. 

Messrs. Parker & Wood. Newport, N. H., Nov. 14th, 1^87. 

Dear Sirs: We this year planted five acres with your perfect Ensilage Corn. Three acres 
were planted the 1st of June on land enriched with about five cords of barn-yard manure per 
acre, and yielded from thirty to thirty-five tons per acre. When harvested the 1st of September 
it averaged about fourteen feet in height, and was well eared, the kernels being perfectly formed. 
The other two acres were planted the 6th of June, with three cords of manure per acre and 
yielded about twenty tons per acre — The corn germinated perfectly. 

Yours very truly, Barrett Brothers. 

10 




l^ar fter & Wood. Spectafttes, *888+ 




Several Years' Trial has proved to hundreds of Farmers that it 

has no Equal. 



This Com was produced by a continued selection from a popular ensilage variety, 
and will be found to be what its name implies. In growth it attains a height of 
i twelve to fifteen feet, is short-jointed, with an abundance of leaves, and is sweet, ten- 
der and juicy. It is as heavy a yielder as Blunt's Prolific, while it possesses the great 
advantage of being sure to germinate. 

Price, per bushel, $2.00 ; five-bushel lots, $1.75 per bushel. 

PRICES FOR LARGER QUANTITIES ON APPLICATION. 

SEE TESTIMONIALS OPPOSITE PAGE. 

II 




Farftcr&WooX Specialties, *888» 

ALL SEASONS CABBAGE 

Seedsman Gregory, the introducer, from 
whom we obtained our seed, speaks of this 
new cabbage as follows , — 

What would my market gardener customers 
say of a new Drumhead Cabbage as early 
and every way as good as Henderson's Early 
Summer, but yielding heads from a third to 
half as large again ? Now, this new cabbage, 
while it matures a day or two later in the 
spring, when planted in July matures a day 
or two earlier than Henderson's in the fall, 
so that it will average as early, while the 
solid heads are from a third to half as large 
again ! As a rule, our earliest cabbages are 
only good as early cabbages, being too small 
for late, or too small and thin to be kept 
over winter ? but the heads of this new cab- 
bage being large and also thick through 
make it a most excellent variety, either for extreme early for fall or for spring marketing. Price, 
per packet, 15 cents ; ounce, 50 cents ; pound, $6 00. 

NICHOLS' GREEN CUCUMBER. 

An exceedingly productive variety, of medium 
size, always straight and well formed ; color, dark 
green; fiesh tender, crisp, and pleasant flavor It is 
adapted for early forcing or late sowing. As a pic 
kle sort it will be found unequalled, and a welcome 
addition to the choice table sorts. Price, per packet, 
5 events; ounce, 15 cents; pound, $1. 50. 

EDMAND'S BLOOD TURNIP BEET. 

. This beet is the handsom- 
est, most uniform in size and 
shape, and has proved with 
me to be decidedly the. best 
for general use. The flesh 
is very deep blood red in color, 
and exceedingly sweet and 

tender in quality, very round and smooth in shape, of good marketable 
size, not growing over large and coarse as many sorts of the turnip 
beet are apt to do where they have plenty of room. This character- 
istic, together with the fact that the top grows very small, and having 
but a single tap root, allows their being grown very near together. 
From my trials with this beet I am very much pleased with it, and for a 
second early market variety, or for use on. the table,! would recom- 
mend this sort as being the best adapted for these purposes. ■ ~? 
Price: packet, 5 cents; ounce, 10 cents; pound, $1.00. 

GUERANDE HALF-LONG STUMP-ROOTED CARROT 

, Intermediate as to length between the Scarlet 
Horn and the Short Horn. It is thicker at the 
neck than the latter, and, as will be seen by the en- 
graving, carries its thickness well down towards the 
bottom. It has been known to yield at the rate of 
thirty-five tons the acre. Every carrot can be easily 
pulled by hand ; no ploughing or digging is neces- 
sary. In the experimental grounds of the New 
York Agricultural College, of 25 varieties tested* it 
yielded more than double the average weight of all 
the other kinds. Those who' grew it last season 
about Dan vers, Mass., report.it an immense crop- 
per. Our seed is imported direct from the origina- 
tor. Price, per packet, 5 cents, ounce,, 20 cents ; 
pound, $1.25. 





Parfier & Wood, Speciatties, *888» 







jjpl 




1183 














^ StfF£ />£/! F0/? r//£ MARKET GARDENER WHO EXPECTS 
TO HAVE THE FIRST EARLY AND BEST PEAS. 



A sure pleasing Pea for family use, as it is first in earliness, 
quality superior, peas large. 



Holyoke, Mass, June 23, 1887. 

Messrs. Parker & Wood. 

Gentlemen : — I had not sent in my name as competitor for prize in ' e Maud S." Pea. Had I 
done so I would have been at the top notch in the jubilee year. Picked my first well-matured 
peas on June 14th; second picking, 17th; third, 20th; only for rain on eve 23d would have made 
fourth picking. Respectfully, 

Thomas Chalmers. 
Boston, June 22d, 1887, 
Paid to T. Kelly of Arlington, Mass., $5.00 cash premium for first best peck of peas brought 
to store— picked on June 18th. First picking made on June 16th, but forgot to bring them in 
for competition. Quality' and Character of the pea considered of the best by Mr. Kelly. 

The "Maud S.'' has for several seasons past ripened in all sections of New England from 
14th to 20th of June. Being a large pea, and having large, full pods, it has become very popular. 
Has stood the test for several seasons. Pronounced by all who have grown it to be one of the 
best peas ever produced. 

-<V :'' .jV. ' '' •-,'..;* ■ ,'• ' *- "", '." jr "..^ si" f, ■ 

Messrs. Parker & Wood. . ' 

Gentlemen : — I have tested your "Maud S." early peas for the past two seasons, and have 
had- them in perfection to gather by June 15th, and the yield has been 125 bushels of pods from 
•one bushel of seed, the last gathered being equal to- the first picking ; therefore I cart only say that 
3. have been more. than satisfied with the result on my farm. ».■ ''' 

G. M. Kendall, .Market Gardener. 

THE VERY BEST EARLY GOOD-SIZED PEA FOR MARKET OR PRIVATE GARDENS. \\ 

Price, per packet, 10 cents; per ' quaytj , 25 cents ; peck, $1,150; 



f?ar&&r & Wood. Specialties,* SHH. 




WARDWELL'S DWARF KIDNEY WAX BEAN. 



Vines of medium size, erect, hardy and productive. Pods long, broad, flat, and of a delicate 
waxy yellow, brittle and entirely stringless. Beans white, with two shades of reddish purple 
more or less visible, and a distinct kidney shape. Prepared for the table, it has a fine buttery 
flavor, and is destined to become the leading snap bean, as well as a strongly endorsed winter 
shelled sort. The yield considerably exceeds that of the common Golden Wax, and it is 
equally as early — a most acceptable and appreciable improvement. Price, per packet, 10 
cents ; quart, 40 cents. 

LOW'S CHAMPION BUSH BEAN. 

An excellent shell bean, and as a string bean has but few if any equals. It is abundantly 
productive, and being a very vigorous grower, keeps the pods well off. the ground, free from mil- 
deAV or blight. The pods are large, long and handsome, with from five to eight beans in a pod. 
The bean, when ripe, is a beautiful bright-red color, larger in size than the Horticulturial, and 
of the finest flavor either green or dry. The foliage is remarkably strong and healthy; when the 
beans are fully ripe it is green and vigorous and free from mildew. Quite hardy, and will stand 
a severe frost* This bean yielded on one- eighth of acre, seven and one-half bushels, or at the rate 
of sixty bushels to the acre of seed beans. Price, per packet, 10 cts. ; quart, 40 cts. ; peck,. $2.00. 

EARLY GOLDEN CLUSTER WAX POLE BEAN. 

The introducer speaks of it as follows : 
" This new variety is an improvement on all 
the good qualities of the Giant and Dwarf Wax. 
It is distinct in seed, in color and habit of growth. 
The pods retain their tenderness and plumpness 
long after the beans have attained a large size, 
so that only a few days elapse after they cease to 
be string-beans before they are fit to shell. The 
pods are a beautiful golden yellow, and are from 
6 to 8 inches long, borne profusely in clusters of 
4 to 6. Commencing to bear ten days after the 
Golden Wax, it continues to produce an abun- 
dance of pods until the frost sets in. Its cooking 
qualities are excellent, and without doubt it will 
become the standard pole-bean." 

Price,. per packet, 25 cents; half-pint, 50 eents 
by mail, half-pint, 58 cents. 



DWARF MONT D'OR BEAN. 

A new wax bean from Germany, that will not 
disappoint any one who gives it a trial. It is the 
earliest of the wax varieties ; vines hardy, stout 
and thrifty, and are very prolific; the pods are 
crooked, and of a golden yellow color; seeds 
almost black, and nearly round. Cannot be ex- 
celled as a string or snap bean. Price, packet, 
10 cents ; quart, 40 cents; peck, $2.00. 

T4 




POTATOES FOR SEED. 

Probably all of our customers are aware that potatoes are scarce, brought about by the rot- 
ting of crops last fall in many sections where seed potatoes are raised. The larger part of the 
crops were thrown away or ploughed in. This was especially true of most parts of N. E. within a 
radius of 100 miles, and in no section of our broad country was there anything like a fair produc- 
tion. The market price for edible potatoes has been very moderate, especially in Boston, kept so 
by the large quantities of imported varieties ; these of course have a tendency and actually do 
keep the price of cooking potatoes about the usual price ; but as foreign potatoes cannot be used 
for seed, seldom giving a crop in our country, it must be seen that necessarily potatoes for seed, 
which should be true to name, and grown by men who make a speciality of seed stock, must but 
be scarce, and considerably higher in price. 

We wish to inform our customers that the potatoes we sell will he true to name, and were pro- 
duced, by growers whom we have long been acquainted with. 

We shall probably have to disappoint many in filling orders, as our 
stock is limited in all hinds. Have catalogued only varieties we hope to 
be able to supply well into the season. Would advise early ordering. 
The prices are as low as we believe they will be made by honorable 
houses. We shall surely meet all honest competition. 

THE NiW POTATO, "CHARLES DOWNING," COME TO STAY. 

Tested at the Ohio State Experiment Station, 
with over 100 other named sorts and a large 
number of new seedlings, no variety is recorded 
as excelling it inearliness, and but one other is 
marked" 10," (the highest grade in table quality). 
Its average yield is given at 375.1 bushels per 
acre, the popular "Early Sunrise" in same test 
being given at 197.5 bushels and the "Belle" at 
125.07 bushels. These figures are taken from the 
published report, and must be accepted as an 
entirely disinterested opinion. The Report says : 
14 The testing of quality was done in December 
and January, after the varieties had been put 
into winter quarters." Same Report describes it 
as follows: " Strong nearly erect, growth 22 in. 
high, foliage green, smooth and medium size, lit- 
tle scattered in the hill, smooth, bright color. 
Cooking test: skin broke well in boiling; firm 
white flesh; flavor and grain excellent ; graded 
10. We consider this one of the new varieties 
worthy of commendation." We have secured 
our stock of Mr. I. F. Tillinghast, the introducer. 
$1.00 peck; $3.00 bushel; $7.00 barrel. 

Didnotrotthis past season to^eartl^ l S^^oth^laJS^d^.^tUl^lOs Us own asuleader. 
One of the best First JSarly Varvetxes. 
A large, handsome va PRODUCTIVE, LAE6E CROPPER, QUALITY UNSURPASSED 
riety, resembling Clark's 
No. 1, but earlier; growth 
of tops very vigorous; 
cooks dry and mealy ; so 
far has been quite free 
from disease. We have 
very flattering reports 
Per peck, $1.00; bushel, 
$2.50; barrel, $6.00. 

Among many varieties 
of potatoes planted last 
season, I found that your 
" Victory " was the only 
variety planted that was 
not nearly an entire fail- 
ure, on account of " rot." 
The "Victory" and 
Dakota Red were quite 

free from disease. I consider the Victory early as Sunrise or any of the worthy early varieties, 
and one of the best potatoes in every particular. Teele, W. Acton, Mass. 

15 





Farfter & Wood. Speciartfes, 1888. 



THE EARLY MAINE POTATO. 

They are earlier than the Early Rose, a very large cropper, while the quality is very 
superior; in shape it resembles the Rose, the skin is very smooth, the eyes being even with the 
I surface, a good quality in any potato. Price: peck, 75 cents ; bushel, $2.00; barrel, $5.00. 




CLARK'S NO. 1 POTATO. ,7 j 

For the past few years we have sold this potato, and it has given universal satisfaction ; and! ■] 
we recommend it as a productive, first-class variety. It is earlier than the Early Rose, to which j 
it bears a close resemblance. It cooks mealy, is of excellent flavor, and is a fine variety for either'! 
the farmer or market-gardener. It is very prolific. Price: peck, 50 cents; bushel, $1.7-5; barrel,', j 

$4.50. . . ' ! 

BURBANK'S SEEDLING POTATO. 

A white-skinned, medium early variety, seedling ! of the Early Rose, of fine form, and good 
proportions. Flesh fine grain, and of excellent flavor. I It produces a large crop of handsome 
tubers, nearly all of which are marketable. Price: peck, 50 cents; bushel, $1.50; barreh $4.00. 

EARLY OHIO POTATO. 

The Early Ohio is generally accepted to be a standard early potato. In color like the Early 
Rose, its parent; in shape, it is distinct, being round-oblong instead of oval-oblong, so that side- 
by side it is readily distinguishable. Quality always dry and mealy. It is a week earlier than 
Early Rose, while in many instances the yield is a third greater. To get the best results,//^/ on 
rich, rather moist soil. Price : peck, 75 cents ; bushel, $2.00 ; barrel, $5.00. 

WHITE STAR POTATO. 

The vine is strong, semi-erect, branching, a single stem being produced for each eye. The 
foliage is very abundant and vigorous; the. leaves medium-sized, smooth, dark-green, and stand 
the sun better than those of any variety we know of. The tubers are produced abundantly, in a 
compact cluster, are large, oblong, of uniform size, and very handsome. The skin is very white,, 
and; covered with a minute russet netting. The flesh is white, of the finest quality, either baked 
or boiled; one of the best keeping sorts. Price: peck, 50 cents; bushel, $1.50; barrel, $4.50. 

EARLY SNOWFLAKE POTATO. 

This favorite variety possesses more good qualities than any variety heretofore introduced. 
It ripens about a week later than the Early Rose. Its mealiness, pure, delicate flavor, and the 
evenness with which it cooks through, have never been excelled by any potato. Price : peck, 75, 
cents; bushel, $2.00; barrel, $5.00. - • "' 

EARLY ROSE POTATO. 

An old, well-known variety, early and productive. Extra choice stocks ; grown in Houltoiv 
Me., also in Nova Scotia, especially for our seed trade. Price: peck, 50 cents; bushel, $1.50$: 
barrel, $3.50. Special prices on large lots. 

16 




POTATO ORDERS FILLED AS SOON AS ALL DANGER FROM FROST IS OVER*. 

PEARL OF SAVOY POTATO. 

This potato has given the best of satisfaction: 
as an early variety. It is a cross between the- 
Clark's No. i and Extra Early Vermont, and re- 
tains the good qualities of both. The tubers 
are large in size, oblong, flesh of a beautiful 
pearl white; cooks very mealy and dry; vines 
hardy and vigorous ; so far has shown no signs 
of disease. It is a large cropper, and one o£ 
the very best early kinds., Price: peck, 75.. 
cents; bushel, $2.00; barrel, $5.00. 

EARLY SUNRISE POTATO. 

A very popular variety, producing potatoes fit 

for the table in fifty-two days from time of plant- 
ing. The tubers are oblong, large, solid, uniform, 
and handsome ; flesh white, fine grained, and dry, 
cooking well, even when first dug; very produc- 
tive, and of fine keeping qualities; vines dark 
green, good strong growers. The twelve largest 
potatoes in a crop grown from one pound in sixty- 
seven days weighed twenty-five pounds eleven 
ounces. Price: peck, 75 cents; bushel, $2.00; bar- 
rel, $5.00. 

Jiesisted the rot of Inst season to a much greater extent than- 
any other variety excepting perhaps jP. & W. Victory. 

This remarkable potato has surely outdone all 
other varieties in the point of productiveness. It 
is a handsome, long, round potato, with reddish 
flesh-colored skin ; flesh remarkably white and fine 
grained; cooks mealy and dry; grows compactly 
and deep in the hill ; vines grow erect and stocky, 
quite free from blight, the tubers ranging from, 
medium to large in size ; do not rot, and seem 
to be disease-resisting. A late variety, and a 
splendid keeper; does well on both heavy and; 
light soil. Price: peck, 50 cents; bushel, $1.7 5f 
barrel, $4.00. 





BEAUTY OF HEBRON POTATO. 

' A popular variety, very prolific. Resembles the Early Rose in shape, but lighter red in colon 
Is earlier, and will out-yield this standard variety by from a quarter to a third; cooks dry and 5 
mealy. A fine keeper, of delicate flavor, gene- 
rally sound and solid to the core. Price, peck, 
50 cents; bushel, $1.75 ; barrel, $4.00. 

LADY FINGER POTATO. 

THE OLD-FASHIONED VARIETY FOR BAKING. 

For the past few years, and especially last 
season, we have had a great many inquiries for 
this old favorite, and, after many unsuccessful, at- 
tempts, we finally procured a stock, and had a 
supply raised especially for us. The Lady Fin- 
ger is a very old variety, of pretty appearance, 
and much esteemed as a Baking Potato. The 
tubers are long and slender, of nearly the same 
diameter throughout, and when cooked are as 
white as snow, and very mealy; the eyes are 
numerous and slightly depressed ; stem from one 

to two feet high, and leaves light green. Copyright, i887,ParkeE& Wood. 

SEED STOCK VERY SCARCE THIS SEASON. 

Price: quart, 25 cents; half peck, 75 cents; peck, $1.25; bushel, $4.00. By mail, 35 cents 
a pound, postpaid; three pounds for $1.00. 17 




VEGETABLE PLANTS AND ROOTS 



We have made special effort to supply plants that are true to name, and at prices that are 
sure to suit all. They are grown for us by a SPECIAL GROWER, from true strains of seeds 

furnished by us, and we shall always have them in their proper seasons in splendid condition. By our 
system of packing, we can safely guarantee their safe arrival when sent by express. We make no charge for 
either packing or boxes. 

ASPARAGUS ROOTS. 

The preparation of the Asparagus bed should be made with more care than for most vegetables, from the fact that it Is 
a permanent crop, which ought to yield as well at the end of twenty-five as of five years, if the soil has been well prepared. 
To start with, it should be on ground thoroughly drained, either naturally or artificially, and, if choice can be had, on a 
light, sandy loam. This should be trenched, and mixed with sufficient manure to form a coating of at least six inches 
thick over the bed; this manure should be worked into the soil, by trenching to the depth of two feet, as the roots of the 
plants will reach quite that depth in a few years. In setting, the crowns of the plants should be placed at least eight inches 
below the surface. It makes but little difference whether it is planted in spring or fall; if in spring, it should be done as 
early as the ground is dry enough to work; and if in fall, just as soon as the plants can be had, which is usually in the 
early part of October. For an ordinary family, a bed of six rows, fifty or sixty feet in length, and three feet apart, will 
be sufficient, the plants in the rows being set nine inches apart. 

Moore's Crossbred, $1.50 per hundred; $10.00 per I Moore's Giant, $1.50 per hundred; $8.00 per thousand, 
thousand. 

Conover's Colossal. One-year-old roots, by mail, price $1.25 per hundred; two-year old roots, by express ot 
Id the store, price $1.00 per hundred; $7.00 per thousand. 

CABBAGE AND CAULIFLOWER PLANTS. - 

Hotbed plants, which can be planted out from the last of March to the end of April, according to the season. 
Cabbage, Jersey Wakefield. I Cabbage, Fottler's Drumhead. 

— Henderson's Summer. | — Stone Drumhead. 

Price 25 cents per dozen; $1.00 per hundred; $8.00 per thousand. If by mail , add 25 cents to hundred price. 
Cauliflower, Snowball. I Cauliflower, Early Paris. 

— Dwarf Erfurt. j 

Price 40 cents per dozen; $2.00 per hundred; $8.00 per thousand. If by mail, add 23 cents to hundred price. 

CABBAGE PLANTS. For fall and winter crops. Ready July I. 
Cabbage, Savoy, American Improved. | Cabbage, Fottler's Drumhead. 

— Red Dutch, for pickling. | — Stone-Mason Drumhead. 

Price 40 cents per hundred; $4.00 per thousand. 

CELERY PLANTS. Ready about June 10. Boston Market the best variety. 
Price 75 cents per hundred; $7.00 per thousand. 

TOMATO PLANTS. Ready May 1. 
Acme, very popular. I Boston Market. Fine sort, 

liivingston Perfection. | Cardinal. 

Price 30 cents per dozen; $2.25 per hundred; $20.00 per thousand. 

PEPPER PLANTS. Ready June 1. 
Squash. 10 cents each ; 50 cents per dozen. | Sweet Mountain. 10 cents each; 50 cents per dozen. 

LETTUCE PLANTS. Ready May 1. 

Boston Market, Fine Curled. | Tennisball. The standard variety. 

Price 20 cents per dozen ; 75 cents per hundred. 

EGG PLANTS. Ready May i S . 
New-York Improved. The popular variety. | Black Pekin. A fine sort. 

Price 10 cents each; $1.00 per dozen. 

SWEET POTATO PLANTS. Ready June I. 
Nansemond. The best sort for planting North. Price $1.00 per hundred; $7.00 per thousand. 

RHUBARB ROOTS. 

Rhubarb Roots may be planted early in spring or in fall, setting the roots three feet apart each way. If planted in 
spring, on ground well prepared, a full crop may be gathered the succeeding season. It requires but little labor; once 
planted, it will remain iri bearing condition for three or four years, only requiring a top dressing of manure dug in, in 
spring or fall. 

Xannaeus. Large, early, tender, and fine. The very best of all in quality. 

Price 25 cents per root; clumps that will separate into several roots, 50 cents; $2.00 per dozen. 
Oiant Victoria. The largest stalk of any good variety. Has grown to over two pounds per stalk. 

Price 25 cents per root; clumps that will separate into several roots, 50 cents; $2.00 per dozen. 

CRANBERRY PLANTS. 

We offer below the two leading varieties. Circular of instructions for culture will be sent to appli- 
cants. 

Eaton's Early Black Bell. _ Ripens very early, being fully colored by Sept. 5, in the Eastern States. Color 
very dark red, almost black; medium size, and very uniform; great bearer, good keeper, and vines perfectly hardy. 

Mansfield Creeper. This is entirely different in its growth and habit from all other varieties: it creeps on the 
ground, and takes root at every joint, and bears shoots every two or three inches on the vine, and throws out fruit-buds 
for a fresh start another year. It is a few days later than the Eaton Bell; both are adapted to upland culture. It is of 
large size, and great bearer; the flesh is tender; fine keeper; color dark scarlet on one side, the other side nearly white, 
with a mottle ; shape roundish oval. 

Price: either of the above by mail, 60 cents per hundred; by express, 45 cents per hundred; $3 50 ver thousand; 
$15.00 per five thousand; $25.00 per ten thousand. Ten thousand is sufficient to plant an acre, at two ieet ap-rt. 

18 



A SOFT, VELVETY LAWN CAN BE OBTAINED BY SOWING 




PARKER & WOOD'S 

^•BOSTO N +LMtfN + SEED. <fr 

One of the most pleasing features connected with a rural or suburban home is a good: 
lawn. In order to obtain this object, it is necessary, in the first place to shape the ground to the 
proper grade. Before seeding, .the ground should be manured with well-rotted compost and 
well worked with spade and rake, or plow and harrow, as the extent of land to be cultivated may 
require ; to prevent unequal settlements, it must be well rolled until a firm surface is obtained. 

Spring is the usual time of seeding, and it should be done in April and May, before the 
hot weather sets in; but if left until June or July, a sprinkling of oats should be sown with the 
grass ; the shade given by them will protect it from the direct rays of the sun. September has 
been found a very good time for seeding, as the young grass gets a good start before winter, and 
in the spring is able to keep ahead of the weeds, as it is often the case that spring sowings are 
either partially or entirely spoiled by severe hot weather, or the young grass is injured by a 
large crop of weeds which get the first start, choking out all other growth. Undoubtedly these 
are the causes which bring about so many complaints that Lawn Grass Seed fails to germinate, 
or that the seed produced a crop of weeds in place of grass ; the fact being that the fine roots 
of the latter are choked out by the coarse and quick- growing weeds. 

A carefully prepared mixture of natural clean extra grasses, such as we offer, is the best to 
seed with. It should be borne in mind that seed for lawns should be sown at least twice as thick 
as if sown for hay. When the young grass is about six inches high, it should be cut, but not 
very closely. In very dry weather a thorough watering should be frequently given. 

In the fall or early spring some good fertilizer should be applied as a top-dressing. Old 
lawns maybe renovated by sowing,, in , either spring -or fall, our mixture at the rate of two 
bushels to the acre. For new lawns, sow one quart to 300 square feet ; and four bushels to 
4-1,6 90 square feet, or one acre. 

Parker & Wood's Boston Lawn Seed. Price, 25 cts. per quart; four quarts, 75 cents;, 
peck, $1.00 ; per bushel of 16 lbs., $4.00. 

Parker & Wood's Lawn Dressing. See page 124. 

Lawn Mowers. See description and prices of the " New Easy, shown above. 



l 9 



P« & W* harden Ivc^nisifcs* £te< 



HOT-BED MATS OF* THE BEST MAKE. 
Size 6x6 feet. Price $1.75 each; 



■ i 1 8 ; 1 1 



for larger quantities, price upon application. 




Arcliangel Mats, new, So cents each; $8.00 per 
dozen. 

Roffea Bass, for tying, 40 cents per pound. 
€uba Bass, for tying, very fine, 75 cents per pound. 
"Thermometers, for greenhouses. 50 cents, 75 cents, 
and $1.00. 

■Grafting 1 Wax, the best, V 4 pound, 10 cents; % 

pound, 20 cents ; 1 pound, 40 cents. 
"Verbena Baskets, of the best make, $2.50 per 

hundred ; $20.00 per thousand. 




NOT INJURIOUS TO MAN OR BEAST. 
An Insecticide and Fertilizer. 

Send for pamphlet containing full descriptions and directions 
(for use, written by a scientific gentleman, giving also many valu- 
able testimonials. Guaranteed to destroy Potato Bugs, Cut 
Worms, the Curculio, Chicken and Cattle Lice, Yellow-Striped 
■Bugs, Rose Lice and Bugs, and all Lice, Worms, or Caterpillars 
4ipon Melons, Cucumber, Citron, Tobacco, Cabbage, or Egg 
Plants, Tomatoes, Currants, Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Grape 
Vines, Shrubs, and Flowering Plants, Canker Werms and other 
Caterpillars on Apple, Elm, and other Trees. Already mixed. 
Applied with sifter or bellows. 

Price, five-pound package, 30 cents ; ten-pound package, 50 
•cents ; by the barrel (about two hundred and thirty-five pounds), 4 
<cents per pound. Full directions with each package. 



WATERING POTS, OR PLANT 
SPRINKLERS. 

These sprinklers are made of heavy block 
tin, painted green* and are the strongest and 
most durable sprinkler made. 

■ ' . ." V ' ?'< •'" '■' - , •■ EACH. ' 

1 quart, round shape, with sprinkler, $ .40 

" - '*'■>•., ■ ..." - ■ " '•• -.45 
" ■ " •„>••*•* -t-f" r ' . " ' .60- 

„ \, \ -. 1- - 4; 

" " " " " 125 
" " 150 

. ■ , 2.00 

" oval, brown, !* " -5° 

.65 

" with long spout, .50 

.65 

The following are painted green : 
4 quart, round shape, with ong spout, 
6 



RODDICK'S SPRINKLER. 





Superior to all 
other Sprinklers 
of this class,, as 
it throw*, a fine , 
spray, and can be 
filled with water 
very much quick 
er. Time requir- ' 
ed, just 6 seconds. 



An indispensable article for window gardening, it being one of the best in- 
ventions for washing the foliage and sprinkling plants kept in the house dur- 
ing winter, and tor washing and moistening cut flowers. Price nz cents by 
mail, postpaid, $t. 00. ' 1 

FOR GARDEN TOOLS OF ALL KINDS, SEE IMPLEMENT DEPARTMENT. 

20 



BELLOWS, DUSTERS AND SPRINKLERS. 

For distributing Paris green, London purple, sulphur, hellebore, pyrethrum, or any other 
Snsect- destroying powder, for the extermination of bugs, worms, insects, and mildew upon 
grape-vines, plants, trees, etc. . - - »• • 




Parker & Wood's Extra Garden Bellows, No. 19a, $150 

' . " , " 16a, 1. 00 

* "J ' f ' '■ "■ " " " " I43V-V-7S 

" " " " 9a, -5o 



French Insect Bellows. V 

French Bellows. Direct importation of very best make. Large size, $2.00 1 small size, $1.25. 

American Bellows, leather . 50 cents, $1.00, and $1.50 each. 

French Spray Bellows : an Atomizer. Excellent 
for sprinkling house-plants; the water in the ball 

will last for hours, as the spray thrown is so fine $2.50 each. 

American Insect Bellows. 

TIN PARIS-GREEN SIFTER. 

A convenient and simple article, made in the style of a 
large dredging-box. "Will sprinkle Paris green or powder 
of any kind in the dry state in a most thorough manner. 
Price, without handle, 15 cents each. 

EUREKA FUMIGATOR. 

After many unsuccessful attempts, we have found an 
effectual apparatus for the fumigating of greenhouses, etc., 
avoiding the unpleasant effect of being 

smoked almost to death, as by the old Tin Paris-green Sifter, 

mode, as they require constant attention a 
to prevent the tobacco-stems burning to a blaze, and destroying the plants. This 
apparatus is of simple construction, and not liable to get out of order. When 
once lit, it is self-acting, and may be left in the house with perfect safety, as flar- 
ing is an impossibility, and setting any thing on fire out of the question ; while 
all the material is completely consumed without waste, and given off m a dense 
smoke, filling; a house in a short time. 

It can be used for fumigating greenhouses, conservatories, pits, frames, hos- 
pitals, ships, poultry-houses, etc,, destroying all insects, or purifying rooms. They 
are all made of heavy bloom iron, which makes them very durable and not 
easily burned out. Directions for use with each. 

No i — .Height 12 inches; diameter at top 5. inches. For a house 10 x 20 feet. Holds half, peck of stems , $1.50 
m " o ' « •• •" } " " •»> " • - **• ' 'V 12 X 40 one . 2.25 





Eureka Fumi gator. 




12 x 46 

15 X IOO 
20' X IOO 



one 

half bushel 
I 



1 2.25 
3.00 
4 00 



"THE ARLINGTON" PLANT PROTECTOR. 

This simple arrangement is useful to all who have a garden. It not 
onlv protects from bugs, borers, and fowl, but subdues all violenceof wind, 
rain and cold, keeping off light frosts, and facilitating the growth of young 
plants in a wonderful degree. With fair usage they will last ten years. 
Price 15 cents each; $1.25 per dozen. Price for larger quantities upon 
application. »i, . •< 1fl1 ,. nn 

For insect Powder, Eestroy&rs, aal Qampion Ms-Green Sprinkler, etc., see p. mi and 122. 



FANCY AND COMMON IN ALL STYLES AND VARIETIES. 






Hanging Pot. No. 21, 
8 in. diameter, 50 cents each. 



Repousse Flower Pot. 

[Gold or silver finish?) 
6 in. diameter at top, 50c. each. 
8 " " " " 70c. " 



Hanging Pot. No. 116 

7 in. diam. 25c. ea. 

8 " u . 30c. " 

9 " " 35C " 





Fancy Pot. No. 78. 
4 in. diam. 20 cts. ; 5 in. 30 cts.; 6 in. 40 cts. each. 



Log of Wood Hanging Pot. 
50 cents each. 



No. 25. 



COMMON EARTHEN POTS, for Florists and Others. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Size. 


Pots, each. 


Sauc, ea. 


Pots, doz. 


2^ in. 


$ .02 


$ .01 


% .15 


3 in. 


.03 


.02 


.24 


4 in. 


.04 


.03 


.25 


5 in. 


.05 


.03 


.50 


6 in. 


.07 


.04 


.60 


7 in. 


.10 


.05 


1.00 


8 in. 


.15 


.05 


1.25 


9 in. 


.18 


.06 


1.75 


10 in. 


.20 


.08 


2.25 


11 in. 


.25 


.10 


2.75 


12 in. 


.50 


.14 




13 in. 


.75 


.25 




34 in. 


.90 


.30 




15 in. 


1.15 


.30 




16 in. 


- 1.40 


.35 




17 in. 


1.65 


.40 




18 in. 


2.15 


.45 





EARTHEN SEED-PANS (Round). 



Size. 


Doz. 


Per 100. 


6 inch 


. $ .75 


$6.00 


8 " 


1.50 


10.00 


10 " 


2.40 . . 


•15.00 


12 " 


3.00 


20.00 




No. 70. Orchid Pot. 



No. 72. Orchid Pot. 



EARTHEN SEED-PANS (Square). 



Size. 
12 x 12 in. 
12 x 12 in. 



Deep. 
4 in. 
2K in. 



Each. 
$ .50 ' 
.35 



Per 100. 
$40.00 
30.00 



EARTHEN BULB-POTS. 

Size. Doz. Per 100. 

3^x 6^ in. . . . $ .75 $5.00 

5 x 7 in 1.00 7.00 



Send for fully illustrated Catalogue and Price-List of Flower-Pots, Pot-Brackets, 
Rustic Work, Garden Vases, Bouquet Holders, Wreaths, &c, for Cemeteries. 36 Pages, 
beautifully illustrated, sent free to any Address. 

22 



These Stands are painted green, and finished in gold bronze, making them very attractive 
and ornamental, and are fitted with Porcelain-Wheel Castors. 

^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ 

Designs, 

Strongly 

Built, 

at 

Reduced 

Prices. 




NO. 1. PLAIN OBLONG STAND. $2.50. 
24 in. high, 30 in. long, gl in. wide. 





NO. 2. SQUARE STAND WITH 2 SHELVES. $3.00. 





NO. 3. SQUARE STAND WITH 3 SHELVES. $4.00. NO. 4. SEMI-CIRCEE STAND WITH 2 SHELVES AND 
36 m. high, 24 in. deep. 33 in. long. HOLDER FOR A SINGLE POT, $4.50. 




STUMP BOX. 
Two Sizes. '$1.50 and $2.00. 

Send for Special Fully Illustrated Catalogue 
of Rustic Work, Flower Pot Brackets, Fancy 
Pottery, &c. 

Catalogue of 36 pages mailed free. Send 
for it. 



NO. 5. HEXAGON VASE 
Price, $1.50 to $3.00. 




in urn 11 1 HANGING BASKETS. 

40 cents to $1.00 each. 

For Trellises, Wooden Plant-Stands and Wood Labels, see pages 119 and 120. 

2 3 




SPECIAL PRICES TO THE TRADE. 




Egg food for all kinds of laying fowls and young poultry. Will make your hens lay winter 
and summer supports: them during molting, and keeps the fowls in the best condition ; prevents 
and cures the common ailments, such as cholera, gapes and roup, — making poultry one of the 
most profitable of farm stock. 



EACH. 
$0.50 
I. OO 
2.00 

6.25 



Imperial Egg Food, one-pound package, with directions (mail, 65 cents) . . ... . . . . 

Imperial Egg Food, two-and-a-half pound package, with directions (mail, $1.40) . . . . . . 

Imperial' Egg Eood, six-pound box, with directions (express) . .' ';'')..' . .';.<• . ... A. . 

- Imperial Egg Eood, twenty-five-pound keg, with directions (express) . . . . ' . . * ; . . . 

RUST'S feCC PRODUCER. 

We find this to be one of the best foods in existence. Full size packages/25 cents. 

HAVEN'S ROUP PILLS. Dozen in a Box v 25 Cents. 

Sassafras, or Medicated Nest Eggs. For setting and laying hens. Price, each, 5. cents; per dozen, 40 
cents. By mail, 10 cents ; per dozen, 75 cents. - ; ) \ j 

China Nest Eggs., Price, each, 3 cents; per dozen, 35 cents; by mail, 60 cents .per dozen; 

Ground Oyster Shells. 10-pound.bag, 15 cents; 25-pound bag, 35 cents; 50-pouhd bag, 50 cents; 100-pound 
bag, 6o_ cents. No charge for bags- Barrels of about 250 pounds, % cent per pound. " A ' ; 

Pure Ground Beef Scraps. 5-pound bag, 25 cents ; 10-pouhd bag, 50 cents ; 25-pound bag, 75 cents ; 50- 
pound bag, $1.25 ; 100-pound bag, $2.00. No charge for bags. ~ 

Cracked Chi cken Bone. 5-pound bag, ,25, cents ; 10-pound bag, 40 cents ; 50-pound [bag, $1.50; 100-pound 
bag, $3.60. Barrels of about 250 pounds, 2 J cents per pound. No charge for bags or barrels. 

Bone Meal. 5-pound bag, 25 cents ; 10-pound bag, 40 cents ; 50-pound bag, #1.75 ; 100-pound bag, $3.00. No 
charge for bags. \; , ' ' ". " " " ' • tt^-Sj, , V .. ; v , , 

THE "BOSS" DRINKING FOUNTAIN. 

Galvanized,, round or square, capacity 8 quarts. Price $1.50 each. - 

HAVEN'S CLIMAX CONDITION POWDERS. 

A most valuable condiment for all kinds of stock; Invaluable to the poultry keeper as a preventive and cure of 
disease, such as gapes, cholera, roup, etc. Packet, 25 cents. 

t Sunflower Seed. This is one of the best egg-producing foods known for poultry, keeping them in fine condi- 
tion. It can be sown any time up to the middle of July. " The Poultry World " says this plant should be grown by 
every poultry breeder who has only the facilities to grow a few stalks, which may be planted alongside of fences, and 
in most any kind of soil. 

Sunflower Seed, Russian Mammoth. Striped-seeded. Price 15 cents per quart ; $3.00 per bushel. 
Sunflower Seed. Black-seeded. Price 15 cents per quart ; $3.00 per bushel. 

Damaged Wheat, for Hens, 2 bush. (100 lbs.) in a bag. Price, 100 lbs., #1.75. Bags, 20 cents each, return- 
able at same price. s 

Barley for Hens, 2 bushels (96 lbs.) in a bag. Price, 100 lbs., #1.60. Bags 20 cents each, returnable at same price. 

Buckwheat for Hens, packed same as above. Price, 100 lbs., $1.60. 

Sea Shells. Price, same as for Oyster Shells. 

Poultry Drinking Fountains, Patent Stoneware. Very dur- 
able. Half gallon, 25 cents each; one gallon, 35 cents each; two gallon, 
50 cents each 

Poultry Drinking Fountains, Galvanised American. (Pyra- 
mid shaped.) Will not burst from freezing. Size, 6 quarts, $1.00 each. 

Poultry Drinking Fountains, Earthen. (Hive shaped.) 1 
quart, 20 cents each; $2.25 doz. 2 quarts, 30 cents each; $3.00 doz. 
3 quarts, 35 cents each; $3.50 doz. 4 quarts, 40 cents each; £4.00 doz. 

Awarded First Premium for Best Display of Poultry Supplies. Mass. 
Poultry Association, held in Mechanics' Building, Boston, Jan.»1887+ 




STONEWARE FOUNTAIN. 



J?ar6er & Wood. Sf*ectafttes t ^888. 




COPYRIGHTED BY PARKER &W0QD. 1887 

This vine whose elegant appearance is well shown in the above engraving of Trinity Church, 
was first presented to the public some ten or fifteen years ago, and has become one of the most 
popular decorative vines to be found about Boston and its suburbs. The vivid_ freshness of its 
leaves, and the tenacity with which it clings to and covers every object upon which it grows, at- 
taching itself firmly to wood or stone buildings, trunks of old trees, etc., covering them with a 
rich mantle of foliage, and hiding from view all unsightly features, has always been the admiration 
of visitors to our city; and nowhere does it show to better advantage than on the grandly massive 
•outlines of Trinity Church,— one of the most notable edifices on the "Back Bay ; " while it is to 
be seen so often on other buildings, both public and private, about our city, that strangers who have 
been charmed by its graceful appearance, have given it the cognomen of "Boston Ivy,'? to better 
distinguish it when wishing to procure plants. 

The foliage of this Ampelopsis assumes in the fall months various colors of brilliant hues, from 
scarlet. and bronze to vivid tints of yellow intermixed, retaining its beauty till the leaves finally drop 
off after heavy frosts. It is of Japanese origin, entirly hardy, growing rapidly when once well es- 
tablished in the soil, and attaining a height ©f more than fifty feet. With but httle care its delicate 
-tendrils may be trained to cover or screen windows or other objects, as maybe desired. The leaves 
are small on young plants, and of an olive-green color, increasing in size as the plants acquire age. 
Every year the Boston Ivy" grows more and more popular, and is without a rival in its class. 

The plants are propagated and grown in pots, and set out at the usual time of other bedding- 
plants; therefore, they can be obtained at any time when the season is suitable to handle them. 
- Before planting the soil should be well dug and pulverized, that the young roots may push rapidly. 
When planting, avoid as much as possible the drippings from the eaves of buildings, which are very 
injurious to the young plants. It is also a very good plan, if the roots are likely to come in con- 
tact with stone cellar walls, or ledges below the surface, to place old planks or boards against the 
Tsame, edgewise or flat, to keep the moisture of the soil from being drawn off by evaporation by the 
stone walls, which often causes root-dryness and the loss of plants. 

Seed, I o cents per pkt.; plants 25 cents each, $2.50 per dozen. If by mail, 10 cents each 
.extra. 

2 5 



# PKRKER & MOOD'S 

NOVELTIES * AND * CHOICE * FLOWER * SEEDS 

FOR 1888. 




ACROCLINIUM ALBUM. 
Aquilegia Californica Hybrida. 

and spurs deep orange-red. Per 
pkt., 15 cents. 

Aster, Comet. New and ex- 
tremely beautiful class, of the 
same height and habit as the 
Dwarf Paeony Perfection Aster, 
forming fine regular pyramids 1 2 
to 1 5 inches high, and profusely- 
covered with large double flow- 
ers. The shape of the latter de- 
viates from all classes of Asters 
in cultivation, and closely resem- 
bles a large-flowered Japanese 
Chrysanthemum. The color is 
a lovely delicate pink, bordered 
with white. Per pkt., 15 cents. 



Acroclinium Album, Flor Pleno. The double form of 
this beautiful white Everlasting Flower is faultless in 
shape and color. They grow somewhat taller than the 
single varieties, but are more substantial in proportion. 
Per packet, 10 cents. 

Ag-eratum, Little Dorrit, New White. Charming 

dwarf bushy variety, with white flowers; particularly 
useful for cutting. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Alyssum Nanum Maritimum, New Dwarf "Little 
Gem." This New Dwarf Sweet Alyssum " Little Gem," 
is a remarkable addition to this favorite annual. The 
plants are of a very compact, spreading habit, and only 3 
to 5 inches in height, and each plant will cover a circle 
of 1 5 to 30 inches in diameter. The plants begin to blos- 
som when quite small, and so profusely that the plants 
are a solid mass of white from spring till late in autumn, 
A single plant (by count) gives over 600 clusters of- flow- 
ers on a medium sized plant at one time. For small beds- 
or edgings, pots and baskets, it is a gem among flowers. 
The flower clusters are more compact, larger and better 
for cutting than the common variety. This is an Ameri- 
can production, and is not to be confounded with any 
other dwarf species of foreign production, and we recom- 
mend it without hesitation. 10 cents per pkt. 

A new variety,, centre petals golden-yellow, sepals 




"Little Gem" Sweet Alyssum. 



Aster, Liliput, Pure White. The chief beauty of this variety is the diminutive size of its 
flowers, and the abundance in which they are produced. Useful for all purposes for which cut 
flowers are required. Per pkt., 1 5 cents. 

Aster, Mignon, Pure White. This is said to be one of the finest and most floriferous Asters 
grown, resembling in type the Victoria race, and exceeding in size the imbricated Pompon type ; 
being globular in form, and of the purest white. The excellence of the novelty will place 'it in 
the first rank of Asters, for its usefulness in various ways. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Asters, Zirngriebel's ImproYed Double White. This magnificent Aster is a cross between 
the Victoria and Paeony varieties. The flowers are large, pure white, beautifully imbricated, 
and globular in form. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

26 



PARKER & WOOD'S FLOWER-SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 



Aster, Triumph Dark Scarlet. 

This novelty is undoubtedly the 
most beautiful and perfect of all 
dwarf Asters. The flowers 
measure about three inches 
across, and are of the most 
faultless Paeony form, and beau- 
tifully incurved. The color is a 
pure, rich scarlet, of fine form, 
produced in great abundance; 
each plant bears 30 to 40 flowers 
of exquisite beauty. Per pkt., 
25 cents. 

Calceolaria, Thompson's "Dal- 
keith Park" Strain. Large 
flowers of fine form and sub- 
stance, rich colors, beautifully 
spotted and marbled. The finest 
strain in cultivation. Per pkt., 
50 cents. 

Chrysanthemum Frutescens. 

Marguerite or Paris Daisy, white. 
10 cents per pkt. 

Chrysanthemum, Etoile d'Or. 




Triumph Aster. 



' GoldenParis Daisy." The large golden-flowered variety of the white Marguerite. Excellent 
for cutting. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Chrysanthemum, Inodorum Plenissima. Dwarf-growing, with double white flowers; very 
free-flowering ; good variety for pot culture ; excellent for cutting. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Chrysanthemum, Tricolor Eclipse. Golden yellow, with a bright purplish-scarlet ring ; disc 
dark brown. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Cineraria Hybrida Grandi- 

flora. Finest large-flowering 
exhibition varieties, embracing 
the richest and most varied, 
showy and attractive colors. 
Saved from the finest strain in 
the world. Extra. Per pkt., 
50 cents. 

Cineraria Alba. Th is will prove 

a very serviceable sort for cutting 
purposes. The plants are dwarf , 
of compact habit, and produce a 
profusion of large flowers, fine 
form and substance ; the ray 
petals are pure white, and the 
centre is of a fine indigo-blue 
color. Per, pkt., 50 cents. 

Cosmos HybriduS. A magnifi- 
cent race of plants which attain 
a height of nearly five feet, and 
which in the fall months are lit- 
erally covered with flowers which 
closely resemble single Dahlias. 
The flowers of these new hybrids 
are from one to two inches in 
diameter, and range through all 
shades of rose, purple, flesh col- 
or, and pure white, and are ex- 
Calceolaria, cellent for cutting. They are 
easily raised from seed, and bloom the first season. Per packet, 10 cents. 
Cyclamen Persicum Oigranteum, " Charming Bride." Awarded a first class certificate 
by the Royal Horticultural Society. The flowers are extremely large, of good substance, and 
of the purest white. We consider it a valuable acquisition to the Cyclamens. Per pkt., 50 cts. 

27 




PARKER & WOOD S FLOWER-SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 



Cyclamen Persicum Giganteum Sanguineum. The flowers of this new variety are the 
largest, and of the deepest and richest shade of blood- red imaginable. From the seed offered,, 
very fine and in every way satisfactory results will be obtained. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Dahlia, Carter's Cactus. A magnificent 
variety, producing brilliant-colored semi- 
double flowers, whose appearance has 
given it the name of "Cactus Dahlia," or 
" Jaurezi." They are charming in effect, 
from their variegated forms. The seed, if 
sown early, will produce a grand display of 
continual flowers, which will be found in- 
valuable for harvest festivals or church 
decorations. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Dahlia, Gracilis Single Striped. An in- 
teresting new single class, producing flowers, 
which are striped, mottled, flaked, and. 
dotted with a great diversity of colors.. 
This was pronounced by all who saw it last 
year to be the finest and most wonderful. 
Dahlia they ever saw. Per pkt., 15 cents.. 

Dianthus Chinensis Heddewigii Bril- 
liant. New. A fine variety, producing, 
large, rich-colored flowers of an : intense 
crimson, extremely hardy, and most effec- 
tive; dwarf habit, very free and continu- 
ous bloomer. Per pkt., 10 cents. 
Grnaphalium Leoiltopodiuni "Edelweiss." The flowers are pure white, star-shaped, and of 
a downy texture. This is the true Edelweiss of the Alps, well known and so much prized by 
tourists in Switzerland Per pkt., 20 cents. 

Iberis Gibraltarica Hyhrida. (Perennial Candytuft.) A beautiful light mauve color, con- 
tinuing in bloom without intermission from April until August. The finest variety in cultiva- 
tion. Per pkt., 15 cents. .. ' 

Impatiens Sultana. (New Perennial Balsam.) Producing almost incessantly numerous 
bright-rose flowers, an inch or more in diameter. One of the best of recent introductions. 
Tender perennial ; start in heat ; of easy Culture. Per pkt., 1 5 cents. 

Iris Robinsoniana. "The Wedding flower of Lord Howe's 
Island." One of the largest of the 'Iris family, growing over 
six feet in height, with spikes of pure white flowers tipped with 
golden yellow. Per pkt., 1 5 cents. 

Larkspur, Yellow Flowered. (Delphinium Zalil.) A novel 

color among Larkspurs. The individual flowers are nearly. as 
large as a 25-cent piece, are of a bright sulphur yellow, and are 
borne on spikes 8 to 16 inches in length. As many of the flow- 
ers expand at one time, they show their beauty to advantage. 
Flowers from May to August. Per pkt., 40 cents. 

lobelia Cavanlllesi. The principal merit of this new peren- 
nial variety is the beautiful coloring of its flowers, the tube be- 
ing brilliant scarlet with orange-yellow lips. Being free- 
blooming and easily cultivated, it is equally desirable as a pot 
plant, or for planting out with other perennials. Its lively 
green and slender foliage contrasts admirably with the beautiful 
bright red and yellow-colored flowers. Flowers first season if 
sown early. Per pkt., 15 cents. Mignonette. 

Marigold, African El Dorado. Flowers from three to four inches in diameter, most per- 
fectly imbricated, and extremely double. The colors run through all shades of yellow, from 
very light primrose to the deepest orange. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Marigold, JiTew Dwarf French " Butterfly." This is said to be one of the most beautiful 
in this section of annuals, both in form and color. The alternate petals of velvet-purple and 
old gold being clearly defined over the entire plant. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

28 




Cineraria Hybrida Grandiflora. 




PARKER & WOOD'S FLOWER -SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 




Mignonette, Parker & Wood's New " Mastddonte." This new special strain of Mignon- 
ette is a remarkable grower, producing in a strong soil, spikes from 5 to 7 inches in length, and 
one and a half to two inches in diameter, with a wonderfully delicious fragrance, which they 
retain for a long time after being cut. It is of immense value to florists for cut- flowers, and is. 
unsurpassed for that purpose among the large varieties. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Hina Lobata. A charming 
Mexican climbing, half-hardy 
annual, closely resembling 
the Ipomeas, though from 
its flowers quite distinct from 
that genus. In color they 
are as singular as they are 
attractive; the buds are at 
first of a vivid red, but turn 
orange-yellow just before they 
open, and when fully expand- 
ed, the flowers are of a creamy 
white shade. They are co- 
piously produced from base 
to summit, some 18 to 20 
feet, and, as can be imagined, 
becomes a strikingly beauti- Mina Lobata. ., - 

ful object. Like the Cypress Vine {Ipomea Quamoflit), this rapid-growing species cannot fail 
to become popular. It requires the same treatment as other half-hardy annuals. Per 
pkt,., 20 cents. C V J ' ' 

Mimulus, "Queen's Prize" (Carter's). A most magnificent strain of this easily cultivated 
and brilliant-colored annual. Many of the flowers measure two to three inches in diameter, the; 
colors being almost endless in their varied pencillings and mottlings of rich purple, crimson, 
yellow and other shades. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Moon Flower (Ipomea Noctiflora). The seed we offer of the Moon Flower is true, and not 
Ipomea Bona Nox. It is a very rapid growing vine, and will easily cover a surface of 25 feet. 
At night and during dull days the plants are covered with large, pure white, fragrant flowers 
5 to 6 inches in diameter. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Musa Ensete (Abyssinian Bana- 
na). Magnificent foliage plant, 
with broad, massive leaves that 
grow to immense proportions. A 
superb plant for the lawn, only re- 
quiring to be known to become ex- 
ceedingly popular. Seeds should 
be started early, and frequently 
transplanted. Per pkt., 20 cents ; 
per 100 seeds, $3 00. 

Myosotis Alpestris " Victoria. " 

This new Forget-me-not is of a 
stout and bushy habit of growth, 
attaining a height of 5 to 7 inches, 
and a circumference of 16 to 18 
inches, and when fully grown is 
quite globular in shape and perfect- 
ly covered with bright, azure-blue 
flowers. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Myosotis Dissitiflora Alba (For- 
get-me-not). Pure white flowers, 
Myosotis Alpestris " Victoria " (Forget-me-not). equally as large in size as those 

of the original blue variety, which is such a general favorite. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Merembergia Frutescens, Pure "White. For sunny situations no better white flower 
than this can be selected ; the flowers are large, formed well above the leaves, and are pro- 
duced in abundance throughout the summer, and even until autumn. Per pkt., 20 cents. 

29 




PARKER & WOOD'S FLOWER-SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 



Pansy, Bug-not's Prize Strain. An extra fine variety from a celebrated French grower- 
The flowers are very large, and of great substance, each petal bearing a large blotch or stain, 
which covers it almost entirely ; the colors are both splendid and extremely varied. The plant 
is vigorous, with large leaves, above which the flowers are raised by stout stalks, showing them 
to the best advantage. Choice mixed, per pkt, 50 cents. 

Pansy, Scotch Prize. Seed 

saved for us from the largest 
collection of finest named Pan- 
sies in Scotland. The plants are 
of compact, free-flowering habit, 
with flowers of great substance. 
Extra choice. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Pansies, Parker & Wood's 
Prize Show Varieties. We 

offer again as a specialty for the 
season of 1888 our Choice Pan- 
sy Seed, feeling confident that 
none of better quality, producing 
flowers of such gigantic and per- 
fect forms or of more magnifi- 
cent coloring is attainable, hav- 
ing been carefully selected from 
named Exhibition flowers by a 
distinguished grower. The plants 
are compact, robust, and free- 
blooming, producing flowers of 
enormous size, often measuring 
upwards of three inches in diam- 
eter, circular in form, of good 
substance, and unsurpassable in 
beauty and variety of colors. 
Per packet, 50 cents. 

Papaver JNudicaule Aurantia- 
CUm. A new hardy herbaceous 
Poppy. Produces its beautiful 
bright orange-colored flowers all 
summer, and until late in the au- 
tumn. Blooms the first year from seed. Per packet, 20 cents. 

Papayer, The Mikado. A peculiar and interesting variety from Japan. The flowers are 
brilliant scarlet and white, with elegantly curved petals, like a Japanese Chrysanthemum, the 
fringed edges being a beautiful crimson scarlet. One of the most effective annuals. Per pkt., 
20 cents. 

Papayer Pavoninum, "Peacock Poppy." This beautiful new single Poppy is somewhat 
similar to Papaver Umbrosum, being of dwarf habit, not much exceeding a foot in height, and 
very free- flowering. The most striking feature of the flower is the conspicuous glossy black 
zone which marks the petals near the base, forming a complete ring, which shows to great ad- 
vantage on the brilliant scarlet ground., "Vyjieii fully expanded they are nearly , four inches 
across, and are borne in great numbers. Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Petunia Grandiflora Fimbriata "Titania" (Benary). The flowers of this very remarkable 
and beautiful variety are of a dark, rich shade of velvety purple, admirably relieved by a broad 
and clearly defined pure white band around each petal. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Petunia, Double White Fringed "Lady of the Lake." This is a distinct double-flower- 
ing variety of large size, with beautifully fringed flowers, and will produce a large percentage 
of doubles. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Phlox Drummondii, Double White. The first really double Phlox ever offered. At least 
60 per cent, of the seedlings will produce a profusion of charming densely double pure white 
flowers. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Primula Sinensis Fimbriata Alba Mag-niiica. Splendid variety, pure white flowers with 
large bright yellow eye, each petal being deeply and beautifully fringed, borne in large trusses 
well above the foliage. Per pkt., 50 cents. 




PARKER & WOOD'S GIGANTIC PRIZE SHOW PANSY. 



30 



PARKER & WOOD'S FLOWER-SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 



Phlox Drummondii. 



Primula Sinensis Fimbriata Chiswick Ked. Brilliant crimson-scarlet, splendid habit, 
with extra large fringed flowers, per pkt., 50 cents. 

Primula Sinensis Fimbriata Meteor. In- 
tense rich crimson; large, fringed flowers; 
distinct. Extra. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Primula, Fringed Fern-Leayed. White, 

large, beautiful fringed flowers. Per pkt., 50c. 

Primula, Fringed Fern-Leaved. Richest 
crimson scarlet ; extra. Per pkt., 50 cents. 

Primula Obconica. A Chinese species re- 
quiring to be grown in a cold frame or house. 
It is in bloom more or less for half the year, 
and on this account is very valuable. The 
flowers are of a pale lilac, almost white color, 
and produced in umbels. Per pkt, 40 cents. 

Primula, Denticulata Alba. A white variety 

of this perfectly hardy herbaceous plant, which 
is one of the first to open its lovely blossoms in 
spring. It is also very suitable for growing in Pots. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Primrose, Hardy High-colored Hybrids, "Dean's." Saved from finest varieties only. 
Extra choice. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Stock, Perpetual Ten-weeks, Snow White, "Princess Alice." A fine perpetual bloom- 
ing ten-weeks Stock, growing from i$ to 2 feet high. When sown early, they commence to 
bloom in June and continue until frost destroys them. The most valuable feature is that it 
produces faultless flowers during September and October, when other strains sown at the same 
time have faded. The individual flowers are very large, perfectly double, and of the purest 
white ; recommended for cut-flowers. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

New Sweet Peas (Eckford's). We have 

much pleasure in offering the following 

new varieties of this favorite annual. The 

sorts are all very distinct, and of unusual 

excellence, the flowers extremely pretty, 

and of the most charming and varied col- 
ors. They cannot fail to please, and can 

be highly recommended. 
Apple Blossom. The standards are bright 

pinkish rose, the wings blush, a beautiful 

shade of apple blossom, very pretty and 

distinct. Per pkt., 25 cents. 
Boreatton. A very fine dark Pea, with bold, 

stout flowers, the standard being a rich 

shining, bronzy crimson, the wings of beau- 
tiful crimson purple, shaded with rose. 

Per pkt., 2 5 cents. 

Splendour. Awarded a first class certificate 
by the Royal Horticultural Society. Color 
rich pinkish rose, shaded with crimson, 
flowers large and of finest form. A superb- 
ly distinct variety. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Adonis. Bright rosy carmine; splendid. 
Per pkt., 5 cents. 

Cardinal. A splendid robust-growing vari- 
ety, producing a great profusion of bright, shining, crimson-scarlet flowers, 
handsome. Per pkt, 10 cents. 

DucheSS of Edinburgh. A very distinct and beautiful variety; the standard, light scarlet, 
flushed with crimson, slightly marbled or splashed at the edge with creamy white, wings deep 
rose. Per pkt, 15 cents. 

Indigo King. The standard of this charming variety is of a dark maroon-purple, with indigo- 
blue wings. Per pkt., 5 cents. 

3i 




Sweet Pea. 



Very distinct and 



PARKER & WOOD'S FLOWER-SEED NOVELTIES FOR 1888. 



NEW SWEET PEAS (Continued). : 
Tlsa Eckford. A most charming variety, the flowers being a beautiful creamy-white, heavily 

Orange Prince. The most distinct variety 
ever sent out. The standard is bright or- 
ange-pink, flushed with scarlet wings, bright 
rose, veined with pink; extremely hand- 
some. Per 'pkt., 15 cents. ' 

Princess Of Wales. A lovely variety, 
shaded and striped with mauve on a white 
ground in a most pleasing manner ; flowers 
of great substance and perfect shape. Per 
pkt, 5 cents. 

The Queen. A very beautiful and pleasing 
• variety, the light rosy-pink standard being 
in charming contrast to the wings, which 
; are light mauve. Per pkt., 15 cents. 

Vesuvius. Rose, crimson spotted, lower 
part of flower violet; distinct. Per pkt., 5c. 

P. & W.'s Special Mixture is made up of the choicest named varieties that can be imported, 
mixed with great care, so as to give the greatest possible variety of colors. Per pkt., 5 cents ; 
ounce, 1 5 cents ; pound, $1.00. 

Tridax Bicolor Rosea. Half-hardy annual from Mexico, forming a neat, erect bush 15 inches 
in height, with lanceolate foliage ; flowers a pretty rose color, with yellow discs; in the bud 
the florets are of a deep crimson; very free blooming. Per pkt., 20 cents. 

Verbena Hybrida Compacta Candidissima. A new strain, with erect stems, forming 

compact, sturdy plants of only five inches in height which is literally covered with beautiful 
. white umbels of flowers. Per pkt., ,25 cents. 

Verbena Hybrida Compacta. New dwarf variety of erect and compact habit, growing only 
five inches high, covered with beautiful umbels of flowers. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Verbena, New Mammoth, The characteristics of this new strain of Verbenas are, that when 
well grown, every flower truss measures over nine inches in circumference, while the single 
florets are as large as a 25-cent piece. This great improvement in size is certain to increase 
the popularity of the Verbena. It is altogether distinct and surprisingly beautiful, the colors 
of which present the same wide range as the ordinary type. Per pkt., 25 cents. 

Zinnia Eleg-ans Gfrandiflora Eobusta 
Plenissima. A particularly fine new class 
of Zinnias, differing from the older ones ih-its 
unusually robust habit of growth and the im- 
mense size (five to six inches across) of its per- 
fectly-formed, very double flowers. The 
plants rise to a height of three or four feet, 
while the magnificent flowers are of great sub- 
stance, and preserve their beauty for about 
four weeks, even in the hottest of seasons. 
Per pkt., 10 cents. 

Flower Seed for a Wild Garden. All lov- 
ers of flowers who are fond of novelties in the 
way of flower-gardens, and cannot give much 
time to cultivation, will find this mixture the 
desirable thing if sown en masse, as it will pro- 
duce a continuous bloom of flowers of every 
hue, and you will have a mass of floriferous 
splendor that will last all summer. This Mix- 
ture is composed of the most free and showy 
Annuals suitable for a wild flower-garden. 
•One ounce, 50 cents; half ounce, 25 cents; 
.packet, 10 cents. 

32 



with rosy pmk. Per pkt., 15 cents. 




Verbena Hybrida Compacta Candidissima. 




African Marigold, El Dorado. See p. 28. 



ARTICHOKE. 

German, Artischoke. — French; Artichaut. — Spanish, Alcachofa. 
One ounce of seed sows thirty feet of drill. 

Sow in light, rich, and rather moist soil, in drills eight or ten inches apart; when the plants 

are well up, transplant, four or five inches deep, in rows four feet apart, and two feet apart in the 

rows. Cover with straw; during winter. The immature heads boiled till tender, and served 
seasoned with pepper, butter, and salt, make a delicious dish. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Large Green Grlobe. Fine large heads ; the best for general use . . $0.05 $030 $3.00 

ASPARAGUS. 

German, Spergel. — French, Asptrge.— Spanish, Esparrago. 
One ounce to forty feet of drill. 
Sow in spring, as soon as the soil is in good working condition. The seed-bed should be 
thoroughly spaded over, the surface levelled and raked smooth, and the seeds sown, not very 
thickly, in drills twelve or fourteen inches apart, and about an inch deep. When the plants are 
well up, thin them to three inches apart. Cultivate during summer, and give the plants a light 
•covering of stable-litter during winter. At one or two years, transplant to permanent beds, in rows 
three feet apart, and the plants one foot apart in the rows. The soil should be trenched two feet 
deep, and highly manured. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

€onOvei ,? S Colossal. The largest and most prolific ; very tender . . $0.05 $0.10 $0.75 

ASPARAGUS ROOTS. 

PER IOO. 

Conover's Colossal. Two year old roots (by express) $1.00 

•Uonover's Colossal. One year old roots (by mail, postage paid) . . . 1.25 

BEANS (English or Broad). 

German, Gartenbohne. — French, Fhje de Marais*. — Spanish, Haba. 
One quart will plant one hundred feet of drill. 
English dwarf beans should be planted very early in our climate, as soon as the ground is 
workable, A good stiff loam is best adapted to their growth. When the pods begin to grow, 
break off the top of the stems : this will cause them to swell and fill up, and prevent them run- 
ning all to flowers. Plant four inches apart, x two inches deep, in drills two feet apart. Gather 
them when about half their full size; boil them in plenty of water, with a little salt, and serve 
up as other beans. 

Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart extra, if to be sent by mail. 

PKT. QT. BUSH. 

Broad Windsor. The largest and best variety grown; very tender and 

delicious . . # 0 - 10 #°- 2 5 $1-°° 

33 



PER 1,000. 
$7.00 



34 



j^ARKER. 8j ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



BEANS (Dwarf or Bush). 

German, Bohue. — French, Haricot. — Spanish, Frijorenano. 
One quart will plant one hundred feet of drill ; one and a half bushels for one acre. 

A succession of sowings can be made from the first week in May until September. Plant in 
drills, about two inches deep, and from eighteen inches to two ' feet apart, according to the richness 
Of the soil. The poorer the soil, the closer they can be planted. The plants should be about 
three inches apart. Hoe only when dry, as the pods will rust badly, if- the leaves are disturbed 
when wet with dew or rain. 

Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart, extra, if to be sent by mail. 

PKT. QT. PECK. 

Early Feejee. The earliest variety grown; productive, and of fine quality $o.io $0.25 $1.25 

Early Rachel. A very early and productive variety 10 .25 1.25 

Early Mohawk. Very early, hardy, productive, and of rich flavor. Pint, .15 .10 .25 1.25 

Early "Valentine. Very early, tender, and of fine flavor 10 .25 1.25 

Early 2s T ew Improved Round Pod Red Valentine. About ten days ear- 
lier than the old Valentine bean, and retains all of its good qualities, and 
is very prolific . . . . . .... . . . . .10 .25 I.25 

Early Long" Yellow Six Weeks. A favorite variety, desirable as a string 

bean Pint, .15 .10 .25 1.25 

Early China Red-Eye. Well-known variety, of good quality . . . .10 .25 1.25 

Canadian Wonder. The pods are flat, straight, growing from eight to ten 

inches in length, green in color ; used chiefly as a shell bean . . . .10 .30 1.50 

Mont (FOr. The earliest of the dwarf wax varieties. The vine is hardy, 

stout, thrifty, and well laden with crooked pods ; yellow in color . . .10 .40 2.00 

Ivory Pod Wax. It ripens extra early ; pods are large, brittle, and string- 
less, of a beautiful, transparent ivory white. As a snap bean, it excels 
in tenderness and creamy flavor ; while as a shell bean for winter use, it 
is superior to the Marrow 10 -3° I -5° 

Early White Wax. A white bean ; pods waxy yellow when ripe ; very tender 

and delicious ; used as a snap or string bean .... Pint,. .10 .30 1.25 

Dwarf Black Wax. A black bean ; pods waxy yellow when ripe ; like the 

White Wax, delicious for a string or snap bean . . . Pint,. .10 .30 1.25 

Crystal White Wax. A new wax bean of quick growth and exceedingly 

productive 10 .30 1.50 

Early Golden Wax. A distinct variety, ten days earlier than the Dwarf 
Black Wax; pods long, brittle, and entirely stringless ; ex-els all others 
as a snap or string bean; also one of the best shell beans for winter use, .10 .30 1.50 

Lemon Pod Late Wax. Noted for its continued bearing and productive 
qualities ; the pods are long, handsome, very tender, rich, and entirely 
stringless. As a green shell bean, for succotash, or for a winter shell 
bean, it is unsurpassed ; they are of large size, white, plump, and smooth, .10 .30 1.5c 

Dwarf Horticultural. Resembles the Pole Horticultural; is of excellent 

flavor; used as a shell bean ; popular with market-gardeners . Pint, .15 .10 .25 1.25 

Goddard. Resembles Dwarf Horticultural, and fully as early; vines, pods, 
and beans grow about one-third larger;- pods are of a beautiful bright- 
red color, and do not spot; plant three beans in a hill; hills two and a 
half feet apart, and three feet between the rows ; best selling green shell 
bean in the market 10 .30 1. 25 

Marblehead Early Horticultural. One of the earliest beans grown, with 
all the excellent qualities of the Dwarf Horticultural ; pods large, rich 
colored, filled with handsome large beans ; unexcelled for shelling . . .10 .50 2.00 

Refugee. Very productive, though not early; extensively grown as a pickling 

bean > . - ' > . . . 10. .25 I.25 

Bwarf Yellow Cranberry. One of the earliest varieties; a favorite with 

market-gardeners for string or snap bean Pint, .15 .10 .30 1.75 



'ARKER y Y OOD ' JSeBD pATALOGUE. 



35 



PKT. 


QT. 


PECK. 


0.10 


$0.30 


$1.25 


.IO 


•25 


1.25 


.IO 


•25 


1.25 


.IO 


• 2 5 


I. CO 


.IO 


'. - 2 5 


1.25 


.IO 


• 2 5' 


1.25 


.10 


•25 


1.25 



BEANS (Dwarf or Bush) — Continued. 

Perfect Wonder Bush. Wonderfully productive, yielding from one hundred 
to one hundred and seventy-five or more pods on a single vine, with 
from four to six beans in each pod ; the vines grow very stout and bushy, 
from fifteen to twenty inches high; bean is small and white, medium 
late ; plant in hills from twenty inches to two feet apart in the rows, one 
bean in each hill . . . • . ... I 

Large "White Marrow. Extensively grown for sale in the dry state .. 

Long" White Kidney. Excellent as a shell bean, green or ripe 

White Pea. The favorite variety in New England for baking 

fellow-Eye Improved. Excellent for field culture . . . 

Ked Kidney, or Chilian. Largely, used for field culture . . .•■ 

Turtle Soup. Tender, of good quality, best of all for soups . . . . 

BEANS (Pole or Running). 

German, Stangen-Bohne. — French, Haricots d Rames. — Spanish, Jtidias. 
One quart will plant about one hundred and fifty hills ; ten to twelve quarts for one acre. 

These are more tender, and require rather more care in culture, than the bush beans, and 
should be sown two weeks later; they succeed best in sandy loam, which should be liberally 
enriched with short manure in the hills, which are formed according to the variety, from three to 
four feet apart; from five to six seeds are planted in each hill, about two inches deep, leaving a 
space in the centre for the pole. Limas and Sievas will not grow until the weather and ground 
are warm ; if planted before, they are apt to rot in the ground. 

Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart, extra, if to be sent by 

Pole Horticultural. Favorite variety for private garden use ; a delicious 

green shelled bean; also fine in a dry state . . . Pint,. ; 
Parker & Wood's Defiance. A splendid snap bean, entirely stringless, and 

lasting so to the end of the season ; the vines are of vigorous growth, 

and take exceedingly well to the poles ; pods are from five to six inches 

long, deep-green in color, very numerous, and of fine quality . 
Large White Lima. A late variety; best of the pole beans; universally 

grown, both for market and private use 

Sieva or Small Lima. Resembles the preceding ; being earlier is surer to 

produce a . good crop 
Breer's Improved Lima. The early maturity of this bean makes it .a 

decided acquisition for our New England climate; very productive; 

excellent quality 

Golden Butter. Earliest of the wax pole varieties, and is very prolific; pods 
golden yellow, tender, of best quality ; seeds purplish brown . 

Indian Chief. A black bean 5 pods waxy yellow when ripe ; the best pole 
string bean, quality superior 

Giant Wax. A red bean ; pods long, waxy yellow ; when cooked, tender and 
delicious 

White Case-Knife. An old variety, productive and early ; a fine shell bean, 

Concord. Resembles the Horticultural; is earlier, and takgs better to the 
poles ; very prolific . 

Scarlet Runner. A great favorite as an ornamental plant; grows ten feet 
high, and produces dazzling scarlet flowers ; also useful as a vegetable . 

White Runner. Similar to the preceding, except flowers are white 

Red Cranberry. Very prolific and early; a favorite with marketmen . 

White Cranberry. A late variety ; a good string bean .... 

King- of the Garden Lima. A vigorous grower, bearing profusely large 
pods, ranging in length from 5 to 8 inches. Beans, when in a green 
state, are much larger than the Lima ; as the vines grow luxuriantly, 
two are sufficient to each pole; do not plant too closely, and beans will 
set early, and continue bearing until killed by frost .... 



PKT. 


QT. 


PECK. 


$O.IO 


$0.30 


$1.50 


.IO 


. -3° 


I.50 


.IO 




2.50 


.IO 




2.5O 


.IO 


•5° 


2.50 


.10 


.40 


i-75 


.10 


•3° 


1.50 


.10 


40. 


4.00 


.10 


•3° 


1.5© 


10 


•30 


1.50 


.10 


.40 


2.00 


.10 


.40 


2.00 


.10 


.40 


i-75 


.10 


.40 


2.00 


.10 


•5° 


2.50 



36 "Parker 8f ^yboD, ^eed atalogu e. 

BEET. 

German, Rtmkel Rube. — French, Betterave. — Spanish, Betteragu. 
One ounce sows fifty feet of drill ; fiv to six pounds for one acre. 

The soil which is best suited for the culture of the beet is that which is rather light than 
otherwise, alwavs provided that it is thoroughly enriched by manure. For an early supply, sow 
m spring, as soon as the ground becomes fit to work, in drills about one foot apart, and two 
inches deep. For main crop, sow the first week in May; and for winter use, sow in June. When 
the plants have attained three or four leaves, thin out, so that they may stand eight or nine 
inches apart. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Eclipse Turnip Blood. A beet considered to be even earlier than the 
Egyptian ; being smoother, of fine color, globe-shaped, with small top ; 
and is a large cropper $0.05 #0.15 $1.00 

Egyptian Turnip Blood. Early variety; to market-gardeners, who seek 

earliness above all else, we recommend this valuable variety . . . .05 .10 .75 

Bastian's Turnip Blood. Almost as early as the preceding ; handsome in 
shape ; beautiful blood-red color when boiled ; the popular beet with 

market-gardeners 05 .10 .75 

Early Flat Bassano. A standard early variety 05 .10 .60 

Early Turnip Blood. A standard sort, good f-r summer or winter . . .05 .10 .50 
Dewing's Early Turnip Blood. Fine form and flavor; excellent market 

variety ; the standard sort for an early or late beet 05 .10 .75 

Long* Smooth Blood-Red. Excellent winter variety 05 .10 .50 

Swiss Chard or Silver. Cultivated for its leaf-stalks, which are served up 
much like asparagus, and for its leaves, cooked as spinach ; if cut often, 
new and more tender stalks will be produced 05 .10 .,75 

BEET (Mangel Wurzel and Sugar). 

From four to six pounds of seed will sow an acre. 

As these varieties grow much larger than the preceding, they require more room, and should 
be sown in drills about two feet apart, and be thinned out to twelve or fifteen inches in the row. 
The long varieties are best suited to a deep soil, and the globe varieties succeed better than the 
long sorts on sandy soil. They are excellent food for cows, to increase the flow of milk. Farmers 
should begin to feed them towards the close of winter. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Mangel Wurzel, Long" Red. An excellent variety, producing roots of large 

size $0.05 #0.10 $0.50 

Mangel Wurzel, Mammoth Long Red. One of the largest and most 

profitable varieties grown for agricultural purposes . . . . .05 .10 .50 

Mangel Wurzel, Korhiton Giant Long Red. Roots of mammoth size; 

one of the finest in cultivation 05 .10 .50 

Mangel Wurzel, Red Glohe. Roots of large size and globular form; very 

productive ; adapted for shallow soil 05 .10 .50 

Mangel Wurzel, Yellow Olofoe. Similar to Red Globe, except in color ; is 
thought by many to be better for feeding to cows, as it is said to impart 
a rich color to the milk 05 .10 .50 

Mangel Wurzel, Yellow Ovid. Grow very symmetrical and freer of root- 
lets than the long sorts; of fine quality, very heavy 05 .10 .50 

Beet, White French Sug-ar. A very heavy cropper; cultivated in France 

for making sugar 05 .10 .50 

Beet, Lane's Improved Sugar. One of the very best and most nutritious 

varieties for feeding cattle 05 .10 .50 

Beet, German Imperial Sugar. Best to cultivate for sugar . . . .05 .10 .50 



BORECOLE. (See KALE.) 



^ARKER 8f ^/"OOD, pEED pATALOGUE. 



37 



BROCOLI. 

German, Spar gel- Kohl. — French, Chou Brocoli. — Spanish, Broculi. 
One ounce will sow a bed of forty square feet, and produce about three thousand plants. 

A class of plants closely allied to the cauliflower family, more hardy, therefore surer to head. 
Sow the first week in May, in drills three or four inches apart, covering the seeds lightly. When 
the plants are three inches high, thin out to six inches. When the leaves are about three inches 
broad, transplant to prepared beds, two feet apart each way. Rich soil and frequent waterings 
are -essential. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Walcheren. One of the best sorts, with large firm heads . . . $0.10 $040 $5.00 
Early Purple Cape. Good variety for the North, producing fine, close heads 

of- a purple color . ... • . .. .... .., . . .10 40 4.00 

White Cape. A very hardy and vigorous variety, with creamy-white heads . .10 40 4.00 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

German, Sprossen-Kohl. — French, Chou de Bruxelles. — Spanish, Berza de Brussela. 
One ounce will sow a bed of forty square feet, and produce about three thousand plants. 

A tender and delicious vegetable, closely allied to the cabbage family, and should be planted 
in every vegetable garden. The small, cabbage-like heads which grow upon the stem are much 
improved by a moderate frost. Sow in hot-beds in March or April, and in the open ground in 
May, cultivating as recommended for brocoli. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Improved Dwarf. Excellent variety, producing compact sprouts, tender, and 

of fine flavor $0.10 $0.20 $2.00 



CABBAGE. 

German, Kopfkohl. — French, Chou Pomme. — Spanish, Refiotto. 
One ounce for a bed of forty square feet ; will produce about 3,000 plants. 1-4 lb. for one acre. 

The cabbage, to be well grown, requires a deep, rich, loamy soil. For early use, sow the 
seed in hot-beds in February or March. When the plants are four or five inches high, they 
should be transplanted, if the weather is mild, into the open ground, in rows two feet apart, and 
about fifteen inches apart in the row ; make the ground rich and light. It is very important with 
cabbage or cauliflower that the plant is set down to the first leaf, so that the stem is all under 
ground. Sow in the open ground in May, which will be soon enough for an open crop. The late 
varieties are usually sown in the middle of May, and the plants are set out in July at distances of 
three feet between the rows, and two feet between the plants. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Henderson Early Summer. The favorite early cabbage with Boston mar- 
ket-gardeners ; about ten days later than the Jersey Wakefield, being 
fully double the size ; will keep longer without bursting open after head- 
ing than any other early variety . . . $ -0$ $ -25 $2.50 

Henderson Early Summer. Eoctra Market- Gardeners' Stock . .05 40 4.00 

Early Peerless. A variety nearly as early as Jersey Wakefield, often weigh- 
ing twelve to fifteen pounds; remains very long after heading without 
bursting. They can be planted closer in the rows than most varieties, 
as there are few outer leaves, and more plants can be set to the acre . .05 .40 4.00 

Early Jersey Wakefield. The standard early variety in New York market, 

of large size, fine quality, and sure to head 05 .40 4.00 

Early York. An old standard sort ; early, of medium size, solid, excellent 

quality .' 05 .20 1.50 

Early French Oxheart. An early sort, of good quality; heads firm and close, .05 .20 1.50 

Warren's Stone-Mason. This cabbage, known as " Warren's Stock," is 
earlier, a more , compact, hard-headed, and a smaller variety of Stone- 
Mason Cabbage. A great favorite with the market-gardeners around 
Boston . .05 40 4-Op 



38 



'ARKER 8j ^OOD, jSEED jCATALOGUE. 



CABBAGE — Continued. 

Early Winning'Stadt. One of the best for al] soils ; heads cone-shape, large, 
and solid . . . : « , $ 

Early Etampes. An early variety, claimed to be earlier than any other sort, 
with hard and solid pointed heads, of medium size and of remarkably 
fine quality . . . . . 

Fottler ? S Improved Brunswick. The earliest of the large heading drum- 
heads, in great favor with market-gardeners in all sections ; used gen- 
erally as a second early crop; also one of the best for a late crop, pro- 
ducing, very solid heads, weighing from twenty to thirty pounds each 

Fottler's Improved Brunswick. Extra Market - Gardeners'' 

Stock 

£|fpae*$^^ one of the very best for 

family or market use ; solid heads of excellent quality .... 

Stone-Mason Drumhead. Extra Market- Gardeners 9 Stock 
Premium Flat Dutcll. A very popular and highly esteemed variety; its 

keeping qualities unsurpassed; large heads, tender, fine flavor; excellent 

for winter use 

Large Late Drumhead. A good winter variety, of large size, with round, 
compact heads ............ 

Marhlehead Mammoth. A late variety, the largest of all cabbages; heads 
have been grown weighing sixty pounds 

American Improved Savoy. An improvement on the Green Globe Savoy; 
very reliable for heading; excellent sort for market-gardeners . 

Drumhead Curled Savoy. Quite firm, large-size heads, of fine flavor ; excel- 
lent for winter sort . . . . . . "■' . 

Large Early Schweinfurt. A very early, large variety, fine for summer or 
fall use . , 

Little Pixie. Small, tender, and sweet ; earlier than Early York ; heads hard, 

Red Dutch. The old variety for pickling 

Red Drumhead. Grows larger than the preceding, and more profitable; is 

reliable for heading; grows very hard under high culture 
Curled Savoy. Fine for greens ; extensively grown by market-gardeners 

CARROT. 

German, Moehre. — French, Carptte. — Spanish, Zanahoria. 
One ounce will sow one hundred feet of drill ; three to four pounds for one acre. 

Deeply tilled soil, of a light, sandy nature, is the most suitable for carrots. ' Avoid sowing an 
newly manured ground, which has a tendency to produce forked roots : the land should therefore 
be manured the previous season. For early crops, sow as soon as the ground can be worked ; and 
for later crops, from the beginning until the end of May, in rows fifteen inches apart and half an 
inch deep. Thin out the young plants to five inches, and keep the surface open by a frequent use 
of the hoe. 

Early French Forcing. Valuable for forcing ; very early and small, of fine 
flavor . • i 

Early Scarlet Horn. An old favorite soi% much esteemed for early sum- 
mer use • 



PKT. 


oz. 


LB. 


•05 I 


&0.20 


$1.50 


•°5 


•25 


2.00 


•°s 


• 2 S 


2.50 




.40 


4.00 


•°5 


• 2 5 


2. 50 


•05 


40 


4.00 


•°5 


• 2 5 


2.50 




.20 


2.00 


.ok 


•2.K 


2.50 


•05 


.40 


4.00 


•°S 


.20 


2.00 




.30 


3-°° 


•°5 


•3° 


3.00 


•°5 


.20 


2.50 


•°5 


.40 


4.00 


•05 


.10 


•75 



Danvers Half-Long". A variety in size between the Early Horn and Long 
Orange varieties ; of fine quality, and a great yielder ; very popular with 
market-gardeners. {Pointed rooted) 

Danvers Half -Long-. Extra Market- Gardeners 9 Stock. [Stump) , 
Long 1 Orange Improved. The standard variety for garden or field crops; 

darker in color, and smoother, than the old Long Orange . . .' 
Large White Belgium. Extensively grown for stock ; grows one-third out 

of ground, consequently the entire crop can be pulled by hand 
Alt ring ham. Root smaller than the Orange ; mild-flavored . 



PKT. 


oz. 


LB. 


SO.05 5 


So. 1 5 


#1.25 




•15 


1.25 




•15 


1.25 


•05 


.20 


i-75 


•°5 


.10 


.80 


.05 


.10 


.60 


•05 


.10 


.60 



J^ARKER 8f ~Sffoor>, ^EED j^ATALO GUE. 



39 



CAULIFLOWER. 

German, Blumen-Kohl. — French, Chou-fleur. — Spanish, Coliflor. 
One ounce will sow a bed of forty square feet, and produce about three thousand plants. 

A good, extra rich soil is essential for the successful cultivation of this most delicious vege- 
table; our most experienced cultivators, however, acknowledge the advantage of a cool, moist 
season. Pursue the same general directions as recommended for growing cabbage, watering 
liberally during the dry weather. An occasional application of liquid manure is beneficial. 

Early Henderson Snowball. The popular variety with market-gardeners, 
and is not to be excelled for general planting in private gardens; very 
early, and reliable for heading ; of dwarf, compact habit, thus allowing 



PKT. 


oz. 


LB. 




$3-5° 




• 2 5 


$5.00 




.10 


.60 


$8.00 


.10 


.60 


8.00 


• 2 5 


5.00 




.10 


.60 


8.00 


.10 


•75, 


8.00 


.10 


.60 


8.00 


.10 


•75 


10.00 



Early Henderson Snowball. Extra Market- Gardeners ? Stock, 

Early Paris. A standard early variety ; excellent for market or family use 

Half -Early Paris. Excellent variety ; good for early or late crops 

Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt. A fine market variety ; large, compact heads 
of fine quality . ... . . Price, % lb., $20.00, 

Walclieren. An old favorite variety ; very hardy 

Boston Market. A popular variety with market-gardeners ; very early, of 
dwarf habit ; fine, well-formed heads . . . . . . 

JLenormand's Short Stemmed. A large late sort, of superior quality . 

Veitcll's Autumn Giant. A very robust and quite distinct variety; hand- 
some heads, of snowy whiteness, protected by the foliage 

CELERY. 

German, Seleri. — French, Celeri. — Spanish, Afiio. 
One ounce will sow a bed of nine square yards, and produce about seven thousand plants. 

The seed may be sown in the open ground in April, as soon as the ground can be nicely 
worked. Sow about half an inch deep, and be careful to firmly press the soil over the seed; this 
should be done by treading over the rows with the feet, after sowing ; this prevents the air drying 
up the seed, which thereby loses its vitality, and fails to germinate. Many valuable crops are 
annually lost by inattention to this important particular. After the seed is up, keep carefully 
clear of weeds, until the time of planting, in June or July. The tops may be shorn off once or 
twice before planting ; this makes them " stocky," and they suffer less on being transplanted. 
After the ground has been well prepared, plant in rows from three to four feet apart, according to 
the variety, setting the plants about six inches apart, and pressing the soil firmly about the roots. 
Keep free from weeds until the plants are able to take care of themselves. Earth up gradually 
during their growth, keeping the leaf-stalks close together, so that the soil does not get betweer 
them. The, soil best suited for celery is a rich, moist loam. 

PKT. OZ. LB 

Henderson Half -Dwarf. Extensively used by New York market-gardeners ; 
and, with those who do not succeed with the Boston Market variety, it 
has grown to be quite a favorite. It is of excellent quality, possessing 
the nutty flavor peculiar to the dwarf kinds . " . , . . $0.05 $0.40 $3.00 

Crawford Half -Dwarf. The sam^ can be said of it as of the preceding . .05 .40 3.00 

Dwarf GrOlden Heart. In size, and habit of growth, much like the Half-Dwarf 
White kinds. Except when blanched, the heart is of a waxy golden- 
yellow, rendering it a showy variety for either market or private use. 
Very solid, of excellent flavor ; a fine keeper . 

£iant White Solid. Of large size, solid, and crisp . . .... 

Gaiter's Dwarf Crimson. Solid and crisp ; best of the red sorts 

Boston Market. The standard Boston variety ; dwarf growing ; white and 
solid, of excellent quality 



•05 


• 2 5 


2.50 


•0.5 


.20 


2.00 


.05. 


.20 


2.50 


.TO 


•5 3 


5.00 



4 o 



^ARKBR 8f Y OOD « ^EED pATALOGUE. 




American Improved Savoy Cabbage. 



Brussels Sprouts. 



^ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



4* 



CELERY — Continued. 

PKT. OB. LB. 

New Early Arlington. The best for an early celery, of fine quality and 
flavor, resembling very much the " Boston Market," growing somewhat 
taller .' . . . . . . ■ . ... . . $0.10 $040 $3.00 

La Plume Chestnut. A very fine half-dwarf white variety, with large and 
solid leaf stalks, which have a true chestnut flavor ; a vigorous and rapid 
grower . ... . . . . 05 .40 3.00 

Sandringh am Dwarf White. Remarkable for fine flavor and solidity . .05 .20 2.00 

Henderson " White Plume." A variety with white inner leaves and 
heart. The blanching is effected by closing the stalks, and drawing 
the soil up around them with a hoe ; quality good, being crisp, and of a 
nutty flavor . . 10 .60 6.00 

Soup Celery Seed. For flavoring . 05 .10 .50 

CELERIAC, or TURNIP-ROOTED CELERY. 

German, Knot Sellerie. — French, Celeri-rave. — Spanish, Apio raiz de Nabo. 
One ounce will sow a bed of nine square yards. 
The seed may be sown in the open ground in April, and the young plants nursed in the same 
way as celery ; but, in planting out, the ground is manured and. dug, not trenched, and the plants 
set in shallow drills twelve inches apart, watering freely. As the growth advances, draw the earth 
to the plants, by which the knotty roots will be blanched, and made delicate and tender. 

, • V PKT. OZ. LB. 

Erfurt Extra $0.05 $0.20 $2.50 

CHERVIL. 

German, Gartenkerbel. — French, Cerfeuil. — Spanish, Perifollo. 
©ne ounce will sow about one hundred feet of drill. 
Cultivated like parsley. Sow thinly in May, in drills half an inch deep, one foot apart. Us* 
while the leaves are young and tender. 

, PKT. OZ. LB. 

Curled Chervil. The young leaves are used for garnishing, and flavoring 

soups $0.05 $0.20 $2.00 

CHICORY. 

German, Chichorie. — French, Chicoree. — Spanish, Achivoria de Cafe. 
One ounce will sow a bed of four square yards. 

Chicory is cultvated chiefly for its roots, which are dried, and used as a substitute or flavoring 
ingredient for coffee. The leaves, when blanched, are also esteemed as an excellent salad. Cul- 
tivate as recommended for carrots. 

PKT. r>z. LB. 

Large Rooted or Coffee Chicory . . . . . ... . $0.05 $0.10 $1.00 

CORN SALAD, or FETTICUS. 

German, Lammersalat. — French, Mache. — Spanish, Canonigos. 
One ounce will sow twenty square feet 5 six pounds will sow an acre. 

A vegetable used as a salad, and sold to a considerable extent in our markets. It is sown on 
the first opening of spring, in rows of one foot apart, and is fit for use in six or eight weeks from 
time of sowing. If wanted to come in early in spring, it is sown in September, covered up with 
straw or hay as soon as cold weather sets in, and is wintered over same as spinach. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Large Leaved $0.05 $0.10 $1.00 



42 f^ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUB. 



SWEET CORN. 

German, Welschkorn. — French, Mais. — Spanish, Maiz. 
One quart will plant two hundred hills ; eight quarts for one acre in hills. 

Corn revels in a warm and rich soil, and nothing is gained by planting before the ground has 
become warm. All varieties of sweet corn may be either sown in rows four and a half feet apart, 
and the seed planted at about eight inches in the rows, or planted in hills at distances of three or 
four feet each way, according to the variety grown, or the richness of the soil in which it is planted. 
The taller the variety, or richer the soil, the greater should be the distance apart. 

Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart, extra, if to be sent by mail. 
Price of ears, any variety, 5 cents each; add 10 cents extra if by mail. 

PKT. QT. PECK. 

Marblehead Extra Early. The most popular kind for a first early corn, 
of dwarf habit, very prolific ; ear of medium size, kernel slightly red in 
color ; sweet, and of excellent flavor .... Pint, .15 $0.10 $0.25 $1.25 

Extra Early Corey. Ears of fair size, kernel large a:,d s". ghtly red ; very 
desirable for market purposes 

Early Minnesota. Very early 5 ears fair size, of fine quality 

Early Narragansett. One of the earliest ; red cob ; good quality 

Early Crosby. The standard early sort; a great favorite for market or 
private garden use . .. . . . . • . . Pint, .15 

Moore's Concord. Medium early; large, well-filled ears ; of excellent flavor, 

Amber Cream. A rich, sugary, and tender medium early variety ; tall-growing, 
ears ten inches long; deep kernels, of amber color, white when ready for 



Potter's Excelsior. Medium early; one of the sweetest and finest-flavored 
varieties grown ; highly recommended . . . . . Pint, .15 

Perry's Hybrid Early. It is as early as Minnesota, grows large, handsome 
ears, is very productive; the quality is very fine, and the appearance of 
the ear when in condition for cooking is very attractive. The kernel is 
large and pure white in color, turning to a reddish tinge when ripe 

Black Mexican. Ears black when ripe ; thought by many to be the sweetest 
corn grown 

Marblehead Mammoth. The earliest and sweetest of the large-growing 
sorts . , . • 

Clark's Old Colony. The ears are large, tender, and sweet, of dwaifer 
growth than the Stowell's Evergreen, which it very much resembles, but 
is ten days earlier . . . . . ... ;< * 

Burr's Mammoth. A late variety ; produces very large ears ; productive 
fine flavored Pint, .15 

Stowell's Evergreen. The standard late sort, remaining longer in the green 
state than any other kind; of excellent quality . . . Pint, .15 

Egyptian. Fully as late as Stowell's Evergreen, and sweeter in flavor; beau- 
tifully shaped ear ; fine large kernel ; in great favor for canning purposes, 

SWEET CORN FOR GREEN FODDER CROPS. 

Three bushels will sow one acre broadcast ; half a bushel, if sown in drills. 

All owners of cattle will find this, the cheapest and best crop to grow for feeding to stock in 
a green state during the summer months, helping out the shortness of summer feed, and keeping 
up a supply of milk. It is far better than the Southern Dent, or flat corn, being much more nutri- 
tious. Also, being so sweet and palatable, cattle eat every part of the stalks and leaves, leaving 
no waste, as is usual with other varieties. 

PECK. BUSH. 

Stowell's Evergreen Fodder. The very best variety 75 $2.50 

Mixed Sweet Fodder Corn 75 2.00 



.10 


• 2 5 


1.25 


.TO 


.55 


1.25 


.IO 


*? C 


1.25 


.IO 


•25 


1.25 


.IO 


• 2 5 


1.25 


.IO 


•25 


!- 2 5 


.IO 


• 2 5 


I - 2 5 


.10 


•3° 


1.50 


• IO 


•25 


1.25 


• IO 


• 2 5 


1.25 


.IO 


• 2 5 


.1.2.5 


.IO 


• 2 5 


1.25 


.10 


•25 


1.25 


.10 


.25 


i.*S 



'ARKER 8f ^jyoOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



43 



FIELD, EMSILAQE, AND FODDER CORN. 

Three bushels will sow one acre broadcast ; half a bushel, if sown in drills. 

Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart, extra, if to be sent by mail. 
Price of ears, any variety, 5 cents each ; add 10 cents extra if to be sent by mail. 

QT. 

Early ElllllS. An improved variety of the Longfellow. Ripens in one kwi- 
dred days from time of planting. The ears set low on the stalk, and 
measure ten to twelve inches long ; have a large kernel and small cob. 

Angel of Midnight. The ear is perfect in shape; length, io to 12 inches; 
rows straight and even, and filled from tip to tip. Kernels large . 

Early Yellow Canada* A well-known early variety ; eight-rowed 

Early Boardman* Eight-rowed ; very productive ; fine ear and large kernel, 

White Flint. One of the best white varieties 

Longfellow. A fine yellow flint variety; grows a handsome ear, twelve to 
fifteen inches long; largest kernel yellow corn; safe to plant in this 
latitude ; *" • . 

Tuscarora. Large variety with flour white kernels, a little indented; in olden 
times used as a sweet corn ; remains long in a boiling state 

Wausliakuni. An eight-rowed yellow flint corn, obtained by crossing the 
Longfellow with a choice local variety. It has a very small cob, well filled 
out at both ends, with kernels of good size. The stalks are stout, mak- 
ing good fodder . . . . . . . 

White Flat Ensilage. Grows very rapidly, and attains a height of twelve to 
fifteen feet. Plant during June, in drills four feet apart ; manure heavily, 

Parker & Wood's Perfect Ensilage. This is the result of a continued 
selection from a popular ensilage variety, and will be found to be what 
its name implies. In growth it attains a height of from twelve to fifteen 
feet, short jointed, with an abundance of leaves and ears. It is as heavy 
a yielder as Blunt's Prolific, while it possesses the great advantage of 
being sure to germinate , . . . . . . . . 

Early Sailford.. Used for a green fodder or ensilage variety; also makes a 
fine quality of white meal. Stalk medium height, ears set low, generally 
two to the stalk; kernel plump, nearly white in color; very productive . .20 2.00 

Blunt's Prolific Ensilage* A very fine variety for ensilage, making a large 
growth of stalk, and as a field corn will produce three to six ears to the 
staik. It is, however, too late a variety to ripen in New England ; and, as 
it has given so much trouble in germinating, we cannot recommend it . 275 

White Flat Corn. A very fine variety for fodder ; used to some extent for 

ensilaging . ... g ........ . .10 1.5a 

.Popping Corn, Common White variety. Selected ears for seed. Each, .03. 

Fopping C©rn, White Rice variety. Selected ears for seed. Each, .05. 

CRESS, or PEPPER-GRASS. 

German, Kresse. — French, Cresson. — Spanish, Mastruco. 
One ounce will sow sixteen square feet. 
A well-known, pungent salad. Cover very slightly; sow at frequent intervals, to keep up a 
succession. To be used before the flowers appear. 

' PKT. OZ. LB. 

Extra Curled. The best sort ; very fine ; may be cut two or three times, $0.05 $0.10 $0.50 

CRESS (Water). 

German, Brumtenkresse. — French, Cresson de Fontane. — Spanish, Berro. 
One ounce will sow one hundred square feet. 
This universally esteemed and exceedingly wholesome salad may be grown in any moist situa- 
tion, but more successfully by the edge of a running brook. The seed may be sown in May, on 



•15 


$2.00 


■is 


2.50 


•is 


2.50 


•IS 


2.50 






• 2 5 


S-oo 


.20 


2.00 


.10 


2.00 




2.00 



44 



j^ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



CHESS (Water) — Continued. 
the ground where it is intended to be grown, and the thinnings transplanted. The plants should 
be set not less than a foot apart. The cress will be fit for gathering the second year. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Water Cress. True, best variety $0.10 $0.40 $4.00 

CUCUMBER. 

German, Gurken. — French, Concombre. — Spanish, Pepino. 
One ounce will plant fifty hills ; two pounds will plant one acre. 

Cucumbers succeed best in warm, moist, rich, loamy ground. They should not be planted in 
the open air until there is a prospect of settled warm weather. Plant in hills about four feet apart 
each way. The hills should be previously prepared by mixing thoroughly with the soil in each a 
shovelful of well-rotted manure. When all danger from insects is past, thin out the plants, leav- 
ing three or four of the strongest to each hill. The fruit should be plucked when large enough, 
whether required for use or not, as, if left to ripen on the vines, it destroys their productiveness. 
Sow for pickling from the middle of June to the middle of July. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Extra Early Russian. The earliest variety ; small, hardy, and produc- 
tive . : $0.05 $0.15 $1.00 

Early Cluster. A favorite early sort, growing in clusters, and extremely pro- 
ductive 05 .15 1.00 

Early Frame. A standard early sort of medium size 05 .15 1.00 

Long: Prickly. _ A well-known variety, with fine long fruit ; color dark green ; 

firm and crisp . .05 .15 1.00 

Peerless White Spine. The fruit is of good size, straight, and well formed ; 
full at both ends ; skin deep green, holding color until mature ; is very 
productive and early 05 .15 1.25 

Improved White Spine. The standard sort with market-gardeners ; excel- 
lent for forcing or out-door culture ; a great bearer 05 .15 1.00 

Tailby's Hybrid. Similar to White Spine ; it is larger, however, very hand- 
some, and prolific ; valuable for forcing 05 .15 1.50 

Boston Pickling". The popular varietv with Boston market-gardeners, for 

pickling 05 .15 1.25 

Boston Pickling-. E$ctra Pickle- Groivers' Stock 05 .20 1.50 

West India Gherkin or Burr. Small, oval-shaped, prickly variety, resem- 
bling a burr ; used only for pickling ,05 .20 2.50 

CUCUMBER (English Frame). 

Sow in small pots from the middle of January, in a hotbed or hot-house. When grown to 
three leaves, plant out in a previously prepared hill of loose, rich soil, in the centre of the sash. 
Keep a temperature of sixty-five degrees at night, to seventy-five or eighty degrees with sun-heat. 
The following selection includes some of the leading English varieties: — 

PKT. PKT. 

Bollison's Telegraph . . . . $0.25 I Blue Gown ...... $0.25 

Ihike of Edinburgh . . . . .25 | Marquis of Lome 25 

DANDELION. 

German, Pardeblume. — French, Pisse-en-lit. — Spanish, Amargon. 
One ounce will sow one hundred feet of drill. 

The dandelion affords 'one of the earliest and most healthful spring greens or salad. The 
seed should be sown in May or June, in drills, half an inch deep, and twelve inches apart, and the 
earth firmly pressed over the seed ; thin out afterwards to four inches apart. 

PKT. OZ. LB 

American Improved. Thick leaf ; the favorite market sort . . ' . $0.10 #040 $5.00 

Thick -Leaved French . . . . . . IO .30 2.50 



J^ARKER 8f Y OOD > ^EED pATALOGUK. 45 




4 6 



ARKER 8j Y OOD ' jSeED j^ATALOGUE. 



EGG PLANT. 

German, Eierpflanze. — French, Aubergine. — Spanish, Berengena. 
One ounce will produce about one thousand plants. 
The egg plant will thrive well in any good garden soil, but will repay good treatment. The 
seed should be sown in hotbeds the first week in April, care being taken to protect the young 
plants from cold at night. Plant out about June i, about two and a half feet apart If no hot- 
bed is at hand, sufficient plants may be raised for a small garden by sowing a few seeds in common 
flower-pots or boxes in the house. 



PKT. OZ. LB. 



New York Improved. Fruit round, purple ; the leading market variety . $0.10 $0.50 $6.00 

Early Long" Purple. Very early and hardy variety; of good quality . .10 .30 3.00 
Black Pekill. A highly esteemed variety ; fruit round, jet black in color, 

of superior quality 10 .60 6.00 

White Fruited. Grown for ornamental purposes only . . . . .05 .30 3.00 

ENDIVE. 

German, Endivien. — French, Chicoree. — Spanish, Endivia. 
One ounce will sow sixty square feet. 
Sow, for an early supply, about the middle of April. As it is used mostly in the fall months, 
the main sowings are made in June and July, from which plantations are formed, at one foot 
apart each way, in August and September. It requires no special soil or manure, and, after plant- 
ing, is kept clear of weeds until the plant has attained its full size, when the process of blanching 
begins. Gather up the leaves, and tie them by their tips in a conical form, with bass matting. 
The inner leaves, in the course of from three to six weeks, according to the temperature at the 
time, become blanched. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Green Curled. The hardiest variety; leaves dark green, tender and crisp, $0.05 $0.20 $2.00 
MOSS Curled. A beautiful curled variety ; very ornamental, of fine quality, .05 .20 2.00 
Broad-Leaved Batavian. (Escarolle.) A summer variety, chiefly used 

in soups and stews 05 .20 2.00 

KALE, or BORECOLE. 

German, Blatter Kohl. — French, Chou Vert. — Spanish, Breton. 
One ounce will produce about three thousand plants. 

Sow early, transplant and cultivate same as cabbage. This is the most tender and delicate 
of all the cabbage tribe, and is best when touched by frost. 

- " 4 £ J\ -. v.- jj _ v. *PKT. OZ. LB. 

Green Curled Scotch. A hardy dwarf variety, beautifully curled, with . 

spreading foliage . . . . . . . . . . . $ ao5 j aiQ $ ^ QO 

Kale Seed* or German Greens. Used for quick-growing spring greens ; 
the popular sort with Boston market-gardeners; used and cultivated 
similar to Savoy Cabbage greens . . . G ^ IO >2<> 

Siherian Dwarf Curled Kale, German Greens, or " Sprouts." Grown 
as Winter Greens, sown in the month of September, in rows one foot 
apart, and treated in every way as spinach. It is ready for use in early 
spring. Very popular with New York market-gardeners . . . .05 .10 .75 

KOHL-HABI. 

German, Kohl-Rabi. — French, Chou-Rave. — Spanish, Col de Nabo. 
One ounce will sow a drill of about two hundred feet. 

Kohl-Rabi, or Turnip-Rooted Cabbage. This vegetable, the popularity of which is rapidly 
increasing, combines the virtues of the turnip and cabbage, but excels both in nutritive, hardy, 



j-^ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



47 



KOHL-RABI— Continued. 
and productive qualities. The edible part is the bulb, which is dressed and served like turnips, 
and is very delicate and tender. The seeds may be sown at the same period as the Swedish or 
Ruta-baga Turnip, and may be cultivated in the same way. In hoeing, be careful not to throw 
earth into the heart of the plant, or the bulb cannot form. The bulbs may be kept sound and 
nutritious until late in the spring, even later than those of the Swedes. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Early White Yienna. The best and earliest for market or table use . $0.05 $0.25 $3.00 
Early Purple Vienna. Fine variety, of a bluish-purple color . . . .05 .25 3.00 
Large White or Green. Excellent varietyTor farm culture 05 .20 2.00 



LEEK. 

German, Laitch. — French, Poireau. — Spanish, Puerro. 
One ounce will sow a drill of about one hundred feet. 

The leek is very hardy, and easily cultivated ; it succeeds best in a light but well-enriched 
soil. Sow as early in spring as practicable, in drills one inch deep and one foot apart. When 
six or eight inches high, transplant in rows ten inches apart each way, as deep as possible, that 
the neck, being covered, may be blanched. If fine leeks are desired, the ground can hardly be 
made too rich. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

London Broad Flag. ' The favorite market variety, with broad, thick 

leaves . . . . . . • . . . . . . . $0.05 $0.15 $1.50 

Giant Carentan. A very extra winter variety . 05 .25 3.00 



German, Lattich-Salat. — French, Laitue. — Spanish, Lechuga. 
One ounce will sow one hundred square feet, or one hundred and twenty feet of drill. 

Lettuce is easy of cultivation, but likes a good, rich s©il. For early use, sow under glass in 
February and March, and transplant as soon as the ground can be worked. Later sowings may 
be made in the open ground, at intervals of two weeks, for succession, as long as the weather 
permits ; thin out well, and set in rows one foot apart, and a foot between the plants. Lettuce 
requires good ground and abundant moisture. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Boston Fine Curled. A beautifully curled variety, of superior quality $0.05 $0.20 $1.50 

Boston Fine Curled. Extra Market- Gardeners > Stock . . .05 .30 4.00 

Early Curled Silesia. Very early, tender, and sweet ; fine for early out-of- 
door culture . . . .05 .20 2.00 

Black-Seeded Simpson. Nearly double the size of the ordinary Curled 

Simpson; stands the summer well . . 05 .25 2.00 

Black-Seeded Teimislball. The popular variety with Boston market-gar- 
deners for summer growing ; fine heads, crisp and hardy; and the earliest 
of the heading varieties . . . °5 ,2 5 2 «5° 

Black-Seeded Tennisball. Extra Market- Gardeners 9 Stock . .05 .30 4.00 

WMte-Seeded Tennisball. The variety so extensively used by Boston 
market-gardeners for culture under glass ; grows very compact, is white 
and crisp ; the best for forcing 

White-Seeded Tennisball. Extra Market- Gardeners' Stock . 

Royal Summer Cabbage. A fine summer variety; heads of good size, 
close and well formed 

Hanson. Heads very large; hearts quickly, and stands the summer well, 
quality excellent 

American Gathering. Resembles the cabbage variety ; growing to an im- 
mense size ; and remains tender and crisp throughout the entire season, 



•05 


•25 


2.50 


•05 


.40 


5.00 








•OS 


.25 


2.00 


•OS 


•25 


2.00 



4 8 



ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED j^ATAL-OGLJE. 



PKT. 


OZ. 


LB. 


0.05 $ 


0.25 


$2.00 


•05 


•25 


2.00 


•°s 


• 2 5 


2.00 


•05 


.20 


I.50 


•05 


.25 


2.00 



LETTUCE — Continued. 

Perpignan. One of the best summer varieties, not inclined to go to seed ; 

large heads, of fine quality i 

All the Year Round. Very hardy, compact variety ; may be sown for suc- 

; cession all the year round ; does not tend to seed ♦ 
Salamander. An excellent summer variety, forming good-sized heads that 

stand the drought and heat, without injury, longer than any other sort . 
Ice Drumhead, or Malta. One of the best summer varieties ; tender and 

crisp, and of good flavor 

White Paris COS. An upright variety, with long narrow leaves, which 

should be tied up for a few days to facilitate blanching ; one of the finest 

for summer use 

MARTYNIA. 

One ounce will plant about two hundred hills. 

A strong-growing annual plant, bearing curiously shaped seed-pods, which, when young and 
tender, make excellent pickles. Sow in the open ground in May, and thin out the plants to two or 
three feet apart ; or may be sown in a hotbed, and afterwards transplanted 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Martynia $0.05 $0.40 $4.00 

MELON (Musk). 

German, Melone. — French, Melon. — Spanish, Melon Almizcleno. 
One ounce will plant about eighty hills; two to three pounds for one acre. 

Muskmelons are cultivated in hills, which should be five to six feet apart each way, and 
composed of light, moderately rich soil. The hills should be dug about two feet square, eighteen 
inches deep, and half filled with well-rotted manure, which must be thoroughly incorporated with 
the soil. Plant in May, ten seeds to a hill ; and, when the plants are well up, thin out to three. 
Cultivate until the vines cover the ground, and pinch the ends of the growing shoots to induce 
early fruiting. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Nutmeg". Fruit finely netted and scented ; flesh greenish yellow ; a favorite^ 
variety • • • • • • • • • • 

Large Yellow Musk. A well-known sort; a very large, deep-ribbed, and 
• thickly netted variety . . - 

Arlington Green Nutmeg. An oval, green-fleshed, and highly flavored 
sort ; the favorite with Boston market-gardeners 

Hackensack. Has grown quite popular in the Boston market, and is consid- 
ered in New York the most popular variety of muskmelon grown for 
market. It attains a large size, is round in shape, flattened at the ends, 
is of most delicious flavor, and wonderfully productive .... 

Early Christiana. Remarkable for early maturity, making it a most valuable 
sort for New England climate ; green, with yellow flesh ; excellent flavor, 

Surprise. Said to be the finest flavored melon grown ; resembles the Nutmeg ; 
flesh deep-salmon color, and very thick 

Bay Yiew. One of the largest, most productive, and best-flavored canta- 
loupes grown; fruit weighing ten to fifteen pounds each, averaging six- 



Casaba. A large variety; very sweet, and of delicious flavor .... 

Banana Cantaloupe. Grows from eighteen inches to two feet long; the 
color outside is of a creamy-white or delicate straw color; entirely free 
from any netting ; is of rich salmon flesh. When ripe, it resembles a 
large, overgrown banana, and smells like one 

Skillman's Netted. An old favorite; early, sweet, and of excellent quality, 

White Japan. An early sort, round, creamy-white fruit, of medium size, 

sweet and delicious .05 .10 \.CQ 











>*>5 


1.25 


■OS 


•15 


1.50 


•°5 


•is 


1.25 


•05 


.10 


1. 00 


.05 


.10 


1. 00 


•°5 


.10 


1.00 


•°5 


.10 


I.OC 


.TO 






•°5 


.10 


I. GO 



"Parker 8f |ood', ^eed pATALOGUE. 



49 



MELON (Musk) — Continued. 

PICT. OZ. LB. 

Montreal Market. A large size, handsome, and fine-flavored melon. The 
fruit is nearly round, with green, netted skin, and has an average weight 
of from fifteen to twenty pounds. It is one of the best for exhibition 
or late market $0.05 $0.10 $1.00 

California Nectar. A new variety, of delicious flavor, fairly productive, 

medium early, and good size . . .05 15 

Hardy Ridge, or Prescott. Of French origin; large, round, flattened at 
both ends ; skin white, warty, widely and deeply ribbed. The flesh, four 
to five inches thick, is of a rich salmon color, very juicy and sugary . .05 .15 

Mango. [For pickling.) Resembles long muskmelon, but of much smaller 

growth; used entirely for pickling, being gathered when green . . .10 .40 4.00 

MELON (Water). 

German, Wassermelone. — French, Melon d'Eau. — Spanish, Sandia. 
One ounce will plant about sixty hills ; four or five pounds for one aci 

Plant in hills, as directed for muskmelons, and treat in all respects the same, except that the 
hills should be six to eight feet apart each way. 

PKT. OZ. LB* 

Tick's Early. Of medium size, oblong and smooth; flesh bright pink, 
resembling the Southern varieties; solid and sweet; one of the best 
early sorts . . . . ' . [. . . . . . . $0.05 $0.15 

Phinney's Early Oval. Very early and sweet ; flesh deep red . . . .05 .10 $0.75 

Mountain Sweet. The most popular variety known, one of the best for 

Northern cultivation; fruit dark green, oblong in shape 05 .10 .75 

Ferry's Peerless. Of medium size; rind thin, and color mottled green; 

flesh bright scarlet, very sweet; an excellent sort for garden cultivation, .05 .15 

Mammoth Ironclad. This watermelon has such decided points of supe- 
riority that it will speedily become a popular favorite. Perfectly shaped, 
and handsomely striped skin; flesh mealy, but firm, with rich, sugary 
flavor 10 .20 

Scaly Bark. This variety grows oblong in shape, and frequently weighs 
forty to fifty pounds each. Smooth, dark-green skin with light stripes; 
flesh light crimson, and very sweet . . . . ... . .10. .20 

Cuban Queen. A very large and fine variety ; skin beautifully striped, dark 
and light green; flesh bright red, solid, luscious, crisp, and sugary; 
excellent keeper 05 .10 1.00 

Orange. Peculiar on account of the division of the flesh from the rind, 
which may be taken off like the rind of an orange ; flesh red, tender, and 
sweet 05 .15 

Black Spanish. A very sweet and delicious variety; fruit round, of large 

size; skin blackish green ; flesh scarlet 05 .10 .75, 

Citron. {For preserves only) Handsome round fruit, of small size . . .05 .10 1.00 

MUSHROOMS. 

German, Champignon. — French, Champignon. — Spanish, Hongo. 
Ten pounds will spawn about ten feet square. 

Mushrooms may be cultivated much easier than is generally supposed, and are one of the 
most profitable crops grown, especially in the vicinity of large cities, where the demand, at all 
seasons, is far in excess of the supply. Their cultivation may be carried on successfully in a 
cellar or shed during winter, or in the open air in summer. 

Cultural Directions. — Collect sufficient fresh horse-droppings to form the desired size 
of bed, spreading them out in an airy shed to dry, and turning them frequently. When in a 
proper state as to dryness, which will soon be learned by experience, make these into a bed from 
nine inches to one foot thick, beating them firmly together. If the droppings have been properly 



5° 



J^ARKER 8f "^yOOD, ^EED j^ATALO GUE. 



MUSHROOMS — Continued. 
prepared, gentle fermentation will soon commence; and when. the temperature of the bed is from 
75 0 to 8o°, with no danger of its rising higher, put in the spawn. This is done by making shallow 
holes about nine inches apart, inserting pieces of spawn about the size of a hen's egg, and 
covering with the dung, pressing this closely about the spawn. It is of the greatest importance 
that the temperature of the bed should not decline below 75 0 , nor rise above 8o°, for a month 
fter spawning. Within a fortnight after putting in the spawn, cover the bed about two inches 
hick with good, mellow, moist soil, making this firm ; and if under this a covering one or two 
inches thick of cow-dung, in about the same state as to moisture as the soil, can be afforded, this 
will cause the bed to last longer, and also to produce a larger crop, than if covered with soil 
only. The most suitable temperature for beds in bearing is 50 0 to 55 0 ; and, as a high temperature 
causes the mushrooms to come small, this should be avoided. Watering beds in bearing often 
■causes the small mushrooms to damp off : "tfore, water only when the bed ceases to be 
productive, and then use water about the same „„nperature as the bed. 

LB. 

Mushroom Spawn. {Bricks?) English superior quality. {By mail 30 cents lb.) . . $0.20 
Mushroom Sppwn. French in bulk 40 

MUSTARD. 

German, Senf. — French, Motitarde. — Spanish, Mostaza. 
One ounce will sow about eighty feet of drill ; half bushel for one acre. 

As an ingredient, the green mustard imparts a delightfully pungent flavor to the various forms 
•of prepared salads. For early crops the seed may be sown in a hotbed in March; and for 
general crops, at frequent intervals through the spring, in drills from eight to twelve inches apart. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

White or Yellow. The best variety for salads ; the seed is also used medi- 
cinally, and as a seasoning for pickles $0.05 $0.10 $0.20 

Black or Brown. An esteemed sort for culinary use ; more pungent than 

J white . '. . . . .' '/ ''" -.: V :\ • f y°S' #0" - ... .26 

NASTURTIUM, or INDIAN CRESS. 

German, Indianische Kresse. — French, Capucine. — Spanish, Cufitichina. 
One ounce will sow about twenty feet of drill. 
The nasturtium is both ornamental and useful ; the tall variety forming a showy and graceful 
climber, and the dwarf an exceedingly beautiful and attractive border flower, while the young 
seeds of either, when pickled, furnish an excellent substitute for caper's. Sow the seeds in drills 
one inch deep ; the tall should be grown by the side of a fence, or supported by a trellis, 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Tall Mixed. A showy, graceful climber . . . . . . . $0.05 $0.15 $1.25 

Dwarf Mixed. A border plant, with beautiful flowers 05 .15 1.25 

OKRA, or GUMBO. 

German, Essbarer Safran. — French, Gombo. — Spanish, Quimbombo. 
One ounce will plant one hundred hills. 
This plant is extensively cultivated for its green pods, which are used in sbups and stews, and 
are very wholesome and nutritious. Sow about the middle of May, in drills three feet apart, and 
thin out the plaats to one foot apart. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Improved Dwarf Green. Very early, smooth pods .... $0.05 $0.10 $1.00 
iLORg" Green. Long ribbed pods, very productive . . . . . .05 .10 1.00 



52 



j^ARKER 8j Y OOD i pEED j^ATALOGUE. 



ONION. 

German, Zwiebel. — French, Oignon.- — Spanish, Cebolla. 

One ounce will sow one hundred feet of drill; six pounds for one aere. 

The onion thrives best in a rather strong, deep, rich, loamy soil, and, unlike most vegetables, 
succeeds well when cultivated on the same ground for successive years. The ground should be 
deeply trenched and manured the previous autumn, and laid up in ridges during the winter to 
soften. As early in spring as the ground is in working order, commence operations by levelling 
the ground with a rake, and tread it firmly ; sow thinly in drills about a quarter of an inch deep 
and one foot apart ; cover with fine soil, and press down with the back of a spade or a light 
roller. When the young plants are strong enough, thin gradually, so that they stand three or four 
inches apart. Keep the surface of the ground open, and free from weeds, by frequent hoeing, 
taking care not to stir the soil too deeply, or to collect it about the growing bulbs. 

FKT. OZ. LB. 

Extra Early Red. A close-grained, mild-flavored variety j a good keeper $0.05 $ .30 $3.00 
Large Red Wethersiield. Larger, and about ten days earlier, than the pre- 
ceding variety ; an excellent keeper 05 .25 2.50 

Early Red Globe Danyers. The earliest, most productive, and handsomest 
of all the red sorts ; ripens two to three weeks earlier than Red Wethers- 
field . " 

Yellow Globe Danvers. The popular Boston market Onion ; of mild flavor ; 

very productive, and a good keeper. Massachusetts grown . 
Yellow Danyers. Similar to above, but flatter in shape . 

Southport White Globe. Distinct in form, being nearly globular; of a 
beautiful silvery-yellow color, mild flavor, and good keeper 

Southport Yellow Globe. Form nearly ovoid, regular and symmetrical; 
mild and pleasant flavor ; keeps well 

White Portugal, or Silver Skin. A mild-flavored variety; not a good 
keeper ; used for pickling when small 

Yellow Dutch, or Flat. Of fine flavor; keeps well . . . % 

Jfew Queen. An early silver-skin variety, remarkable for rapidity of its 
growth and good keeping qualities 

'Giant Rocca. A very large variety from Naples; bright brown skin, and 
delicate flavor ; globular in shape 

Mammoth Red Tripoli. Of mild flavor; the largest of the foreign 
varieties 

ONION SETS. 

•6 to 12 bushels are generally used to set an acre in drills ; 30 pounds will sow an acre in drills. 

The sets should be planted out as early in spring as the ground is dry enough to work ; plant 
ithem in rows one foot apart, with sets three or four inches apart. When raised from sets, the 
onions can be used in the green state in June, or they will be ripened off by July. Sets are pro- 
duced by sowing the seed as early as the ground can be worked in spring, very thickly, in beds 
or drills; and about the middle of July, or whenever the tops die down, the small bulbs or sets 
are gathered and kept spread thinly in a cold, dry cellar or loft, until the following spring. The 
potato and top onions are grown only from bulbs. 









•95 


.40 


5.00 


•°5 


.40 


4.00 


•°5 


• 2 5 


3.00 


•°5 


• r 5 


2.00 


•05 


•3° 


3-25 


•°5 


.20 


2.00 


•°S 


• 2 5 


2.00 


•°5 


• 2 5 


2.00 









QT. PK. 



White Onion Sets . . . $0.40 $2.00 
^Potato, or Hill, Onion Sets . .30 1.50 



QT. 



Top, or Button, Onion Sets .#0.40 
Add 20 cents per quart extra if to be sent by ma/7. 



J^ARKER 8f Y OOD i ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 



53 



PARSNIP. 

German, Pastinake. — French, Panais. — Spanish, Pastinaca. 
One ounce will sow two hundred feet of drill; five pounds for one acre. 

Sow as early in spring as the weather will admit, in drills fifteen inches apart, covering, half 
an inch deep. When well up, thin out to five or six inches apart in the rows. Unlike carrots, 
they are improved by frost ; and it is usual to take up in fall a certain quantity for winter use, 
leaving the rest in the ground until spring, to be dug up as required. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Long- Smooth White. The best for general use $0.05 $0.10 $0.60 

HollOW Crown. Good old sort 05 .10 .60 

Student. Of fine flavor, free from fibres .05 .10 .75 

Maltese. Long, smooth, and white ; of excellent flavor . . • -°S - IO -75 

PARSLEY. 

German, Petersilie. — French, Persil. — Spanish, Perejil. 
One ounce will sow one hundred and fifty feet of drill. 

Parsley succeeds best in a rich, mellow soil. As the seeds germinate very slowly, three or 
four weeks elapsing sometimes before it makes its appearance, it should be sown early in spring. 
Sow thickly in rows a foot apart, and half an inch deep. For winter use, protect in a frame or 
light cellar. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Carter's Perpetual. A most distinct and valuable variety, of the best 

curled type. Its great value is where a perpetual supply is required $0.05 $0.10 -$1.25 

Double Curled. A fine dwarf variety, beautifully curled ; excellent for gar- 
nishing 05 .10 1.25 

Champion MOSS Curled. A very select stock, beautifully crimped and 

curled. . . . . . . . ... ..' . • .05 .10 I.25 

Fern Leared. A very beautiful variety, being more like a crested fern or 

moss than parsley ; very valuable for table decoration 05 .10 I.25 

PEAS. 

German, Erbse. — French, Pais. — Spanish, Guisante. 
One quart will plant about one hundred feet of drill; one and a half bushels for one acre. 

Peas come earliest to maturity in light, rich soil. For general crops, a good dressing should 
be applied; and, for the dwarf-growing kinds, the soil can hardly be too rich. Plant the early 
varieties as soon as the ground can be worked, the others in succession from April to June. For 
private use, they are generally sown in double or single rows, in drills, about two feet apart and 
three inches deep, for the dwarf varieties ; and three to four feet apart and four inches deep, for 
the taller varieties. Those growing over two and a half feet in height should be bushed. 
Add 15 cents per pint, or 25 cents per quart, extra, if to be sent by mail. 

Extra Early Varieties. 

< PKT. QT. PECK. 

Carter's First Crop. One of the earliest peas grown ; s£ ft. . . $0.10 $0.30 $1.50 

First and Best. One of the best early market peas ; 2 J ft. . . ' . . .10 .30 1.50 
Parker & Wood's "Maud S." The best first early pea for market or 
private use; vines about two feet high; long, large, well-filled pods, 

which ripen up evenly ; peas good size and of excellent flavor . . . .10 .30 1.50 

Early Caractacus. One. of the best early sorts | a favorite- first early variety 

with market-gardeners ; 2\ ft. . . 10 .30 1.50 

Early New Rural New Yorker. It is early, of robust and branching 
habit; vines can be stripped of eighty to ninety per cent of the pods 
in one picking. Pods are large, and contain from six to nine peas. 

Height of vine, 2 ft. . . - . • ... . . .10 .30 I.50 



54 



J^ARKER 8j- "y^OOD,. ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 



PEAS — Continued. 

Early Dexter. An extra early sort, in great favor with market-gardeners ; 
especially recommended ; ft. . . . .* . \ 

Philadelphia Extra Early. A desirable variety; the standard early in 
Philadelphia markets ; 2^ ft , 

Early Daniel O'Rourke, Improved. A well-known early variety ; 2.y 2 ft., 
Kentish Ilivicta. First early, ripens all together ; pods of a fine green color ; 
very prolific; and is in great. favor with market-gardeners; we highly 
recommend it ; ft. 

Tom Thumb. A dwarf early variety ; abundant yielder ; 1 ft. 

McLean's Blue Peter. A first early, blue-seeded Tom Thumb ; pods large 
and well filled ; 1^ ft . 

Extra Early Premium Gem. One of the Little Gem order, but a decided 
improvement in quality and productiveness ; iJE^ ft. 

Laxton's Alpha. The earliest wrinkled pea, of excellent quality; sweet; 
very productive ; 2^ ft 

McLean's Little Gem. One of the best dwarf wrinkled marrows grown; 
very productive, and of fine flavor ; 1 f t 

Bliss's American Wonder. A cross between the Champion and Little 
Gem, a sufficient guaranty of its superior qualities ; a most excellent pea; 



Second Early Varieties. 

McLean's Advancer. The standard Boston market-gardeners' variety, for 
second early and principal crop; green, wrinkled; pods long, well filled, 
of excellent quality; unexcelled for private gardens ; 2^ ft. 

Carter's Stratagem. One of the best peas ever sent out ; vine of branching 
habit, heavily laden with immense pods, containing ten to twelve peas of 
large size ; 1 ^ ft. . . . . . .' . . . . 

Pride of the Market. Resembling Stratagem in habit of growth; the 
foliage and pods are of a deeper green ; the latter are from five to seven 
inches in length, and well filled with very large peas ; 1^ ft. . 

Bliss's Abundance. A dwarf variety, with large, dark-green foliage ; pods 
from three to three and a half inches long, containing from six to eight 
large wrinkled peas of excellent quality ; ft. . . . . 

Laxton's Prolific Early Long 1 Pod. Very long pods, containing eight to 
ten peas ; very productive, and of fine quality ; 4 f t 

Laxton's Supreme. A superior green marrow variety; pods very large, 
literally covering the foliage ; 4 f t 



For G-eneral Crop. 

Champion of England. An old favorite ; rich flavored, and very productive ; 
4 ft '. 

Bliss's Everbearing". A splendid general cropper ; pods average four inches 
long, and contain six to eight wrinkled peas of enormous size; and,- in 
sweetness and flavor, they are unsurpassed; 2 ft ' 

Yorkshire Hero. A large wrinkled marrow, of branching habit; of fine 

' v flavor; 2^ ft. V y^ rJf #-i,tttxV>r.> . 

Carter's Telephone. This remarkable pea is a week earlier than Champion 
of England; pods five to seven inches in length, and containing from 
eight to twelve peas -of unequalled flavor ; 3 ft. . 

Blue Imperial. An old sort; fine flavor ; prolific;- 3 ft. " . • . 

Large Dwarf White "Marrowfat. A fine late variety ; very prolific ; 3 ft. 

Black-Eye Marrowfat. The standard late variety, for garden or field use ; 
hardy and productive ; 4 ft. , 

Canada Field. Mostly used as a field crop . ■ . . 



PKT. 


QT. 


PECK. 


>o.io : 


$0.30 


$1.50 


.10 




I.50 


.10 




I.50 


.10 


•30 


r. 5 0 


.10 


•3° 


I.50. 




•25 


1.50 


.10 


•3° 


I.5O 


•IS 


•30 






•3° 


I.50 




.40 


2.g>0 


.10 


•30 


I.50 


..15 


•5° 


3.OO 


•15 


•5° 


2.5°- 


•15 


•5° 


3.OO 


.10 


•3° 


2.0O- 




•30 


2.00 




•3° 




■ r ,5 


.40 


2.00 


.10 


•3° 


1.50 


•15 


•50 


2.50 


.10 


•25 


1.25 


.10 


.20 


•75 


.10 


.20 


•75 


.10 


•15 


.50 



^ARKER (| Y OOD i jSEED j^ATALOGU E. 



55 



PEAS — Concluded. , s 

Edible J?p44e^i, or Siageur, Peas. ; 

The varieties of this class are cultivated for their pods, which are' remarkably tender and 
^succulent; in flavor equal to the. best string beans. They are gathered young, boiled whole, and 
.served up with white sauce. 

•' • PKT. QT. BUSH. 

Dwarf Gray Sugar. A prolific variety, of fine quality ; 2>£ ft. . . $0.15 $0.30 $7.00 

Tall Gray Sugar. Similar to the preceding, but taller; 4 ft. . . . . .15 .30 8.00 

JNew Wrinkled Sugar. A distinct variety, bearing large tender pods of 

delicious flavor ; 2^ ft 15 .30 8.00 

PEPPER. 

German, Pfeffer. — French, Piment. — Spanish, Pimiento* 
One ounce will produce about two thousand plants. 

Sow early in April in a hotbed, in shallow drills six inches apart, and transplant to the open 
ground as soon as the weather is warm and settled. Set the plants in mellow soil, in rows sixteen 
inches apart, and the same distance apart in the rows. The seed may also be sown in the open 
ground, but not until all clanger of frost is past. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

■Golden Dawn. This is the sweetest and most beautiful Mango Pepper in 
the world ; the seed and pulp may be handled or chewed without detect- 
ing the slightest fiery flavor; it is of a golden-yellow color; an abundant 
bearer; and is superior for stuffing — as mangoes .... $0.05 $0.30 $3.50 

Large Bell, or Bull Hose. A large, early variety, of pleasant flavor . . .05 .30 3.50 

Cherry Red. Small round fruit, of a rich glossy scarlet color, and extremely 

piquant . . .. . ........ .05 .30 3.50 

Squash, or Tomato-Shaped. Very large; flesh thick, mild, and sweet ; one 

of the best for pickling . . .05 .30 3.50 

■Sweet Mountain, 01* Mammoth. Similar to the Bull Nose, but larger, 

sweeter, and of milder .flavor ; extensively used for mangoes . . . .05 .30 3.50 

Long Red Cayenne. Fruit three to four inches long, conical in form, of a 

bright red color, and very productive ... . , . . . .05 .30 3.50 

■Oxheart. A superior heart-shaped variety, excellent for pickling; medium 

in size ; very productive and piquant ....... .05 .30 3. 50 



(SEE LIST SPECIALTIES.) 

German, ICattoffeL -^French* Pomme de Tei're. — Spanish, Patata. 
Use about ten bushels or four barrels to plant one acre. 



German, Kiirbiss. — French, Courge. — Spanish, Calabaza. 
t)ne pound will plant from two hundred to three hundred hills ; four to six pounds for one acre. 

Pumpkins are now principally cultivated for agricultural purposes. They are usually planted 
in fields of corn or potatoes, but may be profitably raised in fields by themselves. Sow 1st of 
May, in hills eight feet apart. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

JLarge Cheese. The best variety for cooking purposes . . . . $0.05 $0.10 $0.75 
Large Tours, or Mammoth. Grows to an immense size, often weighing 

over one hundred pounds . . ... 10 .30 2.50 

Connecticut Field. Very productive ; largely grown for feeding stock . . .05 .10 .25 
Sugar. Very sweet; an excellent table sort . . . . . . . .05 .10 .75 

CashaWo Similar to the Common Crookneck Winter Squash . . .05 .10 ,75 



56 



^ARKER 8f ^yOOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



RADISH. 

German, Rettig. — French, Radis. — Spanish, Rabano. 
One ounce will sow one hundred feet of drill ; eight pounds for one acre. 

A light, rich soil, not recently manured, is best suited for radishes. For early use, sow in a 
gentle hotbed in February, and in the open air as soon as the ground can be worked, continuing 
at intervals until September. Water freely during dry, hot weather, as rapidity of growth is 
necessary to insure tenderness and mild flavor. Sow in August and September for winter use. 

_. . T „ , , PKT. OZ. LB. 

Early Long Scarlet. Imported stock. The standard variety for market and 

private gardens $0.05 $0.10 $o.8o 

Early Long 1 Scarlet. American Stock 05 .10 1.00 

French Breakfast. Scarlet, with white tip; shape nearly oval; good for 

forcing or summer sowing " 05 .10 .80 

Scarlet Turnip. The standard early, short, quick-growing variety . . .05 .10 .75 

White Turnip. Of mild flavor ; excellent for summer use .... .. . . .05 .10 .60 

Scarlet OliYe-Shaped. Very early and handsome ; quick growth ; excellent, .05 .10 .75 

Long- Black Spanish Winter. One of the hardiest and best for winter use, .05 .10 .75 
Chinese Rose Winter. A bright rose-colored winter variety, of the finest 

quality .05 .10 .75 

Long" Salmon. A long, salmon-colored variety, with rather large top . . .05 .10 .60 

RHUBARB. 

German, Rhaba7'ber. — French, Rhubarbe. — Spanish, Ruibarbo. 
One ounce will produce about seven hundred plants. 
Sow in April in drills eighteen inches apart, and cover the seed with fine soil, pressing it 
down firmly. When the plants are strong enough, thin out to six inches. In the fall or following 
spring, transplant the roots into deep, rich soil, three feet apart each way. Do not cut until the 
third spring after sowing. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Victoria. Large, fine for cooking #0.05 $0.25 #2.50 

Linnaeus. Large, tender, and very fine 05 .25 2.50 

Roots. 25 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. By mail, 40 cents each ; $4.00 per dozen. 

SALSIFY, or OYSTER PLANT. 

German, Bocksbart. — French, Salsifis — Spanish, Salsafi. 
One ounce will sow fifty feet of drill. 
A very delicate and nutritious esculent, especially esteemed for its peculiar oyster-flavor. 
Sow the seed early in spring, in drills twelve inches apart and one inch deep, thinning out the 
young plants to six inches. The roots will be ready for use in October, when a supply should be 
taken up and stored like carrots. Those remaining will suffer no injury by being left in the 
ground till spring. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Salsify, Long- White . . . . .. . . . . . $0.05 #0.20 #2.50 

Scorzonera, or Black Salsify 05 .30 2.0® 

SEA-KALE. 

German, Seekokl, Meerkohl. — French, Crambe Maritime. — Spanish, Breton de Mar. 
One ounce will produce about three hundred plants. 
Cultivated for its blanched shoots, which are cooked as asparagus. A supply may be had 
all winter by planting the roots closely in a warm cellar before frost. Sow one inch deep, in drills 
two feet apart; thin out to six inches, and the next spring plant in hills three feet apart. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Silver Sea-Kale $o.o$ $0.20 $2.00 



j^ARKER 2| ^OOD, pEED pATALOGUE. 



57 



SORREL. 

German, Sauerampfer. — French, Oseille. — Spanish, Acedera. 
One ounce will sow a hundred and fifty feet of drill. 

This plant is considered valuable for its acid properties ; mixed with salads, it imparts an 
agreeable and refreshing flavor. Sow in shallow drills twelve inches apart, and thin out the young 
plants to. six inches. - 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Large-Leaved French . . . . $0.05 $0.15 #1.50 

SPINACH. 

German, Spinat. — French, Epinards.— Spanish, Espinaca. 
One ounce will sow a hundred feet of drill ; ten pounds for one acre. 

This is a very important crop in our market-gardens : it is one of the most easily managed of 
all vegetables, requiring but little culture, and may be had fit for use the entire season. The 
main crop is sown in August or September for spring use, and, although extremely hardy, requires 
to be occasionally protected by a light covering of hay or straw during winter. For summer use, 
it may be sown at intervals of two or three weeks, from April to August. Spinach is best devel- 
oped, and most tender and succulent, when grown in rich soil. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Long" Standing* This variety stands a long time before running to seed ; 

the leaves are very thick, and of excellent flavor .... $0.05 $0.10 $0.40 
Round Thick Leaf. The standard for market or private gardens, equally 

good for fall or spring sowing. Imported stock . . . . . . .05 .10 .40 

Bound Thick Leaf. American Stock . . . . . . . .05 .15 .50 

Sayoy-Leaved. A very valuable variety, with wrinkled leaves, resembling the 

Savoy Cabbage; it is very hardy and prolific, and rapidly gaining favor 

with Boston market-gardeners 05 .10 .40 

Bloomsdale. An improved Savoy-Leaved variety 05 .10 .40 

Prickly, or Fall. An exceedingly hardy variety ; not as productive as the 

Round Leaf; adapted for fall sowing . . . . . . ••05 .10 .4© 

Large-Leaved Tiroflay. A very fine selection of the old Lettuce-Leaved 

Spinach; for summer use, it is excellent . . . . . . . .05 .10 .40 

INew Zealand. Produces abundantly all summer . . . . . .05 .15 1.50 

SQUASH. 

German, Kurbiss. — French, Courge. — Spanish, Calabasa Tontanera. 
Bush sorts, sow 1 oz. to 50 hills, 6 lbs. per acre ; running softs, 1 oz. to 16 hills, 4 lbs. per acre. 

Squashes are of luxuriant and vigorous growth; and, although they will grow readily - on 
almost any soil, they will well repay generous treatment. Like all vegetables of this class, it is 
useless to sow until the weather has become settled and warm. Light soils are best suited for 
their growth ; and it is most economical of manure to prepare hills for the seeds in the ordinary 
manner, by incorporating two or three shovelfuls of well-rotted manure with the soil, for each hill. 
For the bush varieties, from three to four feet each way ; and for the running sorts, from six to 
eight feet. Eight or ten seeds should be sown in each hill, thinning out after they have attained 
their rough leaves, leaving three or four of the strongest plants. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

White Bush Scallop. A very early and excellent variety, for market or 

private use . . . $0.05 $0.10 $1.00 

Yellow Bush Scallop. Similar to preceding, except in color . . . .05 .10 1.00 

marly Warted, or Summer Crookneck. Long, bright yellow fruit; the 

most popular early summer variety 05 .10 1.00 

Boston Marrow. One of the standard winter varieties, of rich orange color ; 

a good keeper, and of excellent flavor ^ .05 .10 1.00 




Egg Plant. 



Parker & Wood, Seed Catalogue. 






59 


SQUASH — Continued. 










pk*. ; 


I oz. 


LB. 


'Cocoanut. A small-sized, fine-flavored, and prolific variety '. . . $ 


3.0^ $ 


O.IO 


$1.00 


Hubbard. A standard winter sort, of excellent flavor ; keeps longer than the 
















Marblehead. An excellent blue-shell variety; very sweet ? ; dry, and of de- 








licious flavor ; good keeper . . . . . 


■05 ' 


.10 


1. 00 


Turban. A well-known sort ; hard shell, of the finest quality ... 


•05 


.10 


1. 00 


Whitman. Resembles the Hubbard; • thick shell and thick meated; lemon- 








colored flesh; dry, sweet, and delicious . . . . . 


•05 


.10 


1. 00 



Essex Hybrid. A cross between the Hubbard and -Turban, with color, 
shape, and qualities of the latter, and the dryness and hard shell of the 
former. . . . . . . .05 .10 

Perfect Gem. A small squash, color creamy white ; is slightly ribbed, with 
a thin, smooth skin ; excellent keeper . 

Canada Crookneck. A small, well-known winter variety, of fine quality 

Large Winter Crookneck. An old standard winter variety; flesh close- 
grained, sweet, and fine-flavored ........ 

Olive. A new French variety ; the shape and color of the fruit are exactly like 
those of an olive; in weight it ranges from six to ten pounds;- thin, 
smooth skin ; flesh firm, and of golden-yellow color ..... 

Yokohama. Of fine flavor, sweet, and dry; it is excellent stewed; when 
baked, much resembles a sweet potato * 

Pineapple. Skin and flesh of pure creamy-white color, fine-grained, of ex- 
cellent quality ; good keeper ; fine for pies and custards. Vines strong, 
and produce six or seven squashes each 

Mammoth Yellow. Very large,, often weighing one hundred pounds ; good 
for stock feeding ; also quite a curiosity 

Mammoth 66 Jumbo." The largest variety ., . 









•OS 


.10 


1. 00 


•05 


.10 


1. 00 






•75 


.10 


.20 




•05 




1.50 




.20 




.10 


•25 


2.5c 


.10 


•25 


2.5c 



German, Liebesapfel. — French, Tomate. — Spanish, Tomate. 
One ounce will produce about twelve hundred plants ; a quarter of a pound for one acre. 

This delicious vegetable is one of the most important of all garden products. The seed 
should be sown in a hotbed about the first week in March, in drills five inches apart and half an 
inch deep. When the plants are about two inches high, they should be set out four or five inches 
apart in another hotbed, or removed into small pots, allowing a single plant to a pot ; they are 
sometimes transplanted a second time into larger pots, by which process the plants are rendered 
more sturdy and branching. About the middle of May the plants may be set in the open ground. 
They are planted for early crops on light, sandy soil, at a distance of three feet apart, in hills in 
which a good shovelful of rotted manure has been mixed. On heavy soils, which are not suited 
for an early crop, they should be planted four feet apart. Water freely at the time- of transplant- 
ing, and shelter from the sun for a few days until the plants are established. Sufficient plants for 
a small garden may be started by sowing a few seeds in a shallow box or flower-pot, and placing 
it in a sunny window. 

PKT. oz. LB. 

Early Acme. This tomato is one of the earliest varieties yet introduced. 
The fruit is of a medium size, perfectly smooth, and regular in shape ; 
color quite distinct, being a dark red, with purplish tinge . . . $0.05 $0.30 $2.75 

Boston Market, Bright-red Smooth. A tomato largely in use by market- 
gardeners, and sure to please the most critical, for market purposes, it 
being smooth, perfect in shape, early, "fine quality, and solid . . . .05 .25 3.00 

Early Boston Market. The true early, slightly ribbed variety. Extra 

Market- Gardeners 9 Stock 05 .40 4.00 

Early Mayflower. One of the earliest large tomatoes; of splendid shape, 
perfectly smooth, of bright-red color ; flesh solid, free from seeds ; very 
productive . . ... . . . .05 .30 3.00 



6o 



Parker ^ ^O.OD, ^eed Patalogue. 



TOMATO — Continued. 

PKT. OZ. La 

The Cardinal. A remarkable bright-red colored variety, looking, when ripe, 
almost as if varnished. The flesh is of the same brilliant color. They 
make the handsomest sliced tomatoes imaginable, and have absolutely 
no green core. It is very solid and firm, ripens early, and of large size, $0.05 $0.30 $3.00 

Essex Hybrid. A very early sort ; color bright pink ; large size, solid, rich- 
flavored ; very productive ; fine market variety 05 .30 3.00 

Emery. A favorite market-gardeners' variety, smooth, solid, fine color, early . .05 .30 3.00 

Paragon. A very desirable variety of the Acme type ; it is preferred in some 

sections on account of its color, which is a bright, glossy crimson . . .05 .30 3.00 

LiYingfSton's Perfection. It is blood-red in color, perfectly smooth; has 
very few seeds; the largest early sort known; ripens all over and 
through at the same time 05 .30 3.00 

Liying'Ston's Favorite. Smoother than the Paragon ; is a darker red than 
the Perfection ; ripens evenly, and as early as any good variety, holding 
its size to the end of the season; very prolific, good flavor, few seeds, 

flesh solid, and bears shipping long distances 05 .30 3.00 

Canada Victor. Very early, smooth, red variety; fine keeper; excellent 

flavor • 05 .30 2.50 

Gen. Grant. Large, smooth sort; ripens quickly and thoroughly; flavor 

excellent 05 .20 2.50 

Trophy. Very large fruit; one of the finest in cultivation; unsurpassed in 

flavor and productiveness 05 .30 3.00 

Yellow Plum. A perfectly smooth, yellow sort; much used for preserves, 

also for pickling 05 .30 4.00 

Strawberry, or Ground Cherry. Grows enclosed in a husk, possessing a 

pleasant strawberry flavor ; excellent for preserves ..... .05 .30 4.00 

Golden Trophy. About the size of Smooth Red ; color bright yellow ; good 

quality . .05 .25 3.0a 

Fig or Pear Shape. Fine for preserves or pickling 05 .40 4.00; 

TURNIP. 

German, Ruebe. — French, Navet. — Spanish, JVabo. 

One ounce will sow one hundred and fifty feet of drill; two pounds for one acre. 

For the spring crop, commence sowing the early varieties as soon as the ground can be 
worked, in drills fourteen inches apart ; thin out the plants to five or six inches apart. Keep- 
clear from weeds, and, when the bottoms begin to enlarge, brush away the earth from about the 
roots to the depth of half an inch or more, and give them a light dressing of wood ashes. This 
is the surest mode of obtaining fair and smooth spring turnips in old gardens, where they are 
almost certain to grow wormy if the earth is allowed to remain in contact with the bulbs. It is 
important to get them started very early, so that they may have time to grow of a sufficient size 
before very hot weather, when they will soon become tough and strong. For the fall and main 
crop, sow from the middle of July to the last of August, in drills, as directed for the spring 
sowing. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Early Purple-Top Munich. The best very extra early turnip, good quality, $0.05 $0.10 $0.60 
Early Six Weeks, or Snowball, An early, small, quick-growing variety, 

smooth white flesh .05 .10 .60 

Purple-Top Flat-Strap Leaf. The popular early variety ; excellent for 

market or private gardens . . . . . . . . . .05 .10 .60 

White Flat-Strap Leaf. The best early white variety, for table or market 

use . . . .05 .10 .60 

Golden Ball. Solid, sweet, good size, and keeps well 05 .10 .60 

Yellow Stone. An excellent sort for early or late sowing; good cropper, fine 

keeper; used for table or stock .05 .10 .60. 



j^ARKER 8f Y OOD i ^EED pATALOGUE. 



6l 



TURNIP — Continued.. 

Long White Cow-Horn. A carrot-shaped variety, fine grained and sweet ; 

matures quickly $ ao5 

Purple-Top White Globe. An early variety; very heavy cropper . . .©5 4® 
Yellow Aberdeen. Very hardy and productive; fine form, and excellent 

variety ,©5 .10 

White Egg". A rapid-growing fall sort ; fine for market ; oval in form, very 

smooth white skin, flesh fine grained, of mild and sweet flavor . . .05 .10 



0.60 
.60 



, TURNIP (Ruta Baga, Russian, or Swedish). 

One ounce will sow one hundred and fifty feet of drill; two pounds for one acre. 

The Ruta Baga, Swedish, or Russian Turnip is extensively grown for a farm crop ; the roots 
are close grained, very hard, and will endure a considerable degree of ©old without injury. The 
roots are best preserved in a pit or cellar during the winter, and are excellent for the table early 
in spring. Sow from 20th of June to the middle of July, in drills two feet apart, and thin out to 
eight inches. 



American Improved Ruta Baga. A very fine variety, grown both for table 

and for stock; flesh solid, of very fine quality; keeps well until summer, $< 
White Swede. This variety is extensively cultivated, and preferred in many 

sections for its white flesh ; is very hardy and productive ; keeps well 

until late in the spring 

Carter's Imperial. A purple-top, yellow variety, very productive; one of 

the very best for field-culture 

Shamrock. An excellent purple-top yellow sort ; grows small top ; a good 

keeper 

Skirving's Purple-Top. A very heavy cropper ; is solid and sweet ; excels 

lent for field-culture 

White French, or Bock. A very delicate-flavored variety ; excellent keeper ; 

fine for table 

Sweet German. A white globe-shape sort ; superior for table use,; of most 

excellent quality ; good keeper 



.05 $ 


0.10 


$0.60 


.05 




.60 


•05 


.10 


.60 
















.10 


.60 


•°s 


.10 


.60 



HERBS (Pot, Sweet, and Medicinal). 

These are valuable for culinary and medicinal purposes, and should be found in all gardens. 
They are easily grown, and, when preserved by drying, are ready for use at any season of the year. 
Nearly all require the same treatment, and one direction will answer for all. Plant in spring, 
when the ground is warm, in drills, covering lightly. When the plants are well up, thin out or 
transplant. Select a sunny day for cutting, and spread thinly in the shade till dry ; then pack in 
papers, or pulverize and keep in closely corked bottles. The perennial kinds should occasionally 
be divided, and transplanted in spring. 

Sage {Salvia officinalis). Annual 
Summer Savory {Satureia hortensis). Annual . 
Sweet Marjoram {Origanum marjoram). Annual 
Thyme {Thymus vulgaris). Perennial 
Anise {Pimpinella anisum). Annual • 
Balm {Melissa officinalis). Perennial . 
Basil, Sweet {Ocymum basilicum) Annual 
Caraway {Carum carvi). Perennial . 
Coriander {Coriandrum sativum). Annual 
Dill {Anethum graveolens). Biennial . 
Fennel, Sweet {Anethum fceniculum). Perennial 
Horehound {Marrubium vulgare). Perennial . 



PKT. 


oz. 


LB. 


0.05 


$0.20 


$2.00 


•°s 


.20 


1.50 


•°s 


•25 


2.5O 


•05 


•SO 


4.OO 


•OS 


•15 


I. OO 


•OS 


•25 


3.OO 


•05 


.20 


2.00 


•05 


.IO 


•50 


•05 


.IO 


1. 00 


•05 


•is 


1.50 


•05 


•is 


1.50 


.05 


•25 


2.50 



62 



'ARKER 8f "y^OOD, jSEED j^ATALO GU E, 



HERBS — Continued. 

PKT. . OZ. LB. 

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis). Perennial $0.05 $0.25 $2.50 

Lavender (Lavendula vera). Perennial 05 .20 1.50 

Rosemary {Rosemary officinalis). Perennial 05 .40 2.50 

Rue [Ruta graveolens). Perennial . . . . 05 .20 2.00 

Saffron (Carthamus tinctorius). Annual 05 .20 2.00 

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgaris). Perennial 10 .50 3.00 

Worm TTOOd (Artemisia absinthium). Perennial . . . . . . .05 .25 2.50 

MISCELLANEOUS SEEDS. 

PKT. OZ. LB. 

Caraway. For flavoring, etc $0.20 

Celery Seed. For flavoring .50 

Garden Burnet. Used as a salad ; also to flavor soups .... $0.05 $0.20 2.00 

Garden Rocket. For salad 05 .30 3.00 

Golden Parslane. Fine for greens 05 .15 1.50 

Herb Seeds. For flavoring; at reduced prices. {See general list for varieties.) 

Pop Corn. For parching .05 

Rape, English. Tops valuable for feeding stock .05 .20 

Tobacco, Connecticut Seed-Leaf 05 .30 3.00 

Kenney's Early Amber Sugar-Cane. Sow one and a half bushels broad- 
cast for one acre (fifty-six pounds to the bushel). 

PKT. QT. BUSH. 

Flax Seed -25 3 00 

Sunflower, Russian Mammoth 05 .25 3.00 

Tetches, or Tares. Spring or fall ; for feeding to stock; also fine for soups, 

etc. Sow two to three bushels broadcast for one acre .... .25 4.00 



RASS SEEDS. 



For general grass-seeding for mowing-lands, sow Clover, Timothy, Red-Top mixed 
together; for one acre, 8 pounds Clover, % bushel Timothy, 1 bushel Red-Top. 

(prices subject to market changes.) 

QT BUSH* 

Blue Grass, Kentucky (Poa prate nsis). Also called June Grass. This does well " 
on light, dry soils, and is highly recommended for permanent pasture. It 
requires two or three years to form a good sod, and does not arrive at its 
perfection as a pasture grass until it is much older. It is valuable in mixtures 
for lawns. It withstands the heat of the hottest summers. Double extra 
clean. Blossoms in June. Two to three bushels to the acre (fourteen pounds 
to a bushel) x ^ x> cj 0 

Blue Grass, Kentucky. Fancy extra cleaned seed (fourteen pounds to a bushel), .15 1.75 
Crested Bog's Tail [Cynosurus cristatus). Good for permanent pasture for sheep ; 
is productive and early ; suffers but little from dry weather, and is .one of the 

best grasses for lawns. Twenty-five pounds to the acre (twenty-six pounds to lb. 

a bushel) .40 

Fowl Meadow Grass [Poa serotina). Succeeds best in low, moist land ; and, when 

sown with other grasses, is valuable either for pasturing or curing for hay. bush. 

Blossoms in July or August. Two bushels to the acre (eleven pounds to a 

bushel) ...... 20 2 25 



^ARKER ^ ^jyoOD, ^EED j^ATAL-OGUE. 



65 



GRASS SEEDS — Continued. 

Hard Fescue {Festuca duriuscula). Admirable pasture grass of fine quality; 

thrives well in dry situations. Thirty pounds to the acre (twelve pounds to a < 
bushel) 

Meadow Fescue {Festuca elatior var. pratensis). This is excellent for hay when 
sown with other grasses, such as Orchard Grass and Timothy, and is also 
considered one of the best grasses for permanent pasture on a great variety of 
soils. Forty pounds to the acre (fifteen pounds to a. bushel) .... 

Meadow Foxtail {Alopecurus pratensis). Regarded as one of the most desirable 
grasses for permanent pasture, being early and rapid in growth. Its roots are 
fibrous.and perennial, and it grows to a height of from two to three feet. It is 
much relished by all kinds of cattle, and is specially adapted for permanent 
pasture. It thrives best on rich, moist soils. Twenty-five pounds to the acre 
(eight pounds to a bushel) 

Orchard Grass {Dactylis glomeratd). Is one of the most desirable of all pasture 
grasses ; coming earlier in the spring, and remaining later in the autumn, than 
any other. It grows to a height of two to two and half feet, and produces an 
immense quantity of foliage. It yields a large amount of hay, and sends up 
a thick growth very quickly after being cut. It is well adapted to 'sow, either 
for grazing or for hay. Blossoms same time as Red Clover. Three bushels 
to the acre (fourteen pounds to a bushel) . . $c 

Red-Top Grass {Agrostis vulgaris). A good permanent grass. Excellent for 
lawns, pastures, etc., and for sowing with Timothy and Red Clover for cutting 
for hay. Blossoms in July. Three bushels to the acre (ten pounds to a bushel), 

Red Top. Fancy extra clean seed 

Rhode Island Bent {Agrostis canind). A valuable grass, mostly used for lawns, 
for which it is one of the best. Sow three bushels to the acre. In some sections 
it does well as a permanent pasture-grass, but does not produce heavy crops. 
Blossoms in June or July. Three bushels to the acre (ten pounds to bushel), 

Rough-Stalked Meadow Grass {Poa trivialis). Is a valuable grass to cultivate 
■ in moist, sheltered soils ; and, possessing considerable nutritive qualities, is 
relished greatly by cattle and sheep. Twenty pounds to the acre (ten pounds 
to a bushel) 

Rye Grass, English {Lolium perenne). This is probably one of the most impor- 
tant and valuable of the cultivated grasses. It is naturally adapted to most 
any soil, matures early, and is very productive, but contains less nutritive 
value than Orchard Grass. Two bushels to the acre (twenty-four pounds to 
a bushel) . . 

Rye Grass, Italian {Lolium Italicum). This ripens much sooner than the Eng- 
lish Rye Grass, and is greatly preferred by cattle, and greadily eaten by them 
either in a green or dry state. Two bushels to the acre (eighteen pounds to a 
bushel) ' 

Sheep Fescue {F"estuca ovina). Is excellent for pasturage for sheep ; is short and 
dense in its growth, making it valuable for grass-plots. Thirty pounds to the 
acre (twelve pounds to a bushel) 

Sweet Vernal Grass {Anthoxanthum odoratum). Is not valuable when sown 
alone; but, when sown with other grasses, it becomes so, because of its early 
growth. It also yields a delightful odor when cured for hay. Thirty-five 
pounds to the acre (ten pounds to a bushel) 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass {Avena elatior). This produces an abundant supply of 
foliage, and is valuable for pasture on account of its early and luxuriant 
growth. It shoots up very quickly after being cut, and produces a thick crop 
of aftermath, which also makes it valuable as a soiling-crop. Six bushels to 
the acre (twelve pounds to a bushel) 

Timothy {Phleum pratense), Herd's Grass. As a crop to cut for hay, this is proba- , 
bly unsurpassed. It thrives best on moist, peaty, or loamy soils, and is not 
1 suited to light or sandy soils, although on such it can, with care, be made to 
produce fair crops. Blossoms in June or July. One-half bushel to the acre 
(forty-five pounds to a bushel). Sold always at lowest market price 



LB. 
3.3°- 



40 



40 



BUSH. 
2.50 



.8a 

LB. 
•15 



.15 2.75, 



LB. 
.40 



• 2 5 



BUSH. 
2.50 



.25 3.OO 

LB. 
•30 



40 



BUSH. 

3.00- 



54 J^ARKER ^ ^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 

GRASS SEEDS — Concluded. 

Wood Meadow Grrass {Poa nemoralis). This grass grows well both in shady and lb. 
exposed situations, produces foliage in abundance early in the spring, and is 
well adapted for lawns, pleasure-grounds, and shady situations under trees. 
Twenty-eight pounds to acre (fourteen pounds to a bushel) .... #0.40 

Yellow Oat Grass {A vena flavescens). Good for dry pastures and meadows; is 
much relished by sheep. Thirty-five pounds to the acre (eight pounds to a 
bushel) .50 

PARKER & WOOD'S BOSTON LAWN GRASS. 

For forming new lawns, about four bushels per acre are required- 

Recommended for lawns, public parks, and pleasure-grounds. A mixture of the finer-leaved 
grasses, adjusted in such proportions as enable it to withstand the summer drought better than 
any other lawn grass in the market. 

Price, per quart, 25 cents ; four quarts, 75 cents ; peck, $1.25 ; per bushel (16 pounds), $4.00. 
If by mail, add 10 cents per quart for postage. 

ENGLISH LAWN GRASS. 

A mixture of very fine and durable, though less expensive, grasses, which produce a luxuriant 
lawn, and firm, durable turf. Suitable for lawns or pastures. 



MIXTURES FOR PERMANENT PASTURE. 

The extraordinary yield of nutritive herbage produced from seeding down a combination of 
natural grasses has been amply demonstrated, and the practice is rapidly gaining favor with the 
most intelligent agriculturists. 

Flint's Mixtures. Adapted to all soils and situations. Any mixture required. Price upon 
application. 

See Specialty Pages for Permanent Mixtures. 

MILLETS. 

(these prices are subject to change with the market.) 

Sow three-fourths to one bushel for one acre. 

Hungarian (Grass) Millet {Setaria Germanicd). Splendid forage crop for light land. BUSH ° 
On rich land two crops may be grown the same season. Withstands drought, 
and yields abundantly. Height, two to three feet. (Forty-eight pounds to a 

bushel.) g I>5o 

Golden or German Millet. A heavier cropper than the Hungarian, and needs a longer 
season and a stiffer soil ; stands up well ; is easily cured ; makes a coarse, harsh 
hay, which is greedily eaten by all kinds of stock. (Fifty pounds to a bushel.) . 2 .oo 

Italian Millet {Setaria Italica). Sometimes called Common Millet. Medium, early, 
leafy; stalk small; three or four feet high; heads thick, nodding, six to nine 
inches long; fine for soiling. (Fifty pounds to a bushel.) . . . .. . z ^ 0 

CLOVERS. 

(these prices are subject to change with the market.) 

.Large Red, Mammoth, or Pea Vine ( Trifolium pratense). If sown alone, fifteen to 

twenty pounds to the acre $0.14 

Medium Red Clover ( Trifolium pratense). If sown alone, fifteen to twenty pounds to 
, the acre . J 1 



White Clorer {Trifolmm repens). If sown alone, twelve to fifteen pounds to the acre . $0.30 
Alsike ClOYer, Swedish {Trifolium hybridum). If sown alone, eight to ten pounds to 

the acre . 25 

Alfalfa, or Lucerne Cloyer {Medicago saliva). Also called California and Chilian 

Clover. If sown alone, twenty pounds to the acre .30 



jPARKER 8jr Y OOD i ^EED pATALOGUE. 



65 



RAINS. 



All our grains are selected expressly for seed, and are strictly pure and true to name. 

(prices of grains are subject to change with the market.) 



SPRING- WHEAT. 

Sow one to two bushels broadcast to an acre (sixty pounds to the bushel). 

PECK. BUSH. 

Lost Nation. A very popular bald wheat, fine plump grain; very prolific . . $0.75 $2.50 

California. A standard bearded wheat ; very prolific . . .. . . . .75 2.50 

White Russian. Has been thoroughly tested, and has given great satisfaction. 
It is a bald chaff wheat ; very prolific ; long, large heads, filled with plump 

kernels ; particularly free from rust, not liable to lodge . ... .75 2.50 

Saskatchewan Fife. Unequalled for productiveness, earliness, and vigor, and 

singularly exempt from smut, and other diseases .75 2.30 



WINTER WHEAT. 

Sow one to two bushels broadcast to an acre (sixty pounds to the bushel). 
€Iawson. Also known as the Seneca. This is a beardless white wheat, with red 
chaff. It proves early and hardy, has a stiff straw, and yields larger crops 
than any other kind. It has been cultivated for a sufficient length of time to 
thoroughly test its character, nature, and quality; and it is, without doubt, the 
best white wheat now cultivated 0.75 2.50 

BUCKWHEAT. 

Sow one bushel broadcast to an acre (forty-eight pounds to the bushel). 
Silver- Hull. This is a very great improvement over the common variety. Sown 
at the same time, it matures earlier, and yields nearly double under the same 



conditions. The grain is of a light-gray color, and has a very thin husk . . 0.75 2.00 

Common Yariety 50 1.50 

SPRING- BARLEY. 

Sow two to three bushels broadcast to an acre (forty-eight pounds to the bushel). 

TWO -Bowed. The popular kind in New England ....... 1.50 

Four-Rowed. Demand increases each year for this variety ..... 1.50 

OATS. 

Sow two to three bushels broadcast to an acre (thirty-two pounds to the bushel). 

White Bedford. The standard market variety 1.00 

Welcome. A very heavy oat . 1.50 

White Bussian. Rust-proof ; do not lodge 1.00 

RYE. 

Sow one and a half to two bushels broadcast to an acre (fifty-six pounds to the bushel). 

Spring. Very best quality for seed 1.50 

Winter. Very best quality for seed .... 1.50 




PARKER & WOOD'S 

"BOSTON COLLECTION" 

^Selected tfiiiwjLh •:• Plcme^ •:• Seeds,-* 

Containing TWENTY-FIVE PACKETS of the most popular and distinct vari- 
eties of Florist Flowers for a Summer Garden, that are 
useful and ornamental in every respect. 

Free Blooming, Easy Growing, Sure Flowering, Flowers, through the Season, 



THE COLLECTION IS MADE UP OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES : 

Sweet Peas: colors mixed. — Nasturtium: (Tall) colors mixed. — Mignonnette : sweet. — 
Asters : double German, mixed. — Sweet Alyssum: — Nasturtium.: Tom Thumb, mixed. — 
Scabiosa (Mourning Bride): mixed — Chrysanthemum: choice, mixed. — Salpiglossis : extra- 
mixed. — Petunia: splendid mixed. — Eschscholtzia : mixed. — Marigold: double, mixed. — 
Stocks : double German (ten weeks), mixed. — Poppy : choice mixed. — Porttdaca : mixed. — 
Phlox Drummondii : mixed. — Zinnia : double mixed. — Candytuft : mixed colors. — Verbena ;■ 
mixed. — Balsam : double mixed. — Thunbergia Vine : mixed. — Everlasti?tg Flowers: mixed. — 
Larkspur : double branching, mixed. — Pansy: choice mixed. — Pinks : double, mixed, annual. 

ONE COLLECTION (of above twenty-five varieties), mailed" to one address . . . $1.00 
THREE COLLECTIONS (of above twenty-five varieties), mailed to one address . . 3.50 



Oxxis collections of IWelVe and sioC Varieties axe also, made: tip -With. 
special cace fos a small gacden. 

ONE COLLECTION (of twelve varieties), mailed to one address ...... $0.5© 

THREE COLLECTIONS (of twelve varieties), mailed to one address .... 1.25 

ONE COLLECTION (of six varieties) mailed to one address ......... .35 

THREE COLLECTIONS (of six vaiieties) mailed to one address .65* 

66 



j^ARKER 8j ^OOD, pEED pATALOGU E. 6^ 



BRIEF DIRECTIONS 

For the 

e ah Treatment of Iwwm Seeds. 



JLM Flowers raised from Seed are usually known as Annuals, 
Biennials , or Perennials, 

ANNUALS are raised from ihe seed, perfect their flowers, mature their seed, the same season, and then perish. 
"They are divided as follows: Hardy, half-hardy, and tender. Hardy annuals are such as will bear a hard frost; half- 
■hardy annuals will bear but little; tender annuals will not bear the frost at all. 

BIENNIALS flower the second and sometimes the third year from the time the seeds are sown, and then perish. 
PERENNIALS do not in their growth form either trees or shrubs, but lose their tops, wholly or in part, every yea* 
after they have done flowering. The roots continue to live and generate for several years successively. 

Biennials and perennials are hardy, half-hardy, and tender. Hardy biennials and perennials stand 
•the hardest winter without protection ; half-hardy require to be well protected ; and tender biennials and perennials must 
tie kept where frost will not touch them. 

With regard to the proper time for sowing seed in the open ground, much depends on the char- 

acter of the season. The general rule recommended has been to sow 
hardy annuals from the middle of April to the first of May; half-hardy, 
first of May; and tender annuals, last of May and first of June. But, 
from our own experiense, we are convinced that more disappointment 
results from too early sowing than from any other cause. The general 
rule that we would recommend is not to sow even hardy annuals before 
the middle of May. We would much rather, as a general thing, defer 
sowing them until the first part of June than to sow them as early as 
the middle of April. The half-hardy and tender annuals we would 
sow from the latter part of May to the ioth of June, or even some 
days later if necessary. Biennials and perennials may be sown at 
any time from the middle of April to the first of July; but, in order to 
get good strong flowering-plants for the following season, we would 
Common Violets. advise to sow them as early as the ioth of June. 

Seeds may he sown in patches among the horder-plants, in rows, or groups, where they are 
<to remain, or in a nursery-bed, and afterwards transplanted. As a general rule, the surface-sOil should be rather dry 
than otherwise at the moment of sowing; and the operation never should be undertaken when the ground is very wet, 
■especially at an early period of the spring. Whenever it may be desirable, for some special reason, to sow when the 
ground is too damp, the surface should be scraped off to the depth of an inch or two, and its place supplied by dry soil, 
on which the seeds may be sown. In the case of seeds of a moderate size, the surlace-soil may be scraped aside with the 
■edge of a trowel to the depth of a quarter of an inch; and, around the circumference of the slight hollow thus made, the 
■seeds may be thinly strewn, the soil being then returned and gently pressed flat with the hand or trowel. If the soil 
•should be of an adhesive nature, the pressure should be very slight, or the surface will cake. It will be better in this case 
to cover the seeds with a little sandy loam, or other friable soil, instead of that where the sowing is made. 

It is particularly requisite that seeds should not he sown too deep, from whence arise 
many of the failures of inexperienced gardeners. The depth at which the seeds are sown will vary with 
their size. Large seeds, such as those of the Lupinus, Sweet Pea, or Marvel of Peru, may be three-quarters of an inch 
deep; other varieties from an eighth to a half inch deep, according to the size or nature of the seed. Some that are very 
•small require to be sown on the actual surface, — a slight pressure being then sufficient to embed them to a proper depth. 
For the majority of the seeds, a very thin covering suffices ; if sown too deep, they are longer in germinating, and the small' 
'ones are liable to decay. It sometimes insures a more even distribution of very small seeds, such as those of Campanula, 
Digitalis, etc., if they are intimately mixed, before sowing, with a little fine, dry soil; the mixture being sown in the same 
way as the seeds. Woolly seeds, which adhere to each other, like the Globe Amaranthus, etc., should be rubbed with a 
little fine sand, which will generally separate them. In all cases, the more thinly the seeds are strewn, the better; when 
too thickly sown, the seedlings become elongated and sickly, — an evil which no subsequent thinning out will entirely 
remedy. 

If the soil he dry, and the weather sunny, it will be necessary to water the seeds slightly from a very 
fine rose watering-pot. Rain-water is preferable. In the absence of rain, this application must be repeated every day or 
two; for it is important to observe, that, when once the seeds begin to swell, they are peculiarly susceptible to injury from 
drought, and will speedily perish unless the soil be maintained in a moist condition. To neglect of this important precau- 
tion, many failures are solely attributable. On the other hand, an excess of moisture previous to germination will often 
cause the seed to decay, especially in cold seasons. Early in the spring, therefore, the water-pot must be used with 
judgment, and never late in the day when frost threatens. 





68 



J^ARKEF^ %j "y^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 



IMPORTED COLLECTIONS OF 

i Ml 

In which are enclosed Six, Eight, Twelve and Eighteen Separate Papers, each containing Seeds of a 

Different Color of the same Plant. 
FOE CONVENIENCE, ORDER BY NUMBERS ONLY. 



Col. No. 10. 

ii. 

" 12. 
" 13- 

h- 
It 

« 17. 
18. 

« 19. 
" 20. 
u 21. 

" 22. 
23. 

* 24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 

" 29. 
30. 

" 31. 



3 2 - 
33- 
34- 
35- 
36- 

37' 
38. 
39- 
40. 
41. 
42. 

43- 
44. 

46. 

47- 
48. 
49. 
5o. 
5 1 - 
5 2 - 
53- 
54- 



Asters, Betteridge's Globe Quilled . 

" Cockade or Crown 

" Dwarf Bouquet (Boltze's) 

" Dwarf Chrysanthemum-flowered . 

" Dwarf Paeony-flowered (Benary) . 

" Dwarf Victoria .... 

" Imbricated Pompon 

a a a 

" Large-flowered Rose, splendid 

" Tall Pyramidal German 

" Truffaut's Pasony-flowered Perfection 



" Victoria (Benary's Prize), Magnificent 
n n a a a 

Balsams, Improved Camellia-flowered 

" Spotted French Rose-flowered . 

a a tt a a 

Hollyhocks, Chatter's superb, Benary's Prize Strain 

« " a. a ii 

Larkspur, Dwarf Stock-flowered 

Tall « « Branching 
Nasturtium, Dwarf. See Nos. 50 and 51. 

Tall. See Nos. 48 and 49. 
Pansies, or Heartsease. Large-flowered 

<( ti a a tt 

Petunia Hybrida Grandiflora, Single . . 

" " Double 

Phlox Drummondii, Grandiflora . 



Portulaca, Single . 

" Grandiflora Double 

Scabious, Dwarf Double 
Stocks, Dwarf German Ten-week 

" Large-flowering Ten-week 



' " Large-flowering Wallflower-leaved Ten-week 

" " New Giant Perfection ten-week Pyramidal 

Growth , . . . . 

Sweet Peas, . . . . . . .... 

Tropaeolum Majus (Tall Nasturtium) . . ..... . .. , 

Tom Thumb, ' ' .' .7 ! 

a a a •....■* 

Yerbena Hybrida 

Zinnia, Elegans Double 

" " Dwarf Double . . . . . 



In 12 colors, $0.50' 
•5° 
•75 
•5° 



6 
12 
8 
8 
6 
12 
8 
12 
12 
18 
12 
6 
12 
6 
6 
12 
6 
12 



6 
6 
12 
6 



18 
12 



J 2 
12 
8 
12 

6 
6 



1. 00 
•75 

I. CO' 

•75 
1.00 

•75 
.40 

I.OO' 

.60 

' I.OO' 

.75 
.40 

1.00 
•5°' 
•5°' 
.40 



•75 
.40 

•50 
•50 
1.00 

•50 
.40 
.60 
•50 

1.00 

2 

.40 
•75 

•75 
•5° 
•5° 
•35 
•5° 
.30 

•50 
.50 
•5° 



j^ARKER 8j Y OOD i pEED j^ATALOGUE. 69 




SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS 




BY MAIL, POSTAGE PAID. 



Purchasers remitting $1.00 may select seeds IN PACKETS, at catalogue pru 

» " 2.00 <* " " IN PACKETS, " 

« 3.00 " " " IN PACKETS, " 

4.00 " " " IN PACKETS, " 

« 5.00 " " « IN PACKETS, " 

10.00 " " " IN PACKETS, " 



ices, amounting to $1.25 
2.50 

3-75 
5.00 
6.50 
13-00 



No variation whatever will be made from the above rates ; and we wish it distinctly understood by our 
correspondents, that the above discount will be allowed only upon flower and vegetable seeds ifi 
packets. Seeds, when ordered by the ounce or pound, will not be included. 



COLLECTIONS OF FLOWER SEEDS BY MAIL. 

Although these collections are all our own selection, we take especial pains that they shall be highly 
valuable, and every way worthy of perfect confidence. They contain no variety of doubtful merit, but only 
those best adapted for general cultivation ; and as such they are recommended to extensive cultivators of 
flowers, as well as to those who are unacquainted with the most desirable varieties. They will be forwarded, 
postpaid, to any address in the Union, on receipt of prices annexed. 

No. 1. — Contains twelve varieties of choice annuals . $0.50 

No. 2. — Contains twenty-five varieties of choice annuals 1.00 

No. 3. — Twenty-five varieties of choice biennials and perennials 1.00 

No. 4. — Ten extra fine varieties of rare annuals and perennials 1.00 

No. 5. — Fifty varieties annuals, biennials, and perennials . . . . . . • • 2.00 

No. 6. — One hundred varieties annuals, biennials, and perennials, including many 

of the best in cultivation 4«°° 

Persons desiring to make their own selections from the general list will be entitled to a discount propor- 
tionate to the quantity ordered. See list of rates above. 





For Fall Planting and House 
Culture. 

ALL POINDS 

AND OF 

THE BEST QUALITY. 

DESCRIPTIVE 

illustrated 6ataloq,ue 
Will lie ready in September of eacn Year. 

Send your Address early as possible. — now, if convenient, - and oblige PARKER & WOOD. 



Select Descriptive List of Choice 




Embracing only the most Popular Varieties and Choicest Strains of Annuals, Biennials, and 
Perennials, for Cultivation in the Flower-Garden, Conservatory, or Greenhouse. 

All Flower Seeds sent Free by Mail on Receipt of Price. 



Explanations. — In order to simplify as much as possible, and to assist purchasers in 
making selections from the following list, we give the name by which the plants are best known, 
whether common or botanical, with character, height, hardiness, duration, and usual time of 
flowering of each variety. 

The dagger (f) denotes that such Biennial and Perennial plants usually flower the first season 
if sown early. 

Where the ounce price is under fifty cents, not less than one-half ounce will be sold ; and not 
less than one-fourth pound where pound price is quoted. 

In ordering flower seeds, the number only need toe used. 



ABRONIA. 

A beautiful plant from California, with long, trailing stems, 
bearing clusters of pretty, fragrant, verbena-like blossoms, 
from August to October. By carefully removing the 
tough skin which covers the seed, it will germinate more 
freely. Treat as half-hardy annuals. % foot. 

No. pkt. oz. 

1. Abronia umbellata, rosy lilac, fragrant . . $.05 $.80 




Abronia. 



t ABUTILON. 

Desirable plants for the conservatory, freely producing a 
profusion of bell-shaped flowers. Many of the varieties 
succeed well if plunged in the border during summer. 
Half-hardy shrub. pkt. oz. 

2. Abutilon, choice mixed $.20 

ACACIA. 

Highly ornamental plants, that may be employed for out- 
door decoration during the summer, with most satisfac- 
tory results. Greenhouse shrub. 

3. Acacia, choice mixed 10 

ACROCLINIUM. 

Beautiful plants, with everlasting flowers; graceful border 
plants, and specially adapted for winter bouquets, for 
which they should be cut as soon as they begin to bloom, 
and dried in the shade. They are of easy cultivation in 
any good garden soil. ' Flower from June to October. 
Half-hardy annuals. 1 foot. 

4. Acroclinium roseam, delicate rose ... .05 $.60 

5. — album, pure white . 05 .60 

6. — roseum, doable. A double form of this 

everlasting is a most desirable variety. 
The flowers are somewhat larger than 
the single sorts ; and, from the seed we 
offer, about 75 per cent wilLbe double . .10 

t ADLUMIA (Mountain Fringe). 
A beautiful climbing plant, with numerous pale pink flow- 
ers. Hardy biennial. 15 feet. 

7. A (I In mi a cirrhosa . . .05 

70 



j^ARKER ^ Y OOD i pEED pATALOGUE. 



71 



AGERATUM. 

Profuse blooming plants during summer and autumn in the 
open ground, in groups or masses; also good for pot cul- 
ture for winter blooming. Half-hardy annual. 

pet. oz. 

Ho. 8. Ageratum Mexicanum, lavender blue, 

1 ft $.05 $.60 

St — alba, white, 1 ft .05 

10. — Mexicanum nanum, blue, fine bed- 
ding plant, % ft 05 

£!• —Tom Thumb, very dwarf, blue, % ft., .05 
t& — Swanley blue, dwarf, with very large 

flowers, charming, % ft 10 1.35 



1. 00 

1. 00 




21. Ammobium alatum, white 



PET. OZ. 
.$.05 $.50 



Ageratum Tom Thumb. 
ALYSSUM. 

Pretty, useful little plants for beds, edgings, or nxle-work, 

producing an abundance of attractive flowers the first 
season, from June to October. 1 foot. 
IS. Alyssum, sweet, very fragrant, white. 

Good for edging. Hardy annual . . .eg .50 

14. — saxatile, yellow flowers. Hardy per- 

ennial . .©5 .60 

ALONSOA. 

Handsome bedding plants, producing flowers of great bril- 
liancy, from early summer until frosts; also blooms freely 
in-doors during winter. Half-hardy annual. \%feet. 

15. Alonsoa linifolia, scarlet 05 .75 

16. — albiflora 05 .75 

AMARANTHUS. 

Ornamental foliaged plants, valuable both for the open border 
and the conservatory. For out-door culture, should be 
• sown very early under glass, and removed when the weather 
becomes sufficiently warm. Half-hardy annuals. 

17. Amaranthus tricolor {Joseph's Coat), 

fine, three-colored. 2 ft .05 .50 

18. — caudatus {Love lies Bleeding}. 2 ft.. .05 .50 

19. — melancholicus ruber. This is of dwarf- 

er habit, and has lively blood-red col- 
ored foliage; of easy culture in any 

common garden soil. 1% ft .05 .50 

80. — salicifolius {Fountain Plant), one of 
the finest, with long, narrow, and wavy 
leaves, which change in color from a 
bronze green to brilliant scarlet, as the 
plant attains age. 3 ft 05 .50 





Amaranthus Tricolor. 
AMMOBIUM. 

h leading everlasting flower, and a showy bowJer plant; 
Bseful for bouquets summer or winter. In flower from 
July to August. Hardy annual. t%Jeet. 



Ammobium. 
ANAGALLIS. 

Beautiful little plants, valuable for edgings, small beds, 
vases, basket, or rock-work; when sown in a mass thick- 
ly will cover the ground with a profusion of flowers from 
July to October. Succeed best in a light, rich soil, with 
warm exposure. Half-hardy annuals. 1 foot. 

22. Anagallis fclrandifiora, fine mixed . . .05 .75 

ANTIRRHINUM. 

(See Snapdragon, No. 417.) 

AQUILEGIA (Columbine). 

Plants of great value on account of their easy cultivation 
and their beautifully colored and curiously shaped blos« 
soms. In flower June and July. Hardy perennials, 
i foot. 

23. Aquilegia, blue. A fine, flowering variety, 

with beautiful blue flowers ..... .10 

24. —fine mixed . .05 1.00 

t ARISTOLOCHIA (Dutchman's Pipe). 

Highly ornamental and attractive climber, with massive 
foliage, and very curious, horn-shaped flowers of the most 
varied and beautiful colors. Hardy perennial. 10 feet. 

25. Aristolocltia sipho, rich purple 10 

ASTER. 

This splendid class of plants is not only one of the most 
popular, but also one of the most effective, of our garden 
favorites, producing in profusion flowers in which rich- 
ness and variety of color are combined with the most 
perfect and beautiful form. It is indispensable in every 
garden or pleasure-ground where an autumnal display is 
desired. For flower-beds and mixed borders, it stands 
unrivalled. Asters delight in a deep, rich soil ; and, dur- 
ing the hot weather, mulching with coarse manure is very 
beneficial. For early blooming, sow in a hot-bed ; and for 
late, in the seed-bed in the garden; and transplant, in 
moist weather, the larger varieties about ten inches apart, 
and the smaller six. If supplied liberally with guano- 
water as they advance in size, they will abundantly re- 
ward the cultivator in the increased size and beauty of 
their flowers. Half-hardy annuals. 

27. Truffaut's French Paeony-flowered Per- 

fection. For form of flowers, variety and 
brilliancy of colors, and habit of growth, 
this is universally admitted to surpass all 
others. Extra fine mixed. 1% feet. . . .10 4.00 

28. Truffaut's French Paeony-flowered Per- 

fection, pure white, very fine 10 4.00 

29. Truffaut's French Pseony-flowereu Per- 

fection, fiery crimson, very fine ... .10 4.00 

30. Truffaut's French Paeony-flowered Per- 

fection, blue-black, very fine . . . .. .10 4.00 

31. Truffaut's Pseony-flowered Perfection, 

Collection containing 18 distinct colors . 1.00 

32. Truffaut's Paeony-flovrered Perfection, 

Collection containing 12 distinct colors . .75 



7 2 




ASTER — Cotttinued. pkt. 

33. Truffaut's Pseony-flowered Perfection. 

Collection containing 6 distinct colors . . .40 
84. Cockade, or Crown . The flowers are very 
double, with beautiful white centres, bor- 
dered with crimson, scarlet, violet or blue, 
making the.n very attractive. Mixed. 

ft • - IO 

35. Cockade, or Crown, Collection contam- 

V'% 6 distinct colors 5° 

36. I ..o'rique pompone, finest mixed, i^ft. .10 
86>£, Imbrique Ponipoiie, white, beautifully 

imbricated , *° 

37. Dwarf chrysanthemum iiowered,mixed. 

A splendid variety, very robust, and a pro- 
fuse bloomer. Flowers later than other 
sorts, %ft 10 

38. Dwarf chrysanthemum. Collection con- 

taining 8 distinct colors 50 

89. Dwarf' Victoria. An extra fine class for 
dwarf beds or edgings. Their fine form 
makes them most attractive. Mixed. . .10 



40. Dwarf Victoria. Collection containing 

6 distinct colors 

41. Victoria. Flowers very large, perfectly 

double, beautifully imbricated and freely 



produced. Mixed colors. 1% feet . . .10 3.50 
413^. Victoria, pure white, extra ; splendid for 

florists' uee 10 4.00 

42. Victoria, dark crimson, extra ; splendid for 

florists' use 10 4.00 

Victoria collection containing 12 distinct 

colors 1.00 

Victoria collection containing 6 distinct 

colors 60 

42>£. Dwarf Pyramidal Bouquet. So profuse 
in bloom that the foliage is completely 
hidden with flowers. Mixed colors. 1 ft. .10 3.00 

43. Dwarf Pyramidal Bouquet. Pure white, 

very fine 05 1.00 

44. Betteridge's prize globe quilled, very 

double with tube petals .05 1.00 

45. Globe quilled. Collection containing 12 

distinct colors So 

46. Washington. One of the finest ; flowers 

very large, sometimes 5 inches in diame- 
ter. Fine mixed 20 8.00 

47. German, fine mixed 05 1.00 



AURICULA. 

A well-known favorite, succeeding best in a northern aspect. 

Half-hardy perennial. Yz foot. 
48. Auricula. English hybrids, very choice 

- strain 25 

&9. — alpina, various colors 15 

AZALEA. 

Beautiful greenhouse and hardy shrubs; require careful 
management until well established. 

60. Azalea indica, from finest greenhouse 

varieties. 4 ft. ....... . .25 

SI. — pontics, hardy varieties ..... .25 

A VENA (Animated Oats). 

Very graceful ornamental grass, with large, 
drooping spikes on slender stems. Annual. 
S8. Arena sterilis .05 

BACHELOR'S BUTTON. 

(See No. 107.) 

BALLOON VINE (Cardiospermum). 

& curious, rapid-growing climber, with an inflated membra- 
neous capsule, from which it derives its name. They suc- 
ceed best in a light soil and warm situation. In flower 
July and August. Half-hardy annual. 5 feet. 

$8. Balloon Vine, Cardiospermum haliea- 

cabum, white, from India 05 .75 



Balloon Vine. 

BALSAM (Lady's Slipper). 
Magnificent conservatory or out-door plants, producing thdr 
gorgeous masses of beautiful, brilliant- colored flowers in 
the greatest profusion. Half-hardy annuals. 



pkt. oa 

54. Balsam, camellia-flowered, very double, 

and perfect in form; choice mixed . . $.10 

55. — camellia-flowered. Collection contain- 

ing 6 separate colors 1.00 

56. — rose-flowered, perfectly double, choice 

mixed 10 1.50 

57. — rose-fiowered. Collection containing 

12 separate colors 1.00 

58. — improved carnation-striped. All the 

flowers are beautifully striped, and the 

colors showy 10 $1.50 

59. — Solferino, beautifully striped and 

streaked with lilac and scarlet. 2 ft. . . ro 

60. — dwarf Victoria. The handsome double 

flowers are both striped and spotted . . .10 

61. — double white, very fine, pure white 

flowers 10 

62. — finest double mixed 10 

63. — good mixed . .05 




Balsam. 
BARTONIA. 

Plants of a succulent character, with large, golden flowers, 
expanding only in the middle of the day. When in per- 
fection, this is a fine plant: and, although its habit and 
foliage are less attractive than some other annuals, in size 
and brilliancy of blossoms it is inferior to none. Half- 
hardy annual. 2 feet. 



jP ARKER 8f Y OOD " ^EED pATALOGUE. 



73 



BARTONIA — Continued. 
64. Bartonia aurea, golden-yellow . . . 



.$.05 $.50 




Bartonia. 



BEGONIA. 

No tribe of plants affords more beautiful variety in habit of 
growth and richness of color than this. Greenhouse, and 
half-hardy perennials. 

65. Begonia, tuberous rooted, saved from 

.newest English Hybrids. Choice mixed. . 50 

66. — tuberous rooted, single, mixed ... .25 

67. — Froebeli, bright scarlet .25 

68. — Hex hybrida, beautiful variegated foli- 

age; for pot culture .25 

BELLIS PERENNIS. 

(See Daisy, No. 152.) 

BROWALLIA. 

It is only within a few years that the great value of the 
Browallia as a bedding-plant has been shown. It is now 
considered indispensable in all massing and ribbon-line 
gardening; indeed, for all bedding purposes, it is used 
almost as freely as the Coleus. It is easily reproduced 
from seed, and requires no special cultivation. Half- 
hardy annuals. 

69. Browallia cerviakowskii, blue, with 

white centre, beautiful 05 

70. — elata alba, white, very pretty 05 

71. — cseruleo grandiflora. The large, beau- 

tiful flowers of this improved variety 

are thickly studded over the plant . . .05 1.00 

BRACHYCOME (Swan River Daisy). 
Free-flowering, dwarf-growing plants, covered during the 
greater portion of the summer with a profusion of pretty, 
cineraria-like flowers; useful for edgings, in small beds, 
rustic baskets, or for pot-culture. Half-hardy annuals. 
y 2 foot. 

72. Brachycome iberidifolia, blue 05 .80 

73. —albiflora, white .05 .80 

BRIZA. 

Charming varieties of the well-known Quaking grass. An- 
nual. 1 foot. 

74. Briza gracilis, small quaking grass . . .05 .75 

75. — maxima, large quaking grass 05 .75 

76. — maxima compacta, very beautiful . . .05 .75 



t CALCEOLARIA. 

Plants of a highly decorative character. They will succeed 
in a light, rich soil. In flower April to June. Chiefly 
grown for inside decoration. Greenhouse perennial. 
2 feet. PKT- oz . 

78. Calceolaria Hybrida Grandiflora, from 

the finest formed and most beautifully 
spotted and mortled varieties 50 

79. — finest hybrids, mixed ; saved only from 

the most perfect flowers . . . . . . .25 

90. — Eugosa, splendid shrubby varieties for 
bedding, saved from a very fine selection 
embracing a great variety of colors . . .50 

CALLIOPSIS, or COREOPSIS. 

Flowers numerous, rich, and strikingly beautiful. In flower 
July to October. Hardy annual. 

83. Calliopsis, fine mixed. 2 ft. ..... .05 $.50 

84. — Drummondii, yellow dwarf 05 .50 

85. — dark red, very pretty .05 .50 

86. — coronata, yellow, with crimson spots . .05 .50 

87. — bicolor, yellow and brown 05 .50 

& 



1. 00 
1. 00 




Oacalia. 
CACALIA (Tassel-flowery 
A profuse and beautiful flowering plant, with tassel-shaped 
flowers growing in clusters on slender stalks, from which 
it is- sometimes called Flora's Paint-Brush. Set the plants 
6 inches apart. In flower July to October. Hardy an- 
nuals. \ l /zfeet. 
77. Cacalia coccinea, flowers scarlet ... .05 .60 
77J. — lutea, flowers yellow 05 .60 




Calliopsis. 
CALINDRINA. 

Handsome, bright-colored annuals, suitable for sunny situa- 
tions, or pot culture. 1 foot. 

88. Calindrina grandiflora, rosy pink . . . .05 1.00 

89. — discolor, rose . .o^" 1.00 

CAMPANULA, MEDIUM. 

(See Canterbury Bells, No. 99.) 

CANARY-BIRD FLOWER. 

A beautiful climber, well adapted for summer growth against 
walls and artistic trellises, as well as for brilliant decora- 
tion in rural and fancy combinations of rock-work or 
flower mounds ; is a free bloomer from July till Septem- 
ber. Half-hardy annual. 10 feet. 1 

90. Canary-Bird Flower {Trop&olum pere- 

grinum), yellow 10 .50 

CANDYTUFT (Iberis). 

One of the most useful border annuals, very effective in 
beds, groups, ribbons, etc. ; also very useful for pot cul- 
ture, for conservatory decoration during winter; indis- 
pensable for bouquets. Seed should be sown in the fall, or 
as early in the spring as possible. Thin out the plants to 
4 or s inches apart. Will continue in bloom until frost. 
Hardy annuals. 1 foot. 

91. Candytuft, fragrant, fine white variety, .05 .25 

92. — crimson, a beautiful variety 05 .25 

93. — purple, rosy purple 05 .25 

94. — rocket, large white, selected 05 .25 

95. — new, carmine, large, compact heads . .10 .50 

96. —fine mixed 05 .25 



74 



»ARKER (| ^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 



C A N D Y T U FT — Contin ued. PKT . 02. 
97. Candytuft, sempervirens, perennial, quite 

hardy. Flowers very early in spring . $.05 $1.00 




Candytuft. 
CANNA {Indian Shot). 

^liese stately species of plants are highly ornamental in 
flower-gardens, producing a rich and Oriental effect by 
their large, broad, massive foliage, and rich crimson and 
scarlet flowers. Soak the seeds in hot water for about 
12 hours before sowing. In autumn the roots may be 
taken up, and kept in the cellar, and replanted in the open 
air in May or June. In flower June to September. Half- 
hardy perentiials. 

08. Canna, mixed 05 .50 

tCANTERBURY BELLS (Campanula Medium). 

When well grown are very attractive as border plants. They 
succeed in light, rich soil. The plants should be 2 feet 
apart. In flower June to August. Hardy biennials. 
2% feet. 

99. Canterbury Bells, double mixed . . .05 .75 
100. — single mixed . .05 .50 




Canterbury Bells. 

CARNATION PINK. 

(See Di&nthus, No. 172, etc.) 

CASTOR OIL BEAN. 

(See Ricinus, No. 395.) 

CATCH FLY (JSilene). 
Showy, free-flowering plants of easy culture. In flower 
July and August. Hardy annual. 1 foot. 

101. Catchfly, pink ......... .05 .60 

102. — white 05 .60 

CELOSIA. 

(See Cockscomb, No. 128.) 



CENTAUREA. 

Showy, hardy plants, which have beautiful silvery foliage, 
and are indispensable for ribbon bordering, or carpet 
bedding; and, as single specimens, they are very attrac- 
tive. Half-hardy perennials. pkt. oz. 

103. Centaurea candidissinia, large, smooth, 

silvery, cut leaf; one of the most desir- 
able varieties (per 1,000 seeds, $1.00) .$.10 

104. — gymnocarpa. A graceful, silvery, fine- 

cut leaved variety; a very beautiful 

plant 10 $1.50 

105. — candidissinia com pacta. A dwarfer 

and neater candidissima 15 

106. —gymnocarpa laeiniata. Finely cut 

foliage 15 

107. — Cyanus {Bachelor's Button), free- 

flowering, showy border plants, very 
popular as cut flowers and for bouquets. 
In flower August and September. Fine 
mixed. Hardy anmial 05 .50 

108. — Moschata (Sweet Sultan), mixed . . .05 .50 
108%. — Moschata, blue, white and yellow, 

each ^ .05 - 6o 




Centaurea Gymnocarpa. 



CHRYSANTHEMUM. 

The tall, double-flowered Chrysanthemums, when well- 
grown, make very showy and effective summer-flowering 
border plants. They should be thinned out to from 12 to 
18 inches apart. Should be started under glass. In 
September to November. Hardy anmial. 2 to 3 ft. 

109. Chrysanthemum, double white ... .05 .50 

110. — double yellow 05 .50 

111. —'tricolor, white with yellow band, showy .05 .50 

112. — Burridgeanum, white with crimson 

band, beautiful 05 .50 

113. — segetum grandiflorum. A new annual 

variety, with bright yellow flowers . . .05 

114. — indicum fl. pi ."very double, mixed. . .15 

115. — mixed annual varieties 10 .40 

CINERARIA. 

Well-known and highly valuable plants for greenhouse dec- 
oration on account of the profusion of their flowers _ and 
the richness and variety of colors. They delight in a 
light, rich soil. In flower February to May. Green- 
house perennial. 

116. Cineraria hybrida, extra choice mixed 

colors, saved from prize varieties . . . .4° 

117. — choicest mixed 25 

118. — new double. The flowers are perfectly 

double, representing every shade of color .25 
118 1-2. — maritima {Dusty Miller), a fine sil- 
very foliage plant, for bedding, bor- 
ders, etc. Half-hardy perennial . . .05 



CLARKIA 

An interesting class of favorite bedding- plants, flowering 
freely, with a great variety of delicate and cheerful-lookmg 
blossoms during the autumn months, and even after quite 
hard frosts. They will thrive best in a shady location. 
Hardy annuals. 1 foot. 



J^ARKER 8f ^OOD, pEED pATALOGUE. 



75 



C L A R K I A — Continued. PKT . 

119. Clarkia, Tom Thumb, rosy crimson . $.05 

120. —Mrs. Langtry. Very showy petals of 

pure white, with a centre of brilliant 
carmine crimson; grows very com- 
pact, and flowers freely 05 

121. — pulchella, deep rose 05 

122. — double mixed 05 

123. — finest mixed 05 



$.60 



'I s 
.60 

•75 

.50 





Clarkia, 
t CLEMATIS. 

These are well-known, hardy, climbing plants, and deserve 
a place in every garden. They form most beautiful 
objects when trained over lattice-work or baskets. The 
seeds germinate slowly. Hardy perennial. 20 feet. 

124. Clematis flammula {Virgin's Bower), 

white, fragrant 10 

125. — viticella, purple, a beautiful variety . .10 

CLIANTHUS DAMPIERII (Glory Pea). 

One of the most beautiful plants in cultivation, about 3 feet 
in height, with neat compound leaves, and drooping 
clusters of large, rich scarlet, long-petaled, pea-shaped 
flowers, 3 inches in length, something similar to the 
splendid blossoms of the Coral Tree, each flower being 
picturesquely marked with a large, black, cloud-like 
blotch in front. To grow this splendid plant successfully 
in the open air, it should have a dry, sunny exposure, and 
should never be watered Magnificent flowering shrub. 
Half hardy annual. 

126. Clianthus dampierii 25 



COB/EA. 

Splendid half-hardy, evergreen climber, with large purple, 
bell shaped flowers. Start the seeds in heat, setting them 
on edge ; cover % inch. 20 ft. 

127. Cobsea scandens, purple 10 1.50 

COCKSCOMB (Celosia Cristata). 

Very singular, attractive and showy class of plants. In 
flower August to November.. Half-hardy annuals. 

128. Glasgow prize, an improved Cocks- 

comb, very large dark crimson combs . .15 

129. Cristata nana, choice mixture of new- 

est dwarf crested varieties, 10 

130. Japonica (Japanese), combs are almost 

as delicately cut as ruffled lace, while 
the colors are the brightest imaginable . . 10 

131. Pyramidalis, a choice mixture of all the 

plumed or feathered sorts °S 



Cockscomb. 
COLEUS. 

Ornamental foliage plants used in ribbon gardening, mass- 
■ ing, etc. Half-hardy perennials. fkt. oz. 

133. Coleus, Benary's new hybrids. Beau- 

tifully streaked, blotched, and circled, $.30 

134. —finest mixed 25 

COLLINS1A. 

An exceedingly pretty, free-flowering, popular genus, re- 
markably attractive in beds, mixed "borders, or ribbons. 
They thrive best in stiff clay soil. Hardy annual. 
1 foot. 

135. Collinsia, finest mixed 05 $.60 

COLUMBINE. 

(See Aquilegia, No. 23.) 

CONVOLVULUS MAJOR. 

(See Morning Glory, No. 292.) 

CONVOLVULUS TRICOLOR 

(Dwarf Convolvulus ). 
Beautiful, free-flowering, and remarkably showy plants, 
with exceedingly handsome, rich-colored flowers, produ- 
cing in beds and mixed borders an unusually brilliant 
effect. 

136. Convolvulus tricolor minor. Rich, 

violet-purple, with white centre; trail- 
er. Hardy annual. 1 ft 05 .25 




Convolvulus Tricolor. 
137. — Mauritanicus. The most beautiful 
creeping variety ever introduced, por- 
celain-blue, very floriferous. A charm- 
ing plant for baskets, vases, etc. 
Hardy perennial. 1 f t 10 



•75 



76 



'ARKER 8jr Y OOD i JSeED jl^ATALOGUE. 



CONVOLVULUS TRICOLOR — Continued. 

PET. OZ. 

138. Convolvulus tricolor variegatus, 

beautifully striped with white ; trail- 
er $.05 $ 50 

189. — minor, mixed 05 .25 

COIX LACHRYMA (Job's Tears). 
Curious ornamental grass from East Indies, with broad, 

corn-like leaves. 1% foot. 
140. Coix lachrynia. Annual ..... .05 

t CUP HE A (Gigar Plant). 
A highly decorative plant for the conservatory or the 

flower border. 
§41. Cuphea, choice mixed .05 

t CYCLAMEN. 

Handsome and curious tuberous-rooted herbaceous plants, 
specially adapted for the conservatory, or window, for 
winter. In flower December to April. Half-hardy 
perennial. Our strains are unsurpassed. 

142. Cyclamen persicum giganteuni, a 

great improvement over the older sort, 
extra choice 5° 

143. Finest mixed , .... .25 

Eulbs, each 25 

CYPRESS VINE (Ipomea Quamoclit). 

Among the most beautiful climbing plants which adorn the 
flower garden. The dark green, very graceful, fern-like 
foliage, thickly studded with brilliant starry flowers, is 
very effective. .The seeds should be scalded before sow- 
ing. In flower July to October. Half-hardy annuals. 



10 feet. 

145. Cypress vine, scarlet 05 .50 

146. — white 05 .50 

147. —rose 05 .50 

148. —mixed 05 .50 



t DAHLIA. 

The seeds we offer have been collected from the finest 

varieties in cultivation. Half-hardy perennial. 
We have the most improved strain of single varieties. 



149. Dahlia, fine mixed, double 10 

150. — single, " Paragon," deep maroon pet- 

als, edged with bright purple ... .10 

151. — single mixed . 10 



DAISY (Bellis Perennis). 
Every one knows the daisy, fine for the border, or pot cul- 
ture. Sow seed very early. Plants can be removed safely 
when in flower. Plant about 6 inches apart when set, so 
that when full grown they will cover the ground. Half- 
hardy perennial. 

162. Daisy, " Longfellow," double. A very 
large-flowered variety, with dark rose 
flowers. May be sown in spring, and 
will bloom in a very short time . . .15 
153. — double white, beautiful pure white 



flowers 10 

154. — double mixed, saved from fine double 

flowers 10 

155. — Ox-eye {Chrysanthemum tricolor 

purptirea), a pretty, old-fashioned 
daisy. Hardy annual. 2 ft. . . .05 
456. — tricolor {ChrysantJtemum atrococci- 
nezim), a three-colored variety, very 
showy. Hardy annual. 2 ft. . . .05 



t DATURA (Trumpet Flower). 
Very attractive, trumpet-shaped, fragrant flowers. In large 
clumps or borders of shrubbery, they produce an excellent 
effect Half-hardy perennial . 

157. Datura meteloides (Wrightii), white- 

bordered lilac. 2 ft 05 .75 

158. — Huberiana, double mixed finest . . . .10 

t D E L P H I N I U M (Perennial Larkspur). 
(For annual varieties, see Larkspur, No. 248.) 
A class of most beautiful plants, with curiously cut leaves 
and splendid flowers, admirably adapted for large groups 



or masses, and invaluable for cut flowers. Flower the 
first season when sown early, and may be sown in the 
autumn. They should be sown where they are to stand, 
as they are difficult to transplant. In flower July to Oc- 



tober. Hardy perennials. pet. oz. 

159. Delphinium elatum {Bee Larkspur), 

light blue variety. 3 ft $.05 $.75 

160. — Formosum, new, with large, brilliant 

blue and white flowers. 2 ft 10 

161. —fine mixed 05 .75 

162. — Nudicaule, dwarf, varying in color 

from light scarlet to a shade verging 

on crimson ; very brilliant. 1 % ft. . .15 




Delphinium Formosum. 



DIANTHUS (Pink). 

A genus of splendid, showy plants, embracing some of the 
most popular flowers in cultivation. Most of them will 
flower the first season. The perennial varieties endure 
the winter well, and produce finer blossoms the second 
summer. The Heddewigii are remarkable for their size 
and magnificent colors. The seed may be sown in spring 
under glass, or in a seed-bed. They bear transplanting 
well, and should be set about one foot apart. 




Oianthus Heddewigii. 



163. Dianthus Chinensis {China or Indian 

Pink), single, mixed. Hardy an- 
nual. 1 ft 05 .50 

164. —Chinensis, double, mixed. Hardy 

annual 05 .50 



J^ARKER ^ "^OOD, pEED pATALOGUE. 77 



D I AN THUS — Continued. PE:T . oz . 
£65. Dlanthus Heddewigii diadeinatus, 
double {Diadem Pink), flowers 2 to 3 
inches in diameter, of all tints, from 
delicate rose to the deepest velvety- 
purple, and very double. Hardy 



annual $.10 $2.00 

166. — Crimson Belle, beautiful, vivid crim- 

son-lake flowers, large and beautifully 
laced. Hardy annual 10 

167. — Eastern Queen, beautifully marbled, 

unique, and very attractive. Hardy 
annual . 10 



168. — Heddewigii laciniatus, double {Ja- 

pan Pink) , a beautiful double-fringed 

variety, mixed. Hardy annual, ift., .05 1.50 

169. — Heddewigii, imperialis, double {Im- 

perial Pink), very pretty, mixed. 



Hardy annual. 1 ft 05 1.50 

170. — pluniarius (Pheasant-eye Pink), very 

fragrant. Mixed hardy perennial . .05 .75 

171. — fine mixed 05 1.00 

172. — Caryophyllus, fl. pi., carnation {Per- 

petual, or Tree). The strain we offer 
is unequalled. Hdlf-hardy peren- 
nial ' 40 

173. — Caryophyllus (carnation), German 

double, extra fine. Half-hardy per- 
ennial 25 

174. — Caryophyllus {carnation), Grenadin. 

Hardy perennial 15 

175. — Caryophyllus, good mixed. Hardy 

perennial . 10 

176. — Caryophyllus, Picotee. Hardy peren- 

nial 23 

177. — barbatus {Sweet William), single . .05 .50 

178. — barbatus {Sweet William), double . .10 1.30 




Dinathus Chinensis. 



DIDISCUS. 

A pretty plant, from Australia. Half-hardy annual, xfoot. 
179. Didiscus eoerulus, blue .05 100 

DIGITALIS. 

(See Foxglove, No. 193.) 

DOLICHOS (Hyacinth Bean). 
Very curious climbers and quick growers. In flower July 

and August. Tender annuals. 10 feet, 
480. Dolichos, mixed °S 

ECHEVERIA. 

Very popular plants for bedding or pot culture. A group 
composed of the different varieties can be made one of 
■the most attractive objects in the flower-garden. 



181. Echeveria metallica, broad, large, suc- 

culent leaves, beautifully shaded with 
a purplish glaucous hue. It is a 
greenhouse plant, but grows freely in 
the open ground in summer .... $.23 

ERYTHRINA (Coral Tree). 
A splendid genus of half-hardy shrubs, with beautiful 
scarlet flowers; do well out of doors, if planted in a warm 
situation. 

182. Erythrina crista-galli 20 

ERYSIMUM. 

Free-flowering annuals, blooming in spikes; very effective 
in beds or borders. 1 foot. 

183. Erysimum Arkansanum, yellow ... .05 .50 

ERIANTHUS. 

A noble grass, resembling the Pampas. Perennial, 7 feet. 



184. Erianthus ravennae .05 

ERAGROSTIS ELEGANS (Love Grass). 

A favorite variety, graceful habit. Annual. 2 feet. 

185. Eragrostis elegans 03 




Eschscholtzia. 



ESCHSCHOLTZIA (California Poppy). 
Showy, free-flowering class of plants, with extremely rich 
and beautiful colors. A little difficult to transplant. H 
sown early, will flower the first season from July to Sep- 
tember. Hardy antiual. 

186. Eschscholtzia, fine mixed ..... .05 .40 

187. — Mandarin, beautiful. The 'inner side 

of the petals is of a rich orange color, 
the outward side being the brilliant 
scarlet known as the mandarin scar- 
let IO I.OQ 

188. — Calif ornica, yellow 05 .40 

ETERNAL or EVERLASTING 
FLOWERS. 

(See Helichrysum, No. 230. Also see Acroclini' 
urn, Ammobium, Globe Amaranthus, i?o* 
danthe, Xeranthemum, Nos. 4, 21, 203, 391, 467.) 

EUPHORBIA (Snow on the Mountain). 

189. Euphorbia variegata, flowers and foliage 

beautifully variegated, green and 

white. Tender annual 03 .40 

EVENING PRIMROSE ((Enothera). 
These splendid plants are of the easiest culture, and deserve 
a place in every collection. The flowers open in the latter 
part of the day, making a most brilliant display during 
the evening and early morning. Hardy annuals. 2 feet. 

190. Evening Primrose, fine mixed 05 .75 

FEVERFEW. 

(See Pyrethrum, No. 387.) 

t FORGET-ME-NOT (Myosotis). 

These beautiful little flowers are too well-known to need 
recommendation; will grow around fountains, over damp 
rock-work, or in any moist situation. Half-hardy 
perennial. % foot. 



78 



j^ARKER 8j ^OOD, pEED j^ATALOGUE. 



FO RG ET- M E-NOT— Continued. 

PKT, OZ. 

191. Myosotis palustris {Forget- me -not), 

true $.10 $3.00 

192. — dissitiflora, dark blue, very early, 

quite distinct 10 




Forget-me-not. 

t FOXGLOVE (Digitalis). 
Very ornamental and showy plr its for shrubberies or half- 
shady places. If sown early, will flower the first season. 
In flower July to September, hardy perennials. 2 feet. 

193. Foxglove, fine mixed 05 .75 

FUCHSIA. 

A well-known plant, of easy culture in pots, for conserva- 
tory or parlor decoration, or the open border. Green- 
house perennial, z.% to 3 feet. 

194. Fuchsia, fine mixed 25 

GAILLARDIA. 

Splendid bedding-plants, remarkable for the profusion, size, 
and brilliancy of their colors. Hardy annual. 1 foot. 

195. Gaillardia, Picta Lorenziana, beautiful 

double flowers, fine for bouquets; col- 
ors, golden yellow, orange, claret, and 

amaranth 05 1.00 

196. — fine mixed 05 .60 

197. — grandiflora, scarlet and yellow . . . .05 .60 

GERANIUM (Pelargonium). 
These well-known garden favorites are as indispensable for 
in-door as for out-of-door decoration, and should be exten- 
sively cultivated; the seed we offer having been saved 
from first-class varieties, the amateur has a fair chance of 
raising many charming novelties. Greenhouse peren- 
nial. 

198. Geranium, apple-scented, a favorite va- 

riety. 1 ft. . . . . 25 

199. — scarlet shades, mixed 15 

200. — mixed, beautiful, good for bedding or 

pot culture 10 

GILIA. 

Very pretty dwarf annuals; bloom in almost any situation, 
grow well in pots, and may be placed in a rockery. In 
flower June to August. Hardy annuals. 1 foot. 




GLOBE AMARANTHUS (Gomphrena). 

Useful in many situations as the background of flower bor- 
ders. The flowers are pretty, everlasting, and may be 
cut in summer and preserved for winter bouquets. In 
flower June to October. Half-hardy annuals. 2 feet. 

PKT. oz. 

203. Globe amaranthus, flesh color .... $.05 $.60 

204. — amaranthus, red 05 .60 

205. — amaranthus, golden yellow ... .05 

206. — amaranthus, variegated 05 

207. — amaranthus, orange . . . . . . .05 .60 

208. —am aranthus, white 05 .60 

209. — amaranthus, finest mixed 05 .50 

GLOXINIA. 

A superb genus of greenhouse plants, producing in great 
quantity beautiful flowers of the richest and most brillianfc 
colors. Stove perennial bulbs. 

210. Gloxinia, choice mixed, erect 40 

211. — choice mixed, drooping 40 

GODETIA. 

Plants easily cultivated, and will produce a great quantity 
of flowers, of very brilliant colors. In flower July to 
September. Hardy annuals. 1 foot. 




Gilia 

201. Gilia, finest varieties mixed . . . 

202. — tricolor, white, lilac, and purple 



•OS 



0"/ 0 

Gode'Ja, " Lady Albemarle." 

212. Godetia, fine mixed . .03 

213. — Lady Albemarle, intense carmine crim- 

son, very beautiful .10 

214. — The Bride, white, with crimson edge . .05 

215. — Lady Satin Rose. Certainly a valuable 

acquisition. The flowers are of deep 
rose pink, the surface shining like 
satin . . . , . .05 

216. —Duchess of Albany. One of the best 

introduced. The plants are covered 
with large, satiny, white flowers. . . .oS 



.50 



.50 



J^ARKER ^ ^"OOD, pEED j^ATALOGUE. 



79 



GOURDS (Ornamental). 
A valuable and highly interesting class of climbing plants, 
both on account of their beautiful foliage and their singu- 
lar shaped and curiously marked fruit. The smaller 
fruited varieties are the most neat and ornamental, and 
are eminently adapted for screens and trellis work. In 



flower July to October. Tender annuals. p KT . 0 z. 

217. Gourd Bottle, useful and ornamental . $.05 $.75 

218. — Bottle, miniature, very ornamental . .10 .75 

219. — Dipper, a favorite variety 05 .75 

220. —Pear shape 05 .75 

221. — Snake cucumber, very curious . . . .10 1.00 

222. —Apple striped 05 .75 

223. —Gooseberry, very pretty 05 .75 

224. —Hercules' club, curious, large variety, .05 .75 

225. — Orange, fruit resembles an orange . . .05 .75 

226. — fine mixed, ornamental varieties . . .05 .75 




Snake Cucumber. 
GREVILLEA. 

A handsome plant for house culture, useful for table and 
other decorations. Greenhouse perennial. 



227. Grevillea Bobusta 10 

GYPSOPHILA. 

A pretty, free-flowering little plant, adapted for rock-work, 
baskets, or edgings. Hardy annual. 1% foot. 

228. Gypsophila elegans, white and pink . . .05 .50 



GYNERIUM (Pampas Grass). 

Magnificent, ornamental grass, producing numerous flower- 
stems, surmounted by plumes of silvery inflorescence. 
Half-hardy perennial. 7 feet. 

229. Gynerium argenteum ...... .05 




Helichrysum. 



HELICHRYSUM (Everlasting Flowers). 
These are beautiful plants for the mixed border, and the 
flowers are very much admired for winter bouquets, for 
which they should be cut as soon as they begin to expand, 
and care-fully dried in the shade. In flower July to Octo- 



ber. Hardy annuals. 

230. Helichrysum, fine mixed, all colors . . .05 .75 

231. —Fireball, beautiful, double, crimson 

maroon 10 1.50 

282. — double, crimson °5 -75 

283. — double, white 05 .75 

284. — double, yellow . 05 .75 



t HELIOTROPE. 

Well-known and highly valuable plants, both for the green- 
house and the open border, producing an abundance of 
delightfully fragrant blossoms from May to October. For 
autumn flowering, seeds may be sown in spring. Half* 
hardy perennials. 2 feet. 

fkt. oz. 

235. Heliotrope, finest mixed $.10 $2.00 

t HOLLYHOCK (ALthea). 
This is one of the finest ornamental plants. It has been 
much improved of late, and now produces beautiful 
double flowers of almost every shade of color. If sown 
early in heat, the plants may be had in bloom the first 
year. In flower July to September. Hardy perennial. 

236. Hollyhock, double, fine mixed. 6 ft. . . .0.5 1.50 

237. — double, extra mixed, from prize flowers, .10 2.00 

238. — Chater's prize varieties ..... .25 

t HONESTY (Lunar ia). 
Early summer free-flowering plants, with silvery seed-pods, 
useful for winter decoration with ornamental grasses, etc. 
Hardy biennial. 2 feet. 

239. Honesty, purple .05 .50- 

t HUMEA. 

A remarkable, handsome plant for decorative purposes. 
Leaves very fragrant when slightly rubbed. Succeeds 
best in light, rich soil. Half-hardy biennial. 6 feet. 

240. Humea elegans, red ....... .10 3.00 

IBERIS. 

(See Candytuft, No. 91.) 

ICE PLANT (Mesembryanthemum Crystallinum). 

A pretty trailing-plant much used for garnishing; the leaves 
being covered with crystalline globules, giving it the ap- 
pearance of being coated with ice. In flower July to 
September. Half-hardy annual. % foot. 

241. Ice plant, white 05 

I POME A (Convolvulus). 
These beautiful climbers are well known and much admired. 
All the species delight in a light soil, well manured with 
decayed leaves or well-rotted manure, but will grow in 
almost any soil or situation, and produce an abundance of 
beautiful blossoms. They should be started under glass, 
and afterwards planted in warm, sheltered locations. 
Tender annuals. 10 feet. ' 




Ipomea Coccinea. 



242. Ipomea coccinea (Star Ipomea), scar- 

let .. . 05 .50 

243. —Bona Nox {Evening Glory), pure 

white, fragrant ; expands in the even- 
ing 05 .50 



■l 



So 



^ARKER ^ "^000, jSEED j^ATALOGUE, 



t I POM OPS IS (Standing Cypress). 
Very handsome free-flowering plants, with long spikes of 
dazzling flowers. _ Seed started under glass will com- 
mence blooming in August; good for conservatory and 
out-door decoration. Half-hardy biennial. 

pet. oz. 

244. Ipomopsis, finest mixed ..... . $.05 $1.00 

JACOB EA (Senecio). 
These plants are of easy culture, producing fine double 
flowers of great beauty, in light, rich soil. In flower July 
to September. Hardy annuals. 1 foot. 

245. Jacobea, double mixed 05 .75 



KAULFUSSIA. 

plants of neat, compact growth ; very effec- 
Hardy annual. % foot. 
246. Kaulfussia amelliodes, blue 05 .75 



Free-flowerin_ , 
tive in beds or borders. 



t LANTANA. 

Highly valuable plants of vigorous growth and branching 
habit, producing a profusion of variously colored, bril- 
liant blossoms, constantly changing in hue. They are 
much esteemed either for pot culture or bedding purposes. 
In flower April to November. Half hardy perennial, 
2 feet. 

247. Lantana hybrida, finest varieties ... .05 i.c 

LARKSPUR (Delphinium). 

(For perennial varieties, see Delphinium, No. 159.) 

Very elegant and ornamental plants, producing in great 
variety of form and color some of the most beautiful 
flowers in cultivation. They flourish in any soil or climate, 
and bloom with constant profusion throughout the sum- 
mer and fall. Hardy annuals. 




Larkspur. 

248. Larkspur, double dwarf rocket, fine 

mixed. 1 ft 05 .30 

249. — tall rocket, finest varieties, mixed. 

2% ft. . . 05 .50 

250. — dwarf stock-flowered. Collection in 

12 separate colors 50 

251. — tall stock-flowered. Collection in 8 

separate colors 40 

252. — double stock-flowered, mixed. x% ft. .05 .50 



LAVENDER. 

Cultivated chiefly on account of its delicious fragrance, grow- 
ing freely in any light soil. In flower July and August. 
Hardy perennial. 2 feet. . pet. oz. 

253. Lavendar, lilac $.05 $.25 

LAGURUS OVATUS (Mare's Tail). 
An elegant, well-known, ornamental grass, with fine silky 
heads of flowers. Annual. 1 foot. 

254. Lagurus Ovatus 05 .50 

f LINUM (Flax). 
Very effective and showy bedding-plants, with fine foliage 
and delicate stems. 1% feet. 

255. Linum grandiflorum (Scarlet Flax), an- 

nual . 03 .50 

256. — perenne (perennial) 03 .75 




Lobelia. 
LOBELIA. 

A charming genus of dwarf plants, admirably adapted for 
beds, edgings, and rock-work. Their delicate, drooping 
foliage, and pretty little blue and white flowers, render 
them very attractive in pots or hanging-baskets. In 
flower June to October. Half hardy annuals. 

257. Lobelia speciosa (Crystal - Palace va- 
riety) , one of the best varieties, with 
rich green leaves, and producing a 
succession of beautiful intense blue 
flowers. y 2 ft 

258. — Paxtonia, pure white, with sky-blue 

belt. % ft . 

259. — pumila inagnifica. Very dwarf habit, 
with a profusion of dark-blue flowers. 
% ft 

260. — White Gem. The best white variety, 
very compact, and free flowering. %ft. 

261. — cardinalis, scarlet, splendid, hardy 

herbaceous plant. 2 ft. .... . . 

262. — Queen Victoria. _ Dark scarlet ; dark 
1 eaves and very brilliant flowers ; splen- 
did. 2 ft. . . 



LOPHOSPERMUM. 

A genus of beautiful climbing plants, with pretty, showy,. 

Foxglove-like flowers. They will thrive in any light, rich 

soil. Half-hardy annuals. 10 feet. 
264. Lophospermuni scandens, rosy purple, .10 

LUPINUS. 

A splendid genus of handsome and ornamental garden plants,, 
with long, graceful flower-spikes of rich and varied colors ' r 
valuable for mixed borders. In flower June to October. 

Hardy annuals. 



.10 2.oo> 



3.00. 
.10 5.00- 



265. Lupinus, annual varieties, mixed 

266. —blue 



•05 
•05 



.30 
.40 



f LYCHNIS. 

A genus of handsome and ornamental plants, of easy culti- 
vation in any good, rich soil. In flower June and July. 
Hardy perennials. 2 feet. 
267. Lychnis chalcedonica, fine border plant, 

scarlet 0 < 



jP ARKER ^ Y°O d i pEED ^ ATALO GUE. 



8r 



LYCH N IS — Continued. PKT . 0 z. 
Lychnis chalcedonica alba, fine, white 

variety $.05 $.50 



, — finest mixed 05 



.50 




Lychnis. 



MARIGOLD (Tagetes). 
Well-known, free-flowering plants, with handsome double 
flowers of rich and beautiful colors. The African, the tall- 
est, is also the most striking in large beds, mixed flower, 
and shrubbery borders. The dwarf French is used as fore- 
ground to taller plants, and makes splendid compact edg- 
ings to beds or borders. Half-hardy annuals. 

270. Marigold, African lemon. Large dou- 

ble lemon flowers 05 

271. — orange, large double orange flowers. . .05 

272. — fine mixed 05 

273. — French gold striped, magnificent yel- 

low flowers striped with brown . . . .05 % 

275. — tagetes signata pumila, "golden 

ring," admirable bedding plant, with 
gracefully cut foliage, covered with pure 
yellow flowers, compact habit 05 

276. — meteor (calendula officinalis), perfectly 

double and beautifully striped, the pe- 
tals having a creamy center edged with 
orange yellow 05 .40 

277. — Prince of Orange, like "Meteor" but 

darker in color ; a very profuse and con- 
stant bloomer, highly recommended . .05 .40 




MALOPE. 

Beautiful plants, of branching habit, producing their large- 
flowers in great profusion; very showy in mixed borders. 
Hardy annuals. 2 feet. PKT . 0 z. 

279. Malope Grandiflora, crimson. . . . . $.05 $.40 

280. — mixed fine .05 .40 

MAURANDYA. 

None of the climbing-plants exceed these in beauty. They 
are particularly adapted for greenhouse culture, but sue* 
ceed well plunged in the open border during the warm 
weather. In flower July to October. Half-hardy per 
ennials. 10 feet. 

281. Maurandya, fine mixed . 10 3.00 




French Marigold. 

t MARVEL OF PERU, or FOUR 
O'CLOCKS (Mirabilis). 
Very picturesque plants, with flowers of great variety of 
color, which contrast finely with their dark-green, glossy 
foliage. They are of easy culture in any common soil. 
In flower July to October. Half-hardy perennials. 
278. Marvel Of Peru, fine mixed. 2 ft. . . .05 .25 



Maurandya. 

MIGNONETTE (Reseda). 

The mignonette is universally esteemed for its delicate per- 
fume and singularly pretty spikes of bloom. If well 
thinned out at an early stage, the growth of flower and. 
foliage will be greatly facilitated. In flower June to Octo- 
ber. Hardy annual. 1 to i% feet. 

282. Mignonette, sweet {Reseda Odorato), 

per pound, $1.50 05 .15 

283. — Parsons's white, very fragrant, highly 

recommended , 05 .25 

284. — Miles's hybrid spiral, profuse bloom- 

ing, very fragrant 10 1.00 

285. —Giant Crimson, large flowering, showy, .05 .30 

286. — " Machet." New and distinct, of vig- 

orous, pyramidal growth, with thick, 
dark-green leaves, and deliciously 
scented red flowers 10 1.00 

287. — Victoria, strong growing, with dark- 

red flowers . . " ' 10 .50. 

288. — Golden (Jueen. A distinct variety, of 

great merit ; flowers are a rich yellow 

color, and very fragrant 10 .75, 

tMIMULUS. 

Handsome and free-flowering plants, with singularly shaped! 
and brilliantly colored flowers. Half hardy perennials^ 
2 feet. 

289. Mimulus cardinalis, scarlet 10 

290. — duplex, double, tiger-spotted 10 

291. — choice mixed . . 10 




Mirabiu's. 




Mimulus. 

MORNING GLORY, TALL 

(Convolvulus Major). 

A well-known and beautiful free-flowering class of climbers,, 
with brilliant and varied colored flowers, growing freely 
in almost any situation. Half-hardy annuals. 10 feet. 

292. Morning Glory, tall, finest varieties mixed, .05 .20. 



82 



j^ARKER 8f ^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE, 



MORNING GLORY, DWARF 

(Conuoluulus Minor). 
'Beautiful, free-flowering, and remarkably showy plants, with 
exceedingly handsome rich-colored flowers, producing in 
beds and mixed borders an unusually brilliant effect, either 
in distinct colors, ribboned, or mixed. Half-hardy an- 
nuals, i foot. PET 

293. Morning Glory, dwarf, fine mixed . . $.05 $.20 

MOMORDICA. 

Trailing-plants, with curious ornamental foliage; the fruit 
is golden yellow in color, and, when ripe, opens, disclos- 
ing its seeds and brilliant carmine interior. Half-hardy 
annuals. 

291. Momordica balsamina {balsam apple) . .05 .50 

295. — Charantia {balsam pear) 05 .50 

MOURNING BRIDE. 

(See Scabiosa, No. 411.) 

t MUSK PLANT (Mimuius). 

This fragrant and universally favorite little plant is equally 
at home in the sitting-room, greenhouse, or flower-garden. 

Half-hardy perennial. 

296. N.mk~PliLi\t{mimulusmoschattis). % ft., 
■297. — New Giant. This improvement on the 

old variety of musk is sure to find 
favor with all lovers of this fragrant 
flower. Habit of growth, erect, with 
stems four times larger than the old 
variety, and with a corresponding in- 
crease in size of blossom. Color, rich 
golden-yellow; and the plant emits a 
perfume far exceeding any of its class, 



•05 



•15 



MYOSOTIS. 

(See Forget-me-not, No. 191.) 




Nasturtium, Dwarf. 

NASTURTIUM, DWARF (Tropceolum Nanum). 
Beautiful plants, flowering all through the season. The 
foliage of most varieties is light green, clear and beautiful 
Flowers large, of all the different shades of yellow, orange 
and red; very brilliant. They are among the most useful 
and beautiful of garden favorites for bedding, massing, or 
ribboning. Half hardy annuals. 1 foot. 

298. Nasturtium, dwarf, Golden King, 

golden yellow blossoms o< 2 c 

299. — Ruby King, flowers very dark . . . \o S ! 2 < 
$00. — spotted, yellow, spotted with crimson . .05 .'25 



PKT. OB. 

301. Nasturtium, dwarf, scarlet $.05 $.25 

302. — Crystal - Palace gem, sulphur color, 

spotted with maroon 05 .25 

303. — The Pearl, nearly white 05 .23 

304. — Empress of India, splendid new dark- 

leaved variety with crimson flowers . . .05 .30 

305. — King of Tom Thumbs, intense scarlet, 

dark foliage, one of the best 05 .25 

306. — King Theodore, darkest shade of crim- 

son, dark foliage extra 05 .25 

307. — fine mixed 05 .25 

NASTURTIUM, TALL. 

See Tropaeolum, No. 446, for choicer varieties. 

Well-known, profuse-flowering, plants, admirably adapted 
for rock-work, banks, covering trellises, or rustic work; 
the seeds, if picked young, are an excellent substitute for 
capers. Hardy annuals. 6 feet. 

308. Nasturtium, tall, striped 05 .15 

309. — coccineum, scarlet 05 .15 

310. — red, blood color, beautiful 05 .15 

311. — Dunnett's orange, beautiful dark 

orange .' .05 .15 

312. — spotted, very pretty 05 .15 

313. — mixed 05 .15 




(Enothera. 



NEMOPHILA (Love Grove). 
A popular plant, of dwarf spreading habit, well adapted for 

border or pot culture. Hardy annual, J A foot. 
311. Nemophila insignis, blue .... 05 2* 

315. — mixed .05 .25 

t NIEREMBERGIA. 

Charming little plants, which flower profusely during the 
whole summer ; well adapted for hanging-baskets and 
edgings. Half-hardy perennial. 

316. Nierembergia, white and blue 05 

NIG ELLA (Love in a Mist). 
Curious hardy annuals, with finely cut leaves, very singular 
flowers and quite showy; sometimes called Love in a 
/Uzst, from the extraordinary motion manifested by the 
stamens. Grows freely in any common garden soil. In 
flower June to August. Hardy annuals. 

317. Nigella Dam'ascena, fine blue. 1 ft. . . 05 • .40 

318. — nana, double, blue and white. % ft. . .'05 .40 

NOLANA. 

Beautiful trailing-plants, with prostrate stems, unsurpassed 
for rock- work, pots, baskets, or vases ; convolvulus-shaped 
flowers, of various brilliant colors. Hardy annual. % 
foot. 

319. Nolana, fine mixed 05 .40 

OENOTHERA (Evening Primrose). 
(See No. 190.) 

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES. 

(See Nos. 52, 74, i 4 o, 184, 185, 229, 254, 424, 469.) 



'ARKER 8j Y OOD ' pEED pAtALOGUE. 



83 



tOXALIS, 

A well-known class of plants, with brilliant colored flowers 
and dark foliage; suitable for either greenhouse or out- 
door decoration. Half-hardy perennials. PKT . 0 z. 

820. Oxalis corniculata purpurea. As a 

dwarf, bronze-foliage plant, this little 
oxalis is unequalled. It has been used 
in the public parks of Chicago and 
Boston for the past two years with ad- 
mirable effect $.10 

821. — rosea, rose-eolored ; flowers freely. % ft. .10 

PANSY, or HEARTS-EASE (Viola Tricolor). 
These splendid flowers are universal favorites, both with 
florists and amateurs. For spring and summer flowering, 
sow in August or September, and protect during winter 
in cold frame, or cover with evergreen boughs. They 
will flower better during the hot weather if placed in a 
shady location. For autumn-flowering, sow in spring, 
and pinch off the buds till the heat of summer is past. 
They thrive best in a loamy, rich soil. Hardy peren- 
nials. l /i foot. 

322. Pansy, English fancy, extra choice . . .25 

323. — extra, choice mixed ; saved from one 

of the finest collections in Europe . . .25 8.00 

324. — Emperor William, flowers brilliant 

blue, with a well-defined eye of purple 

violet xo 2.00 

325. — fine mixed 05 I Z 5 

826. — Lord Beaconsfield, purple violet . . .10^.00 

327. — largest flowered. A famous Scotch 

strain, unequalled for color and size . .25 

328. — Odier, or blotched, large, flowers 

beautifully blotched, perfect in size 

and form 25 6.00 

829. — Faust, or King Of the Blacks, a fine 
bedding variety, with uniform coal- 
black flowers 10 2.00 

330. —white, pure white flowers; fine for 

cemeteries 10 2.00 

331. — Belgian, or fancy, large flowers, beau- 

tifully blotched 25 5.00 

332. — collection containing 12 beautiful va- 

rieties, separate 75 




English Pansy. 



PASSIFLORA, 01- PASSION-FLOWER. 

^ class of exceedingly beautiful climbing-plants, producing 
a profusion of curious flowers during the summer and 
autumn in the open border, and are also valuable for the 
conservatory. Half-hardy perennial. 10 feet. 

833. Passiflora coerulea, sky blue 10 

PEAS, SWEET (Lathyrus Odoratus). 
These are among the most useful and beautiful of the hardy 
annuals. They will attain a considerable height in rich 
soil, and bloom throughout the season if the flowers are 
cut freely and tbey are not allowed to ripen seed. Hardy 
annuals. 6 feet. 



834. Peas, sweet, mixed. Per lb., 75 cents . . .05 .10 

835. — white 05 10 

336. — striped, . , os .10 

337. — skyhlue, 05 .10 

338. — Crown Princess of Prussia, delicate 

blush, very fine .05 .10 



pkt. oz. 



339. — Butterfly, white, tinted lilac, extra .05 .10 

340. *— Painted Lady, rose and white . . . .05 .id 

341. — Invincible scarlet, a beautiful deep 

scarlet variety 05 .10- 

342. — everlasting, (lathyrus latifolius), per- 

ennial ............ .05 .40 



PENTSTEMON. 

Very ornamental perennials, with long, graceful spikes of 
fine-shaped and richly colored flowers. One of the most- 
effective and free-flowering of border and bedding plants; 
succeeds in any soil. In flower August to September. 
Half-hardy perennial. 2 feet. 

348. Pentstemon, fine mixed 10 

PAPAVER. 

(See Poppy, No. 363.) 




Petunia, 
t PETUNIA. 

These well-known and much-admired plants are of' the 
easiest culture, and produce a profusion of flowers during 
the season. In flower July to October. Half-hardy 



annuals. 

344. Petunia nyctaginiflora, white, fragrant. 

2 ft i . . .05- i.oo> 

345. — Phoenicia, small, deep purple, an abun- 

dant bloomer. 2 ft . .05 l.os> 

346. — New double fringed, a most beautiful 

variety . .25 

347. — hybrida grandiflora, magnificent 

flowers, of extra large size, beautifully 
fringed and variegated ; extra choice . .25- 

348. — marginata, bordered and veined with 

green. 2 ft .20. 

349. — intus aurea, "new yellow throated," 

large veined flowers, with beautiful 
deep-yellow throat ; extra .fine . . . .50 
850. — hybrida nana compacta. A compact 
"growing bush, resembling a natural- 
grown bouquet; ' very effective in 
masses or pots. %. f t 25 

351. — Countess of Ellesmere, rose with 

white throat, very pretty 05 1.00 

851>£. — Nyctaginiflora, pure white ... .05 1.00 

352. — fine mixed 05 .75 

353. — extra double mixed 25 



PERILLA. 

As an ornamental foliage plant, the Perilla claims attention. 
Its blackish-purple stem and leaves form a good contrast 
to the silvery foliage of Cineraria maritima, or the 
green of other plants. Half-hardy annual. x% foot. 

354. Perilla Nankinensis --05 

PELARGONIUM. 

(See Geranium, No. 198.) 



•§4 



^ARKER 8j ^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGU E. 



i.oo 

I.OO 
I.OO 

•75 



i. So 



PHLOX DRUMMONDII. 

■For brilliant effect and continuous blooming in the flower- 
garden, it is hardly possible to overestimate the Phlox 
Drummondii. As a plant of simple culture and accom- 
modating habit, it is not excelled by any annual in culti- 
vation. Half-hardy annuals, to 2 feet. PK t. oz. 
1555. Phlox Drunuuondii alba, pure white .05 
356. — alba oculata, white with crimson eye .05 
857. — splendens, large bright scarlet, extra .05 

358. — fine mixed 05 

35!). — grandirlora finest mixed, an im- 
proved variety, with unusually large 

flowers of great substance 10 

360. — perenniaCfine mixed 05 

PHASEOLUS (Runner Bean). 
Beautiful and popular climbers. 12 feet. 
"361. Phaseolus coccinea {scarlet rtinner) . .05 .10 
362. —white-flowered 05 .10 

PINK. 

(See Diantlms, No. 163.) 

POPPY (Papauer). 
A tribe of remarkably showy free-flowering plants, produ- 
cing a rich and effective display in large, mixed borders, 
shrubberies and plantations. They grow freely in any 
common soil. In flower June to oeptember. Hardy 
annuals. 2 feet. 

-863. Poppy, carnation - flowered, choice 

double mixed 05 

■364. — paeony-flowered, double mixed ... .05 

365. — ranunculus-flowered, double mixed . .05 

366. — umbrosum, immense single flowers of 
brilliant crimson color, large black 

blotch in centre 05 

orientale, superb, scarlet flowers often 

six inches across ; hardy perennial . .05 1.00 
Danebrog, single, brilliant flowers, 
silvery - white spot on each petal, 
forming a white Maltese cross on red 

ground 10 1.00 

finest double mixed 05 .25 

finest single mixed 10 1.00 



367. — ( 



369. 
870. 



•25 
.25 

•25 

.60 



PORTULACA. 

For brilliancy, delicacy, diversity, and beauty of color, the 
Portulaca surpasses all other out-door plants. It luxuri- 
ates in light soils and sunny situations, rapidly carpeting 
the ground with its flowers and foliage. For small beds, 
edgings, rock-work, or hanging-baskets, it is incompara- 
bly the finest annual grown. In flower July to October. 
Half-hardy annuals. % foot. 











■05 








•05 


•75 




7.00 



372. — caryophylloi'des ( carnation -like), 
white and crimson, striped .... 
• 373. — splendens, crimson purple, very fine . 

374. — Thellusonii, fine scarlet 

375. — finest mixed, many varieties . 
876. —grandiflora, double mixed . . . . 
376£. — grandiflora, extra fine double mixed ; 

producing all colors, and remaining 

a long time in flower 15 



t PRIMULA. 

The strains ive offer ^of this favorite plant are from 
the best English growers, and cannot be sttrpassed. 

A charming, profuse-flowering plant, indispensable for win- 
ter and spring decoration in the conservatory: succeeds 
best in sandy loam and leaf mould. Greenhouse per- 
ennials. 

^377. Primula sinensis fimbriata alba, 

pure white fringed flowers, extra 

choice 4 o 

'378. — rubra, splendid dark red, large fringed 

flowers, extra choice 4Q 

•379. — finest mixed, from finest fringed sorts [25 
-380. — fern leaved, finest mixed varities of 

brightest colors, extra choice ... .40 



PKT. OZ. 

381. — double flowering, pure white extra .50 

382. — double flowering, brilliant red extra .50 

The double varieties are very choice, beautiftdly fringed. 
This seed produces a large percentage of double flowers. 




Primula. 



tPYRETHRUM (Feverfew). 
Very valuable plants, producing an abundance of flowers 
throughout the entire season. They are of easy culture 
in any rich soil. Hardy perennials. 

387. Pyrethrum hybriduin (Feverfew), 

fine mixed, from best hybrid varieties, .10 $.75 

388. — double white 10 .75 

389. —Golden Feather {Parthenifoliuin 

auretim), golden foliage, fine for rib- 
bons, borders, etc. 10 1.50 

PERSIAN INSECT PLANT. The so- 
called "Persian Insect Powder" is 
obtained from the flowers of these 
plants. They also destroy insects on 
plants growing near them. They are 
highly ornamental for gardens. 

390. Pyrethrum carneum {Persian Insect 

Plant), flesh color 10 3.00 

391. — roseum {Persian Insect Plant), light 

red . % . . . . 10 3.00 

RESEDA. 

(See Mignonette, No. 282.) 

RHODANTHE. 

The most delicate and beautiful of our everlasting flowers; 
bell-shaped before fully expanded. Flowers when gath- 
ered young make very handsome winter bouquets. Thrive 
best m a light, rich soil, and a warm situation. In flower 
July to September. Half hardy annuals. 




Rhodanthe. 



392. Rhodanthe Manglesii, rose-colored, ex- 
cellent for pot culture ...... .05 



j^ARKER & ^OOD, pEBD pATALOGUE. 



85 



RHODANTHE - Continued. 

PKT OZ 

393. Rhodanthe atrosanguinea, flowers dark 

purplish crimson ....... $.10 

394. — silvery white 05 $1.00 

RICINUS (Castor-Oil Bean). 
These plants are cultivated for the stately, picturesque, 
and highly ornamental character of their growth and 
foliage. From seed they quickly attain gigantic propor- 
tions, and are ornamental till destroyed by frost. Hardy 
anuals. 

395. Ricinus Iborboniensis, splendid large 

leaves, beautiful. 15 ft 05 .30 

-396. — sanguineus, blood-red stalks, scarlet 

fruit, producing a grand effect. 10 ft., .05 .30 



403. Salpiglossis, fine mixed, tall flowering. 

t% ft $.10 $1.00 

404. — dwarf, mixed. 1 ft. . . 05 .75 





Ricinus. 

t ROCKET (Hesperis). 
These will be much improved by transplanting into light 
and very rich soil as soon as they are through flowering. 
If sown early, will flower the first season. In flower July 
to September. Hardy perennials. 1% foot. 

397. Rocket, mixed 05 .40 

ROSE CAMPION (Agrostemma). 
Exceedingly handsome, showy, free-flowering plants, strik- 
ingly effective in mixed or shrubbery borders. Hardy 
perennials. x% feet. 

398. Rose Campion, rose 05 .75 

-399. — white, with rose centre 05 .75 

ROSE OF HEAVEN. 

(See Viscaria,, No. 463.) 

ROSE, AFRICAN (Hibiscus Africanus). 

-A beautiful annual, of the easiest culture, producing double, 
semi-double, and single flowers, all handsome, sporting in 
a thousand different varieties of scarlet, crimson, purple, 
pink, white, variegated, and party-colored, and continuing 
a long time in bloom. Hardy annuals. 1% feet. 

•400. Rose, African, buff, with maroon centre • -05 .5° 

ROSE. 

Too well known to require any description. The culture of 
the rose from seed is very simple, generally rewarding the 
amateur with flowers the second year. 

401. Rose, hybrid perpetual 15 

402. — French hybrids 15 

SALPIGLOSSIS. 

"These have very richly colored, funnel-shaped blossoms, 
purple, crimson, clear yellow, and buff, beautifully marbled, 
with fine shades of light blue. The dwarf varieties are 
very desirable. They are of the easiest culture, and thrive 
well in any light, rich soil, and deserve more general cul- 
tivation. In flower July to September. Half-hardy 
annuals. 



Salpiglossis. 

t SALVIA (Scarlet Sage). 
Splendid plants, both for pot culture and for beds or borders, 
growing freely in any light, rich soil, and producing beau- 
tiful spikes of gay flowers in the greatest profusion. In 
flower July to October. Half-hardy perennials. 

405. Salvia coccinea, scarlet, large and showy. 

2 ft 05 1 .00 

406. — coccinea splendens, bright scarlet . . .10 1.50 

407. — patens, splendid deep-blue flowers i . .20 

SANVITALIA. 

A beautiful little plant, well adapted for small beds and rock- 
work. The flowers are large in proportion to the size of 
the plant, and of a rich brown and yellow color. Thrives 
best in a light, rich soil, and continues in bloom during the 
summer and autumn months. Hardy annuals. % foot. 

408. Sanvitalia procumbens, fl. pi., beautiful 
bright yellow double flowers 05 .75 

SAPONARIA. 

Charming little plants, producing masses of minute cross- 
shaped blossoms ; admirable for bedding. Should be cut 
back when out of flower, for late blooming. Hardy an* 
nuals. y% foot. 

409. Saponaria calabrica, bright, rosy pink . .05 .75 

410. — calabrica alba, pure white 05 .75 

SCABIOSA (Mourning Bride). 
Very showy plants, with beautifully variegated flowers, 
very valuable for cutting for bouquets and other orna- 
ments. They embrace nearly all colors, from very dark 
to white. Sow quite early in the spring, in the open bor- 
der. Hardy annuals. 




Mourning Bride. 

411. Scabiosa atropurpurea major, finest 

mixed. 2 ft. . . . . . . . . . 

412. — dwarf, double varieties, mixed, very 

pretty. 1 ft 05 



05 



86 



J^ARKER 8j- ^yOOD, jSEED j^ATALOGUE. 



SCHIZANTHUS. 

These are elegant, slender-branched plants, with very con- 
spicuous flowers, good for the open border or pot culture. 
If wanted for spring flowering, should be sown in Sep- 
tember, and protected during the winter. In flower July 
and August. Half-hardy annuals. i% to 2 feet. 

fkt. oz. 

413. Schizanthus, fine mixed, many varieties, $.05 $.50 

SEDUM (Stonecrop). 
A pretty little plant, growing freely on rock or rustic work. 
Hardy annual. % foot. 

414. Sedum coeruleum, blue 10 2.00 

SENSITIVE PLANT (Mimosa). 

Very curious and interesting plants, their leaves closing if 
touched or shaken. It requires starting in heat, and must 
not be put in the open ground until the weather is quite 
warm. In flower July and August Half-hardy annual. 
2 feet. 

415. Sensitive Plant (mimosa pudica), pink- 

ish white 05 .75 




422. Statice Incana hybrida, mixed colors. 

1 ft $.10 

423. — Suworowi (annual), very beautiful 

novelty. Each plant throws up ten 
to fifteen spikes, about sixteen inches 
long, of bright rose flowers; blooms 
from May to October 10 , 



Sensitive Plant. 

SILENE. 

(See Catchfly, No. 101.) 

SMI LAX (Myrsiphyllum Asparagoides). 
A beautiful winter climbing-plant, adapted to the conserva- 
tory. Nothing can excel this plant in beauty of foliage 
and orange fragrance of the flower. It is extensively used 
for bouquets and floral decorations of every description. 
Greenhouse perennial. 6 feet. 

416. Smilax (roots, 25 cents) 10 

SNAPDRAGON (Antirrhinum). 
These are beautiful summer and autumn flowering plants, 
in great variety of colors, amongst which are many richly 
spotted and striped. When sown early, producing flowers 
the first season. Half-hardy perennials. 

417. Snapdragon, tall, mixed. 2 ft. ... .05 .75 

418. — dwarf, mixed. y 2 ft 05 .75 

SOLAN UM (Jerusalem Cherry). 
A class of beautiful, ornamental, fruit-bearing plants, useful 
for conservatory or drawing-room decoration. Half- 
hardy annuals. 

419. Solanum Capsicastrum, scarlet fruit . . .10 

420. — Fontanesianum, yellow fruit ... .10 

421. — mixed 10 

t STATICE. 

Interesting plants of easy culture;- the flowers are valuable 
for winter bouquets. Half-hardy perennial. 




Stipa Pennata. 
tSTIPA. 

Ornamental grass of much beauty, used in the formation of 
winter bouquets. Hardy perennial. 2 feet. 

424. Stipa pennata (feather grass) ... .05 $i.ocr 

STOCKS, TEN-WEEK (Mathioia). 

The Ten-week Stock is the most universally cultivated, and 
usually blooms 10 to 12 weeks after being sown. They 
grow from 6 to 15 inches high, and when cultivated in 
rich soil, and occasionally watered with weak guana 
water, throw out an immense quantity of lateral spikes of 
bloom, so that each plant forms a perfect bouquet; and it 
would indeed be difficult to surpass the grand effect pro- 
duced in beds or ribbons by these exquisite gems. Half- 
hardy anmials. 1 foot. 

425. Stocks, Ten-week, dwarf, fine mixed . .05 2.50- 

426. — Ten-week, large flowering, extra fine 

mixed 10 2,00 

427. — Ten-week, large. flowering, crimson . .10 4.00 

428. — Ten -week, large-flowering, purple . . .10 4.00 

429. — Ten-week, large-flowering, pure white .10 4.00 

430. — Ten-week, large-flowering, yellow . . .10 4.00- 

431. — Ten-week, large-flowering, German. 

Collection in 12 separate colors' . . . .75 

432. — Ten-week, large-flowering German. 

Collection in 6 separate colors . . . .40 
— Ten-week, new Giant Perfection Col- 
lection containing 8 separate colors . .75 
432%.— Ten-week, new Giant Perfection, mxd. .10 

STOCKS, INTERMEDIATE. 

The Intermediate varieties are prized on account of their 
flowering late in the autumn; also as pot plants for early 
spring blooming, for which purpose they should be sown 
in July or August, and kept from hard frost during winter. 
Plants treated in this way, and planted out in May, make- 
a rich display during the early summer months. 

433. Stocks, Intermediate, or Autumn- 

flowering, extra choice mixed . . .15 

STOCKS, BROMPTON AND EMPEROR. 

The Brompton variety branch a great deal, and are very 
bushy, making, when in bloom, a grand display. The 
Emperor may be treated in the same manner as the Inter- 
mediate. They frequently last several years if protected 
from frost. 



J^ARKER 8f Y OOD i jSEED pATALOGUE. 



STOCKS — Continued. 

PKT. OZ 

*34. Stocks, Brompton, or Winter, extra 
choice mixed. Half-hardy biennial. 
2 ft . . . . . $. IS 

435. — Emperor, or Perpetual, extra choice 

mixed. Half-hardy perennial r . .15 

SUNFLOWER (Helianthus). 
A genus of well-known, tall-growing plants, with large, 
brilliant yellow flowers. They are very effective in 
proper situations, in large shrubbery borders, or as 
screens. Hardy annuals. 

436. Sunflower, Mammoth Russian, fine. 

6 ft .05 .25 

437. —Miniature (true Msthetic). This 

aesthetic little flower has become quite 
• a favorite of late, especially for bouquet 
wear. The plant grows about 1 foot 
high, is a free-bloomer, highly orna- 
mental for beds and borders. The 
flower is about 1 inch in diameter, 
with dark centre, with an overlapping 
row of broad, deep golden yellow 
petals. Sow in light soil in March 
or April, in a cold-frame or hot-bed. 
Transplant to about 18 inches apart 
each way. It will bloom in the open 
ground from June to October ... .05 .50 

438. — Globosus, large, yellow, double flowers, .05 .25 

439. — Green-centred, double, very showy 

flowers 05 .25 

440. — Mrs. Langtry, single, very -showy, 

dark centre 10 .75 

SWEET CLOVER (Tri folium odoratum). 

441. Sweet Clover, very pretty and fragrant, 

white. Hardy annual. 2 ft. . . .05 

SWEET PEAS. 

(See Peas, No. 334.) 

SWEET SULTAN. 

(See Centaurea Moschata, No. 108.) 

SWEET WILLIAM. 

<See Dianthus Barbatus, No. 177.) 

TACETES. 

(See Marigold, No. 270.) 

THUNBERG1A. 

These are beautiful, half-hardy, profuse-flowering annuals 
of twining habit, and are among the most elegant plants 
in the summer conservatory, or in a warm, sheltered spot 
in the open border. They delight in rich, loamy soil. In 
flower July to October. Half-hardy annuals, \feet. 

442. Thunbergia alata, yellow or buff, with 

dark eye _ ... .05 .80 

443. — aurantiaca, bright orange, with dark 

eye . . . °5 

444. — Bakerii, pure white ........ .05 .80 

445. —finest mixed °S - 8o 



beautifully marked flowers; for covering trellises, veran- 
das, and bowers; for bedding purposes they are unsur- 
passed. 6 feet. 




446. Tropseolum, Lobbianum Caroline 

Schmidt, deep scarlet, a most beau- 
tiful variety 

447. — Lobbianum Geant des Batailles, 

brilliant carmine, fine 

448. — Lobbianum Boi des Noirs, almost 

black 

449. — Lobbianum, Spitfire, brilliant scarlet 

450. — Lobbianum, finest mixed ..... 



$.10 $.50. 



•50 



•5° 
•5° 
•So 




TROP/EOLUM (Nasturtium). 
Elegant-growing, profuse-flowering, and easily cultivated 
climbers, combining with these important qualities great 
ffichness and brilliancy of color, with finely formed and 



Tropseolum Lobbianum. 
VENUS' LOOKING-GLASS. 

Pretty, dwarf plants, particularly adapted for beds, ribbons, 
or edgings. In flower June to August. Hardy an- 
nuals. y<2. foot. 

451. Venus' Looking-Glass, fine mixed . . .05 .50 

tVERBENA. 

Well-known plants of great beauty and variety. When 
sown early, will flower the first season. In flower May 
to October. Half-hardy perennials. 

452. — Hybrida, choice mixed, saved only 

from the most beautiful named flowers .10 3 .00 

453. — Defiance, beautiful, deep scarlet . . .15 4-00 

454. — Italian Striped, mixed 15 3-°° 

455. — Candidissima, the best pure white . .10 3.00 

456. — fine mixed 05 1.50 

457. — Aubletia, reddish purple . . . ... . .05 

458. — Montana, bright rose, hardy perennial .05 
458)^. — Lemon-scented (Aloysia citroidia). 

Half-hardy shrub 10 

VINCA. 

A genus of beautiful greenhouse shrubs. _ If sown early in 
heat, and transplanted to a warm situation in the garden 
about May or June, they will flower beautifully in the 
autumn, and may be potted for the house before frost. 
iVzfeet. 

459. Vinta, finest mixed 10 1.50 

VIOLET (Viola odorata). 
A well known favorite, much in demand on account of its 
profusion of bloom and delightful fragrance. Hardy 
perennial. Yo. foot. 

460. Viola odorata (Sweet Violet), blue . . .10 

461. — " The Czar," light violet, very fragrant, .10 

VIRGINIAN STOCK. 

Very pretty, free-flowering little plants, useful for small beds, 
baskets, or edgings. Hardy annual. % foot. 

462. Virginian Stock, fine mixed, red and 

white 05 .50 



^ARKER 8j yOOD, ^EED j^ATALO GUE. 



VISCARIA (Rose of Heaven). 

Remarkably pretty, free-flowering plants, growing freely in 
any good garden soil. In flower July to August. Hardy 
annuals. fkt. oz. 

468. Viscaria, finest mixed $.05 $.50 




Viscaria. 

WALLFLOWER (Cheiranthus cheiri). 

These well-known plants are prized for the fragrance of 
their flowers, and for coming early into blossom. In 
flower June to August. Half-hardy perennials. 2 feet. 

464. Wallflower, fine mixed, single 05 .40 

465. — finest German, mixed, double ... .10 4.00 

466. — Covent Garden strain, true 10 1.00 

WHITLAVIA. 

A beautiful, free-flowering plant, suitable for beds or mixed 
borders, and growing freely in common garden soil. 
Hardy annual. 1 foot. 



467. Whitlavia Gloxoinoides, tube of corolla 

pure white and delicate light blue . . $.05 $.40. 

XERANTHEMUM. 

These are very beautiful, everlasting flowers, highly prized 
for winter bouquets. In flower July to September. 
Hardy annuals. 2 feet. 

468. Xeranthemum, fine mixed 05 1.00- 




Xeranthemum. 

ZEA (Ornamental Maize). 
Valuable sub-tropical plant. Japonica is much prized fog- 
its beautiful variegated foliage. 3 feet. 

469. Zea Japonica. Annual 05 .15 

ZINNIA. 

The Zinnias are a splendid class of free-flowering plants,., 
producing blossoms in great variety of colors, which re- 
tain their beauty till destroyed by frost. For early flow- 
ering, sow under glass, and_ transplant when the weather 
becomes warm; for later, in the open ground in May,. 
For flowering, the plants should be set 18 to 20 inches 
apart. Half-hardy annuals. 2 feet. 

470. Zinnia elegans, double, mixed 05 

471. — elegans, double, purple 05 

472. —elegans, double, scarlet ..... .05 

473. —elegans, double, white 05 

474. —elegans, dwarf, double, mixed. . . .10 1.0c- 



JfOPULAR SlLIMBING t^INES, ETC. 

Description and prices -will be found in Catalogue under numbers here shown*. 



No. 7. Adlumia cirrtiosa. 

25. Aristolochia sipho. 

90. Canary-bird Flower. 
124. Clematis. 
127. Cofoaea Scandens. 
292. Convolvulus Major. 
145. Cyprus Vine. 



No. 53. Cardiospermum. 
242. Ipomea. 
294. Momordica. 
308. Nasturtium, tall. 
217. Ornamental Gourds* 
334. Sweet Peas. 
442. Thunbergia. 



Blower Seeds. 

SUITABLE FOR PLANTING IN HANGING BASKETS AND WINDOW BOXES*. 



No. 8. Agerattim Mexicanum. 

13. Alyssum, Sweet. 

22. Anagallis. 

88. Calandrina grandiflora. 
104. Centaurea gymnocarpa. 
103. Centaurea candidissima. 
137. Convolvulus Mauritanicus. 

91. Candytuft. 
387. Feverfew. 



No. 202. Gilia tricolor. 

246. Kaulfussia amelloides.. 

257. ILobelia speciosa. 

282. Mignonette. 

296. Musk Plant. 

293. Morning Glory, dwarfo- 

314. Nemophila insignis. 

452. Verbena. 



^AI\KEI\ 8f "^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 89 



Summer • f lowering * Iulbs. 




GLADIOLUS. 

Scarcely anything need be said in praise of the Gladiolus. It is, perhaps, the most beautiful 
.and desirable of all the summer flowering bulbs, and has become a general favorite, and exceeding- 
ly popular, wherever known. The Gladiolus is of the easiest culture in any good garden soil, and 
may be planted any time from April to the middle of June. Set the bulbs four inches deep, and 
eight or ten inches apart. For a long succession of bloom, it is recommended to plant the bulbs 
at intervals of ten or twelve days. 

DOZEN. HUNDRED. 

Finest named varieties ..... a $1.00 to $5.00 

Scarlet shades in splendid mixture . ..... .40 #2.50 

Pink " " " * .50 3.00 

White " " " " ...... .50 3.00 

Yellow " " " " ...... .50 3.00 

Fine mixed, all shades . .40 2.50 

Extra choice mixed, all shades . , 50 3.00 

By mail, 15 cents per dozen extra. 

LEMOINE'S NEW HY- 
BRID GLADIOLUS. 

This mixture comprises every 
variety now in commerce. For 
vivid and rich orchid-like coloring, 
they have no equal. Emblazoned 
with the most intense, burning 
and inexpressibly rich shades, 
they are truly wonderful. In the 
blotch, which is a remarkable and 
typical feature, the coloring reach- 
es the climax. Extra fine mixed, 
15 cents each. $1.50 per doz. 



Gladiolus. 



AMARYLLIS. 

Very beautiful drooping, lily-shaped flowers, 
•varying in color from richest crimson to pure white 
striped with scarlet or crimson. They should be 
:grown in well drained pots, in a soil of equal parts 
•of peat, leaf -mould and loam. 

Fonuosissima (Jacobean lily), velvety crimson, a 
desirable border plant. 20c. each, $2.00 per doz. 

Zephyranthes Rosea, soft rose color ; this is a 
most charming bulbuous plant, with numerous 
lily-like flowers. 10c. each, $t.ooperdoz. 

Tettata Hybrida, extra fine large flowers. 75 cts. 
each. 

BEGONIA (Tuberous-rooted). 

Splendid varieties, covered the whole summer 
with bright and elegant flowers, succeeding as well 
in the shade as in the sun. Its utility for bedding 
cannot be overestimated. Masses on a lawn present 
a gorgeous aspect, and elicit general admiration. 
Flowering bulbs. Price : 20c. each, per doz., $2.00. 



CALADIUM ESCULENTUM. 

One of the most beautiful of the ornamental- 
foliaged plants, either for culture in pots, or plant- 
ing out on the lawn. They will grow in any garden- 
soil, and are of the easiest culture, often growing _ 
five feet high ; with immense leaves, very smooth, == 
and of a light green beautifully veined with dark 
green. 10c. each. $1.00 per doz. Extra large, 25 
cents each, $2.50 per doz. 



CALLA /ETHIOPICA. 

The well-known Calla Lily is one of the best 
plants for parlor culture. .Its growth is stately, the 
flower showy, exceedingly fragrant, and freely pro- 
duced. A commer.dabi e'f eature is fhat it eff ectu- 




Gladioli Lemoinei. 



uutea. A commer.aaDie ieHiure is mm il cucliu- . . . ± ••^„ 

ally resists all the. injurious effects which gas and furnace heat generally inflict on our floral pets. The requisites tor 
successful culture. are:rieh soil, plenty of water and pot-room. 25 cents each, $2.00 per doz. 



go 



^ARKEF^ Y OOD i ^EED pATALOGUE. 



CANNAS. 

For a grand and fine effect in the floral garden, no foliage-plant can surpass the Carinas. Whether grown in masses ? . 
or planted here and there singly among flowering plants, their stately growth and massive foliage of various shades, and 
their brilliant flowers, combine to render them highly effective and ornamental. 
Mixed "Varieties, 10 cents each; #i.ooperdoz. | Choice Rained 




Freesia Refracta Alba Odorata. 



Varieties, 25c. each; $2.50 per doz. 
CYCLAMEN. 

One of the most beautiful plants for house cul- 
ture, and easily grown. Pot the bulbs in a rich, 
light soil, and keep in a sheltered place till the leaves 
are well grown; then remove to a sunny window and 
keep well watered. 25 cents each; $2.50 per doz. 

FREESIA REFRACTA ALBA ODORATA 
Ready for delivery in August. 

These plants are grown from bulbs, and for the 
past few winters have produced some of the most 
beautiful and fragrant flowers ever offered by our 
florists. The flowers are very handsome,tube-shaped, 
pure white blotched with yellow, and borne on a 
slender stem about twenty inches in height, with 
narrow foliage. They are peculiarly graceful, and 
emit a fine perfume for a long time after cutting. 
The bulbs are rather small and irregular in form, 
and should be potted in four to six inch pots, four 
or more bulbs in a pot, from August to November, 
in any good soil of a sandy texture, to get well start- 
ed for winter blooming. Their treatment is simple, 
and about the same as other small bulbs. For house 
culture they are particularly pleasing plants to grow, , 
and should receive early attention in their planting. 

We wish to place these before our customers . 
now, in order that they may be procured earlier in 
the season than is usual with Autumn Bulbs, — 
August and September being the months when the- 
bulbs are in the best condition for delivery. 

Flowering bulbs, by mail, per dozen, 50 cents; 
per hundred, $3.50. Per 1,000 bulbs, quotations on 
application. Extra large bulbs, 8 cents each; 75. 
cents per dozen. 

GLOXINIAS 

are among the handsomest of our summer-blooming; 
greenhouse plants. Bulbs should be started in the 
spring, in a warm place. They require partial shade, 
and a" liberal supply of water when growing. After 
blooming, water should be withheld, and the bulbs- 
remain dry through the winter. 25 cents each; 
$2. 50 per dozen. Extra large, 35 cents each ; jfc.So* 
per dozen. 



HYACINTHUS CANDICANS- 

A magnificent species, with flower stems three feet high, pure white, large 
bell-shaped flowers. 10c. each ; 75c. doz. 

IRIS KAEMPFERII. 

This Japanese Iris, though of late introduction among our hardy herbaceous 
plants, has become one of great value for its large and magnificent flowers (from 4 
to 6 inches in diameter), of the most attractive shadings and self-colors. The 
flowers are produced on strong stems, rising above the flag about two feet, and a 
mass of them in borders is as attractive a sight as one can well imagine. At the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society's Exhibition, the flowers have invariably 
been much admired for their special pencilings and colors. 

Mixed colors, 15 cents each; $1.50 per dozen. 

JAPAN LILIES. 

6" ee our Fall Bulb Catalogue for full list of L Hies. Sent free upon application. 

These superb flowers are usually planted in the autumn, but we generally 
keep a full supply for spring planting. The bulbs keep sound and fresh, and 
bloom freely. Our autumn catalogue of bulbs enumerates many other fine sorts. 
The following are recommended for planting at this season, the others in the 
autumn only : 

Liliiim Auratum, tlie Golden-banded Lily of fapan. We offer this season a 
large stock of splendid sound bulbs, imported direct from Yokahama, Japan. 
Thirty flowers are often produced from one bulb, measuring nine inches 
across when expanded. The color is white, studded with crimson, with a 
golden band through the center of each petal ; they possess a most delicious 
fragrance. Price, extra sound bulbs, 20 cents; $1.75 per dozen. 

— Lancifolimn Album, pure white, beautiful. 35c. each ; $4.00 per doz. 

— " Rubrum, white, with crimson spots, :15c. each ; #1.50 doz 

— Roseum, white, with rosy spots. 15c. each; #1.50 per doz.' 

By mail, 10 cents each extra. 




Lilium Auratum. 



j^ARKEF^ 8f ^yOOD, jSEED JCaTAL-OGUE, 



91 




MADEIRA VINE. 

The Madeira Vine is a popular and favorite tuberous-rooted climbing plant with dense and beautiful shining foliage, 
and of very rapid growth, twining on strings to a great height, or forming garlands in any fanciful form. In the au- 
tumn it is covered with racemes of feathery-white flowers, sweet and fragrant as mignonette. It will grow anywhere, but 
does best in a warm, sheltered, sunny.location. It is also a very pretty plant for training around the windows in the 
house. 5 cents each ; 50 cents per dozen. 

WHITE WATER LILY (Nymphaea Odorata). 

■^^^^^^^^^^^M^ r If lovers of flowers only knew how easily the fragrant White Water Lily can be 

-^^^^^^W^J^^^^^- grown, we are quite sure these lilies would be cultivated far more than many other 
.■^^^^m\jJ/\M^^^% less fragrant and beautiful flowers that take more time and trouble to cultivate. 
^^^V«wlwTOlBW^ These lilies, once planted in a pond or small_ stream (they bloom more profusely in 

1 l entirely dry up in summer), will need no further care, 
-«im§M wKKB&lEw and will increase from year to year. People who have not the facilities for growing 
, ■ ,/ , 1 i 11 1 1 tean 1 hi ii tlj 11 lily gardens in tubs and aquariums, 

where they can admire and gather the most fragrant and beautiful flower thatgrows 
on land or water. Roots 25 cents each. {By mail postage paid) $2.50 per dozen. 

P/EONIES. 

These have become indispensable to_ every garden. They are all hardy, and 
admirably adapted to our northern climate; growing in almost all situations. 
Good roots, 25 cents each; $2:75 per dozen. 
White Water Lily. Tenuifolia Flore Pleno, Flowers very double, crimson — of a shade rivalling 

the Jacqueminot Rose. The foliage is remarkably pretty, being dense and 
finely cut, like a fern. 50 cents each ; $5.00 per dozen. By mail, 10 c. each, extra. 

RANUNCULUS. 

For form and brightness of color the Ranunculus vies with the Rose, and is a great favorite with those who have 
■seen the perfection to which it can be grown. They are well adapted for pot or border culture, and among early- 
flowering plants are unsurpassed for variety and richness of color ; plant as soon as the ground can be worked in the 

spring- r> . i 

Persian, double mixed . 25 Cents per dozen. 

Turban, double, mixed 2 5 \, \ t ,< 

Double French seedlings 2 5 

TIGRIDIAS (Tiger Flower). 

A genus of Mexican bulbs; grow one and a half feet high, pro- 
ducingflowers of the most exquisite beauty. The flowers are about 
four inches across, of singularly curious shape, and the color of each 
variety gorgeous, and purely contrasted. No flower can exceed it 
in beauty. In bloom from July to the 1st of October. In autumn 
take up the bulbs, and keep them in a dry place, away from frost, 
until the time of planting in the spring. 

Conchiflora, orange and golden yellow, spotted black. 5 cents 

each ; 50 cents per dozen. 
(Jrandiflora, richest scarlet, tinged and spotted with pure yellow. 

5 cents each; 60 cents per dozen. 
Crrandiflora Alba, large flowers of a pearly white color, marked 

at the base of each division with large spots of a reddish-brown 

color on a yellowish ground, forming a fine contrast with the 

white of the petals. 8 cents each; 80 cents per doz. 

DOUBLE 
TUBEROSES. 

The Tuberose is one of the 
most delightfully fragrant and 

beautiful of summer-flowering Double Tuberose, 

bulbs ; throwing up tall spikes 

of double white flowers, two or thjee feet high, which remain in bloom a long 
period. The bulbs may be planted from February to May. When they are 
needed very early, they may be planted in the greenhouse or hotbed in Febru- 
ary or March, and, for a succession of flowers, in April and May. In plant- 
ing, remove useless small offsets_ around the main root, and place a single tuber 
in a pot four or five inches wide. Use good loam and leaf-mould, with good 
drainage. 

Large Flowering Bulbs. Per dozen, 60 cents. By mail, 8 cents each; 85 
cents per dozen. 

Extra Large Flowering Bulbs. Per dozen, 75 cents. By mail, 10 cents 

each; $1. 00 per dozen. 
Double Pearl. Per dozen, 60 cents. By mail, 8 cents each; 85 cents per 

dozen. 

Extra Large Pearl. Per dozen, 75 cents. By mail, 10 cents each; $1.00 per 
dozen. 

Jris Kaempferii. 





-Packer ^ ^ood, ^eed Patalogue. 



•■ SOVELTExS IN FLA.NTS /If© 'FREES. * 

"We send Plants by Mail, bill advise K^psess -Wheite Possible. 

We send by Express, at Purchasers' Expense, Strong, Healthy Plants, Carefully 
Packed, that will stand a journey to any Part of the United States or Canada. 
No Charge for Boxes, Baskets, or Packing. 




SYRINGA PEKINENSIS PENDULA,- "New Flowering Weeping Lilac." 

" The most beautiful of all our small weeping trees," said Mr. Sam'l B. Parsons, at the Exhibi- 
tion of the Am. Pom. Society at Boston last September, when the first specimens of this charm- 
ing little tree were exhibited. 

As round as a weeping willow, and far more graceful in flowing outlines, and decked with 
clusters of white blossoms having the odor of honey. 

Ready October, 1888, orders booked now, price $5.00. 



JPARKEI\ 8f ^"OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE, 



COBEOPSIS LANCEOLATA ("The Perennial Golden Coreopsis,") 

We have the exclusive sale of this plant for Boston. 

. We have great pleasure in offering this valua- 
ble hardy perennial, which is destined to have a. 
wide and well deserved popularity. 

The annual varieties of coreopsis are well 
known to all lovers of flowers, and for their ease 
of culture, good blooming qualities and clean 
growth are universal favorites. 

The variety which we offer being a perennial,, 
at once recommends itself over the annuals, re- 
quiring as it does but one purchase of the plants 
to have- them always in the garden from year 
to year with little or no care necessary. Each 
plant is of clean upright habit, bearing the flow- 
ers clear from the ground, and is of itself hand- 
some, with its clear green lancelinear leaves. 

The flowers are two to three inches in diame- 
ter of an intensely clear golden yellow, each is 
borne at the end of along, straight stem five to 
ten inches long, which at once recommends it as 
a valuable florist flower, and desirable for cut- 
ting. 

The plant commences to bloom about the first 
week in June, being at once covered with a 
wealth of flowers and continuing in full bloom- 
until hard frost ; by cutting the flowers as they 
mature, the number of blossoms will be greatly 
increased. 

The plant being, a perennial and perfectly- 
hardy when once planted, requires no further 
care, but will increase in size from year to year,, 
forming a strong, vigorous clump, the blooming 
qualities increasing with its size. 
When desirable the clump may be divided into smaller plants either in spring or fall. 
It will prove a most valuable acquisition for bedding in masses or planting singly in mixed 
borders or among shrubbery, in any of which situations it will form a conspicuous and lasting 
ornament. Its use as a florist flower is freely acknowledged, and all alive to their trade will see 
that they obtain a stock as soon as possible. It may be forced into early bloom. It is adapted 
to any soil. 
Strong Plants, 25 cts. each ; $2.50 per dozen. 

SYRINCA JAPONICA. -THE TREE, OR GIANT LILAC. 

An astonishing species of lilac, found in the most northern corner of Japan, which makes a 
large tree and produces clusters of white blossoms, sometimes of the enormous size of twenty- 
four by sixteen inches. (See description of this tree by Prof. C. S. Sargent, in July, 1886, of 
Gardener's monthly). The foliage is thick and glossy, often six inches wide and eight inches- 
long. Very rare, and perfectly hardy. Some specimens are now twenty feet high. Two years,, 
pot grown, $1.50 to $2.50. 

PYRUS MALUS PARKMANII.-THE TEA-ROSE CRAB. 

This is the famous little tree now so much in demand for the splendid beauty of its buds and 
blossoms. The buds are like small carmine tea-roses, and the blossoms are double, and of a 
lovely light carmine color. The very long and slender stems bend gracefully under the weight of 
the buds and blossoms and the profusion of these is such as to completely cover the tree, even to 
the tips of the last year's growth. No Hawthorn or Magnolia is so surpassingly lovely in bloom 
as this new tree. 

Price, 1 yr., 50 cts.; 2 yrs., 75 cts.; 3 yrs., $1.00. 

CORNUS FLORIDA RUBRA. 

A form of our beautiful native flowering dogwood, having its blossoms richly suffused with 
bright red. 

This is not slightly pink, as so many of those in the woods are, but deep and bright red and of 
splendid appearance. A most desirable tree. Price, $2.00. 




24 ^AI\KEf\ Sj |00D, |SEED j^ATALOGUE. 



#*H0USE-I ) L/INTS.i» 




Dracaena Terminalis. 

Dracaena Indivisa. 

AZALEA INDICA. 

One hundred and fifty of the very finest varieties, including all the leading sorts, and new kinds of recent introduc- 
tion. 25 to 50 cents each; $2.00 to $4.50 per dozen. Large plants of many varieties, $1.00 to $3.00 each. 

AGAVES (Century Plants). 

Our collection embraces over sixty species. No plants are more decorative, or more effective for.the conservatory in 
winter, or lawn or garden in summer. Prices from 50 cents to $3.00, according to^variety. Large size, $2.00 to $5.00 each. 

ABUTILONS. 

Erect-growing greenhouse plants, from two to six feet high, 
flowering during winter and spring, also in summer, in the open 
ground. 

Aureum, flowers large, deep yellow. 

Boule de Neige. Pure white; great improvement on the old 

white variety. 
Canary, pale lemon or canary color. 
Thoinpsonii, mottled, golden yellow. 

And many other fine varieties. 15 cents each; $i.5odoz. 

BEGONIA REX (Ornamental Leaved). 

Beautiful foliage plants, admirably adapted for baskets, war- 
■ dian cases and ferneries, or for shady recesses in summer. The 
leaves are very large, variegated, or zoned, with an attractive 
metallic surface. Ten varieties. 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 

TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS. 

This is a class of Begonias produced since the introduction of 
Begonia Sedeni, and particularly adapted for summer bedding. 
They should be planted out in May, in the same manner as 
Gladiolus. They grow readily, attaining the height of twelve or 
fifteen inches, and are covered with their very large flowers. 
Fine mixed seedlings, 20 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. 

CROTONS. 

. l Beautiful variegated foliage-plants, for hot-house or war- 
diah-cases. Ten named varieties. 50c. each; $4.50 per doz. 

DAPHNE INDICA. 

A handsome evergreen growing from three to six feet high. 
Flowers,, white, in clusters. They are highly esteemed for their 
delightful fragrance. 30 cents each. 

DRAC/ENAS. 

These are all very showy plants, of erect and stately growth, 
and handsome foliage, most of them deep, bronzy red and bright 
crimson. For centres of baskets or rustic stands they are espe- 
cially brilliant and beautiful. Twenty best varieties. 50 cents 
each; $4.50 per dozen. Large plants $1.00 to $2.00 each. 

MONTHLY CARNATIONS. 

Blooming at all seasons of the year ; fragrant, and indispensable for bouquets. A fine named collection in all colors. 
35 to 25 cents each ; $2.25 per dozen. 

CALLA ytTHIOPICA (Easter Lily). 

An old and favorite plant, growing freely, and producing its large, pure white blossoms all winter. 25 cents each; 
$2.00 per dozen. 

CAMELLIAS. 

Our collection is equal to any in the country, and includes many specimens fifteen feet in height. Nice plants from 
$1.00 each ; $9.00 per dozen. 




Group of Fuchsias. 



j-^ARKER. 8f ^OOD, jSEED CATALOGUE. 



95 



FUCHSIAS. 

Fuchsias are popular and generally admired plants, adapted for the greenhouse, parlor or garden ; growing freely, 
and blooming all summer. Our collection comprises all the free-blooming and best sorts. Double, single and golden- 
leaved Fuchsias, 25 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. 

FICUS ELASTICA (India-Rubber Tree). 

A noble-looking plant, with very large, thick, glossy-green leaves; admirable for planting out in summer, and 
one of the most decorative for the conservatory or parlor in winter. $1.00 each ; $9.00 per dozen. 

GLOXINIAS. • " 

Gloxinias are a beautiful group of plants, with large, foxglove-shaped flowers of an infinite variety of tints, and' 
produced in great profuson from the base of a deep, rich green, velvety foliage. They flower all the summer, and are- 
the finest ornaments of the greenhouse from June to September. Fine named varieties, 50 cents. Extra fine seedlings,, 
beautiful colors, 25 cents each; |2.so per dozen. 

HEATHS, or ERICAS. 

A beautiful class of plants, flowering during the winter months, and invaluable at that season for choice bouquets. 



Six fine varieties. 30 cents each ; 



3.00 per dozen. 

HYDRANGEAS. 



All beautiful, plants, producing very large heads of white, pink, or blue flowers. 



Hortensis, the well-known common and beautiful kind. 
Otaksa, similar to Hortensis: with larger heads of bluish 

flowers. 
Thomas Hogg, pure white. 



Paniculata grandiflora, white, hardy, see special list of 
shrubs. 

Japonica variegata, leaves marked with pure white.. 
50 cents each ; $4.50 per dozen. 



20 cents each; $2.00 per dozen ; large plants, special price. 

IVY. 

Valuable for the parlor or greenhouse ; growing very freely in the shade. 15 cents each ; $1.50 per dozen 

GERMAN IVY. , 

A rapid-growing and handsome plant, with ivy-shaped 
deep-green leaves, admirably adapted for covering a wall or 
trellis in summer, or for baskets or vases. 15 cents each ; 
#1.50 per dozen. 

CAPE JESSAMINE (Gardenia). 

Well known for their large, double, fragrant, white 
flowers, produced all the autumn. 30 cents each ; $3.00 per 
dozen. 

PRIMROSE, Chinese Varieties. 

A fine class of free-flowering, winter-blooming plants, js 
continuing a long time in flower, in suitable sunny situa- fP 
tions ; producing flowers of nearly all shadings.and tints. 
Double White, 5° cents eacn ! 

Single Varieties, of various colors, 15 to 25 cents each. 
#1.50 to $2.50 per dozen, according to size of plants. 

PALMS. . 
Seaforthia Elegans, tall and graceful. 
Latania Barbonica, very desirable and easily grown. 
50 cents to $3.00 each. 

PELARGONIUMS, SHOW AND SPOTTED. 

The recent new kinds are very great improvements 
upon the Pelargoniums of former years ; and they are now 
justly considered to be among the most attractive and beau- 
tiful of greenhouse plants, ■ — ■ easily grown, flowering pro- 
fusely, and presenting in their varied as well as exquisite tinting, spotting, and penciling, an array of beauty almost 
unsurpassed. Forty-seven named sorts, finest colors. 30 cents each; $3,00 per dozen. . Plants in three-inch pots, 
$10.00 per hundred. 

PASSIFLORA (Passion Flower). 

All the Passifloras are very handsome climbing plants, growing rapidly, and blooming freely with blue, purple, or 
scarlet blossoms. Passiflora Caerulea is nearly hardy ; and Passiflora Princeps requires the hot-house. 30 cents each ; 
$3. 00 per dozen. 

MYRSIPHYLLUM ASPARAGOIDES (Smilax). 

One of the most delicate and beautiful of all climbing plants, growing rapidly, and covering a trellis in a few weeks. 
The foliage is small, smooth and glossy, and for bouquets or wreaths, or for table decoration, surpasses every other 
plant. 20 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen ; $8.00 per hundred. 




Passiflora Cserulea. 



'ARKER ^ Y OOD ' j$EED pATALOGUE. 



[EjMERAL IcIST OF §EDD1.NG FLA.NTS. 




^0.15 
•15 



51*50 
1.50 



•15 J -5° 



Bouquet. 



EACH. DOZ. 

A (/ e r a tl mis . Handsome bedding-plants, pro- 
ducing a profusion of bright blue flowers 
throughout the whole summer. 

Imperial Dwarf, blue flowers; f foot high . 

Mexicamim, flowers light blue ; 2 feet high, 

Tom Thumb, 6 inches, with porcelain-blue 

flowers ....... 

Aloysia Citriodora {Lemon-scented verbena). Always 
admired and prized for the delicate odor of its graceful 
and neat foliage. 15 cents; $1.50 per dozen. Large 
plants at higher prices. 

Asters. The flowers are very large and double, al- 
most globular; and they are produced in such great 
profusion as to cover the plant. 50 cents per dozen; 
$3.00 per hundred. 

EACH. DOZ. 

A ltd 'HO 1 ith eras , many different varieties in 

choice colors, named . . . . $0.15 $1.50 

Am aran tliiis tricolor {Joseph's Coat), beautiful gold, crimson, and green leaves, .15 1 .50 
AcTiyr antes , best named varieties and colors; fine for masses or ribbon-gardening, .15 1.50 
Alyssum variegatiwn dwarf ; handsome green and white leaves . . .15 1.50 

Double tvhite Fever fetv {Pyrethrum). One of the most popular and admired of summer 
bedding-plants. 15 cents each; $1.50 per dozen; $8.00 per hundred. 

EACH. DOZ. 

Double Balsams. Our Balsams are of the 
choicest description, perfectly double, sym- 
metrical in form $ 

Calendula [Prince of Orange) 

Cineraria maritima {Dusty Miller), white- 
leaved; valuable for bedding 

Centaurea candidissima white ; fine for 
bedding . . . . . ,, 7 & 

Centaurea gymnocarpa, white; finely cut 
leaves 

Coleus, twenty-five varieties 

Daisies, A collection of the most beautiful 
, shades and varieties, of various colors 
$8.00 per hundred. 

Gnaphalium lanatum { Cotton-weed), white, 
vigorous and fine for beds .... 

Golden Feather {Pyrethrum), the best golden-leaved plant 



0.05 


So. 50 




2.00 


•15 


I.50 


•15 


I.SO 


•15 


I.50 


• l S 


1.50 


.10 


I. OO 


•*5 


I.50 




Balsam. 



. . .15 LS© 

.Heliotropes . The Heliotropes are among the most popular plants, producing throughout 
the summer an abundance of deliciously fragrant flowers in large trusses. Some of the 
newer kinds are exceedingly fine. Sixteen named sorts, elegant colored flowers. 15 cents 
each; $1.50 per dozen. 



jPAI\KEI\ 8f "y^OOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE, 



97 



BEDDING PLANTS (continued). 

Geraniums. The geranium is too popular to require a lengthy description here. Nothing 
can excel the brilliancy and beauty of both leaves and flowers. The Zonale varieties are 
equally well suited for bedding purposes, or for pot-culture in the house during winter. 



EACH DOZ. PER IOO. 
$0.15 $I.0O $6.00 



1,00 6.00 



6.0O 



Double Mme Thibaud, 

rich rose . 
■ Double H. Cannell, 

bright scarlet . 
Double Queen of the 

Fairies, flesh color 
Double Simon Delaux, 

carmine-red 
Do^lble Blanch Par/ait, 

pure white 
■ Double Sunlight, apri- 
cot ... 
Single Jean Sisley, white 

eye, scarlet bright . 
Single Ge7i, Grant, 

scarlet fine bedder . 

Single New Life, striped 

scarlet and white 

Single Gertrude, salmon 

Single La Candeur, 

white 

Single Silver-Leaved . 

Single Bronze-Leaved . 

Single Tricolor Mme Pollock, 25 cts..each, 

$2.50 doz. 



•is 



•15 



•IS 



•15 



•15 



•!5 



.15 1.00 



•*5 

•IS 
•iS 
•15 



1. 00 
1. 00 

1. 00 
1. 00 
1. 00 




Fancy Leaved Geraniums. 



.Lobelias. Blue and white ; fine for ribbon work 
Marigold. Dwarf French. Yellow and bronze 

Dwarf African. Golden yellow . ... 

MyOSOtis palustris {Forget-me-not), blue flowers . 
Myrtle, common; evergreen, fragrant .... 
Nasturtium. Dwarf, all. colors . . . • . 
Nierembergia gracilis, bluish white ; beautiful for bedding 
Nierembergia grandiflora, white ; fine bedding-plant 
JPansies. Extra large flowers, and fine colors . 
JPhloay Ufrummondii. All colors . ... 

RidnUS {Castor- Oil Bean) . . . . . . ,. 

Stevia compacta, white ; winter flowering, for bouquets 

Serrata, white ; valuable for bouquets in winter 

Serrata variegata, foliage edged with white 

Stocks, Ten-weeks . , 1 . 

Assorted colors '. . . • • . . *• 

Tradescantias {Spiderwort), green, striped and bronze : basket plants 
Thyme, variegated leaves . ... . . .. 

■Vincns {Periwinkles), six varieties; fine for baskets : •. 
Zinnias. New double dwarf, all colors . • 



EACH. 
.IO 

.TO 

.IO 
•15 

•.xp 

10., 
.16 
.20 
- - 2 5 
•. - 2 5 

•IS. 
.10 
.10 

•*5 
•15 
, ,.20 
..10 



DOZ. 
I. OO 
I. OO 
I. OO 
I OO 

1.50 

1. 00 

1.50 
1.50 

•75 
.60 
2.00 
2.25 
2.25 
1.50 
.80 
1. 00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 



98 



Ei\ 8f ^OOD, pEED pATALOGUE. 




BEDDING PLANTS (continued). 

LANTANAS. 

The Lantana is now a universal favorite, and rivals the Verbena as a bedding-plant, blooming abundantly from July 
until frost It stows freely, forming dwarf, compact bushes twelve to eighteen inches high, profusely studded with, 
neat snow-white, pink and rose, or brilliant orange and scarlet flowers. Many fine named varieties. 15 cents each 
$1.50 per dozen. 

DOUBLE PETUNIAS. 

We offer very fine varieties, some of them extra seedlings of last 
year, with large and very handsome flowers. 20c. each ; $2.00 per doz. 

DWARF HYBRID PETUNIA. 

Hybrida nana compaeta multiflora. A beautiful strain of dwarf 
habit, only five to eight inches high, and the same broad ; making a 
natural bouquet of brilliant cherry-colored flowers, blooming the entire 
summer. 15 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. 

SALVIAS (Flowering Sage). 

The Salvias are all very showy and beautiful plants, flowering all the 
latter part of summer, the scarlet and brilliant-colored varieties forming 
splendid masses of bloom. Scarlet, blue, white, etc. 15 cents each ; 
$1.50 per dozen. 

VERBENAS. 

Our collection of these popular and favorite plants comprises a col- 
lection of all the most beautiful and distinct colors,- both new and old. 
Twenty-four named varieties, all the finest colors. 10 cents each ; 75 
cents per dozen. Sweet Williams. 

VIOLETS, SWEET-SCENTED. 

These are indispensable in every collection. It is one of the leading flowers, among florists, for bouquets and cut- 
flowers, blooming throughout the winter. 

Double White. Marie Louise, very dark blue. 

Belle de Chantenay, double white. 30 cents. Victoria Keglna, new single. 30 cents. 

Neapolitan, double blue. English Dark Blue, double, hardy. 

IS cents each; $1.50 per dozen, except those noted. 

HARDY PERENNIALS. 

HOLLYHOCK, DOUBLE (Althea Rosea). 

This old-fashioned flower is rapidly gaining its former popularity, both the 
single and double varieties being widely sought after for lawn and border decora- 
tion. Our collection embraces about 24 colors : pure white, rosy crimson, purple, 
yellow, orange, black, etc. We offer plants that will bloom this season, seedlings 
from a choice collection of very double flowers. Price, 25 cents each ; $2.00 per 
dozen. 

HOLLYHOCK (Single). 

We have a large collection of various colors, seedlings from the finest strain, 
that will bloom this summer. 15 cents each ; $1.50 per dozen. 

Hollyhocks, from seed, are easily obtained if they are sown in June or July, 
or even later, in a well prepared, well-drained, alluvial soil, and carefully cared 
for during their early stages of growth. After they have obtained strength and 
size enough to handle, they may be transplanted in September to the borders and 
situations where they are to flower the following season. A slight protection of 
loose leaves, straw, etc., is generally sufficient to protect them. They are one of 
our finest herbaceous plants, growing to the height of 5 to 8 feet, and there are 
varieties of almost every color. 

Our collection of seeds are selected from the best known growers of Holly- 
hocks, and we are confident they will give entire satisfaction if obtained from 
Parker & Wood. For collections of colors, see pages 68 and 79. 

SWEET WILLIAMS. 

The improvement in the varieties of this old and always admired plant have 
given it additional value. Our stock comprises many very beautiful colors. 20 
cents each; $2. 25 per dozen. 

TRITOMAS. 

Splendid, half-hardy plants, with masses of long narrow leaves, from the cen- 
ter of which their tall flower-stems, three to five feet in height, are produced in 
summer and autumn, with large terminal spikes of orange-red and scarlet flowers, 
each spike a foot or more in length. They thrive in any rich, light garden soil. 
On approach of winter, they should be taken up and placed in dry soil in a frame 
Double Hollyhock. or cellar, for replanting out in the spring. 25 cents each; $2.50 per dozen. 




j^ARKER 8j ^jyOOD, jSEED pATALOGUE. 99 



PINKS (CARNATIONS), New for 1887. 




Striped Carnation Pink. 



Mile. Carle, white ; very free blooming. 
Boissy, clear sulphur-yellow; free blooming. 
Orient, bright crimson-scarlet ; large flowers ; fine. 
Clifton, extra large ; dark crimson ; very fine. 
Florence, scarlet, beautifully fringed ; extra. 
Faxton, white, edged with scarlet; delicate flower. 
Silver Lake, pure white flower, fringed; very free 
flowering. 

Andalousie, clear yellow ; fine for wintei-blooming. 
Jean Sisley , extra large ; scailet and yellow ; fine. 
Le Favori, salmon-pink; very large flowers; free 
flowering. 

35 cents each ; $3.50 per dozen. 

PINKS (CARNATIONS), Older Varieties. 

Alegature, the best free-flowering scarlet grown. 
Century, deep pink ; a healthy and strong grower. 
Victor, pink, fringed; free flowering. 
Laura, light salmon ; a new shade of color. 
Mrs. Koikes, salmon ; very good. 
Anna Webb, brilliant crimson ; a great favorite. 
Grace Wilder, rink; dwarf plant; fine color. 
Buttercup, yellow and red; very good when well 
grown. 

25 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. Young plants, by mail, 
after March, $1.50 per doz. ; $8.00 per 100, 

HARDY PINKS, for Garden. 

Grass Finks, for edging. Rose-color, sweet-scented. 

Clumps, 25 cents each; $2.00 per dozen. 
Clove Finks, scarlet; very hardy; clove-scented. 

Clumps, 25 cents each; $2.00 per dozen. 
Pheasant-Eye Finks, whits, maroon eye ; fragrant 

and double. In 5-inch pots, 25 cents each; $2.50 

per dozen. 

Dianthus Finks (Heddiwigii varieties), double and 
single, of every color, in great variety. 15 cents 
each; $1.50 per dozen. 



PANSIES. 



Our stock comprises many thousand plants, raised from seeds from the choicest collections abroad, and also from our 
own selected seedlings, embracing all the various shades of color, with flowers of the largest size and fine form. 

Pansies, Parker & Wood's Prize, 15 cents each; 75 cts. I Pansies, of the finest French fancy flowers. 10 cents 
per dozen. I each; 50 cents per dozen. 




Fancy Pansies. 



IOO 



'AI^KER 8f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 




Clematis Jackmanii. 



CLEMATIS (Climbing Flowering Vine). 

Within the past few years great attention has been given to the culti- 
vation of these valuable plants, bearing magnificent large,, showy, flowers 
of nearly every shading, and adapted to all kinds of ornamental decora- 
. tions, where vines constitute the effect desired, on walls, trellises, veran- 

\^ dahs, or old trees, etc. 

Our collection embraces shades in nearly all colors in flowers that are 
embraced in this species of plants, that have been so extensively improved 
by hybridizing. 

Single plants, 50 cents ; t dozen assorted varieties, $5.00. 
Our space will not admit of a full list, but we give some of the most ' 
popular colors. 



Albert Yictor. Deep lavender. 

Countess of Lovelace, Double; bluish lilac. 

Crispa. Similar to Clematis Coccinea, with delicate, violet-blue flowers' 

25 cents each : $2.00 per dozen. 
Duchess Of Lovelace. Double; deep bluish lilac. 
Duchess of Edinburg. Double white. 
Duchess of Teck. Single ; pure white ; fine. 
Flanmnila. White ; sweet-scented- 
Jackmanii. Violet-purple ; very fine. 
Star of India. Reddish violet-purple. 
Yirginiana. White ; rapid climber. 



HARDY CLIMBING- AND TRAILING VINES. 

Ampelopsis Veitchii (Japanese or Boston Ivy). Very fine for covering rocks, walls, etc. 25c each ; $2.50 doz. 

— Quinquefolia ( Virginia Creeper). Rapid climber. The leaves color very brilliantly in the fall. 25/cents each. 
Akebia Quinata. Rapid climber, with dark green leaves and fragrant, velvety purple flowers. ! 50 cents each. 
Dutchman's Pipe (Aristolochia Sipho). Heart-shaped leaves, the flowers resembling a pipe. 50 cents each. 
Honeysuckle, Belgian {Lonicera Belgica). Fragrant red and buff flowers. 50 cents each. 

— Hall's Japan (Lonicera Halliana). Flowers 

opening white and turning yellow; very del- 
icate fragrance. 50 cents each. 

— Trumpet (Lonicera Sempervirens). Crim- 

son trumpet-shaped flowers. 50 cents each. 

— Variegated Japan (Lonicera Aurea Reticu- 

lata). Leaves beautifully veined with yellow ; 
cream-colored flowers. 50 cents each. 
Hop Vine (Htnnuhcs Lupulus). 35 cents each. 
Moon Flower (Ipotnea Bona Nox). This half- 
hardy plant is a grand and beautiful climber 
that produces large, pure white, sweet-scented 
flowers in great profusion, which bloom in the 
night and on dull days. It is a strong, vigorous 
climber, attaining a height of 25 feet in one 
season, with ordinary culture. To keep over, 
winter, the plants must be cut - back, the roots 
potted and kept in a growing condition. 20 
cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. 
Koxbury Wax-work (Celastrus Scandens). 
Native climbing plant; glossy leaves,, yellow 
flowers, and clusters of orange capsuled fruit, 
which remains on all winter. 50 cents each. 
Trnmpet-flower '(%w;zM Radicans). Large 
trumpet-shaped orange arid red flowers; splen- 
did climber. 50 cents each. 
Wistaria, Chinese Purple. The finest of 
climbing plants.; purple flowers. 50 cents to 
$1.50, according to size'. • 
Wistaria, Chinese White. Similar, but white 
flowers, f-i.oo. .' '" y '" 

Double Chinese. 



Wistaria, 

flowers. $2.00. 
Wistaria Magnifica. 
cents to $1.00 each. 




New. 



Fine double 

'Wisteria Sinensis. 

A strong, vigorous grower ; flowers lilac, in long, graceful, drooping racemes 



5° 



^ARKEI\ 8j- Y OOD i ^EED J^ATALOGUE. 



IOI 



HARDY IC-RBACEOUS ffLA^TS. 

It is seen at once the great advantage that Hardy Herbaceous Plants possess over tender 
varieties or annuals, as they only require to be obtained once, when they will come up every year 
and give a profusion of flowers unexcelled by any other class of flowering plants. 

Achillea JEgyptica (Egyptian Yarrow), i ft. 
May until Sept. Very striking ; flowers clear yel- 
low. 20 cts. 

Achillea Ptarmica, Fl. PI. (Double). 1 ft. 

July to Sept. Handsome double white daisy-like 

flowers in close, flat spikes. 20 cts. 
Aconitum Uncinatum (Monk's Hood) 3 ft. Aug. 

Large handsome clusters of deep purple flowers. 

20 cents. 

Adonis Vernalis (Spring Adonis), 1% ft. April. 

Handsome, large, yellow flowers. 20 cents. 
Anemone Japonica, one of the most beautiful of 

the hardy herbaceous plants ; a finer bed of flowers 

can hardly be imagined than is made by these 

Japanese Anemones. They commence to bloom 

in August, and continue until late in the fall. 

— Alba. Pure white. 25 cents. 

— Rosea. Rose, shaded pink. 25 cents. 
Anemone Pulsatilla (Pasque Flower), 6 in. May. 

Handsome cup shaped, deep, purple flowers with , Spectabilis. 

bright yellow stamens. 25 cents. 

Anthericum Eiliastrum (St. Bruno's Lily), 2 ft. May to July. Narrow grass-like leaves; flowers clear 

white, trumpet-shaped, in long spikes. 25 cents. . 
Arabis Alpina (Alpine Rock Cress), 8 inches. Last of April until June. Flowers pure white, fragrant, in clusters. 

20 cents. •' '■' 

Aquilegia Coerulea (Rocky Mountain Columbine), ito 2 ft. July. Large handsome flowers, delicate blue without, 

clear white within. 35 cents. .' : ' 

Aquilegia Chrysantha (Golden Spurred Coumbine), 2 to 3 ft. July to Sept. 25 cents. 
Boltonia Asteroides, 5 ft. Aug. and Sept. Very showy, large, lavender, aster-like flowers. 30 cents. 
Campanula Grandiflora (Large Blue Bell), 3 ft. June to Sept. Many large bell-shaped flowers, blue or white, 

1 to 1 Y> inches in diameter, 23 to 30 flowers on a stalk. Very desirable. 25 cents. . ' 

Campanula Carpathica (Hare-bell), 1 ft. All Summer. Handsome, clear blue, bell-shaped flowers.- 25 cents. 
Centaurea Calocephala, 3 ft. June to Sept. Flowers deep magenta, 1 to 2 inches in diameter. Curious and 

■desirable. 20 cents. 

CoreopsisXanceolata, 2 ft. June to Oct. Flowers bright yellow, i}4 to 3 inchesin diameter, on long stalks; very 

free blooming, continuing throughout the Summer ; a most desirable plant, suited to any soil. .25. cents. 
Delphinium Formosum (Larkspur), 3 ft. June, July and August. Flowers in long, dense spikes, in shades of 

blue, well-known and desirable ; 20 cents. 
Dielytra Spectabilis (Bleeding Heart), 3 ft. . June to July. A well-known and very desirable plant. Foliage light 

green, deeply lobed, flowers crimson and white, heart-shaped, in long, drooping sprays. 20 cents. 
Epiedium Macranthum, 1 ft. May. Flowers peculiar in shape, pink and white, in loose clusters, extending 

beyond the leaves. 20 cents. 

Erigeron Bellidif olium (Robin's Plantam), 2 ft'. May. Leaves dark glossy green, oval and lying close to the 

ground, flowers clear purple, arranged about a tall spike, 20 cents. 
Eupatorium Argeraoides. 20 cents. 

Eunkia Ovata, 2 ft. July to Aug. Large clumps of handsome tropical leaves ; flowers purple, trumpet-shaped. 
20 cents. 

Eunkia I,ancifolia Variegata, 1 ft. Aug. Leaves variegated light green and creamy white ; flowers purple. 
35 cents. 

Eunkia Subcordata (White Day Lily), 2 ft. Aug. and Sept. Flowers pure white, fragrant. 30 cents. 
Gaillardia Grandiflora, 2 ft. June to October. Large orange flowers with deep scarlet centre, often 2 to 4 inches 
across the flower. 25 cents. 

Geraneum Sanguineum (Crane's Bill), x ft. June to Oct. Flowers single, scarlet, on short stems. 25 cents. 
Geum Triflorum (Three-Flowered Avens), 1 ft. May and June. Flowers peculiar in shape, rose colored; leaves 
fern-like. 20 cents. 

Heliopsis Lajvis (Ox-eye), 5 ft. All Summer. Large clear yellow flowers. 25 cents. 
Helenium Pumillum, 1% ft. July to Oct. Flowers clear yellow and very numerous. 25 cents. 




102 



'ARKER ^ JfOQD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE„ 



HARDY HERBACEOUS PLANTS (Continued). 

Helianthus Deeapetalis Multiflorus, Fl. PI. (Double Perennial Sunflower), 4 ft. August to frost. Flowers 

single yellow, 2 to 4 inches in diameter ; very double and very numerous. 25 cents. 
Hemerocallis Flava (Yellow Day Lily), 2 ft. June. 15 cents. 

Hibiscus Flavescens (White Rose Mallow). This species has immense flowers from 6 to 10 inches across, clear 

white with a deep crimson centre. 25 cents. 
Hibiscus Moschuetos, 5 ft. Aug. Each flower is from 3 to 5 inches across when open, and of a most beautiful 

rose pink color. 25 cents. 

Hypericum Pyriuiidatum (Pyrimidal St. John's Wort), 5 ft. Aug. Clear yellow flowers, 1 to 2 inches in diam- 
eter. ' 20 csnts. 

Iberis Sempervirens (Hardy 
Candytuft), 6 in. June. Flowers 
pure white in many dense round- 
ed heads entirely covering the 
plant ; very fine. 25 cents. 
I.athyrus I<atifolius (Perennial 
Pea). All summer. A trailing 
vine with rosy pink flowers on 
long stems ; very free blooming. 
25 cents. 

Lobelia Cardinalis (Cardinal 
Flower), 2 ft. Aug. Flowers deep 
clear cardinal in long spikes. 20 
cents. 

Lychnis Cbalcedonica (Pride of 
London), 3 ft. June and July. 
Flowers intense scarlet in flat 
heads at end of stalk ; a very de- 
sirable variety. 25 cents, 
liychnis Visicaria, Fl. PI. 
(Ragged Robin), 1 ft. June. Long 
dense spikes of dark pink, very 
double and fragrant flowers. 
Free blooming. 25 cents. 
I.ythrum Salicaria Superba 
(Loose-strife), 3 ft. July and 
Aug. Numerous long spikes of 
rose colored flowers. 25 cents. 

... ,.■ - Pseonies. The showiest and most 

Helianthus Multiflorus, Fl. PI. , . , . , , , * 

desirable of hardy ornamental 

plants, which should be introduced into every garden. Our collection comprises one hundred of the most beautiful 
varieties. 25 cents each ; $2.50 per dozen. 
Pardantlms Sinensis (Blackberry Lily), 3 ft. July and Aug. Handsome, deep orange-scarlet flowers, with deeper 
colored spots. 25 cents. 

Penstemon Barbatus Torreyii (Torrey's Penstemon), 4 ft. July and Aug. Flowers brilliant scarlet. 25 cents. 
Phlox, choice hardy varieties. Our collection of these very showy and hardy plants comprises several of the latest and 

finest varieties of all the varied colors. 15 cents each; $1.50 per dozen. 
Ranunculus Acris, PI. PI. (Double Buttercup), 2 ft. June to August. 15 cents. 
Spiraea Auruncus. 3 to 4 ft. June. Very large spikes of fine creamy-white flowers. 25 cents. 

— Filipendula, Fl. PI. (Double Drop-wort), 2 ft. June. Double pure white flowers. 25 cents. 

— Japonica, 1 ft. 

. June. Short spikes of clear white flowers. 20 cents. 

— JLobata (Queen of the Meadow), 4 ft. June and July. Flowers clear pink, in dense, close clusters. 20 cents. 

— Ulmaria Varlegata, 2 ft. Aug. Leaves beautifully variegated with golden yellow. Flowers white 20'cts 
Veronica Incana (Hoary Veronica), 6 in. July and Aug. Flowers deep azure blue, in dense narrow spikes. 20 cte. 

— Spicata, ft. July and Aug. Flowers amethyst blue. 20 cents. 

— Virgrinica, 5 ft. Aug. Flowers pure white, in immense compound spikes; leaves light green. 20 cents. 




25 varieties from, above list, our selection, - - 

25 " " " purchaser's selection, - 

12 " " " " our selection, - - - 

12 " " w purchaser's selection, - 



$4,50 
5.00 
2.25 
2.50 



^ARKER 8f Y OOD ' jSEED j^ATALOGUE, 




Double Dahlias. 



New Singie DaWsas* 



DAHLIAS. 



John Bennett. Yellow, deeply edged with scarlet. 
Christopher Schmidt. Light salmon; fine form. 
Charles Leicester. Beautiful, bright scarlet. - 
Constancy. Yellow ground, edged with lake. 
Duke of Connaught. Dark crimson, shaded purple. 
Emily Edwards. Blush white ; beautiful. 
Queen of Beauties. Pale straw, tipped with purple. 



BEAUTIFUL SHOW VARIETIES. 

Hope. Light rosy-lilac ; large flower; fine. 
Imperial. Deep purple, shaded with lilac; handsome. 
Lady Winborne. Deep pink ; splendid form. 
Miss Henshaw. White; full, large flower. 
Pie-eminent. Purple or plum-color ; extra. 
Shirley Hibberd. Dark, shaded crimson. 
Sunbeam. Clear bluff, with a beautiful outline. 



With many others that are not enumerated. 20 cents each, $2.00 per dozen. 

POMPONE or BOUQUET. A dwarf "form ; early and free-flowering. 

Helen. Light blush ; delicate color. 
Karl Goldenberg. Yellow, tipped with white. 
Kleiner Serins. Scarlet. 
Little Dear. Blush white, tipped with rose. 
Pure Lore. Lilac; beautiful shade. 
Bubincentifiora. Dark maroon ; fine shade. 
Sacramento. Yellow, edged with red. 
Price, 15 cents each, $1.50 per dozen. 
FA NCY ' VA RIE TIES. 



Ardens. Clear straw-yellow. 
Fannie Weiner. Yellow, with crimson edge. 
Fire-Bail. Bright orange-red. 
Floribundi. Rich carmine-red. 
Gold Meteor. Golden yellow. 
Gem. Crimson; fine color. 
Gold-Light. Creamy white. 



This class embraces a fine selection of the most beautiful and newest variegations, as regards colors. 
Annie Pritchard. White, striped with lilac-rose. I Chas. Wyatt. Deep rose, flaked with crimson. 

George Smith. Bright magenta ; fine form. I Lady Antnobus. Red, tipped with pure white. 

Golden Eagle. Yellow, laced with purple. Prof. Faucett. Dark lilac, striped with chocolate. 

Jessie Mcintosh. Red, distinctly tipped with white. | W. H. Williams. Splendid bright scarlet ; elegant. 
Also many others of distinction in this class. Price, 20 cents each, $2.00 per dozen. 
SINGLE FLOWERING. 
The Single varieties have become very popular, producing, as they do, large flowers of the most attractive hues, 
very early in the season. We have an extensive collection, and can give almost any color' desired, from white to the 
darkest maroon, or in fancy stripes and mottled. Price, 20 cents each, $1.50 per dozen. 

CACTUS DAHLIAS. 

A late summer and autumn variety. Resembling a Cactus-flower ; very showy as a decorative plant. Height 
about 3 feet, very bushy, but quite unlike the common Dahlia in appearance. 23 cents each ; $2.50 per dozen. 
Mrs. Hawkins. Lovely rich sulphur, very free bloomer. | A. W. Tait. Pure white, tips of petals curiously cleft, 
Jaurezii. Most intense scarlet. | exceedingly attractive. 



104 



J^ARKER 8f jyoOD, ^EED pATALOGUE. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

Fall and Winter Flowering. 



The named varieties offered in this our lim- 
ited list are among the most distinct and beauti- 
ful that have competed for premiums at the 
various exhibitions. The plants are grovyn by 
the best known cultivators, ' and are reliable. 
Strong young plants are sent out about the first 
of June to plant out, in a well-prepared soil of 
rich compost of light loam, with rotted manure 
well mixed in the soil, giving them a cool, airy 
situation for their growth during the summer. 
They should be potted about the last of Au- 
gust to early in September, to bloom in the 
house or conservatory. Care is always neces- 
sary to protect the plants from early frosts while 
the buds are >ander. , . . 

During the past few years the splendid addi- 
tions to the various classes of Chrysanthemums 
by foreign and American cultivators have given 
them a boom that can hardly be realized until 
one sees a collection of these plants in the 
queenly magnificence of full bloom, during the 
fall season, when other flowers have faded 
away. 

Single plants, 15 cts. each ; $1,50 per dozen. 
New varieties of late introduction, not given in 
this list, 25 to 50 cts. each, according to kind. 

CHINESE VARIETIES (Large-Flowered). 

Antonelli. Salmon-orange, incurved. 

Barbara. Rich golden bronze. 

Bronze Jardin des Plantes. Bronze, 
orange-yellow centre. 

Bruce Findlay. Pale canary-yellow ; most 
distinct in color. 

Duchess of Connaught. Delicate rose- 
pink. 

Empress of India. Large, pure white. 
Gen. Brainbridge. Dark orange, amber- 
gold centre. 

Golden Queen of England. Very large, 

golden color, fine. 
Golden Beverly. Golden yellow; dwarf 

plant. 

Hero of Stoke-Newington. Blush, in- 
curved. 

Jeanne d'Arc. White, tinged pink, in- 
curved. 

Eady Talford. Rose-lilac, incurved. 
Lady Hardinge. Delicate rose-pink. 
Mrs. Sliarp. Carmine-pink, incurved. 
Mr. Cor bay. Ruby-red, fine. 
Perle des Beautes. Bright amaranth-crimson. 
Prince of Wales. Dark piirple violet. 




Japanese Chrysanthemum. 

White Eve. Fine white. 



JAPANESE VARIETIES (Petals Variable). 



Beauty of Swanley. Soft shade of lilac, shaded pink. 
Belle Paulle. White, edged pink. 
Boule d'Or. Yellow bronze. 

Bouquet Pa.it. Rich rose and silvery white ; centre 

shaded yellow. 
Bronze Queen of England. Bronze and yellow. 
Carmen. Crimson, tipped yellow. 
Oompte de Germany. Nankeen, striped. 
l>r. Masters. Brown-crimson, tinged yellow centre. 
Early Bed Dragon. Crimson, orange centre. 
Embleme. Orange-yellow, striped crimson. 
Fair Maid of Guernsey. Pure white. 
Ferdinand Feral. Light pink. 
Fleur de Bois. Rich crimson. 
Gorgeous. Deep yellow, extra. 

POMPON VARIETIES 



Golden Dragon. Fine yellow; large flower 
Grandiflorum. Deep, rich yellow ; latt. 
Hon. John Welsh. Crimson-lake. 
Kiva Kana. Orange, shaded crimson. 
I* Fournaise. Fiery red, tinged yello . 
X,a Frizure. Light pink and white. 
ILady Selbourne. Pure white. 
Slsgnum Bonum. Rosy lilac. 
Mens. Blanc. Brilliant amaranth. 
Peter the Great. Fine lemon-yellow; *iwarf 
Pres. Parkman. Fine bright amaranf , 
Rosa Bonheur. Deep crimson-amarav h. 
Tokio. Bright crimson. 
Win. Robinson. Orange and brown. 



(Small-Flowered). 



Antonius. Canary yellow. 
Brilliant. Reddish Crimson. 
Golden Cedo Nulli. Yellow, 
la Fiancee. Pure white, fringed. 
ILe Desire. White, pink centre. 



i Mile. Marthe. Pure white, fine. 

j Montgolfier. Crimson, tipped yellow. 

Perfection. Reddish brown, tipped gotri. 

Stella. Golden yellow. 

Snowdrop. Pure white. 



AI\KEI\ 8j Y OOD ' ^EED pATALOGUE. 



SELECT LIST OF THE CHOICEST ROSES. 




fa"'' 



i 4 



sn 




No garden, however small, is com- 
plete without Roses. The Rose 
stands, as it has for years, " Queen 
of the Flowers." With a proper se- 
lection of kinds, Roses can be had 
from June till heavy frosts come with 
withering touch. 

Every year adds a large number 
of varieties to our lists, new at least 
in name, if not in character ; and. it 
shall be our special endeavor, after 
careful comparisons, to point out such 
of them as show a decided improve- 
ment in their leading characteristics 
over pre-existing varieties. 

The following brief hints may be 
of service to the inexperienced. 
TIME TO PLANT. As early in the spring as the ground will permit. The bushes we offer 
this season are of careful selection, and well-grown ripened wood ; we advise pruning them back 
when they are planted, which will make them start stronger, and bring them earlier into bloom. 
If early planting is neglected, we can supply potted bushes which can be planted without disturb- 
ing their growth. 

The Tea scented, and others that are pot grown, should not be planted till all danger of 
spring frosts is over. i * 

SOIL. The most suitable soil is a strong, rich 
loan;, mixed with about one quarter its bulk of well- 
decomposed stable manure. It is necessary that the 
ground be dug at least a foot and a half deep. 

It may safely be laid down as a rule, that it is 
impossible to make the soil too rich for the rose. 

During the growing season frequent watering of 
liquid manure, made either of cow manure or guano. 
This stimulant will keep the plants vigorous and healthy, 
and will amply repay the attention in size and quality of 
blossom. In using it avoid as much as possible getting 
it upon the foliage, especially when the plants are in 
bloom. 

SITUATION. The best situation for the rose is 
an eastern or northern expousre, if slightly shaded from 
the intense heat of midday, the bloom will be more per- 
fect and continuous. 

PRUNING. The hardy sorts may be pruned in 
March or April, the tender varieties should be left till a 
month later. 

Close pruning will produce quality, and long prun- 
ing quantity of bloom. 

Climbing roses need comparatively little pruning, 
the tips only of the shoots require to be taken off, and 
any weak and unripe shoots cut out altogether. 




io6 



^ARKEP^ 8f Y OOD ' ^EED jCATALOGUE, 



ROSES- 

Choice Hybrid Perpetual Roses. 

50 cts. each, §4.50 per doz. 

Abel Cari'iere. Velvety crimson, large, full and 
finely shaped. 

A. K. Williams. Carmine red, changing to ma- 
genta, large and lull, one of the best, fragrant. 

Alfred Colornb. Bright fiery red, large, full, and 
of fine globular form, very "fragrant and superb. 

Anna de Diesbach. Clear, bright rose, very large 
and fine-shaped, full and fragrant. 

Baroness Rothschild. Light pink, large and 
double, very distinct and beautiful. 

Baronne Prevost. Beautiful bright rose, shaded 
crimson. 

Beauty of Waltham. Bright rosy crimson , large 

and full, fragrant. 
Boule de Neige. Pure white, fine form, one of 

the best. 

Captain Christy. Delicate flesh color, deeper 

centre, very large, fine in autumn. 
Charles Refevbre. Brilliant crimson, large, full, 

and well formed. 
Countess of Oxford. Bright carmine, shaded 

purple, very large and full. 
Dr. Andry. Rich, rosy crimson, large and full, 

good form. 

Duchess de Vallam-brosa. Flesh color, shaded 

with rose, free flowering. 
Duchess of Bedford. Rich velvety crimson, 

suffused with scariet, petals reflexed. 
Duke of Edinburgh. Brilliant crimson, shaded 

wiih maroon, full, regular form, extra fine. 
Duke of Teck. Crimson scarlet, large, full, and 

good form, very free flowering. 
Dupuy Jamain. Bright cherry-red, large and 

full, fine in autumn. 
Edward Morren. Deep cherry rose, flowers full, 

large, and very double. 

Etienne Revet. Carmine, large, full, and exquisitely 

formed, one of the best. 
E. Y. Teas. Deep cerise red, large, full, perfect 

globular form, very fragrant. 
Eisher Holmes. Brilliant crimson, flowers fine- 
ly formed, double, very fragrant, extra fine. 
Erancois Michelon. Deep carmine rose, very 

large, fine form, free bloomer, fragrant. 
General Jacqueminot. Rich crimson, of fine 

shape, and exquisite fragrance. 
General Washing-ton. Crimson scarlet, fine. 
Gloire Ryonnaise. White,' slightly tinted with 

yellow, full and of good shape, very handsome in 

the bud, fragrant, extra fine. 
Harrison Weir. Velvety crimson, enlivened with 

scarlet, large and full, fragrant. 
Horace Vernet. Scarlet crimson, large, full, double, 

extra fine. 

Jean Ribaud. Scarlet crimson, shaded, very 
large, a fine dark rose. 

John Hopper. Bright rose, with carmine centre, 
large and full. 

John Stuart Mill. Bright, clear red, large, full, 
and beautiful form. 

Jules Margottin, Deep rose, large and fine. 

Ra France. Silvery rose, changing to pink, a 

most constant bloomer, very fragrant, beautiful 

both in flower and bud. 



-Continued. 

Ra Beine. Clear bright rose, very large. 

Louis Van Houtte. Crimson maroon, large, 

highly perfumed, one of the best. 
Mabel Morrison. Pure white, tinged with rose 

in autumn, one of the best whites. 
Madame Gabriel Ruizet. Delicate, silvery pink, 

large, full, finely cupped, fragrant. 
Madame lacliarnie. White, faintly touched 

with rose, changing to pure white, large and full. 
Madame Victor Verdier. Carmine crimson, large 

and full, fine form. 
Mile. Annie Wood. Beautiful clear red, large 

and full, fine form. 
Mile. Eugenie Verdier. Silvery rose, large 

globular flowers. 
Mile. Marie Bady. Brilliant red, large and 

, full, form perfect, free flowering, verv fine. 
Magna Charta. Bright pink, suffused with 

carmine, very large and full, fine form, extra. 
Marie Bauman. Bright carmine, exquisite color 

and form, very fragrant. 
Marquis de Castellane. Beautiful bright rose, 

very large, a fine, bold flower. 
Marshall P. Wilder. Cherry-carmine, large 

and full, an abundant bloomer. 
Mervelle de Ryon. White, with a slight tinge 

of satiny rose, large, and of excellent form, a 

superb variety, extra fine. 
Mrs. Harry Turner. Crimson scarlet, maroon 

shaded, flowers large, and very fine. 
Mrs. Raxton. Dark rosy crimson, marked with 

scarlet, large and full, perfect form, and richest 
• fragrance. 

Paul Neyron. Dark rose, very large flower, 

free bloomer, rich fragrance. 
Perfection de Lyon. Rose, reverse of petals, 

lilac, large and full, very fine. 
Prince C ami lie de Rohan. Dark crimson maroon, 

shaded with blood red, a splendid rose. 
Sir Garnet Wolesley. Bright red, shaded car- 
mine, large and full, and perfectly formed. 
Senateur Vaise. Scarlet crimson, beautiful shape, 

large, free flowering, highly fragrant. 
Star of Waltham. Crimson, very large, and 

double, fine form. 
Sultan of Zanzibar. Maroon, shaded with crimson, 

extra fine. 

Sydonia. Bright rose, large and full, fine. . 
Thomas Mills. Rosy carmine, large and f ull. 
Victor Verdier. Bright rose, carmine centre, 

free bloomer, very fragrant. 
White Baroness. Pure white, immense double 

flowers, extra fine. 
Xavier Olibo. Dark velvety crimson, large and 

full, one of the finest dark roses, fragrant. 



Hardy Climbing Roses. 

50 cts. each, 84.50 per doz. 

Baltimore Belle. Pale blush, nearly white. 
Climbing Countess of Oxford. Bright carmine 

red. ' 
Climbing Victor Verdier. Bright rose, carmine 

centre. 

Climbing Jules Margottin. Deep rose, a splen~ 
did pillar rose. • 

Gem of the Prairies. Carmine crimson, large and 
fragrant. 

Grevelle, or Seven Sisters. Blush and crimson, 

grows in clusters. 
Queen of the Prairies. Deep rose, with a white 

stripe in the centre of each petal, vigorous 

grower. 



^ARKEF^ ^ ^OOD, jSEED j^ATALOGUE. 



107 



ROSES (( 

Tea Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 
Second size, 35 cts. each, $3.50 per doz. 

The most satisfactory and desirable roses for the sum- 
mer garden, or for winter blooming, are the Teas, now 
so much improved that they embrace not only large and 
beautiful flowers, and of the most delicate and exquisite 
colors, but a more vigorous habit and continuous bloom- 
ing the whole year. Unfortunately they are not hardy : 
but they can be wintered in a frame or cool greenhouse, 
and planted out in April or May. 

Bon Silene. Carmine, tinted with salmon, very fra- 
grant. 

Catherine Mermet. Bright silvery pink, large, full 
fragrant. 

Cornelia Cook. White, sometimes tinged with pale 

yellow, very large and full. 
Devoniensis. Creamy white, centre sometimes tinged 

with blush. 

Duchess of Edinburgh. Intense glowing crimson, 

very brilliant and beautiful. 
Gloire de Dijon. Pale yellow, very fragrant. 
Hovey's White Tea. Pure white, large. 
Isabella Sprunt. Sulphur yellow, very beautiful in 

bud. 

Madame Lombard. Salmon, shaded with carmine, 
large and full, very fragrant. 

Nephitos. ;Pale yellowish white, large buds, beau- 
tiful. 

Perle des Jardines. Deep canary yellow, free 

grower, and very profuse bloomer, very fragrant. 
Saffron. Deep fawn, free bloomer. 




Austrian Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 
Harrisoni. Golden yellow, profuse bloomer. 
Persian Yellow. Rich deep yellow, profuse bloom- 
er, the finest yellow rose grown. 



Scotch Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 
These are distinguished for their small leaves, abun- 
dant bloom, and delicate habit. Being perfectly hardy 
they are desirable for beds, or borders. 
Countess of Glasgow. Dark rose. 
Queen of May. Bright pink. 
William the Fourth. Pure white. 
Yellow Scotch. Bright yellow. 



Eourbon Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 

These are constant bloomers, and the most beautiful 
in autumn ; although not quite hardy, a slight protection 
suffices. 

Appoline. Rosy pink, a vigorous grower. 
Duchess de Thuringe. White, slightly tinged with 
lilac. 

Hermosa. Delicate rose, very double and perfect. . 
Souvenir de la Malmaison. Delicate blush, with 

a rich tint of cream, large double, perfect form ; 

one of the best roses grown. 



Noisette Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 

These are of vigorous growth, and nearly hardy, valu- 
ble as pillar roses in sheltered situations. 
Lamarque. Nearly white, a good pillar rose, vigor- 
ous grower. 

Marechal Niel. Deep yellow, large, full, fragrant, 
one of the most valuable for growing under glass. 

Solf aterre. Bright lemon, large and globular, inclin- 
ing to flat, fragrant. 



Moss Roses. 

50 cts. each, $4.50 per doz. 

Moss Roses are very popular and much admired for 
their buds, which are covered with a moss-like texture. 
Blanche Moreau. Pure white, large, full, perfect 

form, produced in clusters. 
Countess de Murinais. Pale flesh, changing to 

pure white, one of the best white moss roses'. 
Crested Moss. Rose. Large and full, beautiful. 
Glory of Mosses. Pale rose, large and handsome 

flower.. 

X.aneii. Brisrht rose, large and full, vigorous grower. 
Perpetual White. White, very double, blooms in 

clusters, one of the most desirable. 
Soupert et Notting. Bright rose, very large, full 

and globular, exquisite fragrance. 



NEW ROSES. 

American Beauty. ( Hy. Tea.) Brilliant carmine, 
large, well-shaped flowers, perfectly double, pro- 
fuse bloomer, vigorous grower, fragrant. First 
size, $1.00, small plants, 50 cts. each. 

Meteor. (Hy. Tea.) Deep velvety crimson, a con- 
stant and free bloomer, a splendid rose for sum- 
mer and fall blooming, described as " the best 
keeping rose in cultivation." 75 cents each. 

Mrs. John !Laing. Beautiful soft pink, large and 
full, well-shaped buds, profuse bloomer, vigorous 
grower, fragrant, a superb rose ; the finest rose 
grown for florists' use. Can readily be brought in 
_ for Christmas. $1 00 to $1.50 each. 

Puritan. (Hy. Tea.) Pure white, large size, of per- 
fect symmetry, profuse bloomer, vigorous grower, 
very fragrant. $1.00 each. 

The Bennett. (Hy. Tea.) Brilliant crimson, long 
pointed buds, profuse bloomer, very fragrant. 
50 cents each. 

The Bride. (Tea.) A pure white rose of large size 
and most perfect form, free-blooming and strong- 
growing variety, of delicious fragrance. 50 cents 
each. 

Sunset. (Tea.) Orange-yellow, flowers largo, and 
double, a strong grower. 50 cents each. 



elect* Hardy* Shrubs. 



WE GIVE BELOW THE MOST SHOWY AND DESIRABLE VARIETIES. THOSE NOT HERE NAMED 
CAN BE SUPPLIED AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 



Azaleas. Of the hardy Ghent type, and in variety of the most brilliant colors. Fine flowering 
plants, $1.00. 

Azalea Mollis. A new type, flowering earlier than the Ghent, and in brilliance of colors 
and form of flowers approaching the superb but tender India varieties. A great acquisi- 
tion. $1.00. each. 

Althcea [Marsh Mallow). Double, variegated and purple; handsome shrubs. 

Althma, new variegated. Foliage beautifully edged with white. 

Amorpha frutiCOSa {Bastard Indigo). A fine shrub, with purple and gold flowers. 

Calycanthus florida, or Allspice- Tree. Very fragrant blossoms. 

Catalpa JKaempferi. A dwarf and handsome species from Japan. 

Cranberry -tree {Viburnum). A handsome shrub with scarlet fruit. 

Clethra alnifolia. One of the finest shrubs, with fragrant white flowers. 

Daphne cneorum [Spurge Laurel). Evergreen, with fragrant pink flowers; beautiful. 
Spreading in habit. 

Deutzia crenata pleno. Beautiful, with spikes of double blush flowers. 
Deutzia crenata pleno alba. Double, hardy shrub, white flowers, delicately margined. 
Deutzia gracilis. One of the most popular and beautiful flowering shrubs ; good for pot- 
culture. 

Deutzia purpurea pleno. With spikes of dark-colored double flowers. 
Deutzia scabra [rough leaved). The original species, of upright growth, covered with clear 
white flowers. 

Deutzia Crenata [scalloped leaved). Like preceding variety, but of less vigorous growth. 

Deutzia variegata. Beautiful variegated foliage. 

Deutzia Fortuneii. Deep-green foliage and large white flowers. 

Double Chinese Plum [Prunus triloba). Very fine; double pink flowers. 

Forsythia viridissima. Deep-green foliage and bright-yellow bell-shaped flowers. 

Forsythia Fortuneii. Upright growth, and bright-yellow flowers. 

Forsythia suspensa. Early blooming ; golden-yellow flowers. 

Fringe, Wllite [Chirnanthus Virginica). 

Hypericum Kalmianum {St. John's Wort). A fine shrub, with yellow flowers in August. 

Homey SUCfele White Tree [Lonicera Iberica). Very handsome white flowers. 

Hawthorn. Paul 9 S new double scarlet [Crataegus coccinea fl. pi.). Superb- dark 
scarlet flowers. $1.50 to $3.00. 

Hawthorn, new double white. $1.50 to $3.00. 

Lonicera tartariCa {Honeysuckle). A handsome early-flowering, deciduous shrub; pink, 
Lonicera tartarica alba {Honeysuckle). Like preceding;' flowers white. 
Magnolia conspicua. Very large white flowers, blooming in April. $2.00. 
Magnolia Soulangeana. Large, purple and white ; early in spring. $1.50 to $2.00. 
Magnolia Lenne. With very large purplish flowers. $2.00. 

Ptirple Hazel. The dark, rich, luxuriant foliage of this shrub is in fine contrast with lighter 
kinds. 

Pyrus japonica. Fine, rich foliage, and brilliant scarlet flowers ; a good hedge-plant. 
Philadelphus thyrsiflorus {Syringa). Very long spikes of large white flowers. 
Purple Barberry. Very showy ; dark-purple foliage. 
Smoke-Tree, Purple Fringe {Rhus cotinus). A very handsome shrub . 
Syringa sinensis. Large clusters of reddish-purple flowers. 
Spiraea callosa. A handsome deciduous shrub ; red flowers. 
108 




j-'ARKER Y OOD i jSEED j^A.TA LOGUE, IO9 



SELECT HARDY SHRUBS — Continued. 
Bpircea alba. Deciduous shrub; beautiful white flowers. 

Spircea Thunbergii. Deciduous ; covered with 'small white flowers ; fine foliage. 
Spirwa trilobata, Meevesii pleno, prunifolia pi., and several others. 
Tamarax, Very handsome ; heath-like foliage and pink flowers. 

Viburnum plicatum. One of the very finest shrubs, producing pure white flowers. $1.00* 

Viburnum lantanoid.es . Handsome, Lantana-like, with large clusters of. white flowers. 

Viburnum opulus {Snowball). An old, beautiful, and favorite shrub. 

Weigelia rosea, and alba. Beautiful shrubs, flowering in June. 

Weigelia Desboisi. Very dark crimson flowers ; fine. 

Weigelia Candida, New*"- With pu#& ? white, flowers. 75 cents. 

Weigelia variegata. Foliage beautifully edged with white. 

White Fringe. Superb foliage, and delicate, fringe-like, snow-white flowers. 

50 cents each; except those noted ; $5.00 per dozen. 

ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS OF SPECIAL MERIT. 

Cornus Siberica Variegata. A new shrub, with vigorous green leaves, distinctly mar- 
gined silver, giving a most attractive and bright effect It bears the sun perfectly, and is 
sure to become popular. The wood is bright red in winter. 7.5 cents. 

Eocochorda Grandiflora. A scarce' and distinct flowering shrub. Its. large, snowy-white 
flowers in June are beautiful. 75 cents ; extra size, $1.60. 

Japan Ited JBwd {Cercis Japonica). Distinguishable from the American Judas Tree by its 
low growth and profusion of bright pink flowers, produced before, the leaves. 50 cents; 
extra size, 75 cents. 

tthus Laciniata. The foliage of the fern-leaved sumac is perhaps unequalled- in luxuriant 
beauty. 50 cents. 

Kalmia Latifolia. Beautiful, delicate, pinky-white flowers ; fine glossy foliage. It deserves 

extensive cultivation. Fine flowering bushes, $1.00; smaller plants, 50 cents. 
Hydrangea JPaniculata. A most desirable flowering shrub, producing lovely trusses of 

white flowers throughout August and September. 50 cents. 
JCanthoceras Sarbifolia. A most magnificent ornamental shrub of recent introduction. 

Flower spikes eight inches long, each flower one inch, in diameter. Color white tinted 

rose, with reddish centre. $1.00. 

HARDY CLIMBING- PLANTS. 

A.mpelopsis {Virginia Creeper). One of the best; rapid growing and beautiful. 
Ampelopsis Veitchii. Exquisite ; a miniature Virginia creeper. 25 cents each. 
Signonia, or Trumpet Floiver. Handsome scarlet. 
Clematis flamtila. With very fragrant Wjhite flowers, in clusters. 
Honeysuckle {Lonicera) Japan, Variegated. 

Honeysuckle, Hall's Netv. From Japan; pure white; fragrant and fine. 
Honeysuckle, Scarlet Trumpet. Monthly blooming ; scarlet flowers. 
Honeysuckle, Variegated Monthly. Fragrant, yellowish-white flowers. 
Honeysuckle, Japan Evergreen. Foliage nearly evergreen; flowers yellowish. 
Akebia quinata, A rapid climber, with dark green leaves and purple flowers. 
Apios tuberosa. Tuberous-rooted perennial, covered with clusters of fragrant red flowers. 
Periploca grwca. A handsome and vigorous growing vine. 
Moocbury Wave- Work (Celastrus). Very handsome. 

Wistaria, Chinese Purple. The finest of climbing plants ; purple flowers. 50 cents to 
$1.50, according to size. 

Wistaria, Chinese White. Similar, but white flowers. $1.00. 

Wistaria, Double Chinese. Fine, double flowers. $2.00. 

Wistaria Magnifica. New. A strong, vigorous grower, flowers lilac, in long, graceful, 
drooping racemes. 50 cents to $1.00 each. 

Price, 50 cents each, except those noted. 



Srnamental Irees. 



OUR NURSERY STOCK CANNOT HE SURPASSED IN QUALITY, AND THE PKICES ARE LOW FOR SUCHv 

" WEEPING- TREES. 

Weeping Mountain Ash {Pyms 

sorbus pendula). 

Weeping Beech {Fagus pendula). 

Weeping Birch {Betula alba pendula). 
Weeping Cherry {Cerasus Pumela). 

pendtdd). 

5 Weeping Willotv {Salix pendula). 
Kilmarnock Willotv {Salix caprea 

pendula). Very beautiful. 
Weeping JElm {Ulmus pendula). 
Weeping Willow {Babylonian). The 
true, old-fashioned variety, 50 cents to 
$1.00 each. 
Wier's Cut-leaf Weeping Maplit 
{Acer dasycarpum Wierii). Very crna-* 
mental. 

Price, $1 to $2 each, except those noted.. 

HEDGE PLANTS. 

Spirwa Thunhergi. The delicate- 
foliage of this flowering shrub makes- 
it very desirable for a low, graceful, 
hedge. $15.00 per hundred. 

Buchthorn. Very hardy. $6.00 per 
hundred. 

Privet. Very early; a clean, bright 
green until late frost. $6.00 per 100. 
Three - th orned Acacia. The foli- 
age is very beautiful, and it makes ai 
strong and fine defence. $2.00 per 
hundred. 

JEvergreens for hedges: Arbor Vitje, $10 to $20 per 100; Norway Spruce, $30 to $40 perr 
• 100; and Pines, $20 to $30 per 100. 
2 to 3 feet is about the height of hedge plants ; they should be planted from 8 to 12 ins. apart.. 

DECIDUOUS TREES, 

OR THOSE THAT SHED THEIR FOLIAGE EACH SEASON. 

Silver-Leaf Maple {Acer dasycarptwi). A ^ery rapid grower, with graceful drooping 

branches. 7 to 10 feet, 75 cents; 12 to 14 feet, $1.56. 
Norivay Maple {Acer Platanoides). A round-headed tree, with dark green foliage that clings* 

to the tree very late. 7 to 10 feet, 75 cents ; 12 to 14 feet, $1.50. 

Sugar or Boch Maple {Acer saccharhtum). One of the commonest and best street-trees.. 
10 to 15 feet, $1.00 to $2.00. 

Med Maple {Acer rubrum). A very pretty tree when in flower and autumn foliage. 6 to 8: 
feet, 75 cents to $1.00. 

Horse- Chestnut {sEsculus hippocastanum). A well-known street-tree. 6 feet, $1.00. 
Canoe Birch {Betula papyracea). A very beautiful tree, with pure white bark, and drooping: 
branches. 6 to 10 feet, 50 cents to $1.00. 

Sweet Chestnut {Castanea vesca Americana). A handsome shade-tree, with edible fruit. 
6 to 10 feet, 50 to 75 cents. 

Catalpa Speciosa. An ornamental tree, excelling the Horse-Chestnut. Flowers trumpet- 
shaped, growing in clusters; color white, with purple throat. 4 to 6 feet, 75 cents. 
Judas Tree {Cercis Canadensis). A low-growing tree, with pink flowers, 6 to 8 feet, $1.50. 




White Ash. 



^ARKER 8j Y OOD > ^EED CATALOGUE. 



Ill 



DECIDUOUS TREES — Continued. 

White Ash {Fraxinus Americana). Desirable and rapid-growing shade-tree for any soil. 6 to 

12 feet, 50 cents to $1.00. 
Three Thorn Acacia, or Honey Locust {Gleditschia triacanthos). Rapid grower, with 

handsome light-green foliage, and long sharp thorns and long seed-pods. 4 to 8 feet, 

50 cents to $1.00. 

Black Walnut {JugUns Nigra). A rapid grower, with edible fruit. 7 feet, 50 cents to 
$1.00. 

Koelruteria {Koslruteria Paniculata). A fine, small-growing tree, with large panicles of yellow 

flowers. 3 to 6 feet, 60 cents to $1.00. 
Tlllip Tree {Liriodendron Tulipifera). A handsome, upright tree, with tulip-like flowers and 

peculiar leaves. 4 to 6 feet, 75 cents to $1.50. 
JPurple Beech {Fagus sylvatica purpurea). Beautiful deep-purple foliage, changing to 

greenish-purple in the fall. 5 feet, $1.00 ; 8 feet, $2.00. _ jt 




Scotch or European Larch. • . Norway or Blue Spruce. 

■(Jticumber Tree {Magnolia acuminata). A fine conical tree, with large leaves and showy 

fruit. 4 to 6 feet, 75 cents to $1.50. 
Balm of Gilead {Poplar balsamea). A rapid-growing tree, with medicinal buds. 6 to 12 feet, 

50 cents to $1.00. 

Cottonwood {Populus monilifera). A very rapid grower. 7 to 12 feet. 50 cents to $1.00. 
3%Oimtain Ash {Pyrus ancuparia). A tree with clusters of white flowers followed by showy 

orange berries. 7 to 9 feet, 75 cents to $1.50. 
Med Oak {Quercus coccinea). The most rapid growing oak. 4 to 8 feet, 75 cents to $1.50. 
White Oak {Quercus alba). Makes a very large tree, with tough wood. 3 to 6 feet, 50 cents 

to $1.00; 1 to 2 feet, 20 cents to 30 cents. 
Waiden-hair Tree {Ginko or Salisburi). Very superior specimens of this distinct and 
desirable tree at $i.co to $2.00. 

.Swamp White Oak {Quercus bicolor). A rough-bark tree; will grow in wet soil. 3 to 5 
feet, 60 cents to $1.00. 

Willow {Salix lucida). A rapid-growing, tree-formed willow, with glossy leaves. $1.00. 
Golden WilloiV {Salix vittellina). Bark of this tree is golden yellow, and quite showy in 



New and Special, im Keneral, List of Perm 



GRAPE-VINES FOR GRAPERIES. 

These plants are raised from cuttings of bearing vines, and all grown in ports. We can also 
supply fine canes imported from the most reliable JStcropean sources. 
JBuckland Stveetivater. Large oval berries,, amber color, tender flesh. 
Vhasselas de Fontainebleau, White, A delicious and fine early grape. 
Chasselas, White. Good-sized bunches ; rich, sweet, and early. 
Foster's White, Bunches and berries large ; clear amber color. 
Frontignan, Grizzly. Yellowish-red berries, with delicious Muscat flavor. 
Hamburg , JBlach. Well known as one of the best of grapes. 
Ham J) t ll '() , Golden. A very fine grape ; amber colored ; large bunches. 

Price 75 cents each; $8.00 per dozen. Extra size, $1.50 to $2.00 each. 




The Prentiss. 



HARDY GRAPE-VINES. 

Brighton. Very excellent quality; bunch large shouldered, berries red, medium size; vigorous 

and hardy ; early, and a great bearer. 50 cents. 
Concord. Acknowledged to be " the grape for the million." 
Delaware. A small, but very delicious, red grape ; very hardy. 

Moore 9 s Diamond. White or light colored ; bunches large, flesli melting and juicy ; sweet 

to the centre ; good grower. 2 years, #1.00. each. 
Worden. Earlier than Concord; black; perfectly hardy vine. 

Niagara New White. The vine is remarkably hardy, and an unusually strong grower; 
bunches very large and uniform, very compact. Quality good, very little pulp, melting and 
sweet. Ripens with the Concord, and hangs on the vine till frost. It is enormously pro- 
ductive, and a regular bearer. Vines,. $ 1 00 each. 

Faton, New. The finest black grape grown. Vigorous grower, earlier than the Concord, 
and of superior quality. Bunch and berries very large. #3.00- each. 

112 



^ARKEI^ $f ^OOD, ^EED pATALOGUR. I I J, 

HARDY GRAPE VINES (Continued). 

Moore's Early. A large, early, and handsome grape. One year old, 25 cents; $2.50 per 

dozen. Two year old, 50 cents ; $5.00 per dozen. 
JPocklington. A valuable white grape. A seedling of Concord; fruit large, golden yellow, 

with bloom, in large clusters, very best quality, sweet to centre, and has always proved 

hardy in the Northern States and Canada; fruit holds on vine ripe for a very long season.. 
Potter's Early Sweet. Very early ; ready for use September 1st. Sweet and good flavor, 

and has taken the premium at the State fair for several years. Vines, two years old, $1.50 

each ; three years old, $2.00 each. 
Prentiss. A white grape of great merit ; bunch large, berry medium, skin thin, flesh sweet 

and juicy, vine a vigorous grower and hardy. Good two year old vines, 50 eents each ; 

$5.00 per dozen. 

Hogers Wo. 15, or Agawam. Large bunches and large red berries, of good quality. 
50 cents. 

The Eaton. Moore's new black grape. $3.00 each. 

F. H. Hayes. White, hardy and productive, large clustues, sweet and good grower. $1.00.. 
Two year old, 50 cents, except where noted. 

RASPBERRIES. 

This valuable fruit is usually ripe just 
after strawberries. It ought to receive more 
attention, both for family use and for market. 
When properly grown, in. deep, strong soil^ 
it is very remunerative, and with less trouble 
than any other small fruit. Manure freely, 
and cultivate well. Cut out with a sharp- 
faced spade all the suckers, except those in- 
tended for fruiting ; plant in rows four to five; 
feet apart, and three: feet between the rows - r 
cut out all old wood each year, in.early spring. 
Tender varieties should be protected in win- 
ter by bending down and covering with earth. 

HANSELL RASPBERRY. perdoz. period 

Cuthbert. One of the very best, adapting itself to almost any climate, be- 
ing hardy in winter, and a vigorous grower during the heat and drought 
of summer. Fruit clear red, firm, and caf ries well to market. 

JEEansell. The earliest of all raspberries; hardy, of vigorous growth, and 
productive. Fruit bright crimson, very firm, having been shipped four 
hundred miles in good condition . 

Belle de Fontenay. Hardy, red, producing a good crop in the autumn 

Herstine. One of the best red verieties ; large and finely flavored 

Shaffer's Colossal. A cross between the red and black; vigorous, large 
and productive. It is regarded by judges as introducing a new type 

Caroline. Large and finely flavored. Yellow . . . 

Gregg. The largest, most juicy and best of the black caps .... 

Hancocos. New. Early, good color, quality best. Plants vigorous grow- 
ing 

Souhegan. Another black cap ; early and excellent 




I.OO' 


$5.00 


1.00 


5.00 


1.00 


5.00 


1.00 


5.00, 


1.00 


5.00 


1.00 


5.00 


1.00 


5.00 


2.50 


10.00 


1.00 


5.00 



H4 



^ARKEI\ 8f yoOD, ^EED j^ATALOGUE. 




Fay's Prolific. 



CURRANTS. 

This fruit ripens about the time the raspberries go out of bearing. It will remain on the 
bushes, without injury, longer than any other small fruit, when grown 
on cool, moist soil. Plant four feet apart, in good soil ; prune out old 
wood, so that each remaining shoot may have room to grow. Late in 
May, watch the bushes carefully for the currant-worms. If they ap- 
pear, dust with hellebore. Manure heavily in autumn, and early in 
spring spade in the manure. 

A very valuable variety, remarkably productive, 
with very long bunches of large, rich, red. 
colored fruit. Compared with the best, it 
is better in flavor, much less acid, and five 
times as prolific. One-year plants, 30 cents 
each, $3.00 per dozen; two-year plants, 50 
cents each, $5.00 per dozen. 

PER DOZ. PER IOO. 

Cherry. Very large, with dark-red berries, rather acid. $30.60 per thousand. $1.00 $5.00 

JLct Versaillciise. Splendid, large red. $30.00 per thousand . . . 1.00 5.00 

White Orape. The finest white variety 1.00 5.00 

White D utch. An old but good variety . . . . " . . . 1.00 5.00 

Hed Dutch. A fine variety . . 1.00 5.00 

GOOSEBERRIES. 

Being a gross feeder, the gooseberry delights in a deep, rich soil. Planting under partial 
shade, along fences, or by the side of buildings, in a measure prevents mildew, to which goose- 
berries are very subject. Mulching is also good, as a preventive. Should the currant-worm 
appear, use hellebore as directed for currants. Plant and prune as recommended for currants. 

Smith's Improved. Large, 
light green, of fine quality- 
$1.50 per doz., $8.00 per 100. 

Houghton's Seedling. Very 
prolific, pale red, almost free 
from mildew. $1.50 per doz- 
en, $8 00 per hundred. 

Whinham 's In dust r y . 
This variety originated in the 
north of England, is of a very 
robust habit of growth, and 
is extraordinarily productive, 
and is suitable for cooking 
purposes at an early date. It 
is of enormous size when ripe ; 
•color dusky red. This is the 
only Gooseberry of this fine 
European class that is perfect- 
ly free from mildew, and as 
reliable as our own small na- 
tive sorts. The demand for it 
is now something astonishing, 
over half a million plants be- 
ing sold last year in this coun- 
try. Prices reduced to 25 

-cents each; $2.50 per dozen. Industry Gooseberry. 




j^ARKER 8j Y OOD i pEED pATALOGUE. I 1 5' 




Belmont. Jewell. 

STRAWBERRIES. 

Strawberries are easily cultivated. Moist but well-drained land is best, The soil should be 
deeply pulverized and freely manured. In setting, do not plant deep, but press the earth firmly 
about the plants. Plant in beds four feet wide, with alleys two feet wide between them. Put on 
each bed three rows of plants fifteen inches apart, and the plant's the same distance apart in rows. 
For the best results, mulching with some light material is indispensable as soon as the ground has 
become slightly frozen. The varieties marked " Pistillate" must have a row. of staminate, or perfect 
flowered varieties, planted, say, every ten feet among them. 

J ' PER DOZ. PER IOO. 



Belmont. Late ; fine color, very productive, see page 9. . . . $0.50 $1.75 

Crescent Seedling {Pistillate). Medium size, bright red, and of good 

flavor 1 -3° i-oo 

Charles Downing (Stammate). Good for general cultivation ; fruit large, 

scarlet, firm; a 'standard market variety .30 1.00 

Crimson Cluster. Berries large, rich crimson, and borne profusely in 

clusters . . . • • 1.00 6.00 

Cumberland Triumph (Stammate). Of the highest value for produc- 
tiveness and quality of fruit; flesh firm and of good color . . . .- .30 1.00 

James VicJc (Stammate). This variety is said to excel all others in qual- 
ity, color, form, firmness and productiveness .30 1,00 

Jewell (Pistillate). This new variety has met with much favor with some 
growers. Season of ripening, medium to late. Fruit large, bright red, 

quality very good to best . ......... .50 1.75 

JLentuclcy (Staminale). A good variety for home use ; color and quality 

fine .30 1.00 

Manchester (Pistillate). Specially commended for large size, fine flavor, 

bright scarlet color, and great productiveness ; adapted for marketing . .30 i.oq 

Parry. A strong, vigorous grower, flowers perfect, very productive ; fruit 

large, color bright crimson, and quality best .30 i.oq 

Sharpless (Staminate). The largest of all'; irregular in shape ; very pro- 
ductive, and of good quality; for home use it is unsurpassed . . . .30 1.00 

The Gold. A new seedling of the finest quality, regular in size, firm in 

texture, keeping well ; color bright scarlet with gold seeds . . . 2.00 8.00 
The Henderson. Firm, solid flesh of exquisite flavor, large size, good 

form and productive .75 5.00 

Wilson (Staminate). Large, red, fine flavor ; good for market or family use. .30 1.00 



J^ARKER ^ ^000, jSEED j^ATALOGUE. 




Early Harvest Blackberry. 



BLACKBERRIES. 

Plant in good, well-manured land ; in rows three feet apart, six feet between the rows ; prune 



same as raspberries. 




PER DOZ. 


PER IO0. 


Dorchester. Very early ; berries large, rich, and sweet 




$I.OO 


$5.00 


Kittatiiwiy. Large, and of excellent flavor 




i.oo 


5.00 


Snyder, An entirely hardy and productive kind, of good quality . ' . 




1. 00 


5.00 


Taylor's Prolific. Equally as hardy as Snyder, larger, and more 


pro- 










IOO. 


5.00 


Wachusett. It has but few thorns. Very fruitful, if cultivated on 


dry, 






deep, rich soil . • . . . . . * 


1.00 


5.00 


Early Harvest. Extra early, and of fine flavor; hardy, vigorous, 


and 















PEAR TREES. 

All the fruit trees we send out are healthy, well rooted, and true to name. Our stock of pears 
includes all the popular and desirable varieties, of which we enumerate a few : — 

Sartlett. Large size and delicious, hardy, productive. September. 
JBeurre Hose. Large russet ; high flavored. October. 
JBeurre d'Anjotl. Large and excellent; keeps well. November. 
JBeurre Clairgeau. Very large, handsome, and good. November. 
JSeurre Diel. Very large, rich, and fine. November. 
JBeurre Hardy. Russet ; light, rich, delicious. September. 
JZeiirre Superfine. Large ; very melting and fine. October. 
Helle Lucrative. Good size, and very delicious. September. 



ARKER 



8f Joon, p 



iEED 



PATALOGUE. 



II/ 



PEAR TREES — Continued. 



Tysotl, A very fine summer pear. August. 
Buffum, Medium ; very productive and good. September. 
Olapp's Favorite. Large as Bartlett, and early. August. 
Dana's Hovey, The finest winter pear. December. 
Doyenne Bousock. Very large and fine. September. 

Doyenne du Cornice, One of the most delicious of autumn pears. October. 
Doyenne d'Ete. Small, but very delicious. August. 
Duchess d'Angouleme. Very large and handsome. November. . 
Elizabeth (Mannings), Small, very handsome, and fine. August. 
Flemish Beauty. Very large, handsome, and excellent. September. 
Howell, Large, handsome, and fine. . 

Kieffer's Hybrid. The fruit is large, weighing from 10 to 18 ounces each; color greenish 
yellow, some russet; flesh white and juicy, quality good; season October to December. 
'Standard $to 6 feet, $1.00 each. 
Mew Seckel, Ansault. Larger than the Seckel, fine flavor. September and October. 
Lawrence. Medium size ; a fine winter pear. December. 
Law son. Large and highly recommended. October to December. 
Louise Bonne de Jersey. Large, handsome, excellent. October. 
Seckel. One of the most delicious pears. October. 
Sheldon. Russet; very high flavored and delicious. October. 
Vicar of Winkfield. A good, late-keeping pear. January. 
Winter JVelis. Russet ; high honored and excellent. December. 

Price : One to two years old, 5 to 6 feet high, $1.00 to $1.50 each; extra size, four to five 
years old, 6 to 9 feet high (many in bearing), $2.00 to $5.00 each, except those noted. 



Alexander. Origin Illinois ; red, of medium size, very early. Early July. 

Hale's Early. Medium size; greenish white, with red cheek; good quality. Tree healthy 

and productive. Last of July. 
Early York. Medium size ; covered in the sun with dull red ; flesh greenish white ; very 

tender. Last of August. 

Crawford's Early. This very beautiful and best of yellow Peaches is highly esteemed for 
market purposes. Fruit very large, oblong ; skin yellow, with a fine red cheek; flesh 
yellow, juicy, sprightly acid. The tree vigorous, wonderfully productive, and hardy. Early 
in September. 

Foster. Orange-red, dark on sunny side ; flesh yellow, very rich, juicy, sub-acid. August. 
George IV. Large; white with red cheek; melting, juicy, and delicious. Moderate bearer. 
Last of August. 

Old Miocon Free. Large, pale yellow, with a deep-red cheek ; tender, rich, and good. One 
of the best. First to middle of September. 

Stump of the World. Very large, roundish ; skin white, with a bright-red cheek. Flesh 
white, juicy, and good. Last of September. 

€rawford'S Late. Fruit of the largest size; skin yellow or greenish-yellow, with a dull- 
red cheek. Tree vigorous, moderately productive. One of the finest late sorts. Best for 
late preserving. Last of September. 
Price.: One to two years, 3 to 5 feet, 30 cents ; extra large or older trees, 6 to 7 feet, 60 cents. 



QUINCES. 

Orange. One of the best. 50 cents each. 



ight grower; bearing young and abundantly; fruit larger than 
7 c cents to $1.00 each. 




PEACH TREES. 



n8 



j^ARKER 8f y^OOD, ^EED J^ATALOGTJ E, 



APPLE TREES. 

An assortment of all the best varieties, viz. : — 
Baldwin. A well-known sour winter apple. December to .April. 

M. I. Greening. A superior cooking and eating. Mild acid, green. December to February.. 
Porter. Large, oblong, yellow, sprightly sub-acid. Fine eating. September. 
Med Astrachan. Early, handsome red, pleasant acid ; white flesh. Early August. 
Talman Sweet. Clear yellow ; a rich, sweet variety. December to April. 
Early Harvest. Yellow, tender, sub-acid. Bears young. August. 
King. Very large, striped red and yellow. Superior quality. December to April. 
Hubbardston Nonesuch. Large, dark-red stripe d. One of the best for eating and cook 
ing. November to February. 

Northern Spy. Very large, sub-acid. Excellent for spring eating. December May. 
MoQzbury Musset. The well-known late keeper. March to June. 

William's Favorite. Large, dark red. Very popular market variety. August to Sep- 
tember. 

Wealthy. Deep crimson, tender, juicy and .delicious. December to February. 
Tillman Siveet. Medium size, clear yellow; excellent for cooking. December to April. 
Jacobs Siveet. Large, fine yellow with red cheek ; an excellent keeper, hardy and very pro- 
ductive. December to April. Fine trees, $1.00 each. 
Price : | to I inch in diameter, 5 to 6 feet high, 50 cents each ; dozen, $5.00. 1 3 to 3 inches, 
in diameter, 7 to 9 feet high in bearing, $1.00 each; dozen, $10.00. 



Billiard' S. Large: rich purpie, velvety 
bloom; exceedingly beautiful. 

Med Gioerian. Rose and yellow, with fine 
bloom. 



CRAB APPLE TREES. 

Transcenaeni. large, red and yellow.. 

Yellow Siberian. Rich yeiiow. 
II y slop. Dark red, blue bloom. 



j Price : good strong trees, 50 cents each. 

CHERRY TREES. 

Slack Tartarian, Large, purplish black, rich and juicy. June and July. 

Mockport Bigarreau. Large, amber and light red, sweet. Early July. 

Downer's Med. Rather large, light red, delicious. July. 

Early Michmond. Medium, dark red, slightly acid. Best cooking. June. 

Black Heart. Medium, black, juicy, and good. Early July. 

Gov. Wood. Large, light yellow, juicy and sweet. One of the best. June. 

Price : 5 to 6 feet, 75 cents each; 6 to 7 feet, $1.00 each. 

PLUM TREES. 

Imperial Gage. Fruit large, pale green, rich. Great bearer. Sept. 1. 

Coe's Golden Drop. Very large, yellow dotted red. Best quality. September. 

Meine Claude. Greenish yellow. Immense bearer. Late September. 

Lombard. Medium in size ; violet red. Good quality. Productive. Late August. f 
Price : 4 to 5 feet, 75 cents each ; 6 to 7 feet, $1.00 each. 

JUNE BERRY". 

A valuable native fruit introduced by Mr. B. G. Smith of Cambridge. The plants are hardy, 
and about the size and shape of the currant. The foliage is glossy and firm ; fruit large, 
black, and about the size of the currant. Ripe in June, and is excellent for the table and 
preserving. 

Price, 25 cents each ; $2.00 per dozen. 



Hed Seed, f rellises, Iabels, ma. 



BIRD SEED, CUTTLE-FISH, GRAVEL, Etc. 

IF BY MAIL, ADD SIXTEEN CENTS PER POUND ADDITIONAL FOR POSTAGE. 

Our mixed Bird Seed, put up in fancy one-pound boxes, is a very convenient article, containing 
the very best of seed, thoroughly cleaned. Price 10 cents per pound ; Forty-pound case, jjte.go. 

Bird Gravel. Price 10 cents per quart box; Thirty-six quart case, $2.00. 
PRICES VARIABLE. 

QT. BOSK. 

Unhulled Rice, or Paddy . . $0.20 $4.00 

Mixed Bird Seed • .15 3.00 

Maw .25 per Lb. 

Lettuce 40 " 

Cuttle-Fisli Bone ........ 40 " 



QT. 



BUSH. 
$3.00 
3.00 

I-50 
3.00 
4.00 

Moekingr-Bird Food. Price per one-pound bottle, 35 cents. In bulk, 25 cents per pound 
Bird Tonic, or Song Restorer. Price per bottle, 25 cents. 



•Canary, Sicily, best clean seed .... $0.15 

Hemp, Russian, the best .15 

Millet 15 

Rape, German (small seeded) 15 

pe, English (large seeded) 20 



TRELLISES, PLANT STAKES, POT LABELS. 




Mo. 00. No. 00, Wide. No. 0. No. 0, Wide. 



!No. 00. — 18-inch stick, 3% inches wide . . $0.50 $0.05 
" 00, wide. — 20-inch stick, 8 inches wide, 
" 0. — 4 24-inch stick, 5 inches wide . . 
" O, wide. — 24-inch stick, 8 inches wide, 
" 0^4. — 24-inch stick, 7% inches wide . 

Tvy Trellis. — 16 inches diameter .... 



No. 0%. 



ivy Trellis. 



Fan Trellis. 

PER DOZ. EA. 



24 

Fan Trellis. — 1% ft. high 



0.75 


.08 


-75 


.08 


1. 00 


.10 


1.50 


•iS 


5.00 


•50 


7.00 


.60 


9.00 


■75 


1. 00 


.10 



Fan Trellis. — 2 ft. high 



.... $1.50 

2.00 

21 in. wide at top, 5.00 
27 " 
32 



42 



6.00 
8.00 
9.00 
ii.oo 
12.00 



po.15 
.20 
•50 
•5° 
•75 
•75 
1. 00 
1. 00 



Ion 9 X s/g t - u . dig,. 



4ft. * tf/G 



Jj&mmmmm 'ui l ' n ' 



W ilBHIli l ' ^ 



ROUND PLANT -STICKS. 

— — ■ For greenhouse, conservatory, and 

light garden work, where plants are 

to be supported, these round, ' tapering sticks, 

painted green, will be found to be rather superior 
■ to the square kind, being ornamental, and not 

unsightly. 



SQUARE PLANT STICKS. 



2 ft. * en,- 



rf*Jh 



Chase's Round Plant Sticks. 



2- feet sticks (painted green) 
2% -feet sticks " " 

3- feet sticks " " 

4- feet sticks " " 

5- feet sticks " " 

6- feet sticks " " 



ROUND PLANT STICKS. 



$1.50 
2.00 
3.00 
4.00 

5-oo 
7.00 



PER IOO. 

1% feet (round, painted green) $1.00 

-2 feet " " " 2.00 

2%. feet " " " . . . 2.50 

feet " " " 3-5° 



3^ feet (round, painted green) $4-5° 

4 feet " " 5 °° 

5 feet. " " /' . 6.00 

6 feet " " *• Dahlia ...... 12.00 

119 



1 20 



J^ARKER 8f Y OOD ' ^EED pATALOGUE. 



TRELLISES, POT LABELS— Continued. 






No. 2. 



No. zy 2 . No. 1. Small Veranda. Arch-Top Ivy. Cross. 



Bow Trellis. 



PER DOZ. 

No. 1. — 30-inch stick, 10 inches wide .... $2.00, 

" 3° " 14 " .. ■. ......... 3>5o 

O, 36 12 " .» . f ' y-ij ... _ i ,. A . i ..... . .. t£ , f .4.OO 

" 3%. — 4 2 " 14 " " 4.50 

Arch-Top Ivy. — 28 inches high, 14 inches wide, with black walnut base . ......... ioioo 

Cross. — 2 feet high, 15^ inches wide ... 3 00 

3% " 24 " " 4.50 

Bow Trellis, No. 4. — 4 foot stick, 15 inches wide . 5.00 

" ** " 5. — 5 " " 18 " " 6.50 

" " " 6. — 6 " " 20 " " £.00 

VERANDA TRELLIS. 

This is by far the most ornamental and substantial Trellis made,, being 
cially adapted to out-door use, for high climbing shrubs and vines. 

PER DOZ. 

• • • • $3-°o 




.30 
.40. 
•45 

I.QO 
■30 
.40. 

•5^ 
.60 

•75 



espe- 



2 feet 




3 " 




4 " 




5 


18 


6 " 


18 


7 " 


18 


8 " 


18 


9 " 


20 


10 " 


20 


11 " 


24 


12 " 


24 



6 inch 



POINTED WOOD POT LABELS. 

PER IOO. PER 1 ,000. 

3% inch $0.15 $0.60 

4 " 15 .60 

4% " 15 -7° 

s 15 .80 

. 15 1. 00 

len size 40 3.50 

• -5o 4-SO 



TREE LABELS, NOTCHED AND WIRED. 

PER TOO. PER 1,000. 

Z% inch, iron wired $0.15 $iToo 

3% " copper wired . . .20 I-SO 

3^ " tree (notched, not wired) . • .15 .60 

6 " " " " " 25 1.50 



ASH PLANT-STANDS, 



Three shelf, . . $1.00 each. 
Four " . . 1.25 " 
Easily taken apart for packing away. 

BEST, CHEAPEST, MOST DURABLE PLANT-STANDS ON THE MARKET. 




insect Destroyers, bellows, mc. 

We offer the following preparations for destroying the different kinds of insects, which are such pests 
to the gardener and amateur ; some of them not only destroy the insects, but at the same time promote a 
healthy and vigorous growth when applied to plants and general vegetation. 




MORRILL'S 
Canker-Worm Exterminator. 



A SURE PROTECTION FOR FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 
v TREES FROM THE RAVAGES OF THE GRUB 
AND CANKER WORM. 



As easily applied as paint or whitewash, by first 
. placing a band of tarred paper six inches in width, 
securely fastened around the tree, four feet above 
the ground, and cover the paper thoroughly with the 
Exterminator, using a common paint-brush. 

PRICES. 

2-pound cans $0.30 



28 



I 5 
.60 

1. 10 

2.00 



In kegs, about 125 pounds, per pound 
In barrels, 400 pounds " " .. 



.osy 2 

.08 



Fowler's Gardener's Insecticide. A great favorite with English horticulturists, as a perfect check upon 
scale, thrip, red spider, etc. Per bottle, 75 cents. 

Carbolic Acid Soap. Destroys insects and parasites of every description infesting plants or animals. Per cake, 
15 cents and 50 cents. 

Gishurst's Compound. This is extensively used in Europe, as well as in this country, and is effectual for pre- 
venting and destroying green, brown, and black fly, mildew, thrip, mealy bug, and scale; also for washing walls, 
frames, and sashes of greenhouses. With directions. Price per box, 60 cents ; by mail, 85 cents. 

Whale-Oil Soap. An effectual remedy for destroying and preventing insects on plants, trees, vines, etc., for 
washing down the bark of trees, grape-vines, destroying the aphis, or plant-louse, slugs on roses, thrips on grape-vines, 
mildew and slugs on pear-trees. Put up in bars. Prices: one pound, 15 cents; two pounds, 25 cents; five pounds, 60 
cents ; ten pounds, $1 .00. Also sold in larger packages, boxes, and barrels : 8 cents per pound. 

Tobabco Soap. A universal remedy for garden and nursery pests. Price 40 cents per pound. 
Hellebore. For destroying rose slugs. Apply in a liquid form, with a syringe, atomizing-bellows, or whisk, 
bending the tops of the plants over, so as to reach the under as well as the upper side of the leaves, dashing the liquid 
upon the plant in a fine spray. One or two applications is usually sufficient for a season, and it is thoroughly effective. 
It can also be used in a powdered state early in the morning while the dew is upon the plants. Price 30 cents per pound; 
by mail, '45 cents. . .. . r. . ' 

Persian Insect Powder. For destroying roaches, ants, fleas, and all other noxious insects. To effectually 
destroy the bugs, the powder must be thrown into the crevices, holes, and places infested by them. Price 75 cents per 
pound; by mail, $1.00^ , 

Pure Paris Green. Parker &> Wood's Best, also Raynolds's Strictly Pure. For destroying potato bugs. 
Apply with iW/0ws, ( distributing it evenly over the plants. The best time is early in the morning, while the plants are 
wet with dew; it then forms a paste on the plants, and is more effectual: or in a liquid form, stirring often to prevent 
it settling to the bottom, apply with Cbampion Sprinkler, a syringe, atomizing-bellows, watering-pot, or a whisk. 
Directions for use with each package. Price, 30 cents per pound ; by mail, 45 cents. 

London Purple. For destroying potato-bugs. Combine either with water or plaster, and apply with bellows; 
or in a liquid form with an atomizer, etc. Directions for use with each package. Price 20 cents per pound; by mail, 
35 cents. • ' 

Pure Plour of Sulphur. A preventive and cure for mildew on grape-vines, rose-bushes, etc., in or out doors, 
andfor the destruction of insects, on plants. It is most effective when applied with bellows. Price 10 cents per pound ; 
by mail, 25'cents.' ..... 

Tobacco Stems. For fumigating plants, to destroy insects in hot-houses, hotbeds, etc. ; and,, if used every week 
or 'twOj .it not- only, destroys the insects, but promotes a healthy growth of the plants. Price 5 cents per pound; ia 
cases of about two hundred pounds,' $3.00. 



122 



^ ARKR.R 8j Y OOD i jSEED pATALOGUE. 



CHAMPION 



^ATENT*ffARIS-i[REEN*iPRINKLER. 

WAERANTED TO DO THE "WORK OP FOUR MEN. AND GIVE ENTIRE SATISFACTION. 




WILL SPRINKLE TWO ROWS AT A TIME. 

No headache or sore throat in using Paris Green with 
this Sprinkler. 



Directions : Fill the can with water, and put 
a spoonful of Paris green in the floating filter, 
and the motion of the body will keep it well 
stirred up. 

TESTIMONIAL. 

Department of Agriculture, 
Commissioner's Office, Jan. 28, 1885. 
Sir, — Your sprinkler has been used on my farm, and 
has given entire satisfaction. It answers entirely the purpose 
for which it is designed. 

Truly yours, 

T t> -r. ^ GE0 - B - LORING. 

J. B. Dupont, Esq., Somerville, Mass. 

Mr Benjamin P. Ware, president of the Essex Agricul- 
tural Society, in his address before the Farmers' Institute, at 
Peabody, Dec. 27, 1883, said that he had used the poison, both 
m a dry and liquid state, to destroy the potato-bugs, and con- 
sidered this sprinkler the only sure and effective method of 
doing the work, and saving labor. 

Mr. John Greenwood, foreman for J. C. Rogers, says: 
I have used your sprinkler last season, and find that it can 
do the work of four men ; and it is the best insect-destroyer 
of the kind I have ever seen." 

PARKER & WOOD, 

Sole Eew England Agents, 

Wholesale & Retail. 

Price, $3.50 each. 



FARMERS' FAVORITE 

Potato* Bug * Exterminator. 

WE AKE NEW ENGLAND AGENTS. TEADE SUPPLIED. 



The best machine ever invented for applying Poisons mixed with Plas- 
ter, etc. "Best I ever saw," is the verdict of every one after using. 

The cut shows the manner of using (the strap to go over the shoulder " 
we do not furnish). The long handle is not to be shaken, the hand upon 
the same acts merely as a balance, and to thrust the " duster " out over 
the plant, or row. The hand upon the can is used to turn the same, and 
as a wheel is fastened to the long handle, a shower of dust is forced 
through, light or heavy, according to the length of the turn given ; from 
eight to twenty-four inches may be covered as desired. 

The potato crop can be saved by the timely use of Slug Shot, 
Pans Green or other poisons, mixed with Plaster, Flour, etc. The great 
trouble has been to apply the poisons safely, cheaply, quickly, 
and ef f ectually. That difficulty has been entirely overcome by the 
invention here described. 

Trice, $1.50. 




f^ARKER 8f Y OOD i jSEED j^ATALOGUE. I 23 



m Fertilizers, m 



BRADLEY'S SUPERPHOSPHATE OF LIME 

Is a high-grade chemical fertilizer of uniform quality; its mechanical condition is unsurpassed', 
it furnishes the plant-food constituents in proper proportions, being a complete manure for all 
■crops ; its lasting qualities are astonishing, a single application showing its effects for several 
years; it adds permanent fertility to the soil; it has never failed to give satisfaction when it has 
been intelligently used, having now stood the test for over twenty years on all the different crops, 
and on all kinds of land. 

Even where barnyard manure can be had in abundance, an application of phosphate is indis- 
pensable in order to insure a quick start, vigorous growth, and early maturity, as well as a largely 
increased yield in the crops. 

It is a much cheaper fertilizer than stable manure; as it costs much less in proportion to the 
-amount of plant-food it contains, — one ton of it containing more plant-food than many cords of 
manure. It is free from weed seeds, easier to handle, and produces larger crops of far better 
quality. 

Send for forty-eight page pamphlet, containing full information as to quantities 
required for the different crops ; also hundreds of testimonials, etc. 

Price, 50-pound bag, $1.25; 100-pound bag, $2.25; barrels of about 250 pounds, 2 cents per 
pound ; per ton (about eight barrels), $40.00; 5-pound boxes, 30 cents. 

DARLING'S ANIMAL FERTILIZER. 

The animal fertilizer is made from fine bone, animal dust, dried blood, muriate of potash 
•(eighty per cent). The analysis is ten per cent of ammonia, eleven per cent of phosphoric acid, 
and ten per cent of muriate potash, the latter being equal to five per cent of real potash. This 
fertilizer is applicable to any of the formulas for plant-food, as you will see that it contains a very 
large per cent of ib" three principal chemicals required in all formulas, — ammonia, phosphoric 
acid, and potash ; a. S. the fact that these chemicals can be bought in this way at a much less price 
than in any other, is well worthy of your attention. 

Send for pamphlet containing full instructions, testimonials, etc. 

Price, 50-pound bag, $1.00; 100-pound bag, $2.00; 167-pound bag, $3.34; per ton (of 12 
Taags), $40.00. 

DARLING'S FINE GROUND BONE FOR A FERTILIZER. 

This bone has been sold in New England for the past fifteen years ; and, judging by the very 
large increase of the demand for it, we think it must have given the best of satisfaction. " The 
fertilizing value of ground bones of corresponding compositions stands in a direct relation to their 
degree of fineness." A finely pulverized bone, well composted, is claimed to exceed all other fer« 
tilizers in efficiency, being well adapted to all kinds of soil. It should be composted a few weeks, 
if possible, before using. In many instances farmers have, with this bone, made a superphosphate 
by the use of vitriol or ashes, which they claim to be better than any superphosphates now sold in 
New England, and at a much less price. This bone is very fine, and warranted in all cases to 
contain what the analysis calls for that is on each package, — twenty-three to twenty-five per cent 
of phosphoric acid, equal to from fifty-two to fifty-five per cent of bone phosphate ; and from 3.5 
to 4.5 per cent of nitrogen, equal to from four to five per cent of ammonia. 

Price, 5-pound box, 25 cents; 10-pound bag, 40 cents; 50-pound bag, $1.50; barrels of 
about 250 pounds, 2 cents per pound j per ton (about eight barrels), $40.00. 



I2 4 



J^ARKER & ^"OOD, ^EED AT A L O GU E . 



PARKER Se WOOD'S VEGETABLE GARDEN FERTILIZER. 

This is made for a garden manure, where a fertilizer that can be easily applied is required 

It is entirely free from weed-seeds, and will produce as large crops, on whatever it may be used, 

as could be obtained from stable or other manure. It will'be found neat and clean to handle, and 

with very little odor ; and we highly recommend it, especially to those who have small gardens, 

and where manure is expensive, and not easily obtained. 

Bags of 100 pounds, for 2,500 square feet, $2.50; bags of 50 pounds, for 1,200 square feet, $1.25; bags of 25 
pounds, $1.00; bags of 10 pounds, 50 cents. 

PARKER St WOOD'S LAWN DRESSING AND FERTILIZER. 

We feel warranted in recommending this fertilizer and lawn-dressing to the public, as the best 
ever introduced. It contains all the most important constituents requisite to produce a rich, 
luxuriant, and lasting growth of beautiful dark-green grass. It is quick in action, its effect being 
seen immediately after the first rain. It acts energetically on the unfolding leaves, goes directly 
to the roots, stimulates them to activity, and causes the grass to thicken. A firm growth follows, 
which remains green, luxuriant, and velvety for the whole season. Stable manure is very un- 
sightly, gives out an unpleasant odor, disfigures the lawn, and usually contains weed and other 
foreign seeds. The dressing should be applied early in the spring, and sown broadcast on a 
damp day, or just before a rain. In making new lawns, sow at the same time the seed is sown, 
raking it in with the seed, using eight hundred pounds to the acre. 

Six hundred to eig-ht hundred pounds broadcast to the acre. 

Bags of 100 pounds, sufficient quantity for 2,500 square feet, $2.50; bags of 50 pounds, sufficient quantity for 1,250 
square feet, $1.50; bags of 25 pounds, sufficient quantity for 600 square feet, $1.00; bags of 10 pounds, 50 cents. 

PERUVIAN GUANO. 

For forcing early vegetables, or second garden crops, the brand " No. 1 and Guaranteed " 
Peruvian Guano is especially recommended. It is generally used by florists ; and nothing is better 
for house-plants than a weak solution, applied once or twice a week. 

Guaranteed. Price per ton, in 200-pound bags, $67.50. No. 1. Price per ton, in bags of about 200 pounds, 
per pound, 3 cents; per 100-pound bag, $4.00; per one-pound package, 10 cents; 5-pound box, 40 cents. 

POT-PLANT FERTILIZERS, GROUND PLASTER, AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS* 

ETC. 

These are prepared expressly for plants in the house or greenhouse, and the use of either of 
the undernoted will produce healthy, vigorous growth, and increased beauty. Directions for use 
accompany each package. 

Booker's Ammoniated Food for Flowers. Clean to handle; free from odor, and will 
keep any length of time ; fancy boxes. Price, 10 cents and 35 cents. 

Darlings Plant Food. For the house and out-door flowers ; clean to handle and odorless ; 
try it on your house-plants and flower-beds ; fancy boxes. Price, 25 cents ; by mail, 25 cents extra. 

P^^w'^fw 11 !? ptocktaM&e Fertilizers. All kinds supplied at manufacturers' prices. 
Pamphlets, with full directions for use, sent free. 

upon^applfcadom Pota8h * Eighty per cent to per cent muriate of potash. Price 

Sulphate of Ammonia. Twenty-four per cent to twenty-five per cent ammonia. Price 
upon application. 

Plaster Dust. For destroying insects upon vines. Price : 5-pound box, 1 5 cents ; 2 s-pound 
bag, 50 cents. Barrels of about 150 pounds about $2.00 per barrel. 

Ground Plaster. Best quality Nova Scotia; used as an absorbent fertilizer. Barrels of 
about 333 pounds. Price about $1.50 per barrel. 

boxesfs^SSr ° Uan °' in one -P° und Packages, 10 cents; five pounds, 4 o cents. Phosphate, in five-pound 
Nitrate of Soda. Bone Black. Lime. Bried Blood. Kainit. Prices upon application. 

BONE MEAL FOR CATTLE. 

pJ^^^^S^ St ° Ck ShOUld * Se t0 fGed - ™ s is ^ f-m clean bones, 
P-l?^^^ — s, 4 cents; five 



* Agricultural # and * Woodenw are * Department. * 



IN the following pages we mustrate and briefly describe some of the more important implements 
and articles in which we deal. For fuller explanations, send for special circulars on the 
articles about which you wish to be informed. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

We carry a full line of the v e ry best Specialties we can obtain, and we have no goods in our 
stock which will not do credit to a first-class warehouse. 

We intend, further, that if our customers wish for superior qualities of goods, such as are not 
ordinarily on sale, they will be able to find them here, at the lowest prices- at which they can be 
afforded. We also deal quite largely in many items of hardware. 

WOODENWARE. 

Our trade in this line is an extensive portion of our business, and is rapidly increasing. I» 
the past we have done a wholesale trade almost exclusively; but we have now arranged a conven- 
ient retail salesroom on our first floor, where all customers can be quickly and comfortably served. 

Please call and examine our assortment of woodenware. 




This branch of our business is one of the most important in which we are engaged. Many 
do not realize the fact that quantities of tools and implements are annually rendered useless by 
neglect, after having become broken, when a few dollars or even cents spent in repairing them 
would make them as good as new. 

Send us your broken Tools and Machines, 

And we will remodel them at reasonable charges. We carry a full line of duplicate parts of all 
kinds of implements. Mowing-machines, corn-shellers, hay-cutters, broken forks and rakes, 
plows, harrows, etc., we can put in perfect order when injured, if it is a mechanical possibility to. 
do so. 

Send us your Lawn -Mowers to be sharpened, 

And we will make them cut as nicely and as keenly as when new. We fully appreciate the 
necessity of doing all repairing work promptly. 

With several skilled and well-paid mechanics in our repair-shop, having at their command 
power drills, lathes, sharpening-machines, emery wheels, polishing-wheels, — all driven by our 
elevator engine, — and having also a blacksmith's forge, we are able to perform the most compH« 
cated repairing-j ©bs in a workmanlike manner, and with great despatch. 

We can assure our customers that their interests will be well served by intrusting theiu 
work of this nature to us. 



126 



pARKER 8f ^OOD, JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



BLAIR MANUFACTURING CO.'S LAWN MOWERS. 
PARKER & WOOD, New England Agents. 




THE " NEW EASY" MOWER. 

THE " NEW EASY " is the only Lawn Mower that will cut to within one inch of walls, 

fences, shrubs, trees, etc. 
THE " NEW EASY" is the only Lawn Mower that will cut narrow borders. 
THE " NEW EASY" is the only Lawn Mower that will perfectly cut low terraces, mounds, 

flower-beds, etc. 

THE " NEW EASY" is the only Lawn Mower with sufficient traction to cut high terraces 
with rope attachment. 

The wire drum is the important feature in this Lawn Mower which gives it its great advan- 
tages over all others. Runs perfectly silent j easily operated; patent positive pawl; handle 
instantlv detached ; all parts interchangeable. 
THE NEW EASY is the ideal LAWN MOWER. 

'Every machine fully warranted. 

PRICE LIST. 



.New Easy Lawn Mowers, jo-inch cut . 

12-inch cut. 
•14-inch cut . 
« 16-inch cut . 
" " " -18-inch cut. 
" " 20-inch cut . 
i* * " >( j24-inqh.cut. 



each, 



Prices. 


Net Prices. 


#13-00 


$8.00 


15.00 


9.00 


17.00 


10.00 


19.OO 


11.00 


21.00 


12.50 


23.00 


13-50 


30.OO 


18.00 



8f Y OOD ' JMPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



127 



BLAIR MANUFACTURING CO.'S LAWN MOWERS. 
PARKER & WOOD, New England Agents. 

THE "BAY STATE " We 

LAWN MOWER. s uarantee 

-Sjfir The "Bay State" 

THE BEST SIDE-WHEEL S2r to a „ y 

j^^^ other machine of this style in the 
Lawn Mower ever shown /tyy^ market. 

, j. ( SBr- Very quiet running, Least Possible 

power required. Finely constructed. Hand- 
some. Very durable. The Hatchet is perfect 
and absolutely positive. 

Side wheel, or rear-cut lawn mowers are pre- 
.« - . x^^^^^^Sx ferred by some, although they cannot do the vari- 

<*■-■} ety of work that can be done with the " NEW 
5<m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ EASY." We can recommend The "BAY 
^ ^Pll^^^^^ j ^ ^pW™^^'-'' ^ STATE " in the highest terms. 

List prices. Net prices. 

Bav State Lawn Mowers, 12 in. cut $15.00 $9.00 

14 » „ ............. 17.00 10.00 

16 „ „ • • • * i9-oo 11.00 

„ 18 „ „ 2L00 12.50 




We have had some «*|^ TH H R/^QTYW » 

call for a lower-priced I Lk Sid DUD 1 

Lawn Mower than the ^^^^^ 

leading popular machines. ^^^^ LAWN MOWER. 

THE " BOSTON " Warranted Superior 

has bee^ made by the manufacturers of the ^kk. to any Low- Priced 

famous " NEW EASY," and the mer- Lawn Mower 

itorious "BAY STATE," and it has proved to ^^Bfe^ Manufactured- 

be far ahead of all other lawn mowers of equal ^SiilP^lk, 

price * JlnHK^init 

It possesses many characteristics of the higher- l^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HRli 
priced machines made by this Company, being noise- .' 1 |ol 

less, easy to run, reliable, and very strong and ^^^^^^^^Ba^B Bi^ ^^ 

durable. - ™ Z-Z-,,^ 

List prices. Net prices. 

Boston Lawn Mowers, 12 in. each $13 0° #7-75 

„ „ „ 14 » , • • • 'S-oo 8 -7S 

n » » » I7.00 9-75 

WOODEN LAWN RAKES, very useful for removing surplus cuttings, 50 cents each. 



128 



J^ARKER ,8f ^OOD, JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



THE EXCELSIOR HORSE LAWU MOWER. 



Mill- 
i/A 



mm 



We invite especial attention to our Excelsior Horse Lawn Mower. Its Sectional Caster 
"Wheels do not roll down the standing grass, nor leave marks on the lawn. Its Side-Draught Attach- 
ment (which is furnished with the three larger-sized mowers) allows the horse to walk only on the 
• cut grass. We guarantee this to be the best Horse Lawn Mower manufactured, and to do 
perfect work. 

The Superintendent of Department of Public Parks, New York City, wrote us as follows : 
" We are pleased to say that the six Horse Lawn Mowers you shipped this Department at the be- 
ginning of the season have been thoroughly tested, and we consider them superior to any we have 
used. The Side-Draught Attachment, and the new Sectional Caster Wheels, fully meet our expec- 
tations, and prove very valuable additions. We have adopted your mowers in preference to all 
others." 

NET PRICES. 

Twenty-five inch cut, without seat or shafts . ... . . . $65.00 

Thirty-inch cut, with seat and shafts . 1 10.00 

Thirty-five inch cut, with seat and shafts . i35-oo 

Forty-inch cut, with seat and shafts . 170.00 

The twenty-five inch mower is furnished with shafts when desired. Price, $10.00. Horse boots 

,per set, $12.00. Full directions for setting up, adjusting, and using, accompany each mower. 

Every mower fully guaranteed. A trial is solicited. The thirty-inch is the usual size. 



The Coldwell Edger is so constructed that it trims the sod as well 
as the grass, thus doing the work of edging shears and edging knife, 
and doing it much better and quicker. This machine is the result of 
several years' experimenting and practical experience, and we have 
no hesitation in saying that there is no other machine ever put on the 
market that will do the work ours will. 

It has a wide roller, which gives it a broad bearing on the ground, 
and makes the work truer than with a 
narrow roller. The knife is directly 
under the centre of the roller, enabling 
it to cut a small circle as well as a 
straight border. 

It is self-sharpening, and not liable 
to get out of order. It will pav for it- 
self in one season. No person having 
a lawn should be without one. 

Coldwell Lawn Edger, — list price, 
7.00; net price, $6.50. 




'ARKER 8f Y OOD i Jm.PLEM.ENT pATALOGUE. 



129 



THE GLOBE LAWN MOWER. 



First Prices. Net Prices 



lO-m. 
I2-in. 
14-in. 
16-in. 
:i8-in. 



6- 75 

7- 75 
8.75 
9-75 

10.75 



ADJUSTABLE CUT, 

SOLID CUTTING CYLINDER. 
HANDSOMELY FINISHED. 

Guaranteed First-Class in every respect. 
A GOOD LAWN MOWER AT A LOW PRICE. 




11.00 
13.00 
15.00 
17.00 
19.00 



GARDEN REELS. 



For reeling garden-lines used in trim- 
ming borders. 

No. 1, net price, ... 50 cents. 
No. 2, net price, "'. . . 75 cents. 

GARDEN LINES. 



80-foot Flax Lines, net, . 50c. 
120-foot Flax Lines, net, 75c. 
160-ft. Flax Lines, net, . $1.00. 
100-foot Cotton (tarred) lines, 
net, . ... . 60c. 




" CAPITAL " LAWN RAKE. 

The "Capital" Lawn Rake has brass bows and steel teeth so shaped 
that they pick up the leaves and sticks and rake the lawn clean without dis- 
turbing the soil, and very rapidly. They will last a life-time, and every man 
having a yard or lawn that he wants to keep clean ought to have one. 
By simply pushing it back the grass is unloaded. 

"Capital "Lawn Rakes, each, $0.50. 



THE " GIBBS " LAWN RAKE. 

The "Gibbs" Lawn Rake is very well known as a very supe- 
rior article for removing lawn grass. The ease with which the 
rake can be operated will surprise any one accustomed to the 
best rakes in use. The workmanship is strictly first-class. 
Gibbs Lawn Rakes, . . . each, $0.75 

WIRE POULTRY NETTING. 

The size almost universally in use is 2-inch mesh, and No' 



19 wire. We carry 
the following widths 
in stock: 12, 18, 24, 
30, 36, 42, 48, 60, and 
72 inches. Each roll 
contains 1 50 running 




13° 



j^ARKEF^ 8j 'JfOQTD, JmPLEMENT j^ATALOGUE. 



PARKER & WOOD'S NEW IXL SWIVEL PLOW. 

With Adjustable Clevis, 
FOB LEVEL LAND AND HILLSIDE, 

INVENTED BY THE LATE JOEL NOURSE. 





"We guarantee the IXL to be of lighter draught than any other Swivel Plow made. 





List Prices. 


Net Prices. 


IXL Plows, Fixed Clevis. 

No. 2, One-horse .... 
No. 6, Two-horse .... 
No. 8, Four-horse 


Plain. 


Wheel. 


Wheel and 
Cutter. 


Plain. 


Wheel. 


Wheel and 
Cutter. 


$7.50 


$9.00 


$10.50 

13-5° 
16.50 


$7.00 


$8.25 


$9.50 
12.50 
15-5° 


IXL Plows, with Improved Shifting Clevis. 

No. 2, One-horse .... 
No. 8, Four-horse . . . . 


9-5° 


II.OO 


12.50 

z 5-5° i 
18.50 


9.00 


IO.25 


II.50 
14.50 

i7-5° 



THE BUCKEYE CLIPPER 

CARBON PLOW. 




CARBON METAL HAS DOUBLE THE WEAR OF CHILLED IRON. 





List Prices. 


Net Prices. 


Numbers. 


Plain. 


With Wheel. 


With Wheel 
and Jointer. 


Plain. 


WithWheel. 


With Wheel 
and Jointer. 


No. 6, D, one-horse . 
No. 8, D, light two-horse 
No. 9, D, medium two-horse . 
No. 10, ordinary two-horse 
No. I2 t large two-horse . 
No. 15, three or four horse . 


$8.00 

9-50 

10.00 
10.50 
11.00 
11.50 


■ $10.50 
11.00 

11.50 
12.00 
12.50 


$12.50 
13.00 

!3-5° 
14.00 
14.50 


#7-25 
8.75 
9.00 

9- So 
10.00 
10.50 


9-75 
10.00 
10.50 
11.00 
11.50 


II.50 
I2.00 
12.50 
13.OO 
I3-50 



'ARKER 8f "^OOD, JjVLPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 1 3 I 



THE YANKEE SWIVEL PLOW. 




The good points of this Plow have deservedly madeit one of the most popular in New England* 



DESCRIPTION. 


LIST PRICE. 


NET PRICES. 


Plain. 


Wheel. 


Wheel & 
Cutter. 


Plain. 


Wheel 


Wheel & 
Cutter. 


No. Y, I, — Large one horse . . 
No. Y, 2, — Light two horse . . . 
No. Y, 3, — Medium two horse . . 


$ 8.00 
10.50 
12.00 
13.00 


$9.00 
11.50 
13.00 
14.00 


$10.00 
13.00 
14.50 

*s-5° 


$7.25 

9-5°. 
11.00 
12.00 


$8.25 
10.50 
12.00 
13.00 


$9.00 
12.00 

13-5° 
14.50 



THE "LION" PLOW. 

One of the leading land-side Plows of the East. 



Description. 



No. 10, very large, lock colter 
No. 60, large, lock colter . 
No. 61, extra large ; sod . 
No. 25,' large 

No. 24, medium' . . 
No. 22, large one-horse 

O. E., large one-horse 
No. 14, light one-horse 
No. 15, medium one-horse 
No. 1, small one-horse 
No. 2, medium one-horse . 



List Prices. 



Plain. 



j$2I.OO 
14.OO 
12.50 
IO.OO 
9.OO 
6.50 
6.50 
4.00 
5.OO 

4- 5° 

5- 50 



Wheel. 



£23.00 
16.OO 
14.50 
11-75 

io-7'5 
8.00 
8.00 



Wheel and 
Cutter. 



$25.00 

1775 
16.OO 

J 3-25 
12.25 

9-25 
9-25 



Plain. 



Net Prices. 



£19.00 
12.50 
n.25 
9.00 
8.00 
6.00 
6.00 

.3-5° 
■4-5° 
4.00 
5.00 



$2r.oo 
14.50 
13.00 
10.50 

975 
7-25 
7.25 



#22.50 
16.00 
14,50 
12.00 
11.00 
8.25 
8.25 



THE DOE PLOW. 

We are the ONLY PARTIES IN BOSTON who sell the ORIGINAL DOE PLOW, which is 
made ONLY in Concord, N. H. All other "Doe " Plows are imitations. 



Name. 


List Prices. 


Net Prices. 


Plain. 


Wheel. 


Wheel and 
Cutter. 


Plain. 


Wheel. 


Wheel and 
Cutter. 


E, Star No. 0 

E, Star No. 1 . 

E, Star No. 2 

E, Star No. 3 . 

E, Star No. 4 . . 

E, No. 8 


$575 
675 
8.50 

9-5° 
10. 50 
18.50 


$8.00 
IO.OO 
II.OO 
I2.00 
20.25 


$9.50 
II.50 
12.50 

!3-5° 
22.25 


#5-2 5 
6.00 
7-50 
8.50 

9-5° 
16.50 


$7-25 
9.00 
10.00 

11.00 

18.25 


$8.50 
IO.50 
II.25 
12.25 
20.25 



j 2 2 j^ARKEF^ 8j Y OOD ' JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 

NATIONAL REVERSIBLE SULKY PLOW. 



Sills* 



THE MOST WONDERFUL INVENTION AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE AGE. 

Only needs to be Tested to be Appreciated. 



In the construction of this truly wonderful improvement we use two perfect Steel Flat 
Land Plows mounted upon a steel lbeam. When one is in use the other hangs at right 
angles above it, and greatly assists in preventing the plow from tipping on steep hill-side land. 

The sulky is made so as to use two or three horses. Plows are raised out of the ground by 
one of the most perfect power-lifts ever made, and can be operated while walking behind the 
plow as well as in the seat. The seat is adjustable so that the operator sits in a level posi- 
tion. It is made very durable, mostly of steel and malleable iron, and is warranted to do as 
good work on level or side-hill land as any plow made. In fact, it is a perfect sulky plow on 
level land and on side-hill. . 

Almost every part of the plow is made either of steel or of malleable iron. Not a thing 
has been left undone that could be done to make this the best sulky plow in the world. 

The points of merit are too many to detail in this short description, but we will guarantee to 
any man in the United States that wants a plow, on the receipt of an order and the price of a 
sulky, that we can ship a plow better adapted to all soils, even and uneven land, side-hill and 
level, sticky and gravelly, and in fact in any place a plow is used, than can be found in the world. 

We will further guarantee that our sulky will not slide down on side-hill land, but will keep 
up and cut a full furrow, as its mechanical construction inclines the same to work up the hill. 

NET PBICE, including Neck Yoke, Erener, and Whiffletrees, also Extra Plow and 

Jointer Points, $55.00. 



^arker %j Y OOD > Jmplement Patalogue, 



133 



-*THE * THOMAS * REVERSIBLE I HARROW. 4- 




THE MOST ECONOMICAL HARROW 

a farmer can possess, for while the common straight tooth harrow is a tool that no tiller of the 
soil dispenses with, there are a large number of farmers who do not, as yet, fully understand the 
value of the Smoothing Harrow, — not only for its efficiency in leveling and pulverizing the plowed 
land, but also for ^immense labor-saving , 

CULTIVATOR OE GROWING CROPS. 

The Thomas Harrow is known all over the United States as one of the greatest labor-saving 
inplements in use. It will take the place of more farming tools than any other article manufac- 
tured, inasmuch as it is at ones a pulverizer, a smoother or leveller, a cultivator, a horse-hoe, a 
broadcast weeder, a manure-spreader, and a seed-coverer. 

A farmer can save a hundred dollars in hoeing corn or potato crops alone, in one season, by 
its use. It will cultivate corn eight inches high, with marked benefit. 

The fundamental principle underlying its remarkable efficiency is THE DRAW GUT, or 
The Slanting Tooth, which distinguishes it from all of the old-fashioned harrows. Unlike them, 

— -<<1 THE THOMAS HARROW [> — 1 

DOES NOT CLOG, as it buries all surface substances; 
IS EASY OF DRAUGHT, as the teeth collect no rubbish; 
IS A PERFECT PULVERIZER, the teeth tracking only one inch apart j 
IS A WONDERFUL CULTIVATOR, hoeing acres of crops in a day; and 
IS A GREAT LABOR SAVER, as it harrows ten and one-half feet in width as easily 
as the old style will do one-half of that surface, and in a much more satisfactory manner ; leaving 
the ground in a smooth, fine condition, with all corn-stalks, straw, roots, manure, etc., completely 
buried beneath the soil. 

THE CULTIVATION OF GROWING CROPS is in its infancy in New England; 
yet many farmers in this vicinity can testify to the immense saving in labor by the use of the 
Thomas Smoothing Harrow in so doing. 



SEND FOR OUR COMPLETE PAMPHLET ON THE SUBJECT. 



List Prices. NetPricbsw 

Two-section Thomas Harrows, forty-eight %-inch steel teeth, 7 feet spread . $13.33 $12.00 
Three-section Thomas Harrows, seventy- two %-inch steel teeth, io£ ft. spread, 20.00 18.00 
Seats, extra . . . . ., • ; . . . . 2.50 2.50 



134 



^ARKEF^ 6^ ^OOD, Jm.PLEM.ENT j^ATALOGUE. 



TH6 YHNKGe PULU SRIZeR. 




COMBINING ALL THE LATE IMPROVEMENTS IN DISK HARROWS. 

This new harrow is constructed with the view of combining all the essential points of value 
in the various disk harrows, and has already proved itself unequalled by any. 

By using buffers on the inside ends of the gangs the friction caused by the side thrust is 
largely overcome, 

Reducing the "Wear and. IDraft 

to the smallest possible amount. The draft is directly from the axle and so arranged that the 
harrow is perfectly balanced, all the disks cutting uniform depth with heavy or light driver, and 
always flexible. It is the only harrow that tills the entire width of the cut, leaving no ridge in 
the center or between the gangs not cultivated. 

, r . TT . , T , List. Net. 

Yankee Harrows, 12 Steel Disks, 13 inches diameter, cut 6 feet wide, . each $™.oo $215.00 

„ " , o " 12 " " 16 " " " 6 i " " 35-oo 30.00 

Extra for Scraper Attachment, . 4.00 3.00 

" " Neck Yoke, Whiffietree and Evener, '.'.*.*.' 3.00 3I00 

Yankee Harrows are always shipped knocked down, and, unless otherwise ordered, without 
Scraper Attachment or Whiffletrees, Evener and Neck Yoke. 

THE IMPROVED 

X*A BOW DISK HARROW. 

This well known harrow has been upon the market many years and has gained hosts of 
friends. 0 
No. 00 One horse size, has 10 Steel Disks, 13 in. diam., cuts z, ft wide . . 3hc 00 $26.00 
" 9 " * " " 12 « - 16 « « « 6i "... lLo 30.00 

Scrapers for No. 9 harrows, extra 3.00 3-00 

Whiffletrees, Eveners and Neck Yokes for No. 9 harrow, per set V V '. '. 3.00 3^00 

La Dow Harrows are always shipped knocked down, and, unless otherwise ordered, without 
Scraper Attachment or Whiffletrees, Evener and Neck Yoke. 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR. 



j^ARKER 8f ^OOD, JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE, 



135 



SHARE'S COLTER HARROW. 



The advantages of the 
Share's Harrow over others 
lie principally in the con- 
struction of the teeth. The 
colters are broad, thin blades 
of steel or iron, inclining for- 
ward so as to prevent clog- 
ging; also to cut the sods, 
and make an easy entrance 
into any kind of earth. 

This implement, like a 
plow or any other tool, works 
much the best when kept 
clean and bright. 




Description. 


List Prices. 


Net Prices. 


Share's Harrow, nine teeth, steel . .... 


$12.00 
14.OO 
16.OO 
18.OO 


$ 9.00 
ro.50 
'12.00 



THE "A" HARROW. 



Eleven teeth . . . • • 
Thirteen teeth . . • • 
Fifteen teeth ..... 
Seventeen teeth .... 
Fifteen teeth, extra heavy . 



List . 
Prices. 
$5.00 
6.00 

7-5° 
10.00 

13-5° 



Net 
Prices. 
$4.00 
5.OO 
6.00 

8. 50 
11.50 



THE REDOES HARROW. 

Hinged in the middle, allowing either side to be lifted 
while the Harrow is moving. 



Fourteen teeth 
Eighteen teeth . 
Twenty- two teeth 
Twenty-six teeth 
Thirty teeth . 



List 


Net 


Prices. 


Prices. 


. $8.00 


$6.25 


. 9.50 


7-5° 


• 13- 5° 


10. 50 


• i5-5o 


12.00 


. 17.50 


14.00 





SQUARE HARROW. 



One-horse, 25 teeth . 
Two-horse, 40 teeth . 



List 
Prices. 

I9.OO 

18.OO 



Net 
Prices. 

$7.oc 

15.00 



SQUARE HARROW. 




The field-roller is used on plowed land to level and smooth it after sowing down to grass or 
grain. The operation of rolling forces sods and small stones into the soft ground, pressing the 
light, loose soil of the surface closely around the small seeds, and securing for them a sure and 
quick germination, and leaving the surface even and uniform for the mower, tedder, and rake. 

In the spring there is frequently great advantage to new grass fields in rolling them, thus re- 
placing the earth which has been upheaved by the frost. 



"Sections 
Each. 


Inches 
Long. 


Inches 
Diameter. 


Weight about — 


List Price. 


Net 
Price. 


3 


. 12 


20 


550 lbs. 


$40.00 




4 


' 12 


20 


650 lbs. 


45.OO 




S 


12 


20 


750 lbs. 


55-co 


Liberal 


4 


12 


24 


850 lbs. 


52.00 


dis- 




12 


24 


1,000 lbs. 


60.00 


1 


12 


24 


1,200 lbs. 


66.00 




4 


12 


27 


950 lbs. 


61.00 


count. 




12 


27 


1,150 lbs. 


66.50 




i 


12 


27 


1,350 lbs. 


7^-00 





GARDEN ROLLERS. 

Weighted to cause handle to be upright. 

Valuable in the garden, on the lawn, and for 
keeping walks hard and uniform. 

2 sections, each 7% X 15, weight 130 lbs. List 

price, $8.00; net price, $6.50. 

3 sections, each, 7K X 15, weight 185 lbs. List 

price, $11.00; net price $9.00. 
1 section, each 20 X 20, weight 255 lbs. List 
price, $14.50; net price, $12.00. 

1 section, each 12 X 20, weight 150 lbs. List 

price, $10.00; net price, $8.00. 

2 sections, each 12 X 20, weight 320 lbs. List price, $18.00 ; net price, 
2 sections, each 12 X 24, weight 420 lbs. List price, $24.00; net price, 
2 sections, each 12 X 27, weight 550 lbs. List price, $30.00; net price, 




$14- S°- 
$18.00. 
$21.00. 



STEEL-TOOTH CULTIVATOR. 

DESCRIPTION. LIST PRICE. 

Solid Steel-Tooth Cultivator, no wheel . . . $6.00 

Solid Steel-Tooth Cultivator, with wheel 7.00 

Reversible Steel-Tooth Cultivator, no wheel 6.00 

Reversible Steel-Tooth Cultivator, with wheel . . ;.. 7.00 



NET PRICE. 

$4.50 
5.00 

4- 75 

5- 25 



^ARKEF^ 8f ^yoOD, JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



HORSE HOES. 




AND CULTIVATOR COMBINED. 

THE "ECLIPSE" HORSE HOE is identical in every respect, except the painting, with 
the only genuine " Iron Age " Horse Hoe, which has achieved the reputation of being the 
leading implement of its class for -so many years. 

We were led to adopt the name " Eclipse " on account of the fact that many cheap imita- 
tions of the Genuine Iron Age have of late years appeared upon the market, which have 
tended to confuse the public as to the real merits of the standard and noted original tool. 

The " Eclipse " is made in the most thorough and workmanlike manner, and has 
hardened crucible steel plates, and steel standards. 

It can be arranged, by means of a steel Disk attachment, as a double or single plow ; or by 
the use of a peculiar wing, as an adjustable weeder ; or by employing a leveller attachment, as a 
corn coverer ; in addition to the usual combinations common to Horse Hoes and Cultivators. 

Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed to every Purchaser. 



List Prices. Net Prices. 

"Eclipse" Horse Hoe and Cultivator combined, with wheel . $9.40 $7-$o 

" Cultivator, with wheel . . ... . . 7.00 5.75 

" Cultivator, plain . . . . . 6.00 5.00 

" Leveler- attachments (for covering) . . . .1.25 1.00 

" Steels Disk attachments, (for making plow) . . 2.25 2.00 

" Adjustable Weeder attachment .. ' .. . , . 1.50 1.25 

THE DIXIE HORSE HOE. 



The "Dixie" Horse Hoe is made by the same manufacturer as the Eclipse, and is war- 
ranted to be superior to most of the horse hoes offered to the farmer. 

Dixie Horse Hoe and Cultivator combined List Price, $8.40 ; Net Price, $6.50 

THE DIAMOND CULTIVATOR OR HORSE HOE. 

One of the most serviceable tools a farmer or gardener can have. It is especially adapted to 
vine culture. 

Made with an iron frame, and contains fourteen hook shaped narrow steel teeth with forged 
diamond points. 

Workmanship and finish first-class. 

The Diamond Cultivator List price, $8.00 ; Net price, $6.50. 



138 



'ARKER 8f "^OOD, JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



Wheelbarrows. 




price LIST. 



1. 


3. 


3. 


4. 


5. 


6. 


7. 








$7.00 


$8.00 


$9.00 










5-75 


6.50 


7-5° 




$4-oo 


$4-25 


$4-75 


5- 2 S 


6.00 


7.00 


$s7 S o 


3-5o 


3-75 


4.25 


4-50 


5.00 


6.00 


7-50 


3-75 


4.00 


4-50 


5.00 


5-7 S 


6 7S 




3-25 


3-5° 


4.00 


4-25 


5.00 


6.00 










4-75 


5-5° 


6.50 










4.00 


475 . 


5-7S 






3-85 




4.25 




5.00 






3-25 




3-75 




4-50 






3-5° 




4.00 




4-75 






3.00 




3-50 




4-25 





WOOD'S CUSTOM (8 spokes), 
WOOD (8 spokes) . . . . . 
BOSTON (8 spokes) . . . . 

I X L (8 spokes) 

ARLINGTON (6 spokes) . . 
STAR (6 spokes) 



List prices . 
Net prices . 
List prices . 
Net prices , 
List prices , 
Net prices . 
List prices , 
Net prices , 
List prices 
Net prices , 
List prices 
Net prices 



THREE-WHEEL PRINTER'S BARROW, custom made. List price, $25.00; net price, $22.50 




Champion Junior Barrow, 

CHAMPION JUNIOR CANAL BARROWS .......... $2' 

CHAMPION KING CANAL BARROWS / 

COMMON BOLTED BARROWS. ] ' ' ~ 2 ' 

COMMON CANAL BARROWS ......... . ° .. '° ° " " 2 



J^ARKER 8j Y OOD i JmFLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



139 



GRASS HOOK. 

Very convenient 
for trimming after 
the Lawn Mower 
next to fences, etc. 

No. 

2. Small, each 30c. 

3. Medium, 35c. 

4. Large, 40c, 






Humphrey Hoe. 

THE ARLINGTON SLIDE HOE. 



GRAIN SICKLE. 

These are the cele- 
brated imported "T. 
S." sickles, and are 
unexcelled in quality. 

No. 

2. Small, 40c. 

3. Medium, 45c. 

4. Large medium, 50c. 

5. Large, 60c. 



THE HUMPHREY HOE. 

Made of Best Cast Steel. 

This hoe has achieved a high reputation where- 
ever it has been used, as it has many points of 
merit. It enters the ground much more easily 
than a common hoe, and enables the user to do 
much faster work. It is already very popular, and 
gives the highest satisfaction. Net price, 65 cents. 



This implement is used by market-gardeners, to the exclusion of all other 
kinds, for weeding between rows of onions, beets, and all varieties of vegetables 
sown in drills. The knife and plate are made of the best of steel. 

4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 inches wide. Net price 




$1.50 



DUTCH HOE. 

This is a solid welded 
scuffle hoe, imported. 

6 in., handled, each, . $0.85 

m it " " , .90 

8 " " " • .95 

o « « " . 1.00 




SCUFFLE HOES {American). 



These have malleable iron shanks and sockets with polished steel blades. 

5 hi., handled/ .$0.40 

' ' • » ■ -45 




•So 

fo 
.65 

PLIMPTON'S PATENT TOOTH HOE. 

" Hard Hoeing Made Easy." 

This popular socket 
hoe has a toothed edge, 
causing it to cut the weeds 
with little power. The 
blade is made of the best 
cast steel, and is trowel 
tempered. 

Every hoe fully war- 
ranted. 

Net price, 75 cents. 



140 



^arker 8f Jfoou, Jmplement Patalogue. 




THE GEM WHEEL HOE. 

The best wheel hoe in use ; of good size, — not a 
toy ; all iron and steel, except handles ; adjustable in 
every way. Thoroughly well made, and handsomely 
finished. 

It is made with single wheel, for use between the 
rows ; and with double wheels, for use astride the 
rows. 

It gives universal satisfaction, and We can confi- 
dently recommend it, We sell the single wheel hoe 




Gem Hoe, single wheel, 5 stirring teeth, 2 front 
cutting teeth, 2 wings. Net price .... $5.00 

Gem Hoe, double wheel, 5 stirring teeth, 2 side 
cutting teeth, 2 wings. Net price .... $6.00 



LIFTER OR CUTTER. 



Useful for cutting under strips 
of sod as they are being rolled. 



Sod Lifters, 



FAVORITE" WEEDER. 





Net Price. 
each, S3. 00 



Very useful Hoe for hoeing around shrubs, or in cutting deep-rooted weeds. Can 
be used like any hoe and has many additional advantages. 

List Price. Net Price. 

Lefavour's " Favorite" Weeders . . ... . .. . each, $ .75 $ .60 

TREE SCRAPERS. 

For removing old bark from trees, and aiding them in a healthy 
growth, the tree scraper is indispensable. Ours are made of best steel, 
and will carry a keen edge. 

Net Price 

Tree Scrapers each, $ .35 

Solid Steel Garden Trowel. 

This Trowel is made with a solid shank, and of best 
steel throughout. It is much stronger and more dur- 
able than common trowels. 

Net Prices. 

Solid Shank, Solid Steel Garden Trowels, 6 inches, eac h $ .40 

« << « u " 4 7 '/ ...... « , .45 

" " ." " " " •§ " ...... " .50 

LANG'S HAND WEEDER. A 

This effective Weeder is becoming more popu- 4&3$^ m, $j^liw 
Iar each year among Gardeners, Florists, Small /M^^^ ^^^'\Iq^^^ ,£/ 
Fruit Growers, and Amateurs. It is very con- *#^\JXjP ^^^^W^^^^:^ 1 
veniently used, and fits the hand so comfortably S pattappue dfor ggg^ ^ 
that the fingers are entirely free for use whenever necessary. 

Net Price. 

Lang's Hand Weeders - . . , t each, $ 

The Crescent Hoe. 

This improved scuffle hoe is very much liked because of the ease with which it is handled. 
The blade, which lies flat on the ground, is of best steel, and is made in the form of a crescent. 

... , „ . j-r Net Prices. 

7 inch Crescent Hoes . each, $ .65 

9 u .... . lfe . H .75 





j^ARKER 8j ^OOD, JmPLEMENT j^ATALOGUE. 



GARDEN AND FLORAL SETS. 




MO. IO0. 

No. 10. 



. GARDEN SET, NO. 70 OR 80. 

Ladies' Garden Sets, 3 pieces, spade, fork, and malleable hoe-rake 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



70. 
80. 



Boys' 
Ladies' 



3 

« " 4 
" " 4 
Floral Sets, 4 
« 4 



spade, fork, and steel hoe-rake 
D. hdle. spade, steel hoe, 7-tooth rake,- fork, 
same as No. 70, but larger size .... 
short handles, put up in paper boxes . . 



. per set, $0.35 

•55 



1. 00 
1.25 



Six-inch, plate steel, — net price, 15 cents. 
Seven-inch, plate steel, — net price, 20 cents. 
Eight-inch, plate steel, — net price, 20 cents. 
Nine-inch, plate steel, — net price, 25 cents. 

Add 7 cents each for postage. 





Best Steel Rakes, 10-tooth, — net price, 45 cents. 
Best Steel Rakes, 12-tooth, — net price, 50 cents. 



Steel (the best), — net price, each, 35 cents; postage, 4 cents. 
Malleable iron (will not break), — net price, each, 20 cents-, 

postage, 5 cents extra. 
Cast-iron, — net price, each, 10 cents ; postage, 10 cents extra. 

Best Steel Rakes, 14-tooth, — net price, 55 cents. 
Best Steel Rakes, 16-tooth, — net price, 60 cents. 



"Hard hoeing made easy." 

Made with toothed edge. Will hoe with half the power required for common ..hoe. Net 
price, 75 cents. 



Made of the best malleable iron, tinned, — net price, 15 cents. 
Cast-iron, — net price, 5 cents. 

Add 5 cents each for postage. 

Much liked by all who have used it. Price, postpaid, 50 cents. 





A convenient, cheap, and useful tool, made of 
steel, well tempered, — net price, 25 cents, .. . 

Add 5 cents for postage. ; 



1 Weeder. 

Spading, manure, and hay forks of all sizes. 



Steel, per pound, 6 cents. 
Iron, per pound, 6 cents. 



Long and D handles, various grades. Socket and shank hoes of all kinds. 

BORDER* KNIVES. 

Border knives, each, 75 cents 



142 



ARKER 8f ^jyOOD, JmFLEMENT pATALOGUE. 




WATERS' IMPROVED TREE PRUNER. 

The blade is very thin, thus offering very slight resistance to the 
wood in cutting. The Waters Pruner never fails to cut the slightest 
twig. The thin blade of the pruner passes through the limb so easily 
that the grain is uninjured, and the bark left smooth. 

LIST PRICES 



4 feet 
6 feet 
8 feet 
io feet 



Extra blades, 30 cents each ; 



each, $1.75, 
' 2.00 
" 2.25 
" 2.50 
£3.50 per dozen. 



NET PRICES. 

$1.50 

1-75 
2.00 
2.25 



Extra blades and other parts are easily and cheaply replaced. 

THE - TELEGRAPH 53 TREE PRUNER. 

This pruner has many features like the " Waters " ; but, unlike it, it is 
provided with a spring which throws the blade open, and the blade is oper- 
ated by a cord which can be of any length to correspond with the pole. 
The socket has a thread on the inside, thus permitting a long pole to be 
securely put on. > 

Net Prices. "Telegraph" Tree Primer. 
Telegraph Tree Pruners each, $2.00 




Extra blades, each, 30 cents. Extra springs 



THE 



.25 



GLE 




Eagle Pruning Tools, No. 



The Eagle is one of the best of 
two-handled shears, being thor- 
oughly made of best steel. The 
knife has a drawing cut, causing 
it to work with great ease. 

It is light and powerful, and 
we can .recommend it highly. 



Net Price. 
each, $2.25 



ROCKDALE PRUNER. 



The Rockdale Prun- 
er is strong and dura- 
ble, though somewhat 
lighter than the Eagle 
Pruning Tool. It is 
made of best cast- 
steel, and can be rec- 
ommended as a con- 
venient and useful 
tool. 

Rockdale Pruners . . 




each, $1.50 



J^ARfCER 8f ^jyOOD, JMPLEMENT j^ATALOGUE. 



ENGLISH CUTLERY. 

Sayiior & Cooke's Grass and Hedge Shears. 

Net Prices. 

STo. loo, 6-inch Grass Shears . per pair, 

7- inch Grass Shears . 
7^-inch, Grass Shears 

8- inch Grass Shears 

9- inch Grass Shears 

10- inch Grass Shears . 
No. 101, 7 ^4-inch Hedge Shears, notched 

8- inch Hedge Shears, notched . 

9- inch Hedge Shears, notched . 
1 o-inch Hedge Shears, notched 

No. 104, 8-inch, Long Handle Border Shears 

9- inch Long Handle Border Shears 

10- inch Long Handle Border Shears 
No. 105, 8-inch Long Handle Border Shears, with wheel, 

9- inch Long Handle Border Shears, with wheel, 

10- inch Long Handle Border Shears, wheel . " 

English pruning: ana Budding: Knives 

No. 7,940, Budding Knives, I X L each, $1.25 

7,706, Pruning Knives. I X L T " 

7,948, Pruning Knives, I X L 
1,933, Pruning Knives, I X L 

113, Pruning Knives, Trenton 

in, Pruning Knives, Trenton 

609, Pruning Knives, Trenton 

fl MEXICAN TUNING AND BUDDING I^NIYES. 

No. 327 j^, Budding Knives, ivory handles . each, 

324, Budding Knives, ivory handles • 

Add 4 cents per knife for postage. 




1.50 
1.25 
1. 00 

•75 
1. 00 

l;2 5 



Grass Shears. 



£1.00 
1.25 




NEW GERMAN PRUNING SHEAR. 



NEW GERMAN PRUNING SHEAR. 

Net Prices. 

?l inch per pair $1.00 

8 " " 1.20 

10 " " " 1.50 

German Grape Shears . " " .50 
Add 1 5 cents per pair for postage. 
This shear is forged of best quality iron 
throughout, and no malleable iron enters into its construction.. 

It has a new spiral spring of peculiar pattern which will not break. , 

The blade is foro-ed— not stamped — from best cast-steel, and cannot be surpassed m quality. 

We can recommend .this as unqualifiedly the best shear in the market. 

TAYLOR'S PRUNING SHEARS. 

These are inexpensive, but are well made, and are very popular per pair, 50 cents. 

Add 14 cents per pair for postage. 

SHEEP SHEARS EST GOOD VARIETY. 



FLORISTS' SCISSORS. 



Net Prices. 



No. 112. 6 inch Vine Scissors 
j « « « 



per pair 



No. III. 6 " Flower Gatherers 

• 'ij, it ' fa H ' • <*• 'Iff* . 

No. no. 5 " Bow Scissors (cut on opp. page) . . 

6 " " " 

~ « « « 

Add 4 cents per pair for postage. 

©rafting Chisels (cut on opp. page) 




each .50 



FLOWER GATHERER, 



144 



J^ARKER ^ ^OOD, JmPLEMKNT pATALOGUE. 



THE EVANS 

TWO-HORSE PLANTER. 

WITH FERTILIZER ATTACHMENT. 
Kotary Feed. Does not Clog. 

Will plant one or two 
rows ; drops corn in plain 
sight of driver. Has 
points of excellence not 
found in any other plant- 
er. With fertilizer at- 
tachment, $55.00; with 
drill attachment, $60.00. 



Combined Lock and Regu- 
lating Hand Lever, show- 
1 ing manner of regulating 
depth, of planting without 
destroying flexibility o£ 
planter. 





THE ECLIPSE ONE HORSE CORN PLANTER. 

The Most Perfect for New England use. Price $35.00. 

THE ARLINGTON SEED SOWER, 

The Market-Gardeners' Favorite. 

The Arlington is the only seed drill used by the 
famous and successful market-gardeners of Arling- 
ton, Belmont, Revere, and other vegetable-raising 
towns. It is built in a strong and thorough manner, 
and is very light. List price, $16.00; net price, $1 1. 



A. H. MATTHEWS' UTTLEGEM DRILL 



This little implement supplies a long-felt want: 
among small gardeners for an inexpensive drill which, 
will do perfect work. It is selling rapidly to per- 
sons who have felt heretofore that it would not pay 
them to buy the larger and higher cost drills. List 
price, $6.00; net price, $5.50. 



A. H. MATTHEWS' NEW SEED DRILL 

This new drill can be recommended as the most 
improved and perfect implement of its kind in the 
market for sowing all kinds of vegetable seeds with 
accuracy. It has a horizontal indicator bearing the 
names of the different seeds on the top side in plain 
sight, and is so arranged that the seed can be en- 
tirely shut off. The markers for marking the next 

row are very simple and can be managed entirely by _ u 
the foot with great facility. It is carefully and acurately made, and is strong and durable. List 
price, each, $12.00; net price, $9.00. 



si 




J^ATRKER 8j "^OOD, Jm.FLEM.ENT pATALOGUE. 145 




111113 



The Jtfost Perfect Broadcast Sower JULade. Fully Warranted. Perfectly Simple. 

Sows all grains, grass seeds, plaster, salt, ashes, commercial fertilizers — everything requiring; 
broadcasting — any quantity per acre, better and faster than any other method. Saves seed by 
sowing perfectly even. Not affected by wind, as seed is not thrown upwards. Sows half or full 
cast, on either or both sides of wagon. Readily attached to any wagon or cart without injury,, 
and used wherever they can be driven. Lasts a lifetime. Sows 80 acres wheat per day. 

List Price. Net Price.. 

Strowbridge Broadcast Seed Sowers, each ........... $25.00 $18.50 

Send for illustrated pamphlet. 



The Cahoon Broadcast Sower, 

The sowing of grass and grain by hand is well known to be a diffi- |j 
cult operation, requiring a very skilful operator to do it well. This diffi- | 
culty is entirely overcome by the use of the Cahoon Broadcast Seed £ 
Sower, which can be handled with ease by an entirely inexperienced per- |j 
son, and will sow much more evenly than can possibly be sown by hand. | 

It can be gauged to sow as much or as little to the acre as may 5; 
be desired. 



Cahoon Broadcast Seed Sower, hand machine 



List Price. 

. too 



Net Price. 
$4-75 





THOMPSON'S SEEDER. 



For Broadcasting Grass Seed. 

Simple. 



Light, Strong and* 



Sows uniformly the whole length of the hopper, 12 ft.. 
Its simplicity of construction, and its accuracy of 
work in the field place it at THE HEAD OF ALL. 
SEEDERS. 

No. 1. Complete Clover and Grass Seeder . $10.00- 
No. 2. Complete Seeder, with double, hopper 

for Red Top and Orchard Grass . 12.50* 

AUTOMATIC HAND CORN PLANTER. 

This tool is manipulated by one hand, and is used as a person would handle a walking-stick.. 
It will plant as fast as a person can walk. Being well made, and perfectly simple in construction,, 
it has justly earned a high reputation. _ 

Automatic Hand Corn Planter . . .. . . ... . List price, $3.50 ; net price, $2.50.. 



I46 ^ARKER ^ ^OOD, JjVLPLEMENT j^ATALOGUE. 



COMBINED BARREL-TRUCK AND HAND-CART. 




This barrel-truck is one of the most convenient articles used about a garden or farm. There 
are innumerable uses to which it can be put. The barrel can be raised from the ground, carried 
to the place desired, and instantly detached, all without handling. 

It is more commonly sold with barrel only, although the box is very convenient in many 
places. 

Net Prices. 

Water Truck only (including one pair Trunnions), . . . each, $10.50 

" " with barrel, . " 13-00 

" " with box, " 14.50 

" " with Barrel and Box, complete, • , . , " 17.00 

Extra Barrel, with Trunnions, . ..... " 3.00 

Trunnions per pair 75 



LAWN SPRINKLERS. 



Every owner of a lawn has now come to regard the sprinkler as in- 
dispensable to having a green and handsome surface. 

These Sprinklers are the standard kind, and will sprinkle a large 

glat of lawn if connected with an ordinary head of water. Every 
prinkler warranted. 

4- arm, . . . . . . . Net price, $3.00 

6-arm, ....... " " 3.50 

4-arm, with ball top, . . . . " " 3.25 

• 6-arm, " 3$ ' Tl> [*■ . , 'f - 3.75 




AQUANETTE. 

A brass force pump, the best article of the kind ever in- 
vented for use in sprinkling trees, shrubs, &c, with insecti- 
cides. It can be used by carrying the pail on the arm, and the 
operator can mount a ladder, and shower trees at the highest 
point which could not be reached from the ground. 

Aquanettes . . . each, net price, $5.50 

HOSE REELS. 



Lawn Sprinkler. 



We carry a good assortment of Hose Reels, which range in price from $1.75 upwards. 



E.R 8f Y OOD ' Jm.plem.ent p atalo gu e. 



147 



^ssttst furtt: f»mp4 

An excellent article for watering flower beds, washing windows and 
carriages, applying poisonous liquids to trees for destroying insects, 
and various other purposes. 

Several towns have adopted this style of pump as a fire 
extinguisher, and every family will find it valuable to have 
it on hand for a like purpose. 

Net price, $4-50. 



MADE OF BEST QUALITY CHARCOAL TIN. 

This pump is not the common worthless kind which is 
sold quite generally in the market, but is a substantial and 
well made article. 

THROWS A STREAM 50 FEET. 
With Sprinkler attached it throws a gentle shower or spray. 
Excellent for watering Shrubs, Vines, Fruit Trees, and 
Boston Tin Flowers, and valuable for washing windows, carriages, etc, 
Force Pump. p O i S0nous solutions to plants, vines, or trees. 

Boston Tin Force Pump, Net price, each $1.00. 




Hand Force Pump. 

Can be used for apply- 



No. 2. — Ladies' Syringe, with one Stream and 
two Spray Roses ; the two Roses when not in use 
are screwed on the sides of the Barrel, as shown in 
cut. Price. $4.75. 

No. 3. — American Improved Syringe, 18 inches long ; diameter, 1 Best Plate Valve 
Syringe, large size, with one Stream and two Spray Roses, with side pieces on Barrel. 



Length of Barrel, 13% ra. ; diam., lj-g- 
2 



$7.00. 

Length of Barrel, 18 in.; diameter, 1%. 



Price 

No. 5. — American Improved Syringe, best 
Conical Valve Syringe, large size, with one Stream! 
and two Spray Roses. This Syringe is in general 
use with Horticulturists in the United States and Europe. With side pieces on Barrel. 
Price . . . $7.50. 

No. 6.— Best Conical Valve Syr- 
inge, large size, with one Spray Rose 
and. Goose Neck Angle Joint, turning 
in all directions, for washing the under 
surface ©f the leaves of plants and 
flowers, cleansing them from insects,, 
etc. Price, $7.50. 

No. 7. — American Improved Syringe, Length of Barrel, IS in. 5 diameter, 1%. 

best Conical Valve Syringe, large size, with ^^^7 
one Stream and two Spray Roses, within 
Knuckle Joint turning in all directions, for 
the same purpose as No. 6, with side pieces on Barrel. Price, $9.50. 

"Whitney's Brass Syringe. 12-inch Barrel; 1 inch diameter. Straight Stream and 
one Rose. Does excellent work. Net price, $1.75 each. 
Tin Syrinpres, 75 cuts osifh. 




148 



jpARKEf\ 8f Y OOD i JMPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 




HOSE NOZZLES. 

We carry the leading kinds in stock. 

THE LOWELL HOSE NOZZLE. 

This is the most perfect graduating pipe known, making a very delicate and 
wide spread spray, which can gradually be made coarser and more profuse until 
a straight stream is thrown. 

It is made of brass and well finished. 

Net price, 
each, $0.75 

" 0.75 , 
" 075 



I inch Lowell Hose Nozzles, . 

I " Magic Hose Nozzles, with screw tip, 

I " Fairy " - " « " 



RUBB6R H0S6. 

There have been so many qualities of rubber hose made to fit the names 
" Standard '•' and " Extra," that these words have come to mean but very little 
to the user. 

We have accordingly laid in a stock of hose which we have had made especially 
for us, in accordance with rigid specifications, and bra7ided with our name. 
Every Length Warranted. 





"STANDARD " 

Equal quality with regu- 
lar market Standard. 


Parker & Wood's 
"EXTRA STANDARD " 

Suitable for ordinary 
hydrant pressure. 


Parker & Wood's 
"EXTRA" 

Suitable for heavy hydrant 
pressure. 


Parker & Wood's 
"SUPERIOR" 

Highest quality; adapted 
for unusual pressure. 


* in. 3-ply. 

A « <( 

4 

I « « 

I " 4-piy- 
4 

1 « " 


List. Net. 
.25 .08 
.30 .IO 
.40 .13 


List. Net. 
.25 .10 

.30 , .12 
.40 .15 
.30 .12 

•37 -15 
.50 .19 


List. Net. 
.25 .12 
.30 .14 
.40 .19 
.30 .14 
% .18 - 
.50 .24 


List. Net. 
.25 .16 
•3d .18 
.40 .24 
.30 .18 

•37 , .24 
•5° -30 



7 cents 



" COMPETITION " f inch 3-ply hose, not warranted, per ft. net, 
Above net prices include couplings, put on with Caldwell's Patent Straps and Cement co 
feet lengths. For 25 feet lengths, coupled, add \ cent per foot. 

COTTON HOSE. 



j in. Best quality, coupled, 50 feet lengths, per ft. 

fit fi ?'"'«* 50 H if,' . «- 



10 cents 

11 " 



CHANDLER'S 

Ice-Cutting Machine. 

NO CHILLED IIA3DS. 

The machine, as shown in the cut, occupies a 
«pace of only eight inches square ; is about twelve 
inches high, and can be attached by screws to a 
bar, counter, table or shelf, as desired. It turns 
easily, and can be operated child ten years old. 

Any piece of ice that will go into the hopper 
will go through by its own weight, being drawn 
in by the peculiar shape of the teeth. 

_ . List. Net. 

Japanned, smallest size $4.00 $3.50 
All galvanized iron, with 

pan, smallest size . 5.00 4.50 
No. 2. All galvanized iron, with 

pan, for family use . 6.00 5.50 
"No. 2J. All galvanized iron, with 
pan,'_ for hotels and 
hospitals . . 10.00 9.50 
All galvanized iron, with 
pan, for large hotels 
and confectioners . 25.00 23.50 



No. 1. 
No. 1. 



No. 3. 




J^ARKEf^ 8f Y OOD| JMPLEMENT J^ATAL-OGUE. I 49 



ICE-CREAM FREEZERS. 





The Gem Ice-Cream Freezer. 



The Gem Ice-Cream Freezer, 



The Gem Ice-Cream Freezer is recognized as one of the few leading freezers in use, being 
particularly preferred on account of its covered gear and its economy in the use of ice. Its 
points of superiority may be briefly mentioned as follows : — 

The Tub is made strong and of the best quality of Cedar, bound with Galvanized Iron Hoops. 
The Gearing is completely covered, so that nothing can get between the Cogs. The Can can be 
revolved to harden Cream after Stirrer has been removed. The Cross-bar is arranged to give 
the greatest facility for packing Ice. The Can and Stirrer both revolve, but in opposite direc- 
tions. The Scraper is Self-Adjusting. The Workmanship and Material are of the very best. 



PRICES OF *GEM FREEZERS: 



Sizes . . 
List Prices 
Net Prices 



2 QT. 
$3-75 
*-75 



3Q T - 
$4-50. 
2x0 



4 QT. 

$5-5° 
2.50 



6 QT. 
$7.00 
3-25 



8 QT. 
$9.00 
4.OO 



IO QT. 
$11. OO 

5-SP 



14 QT. 
$14.00 
7.OO 




The White Mountain 
Ice-Cream Freezer has 




THE STAR ICE CHiPPER. 



been before the public 

for many years, and is 

well known to be unex- 

, . .. , . A very superior hand tool for mak- 

celledinits freezing qua- ^ g fin(? j ce / The cutting teeth are J a _ 

lities, and to be substan- justed m such relation to a gauge that 
. . , . the chips cut are just right for all or- 

tially and thoroughly dinary purposes . B y it a cake of ice 

made. can be reduced to chips in a very few 

minutes. Price, 25 cents. 

PRICES OF WHITE MOUNTAIN FREEZERS : 

Sizes ... 2 QT. 3 OT. 4 QT. 6 QT. 8 QT. IO QT. 

List Prices . $ z . 75 $4.50 $5.50 $7.00 $8.00 $10.00 
.Met Prices •. 1.88 2.25 2.75 3-50 4.50 6.00 

Large size Gem or White Mountain Freezers, with or 
without balance wheels. Prices upon application. 

ICE AWL. 

A very excellent article for 
chipping off single pieces of 
ice for ice-pitcher use, etc., as 
it performs its work without 
waste of ice. It is provided with a malleable iron head by which a 
piece of ice can be quickly cracked into smaller pieces while being held 
in the hand. Price, 20 cents. 





THE AMERICAN ICE CHISEL. . 

A well-known saw tooth chisel which is 
largely used in ice-chests, etc., for cutting 
cakes of ice into small pieces, and for shav- 
ing chips. 

Wood handle, 25 cts.; iron handle, 20 cts. 



j^ARKER 8f Y OOD ' jMPLEMENT j^ATALOGUE, 



We make a specialty of mounting in a supe- 
rior manner the Finest Quality of Bay de Cha- 
leur, Nova Scotia, Stones. 

They contain more wear than any grindstones 
known. 

Our stones are mounted by skilled mechanics 
in our own workshop, who takes pains to turn 
them very smooth and perfectly true. 

None but the best grits are used for this pur- 
pose. We use the heaviest and strongest fixt- 
ures only. Our mounted stones cannot be 
excelled in quality and service. 





List. 


Net. 


Parker 8 


1 Wood's Mounted Grindstones, 




20 inch 


$8.00 


$6.40 


22 " 


. . 8.50 


6.80 


24 " 


9.00 


7.20 


26 " 


9-50 


7.60 


28 " 


10.00 


8.00 


30 " 


10.50 


8.40 


32 « 


. . . ...... 11.00 


8.80 


34 " • 


. 12.00 


9.60 


36 « . 


13-00 


IO.40 


38 « . 


14.00 


II.20 




PARKER & WOOD'S MOUNTED GRINDSTONE. 

" U. T.K." MOUNTED GRINDSTONES. 

Western grindstones do not have the reputation 
for service that Nova Scotia stones do, but some 
buy them because of the difference in price. We 
consider the "U.T.K." one of the very best of 
Western makes. The stone is best quality Berea 
grit; the legs are wrought iron; the hangers are 
malleable iron painted black ; the wood-beams and 
treadle are painted bright vermillion. 

List. Net. 

U.T.K. Mounted Grindstones, No. 

1, Medium Size $6.00 $4.50 

U.T.K. Mounted Grindstones, No. 

2, Small Size 5.50 4.25 

U.T.K. Mounted Grindstones, No. 

3, Smallest Size 5.00 4.00 



KITCHEN GRINDSTONES. 

This is a very useful article for every housekeeper to have in the kitchen 
by which to sharpen carving and other knives, as well as the small tools 
which go to make up the set used in every family. It has a solid iron frame 
and waterbox. 

Net Price. 

NOVA SCOTIA GRINDSTONES, unmounted, plain, per pound, 2$ 
cerrts. 

GRINDSTONE FIXTURES of all sizes. 

GRINDSTONE FRAMES of best quality, made of oak, well finished in oik 

Prices on application. 




List Price. 

Kitchen Grindstones, 10 in. diameter $2.00 




j^ARKEf^ 8f "^yOOD, Jm.FLEM.ENT j^ATALOGUE. 




CYLINDER CHURNS. 

List Price. Net Price. 

No. i Cylinder Churn $2.50 $2.00 

No. 2 Cylinder Churn 3.00 2.50 

No. 3 Cylinder Churn . . ... 3.50 3.00 

BIB No. 4 Cylinder Churn 4.00 ' 3.50 

No. 5 Cylinder Churn ' 4.50 4.00 

DASH CHURNS. 

No. 1 Pine Dash Churn $1.00 

ISP^Iflgji, No. 2 Pine Dash Churn 1.25 

J^ J^r No. 3 Pine Dash Churn 1.50 

No. 4 Pine Dash Churn . 1.75 

MILKING TUBES. UtMk 

No farmer having cows with obstructed jjgjyjBBg^^^a fipjllir _~ _ 
teats caused by sores, or garget in the ud- 
der, can afford to be without them. I§j0mm& Silver. 
Coin Silver, including postage . . $0.75 
Plated on white metal, including 

* P<^ e ^> '-X ^V'- - * Plated. 
11)1 

PRESCOTT CATTLE STANCHION. 

Keeps the cattle clean; gives them comfort; turns to either 
side at the pleasure of the animal; locks automatically, unlocks 
at a touch of the lever; strongly made, and simple. 

This stanchion is, without doubt, the most improved one now be- 
fore the public. " 

List Price. Net Price - 

„.,,,,, Q . ,. Prescott Curved Cattle Stanchions .... each $3.00 #2.50 
Prescott Cattle Stanchion. « Straight « « " 2.00 1.50 

OX MUZZLES, plain and guarded . . . per pair, 30 to 60 cents. 
Special, heavy, 6 guards, extra large (see cut) . per pair, 75 cents. 

CATTLE LEADERS . . . , each, 20 cents. 

GIRDING CHAINS, for measuring cattle . . . each, 40 cents. 

COW BELLS, Kentucky each, 35. cents. 

OX BALLS, all sizes per pair, 6 to 25 cents. 

BULL PUNCHES, for making holes in. bull's 

nose in which to insert ring each, 50 cents. 

BULL RINGS : Copper, z\ inches each, 30 cents. 

" Copper, 3 inches each, 35 cents. 

Steel, 2\ inches each, B 25 cents. 

Steel, 3 inches each, 30 cents. 

PAT. BULL RING SNAPS, made to snap into a bull-ring r r , - 
fastened in the animal's nose, by means of which he can be safely b t,uarC1 UX muzzle ' 

handled. Each, handled, 75 cents. 

«fcalE^8l!^HnBm CATTLE TIES, 3 ft., & ft., 4 ft, 4$ 

' ft. long, with both 

' open or closed rings, 

and toggles or snaps. 

Do+ on d' o Each, 25 to 50 cents. 

Pat. Bull Ring Snap. ' 3 D 

TIE-OUT CHAINS, 25 feet long, with two swivels; large German 
snap at one end, and stake for driving into the ground at the " other end, 
Each $2.00. 

Ox and Log Chains, Trace, Back, and Whiffletree Chains, etc., 
Cable Chain, \, f, ^ \, and f inch. Bottom prices. 

WHIPSTOCKS, made of best hickory, strongly leathered. 
GOAD STICKS, best oak, hand shaved, each, 25 cents. 

Cattle Tie, 







j^ARKEI^. 8f ^OOD, Jm.PLEM.ENT j^ATALOGUE. 



THE ROSS ENSILAGE AND FODDER 
CUTTER. 

Power Sizes in Stock. Send for Pamphlet. 
HAND SIZES. 

List Price. 

No. 7. Smallest hand . . . 

cutter, cuts % and 

1 in., one 9 inch 
■ knife .... $16.00 
No. 834 Small hand cutter, 

cuts X A and' 1 in., two 9' inch ' 

knives ' . . . 25.00 
No. 9A. Large hand cutter, 

cuts %, %, and % in., three 

9 inch knives . . 32.00 
No. 1 2 A. Large hand cutter, 

same as 9A, but has two 

balance wheels for two men, 38.00 
Send for Complete Illustrated Pamphlet. 




The Union Lever Feed 
Cutter. 

Very popular on account of its 
simplicity and ease of adjustment. 
It is a very strong-framed, lever-cut 
machine, not liable to get out ot 
order, and universally gives satis- 
faction. 

No. 2. — Plain, straight knife, list 
price, $10.00 ; net price, $9.00. 

No. 2. — Plain, hawk- bill knife, list 
price, $11.00; net price, $10.00. 

THE NEW-YORK LEVER CUTTER. 

This cutter is made on the same general principles as the Union Cutter, but is lighter, and 
more cheaply made. 

List Prices. Net Prices. 
No. i. — Plain, straight knife . . . $6.00 $5.00 
No. 2. — Plain, hawk- bill knife . - . 7.00 5.50 



vlC to* THE VICTOR HAY-CUTTER. 

This cutter has a large sale in New England, and com- 
prises as much worth for the money as any cutter made. 

List Prices. Net Prices. 
No. I. — Straight knife ...... $7.00 $4.50 

No. 2. — Hawk-bill knife 7.50 5.00 

No. z\. — Hawk-bill knife 9.00 7.00 

No. 3. — Hawk-bill knife 11.00 8.5a 

THE ROYAL HAY-CUTTER. 

This new lever cutter resembles the Victor in appear- 
ance, and sustains a good reputation wherever it has been 
introduced. 

List Prices. Net Prices*. 
No. 1. — Straight knife . .... .$7.00 $a to 

No. 2. -Hawk-bill knife , 

No. 2\. — Hawk-bill knife ...... 9.00 700' 

No. 3. Hawk-bill knife . . . . . II<00 




^arker 6^ ^ood, Jmplement Patalogue. 15; 



Waifs Patent Feed Bag. 



This Feed Bag is a standard kind, much liked 
••fey teamsters and those who have occasion to feed 
while away from the stable, and is reasonable in 
price. 

Canvas bottom 0 $0.75 

Wood bottom 1.00 

-Leather bottom t.2$ 





Whittakers Patent Feed Bag. 

This horse Feeder is a favorite among those 
who have occasion to use feed bags, as it is arranged 
so as to draw the- bag toward the horse's mouth 
when his head is lowered, thus preventing all waste 
of grain and feed. Price, $1.00. 



The Wellington Root Cutter. 

This Cutter is made wholly of iron and steel, and will out- 
wear any other root cutter made. 

The gouge-shaped steel knives cut pieces of uniform size, 
-the machine is furnished with a heavy balance-wheel to give a 
-steady motion, and the gear is protected from dirt by a flange and 
«ap. Will cut with ease from one to two bushels per minute. 

List price, $15.00; net price, $13.50. 

The 'Champion Root Cutter. 

The Champion has a strong wooden frame, and has a heavy 
"balance-wheel. The teeth are curved hooks, which revolve on a 
-shaft, and pass beside knives attached to the bottom of the hop- 
per. It is particularly serviceable on mangels, pumpkins, etc. 

List price, $10.00; net price, $8.00. ' 

WHITMAN'S ROOT GUTTER. 



WELLINGTON'S 
PATENT 




The cutting cylinder is provided with three knives similar to plane irons ; these cut the roots or 
-vegetables into slices with great rapidity. The cylinder also has cross-knives, which cut these 
-slices into convenient sizes for cattle or sheep. 

WHITMAN'S ROOT CUTTER , . 



List Price. 
. $I2.00 



Net Price. 
$10.00 



COCO AN UT GRATERS.— Tm-clzd cylinder, list, $7.50; net $7.00. Steel-pin cylinder, list, 
$9.00 ; net, $8.00. 

. HORSE-RADISH GRATERS.— Tin-clad cylinder, list, $7.00; net, $6.50. Steel-pin cylinder, 
Jist, $8.00.; net, $7.50. ; , . 



154 J^ARKER | Y OOD ' P AIRY JMFLEMENT JPaTALOGUE. 



DAIRY IMPLE MENTS. 

In this department we have on hand or can furnish anything required for the manufacture 
of butter, and we offer to our patrons only such as we can confidently recommend to them- 

THE COOLEY CREAMER, 

Parker & Wood, Sole Agents for Boston. 

The Cooley Creamer has been upon 
the market so long, and is so exten- 
sively used, and so well known, that it 
will not be necessary for us to enlarge 
upon its merits. This Creamer is 
manufactured in 

Four Styles and Ten Sizes Each. 
Send for Fully Illustrated Pamphlet. 

More purchasers prefer the Elevator 
than either of the other styles. There 
is no lifting of cans of milk by hand. 
Tthas all the labor-saving conveniences 
of the Cabinet and Junior styles, with 
the additional advantage of having 
loose cans to be taken right to the sink 
to be washed, or they can be placed in 
the sun and air to dry, if desired. 
The cans stand upon a cast-iron plat- 
form, and are held firmly to it by but- 
tons that can be easily turned. The 
covers of cans are fastened to the 
handles with a catch, which can be 
readily turned in or out. The whole 
apparatus is so well adjusted, a child 
can raise the milk of twenty or thirty 
cows. 




ELEVATOR STYLE 



PRICE EIST OF COOLEY CREAMERS. 



No. 


0. 


I C an, 


I to 


3 cows 




oo. 


2 




4 " 




n 


ft 


3 




6" 


3 ■ 




. $b 


4 




9" 


12 " 


« 


3- 


6 


M 


12 " 


18 " 


u 


4- 


8 




18 " 


25 " 


M 




10 


« 


24 « 


3 ? u 


« 




12 


« 


3 S" 


36 « 




7- 


14 


(« 


36 " 


42 « 


« 


8. 


16 


(( 


42 " 


48 « 



Senior Style. Junior Style. Elevator Style. 



#18.00 
25.OO 
30.00 

35-0° 
4500 
55-oo 
. 65.00 

75-oo 
85.00 
95.00 



$20.00 
26.00 
32.00 
37.00 
48.00 
58.00 
70.00 
80.00 



Prices for Creamers include cans, each can having a glass panel. 
Cans hold 18 quarts each. Half cans, 9 quarts each. 



£'32.00 

45.00 
57.00 
68.00 
79.00 
93.00 
105.00 
117.00 



Cabinet. 
$20.00 
27.00 
33-oo 
40.00 
52.00 
64.00 
75.00 
85.00 



THE YANKEE BUTTER WORKER. 

The Yankee Butter Worker is liked by many because it can be 
placed on a table when in use, and set away when not in use. It is 
efficient in its work, simple in construction, and convenient to handle. 
The handle is made of galvanized iron, with a ferrule that turns on 
the iron portion, and not on the hand, which saves blistering, as is the 
danger where the handle is rigid and must turn in the hand. We can 
recommend it as the best butter worker for families in the market. 

No. r. Size, 14 by 23 in. and 2\ in. deep, inside. Capacity, 10 lbs. . 

No. 2. Size, 17 by 20 in. and 2J in. deep, inside. Capacity, 20 lbs. ! 

No. 3. Size, 20 by 30 in. and 2\ in. deep, inside. Capacity, 30 lbs! ! 

No. 4. Size, 23 by 36 in. and 2^ in. deep, inside. Capacity, 50 lbs! ! 




Yankee Butter Worker. 



List. 

$6.00 
7.00 
8.00 

10.00 



Net. 

$4-5° 
5-50 
6.50 
8.00 



'ARKER 8f ^OOD, pAIRY JmPLEMENT pATALOGUE. 155 



THE BLANCHARD CHURN. 




The Blanchard Churn has no rival in cheapness, 
durability, simplicity, and efficiency. It is used by 
the best dairymen in the country; and its large and 
increasing sale everywhere is the best proof that it 
gives the highest satisfaction. 

There are now in successful operation over 100,000 
of these churns. As the result of careful study and 
experiment, recent improvements have been made, 
and the round- top churn now produced is undoubt- 
edly unexcelled by any in the market. There is a 
ventilator in the top of each churn. The body of 
the churn, being cylindrical, causes all the cream to 
be churned alike ; and streaked butter is thus made 
impossible. Those who desire to make " granulated 
U butter " can do so perfectly with the Blanchard 
Bill Churn. Be sure and buy the genuine " " 



' Blanchard." 



PRICE LIST. — Family Sizes. 



List Price. 
. . $6.00 
. . 7.00 
. . 8.00 



Net. 
$5.00 
6.00 
7.00 
9.00 
1 1. 00 



| No. 3, for up to about 2 gallons of cream 
JpNo, 4, for up to about 4 gallons of cream 
• No. 5, for up to about 8 gallons of cream 
No. 6, for up to about 12 gallons of cream . . 10.00 
No. 7, for up to about 16 gallons of cream . . 12.00 

SEND FOR SPECIAL. CIRCULAR OF FACTORY CHURNS. 

DAVIS SWING CHURN. 

The demand for abetter 
grade of butter in these 
times of low prices has 
called attention to the fact 
that the quality of the ar- 
ticle depends very much 
upon the churn in which 
it is made. 

The principle governing 
the process of butter-mak- 
ing in the Davis Swing 
Churn is that the particles 
of cream come in contact 
with each other only, and 
are not unduly beaten by 
floats. 

It is very easy to work, 
and very simple in its con- 
struction. The opening . 
into the box is always right j 
side up, the lid is ventila- _ 
ted, and there is no slop- ' - 
ping or dripping of cream. Each churn has a glass indicator in the cover, thus enabling a per- 
son to tell when the butter comes without raising the lid. The butter comes m beautrf ul granules 
in the most desirable form for washing with cold water or brine. 

No. 1, capacity 7 gallons, will churn 3 gallons, or less • ^8 '00 




2, 
*3» 
4, 
5, 
6, 
7» 



16 
24 

30 
40 
60 
80 
100 
200 



10.00 
12.00 



30 
40 
50 
100 



15.00 
18.00 
25.00 
30.00 
35-oo 
50.00 



Nos. 7, 8, 0 and 11 are hung in strong square frames, adapted especially to factory use. 
Arranged for attaching power, 75 cents extra. Folding frames for churns, $1.00 extra. 
Churns shipped knocked down and bundled, unless ordered set up. 

The " Champion " Barrel Churn we can recommend. 

Send for Descriptive Circular. 



I56 J^ARKER 8[ Y OOD ' pAIRY JmFLEMENT pATALOGUE. 



COMBINATION BUTTER-PRINT, 

WITH MOLD, CUTTERS, AND PADDLE. 

This combination Print is extensively used 
by manufacturers of " gilt-edged " butter. 
The cut here shown represents No. 6 print 
in its mold, which holds 2 lbs., and is divided 
into 8 cakes, M lb. each, with a cutter, which 
goes with each print. The butter is pressed 
into the mold on to the face of print with a 
paddle, which is also used as a stick to strike 
off surplus butter. In filling, the mold stands 
upon the butter-worker or table, and the but- 
ter is pressed into the mold with the left 
hand on top of paddle. The print should be 
kept in mold in the cellar when not in use. 




No. of 


No. of Cakes at 


Capacity of 


Capacity of each 
Cake in'ounces, 


Print. 


each Impression. 


Moid in lbs. 


1 


3 


Wz 


8 


2 


4 


2 


8 


S 


4 


2 


8 


4 


4 


1 


4 


5 
6 


4 
8 


1 

2 


4 
4 


7 


6 




4 


8 


12 




2 


9 


16 




1 


10 


24 


h 


1 


12 


8 




8 



Dimensions of 
Mold in ins. 

10 X 33^ 

12X3 
4KX5 
10X2^ 

10 x ±A 
10X&2 

12X4 
10 X 3 
10X4 

11X5 - • 
No extra, Charge for Initials or Monogram. 



Dimensions of 
each Cake 



3 X3 . 
'2V 4 X2K 
2^X2% 
2^X2^ 
3^X1M 
2 X2 

igxiya 

134X1^ 
mX*A 



Pkiob. 

$4.00 
4.25 
4.25 
4.00 

i 4.25- 
5.00 
4.75 
5.50 
5.50 
5.75 
5.00 



BUTTER MOLDS. 




Square Mold. 

Square, 1 pound, two ^-pound prints . . 
Square, A pound, two V^pound prints-". 

Square, % lb., single print 

Round, 1 pound . . . . . . 




$1-25 
1. 10 
.90 
.40 



Round Mold. 

Round, % pound ......... $0.30 

Round, Vi. pound 25 

Round, 1-16 pound ....... "2© 

Round, 1-32 pound 15 




Hexagon, mahogany, 1 pound . 
Hexagon, mahogany, pound . 



Hexagon Mold. 

$0.75 I Hexagon, cedar, 1 pound #0.65 

.65 I Hexagon, cedar, A. pound 55 



J-'ar.ker 8f Y OOD > P AIRY Jmpi ement J^atalogue. 157 




FARMERS' SCALES. 

We offer for the use of farmers, dairymen, and housekeepers, a 
convenient and low-priced scale, warranted. accurate, weighing from 
K oz. to 240 lbs. Net price . . . • « « $5 00 



FLOATING DAIRY THERMOMETER. 

These thermometers are graduated especially for dairy use, and mark the degrees for freezing, 
churning, cheese making and scalding Price, . • . . . each $ .35 

LACTOMETERS. 

< A reliable instrument for testing the quality of 

milk. 

Common Lactometers^ 1 . , . . , • . . . each, $ .65 

" Board of Health" Lactometers ....... " .85 

CREAM GAUGES. 

Used for determining the per cent, of cream which milk will raise. 
Cream Gauges . . . . . . . . each, $1.00 

CREAM TESTERS. 

IN SETS OF FOUR PIECES, WITH STAND. 

Used for making comparisons between amount of cream 
raised on different cows' milk. 




Cream Testers 
Extra Tubes 



set, $2.75 
each, .50 




CREAM GAUGE. 



NEW PATTERN BURNING BRAND. 




CREAM TESTER. 

Each brand is 
cast in one piece, 
allowing no 
chance for the 
letters to become 
loose, as in the old 
style brands. 

Tlie Iron Shield 
Attachment 

is to be found in no other. It covers the 
letters while the brand is being heated, thus 
protecting them from injury by the fire, 
f Shields are not necessary on brands larger 
' than one-half inch, and will only be furnished, 
IP*- on larger sizes by special order. They are made with 
r extra long handles ; are finished in a superior manner ; 
and will last a lifetime with proper use. Four to six days' 
time will fill all ordinary orders. 

Patent Burning Brands. Net Prices, viz. : — 




it 



s, eight letters or less 



s-inch 
%-inch 
1 -inch 



Extra letters each. 

$1.25 . $.15 

I.25 . .15 

I.25 . .15 

I.50 . .20 

2.00 . .20 

2.50 . .25 



1 58 J^ARKER 8f ^OOD, "^OODENWARE j^ATALOGUE. 



WOOBENWARE DEPARTMENT. 

We carry a large stock of all varieties of goods in this line. Wholesale and Retail Trade 
solicited. 




IMPERVIOUS OIL-CANS. THE BEST IN THE WORLD. 

These cuts represent our Impervious Oil-cans for family use. They are made of wood, 
joints tongued and grooved, and covered with a paper strip inside, — all being thoroughly coated 
with patent composition, thus adding greatly to their strength, and rendering them perfectly 
impervious to kerosene, carbon, or other oils. They are fitted with our new nickle-plated com- 
pression faucet, and vented fillers. Experience has fully proved that these cans are the only 
packages fitted to stand handling and transportation ; and from the peculiar character of the 
lining, they are absolutely free from all sweat and odor of oil, rendering them the strongest, clean- 
est, and safest family oil-can ever offered for use. The constantly increasing demand has proved 
beyond doubt that these oil cans have no rival in porn; of safety, durability, and cleanliness. 

Net Prices. 

Two-gallon . - . . V. . . . . « IiIO 

Three gallon ............ It2 c 

Five-gallon . . ■ , ] 

Six-gallon , . * * [ 

Ten-gallon . '> l' I . '. 2.00 

A FULL STOCK OF THE FOLLOWING NAMED ARTICLES, 

NOT ILLUSTRATED IN THIS CATALOGUE. 

BROOMS, PAILS, 

WHISK BROOMS, MEASURES, 

BRUSHES, COTTON MOPS, 

BASKETS, CLOTHES PINS, 

PASTRY BOARDS, ROLLING PINS, 

SKIRT BOARDS, BUTTER PRINTS, 

WASH BOARDS, CORN POPPERS 

, WASH BENCHES, TOWEL ROLLS, 

' WELL BUCKETS, WOODEN SPOONS 

BUTTER BOXES, 5 and 10 lbs. LEMON SQUEEZERS 
%KBUTTERB 5 OXES, C LOTHESUNE REELS. 

NEST BOXES, 
BERRY BOXES, 
CLOTHES STICKS, COVERED BUCKETS 

BUTTER SPATS, WOOD BOWLS, 

FLOUR SIEVES, BARREL COVERS, 

C °AL SIEVES, NEW ERA OIL CANS, . 

SLEDS, WOOD DIPPERS 

SN £?L SH0VELS ' DISH DRAINERS, . 

TUBS, FAUCETS 

CI J°A??!p T i G ,I? AYS ' SAW HORSES, 

£nn4 P %PAP« MINCING KNIVES, 

KNTFF A S vs I CLOTHES LINES, 

KNIFE TRAYS, BUTTER LADLES, Em 



■ft INDEX. 



Aquanette ... .146 
Ashes, Canada unleached ; 6 
Asparagus Roots. . . 18 
Awls, Ice ... . . 149 



B 



Bags, Feed . . .153 
Balls, Ox . . . .151 
Barrel-Truck . . . 146 
Barrows, Wheel . .138 
Baskets, Rustic . . 23 
Begonia bulbs ... 89 
Bellows . • . • .21 

Bells, Cow . ... 151 
Bird-Seed . . .119 
Blackberry Vines . .116 
Bone Fertilizer . .123 
Bone Meal for Cattle . 124 
Bone Meal for Chickens . 24 
Boston Ivy . . 25 
Boxes, Rustic . .*.-.. 23 
Brands,. Burning . -157 
Buckwheat . . '65 
Bulbs, Summer , : 89-91 
Bulbs, Fall-flowering . 90 

C 

Cabbage Plants . . 18 
Canary Seed . . .119 
Canker- Worm Extermina- 
tor . . . . 121 
Cans, Oil ... . . 158 
Carts, Hand . . .146 
Cauliflower Plants . . 18 
Celery Plants . , . ... 18 
Chains . . . . 151 
Chains, Girding . -151 
Chains, Tie-out . .151 
Chicken Feed ... 24 
Chippers, Ice . . . 149 
Chisels, Grafting . .143 
Chisels, Ice . . . 149 
Churns . . . 151^-155 
Chrysanthemums . . 104 
Climbing Plants 

25, 29, 88, 95, 100, 106, 109 
Clovers . . . . 64 



Collections of Flower Seeds, 

66, 68, 69 

Corn, Ensilage • . • . 43 
Creameries . . .154 
Cream Testers . • .157 
Crowbars . • . .. 141 
Crushers, Ice . . • . 148 
Cultivators . . 136-147 
Culture of Flower Seeds 67 
Cutlery, English . .143 
Cutters, Ensilage . . 152 
Cutters, Hay . . .152 
Cutters, Root . . . 153 
Cutters, Sod . . .140 



Dahlias . . . .103 
Dalmatian Insect Powder 121 
Drills, Corn . . .144 
Drills, Seed. . . .144 

■ E 

Edger/Lawn . . . 12S 
Egg Food, Imperial & Rust's 24 



Eggs, Nest 



F 



. 24 

123-124 
22 

. 124 
. 141 
. 141 



Harrows 

Hellebore 

Herbaceous Plants 

Herbs 

Hoes 

Hoes,. Dutch . 
Hoes, Horse . 
Hoes, Humphrey 
Hoes, Scuffle 
Hoes, Slide ' . 
Hoes, Wheel . 
Hooks, Grass 
Hooks, Weeding 
Hose, Rubber 
Hot-Bed Mats 



Ice- Cutting Machine 
Ice Tools . • 
Insecticides 
Ink, Printers' . 



Fertilizers 
Flower Pots. . 
Food for Plants 
Forks 

Forks, Strawberry 
Frames and Fixtures, Grind- 
stone . . . 150 
Freezers, Ice Cream . 149 
Fruit, Trees . . 116-118 
Fumigators . . . 2.1 

G 

Garden Requisites . . 20 

Gauges, Cream . .157 
Gladiolus ... 89 

Grains . . -65 

Grape, Vines . . 11 2-1 13 

Grass Seeds . . 62-64 

Graters, Cocoanut . • . 1 53 

Graters, Horseradish . 153 

Grindstones . . , 150 



Japanese Ivy 



K 



Knives, Border 
Knives, Budding 
Knives, Grafting 
Knives,' Pruning 

Ij 

Labels . . . 120 

Lactometers' . . 1 57 

Lawn-Grass Seed . 19-64 

Leaders, Cattle . =151 

Lifter, Sod, or Cutter . 140 

Lines, Garden - .129 

Lilium, Auratum . . 90 

M 

Mats, Hot-Bed . . 21 
Millets . ... 64 

Miscellaneous Seeds . 66 

Mocking Bird Food . 127 

Molds, Butter . . .156 

Mowers, Lawn , 126-129 

Muzzles, Ox „ . .151. 
159 



. 121 
101-102 
61, 62 

139- Hi 

• 139 

• 137 

• 139 

• 139 

• 139- 
. 140 

• 139 

140- 141 
" . 148 

20- 



I48-I49 
1 121 
. 121 



25-IOO 

141 
143 
143 
143 



i6o 



j^ARKEi^ 8f Rood's Catalogue, 



N PAGE. 

Nest Eggs ... 24 
.Netting, Wire, Poultry . 129 
Novelties, Flower Seeds 25-32 
Novelties, Vegetable Seeds 3-19 
Nozzles, Hose . .148 

O 

•Ornamental Trees . 110-111 
•Oyster Shells, . .24 

P 

Taris Gi'een and Poison . 121 
Peas, P. & W.'s "Maud' S." 

13-53 

".Plant food . , .124 

Tlant Protectors . ' . 21 
Plant Stands, Wire . 23 

Tlant Stands, Wooden . 120 
Plant Sticks . . .119 
Plants • . . . 92-107 

"Plants) Climbing 25, 95-100, 
106-109 

"Plants, Cranberry . . 18 
Plants, Flowering and Or- 
namental-Leaved . 96-97 
Tlants and Roots, Vege- 
table . ... 18 
Plants, Bedding . . 96-99 
Plants, Herbaceous . 101-102 
Plants, Novelties" . . 92-93 
Planters, Corn . 145-144 
Plows . . . 130-132 
: Plows, Sulky . ■ . . 132 
; Potato, Parker & Wood's 

Victory . • . 15" 

"Potatoes . • . • I S~ I 7 
Tots, Flower ... 22 
Tots, Watering . . 20 
Poultry Supplies . . 24 
Prints, Butter . . -156 
Pruners, Tree . . . 142 
..Pruning Tools . . .142 







Jl Hill M*J ... 


1 46—14.7 


Punches, Bull . . 


J 


K 




Rakes, Garden 


. 141 


Rakes, Lawn . 


. 129 


Reels, Garden ." 


. T29 


Reels, Hose 


. 146 


Repairs . . . : . 


• 125 


Rings, Bull .... 


• I5 1 


Roffea ... 


. , 20 


Rollers, Field . . . 


136 


JL\. Ul Id O j V_J tXX UV^ll 9 


. n6 


~R r» r» t ^ Vm V>2 r V> 

JLVL/VJ LOj XVJ.1 LIL^CLJ. !_/ • 


; . l8 


Roses . • 


IO5-IO7 


Rustic Work 




Xv y c . • • • 




s 

Scales, Farmers' 


' ;,: '157 


Scissors, Florists' . 


• 143 


Scrapers, Tree 


. 140 


Scraps, Beef . 


. . 24 


Seed, Bird 


. 119 


Seeds, Flower . • 


66-88 


Seeds, Flower, Novelties 25-32 


Seeds, Grass 


62-64 


Seeds, Miscellaneous 


62 


Seeds, Vegetable 


" 33-62 


Seeds, Vegetable, Novelties 




3-i9 


Sets, Floral 


. 141 


Shears, Grass . 


• i43 


Shears,- Hedge . • 


• 143 


Shears, Pruning 


• 143 


Shears, Sheep . • . 


■ • 143 


Shrubs, Flower 


108, 109 


Sickle, Grain . 


• 139 


Sifters, Paris Green . 


21, 122 


Slug Shot 


20 


Small Fruits . 


112-116 


Snaps, Bull- Ring 


• 151 


Soap, Tobacco 


. 121 



PAGE. 

Soap, Whale Oil . .121 
Sowers, Seed . . 144-145 
Spades .... 141 
Sprinklers -. . .122 
Sprinklers, Lawn . . 146 
Sprinklers, Rubber . . 20 
Stanchions, Cattle . : . 151 
Stems, Tobacco ', . 121 
Sticks, Goad. . . . 151 
Strawberry Plants. . . 9-1 1 5 
Strawberry Plants, Belmont 9 
Sulky Plows . . . 132 
Summer-Flowering Bulbs 89-91 
Syringes . . . ' . 147 



T 



Testers, Cream 




157 


Thermometers, Churn 




iS7 


Ties, Cattle . • . 




*5 r 


Tigridias . 




91 


Tomato Plants 




18 


Tools, Floral . 




141 


Trees, Fruit ■ , . 


116-118 


Trees, Ornamental * 


IIO- 


-in 


Trellises . 


119- 


-120 


Trowels . 


140- 


-141 


Trucks,- Barrel 




146 


Tubes, Milking 




151 


Tuberoses 




91 


Tying Materials 




20 



V 

Vases, Stone Special Circular 
Vines, Cl'bing 25, 88,95,100,109 



w 



Weeders, Hand 


140-141 


Wheat . 


. 65 


Wheelbarrows 


. 138 


Whipstocks 


• 151 


Wild-Garden Seeds* •■ Flower 32 


Wire Plant-Stands . 


• 23 


Workers, Butter 


• 154 



THINGS TO R6M6MB6R: 

SYou can save money hy combining your Tool and Seed Orders* We 
deal in first-quality goods at lowest prices. 



Bend in your Lawn Mowers for sharpening and repairing EAMLY. 



ii- J. ARAKELYAN, PRINTER, 148 AND 150 PEARL ST., BOSTON. 



SPECIAL NOTICE! +■ 





E HAVE INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOGUE ONLY A FEW OF THE PAGES 



YV USUALLY DEVOTED TO IMPLEMENTS, MACHINES, TOOLS, WOODEN- 
WARE, ETC., AS WE HAVE IN PREPARATION A 



IMPLEMENT AND WOODENWARE CATALOGUE, 



WHICH WILL BE FORWARDED TO ALL WHOLESALE DEALERS UPON PUBLI- 
CATION, AND TO ANY OTHERS WHO MAY APPLY, FREE OF CHARGE. 

PENDING ITS ISSUE, WE CAN FURNISH TO THOSE NOT ALREADY IN 
POSSESSION OF THEM, COPIES OF OUR 1887 COMBINED SEED AND IMPLE- 
MENT CATALOGUE, IN WHICH THE IMPLEMENT PRICES GIVEN WILL BE 
GENERALLY CORRECT FOR THIS SEASON; AND BY THE AID OF SPECIAL 
CIRCULARS AND BY CORRESPONDENCE AS TO PRICES OF SPECIFIC ARTI- 
CLES, OUR 1887 BOOK WILL SERVE AS A SATISFACTORY SUBSTITUTE UNTIL 
THE NEW IMPLEMENT CATALOGUE IS PUBLISHED. 



COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED DESCRIPTIVE 



FAITHFULLY YOURS, 



PARKER & WOOD. 



4 - <|. ARAKELYAN, PRINTER, 148 AND 150 PEARL §T., BOSTON,