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7 




ANTIOCH 




Edition of April 20-26, 2007 



LAKE COUNTY 



Madigan backs tax increase 

At an open forum at the College of Lake 
County, Illinois House Speaker Rep. Michael 
Madigan, D-Chicago, kept coming back to the 
theme that a tax increase will be needed in 
this current budget cycle. 

PAGE 9A 






. ' ' I ■'• ■ ■ : ■ ' ■ 



'.,.[. • :■.■■.:>:! ' ■ : 











No new schools - again 



Breaking news @ 
LakeCountyJournal5.com 



^ETOUTANDGO 



Wia**vi.nt 



Five things to do in and 
around Lake County: 



"Rent" at Genesee 

7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 22 

The broadway hit "Rent" will 
be performed at the Genesee 
Theatre. For info t call (847) 
782-2366 



Antiques & Garden 

Show 

Friday-Sunday, Apr. 20-22 

The 7th annual show will be 
at Chicago Botanic Garden. 
For info, call (847) 835-5440 

Flying 4 Kids 

Saturday, April 21 

Flying 4 Kids will take place 
on Saturday, April 21, at 
Belvidere Park in Waukegan. 
For info, call (847) 360-4726 



Classical music 

Sunday, April 22 

Irina and Natalia Kogan will 
perform at Cuneo Museum & 
Gardens in Vernon Hills. For 
info, call (847) 362-3042 



'A Thousand Cranes' 
April 23-28 

"A Thousand Cranes," by 
Kathryn Schultz Miller, at 
Waukegan's Qowen Park 
Theatre. Info: (847) 360-4726 



WHAT'S INSIDE 



Local Digest 4A 

Election results 9A 

LakeLife IB 

Movies 4B 

Obituaries 13A 

Opinion... 15A 

Sports 9B 

Proudly serving 

Antioch and 

North Central 

Lake County 

Founded in 1886 

Or CfltATIH CMICAOO 





T^BFIJ'OOQZS"" 1 



Volume 121 No. 16 
Newstand price 50 cents 







u ,i. ,., .. , , . , ..'.«. Sandyfoessncr-sbfDSsncr@nwncwsgroijp.com 

Heidi Wennstrom, director of curriculum for Antioch School District 34, checks the election results for the district's building referendum question at Johnny's Chophouse 
In Antioch. Unofficial results show the referendum did not pass. 

Referendum fails by slight margin, other option sought 



'' By TARA CLIFTON 

.... — . tcllftQn@nwnevy5group.com 

ANTIOCH - School.' .District 34 officials and 
members of Citizens for D34 Children were still 
waiting for absentee votes to be counted Tuesday 
night when they finally decided to go home 
around 10:30 p.m. 

As of that time, unofficial election results 
showed that the district's building referendum 
failed for the second year in a row. 

Out of 4,826 ballots counted, 54 percent of vot- 
ers said no to approving $46.95 million to build 
two new schools. 



.- -And 'Uko 'last year, tho. numbers were close,! 

with' 2,615 .voting ho and 2,211 checking the yes 
box. v \ 

These numbers did not include absentee, early 
voting, or provisional ballots. 

The School District 34 crew had spent the 
evening at Johnny's Chophouse, hoping that over- 
population problems would be solved with the ref- 
erendum's passage. 

Now other options will be sought. 

"Everyone is really quiet right now," said Mary 
Gaborek softly, a member of Citizens for D34 
Children. 

Scott Thompson, caught in conversation, was 



■ 

not available to common 



i h \ ■■-'.;: -";■■?» : 

t, Gaborek said. And be 

seemed not in the mood to talk any way.'she said. 

School officials had seen the referendum as 
their last hope to what they saw as a growth cri- 
sis. 

Right now, total district enrollment is 3,072, 
but the schools are designed to hold 2,730. Sixteen 
mobile classrooms are used to handle the over- 
flow of students, but this presents a safety and 
security problem when students need to leave the 
mobile to use the restroom, attend gym and other 
classes, or eat lunch. 

See REFERENDUM, page 3A 



C 



SPORTS 




» PrepSports 

■ 

Big Blue Devil third inning dooms 
Round Lake 

Warren baseball breaks out big 13-0 
victory in North Suburban Conference 
crossover. PAGE 9B ' 

Las Vegas or bust 

Lake County boxer Jose Hernandez 
gears up for a bout that could get him a 
featherweight title shot. PAGE 9B 

» Can'tMiss 

Baseball 

Lakes at Antioch, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, 
April 24 

Girls soccer 

Grayslake North at Grant, 6:15 p.m., 
Tuesday, April 24 

>>SideLines 

In the midst of tragedy, Dan Patrick 
says that sports can give us the best 
escape of all. PAGE 9B 



LAKELIFE 



» OnTheWeb 

■ Check out Dr. Sherri Singer's 
column, Parent Place, this week 
at LakeCountyJournals.com in the 
LakeLife section. 

• Leslie Glazier-Werner's column, 
Les on Life, also appears on the 
Web site in the LakeLife section.- 

» EveryMom 

Columnist Jami Kunzer discusses 
how to deal with chil- 
dren's little pinches, 
prods and punches. 
PAGE7B 



IN MOTION 




m-uliun&lid* 



Miss America 2007 
Lauren Nelson visited 
Gurnee on April 13, to 
preach 
internet 
safety to 
students 
at Wood- 
land 
Middle 
School. To see a video 
about the event, visit 
LakeCountyJournals.com 
and click on the multime- 
dia section located on the 
right side of the screen. 




WEEKEND OUTLOOK 



FRIDAY, APRIL 20 

• % HIGH: 61 



Ww," 



LOW: 40 



SATURDAY, APRIL 21 

/ HIGH: 68 

^~* LOW: 48 

SUNDAY, APRIL 22 

- HIGH: 72 

!~5r** LOW: 52 

Source: CBS2 Chicago 
For updates visit LakeCountyJoumals.com 



WEB POLL 



This week's question 

In light of the Virginia Tech 
shootings April 16, would you 
favor stricter gun control laws? 

A) Yes 

B) No 

Vote at LakeCountyJoumals.com 



Last week's question - What's 
your prognosis for Chicago's 
teams? 

Both miss playoffs (39 percent) 
Sox in, Cubs out (26 percent) 
Cubs in, Sox out (26 percent) 
Both make playoffs (9 percent) 




Call 
(847)356-4666 

or visit us on the, 

web at' 
\vww,victorylakes.org 



at Victory Lakes 



1075 Victory Drive ■"• Lindcnburst, I L. 60046 

f£l&31it VilL%e,n Victory lakr$ h iponurtil fy ilit Fntnriiatn Silitn 
'^)pfCtiit-tp and Irtarip III lijtfimify e/fnnrhtan CemmMilin. 




Page 2A • April 20, 2007 AN 



COMMUNITY 



Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 



»AboutUs 



ANTIOCH 

IOURNAL 

Serving Lhi? 
Antioch area .since 188ft 

Volume 121 No. 16 (USPS 027-080) 

The ANTIOCH JOURNAL is 

published weekly on Friday. It Is a 

member of the Northwest News 

Group. Periodical mall postage paid at 

Grayslakc, IL 60030 

Antioch Journal 

34121 N. Route 45, Suite 224 

Grayslakc, IL G0030 

POSTMASTER: 

Send address changes to Antioch 

Journal, 34121 N. Route 45, Suite 224, 

Grayslakc, IL 60030 

All rights reserved. Copyright 2007. 

MAIN OFFICE 
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Look lor us on the Internet at 
LakeCounlyJournals.com 

EDITORIAL 

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Phone: 847-223-8161 

E-mail: wjnews@nwnewsgroup.com 

Fax: 847-223-8810 

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$9.88 in Lake County; 
$1735 elsewhere. 



» QuoteOtTheWeek 

"I think it's going to be come down to going door to door and explaining how impor- 
tant it is. People forget this Is a volunteer organization." 
—Antioch Fire Department U. Chris Llenherdt on the department's failed ref- 
erendum (see story on 3A) 



» NewsYouNeed 



This week's top local stories: 

• Antioch resident educates others on his passion, cosmology. 3A 

• Antioch Fire Department looks to cut educational programs after referendum fails. 3A 

• The results are in for the Antioch Village Board election. 4A 



» Editor'sChoice b v Larr v Lou 9 h 



Want more info? Try the online edition 



Face it. The print edition has it's limits. 

And one of those is space. 

We cannot print everything we would like for you 
to have. 

13 tit our online edition has no such limits. 

So even if our ink-on-paper product cannot 
accommodate all the info, our electronic version can. 

One example is letters to the editor. 

Our weekly Opinion page in the print edition has 
room most weeks for only two or three letters. 



But at LakeCountyJournals.com, we post many 
mom Just check the Opinion section on our home 
page. 

In the online version of LakeLife, you also will 
find a couple of columnists you cannot get in print. 
Psychologist Sherry Singer writes about parenting, 
and Leslie Werner-Glazier offers observations on life 
in her Les on Life feature. Both had previously 
appeared in print, but now are offered exclusively 
online. 



You might find other nice surprises there, too. 

Like weather, 24/7: Radar, forecast ... the works! 

Take a look. 

As always, we want to know what you think. 
Write to lloueh@nwnewsgroup.com. 

Thanks for reading the Journal - in print and 
online. • 

• Larry Lough is editor and general manager of 
Lake County Journals. 



All smiles 





or o»t«TtirciiitnT5o 



John Rung • Group Publisher 
Chris Knig - Group Editor 



J 



LAKLCOUIV1V 



OURNALS 



Larry lough • 
General Manager and Editor 

"Serving our communities 

to make them better 
places to live." >■' 




Sandy Bressner - sbfessrer<2n wiewsgroijp.com 

U.S. Rep. Melissa Bean, D-Barrington, and Miss America 2007 Lauren Nelson share a laugh with Tom lannitti, director of gov- 
ernment relations for i-SAFE, during a visit to Woodland Middle School in Gurnee. The three were there to talk to students 
about Internet safety. 



» CorrectionsAnd 
Clarifications 

•A story in the April 6-12 edition Lake 
County section headlined "Residents ban 
together" included an incorrect quote 
from Waukegan resident Maggie Powell. 
The story quoted her as saying, "I've 
always believed I'd rather be an active par- 
ticipant than an active spectator." It 
should have read, "...an active participant 
than a passive spectator." 

We regret the error. 

•Information that ran with photos for 
the story headlined "To Iraq, with love," 
on page IB of the April 13-19 edition of 
the Lake County Journals incorrectly 
stated that the radio station WRLR is in 
Round Lake. It is actually in Round Lake 
Heights. Two photo outlines also mls- 
i spelled Baghdad, and another outline 
identified a CD mix of music as a CD of 
the radio show. 

We regret the errors. 

•In the April 13-19 edition of the Lake 
County Journals, an item in the "Get Out 
and Go" section on Page 1A promoting the 
"Chicago Treasures" program at the 
Chicago History Museum incorrectly stat- 
ed the day of event. It should have read , 
Wednesday, April 18. 

We regret the error. 

• * ■ 

Accuracy is important to us at the 
Lake County Journals, and we strive to 
correct mistakes promptly. If you believe 
a factual error has been published, please 
bring it to our attention. 

Call Larry Lough at (847) 223-8161 or 
e-mail him at llough@nwnewsgroup.com. 



! . 





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COMMUNITY 



AN April 20, 2007' Page 3A 






Theories that could fill the universe 



Man to present cosmological theories at conference 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tctif ton@n wn ewsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - Charles J. Sven guesses that his 
interest in cosmology blossomed during his 
mother's illness. 

For years Sven, an Ant loch resident, cared for 
her before she died. Because of her sickness, she 
slept often, and Sven had to entertain himself. 

So he sat at the computer, reading .about vari- 
ous scientific theories, and bis interest sparked, 
which built into a fire that has lasted for the past 
10 years. 

He has done so much research, in fact, that he 
self-published a book in 1999, "The 21st Century's 
All New Cosmology: As Galileo changed our 
understanding of the Solar System, this book 
changes the understanding of our universe." 

He also will present two papers at the Natural 
Philosophy Alliance's 2007 Annual Conference 
on the Foundations of Natural Philosophy. 

Highly-respected scientists and independent 
researchers from across the world will gather 
from May 21 to 25 at the University of 
Connecticut in Storrs, Conn., to share their 
knowledge. 

Sven will use a PowerPoint presentation to 




explain his two papers, "Big Bang Fuel 
Discovered and Demonstrated," and "CMB 
Anomaly Pinpoints Big Bang Epicenter." 

Members of the Natural 
Philosophy Alliance who are 
organizing the event could not 
immediately be reached for 
comment. 

Sven's eyes shine and he 
smiles widely when describing 
his ideas. 

And when explaining them, 
he does it in a way that shows 
he genuinely wants the other 
person to understand it also. 

This might have to do with 
his love of teaching. Sven 
obtained a certificate for substitute teaching in 
1990, and for the past five years has taught in 
Round Lake School District 116. 

When he's not teaching, he's studying the cos- 
mos. 

Sven simply pieces together research from 
other scientists, and draws his own conclusions, 
he said. 

"I'm looking at all the elements scientists are 
finding," he said. "But they're not connecting 



Charles 1. Sven 
Author and 
theorist on 
cosmology 



the dots." 

Sven said ho believes that sometimes an out- 
side perspective can be helpful, because scien- 
tists can be too close to what they study. 

By linking this research, Sven said ho has dis- 
covered what fueled the Big Bang, and located 
the center of the Big Bang explosion. 

Sven showed the results of a joint Japan and 
U.S. study that discovered that the age of pro- 
tons is incalculable, and that the proton cannot 
be broken down. 

This reveals, Sven said, that the proton is a 
massive energy source. 

Combining this with the power of photos, 
light particles, the speed of light, and parts of 
an Einstein theory, Sven says these factors could 
have set off the Big Bang, which many scientists 
believe was the creation of our universe.^ 

This is just one of the many thoughtsbounc- 
ing around inside Sven's head, and he's con- 
stantly creating more. 

Sven said that people need to cultivate the cre- 
ativity and curiosity that he believes all are born 
with. 

Many people just don't know how to express 
these inherent desires. 

"I know I got something in me," he said. "I 
don't know how to get it out." 

Sven, however, figured how to feed his pas- 
sion for learning years ago. 



Referendum failure saddens 
Antioch Fire Department 

Department to cut public education programs 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton@nwnewsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - The first 
thing to go will be the pub- 
lic education programs, 
said Antioch Fire 
Department Lt. Chris 
Lienhardt. 

That's what the depart- 
ment will have to do to 
keep its crews running 
after a proposed referen- 
dum failed Tuesday night. 

As of 10 p.m. on election 
night, with 16 out of 16 
precincts reporting, 56 per- 
cent voted against proper- 
ty tax increases, according 
to unofficial results. These 
results did not include 



absentee, early voting or 
provisional ballots. 

The money would have 
increased the tax rate from 
19 to 30 cents per $100,000 of 
equalized assessed value, 
affecting only Antioch 
Township residents. 

Lienhardt said that the 
funds would have been 
used to make the down- 
town fire station open 24 
hours a day, hire person- 
nel, and supplement the 
current budget. 

"It's not a jovial group 
down at the fire station," 
said Lienhardt that night. 
He is public relations offi- 
cer for the fire department. 

"We busted our humps 



going door to door this past 
weekend. We did every- 
thing you're supposed to 
do," Lienhardt said. 

Life for the volunteer 
firefighters will be more 
difficult, he said. Already 
equipment is used until it's 
lifeless, and grants are 
filed endlessly with no 
results. 

Lienhardt said the fire 
department will ask for the 
tax boost during the next 
election. 

"I think it's going to 
come down to going door to 
door and explaining how 
important it is," he said. 
"People forget this is a vol- 
unteer organization." 



D-34 structure to change 



» OurTown 




• REFERENDUM 

Continued from 1A 

Brent Bluthardt, head of 
the Exploding Growth Task 
Force, has said in past inter- 
views that drastic measures 
would have to be taken if the 
voters said no. 

Formed in the fall of 2006, 
the 30-member task force was 
assigned to create plans to han- 
dle the estimated influx of stu- 
dents in case the referendum 
did not pass. 

The task force used current 
school configurations and pop- 
ulation numbers, as well as 
student increase expectations. 
Based on the group's projec- 
tions, the school district can" 
anticipate growth of an addi- 
tional 700 to 900 students by the 
year 2011. 

For the 2007-08 school year, 
the students can be absorbed 
into the current structure, 
Bluthardt said. But after that 



is when things get tricky. 

Without the new buildings, 
class sizes would be increased. 
Also, rooms for music, science, 
math, band, strings and art 
labs would be eliminated. 
Instead, they would be taught 
via teachers who carted the 
materials among the class- 
rooms. 

With more students to pick 
up, bus routes would lengthen 
and travel times would jump. 

And if push comes to shove, 
teacher jobs would be eliminat- 
ed, music, sports and art would 
be offered only as after-school 
activities, physical education 
would no longer be offered, 
and students would eat lunch 
in their classrooms. 

If the building referendum 
had been approved, it would 
have led the way to build an 
elementary and middle school, 
improve current buildings, 
and create new configuration 
for all the district schools. 



Community 
remembers 
long-time 
resident 

The community mourned last 
week the death of Terry A. Folbrick, 
63, who died in his home. 

Folbrick was a former director 
of the Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce, served on the planning 
commission, was an area chairman 
for Ducks Unlimited. . . and the list 
could go on and on. 

Folbrick was born on Jan. 1, 
1944, in Burlington, Wis. He lived 
in Antioch his whole life, involving 
himself not only in community 
service, but also in hunting, fish- 
ing, woodworking and gardening. 

Funeral services took place on 
April 17, three days after he died, 
at Strang Funeral Home. 

The family has set up a fund In 
his name for Ducks Unlimited. 



Kari Hintz must have dancing in 
her blood. The daughter of Jim 
and Karol Hintz of Antioch, Kari 
is a four-year member of the 
University of Iowa Dance Team. 
While she attended Antioch High 
School, she performed with the 
Antioch Sequoit Dance Team. 

Kari will graduate from Iowa in 
May 2007 with a degree in dance 
education. Keep up the good work! 



• If you have interesting information or 

anecdotes to submit for "Our Town," e-mail 

reporter Tara Clifton at tclifton@ 

nwnewsgroup.com. 




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Page 4A- April 20, 2007 AN 



aOMMUNIH. 



Uke County Journals/ LakeCountyJoumals.corri 



The clock is ticking 

Officials plan projects to use tax district money 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton(5'nwnewsgroup,com 

ANTIOCH - Starting this 
November, the village will 
rely just a bit more on its 
Business District Fund. 

The village's tax incre- 
ment financing district, 
which covers most of the 
downtown area, will expire 
on Nov, 17, said Community 
Services Director Claude 
LcMere. The district was cre- 
ated 23 years ago. 

The money has been used 
Tor numerous projects, 
LeMerc said, from buying 
property to improving store- 
fronts. 

A tax increment financing 
district is typically used to 
revitalize a sluggish down- 
town or spruce up run-down 
areas, according to the 



Illinois Tax Increment 
Association Web site. 

The district works to allow 
local governments to freeze 
property taxes for a certain 
amount of time, usually 23 
years, to generate funds to 
restore run-down areas. The 
difference in taxes from the 
years before and after the dis- 
trict go to the district fund to 
pay for developments. The 
funds increase as time goes 
on. 

And now Antioch's time is 
up LeMerc said that any tax 
district money not used or 
allocated for projects will go 
to the state after Nov. 17. 

LeMere said that officials 
want to get as much use out 
of the money as possible, so 
they are planning several 
projects before time runs out. 

Some projects include 



repaying parking lots and fix- 
ing sidewalks within the dis- 
trict. After this, officials will 
still have $180,534 in the fund. 

LeMere said lie and his 
colleagues are working on 
ways to spend that money. 

When the tax district is 
gone the village will continue 
to use the Business District 
Fund, which also was used 
for the downtown, LeMere 
said. 

Introduced by Trustee 
Barbara Porch In 2004, the 
business fund works by tak- 
ing 25 percent of the addi- 
tional sales tax revenue 
earned during the previous 
year. 

The fund has been used to 
renovate downtown business- 
es such as adding access 
ramps for the disabled, and 
also to beautify Lake Street. 




»LocalDigest 

Wetlands cleanup 

The village and Friends of the 
Wetlands wilt host a spring 
cleanup day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
on Saturday, May 5, in the 
William E. Brook Memorial 
Wetlands, near the bandshell on 
Skidrnore Drive. 

Bring work gloves and boots, 
long pants, and dress appropri- 
ately for the weather. A hot lunch 
and snacks will be provided. 

Call Donna Bevan at (847) 395- 
6342 if you are interested. 

Mano-a-Mano Gala 

Mano-a-Mano will host 
Carnivale Caliente, a benefit gala 
at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 28 at 
the Round Lake Beach Cultural 
and Civic Center. 

The evening will start with 
cocktails and entertainment and 
will include a Latin American 
dance demonstration. 

Tickets are $100 a person. 
Tables are available for groups of 
eight for $750. Dinner will be pro- 
vided by Pear Tree Catering. 

For more information, or to buy 
tickets, contact Mano a Mano at 



(847)201-1521. 

Mano a Mano Family Resource 
Center Foundation Inc. is a non- 
profit organization and your con- 
tribution is tax deductible. 

Poppy campaign 
Antioch Veterans of Foreign 
Wars members and the Women's 
Auxiliary will distribute "Buddy 
Popples" around town on May 4 
and 5. The poppies were hand 
made by disabled, hospitalized, 
and aging veterans. As the VFW's 
official memorial flower, the 
poppy represents the blood shed 
by American service members. 
All proceeds from distribution are 
used for veterans' welfare. 

Senior soiree* 
What's important about county 
government? Lake County Board 
Chairwoman Suzi Schmidt will 
break it down for senior citizens 
at a free lunch at In Laws 
Restaurant, on Milwaukee 

Avenue and Route 132, in Gurnee. 
Tne event starts at 11:30 a.m., on 
May 14. Attendees must reserve 
their place by May 8. They can 




Family Owned 



• Burial Serjices v 

* Cremation Sewiccs 

• Memorial Services 

* Pre-Planning 

847-356-2146 

Lake Villa, It 



do so with Roberta Pfeiffer at 
(847) 680-0331. Pfeiffer 
belongs to Breakfast Exchange 
Club of Gurnee, a local branch 
of the national service organi- 
zation and the event's organiz- 
er. 

Summer help 

The Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department is tak- 
ing applications for summer 
staff positions, which include 
lifeguards, cashiers, and Day 
Camp Counselors. 

Applications and job descrip- 
tions can be picked up at the 
parks office on 806 Holbek 
Drive. 

Brush pick up 
The Village of Antioch will 
provide brush pick up on the 
second Monday of each 
month through October. Brush 
must be at the curb by 7 a.m., 
and the brush must be 
stacked with the butt end fac- 
ing the road. Branches should 

be no larger than 4 Inches In 

diameter. This pick up Is for 
village residents only. 
For more information, call 
the public works department 
at (847) 395-1881. 

Cub Scout rummage sale 
Antioch Cub Scout Pack 191 
will have a rummage safe at 
the Antioch Senior Center 
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Saturday, April 28, to raise 
money for their summer 
camp. 




Sandy Grossner • ibrcssner n r wnws grc up c om 

Antioch trustee candidates Michael Wolczyz, Larry Hanson and Dennis Crosby celebrate their respective 
wins on the Antioch Village Board during an Election Night party at Something Sweet in Antioch. 

Independent candidates win 
three Antioch trustee seats 

By TARA CLIFTON 

tcli!ton@nwncwsgroup.carn 

ANTIOCH - The three peo- 
ple who were elected to serve 
on the Antioch Village Board 
Tuesday night could not be 
reached for comment. 

They might have been cele- 
brating their victory. 

Independents Larry 

Hanson, Dennis Crosby, and 
Michael Wolczyz won over 
independent Kathy 

Nordmeyer, and members of 
the Continue Antioch's 
Progress party, according to 
unofficial results on Election 
Night. Barbara Porch, Mary 
Turner, and Ned Aylward were 
members of that party. 

Hanson, Crosby and 
Wolczyz won roughly 55 per- 
cent of the 8,036 votes cast. 
These Tuesday night numbers 
did not include absentee, early 
voting, or provisional ballots. 

The race to be trustee 
ranged from healthy competi- 
tion to heated battling. Village 
Board meetings sometimes 
ran for hours, .with debate on 
tissues getting .off . track to" 
focus on "personal or political 
conflicts. 

These arguments often 
squared Trustees Larry 
Hanson and Robert Caulileld 
against the rest of the board. 
The two past interviews that 
they have felt alienated from 
the rest of the trustees. 

About a month ago, the 
trustee race became heated. 

Trustee Larry Hanson 
accused Trustee Scott Pierce of 
identity theft, and filed March 
9 a criminal complaint with 



Sandy Brenner • sbrcssner@nwrtewsgroup.cord 

Antioch trustee candidate Dennis Crosby high-fives 10-year-old Abbyj 
Michel, of Antioch, during an Election Night party at Something Sweetj 
in Antioch. Crosby won his seat on the Antioch Village Board, along 1 
with candidates Michael Wolczyz and Larry Hanson. 



the state's attorney's office, 
Hanson became upset when 

he learned that Pierce had 

bought his expired Internet 

address, www.Imhanson.com. 

He took it as a personal attack. 
But Pierce said he simply 

saw an unused domain and 

grabbed it 

The i criminal complaint 

was thrown out because Pierce 
did not commit a crime, the 
state's attorneys office said. 

After that incident, ten- 
sions cooled but remained, 
which was evident during a 
Village Board meeting where 
merchants begged trustees to 
not remove money from the 
Antioch Business District 
Fund. Arguments about this 
issue lasted nearly an hour. 

But now that it's all over, 
life will go on, said Mary 
Turner. 

"It's fine," she said. "The vot- 



ers spoke and that's OK." 

Turner was elected a 
trustee four years ago, and 
most recently chaired the plan-' 
ning and zoning committee, j 
She felt better Tuesday 
night when she put.her situa- 
tion into a wider perspective, 
she said. 

"What happened Inl 

Virginia, that was a travesty,"j 
Turner said. "What happened! 
here, this is a pebble in thej 
sand." Turner was referring toj 
the recent shootings ac 
Virginia Tech, which resulted! 
in the death of 33 people; 
including the shooter. 

And besides, Turner isj 
happy with her work over the} 
past four years, 

"I'm proud of the job I did as 
a trustee," Turner said. "I 
know the new board will be; 
great. They will do what theyj 
think is best for Antioch." 




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Antioch Library Friends 
Spring Cleaning 

April 28, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 
Sunday, April 29, 1 to 5 p.m. The 
Antioch Library Friends needs 
old books for its used book 
shop. For two days they will • 
offer curb-side service at the * 
library for you to drop off your 
old books. Pull up to our "book 
valets" in front of the library and! 
drop off your donations. Please j 
call Amy at (847) 395-0874, ext. 
227 for more details. 
Unfortunately, we cannot 
accept magazines or encyclope- 
dia sets. 

Book Groups 

Please call 847-395-0874 ext. \ 
230 to register. 

Novel Pleasures 
Tuesdays at 10 a.m. April 24, j 
"My Sisters Keeper," by Jodi 
Picoult. 

Now Showing 

Call (847) 395-0874 ext. 230 
to register and for title informa- 
tion. 

Anime Afternoon Movie 

April 20, 3:15 -4:45 p.m. The 
library provide the popcorn. You 
can bring closed drinks and 
other snacks. 

Teen Movie Night 

April 23, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The 
library provide the popcorn, you 
can bring a closed drink and 
other snacks. 



I 



Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 



IMflTO. 




AM April 20, 2007 • Page 5A 








Identity 




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Pago 6A • April 20, 2007 AN/LV 



ARQIJND TOWN 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



ANTIOCH 

• Antioch Public Library 
District Board meeting. 7 p.m., 
last Tuesdays. 757 N. Main St. Call 
(847) 395-0874 to confirm. 

• Bingo. 12:45 p.m., Mondays. 
The Senior Center. Call (847) 395- 
0139 for details. 

• Bingo. 6:45 p.m., Tuesdays. 
Antioch VFW. Doors open at 4:30 
p.m. Call (847) 395-5393 for more 
information. 

• Pinochle. 12:30 p.m., 
Thursdays and Fridays. The Senior 
Center. Call (847) 395-0139 for 
details. 

• CPR classes. 6 p.m., second 
and fourth Wednesdays. Squad 
Building, 835 Holbek Dr„ sponsored 
by 'Antioch Rescue Squad. $5 fee. 
Call (847) 395-5511 to learn more. 

• Take Off Pounds Sensibly 
meeting. 6 p.m., Wednesdays, 
weigh-in, 7 p.m. meeting. The 
Senior Center, 817 Holbek Dr. Call 
Dorothy at (847) 395-7407 or Betty 
at (847) 838-3907 for more infor- 
mation. 

• Kiwanis Club of Antioch 
meeting. Noon, Tuesdays. 
Petrucci's Italian Market & Cafe, 311 
Depot St. The public is welcome to 
join and share experience, knowl- 
edge and service project ideas. 
Contact Melissa at (847) 489- 
8044, e-mail at 

mjrigont@hotmail.com, or Larry 
Mondie at (847) 650-9530, e-mail 
at brscoops@aol.com for more 
information. 

• AARP Chapter 387 (for 
adults 55+) meeting. 1 p.m., sec- 
ond and fourth Tuesdays, The 
Senior Center, 817 Holbek Dr. Call 
Sharon Nowak at (847) 395-5068 
to learn more. 

• Lakes Region Historical 
Society meeting. 7:30 p.m., 
fourth Thursdays. Meeting House, 
977 Main St. Call Wendy Mastom at 
(847) 354-0321 or Earl Beese at 
(847) 395-1685 for additional 
details. 

• Northern Illinois 
Conservation Club General 
meeting. 7 p.m., Monday, April 23. 
Clubhouse, one-half mile south of 
Rt. 173 on east side of Rt. 83. For 
more information, call (847) 395- 
NICC or visit www.lake- 
online.com/nicc. 

• Irish-American Club meet- 
ing. 7:30 p.m.,- fourth Thursdays. 
State Bank of the Lakes. Call (847) 
395-3942 for details. 

■ * takes fttca Community Band 
reh0arSalrr-&'p.m;, Mondays: 



Antioch Community High School 
band room, Area musicians high 
school age and older are welcome 
to join. No auditions. Call Debbie 
Davis at (847) 395-0272 to learn 
more. 

• Open gym. 7-9 p.m., Sundays. 
Antioch Community High School. 
$2, Adults only. 

BARR1NGT0N 

• International Adoption 
informational meeting. 7-9 p.m., 
fourth Mondays. Good Shepherd 
Hospital. 450 West Rt. 22. Hosted 
by The Cradle. For more informa- 
tion, call (847) 475-5800. 

CRYSTAL LAKE 

• Crystal Lake Toastmasters 
Club meeting. 8-10 a.m., first and 
third Saturdays at Amcore Bank 
Building, Rt. 14 and Pingree Rd. 
Develop your presentation and 
leadership skills. For information, 
call Steve at (847) 526-1525 or visit 
http://user.mc.net/-toastl. 

FOX LAKE 

• SWALCO Household 
Chemical Waste Collection. 8 

a.m.-2;30 p.m., Fox Lake Streets 
Department, 216 Washington St. 
For more information, including 
accepted materials, call (847) 336- 
9340 or visit www.swalco.org. 
f Friends of the Library Book 
Sale. Friday, April 27, 9:30 a.m.-8 
p.m.; Saturday, April 28, 9:30 a.m.-4 
p.m.; Sunday, April 29, 1-4 p.m.-"$2 
a Bag Day." Fox Lake District 
Library, 255 E. Grand Ave. For more 
information, call (847) 587-0198. 

• "A Night in Paradise with 
Jimmy Buffet Music" fundrais- 
er. 7-11 p.m., Saturday, April 28, 
American Legion Hall, 213 Riverside 
Island Dr. Tickets are $25 per per- 
son, benefitting the Robert D. 
Sayles/Fox Lake Grade School 
Education Foundation. Silent and 
live auctions, 50/50 raffle, cash bar. 
For more information or tickets, call 
Marilyn Filiatreault at (847) 587- 
0749. 

• Artworks Children's 
Museum ArtNight Gala 
Fundraiser. 5:30-9:30 p.m., 
Saturday, April 28. Maravela's, 

4 S. Washington St. Tickets are 
$55 per person, $400 for a table of 
8. Silent and live auctions, artist 
demonstrations, performances and 
art displays. For tickets or informa- 
tion, call Linda at (847) 208-2237. 

• "Jewels of Schmoogieland " 
3 and 6 p.m.~ Saturday, April 28. 



Evangelical Lutheran Church of All 
Saints, 5800 E. State Park Rd. 
Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for 
seniors and youth; children under 3 
are free. For more information, call 
(847) 322-1812. 

• American Legion Post 703 
meeting. 7:45 p.m., fourth 
Wednesdays. Legion Hall, N. Rt. 12. 
Call (847) 587-2179 for information. 

GRAYSLAKE 

• Council of Catholic Nurses 
of Lake County meeting. 

Saturday, April 21. Mass at 10 a.m. 
at St. Patrick Church In Wadsworth; 
luncheon after at 11:30 a.m., 
Country Squire Restaurant, 19133 
Rt. 120 in Grayslake. Cost is $25 for 
members, $30 for nonmembers. For 
reservations or information, call 
Gloria at (847) 336-3295 or Mary at 
(847) 623-9125. 

• Choral concert. 4 p.m., 
Sunday, April 22. College of Lake 
County, James Lumber Center for 
the Performing Arts, Malnstage 
Theatre, 19351 W. Washington St. 
Tickets are $5 for the general public 
and $4 for CLC students, alumni 
and seniors, and are available at the 
CLC Box Office, by phone at (847) 
543-2300 or online at www.clcilli- 
nois.edu/tickets. 

• 26th Annual Student Art 
Exhibition opening. 7-9 p.m., 
Friday, April 27. Robert T. Wright" 
Community Gallery of Art, College 
of Lake County, 19351 W. ' 
Washington St. For more informa- 
tion, call Steve Jones at (847) 543- 
2240 or visit http://gallery.c1cilli- 
nois.edu 

• Run/Walk fundraiser. 10 a.m., 
Saturday, April 28. College of Lake 
County, 19351 W. Washington St. To 
raise funds to finish the CLC Fitness 
Trail. The Run/Walk will begin at the 
Service Drive on the west side of 
Lot 7A over a two-mile course. For 
more information, or to donate, call 
(847)543-2091. 

• 30th Annual Guest Artist 
Concert. 4 p.m., Sunday, April 29. 
College of Lake County, James 
Lumber Center for the Performing 
Arts, Mainstage Theatre, 19351 W. 
Washington St. Steve Cohen plays 
with the CLC Wind Ensemble, and 
Conrad Herwig plays with the CLC . 
Monday Night Jazz Ensemble. 
Tickets are $6 for the general public 
and $5 for CLC students, alumni 
and seniors, and are available at the 
CLC Box Office, by phone at (847) 
5A3-23O0 or online at wwwxlcHH- 
nols.edu/tlckets. - " ' - ' 



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• Robin Huw Bovven Early 
Music concert. 4 p.m., Sunday, 
April 29. Byron Colby Barn, 1561 
Jones Point Rd. Admission is $15, 
with children under 16 free. To 
order tickets or for more Informa- 
tion, call (847) 543-1202. 

GURNEE 

• Lake County Mother of 
Twins and More Club meeting. 

6:30 p.m., fourth Tuesdays. Joy 
Lutheran Church, 749 S. Hunt Club 
Rd. Call (866) 248-7670, ext. 1264, 
before attending. 

• Singles (ages 55+) Breakfast 
Group meeting. 8:30 a.m., 
Saturdays. In-Laws Restaurant, 720 
Milwaukee Ave. Call Chuck at (847) 
362-5458 for details. 

• Lake County Philatelic 
Society meeting. 7 p.m., fourth 
Tuesdays. Warren-Newport Public 
Library, 224 N. O'Plalne Rd. Area 
stamp collectors are invited. For 
more information, call (847) 244- 
4048. 

HAINESVILLE 

• Hainesville Village Board 
meeting. 7 p.m., second and 

fourth Tuesdays. 100 N. Hainesville 
Rd. For more information, call (847) 
223-2032. 

■ Emergency Management 
Agency meeting. 7 p.m., second 
and fourth Wednesdays. 100 N. 
Hainesville Rd. For more informa- 
tion, call (847) 223-2032. 

INGLESIDE 

• Fox Lake/Round Lake Area 
Rotary meeting. Noon, Fridays at 
Za Za's, 69 Washington. 

• Grant Hall Museum. 1-4 p.m., 
Sundays. Fox Lake-Grant Township 
Area Historical Society, 411 
Washington St. Admission free, 
donations accepted. For informa- 
tion, call (847) 587-0544 or mail 
P.O. Box 224, lngleside,IL 60041. 

• Grant Township Republican 
Club meeting. 7:30 p.m., fourth 
Tuesdays, Township Building, 26725 
W. Molidor Rd. Call (847) 740-2233 
for more information. 

• Lake County Astronomical 
Society meeting. 8:30-10 p.m., 
third Fridays. Volo Bog State Natural 
Area. Meeting followed by a 9:30 
p.m. viewing period. For informa- 
tion, call (815) 344-1294 or visit 
www.lcas-astronomy.org. 

LAKE BLUFF 

• Lake Forest Symphony Guild 
"Mad Hatter" benefit. Thursday, 
April 26, Cocktails, 11 a.m.; Fashion 
Show, noon. Tickets are $60 per 
person, available by calling Jan 
Ward at (847) 951-5446. For more 
information, call (847) 295-2135 or 
visitwww.lakeforestsymphony.org. 

LAKE FOREST 

• Shoreline Dance Club dance. 

7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 21. Gorton 
Community Center, Stuart 
Community Room, 400 E. Illinois 
Rd, Bob and Penny Urbon will teach 
the Fox Trot. Admission is $20 for 
members and $25 for nonmembers. 
For more information, call (847) 
816-7602, (847) 835-1674 or (847) 
295-1417. 

LAKE VILLA 

• Prince of Peace Rummage 
Sale. June 14-15. Prince of Peace 
Parish, 135 S. Milwaukee Ave. Will 
accept any working vehicles, elec- 
tronics, computers, appliances and 
furniture. For donation pick-up, call 
(847) 356-6111, ext. 509. For more 
information, call Kevin Hanrahan at 
(847)612-1818. 

• Friends of the Lake Villa 
District Library AV Only Sale. 1-4 
p.m., Sunday, April 22. Lake Villa 
District Library, Meeting Room A/B, 
1001 E. Grand Ave. Sale limited to 
audio, video and music items. For 
more information, call (847) 356- 
7711. 

• Northern Lake County 
Quilters' Guild Quilt Show. 10 
a.m. -4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 
April 28-29. Lakes Community High 
School, corner of Grass Lake Rd., 
east of Deep Lake Rd. Admission 
$4. For more information, call 
Madelyn Anderson at (847) 651- 
8349 or visit www.nlcqg.org 



• Weigh to Win meeting. 7-8 

p.m., Tuesdays. Calvary Christian 
Center, Monaville Rd. Call (847) 
356-6181 to learn more. 

• Lake Villa Take Off Pounds 
Sensibly meeting. 5:30 p.m., 
Wednesdays. Church of the Holy 
Family, 25291 W.Lehman. Call 
Cathy at (847) 587-7710 or Debbie 
at (847) 687-5531 for details. 

• MOMS Club of Lake 
Villa/Lindenhurst meeting. 9:30 
a.m., Mondays. Lake Villa District 
Library, 1001 Grand Ave. Children 
welcome. For more information, call 
Erin Bearss at (847) 546-1545. 

LIBERTYVILLE 

• "A Way Out" meeting. 7 p.m., 
Fridays. St, Lawrence Episcopal 
Church, 125 W. Church St. An 
Alcoholics Anonymous group for 
gays, lesbians and straights. Call or 
e-mail Linda West at (847) 735- 
1230 or Lcwestl@yahoo.com for 
details. 

• Widowed Outreach Network 
of Lake County meeting. 1:45- 
3:30 p.m., fourth Sundays. Condell's 
Allen Conference Center, 700 
Garfield. For more information, call 
(847) 990-5275 or (847) 367-0087. 

• National Alliance for the 
Mentally III support group 
meeting. 7 p.m., fourth Tuesdays. 
St. Lawrence Episcopal Church, 125 
W. Church St. Call Michele Birkey at 
(847) 367-1020 for details. 

• Bicycle Club of Lake County 
meeting. 7 p.m., fourth Tuesdays. 
Libertyville Civic Center, 135 W. 
Church St. Beginners and experts 
welcome. For more information, call 
(847) 604-0520 or visit www.bike- 
bclc.com. 

• Singles' Bike Ride. 9 a.m., 
fourth Saturdays. Old School Forest 
Preserve, St. Mary's Rd, Lunch after 
at Mickey Finn's. Sponsored by the 
Bicycle Club of Lake County. Visit 
www.bikebclc.com for more infor- 
mation. 

LINCOLNSHIRE 

• GLCC Seminar, "Emergency 
Preparedness-Are You Ready?" 

9:30 a.m.-noon, Wednesday, April 
25. Regal Cinemas, 200 Parkway Dr. 
Business professionals can learn 
the essentials in planning for emer- 
gencies. Fee is $25 for chamber 
members, and $50 for nonmem- 
bers. To register or for more infor- 
mation, call (847) 793-2409 or e- 
mail tgIcc@aol.com. 

' LINDENHURST^- - 

• Lindenhurst Village Board 
meeting. 7 p.m., second and 
fourth Mondays. Village Hall 
Boardroom. Call (847) 356-8252 for 
more information. 

• Free blood pressure screen- 
ing. 8 a.m.-noon, Mondays. The 
Village at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center. Call (847) 356-5900 to 
learn more. 

• Medical Lunch and Leam. 
Noon, fourth Wednesdays. The 
Independent Living Village Center 
at The Village of Victory Lakes. Call 
(847) 356-4600 to learn this 
month's topic and to reserve your 
seat. 

McHENRY 

• Tourette Syndrome Assn. of 
Illinois support group meeting. 

7-8:30 p.m., third Fridays. Elm 
Street Place Office Complex, lower 
level meeting room, 5400 W. Elm 
St. For additional information, call 
(815) 675-0436. 

• Fibromyalgia support group 
meeting. 7 p.m., fourth Tuesdays. 
Northern Illinois Medical Center 
(Centegra). For more information, 
call Lois at (815) 653-7171. 

MILLBURN 

• Lake County Doll Collectors 
meeting. 1 p.m., third Saturdays. 
Millburn Congregational Church, Rt. 
45 and Grass Lake Rd. Call (847) 
623-2072 for details, 

• Millburn Chapter 570, Order 
of the Eastern Star meeting. 
7:30 p.m., second and fourth 
Tuesdays. Millburn Masonic Lodge, 
Rt. 45 near Grass Lake Road. For 
more information, call Chapter 
Secretary Clarissa Mellen at (847) 
244-3698. 



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Myths and Facts about Hospice Care 
Myth #3 of 12; Hospice is- only For cancer patients. 
Fact: Hospice services are not just for cancer patients. 
Also included are care to patients suffering 
from congestive heart failure, dementia, chronic 
lung disease and other life-limiting conditions, 
all of which are served by the Monarch Hospice 
team of healthcare professionals. 



For more Information or to volunteer, please call 24 hours a day 7 days a week: 

847-885-1818 or 866-455-1818 

www.monarchhosplce.com 



MUNDELBN 

• Heads Up brain injury sup- 
port group meeting. 7 p.m., 
fourth Tuesdays. Lake County 
Center for Independent Living, 377 
N. Seymour Ave. For information, e- 
mall Oiana Nelson at 
asladvo@lccil.org, or call the Center 
at (847) 949-4440 (voice) or (847) 
949-0641 (TTY). 

• National Alliance for the 
Mentally III support group 
meeting. 7 p.m., last Thursdays. 
Calvary Church, 1221 W. Maple Ave. 
For parents of young school-age 
children with a brain disorder. Call 
(847) 249-1515 for more informa- 
tion. 

RIVERWOODS 

• Prairie Knitters meeting. 

7:30 p.m., fourth Tuesdays. 
Riverwoods Town Hall, 300 
Portwine Rd. New members wel- 
come. Call Shari at (847) 374-1602 
for more information. 

ROUND LAKE 

• 2nd Annual "Auction for 
Art" and Fashion Show. 6-8:30 
p,m,, Friday, April 20. Village 
Elementary School, 880 W. 
Nippersink Rd. For more information 
or to make a donation, call Shelley 
Trump at (847) 546-7835. 

• Big Brothers, Big Sisters 
meeting. 6:30-8 p.m., Mondays. 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, 510 
Cedar Lake Rd. Call (847) 360-0770 
for information. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

• Lake County Community 
Health Partnership 

Immunization Clinic. 4*6 p.m., 
fourth Tuesdays, Condell Acute 
Care Center, 2 E. Rollins Rd. For 
more information, call (847) 377- 
8470. 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS 

• Round Lake Area 
Community Band rehearsal. 7- 

9 p.m., Tuesdays. Indian Hill 
School, 1920 N. Lotus Or. New 
musicians and ail instruments are 
always welcome. Call Christi at 
(847) 546-8558, ext. 422, to learn 
more. 

SPRING GROVE 

• Fox Lake School District 114 
Board of Education meeting. 7 

p.m., fourth Tuesdays. Lotus School, 
29067 W. Grass Lake Rd. 

--—VERNON HILLS- **•"* 

• Loop the Lakes 5K Run & 2- 
Mile Walk. 9 a.m., Saturday, May 
5; check-in at 7:30 a.m. Century 
Park, north of Townllne Rd. at 
Lakeview Parkway. Registration fee 
$15 until April 27; $20 April 28-May 
5. Register online at 
www.vhparkdistrict.org or 
www.signmeupsports.com. For 
more information, call Kelly Stoeber 
at (847) 996-6805.' 

• Adopt a rescued cat. 
Saturdays and Sundays. Petsmart, 
701 N. Milwaukee Ave. For more 
information, call Kindred Kitties at 
(224)234-0723. 

* 

WADSWORTH 

• Pageant Applications being 
taken until April 28 for the 2007 
Wadsworth Area Pageant. For an 
application, e-mail 
dancerangelique@gmail.com or 
send request to WAPC, P.O. Box 
308, Wadsworth IL 60083. 

• Council of Catholic Nurses 
of Lake County meeting. 
Saturday, April 21. Mass at 10 a.m. 
at St. Patrick Church in 
Wadsworth; luncheon after at 
11:30 a.m., Country Squire 
Restaurant, 19133 Rt. 120 in 
Grayslake. Cost is $25 for mem- 
bers, $30 for nonmembers. For 
reservations or information, call 
Gloria at (847) 336-3295 or Mary 
at (847) 623-9125. • 

WAUCONDA 

• 2nd Annual Tree and Shrub 
Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p. m. ( Saturday, April 
28, Acres Group, behind Walgreen's, 
610 W. Liberty St. For more infer- ■} 
mation, call Paul Washburn at (847) 
878-6604. 

ZION 
■ A Safe Place support group 
meeting. Mondays. For women 
who are dealing with abuse in their 
homes. All are welcome. No fees. 
Call A Safe Place at (847) 249-4450 
or (847) 249-6557 (TTY) or go to 
asafeplaceforhelp.org for more 
Information. 

• Zion Parte District Senior 
Citizens Club meeting. 10 a.m., 
Wednesdays. Shiloh Center, 2600 
Emmaus Ave. 



• To submit an item to the 
Calendar, e-mail to 
wJcalendar@wceklyJoitrnals.com, ' 
phone (847) 223-8161 
or fax (847) 223-8810 at least 
14 days before the event. 



li 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 
»Neighbors 



COMMUNITY 



AN/LV April 20, 2007- Page 7A 




Carol Jflen of 
Aiitioch 

I grew up In: 

Chicago, t spent summers and week- 
ends in Antioch 

My family: 

Husband, Paul; son, Jack; daughter, 
Sofia 

My pets: 

Two cats, Bug and Scratchy; one lizard 

named Verde 

Occupation: > 

Part owner of Remembering When 
Scrapbooking 

Hobbles: 

Scrapbooking, reading 

Last movie I saw: 

'Talladega Nights" 

My dream vacation would be: 

With my husband and kids In Europe 



• If you have a "Neighbor" whom we 

should profile in this column, call the 

Lake County Journals at (847) 223-8161, 

or e-mail antioch@weeklyiournals.com 

or lakevilia@weeklyioumals.com. 



»PoliceBeat 

People named here have only been 

charged with these crimes, not 

convicted. Information in Police Beat 

comes from local police records. 



ANTIOCH 

No valid license 
Bernabe Arguelles-Salazar, 32, 
1400 block of Maple, Round 
Lake, driving without a valid 
license, driving with an 
obstructed windshield, driving 
without insurance, April 14. 

Pedro Ibarra, 24, 3400 block of 
West 72 Place, Chicago, driving 
without a valid license, speed- 
ing, driving without insurance, 
April 13. 

DUI 

Michelle L Smudde, 27, 9900 
block of Marvin Drive, Huntley, 
driving under the influence, fail- 
ure to signal, improper lane use, 
April 14. 

Hilario Possos, 26, 1500 block 
of Plymouth Court, 
Carpentersville, driving under 
the influence, driving without a 
valid license, April 16. 

Intoxicated pedestrian 

George Schuller Gonzales, 51, 
4100 block of West Henderson, 



Chicago, April 16. 

LAKE VILLA 

Suspended license 

April L. Weatherspoon, 32, 
37080 Avon, Lake Villa, driving 
with a suspended license, April 
13. 

Disorderly conduct 
StarK.Bryson,18,600W. 
Grand Ave, Lake Villa, April 8. 

DUI 

Jamie M. Missbach, 37, 804 
Farmhill Lane, Lake Villa, driving 
under the influence, improper 
lane use, April 6. 

Suspended license 
Jared F. Lopez, 27, 1808 
Tomahawk Trail, Round Lake 
Heights, driving with a suspend- 
ed license, improper passing, 
April 7. 

Jose S. Gordiano-Bueno, 36, 
751 Walworth Street, Genoa 
City, Wis., driving with a sus- 
pended license, speeding, April 
5. 

No license 
Jorge E. Rivas, 20, 1430 
Greenwood, Round Lake Beach, 



driving without a license, 
speeding, driving without wear- 
ing a seat belt, April 4. 

LINDENHURST 

DUI 

Heidi L Young, 48, 10859 W. 
Yorkhouse, Beach Park, driving 
under the influence, two counts 
of possession of a controlled 
substance, driving with sus- 
pended registration, driving 
without proof of insurance, April 
9. 

Viorel Poptile, 38, 2358 W. 

Touhy Ave., Chicago, driving 
under the influence, speeding, 
improper lane use, improper 
turn, failure to yield to an emer- 
gency vehicle, driving without 
wearing a seat belt, April 11. 

Margaret M. Will, 47, 260 
Dittmer Lane, Lindenhurst, two 
counts of driving under the 
influence, improper lane use, 
failure to yield to an emergency 
vehicle, April 14. 

Barry W.Tyler, 41, 5383 
Oakview Lane, Gurnee, driving 
under the influence, improper 
lane use, driving without proof 
of insurance, DUI with a blood 



alcohol content of more than 
0.08, April 15. 



D. Penar, 25, 350 
Normal Court, Des Plaines, driv- 
ing under the influence, 
obstruction of justice, improper 
lane use, driving with a sus- 
pended license, April 14. 

Jeffrey J. Toff, 24, 11 University 
Circle, Hawthorn Woods, driving 
under the influence, obstruction 
of Justice, April 14. 

Possession 

Scott D. Cole, 48, 977 Victoria, 
Antioch, possession of drug 
equipment, improper lane use, 
improper turn, driving without a 
valid license, driving without 
proof of insurance, April 11. 

Weston R. Kroeker, 18, 2019 
Woodlane Drive, Lindenhurst, ' 
possession of marijuana, pos- 
session of drug equipment, April 
11. 

Christopher M. Richards, 18, 
17660 Route 173, Wadsworth, 
possession of drug equipment, 
April 11. 

Suspended license 
Alicia K. Kieffer, 19, 17297 W. 



Dartmoor, Grayslake, driving 
with a suspended license, 
improper lane use, April 12. 

Robert W.Sutfin, 29, 3029 
Falling Waters Lane, 
Lindenhurst, driving with a sus- 
pended license, April 12. 

Leaving an accident 
Stephen H.Werner, 24, 22198 
Greene Lane, Antioch, leaving 
the scene of an accident, failure 
to give information, April 9. 

No valid license 
Adislao Zamarripa, 41, 120 
Bellevue Drive, Round Lake, 
driving without a valid license, 
speeding, driving without proof 
of insurance, improper use of 
registration, April 14. 

Juan Jose Lopez-Valadez, 27, 
5411 42nd Ave., Kenosha, Wis., 
driving without a valid license, 
April 13. 

FOX LAKE 

Property damage 
A Fox Lake resident told police 
that her sun roof glass was bro- 
ken when she went out to 
uncover snow, 0-100 block 
Ernest Avenue, April 11. 



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JfflMMUNlH. 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



Mundelein grad weathers 
storm at Virginia Tech 

Students friends live on dorm floor where shootings began 



Drawing his future 



By EMILY PREVITI 

cpreviti@nwnewsgroupxom 

MUNDELEIN - Terry 
Campbell did not worry about 
liis son's safety when he sent 
him to school 15 months ago. 
. Charlie Campbell, now 19, 
played soccer for the 
Mundelein Mustangs and the 
Chicago Sockers club team. 

Terry recalled that his ath- 
letic son had his pick of 
schools: Northwestern 

University, DePaul University; 
Colgate Unviersity, in 
Hamilton, N.Y.; and Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State 
University, in Blacksburg, Va. 

Blacksburg's 40,000-person 
community's "hometown" feel 
appealed to Terry; the stu- 
dents' palpable love for 
Virginia Tech drew Charlijj 
there. ' C 

The "tight-knit" community 
that attracted Charlie, a busi- 
ness major, apparently 
repelled 23-year-old Cho Seung- 
Hui. 

Cho, a senior English major, 
indicated as much in letters 
left behind alter he shot and 
killed 32 people, both students 
and faculty members, at a 
dorm and academic building 
on Tech's campus April 16. 

Cho then took his own life. 
Campbell was not hurt during 
the shooting. 

"Some people envy ..." 
Charlie's voice trailed off. "I 
just have no words for that. I 
don't understand how he could 
do that, or why he was angry 
or why he reacted in such a 
harsh way. I just don't have any 
words for that right now." 

Dealing with tragedy 

Until January, Charlie lived 
in a dorm about 15 yards away 
from the one that set the stage 
for the shootings. He then 
moved a mile away to an off- 
campus house. His girlfriend 




Charlie 
Campbell 
Mundelein 
resident and 
current student 
at Virginia Tech 



still lives in the dorm, and 
many of his friends live on the 
floor where Cho shot his first 
two victims. 

Terry said he and his wife, 
who talk to Charlie practically 
daily, will monitor their son to 
ensure his well-being, but trust 
he will do best healing with his 
friends and relying on the sup- 
port system 
of the soccer 
program. 

Terry 
remarked on 
the compo- 
sure of his 
son and the 
"kids on TV" 

"I don't 
feel that it 
had set in, 
the impact 
of the gravi- 
ty of what 
happened," 
he said. "I 

think they had protected them- 
selves from it." 

Indeed, Charlie exuded 
calmness on his cell phone 
after a team meeting around 
8:30 p.m. on April 17, where the 
team decided to suspend prac- 
tices until classes resume 
April 25. Charlie said he plans 
to fly back to Illinois or stay 
with a friend in Richmond, Va., 
roughly 40 miles from campus. 

Local man amid events 

During the soccer team's 7 
a.m. practice, Charlie said, he 
saw first responders swarm 
the parking lot between the 
field and dorm where two peo- 
ple were shot and killed. 

Terry found out about the 
shootings after his older son 
called him to check on Charlie. 

"At the time, I felt like 
[Charlie] was probably OK 
because he would have been at 
practice during that time peri- 
od," Terry said. "When the 
number went up to eight casu- 



tf— 

I don't understand how 
he could do that, or why 
he was angry, or why he 
reacted in such a harsh 
way. I just don't have any 
words for that right now. 



Charlie Campbell 

Virginia Tech student 



■99 



alties, [and] I got impression 
this also happened elsewhere 
on campus, I got worried." 

On the way from practice to 
his 10 a.m. economics class, 
Charlie said, he and his four 
friends saw police with 
machine guns storming 
Norris Hall, where Cho shot 
and killed the rest of his vic- 
tims and himself. He and his 
500 classmates waited in Uieir 
lecture hall until their instruc- 
tor formally announced that 
classes were cancelled and 
campus was closed. 

Terry said the family did 
not hear from Charlie until he 
returned to his house around 
11 a.m. 

"It was ... when 1 couldn't 
reach him that I was con- 
cerned," Terry said. "It would 
have been worse if we. hadn't? 
talked when I heard tiie num- 
ber [of people killed] increased 
significanUy." 

Anxiety wracks students, 
too, Charlie explained, as 
names of victims continue to 
"leak out." 

"I was more concerned with 
what crazy things he might do 
than what crazy things like 
this would happen," Terry 
said. "If it did [cross my mind], 
this wouldn't have been the • 
typical setting where I would 
have expected, it." 




Sandy Of essner - s Lif cisner o nwiiewsgroup com 

Martin Bridges, a junior at Antioch Community High School, studies items on a table during a still life 
drawing workshop as part of the North Suburban Conference. Art Show at Vernon Hills High School. 



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Lake 

» LocalDeaths 

Helen R. 'Sarge' Helgesen, 87, Antioch 

Ann St. Pierre, 81, Antioch 

Warren Milton Edwards, 78, Tavares, Fla. 




9A 

Edition of April 20, 2007 
LakeCountyJoUrnkls.com 




Daniel J. Pieger, 29, Grayslake 

William L 'Bill' Walsh, 82, Saint James City, Fla. 

Floyd F. Matthews, 68, Wauconda 



Terry A. Folbrick, 63, Antioch 
Ryan M. Horvath, 27, Antioch 

OBITUARIES ON PAGE 13A 



» InBrief 

Women's Health Awareness 
Day coming in May 

LAKE FOREST -The Women's 
Auxiliary Board and the Women's 
Health Advisory Council of Lake 
Forest Hospital will host Women's 
Health Awareness Days in Lake 
Forest's Market Square from 9:30 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 
10, and Friday, May 11. 

The event will feature health, 
prevention and wellness informa- 
tion, along with screenings for 
women in all stages of their lives. 

All Women's Health Awareness 
Days services are free of charge. 
These include body mass index 
(BMI) and posture screenings. 
Attendees also will be able to reg- 
ister for free hearing screenings. 

In addition the CareCoach, Lake 
Forest Hospital's mobile health 
van, will be on hand providing free 
bone density screenings and 
checking blood pressure and blood 
sugar. 

There will be a nurse practitioner 
available to answer any questions 
visitors might have. 

- Local reports 



Free seminar on home buying 

WAUKEGAN- Consumers Credit 
Union will sponsor a free seminar, 
"Home Buying Made Easy" to pro- 
vide information about financing 
options, home inspections, property 
values and more. 

This seminar will take place at 6:30 
p.m. May 3, at Ramada Inn in 
Waukegan, and is open to the public. 

Seminar presenters include Greg 
Anderson with Baird & Warner; Lee 
Perry of Perry Appraisals; and Cathy 

Johnson of Brick Kickers. Dan 

Mathews and Gil Chavez of 
Consumers Credit Union will explain 
different financing options. 

Registration begins at 5:30 p.m. - 
For reservations,' call Gerred Riley at 
(847)265-5531. 

Consumers Credit Union has 
offices in Waukegan, Mundelein, 
Round Lake Beach, Gumee, and 
North Waukegan. 

- Local reports 



Dollar Tree store moves 

WAUCONDA - Dollar Tree Stores, 
the nation's largest dollar-discount 
variety store, has opened at a new 
location in Wauconda. 

The 12,006-square-foot store is in 
Wauconda Shopping Center, 620 W. 
Liberty St. 

"After 20 years in business, we 
are still proud to offer Wauconda 
area consumers an opportunity to 
find great values every day of the 
week," said Chelle Gagliano, of 
Dollar Tree, in a statement. "We 
are eager to serve the community ■ 
by providing a fun and convenient 
shopping experience at a price that 
is right for everyone." 

Dollar Tree stores are open seven 
days a week. 

- Local reports 



Persistence pays off 




Sandy Bfossnor ■ sbrcssnerisnttnewsgfoup.com 

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan addresses students and community members during an open forum at College of Lake County's 
Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan. A proposed casino in Waukegan and education funding reform were among the topics discussed. 

House speaker makes Waukegan appearance 



By MATT PERA 

mper3@nwnewsgroup.com 

WAUKEGAN - It is a common 
adage in the realm of politics - if you . 
want something to happen, you better 
be persistent. 

State Rep. Eddie Washington, D- 
Waukegan, followed that creed in 
order to to get Illinois House Speaker 
Michael Madigan to appear at the 
'College of Lake County Lakeshore 
Campus recently. 

Washington said he filled out 
countless request forms and had mul- 
tiple discussions with the speaker dur- 
ing the past several months. 



The patience paid off on April 11, 
when Madigan toured the Waukegan 
campus and participated in an open 
forum with Lake County residents, as 
well as CLC students, faculty and staff. 

Washington also worked with 
Waukegan Township Supervisor 

Patricia Jones, who also is a CLC 

trustee, to organize the forum. 

The discussion during the forum 

included topics such as raising taxes 

for the good of education, bringing a 

casino to Waukegan for additional 

funding for Waukegan Community 

Unit School District 60, and the needs 

of community colleges throughout the 

state. 



"I think one of the rolls of commu- 
nity colleges is to provide forums for 
public discussion of issues," CLC 
President Richard Fonte said. "Having 
the speaker come to Waukegan and 

our community is really Important." 
Throughout the forum, Madigan 

continuously returned to one point in 

particular - that the state was in need 

of more money. 

"My current judgement is that 

before [the legislature completes] our 

budget in May or June of this year, 

Illinois is going to need a tax increase," 

he said. 

See MADIGAN, page 14A 



Des Plaines River Trail keeps growing 

Forest preserve cotes 20-0 for trail addition Need more info ... 

LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 



LIBERTYVILLE - Lake 
County Forest Preserve 
committees approved the 
purchase of one of two 
small, but considered criti- 
cal, parcels needed to com- 
plete the final mile of the 33- 
mile • Des Plaines River 
Trail. 

One additional parcel is 
all that is needed to close 
the gap and complete the 
continuous countywide 
trail. Committee action was 
approved at an April 5 meet- 
ing. 

The proposed $250,000 
land purchase for the 0.98- 



acre trail addition was 
approved by a 20-0 vote by 
•the full Lake County Forest 
Preserve Board of 
Commissioners at its April 
10 meeting. 

The trail addition is part 
of the Lands and Lakes 
property in Vernon 
Township. It is located east 
of Milwaukee Avenue, 
north of Deerfield Road and 
south oT Route 22. 

This land will be used to 
fill in a section of a final 
one-mile gap in the south- 
ern section of the trail. 

Weather permitting, con- 
struction on this section 
would begin this summer. 



Forest Preserve officials 
will continue negotiations 
to acquire .the last remain- 
ing parcel needed to com- 
plete the survey. 

That property is private- 
ly owned. 

The Des Plaines River 
Trail connects 10 Forest 
Preserve sites with local 
parks and communities as it 
winds through the nearly 
B,000-acre Greenway near 
the Illinois-Wisconsin state 
line southward to Cook 
County. 

There are 31 miles of the 
Des Plaines River Trail that 
are open to the public for 
biking, fishing, hiking, 



For additional information 
about the Lake County Forest 
Preserve, or for a program cal- 
endar and additional Informa- 
tion, call (847) 367-6640 and . 
request a free copy of the 
Horizons quarterly or visit the 
Web site at www.LCFPD.org. 

horseback riding and other 
outdoor recreational activi- 
ties. 

The trail begins at 
Russell Road in Wadsworth 
and follows the river south 
to West Riverside Drive in 
Lincolnshire.* 

See TRAIL, page 14A 



» ElectionResults 

Lake County Votes 2007 
Below are the unofficial results 
from the election in the Lake 
County Journals coverage area. For 
in depth coverage of your town, 
check out pages 1A - 8A. 



Antioch Trustee (three seats) fl 


Ned Aylward 


10.49% | 


Barbara Porch 


12.79% 1 


Mary J, Turner 


13.73% I 


Kathy Nordmeyer 


5.46% m 


Larry Hanson 


21.86% 1 


Dennis Crosby 


17.99% II 


Michael Wolczyz 


17.67% M 


Fox Lake Clerk (one seat) | 


Samantha Weeks 


64.50% ■ 


Karla-Joan Zander 


35.50% 1 


Fox Lake Trusteq (three seats) | 


William Borchers 


15.98% § 


Kevin Burt 


18.06% f 


Gregory Murrey 


20.36% J 


Nancy Koskc 


20.70% ■ 


Jack Kiesgen 


24.89% 1 


Grayslake Trustee (three seals) | 


Michael Francq 


14.01% I 


Rhett Taylor 


28.34% 1 


JeffWerfel 


30.49% J 


Ronald Jarvis 

GnrnfifiTrustppfmir-v 


27.15% 1 
par tprm m 



Gurnee Trustee four-year term 


(three seats) 




Bob Wallace 


18,31% 


Greg Garner 


18.54% 


Bob Kofier 


17.18% 


Cheryl Ross 


24.85% 


Michael Jacobs 


21.13% 


Gurnee Clerk 




Andy Harris 


100% 


Hainesville Trustee (three seats) 


Kevin Barrett 


19.12% 


Jim Tiffany 


21.50% 


Gary Walkington 


16.37% 


Georgeann Duberstein 


14.26% 


Frank Lesnak 


3.14% 


Douglas Raul VJWHams 


\0.09% 


Wallace Stllzll - 


6.09% 


Pamela Genender 


9.04% 


Island Lake Trustee four-year 


term (three seats) 




Gregory Guido 


16.27% 


Richard Garling 


23.96% 


Donald Saville 


27.51% 


John Ponio 


32.25% 



Lake Villa Trustee (three seats) 
Joyce Frayer ... 18.69% 

Steven Trkla 26.12% 

Karen Harms 27.61% 

David Dykstra 27.58% 

Lindenhurst President (one seat) 
James Betustak 3376% 

Susan Lahr 66.24% 

Lindenhurst Clerk (one seat) 
Donna Bauschke i 34.86% 
Patricia Chybowski 65.14% 

Lindenhurst Trustee (three seats) 



Gary Stittgen 


10.57% 


Mary McMarthy 


12.10% 


Carl Norlin 


11.43% 


Patrick Dunham 


21.96% 


Dominic Marturano 


20.97% 


Renee Metzelaar 


22.96% 


Round Lake trustee (three seats) 


Michael R. Blum 


25.14% 


Dale D. Multerer 


25.18% 


Sherry B. Perkowitz 


26.31% 


Rose White 


23.36% 



See ELECTION RESULTS, page 12A 





John S. . 
Matijevich 




» SeeingltThrough 

State-of-the-art junkyard will not find 
its way in Park City, thanks to a vote 
by the Gurnee Village Board. John 
Matijevich thinks that this was the 
right decision by the board, to look out 
for needs and wants of residents and 
not just the money it could bring to 
the village. 

PAGE15A 



>> Snapshot 



This week's question 

■Talk radio disc jockey Don Imus was fired 
by CBS and MSNBC for making inappropri- 
ate comments about the Rutgers 
women's basketball team. Do you think 
the punishment fit the crime?" 

ANSWERS ON PAGE 15A 



» PartyUnes 

Lawmakers support need to 
fund help for autism 

State representatives and residents 
gathered recently at a forum to advocate 
for the need of funding for autism. 

PAGE 15A 



» OurView 

Stop domestic violence 

Recent incidents increase the need for 
Americans to break free from violence. 

PAGE 15A 



» SketchView 




Shaving for a cause 




Chris Padgett • cpadgett@flwnewsgroup.com 

Waukegan High School JROTC Senior Instructor Col. Barry Gallagher 
groans as he sees his partly shaved head. Gallagher shaved his head 
when students raised money to pay for painting and repairs to the high 
school's rifle range. See story on page 16A. 

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Page 10A • April 20, 2007 ALL 



COUNTY 



Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 



Local greenhouse project breaks ground 



Facilities to be built in Waukegan, North Chicago ImnoifAgh/thc SLm, 

° " said Bill Bodlne, director of 

By EMILY PHEVITI two greenhouses. During the last two years, external relations for the 

eprevliianwnewsgroup,com State Rep. Eddie efforts of Washington and Illinois Farm Bureau. 

Washington and represents farm bureau personnel helped In 1981, the UDSA launched 
WAUKEGAN - Students at tives from the Lake County to secure $150,000 in, local Ag on a national scale to 
two local schools wilt plant and Illinois Farm Bureaus donations to make the project Increase students' understand- 
their own seeds of knowledge attended the ceremony at the possible. ing of the link between pro- 
next year. Ncal Math and Science Contractor Chris ductlon and consumption, as 
Though construction will Academy, 1905 Argonne Drive, Kirschner expects to have the well as the role of agriculture 
not start until lata May or in North Chicago, and project completed before in the economy and society, 
early June, ground broke Jefferson Middle School, 600 S. school starts in the fall. A greenhouse is not a 
April 12 for construction of Lewis Avenue, in Waukegan. The greenhouses will help required part of that, said 




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Kevin Dnugherty, executive 
director of Illinois Ag in the 
Classroom. 

Rather, the greenhouse 
puts hands-on activities at the 
fingertips of staff and stu- 
dents. 

Washington said he hopes 
It also will emphasize the 
intersection of the agriculture 
and horticulture with biology, 
plant science, chemistry, engi- 
neering and economics, 

"This gives them a well- 
rounded view ... and apprecia- 
tion for the earth," 
Washington said of the proj- 
ects. 

Contents of the program 
differs between schools, 
Dougherty said. Districts in 
Waukegan, North Chicago and 
elsewhere in Northern Illinois 
link agriculture to nutrition 
and the green industry, 
Daugherty said. Programs in 
the southern, more rural part 
of the state, on the other hand, 
typically focus on traditional 
farming and feed crops. 

Details aside, Daugherty 
said, the goal is to show chil- 
dren how agriculture connects, 
to their "food, fiber and fuel." 

"We try to make it real to all 
students," Daugherty said, 
"We use agriculture as a 
spring board to teach other 
subjects, to show their food 
just doesn't come from the 
Jewel." 

The greenhouses in 
Waukegan and North Chicago 
will bear the names of Leroy 
Jones and George Miller, 
respectively. 

Jones taught agriculture 
and Miller was a commission- 



Did you know? 

Illinois Ag in the Classroom pro- 
gram reaches the more students - 
348,000 - than do programs in 
any other stale; California and 
Tennessee closely trail. 

More than 20,000 teachers car- 
ried out the $1.9 million effort in 
2005. 

Local donations underwrite all Ag 
in the Classroom programs, though 
counties can apply for $5,000 
grants each year. 

'Information Illinois Ag in the 
Classroom 

Local donors 

Funds to build the $150,000, 30- 
by-48-by-8-foot Waukegan and 
North Chicago greenhouses 
come from ComEd, Pioneer Hi-Bred 
International Inc., First Midwest 
Charitable Trust, Monsanto, Abbott 
Fund, Abbott Laboratories, the 
International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers Local 150, the 
Illinois AFL-CI0, the Northeast 
Illinois Federation of Labor, the 
Lake County Building & 
Construction Trades, and 
International Greenhouse Company 

reformation from Lake County 
Farm Bureau and International 
Greenhouse Company 

er on the Foss Park District 
Board, where he implemented 
curbing in North Chicago that 
allowed access to the disabled, 
Washington said. 

Both men are deceased. 



YWCA celebrates 85 years 

lake county journals For more information 



On April 17 the YWCA Lake 
County celebrated 85 years as a 
voice for women and girls. 

Founded in 1922 as a resi- 
dence for young women during 
World War I, the YWCA 
worked with girls who had 
come to Waukegan to work, or 
to be near their boyfriends at 
Great Lakes. * " ' 

Today it serves 22,000 Lake 
County residents a year 
through its core program 
areas: women's economic 
advancement, parent and 
provider education and train- 
ing, women's and girls' health, 
after school programs, youth 
leadership and development, 
and racial justice. 

The YWCA is active on 
national and local levels to 
educate, increase awareness 
and change institutionalized 
systems that deny people 
access and opportunity for rea- 
sons of color, age, economic 



i 



Those who want to learn more 
about the history of the YWCA or 
the upcoming Women of 
Achievement event can visit 
www.ywcalakecounty.org. The 
auction can be directly accessed at 
www.ywcawoa.cmarket.com. For 
more Information about donation 
'opportunities, contact, Debbie 
Larker, at (847) 662-4247, ext. 102, 
or larkerd@ywcalakecountyil.org. 



status, culture, ethnicity or 
gender. 

To celebrate its success, the 
YWCA is sponsoring an online 
auction that began April 1 and 
will run until May 10. 

The eBay-style online auc- 
tion culminates at the 29th 
Annual Women of 

Achievement dinner on May 
11. The event will take place at 
Chevy Chase Country Club in 
Wheeling. 



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Lake CourfTY Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com COUNTY 

Lake County to be part of S1 



By STEVE PETERSON 

spelofson@nwnewsgroup.com 

WAUCONDA - Efforts to 
bring the 2016 Summer 
Olympic Games to Chicago, 
and at least one sport to the 
Wauconda area, will intensify 
in coming months now that 
Chicago lias been chosen by 
the United States Olympic 
Committee. 

The Olympic Committee 
announced Chicago as the 
choice for the U.S. bid on April 
15. 

"There will be meetings 
within 30 days with the 
International Olympic 

Committee and defining the 
conceptual plan.' It would be a 
great honor to represent 
America," Lake County Forest 
Preserve President Bonnie 
Thomson Carter said after the 
announcement. 

Carter, R-Ingleside, said 
that public input would con- 
tinue to be received during the 
process leading up to the IOC's 
final decision in October, 2009. 

"I am very pleased that 
Chicago was chosen," 
Wauconda Village Board 
President Sal Saccomanno 
said. "It is a wonderful oppor- 



Olympi 

tunity for the Wauconda area. 
Wauconda will be responsible 
for water and sewer hook-ups 
for the site, A lot of work has 
to be done in a short time. It 
would be wonderful for the 
businesses In the area and 
Wauconda would be the clos- 
est." 

Several surrounding vil- 
lages approved resolutions of 
support for having the eques- 
trian events at Lakewood 
Forest Preserve, which would 
have a 12,500 seat stadium for 
the equestrian events in the 
Olympics and the para- 
Olympics to follow. 

The proposed site at 
Lakewood Forest Preserve is 
located south of Ivanhoe 
Road, in an area with nine 
miles of existing equestrian 
trails. The facility would be 
used for two weeks of the 2016 
Olympic Summer Games and 
then for the following week for 
the Paraolympics. Other 
organizations and individuals 
associated with the Olympics 
would provide funding. 

"Bringing the Olympic 
equestrian events to 
Lakewood Forest Preserve is a 
wonderful opportunity for all 
of Lake County," Carter said. 



Local voices .. 



Bill Brumbach, a trustee in 
nearby Grant Township, said that 
the Olympics would be a success 
for the region. 

"It's exciting that Chicago was 
chosen as the American city," he 
said. 

Restaurant owner Tony 
Bondanyi of Fox Lake said the 
Summer Olympics would be great 
for the area. 

"I am hopeful that they do come. 
I would go to it," Wauconda resi- 
dent Lorena Ebert said. 

"It would be a good thing," 
Wauconda resident Virginia 
Mueller said. 

"It will enhance tourism dur- 
ing and after the Olympics 
and make substantial 
improvements to Lakewood 
that all preserve visitors may 
enjoy for generations to 
come." 

The Olympics would have a 
legacy of $12.5 million in 
improvements. 

For more information on 
the site, visit www.LCFPD.org. 



»CLCNotes 

Student Art Exhibit 
The 26th Annual Student Art exhibition, a juried 
exhibit featuring artworks created by College of 
Lake County students, opens on April 27 at the 
Robert T. Wright Community Gallery of Art on the 
CLC Grayslake Campus, An opening reception and 
awards presentation will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. 
on April 27 in the gallery. It will include refreshments 
and musical entertainment by Jazz Spectrum. The 



Lake County Art League will present two $500 
scholarships, the CLC Student Activities Office will 
present nine cash Merit Awards totaling $450 and 
the Steve Mendelson Memorial Award for $150 will 
be presented to an outstanding student artist. 

For further information about the gallery, contact 
curator Steve Jones at (847) 543-2240 or at 
sjones@ctcilllnois.edu. Or visit http;//ga1lery.clcitli- 
nois.edu/. 






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Participants of REALITY Illinois-Lake County and members of the Mundelein High School Students Against 
Destructive Decisions Club displayed 1,200 shoes in the parking lot of St. Andrew's Church in Mundelein. 
The shoes signify the 1,200 shoes that are left empty every day because of tobacco. 

Church, student organization look to prevent tobacco use 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton@nwne wsgrou pxom 

MUNDELEIN - Grishma 
Pandya, 18, had a feeling her 
project had made a difference 
when the vehicles started 
slowing down. 

They slowed when driving 
past the parking lot at St. 
Andrews Church in 
Mundelein last week, which 
was filled with 1,200 shoes. 

Those shoes, Pandya said, 
represented 1,200 Americans 
that die daily because of 
smoking or exposure to sec- 
ondhand smoke. 

"A couple of people even 
turned in and asked," Pandya 
said. "They were like, 'wow.'" 

That was the reaction that 
Pandya had hoped for. She is 
president of Students Against 
Destructive Decisions at 
Mundelein High School, and 



a 

We wanted to make it a 

powerful [demonstration] 

and educate people 

Grishma Pandya 

Students Against Destructive 

Decision president at Mundelein 

High School 

99 

organized the event with the 
help of REALITY Illinois- 
Lake County, a youth-run 
county health department 
program aimed at young peo- 
ple to prevent tobacco use. 

The shoes were displayed 
in the parking lot from 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 
12. 

People also could read 
signs loaded with informa- 



tion about the negative effects 
of tobacco. 

Pandya said she wanted to 
find a way to turn statistics 
into something that people 
could use. 

"We wanted to make it a 
powerful [demonstration] and 
educate people," she said. "A 
lot of people don't understand 
the numbers." 

The shoe display was part 
of a number of activities 
occurring across the country 
for Kick Butts Day, which was 
on March 28. The day encour- 
ages teens to be the leaders in 
discouraging tobacco use. 

Cher Hanson, of REALITY 
Illinois-Lake County, said she 
was pleased so many people 
seemed to notice the shoes. 

"We had lots of people turn 
their heads to look, and some 
honked," Hanson said. "It def- 
initely made an impact." , 



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Page 12A • April 20,2007 ALL 



COUNTY 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



Steeple Chase Golf 
Club gets top rating 



lake county journals Tourney time 



The Mundoletn Park & 
Recreation District announced 
recently that Steeple Chase, its 
award-winning golf course, 
located at 200 N. La Vista Drive, 
earned a 5-Star rating by the 
Chicagoland Golf Top Public 
Courses 2007 list. 

The Mundelein area is con- 
sidered one of the Top Ten 
areas to play golf in Metro 
Chicago by the publication. 

"Steeple Chase is a feather 
in the cap of the many ameni- 
ties that the Mundelein Park & 
Recreation District has to offer 
not just the community in 
Mundelein, but the entire 
Metro Chicago area," said 
District Director Margaret 
Resnlck. "This recognition by 
Chicagoland Golf is well 
deserved by our Golf 
Operations Manager, Bill 



The 2007 Golf Tournament Schedule at Steeple Chase Is as follows: 



Day and Date 

Saturday, July 21 

Saturday and Sunday Aug. 11 and 12 

Sunday, Sept. 9 

Saturday, Oct. 6 



Scheduled Event 

Super Scramble 

Club Championship 

Fall Classic 

Fall Scramble 



Brolley and his staff for all 
their hard work and dedica- 
tion." 

Steeple Chase has many 
programs to ofTer the commu- 
nity, including Family Golf, 
available Sunday through 
Thursday after 4 p.m., when a 
child, 18 years and under, play6 
for free with a parent. 

The staff of PGA profes- 
sionals at Steeple Chase also 
oflers adult group lessons and 
junior golf lessons for children 
7 to 16 years old starting as 



early as May 

Private lessons may be 
scheduled by calling the Pro 
Shop directly for all reserva- 
tions and information at (847) 
949B9Q0. 

The Grill Room Restaurant 
at Steeple Chase offers a com- 
plete menu for breakfast and 
lunch. 

On Friday Nights, the "All 
You Can Eat" Fish Fry offers 
beer battered cod, cole slaw 
and fries. There are also other 
entrees and weekly specials. 



ELECTION RESULTS continued from 9A 



Round Lake Beach trustee 
(three seats) 

Richard M. Cape 13.31% 

TediVUivengoodJr. 11.93% 
Nancy M. Paufick 13.05% 

Gina Miosi 20.69% 

Sue Butler 21,74% 

Nemesio "Poncho" Villa 19.28% 

Round Lake Park president 
John R. Teubert 33.77% 

Jean M. McCue 66.23% 

Round Lake Park trustee 
(three seats) 

William "Bill" Baczek 12.54% 

Luis "Arturo" Martinez 10.70% 

Steven D. Rathunde 10,89% 

Candace L Kenyan 21.50% 

Kathleen B. Pender 22.23% 

Kenneth E.SchnurSr. 22.14% 

Volo Trustee (three seats) 
Bruce Buschick 21.47% 

Michael Wagner 32.20% 
William Evans 25.42% 

Le Roy Wegener 20.90% 



Wadsworth President (one seat) 
Glenn Ryback 55.16% 

John Nordiglan 44.84% 

Wadsworth Trustee (three seats) 
Candye Nannini 20.91% 

Lynn Schlosser 24.24% 

Joseph Neal 17.95% 

Rodney Dale Johnson Sr. 15.44% 
R. Ken Harvey 21.47% 

Wauconda Trustee (three seats) 

25.06% 

20.92% 

18.40% 

18.06% 

17.56% 



Waukegan Alderman - Ward 3 
(one seat) 

Greg Moisio 67.20% 

Mary Frances Troha 32.80% 

Waukegan Alderman - Ward 5 
(one seat) 

Edith Newsome 68.86% 

Dexter Reid 31.32% 



Patrick Murphy 
Jean Mayo 
Edward Lochmayer 
Roger Wojcicki 
Sheryl Ringel 



Waukegan Alderman - Ward 1 
(one seat) 

Samuel Cunningham 69.43% 
Evie "Lynch" Hakeem 30.57% 



Waukegan Alderman 
(one seat) 
John Balen 
Susan Bailey 



Ward 2 

52.18% 
47.82% 



Waukegan Alderman - 


■ Ward 6 


(one seat) 




Larry TenPas 


79.42% 


Mark Kajfez 


20.58% 


Waukegan Alderman - 


Ward 8 


(one seat) 




Richard Larson 


63.24% 


Mari Carlson 


36.76% 


College of Lake County Trustee 


v (two seats) 




O.H. Michael Smith 


15.39% 


Barbara Oilschlager 


28.67% 


Ronald R.C. Lackey 


12.35% 


John Lumber 


20.08% 


Margaret Padilla Caraasco 16.13% 


Walstone Francis 


7.38% 



■I - 1 , ■ 




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Local park district to host 
Waukegan Idol' auditions 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

The Waukegan Park District and the city 
or Waukegan announced recently that the 
vocal competition "Waukegan Idol" is back 
for its second year. 

Auditions will take place Saturday, June 
23, in the Dr. Lynn Schornick Theatre at Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts, 39 Jack Benny 
Drive, In Waukegan. 

Vocalists ages 14 to 17 and 18 to 30 may 
present an audition piece on June 23 between 
1 and 4 p.m. 

Registration requires a completed regis- 
tration form and a $25 registration Tee to the 
registration desk at Jack Benny Center for 
the Arts no later than Friday, June 15. 



Those auditioning may sing a cappella or 
to a CD with musical accompaniment only. 

Audition numbers may be an original 
song, a cover, or an original arrangement. 
The judges will decide a top five from each 
age category to compete for the "Waukegan 
Idol" Finals. 

The finals will take place on Saturday, July 
14 from 3 to 5 p.m. in downtown Waukegan as 
part of the "Scoopin* Genesee" festivities. 
Winners will be announced at the event. 

For more information, call Jack Benny 
Center for the Arts at (847) 360-4740 or stop by 
39 Jack Benny Drive, in Waukegan. This 
event is sponsored by the Waukegan Park 
District's Cultural Arts Division, the City of 
Waukegan, and Lab 32 Studios. 



Lake Forest Hospital to offer 
free screenings in Fox Lake 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

The CareCoach, Lake 
Forest Hospital's mobile 
health unit, will be offering 
additional free screenings dur- 
ing an extra stop in Fox Lake 
on Tuesday, May 8. 

Carpal tunnel and balance 
screenings will be done by a 
physical therapist. Foot 
screenings, done by a podia- 
trist and two students from the 



William M. Scholl College of 
Pediatric Medicine in North 
Chicago, also will be available. 

The CareCoach will pro- 
vide these services on a first- 
come, First-served basis at 
Lake Front Park, 71 
Nippersink Road, from 2 to 4 
p.m. 

Space is limited, so partici- 
pants should plan on arriving 
early For additional informa- 
tion, call (847) 535-6709. 



The CareCoagh has been 
serving uninsured and under- 
insured persons in Lake 
County since 1999. 

It makes regular visits to 23 
sites across the county, includ- 
ing Fox Lake, offering free 
blood pressure, blood sugar 
and osteoporosis screenings 
plus a consultation with a reg- 
istered nurse. Check out 
www.lfh.org for a complete 
schedule. 



Academy Square project breaks 
ground, completion set for this fall 



lake county journals To learn more 



Ground was broken 
recently on the former site of 
a Waukegan landmark - 
Academy Theatre - to make 
way for the Academy Square 
Project. 

This 42,000 square foot 
project , developed by 
Revolution Investment . 

Partners and financed by 
Harris Bank will be built by 
the Bannockburn-based con- 
struction firm Principle 
Construction Corp. and is set 
to be completed in the fall of 
2007. The site is located on 
Genesee Street, directly 
across the street from the 
Genesee Theatre. 

Anchoring the develop- 
ment will be a restaurant, 
named Jack's on Genesee, 
which will be run by restau- 
rateur Jack Dolio and serve 
continental fare. 

Dolio is known for his 
award-winning Chicago prop- 
erties such as Charlie's on 
Webster and former venues 
such as Charlie's Ale House, 
Carlucci's, Savarin, and 
Kimos in Hawaii. 

Jack's on Genesee will be a 
9,500 square foot restaurant 
with ample seating for the 
lunch and dinner crowd, a 
full-service, top-shelf bar and 
lounge, and an outdoor court- 



For more information about the 
Academy Square Project or to 
inquire about additional develop- 
ment opportunities in Waukegan, 
call Michael Leestma with 
Revolution Investment Partners, 
LLC at (847) 242-0105. 

yard seating area. 

Additional anchor tenants 
of the Academy Square 
Project will include, well- 
known Chicago interior 
design firm, KDT Designs 
Inc, which specializes in inte- 
rior space planning for resi- 
dential and commercial 
developments world-wide. 

Academy Square will also 
be home to Re/Gar Realty, one 
of our regions leading resi- 
dential and commercial real 
estate companies that service 
the entire Lake County area. 

"With so [much] high-cal-. 
iber talent assembled togeth- 
er making this project a reali- 
ty we are delighted be a part 
of this outstanding team," 
Waukegan Mayor Richard 
Hyde said. "This is the first 
project out of the ground in 
Waukegan's Downtown and 
we are sure that this project 
will raise the bar for future 
projects and also will help set 
the tone for the development 



potential of our community. " 

Charles Herbst, Managing 
Director of Revolution 
Investment Partners, said 
Waukegan had helped his 
company plan the project. 

"We are excited to be 
involved in this diverse and 
growing community and our 
tenants feel that there is an 
underserved marketplace in 
the downtown area that they 
are ready" to fill," he said. 

State Sen. Terry Link, D- 
Waukegan, said the Academy 
Square project was a major 
indicator that Waukegan's 
strategic plan for the down- 
town area was "starting to 
take shape." 

"We can now obviously see 
that this community is start- 
ing to live up to its potential 
and is certainly moving in a 
positive direction," Link said." 
"I am excited to see that all of 
our effort in laying the 
ground work for this kind of 
development is starting to 
bear fruit." 

Dolio added that he was 
looking forward to opening 
his new restaurant. 

"I am excited that I have an 
opportunity to be a part of 
such an amazing project and I 
look forward to bringing a 
special venue to this great 
downtown community," Dolio 
said. 



yprvrw 

cApril2Z28,29 

Tiidays ^ Saturday, 10-5, Sunday 12-5 

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Center 

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847.782.9094 

From 1-94, exit 132 East. Turn right at Dliley's Road. {1st stop light). 
Follow Dliley's Rd. into Northrldge Dr. 



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.Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



.OBITUARIES. 



ALL April 20, 2007 • Page 13A 



i 



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i 



I 




HELEN R. 'SARGE' 
HELGESEN 

Bom March 1, 1920 

W April 9, 2007 

Saved as aWAChthcUS Army Air Corps dur- 

' IngMW 

* 

i ANTIOCH- Helen R "Sarge" Hdgescn, .too 
87,ofAntloch, 
passed ayvay 
Monday April 9, 



;20Q7nt Winchester 
House, in 

Libcrtyvilla Sl« was 
bom in Chicago, the 
daughter of the late Wataity and Anna (Stanyk) 
Kiettyka. Helen saved in the Women's Army 
Corps in the US. Army Air Corps during WWII 
(and was a member of the VFW Post 4551 
'Auxiliary of Antkxh. Before her retirement in 
1982, she worked for more than 25 years at 
Pickard China. Sarge was an avid Dingo player. On 
Sept 15, 195G, she married Russell J. Helgcsen in 
Antioch, and he preceded her in death on Nov. 11, 
■1998. 

Survivors Include her daughter, Joyce (Dan) 
White, of Ziorr, her throe grandchildren; her seven 

E' ireat-grandchildren and a nephew. In addition to 
tcr parents, she was preceded In death by her 
ifirst husband, Mclvin Luck, in 1954, her brother 
and her sister. 

A Memorial Service took place at 1 pja on 
April 12 at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 
Military Honors and interment of ashes followed 
tn Hillside Cemetery In Antioch. Visitation took 
place from noon until the time of services on 
April XL Please sign (he guest book for Helen at 
www.str3nglh.com. Please also sign tlic Guest 
tlook at VrtmLateCounryJoumikwrnAbtts. 

ANN ST. PIERRE 

Bom: July 20, 1925 
Died: April 10, 2007 
Was a homemakcr and kn-ed Irving life 

ANTIOCH - Ann St. Pierre, age 81, ol 
Antioch, passed away Tuesday, April 10, 2007 at 
Condell Medical Center, in Ubertyville, She was 
bom Jury 20, 1925 in Tampa, FU, the daughter of 
the lale Morris and Lorraine (McNevin) 
MacDonakL She moved to Wikfwood in 1952 and 
then to the family farm in Gumec in 1959. Later, in 
1969, she settled in Antioch, where she was a 
member of St Peter Church and the Antioch 
jiVbman's Club. Ann was a homemakcr, loved Irv- 
ing life and will be missed by all of her many 
mends. On June 20, 1950, she married Sherman 
St Pierre in Chicago. 

Survivors Include her husband of 55 years, 
Sherman; her children, Kathleen St Pierre, of 
Antioch, Leslie (Robert) Suave, of Port 
Washington Wrs, Christopher St Pierre, of 
Antioch, and Mary Am (Louis) Schwartz, of 
Chicago; her four grandchildren, Anna (Joe), Lori 
<Barry), Michelle (Jell), and Edward; nine great- 
grandchildren, Robbie, MykaL. Nora, Gavin, Reese, 
Bailey, Brina, Justin and Jack. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian 
Burial took place at 10 am on April 16 at St Peter 
Church In Antioch. Interment followed in Hillside 
Cemetery in Antioch. Visitation took place from 
2 to 4 pm on April 15 at the Strang Funeral 
Jome of Antioch. Please sign the guest book for 
\nn at www5lranglh.com Please also sign the 
Quest Book at 
www.lakeCountyJouma1s£omybb'rts. 

WARREN MILTON 
tDWARDS 

BonrFeb.19,1929 

btai April LI, 2007 

^ervedinthe6thHdiccptet Group ol IheUS. 
j Army 

TAVARES, FLA. - Warren "Ed* Edwards, age 
78,ofTavares,Fk, , 

and Door County, 
Wrs, went home to 
be with the Lord on 
Wednesday, April 11, 
2007 in Orlando, Fla. 
He was bom In 
phicago,andwasa 
'40 year resident of Lake County. 




Warren served in the 6th Helicopter Group of 
the US. Army In the Korean War and was a char- 
ter member of the Gagewood Lions Club. He 
established his own construction company, 
Warren Edwards BuikJers Ire. 

He b survived by his wife of four years, 
Patricia; his brothers; Ns sister-in-law; his chil- 
dren Cynthia (Roy) Wicse of Reston, Va„ Corime 
(Larry) Peacy of Grand Rapids, Midi, Carlton 
"Chip- (Julie) of Lake Villa, Ellen YeJich of 
Belgium, Wis, and Valerie (Jen) Miller of 
Undonhurst; 15 grandchildren ; and five great- 
grandchildren , He is also survived by Patricias 
children, Paige (Tom) Thomburg, Tracy (Oonnie) 
Blue, Aaron (Beth) McNcese all of Greenville, 
Tena; nine grandchildren and Five great-grand- 
children. He was preceded in death by his first 
wife of 45 years, Glen Doris (Gkji) and a brother. 

Visitation took place at Village Church of 
Gumec on April 17 from 3 to 5 pm followed by a 
5 pm funeral service. Interment was on, April 18 
at 9:30 am. at Warren Cemetery in Gumce. In 
lieu of [lowers, donations should be made to 
Compassion International, Colorado Springs, CO 
80997 Arrangements were handled by Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium, In Grayslake. 
Please sign the Guest Book at ( 

wwwLikrjCountyloumals.convbbits 

DANIEL J. PIEGER 

Bom: Aug. 27, 1977 

Died: April 11, 2007 

Flayed in the Like Villa Little League during his 
chMtood 

GRAYSLAKE - Daniel J. Piegcr, age 29 year 
ol Grayslake, died Wednesday, April 11, 2007 at 
his home. Bom in Waukcgan on Aug. 27, 1977 to 
John Piegcr and Kathy Nelson Wagner. A 1995 
graduate of Grayslake High SchooL Dan loved 
playing baseball, the outdoors, fishing, and was a 
lifelong Chicago Cubs fan. 

Survivors Include his parents John Piegcr of 
McHenry and Kathy (Kevin) Wagner of 
Undenhurst; his siblings, Kclli (Jason) Mule of 
Grayslake, Shannon Wagner of Undenhurst Mary 
Piegcr of Waukesha, Wis, and Kevin Wagner Jr. of 
Undenhurst; his grandparents Hildegard Piegcr of 
Grayslake and Harry & Gerry Nelson of Crossville, 
Tena; his step-grandparents Urban and Patricia 
Wagner of McHenry; his aunts and uncles 
Hildegard (Ted) Geigcr, Donna (Rafael) Gonzalez, 
and Harry (Joanne) Nelson; his cousins; his life- 
long friend, Ray Hajduk; and extended mends and 
family from Crossville, Tern. Dannyls grandfather 
Ludwkj Pieger precedes him in death. 

A Funeral Mass was celebrated 10 am, on 
April 16 at St Gilbert Catholic Church, in 
Grayslake. Interment followed at Ascension 
Cemetery in Ubertyville. Friends of the famiry vis- 
ited from 2 to 6 pm, Sunday, April 15 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium, in Grayslake. Dan 
was diagnosed with Juvenile Diabetes at the age 
of 9 and fought a long hard battle against it In 
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be 
made to the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, 500 N 
Dearborn St, Suite 305, Chicago, IL 60G10, or 
Ukc Villa Township Little League, P.O. Box 123, 
take Vilb.IL 60046. Please sign (lie Guest Book 
at www.LateCcontyJoumalscom/obits 

WILLIAM L 'BILL' WALSH 

Bom: July 11, 1924 
Died: April 7, 2007 
Saved in the US. MarbeCorpin WWII 

SAINT JAMES CITY, FLA - Bill Walsh, 82, of 
Saint James City, Fla, and formerly of Fox Lake, 
passed away on April 7, 2007, while under the 
care of Hope 
Hospices in Cape 
Coral, Fla. He was 
bom on July U, 1924 
in Fox Lake, and 
resided (here most 
ol lis life. Bill served 
in the Marine Corp, 

in World War II, and he is a 61 year member of the 
American Legion Post 703, Fox Lake. He is also a 
member or Plumbers Local 93 U A, in vbk»,anda 
member of the Pine Island Moose Lodge 1954, 
and the Calusa Land Trust of Pine Island. 

Survivors Include his wife of 56 years, Phyllis 
Lemm Walsh, of Saint James City, Fk; his sons, 
William (Megan) Walsh, McHenry, Robert (Janet) 




Watslv of Ing IcskJe; his daughter, Kathleen (Brian) 
Palmer of Ingleside; his grandchildren, Erin, Cara 
and Dierdrc Walsh, of McHenry, lota Walsh of 
Inglcsldc, Brian and Dylan Palmer of Inglcsldc, 
Cassandra Fomear of Myrtle Boaeli, S& two 
ster>grandsons, Kyle and Cody Kuebler, of 
Ingleside; and a great-granddaughter, Mackenzie 
Bullcr of Ingleside; his two sisters, Shirley 
Magenta of Grayslake and Pamela (Richard) 
Lahey of Gages Lake; his brother-in-law, Harry 
Lemm of Palatine; and several nieces and 
nephews. He Is also survived by his best friend 
and pal "Trina." Bill was a good son a loving hus- 
band, a proud father, grandlatlter, great-grandfa- 
ther and a true friend - ho will be missed by alL 
His final wish was to bo cremated and his 
ashes brought back "1101™:"' to Fox Lake, where a 
memorial service will be held later this summer 
with his family and friends. Arrangements were 
handled by the Horizon Funeral Home in Fort 
Meyers, Fla. Please sign the Guest Book at 
ww\v.ljl(e(k)untyJrjurrolicrjnvbbits 

FLOYD F. MATTHEWS 

Bom: April 24, 1938 
Died: April 13,2007 
Was an ova-lh&foad truck driver 

WAUCONDA - Floyd F. Matthews, age 68 of 
Kenosha, Wis, passed away Friday, April 13, 2007 
at the Aurora Medical Center in Kenosha, Wis. 
He was bom in Wauconda, the son of the late 
Silvcnls and Frances (Hill) Matthews. He enjoyed 
traveling, working on cars and was a caring fami- 
ly man. 

Survivors include his children Steven (TamQ 
Matthews of Schererville, Ind, Floyd P. "Skip" 
(Hatty Benson) Matthews of Kenosha, Wis, 
Jenna (Wayne) Sherman of Waylcn Mo, Brian 
Mattliews of Kenosha, Wis, Richie Matthews of 
Ponliac; his stepdaughter, Jewell (Kenneth) 
Shirley of Kcnoslia, Wis,* two sisters; a brother, 
four grandchildren; and three great-grandchil- 
dren. He was preceded In death by his sister; a 
grandson' and his life long friend and companion, 
Carol La wsoa 

Family and friends called from 4 to 8 pm, on 
April 16, at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, 
Interment was private. Those desiring may make 
contributions to a family rnemorial In life memo- 
ry- 

Please sign the guest book for Floyd at 
wwwitrangfhcom Please sign the Guest Book 
at wvwMcCountyJoumals-ctHrvobits Please 
also sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJoiimals.coiTvbbi[5 

TERRYA.FOLBRICK 

Borne Jan. L 1944 

Died April 14, 2007 

Owed and operated the Kodak Gun Stop 

ANTIOCH - TERRY A FOLBRICK, age 63 of 
Antioch, passed away Saturday, April 14, 2007 at 
hishome. He was bom Jaa 1,1344 in Burlington, 
Wis, the son of the late Richcrt and Lorraine 
(8isr)ofbergcr)Folbrick. He was active in the 
community In (he Antioch Jaycces, former direc- 
tor of Ute Antioch Chamber of Commerce and a 

member of the Antioch Planning Commission. On 
Aug. 8, 1970 be married Patrida Wells In Antioch. 

Survivors include his wife of 36 years, Pat, 
his children Jason (Headier) Folbrick of Spring 
Grove, and Lori Folbrick of Genoa City, Wrs; his 
grandson; and his sister. 

The funeral was held at 7 pm, on April 17, at 
the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, with visita- 
tion starting at 4 pm Interment was private, 
Tl»serj<^ngmaynukecwitnDutiortstoDuck5 
Unlimited P. 0. Box 316, AnOoch, IL 60002 In his 
memory. Please sign the guest book for Terry at 
wwwstrangfhxom Please also sign the Guest 
Book at wvwiaikeCrxin^Joumalscorrtybb'fts 

RYAN M. HORVATH 

Bom Oct 3L 1979 

Died: April 12, 2007 

Was an avid Chicago Cubs and Chicago Bears fan 

ANTIOCH - Ryan M Horvath, age 27 of 
Antioch, passed away Thursday, April 12, 2007 at 
Condell Medical Center, UbertyviHe. He was bom 
in Elgin, the son of Robert and Roberta (Case) 
Horvath He was a volunteer for SEDOL in ■ 



;; ■ 



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WmBSS5& 



STRANG FUNERAL HOME OF ANTIOCH 

Funeral Directors 

Dan Dugenske, 
: John Grehan & Jason Flade 

^££*XS Adm. Assistant: Earla Ludden 

^PX^r^XT 1055 Main Street • Antioch, IL 60002 

lluugfujuS ami meaningful ltnicr. (847)395-4000 



Visit mif WehfcKc ;it vsu \\.slr ;mgl1),o>m 



Place your 

advertisement 

In our 

FUNERAL 

DIRECTORY 

Today} 

Lake county 
Journals 

847-223-8161 

Fax: 

847-233-2691 

e-mail: 

LMadsd 

nwnewsgroup.com 



WARREN FUNERAL HOME 
CEMETERY & MAUSOLEUM 

Serving Lake County since 1846 

• Serving All Faiths & All Cemeteries 

• Call Us For Our Preplanning Options , 

• Traditional Services 
& Cremation Services 

Sehabla Espinol 



1495 N. Cemetery Rd. • Gurnee 



847-855-2760 



www.warrencemetery.com 



VVlldwood. 

Survivors include his parents. Robert and 
Roberta; his brothers, Robert of Milwaukee, Wis, 
Jason and Jeffrey both of Round Lake Heights; his 
sister, Jillon ol Kalamazoo, Midi and his paternal 
grandmother, Elma Horvath of South Bend, Ind. 
He was preceded In death by his grandf al hers, 
Robert Case and Frank Horvath 

The funeral took place at 4 pm, on April 15, 
at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, with visi- 
tation start ing at 1 pm Those desiring may 
make contributions to the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association Deer Brook Corp Center, 570 Lake 
Cook Raid, Suite 116, Deerficld, IL 60015 or 
SEDOL, 18160 VV. Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, 
Wl 60030 In his memory. Please sign the guest 
book for Ryan at www.s1rangln.corn. Please 
also sign tin Guest Book at 
www.LakeCfflJntyJotimats.convobits 

DIANE L BORISOF-CLiFF 

Bont SepLL 1942 
Wat March 9, 2007 

Was a forma custodian at tlK Indian Hill Qvpel 
In Round Lake Bead} 

MUNDEIEN - Diane E. Borisof-Clifl age 64 
of Mundelcin, passed away Friday, March 9, 2007 
at ManorCarc Health Services in Libertyville. She 
was a former custodian at tire Indian Hill Chapel 
in Round Lake Beach. 

Surviving arc her husband, Robert Cliff or 
Mundelcin; two sisters; a brother; and two nieces 
and nephews. 

A memorial service was held at 2p.m.on 
April 14 at the Lake County Center for 
Independent Living in Mundelein Interment was 
at Northwhorc Garden of Memories in North 
Chicago. Arrangements were handled by the 
Burnett-Dane Funeral Home In Libertyville. Please 
sign the Guest Book at 
www.UkrX^ntyJouira!s£onvbbits 

SUEC.GAUBATZ . 

Bont Aug. 24, 1951 
Died: April 13, 2007 
Wasamemberofthe Kirk Ptayos 

MUNDELEIN - Sue a Gaubatz, age 55 of 
Mundelein, passed away Friday, April 13, 2007 at 
the Lake Forest Hospital She was employed by 
Hewitt Associates in Lincolnshire for the past 34 
years and was an active member of Si Mary of 
Vernon Parish In Indian Creek. 

Surviving are her husband, Tom Gaubatz; 
daughters, Elizabeth (Andrew) Dannhom ol 
Portland, Ore. and Rebecca Gaubatz of 
Mundelein; her mother, Evelyn Higginbotham of 
Orland Park; two sisters; and her brolher. She 
was preceded in death by her father, William 
Higginbotham. 

Visitation was from 3 to 8 pm on April 15 at 
SL Mary of Vernon Catholic Church in Indian 
Creek, Mass of Christian Burial was at 11 am, 
April 16 at the church. There will be a private 
interment service later at Ascension Cemetery. 
Memorial contributions can be made to tltt 
National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. Arrangements 
were handled by (he Bumctt-Dane Funeral Home 
in libertyville. Please sign the Guest Book at 
wvw.UkeCoufilykxjrnalicofi'vfabits 

VELDA 'PEARL' PRICE 

Barrc Aug. 17, 1913 

Dted April 15, 2007 

Was dedicated to ha church and family 

FOX LAKE - Vckla "Pead" Price, age 93 of 
Fox Lake, passed away Sunday, April 15, 2007 at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, In 
Undenhurst Shewasbom in Chicago, For many 
years she had worked along side her husband 
John R. Price at his company Bergman Oil Co, 
Chicago. 

Survivors include her son, James (Nancy) 
Price of Cape Coral, Fla; and a granddaughter, 
She was preceded in death by her husband, John 
on Feb. 5, 1980, and her son, John Jr. on Jan. 1, 
1970 

The funeral was held at 7 pm, on April 19, 
at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch, with visi- 
tation from 4 to 8 pm Interment was private in 
. Glen Oak Cemetery, in Hillside. In Ueu of (lowers 
those desiring may make donations to the 




Antioch United Methodist Church or an American 
War Veterans Group In her memory. Please skjn 
PcarFsgueslbookat www.strangflicom. Please 
also sign tlte Guest Book at 
wwv.bkr^xmryJoumilsconvbbits 

ARDEN DALLAS SANDERS 

Bom: Sept. 20, 1916 
DJcrJc April 15, 2007 
Servedi} the US Marine Corps during IVIVH 

UNDENHURST - Arden Dallis Sanders, ago 
90 of UndenhursL passed away Sunday, April 1 5, 
2007 at his home. He was bom in Mercer 
County, Mo, to Rosa Mae and Robert Riley 
Sanders. He met and manied Arfene Stutzman in 
Gliddon, Iowa in 1938. Dallas was a US. Marine 
Corns veteran during WWII and Liter worked as 
the maintenance 
superintendent for 
Gfidden for many 
years. 

Surviving are his 
wife of 68 years, 
Arlene Sanders; two 
daughters, Sandra 

(Donald) Palmer of Ubertyville and Mary Jane 
Marshall of Two Harbors, Mina; six grandchil- 
dren; and nine groat-granddiildreri He was pre- 
ceded in death by his parents and seven brothers 
and sisters. 

Visitation was from 6 p.m. until the time of 
services at 730 pm on April IB at the Bumctt- 
Dane Funeral Home in Libertyville. A graveside 
service with military honors was held at 10.30 
am on April 20, at the Merle Hay Cemetery in 
Gliddon, Iowa. Memorial conthbut ions can be 
made to Condell Hospice, 115 W. Churdi St, 
Ubertyville, IL 60048. Please sign the Guest 
Book at www.UkeCountyJciurrutscorivbbits 

ELISESPENCEKAPELLA 

Bont Jury 30, 1917 
Died: April 12, 2007 

Forma employee rJDemngaManufxturiiig Co. 
ofMundehin 

PELHAM, GA. - Elise Spence KapoHa, age 89, 
passed away April 12, 2007 at Marian Care 
Center in St Paul Minn, formerly of Fox Lake, and 
originally of Peiham, Ga Former employee of 
Derringer Manufacturing Co, at Mundefeia 
Preceded In death by, her parents, Imry and 
Bertha Cross Spence; her husband, Louis 
Kapefla; and four sisters. 

Survived by, lier daughter, Mary Nordctl and 
her husband, Paul; and grandson, Christopher all 
ol SL Paul Mifia; brother, Lamar Spence of 
Atlanta, Ga; sister, Jewell Randall of Thomasville, 
Ga; and several nieces and nephews. Private 
Interment look place at Peiham, Ga 
Arrangements were handled through The 
Roseville Memorial Chapel in St Paul Mim For 
Information call (651) 631-2727. Please sign the 
Guest Book at 
www.Ulo^ountyJournalscrjnvbbits 

BARBARA ANN SCHMIDT 
(MOLCZAN) 

Born: May 31 1955 
Dfat April 13, 2007 

Beyond ha passkxtfor teaching, she had a pas- 
sion for life, famSy and mends 

UBERTYVIIil - Barbara Ann Schmidt 
(Molczan) age 51 of Ubertyville and formerly of 
Long Grove, passed away Friday, April 13, 2007 at 
her home after a two-year battle with a brain 
tumor. She was bom in Evanston, to Burton and 
the late Margaret Ann Schmidt She was a 1973 
graduate of Adlai-Stevenson High School in 
Lincolnshire, Barb began her teaching career at 
St Catherines High School in Racine, Wis, teadi- 
ing Physical Education. During her 29 years in 
District 96, she participated in extra duties sudi 
as Before and After School Sports, mentoring of 
new teachers, Leadership Team, scheduling, and 
as a KM Unton Representative. Her family and 
friends joyously celebraled her marriage to Ron 
MolczanonJulyl9,2003. 

Survivors include her husband, Ron Molczan; 
her father, Burton (Jeri) Schmidt; her sister, 
Bonnie (Robert) Brehmer; her niece and nephew 
Heather Brehmer and James Brehmer; her 




cousin; and her cousins daughter, Site was pre- 
ceded in death by her mother, Margaret Arm 
Schmidt; tier grandparents; her aunt and uncles; 
and her cousin. , 

A memorial visitation is sdicduled for Friday 
April 20 from 4 pm until 8 pm at Strang 
Funeral ClupH & Crematorium, 410 E. Befvidorc 
Road, in Grayslake. The memoriil service will be 
held Saturday April 21, at 1D30 am at tlie St 
Andrew Church, 10 S. Lake SL, in Mundelcin, 
with a one liour memorial visitation in the drurch 
prior to the funeral service. In lieu of flowers, 
donations may bo made to Die KiWeer School 
PTO, 3100 Old McHenry Road, Long Grove. IL 
600-57, or the Car I luge College Kappa CliI 
Anniversary Gift, 2001 Alford Park Drive, Keooslia, 
Wl 53140. For more information logon 
wwwjtrangfuneraLorg. Please sign the Guest 
Book al www.Lalatf^tyJourailscorrvbbits 

WALKER PHILLIP LYONS 

Bern March 6, 1919 
Died: April 13, 2007 
Started Lynns-Ryan Ford Sales, tnc m Anthdi 

GURNEE - Walker Phillip Lyons, bom March 
6, 1919 to Frank and Nellie Lyons in PliiLrddphia, 
Pa, gently passed away April 13 2007. Walker's 
family moved to lite Chicago area in 1921 when 
his father passed 
away. Walker, his 
brothers, and his 
moll icr moved in 
with his aunt and 
uncle, George and 
Viola Lyons, to be 
raised and schooled 
in Oak Park Walker's 
molt er passed away in 1931 when he was 11 
Walker met and manicd his next-door neighbor, 
(Kathleen) Rosalie Ryan, in 1943, Walker and 
Rosalie loved family and children, but could have 
none of their owa They then dtoso to adopt 
three diitdren (Sarah) Sally in 1952, Kevin in 
1954, and Gary In 1955. Walker was also a mem- 
ber and past-president of the Oak Park Optimist 
Club, Walker's positive oullook and friendly man- 
ner helped him to be a successful salesman in * 
many fields: shoes, for Scars, and Finally automo- 
biles, where he found his true catling. He and his 
brother-in-law, Larry Ryan, scraped up enough 
money to purchase and start Lyons-Ryan Ford 
Sales, Inc. in Antioch, on April 1. 1957. He, Rosalie, 
and tliei r children moved to Antioch later that 
year. In Anlkxh Ik was an active member and 
supporter of the community. Walker was a past 
member of both the local Knights ol Columbus, 
Lions Club, and PM&L Walker and Liny 
branched out by purchasing and opening Lyons- 
Ryan Ford on GOth Street in Kenosha, Wrs, in 
1960. Walker operated that dealership until 
October 1968, when it was sold. 

Walker and family moved to the San 
Francisco Bay area in 1969, where he and Larry 
opened Lyons-Ryan Ford in San Rafael, Calif, in 
May of 1970. Walker was divorced from Rosalie in 
1973. Larry and Walker sold their dealership in 

July 1 7S . Watlux tcurcd, ihougfti still maintained 
Ills partnership In live Anlkxh simc VJalVcr 
resided in San Rafael, remaining active by cither 
swimming or playing racquctball daily until he 
left in Jury 2003. Walker returned to the 
Chicagoland area to be closer to his family, Irving 
at Sunrise of Gumec until his passing. Walker was 
preceded in death by liis brothers William, Paul 
Frank, and George, and by his son, Gary. 

His is survived by his daughter (Sarah) Sally; 
his son, Kevin (Janet); and his grandchildren, 
Katorynn and Gregory, Walker was a loving and 
caring lather, grandfather, uncle, and friend. He 
did not often show his feelings openly, but he 
always let you know lie was loyal and supporting 
you. 

Walker's "celebration of life" will be nek) at 
Strang's Funeral Home, 1055 Main SL, Antioch, 
on Friday, April 20, from 4 to 8 pm Red sweaters 
are encouraged. His "parade to peace" will start 
at Strang's at 11:30 am on Saturday, April 2J, 
ending with a gravesite service. In lieu of flowers, 
memorials may be sent to Like County Haven, 
PO Box 127, libertyville, IL 60048. ( Info call (847) 
395-4000) Please sign Hie quest book for Walker 
at-wvutrangflvcom. 
Please also sign the Guest Book at 
w\,vw.LakeCcimtyJounTalsxonrvbbrts 



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Page 14A • April 20, 2007 ALL 



COUNTY 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



I 



Des Plaines River Greenway preservation 
has been forest preserve priority since '58 



• TRAIL 

Continued from 9A 

There, a one-mile gap 
exists from West Riverside 
Drive to Estonian Lane, 
where a short section of the 
trail continues to Cook 
County Forest Preserve 
trails. 

Bridges and underpasses 



along the trail's route make it 
possible to travel nearly the 
entire distance without cross- 
ing any major roads. 

Preservation of the Des 
Plaines River Greenway has 
been a priority since the Lake 
County Forest Preserve was 
founded in 1958. Planning for 
the counlywide trail through 
the Greenway began in the 
late 1970s. The first section of 



the Des Plaines River Trail 
was open In 1901 near 
Wadsworth. By connecting to 
the North Shore Path, the 
McClory Trail and the Forest 
Preserve's 35-mile 

Millennium Trail, the Des 
Plaines River Trail is consid- 
ered the center piece of the 
regional system of trails, cov- 
ering more than 100 miles in 
Lake County. 





Sand/ Bressner - sbfESsncrJa nwnevwgroup.com 

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan shares a laugh with State Rep. Eddie Washington, D-Waukegan, 
and former congressional candidate Dan Seals, following an open forum at the College of Lake County's 
Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan. 

House speaker explains benefits 
tax increase could have on CLC 



: A/G or Furnace [Spring Allergies?; 
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Exp, 4/30/07 



Exp. 4/30/07 



Heating 1 & Cooling 

H| 847-247-0400 

Family Owned by John & Kathy Murray 





f&ttr 

**-*^ with an obituary In the Lake County Journals. 

Obtt&y Mrte-tps must 6c ujtmtted by noon on Tuesdjys for incknien k\ thai iwckl erttai 
AWwrekafe*! ntxJi £j*e County Jburro/jflo rtOoWWe the abttuty lowptar. 



For information call: 847-223-8161 • Visit: LakeCountyJournals.com 



• MADIGAN 

Continued from 9A 

One benefit a tax increase 
would have for CLC specifical- 
ly, Madigan said, would be 
more state aid to community 
colleges. 

The state currently cur- 
rently covers seven to eight 
percent of community col- 
leges' financial needs, while 
taxpayers and tuition pay for 
the rest. Madigan acknowl- 
edged that the initial agree- 
ment between the state and 
community colleges was that 
the state, taxpayers and stu- 
dent tuition would each take 
an equal share of financial 
responsibility. 

The lack of state aid, Fonte 
said, was one of the reasons 
CLC increased its tuition ear- 
lier this year. 

"I think the speaker is sen- 
sitive to the needs of commu- 



CLC facts 



nity college funding," he said. 
"I find that really important 
that he recognizes the fact that 
the share that we get from the 
state over the last 15 years is a 



decreasing percentage. I think 
he recognizes that the state is 
not fulfilling its obligation. 
The pressure is on the student 
tuition and the local taxpayer." 



A marketing feature 6^ the L,ake. County Journals 

Business of the Week 



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Address: 2060 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 

Telephone: 847-265-5280 Fax: 847-265-5282 

Website: aquapoolspapros.com Email: aquapoolspapros@aol.com 

Primary Products/Service Provided: Retail & Service Co. selling in-ground and above ground pools, spas, 
saunas, accessories. Service and repairs for all brands of pools & spas including openings and closings. 

Years In Business: 9 Number of Employees: 15 in season 

What makes your business unique? Our 75 years of combined industry experience helps us choose the best 
products to sell our valued customers. In facl, we have received more awards for pool and spa installations 
and service than any company in Lake County since 1999. We offer free water testing and expert advise lo 
anyone that may need our help. The bottom line is we don't spend our time selling palio furniture, pool tables, 
hardware, lumber or Christmas trees, We are Pool & Spa professionals! 

Words thai best sum up your business: We take great pride in our personable, experienced staff so that our cus- 
tomers can enjoy their backyard investment with Iheir family and friends. 



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(847) 265-5280 




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B 
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d 
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1 



The following statistics were 


provided by the College of Lake County 


t 


and are based on Spring 2007 enrollment ; 


1 


Head-count: 


Student profile: ' 


f 


15,724 students enrolled 


Age: 


S 


in credit programs 


24 and younger: 50 percent j 






25 to 34; 22 percent 1 


i 


Fiscal year 2007 


35 and older: 28 percent ; 


._ 


operating fund budget 






$72,130,308 


Ethnicity: 


J 


Property taxes: 63.5 percent 


White: 58 percent A 




Tuition/fees: 24.8 percent 


Black: 8 percent ''< 




State funding: 10.5 percent 


Hispanic: 23 percent j ' 
. Asian: 6 percent ; 
Other: 5 percent 1 




In-district tuition and fees for 2007-08 academic year rj 




$80 a credit hour 







) ,1 




» FirstAmendment 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting 
free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or of the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government 



ILAktCOUNlY 
OURNALS 

John Rung - Group Publisher Larry Lough - General Manager 
Chris Krug - Group Editor Matt Pera - News Editor 




Edition of April 20-26, 2007 ALL • Page 15A 
» OurView 

■ 

Breaking free 
from violence 



LakeCountyJournals.com 



Domestic violence continues to 
be a major problem in this country, 
and yet it often remains in soci- 
ety's shadow. 

Everyone knows that it occurs. 
Everyone agrees it is a problem, 
But, the issue often remains in the 
background. 

Recently in Lake County, a fairly 
high-profile case has shined a spot- 
light on domestic violence. And if 
any good can possibly come of the 
horrific attack on, and subsequent 
death of, Nadine Dean, perhaps 
that is it. 

Dean's husband, John Dean, 56, 
of Gages Lake, admitted to stab- 
bing Nadine "several times" at 
their home, located at 33593 N. 
Oakland Drive; on Feb. 20, accord- 
ing to the Lake County Assistant 
State's Attorney Brett Henne. 

Dean was arrested in Waukegan 
the same day he allegedly stabbed 
his wife, and appeared in court on 
March 15. He faces eight counts of 
first degree murder. His trial is 
scheduled for May 29. 

In McHenry County, Gloria 
Johncours was trying to break free 



of her troubled marriage when she 
was shot April 2, allegedly by her 
ex-husband. 

The attack occurred while 
Johncours was driving; police 
allege that Edward Johncours 
drove alongside her and opened 
fire. Johncours survived the attack, 

Before the attack, Gloria 
Johncours had sought an order of 
protection against her ex-husband. 

Nationally, 61 percent of female 
homicide victims also were wives 
or girlfriends of their killers, 
according to the National Coalition 
Against Domestic Violence. 

Experts say that the most dan- 
gerous time for a woman can be 
when she decides to leave an abu- 
sive relationship. 

There is help for victims of 
domestic violence. Turning Point 
offers extensive services for vic- 
tims of domestic violence. Turning 
Point has a 24-hour crisis line at 1 
(800) 892-8900. 

Women who endure such abuse 
often can feel alone. Or feel they 
have no options. But there are peo- 
ple who are willing to help. 



» 



PartyUnes 



Parents speak out 
at autism forum 



Sandy Cole 

State 
representative, 

R-Grayslake 



State legislators in Lake County 
heard a collective plea on April 11, 
from more than 50 frustrated par- 
ents, educators, 
caretakers and 
professionals. 
The plea is for 
more services 
and educational 
funding for autis- 
tic children in 
Illinois. 

The autism 
forum, which 
took place at the 
University 
Center of Lake 
County, was spon- 
sored by State 
Reps. Sandy Cole,- 
R-Grayslake; 
Mark Beaubien, 
R-Wauconda, - 
, JoAnn Osmond, 
R-Antioch, and 
Ed Sullivan Jr., R- 
Mundelein, in 
response to the 
growing number 
of children in 
Lake County 
affected by 

autism spectrum 
disorders. 

"Approximately 
in Illinois have 
autism, and the prevalence of this 
disorder is rapidly increasing each 
year," said State Rep. Patricia 
Bellock, R-Hinsdale, a long-stand- 
ing advocate for funding and legis- 
lation on autism. 

.Bellock, her . colleagues and 
guest speakers present at the forum 
were visibly moved by the emotion- 
al and personal testimony of par- 
ents who tearfully described the 
inadequate education and services 
their developmental^ disabled chil- 
dren were receiving in both main- 
stream and special educational 




Mark Beaubein 
State 

representative, 
R-Wauconda 




JoAnn Osmond 
State 

representative, 
R-Antioch 



24,000 children 
some form of 



schools. 

"My little boy doesn't sing to me 
anymore," sobbed a young mother 
from Gurnee 
whose 9-year-old 
son is autistic and 
blind. "That was 
his thing - he 
loved to sing all of 
the time, but 
stopped because 
his teachers told 
him it was inap- 
propriate to sing 
at school." 

Dr. Carol 
Paxton Cox, a 
licensed clinical 
psychologist with 
a practice in 
Grayslake, said 
more funding was 
needed for schools 
to meet the needs 
of autistic i chil- " 
dren. 

"Decades after 
the rise of ADHD 
and now autism, 
why are we still 
trying to jam 
square peg chil- 
dren into round' 
holes?" she asked. "Where would .' 
the world be today if great people 
like Howard Hughes, Issac Newton, : 
Albeit Einstein and . Thomas 
Jefferson were not allowed to pur- ' 
sue their obsessive talents and pas- 
sions?" 

Cole joined Bellock, Osmond and 
Sullivan as a co-sponsor to Speaker 
of the House, Michael Madigan's 
House Bill 1661 that would appro- 
priate $10 million from the General 
Revenue Fund to the Department of 
Human Services for a grant to the 
Autism Program for an Autism 
Diagnosis Education Program for 
young children. The bill could be 
effective on July 1, 2007, 



Ed Sullivan Jr. 

State 

representative, 

R-Mundeiein 



» Snapshot 

"Talk radio disc jockey Don Imus was fired by CBS and MSNBC for 
making inappropriate comments about the Rutgers women's 
basketball team. Do you think the punishment fit the crime?" 




' 



"He's got the right to 
say whatever he 
wantsrThey have the 
right to fire him." 

DonPeet 

Hawthorn Woods 

"I don't think what he 
said was right. But I 
don't that [firing him] 
was fair." 

Pat Hie key 
Grayslake 




"It's fair he was 
fired. He had been 
warned before." 



Jim Scaiper 

Grayslake 

"Yes, for him to 
make qualifications 
about women he 
doesn't know is 
inexcusable." 

Scott Beckman 

Grayslake 



» SketchView 



ili)innUUJhn-mHl^llViM))m^1ium,uM,, ■., i ,v.i^,iaau^to 1 1 jj, 







» YourView 

What it really means 
To the Editor: 

This letter comes as a 
response to citizen ques- 
tions regarding the 2006 
Illinois State Report card. 
It is critical for the public 
to understand that the 
playing field is not level 
when it comes to measur- 
ing adequate yearly 
progress through the 
report. 

The results come down 
to the types and numbers 
of students taking the 
test as required under the 
No Child Left Behind law 
created in 2001. Adequate 
yearly progress, also 
referred to as AYP, repre- 
sents annual performance 
targets in reading and 
math that the state, 
school districts, and 
schools must reach as set 
out in the federal law. 
\ the 2006 report card 
.. reflects the Prairie State 
Achievement Exam taken 
.in the spring of 2005. At 
Warren, if approximately a 
dozen more students 
would have scored slight- 
. ly higher, the school and 
.; district would have made 
' adequate yearly progress 
under the federal rules. 
Just, two of the 29 cate- 
gories at Lake County's 
second largest high 



school did not meet the 
standard. 

Some students were 
previously identified as 
having academic difficul- 
ties in elementary and 
middle school. 

Warren appreciates the 
opportunity to be meas- 
ured, but we are disap- 
pointed in the way it is 
done. If any one category 
of students does not 
meet the standard, the 
entire school does not 
meet the standard under 
the No Child Left Behind 
rules. The magic number 
for the 2006 report card 
Was 45. 

If a school did not have 
at least 45 students with 
disabilities or at least 45 
economically disadvan- 
taged students or at least 
45 students of various 
ethnicities, there were no 
standards to be met for 
the No Child Left Behind 
law. 

The reality is Lake 
County's second largest 
high school is achieving 
academic success with a 
greater diversity of stu- 
dents as defined by crite- 
ria in the federal law. To 
be exact, students in 27 
of the 29 categories - 
which includes Hispanic, 
black, white and 



■ ■ 
Letters to the editor 


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Grayslake 

■ ' - * 



Asian/Pacific Islander 11th 
graders tested in math 
and reading - are meeting 
standards. Any perception 
generated by the public 
that Warren is under serv- 
ing its student body sim- 
ply is not true. 
* Statewide, the nearest 
diversity comparison to 
Warren is a high school 
district with a building of 
more than 3,000 students 
in which 25 of 29 cate- 
gories must be met. 
Warren, with approxi- 
mately 4,000 students, 
continues to improve in 
academic achievement, 
despite the criteria in No 
Child Left Behind. 
We heartily embrace the 
challenge of serving a 
diverse student popula- 
tion. 



We only ask our high 

school community to 
understand the compar- 
isons, the criteria, the 
challenges and the con- 
clusions of*the data. 

Dr. Philip L. Sofaocinski 
District 121 Superintendent 
of Schools 

Why Is that? 
To the Editor: 
Not living in Round Lake, 
maybe it's none of my 
business. But, I don't 
understand why the 
Round Lake Police 
Department needs the 
Mundelein police chief to 
conduct their sting, as 
reported in a recent edi- 
tion of paper. 

Frank Mason 

Round Lake Beach 



» SeeingltThrough 



Denying auto recycling plant was right move 



'■•..: 



As you know, in this column, I 
have praised communities that 
have worked together in a spirit 
toward intergovernmental agree- 
ments or other ways to resolve 
neighborly issues. 

By the same token, I have been 
critical when neighboring govern- 
ments have become Involved in 
"incentive warfare" to lure busi- 
ness from one community into 
another. Taxpayers always suffer 
when that happens. 

Recently, one of the big issues 
has been the steps taken by a vehi- 
cle salvage parts operator to move 
his business from the north side of 
Washington Street, In Gurnee to 
the south side of the street onto 
what is called the Nordic 
Properties. The move required a 
special use permit to allow car 
crushing and parts scavenging 
operations. 

; .The petitioner claimed that 
major automobile companies are 
getting into state of-the-art auto • 
recycling plants. 

Critics claim that its a fancier 
name for a junkyard and such 
plants should not be located near 
residential areas. 

The Gurnee Village Board and 
its Plan Commission were besieged 
by packed houses of Park City resi* 




John S. 
Matijevich 



dents who were most affected by 
the potential move of Auto Parts 
City. Gurnee officials had to be cog- 
nizant of the fact that Park City 
officials, "when the shoe.was on the 
other foot," opposed the operation , 
of a plant that would have adverse- 
ly affected Gurnee homeowners. 
That was in 2003, and I recall a sim- 
ilar attempt some years earlier was 
set back by the vigilance and'oppo- 
sltion of both Gurnee and Park 
City residents. There, too, the peti- 
tioners pleaded that the plants 
were state-of-the-art. 

To me/ citizens have every right 
to speak out when they feel that a 
particular business might disturb 
their quality of life or may nega- 
tively impact the valuation of their 
properties, for which they have 
worked so hard to establish. 

I'm sure that the business own- 
ers are upstanding citizens, too, 
- but I stand firmly for families in - 
residential neighborhoods that 



their quality of life must be pro- 
tected from industry-intensive 

uses. 

The Gurnee Village Board, by a 
close 3-3 vote denied the zoning 
change. 

A two-thirds vote was required 
for approval. This was just one } . 
more example of how a group.pf <.' 
citizens must speak out to protect ' 
their interests. If they stand fast, 
and in unison, they can win their 
case. 

: I praise Gurnee trustees Ray 
Damyohaitis; Greg Gamer and 
•Patrick Perry for voting against 
the zoning change, Ifc^hey looked 
at the issue, focusirig'bnhow much 
revenue the project might bring tor 
the village that might have been ' 
selfish. 

But they looked at it from the 
"do unto others as you would have ' 
them do unto you" standpoint. It 
was the right and responsible thing 
to do. ' "\ 

In the end, Gurnee proved, tfratt 
they want to be good neighbors. 
Many citizens of Park City are 
grateful for that. And both sides 
are better for it. 

•John S. Matijevich writes a 
weekly column for the Lake County? 
Journals. 



. -.^^.^^^.^^ M ~ \ MM-tSL 



Page 16A • April 20, 2007 WL/FL/AN/LV 



COUNTY 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



lv / 



Hair erasing experience 

Waukegan JROTC raises funds for rifle range 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

Every spring, the 
Waukegan High School 
JROTC cadets plan ' their 
biggest competition of the 
year -the Drill Down. 

This year, the 16th annual 
internal drill competition 
took place April 12 at the 
Waukegan High School Upper 
Grade gymnasium. 

The six companies that 
competed went through a 
series of challenges to prove 
their military prowess. 

And, while the Drill Down 
was the main attraction, an 
event directly following the 
competition also was highly 
anticipated. 

. Cadets gathered to watch 
two of their leaders - retired 
Army Col, Barry Gallagher 
and retired Sgt. Major Edgar 
Grace - have their heads 
shaved. 

Both went under the clip- 
pers to make a good on a 
promise 

They each promised cadets 




Chris P.idgel! -cpadgcllffflwncwgioup.com 

Students in JROTC run into the gymnasium to perform in a drill team 
competition on April 12 at Waukegan High School. 




they would lose their hair if 
the JROTC met certain 
fundraising goals - $3,000 for 
Gallagher and $3,500 for 
Grace - for improving the 
Waukegan High School rifle 
range. 

Once the improvements 
are complete, the range will 
be dedicated to the memory of 
Army Lt. David Giaimo, a 



1999 Waukegan High School 
graduate who was killed in 
Iraq in August of 2005. 

The kids managed to raise 
a little more than $3,500. The 
fundraiser will continue 
through the end of the school 
year, Gallagher said, adding 
that Giamio's family was 
"fully behind" the effort. 

"We did not take one step to 



■ Chrts Padgcll • cpadgetlfi nwncwsgroup.com 

Waukegan High School JROTC Senior Instructor Col. Barry Gallagher grimaces as his head is shaved. Gallagher 
shaved his head when students raised money to pay for painting and repairs to the high school's rifle range. 

do anything about this until |f you Want to help ... 



we talked to the family,' 
Gallagher said. "They're great 
people." 

A date for the dedication of 
the lLT David L. Giaimo 
Memorial Range has not been 
set yet, but will be announced 
later this spring, Gallagher 
said. 



AH donations should be sent to the following address: 

Waukegan High School Army JROTC Program 

Attention: 1LT David Giaimo Fund 

2325 Brookside Avenue 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

Checks should be made payable to: WHS 1LT David Giaimo Fund 



Great Lakes Bulletin wins top honors 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

The Great Lakes Bulletin, the U.S. Navy's 
oldest continuously published base newspaper, 
placed first in the 2006 Chief of Naval 
Information Merit Awards. 

The newspaper, published by the Lake 
County Journals, placed third in 2005. This is 
the third time the Bulletin has taken top hon- 
ors, also having readied the benchmark in 2004 
and 2002. 

The annual awards program recognizes out- 
standing achievements in internal media prod- 
ucts produced by Navy commands and individ- 
uals. First-place entries are forwarded to the 
Defense Information School for further compe- 
tition as official Navy entries in the 
Department of Defense's Thomas Jefferson 
Awards contest. 

"I'm pleased to return the Bulletin to the top 
spot among tabloid-format newspapers," said 
editor Paul Engstrom, a Navy chief photojour- 
nalist. Engstrom retired as Great Lakes public 



affairs officer in January 1999. He assumed the 
newspaper's helm in October 2005. 

"Anytime you finish first in any endeavor, 
you have to feel proud of your effort," 
Engstrom said. "Garnering this award for 
Naval Station Great Lakes and the public 
affairs' office is gratifying." 

This achievement was a team effort, he said. 

"I want to thank my associate editors, Judy 
Lazarus and Jim Boylan, for their fine work 
and dedication," Engstrom said. "I also want to 
thank the newspaper's many contributors, 
including Matt Mogle and Susan Koerner from 
the public affairs office at Training Support 
Center; John Sheppard, for his assistance In 
editing; MC1(AW/SW) Virginia Schaefer-Ward 
for her photography; and Lake County 
Journals, publisher of the Bulletin, for their 
terrific technical support." 

Placing second in this year's competition 
was the "Rota Coastline," Naval Station Rota, 
Spain. "Skywriter" from Naval Air Facility, 
Atsugi, Japan, finished third. 



University Center celebrates 
administrative professionals 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS |f y 0U g ... 



at 



Abbott 



The University Center of 
Lake County and the GLMV 
Chamber of Commerce have 
established a buffet luncheon, 
program, and expo to thank 
the administrative profession- 
als who keep life running 
smoothly in the world of busi- 
ness. 

"I'm very excited*about the 
wide range of Lake County 
businesses collaborating with 
us on this second annual event 
and providing fabulous door 
prizes." said Kimberly Kreml, 
the event's organizer. "We'll 
again provide a delicious 



Tickets are $20 and seating Is 
limited. RSVP with Kimberly 
Kreml, at (847) 665-4010, or 
kkreml@ucenter.org are request- 
ed by April 20. 

lunch in a lovely setting that 
gets admins away from their 
desks, for a while and gives 
them the opportunity to pick 
up information they'll find 
useful both personally and 
professionally." 

A buffet luncheon will con- 
clude with a presentation by 
Susan Sherwood, divisional 
vice president, Administrative 



Services 
Laboratories. 

Sherwood has responsibili- 
ty for several corporate func- 
tions including Fleet, Travel, 
Records, Library Information 
Resources, Food Services and 
Interior Design. She began at 
Abbott in 1990 and is a 
Grayslake resident. 

In; addition, almost two 
dozen Lake County businesses ' 
and service providers will 
staff tables providing informa- 
tion useful on the job or after 
hours. Besides door prizes and 
giveaways, there will be a free 
gift for each administrative 
professional who attends. 



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SECTION B 

Edition of April 20 to 26, 2007 
LakeCountyJournals.com 



o 



» BestBets 

MUSIC SENSATION: Lonestar will perform at 8 
p,m. on April 28 at Genesee Theatre, 203 Genesee 
St. Tickets cost $35, $40, $45 and $65. 



WAR MEMORABILIA: A National Civil War 
Show and Sale will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
on April 21 at the DuPage County Fairgrounds. 



Details for BestBets events on page 2B 

RING THE BELL: A handbell concert will take 
place at 7:30 p.m. on April 25 at Santa Maria Del 
Popolo Church in Mundelein. 




a r i^iia^iuj 



» NowShowing 

Movie reviews 

"Fracture" 
*** 

• Movie critic Jeffrey Westhoff 
says the strong acting of 
Anthony Hopkins and Ryan 
Gosling make "Fracture" a 
bone-shattering success. 

"Hot Fuzz" 

• Movie critic Jeffrey Westhoff 
says movie spoofs don't often 
work, but viewers will love the 
fresh comedy of "Hot Fuzz." 

PAGE4B 



» Out&About 

Calendar 

Looking for something to do in 
Lake County or the Chicago 
area? Check out the calendar for 
events and activities 

PAGE2B 




» RelishTheAmericanTable 

Melting Pot 

Tagines, slow-cooked Moraccan 
stews, add exoctically delicious • 
flavor to American tastes. Learn . 
how to'make these tasty treats. 

PAGE6B 




» OnStage 
"Massacre" 

A new play, "Massacre (Sing to 
Your Children)," tells the story of 
a small New Hampshire town 
permeated by violence. 

PAGE 7B 






Annie Christie • nchristit.g n wnewsgroup.com 

O-QonOB-Kya !* « tKiddhUt ohrant originating (torn Nlchlmr».D«l»WoFiln.- 



Jessica Cole holds "lUZU," buddhjst prayerbeads,.as>be.chants.NamJWvoho,Ronao.Kyo-Na^-Myoi»«- 

Tiio NfchirenSfioshu sect advises to chant Narn-Myoho-Renge-Kyo regularly-as a means of improving health,- happiness, wisdom arid compassion. Cole is a follower of 

rticbire'n Shbshu Buddhism and teaches classes in her Antioch home. * 

Eightfold Path, Four Noble Truths part of Buddhism 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton@nwnewsgroup.com 

Jessica Cole kneeled on the floor 
with her daughter, Savannah, 5, 
and two of their friends, hands 
joined in prayer before an altar 
in Cole's living room. 

The four chanted in unison, 
almost singing the words using a 
low, constant note. They were recit- 
ing the Gongyo to the Gohonzon. 

The simplest way to explain these 
two terms is to say that the Gongyo 
are prayers sent to the Gohonzon, an 
object of worship that embodies the 
teachings of Nichiren Shoshu 
Buddhism. • 

Cole, 31, has practiced this type of 
Buddhism for 13 years and holds a 
monthly gathering at her home, 
where people chant and talk about 
their faith. 

The group meets at 7 p.m. on the 
second Wednesday of each month. 
Cole started the group in January. 

"We're trying to double the bod- 
hisattvas of the earth," she said. A 
bodhisattva, according to traditional 
Buddhism, is a person who has 



A small Buddhist glossary 



* 



A religious visit 



Gongyo: Prayers recited daily by followers of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism 
Gohonzon: An object of worship that embodies the teachings of Nichiren Daishonin 
Bodhisattva: A person who has attained Enlightenment, but remains on earth to help 
others achieve this state of mind 

Enlightenment: Knowing the true nature of the human spirit and being free of the rein 
carnation cycle 

Four Noble Truths: Realized by the Buddha; 1. Life is suffering 2. Suffering is caused by 
desire 3. End suffering by ending desire 4. Follow the Eightfold Path to end desire. 
Eightfold Path: 1. See things as they are without imposing our expectations. 2. View 
situations with pure intentions. 3. Pure intentions lead to pure, honest speech. 4. Erase 
complexity from your life. 5. Be happy with your position in life. 6. Encounter struggles 
with no aggression. 7. Be mindful of behavior, realizing that it affects both us and 
others. 8. Be completely absorbed in the present, using meditation as a tool. 



Source: http'J/buddhanetnet 



achieved Enlightenment and choos- 
es to remain on earth to teach oth- 
ers. 

Teaching and learning are huge 
components of Buddhism, especial- 
ly the sect Cole follows, which is 
Nichiren Shoshu. 

To understand this sect, one must 
first understand the foundations of 
Buddhism. 

According to scholars and reli- 



gious teachings, Siddharfha 
Gautama was born in northern 
India around 580 B.C. 

As part of a royal family, he was 
sheltered from the sufferings of life, 
until one day he stepped outside the . 
palace grounds. 

He saw, for the first time, a sick 
man, an old man and a corpse. This 
made him realize that illness, death 
and aging are things that no one can 



The Dalai Lama will give a Buddhist 
teaching at 9:30 a.m. on May 6 at the 
Harris Theater in Millennium Park in 
Chicago. He will discuss how to cultivate 
compassion and kindness more deeply. 

avoid. And after seeing a monk, he 
took this as a sign to renounce his 
lavish life and live as a wanderer, 
pondering ways to dodge suffering. 

After years of nomadic life and 
studying with Buddhist and Hindu 
monks, he spent days sitting under- 
neath a bodhi tree in deep medita- 
tion. This is when he realized the 
Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold 
Path. He then became the Buddha, 
which means "awakened one." 

After Siddhartha died, his follow- 
ers began arguing about the 
specifics of Buddhism, which creat- 
ed many sects. 

One of those sects, Nichiren 
Shoshu, was founded by Nichiren 
Daishonin, born in Japan in 1222. 

See BUDDHISM, page 5B 








» Views 

With the release of the Bears' 
schedule just after a Super Bowl 
season, Kevin Kaduk warns fans 
against optimism too early in the 
game. He says that a Super Bowl 
appearance might not be as easy 
this time around. 

PAGE 11B 




» PrepSports 

Wonderful Warren 

Warren baseball breaks out a big 

13-0 victory in North Suburban 
Conference crossover. 

PAGE 9B 



» QuickHitters 
Athletic spotlight 

Mario Perez lifts Warren with his 
pitching, while Grayslake Central's 
Kelly Washington hits state-qualifying 
time. 

PAGE 9B 

» GameOfTheWeek 

Raging rivalry 

This coming week will be filled with 
Antioch and Lakes matchups, but the 
baseball game at 4:30 p.m. on . 
Tuesday, April 24, will be the first. 

PAGE9B 



» DiningOut 







. » t «_y * _ 



w 



Chris Padgett - epaefget I@nwnews9f0up.com 

Edgar Sccundlno, of Hainesville, carries a tray of food from the 
kitchen to a customer during a busy Saturday evening at Las Palmas 
Mexican Restaurant in Lindenhurst. The restaurant is at 1910 E. Grand 
Ave. To read more about Las Palmas, see page 5B. 



. • 



Y 



- -» - ^ .- *■ .* > y .'.'.' . 



w^^t*^^^* 



f^^^^Ww ■ ■ » » ■ 



Out & About 




Check it out... 

Looking for something to do? Check out the 
events below for a variety of activities to enjoy. 



Have an upcoming event? 

To promote an upcoming event in 
LakeLife, submit news to Dani Schweigert 
at dschweigert@nwnewsgroup.com, 



Edition of April 20 to 26, 2007 ALL • Page 2B 



ON STAGE 



ATTIC PLAYH0USE-410 

Sheridan Road, Highwood; For 
more information, call (847) 
433-2660 or visit atticplay- 
house.com or 
atticplay@aol.com. 
Performances run from April 20 
to May 27. Fridays and 
Saturdays at 8 p.. and Sundays 
at 3 p.m. Tickets are $18 with 
advanced purchase and $20 at 
door. 

RAVINIA RISING STARS 
SERIES-Lake Cook and Green 
Bay roads in Highland Park; For 
more information call Box office 
(847) 266 -5100, Visit 
www.ravinia.org Featuring: 
Alison Balsom. Performance 
begins at 8 p.m., April 20 in 
Bennett-Gordon Hall in the John 
D. Harza building on the Ravinia 
Festival grounds. All Rising Stars 
concerts are held on Fridays and 
begin at 8 p.m. Tickets $20. 

GENESEE THEATRE PERFORM- 
ING ARTS CAMP-203 N. Genesse 
St., Waukegan; For more infor- 
mation, call Nina at (847) 406- 
3148. Summer program from 
June 11 to July 29 (July 4th. week 
ofO on Mondays, Wednesdays, 
and Fridays: 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 
a.m. Cost: $700. Register by 
April 21 with full payment and 
receive $100 off. Registration 
forms available in the box office 
lobby or on-line at www.gene- 
seetheatre.com. Completed 
forms can be faxed to (847)- 
782-2355, or mail to: Performing 
Arts Camp Application, Genesee 
Theatre, 203 N. Genesee St., 
Waukegan, IL 60085. 

THE BLOCK/EL BLOOUL* A 
Young Lords Story-by Jazqueline 
Lazu-DePaul University. Contact 
Maria Ochoa for tickets and 



schedule information (773) 325- 
7316).About the "Young Lords" 
from Lincoln Park, Chicago. Play 
premiere: April 20, 6:30 p.m. at 
the Lincoln Park Campus 
(Belden and Sheffield), Chicago. 
Student center building. 

GENESEE THEATRE-203N. 
Genesee St., Waukegan, For 
more information call Molly 
Olesen (847) 782-2366., or Visit 
www.geneseetheatre.com 
Featuring: "Lonestar," Lead 
singer Richie McDonald's 
farewell tour. Performance: April 
28 at 8 p.m. Tickets, priced from 
$35 to $45, purchased at the 
Genesee Theatre Box Office, all 
Ticketmaster outlets, charge- 
by-phone at (312) 559-1212 or 
online at 
www.ticketmaster.com. 

THE CENTER FOR PERFORMING 
ARTS- Governors State 
University, One University 
Parkway, University Park. For 
ticket information, call (708) 
235-2222 or visit centertickets. 
net. Featuring: "Joseph and the 
Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoat," April 29 at 1 and 5 
p.m. at the Center for perform- 
ing arts at Governors State 
University. Half price tickets 
available day of show for two 
hours prior to showtime for one 
hour only. Seniors 65 and older 
are eligible for a 10 percent dis- 
count on show tickets (not valid 
with other offers.) Tickets cost 
$40,50 and $65.50. 

THEATREWORKS-USA-The 

Center for Performing Arts at 
Governors State University, One 
University Parkway, University 
Park. Featuring: "The Lion, the 
Witch and the Wardrobe," April 
28 at 11 a.m. Tickets: call (708) 
235-2222 or visit www.cen- 
tertickets.net. Cost: Prices I and 



II - $10, Platinum- $11, Box office 
$15. 



SOUNDS OF MUSIC 



VILLAGE MUSIC STORE-645 
Osterman, Deerfield. For more 
information, call Bob Gand at 
(847) 945-5321, or visit 
www.VillageMusicStore.com. 
The Bob Gand Smooth Jazz 
Group with vocalist Caroline 
Sheaffer and special guest 
soloist Stevi Spinka on Jazz flute 
will be one of the entertainment 
groups at the North Shore 
Unitarian Art Fair at 3 p.m., 
Saturday, April 28 at the North 
Shore Unitarian Church, 2100 
Half Day Rd. in Bannockburn. 

LAKE FOREST SYMPHONY-50 
E. Old Mill Road, Lake Forest. For 
more information, call (847) 
295-2135, or visit www.lakefor- 
estsymphony.org. Season finale 
concert, May 18 and May 19 at 
the James Lumber Center for 
the Performing Arts in Grayslake 
on the College of Lake County 
campus. Concert begins at 8 
p.m. with a free pro-concert lec- 
ture by Jim Kendros at 7 p.m. • 
Purchase tickets: call Symphony 
office, (847) 295-2135 or James 
Lumber Center box office, (847) 
543-2300; or online www.lake- 
forestsymphony.org. Single tick- 
ets: $45, $35 and $25 for adults; 
senior tickets (65+), $45, $30 
and $20; student tickets, $45, 
$15 and $10. 

SANTA MARIA DEL POPOLO 
CHURCH-116 N. Lake St., in 
Mundelein. For more informa- 
tion, call (847) 949-8300. 
Featuring: Handbell Concert at 
7:30 p.m. on April 25 at the 
church. The concert will offer 
attendees a variety of handbell 
music rung by four handbell 
choirs, including "Pirates of the 
Caribbean" and "Siyahamba." A t 



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freewill offering'will be taken to 
benefit the handbell program. 

LIBERTYVILLE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH SANCTU- 
ARY-429 Brainerd Ave., in 
Libertyville. Featuring: Organ 
Fund Benefit Concert featuring 
Belinda C. King on flute/piccolo 
and James Grace on 
piano/organ. The event will take 
place at 4 p.m. on April 22. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



REMARKABLE WOMAN MAGA- 
ZINE-Fashion Style Event and 
Brunch, May 12 at Royal 
Melbourne Country Club, 4700 
Royal Melbourne Dr., Long 
Grove. Contact: Michelle Lanter 
Smith, (847) 809-0918. Rebecca 
Ortiz, host and model. 
Remarkable Woman Magazine's 
"win a Makeover Contest," 
silent auction, vendor booths 
and raffle prizes. Tickets: $35. 
Reserve at www.remarkable- 
womanmag.com or call (800) 
372-9565, ext. 108. 

BASKIN-ROBBINS-Baskin- 
Robbins, partnering with 
National Fallen Firefighters 
Foundation, featuring "31 Cent 
Scoop Night" on May 2 from 5 
p.m. to 10 p.m., at every loca- 
tion throughout the Chicagoland 
area to raise money for local 
firehouses paying tribute to 
local heroes. Fine closest 
Baskin-Robbins location in your 
area, visit 

www.baskinrobbins.com Cost: 
31$ for 2.5 ounce scoop of 
Baskin-Robbins ice cream. 

DaBOOTSCOOOP- 
B00TSC00TB00TCAMP- 

Classes: The Little Big Horn, 
Mundelein, corner Highway 176 
and Highways 60/83. April 24, 
Maren Oslac teaching beginner 
and intermediate classes. Cost: 
$15 a person, a class, or one 
purchase remaining three class- 
es, $40 per class. Payment at 
ttietloor. "3*T>" 

WESTFIELD HAWTHORN- 122 

Hawthorn Center, Vernon Hills; 



For more information, call 
(847) 362-6220, or visit 
www.westfield.com. Featuring: 
April 20 through 22, 
Bridal/Prom Expo.; April 27 
through 29, Arts & Craft Show. 
Free. 

LONG GROVE- 3110 RFD, Long 
Grove; For more information, 
call (847) 634-9440, or visit 
www.longgroveonline.com/choc 
olate.html. Featuring: From 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m., May 4 through 6, 
7th annual Long Grove 
Chocolate Festival. There will be 
a chocolate potpourri demo 
tent, music, food, shopping and 
Eye Candy Fashion Shows from 1 
to 3 p.m. on May 5 and 6. 

DUPAGE COUNTY FAIR- 
GROUNDS- 2015 W. Manchester 
Road, in Wheaton, For more 
information, call the fairgrounds 
at (630) 668-6636, call Zurko's 
Midwest Promotions at (715) 
526-9769, or visit Zurko's Web 
site at www.zurkopromotions. 
com. Featuring: From 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. on April 21, a National Civil 
War Collector's Show and Sale 
will take place at the fair- 
grounds. Cost is $7. 



MUSEUM EVENTS 



CHILDREN'S MUSEUM- 130 
Washington St., in Ingleside. For 
more information, call Linda at 
(847) 208-2237. Featuring: 
ArtNight from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
on April 28 at Maravela's in Fox 
Lake, at 4 S. Washington St., in 
Fox Lake. The event will include 
a silent and live art auction, 
artists at work, and an "all-you- 
can-eat" buffet dinner. Proceeds 
support museum programs and 
Bubba the art bus, which serves 
the entire Chain 0' Lakes area. 
New this year is a "Best Artists' 
Smock" contest with a grand 
prize of a family membership to 
the Art Institute of Chicago. 
Tickets cost $55 each and are 
available at the door. 
Discounted tickets for tables of 
eight also are available. 

■ 

BROOKFIELD ZOO- 31st Street 



LakeCountyJoumals.com 

and First Avenue, Brookfield; 
For more information, call 
(708) 485-0263, or visit 
www.brookfieldzoo.org. Hours: 
9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily and to 
7:30 p.m. on Sundays. 
Admission costs $10 for adults; 
$6 for seniors and children 3 
through 11; and zoo members 
and children 2 and younger are 
free. Exhibits: "The Living 
Coast: A World of Surprising 
Connections," 2,000-square- 
foot exhibit that "plunges" visi- 
tors into ocean depths off the j 
western coast of South 
America (Chile and Peru), 
where the driest desert in the 
world meets one of the most 
fertile ocean systems; 
American Bison. 

MILWAUKEE COUNTY ZOO- 
10001 W. Blue Mound Road, 
Milwaukee, Wis.; For more 
information, call (414) 771- 
5500, or visit www.milwaukee- 
zoo.org. Hours: 9 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday through Saturday; 
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sundays 
and holidays. Admission costs 
$8.25 for adults; $6.75 for sen- 
ior citizens 60 and older; $5.25 
for children ages 3 through 12; 
children 2 and younger are free. 

ADLER PLANETARIUM- 1300 
Lake Shore Drive, in Chicago; 
For more information, call (312) 
922-STAR (7827). Featuring: 
April 23 through 27, Early 
Childhood Week. Daily activities, 
which are free with paid muse- 
um admission, will take place 
for children throughout the 
week. Early Childhood Week is 
part of the national Week of the 
Young Child. 

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY 

MUSEUM- Lakewood Forest 
Preserve, 27277 Forest Preserve 
Drive (Route 176 and Fairfield 
Road), Wauconda; For more 
information, call (847) 968- • 
3400, or visit www.lakecounty- ■ 
\ disqoverymuseum.org. '••, 
Featuring: Through Sept. 23, 
"Hooked! The History and 
Ingenuity of Sport Fishing." 



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Movies 



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MPAA rating system 

G: General audiences PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned 

PG: Parental guidance suggested R: Restricted 



Edition of April 20 to 26, 2007 ALL ■ Page 4B 



LakeCountyJournals.corr 



No cracks, breaks to be found in 'Fracture' 



By JEFFREY WESTHOFF 

sldctracks@nwnewsgroup.com 

So many twisty thrillers have 
gone bust lately that "Fracture" will 
Inspire double takes precisely 
because its tightly bound plot does- 
n't unravel in the end. 

"Fracture" is a solid, old-fash- 
ioned game of mental cat and 
mouse between two Tine actors, 
Anthony Hopkins and recent 
Academy Award nominee Ryan 
Gosling. 

Gregory Hoblit's ("Primal Fear") 
direction might be too slick for the 
story's good, but Daniel Pyne and 
Glenn Gers* script strikes a 
respectable balance of complexity 
and story logic {unlike, say, "The 
Number 23," a recent example of 
plot twists gone wild). 

The story begins with Hopkins' 
character, Ted Crawford, an aero- 
nautical engineer with a genius for 
spotting the hairline fracture that 
caused a plane to crash. Crawford 
leaves work one afternoon to spy on 
his wife, Jennifer (Embeth Davidtz), 
and her lover at a getaway spa in 
Santa Monica. 

He returns home to wait for his 
wife and calmly shoots her in the 
face after she walks through the 
door. 

Crawford confesses to the shoot- 
ing as soon as the first police detec- 
tive enters the house. The only 
thing that doesn't follow his plan is 
that Jennifer survives the blast, 
although she immediately falls into 
a coma. 

Cut to Willy Beachum (Gosling), 
a deputy district attorney who just 
accepted a job at a posh corporate 
law firm loaned out of a Grisham 
novel. 

Crawford's case lands on 
Beachum's docket as he's cleaning 
out his office, but he figures the 



"Fracture" 



"k~kk 

Genre: Drama/thriller 

Director: Gregory Hoblit 

Writers: Daniel Pyne and Glenn GersRated 

More information: Rated R for language 

and some violent content; running time is 

113 minutes. 

Cast: Anthony Hopkins, Ryan Gosling, 

David Strathairn, Rosamund Pike 

trial will be swift because of 
Crawford's confession and the fact 
that police found him holding the 
gun. Plus, Crawford insists on act- 
ing as his own attorney. 

Then again, if anyone could get 
away with the perfect crime even 
after confessing to it, it would be the 
guy who once played Hannibal 
Lecter, right? 

"Fracture" is a puzzle film where 
Crawford twists his certain guilt 
into plausible innocence. The script 
carefully establishes Beachum with 
just the right amount of arrogance 
and impatience so that he doesn't 
catch on to Crawford's gambit until 
it is too late. 

A prosecutor on his game would 
have realized the significance of the 
make of the gun Crawford (alleged- 
ly) used. 

The script treats Beachum's 
career choice as the central moral 
theme. Will he pursue the greed of 
corporate law, or will he serve the 
public good in the DA's office? 

David Strathairn plays the dis- 
trict attorney, and because 
Strathairn's face has become a sym- 
bol of integrity, we know the deci- 
sion Beachum should make. But 
Beachum says, "I didn't work this 
hard to stay where I belong." 

Kramer Morgenthau's burnished 
cinematography undercuts this 
theme, though. The district attor- 




Photo provided 

Anthony Hopkins and Ryan Gosling star in "Fracture," a drama/thriller directed by Gregory Hoblit. In the film, Hopkins plays a 
man who murders his wife, and Gosling plays a deputy district attorney who is debating about moving up in the corporate world. 1 



ney's office looks just as sexy as the 
upscale law firm (even with gor- 
geous Rosamund Pike as Gosling's 
new boss). And Beachum's modest 
bungalow is striped witli the same 
evocative shadows as Crawford's 
multimillion-dollar house. 

No matter where Beachum ends 
up, the lighting will be just as dra- 
matic. 

The polished cinematography 
does heighten the mind games 
between the attorney and the 



accused (although putting a light 
under Hopkins face is just too easy 
of a trick). 

This is far from Hopkins' most 
complex performances, but there is 
a delight in his transformation from 
bumpkin to jackal after he plays his 
trump. Strangely, his Irish brogue 
increases with his villainy. 

"The Believer" and "Half 
Nelson" have shown Gosling also 
possesses deeper talent than 
"Fracture" asks, but he matches 




J^* Kerasotes $& 

?M\ Movies wuh Mifcic— VtANONHtUS 



54.S0 — BEFOftE 6PM, STUDENTS & SRS, 
$6-00 — AD ij LT EVENING ADMISSION 



Showtjmes for April 20 - 26 
/Voitf Si/ras«En wiwEf i m( )osvf U7S 



Rivertree Court 

701 N. Milwaukee 1-800-FANDANGO 1591A 



ARE WE DONE YET? (PG) (3:45) 6:30 9:15; 

Sat & Sut Matshee 12:45 
GRINOHOUSE(R) 4:20 8:15; &*Tl Sun Hat. 12:30 
HOT FUZZ (R) (4:30)7:15 10:10; 

Sat & Sun Matinee 1:30 
PATHFINDER (R) {4:45} 7:30 9:50; 

Sat & Sun Matinee 1:45 
REDUNE(PG-13) (5:15) 7:45 10:20; 

Sat t Sun Matinee 2:15 
SLOW BURN (R) (4*0) 6:45 9:30; Sat-SuN Mat 1:15 
WSLDHOGS(PG-13) (5:00) 800 10:30; 

Sat S Sun KUthee 2.00 
SHOOTER (R) (4:10) 7:00 IQflO; Sat iSuN Mat 1:00 



ShowPlace 8 

Milwaukee -2nd li6H1 S. o* HWY 60 
1-800-FANDANGO 1590* mDteltALSJUMJ 



FRACTURE (R) (4:30) 7:15 9:50; 

Sat* Sun Mathee 1:45 
The HOAX (R) (4:15) 7:00 9:40; Sat & Sun Mat 1 :30 
IN THE LAND OF WOMEN (PG-13) 

(4:45) 7:30 10.00; Sat & Sun Mathee 2.00 
VACANCY (R) (3:30) 6:10 8:20 10:30; 

Sat &5uh Matinee 12:45 
DiSTURBIA (PG-13) (4:00) 6:45 9:30; 

Sat 4. Sun Mathee 1:00 
PERFECT STRANGER (R) (5:00) 7:45 10:10; 

Sat & Sun Matinee 2:15 
BLADES OF GLORY (PG-13) (5:15) 8:00 1020; 

Sat & Sun Matinee 2:30 
MEET The ROBINSONS (G) (3:45) 6:30 9:00; 

Sat & Sun Mathee 1:15 



i 

well against Hopkins, and that alone*, 
demands impressive chops. 

The best thing about "Fracture" ; 
is that even after the final twist is , 
revealed, the story still makes sense.; 
Sad to say, but these days, what used, 
to be a basic rule of screenwriting ] 
comes across as a gift. 

• Jeffrey WestliofT is a movie critic 
for Uie NoWrWest News Group. He 
can be reached by e-mail at sidei 
ti-acks@nwnewsgroup.com. 

: — I 



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1035 



Writers Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg create a world of comedy that spoofs buddy-cop films in "Hot Fuzz." 



Photo provided 



MARCUS THEATRES 



'Hot Fuzz' secures spectacular spoof 



RE0UHE (PG-13) 
GRIHDHOUSEIRI-IOFEO/O 
THE REAPING (R|- ID REQT) 
AREWEOONEUnffG) 
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UEET THE ROSBBONS |G( 
TEENAGE WDTAH7IIIHJATU 
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By JEFFREY WESTHOFF 

sidetracks@nwnewsgroup.coFn 

Movie spoofs grew stagnant with 
"The Naked Gun." Sometimes the jokes 
were still funny, but the shtick was 
frozen in time. 

Then came the cycle of "Scary 
Movie," "Not Another Teen Movie," 
"Date Movie," "Epic Movie," etc. The 
individual films being parodied changed, 
but not the formulaic scripts. 

So, while the number of spoofs multi- 
plied, the genre went without innova- 
tions until England lobbed "Shaun of 
the Dead" across the Atlantic. The come- 
dy was not just a dead-on parody of 
George Romero's zombie films, but you 
actually cared whether the characters 
survived. 

Tt\e blokes behind "Shaun" - Simon 
Pegg (star and co-writer), Edgar Wright 
(director and co-writer) and Nick Frost 
(genial co-star) -have struck again with 
"Hot Fuzz," a spoof of adrenalized 
buddy-cop films, such as "Lethal 
Weapon, "Bad Boys" and "Point Break." 

The high-energy and flawless humor 
of "Hot Fuzz" promise these three will 



"Hot Fuzz" 



Genre: Comedy 

Director: Edgar Wright 

Writers; Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright 

More Information: Rated R for language and 

violent content, including some graphic 

images; running time Is 121 minutes. 

be making fun of other movies for many 
years. 

As if to prove they can make a career 
of spoofing films without repeating 
themselves, Pegg and Frost smartly 
reverse the slackers they played in 
"Shaun." t • 

Pegg is Nicholas Angel, Scotland 
Yard's most dedicated and successful t 
young officer. Nick is so driven that he 
makes the rest of the force look like 
bums, so his superiors (including Bill 
Nighy) transfer hiin to the cozy town of 
Sandford, which hasn't recorded a seri- 
ous crime in more than a decade. 

In Sandford, Nick is partnered with 
eager Constable Danny Butterman 



(Frost), son of the village police chief 
(Jim. Broadbent). Danny is addicted to 
the Jerry Bruckheimer-John Woo-Joel 
Silver blockbusters that are the meat 
"Hot Fuzz" stews. He hopes to be Martin 
Lawrence to Nick's Will Smith. 

Meanwhile, Nick gets an uneasy feel- 
ing the village leaders, including former 
007 Timothy Dalton as a supermarket 
owner, are too obsessed with their town's 
perfect image. Soon, Nick's fellow cops 
write off a string of grisly deaths as 
freak accidents, leading him to believe 
Sandford's crime-free history is a facade. 

"Hot Fuzz" is even funnier than 
"Shaun" because Pegg and Wright are 
more concerned with the jokes than the 
story. The humor is wilder and less pre- 
dictable- including extremely gory 
moments that are hilarious because you 
don't expect them. 

But "Hot Fuzz" maintains tiie master- 
stroke that Pegg and Wright brought to 
"Shaun." 

• Jeffivy WesthofT is a movie critic for 
tlie NortliWest News Group. He can be 
reached by e-mail at sideti-acks@ 
mmewsgroup.com. 



Military Discount • $6.25 (With ID) 
Student Discount- $7.50 (With ID) 



Fracture (R) • 1:05, 3:45, 7:00, 9:35 

n The Land Of Women (PG13) • 

1£35,2S5, 5:10, 7:35, 9:55 
The Hoax (&")• 1:15, 4:00, 6*5, 920 

Hot Fuzz (R)t^ 125,4:15,7:10,9:50 

Vacancy (R) • X 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 655, 9:05 

Pathfinder (R)^X 

(225. 2:50. 5:20, 7:40, 10:00 
Disturbla (PG13) • 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:40 
Perfect Stranger (R)t^ X 

1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:50 
Red!lne{PG13)v' 

12:45,3:05.5:30,7:50,10:05 
Slow Burn (R) • 6:45,9:15 

Aqua Teen Hunger Force (R) • 

12:55. 3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:40 
Grind House (Rl 1:30,525,9:15 

The Reaping R 12:50, 2:55, 520, 7:46, 10:05 
Are We Done Yet? (PG) 

12:40,3:00,5:15,7:30,9:45 

: lrehouseOog(PG) 12:55,325 

Heel The Robinsons (G) 

12:30,3:10,5:45,825 
Blades 01 Glory (PG13) 

12:45.3:05,525.7:45,10:05 
Teenage Mutant Nlnja Turtles (PG) 

1225,2:45,5:00 
StlOOler (R) 1250, 3:55, 7.00, 10:00 

Premonition (PG13) 7:05,9:30 

JOO(R) 12:35,3:15,6*5.8:50 

Wild Hogs (PG13) 12:30, 2:40, 5:10, 7:35, 10.00 
Meet The Robinsons (PG) 

Open Captioned Fr 3:10. Sa 12:30. Su 5:45 



• NO PASSES * NO MOVIE FUN TICKETS 

nflATtOPOUCY-OfleqJr»d»HoQ**wiUnd«e 
upcouhq mra begin »t jujy wns -a emowtwes 



www maicustiii.'iitn's CO 



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FOX LAKE--> 

115 Lakeland Plaza _..„ 

847/973-2800 MPT* 
DIGITAL SOUND In EVERV AUDITORIUM 



SHOWTIHES-FRIDAY, APRIL 20 
THRU THURSDAY, APRIL 26 

IN THE LAND 

OF WOMEN* («.,„ 

Dally IMS 2:35 4:45 6:55 9:50 

FRACTURE* [H] 

Daily 12:05 2:30 5:00 7:2S 9;S0 

VACANCY*™ 

Dally 12:25 2:20 4:15 6:100:05 10:00 

DiSTURBIA Vn, 

Dally 1 2:20 2:35 4:50 7.-05 9:20 

PERFECT STRANGER* m 

Dally 12:35 2.55 5:15 7:35 9:55 
REDLI NE* trc-ii] Dally 7:15 9:20 

Ff REHOUSE DOG t , , 

Dalty 1X00 2:25 4:50 

ARE WE DONE YET?, p=, 

Dally 12:15 2:15 4:15 6:15 8:15 

MEET THE ROBINSONS m 

Daily 12:00 2:10 4:20 6:40 850 

BLADES OF G LORY t , fi , 1JL 

Daily 1:05 3:10 5:157:20 9:25 
* No puieit or coupont 



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at www.clastlcdnemu.com with 

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Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 




I Annie Christie ■ achristleg'nvmewsgtoup.com 

'Jessica Cole and her 5-year-old daughter, Savannah, chant Nam- 
myolio-renge-kyo. Cole hosts a monthly gathering at her home, where 
people chant and talk about their faith. 

Buddhist believers share 
their faith with others 



• BUDDHISM 

Continued from IB 

I Followers of this faith 
believe lie is the True Buddha, 
because he realized that the 
Lotus Sutra teachings of 
Buddhism were the most 
important. They also believe 
Jthat Nichiren is the one 
Siddhartha prophesied would 
come to the people 2,000 years 
after his death to show them 
The True Law. 

Fifty-three-year-old Rick 
Rudolph, of Grayslake, 
attends Colo's meetings and 
said he found Nichiren Shoshu 
Buddhism when he was 18 and 
a "hippie on the beach in Ft. 
.Lauderdale, [Fla.]." 
! Born Jewish, Rudolph said 
he liked the faith's assertion 
that human beings are respon- 
sible for their own choices. 
■ "For me, it seems like the 
only thing that makes sense," 



he said. "Most faiths depend 
upon a higher being. We 
believe that kind of thinking 
causes trouble." 

Most religions, Rudolph 
said, force rules and ultima- 
tums and depend, too heavily 
upon a god or gods. 

The point of Nichiren 
Shoshu, Rudolph and Cole 
said, is self accountability. 

"We take responsibility for 
our lives," Cole said. "We don't 
blame other people." 

Twice-daily chanting helps 
her Tind her Buddha, Cole 
said. This is the part or herself 
that can connect with humani- 
ty and purify selfish urges. 

Nichiren Shoshu teaches 
reincarnation, and does not 
believe in a heaven or hell in 
the Christian sense. 

"There is no beginning and 
there is no end," Rudolph said. 
"Life is eternal, and each life 
leads to choices that influence 
the next life." 



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1AKEUEL 



ALL April 20, 2007 ? Page 5B 



Experience a Mexican vacation 



Las Palmas offers 
diners authentic, 
relaxing ambiance 

ByDANISCHWEIGERT 
dschwelgert@nwnewsgroup.com 

Imagine sitting on a sandy 
beach with your toes dug 
deep in the warm sand as you 
stare at the crystal blue 
water. Music plays quietly in 
the background, and the only 
thing on your schedule is to 
relax. 

With summer approach- 
ing, many people are seeking 
this serene scene, and one 
place to experience this is 
Mexico. But you might not 
have to travel as far as you 
think to experience a 
Mexican vacation. 

Las Palmas Mexican 
Restaurant in Lindenhurst 
creates a laid-back environ- 
ment that makes you feel as 
though you've just stepped 
onto the shores of Mexico. 

Manager Jesus Vargas has 
been with Las Palmas since it 
first opened in Chicago in 
March 1984. The restaurant, 
he said, was named after the 
owners' homeland, Palmar 
Chico, Mexico. 

Vargas worked as a dish- 
washer for Las Palmas for 15 
years and then became head 
chef. Then, after feeling he 
had accomplished everything 
he could in the kitchen, he 
put down his utensils and 
stepped in front of the count- 
er as manager. 

"When you work for this 
amount of time, you feel like 
part of the family," Vargas 
said with a smile. "I like the 
place, and I like the food." 

It's not hard to see why 
Vargas feels so at home. With 
vibrant red, blue, green and 
yellow tablecloths filled with 
images of exotic birds and 
plants, deep wood chairs and 
ceramic-tiled floors, the 
restaurant offers diners an ' 
inviting and soothing 
ambiance. Palm trees stretch 
toward the coiling, and gontio 
candle light sets a mellow 




Las Palmas Mexican Restaurant is known for its flavorful margaritas. 

Las Palmas • moist, the enchiladas have the 
perfect amount of cheese driz- 
zled on top, and the rice has a 
blend of spices that give it 
mouthwatering flavor. Another 
tasty treat is the tortilla soup, 
which has a tasty broth base 
filled with vegetables and 
topped with fresh avocados 
and tortilla strips, 

Of course, the menu also is 
complete with a variety of 
alcoholic beverages. 
Margaritas are extremely pop- 
ular, Vargas said, which is why 
the restaurant has about 20 
types of tequila. A full pitcher 
of margaritas with Jose 
Cuervo or Sauza Gold costs 
$24.95, and a premium mar- 
garita, which means diners 
can chose from any of the 
restaurant's 1800 or Sauza 
Conmemorativo tequilas, costs 
$8.50. 

And for those who like 
seafood-type meals, Las 
Palmas' menu includes items 



Where: 1910 E. Grand Ave., in 
Lindenhurst (with locations in 
Westmont, Naperville 
Gleriview and Mundelein) 
Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Sunday through Thursday; 11 
a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and 
Saturday (will stay open later 
depending on business) 
Signature dish: Fajitas 
Smoking: Non-smoking 
Alcohol: Las Palmas offers a 
bar that includes about 20 
types of tequila . 
For more information: Call 
(847) 356-4440 

mood. 

And the food is as intoxi- 
cating as the decor. 

"Around this area, there 
are not too many Mexican 
restaurants," Vargas 
explained. "And people are 
always looking for a Mexican 
place to go. We have good 
food and good quality" 

One delicious dish at Las 
Palmas is a combination 
meal with a taco, a pork 
tamale and an enchilada that 
comes with a side of rice and 

rofviod banns. Tho tamalos at 

Las Palmas are dellciously 



Chiis P.idgcll ■ cp.idgcltin mvncwsgtoup.com 

like enchiladas Pacifico 
shrimp and camarones a la 
Veracruzana. Diners who pre- 
fer vegetarian dishes will be 
pleased to find an array of 
choices, including vegetarian 
burrito sulzos, guacamole 
tostadas and enchiladas 
banana. For younger diners, 
the children's menu includes 
hamburgers and chicken fin- 
gers. 

The man who makes all of 
these delectable meals is head 
chef Gelacio Samdoval. 
Samdoval, 56, has worked at 
Las Palmas for 11 years and 
said he has always enjoyed 
working in the kitchen. 

"My favorite meal to make 
is enchiladas," Samdoval said 
as he adjusted a Dos Equis hat 
resting on his head, "But the 
house special is fajitas. People 
like this restaurant because 
it's Mexican food with good 
service." 

I couldn't agree more. 



I Lvve Sushi 

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Chef with 30 years experience 



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IT'S NOT ALWAYS EASY TO KNOW IF A GYM IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR YOU. 



Want a place to work out? A place to connect with 
your community? A place that meets your family's 
health and wellness goals? Are you hoping to join a 
gym where you can stretch your mind as well as your 
body? Then you'll fit right In at your YMCA. 

Enjoy the help of a FREE fitness coach In our Commit 
to be Fit custom coaching program. Or let our personal 
trainers challenge your workout routine and hefp take 
your fitness goals to new heights. 

Lift. Run. Swim. Or, ptay a team sport. 

MEMBERSHIP IT LOOKS GOOD ON YOU. 

Otter valid at participating YMCAs. Programs vary by location. 



Yoga more your fit? You'll find yoga classes, pilates, 
and more. All with skilled instructors who will help you 
follow your own, personal path to a stronger body, 
mind and spirit. 

We're sure you've tried other gyms on for size. But 
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Page6B», <r 



lAKELIFI 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



» RelishTheAmericanTable 




& 



RJ's Eatery ff 



Volleyball and 
Cornholing Sign Up NOW! 



Tuesdays 

Mens 4 man V-ball or 
Co-cd Cornholing 



Wednesdays Thursdays 

Women's V-ball or Co-ed V-ball or 

Co-cd Cornholing Co-cd Cornholing 



$200.00 per team for Volleyball and $50.00 per team for Cornholing. 

Volleyball cash prizes = $500.00 for 1st and $200.00 for 2nd 

Cornholing cash prizes = $150.00 for 1st, $75.00 for 2nd 

and $25.00 for 3rd 

Breakfast Every Sunday from 8-1 2am 



RJ's Eatery 

913 E, Grand Ave. • Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

847-356-2300 



Create the ultimate melting pot 



By CRESCENT DRAGONWAGON 

While couscous has become 
a staple of the American 
pantry, its sidekick, tagines, 
are not nearly as familiar. 

Tagines are slow-cooked 
Moroccan stews named after 
the conically topped, two-part 
cooking vessel in which they 
were originally made. 
Whether tender melanges of 
beef, lamb, poultry, or beans, 
tagines areexotically delicious 
to American tastes. 

Ingredients like garlic, 
chiles, turmeric, saffron and 
ginger hint of Mexico or India, 
while citrus, figs and olive oil 
slny the Mediterranean. How 
appropriate for them to all 
come together in the quintes- 
sential melting pot - the slow 
cooker. 

American ingenuity and 



Depot Street Station 
311 Depot Si reel 
Antioch, IL 
847-395-1036 
Fax:847-395-1026 



!Pe/i 



v errucci s 

Italian Market & Cafe 



Butterball 
Assorted Turkey | 

$ 5.98 lb. 

Limit 2 lbs. 
Expires May 2, 2007 



Smoked 
Provolone 

'4.98 lb. 

limit I lbs . 
bplrei May 2, 2007 



Krakow 


Villa Frinoni 


Polish Ham 


Mozxarella 


'4.28 lb. 


$ 3.98 Ib. 


limit 2 ib j. 
bptrtf Mar 2, 2007 


Unit 2 lbs. 
Expire* May 2, 2007 



|Volpi & Genova| 
Salami 

$ 7.98lb. 

Limit 2 lbs. 
Eipirw May 2, 2007 



Meunsfer 
Cheese 

$ 3.58 Ib. 

limit 2 lbs. 
Expires May 2, 2007 



Open for 

Lunch & Dinner 

Monday-Saturday 

8am - Opm 



Hot or Mild 
Capicollo 

$ 6.98 Ib. 

Limit 2 lbs. 
Expires May 2, 2007 



Hard or Genoa 
Salami 

$ 4.98lb. 

Umrtllbi. 
Expires May 2, 2007 



«vA^ 



Pagllaccl 

Assorted 

Pasta 

78c Ib. 

Limit 4 



JloniamaJe Rotim Pasta Salad *4.58 Ib. 

Jfomemaffe Chicken Salad *4.2fl lb. 

Cobblestone Potato Salad, Coleslaw 
Your Choice *2.48lb. 

Orval Kent Sour Cream & Cheddar 
Maccaroni Salad *3.90 Ib. 



Mezierto 

Assorted 

Pasta Sauce 

'4.98 



Limit 4 



Moroccan flavors unite for a 
comforting, soothing stew. 

Chicken-fig tagine 
(Serves 4) 

Tagines are slow-cooked 
Moroccan-style stews that are 
super made in a slow cooker. 
Serve with green beans, cous- 
cous to soak up the flavorful 
broth and Cilantro Salsa, 

Ingredients 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

Two chicken leg quarters 

Two chicken breast halves 

2 teaspoons cumin seed 

1 teaspoon ground coriander 

1/2 teaspoon turmeric 

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 

1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground 

black pepper 

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper . 

1/2 teaspoon salt 

Two garlic cloves, minced 

One targe onion, coarsely 

chopped 

One large sweet potato, peeled 

and coarsely chopped 




Eight to 10 dried figs, stems 

removed, halved 

3 cups lower-sodium chicken 

broth 

Juice and grated zest of one 

orange 

1 tablespoon honey 

Directions 
Heat olive oil in a large heavy 
skillet. Add chicken and saute 2 
to 4 minutes each side. As each 




Herm's BAR-B-Q 

It's a new Bar-B-Q in Town 
and the name is Herm's 

Delicious Slow Cooked 
Hickory Smoked Bar-B-Q 



Entrees 



• St. Louis Cut Ribs 

• Hot Links 

• Rib Tips 

• BBQ Chicken 



• Chicken Wings 

• PorJcShbuIder 
• Catfish Filet 

• Shrimp 



Beef Brisket 



Lunch Specials 



11am-2pm 



Pulled Pork 
Snndwhlcli w/ 
Slaw, Chips & Pop 
$£95 



Rib Tip 
Special 
with Slaw 
$500 




311 Depot Station, Antioch, IL 60002 

"Catch A Train, Catch A Meal" 

For Faster Service, Call Ahead. ..847.836. 01 32 

Spring Hours: Monday-Sal urday llam-Bpm 



*3* 



piece is browned, transfer to 
slow cooker. 

Scatter spices, and garlic over 
chicken. Tuck onion, sweet pota- 
to and figs among the chicken 
pieces. 

Heat chicken broth In skillet, 
scraping to loosen browned bits. 
Pour over chicken and vegeta- 
bles; add orange juice, zest and 
honey. 

Cover and cook six to seven 
hours on low or three to four 
hours on high. Serve with 
Cilantro Salsa. 

Cilantro Salsa 
If you can't find fresh figs, 
the salsa is just as good with- 
out them. Serve with Chicken- 
Fig Tagine. 

Ingredients 

Two onions, quartered 

Five garlic cloves, peeled 

Juice of one lemon 

One bunch cilantro, washed, 

stems included 

1/2 to one jalapeno pepper 

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 

1 teaspoon cumin 

3 tablespoons olive oil 

One orange, peeled, sectioned 

and diced 

Six to eight fresh figs, stems 

removed, cut into eighths 

Directions 

Combine onions, garlic, lemon 
juice, cilantro, jalapeno, salt, 
cumin and oil in food processor 
and process, pausing to scrape 
sides until a smooth paste is 
formed. Transfer to a bowl and 
stir in orange sections and figs. 

• Crescent Dragonwagon 
contributes tp Relish Magazine. 
Look for Relish magazine each 
montli in the Lake County 
Journals. For more Relish 
recipes, to sign up for a biweek- 
ly newsletter, or to leave a note 
on a Relish message board, log 
on to wmv.reUshmag.com. 




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Uke County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



smm 



ALL April 20, 2007- Page 7B 



» EveryMom 




Jami 
Kunzer 



A little 
pinchfiil 
of love 



My 1-year-old twin daugh- 
ters conduct random experi- 
ments on me. 

One likes to grab a chunk 
of my neck and pinch as tight- 
ly as she can. Those little 
chubby fingers pack some 
power. 

When I exclaim, "Ouch," 
and say "No," she looks at me, 
her eyebrows furrowed, as if 
to say, "You talkin' to mo? 
Well,4'm the only one here ..." 

My other twin daughter 
occasionally bites down on my 
thigh when she gets excited. 

I say, "No." She giggles. 

It's apparently quite funny 
when Mom flinches. 
' I'm .all for tough love. 

And I don't mind whether 
my children, at times, fear me. 
If that fear keeps them from 
doing something they should- 
n't, I'm all for it. 

But right now, I'm taking a 
beating. I'm poked, prodded, 
pulled, pushed, and as I said, 
pinched, all day long. 

I hope this doesn't come 
across as one huge complaint. 
Because, really, I welcome cud- 
dles from my children, I'm 
usually the one seeking them. 

• Columnist Jami Kunzer is 
tlm motliei' of Summer, 2, and 
uifant twins Anna and Lilly. 
She writes about tiie everyday 
clmllenges facing parents. You 
also can connect with Jami 
online Tuesday, Thursday and 
Satwxlay tluvugh her blog, 
which can he found at 
www.nwherald.com. Reach 
Jami atjkunzer@ 
nwnewsgroup.com, or (815) 
4594122. 



» OnStage 



'Massacre' explores the power of evil 



ByTOMWITOM 
Iho maswitom@yahoo.com 

Jose Rivera's oddly constructed 
new play, "Massacre (Sing to Your 
Children)," a Tcatro Vista production 
making its premiere in association 
with Goodman Theatre, is both dark 
and bewildering. 

It's permeated by the violence or 
residents from a small New 
Hampshire town who have struck out 
against a local bully, who apparently 
has made their lives miserable for 
years. But there's lack of clarity, too, 
given Rivera's metaphorical 
approach to his subject matter. 

Initially, seven Latino neighbors 
return, covered in blood, to an old 



Tickets, please 



What: "Massacre" 

Where: Teatro Vista In association with 

Goodman Theatre, 170 N, Dearborn St., 

Chicago 

When: Through April 22 

Tickets: $15 to $30 

Show Information: (312) 443-380 



New England farmhouse; feelings 
run high. Pitchfork, knives and axe 
in hand, they proudly pose Tor pic- 
tures, while one is inspired to memo- 
rialize the event in song. 

Despite the exhilaration of having 
"taken back our lives," the group 
quickly finds that second thoughts 
intrude. Each must confront inner 



demons that question the righteous- 
ness of their actions. 

The object of their hatred is Joe, 
who might (or might not) be evil 
incarnate. He is never seen, but dur- 
ing the second act ho has plenty to 
say from the other side of the front 
door. Everyone's stunned for 20 min- 
utes or so as Joe verbally unmasks 
each of their weaknesses - shortcom- 
ings they denied or blamed on others. 
His taunts seem to hit home. 

The final scene Is a flashback, as 
spelled out in an insert to the pro- 
gram. It takes place right before the 
events of Sept. 11, 2001 - when the 
same characters are together in a 
more convivial frame of mind. 

Knowing the date, however, seems 




Pholo provided 

A scene from "Massacre (Sing to Your 
Children)" features (from left) Henry 
Godinez and Joe Minoso. 

unnecessary from an audience mem- 
ber's standpoint. Whatever relevance 
it might have isn't even hinted at in 
the play. 




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Page 8B • April 20, 2007 ALL 



1AKEUEE_ 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



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EASY 



MEDIUM 



HARD 



CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1. Clapton, musician 

5. Targe burrowing rodent 

9, Having the wind against the 

forward side 

14. Small drought-resistant grain 

sorghum 

lS.Dbeahs 

16. Junipero , Spanish priest 

17. They delivered before refrigera- 
tion 

19. Limbless scaly reptile 
21. Abnormal condition of preg- 
nancy 

23. Used to form a hard coating on 
a porous surface 

24. Maryam of Ethiopia 

26. Ribonucleic Acid 

27, Any of several varnishes 
30. Fish, eggs 

32. Diagrams of the Earth's sur- 
face 

36. Manila hemp 

37. Young Atlantic cod 

39. Crony 

40. MJ. Fox film 

43. kosh, near Lake Winnebago 

44. "Electronic communication 

45. Paddled 

46. Golf ball supporters 

48. Sea eagle 

49. Farewells 

50. Applied Physics Laboratory 

(abbr.) 
52. The 3rd letter of the Hebrew 
alphabet 

54. Friendlinesses 
58. Assign a designation to 
62. Social 

•64. Mineral form of Barium 
Sulphate 

65. Type of rock 

66. Japanese socks 

68. N.C. college 

69. Minor Hebrew prophet 

70. Company officer 

71. Sandy piece of seashore (Br.) 

DOWN 

1. Utter sounds 

2. Puerto _ 

3. Hollies 

4. Retort 




5. Racehorses 

6. Blood group 

7. Data executive (abbr.) 

8. Vipers , 

9. Kind of elephant , 

10. A state of extreme confusion 

11. Song for soloist 

12. iotomy: open the skull 

13. Philosopher 
18. Give off 
20. Of this 

22. In the year of Our Lord 
25. Curving over 

27. A decorative fall of cloth 

28. Lower in esteem 

29. ; bel's Canon 

31. Russian city 

33. Venezuelan river 

34. Polynesian wrapped skirt 

35. Winter rides 

37. Favorite tree topper 

38. Intestines 

41. Egg mixture cooked until just 
set 

42. Simple in line or design 
47. Sarcasm 




49. Of one celled animal 
51. Mary mourning Jesus 

53. Instinctive part of psyche 

54. Scholem . Yiddish author 

55. One of thetarth's layers 

56. Frosts 

57. Eat until satisfied 

59. A thin flat slab of fired clay 

60. British School 

61. Monetary unit, W. Samoa 
63. Lenient 

67. Exist 



» Horoscope 

ARIES- Mar 21/Apr 20 

Someone is breathing down your neck this 
week, Aries, but you can handle the pressure. 

TAURUS- Apr 21/May 21 
There Is no substitute for experience, Taurus, 
so people might not trust your inexperience. 

GEMINI- May 22/Jun 21 
Follow rules you'd want everyone else to, Gemini. 



CANCER -Jun22/Jul 22 
You're firmly set on helping others, Cancer. 

LE0-Jul23/Aug23 

Humility is one of the easiest ways to show 
others how much you care, Leo. 

VIRGO- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Your sense of fun Is waning, Virgo, because you 
haven't been in the best of spirits. 



LIBRA- Sept 23/0ct 23 

You are in no mood for social niceties, Libra, 

SCORPIO- Oct 24/Nov 22 
You have to set up a plan for the future, 
Scorpio. Now it is time to grow up and think 
responsibly. 

SAGnTARIUS-Nov23/Dec21 

Sagittarius, life Is bound to get a bit serious 



this week, but you can brighten things up with 
an infectious sense of humor. 

CAPRICORN- Dec 22/Jan 20 

Others look to you as an authority figure this 
week, Capricorn. Whether at work or at home, 
your word is firm and final. 

AQUARIUS- Jan 2VFeb 18 

You are just going through the motions this 



week, Aquarius. That's because your head just 
isn't in the work you must accomplish. The fog 
will lift soon. 

PISCES- Feb 19/Mar20 
Live life to the fullest this week, because some 
stressful days are ahead, and you won't have 
much time for pleasure once they arrive, 
Pisces. Take the time now to be with friends 
and family. 



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»ElementsOf 
TheRidiculous 




Jana 
Thompson 



Children? I 
prefer cats 

Somebody asked me the 
other day why I don't have 
children. 

(Rude!) 

"No husband," I said, 
which used to be a good 
answer to that question. 

But recent scientific 
advances have proven that 
two people can concoivtt a 
child without a legally bind* 
. ing document. 

No judgment hero, but I'm 
going to want somebody to 
help change diapers. . 

Another reason - 1 just , 
saw a documentary about a 
couple with a set of twins 
and a set of sextuplets. 

The mother or eight has . 
polycystic ovarian syndrome, 
which causes fertility issues, 
among a number of other 
ugly symptoms. So, she got a 
little help from science. More 
power to her. 

I have PCOS as well, and 
I'm positive that, if given the 
chance, I would have the first 
set of eleven-uplets. 

And frankly, I'm just not 
responsible enough. Ask my 
cats. 

"She forgot to feed us 
again. I'll tip over the lams 
bag. Did you remember to 
pay the water bill?" ■/ 

My relatives would receive 
UPS boxes with holes in 
them. 

"Did Jana mail us one of 
her kids again? We're not 
keeping this one. I don't care 
what kind of 'exchange pro- 
gram' she thinks she's run- 
ning." 

Whether I can have cliil-. 
dren is immaterial at the 
moment. Right now, I like 
being "auntie" to my god- 
daughter, Julia, 18 months; 
and her sister, Elizabeth, 3 
1/2. 

• Jana Thompson is a 
columnist for Uie Nortfi West 
News Group. She can be 
reached atjtiiompson@ 
mvnewsgroup.com. 




9B 

Edition of April 20 f 2007 
LakeCountyJournals.com 




HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD: Take a look 
at this week's high school sports schedule. 
PAGE 10B 



BOYS TRACK: Grant's dual North Suburban 
Conference wins serves as a nice bounce back from 
the team's recent loss to Lakes. PAGE 10B 



NASCAR THIS WEEK: Get the breakdown 
about who's hot and who's not for the upcoming 
races. PAGE 13B 



» SideLines 




Daniel J. 
Patrick 



Ail escape 
for our times 



So much happened this week 
in sports, but so much more hap- 
pened in the world we live in. 

In the midst of so much cele- 
bration with the anniversary of 
Jackie Robinson's 60th anniver- 
sary or breaking the color barrier 
in baseball and the world in gen- 
eral stQJ bickering over the taste- 
less words of an aging shock jock- 
ey, another calamitous event 
reminds us that sports are just , 
sports. 

On the morning of April 16, 33 
people died in the worst shooting 
rampage in U.S. history That day, 
the whole wide world of sports 
was reduced to just a bunch of 
games. 

Nothing more, nothing less, 
and that's the way it should be. 
Sometimes it's easiest to appreci- 
ate sports when they should be 
the last tilings on our minds. 

If only the biggest name the 
nation had to worry about truly 
was Don Imus. Or the biggest 
debate in the world was betvyeen 
the Cub fans and Sox fans or 
between Yankee Nation and Red 
Sox Nation. 

Instead, such a sobering event 
as the Virgina Tech tragedy 
reminds us that the world is far 
from friendly, we're still in a war, 
andeven the confines of the 
United States carry their own 
dangers. 

Those of us in the sports world 
are prone to take ourselves so 
seriously. Whether it's predicting 
who's the next phenom or futilely 
working to settle the debate 
between what sport reigns 
supreme, the sports world is ulti- 
mately a very self-indulgent place. 

Whether it's Imus or Tim 
Duncan and NBA referee Joey 
Crawford's fiasco, such problems 
are ultimately tiny when com- 
pared to the outside world. But it's 
exactly these tiny problems that 
give so many of us a much-need- 
ed diversion from all the bad 
that's around us. 

At the prep level, the diversion 
is even stronger. As athletes, the 
pressures of growing up can be 
washed away, if for only a fleeting 
moment, while focusing on beat- 
ing an opponent. As prep fans, 
again, a hard day at work, a hard 
day at home, can all be forgotten 
while rooting for your favorite 
team. 

We wouldn't have these diver- 
sions if it wasn't for sports., 

When we were too busy think- 
ing about athletics, so many 
worlds changed. But at least with 
sports, we all have something to 
pull us through. 

'Daniel J. Patrick is the sports 
editor for the Lake County 
Journals. Write to liim at 
dpatiick@nwnewsgroup.com. 



Las Vegas or bust 

Round Lake boxer gears up for May 5 featherweight bout 



By DENYS BUCKSTEN 

wjncw5@nwne wsgrou pxo m 

In early 2006, Oscar De La Hoya 
said it was only a matter of time 
before Round Lake featherweight 
Jose Hernandez would win a world 
boxing title. It was a nice compli- 
ment coming from the charismatic, 
superstar boxer/promoter. But 
truthfully, the plug didn't cost De 
La Hoya a thing. 

On March 23, the six-time world 
champion backed his endorsement 
with hard cash - a contract for 
Hernandez to join him May 5 on a 
Las Vegas fight card. WBC Super 
Welterweight champion, De La 
Hoya (38-4, 30 knockouts), will meet 
"Pretty Boy" Floyd Mayweather, 
(37-0, 24 knockouts), the WBC 
Welterweight champion. 

In the match preceding the De 
La Hoya fight, at the MGM Grand 
Casino, Hernandez, 31, (22-3, 14 
knockouts) will meet Houston's 
Rocky Juarez, 27, (26-3, 19 knock- 
outs). 

To borrow the relentlessly 
repeated slogan of Mastercard, De 
La Hoya's choice of Hernandez is 
priceless. 

In addition to his first six-figure 
payday, Hernandez has a shot at 
winning a title, and at the very 
least being known as a highly val- 
ued contender. 

Jiernandez got here because of 



an impressive December knockout 
of the then-undefeated Jason 
Litzau. Litzau, who came into the 
matchup 20-0, came out with the 
first knockout loss of his career, 
while Hernandez got a free trip to 
the spotlight. 

De La Hoya's Golden Boy 
Productions, along with MGM 
Grand in Las Vegas, is sponsoring 
the card on a Mexican holiday, 
Cince de Mayo. 

The venue was sold out practi- 
cally before the ink dried on the 
contracts and seats near the ring, 
reportedly, have gone for upwards 
of $15,000. 

Hernandez, modest, quiet and 
self-effacing, doesn't have a nick- 
name, like "Boom Boom," "Baby 
Faced Assasin" or "Terminator." 
But perhaps he should be called the 
"Stealth Fighter," as he comes in 
low and under the radar of some 
boxing people, and Vegas odds mak- 
ers. 

BoxRec.com, for example, ranks 
Juarez at No. 4 of 897 featherweight 
boxers in the world. Meanwhile, it 
ranks Hernandez at a respectable, 
but distant, 32. 

Both men are warriors in the 
tradition of great Mexican boxers, 
relentless in-fighters with strong 
chins and the grit to slug it out 
until the other man drops. 

Hernandez's long-time manager 
and friend, Waukegan businessman 





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Larry Christian, likens his fighter 
to an Arturo Gatti (Welterweight). 

Jose is the guy who will stand 
right there, flat-footed, toe to toe, 
and slug it out. 

Jose could be one of the hardest- 
hitting featherweights out there. 
When he's train- 
ing, other people 
just stop and 
watch because he 
hits like a mid- 
dleweight 

"They want a 
great show in 
Vegas," Christian 
said. "And with 
Jose [Hernandez] 
and Juarez, it's 
going to be a 
war". 

Hernandez, a 
National Golden Gloves champion 
in 1997 before he turned pro, has 
been virtually unstoppable since a 
problematic right hand was surgi- 
cally repaired by Gurnee's Dr. 
Thomas Becker. He has been 
knocked down only once as an ama- 
teur or a pro, and since May 1999, 
has won 16 of 17 fights, 10 by knock- 
out. 

Juarez, who lost the gold in the 
2000 Sydney Olympics to 
Kazakhstan's Bekzat Sattarkhanov, 
twice fought boxing legend Marco 
Antonio Barrera last year, each 
time for the WBC Super 



Jose Hernandez 
Boxer and Round 
Lake Beach 
resident 



Featherweight title. Juarez then 
lost two hard-fought decisions to 
the now 63-5 champion. 

In order to get another title shot, 
Juarez needs to beat Hernandez 
convincingly. But, if Hernandez 
comes up big in Vegas, it could pay 
huge dividends for the Round Lake 
Beach native. 

"De La Hoya has promised Jose 
two more fights with Golden Boy 
Productions, and both will be big 
paydays," Christian said. 

After his second loss to Barrera 
last year, Juarez signed on with vet- 
eran trainer Ronnie Shields, of 
Houston's Savannah Boxing Club. 
Thus far, Shields respects 
Hernandez's game. 

"I've been watching Jose a lot 
lately and he's a very good fighter," 
Shields said. "I also can see why 
people underestimate him a little 
bit. The kid has power and keeps 
his power throughout the fight. I 
talk to Rocky about Jose every day: 
Don't underestimate this kid. 

"Hernandez is a really good 
fighter and he comes to fight. 
That's the way boxing is supposed 
to be." 

That said, Shields said "we have 
seen weaknesses in Hernandez that 
we can exploit." 

Regardless or what happens in 
Las Vegas on May 5, it's going to be 
impossible for Hernandez to sneak 
up on anybody ever again. 



Baseball: Warren 13, Round Lake (5 innings) 



Warren's third inning spells doom for Panthers 



By DANIEL J. PATRICK 

dpatrick@nwnewsgroup.com 

GURNEE - What a differ- 
ence an inning can make, or 
in the case of the North 
Suburban Conference 

crossover between Warren 
and Round Lake, what a dif- 
ference a half inning can 
make. 

In the middle of the third 
inning, Warren had a 3-0 lead, 
but by the end, it was 12-0. 
Two more 1-2-3 innings and 
yet another Blue Devils run 
later, and Warren came away 
with the 13-0 mercy rule win. 

Warren coach Dar 
Townsend said the big third 
inning rally came from a 
string of costly Round Lake 
errors - errors like two 
straight Warren runs scoring 
on passed balls. 

"I think they threw the ball 
around a little bit and had too 
many errors, but we've been 
known to do that as well," 
Townsend said. "It was good 
because we were able to get 
on a roll in that inning and we 



were able to put the game 
away early." 

Round Lake Coach 
Howard Conkling agreed 
with Townsend's assessment 
of the third inning break- 
down. 

"We made too many mis- 
takes; some of our kids need a 
little more confidence," 
Conkling said. "We think we 
can be a much better ballclub 
than we are at this point in 
time, but they've got to 
believe in themselves." 

Blue Devils pitcher Sean 
Kennedy threw the complete- 
game shutout win. 

For Kennedy, the win over 
Round Lake represented a 
significant turnaround, as he 
came into the game with an 0- 
1 record and gave up six 
walks to just five strikeouts 
on the season. 

"For the last few outings, 
Mario [Perez] has pitched 
really well and Kennedy's 
pitched really well," 
Townsend said. "We're hoping 
that now we can get some 
games so we can see some 




sissiE' . r'r ;;^5^siw3a^^^^ 




Sandy BrtSSlWf - sbrcssnera nwnewsgr Dup com 

Warren's Chris Nemeth ducks away from a wild pitch during a 13-0 win at home against Round Lake. 



other guys step up." 

With the win, Warren 
improves its the record to 4-3, 
while Round Lake fell to 2-6. 
Townsend hopes that 
Warren's big win over Round 
Lake will light a fire under 



his team were able to hit a little better." 
"Out pitching has been Looking beyond Tuesday's 

really good, it's'our fielding game, both coaches are frus- 

and hitting that's been ques- trated with the, topsy-turvy 

tionable," Townsend said, weather. 
" "We're hoping to break out a „,.„„„, 

little bit and in this game, we See WARREN, page 15B 



Quick Hitters 




Mario Perez 



Mario Perez - Warren 

One. That's how many hits Blue Devifs pitch- 
er Mario Perez gave up in six innings of work 
against North Suburban Conference Lake 
. Division rival Zion-Benton last week. He also 
finished with one-one (11) strike outs in the 
game while giving up, you guessed it, one, 
unearned run. 



Kelly Washington - Grayslake Central 

Track and field .excellence is nothing new for 
Grayslake Central's Kelly Washington. 
Washington has already surpassed the state 
qualifying time in the 100-meter dash, run- 
ning a 12.0 time, to lead Central to a second 
place finish in a triangular meet against Cary- 
Kelly Washington Grove and Grayslake North. 

To nominate a student athlete for Quick Hitters, please send submis- 
sions to Daniel J. Patrick at dpatrtck@nwnewsgroup.com 




Game of the Week 




COMMUNITY 

MIOIIK1IOOL 



Antioch Sequoits 



Lakes Eagles 



What: Baseball 

Where: Antioch Community High School 

When: 4;30 p.m. Tuesday, April 24 

Split schools make for some of the greatest and most heated 
sports rivalries in prep sports. This week is chock full of former 
cohorts Antioch and Lakes going at it with this baseball game 
starting a long list of matchups. All told, the Sequoits and 
Eagles will face off in baseball, softball, girls soccer, boys ten- 
nis and boys volleyball, all this week and all for the Lake County 
sports fans* enjoyment. 



■Serving up entertainment 




. 



Royce 
Applegren, 
of the 
Antioch 
boys vol- 
leyball 
team, 

squares off 
against a 
Stevenson 
opponent 
on April 12. 
Antioch 
lost the 
match 
against 
Stevenson.. 



Chris Padgett • cpod9ett@11wnewsgrQup.con1 



h 



Page 10B • April 20, 2007 AIL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LafteCountyJournals.com 



»UpcomingGames 
Friday, April 20 

Baseball 

Grayslake Central at Woodstock, 
4:30 p.m. 

Softball 

Warren at Waukegan, 7:30 p.m. 

Boys Tennis 

Marian Central Catholic at 

Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Track 

Round Lake Invitational, 4:30 

p.m. 

Girls Track 

Wauconda Invitational, 4:15 p.m. 

Boys Volleyball 

Lakes at Lake Forest Academy, 

5:30 p.m. 

Saturday, April 21 

Baseball 

Grayslake Central at Johnsburg, 

10 a.m. 

Joliet Catholic at Carmel, 10 

a.m. (DH) 

Round Lake at Antioch, 10:30 

a.m.(DH) 

Warren at Lake Zurich, 10 a.m. 

(DH) 

Wauconda at Lakes, 10:30 a.m. 

(DH) 

Softball 

Antioch at Round Lake, 10:30 

a.m.(DH) 

Lakes at Wauconda, 10:30 a.m. 

(DH) 

Lake Zurich at Warren, 10:30 

a.m.(DH) 

Monday, April 23 

Baseball 

Johnsburg at Grayslake Central, 

4:30 p.m. 

New Trier at Carmel, 4:30 p.m.. 

Girls Soccer 

Carmel at Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 

Softball 

Lakes at Warren, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Tennis 

Grayslake Central at Antioch, 

4:30 p.m. 

Wauconda at Johnsburg, 4:30 

p.m. 

Boys Track 

Antioch/Wauconda at Lakes, 
4:30 p.m. 

Girls Track 

Lakes/Wauconda at Antioch, • 

4:30 p.m. 

Warren at Stevenson, 4:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, April 24 

Baseball 

Lakes at Antioch, 4:30 p.m. 

Grayslake North at Grant, 4:30 

p.m. 

Warren at Libertyville, 4:30 p.m. 

Wauconda at Vernon Hills, 4:30 

p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Grayslake North at Grant, 6:15 

p.m. 

McHenry at Wauconda, 6:15 

p.m. 

Softball 

Antioch at Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 

Libertyville at Warren, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Tennis 

Grant at Lakes, 4:30,p.m. 

Round Lake at Wauconda, 4:30 

p.m. 

Wednesday, April 25 

Baseball 

Crystal Lake at Grayslake 
Central, 4:30 p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Lakes at Antioch, 6:15 p.m. 

Softball 

Lakes at Lake Zurich, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Volleyball 

North Chicago at Lakes, 6 p.m. 
Libertyville at Warren, 5 p.m. 

Thursday, April 26 

Baseball 

Antioch at Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 

'All school athletic schedules 
are subject to change, check 
with the individual schools for 
more information. 




•playoff game 



TEAM 


i FRIDAY 


1 SATURDAY 


SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


1 WEDNESDAY 


1 THURSDAY 1 






• 


NBA PLAYOFFS 
Opponent not determined as 


> 
>f press time 






B 




KANSAS CITY 

7:30 p.m. 

HDNot 






t 






© 


ST.LOUJS 
1:20 p.m. 

CSN, 
AM-720 


ST. LOUIS 

2:55 p.m. 

WFL0, 

AM-720 


• ST.LOUtS 
1:20 p.m. 
WGN, 
AM-720 


MILWAUKEE 

7:05 p.m. 

WCIU, 

AM-720 


MILWAUKEE 
7:05 p.m. 

CSN, 
AM-720 


MILWAUKEE 

1:20 p.m. 

WCIU, 

AM-720 




% 


at Detroit 
6:05 p.m. 

CSN, 
AM-G7Q 


at Detroit 

12:05 p.m. 

WGN, 

AM-G70 


at Detroit 
12:05 p.m. 

C5N, 
AM-670 


at Kansas City 

7:10 p,m. 

CSN. 

AM-670 


at Kansas City 
7:10 p.m. 
CSN-plus, 
AM-670 


DETROIT 
7.11 p.m. 

WCIU/ESPN, 
AM-670 


DETROIT 
7:11 p.m, 

CSN, 
AM-670 




■ 


at Grand 
Rapids 
6 p.m. 

FM-105S 




• 








rV'**5B 





Gymnastics Factory boy wins 
vault state championship 



Against 63 other boys from 
all over the state, four boys 
from Grayslake's Gymnasts 
Factory earned medals in the 
Illinois State Championship 
on March 31. 

Declan Delahunty was the 
top winner, taking home a 
gold medal in the vault with a 
9.75 score. Patrick Dunleavy 
was also able to make a top 
ten finish in the same compe- 
tition with a seventh place 
score of 9.55. Both Jacob 
Ruby and Brent Tunelius 
were able to medal in two 
events apiece. Ruby medaled 
in still rings and vault, while 
Tunelius did it in pommel 
horse and parallel bars. 



Level 4 boys team scores 



Illinois State Championship 

Patrick Dunleavy: Floor: 8.3; Pommel Horse: 7.8; Still Rings: 8.8; 
Vault: 9.55 (7th); Parallel Bars: 7.7; High Bar: 8.6; Ail-Around: 50.75. 

Declan Delahunty: Floor: 7.6; Pommel Horse: 7.3; Still Rings: 8.9; 
Vault; 9.75 (1st); Parallel Bars: 7.8; High Bar: 6.4; Ail-Around: 47.75. 

Jacob Ruby: Floor: 8.0; Pommel Horse: 8.0; Still Rings: 9.0 (14th 
place); Vault: 9.5 (14th place); Parallel Bars: 8.0; High Bar; 7.9; Ail- 
Around: 50.4. 

Brent Tunelius: Floor: 8.0; Pommel Horse: 8.6 (13th place); Still 
Rings: 8.7; Vault: 9.1; Parallel Bars: 8.9 (10th place); High Bar: 7.9; Ail- 
Around: 51.4. 



<tf*tt> 




FWA Snack 'n Learn Free Seminar Series 

Rain Gardens 

Mike Davis of Prairie Rivers Network 



Thursday, April 26, 2007, 5:30 p.m. (one-hour) 
FWA-HQ, 45 S. Pistakee Lake Rd, Fox Lake, IL 

Rain gardens help homeowners and businesses to reduce nonpoint source pollution, 
simply by planting a garden. Popular along the East Coast for years, these techniques 
are a great way to protect the Chain O'Lakes and Fox River from road run-off, exces- 
sive stormwater and lawn chemicals. 



Bring your own snack and grab a scat while you 

learn. 



For further information: 
(S47) 587-8540 







Children are welcome as long as they are seated and not disruptive to others. 



7 



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ICCOUNTV' 

JOURNALS 



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Boys Track: Grant 90, Wauconda 56 
Grant 95, Vernon Hills 50 

Dual success 



Grant track 
defeats two 
division rivals 

By STEVE PETERSON 

spc1erson@nwnewsgroup.com 

WAUCONDA - Grant's 
boys track team notched two 
dual meet wins in North 
Suburban Conference Prairie 
Division action, bouncing 
back from a loss to Lakes. 
Wauconda, meanwhile, had 
some strong individual 
efforts on a night that was 
finally good for better times. 

Grant downed Wauconda 
90-56, and Vernon Hills 95-50, 
while Wauconda lost to 
Vernon Mills 72-62 in an April 
16 meet. 

Joe Claver did well in the 
hurdles for Grant, winning 
the 110-meter high hurdles in 
16.1 seconds against 
Wauconda. 

Brandon Busching won the 
triple jump, in 36 3/4. Greg 
Gustafsori was second for 
Wauconda and Rob Champion 
of Wauconda finished third. 

"He [Busching] has been 
pretty consistent, but it will 
be tough to make state quali- 
fying time," Grant Coacli Sam 
Spasojevich said, 

Field events continue to be 
a Grant stronghold as Tom 
Bychowski continues to .be 
steady in the long jump. and 
Pavel Zurkowski won the shot 
put with a heave of 45-7. 

For Wauconda, Marc 
Anders, won the 3,200 run in 
10.45 against Grant. He also 
won the 800-meter run 
against Vernon Hills. 

"Anders has been phenone- 
mial," Wauconda Coach 
Megan Zemanek said. "He has 
always been responsible and 
has stepped into his role as 
captain." 

Garrett Dorsey won the 
100-meter dash against Grant 
for Wauconda and also 



notched another win in the 
400. 

"Dorsey had a personal 
best in the -100 in 51.0, [and] he 
is undefeated In the 400," 
Zemanek said. 

Jim Turbin and Sean 
Lichtcrman, as well as 
Gustafson in jumps, have 
been steady contributors for 
Wauconda. Colin McKenzie 
also helps In the jumps. 

Zurkowski won the shot 
put event with a throw of 44 
0.550. 

Sophomore Chris Mark 
won the pole vault with an 
crfort of 10 feet. 

Busching took a second for 
Grant for eight points in the 
triple jump, with an effort of 
35. 

Thus far, Grant's season 
has been relatively successful 
for the veteran coach. While 
Spasojevich will step down as 
head coach after the season, 
he thinks his team will make 
his last campaign a good one. 

"We're preparing the same 
way as we always have. We're 
a very young team. We have 
60 athletes, but only four sen- 
iors," Spasojevich said, "they 
are Joe Claver in the hurdles, 
Jim Powla in shot and discus, 
Frank Putzel in the pole vault 
and Matt Ziegler in the shot 
put." 

Zurkowski looked strong 
in winning the shot put by 
setting a personal best. 

The following are other 
places for Grant: Tom 
Bychowski finished in eighth 
place in the long jump in 17-8 
1/4; Lamarr Blandon was 11th 
in the event in 15-10. 

Tyler Dempsey was 12th in 
the 1,600 meter run, in 5:44.2; 
Mike Smeltzer and Chris 
Maxedon were 13th and 15th 
iii the 800 meters, in 2:34.4 and 
2:23.5.; Busching was ninth in 
the 55 meter intermediate 
hurdles in 9.0 seconds; 
Gunther Rosentreter was 
fifth in that meet's finals in 
8.8 seconds; The 4x400 meter 
relay team was seventh in 
4:14.1. 



CLC foundation hosts golf 
outing for scholarships 



For Information call: 847-223-8161 • visit: LaHaCountyJoumals.com 



Tee up for the College of 
Lake County Foundation 2007 
Joan Legat Memorial Golf 
Outing, to take place on 
Monday, June 11 at Glen Flora 
Country Club in Waukegan. 
Proceeds from the event will 
benefit the Foundation's 
scholarship fund, which helps 
deserving CLC students reach 
their educational goals. In 
2006, the golf outing raised 
$32,000 for CLC student schol- 
arships. 

Glen Flora Country Club, 
established in 1911, is a pri- 
vate 18-hole golf course 
known for its well kept greens. 
Registration for the golf out- 
ing begins at 10 a.m., followed 
by lunch at 11 a.m. and a shot- 



gun start at 12:30 p.m. During 
the 18-hole "scramble" tourna- 
ment, golfers will have the 
chance to win prizes, includ- 
ing a new vehicle, provided by 
Liberty Auto City. 

After the tournament, the 
event will continue at 5 p.m. 
with cocktails, hors d'oeuvres 
and a silent auction. One of 
Glen Flora's famous dinner 
buffets will be served at 6 p.m., 
followed by the presentation of 
prizes and awards. Donations 
are $350 a person and proceeds 
will go to the CLC scholarship 
fund. Tickets to attend the 
evening reception are $50. 

For more information and 
registration, call (847) 543- 
2400. 




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Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 
»Views 



SPORTS 



ALL April 20, 2007- Page 11B 



Be careful crowning Bears now 



You know how athletes 
and coaches tell us numbers 
and stats can lie? Not a big 
fan. 

It's usually a trite excuse 
for an underachieving player 
or team, Straight from the 
cliche cache. 

But the NFL released its 
2007 schedule recently and 
the "flbbine figures" busi- 
ness started to make a little 
more sense, 

At least for once. 

If you added up the 2006 
records of the teams on the 
Bears' schedule, you were 
left with the second-easiest 
slate in the league. 

As such, predictions of a 
10-, 11- or 12-win season 
started flying around 
Chicago faster than the April 
snow. 

Those are fine guesses 
and not totally off base for 
the returning NFC champi- 
ons. 

The favored Bears could 
win the weak NFC North for 
the third straight season and 
no one would be surprised. 

Only it's not going to be as 
easy as everyone thinks it 
might be. , 

If you want to crown 'em, 
go ahead, but lost in the 
strength of schedule ranking 
is the fact it's significantly 
padded by two games against 
Detroit (3-13 in *06) and one 
against Oakland (2-14). Also 
worth mentioning is that the 
rest of the NFC North went 
17-31 last year. 

That type of sugary filling 
can make a lot of people for- 
get the tough crust that 
comes with a first-place 
schedule and having to face 
the competitive AFC West. 

Ten of the games come 
against teams that were .500 




Kevin 
Kaduk 



or better and seven of the 
squads made the playoffs. 

So it's easy to see there's 
more work for the Bears to 
do than simply show up and 
receive a playoff bid. 

Especially because the 
morning after hasn't been 
particularly kind to Super 
Bowl losers. 

As will oft be cited this 
year, only two of the last 
eight runner-ups (Tennessee 
and Seattle) have avoided fol- 
lowing their Super Bowl 
appearance with a losing 
record the next season. 

Considering the Bears 
didn't make any significant 
off-season additions outside 
of safety Adam Archuleta 
and will likely start the sea- 
son without Lance Briggs 
and Tank Johnson, the bur- 
den of beating history will 
be a heavy one, 

Looking at the schedule, 
it's hard to see how the Bears 
won't go through at least a 
few struggles. 

The opener comes on the 
road against LaDainian 
Tomlinson and San Diego 
and is followed by two home 
games against equally rush- 
happy Kansas City and 
Dallas. Anyone want to hear 
the criticism that will swell 
around a poor rush defense 
after a 1-2 start? 

Then there's the fact the 
Bears will play five of their 
games in prime time. That's 
not a problem, though play- 



ing four of them on the road 
will be, and Lovie Smith has 
already issued a small dig at 
the league's schedulers. 
Anyone looking forward to 
seeing Rex Grossman in the 
spotlight again? (Think 
Arizona), 

(On a side note, it's inter- 
esting how the NFL has 
seemingly already started 
downplaying "Monday Night 
Football" on ESPN and 
instead chosen the Sunday 
Night game on NBC as the 
showcase honor. 

The Bears are scheduled 
to play on Sunday night 
three times and just once on 
Monday. Indianapolis plays 
twice on Sunday and once on 
Monday. ESPN can't be 
happy). 

Where else will the Bears 
have problems? Well, playing 
at Seattle and Philadelphia 
won't be easy. Back-to-back 
games at Washington and 
Minnesota isn't a help either, 
though the Bears will get 
some extra rest by playing 
the Redskins on a Thursday. 

Sure, the Bears will be in 
a nice position in playing the 
Packers, Vikings and Lions 
twice apiece. 

Ditto for drawing the 
Broncos and Saints at 
Soldier Field. If the Bears 
didn't play in the NFC North 
or have such a good home- 
field advantage, the schedule 
could be a lot worse. 

But for anyone wanting to 
print out playoff tickets 
before the NFL draft, it 
might be best to wait 

No lying. 

• Kevin Kaduk is the Lake 
County Journals' sports 
columnist. Write to him at 
kkaduk@nwnewsgroup.com. 




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Borrowing money against your home can be confusing. 
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of $350 or 1% ol lotal credit line, whichever Is less. APR cannot be less than 3.00% or exceed 25.00%. Applicable Insurances required. 
Offer cannot be used to refinance existing National City debl, National City equity tines opened within last 36 months that rewrite to this rate 
. olfer will Incur ah early termination fee unless the equity line Is Increased $25,000 or more and a draw of $10,000 or more Is advanced at 
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significantly as the minimum payment will Include principal as well as Interest, At maturity amounts owed of $10,000 or more have a 20 -year 
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Page 12B ■ April 20, 2007 ALL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



SportsRoundup 



Lakes blows out North Chicago 31-0 in three innings 



Softball 

Maybe a 31-0 score might 
be considered normal in a 
football game, but in a softball 
match-up, ' it's downright 
amazing. 

After the Lakes softball 
team dropped a 3-2 heart- 
breaker to North Suburban 
Conference Prairie Division 
rival Round Lake, the Eagles 
bounced back to destroy 
another conference rival in 
North Chicago, 31-0. Beyond 
the amazing score was the 
fact that Lakes put up the 31 
runs in just three innings 
before the mercy rule was 
enacted. 

Lakes' Hannah Karstedt 
pitched the shutout while Ihe 
defense played errorless ball 
throughout the game. Leading 
the impressive offense was 
Call Behrendt, who went 3- 
for*5 from the plate with five 
runs scored. 



Grayslake North 3, Dundee- 
Crown 2 

Pitcher Catiy Borders 
came up big for the Knights 
with 8 strikeouts to lead 
Grayslake North to a close 3-2 
win over Dundee-Crown. 
Thanks to two clutch runs in 
the bottom of the seventh 
inning, North was able to 
come away with the Fox 
Valley Conference Fox 
Division win and improve to 
4-3 on the year. 

Baseball 

Warren 6, Lakes 1 

Double-digit strikeouts are 
nothing new for Warren 
pitcher Mario Perez and he 
did it again with 14 Ks against 
Lakes April 16. In the process 
of pitching his 6-1 win, Perez 
gave up just three hits and 
walked one. 

At the plate, Warren got a 
3-for-3 day from Vince 



Viverito and two hits from 
Brennan Drew. The Blue 
Devils also got extra-base hits 
from Viverito, Troy Bloom 
and Sean Kennedy. With tiie 
loss, Lakes drops to 5-7 on the 
year. 

Carmet 8, St. Patrick 6 

Thanks to multi-hit out- 
ings from John Brennan, 
Zach Amrein and Jack 
Perrin, the Corsairs got their 
first East Suburban Catholic 
Conference win of the season 
in an 8-6 victory over St. 
Patrick. 

Carmel rode a six-run 
third inning to victory to 
improve to U-3 on the season. 
Corsair pitcher Joe Pudlo 
came away with the victory as 
Perrin got the save. 

Girls soccer 

Antioch 7, North Chicago 
One half, seven goals, easy 



North Suburban Conference 
Prairie Division win for the 
Antioch Sequoits. Antioch 
took a very democratic 
approach in the victory as 
seven different players found 
the back of the net in the win. 
Sequoits that scored 
include Lex! Florian, 
Christine Kwilosz, Kelly Pish, 
Tamra Davlla, Alisa Walizer, 
Alex Palma and Jen Zak. 
Antioch goalie Katie Budd 
preserved the shutout. With 
the win, the Sequoits Improve 
to 3-2 overall and 2-0 in the 
NSC-Prairie. 

Lakes 2, Grayslake 
Central 2 

Facing a 2-0 deficit, Lakes 
got two goals in the second 
half to come away with a 2-2 
tie. The Eagles got their goals 
from Sophie Khawaja and 
Dana Blocker. For the Rams, 
Megan LeBaron and Melissa 



Kuehl scored in the first half 
to give Central the early lead. 

Boys volleyball 

Waukegan d. Antioch 25-15, 25- 
19 

Antioch was defeated in 
straight sets thanks to - 35 
unforced hitting errors 
against Waukegan. 

The first game started out 
as a close match-up as 
Waukegan held on to a 9-7 
lead before pulling away In 
the second game, the Sequoits 
were able to make a game of 
it, closing in to 21-19 before 
four straight hitting errors 
did them in. 

Sequoit David Eck finished 
with five kills and an ace, but 
his efforts could not prevent 
an Antioch loss. 

With the loss, Antioch is 
still looking for the first win 
of the season with an 0-14 
record. 



Boys Tennis 

Lakes 5, Wauconda 

Lakes' Eagles came up big 
in a North Suburban Prairie 
Division match-up by sweep- 
ing the Wauconda Bulldogs 5- 
0. 

First singles player 
Andrew Yopp led the way by 
defeating Kevin Lenzen 6-4, 6* 
4. Randall Haylock won in sec- 
ond singles while Eagle duo 
Charlie Scupham and Justin 
Shea won 6-1, 60, and second 
doubles duo John Dudley and 
Timmy David won 6-1, 6-1. 
The lone match that went to 
the third set was in third dou- 
bles competition between 
Lakes' Nathan David and 
Andre Skula and Wauconda's 
Ryan Shepard and Connor 
Dimick. 

After Shepard and Dimick 
took the first set 6-4, David 
and Skula slammed the door 
6-2, 6-1 to complete the sweep. 



"I would recommend State Bank of The Lakes to 
anyone looking for a home equity line of credit. 
Their rates are great and their staff is very 
. knowledgeable. It's a bank where everyone 
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See what Lyn Fitch says about us. 

Rates as low as Prime - .75% APR 1 






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The concept of finding a sophisticated bank with one-stop shopping and small 
town community bank service was something Lyn dreamed of finding. Her dream 
came true when she switched to State Bank of The Lakes. 

"Before switching to State Bank of The Lakes, I remember calling my bank to 
get information on my loan and being bounced from desk to desk and location to 
location because no one could locate my file," Lyn said. "At State Bank of The 
Lakes I make one call and ALL my questions are answered promptly." 

Lyn's friend recommended State Bank of The Lakes because of their small town 
atmosphere. Lyn first opened a checking account and it wasn't long before she 
noticed a difference. 

"The staff at State Bank of The Lakes is always helpful. They make you feel like 
you're part of their team. You can't find service like this anywhere else. State 
Bank of The Lakes has a small town atmosphere, but with big bank capabilities," 
Lyn said. 

When Lyn needed a line of credit, State Bank of The Lakes was the obvious 
choice. The level of service and special rates offered by State Bank of The Lakes 
are something you won't find at a big bank. 

Lyn recommends State Bank of The Lakes to anyone looking for excellent 
banking services combined with exceptional rates and products. She's enjoying 
the benefits associated with her line of credit and couldn't imagine going to 
another bank. This is truly, one-stop shopping. 

If you would like to learn more about our banking products, call 
us at 847-356-5700 or stop by the bank today 



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[Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



SPORTS 



ALL April 20, 2007 • Page 13B 




G 



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tSJLSLSi 



ft 



' P. 



■ Rnce: Subway Fresh Fit 500 

■ Where: Phoenix International 
Raceway, Avondale (1.0 ml.}, 312 
laps/miles. 

■ When: Saturday, April 21 

■ Last year's winner: Kevin Har- 
vlck 

■ Qualifying record: Ryan New- 
man, Dodge, 135.854 mph, Nov. 
5, 2004. 

■ Race record: Tony Stewart, Ron- 
tlac, 118.132 mph, Nov. 7, 1999. 

■ Last week: Jeff Burton passed 
Matt Kenseth on the final lap of 
the Samsung 500 at Texas Motor 
Speedway. Burton's pursuit of 
Kenseth began on lap 321, after 
he slipped past a fading Jeff Gor- 
don. Kenseth was as Impressive in 
defeat as Burton was In victory. 
Noting that Burton was chasing 



c-iet=^!=ifTT 



CEXSEBIEmi^P g.iiMa^.'.r. v&tiiiMtea 



him down, Kenseth moved higher 
in the turns. Burton's Chevy re- 
peatedly pulled alongside 
Kenseth's Ford, but riding higher, 
Kenseth was able to "get In the 
gas" earlier off the turns and pull 
back ahead on the straights. Final- 
ly, on the final lap, Burton cleared 
Kenseth on the back straight. 
Asked if lie enjoyed facing Burton, 
Kenseth said: "t like racing against 
him better when I beat him." For 
most of the sunny afternoon, the 
likely winner was Gordon, who has 
never won here. He led 173 out of 
334 laps but faded near the end 
due to wounds that were self-in- 
flicted. Gordon blamed himself for 
a brush with the wall that took the 
edge out of his No. 24 Chevrolet. 



■ Rnce: Bashas' Super- 
markets 200 

■ Where: Phoenix Interna- 
tional Raceway, Avondale, 
Ariz. (1.0 miles), 200 
laps/miles. 

■ When: Friday, April 20 

■ Last year's winner: 
Kevin Harvlck 

■ Qualifying record: Kyle 
Busch, Chevrolet, 
133.819 mph, Nov. 4, 
2004. 

■ Race record: Jeff Bur- 
ton, Ford, 115.145 mph, 
Nov. 4, 2000. 

■ Last week: Matt 
Kenseth, in a Ford, held 
off the charge of Denny 
Hamlin to win the O'Reilly 
300 at Texas Motor 
Speedway. 



■ Race: O'Reilly Auto 
Parts 250 

■ Where: Kansas Speed- 
way, Kansas City, Kan. 
(1.5 miles), 167 
laps/250.5 miles. 

■ When: Saturday, April 28 

■ Last year's winner: Ter- 
ry Cook 

■ Qualifying record: Bill 
Lester, Toyota, 173.833 
mph, July 1, 2005. 

■ Race record: Ricky Hen- 
drlck, Chevrolet, 125.094 
mph, July 7, 2001. 

■ Last race: Toyota driver 
Mike Skinner won his 
third consecutive race, 
dominating the Kroger 
250 at Martinsville 
Speedway on March 31. 



itmi — i *■■■ ■ m' 




— "-PH0EN1XUATA 



April 21 Nov. 11 



® 




SRf 



Banking In 
straights 



Distance: 1.0 mile oval 

Length of frontstretch: 1,179 ft 

Length of backstretch: 1,551 ft 

Miles/Laps: 312 mi.- 312 laps 



^ 



Tuns 1-2, 11°: 
turns 3-4, 9° 



1 



! 






g^clsgCcglJ CJcllJEil-tt 



' Nextel Cup 




l. 


Jeff Gordon 


1,136 


2. 


Jeff Burton 


-8 


;3. 


Matt Kenseth 


-125 


4. 


Jlmmie Johnson 


•181 


5. 


Denny Hamlin 


-222 


6. 


Clint Bowyer 


-270 


7. 


Kyle Busch 


-280 


8. 


Carl Edwards 


-299 


9. 


Tony Stewart 


-322 


10. 


Jamie McMurray 


-331 


Busch Series 




l. 


Carl Edwards 


1,370 


.2. 


Dave Blaney 


-403 


is. 


Kevin Harvlck 


-432 


4 - 


Kyle Busch 


-457 


1 5 


David Reutlmann 


-463 


6. 


Matt Kenseth 


-497 


7. 


Bobby Hamilton Jr. 


-511 


8. 


Marcos Ambrose* 


-546 


• 9. 


Mike Wallace 


-551 


10. 


David Ragan* 


-568 


Craftsman Truck Series 


• l- 


Mike Skinner 


745 


i 2 - 


Todd Bodine 


-94 


"3. 


Rick Crawford 


-143 


i 4 - 


Ron Hornaday Jr. 


-144 


15. 


Ted Musgrave 


-145 


6. 


Jack Sprague 


-181 


I 7 - 


Mike Grafton 


-196 


u. 


Johnny Benson 


-202 


9. 


Travis Kvapil 


-216 


> 10. 


Aaron Fike* 


-248 



t 



* rookie 



t - WHO'S-HOT 



7±w i trsjji ; r* if * ■ > r c i si 



► Who's hot — 

Jeff Burton (right) 
has finished sixth 
or better in six of 
the seven races to 
date. ... Jeff Gor- 
don has finished 
third or better in 
five. 

► Who's not — 
Kevin Harvlck has 
one finish better 
than 17th since 
winning the Day- 
tona 500. ... Dale 
Jarrett's best fin- 
ish is 22nd, 









John Clark/NASCAR This Week 



caa^Eipgciffigil^Viq^: 




Stewart 



Montoya 



Tony Stewart vs. Juan Montoya 

The two were racing fiercely through 
turn four when Monloya's Dodge, at the 
bottom of the track, appeared to slip and 
drift into Stewart's Chevy. A slight tap 
sent Stewart's car spinning. "He (Stew- 
art) got really close to me," said Mon- 
toya. "He got me loose. I went into htm, 
and lie spun. I tried to pass three or four 
times, and he never gave me room. I 
went In a little different and got really 
loose, and I don't know what happened." 
Stewart responded: "He got inside and 
just wrecked me. It's just racing, I guess. 
When you're a rookie, you do stuff like 
that, so it's Just part of racing," 

NASCAR This Week's Monte Dutton 
gives his take: "Montoya felt Stewart 
pinched him. Stewart thought Montoya 
drifted up Into him. Stewart's version was 
closer to the truth. As an afterthought, 
though, Montoya Is no ordinary rookie." 




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Page 14B • April 20, 2007 ALL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



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WARREN BLUE DEVILS WARREN BLUE DEVILS WARRE!\ 




Chris Padgett ■ cpadgelKg nwncwsgroup.com 

Jeff Halvorscn and Mike McNally of the Warren boys volleyball team, jump to block a spike from Lake 
Forest on April 13. Warren won the game against Lake Forest in two matches. 



Baseball: Grant 2, Antioch 1 



Bulldogs pitcher leads 
team in win over Sequoits 



By STEVE PETERSON 

speterson@r» wnewsg roup.com 

FOX LAKE -This time, the 
Grant infielders were ready 
for trickery. 

Ahead 2-1 over Antioch, the 
Sequoits were threatening in 
the sixth inning. A single by 
senior Trevor Popp gave 
Antioch two runners on base. 

The Sequoits tried a 
delayed steal, but the Bulldogs 
catcher Gerik Wallsten 
snuffed it out and the lead run- 
ner was tagged out. 

"We had been working on 
that the last three or four days. 
We knew they would try and 
steal against us," Grant Coach 
Mike Mizwicki said. 

The play preserved a one- 
hit, nine-strikeout effort from 
Grant junior Kyle Stroup. 
With likely that Stroup's arm 
led the Bulldogs to a close 
North Suburban Prairie win, 
despite just two runs of 
offense in the game. 

"I hit my spots well with the 
heat," Stroup said. "We always 
look forward to playing 
Antioch." 

Catcher Gerik Wallsten 



44 

Winning the first game 

in a division series is key, 

because a split is not 

that bad 



Mike Mizwicki 

Grant baseball coach 



■99 



agreed that Stroup had his 
best stuff on a cold April 10 
day in Fox Lake. Wallsten said 
that winning the NSC-Prairie 
is a team goal. 

"Winning the first game in 
a division series is key, 
because a split is not that 
bad," Mizwicki said,."Plus,.we 
don't know about the weather 
later this week." 

Antioch's defense had the 
upper hand early, as a Grant 
runner was thrown out trying 
to steal. 

Grant scored twice in the 
second, aided by a pop up that 
fell in. Chris Utes reached on 
that play and Ryan Thorsen 
walked and scored. Anthony 




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Kaskadden delivered an RBI 
single. 

Antioch starter Jim Fracek 
had a good outing, too, but 
Grant gained the divisional 
hand this day. 

Antioch dropped to 5-9 
overall with the loss, but the 
Sequoits are still on their 
hottest run of the season, hav- 
ing won three of the last four 
games. During the stretch' 
multiple Antioch players have 
stepped up for the Sequoits. 

Top Antioch hitters have 
included Andy Danna (.412 
batting average, .525 on-base; 
percentage) and senior Brett 
Paramski. Pitching also has 
helped the Sequoits. with the 
likes of Ken Karagiorgas who 
is 3-1 and Jeff Baird has been 
the closer. 

"We have won three of the 
last four games. The defense 
has been pretty solid, 
although we had two break- 
downs against Grant and lost 
2-1," Antioch Coach Paul Petty 
said. "We want the kids to 
believe in our style of ball, in 
small ball and that 15 guys 
contribute, not just one or 
two." 



Hunters 
must apply 
for 2007 
license 

The Illinois DNR wants to 
remind you that the . 2007 
license year is now underway, 
as of April 1. If you need to 
buy a 2007 license, you can 
visit one of the hundreds of 
DNR Direct license and per- 
mit vendor locations through- 
out the state, or go online 
through the IDNR web site at 
http://dnr.state.il.us. 

Just click on the link for 
online hunting and fishing 
licenses. This is an easy way 
to buy fishing, hunting, and 
sportsman's • combination? 
licenses, habitat stamps,} 
inland trout stamps and state' 
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Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



SPORTS 



ALL April 20, 2007* Page 15B 



»OutdoorExperience 



A troubling loophole 
opens for hunters 



For the past three years, a 
loophole has developed that 
needs closing. 

The Illinois Auditor ' 
General recently announced 
the Illinois Department of 
Natural Resources has 
issued more than 1,200 hunt- 
ing permits over the past 
three years to people who 
didn't have to go through the 
lottery process like common 
citizens. 

Some permits were paid 
for, while others were issued 
gratis. 

The list of names of the 
permit holders included 
baseball and Hockey players, 
politicians at various levels, 
at least one judge and the 
former director of the 
Illinois Conservation 
Foundation. 

Of course, many of the 
permits were for the state's 
hottest spots such as the 
famed "Golden Triangle" for 
whitetail season. 

It is too bad these VIPs 
have to go through life with- 
out experiencing the real joy 
of Illinois hunting. 

That comes when you 
plan a hunt with a group of 
your pals, then turn in the 
applications listing your 
choices in order of season 
and by county. 

The enjoyment of waiting 
and hoping your application 
is pulled is an electrifying 
feeling these folks never will 
know. 

The real buzz happens 
when the mail comes and 
hunters find out that various 
members of their hunting 
party have been issued dif- 
ferent counties and different 
seasons. 

Too costly to hunt 

I got a call from a friend 
who bought a nice 40-acre 
piece of wooded property 
near Quincy last year. 
Seventy percent of the land 
is timber-laden, and the rest 
is farmed. 

But there are rumblings 
emanating from his county's 
assessor's office that the land 
might be reclassified as 
"recreational land" from its 
present status as "farm 
land." What this means is an 
increase in property taxes 
that is mind-boggling. 

Apparently what is hap- 
pening is the government 
has found a way to suck 
funds out of the bank 
accounts of the state's legion 
of deer hunters. 

Here is some property 
that is basically used a few 
weekends a year to hunt a 
couple of turkeys and maybe 
a whitetail or two. Land like 
this goes for about $4,000 an 
acre in prime areas. The 
land doesn't bring in any 
income, it is basically used 




Steve 
Sarley 



for recreation. 

Assessors are using a 
long-ignored law that allows 
this re-classification. Some 
tax increases have been 
reported as high as 3,000 per- 
cent. 

The owner of a large com- 
mercial hunting operation in 
western Illinois reports his 
taxes might go up $60,000 a 
year. 

He'll have to raise the cost 
of a hunt so high that he is 
worried his business will go 
elsewhere. 

My friend with the 40 
acres will be the owner of a 
piece of property that will 
become too expensive to use 
for hunting. 

The questions are "Who 
will he sell it to?" and "How 
little will he be able to sell it 
for?" 

The IDNR builds this state 
into a whitetail destination 
that is the envy of our neigh- 
bors, and now Springfield 
shows the distinct possibility 
of screwing that up. 

In 2006, the State 
Legislature voted to hold the 
property taxes on wooded 
acreage at the assessed 2005 
rates until this year. The 
issue is up for deliberation 
again. We need, to keep our 
eyes open. Stay tuned. 

An eye on conservation 

For the past 20 years, the 
Conservation Reserve 
Program (CRP) has been a 
successful endeavor that 
pays our nation's farmers to 
set aside land for the protec- 
tion of water and wildlife. 

Why would land that is 
not farmed be more con- 
ducive to wildlife? 

Modern-day farming prac- 
tices have been detrimental 
to most upland game. 

The CRP land that is 
untouched has allowed 
pheasants, for example, to 
stage a strong comeback in 
the Midwest. 

CRP encompasses nearly 
36 million acres of land. 
Conservation groups across 
the country have lauded the 
program as one of the best 
things to ever happen to our 
conservation efforts. 

CRP has been vital to the 
explosion in pheasant and 
quail populations. 

Goose numbers continue 
to climb. 

The fragile duck popula- 
tion is dependent on CRP. 
What could possibly stop the 
CRP program? 



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Ethanol-bascd fuel, com- 
monly called E-85, is often 
pointed at as a way America 
can get out of the death grip 
subjected on us by Middle 
Eastern oil producers. 

E-85 is produced from ' . 
corn. Processing plants are 
popping up all around the 
Midwest. Farmers from the 
heartland are growing as 
much corn as possible to feed 
the E-85 machines. 

Ethanol fuel comes with 
negatives. 

The fuel is almost as 
expensive as pure petroleum- 
based gas, witli far inferior 
miles-per-gallon ratings. The 
fuel would be even more 
expensive without the subsi- 
dies granted to producers by 
our government. 

E-85 is not all it is cracked 
up to be, and hybrid elec- 
tric/gas cars and hydrogen- 
powered cars are much bet- 
ter alternatives to the gas- 
burning internal combustion 
engines that power our vehi- 
cles today. 

Now, farmers and ethanol 
manufacturers have deter- 
mined switchgrass is as 
attractive as corn in the fuel- 
making process. 

Switchgrass is a perenni- 
al, requiring no planting. It 
grows on land that is not 
good enough to grow corn. It 
requires less work to pro- 
duce and is cheaper. 

Planting and selling 
switchgrass would be more 
profitable than being paid to 
keep the land unplanted by 
the CPR program. 

Many farmers would like 
to see the end of the CRP 
program and be able to take 
back the land that the gov- 
ernment was paying them 
not to farm and plant switch- 
grass fields. . 

Thankfully, Department of 
Agriculture secretary Mike 
Johanns has made the wise 
decision to save the CRP pro- 
gram and is not allowing pre- 
viously committed farmers 
from dropping their partici- 
pation. 

Activist conservation 
groups like Pheasants 
Forever and Quails Forever 
were at the forefront of the 
movement to maintain the 
CRP program intact. 

These groups and 
Johanns should be applaud- 
ed. 

• Lake County Journals 
outdoors columnist Steve 
Barley's radio show, "The 
Outdoors Experience, " airs 
live from 8 to 9 a.m. on 
Saturdays on AM-560. Sarley 
also runs a Web site for out- 
doors enthusiasts, 
OExperience.com, He can be 
reached by e-mail at 
ste ve@oexperience.com. 



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Round Lake's Chris McCracken reaches for the throw as Warren's Reid Johnson slides safety into sec- 
ond base during a 13-0 win at home for Warren. 

Round Lake looks forward to playing 
more games to improve performance 



• WARREN 

Continued from 9B 

Thanks to temperatures ranging between 
30 degrees and 70 during the past week to go 
along with snow and the occasional rain 
storm, outdoor practices and games have 
been few and far between. 

"We've really only played a few games 
because of the weather, and that's been diffi- 
cult for us because we haven't been able to get 
on a roll," Townsend said. "But we're no dif- 



ferent than anybody else because we've all 
had to deal with the weather." 

Round Lake has been in a similar boat, but 
thanks to poor field conditions, outdoor prac- 
tices have really been at a premium. However, 
Conkling thinks that weather should be the 
last thing his team thinks about before any 
more games. 

"It's definitely not helping us, we've only 
had four outdoor practices in the entire sea- 
', son/! Conkling said, "But we never want to 
make up excuses. We think we can do a lot bet- 
ter than what we did." 



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Page 16B • April 20, 2007 ALL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



Baseball: Cary-Grove 11, Grayslake North 3 



Cary-Grove offense explodes to defeat Grayslake North 



By JUSTIN STOFFERAHN 

winews@nwnewsgroup.com 

CARY - Cary-Grove senior 
third baseman Keith Denckor 
hit more then baseballs 
Saturday in the Trojans' 11-3 
Fox Valley Conference 
crossover victory against 
Grayslake North, 

Dencker momentarily halt- 
ed the momentum of a five- 



run fourth inning when lie hit 
a line drive off umpire Mike 
Klipstein's left wrist. 

"That was a shot," C-G 
Coacli Don Sutherland said. "I 
couldn't see where exactly he 
got hit. I thought he got hit in 
the heart." 

Klipstein put the frighten- 
ing moment to rest after he 
quickly got to his feet and 
resumed his duties. 



Before Klipstein was hit, 
North pitcher Jordan Field 
loaded the bases on two walks 
and a double. C-G's Kyle 
Williams singled in two runs. 
On the play, the ball went 
through the left fielder's legs, 
which allowed the third run 
to score and put the Trojans 
(4-3-2) up for good, 6-3. 

Down 2-0, C-G got its 
offense going in the third 



when Ryan Tobin hit an RBI 
double and Dencker followed 
with a two-run double, giving 
C-G a 3-2 lead. . 

North (2-3) tied the score at 
3-all when Field hit a sacrifice 
fly in the bottom of the third. 

The Trojans' explosive day 
offensively overshadowed 
pitcher Mike D'Annunzio's 
impressive performance. 

Having last pitched on 



April 3, D'Annunzio showed 
no signs of rust in his com- 
plete-game victory. He limited 
the Knights to three hits with 
four strikeouts and no earned 
runs. 

"The changeup away was 
working really well," 
D'Annunzio said. "I just tried 
to keep thorn off-speed 
because I can't really over- 
power anyone. The off-speed 



pitches made my fastball 
raster." 

C-G committed five errors, 
while the Knights made four. 
North coacli Andy Strahan 
did not use the area's recent 
bad weather, which canceled 
numerous games, as an alibi. 

"I don't think the weather 
has anything to do with not 
picking up the baseball," 
Strahan said. 



Softball: McHenry 4, Grayslake Central 2 



Costly errors lead to Rams loss against tough McHenry team 



By DANIEL J. PATRICK 

dpatrickfg nwnowsgroup.com 

GRAYSLAKE - For the Grayslake 
Central softball team, there's 
nowhere to go but up. After a loss 
against 4-2 loss against McHenry, 
the Rams dropped to 1-5 on the year, 
but one game still weighs heavily on 
every Ram mind: Grayslake North, 

Even after such a difficult start to 
the season, Monday's game with 
Grayslake North could be quite a 
spectacle that both teams are look- 
ing forward to. 

Tlie game will be the very first 



softball game between the two 
schools. 

"I think the girls get more excited 
about it than I do, but I think we 
have to keep an even keel and think 
of it as just another game," 
Grayslake Central Coach Steve 
Reitman said. "It'll be on our home 
field, so hopefully we can defend our 
home turf." 

As for McHenry, Reitman's take 
on the game was simple: his Rams 
made mistakes a team that no one 
can afford to make mistakes with. 
McHenry (4-1) has already set itself 
up for battle in a highly-competitive 



Fox Valley Conference Valley 
Division. 

"In today's game, we had our 
opportunities, but we gave too many 
extra outs to a very good team in 
McHenry," Reitman said. "1 thought 
we did some nice things, we had 
some good swings at the plate, but 
McHenry's a very good team and 
they're going to be a force on their 
side of the conference." 

Despite the loss, the Rams have 
not been steamrolled like earlier in 
the season. 

Last week, Grayslake Central 
even captured the first win of the 



season in an 11-8 victory over 
Dundee-Crown. 

"We've been more competitive 
recently than we've been in our first 
few games of the year," Reitman 
said. "We hope to continue and get 
some more positives going and cut 
down on some mistakes. Hopefully 
we can get a few more wins." 

Against McHenry, the words 
"costiy errors" do not even begin to 
sum up the Rams' troubles. Despite a 
triple and an RBI from Stephanie 
Hosford, the Rams finished with six 
errors that led to the close 4-2 loss. 

"It's been a combination of both 



[run production and costly fielding 
errors]," Reitman said. "We've strug- 
gled to find enough offense to win 
games and we still need to shore up 
some things defensively." 

Despite the troubles, Reitman 
said he thinks his team still has 
plenty of time to turn things 
around. 

"We certainly think we can be 
competitive in our side of the con- 
ference," Reitman said. "We have 
some good teams, but I think that as 
we continue to meld together as a 
team, we're going to be a competitive 
team." 



» CollegeOfLakeCounty 

Lancer tennis player named College of Lake County player of the week 



College of Lake County No. 1 sin- 
gles player, Andrew Nichols, has 
come up big in recent matches, 
winning his last three in a row. 
Nichols' run started with an upset 
against one of the Skyway 
Conference's best in Elgin player, 
Chris Reyna. Nichols and Reyna 
went the distance as Nichols 
dropped the first game 3-6, before 
winning 6-3 and winning the 
tiebreaker 10-7. 

After Nichols' triumph over 
Reyna, he went on to sweep his 
Waubonsee opponent 6-1, 6-0 



and went on to do the same 
against McHenry, this time by a 
score of 6-2, 6-3. 

Singles isn't Nichols' only talent, 
as he also won against McHenry 
and Waubonsee at first doubles. 
CLC coach Randy Malone said 
Nichols' game has come a long 
way since he began his Lancer 
career. 

"Andrew Nichols has made 
many improvements on his tennis 
strokes and his approach to 
match play," Malone said in a 
press release. 



SOFTBALL 

CLC 8, CARL SANDBURG 
College of Lake County's softball 
team came up big in the opening 
round of the East/West Classic in 
Freeport, I. CLC scored eight runs 
on eight hits, including five runs in 
the sixth inning for the big win on 
April 14. 

Pitcher Devon Kelly blanked Carl 
Sandburg by giving up just three 
hits and one walk while striking 
out six to improve to 8-6 on the 
year. At the plate, Alyssa Wilson 
finished 2-for-3, while Carley 



Karwoski hit a two -run triple to 
bring the mercy rule into effect 
and end the game. 

CLC U, ILLINOIS VALLEY 9 
After the Lancers' big 8-0 win 
over Carl Sandburg, CLC kept it 
going with a hard-fought nine- 
inning win over Illinois Valley 
Community College on April 14. 
Both teams were impressive 
offensively, as Illinois Valley out hit 
CLC 16-14 and jumped out to an 
early 3-0 lead. In the top of the 
fifth inning, CLC burst out to the 



games with four runs to put the 
score at 4-3, but five runs apiece 
in the eighth inning kept the game 
going. Finally, CLC was able to 
score two more runs for the big 
win. 

Devon Kelly went 4-for-5 with a 
double and two runs scored, while 
Carley Karwoski went 3-for-4 with 
a double and a 2-run home run in 
the fifth. Emilly Field then 
wrapped things up in dramatic 
fashion with a two-run home run 
in her own in the top of the ninth 
to end the game with a CLC win. 



BLACKHAWK7,CLC1 

With two straight wins under its 
belt, CLC's roll was put to a halt 
with a 7-1 loss at the hands of 
Blackhawk Community College on 
April 15. 

Blackhawk didn't take long to 
start by scoring two runs in the 
top of the first before extending 
the lead to six before the Lancers 
scored their first run. 

Alyssa Wilson hit a solo home 
run to break up the shutout and 
finished 2-for-3 from the plate in 
the game. 










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Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-1:00 

Crwrtoe filler, ifuid lewl fi (rent corriDorient ksaecticn drain 8 refill otintose uo to 5 ols ol oiL tAxsai oil and filler. Offer exnlres 04/31. frirtR od ftol VaW with oilier offer. . 



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Saturday, April 21 7am- 10pm 



Oxford Valley, PA storo open Friday, 8am-10pm, 



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SATURDAY 7AM-1 PM 






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for the family 
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Reg, 39.99-69.99, 

sat© 27,99*48.99 

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Orig. 29.99-65.00,^ 
sale 14.99-31.99 
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for men. 

from Champion' 
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Orig. $20-$24, 
sale 9.00-10.80 

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■i P41912 




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sale 4.80-29.48 Yr 

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ifrorri Croft & Barrow" 
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.Orig. $30^42, 
sale 13.50-18.00 

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50- % 

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pants for men 
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Orig. $40-$55, 
; sale .18.00-26.99 

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Golf tops for men 
from Dockers" 
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Orig. $26-542, 
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ultra-absorbent 
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30x54"; 
10 colors. 
Reg.13.99 



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sale 2^9-32.49 
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sale 15.60-34.80 

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your choice 

expanded 61 -pc. white dinnerware 
set or 65-pc. Cambridge * 

flatware Set Reg. 119.99ea. 



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Queen or King set 

300-thread count Egyptian 

cotton or damask stripe 

sheet set by Martex* 

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Sonoma sportswear 

for misses, petites and women. 
Orig. $10-546, sale 4.99-26.40 
Q selected items online W2830 



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99 



Loo* plain front and drawstring llnon capris 

for misses. Orig. S38 

nil other capris from Lee* & Gloria Vanderbllt* for 
misses and petites Orig. S38, salo 21.99 



petites 1 ; 



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Shorts & bormudas 
■ from Levi's 1 & Dockers* 
for misses. Orig. S32-S34 
selected items online P41932 



40- 



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/ferns 
on/toe J 
| W2300 A 

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Off 
Petites* sportswear 
from Erika*. 
Croft & Barrow*, 
Sonoma, apt. 9* 
and more. 
Orig. $12-$60, 
sats 730-39.00 
Selected styles. 
Q selected items 
online W2850 



ERIKA 




% 
off 

'. Women's sportswear^ 
from apt 9*. Sonoma,^ 

J daisy fuentes', 

^•Croft&Barrow*, 

* ::Cathy Daniels and 

v more. Sizes 1X-3X 

i.'and 16W-24W. 

:-t Orig. $14466, 

.''"•ate 7.99-39.60 

•-Selected styles. 

::- : Q selected Items 

)/ online: 
. KOHLS.COM 

japt;9' 



km 



entire stoc 



99 



Fashion Bermudas, capris and skirts for juniors 

from Rewind*, I.e.!.' and Mudd'. 

Orig. S30-S34 
selected items online P41934 



Iij.'I «iUJ 



'■■■'-' '^ K . '» ' * > c - w -w £?■!£, ' ' tS txtJ. n. L. 




energij 



entire stoc 






^- > -'.-_-. --: ■". 







Off 

SO capris, shorts, skirts and 5-pkt.' Joans 

' for Juniors. Orig. S26-S30, 
salo 12.99-14.99 
- selected Items online P41935 



40 



Off 



40-50 



•j 

■ 111 



entire stock 



entire stock 



17 



99 






Fashion shorts 
for juniors 

fromBongbV 
Angels & Mudd*. 
Orig. $26 
selected Items 
^online P41939 

FREE FLIP- 
FLOPS 

with trW;^; 
■ purchase of 
selected Bongo" 
shorts for Juniors 




40- 



*v ■ 


50& 


•V I 


Sweaters A 


H ■ mmi 


woven tops 


1 t ' 1 


: % ; . for Juniors. 


B-' ■ | 


Orig. S24-S30, 




sale$12-$13 




Qse/ecfed 




Items online 




P41933 



■ 



Active bottoms for Juniors. 

Orig. S18-S30, sale 10,80-18.00 

Excludes MJ Soffe' and collections. 

Q selected items online P41936 



19.99 pr. Super Buy 

;Ehtire stock &\ 

14k gold >^, 

leanings. e^V \ 

S5p \#W 



95.99 eaFSuper Buy 

*Entli» stock **■*& 

1/4 ctMW. sJV 

diamond jeweljy. fxf 
14kgold. : '^i§^ 
Reg. $300 ea. \\Vv-V 



Jewelry photo enlaijgec [to show detail. Diamond Total 
Weights are approximate. T.W. may vary up to .05 cf. 
I Actual savings may exceed the percent savings shown, 



Knit tops (or Juniors. 
Orig. S12-S24, sale 6.00-14.40 

Excludes collections. 
selected items online P41937 





<s/0 

vcaril J*oliirrjt"- 



... 

entire stock 



entire stock 



, 




off 

Chaps collections 

for misses. 

Orig. 19.50-99.50, sale 13.06-66.66 

selected items online W2880 



Sag Harbor*, Villager, Requirements*. 

Cathy Daniels & West End collections 

for misses, petites and women. 

Orig. S22-S69, sale 14.74-46.23 



■■-■-,. ,' - 



± mm ^^^^^^ 


„ 












m 





▼ 



Friday & Saturday, April 20 & 21 



entire stock • m entire stopk 



25-40< 

Fashion jewelry 

Orig. S8-S50. sale 5.36-37.50 

sefecfed items on//ne F999 






60 



^#V#off 

Fine jewelry & sterling silver jewelry 

Excludes Moissanite. 
selected items online F999 



Off 



! 




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i>" r 



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• - 

■ 









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I .' hoCetlonB 



entire stock 



entire stock 



mt c,,u,c ,s,t ■ , 



■ 





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ft'- ■ 



entire stock 



entire stock 




Croft S Barrow" sportswear 

for missos. petites and women. 
Ong. S14-S58. salo 8.99-26.40 
selected items online W2330 



Off 

Notations, Briggs* and Erika* separates 

for misses. Ong. S16-S44. 
sale 9.99-24.99 



issis: 



Fashion accessories 

for her. Orig. S8-S40. 

sale 5.20-26.00 



Off 




off 

Watches 
Reg. 19.95-675.00. sale 14.96-506.25 
selected items online F999 



40- 




% 



off, 



entire stock 



entire stock 



entire stock 



entire stock 



entire 

Nine & Co?, axcess, 
Stamp 10, 
daisy fuentes* 
&AB Studio 
collections 



40- 







: ; :i 






. for misses, petites 
and women. 
Orig. $16-$74, ■ •■ 
Mlo 0.60-44.40 

selected items 
<:'-, . online W2300 



<&?! 



I V 

; I ■ 



V 



7 ■'■".-^iv.- *: 7 /' Kf- * 



■-"';.' '7 




1^ 



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% 
off 

apt' 0° sportswear 

I; for misses, petites 

and women. 
li Orig. $20-$66, 
1 sale 9.09-39.60 

sefecfed' 
Hems online: 

kohls.com; 



40- 



OhBafayTby 
I Motnarhood* 

matemrty apparel 
vOflg; $i6-$44, 
i; sale 0.60-26.40 
J'^J'O 'selected items 
m^:bnlineW2820 



lO 



% 
off 



Hh 



? • .% ( 



'^r 






■ a Pt9" 



rfi: 



s*& 




' Fine fragrances 

Reg. 4.50-70.00, ■ 
•ala 4.05-63.00 

Excludes American 
Beauty, grassroots" 
&FURT1. 

33-SO% Off 
all bath & body ; 
Reg. 1.60-25.00, 
sale 1.00-1675 

Excludes 
■grassroots'". 




40 



% 

off 



Panties & Innamear 
Reg. 3/S15 to $21 eaV 
•ale 3/»«00 to 12-60 ea.j 

Ex dudes Jockey* & 
bra coordinates. 
Q selected Hems 
online P41940 



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entire stock 



'■'■"'■ ''''■■■:■-*•."*'.■ *-'v"' -,«^^ '■■ ■ 
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entire stock 



entire stock 






J-tj -f ' L 



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% 

off 

FuDa*,H.Y.U% 
QlbriaVandeibllt- 
Speft, daisy fuentos*^ 
sport, Tak Qeai*, 

Nika*. adklas*, 
Danakin* 4 Rusaeir 
Athletic active and 
: fUneaawear for 

misses. Orig. $16-$54, 
sale 6.00-43.20 

Selected styles, 
Q selected . 
Hems online 
>W1300. 



m.urjm^mi:.- 




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% 

off 

Swhnwear 

for misses, 
juniors and' 
women. Orig. 
-$24-$86, aale 
16.6O-S5.0O 
$ selected 
Hems online: 
; KOHLS.COM 



% 

'off 

Hamfbags 
A handbag 

accessories 
fvOrig. I^OO^ 
"98.50, 

^vaale9.00-'-'i 
I 60.10 
selected 



Socks ft flip-flops 
for her. Orig. $6-$18, 
•ale 3.00-10 JO 

Accessories dept 

Q selected Hems 

online P41841 1 













■ Hems\ 
online 

wieoos 






4 






"-.V.^-^m 



W 



villager 



JjJ&M*. r 1 *'*^. 





99 

brSS from Vanity Fair . Bali , 
Lily of France & barely there . 
Reg. S25-S30 Selected styles. 

selected items online W180Q 



- V. ,': ,"■ I ,*.-. 



lap 



40 % off 

entire stock 

sleepwear, loungewear & robes 

for tier. Ong. S12-S58. sale 7.20-34.80 
selected items online W24Q0 



• ■ 






i 




wm 





f We've made it easy. 

O Final price is marked on the ticket. . 

We do the math. You enjoy, the savings. 



. savin, ,.-,.,■;,.,-■ by store. Interim markdowns may nava baen taken. Sc^ no price ad|u.tmants grvan on pri W purchases. ^^^ 

SaSoTSfflffi ITJErS 8 and Chamba'rsburg. PA stores. selected items online: clearance 



L. 



*.ti tnni:;;t;*.ii"i*'"i' ""»"""".' !?■'.'■'■'.'!-'■' .'.'.'i ;.'■'_' .'J "-'"•"■'■'-' 



selected items 
online P41952 





40-50 



Off 



Sportswear collections for men 

from axcess and apt. 9". 

Orig. S24-S50, sale 9.60-27.99 Selected styles. 

M selected items online P41950 



nil re SIOCR 



40-50 

Dress shirts for men 

from Croft & Barrow", axcess, Arrow, Axisr and apt. 9'. 

Orig. S28-S46. sale 16.80-24.99 

* selected items online P41951 



^' ess;?, k 
entire stock 



_..■■ , . . 




C 1 ( ,ulN 







entire stock 



Dress pants for men 

from Chaps, Braggi*. Croft & Barrow* and Axist* 

Orig. S45-S80, sale 22.50-41.99 

\ selected items online P41954 



li 



W$ 



,7 



entire stock 




off 

Shorts 

for men Ong. S28-S-U. sale 14.99-27.99 
Excludes atnletic *■ selectee items online PJ195S 



Qse/e 
item] 
online 
P4U 






rv . , ,-; V, 






i 

S.ONOMJ 



off 



entire 

casual pants for men 

team Sccru. Croft A Borrow- ana A.* * 
Or j 54: 550 sale 20.00-27.50 



40-50 

Sport shirts for men 

from Arrow, Axist". Haggar*. Croft & Barrow*. 

Havana Jack's Cafe" and Natural Issue'. 

Orig. S30-S45, sale 17.99-26.99 



entire stop 







croft &barrow 



entire stock 



off 

Loungepants and boxers for men 

from Sonoma and Croft & Barrow". 

Orig. S12-S20. sale S6-S10 

* selected items online P-11955 



^ dp 



M 



entire stock 

40-50S. 

Swim wear 

for men Ong. Si 8-542. sale 9.99-24.99 

k selected items online P41959 



entire stock 





Shorts for young men 
from Lee* Dungarees, 
Unlonbay**, U.S. Polo i 
and Tony Hawk". 

Orig;$34-$44 
selected Items 
■■ online P41963 



1*0 , 

DUN6AREE8 



entire stock 



■• ■ 

.■ .! 
i 



5 



99 



Patriotic tees 
for young 1 men. 
Orig. $10 



nUSSMUA 



°off 
entire l 

athletic apparel 

tor 'Tien Ong 5M-5J5 sale 6.99-28.00 



Knit and golf tops for men . 
from Croft & Barrow', Sonoma. Arrow, Dockers , 
Wedge" and Grand Slam". Orig. S14-S50, 
sale 8.40-29.99 > selected items online P41953 

entire stock 






'4 

id 



40 



Berts, wallets 
and jewelry 

for men. , 
Reg. $12-530, 
sale 7.20-16.00 
Men's dept 
selected item, 
online P41957\ 



% 



off 





■ 




entire stock 



18 s 

Shorts for 
young men ; 

from Plugg* and 
Urban Pipeline - . 

Orig.$30-$36 ^■^j'l^itff^ 

selected Items 
onllneP41964> 




entire stock 



*off 




< tope 
. £*6r young men 
^fT^Tbrr/rJawlf* 

VwfrbieWseV' 
Ong.$lB440, 
Ml* 10.SO-24.00 ' 

i>$' selected itemal 
\ online P419&'- 



^fek 



. "iwawk*?! 






entire stock 



Hrwoff 

Collections 

for girls 4-16. Excludes Candie's'. 
v selected items online P41965 

entire stock 



% 

'off 

Fisher Price* toys 

Excludes TMX Elmo 
and baby gear. 
selected items 
-.. onlineP41969 



10-40% off all other toys 




entire stoc 



■^TV/off 

Dresses 

for girls 4-16. toddlers, infants and newborns. 

Excludes Candle's'. * selected Items online P41968 



mm' fL ' ' ■ 

entire stock 






Outdoor seasonal toys 

Excludes Banzai Blast 
water slide, 




My Talking 
He scut; Pack 






i 






w 

■Ufo 






' X^ff^ 




■'r. 


Btsto 




*' 


Bell 





Friday & Saturday, April 20 & 21 



- 
• ■ ■ . 



■ 



. . . 

- 

. . I 
a . . . 

■ 



10 



■ 
■ 



■ ■ ■■ 



. ■ ' 

■ 




HMa 


1 






























i 




1 




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entire stock 



entire stock 






I *H»% 



I 1 .-?*i;- w *"5 !0 **: 






O'ssiee^rrem* 










'off 

(Sonoma denim 
'and twill pants 

l^tX^I)bys:&:20. 
: Reg. 19.99-24.99, 

sale 0.90-12.48 



, ... 









liv 






I ' 



',.;..'..•,•._:. |ft'irt..g:- - 






Lm5H^ 



entire stock 



entire stock 



: y,x^£A 



:; ; M^!ii 






off 

i 

iV..;~C",I";ci.iV J- ' .""y *■'*■'-- mr 










■«P 






Ibpe for boys S-20/; 
from Machlne , 1 Uhtonbay^ 
and XTrsrhe Gear*. 
Orig. $22^26, 
I saJetll-SlS 
selected Hsms 
~,;:<Mine:P41?72:- 



%!m 













■■■» j 



4^ §|5%- 



:* 



<**. 



tW-!.^ '.'-■ vi.m-- 




. •■-. 





;*Hj 



Fashion tops 

for girls 4-1 6. Excludes Candle's 1 . 

k selected items online P41967 




entire stock 



off 

Sets 

for toddlers, boys 4-7 and girls 4-6x. 
Excludes athletic. 




^•■?^»??saafl 



I 



' llrM 







ntire sto 



entire stock 



■ ■ . 



40 



off 



Tony Hawk' collections 

for boys 4-20. 
S selected items online K4470 



: ■■; 



%%&&■» 



;.|rEKiBi 






r 7 '--. 



AM* 



Off 



entire 



feiiiimu— siejsgj 



fiom TeK Gear and Russell Athletic 
Ony S15-S20. sale 7.50-10.00 
' se/ecfecf <lems online PJ1973 



Swlmwoar 

for girls 4-16, boys 4-20, toddlers and Infants. 

* sotocfed Items online K3300 




t ■% 



entire stock 



Spring outerwear 

for girls 4-16, boys 4-20, toddlers, infants 

and newborns. 




entire stock 



30 



Off 



Nike* activowear 
(or boys 4-7, girls 4-6x, toddlers and infants. 
* selected items online: NIKE 



'•■affetadiy'.', 



'HV>lt 






■^ r5 ": 



40-£ 

entire 



off 



[tJiTnsT^HeTiTlKVifl^TfMeMlJs 



lor boys 4-20. girls 4-16. toddlers and infants. 
fc selected items online. CHAPS 



•■■- ■■■ - •••■•■■•■- ^^-^.^^.jjjjj^^ 



mmmmmmmmm 



WW** 



■>■»■*»■■ 



24.99 

apt. 9* twin 
snoot sot. 
Orlg. 49.99 



19.99 

Collier Campbell 
twin shoot sot. 
Orig. 44.99 









«-AU*A ASHLEY 






: . 

«. . . . 

! I 

jl ■ 



(•at 



tmr 

l*l: 

■ \Zr 

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29.99 

Homo Classics* 1 

twin quilt sot. 
Orlg. 69.99 



I" 



EN 



m 



K home ^classics- 












.*'_ Sv 




'. ' • 



.- ft ' 

'■ 



off 



Shoot sots 



L*l"l*Fv'/ll£lil!K7f71fTM! n- 1- 



Excludes coordinating sheet sets. 
'• selected items online P41975 



' • ' 



Ml: 









J- 



Decorative pillows 

Orig. 14.99-44,99, 
sale 7.49-22.49 
Q selected Items 
online P41978 



L iffeii' :■■■:■ 







Home Classics" 

slipcovers ^ ^^i^ ^-^ j 

Rog. 89.99 ^jjf^^^&Vrtfy f ' 

1M> *' : ''''"' 



„...-. :...v... ij 




I -.;■•■ :-/- Hfl 



is -■? 



IKS* 



tire stock 



Bed pillows and mattress pads 

Reg. 9,99-359.99, sale 4.99-179.99 

selected items online P41976 



entire stock 



•/: 






entire stoc 







Accent, area 
& kitchen rugs 
and doormats 

Q selected Items 
online H1900 





Table linens & 
kitchen textiles 
Orig. 1.99-59.99, 
sale .99-29.99 








5T* 



off 

Qutlts & blankets 
Orig. 29.99-169.99, sale 14.99-84.99 



8.79 

ROYAL VELVET* 
bath towol. 
Reg. $18 






entire stock 



. 



50-60 



Off 



Bath towels & bath rugs 
Excludes embellished towels & 

decorative bath collections. 
selected items online P41977 





i«n«n»«iii^iii'mn ^ 




Bordeaux 



. 



entire stc 

40-50 

Decorative bath collections 

Reg. 4.99-64.99, sale 2.99-38.99 

selected Hems online H1130 



" — 



entire stock 



50-60 0/? 

Luggage 

Reg. 29.99-379.99, salo 14.99-189.99 

selected items online H1740 



Friday & Saturday, April 20 & 21 





, 


• ■ 






■ 


■ 


•• 


■ 


' ' ■ ' . 














■ . 

- 








,\ 






■ 




. 







■■} . ?,ij ■ 






' 




% Off 



Q selected Items 
online H3900 



entire stock 

frames, albums & 
decorative art 

Excludes digital frames. 





Digital Labs 7" digital photo frame 

Insert memory card to view photos. 
Comes with 2 interchangeable 
frames. Reg. 129.99 





Candles and 
decorative lighting 
Excludes Yankee 
Candle 9 & patriotic. 

selected Items 
online H1130 



_ 



entire stock 



tzr\% 




v- 


OUoff 




mi 


Summer Living 4 Shop 


m 


Jek 


$ selected v \vAjli 


, m 




Items nXvVibI 






online '^%\mm^ 




H4500 xUrtW 





t •-.■-■ 



10.99 

Summer Living* % 
floral. Orig. 24.99 
Selected sty las. 



■•/'■.' 





After $1Qmall-ln rebate 

White ILive Boombox 
Charges iPod* while it plays; also plays CDs. 
Reg. 129.99, sale 69.99 IPod 9 not Included, 
Rebate & sale for white only. 




m 



^ssorleiF — - '-^^-^ - 



entire stock of shoes an 



on 




•■;'-' ■'• C':S' 



, athletic sh< 



WW w 



Nike* Air Dart IV Plus 
' running shoes for women 



New Balance* 
534forboy3 









f40 % off 




New Balance* 
534 for girls 




^:-.£> \ 



■ .iKKl^i^^^^^'^:,';-^ 



T' ' : .''••-■■'-' :' : '^' 



iadidaa^ 

Kldzweego 
for boys > 




Rialto 
Starshlp 



i^hb^slridlsandals for 

Mootsies 




wEmiiSBd Hams brttot 7 W7880 




30-40o « 

Entire stock athletic shoes and sandals 
for the family from adidas and Tony Hawk 
Reg. 19.99-69.99. sale 13.99-48.99 

shop online: SHOES 



30-50'c* 

Entire stock running shoes for kids. 
Ong. 34.99-44.99, sale 24.49-31.49 
Excludes athletic shoes designated 
as HIGH-PERFORMANCE. . 



\99-29.99 







\m 



\','! "■" 






' 




ii r 


Wr''i' 






BEb* 




r*A 


" f . 


yt 


iio 



Mudd*-' 



J . 



Bongo* 
: Crossroads 



■ ■ ;, i ■!/,• 




I 1 

shoes & sandals 

i ^; tor. women. 

Orlg. 44.99^49.99 
[;' Sefectetf sfyfes. 



B'Cory 

^DOCKERS' 

!}■•:*" ■ '' ■■'■ : 






Dockers* 
Cambree 




• ■ '■■■■ ■"■>■ --^ '■■' ^ ' '■ 

-■'HiiiM''-.-/.- 




40 



« 



99 



Entire stock shoes & sandals 
for juniors from MudU and Bongo 
Ong 34.99-49.99. sale 20.99-29.99 

selected rtems online P41979 



Shoes & sandals 

tor men pny 59 99 69 M 

Selected styes 



■f^% 






t^'^™" , 4'^' 




entire stock 



off 

Dlnnorware and flatware 

selected items online DM00 



29.99 

Your choice HoMedics* 
Jetspa Foot Bath or 
HoMedics* 10-motor 
back massager with 
heat Orig. 59.99 ea. 



69.99 

After $20 mail-In rebate 
Farberware* Specialties 
14-pc. nonstick , 
cookwareset 
? Reg. 149.99, 
•ale 89.99 



Exclusively at Kohl's 



. 



entire stock 






i \ 

Ira 





m 



entire stock 



10-50 



% 

off 



Personal care 

J soli>Lto<l news ij/i/«je H2400 




fARBERWAR 



entire stock 



Cookware 

selected items online: KOHLS.COM 



■ ■■■• ■■ . ■ ■ ■ ■ ... 

229.99 

' Hoover*,. v.; v, ■.;,.,■ 
1 .Wirtdlbnner, 

Setf-lfropelled ■■"■,■- 
. , vacuum; -A" 
; ;,Reg. 299.99 

^69i99> 

JjlQulcHSteamer*. 

., "deep cleaner.. ■■ 
Heg.109.99 



entire stock 



10- 



off 



Floor care 



sulccteO itvms online H\-i00 



entire stock 

kitchen electrics 

; selected items online D19O0 

19.99 

-Your choice 

West Bend* 6-qt, : 

The Crockery" 
i Cooker, Oater* 

10- speed blender,, 

Mr. Coffee* 4-cup 

programmabte 
i ^'cofreemaker or : A 
ffiB&'&Decket^Sgge 
!■ Classic Toast-ROven%: 

Reo.27.99r39.99ea. : 



entire stobic 







% 

off 

Cutlery 

Excludes 
Henckels 9 
International. 

44.99 

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Page 2* Friday, April 20, 2007 



SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



LakeCountyJournals.com 



10 tips for upgrading 
your home's exterior 



The importance of curb 
appeal can never he underrat- 
ed when you own a .home. 
Whether it's pride of owner- 
ship or fitting in with the 
neighborhood, the exterior of 
your home reflects your per- 
sonality and can create posi- 
tive impressions. And, if 
you're selling your house, the 
importance of curb appeal 
jumps ten-fold as you try to 
position your home for an 
"instant connection" with 
potential buyers. 

Try these cost-effective 
upgrades to transform Hits 
look of your home: 

Tip #1 — Trim out exterior 
windows. Use crossheads for 
over a window and top with a 
solid, decorative or recessed 
panel keystone accent piece. 
On the sides and below the 
window, use moulding pieces 
with plinth blocks in the cor- 
ners to eliminate miter cuts. 

Tip #2 — Add sparkle to 
your yard with a decorative 
lamppost that can help light 
up the night. 

Tip m — Top off your home 
with an impressive cupola. 
There arc many different 
cupolas ranging in height 
from about five feet tall to 
more than seven feet tall. The 
base and roof support are 
made of cellular PVC while 
the sill, crown moulding and 
louvers are made of methane. 
Featuring bell, pagoda and 
hipped copper roofs with the 
center portion options of lou- 
vers, glass or wren birdhous- 
es. 

Tip #4 — Replace a rotting 
wooden porch system with a 
new structural balustrade sys- 
tem which includes porch, 
posts, top and bottom rails, 
balusters and all the other 
pieces essential to create a 
great, weather-resistant 
porch. 

Tip #5 — Interlock and 
install pieces of PVC Beaded 
Board on the ceiling of a 
porch or sunroom and then 
use the same low-mainte- 




Adding window trim and pilasters 
around a window can significant- 
ly increase the exterior look of a 
home. 

nance materials for a wain- 
scot treatment on the walls. 

Tip #6 — Replace older, rot- 
ting wooden louvers with low- 
maintenance urethane lou- 
vers. Functional louvers have 
a noncorrosivc fiberglass 
screen backing to keep insects 
out while allowing maximum 
airflow and ventilation to 
enter the attic. 

Tip #7 — Upgrade the look 
of your entry way by adding a 
new brass kickplate and pol- 
ishing your door hardware. 

Tip #8 — Flank your win- 
dows with easy-care urethane 
shutters. Choose from a selec- 
tion of white louvercd solid 
panel and louvcred slatted 
panels shutters or woodgrain 
plank panel shutters in two- 
plank, three-plank and diago- 
nal V-stylcs. Paint or stain the 
prc-primed shutters to com- 
plement any home exterior. 

Tip #9 — Add decorative 
columns to the exterior of 
your home or yard. Urethane 
columns come In fluted 
square, serpentine, flat square 
and plain panel square styles 
and are weather resistant. 

Tip #10 — Make your entry- 
way more welcoming with an 
elegant door surround. Start 
with fluted pilasters on either 
side of the door and then top 
the door with a decorative 
pediment — try a rams head, 
sunburst, acorn or peaked cap 
style. 



Growing plants in problem places 



By CHARLIE NARDOZZI 

When you read the descrip- 
tions of where to plant your 
new tree, shrub or perennial 
flower, invariably you see 
words such as "fertile, well- 
drained soil" and "full sun." In 
an Ideal plant world, all soils 
would be rich in organic mat- 
ter and well drained and the 
locations would be sunny and 
protected from wind. I don't 



know about you, but that does- 
n't describe my yard, I do have 
some full sun locations, but 
tiiose sites are exposed and 
windy. A protected spot in the 
backyard would be perfect for 
plants, but it floods in late win- 
ter and spring for weeks - a 
perfect recipe for plant death. 
Then there's the north side of 
the garage that has great soil, 
but it's dark all day. 

So what can you do if your 




Selecting the right plant is important when planting in a shady loca- 
tion. Impatiens are perfect for shady areas. 



yard doesn't have the ideal 
planting location? There are 
ways to use almost any loca- 
tion in your yard as planting 
space. It just takes the proper 
plant selection, a little site 
preparation, and some 
Improvisation at planting 
time. 

Planting on 
wet, clay soils 

Clay soil is a blessing and a 
curse. Clay naturally contains 
many nutrients and holds 
water well. However, once wet, 
it's difficult to work and takes 
a while to dry out. 

The key to working on wet, 
clay soil is to improve the soil 
drainage and texture. You can 
Install drainage pipes to divert 
the water to improve drainage, 
but an easier solution is rais- 
ing the soil. Raised beds for 
perennial flowers or raised 
mounds for trees and shrubs 
allow the water to settle below 
the root zone. Build 8- to 12- 
Inch-tall raised bed for peren- 
nial flowers. Amend the beds 
with compost to improve the 
soil texture, creating air 
spaces in the dense clay soil. 

For planting trees and 
shrubs, create a mound with 
the native soil so that when 
you plant 1/3 to 1/2 of the root- 
ball is above the normal soil 
line. Select the right plant for 
wet sites as well. Some plants 
that will tolerate wet, clay soils 
include Joe-Pye weed, 
Louisiana iris, Miscanthus 
ornamental grass, obedient 
plant (Physostegia), winter- 



berry holly, pepporbush 
(Clethra), willow, cypress and 
eastern white cedar. 

Planting in shade 

Selecting the right plant is 
also important when planting 
In a shady location. First, 
determine the amount of 
shade you have. Part shade is 
defined as 3 to 4 hours of 
direct sun a day. Astilbes, 
coleus, impatiens, . and 
heuchera are examples of 
plants that grow well under 
these conditions. Filtered or 
dappled shade is what's found 
under small trees such as flow- 
ering plums, and medium- 
sized deciduous trees whose 
lowest branches are at least 20 
feet off the ground, such as 
maples. Azaleas, mountain 
laurel, bleeding hearts, hostas, 
and ferns grow well in dappled 
shade. Deep shade is what's 
found on the north side of 
buildings or under ever- 
green trees with low brandi- 
es. Few plants, other than 
moss, grow well in deep 
shade so it's wiser to mulch 
that area instead. 

Charlie Nardozzi, a nationally 
recognized garden writer, book 
autlior, speaker and radio and 
television personality, has 
appeared on HGTV, PBS and 
Discovery Channel television 
networks. He is die senior horti- 
culturist and spokesperson for 
the National Gardening 
Association (mvw.garden.org) 
and Chief Gardening OfTicer 
for tlie Hilton Gaixien Inn. 



Gurnee Garden Center celebrates 35 years in business 

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our thank you for your loyalty and support, we offer you a chance to win a $35.00 gift 
certificate in our free weekly drawings. See You Soon! 



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SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



Friday, April 20, 2007 • Page 3 



How to create your dream home 



Among the clipped lawns 
and traditional stylo homes of 
Green Bay, a cozy log home 
nestled in the woods rs a rari- 
ty indeed, Equally rare are 
the steps the owners have 
taken to protect their original 
retreat. 

On a hot summer morning, 
David and Kathy Janczak 
opened their Green Bay home 
to visitors who share their 
passion for log homo living. 
"This is the first time we've 
hosted an open house since 
renovating our log home," 
said Kathy, In the lodge-like 
great room where the family 
of five shared meals, celebrat- 
ed holidays and created hand- 
made Christmas ornaments. 

Nearly 30 years ago, the 
young couple dreamt of a log 
home of their own. David, an 
avid woodworker who had 
been studying log home con- 
struction for some time, 
promised his new bride Kathy 
that he would build her a 
dream home as a wedding gift. 

On a 20-acre parcel of land, 
David diligently set out to ful- 
fill his promise, with Kathy 
working beside him every 
step of the way. Completed in 
1976, the full log home was an 
intimate 1,547 square feet. 
The great room, which was 
the heart of the home, 
remains intact today. 

Local excitement over 
their home and many 
requests prompted David to 
craft similar log homes for 
other enthusiasts. This, in 
turn, created Wisconsin Log 
Homes Inc., which David con- 
tinues to oversee today. Both 
the home and company has 
grown significantly over the 
years, "a testament to 
America's love affair with 
rustic homes and the simple, 
comfortable feeling they gen- 
erate. 

While the 60-plus people 
toured and explored their 
recently remodeled home, 
David and Kathy eagerly 
shared their experiences with 



, both full log and half log con- 
struction. As the visitors mar- 
veled over the fine craftsman- 
ship and attention to detail, 
David educated them on the 
basics of log homes and ener- 
gy efficiency, including 
explaining why he developed 
the Thermal-Log insulated 
half-log building system 30 
years ago, 

David says the spacious, 
yet unpretentious 5,600- 
square-foot hybrid home "Is a 
result of 30 years of ideas and 
experience in log home design 
and construction." Designed 
for entertaining as well - as 
day-today living, the home 
showcases many progressive 
design elements, all while 
exuding traditional log home 
comfort and warmth. 

The Janczak home was 
designed to be one with 
nature, both indoors and out. 
Strategically placed doors, 
windows and bump-outs max- 
imize the surrounding view 
which includes a pond, wood- 
ed area and front water gar- 
den. A screen porch and wrap- 
around architecturally lit 
stamped concrete patio is the 
perfect place to relax during 
sunset at the end of a long day. 

Indoors, the couple's love 
for natural materials is evi- 
dent, incorporated into 
almost every design element. 
From the chocolate glazed 
ceramic tile on the floor to the 
handcrafted antler chande- 
liers, the space is saturated 
with various textures. David's 
trademark wormy wavy edge 
trim and custom gnarly rail- 
ings give the log home a per- 
sonal artistic touch not readi- 
ly seen in the industry today. 

The custom kitchen 
designed by Kathy and the 
company's in-house interior 
designer shows how a modern 
working kitchen can flow 
effortlessly into an open floor 
plan typical of log home 
design. Character cherry cab- 
inets topped with custom 
crown molding, state-of-the- 




art appliances cleverly tucked island has a painted furniture 

behind cabinet panels and a look to it, complete with 

hand-scraped engineered authentic antler pulls, 
hickory floor warmed with As the visitors split up and 

radiant floor heat are some of meandered from room to 



architectural elements while 
others eagerly discussed envi- 
sioned floor plans. "The trip to 
Green Bay was well worth it," 
one attendee noted. "This 



the few places where technol- 
ogy meets style in the 
Janczak home. The raised 
cabinet at the end of the 



room, they began to share home gives us lots of ideas, 

their ideas and own design The finished product shows 

inspirations with one another, much more than any catalog 

Some were focused on the pictures." 



Several visitors were fasci- 
nated with the Janczak's mas- 
ter bath which does not utilize 
a door. A strategically placed 
corner whirlpool tub with a 
mini-chandelier hanging 
above provides a spa-like view 
from the master bedroom. A 
partial wall separates the 
commode without closing in 
the space and a glass and file 
walk-in shower is both func- 
tional and aesthetically pleas- 
ing. "This space was actually 
inspired by the Janczak's 
favorite Mexican retreat," 
Wisconsin Log Homes resi- 
dent interior designer 
Stephanie Gauthicr 

explained. "Beautiful design 
usually originates from 
things that we love. These arc 
the elements that make your 
house a home and uniquely 
yours." 

The groups were well 
rounded; some empty nesters, 
families, newly weds and even 
a couple excited about plan- 
ning a log-inspired bed and 
breakfast. "1 love color and my 
husband loves structure," one 
wife commented in a boldly 
painted bedroom combined 
with a knotty pine ceiling and 
log accented walls. "I am so 
pleased to see that we can 
have both." 

The Janczak's open house 
was a huge success and an 
inspiration to many. "We arc 
planning another in the 
future for those who were 
unable to attend due- to a lim- 
ited number of reservations 
available," Kathy noted. "In 
the past we held design/build 
seminars at our headquar- 
ters', but seeing a completed 
home helps people better 
visualize what they can actu- 
ally have." 

For more information 
about designing and building 
log homes or to order 
Wisconsin Log Homes' com- 
prehensive 156-page planning 
guide and DVD, log on to 
www.wisconsinloghomes.com 
, Ol- call (800) 678-9107. 



Enjoy the great outdoors this spring 



®mmmm&< 



".•■••••. ■ ,■■ 



Winter got you down? 
Tired of being cooped up 
indoors all the time? If so, 
you're not alone. According to 
the National Institutes of 
Health, 25 percent of the popu- 
lation at the middle-to-north- 
ern latitudes of the United 
States experience winter dol- 
drums. 

Well the good news is the 
winter solstice is behind us and 
the days are once again getting 
longer. Soon, winter weather 
will give way to warmer tem- 
peratures and clear, blue skies, 
and you know what that means 
— it's almost time to pull your 
patio furniture and grill out of 
storage and revive your out- 
door living space. 

Residential architects 
report that there has been a 
sharp rise in the popularity of 
outdoor living space in the 
past couple of years. In fact, 
one of the hottest home 
improvement projects these 
days is to transform an exist- 
ing deck or patio into a desti- 
nation where people can just 



kick back and relax at the end 
of the day. 

If you're considering join- 
ing the ranks this year and 
updating your deck, think of it 
as you would any other remod- 
el, and ask yourself a few ques- 
tions before getting started: 

• What do I want to use this 
room for? Cooking? 
Entertaining? Relaxing? 

• What is my budget? 

• Will my plan require addi- 
tional plumbing or electrical 
circuits? 

• Will I need a building per- 
mit? 

• Do I need to build over- 
head protection? 

If you want to be able to 
enjoy the space anytime you 
want (day or night, in 
inclement weather, when the 
bugs are thick, eta) the answer 
to the latter is yes. To add a 
layer of protection, you could 
extend the roof, but that will be 
expensive. It would be more 
practical to add on a canopy or 
retractable awning. 

Canopies are temporary 




roofs that can offer you a 
shield against harmful UV 
rays and light rain-showers 
while still opening up your 
porch, deck, or balcony to 
fresh air and cool breezes. 
They are made of water-resist- 
ant, fabric materials that are 
durable enough to defend 
against the elements yet won't 
fade in the sunshine. 

Retractable awnings offer 
the same protections, along 
with some additional flexibili- 
ty. Awnings of the past were 
generally made of cotton or 
canvas fabrics and were easily 
affected by time and the ele- 
ments. The newer solution- 
dyed, acrylic covers provide a 
better fit, greater stability and 
can last for well over ten years. 



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Real Estate experience! 

CALL CHRIS FOR YOUR FREE 
COMPLIMENTARY MARKET ANALYSIS! 

Make Ynur A'«f Move JJIrA 

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CRP.CBS.GRt.ABR 



847-245-2502 

Search aB of the MLS at my website^ 

www.ChrisHieli. 





• JUST LISTED $ 549,900 

Custom 2 story in Gurnet's Mill Creek Crossing! Tills 4-5 
bedroom, 3. 1 bath home has I si door office/den, formal 
dining anil many new updates lltal will WOW you! 
Located on over 3/4 acre lot with cedar shake roofing, 
side-load garage and full masonry brick fireplace. Dcech 
hardwood flooring, limestone lilc entry and hall plus fresh 
paint. Modern kilchcn with loads of recessed lighting und 
sharp modem look! Full finished hasenicni with Stli bed- 
room and full baih! Master sitting room and luxury bath, 2 
story family room! Low lanes, easy access 10 shopping 
and lollway. More details at hllp://w ww.Christloclz.com 
or lo see this great house call Christopher direct at 
847-245-2502 




GURNEE KAVINIA WOODS BEAUTY!! 

$379,900 

4 bed plus I si floor den/office and finished basemen), 3 
car attached garage, hrighi and open 2 story living and 
dining rooms! Spill staircase, warm family room w/ fire- 
place] Real hardwood flooring on mast main level! 
Upgraded kitchen cabinetry, large rear cusiom deck. 
Vaulted master bedroom with plain shelves, ceiling fun 
and walk-In closet. Master bath suite with soaker tub and 
separate shower. Home is In excellent condition! Walk in 
subdivision pork, easy access lo tollwoy and metro train. 
Great place local] home! l : or a private showing call 
Christopher direct a! 847-245-2*02. Sec more photos al 
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ESTATES OF DEERPATII!! $448,000 

Popular Millhum schools. Hurry, this custom borne in 
Estates of Deerpaili subdivision has n great locution, 4 
bed, 2.1 bath, Ml basement, 1st flnorufficc/dcn or sun 
room! Large kilchcn w/ sitting island plus eating urea, 
walk-in pantry. 1st fir laundry, upgraded ovcrsi/cd lilc 
flooring plus new modem curpct throughout. Fresh inside 
paint, accent oak railing, celling crown molding through- 
out. Vaulted living, formal dining, warm family room v/h 
fireplace! Well landscaped yard w/ large patio and space 
for potential dog nm, upgraded exterior und attached 3 car 
garage! See more photos at hitp://www.ChrisHocl?..com 
and reach Christopher direct for a private showing at 
847-245-25022 




POPULAR LAKE VILLA CEDAR 
CROSSING BEAUTY 

Upgraded exterior! Backs to open space, near parkl Lots of hard- 
wood flooring on main level. 2 story entry, oak staircase railing, 
formal living room, formal dining w/ crown molding and bay 
window, Kitclien loaded w/ expanded cabinetry w/ fruni glass 
accent panels, center island, built-in desk area und new iruaru 
counter tops plus tile surround! Ttic kittlicn Is a real show place. 
Large eating area, 2 story family room v, / fireplace. I si floor laun- 
dry plus upper raised deck area. Vuulted master bedroom w/ walk- 
in closet and private bath w/ separate shower and soaker tub. Full 
walk-out lower level w/ rough plumbing for future hath. Lower 
patio urea, mature professional landscaping. See more details ul 
[i II pi/Avw-w. Chris! I eel / .to. Call (o view today directly al 
847-245-2502. 




STRATTON OAKS!! PREMIUM 
POND LOCATION! $399,900 

Real 5 bedroom 2 story, plus 1 si fir den/office. Upgraded 
hardwood floors, formal dining, formal living, family 
room fireplace, upgraded 42' kitchen cabinetry. Full base- 
ment ready for final finishing bus framed und roughed 
electric, plus roughed plumbing for future bath. 3 car 
ut inched garage. Great pond view from muny rooms. See 
more photos at hitp:/Avww.ChrisHoclz.ci>m. To view litis 
house, call Chris ilirccl ul 847-245-2502. 




ESTATE HOME IN HIDDEN CREEK- 

ANTIOCIII! $749,900 

Custom brick & cedar w/ Isl fir muster! Quality huill 2x6 
construction, 2 story family room w. full masonry fireplace 
and si one accent. Hardwood flooring, formal dining vW 
crown molding. 1st fir master suite w/ sitting/office room, 
Deautiful bright kilchcn w/ adjoining breakfast room Custom 
deck and professional landscaping accent the aggrcgale front 
walk and rear walk-out patio, Jack and Jill bath, walk-in clos- 
ets and so much more. 1 acre lot on cul-de-sac! Easy com- 
mute lo lollway and major shopping. For a private showing 
call Christopher Hoelz dirccl ut 847-245-2502. Sec more 
photos ul http://w ww.ChrisI locl/.com, 



■i 



V> 



Page 4 • Friday, April 20, 2007 



SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



LakeCountyJournals.com 




{ruts 





0, 



By Lou Manfredini, 
Ace Hardware's "Helpful Hardware Man" 

Q. What can I do to give my home instant curb 
appeal? 

A. It's important to increase the value or your 
home, while streamlining the time and expense 
to do so. Here's a short list of my favorite quick 
and easy entry projects: 

■ Color is a great way to personalize your 
home's exterior. Sand and then paint your front 
door in a bold accent color. Even for the risk- 
nvcrsc this is a great project, because if you 
don't like the color, you can change it immedi- 
ately. 

■ Upgrade the hardware on your front door to 
make more of a statement. 

■ Make your windows look new by framing 
them with durable, plastic shutters that come 
in a variety or different colors. The bonus: no 
painting, ever. 

■ Add window boxes and plant seasonal flowers 
to add color. Buy ready-made designs that eas- 
ily attach and can be installed in a matter of 
hours.' 

■ Create instant landscaping on your front porch. 
Plant flowers in several inexpensive, faux 
stone planters in various sizes, and then group 
them together near the door. 



Q. How can i get the best- 
looking lawn on the block? 

A. While many Americans 
wait until temperatures rise 
across the country, 1 recom- 
mend getting a head start to 
make your lawn look great. 
Here arc a few tricks of the 
trade: 

■ Remove winter damage by 
stripping your lawn of any 
dead grass and debris with a 
power rake. 

■ Put in new, 99 percent wecd- 
frcc seed blends. Then, treat 
the lawn to a core aerator 
machine that digs up little 
plugs of soil, which allows 
the grass to better absorb 
nutrients and spring back 
from any winter frost. 

■ Spread an early-spring fertil- 
izer all over the grass, espe- 
cially the trouble spots, to 
ensure a long-lasting beauti- 
ful lawn. Regular mainte- 
nance, such ns mowing and 
watering, is the key to the 
best lawn. 



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utdoor living spaces have become one of the 
most popular renovation and Homebuilding projects in 
recent years. A record number of homeowners are 
transforming simple decks, patios and even bare grass 
lots into year-round rooms. In Fact, a recent U.S. Census 
Bureau report revealed more than one-third of the $150 
billion spent on home remodeling is dedicated to out- 
door living areas. 

"Outdoor rooms continue to be popular because 
they combine two of our favorite pastimes — enter- 
taining and relaxation," says Lou Manfredini, Ace 
Hardware's "Helpful Hardware Man". 

And, it's about this time of year to turn his attention 
from winterizing his home to preparing his lawn and 
outdoor areas for the entertaining season. Beyond the 
"must-have" essentials, including a cooking appliance, 
a dining and/or conversation area, and a hearth or 
other heating unit, outdoor living spaces are all about 
making the design feel like it is part of the home. 

Two of the most important elements are to make the 
space both guest-friendly and appropriate for all kinds 
of weather conditions, from blue skies to gloomy, rainy 
days. For the best sun protection, consider screened-in 
awnings, a garden umbrella over an outdoor table or 
natural shade from vines trained on a pergola. For cold 
weather comfort, the most popular homeowner request 
is for a fire pit, chiminea or portable propane heater to 
help extend the time spent outdoors. 

The choices these days for seating are incredible, 
and limited only by budget and what you want to do. 
Comfort is the only prerequisite. Select sofas, chaise 
lounges, benches and other furnishings in sturdy mate- 
rials such as wood, cast iron, or even anodized alu- 
minum, and in fade-resistant, easy*toclean outdoor 
fabrics. Also, look for do-it-yourself furnishings with 
attachable casters, so you can easily move serving 
carts, tables and other items to different areas of the 
space. 

Decorative details bring interiors to life, and the same 
is true of outdoor rooms. Customized sound systems, 
art works and sculptures, intricate fencing and more 
add personal touches. Overhead lighting as well as 
lanterns, pathway lighting and candles also set' the 
mood. 

"People worry about what goes inside the outdoor 
room and sometimes forget about what surrounds it," 
adds Manfredini. "The view is so important. A well- 
manicured lawn and beautiful landscaping are impor- 
tant to the overall look and feel." He recommends 
adding focal points, such as raised beds and trellises, a 
fountain, a shallow pond or even an arbor. 

There is an endless array of projects to tackle for 
your outdoor' living space. But, pros like Manfredini 
know the best designs are done slowly and evolve over 
time, so each year there is something new to showcase 
and appreciate; 



"'■f *?-*-"*■:«. *.*• 



Trend Alert: 

FRONT YARDS 
BECOME THE 
NEW BACK YARD 

A few ideas to make the best use of your front yard: 

■ Create a focal point for small gatherings and conversation 
with an intimate front patio made of bricks or stones laid in 
an interesting pattern. Consider connecting the patio to your 
driveway or even your porch, so it blends well with the rest 
of your landscaping. 

■ Create privacy as well as atmosphere by lining the edges of 
the new front patio with a variety of tall and short plantings. 
Be sure to include appropriate outdoor lighting in order to 
add ambiance and functionality to the space once the sun sets. 

■ Set up a small casual seating area with a deco-rative table and 
comfortable chairs, so guests feel welcome before they even 
enter the home. 

■ Consider a fountain — even one created from a favorite 
glazed pot — as the sound of water is soothing and helps to 
mute street noise. . 



. 









RE^MBKgrand 




Holly Blanchette 

(8471587-8200x137 727 Grand, Ingleside • (847) 587-8200 x137 



<*KERT 



SPRING GROVE VACANT LOTS1 

Start the new je.ir Imililinj; ytiur new [1111110! 2 wooded Inn 

uu-rhvkim: the Quirt, perfect for walkout luseincnl! I!ach lm h 50(150. 

Selling lugcther lor $MIK. Water ricliis Included! Vacant lurnl is jjoing fusil! 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-6200 ext.137 






CHAIN (MAKES VICTORIAN IAKEFRONTI 

llciuuTull) trtioKiJ lure -i hf, 2 111 Mi s inugt lurae wi \fl acre k< uiih union cijMUit 
,»nkvl iry S i jnta 1 1 1 js .1 in Like * iih perfect hlcnd of Hi and new i! M*ler brail new ly added 
nutii-r huh! Kit fejiimi jj jjuie nvrtcn and tulnku sln-l jp|4! 'J-I/Ifi ceilingi, unfinished JnJ 
llr Irresen nurc space! A must « home! SoM^Ni) 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




HAWTHORN WOODS 

Shinning mutt ice newer JCXK1 u\ fi 2 tlnry with ingniuiid pool & scenic 

location overlooking pond! Huge tiuhlcr will) tilling room, sjiaclnu* open 

[lour plan! hi Union, plot (in walkout hate w/rec nil, hugcffice. & 2nd kill 

I'lufljitdupdl Way iiu much lo Nil! SbWXXI 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




I Jki: NEWTOWNIIOMEJ 

liiiiiiaeulale 2 tlnry uiwiilmnie with contemporary flair! Upgraded can lighting, 

neuiriit dcVnr, huge 2 cur ear wiih wotfc aieall Close to tnelra, Dig Hollow 

Scliooltll Priced rujhtulS 1 63,WXI! 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




CALLING ALL INVESTORS 

Landlord lii(uldalinf holding! ! Multiple hornet available Hatting SI54,'J0O. 
Tenant* In place inning ni 5 1 Utl/nmnlh All .1 br* with many teceul upslatct! 
One willl fcCCiwd huildahlc Itil ! Ariitoclu'lngtetlde ureas! ■. 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-5847-8200 ext.137 , 




? : ?ra» 






WOOD HILLS BAY TOWNIIOME ON THE CI IA1NI 

Musi ice Ihit completely mint W 2 hr I i loui raixn enJ unit! I lame fralura lit ss /new 

sshiie 42" cabinet i. nana »hn!\ to close) R hrjulifult) updated haihs! Srockui corn floor 

plan. Lokcfruni coniplci has pv4, imiiii and hut ilinv! lie in fir Dimmer fun! Only il-12,900!! 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




CHAIN LAKEFRONT NEW CONSTRUCTION!! 

Musi tee lb is (|iuliiy huill Ikuiic witli the million dollar view) -15 hrt, guunncl prau'le 

kitchen, huge cos rrrd porch plus 2nd floor balcony us cilouk i rig lie Like ! |-'uj n".ly 1 1 n . 

media r.n, 2 ilicpli.es, 9 ft ceilingi & "/lulled ceilings (hnughout All (lie belli and 

whlvllaH In aiea of similar homes! Call I lolly for a private ishnwing lulay! 51,199,000 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




LONG LAKE 1AKEFROM1 

Charming 3br 2 hih home orTen nonhwoods cahin feell I loine Ian been complete 
ly undated including fcuju, electric, plusiibing, furnace, o/c. tiding, roof and win- 
dows! Full base, 2 car gar, pier and ihua- anion included ! $399,900 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 




ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS! 

Move right In and enjoy thli i br Ivume w/gnrat htc close lu iclioal. rurk & 
nature prevencl Home fealures, new roof, garage tiding, brand new kitchen,,' 
remodeled bath, new donn & morel Newly painted Inside and out, nil appliance 
included! l-rlccd lu tell iHiick ul JI45.'X)0!I >. ' 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 ' 




SIVNNIING QUAD LEVEL ON I J « OODKI) ACRES] 

Jbr, Jblh home fealurct hrdwd floon, new gorgeouv kil m, Ell i graniic cuunlcrt 

& tiainless tleet apphnncet I Spacious family mi w/fp plut a rcc imMih hr 

hat private halli. llnnitifully landvcaped) I jke rigliU to Long Lake! Tliit 

home thowt like a model! A tleat at 5376,0(K1! 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 



FEATllRI-:i) PROPERTY 



33 ACRE CHAIN LAKEFRONT ESTATE! 

Privacy und elegance ure yours! This turn key stunning 5000 sq 
I'l home is oDercd fully furnished! Gated entry, tennis coun and 

over 1 75 feet of lake frontage on Channel Lake! Incredible 

views! Vacation year round! Way too much (o list! 52,250,000, 

Property can be 5 acres total including adjacent 6 br 3.5 bill 

Inkcfronl home for$3.4'mil 

Call Holly Blanchette 847-587-8200 ext.137 



b 



LAKEC0UlflYj0URNAlS.COM 



SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



Friday, April 20, 2007 • Page 5 



It's hip to be square 



The popularity of do-it- 
yourself projects, fueled by 
low home mortgage Interest 
rates, has been a boon to 
many manufacturers of 
home remodeling products, 
Including carpet tiles. 

These aren't your father's 
carpet tiles. Originally intro- 
duced in the 1960s, carpet 
tiles were felt-like, flat and 
flimsy. They did not wear or 
clean well. Color and pattern 
selections were limited. 
However, today's carpet tiles 
have evolved into sophisticat- 
ed, functional products that 
conceal scams and hide soil. 
A variety of styles and colors 
give customers more options, 
plus they're an easy do-it- 
yourself project. 

Consumers and builders 
alike are searching for afford- 
able, do-it-yourself, quality 
products to make their living 
rooms, work spaces and 
recreation areas more appeal- 
ing. 

Carpet tiles are the perfect 
solution when you need a 
durable, versatile floor cover- 
ing, including basements, 
boats, home offices, kids' 
rooms, recreational vehicles 
and even garages. 

Carpet tiles may be used 
over top of most smooth sur- 
faces including hardwood, 




Carpet tiles are an easy do-it-yourself project and come in a variety 
of patterns and colors. 



particleboard, concrete, 
ceramic tile, laminate or 
vinyl flooring. The tiles have 
a skid-resistant vinyl back- 
ing, so no padding is 
required. All that's needed is 
a chalk line, straight edge, 
sharp utility knife and dou- 
ble-sided tape. 

Carpet tiles are easy to 
clean or replace. Simply vacu- 
um or remove the soiled tile 
and wash with mild detergent 
under the sink. Tiles may 
also be rotated from high traf- 
fic areas to moderate traffic 
areas to maximize wear and 
retain appearance. 

One of the latest trends 



emerging is the use of car- 
pet tiles to create sophisti- 
cated modular carpet area 
rugs. 

Consumers can use their 
imagination and create their 
own design by utilizing vari- 
ous patterns and colors. 
Carpet tiles with subdued, 
grassy, natural and bamboo 
shades are becoming quite 
popular. The new patterns arc 
more textured and have a 
softer, natural look. Some pat- 
terns lend themselves to even 
more creativity by their abili- 
ty to be turned 90 degrees, 
thus creating even greater 
depth. 



Entryways provide 
invitation to home 





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Today, homeowners desire more 
dramatic entries and an entire 
entry system. 

Does your home's front 
entrance cause people to take 
notice or drive on by? 1$ it 
inviting or just another 
entrance? Much like a mani- 
cured lawn and well-main- 
tained exterior add curb 
appeal to a home, so does the 
front entrance. 

Ten years ago, homeown- 
ers personalized their entry 
by incorporating decorative 
glass. Today, homeowners 
desire more dramatic entries 
and an entire entry system. 

If you're considering 
remodeling your front entry 
or building a new home, you 
face many decisions about a 
door's basic material and per- 
formance, complementary 
windows, accessories and 
security. 

Basic materials 

Entry doors are primarily 
constructed of steel, fiber- 
glass or wood. The material 
that is right for your home 
will depend on cost, desired 
look and, to a limited degree, 
geography. 

Steel is the most economi- 
cal and popular material and 
is also sturdy, secure and can 
be painted to match a home. 
Steel is susceptible to denting, 



rusting and corrosion in an entry, 
coastal areas, however. 

Wood, the second most pop- 
ular material, has an inherent 
richness in texture, provides 
security and can be painted or 
stained. Wood requires regu- 
lar maintenance to prevent 
rot and keep it looking good. 

Fiberglass doors make up 
the fastest-growing segment 
of the entry door market. A 
smooth fiberglass door pro- 
vides the characteristics of 
steel but won't dent or corrode 
in coastal climates. Textured 
fiberglass looks like a wood 
door but does not require 
extensive maintenance. 



Performance 

Energy performance is a 
growing concern today, and 
Energy Star ratings indicate 
more energy-efficient prod- 
ucts. Generally steel and fiber- 
glass doors, because of the 
dense insulation inside, are 
more energy efficient than 
wood doors. 

Another source of ineffi- 
ciency can be the frame sys- 
tem. Components of the entry 
should fit snugly into the 
frame without gaps in the 
seams. 

If you're interested in 
reducing maintenance, a 
fiberglass door with a frame 
clad with aluminum or anoth- 
er material may be your best 
option. 

Decorative elements 

Mechanics aside, most 
homeowners are interested in 
an entry's looks. Windows of 
various shapes and sizes can 
be incorporated into a door 
for style. Decorative glass, 
available in many patterns, 
can add panache to the entry 
door, sidelights and transoms, 

Homeowners continue to 
use decorative glass to put a 
signature on their front entry. 
It reinforces an architectural 
style of a home and dresses up 



Where and how to buy 

Entry doors are generally 
sold through lumberyards, 
home centers and window 
and door dealers. 

The installation of a new 
door, especially a door with 
sidelites, transoms and com- 
plementary fixed windows, 
can be quite involved. 
Installation should be left to a 
professional contractor or a 
skilled do-it-yourselfer. 



How to prepare for a 
window replacement project 



"Will birds fly in my house 
when you take my windows 
out?" "Should I turn up the 
air conditioning so you won't 
get hot while replacing the 
windows?" These are just two 
of the concerns homeowners 
generally express to their 
installers when having win- 
dows replaced in a home. 

Since many homeowners 
have lived in their homes for 
only a decade or less, most 
people have not faced a full 
window replacement project 
before. A professional 
installer can ease concerns 
and answer questions well in 
advance of a replacement 
project. Good communica- 
tions is the key to homeown- 
ers feeling comfortable and 
ready for an upcoming win- 
dow replacement project. 

Tip #1 — Window replace- 
ment is a progressive remod- 
eling project. Only one or two 
windows are taken out at a 
time and then those windows 
are immediately replaced. 
The • entire home will not 
resemble a piece of Swiss 
cheese with holes in it for 
birds, weather or animals to 
enter through during the 
replacement process. 

Tip. #2 — Remove window 
treatments (including shades 
and blinds) before the installers 
arrive to give them easy access 
to the windows. Glass orna- 
ments or decorations should 
also be removed from the win- 
dows, ledges and sills. 

Tip #3 — Pre-determine 
with your installer how much 
space will be needed to oper- 
ate inside and outside the 
home for each window. Some 
furnishings may need to be 
moved away from windows 
and breakables taken off wall 
shelves. On the outside, lad- 
ders may need to be used in 
gardens or bushes to reach 
windows for replacement. 

Tip #4 — Decide and com- 
municate with the installa- 
tion team which doors will be 
used to gain access to the 
home, which restrooms are 




No-stress window replacement jobs can be achieved when homeown- 
ers communicate in advance with their window installer. 



available for crew use and 
what procedures you feel most 
comfortable with for home 
access. 

Tip #5 — Kids, pets and 
contractors — they're like oil 
and water. For safety sake, 
make arrangements to keep 
young children and family 
pets secured and away from 
workers at all times.' 

Tip #6 — When selecting a 
window installer, make sure 
to request paperwork that 
assures you that the entire 
installation team is bonded 
and insured. 

Tip #7 — Double check the 
paperwork that comes with 
new windows ... and the win- 
dows themselves. If you 
requested ENERGY STAR® 
qualified windows, make sure 
the stickers are on the win- 
dow. If you asked for low- 
maintenance vinyl frames, 
double check to make sure 
you receive them. And, If you 
see any broken glass or dam- 
aged frames, bring it to the 
attention of your installer 
before the windows are placed 
in your home. Also make cer- 
tain to save your window war- 
ranty information in a secure 
location. 

Tip #8 — Discuss removal of 
your old windows with your 
installer. Sometimes either the 



new or used windows may need 
to be stored at your residence 
for several days. Direct the 
team where to store the win- 
dows, how to protect them and a 
timeframe for removal. 

Tip #9 — Find out your 
installer's weather policy. 
While they may be fine work- 
ing in the rain or snow, you 
may not want the interior of 
your home to get muddy or 
wet. Decide together what are 
acceptable weather condi- 
tions for your project. 

Tip #10 — Ask about 
cleanup. There's a fair 
amount of dust and mess that 
comes with a window replace- 
ment project. Discuss before- 
hand if furnishings should be 
covered during the installa- 
tion process and what the 
company's policy is for clean- 
up after installation both 
inside and outside the home. 

A key tip is that homeown- 
ers should reevaluate the 
effectiveness of their win- 
dows seasonally. For maxi ; 
mum energy efficiency, win- 
dows should generally be 
replaced every 15-20 years. 
When it comes time to replace 
windows, homeowners should 
make certain to investigate 
the latest energy features, low 
maintenance frames and 
other options. 



Restore 



All Temp sells only the top brands 

All Temp Heating and Air Conditioning serving 
the northwest suburbs since 1946. Recipients of over 
30 national awards.. All Temp was just awarded 
"York's 2006 Midwest Largest Patriot Dealer award." 

All Temp sells only the top brands of equipment, 
like Lennox and York which are the only brands 
which have the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval 
2-Year 100%, money back guarantee. 

Rich Edwards, sales manager for All Temp says, 
"We strive for excellence with all our customers. Part 
of our installation includes a Quality Inspection per- 
formed by one of our senior technicians a few days 
after the installation. This is something our cus- 
tomers really like. The Quality, Inspection gives the 
.customer the opportunity .to ask any questions on 
their new equipment while our technician goes 
through a full check list for 100% satisfaction. 

Our best lead source is our current customers who 
refer us to their and family and friends. For a free esti- 
mate, give us a call at 847-526-9082, 



W Habitat 

for Humanity 



New and Recycled Building Materials 

Your first stop for quality, low-cost materials 

Doors, Sinks, Windows, Vanity Tops, Cabinets, Lighting, 
Hardware, Tile, Flooring, Appliances and much more! 



3545 Grand Avenue, Gurnee 

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm Saturday 9am-5pm 

847-623-1020 • www.habitatlc.org 



Shop •Volunteer •Donate 

A Habitat Restore is 100% Earth Friendly! 




Your donation of materials is 
tax deductible. 



Your purchase allows us to provide 
100% of our donations to: 

• build affordable homes 

• help people help themselves 

• make dreams come true 






Page 6 • Friday, April 20, 2007 



SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



T. 




? 3 




£1 



oday's refrigerators not only cool, freeze, keep foods 
fresh and safe, make Ice and filter water, but tlioy also function 
as impromptu art galleries, message centers and the focal point 
of the kitchen. The refrigerator is tiie hardest working — and 
most widely used — appliance in the kitchen. More than 99.5 
percent of American households have at least one, according to 
the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers. And with 
today's increasing focus on home style, it's no wonder home- 
owners want them to look good, too. 

For thousands of years, keeping food cool meant keeping it 
on ice, so design was based 

on function and built around a frozen block. But in the last 50 
years the refrigerator lias evolved from a simple cooling box 
to a multi-functioning home appliance. With this evolution, 
the style of the refrigerator has transformed to an aestheti- 
cally appealing state-of-the-art appliance built for maximum 
storage. 



The cold, hard facts 

In 1800, Maryland engineer Thomas Moore devised a sim- 
ple ice box for transporting perishable farm butter, coining 
the term "refrigerator." This first edition was a cedar tub 
filled with ice and lined with rabbit fur for insulation. But 
while Moore'sTefrigerator delivered function, it lacked 
design appeal and had limited storage capacity. 

Physics streamlined function at the turn of the century 
when chemical gases were compressed to remove heat from 
an enclosed space to keep food cold. Early refrigerators 
using this technology had noisy compressors mounted on a 
boxy cabinet with about 4 cubic feet of storage. Though 
these models were an improvement, function still dominat- 
ed form. 

The Coldspot refrigerator debuted in 1931 in the Sears 
catalog and stores. Shortly after, style began to take prece- 
dence when designer Raymond Loewy transformed the 
refrigerator from "an ill-proportioned vertical shoebox" to a 
salute to the spirit of progress. The sleek, redesigned 
Coldspot refrigerator had automotive styling with chrome 
latches and trim. As function met form, refrigeration began 
to evolve at a rapid rate. The loud noise of the compressor 
had softened to a comforting hum and cumbersome handles 
were replaced by feather-touch latches. 



Fashion meets function 

In 1935, Loewy's Coldspot refrigerator was advertised 
as "luxurious and convenient ... new in design — mod- 
ern — streamlined — arrestingly beautiful." For Loewy, 
the Coldspot refrigerator was "a step in the evolution 
toward perfection," a notion that is still reflected in 
refrigerator design today. In 1977, the Coldspot refriger- 
ator became part of the Kenmore family and continued 
to evolve. 

Today's refrigerators, which provide between 18 
and 26 cubic feet of storage space, haven't forgotten 
or their function. 




Chilling Out Through the Years 

Ice Age: Natural refrigeration menns everyone, nnd everything, is cold. 
Iron Age: Snow, ice, cool streams and caves keep food cold. 
B.C.: The Chinese cut and store ice by the year 1,000 B.C. 

■ 

1700s: Refrigeration technology starts to heal up when Dr. William 
Cullen studies the evaporation of liquids in n vacuum. 

1800s: Natural ice is harvested in winter and stored in icehouses. • 

Early 1900s: About half of all U.S.' households rely on blocks of ice lo 
keep foods cold. The first home refrigerators arc made with compressors 
driven by belts attached to motors located in the basement. In 1918, 
Kelvinator introduces the first refrigerator with automatic control. 

1920s and 30s: The first electric refrigerators With ice cube compart- 
ments debut. 

1940s: Frozen foods stored in tiny freezer compartments become popular. 

1950s and 60s: Innovations include automatic defrost and ice makers. 

1970s: Energy-efficient refrigerators make their mark — a typical 1973 
model uses more than 1,800 kWh per year. 

1980s: Frost-free refrigerators become popular with separate doors for 
freezer and refrigeration. 

1990s: Federal efficiency standards take effect. 

2000s: A typical new refrigerator with automatic defrost and a top- . 
mounted freezer uses less than 500 kWh per year. Sears introduces a 
refrigerator that uses the same amount of energy as a 75-watt light bulb. 



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SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



Friday, April 20, 2007 'Page 7 







: f^ : \ \ f" ' ::v \ 



\\ 




Clever tips and savvy strategies for packing, 
organizing and surviving moving day 



Thousands of Americans move every year. They pick up their belongings — 
ranging from dorm room digs to entire estate furnishings — and find a way to 
transport them from point A to point B. Whether they're moving down the 
street, across the country, or around the world, these individuals all face the 
same question at the outset — "Where do I start?" 

Enter the three P's of moving: 

Planning, Preparation and Packing 



Planning 

If you have a lot of excess clutter, plan to clear it out now. 
Host a yard sale or garage sale if you have the time. Not only 
will this clear out the excess items, but it's also a nice way to 
earn a little extra cash. Or, if you're short on time, donate 
unwanted items to a local nonprofit organization. Many even 
offer free pickup service. 

After you've decided how to handle your surplus items, con- 
sider the rest of your belongings. Plan to pack items you use 
the least first {out-of-season clothing, holiday decor, fine china, 
and crystal, etc.), then work your way to the most essential 
items (kitchen utensils, everyday decorations, and appliances). 

Preparation 

Before filling that first box, gather up the essentials so 
you're ready once the serious packing begins. New, strong, 
moving boxes in a variety of shapes and sizes, bubble cushion- 
ing, packaging peanuts, good-quality 
packing tape, and labels are a must. 

It can be difficult to estimate how many supplies 
you'll need and which boxes will work best for what items, but 
there are professionals who can help. For example, many of 
The UPS Store locations offer moving kits that can be special- 
ordered for your specific needs. These packaging experts can 
recommend a kit based on the number of rooms to be moved 
and their size, and, it takes only one to three days to ship boxes 
and supplies either to the store or directly to your home. 

Once the packing supplies are in hand, designate a 
spot for "Packing Central;" This is where you will consistently 
keep your tape, boxes, paper, bubble cushioning, markers, etc. 
Place smaller items that you'll need to take from room to room 
(like tape, packing paper, and markers) in a basket or caddy for 
portability. 

Packing 

Now that you've laid the groundwork by creating 
an overall plan and lining up your resources, you're ready for 
the real work. Utilize a few smart packing strategies now, and 
you'll reap the benefits later. 

Start by keeping like things together. Keep kitchen pots with 
kitchen pans. Place tablecloths with other linens. Also, be sure 
to label boxes clearly and be as specific as possible. For exam- 
ple, don't just write "books," be more" detailed, like "reference 
manuals." This will be invaluable as you unpack. 

Proper packing technique can't ■ be overstated. 
Take the time to pack your boxes carefully and securely A new 
moving box provides the strength you need for the inevitable 
stacking that occurs as boxes are loaded and unloaded on mov- 
ing day. Line boxes with at least two inches of packaging 
peanuts on all sides and use bubble cushioning 
to protect anything fragile. Use quality packing tape on all 
seams (avoid masking, cellophane, or duct tape). 

Another way to ensure that moving day goes smoothly is to 
label boxes with color-coordinated labels. Designate a color for 
each room and place that colored label on the appropriate box. 
Then, place color labels on the doorways in the new house to 
provide a clear visual cue for where boxes go. 

When moving day approaches, keep a few things in mind for 
those final boxes. Think survival mode. What will you need 



first in your new home? Cleaning supplies, pap?r towels, toilet 
paper, garbage bags, a first aid kit, snacks, and drinks are key 
items, but everyone's must-have list will be a little different. 
Also, don't forget to pack overnight bags for each member of the 
family with toiletries and a change of clothing. Finally, if you 
have children, pack a special box for each child to open upon 
arrival. Include favorite blankets and stuffed animals, family 
photos, a few toys, crayons, coloring books, and 
any other essential belongings. 

Congratulations,- you just elevated your moving - IQ! 
Equipped with these tips and strategies, you're ready for the 
ultimate test— moving day itself. 




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Afak* Your Next Move IHth 

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JUST LISTED $ 549,900 

CuRlom 2 story in Gumcc's Mill Creek Crossing! This 4-5 
bedroom, 3.1 bath I wine lias fsl floor office/den, formal 
dining and many new updates thai will WOW you! 
Located on over 3/4 acre lot with cedar shuke roofing, 
side-load garage and full masonry hrick fireplace. Ueech 
hardwood flooring, limestone (ile entry and hall plus fresh 
paint. Modem kitchen with loads of recessed lighting and 
sharp modem look! Full finished basement with Jib bed- 
mom and full both! Master silting room and luxury bath, 2 
story family room! Low taxes, easy access to shopping 
and lollway. More details at lillp://www.ChrisHoel/..com 
or to see this great house call Christopher direct at 
847-245-2502 




GURNEE RAVINIA WOODS BEAUTY!! 

$379,900 

4 bed plus 1st floor den/offlcc and finished basement, 3 
car attached garage, bright and open 2 story living and 
dining rooms! Split staircase, warm family room w/ fire- 
place! Keal hardwood flooring on most main levell 
Upgraded kitchen cabinetry, large rear custom deck. 
Vaulted master bedroom with plant shelves, celling fan 
and walk-in closet. Master hum suite with soaker tub and 
separate shower. Home Is in excellent condition! Walk to 
subdivision park, cosy access to lollway and metre train. 
Great place to call home! For a private showing call 
Christopher direct ut 847-245-2502. Sec more photaj at 
lilipJ/www.ChrisHocly^com, ' jV 



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ESTATES OF DEERPATII!! $448,000 

Popular Millbum schools. Hurry, this custom home in 
lis i Hies of Deerpaih subdivision has a great location. 4 
bed, 2.1 bath, full basement. 1st floor office/den or sun 
room! Large kitchen w/ sitting island plus eating urea, 
walk-in pantry. 1st fir laundry, upgraded oversized tile 
flooring plus new modem carpel (brougham. Fresh inside' 
paint, accent oak railing, ceiling crown molding through- 
out. Vaulted living, formal dining, warm family room w/ 
fireplace! Weil landscaped yard w/ targe patio and space 
for potential dog run. Upgraded exterior and attached 3 cur 
garage! Sec mnre photos nt htip,7/www.ClimHocl/..com 
and reach Christopher direct for a privale showing at 
847-245-25022 



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POPULAR LAKE VILLA CEDAR 
CROSSING BEAUTY 

Upgraded exterior! Backs to open space, near park ! Lots of hard-, 
wood flooring on main level. 2 story entry, oak staircase railing, 
formal living room, forma! dining w/ crown molding and hay 
window, Kitchen loaded w/ expanded cabinetry w/ fronl glass 
accent panels, center island, built-in desk urea and new quartz 
counter tops plus tile surround ! Tl» kitchen Is a real show place, 
Large eating area, 2 Uory family room w/ fireplace. 1st floor laun- 
dry plus upper raised deck area. Vaulted master bedroom w/ walk- 
In closet and private both w/ separate shower and soaker tub. Full 
walk-out lower level w/ rough plumbing Tor future bath. Luwer 
paliu area, mature professional landscaping. See more details at 
!itip*7/www.DirisiioclAco. Call to view today directly at 
847-245-2501 ' 




STRATTON OAKS!! PREMIUM 
POND LOCATION! $399,900 

Real S bedroom 2 story, plus 1st fir den/office. Upgraded 
hardwood floors, formal dining, formal living, family 
room fireplace, upgraded 42' kitchen cabinetry, Full baw- 
ment ready Tor final finishing has framed and roughed 
electric, plus roughed plumbing for future bath. 3 car, 
attached garage. Great pond view from many rooms. Sec 
more photos nl http://www.ChrisilocU.com. To view this 
house, call Chris direct at 847-245-2502. 




ESTATE HOME IN HIDDEN CREEK- 
ANTIOCH!! $749,900 

Custom brick & cedar w/ 1st fir master! Quality built 2x0 
construction, 2 story family room w. full masonry fireplace 
and stone accent. Hardwood flooring, formal dining w/ 
crown maiding. 1st fir master suite w/ sitting/office roam. 
Beautiful bright kitchen w/ adjoining breakfast room. Custom 
deck and professional landscaping accent the aggregate front 
walk und rear walk-nut patio. Jack and Jill bath, walk-in clos- 
ets and so much more. I acre lot on cul-de-sac! Easy com- 
mute to lollway und major shopping. For a privale showing 
cull Christopher Hoelz direct at 847-245-2502, See more 
photos at http://www.Girislloelf.coin. 



M 












•• ^VVV'rV.'tf'VV^Vij'.- .*-• « ■' 



Page 8 • Friday, April 20, 2007 



SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT 



LakeCountyJournals.com 




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All Temp sells only the top brands of equipment, like Lennox and York 
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OURNALS 



Friday, April 20, 2007 















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Kerry Reed, Head of Youth Services at Lake Villa District Library (right), presents a check for 
$867.75 to Vestee lackson, Executive Director at Save-A-Pet Adoption Center in Grayslake, at Lake 
Villa District Library. Children helped homeless pets this winter by reading to "Save-A-Pet" during 
the Lake Villa District Library's Winter Reading Program. 




DEER POINT 

HOMES TO BUILD 

HOME FOR 

WOUNDED 

MARINE IN ZION 

Page C2 



CHOOSING THE RIGHT ROADSIDE 
ASSISTANCE PLAN p aS oC9 



DO YOU HAVE ANY PHOTOS 
YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE? 

Send your litc.il iihnlos In: 

Liikclnnd luuriinls, 30 S. Whitnuy SI., Cr.iyshki:, IL 60010 fir email In 

psmoll«iiwncwstjroupxom. And wo will print them riylit him; on llik p.itj<:. 



Real Estate 

Classified 

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Page C3 
Page C9 



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Increase your home's value with exterior home improvements 



Spring — typically a time 
for cleaning and de-cluttering 
— is justaround the corner. In 
addition to sprucing up your 
home's interior, you should 
also think about what you can 
do outside the walls of your 
house. Is there an exterior 
home improvement project for 
which you've been saving 
money or putting off until you 
have the time? What outdoor 
project would be most benefi- 
cial in terms of adding curb 
appeal and value to your home? 

Before beginning any 
home exterior projects, you 
should consider the following: 

• Budget — Make sure it's 
realistic and stick to it. 

• Goals —Define your 
desired outcomes for the com- 
pleted project. For example, 
do you want to increase the 
resale value of your home, or 
are you doing much-needed 
remodeling? 



• Sources — Consult reli- 
able contractors, builders, 
architects and realtors for 
advice. Get tips from friends 
and neighbors, too. 

Re-roofing is one common 
home exterior project that 
increases home value. 
Homeowners often are forced 
to put a new roof on their 
home after weather or fire 
damage. They also may be fac- 
ing expired warranties on the 
roofing material. More and 
more often, homeowners are 
re-roofing to enhance the curb 
appeal of a home, even if it's 
not on the market. 

There are several criteria 
to think about when choosing 
a roofing material. Most 
importantly, does it have 
weather and fire resistance 
classifications? Also, what is 
the product warranty? You 
should also consider a roofing 
material's aesthetic value and 



ensure it complements your 
home's style and design. In 
addition to traditional roofing 
materials, such as asphalt, 
siiake, slate or tile, composite 
roofing is an increasingly 
popular choice. Composite 
shingles offer the look of real 
slate or wood shake shingles, 
but provide more durability 
and safety features. 

Deck additions are another 
popular exterior project that 
can easily increase a home's 
value. Typically the center- 
piece to a front or backyard, a 
deck is the foundation for cre- 
ating an outdoor living space. 
If you currently have a deck, 
evaluate the condition and 
look of the material and con- 
sider an upgrade. 

There are two primary 
types of decking material — 
natural wood or composite. 
Composites offer the look and 
grain pattern of real wood 



with a 25-year limited war- 
ranty. Begin by choosing a 
material that will comple- 
ment the architecture and 
exterior style of your home. 
Durability and low mainte- 
nance also are two important 
considerations for any deck — 
after all, you should spend 
more time enjoying the deck 
than caring for it. 

Exterior home improve- 
ment projects are a smart 
investment in your home. 
More than 65 percent of 
homeowners look for roofing 
material that will make their 
roof better-looking and add 
curb appeal to their homes. 

No matter what home 
improvements you make, 
choose a project that will 
most benefit your home, one 
of the largest investments 
you'll ever make, in the 
long-run.— Courtesy of 
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UkeCountyJournals.com 



Deer Point Homes partners with Wounded Heroes 
Foundation to build home for wounded Marine in Zion 



Groundbreaking 
ceremony to be 
held on May 8 

Wauconda-based Deer 
Point Homes has announced 
It Is partnering with the 
Wounded Heroes Foundation, 
a non-profit organization, in a 
new program to help build 
homes at affordable prices for 
the servicemen and women of 
the U.S. Armed Forces who 
have been severely injured 
due to the conflicts in Iraq, 
Afghanistan and elsewhere. 

Miguel Delgado, a retired 
Marine Sergeant from 
Waukegan, whose leg was 
injured by a roadside bomb in 
Iraq, will purchase the first 
home built through this part- 
nership. The groundbreaking 
for his new home will take 
place on May 8 at Shepherds 
Crossing, a Doer Point Homes 
community in north-subur- 
ban Zion. 



The Wounded Heroes 
Foundation was established 
in 2003 when Anna Sherony, 
the mother of a Marine who 
served In Iraq, learned of the 
physical, emotional and 
financial hardships faced by 
injured service personnel and 
their families face upon 
returning home. 

"Thousands of our service- 
men and women have lost 
limbs, incurred traumatic 
brain Injuries, been badly 
burned, or become perma- 
nently blind or deaf while 
serving our country. Since we 
began the foundation, we 
have helped these heroes and 
their families in many ways, 
from raising money to send- 
ing care packages to sponsor- 
ing R & R excursions. We're 
thrilled to expand our capabil- 
ities to include building 
homes through partnerships 
like the one we've established 
with Deer Point," said 
Sherony. 

"When the ' Wounded 



Heroes Foundation reached 
out to us, we Immediately 
offered to help Miguel and his 
family achieve their dream of 
buying a new home," said 
Richard Pietranek Sr„ CEO 
and founder of Deer Point 
Homes. "We asked all of our 
contractors and partners for 
help, and they responded with 
incredible generosity. As a 
result, we have not only 
raised enough in donations to 
build a beautiful new home 
for the Delgados, but also 
enough to continue the pro- 
gram, helping additional 
heroes in the near future." 

The city of Zion is also 
contributing to the program 
and has waived engineering 
and permit fees for the 
Delgado's home. 

Now retired from active 
duty, p Delgado, whose femur 
and heel were shattered and 
femoral artery was torn apart 
by the bomb, currently lives 
in Waukegan with his wife 
Cristhian and their seven- 




Avoid boredom 
this summer. 




Call for a FREE COPY 



of 



Call 847-223-8161 or e-mail kkuester@nwnewsgroup.com. 




LakeCountyJournals.com 

J LAKE COUNTY 



OURNALS 



Your life. Connected. 




month-old daughter Ohani. 
He recently started an appren- 
ticeship tp become an electri- 
cian, 

The Delgado's new single- 
family home at Shepherds 
Crossing, a 239-home commu- 
nity, will include four bed- 
rooms, 2 baths and an 
attached 2-car garage. 

"I am thrilled to be able to 
provide my family with such a 
spacious home that we can be 
proud of," said Miguel. "My 
wife is really excited about 
the kitchen. Plus, with four 
bedrooms, there's plenty of 
room for our family to grow." 
♦ While Sherony lauded the 
success story of the Delgados, 
she added that there are still 
thousands of severely injured 
servicemen and women who 
need assistance. And she 
noted that tiie Department of 
Veterans Affairs is ill- 
equipped to deal with the 
scale or the problem. 

"It can take months from 
the time a serviceperson is 
injured until his or her VA 
benefits are approved, forcing 
him or her to live on as little 
as $500 to $700 a month," she 
said. 

Sherony also noted that 
several rules related to bene- 
fits are outdated and do not 
sufficiently meet the needs of. 
the injured troops. 



"We not only need to raise 
money to help these brave 
men and women, we also des- 
perately need to change the 
policies and procedures that 
are putting huge burdens on 
our troops who have already 
sacrificed so much," she said. 

Besides Wounded Heroes 
Foundation, Deer Point 
Homes, their contractors and 
the city of Zion, many local 
companies are making the 
Delgado's home and future 
homes, for heroes possible, 
through their generous con- 
tributions. 

About Deer Point Homes: 

Building homes for more 
than 15 years, Deer Point 
Homes prides itself on provid- 
ing high-quality, hand-crafted 
homes in communities that 
unite homebuyers with natu- 
ral settings. The Wauconda- 
based developer is currently 
building townhome and sin- 
gle-family home communities 
in Joliet, Woodstock and Zion. 
For more information, please 
visit "http://www.deer- 
pointhomes.com" www.deer- 
pointhomes.com 

About the Wounded 
Heroes Foundation: 

Wounded Heroes 

Foundation Inc., a non-profit 
C-3 SOlcorporation, was 




Miguel Delgado and family. 

founded to provide needed 
support to the men and 
women that defend their 
country They help wounded 
service personnel fill in the 
gaps where needed, whether it 
is assisting with mortgage 
payments, purchasing handi- 
cap accessible vehicles, send- 
ing care packages, sponsoring 
recreational trips, or working 
with partners to help provide 
products and services at more 
affordable costs. For more 
information, please visit 
"http://www.woundedheroes- 
fund.net" www.wounded- 
heroesfund.net. 



Avoid common moving mistakes 



The U.S. Census Bureau 
estimates that more than 15 
percent of the population 
moves every year. If you're ever 
among them, there are a few 
things you should know that 
can help make the process less 
confusing and complex. 

First, be aware that less 
than 5 percent of consumers 
were totally satisfied with their 
move experience, according to 
a benchmark survey recently 
completed by a free Web site 
designed to guide users 
through each step of a real 
estate transaction and move. 
Often, that's the result of fail- 
ing to properly plan and pre- 
pare for such a life-changing 



event. For instance, did you 
know you need to select a mov- 
ing company at least four to six 
weeks in advance? More com- 
mon mistakes that movers 
make include: 

Failing to start early 
enough: The entire move 
process can take six months to 
a year. It's not as simple as put- 
ting one house on the market 
and buying the next-you need 
to determine where to live, how 
much you can afford, whether 
to rent or buy and what the 
timeline is. The earlier you 
start to prepare, the smoother 
the journey. s , . , ... 

; Forgetting to prepare your 
current house: Often, con- 



sumers jump into the fun 
"house hunting" stage when 
they should put more effort 
into preparing their current 
home for sale. Take time to 
make necessary repairs, plant 
flowers, and repaint and declut- 
ter rooms to make your home 
more appealing to buyers. It 
saves last-minute rushing and 
lets you maximize the selling 
price. 

Experts suggest engaging 
the help of a trusted resource 
from the very start. 

Before putting your home 
on the market, make repairs, 
plant Jlowers, and repaint. and 
declutter rooms to make it 
appeal to buyers. 




Get a Cool Cash rebate of up to 
$1,300 on a new Carrier Infinity™ 
System — the most energy efficient 
system you can buy. For year-round 
comfort and energy savings, 

"Turn to the Experts." 




gurnee & 
libertyville 

Allied A/C & Heating 

847-367-8989 



"■"fyCx 



Puron. 



GoolOCash 



Visit us at www.carrier.com 



■ 



'With purchase of qualifying Carrier. products. Otter ends June 29, 2007. Installations must be \ 
completed by July 31, 2007. Rebate must be submitted by Aug. 15, 2007. See Dealer for details, . 




1 ur n to the Exputi 






f 



Lake 



I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 




Reach 57/000 homes each week by placing your ad 

For more Information call 

Kristy Timmons 847-223-8161, x1 18 



CHAIN O'LAKES WATERFRONT 

38R 2BAwrLoll & 2 Endsd Porches. LR w/Slone FP. 
New Laminate Firs. Grt Water & Nature Views, Walk- 
out Base, 2-1/2 Car Gar, Steel Seawall, Pier 
"M R PETE" EICHLER (847)395-230 

TE~ 



ATFRFRONT.,.,. 



■I ft. I '. <r.\ i r i -, 



ANTIOCH 



$699,900 




ANTIOCH LAKEFRONT 

New Construction. Custom 4 BR 3BA Ranch w Walk- 
out LL Stunning Open Fir Ran. Lake Views. HW & 
Ceramic Tile Firs, Granite C-Tops, 2 FP's, WIC's, 
ROBYN EICHLER 847-608-2452 



VYAA ATrRFRONT - 



FOX LAKE 



$239,900 







CHAIN O'LAKES WATERFRONT 

Great Valuel Nice 3BR, 1.5BA w/DR Den, F, HW Firs, 
3 Sliders, Newer Wndws, Full Base, Decks, Lip 2.5 Car 
Gar, Git Wtr Views, Pier, SewerS Wtr. 
"MR PETE" EICHLER (847)395-2300 



WATFR FRONT. 
4 1 ft i > i r t i t la 



i *.< n j . f /-■ i r 



FOX LAKE 



$599,900 




CHAIN O'LAKES LAKEFRONT 

2 YrOld 3BR 2BA,w/100' Wtr Frig. 12' Ceil, Open Fir 
Plan, Obi See-Thru FP, MBR Ste wAMirtpl Tub. Lg Dock. 
Steel Seawall. 2+ Car Gar. City Sewer 
"MR P ETE" EICHLER (847)396-2300 

ror 



ATFRFRONT.,,,, 

■ iru i u*ti pi \4to 



VALLEY LAKE LAKEFRONT 

Over 3800 SF 3 BR 4 BA Valley Lake Hillside Rarch. Kit 
w/Lig EA & Sliders to Deck. LR, FR, Rec Rm, 2nd Kit, 
Scm Porch, 25 Car Gar, Patio & Pier. 
"MR PETE" EICHLER (847)395-2300 



ATFRFRONT. 



INGLESIDE 



$369,900 




DUCK LAKE LAKEFRONT 

Appro* 1 Wooded Acre! Panoramic Lake Views! 
Extensive Landscapingl Beautifully Rehabbed In & Out! 
4BR 1.5BA w/Base. 35 Car Gar, 4 Decks & Pier. 
"MR PETE" EICHLER {847)395-2300 



ATFRFRONT. 

, tl ft, I V I J. I I t . I \ 



MCHENRY 



$369,900 



FOX RIVER WATERFRONT 

3BR 2BA Chalet. Upscale Area. New Kit w/Corian & 
SS Appl, HW Firs, Cath Cell, FP, Rented BA's, 3 
Season Rm, Deck, Steel Seawall, Pier, City Sewer. 
"MR PETE" EICHLER (847)395-2300 



W 



ATTRFRONT 



SALEM, Wl 



$179,900 



* tifc, ?*, 



LOTS OF UPDATES! 

Own this 3 br ranch with lots of charm. Stainless steel app6- 
ances,2fulbaths. Gorgeous extra-large wooded lot can be 
usedroeiqmi^spwarKl'r/er^ariiceprwteyartl. 
JIM NEWCOMB (847) 274-5068 



OnluiK 



American 
Dream 



i 



■(' 



Lake County Journals/ lakecountyjournals.com 



CLASSIFIED 



Friday, April 20, 2007 • C3 



I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



CLASSIFIED 



OUR PHONE LINES ARE OPEN: 

Monday - Friday • 8:30 am - 5:00 pm 
800-589-8237 




Fax:815-477-8898 M* 



email: classified@nwnewsgroup.com 
helpwanted@nwnewsgroup.com 



Deadlines: For Display Ads '• MONDAY, 5pm • Line Ads & Legal Notices • TUESDAY, 5:00 pm 



Packages From 

4 Linus • 1 Week 





H 

\ Items $99 
or Less 

With Coupon 
Only! 



"HIRE THE 

\ BEST ,? 

.-. OUR ADS GET 
RESULTS! 



Call for Rates 

and Specials. 

Print 

and On-line 

recruitment ads 

available. 



Ads appears in 7 
Weekly Journals 

Antloch Journal ' Gurnee/ 

LnkcVilln/ i Wtulswortli lournnl 
Llndcnliurst Journal _ Vox Lake lournnl 

Grnyslakc Journnl ; WauconiJa lournnl 
Round Lake Journal j 



2000 • Announcements 
3000 'Employment 
4000 • Merchandise 
5000 •Transportation 



6000 'Real Estate 
7000 'Rentals 
8000 • Legals 
s03-s99 • Services 




Appnrcl/Furs 4110 ;BuildingSupplies i Furniture 4240 Lawn & Garden SportingGoods Pcts& Supplies Round Lake Sales Autos 

4170 4310 4410 44G0 486,1 



Notices 



2225 



•FflEE CASH GRANTS!' 
525,000m- '20O7' NEVER 
REPAYI Personal, Medical 
Bills, Business, School' 
House. Almost overyono 
qualities! Llvo Operators. 
Avoid Deadlines! Listings 
t -800-785-961 5 ox(... 239 

High School Reunions 
Planning a class reunion? 
Searching lor class mem- 
bers? Classreport.org 

gives free wob space, 

database, planning tools, 

www.clnssreport. 

org/frccspace/ 

HOMEOWNERS 

WANTEDII! 
Kayak Pools Is looking lor 
Oemo Homcsitos to dis- 
play our virtually Mainte- 
nance • Free Pool Save 
thousands ol SSS with our 
PRESEASON SAVINGSII 
CALL NOWI1I 
1-600-31 -KAYAK 
Discount Codffi 521-L1S 



Boy's Clothes sz 12/14 
Exc. condition. Bluo Joans, 
Khaki slacks, shorts, shirts 
& shoos si 8. S15.00 lor 
all. 815-444-8033 

BRIDESMAIDS GOWN 
Sleeveless, Pink goivn, 
slzo20. RotailSIIO.OO 
Selt $40,00 847-623-8920 

KBC Motorcycle Helmet 
Size small, matt black, 
pd SI 6071 yr old. Will 
lake $80. 815-482-7928 

Motorcycle Tech Jacket 
Tounmaster Men's largo 
RoaVbtack. LfsodShrs. 
SB9.00 815-455-0935 

Prom Dress 

Lavender 2 piece, Halter 
Top w/ beading. Size 2. 
Never worn! S99.00 
B47-45B-1699 

Wedding Gown wfveil 
White w/Pink sequins. 
Size 10, Beautiful ONLY 
$199.0011 847-623-8920 



Appliances 4120 



5150 Sport Utility 

Vehicles 5275 



KITCHEN SINK 
Pewter, double bowl, oxtra 
deep. Like now w/ faucet, 
S99.00 B1 5-479-0966 



Twin Bed Frames 
Including Mattress & 
Boxspnng. S20.00 
630-232-4165 



TWIN BED w/ wooden 
headboard & footboard, 
' Box spring & mattross. 

Computers 4200 S25.00 847-289-9040 



CAMPAQ2266 
& PHILLIPS MONITOR 
w/ speakers, Hardly used. 
$75.00 815-337-3771 

USB HUB, 4 Port, 

2-0 powered, D-lmk 

w/ 2 USB cables. £18,00 

847-462-9150 * 



While Wicker Twin Bed 
Excellent condition S85.00 
630-232-2146 

Collectibles 4250 



Solid Granite Pavers 
30-10'Lx5".Wx6'H 
S99,00/all 815-943-6937 

YARD ART 

Bard wood, Flower Cart. 
Great condition. S25.00 
708-287-4042 Hunlloy 



BASKETBALL SYSTEM - 
Portable. Very Good cond. 
$75 obo. 815-236-8205. 



Exercise 
Equipment 



4415 






Machincry& 
Tools 



4320 



Firewood/ 
Fireplace 



4220 



FIRE PLACE SUHROUND 
w/ Mantel & Base. 
Medium Oak color. 
$99,00 815-765-3725 



Now, Dept. 56; Chicago 
White Sox, tavern & sou- 
venir shop & old Comskoy 
Park. { X-mns In I lie city) 
SOgyall 647-658-0785 

Royal Dallon Figurino 
"Mario". About 5" toll. Por- 
ted, part o! a collection. 
S65.00 815-338-2579 



Furniture 4240 



Vintage Collector 

Rod, Reels, & Lures. 

$99.00 tor catch. 

B15-344-4254 



12' Compound Miter Saw 
Craftsman, $99.00 
815-578-9544 

JACK HAMMER 
AIR. Good Condition. 
S99.00 815-455-5166 

MITER SAW 
Craftsman 7 ti, 1 yr old, 
S75.00/obo 847-658-7597 

Swaby Sump Pump 
Runs strong, $75.00 
8t5-3B5-424B Aft. 5pm 



2 Month Membership 
to Curves. S28.00 
815-404-3117 

Elliptical Exerciser 
Imago 8.25, excellent 
condition. $99.00 
815-385-1569 

Exercise Bike 
, Cardio Air Fan typo 
$99Ajbo 815-053-4612 

Exerciso Bike 
Wynmor Wyntono brand. 
$50.00 630-204-4851 

Nordic Track Walk Fit 
Not electric. Good shape. 
$40,00/obo 630-377-3828 



Personals 2260 



FREE BROCHURES 
WAKE UP 

with 

MAKEUPI 

MICRO TATTOOING of 

'EYEBROWS 

'EYELINE 

'UPLINE 

Also offering 

Electrolysis by Sherry. 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

FREE Consultation 

847-249-7446 



Adoption 2275 



A BABY tS A BLESSING 
We're Uanno & Frank, a 
happily married couple 
eager to give your child a 
loving home, close knit 
family and the ability to 

pureuo education, person- 
al Interests and talents. 
We'd love (o speak to you! 
Call Uonne & Frank 
1-877.577-2121 



CHEST FREEZER 
Frigldafre17.2cu.ll. 
$99.00 815-675-6770 

CHEST FREEZER 
Whirlpool, 7 cu.fl.. white. 
Low electric 276 khw. 
SB5.00 815-943-6937 

DISHWASHER 
Frigidalre, Ultra Quiet 
While, works great. 
$99.00 815-271-5609 

FREEZER 

KENMORE, UPRIGHT. 
USED ONCE. $99.00 
815-245-7879 

Gas Stove 

White, has digital clock. 

S75.00 847-322-6065 

Maytag Washer & Dryer 
Electnc, both workgreall 
Could possibly deliver, 
$99,00 ea. 815-759-2776 



Bar Stools 
Five, Metal w/ black 
upholstery, 30' tall. 
$75.00 815-568-5219 

Bedroom Set Girl's 4 
While w/ gold trim. 
Dresser, desk/vanity, 
& 2 nlghl stands. $99,00 
815-459-1922 

Bookcase Oak, with 
3 shelves, glass doors. 
45"Hx36"wx13 , 'D 
$35.00 847-516-3485 



WANTED TO BUY 
,Ofd Comic Books, cash 
I paid. 1930-1 970's, 
224-805-9644 



Medical 
Equipment 



Schwlnn Air-Dyno 
Exercise bike. Excellent 
condition. $50.00 
4330 815-479B975 



P 1 Home 
Electronics 



WHEELCHAIR 
Excel 2000, Like new. 
$997obo 847-658-6058 



11280 Miscellaneous 



ADOPT: 

Caring loving Mom, 

adoring successful Dad 

will LOVE & cherish 

your baby. 

1-800-977-8525 

Susannah & David 

1-800-977-5825 

Expenses paid 



4000 

Merchandise 



1 Relrigerator 10 yrs old, 
Whirlpool, 20.5 cu. It., 
, Top Ircozor. White, 
'$200.00 630-845-6948 

i Refrigerator 

Hoi Point, Double door 

White, very clean. 
t $99.00 847-852-6524 

j WASHER & DRYER SET 
1 0nly 1 yrold. $175.00 
224-944-0238 

Washer & Gas Dryer 
GE, heavy duly. Older, 

, but workgreall $99. SET 

! 815-482-8498 

Washer 

Magic Chef, heavy duty. 

Great condition. $99.00 

B47-587-4456 



CHAIRS 

i Parr of Sage Green 
Traditional Upholstered 
chairs. Excellent condition 
$150.00 847-623-0974 

Chesl of Drawers 
Solid wood. $25.00 
j 630-443-0224 

.CHINA CABINET 
. White laminate & glass. 
52'Wx18"Dx78 if H 
$150.00 630-584-1988 

I 

I Coffee Table 

Good condition. Wood. 
'44"Wx15'H'x26'W 

$80.00 815-344-4254 



12* Laser Disc Movia 
IS3.00 815-991-5149 

1 52" MITSUBISHI T.V. 
.Works good, $99.00 
! 815-477-8344 

| T.V. 60" lyrold. 
cost SI 800.00 

Selling Only S900.00I 
815-344-6267 



4340 



Treadmill 

10 MPH, 0-14 incline. 

programmable, $99,00 

815-308-5559 

Treadmill 

Liko New $99,00 

847-309-4913 

Triple Airwaves Ultra 
Master Exerciso Bike. 
$99.00 815-477-7935 



Coffee Table 
| Square, 37', glass 
i chrome & brass base. 
$30.00 815-344-2358 



w/i 



Arts/Antiques 



Free 



4100 



6 Brown Hard board Doors 
30'x78*. Take All, U haul. 
Fox Lake, 815-363-0640 

CAT male, fixed, part Ap- 
ptchead Siamese. No front 
daws. 5 Prs old. While. 
815-715-4882 

CATS Male (2) loving, 
good with kids, moving, 
must find loving homo. 
847-489-5053 



4130 



1930 Singer Treadle 
Sewing Machine w/ 
6 Drawers. Original finish. 
Working $85.00 
815477-8657 

Dining Table, Beautiful 
Oak, Kitchen/dining rm. 
with middle leg & leaves. 
S75.00 630-208-9145 

HUTCH 

Pine, cabinets on bottom, 

glass on lop. Primitive, pie 

sate. 1830. $599.00 

630-879-6440 



. Computer Stand 
' Metal & glass on wheels. 
30x27x 1 9, great for dorm. 
| $30,00 847-658-4608 

Couch, loveseal, chair 
2 lamps, 2 sets of pillows, 
valances, pastel, Like new 
$1000/obo 630-845-9228 

Couch, foveseat, chair 
2 lamps, 2 sets of pillows, 
valances, pastel. Like new 
$1000/obo 630-845-9228 

DINING ROOM SET 

Table, 6 chairs, china 

cabinet, good condition! 

S800/best offer. 

630-761-8157 

DRESSER W/ MIRROR 
6 Drawer & jewelry cabinet 
Early 70's style, Good con- 
dition, $75. 815-338-2256 



TRACK 1 
STEREO 

Repairs. Receivers, 
tape decks, CD 
players. Reel to 

Reel, Turntables ft 

More! 
Repairs Guaranteed 
Buy Vntage itcreo 

Compcncnts Dead or 

Alive. ,Msu buy vinyl 

LP recorCs. 

847-838-2346 



"94 Dodge Caravan 
'Bench seats, 2. Good 
condition, $99.00/bolh m , , 
815-578-1774 Tickets 

BOOKS-OVER 6000 
Most all genres call for ap- 
pointment. 815-568-5219 

CANOE 

Needs paint, No oars. 
8-10' long. $60.00 firm _ 
j 815-943-8430 Toys 

CEDAR POSTS 
20 Rustic white cedar. 
3'xr $99.00 
615-568-8743 

CONFERENCE TABLE 
5x12 Ovnl, great Tor . 
Train Self$90. 
815-353-1088 



4430 



CUBS vs. PADRES 
April 17. Reserved seats. 
3 Tickets $99.00 
815-479-9827 



4440 



1 COOKBOOKS 

I Hardback books featuring 

648 recipes in 14 

categones. Only $18.00!!! 
1 847-689-4331 



2 Remote Control Trucks 
Kit trucks, many spare 
parts & tools. Needs 
some work. $60./all 
630-247-4280 

Doll House 

Now 2 story, 18x12, 

Gingerbread. $65,00 
847-854-7980 



Cage - Mufti Level 
32'Lx20'Wx58 , H. 2 food 
bowls. 3 litter pans. 
$99,00 815-439-1408 

Cockallel "Barf 
Male, about 7 yrs old. 
Very vocal, not good lor 
small children. Would liko 
company of other birds. 
Requires beak Irimming. 
lncldcago.8l5-568-B058 

Cockatiels 
Pair ot Greys 

$50.00 
815-403-4656 



COCKER SPANIEL 
PUPS ACA, bull & black, 
1st shots, wormed, $350/ 

each, 815-653-2123 

| . 

Columbian Red Tail Boa 
Born 4/5/07 Light markings 
12-18' long, $60.00 
630-338-3105 

DOG RUN 20W 
$99.00 B1 5-648-2583 

FAMILY SEEKS A 

LOVING AND MORE 

SUITABLE HOME FOR 

Brittany Spaniel 

Female, ARC reg. Micro 

chipped, 16mo, Great 

w/kids, good hunting 

potential. Includes 

crate, supplies, and oil 

vet/legal documentation 

$400 

815-206-5683 



Ferret • 5 month old, malo. 
Includes largo cage. 
$99.00 847-639-5778 

Kitten & Puppy Rescue 
Will find great homes lor 
theml 847-740-3977 

| Large Petmate Dog Cage 
Used once, $65.00 
815-477-7935 

SHIHTZU 

1 yrofd. Female. $99.00 

847-309-4913 

Tabby Cat -3yrold. 
Loveable, playful, spayed 
cal. 



RUMMAGE SALE 

ROUND LAKE 
COMMUNITY CHURCH 

217 Goodnaw Blvd. 
April 19&20 9nm-6pm. 

(Friday !i price) 
April 21" 9am -Noon 

$2 bag sale. 
Ushering in Spring with 

a Great Sale! 

Visit our new Boutique 

& our Bargain room tor 

the best prices ever. 

Our sales aro lamous! 

IblkS.ofRl. 134 nl 

Cedar Lake Rd. & tho 

Melra Station. 

847-54 6-1000 




Auto Parts & 
Supplies 5100 



Bumpers & Sido 
Panel for '9' Ford 
GTS up $99.00 
815-765-3725 



Body 

Probe 



Car Top Carrier 
Cream Color, Large stor- 
age. 4x3. Good condition 
$40.00 815-337-4941 

Delta Guliwing Truck Box 
for compact Pick-up. 
Lock w/ key. $49.00 
847-722-B348 



Man 



& declawed. Indoor 
Free to good home. 
Allergies. 815-943-2535 



Livestock & 

Game Boy Advance Supplies 

games. Spyro Orange, i 

Spyro Season of ice, 

Crash Bash Purple. ROOSTER 



4480 



Housewares 4290 



j COFFEE MAKER 

I Tasslmo w/ Pods, 
I New condition. $60.00 
J 847-852-6524 

i MIRROR 

■ Medium Oak, Beveled, 

27x21 Oval. Perfect cond. 

$35.00 815-338-8987 

White Iron Bridge Lamp 
$45.00 630-232-2146 



Lawn & Garden 
4310 



FREE TO A GOOD 
HOME? 



j SOLID OAK ICEBOX 
< Original Hardware. 
$100.00 630-208-9145 



Attention Pel Advertisers:* 
Before placing your ad l< 
|md a new home for you 
pel, consider the following 
-Free" may Imply somolhinj 
Is wrong and detour (ovine 
homes from considering Ic 
adopt your pet. We are alsc 
told that some unscrupulous 
animal dealers who are no 
concerned with the prone 
treatment ot animals, tend Ic 
search lor FREE pels. / 
small tee will also enoour 
age potential owners to con 
stder the responsibilities In 
volved In pet ownership. We 
strongly recommend (hero 
fore, that your ad contain r 
price for the animal. 

HP COLOR LASER JET 
1550L Donor rol needs to 
be replaced, 
815-206-2409 alter 7pm 

KITTENS 8 weeks old, kit- 
ty litter trained, friendly 
with dogs and kids, S30/ea 
815-307-8294 

WOODEN SWINGSET 
•You take down & haul. 
Good Condition. 815-728- 
7177. 



Apparcl/Furs 4110 



Boy's Black Suit 
Neww/Iabels, size 14 reg. 
double breasted, Van Hue- 
sen. $30. 815-444-8033 



TOP DOLLAR PAID 
Always buying antiques & 
collectibles. One piece to 
entire estate (847) 436* 
5580 or (847) 394-5579 



Baby Items 4150 



Arms Read! CoSleeper 
Use tor crib, playpen, & 
travel. Like new. 
$75.00 630-365-0482 

CRIB/TODDLER BED 
White Metal crib converts 
to bed. No mattress, . 
$30.00 815-388-3661 



Powdered Formula 
12,9 oz can. $10.00 
847-791-1229 



Bicycles 4160 



Antique Girts bike 
Raleigh from Nottingham. 
England. $95.00- . 
815-943-4493: ' 



BuildingSupplies 

4170 



KITCHEN Lazy Susan Set 
Mew, 18" wall & 28' base. 
$60.00 815-459-5967 



'Qualified buyers don't In- 
vestigate every ad, just the 
ones lhat oner a good 
deal. Journal Classlled 
(800)589-8237. 

f Publication Poticp 

iredlt terms havebeeiies! 

occupied .by the erfpr aft ertwt 



KITCHEN SINK 
Kohler, while, double bowl, 
cast Iron. Like New. 
$75,00 815-675-1017 



ORESSERS 

2 French Provincial, 3 

drawer dressers. $60. ea. 

630-879-1733 

Entertainment Center 
47Wx54W.32'TVfils. 
$40.00 815-308-5559 



Entertainment Center 
Oak, drawers on bottom, 
Shelves on side w/ glass ' 
door. $50. 647-829-4030 | 

Girl's Vanity 
Pickled Oak, 30Wx17D 
Like new. $95.00 
847-265-0335 

Gun Cabinet $25.00 
630-443-0224 



Headboard Twin size - 
While wicker, Excellent 
condition. $50.00 
615-861-6452 

LIVING ROOM SET 
3 Piece, Couch, Love seat, 
Chair. Green plaid. 
$199.00 847-561-5191 

Navy & Burgundy. 
Overstulfed Chair & 
Ottoman. $45.00 
847-669-7555 



Queen Headboard 
w/ lights, minors & rails. 
$75,00 847-5B7-7381 

.SOFA&LOVESEAT 
Good Condition. $99.00 
815-356-7709 

SOFA. LOVESEAT, & 
CHAIR. R oral print, hardly 
used. Excellent condition. 
$475. Firm 630-879-1709 

Toddler Table & Chair 
20-Hx24'Wx33fc*L 
All wood. $20.00", 
815-307-8002 

Twin Bed Frame on 
ball casters, Wooden, 
medium oak. $30.00/obo 
815-455-3730 " 



4 Wrought Iron Chairs 
w/arm rest. Dark green. 
Great condition, $95.00 
708-287-4042 Huntley 

Complete Lawn Care & 
Landscaping Services 
Spring Clean-ups! Thatch- 
ing, Aeration. Fertilizing, j 
Weekly mowing, Experi- 
enced, dependable & fully 
insured Santos 847-878-' 
52(6, Mike 847-875-9975 

COMPOSTER 

Soil Master, Black plastic 

with cover. $10.00 

815-337-2648 

Garden Tractor 

JD 112, 39* mower, 12 HP 

snowbtade, weights. Runs 

good. $600.00/obo 

§30-879-5899 

Hosta Plants 

$5.00 for a cluster of 5 or 
more plants, 
615-336-6991 Woodstock 

John Doere 116 Tractor 
46" Mower deck, some| 
new parts, needs work. 
Runs & drives. $99.00 
847-254-4018 

Landscape Boulders 
40+ Rose toned, misc. 
sizes, $99,00/all 
815-790-6023. 

Mower • Craftsman 
5.6 motor. Runs great, 
good condition. No bag, 
$50.00 847-961-6982 

OUTDOOR LANTERN 
Progress Lighting Conven- 
ing Collection, Brown mot- 



Hammock 

Heavy duty stand 

w/ Brantf new hammock 

S99.00 847-639- 1374 

] Jason Alronomical 
i Telescope -Model 313 
'Mercury. $160.00/obo 
1 630-466-9901 SugarGrove 

MODEL TRAIN TABLE 

6'xl 3' w/ center cutoul 
for operator. $50,00 
630-377-8879 

Old Steamer Trunk 
I Refurbished 39x21x24 
! Black, Wood slats. 
I $75.00 815-477-8657 

'STOPS GO LIGHT 

I For Pallo or Rec. room. 
Flashes! $99.00 
815-455-5166 



Musical 
Instruments 



4360 



$15./all3 815-405-7561 

Nintendo DS 
Yu-GI-Oh Nightmare 
Troubadour $10.00 
; 815-405-7561 

Thomas & Friends 
Island of Sodor play table. 
Great condition. 
$85.00 815-648-1317 



Wooden Swing Set 

S60.00 

815-338-0118 



Wanted to Buy 

4450 



CANOE 

Small cheap aluminum. 
847-623-6119 



Pets& Supplies 
4460 



While Yokohama Chicken 

very fancy gentle & FREE! 

615-943-0992 



4500 

Garage Sales 



Edelbrock 600 CFM 
Choke Carb. $99.00 
815-575^605 

Engine Block Hoist 

$90.00 

847-219-1153 

GM 14" Wire Wheel 
Covers. 3 only. 
New in boxes. $95.00 
815-648-2049 

KN Velocity Stack 
Air Cleaner. $40.00 
815-575-4605 

Quaker Stale Motor Oil 
10W40. Case ol 24 cans 
$18.00 815-477-8112 

SBC over Iramo zoomies 
lor T Bucket. $50.00 
815-575-4605 

SIDE BOXES 

2 aluminum checker plate 

$99. ea. 815-759-3788 



$500 Police Impounds. 

Cars Irom $500" 

Tax Repos. US Marshal 

and IRS sales Cars. 

Trucks, SUVs, Toyota's. 

Honda's. Chovy's and 

more! For Listings: 

1 -800-298- 17C8x 1010 

1994 BUICK 

LESABRE 
63K miles, good condition. 
new tiros and brakes. 
$3.50a'obo 217-899-3546 

1997BMW32BlConv. 

Cobalt blue, 65K miles. 

great condition. $10,900 

630-232-6271 



1998 Cadillac 

ELDORADO 

2 dr coupe. Rod, 103K 

mi. 4.8 Irtr V-8. auto. A'C, 

AM/FM/cnss. $7,888. 

Dave Lumpkin. 

Joyce Supcrstoro 

B88-462-1328 

2000 Lincoln 
Continental 

4 door, Med. Charcoal 

green, auto, 71,699 mi.. 

Koyloss enlry. S6.6BB. 

Dave Lumpkin, 

Joyce Supcrstoro 

B88-462-132B 



Cars & Trucks Wanted 

Any condition, Ireo 
towing. 815-477-1179 
* Top Dollar Paid * 



ChtssicAutos 5200 



1997 Chevy 
Suburban 1500 

4x4, Indigo Bluo Metallic. 

Auto, PW, CD/Cass plyr, 

AC, cc, lilt. $6,498. 

Drive Lumpkin, 

Joyco Supcrstoro 

808-462-1328 

2002 Toyota 
Highlander 

4WD, auto. PW, PL. till, 

cc, ovg. miles. $13,988. 

Davo Lumpkin. 

Joyce Superstore 

888-462-1326 

2002 Toyota 
RAV4 4x4 

4x4, black. 85.449 ml. 

Auto w/overdrive. Till, cc 

C0/Cass.A/C.S12,78B. 

Davo Lumpkin, 

Joyco Supcrstoro 

888-462-1 32B 



Vans 



5300 



2003 Chevy 
Astro AWD 

Tan. B0.316K ml, auto, 

PS/PB/PW/PL. Till, cc, 

keyloss entry, $9,588. 

Davo Lumpkin, 

Joyco Superstore 

688-462-1328 



Boats & Marine 
Services 5450 



1976 CORVETTE 

Now motor, trans, tiros, 
brakes, exhaust, radiator, 
shocks, outside #9, insldo 
#7.5, $8200/obo 615-337- 
0511 or 815-405-1013 

19B1 Chevy Mattbo 
76,600 miles. Newer en- 
gine, starter, brakes, & 
more. Some rust, $2,000. 
630-513-0994 

1985 Olds Reg 98 
. 4.3. V-G, T-Oiosol FWD 
RBLT Parts. $625.00 
815-827-3418 

Buy, sell, browse Classic, 
, Antiques, Hot Rods, Strcot 
Rods, and Motorcycles 
from across the Midwest. 
Freo events and car club- 



1999 Bayllner 175 Capri, 
135 HP Mercruiser I/O 
stem drive stereo, extra 
prop.+boat covers. Exc 
Cond. $7500262-812-3474 

2004 FOUR WINNS 17' 
tish/ski. 3.0 135hp Extras 
S 13,500 630-890-5486 

Aluminum 12 It, 5 hp mo- 
tor, trolling motor, good 
condition. $400 obo 847- 

639-4308 

Aluminum Mast 20 2 
pc, 9.5' boom, 80 sq It 

mainsail, 20 sq ft gib 
sail, liko new small boat 
dolly, oars & locks. Best 

olfor. 847-587-7097 

JET SKI 1996 SEA-DOO 



SPORT RACK tor lop of Pick-ups 
i car. CARRITE w/ski box & 
1 2 bike racks. Needs car 

w/rain gutters. $50 obo 

815-206-5278 



listing too. Check out Bombardier 60 hours, new 

midweslclassiccar5.c0m paint, tuned up, runs great! 
Summer Fun with trailer 
and cover. S2500/ODO. 
5250 B47-546-9B02 



Stock Oil Pan 

454 Chevy 

$25.00 

815-648-2049 



Burlington Sales 

4540 ! TOW RECEIVER 

for '9B & up Jeep Wrangler 



2 



at. $99. 815-206-5586 

Patio Furniture 
6 Director chairs, while 
wood w/chocolalo & pink 
seats & backs, $60.00 

815-344-4567 

PATIO TABLE 
Square, glass top, green 
Iron, w/ 6 chairs. $75,00 
815-943-3436 



FOR SALE BY BID 
82 Hammond ' 

Wol Organ 

Model #41892 wbench 

ft Glen lone speaker 

#2475 

Stelnway & Sons 
Grand Piano 

Model #L172652 
w/bonch 

Piano and Organ can 
be seen Saturday, 

April 21 
from 9AM-12PM 

2911 Grand Ave. 

Wnukegon, Illinois 

Bid Sheets are available 

at the open house and 

Portable Keyboard 
Yamaha Mode! 470. 
S99.00 847-587-4456 



Spas, Jacuzzis 
& Pools 4390 



Swimming Pool Laddor, 
46', excellent condition. 
$30.00 847-658-605B 



Snowblowers 4400 



S40.00 Value Certificate 
For Dundee Animal Hosp. 
$15.00 815-404-3117 

2 Female cats. Mother & | 
■ baby. Carmel Tabby's. ' 
I Spayed, shots. Have < 

claws. Mom 2yr. baby 1yr. 

Need good homo, moving. 

815-568-8058 

1 Black Lab. 2ft yr old. male , 
, Neutered, shots, microchip • 
1 Plays well w/othordogs. 
! Needs loving home. Un- ■ 
I able to care for as ho 
I needs. 224-345-8859 5p 



BARN 
SALE 

FRI * SAT * SUN 
Sam to 6 pm 

12 N649 
Burlington RD 

47 to Plant Rd west 4 

miles to Main Si. turn 

south to sale 

Antiques, lumlturo, 
primitives, benches, 
bam wood, pictures, 
horse drawn sleigh, 

glassware, col- 
lectibles, dolls, Jewelry 
pottery, tools, garden. 
Baby items galore 
Irom 0-3T & much 

much more. 
ALL MUST GOIIII 



$99.00 847-343-7841 

Truck Storage Chest 
Small Silver Truck Bed 
Storage Chest w/ lock. 
$99.00 815-354-1886 

SOMETHING FOR 
NOTHINGI 

Place a FREE 4 -line, 7- 
day ad in Journal Classi- 
fied to sell any Hem under 
$100, Look lor tho free ad 
coupon in our Journal' 
Classified section. 



1999 Dodge 
1500 Ram 4x4 

Ouad Cab, Intense blue 

Pearl, 1 03,661 mi. Auto, 

PS, PB, A/C. S83B8. 

Dave Lumpkin, 

Joyco Superstore 

8BB-462-1328 



2000 Dodge 
Dakota SLT 

Club cab, 109K ml., For- 
est green, auto. PW, 
A/C, Unt glass. S7.78B. 
Dave Lumpkin, 
Joyco Superstore 
868-462-1328 

2001 DODGE RAM 2500 
Ext Cab 4x4 Diesel. 8 IL 
bed, cap, step bars, BFG 
ATS.60K mi, $18,000. 
815-477-8501 



SHORE MASTER Shore 
Station, holds 3,600 lbs. 
Exc cond. $3000. B15- 
444-8744 or 815-575-4858 



Snowmobiles 5550 



1996 Arctic Cat 600 Triple 

Snowmobile. $1,500.00 
630-232-6848 

Need Stuff? 

According to the Newspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca, more than 20% of all 
adults have looked for 
merchandise in newspaper 
classified ads In the past 
12 months. With a 4-line, 
7-day ad In Journal Classi- 
fied, your stuff could bo 
going home with them. 
Calf (800) 589-8237 today. 
Visa, Mastercard and Dis- 
. cover Card accepted. 



www.mchBniyeounlys ports com 
Local Sports Attitude. 



OPEN HOUSES 

Watch for the Journal 
1 Classified Open House Di- 
rectory every Friday, Sat- 
urday and Sunday. In- 
! elude your listing by calling 
j (800) 589-8237. 



PRIME BUILDING MATERIAL 

AUCTION 

APRIL 28-29, 2007 

Lake County Fairgrounds, Grayslake, IL 



SNOW BLOWER 
Sears Craftsman, 21", 50 
HP, 2 winters old. Moving! 
S2357obo630-513-O994 

Ads that work pay for 
themselves. Ads that donl 
work are expensive. De- 
scription bnngs results! 
Journal Classilied (600) 
589-8237. 



Need Money? 
Have a Lawsuit? 

You can get cash before 
your accident case settles 
Call Now: Toll Free 
866-FUNDS-NOW j 

866-386-3766 



Pre-Settlement 

FINANCE 




www.prescttlcmcntfinancc.com 



PflQBg 

interior doors 
Interior Ili-fbld Unils 
French Doors 
Oak & Pine 6 Panel 
Ditch & Luan Doors 
Oak Mush Doors 
Poor Hardware 

fliltriorduiirs 
Steel limn. Doors 
Leaded wYSidelighls 
Leaded Glass 
Cherry & Mahogany 
Suing Patio door 
Door Hardware 



ki.ohhinc 

Unii 



n Untitled 2 IH" In S" Plank Flooring 
in Oat;, Maple, Cherry, Walnut and 
Other Exotic Woods 

Prc-fimdicd Laminate Flooring 

Carpel and Carpet Pad 

KITfllEKctlUTH 

Complete Kitchens 

Kitchen £ Baih Cabinets 

Sinks Faucets, Vanities* Light fhlurrs 

Jelled Tubs • Toilets • Spas 

TII.F. 

Motble, Travertine & Ceramic Tile in 
4x4,12x12,16x16,2-1x2-1 



WINDOWS 
AIIMiJorllrandi! 

Double I lung Windows 
VenlciM'ixed Casement 
Picture Windows 
Garden Windows 

MISrKU.ANKtUIS 

llarduair 
Lumber 

Siding. Roofing 
Molding & Trim 
Spindles* Stair Pans 
IXrck Posts • Lock sets 
Power* Air Tools 
And Much Mare! 



GATES OI'EN AT 7:30 A.M. & AUCTION STARTS AT 9:00 A.M. 
PREVIEW FRIDAY, APRIL 27 FROM NOON TILL 6:00 P.M. 
I'ri-rcjjisttr on line til www.pcakauciiDn.cuni 
TERMS; Buyer's Premium. Checks and Credit Cards welcome. For exact lerms visit 
our website or call (816) 474-1982. Sale day selections lake precedence over all writ- 
ten material. All purchases must br removed by NOON on Monday, April 30. 
Please be advised that the unction is no place for small children. 



AUCTIONEERING 

BUILDING MATERIALS SPECIALIST 



Phones 816-174- 19K2 

Vfiilour wtbsile : wnw.pakaurtiari.cam 

fordirtclions anil updates. 

Ricliardl'eak, 04 1000454 

Phil Graybill, O4IQO0445 




sgwsp? 



lit to edit or reject any ..ads!, We use standard abbreviationsartd reserve the right to classify your ad. All ads subject to credit approval. Unless 
pjitcceptta^ Discover, *To Cmuceh Deadlines for ad cancellation are identical to deadlines for ad placement; 

e&chfck "jrour ad f t^e firet day h to haye it changed. Our liability shall not exceed portion of the space 






*S 



f 



>; 



C4- Friday, April 20, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 





ACURA 



ACURAOFLIBERTYVILiE 
1620 South Milwaukee Ave. • Libcrlyville. IL 
800/588-4187 F3 

www.acurallbertyvllle.com 

MULLER'SWOODFIELD ACURA 

1099 W. Hiqqins Rd. (Kt. 72) • HoHrron Estates, IL 
847/519-9550 D5 

mullcrcar5.c0m 




SCHAUMBURGAUDI 



320 W. Golf Rood • Schaumburg, IL 

800/259-1757 

www.schaumburgaudl.com 



D5 




ANDERSON BMW 

360 H. Rte. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL 

888/682-4485 

www.andersoncars.com 



B3 



BILL JACOBS BMW 

1564 W. Oqden Ave. • 'facervllle, IL 
800/731-5824 D8 

wwwbillj3c0bs.com 

MOTOR WERKS BMW 

Barrington & Dundee Rds • Barrfngtcn, IL 

800/935-5913 D4 

www.motorwerhs.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

Ide Model Unity Pre owned Veltkles 

1001 W. Hlqgins Rd. (Rl. 71) 

or 1000 W. Cell Rd. (Rl. 58), Hoffman 

Estates, IL 

800/935-5909 D5 

www.motorwerks.com 




GARY LANG BUICK 

Route 31, between Cryslal lake I McHenry 
888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylangauto.com 



REICHERT BUICK 

5220 NW Hwy. • Crystal Lake, IL 

815/459*4000 

www.relchertautos.com 



83 



REICHERT BUICK 

2145 S. Eastwood Dr. 'Woodstock, It 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.relchertautos.com 

WOODY BUICK PONTIAC GMC 

909 E. Chlcaqo Street • Elgin, IL 
800/758-1205 C5 

www.woodycars.com 




ALPIEMONTE 
CADILLAC OF ST CHARLES 

1611 E. Main St. (Rl. 64) -St. Charles 
630/513-5353 B6 

www.plemontecadillac.com 

GARY LANG CADILLAC 

Route 31, between Crystal lake & McHenry 

888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylangauto.com 



MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC 

ZOO N, Cook St, • Barrington, IL 

800/935-5923 

www.motorwerks.com 



D4 




AL PIEMONTE CHEVROLET 

770 Dundee Ave. (fit. 25) • Dundee, IL 
847/426-2000 C4 

www.plemontegroup.com 

GARY LANG CHEVROLET 
Route 31, between Crystal lake & McHenry 
888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylangauto.com 



RAY CHEVROLET 

39 N. Route 12 • Fox lake, IL 

866/RAY-CHEVY 

www.raychevrolet.com 



D2 



RAYMOND CHEVROLET 
US Route 173 •Anlloch.IL 
847/395-3600 Dl 

www.raymondchevrolet.com 

REICHERT CHEVROLET 

5220 NW" Hwy.- Cryslal lake, IL 
815/459-4000 B3 

www.relchertautos.com 



HYunoni 




REICHERT CHEVROLET < 
2145 S. Eastwood Or. • Woodstock. IL 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.relchertautos.com 



CHRYSLB 



ELGIN HYUNDAI 

881 E.Chicago St.* Elgin, IL 

847/888-8222 

www.elglnhyundal.com 



C5 




ROSEN HYUNDAI 

771 S. Randall Rd. • Algonquin. IL 
866/469-0114 B4 

www.rosenrosenrosen.com 



CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

91 S, Rl. 12, Fox Lake, II 
847/497-4200 D2 

www.chryslerdodrjeoffoxlake.com 

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER 

5404 S. Rl. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL 
888/800-6100 B3 
www.cl-cj.com 

FENZEL MOTOR SALES 

206 S. State Street* Hampshire, IL 
847/683-2424 A4 

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY 
CHRYSLER DODGE 

Route 120 • McHenry, IL 
815/385-7220 C2 

www.sunnysidecompany.com 



GURNEE HYUNDAI 

6251 Grand Avenue « Gurnee, IL 

800/613-8096 

www.gurneehyundai.com 



F2 




INFINITI. 



MOTOR WERKS INFINITI 

Barr inqton £ Dundee Rds. • Barrington, II 
800-9355913 D4 

www.motorwerks.com 

INFINITI OF HOFFMAN ESTATES 

A MOTOR WORKS COMPANY 
1075 W. Golf Rd, • Hodman Estates, IL 
888/2806844 D5 

www.lnfinltihoffman.com 



MERCEDES-BENZ OF 
ST. CHARLES 

220 North Randall Road • St. Charles, IL 
800 - NEW BENZ B6 

www.mbchi.com 

MOTOR WERKS 

MERCEDES-BENZ 

Barrington & Djndee Rds • Barrington, II 

800/935-5913 D4 

www.motorwerks.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

Lole Model Luxury Pit-owned Vehicles 

1001 W. Klqqlns Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. Golf 

Rd.(Rt. 58), Hoffman Estates, IL 

800/935-5909 D5 

www.motorwerks.com 



ONTIAC 

fck»fc«fctnr« Aiaiiiitoi^ jfc^-rfi-i T|fr»f JMfflAM 

- ,■- - '■■■■ ' .—■-... 

I^^^MmJ ■"Vaifc '11 - - - *'"'' ■ - ' **• ' ' ' ' ' ' ~- — J 

CRYSTAL LAKE PONTIAC 

6305 NW Hwy. 'Crystal Lake, IL 
815/477-8600 B3 

www.crystallakepontiac.com 

GARY LANG PONTIAC 

Route 31, between Cryslal lake S McHenry 
888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylangauto.com 

REICHERT PONTIAC 

2145 S. Eastwood Or. * Woodstock, IL 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.reichertautos.com 

WOODY BUICK PONTIAC GMC 

909 E. Chicago Street* Elgin, IL 
800/758-1205 C5 

www.woodycars.com 



SUBARU© 

i^ ■* 

GARY LANG SUBARU 

Route 3l, between Cryslal Lake £ McHenry 
888/794-5502 C3 

www.qarylangauto.com 




RAY SUZUKI 

23 Route 12 • Fox lake 

888/446-8743 

www.raysuzuki.com 



D2 



I® TOYOTA 





CHAMPION DODGE 
CHRYSLER JEEP 

505 Northwest Hwy. • Barrington. IL 
888/503-2999 D4 

www.champlonautomall.com 

CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

91 S. Rl. 12, Fox Lake, IL 
847/497-4200 D2 

www.chryslerdodgeoffoxfake.com 

DODGE OF ANTiOCH 
T05 Rt. 173 Antiocti. tL 
888-493-1B54 D1 

www.dodgeofantioch.com 

VIKING DODGE 

On Route 176 St Route (4 • Crystal Lake, IL 
815/459-8000 B3 

www.viklngdodge.com 



CRYSTAL LAKE JEEP 

S404 S. Rt. 31 -Crystal Lake, IL 
888/800-6100 B3 

www.cl-cj.com 

EXTREME JEEP 

3017 West Rl. 120* McHenry, IL 

815/363-9999 

www.extremejeep.com 



MITCHELL-POTTS 
MERCURY/LINCOLN 

907 H. Front St. (Rl. 3D * McHenry, IL 
815/385-0403 C2 

www.Jimpotts.com 

WOODSTOCK 

FORD/MERCURY 

1460 S. Eastwood Or. • Woodstock, IL 
800/664-1727 A2 

www.47ford.com 



MOTOR WERKS PORCHE 

Barrington £ Dundee Rds. * Barrinlon, IL 
800/935-5913 D4 

www.motorwerks.com 

MOTOR WERKS 

CERTIFIED OUTLET 

lole Model luxury Pre owned Vehicles 

tOOl W. Hiqgjns Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. Golf 

Rd. (Rt. 5B), Hoffman Estates, IL 

800/935-5909 D5 

www.motorwerks.com 



CLASSIC TOYOTA 

425 North Greenbay • Waukegan, IL 
847-336-4300 G2 

www.classlcdlrect.com 

ELGIN TOYOTA' 

IZOOE. Chicago St.* Elgin, IL 
847/741-2100 C5 

elglntoyota.com 

PAULY TOYOTA 

On Rfe. 14 • Crystal Lake, IL 
815/459-7100 or 
B47/658-9050 B3 





C2 



BILL JACOBS MINI 

1564 W.Ogden Ave. •Maperville.lL 
800/295-0166 D7 

www.billjacobs.com 



MOTOR WERKS SAAB 

200 N. Cook Street • Barringlon, IL 
800/935-5393 D4 

www.motorwerks.com ■ 




EXTREME KIA 

5213 NW Hwy. * Cryslal Lake, IL 

www.extremefordkfa.com 

815/459/8200 



B3 




KIA OF WAUKEGAN 

500 S. Green Bay Rd. • Waukegan, IL 
B47/782-9400 . G2 

www.kiaofwaukegan.com 



LIBERTYVILLE MITSUBISHI 

1119 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Llbertyvlite, IL 
847/816-6660 F3 

www.libertyviliemitsubishi.com 



BUSS FORD 

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL 
815/385-2000 C2 

www.bussford.com 

EXTREME FORD 

5213 NW Hwy. * Crystal Lake, IL 
815/459-8200 B3 

www.extremefordkta.com . 

SPRING HILL FORD 

BOO Dundee Ave. * East Dundee, IL 
847/551-3300 C4 

TOM PECK FORD 

13900 Auto Mall Dr.* Huntley, IL 
847/669-6060 A4 

www.tompeckford.com 

WOODSTOCK FORD/MERCURY 

1460 S. Eastwood Dr.* Woodstock, IL 
800/664-0896 A2 

www.47ford.com 



CRYSTAL LAKE GMC 

6305 NW Hwy. * Cryslal Lake, IL 
815/477-8600 B3 

www.crystallakeponttac.com 



GARY LANG GMC 

Route 31, between Crystal Lake S McHenry 

888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylangauto.com 

WOODY BUICK PONTIAC GMC 

909 E. Chicago Street • Elgin, IL 
800/758-1205 C5 

www.woodycars.com 



RAYMOND KIA 

119 Route 173. Anlloch, IL 

847/838-7900 

www.raymondkia.com 




PAULY SCION 

On Rfe. 14 • crystal Late, IL 
815/459-7100 or 
847/658-9050 



ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN 

360 N. Rt. 31* Crystal Lake, II 
888/682-4485 B3 

www.andersoncars.com 

BILL JACOBS VOLKSWAGEN 

2211 Aurora Avenue • Napervllle, IL 
800/720-7036 D7 

www.blllJacobs.com 

GURNEE VOLKSWAGEN 

6301 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL 
847-855-1500 F2 

www.GurneeVW.com 



B3 



CLASSIC TOYOTA SCION 
425 North Greenbay * Waukegan, II 
847-336-4300 G3 

www.classlcdlrect.com 




D1 



^ 



NISSAN OF ST. CHARLES 

2535 East Main St. • St. Charles, IL 
630/584-3900 B6 

www.nissanofstcharles.com 



BARRINGTON VOLVO 

300 H. Hough (Rt. 59) • Barrington, IL 
847/381-9400 D4 



LAND 
'ROVER 



BILL JACOBS LAND ROVER 
HINSDALE 

300 East Ogden Ate. • Hinsdale, IL 
888/204-0042 F7 

www.bilijacobs.com 

LAND ROVER HOFFMAN ESTATES 

1051 W. lliqgins • Hoffman Estates, IL 
800/731-5760 D5 

www.blllJacobs.com 

LAND ROVER NAPERVILLE 

1551 W.Jefferson* Napervllle, IL 
800/731-5605 D7 

www.billjacobs.com 

LINCOLN 



TO BE LISTED ll\l THE LOCAL DEALER SHOIA/RQOM, 

PLEASE CALL 

630-845-5233 



MITCHELL-POTTS 
UNCOLN/MERCURY 

907 K. Front St. (St. 31) • McHenry, IL 
815/385-0403 C2 

www.Jimpotts.com 




ANDERSON MAZDA 

360 N. Rt. 31 * Cryslal Lake, II 

888/682-4485 

www.andersoncars.com 



B3 




BIGGERS MAZDA 

1320 East Chicago Street • The Mazda 
Machine on Rt. 19 • Elgin, IL 
847/628-6000 C5 



BRILLANCE HONDA 

210 N, Rl. 31 -Rts 31 S 176 'Crystal lake.il 
888/380-5336 B3 

brllliencehonda.com 

MOTOR WERKS HONDA 

Barringtoa & Dundee Rds, • Barrington, IL 
800-935-5913 D4 

www.motorwerks.com 




MERCEDES-BENZ OF 
HOFFMAN ESTATES 

A MOTOR WORKS COMPANY 
1000 W. Golf Rd.* Hoffman Estates, IL 
888/641-9129 D5 

www.mercedeshoffman.com 




It 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 



CLASSIFIED 



Friday, April 20, 2007 «C5 



Cnmpcrs, Trailers Ilousesfor 
& RVs 5650 Snlc 



Lots & Acreage Houses Locals 8100 Lcjjuls 8100 Locals 8100 Lcgnls 8100 Lcgnls 

6250 For Sale 04 60 Forltcnt 7400 



8100 Assumed Nnme 



I 



2003 38' TROPHY 
PARK MODEL with a 
largo lull deck partially 
covered on a groat sea- 
sonal silo. Loss than 2 
hours away Now 536,995 
Slock » 20OG-31 
Sco Ihlsimlia mora 
parkntodGlsonsito.com 
Lakeland Camping 
Resort, Mlllon.W! 
60B-B6B-47Q0 

2003 INNSBRUCK 

5" Wheel, 3V with 2 slides, 
slored indoors, immacu- 
late, like now! Si 2.500 
815-459-5561 

Motorcycles 5700 

1977 H. D. Sportster 

XLH Runs well, many 

now parts, newer paint job, 

S5000 773-450-3292-Ccll 

1999 Hmloy Davidson 
Dynn Wide Glide Rod, 
Noss, Jokcrmachlno, Mus- 
tang Sampson, loaded! 
Too much lo list! $12,5007 
best oiler. 030-229-6209 

2002 Harloy Davidson 
Road King Classic 

Fuel injected, 11K mi. cus- 
tom pnini + many extras. 
MINT conditon! $15,300 
815-462-4779 

2003 Harloy 

Davidson 

100* Anniversary 

Ultra Classic 

Extensive engine work and 
a large amount ol chrome, 
20K miles, great runner, 
great shapol S20,000/obo 

815-560-1505 

2003 HARLEY DAVID- 
SON, Ultra Classic, FL- 
HTCUI. $14,500 23K, 
miles. Perfect shape. Ex- 
tras incl trailer hitch, lug- 
gage rack, saddle bags, 
glow lights, rotor covers, 
slider lights, all lights are 
hooded. Lois ol extra 
chrome. Color matched 
16 cu. 11. trailer avail (or 
SI 000 extra. 647-420- 
7762 

2004 Kawasaki 
KX 65cc Dirt Bike 



BECOME A HOMEOWN- 
ER 100% /LOW DOWN 

Prior Bankruptcy OK. 
No Minimum Credit Score 
GREAT RATES. Apply & 
www.wykotlmorlnaqo.com 

CONvWA'FHA/LlSDA 

Purchase/Rofinanco 
888-833-2181 

IL Res. Mtg. Lie. EHL 



BEHIND IN 
PAYMENTS? 

Savo your crodil and 

possible cash -out. 

1-8B0-206-4619 



FOX LAKE 
S21 9,900 

Now construction at 

a great price. 2 story, 

3 bdrm with open floor 

plan, hardwood floors, 

2 car gerago, across 

Irom Marina. Will 

consider lease option. 

Alnnwood Associates 

847-247-1141 

or 847-909-3529 

McHenry 3509 Biscayno 
Rd Well maint ranch, 3 
bdrm. 2.5 ba. fin bsmt, In- 
ground pool, Irg comer lot, 
$284,500 815-385-2405 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

3 bdrm, now carpet, paint, 
plumbing. Move right In! 
$125,000,847-693-0913 

Woodstock - Beautiful 
brick custom designed 
walkout ranch on 2 wood- 
ed acres. G rani lo Kirch . 
hdwd & ceramic II. Cuslom 
cab, & woodworking. 4 
bdrm, 3.5 baths 3 Irpl. 
Office, theatre room, kitch- 
enette. (2) 2c. Alt. 
Garages 5590,000 
Shown by appointment... 
B15-64B-2356 



Woodstock- 10 acres 

Zoned AG, trees, pond, 
buildablo, only $299,900. 
Ben Century 21 Now Her- 
itage 815-790-4847 



Wntcr front 
Property 



6515 



LONG LAKE 



wooded lot w/lake 

view & lake rights! 

$800.. ; 

847-740-4399 



South Central FL Privato 
Gnlod Lakofront Commu- 
nity was $179,900 NOW 
S79.900 1 to 3 acre lake 
access. Owner must soil. 
Call OBQ-320'8399 X124B 



Invest. Property 
For Sate 6700 



Floridn-Fcr! Lauderdale 
4 Condos Pkg 4 Sale, long 
term i enters, 5215.000/oa. 
647-293-2000 



Vacntion Property 
For Snlc 6725 



VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN 
CABIN 
Now 3 bdrm log cabin with 
loft on 5 acre mounlalntop 
overlooking great big iroul 
stream near New River 
State Park and Galax, 
mustselll $299,500 ownor 
1-866-789-8535 



7000 
Real Estate for Rent 



Apartments, 

Unfurnished 7250 



CondosrTownhomcs 
For Snlc 6300 




Completely stock, 

£jrr7eme7y clean, hardly 

ridden, very low hrs. 

It has ihe Kawasaki 

Team Green Chevy 

Trucks N-Stylo graphics 

& gripperseatcover.lt 

needs nothing and is 

ready lo ride! 

SI 400 6 I will deliver it, 

locally, il you needed. 

Call 81 5-462-0145 

for more Info, 
lean email you pics. 

1998 KX 250, Dirt Bike V 
malnl, very fast mods. Sir 

Musi Sell! 815-455-5394 

2003 KX125, Dirt Bike V 
main!, mods, Must £ 
S230O 815-455-5394 

2005 KX 250F, very h 
$3800. Wei! Maintained. 
Must Sell! 815-455-5394 



FOX LAKE Deluxe 2 bdrm, 
37 Nipporsink Blvd. Newly 
refurbished. No pets. 
$795. -815-403-9558 

MCHENRY New 3 bdrm r_ j 

TH, Z5 bath, lln'd bsmt. 2 FOX LAKE spacious 

car gar. All applic, Great bnghl 1 bdrm with dining. 

area. Act Now S Receive Balcony, a/c, Indry, slor. & 

Builders Discount. heat $725, no poss. agon! 

$189.900. 815-451-6011 ownod. 815-814-3346 



Round Lnkc Beach 
3 bdrm, all appliances, in- 
cludes Washer/Dryer & 
fenced back yard. SI 000, 
B47-70Z-5268 

Spring Grove Charming 
Country homo. 3 bdrm.. 
2.5 bath, LR. parlor, HUGE 
Country kftch., 1" floor 
laundry, 2 car dolached 
gar., small barn Wi'pasluro 
[horse or pony permitted) 
$1350rrno. Sec. Plus 1" 
mo. To movo in. Avail 6/1 . 
815-675-4224 



Co nun. Property 
For Rent 7500 



LAKE VILLA 

Bar tor Icaso. apartment 
abovo. Great location, ma- 
jor Lake Villa Intersection. 
Avail April. 847-830-6401 



Retail/Office Space 
For Rent 7550 



MCHENRY R|. 31 & Bull 
Volley Road. Brand now 
1600 sq ft ollcc space, 
SlOOO/mo. 815-759-5000 



Industrial 

For Rent 7G00 

SPRING GROVE, 2.000 
sq It, 2 OH doors 12x12. 
14 tt ceilings. Office, bath 
& shower. Greal location 
noxl to post ollico. 615- 
4B2-7703 




•Grayslake/Wildwood * 
Large 1 Bdrm Irom 
S99.900- 2 Bdrms Irom 
S1 19, 900 Builders model 
$134,900 hid garago 
parking Royal Oak; just 
N. of Rl. 120 on Gages 
Lake Rd. blwn Rt. 
45/Hunl Club Rd. IGL 
R.E. 847-548-5100 



Farms/Farmland 
For Sale 0400 



CAPRON, counlry living al 
its best 5 acre farmstead, 
northern Boone County. 

Details 

taytormadecarpanlry.com 

815-737-8877 



Lots & Acreage 
For Sale 6460 




Real Estate 
Services ' 6100 



BANK FORCLOSURES! 

Homos from $10,0001 1-3 
bedroom available! Repos, 
REOs. FDIC, FSBO, FHA, 
etc. These homes musj 
selll For Listings Call 1* 
800425-1620 exten-3421 



Real Estate 
Auction 



6150 



LAND AUCTION 

300 Props Musi be Sold! I 
Low Down/ E/Z Financing t 
FREE CATALOG 
8B8-263-043B 
www.LANDAUCTION.com I 



Open Houses 6200 



GRAYSLAKE 

SUN, APRIL 22 
12PM -3PM 




Beautiful Lake Murray 
(500+ mile shoreline) 
Columbia, SC. Waterfront/ 
lake access lots lor sate. 
Paved roads, ulililies. Auc- 
tion Juno 9. Minimum bids 
$100,000 lo $400,000. 

803-217-9.171 
www.land.scana.com 

HOT SPRINGS, NO Gated 
residential community sur- 
rounded by National For- 
est. Paved roads, club- 
house, waterfall, pond, hik- 
ing IrailsS more. Lots starl- 
ing at $60K. 877-477-3473 

JUST SI 95.22 /MONTH* 
1+ Acres with FREE 
Boat Slips! $34,900 
Nicety Wooded Lake Ac- 
cess property In brand I 
new premier development 
on Kentucky lake! Prime 
waterfronts available. Call! 
1-800-704-3154,9X1-1118, 
'20% down, balance linan- 
ced 30 yrs, 7.5 fixed, OAC. ! 

LAKE OF THE OZARKS 
Lakelront $59,900 Nice 
building site, Paved roads, 
all utilities. Call owner to- 
day! 866-696-5263, x.2585 

Tennessoe Lake Bargain 
3+ Acres - $19,900 FREE 
Boat Slips! Savo $5000 j 
during pre-conslruciion 
sale! Enjoy accoss to pri- ; 
vale, Jimmy Houston en-, 
dorsed bass lake. Paved 
roads, utilities, soils tested. 
LAKEFRONT AVAILABLE. : 
Exc. Financing... Call Now! j 
1-866-685-2562, ox 1. 1004 



FOX LAKE - Vacation 
Village 2 bdrm, 24 hour 
guarded community incl 
poo! and beach, $750 + 
2 mo sec dep. avail 5/1. 
847-525-2841 



Grayslako/Wtldwood 
Minulos lo Gumee Mills 

and I-94 

1 MONTH FREE RENT 

1 Bedroom S825 

htd. Garage/parking 

2 Bedroom 1.5 bath 

S975 

Gar. Laundry, Elov. 

IGL R.E 647-54 B-5100 

GRAYSLAKE 1 bedroom 
clean, bright and quid! 
Most uli! incl, $700 no pets 
or smoking, 847-735-1 71 9 

* 
NORTH CHICAGO 
Very large 4 bdrm, $860 
also 2 bdrm. S650. 

847-910-2789 ■ 

SCHAUMBURG - 1 bdrm. 
Now kitchen, new carpel, 
security btdg., pool, tennis, 
near Elgln-OHaro & Irving 
Park. S750/mo. Available 
May 1". 630-668-4259 

Wauconda Downtown 
1 bdrm $565 avail now, 2 
bdrm $795, avail May 1*. 
847-650-4998 

ZION Large 1 bdrm, eat-In 
kitchen, tenant pays elec- 
tric, will furnish for military, 
oil "SI parking, SGOO/mo. 
available Immediately. 
B47-212-7757 



Lcgnls 



8100 



CondosfTownhamcs 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Board ol Education ol 
Anlioch Community High 
School District No. 117 

v. 
Susan AHyman, etal. 

No. 07 ED 02 

The requisite affidavit for 
publication having been 
filed. NOTICE IS HEREBY 
GIVEN YOU, Susan A. Hy- 
man, Mohamad Nasr, 
Lake Forest Bancorp. Inc., 
dba/ Lnko Forest Bank & 
Trust Company, on Illinois 
corporation, Soulhport Fi- 
nancial Corporation, dba/ 
South port Bank, a Wiscon- 
sin corporation and un- 
known owners. Defen- 
dants in ihe above-cap- 
lioned suit, that a Com- 
plaint to Condemn Proper- 
ty was filed on March 27, 
2007 in Iho Circuit Court 
for Iho Nineteenth Judicial 
Circuit, Lako County, Illi- 
nois, by Ihe above-named 
Plaintiff against you. pray- 
ing the Court lor Ihe con- 
demnation of the following 
properties: 

PARCEL 1: 

THE SOUTH 330.0 
FEET OF THE NORTH, 
990.0 FEET OF GOVERN- 
MENT LOT 1 IN THE 
NORTH WEST M OF 
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 
46 NORTH. RANGE 11. 
EAST OF THE THIRD 
PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. IN 
LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 



For Rent 7300! Common Address: 

42844 N. Crawford Road, 
Anlioch, Illinois 
PIN: 03-07-100-011 



FOX LAKE Affordable 
Spacious 2 bdrm condo 
apt. Gated comm w/pool, 
tennis, on the lake. AWE- 
SOME. Call 81 5-236-0622 



Duplexes 

For Rent 7350 



WINTHROP HARBOR, 

2000sq!l,2bdrm2.5balh, 
possible bdrm In bsmt. 
Near schools. S1400 
month 847-417-7003 



Houses 
For Rent 



7400 



32125 North 
Pine Ave. 

Located in beautiful 
Arbor Vista 

Great family home with 
4 bdrm, 3 balh, 3 car 
with huge back yard 
and groal floor plan. 
Cuslom pointed bsmt 
wilh entertainment 
center and built-in play- 
house. Lois ol storage 
and 3 docks. 
A Must See! 

For info call 

Beverly Beucher 

Nlmrod Realty Group 

847-344-0680 



Palatine 

Sunday, April 22nd 
1pm -4pm 

223 Soulh Lancelot Ln 

End unit, 3bdrm, 2.5ba, 

town home. 

Cobentry Park 

Century 21 KMIECIK 

REALTORS 

773-284-1900 

OPEN HOUSES 

Watch for tho Journal 
Classllied Open House Di- 
rectory every Friday, Sat- 
urday and Sunday. In- 
clude your listing by calling 
(800)589-8237. 



Western New Mexico 
| 20 Acres 349,990 
Scenic region, tall trees, 
views, wildlife, borders 
BLM, electricity, horseback 
riding, hiking, hunting, Per- 
fect for family ranch, gel- 
away or retirement. 100% 
financing, 1-866-356-3666 



NEW HORIZON 

FORECLOSURE 

ASSISTANCE 



• Are you behind 

on your mortgage 

payments? 



• Are you afraid 

of foreclosing on 

your home? 

• Are you 

running out of 

options? 

WE CAN HELP! 

four Convenient 

Locations to Service 

You 

■ Elgin *Fox Lake 

•Round Like 

•Waukegan 

CALL US TODAY! 

847-344-8783 
JORGE 

847-344*8128 
J.R. 



A Lease Option to Buy! 

Crystal Lake * Harvard * 

* McCullom Lako * 

Ml. Prospect * Round 

Lake * Hanover Park * 

Rock!ord*Gumeo*Zion 

815-477-1020 

ANT10CH 3 bdrm, t bath, 
newly remodeled, new fur- 
nace and well, beach 
rights and boat launch, 
$l200/m0. 224-577-5733 

[•Anlioch Coach House 2b- 
drm, 1 ba. lawn care/waler 
Inc. No pets'smoking S735 
mo+S8C. 847-838-5776 

CHANNEL LAKE WATER- 
FRONT 6 rooms, 3-bdrm., 

1-balh, appls., central hi. & 
|alr. $95Q/mo. + imo sec 
dep. Tom 815-341-1967 

CHANNEL LAKE WATER- 
FRONT, 3 bdrm, 2 balh, 7 
rooms, small bsmt, c/a, 
appls, large lot. $1250/mo 
+ 1/mo sec dep. Call Tom 
615-341-1967 

FOX LAKE Plslakee Lake- 
lront, 2 bdrm, 1 balh, appl, 
pier, $900/mo, aval! now. 
■ 312-504.3441 

FOX RIVER GROVE, Riv- 
erfront charming cottage, 
completely rehab, 3 bdrm, I 
1 bath, W/D, priv dock, 
$1295/mo, 847-668-7279 

GURNEE Duplex 3-bdrm., 
j 1-1/2 ba., AfC, 1-car gar,, 
IbsmL, fenced, School Dlst. 
56, $1,350/mo.+sec. Ten- 
ant pays ulils. (847)336- 
1928 



PARCEL 2: 
THE SOUTH 330.0 

I FEET OF THE NORTH 
1320.0 FEET OF GOV- 
ERNMENT LOT 1 OF THE 
NORTH WEST M OF 
SECTION 7. TOWNSHIP 
46 NORTH, RANGE 11, 
EAST OF THE THIRD 

■PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

I 

Common Address: 
42776 N. Crawford Road, 
Anlioch, Illinois 
PIN: 03-07-100-014 

PARCEL 3: 

THE SOUTH 330.0 
FEET OF THE NORTH 
1650.0 FEET OF GOV- 
ERNMENT LOT 1, IN THE 
NORTH WEST M OF 
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 
46 NORTH, RANGE 11, 
EAST OF- THE THIRD 
PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN. IN 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS' 

Common Address: 

42720 N. Crawford Road, 



PIN: 03-07-100-016 

Unless you, Susan A. 
Hyman, Mohamed Nasr, 
Lako Fores! Bancoru. Inc.. 
dba' Lako Forost Bank & 
Trust Company, an Illinois 
corporation, Soulhport Fi- 
nancial Corporation, dba/ 
Soulhport Bank, a Wiscon- 
sin corporation and un- 
known owners, hie or olh- 
orwiso make your appear- 
ance in this suit in Iho ol- 
lico ol tho Clerk ol Iho 
Court ol tho Nineteenth Ju- 
dicial Clrcuil, Lnko County, 
Illinois, on or beloro May 7, 
2007, a Irial may bo hekl 
and judgment may bo en- 
lorod against you for tho 
rollcl prayed in Iho Com- 
plaint. 

(Published in Iho Anlioch 
Journal, April 6, 13 & 20, 
2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Nollco of Public Hearing 

In order to solid public 
inpul for the conceptual 
plan ol a 16-acro park on 
Fairfield Road in Round 
Lake Bench. Located cast 
of Fairfield Road, north ol 
Morningsido, wosl ol Bev- 
erly Drive and soulh o! 
Lake Shore and Hillside 
Drives, tho Round Lako 
Area Park District is plan- 
ning n park development 
tor 2008. Included In tho 
conceptual design is light- 
ed soltball fields, open 
space, a Irail, ouldoor 
shcller(s). a playground 
and parking lot(s). The 
Round Lake Area Park 
Dislricl requests il you 
have any inpul relating to 
Iho project, you attend a 
public hearing specifically 
planned for this purpose. 
The Public Hearing will be: 

Thursday, May 10, 2007 

al 6:00 p.m. ol the 

Robert W. Rolek 

Community Center 

B14 Hart Road 

Round Lako. I L 60073 

Another Public Hearing 
will bo held on: 

Thursday. May 24. 2007 
al 6:00 p.m. al the 
Robert W. Rolek 
Community Center, 

614 Hart Road, 
Round Lako, IL 60073 

for iho purpose ol address- 
ing concerns through pos- 
sible design alterations, 
elc. Irom Iho first Public 
Hearing. 

For further information, 
plcaso call Mr. Jell Nehila, 
Executive Director, Round 
Lako Area Park Dislricl al 
(847)546-855B or e-mail a! 
jnclii1a@rlapd.org. 
(Published in iho Round 
Lake Journal, April 20, 
P007.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ZONING BOARD 

OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Public notice is hereby 
given pursuant to a Pali- 
tion on file in the ( Village 
Clerk's office o! Iho Village 
of Fox Lake, thai a public 
hearing will be held on 
May 9, 2007 at 7:30 p.m. 
In tho Village Hall, Fox 
Lake, Illinois, to hear the 
Pelilion of Daniel & Lory 
Porter, owner of the follow- 
Ing described real cslate 
to-wil: 

Lot 12 in Block 3 in Mar- 
vin's Subdivision ol Part of 
Ihe Northeast Quarter of 
tho Northeast Quarter of 
Secilon 9. Township 45 
North, Range 9 East of tho 
Third Principal Meridian, 
According to Ihe Plal 
Thereof, Recorded May 9, 
1905 as Document 99844, 
in Book "G* ol Plats. Pago 
17, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Tax fdentilication no.: 
05-09-202-014 

Location of properly is: 
North oil ol E. Grand Ave. 
and south of Oak Street on 
the East side. 

The common address is: 

41 Nipporsink Rd„ Fox 
Lake, IL 

Petitioner Is requesting 
Iho following: to rczono 
from B-2 toR-4 and vari- 
ances (listed below) 

Fronl Yard Sol Back: 
Roquired • 25- shown 
17.12', Variance 017.88", 

Sldo Yard Tolal Re- 
quired; 30'- shown on 
drawing 20.5', Variance 
Required 9.5'. 

Minimum Sido Yard: 10' 
shown on drawing 7.5', 
Varianco Required 2.5'. 

Minimum Lot Area: 
20.000 Sq. FL Shown on 
drawing 11,170 Sq. Ft., 
Varianco roquired 8,830 



Snid Pelilion is available 
for examination In Iho Vil- 
lage Clerk's office al Iho 
Village Hall in Fox Lako. 
Illinois 

All Inloroslod persons 
are Invited lo attend said 
hearing and bo heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ron stochi. Chairman 

Fox Lnko Zoning 

Board o! Appeals 

Doled at Fox Lako, Illi- 
nois 

Tills 111h day of April. 
2007. 

(Published in Iho Fox Lako 
Journal, April 20, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

ESTATE OF ANTHONY 
ELSLE1N, DECEASED 

GEN. NO 05 P 808 

CLAIM NOTICE 

Notice Is given o! tho 
death Ol ANTHONY EL- 
BLEIN, ol Waukegan, Illi- 
nois. Letters of Ollico wore 
issued on November 4, 
2005. lo RAYMOND EL- 
BLE1N. as Executor. Ra- 
mond Elbloin's address Is: 
4355 Wahsingion Street, 
Gurnee. Illinois. His attor- 
ney is Daniel K. Sinclair, 
4170 0!d Grand Avenue, 
Gumee, Illinois 60031. 

Claims against Iho Es- 
tate may bo filed in iho Ol- 
lice o! tho Clerk ol tho Clr- 
cuil Court at 1.8 N. County 
Street, Waukogan. IL 
600B5. Room C-104. or 
with representative, or 
both, on or beloro October 
22, 2007. which dale is not 
loss than six monlhs Irom 
tho dale of first publication 
o! this notice and claim no! 
tiled wilhin Hint period Is 
barred. Copies o! a claim 
filed with Iho Clerk must 
be mailed or delivered lo 
Ihe reprcscntalive and lo 
tho nllorney wilhin ten 
days alter il has been tiled. 
Raymond Elblein 
/s/ Daniel K. Sinclair, 
Attorney 

Daniol K. Sinclair 
Altomey for Petitioner 
4170 Old Grand Avenuo 
Gumoo.IL 60031 
847-360-1200 
(Published in the Gunoe / 
Wadsmrtli Journal, Apnl 
20.27&Mav4.2007.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY 

IN PROBATE 

IN THE MATTER OF THE 
ESTATE OF HERBERT C. 
SCHULTZ, DECEASED 
I 

NO 07 P 239 

CLAIM NOTICE 

NOTICE IS GIVEN OF 
THE DEATH OF HER- 
BERT C, SCHULTZ ol 
Wauconda, Illinois. Letters 
of Olfico wore issuod on- 
April 13, 2007, to 
MATTHEW A. SCHULTZ, 
2819 W. Park Lane. Cary, 
IL 60013, whose attorney 
is James W. Kaiser, Esq., 
121 East Liberty Slreel, 
Sic. 3, Wauconda, IL 
60084. 

Claims against Ihe Es- 
tate may be filed in the Ol- 
lico ol Ihe Clerk of Court al 
17 N. County Street. 
Waukogan, IL or with the 
representative, or bolh, 
wilhin six (6) monlhs from 
Iho dale o! issuance of lot- 

; (crs and any claim nol filed 

' wilhin thai period Is barred. 

' Copies ol a daim filed with 
Iho Clork must be mailed 
or delivered to Ihe repre- ' 
sonlative and to the atlor- 

; ney wilhin ten (10) days al- 
ter it has been tiled. 
(Published In lite Waucon- 
da Journal, April 20, 27 & 
Mav 4, 2007.1 

Looking for a 
Career Change? 

According lo tho (Newspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 of all 
job changers said Ihoy 
were still checking ads in 
newspapers, and nail thai 
number had boon consult- 
ing online job ads since | 
their job change. Wilh Iho 
Journal Employment sec- 
lion and ChicagoJobs.- 
com, you've got i! covered! 
To connect wilh qualified ' 
candidates, call (800) 589- , 
B237 today. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 



302 N. Waukogan Road. 
Lake Bluff. IL 60044. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY '»„^JSSSSJS , && 
nwcM ui,„ mn j, Tv...... throo consocu ivo woeks 

wss a -ess *%& 



pipe lor directional drilling 
on Forest Gardens Road, 
in Forest Garden subdivi- 
sion in unincorporated 
Wauconda. Opening bid 
will bo Monday April 30, 
2007 a! 2:00 pm. For moro 
Information call Joo Mun- 
son, Highway Commis- 
sioner, at 847-875-2167 or 
847-526-B085. 
(Published in Ihe Waucon- 
da Journal, April 20, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Nolico is hereby given 
lhal Roberts Road Mini 
Storage. 4015 Roberts 
Rd., Island Lako, IL. 60042 
will soil or dispose ol prop- 
erty, Tho sale will take 
place on Saturday, May 
12. 2007 at 10:30 am. lor 
units fl208 Said Znmudio, 
H302 Michael Manrolla, 
K4Q5 Michaol McKoon, 

1(609 Jalmo Stophan, W816 lhal a lonlalive budget and 
Slovo Domanloy, H1011 approprialion ordinance lor 
Jamos Lorek, and #1201 'ho road purposes ol iho 
Lauren Daly. All contents Wauconda Township In 
sold lo highest bidder lor ihe Couly of Lako, Statool 
cash. Immediate removal Illinois, for iho fiscal year 
required. Wo rosorva Iho beginning March t. 2007, 
right lo wilhdraw any or all ?nd_ending February 28, 
property prior to sale, 
(Published in 
wauconda Journal, 
20 & 27, 2007.) 



3. For each method 
used, prool ol service must 
bo liled promptly with Iho 
court. 

Doled March 6. 2007 

/s/ Thomas E.Nelson 
Judgo 
Kurt M, Armstrong 
(P30322) 

Aiiornoy lor Plainiifl 
51 1 Renaissance Dr., 
Suilo 110 

St. Joseph, Ml 49085 
269-983-5777 
(Published in the Lnko 
County Journals, April 20, 
27 8, May 4,2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING ON ROAD 
DISTRICT BUDGET 

Notice is hereby given 



Iho 
April 



2008. will be on file and 
conveniently available lo 
public •inspection al 505 
Bonner Rd. from and oiler 
9 o'clock am, Tuesday, 

PUBLIC NOTICE A Pj'".2p07. 

Notice is further given 

Nollco ol Public Hoarlng hercb V ,ha ' a P u !j ,ic near ; 
a ing on said Budget and 

In order to solicil public Appropriation Ordinance 

Inpul lor Iho conceplual wi " 00 hold al 6:45 PM, 

plan of a 16-acro park on Wednesday, May 16, 

Fairfield Road In Round 2007, at 505 W. Bonnor, in 



Ihis Town and lhal final ao 
lion on Ihis ordinance will 
bo laken al a mooting lo 
be held at 505 W. Bonner 
al 7 o'clock PM, on Ihe 



Lako Beach. Located easl 
ol Fairfield Road, north ol 
Morningsido, wosl of Bov- 
orly Drive and south o! 
Lako Shore and Hillside 

Drives, Iho Round Lake Wednesday May 16,2007 
Aroa Park District is plan- 
ning a park development 
lor 2008. Included in Iho 
conceplual design is light- 
ed sollball fields, open 
space, a trail, outdoor PUBLIC NOTICE 
shell oris), a playground 
and parking lot(s). The 
Round Lako Area Park 
Dislricl requests II you 
have any Inpul relaling to 
tho project, you attend a 
public hearing specifically 
planned lor this purpose 



Christina Rowo, Clork 
(Published in the Waucon- 
da Journal, Apnl 20, 2007,) 



NOTICE OF UEN SALE 

TO: Lost Known Address: 

Tim Flanagan 

226 S. River Rd. 

Fox Fl Ivor Grove. IL 60021 



Tho Public Hearing will be: 

Thursday, May 10,2007 
at 6:00 p.m., at Iho Robert 
W. Rolek Community Con- 



Your right lo use 
space 342 a I Wauconda 
Sell-Service Storage, 500 
Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 
60034 has terminated and 



ter, 814 Hart Road, Round you no longer have access 



Lako. IL. 60073 

Anolher Public 
will bo hold on: 



Hearing ' 



lo Ihe slored properly. DE- 
MAND FOR PAYMENT IS 
BEING MADE WITHIN 14 
DAYS. Tho stored property 
is subject lo' a lien in Iho 
amount ol $419. This 
amount will conlinuo lo In- 
crease in accordance wilh 
Iho terms ol your rental 
agreement until paid or tho 
property is sold. They are 
lor Iho purpose ol ad- itemized as follows: 
dressing concerns through oato: 3/5/07; Rent 
possible design alter- $874; Lalo Fee: $15; In- 
olions, etc. from Iho first ver iiorv: $30; Due Dato: 
Public Hearing. 



Thursday, May 24, 2007 
al 6:00 p.m. at tho Robert 
W. Rolek Community Con- 
ler, B14 Hart Road, Round 
Lake, IL. 60073 



3/5/07; Balance: S9 19, 

Dale: 4/16/07; Rent: 
S3B0; Late Fee: $9; Inven- 
tory: $30; Duo Dale: 
4/2/07; Balance: S4 19. 
TOTAL DUE: $419,00 
THIS SUM MUST BE 
PAID IN FULL BEFORE 
4/16/07 OR THE PROP- 
ERTY WILL BE AOVER- 
TISEO FOR SALE AND 
PUBLIC NOTICE SOLD. Any excess pro- 
ceeds of Iho sale over the 
lien amount and costs ol 
sale will bo retained by tho 
owner and may bo re- 
claimed by you, or claimed 
by anolher person having 
a court order or other judi- 
cial process against the 
property, at any lime lor a 
period of 2 years from the 
sale and thereafter tho 
proceeds will revert lo 
Wauconda Sell- Service 
Storage. 

General description ol 

goods: Schlago locks, 

dishwasher, 2 ladders, fish 

lank, misc. household 

Lalt0 * electrical supplies. 

Dale and location ol 
i sale: 5/7/07 al 1:00 p.m. At 

TO: DIANNA KOENIG [ S^p n ^f 61 ^ 
You are being sued by f^S* P £- J? LJ«' 
Plaintiff in this Court to ob- fi» "and Rd.. Wouconda, 
tain solo legal and physical '. ; ■ buytM ' 
custody ol your minor *<" mav ££«■ sum 
child. You must filo your I and ™V «"'«' i ns own ' 
answer or lake other a c-, ora,8 ^26-5055. 
lion permitted by law In', /s/ George Gallagher 
Ihis Court at the Court ad- i *«07 

dress abovo on or boforo j (Published in Ihe 
Juno 2. 2007. II you lall lo I Wauconda Journal, 

do so, a delaull judgmenl I flriril '0 *■??. srm \ _ . 

PjsKsas pUBL|C N0T|CE 

ed In tho complaint liled in 
this case. 



For further Inlormatlon, 
please call Mr. Jell Nehila, 
Executive Director, Round 
Lake Area Park Dislricl al 
(847)546-8558 or e-mail at 
jnehila@rtapd.org. 
(Published in tho Round 
Lako Journal, April 20. 
?M7\ 



STATE OF MICHIGAN 

JUDICIAL DISTRICT 

5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

COUNTY PROBATE 

ORDER FOR 
ALTERNATE SERVICE 

CASE NO, 

2007-0695-DC-N 

Kevin Knox, 511 Renais- 
sance Drive, Suite 110, SI. 
Joseph, Ml 490B5 

Plaintiff, 

v. 
Dlanna Koenlg, 302 N. 
Waukegan Road, 
Bluff, IL 60044, 

DefendanL 



INVITATION TO BID 



90 miles of Family Fun! 



Saturday & Sunday 

May5&6 

Along Route 66 irom Joliet lo Towanda. . 

Explore over a dozen communitlus for 

antiques, mortals, foe ti vale and moro I 

www.US6iedcarpo1corrldor.org 



Red Carpet Corridor • 800-835-2055 




THE COURT FINDS: 

1, Servico ol process 
upon defendant Dianna i 
Koenlg cannol reasonably 
be made as provided in 
MCR 2.105, and servico of j 
process may be made in a I 
manner which is reason- 1 
ably calculated lo give do- 
fendant actual nolico of Ihe 
proceedings and an oppor- ' 
(unity to be heard. 

IT IS ORDERED: 

2. Service 'ol the sum- 
mons and complaint and a ' 
copy ol Ihis order may be 
made by Ihe tallowing" 
method; 



Anlioch Township 

Tim Osmond Sports 

Complex Development 

Project • Phasa I 



phali path, ono (1) base- 
ball Hold with infield and 
fencing, two (2) football 
fields, ono (1) shelter wilh 
concrete pad. playground, 
disc goll course, cross 
country (rail, sled hill, 
benches, landscape plant- 
ings, restoration and seed- 
ing. 

Bids are to bo ad- 
dressed lo iho Anlioch 
Township, olln. Slovo 
Smouso. 1625 Deep Lako 
Rd., Lako Villa, IL. 60046. 
and shall bo marked 
'Sealed Bid- Tim Osmond 
Sports Complex Develop- 
ment Project - Phaso I". 

There will bo a Pro-Bid 
rnooling al Iho Township 
Ollico. 1625 Dcop Lako 
Rd., Lako Villa, IL. 6004G, 
at 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, 
May 1st, 2007. Ths rnool- 
ing is nol mandatory, how- 
ever attendance Is Strong- 
ly Encouraged. 

Bidding Documents may 
be obtained alter 3:00 
p.m., Thursday, April 19th, 
2007, by contacting BHFX, 
LLCal (815) 344-0360 tor 
a request form. A nonre- 
fundable foo ol S55 Is re- 
quired (cash or check 
mado payable lo 3D Do- 
sign Studio, 529 Barron 
Blvd., Graysiako, IL 
60030). Upon receipt ol 
foo and requosl form, 
plans can cither be picked 
up al any BHFX, LLC Fa- 
cility or shipped via UPS or 
FedEx using your account 
number. 

Questions regarding Ihis 
bid may bo ducclcd lo the 
Archilocl Craig Mosl. 3D 
Design Sludio, (847) 223- 
1891. 

This project Is being fi- 
nanced. In part, wilh funds 
Irom Iho Illinois Depart- 
ment ol Natural Re- 
sources, "Open Space 
Lands Acquisition and De- 
velopment' (OSLAD) grant 
program. 

" The Anlioch Township 
encourages "minority" 
business firms to submit 
bids on Iho project and 
successful contract bid- 
ders to utilize minority 
businesses as subcontrac- 
tors for supplies, equip- 
ment, services and con- 
struction. 

The Antiooh Township 
reserves ihe right lo rejeel 
any/or all bids and lo 
waive any informality in Iho 

bidding. 

Dated this ISfth day ol 
Apnl. 2007: 

Stovo Smouse, 

Township Supervisor 

Anlioch Township 

(Published In tho Anlioch 

tniurml Urnilnn '.Ami 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 

HEARING ON 
TOWNSHIP BUDGET 

Notice is hereby given 
that a tentative budget and 
appropriation ordinance (or 
the Town ol Wauconda in 
the County of Lake, Stale 
ol Illinois, for Iho fiscal year 
beginning March 1, 2007, 
and ending February 28, 
200B, will be on file and 
conveniently available to 
public inspection al Wauc. 
Town Hall 505 Bonner 
Irom and alter 9 o'clock 
am, Tuesday, April 17, 
2007. 

Notice is lurthor given 
hereby that a public hear- 
ing on said Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance 
will be held at 6:30 PM, 
Wednesday. May 16, 
2007, at Wauconda Town- 
• ship Hall, 505 W. Bonnor, 
' in Ihis Town and lhal final 
action on Ihis ordinance 
will be laken by the Board 
of Town Trustees at tho 
' meeling lo be held aL7 o'- 

orUy p M ,he16 day 

Dated Ihis 13lh day ol 
April, 2007. 

Glenn Swanson, 
Supervisor 
Christine Rowo, Clerk 
i (Published In the Waucon- 
da Journal, April 20, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

.Triangle Storage will dis- 
, poso ol goods for non-pay- 
ment Irom: 

Unit «'s 27 & 29 belong- 
ing to Adolph Kerby con- 
sisllng ol heating & cooling 
supplies and tools. 

Disposal of tho items will 
lako place al Trianglo Stor- 
age, 23480 West Grass 
Lake Road, Anlioch, IL 
60002 on May 7. 2007 at 
10 am. 

(Published In tho Anlioch 
Journal, April 20 & 27, 
2007.) 



8200 



Assumed Name 
8200 



The Anlioch Township 
will receive scaled bids for' 
the abovo referenced 
Project until 11:30 a.m.,' 

:wcwffi;™ BUCN0T|CE 

1E25 Deep Lake Rd., Lake 
Villa, IL, 60046, at which 
lime they will be opened 
and read aloud. 



ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 



The work Includes earth- 
work, asphalt parking, 
storm sewer Inlets and 
connections, detention, as- 



Name o! Business: 
Acorn Consulting Ser- 
vices 

Na lure/Purpose: „■- 
Environmental Consult- 



ing / Homo Inspections 

Addioss(es) whom busi- 
ness is to bo conducted or 
Iransacted In Ihis counly: 
35075 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Inglosldo, IL 60041 847- 
970-0546 

Namo(s) and posl ollico 
or residence addross(os) 
ol Iho person (s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business; 

Michael J. Grant, 35075 
N. Milwaukee Ave, Inglo- 
sldo, IL 60041 847-970- 
0546 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is lo certily thai tho 
undersigned intcnd(s) to 
conduct Iho abovo namod 
business Irom Iho location 
(s) indicated and lhal Iho 
true and legal lull namo(s) 
of Iho porson(s) owning, 
conducing or transacting 
Iho business Is-'aro corrocl 
as shown. 

Is) Michaol Granl 
April 4, 2007 

Tho loregoing inslru- 
mont was acknowledged 
beloro mo by the person (s) 
in lo riding to conduct Iho 

AW»7 Jhis 4 * °' 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

1st Linda M. Paulson 

Nolary Public 

Received: April 4, 2007 

Willard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clork 

(Published in tho" Lake 

County Journals. April 13, 

20 & 27 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name of Business: 
AMERICAN TRUCK 

WASH 

Nature/Purpose: 
Truck Washing 

Address(es) where busi- 
ness Is lo bo conducted or 
Iransacted in this counly: 
2244 Trailslde Lane, 
Wauconda, IL 60084, 
847-833-3429 

Name(s) ond post ollico 
or residence address(os) 
ol Iho person(s) owning, 
conducling or transacting 
business: 

Brian King, 2244 Trail- 

side Lane, Wauconda, IL 

6008-1, 847-B33-3429 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is lo certily lhal the 
undersigned inlend(sj lo 
conduct tho abovo named 
business trom Iho location 
(s) indicated and lhal Ihe 
Into and legal lull namc(s) 
ol the person(s) owning, 
conducling or transacting 
Iho business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

1st Brian King 
April 11, 2007 

Tho loregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
beloro me by Ihe person(s) 
intending to conduct iho 
business this 11 in day ol 
' April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

1st Linda M. Paulson 

Nolary Public 

Received: April 11,2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake Counly Clork 

(Published in Iho Lako 

Counly Journals. April 20, 

27&Mav4.2007.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name ol Business: 
BONFIRE VENDING 

Nalure/Purposo: 
Drink, snack, candy & 
olhor vending machines 
Address(cs) where busi- 
ness is to be conducted or 
Iransacted in this county: 
3621 1 N. Grandwood Dr., 
Gumee, IL 60031, 847- 
245-3351 

Name(s) and post ollico 
or residence address(os) 
ol Iho porson(s) owning, 
conducling or transacting 
business: 

Robert Lee Harnden II, 
36211 N. Grandwood Dr., 
Gumee, IL 60031, B47- 
245-3351 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is lo certily that tho 
undersigned intend(s) lo 
conduct Ihe above named 
business from the location 
(s) indicated and lhal Ihe 
true and legal full namo(s) 
ol tho person(s) owning. 
conducling or transacting 
tho business is/aro correct 
as shown. 

fst Robert Hamdon 
April 16,2007 
Tho foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
i before me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct tho 
business this 16th day ol 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

1st Barbara J. Nosier 

Notary Public 

Received: April 16, 2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake Counly Clerk 

(Published in Ihe Lake 

Counly Journals, April 20, 

27&Mav4.2D07.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name o! Business: 
CUSTOM CABINET CON- 
CEPTS 




WYW.mdienrycountvsports.a 

Local Sports Altitude. 



Ingleslde- 1 bdrm, w/2 c. 
garage & basement. Se- 
cluded on priv. Lake 
$1000/mo. 847-265-1241 



1-800-DONATE-CARS 



flA Heritage 



' The donation Is tax deductible, 
■ Pick-up Is free. 
We take care of all tiie papeiwoik. 



1-800-DONATE-CARS mm-mm: 



PUBLIC NOTICE - NOTICE OP HUNG 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS GASCOMMNYuVhfc Nlcor 

Gas Coin pa ti y hcaty ghes notice to ihe public llul 

it lus filed wilh i he Illinois Commerce Com mission on 

April 6, 2007, tesllmony and exhibits for Docket No. 

U7-01 14 selling forth a reconcilijikin of the Company's 

EnvironnK'nul revvnucs and incurred costs for 2006. 

Funlierinfuniuiloii with ivspcct thereto may be 

iinained eilkrdlrecily from this Company or by 

addressing ihe ChkTGerk of the Illinois Commervc 

jrii missiof i al Sprin^f k.-kJ, Illinois 62701. A cnjij' t)f this 

filing may be inspected by an inieasted pany al any 

business oflfcv of this Company, 

Nordicni Illinois Gas Company 
dha Nicer Gas Company 

G.O'Cuuir,\'Ke!ftsideni 

.. . tonwmiaildRff, Notice BiV 



PUBLIC NOTICE - NOTICE OF FILING 

, NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY d-b 'a 

Nlcor Gas Company herd)) 1 gives notice to die 

public that it has filed with ihe Illinois Commerce 

Commission on April 10, 2007, testimony and 

exhibits Tor Docket No. 060750 selling forth a 

reconciliation of ihe Company's Gas Supply Cosi , 

revenues with actual jyis costs for 2006. 

Further information \\ ilh respect thereto may Ix: 
obuiined either directly from ihis Company or by 

addressing (lie Chief Clerk of die Illinois Commerce 
Commission at Springfield, Illinois 6270 1 . A copy 

of ihis filing inaj' be insjiecied by ;in Interested party 
or any business office of this Company- 

Northern Illinois Gas Company d/b/it 

Nlcor Gas Company 

G. O'Connor, Vice President 

GultauiucNollcuGSC 



s) 



^ * .%«<■.•,*>«>»« 



C6- Friday, April 20, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 



J LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



EMPLOYMENT 



A partner of 

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Accounting 

ACCOUNTANT 

Wo havo a growth op- 
portunity lor an occoun 
tan t who Is sell-motivat' 
ed & o learn player with 
a^yoordegreoand 1 to 
4 years ol experience. 
Safary commonsuralo 
with experience. Send 
your confidential resume 
In full confidence to: 
CPA Firm 
P.O. Box 1061 
Crystal Lnko,ILG0039-I06l 



Admin Assistant 
Busy sales & marketing 
co In Barrlnglon Is look- 
ing for an oxp admin. 
Oulies Incl phone, order 
entry, sales support and 
gen ollico. Individual 
must bo organized, de- 
tail oriented and nolo 
prioritize multiplo tasks. 
Microsoft Ollico, Ward 
and Excol aro a must. 
Send resumos wilh 
salary roq to 

karen@ 

duggonandbrown.com 

orfaxB47-38t-8499 

ASSEMBLY/DELIVERY 

National Co. seeks FT 
Contractor tor N.W. Chica- 
go area to deliver and as- 
semble exercise equip, 
gamo tables, and Inground 
basketball systems otc. 
Must havo own truck and 
tools. Call 501-835-2095 

ATTENTION: DRIVERS 

Run with tho BEST or go 
broke with tho restl Up lo 

43cpm. 2500* miles, 
Weekly Homo Time, Paid 
Orientation. Call Christy, 

800-283-0262 

www.ttnlghttrans.com 

CDL Class -A/4mos. 

OTR Owner Ops: 

800-437-5907 




Auto 

•SALES MANAGER 
•2 AUTO SALES 
Must havo experience 

Apply at: 

Mitchell Auto Sales 

903 Front Street 

McHonry IL 60050. Seo 

Mr Mitchell between 8-5 

Mon-Fri-81S-3B5-720O 

Auto 

SALES MANAGERS 
NEEDED 

Rolchort Chevrolet & Bulck 
In Crystal Lake Is looking I 
(or experienced, hard 
working managers for our' 
sales & commercial truck' 
departments. Great work 
environment with groal pay 
and all tho benefits! 
Contact John Reichert 
815-459-4000 

BARTENDER 

Looking for an honest, re- 
sponsible, hardworking & 
friendly Individual to join, 
our stall. Musi possess! 
good math, cash & multi- 
tasking skills. Experience 
not necessary, willing lo , 
train. Tho Village Inn ol . 
Wauconda, 202 S. Main 
SL Wauconda, IL 6O0B4 | 
apply In person. 

« 

Quaii tied buyers don't In-' 
vostigato ovary ad, just the 
ones that offer a good 
deal. Journal Classified 
(600)589-8237. 

t,ldlHlCIU1fH.U 



Collections 

Account 

Representatives 

QC Services, LP. tho in- 
novative Industry loader Is 
celebrating its 50" year ot 
stability and success! Wo 
servo hundreds of clients 
in various Industries, In- 
cluding a variety ol For- 
luno 100 companies, pro- 
viding top-quality telasor- 
vices & collections solu- 
tions. Wo ore currently 
adding NEW Account Rop 
opportunities for collec- 
tions otourslalo-of-llio-arl 
conler. 

To qualify, you must be ol 
toast a high school gradu- 
ate or equivalent: bo flexi- 
ble and able lo work a 
varying tull-timo schedule 
and adapt quickly lo 
chango; havo sullident 
reasoning ability to define 
problems, collect and ana- 
lyze date, establish facts 
and draw valid conclu- 
sions, oil in a fast-pacod 
environment. 

Wo oflor oxcellont pay & 

bonclitsl Interested 

candidates, please send 

your resume to: 

GC Services, L,P. 

Attn: Human Resources 

440 C, Airport Rd., 

Elgin, IL 60123 

Fox: 847-429-4553 

Email: hr.elgln© , 

gcserv.com 

For more information call 

B47-429-4562 

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Our last growing parts 
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In a small business en- 
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a well-organized loom 
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sorvico experience, 
knowledge of Microsolt 
Oflice and Ihe desire to 
grow wilh our young & 
successful company. 
Tho ability to road, write 
& speak English effec- 
tively is essential; Bllin- 
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For consldorallon, fax, 
email or send resume or 
apply in person Tram 
9am-5pm, Mon-Fri. 

o.Parls 

905 LukoskJo Dr. Ste 2 
Gumeo, IL. 60031 
Ph» 847-855-2345 
Fxfl 647-B55-2160 

ctoy@cpartsonllno.com 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

We'll print & distribulo over 
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According to tho Newspa- 
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ol Information In an em- 
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call (800) 509-8237 today. 



Northwest News Group 
located In Crystal Lake, 
is currently seeking a 
professional customer 
oriented Individual wilh 
oxcellont communion 
lion skills and a team 
player attitude. Main 
responsibilities ol this 
position will bo to son 
vico and retain our cus 
icmcrs. Candidate must 
have strong organiza- 
tional skills, iho ability lo 
multi-task, data-ontry, 
solid computer knowl- 
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paced environment, 
Hours lor this position 
aro Monday-Friday day- 
time hours, end week- 
end and, holiday rotation 
will bo required. 

It you are interested, 
pleaso send resume to: 
NorlhWest News Group 
Human Resources Dopl 
Attn: Customer Service 
Representative 
P.O. Box 250 
Crystal Lake, IL 60039 

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rocruliment® 

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EOE 



Driver 
SSACareor Hero Only 

Makos CenlsSS 

OTR Drivers. Pro-pass 

EZ-pass. Every 60K mile 

raises. Nowor equipment 

100% NO touch. 

BUTLER TRANSPORT 

1-800-528-7875 



DRIVER 

Are you getting a pay in- 
crease? Roenl dnvers 
have! Practical Route and 
Top 10 Pay, Up lo S3 ,000 
Sign-on bonus. Students 
and 0/0 Welcome. Class 
A required. CALL TODAYII 
877-774-5313 
www.GoRoohl.com 



Driver 

Coca-Cola 

Bottling 

Company 

of Chicago 

A Coca-Cola 
Enterprises Company 

Coca-Cola Bottling 

Company of Chicago 

Is now hiring for our 

Pork City Sales 

Centor: 

MERCHANDISERS 

Requires valid drivers II- 
censo with good MVR. 

Candidates should visit 

our websile at 

www.cokecco.com 

/careers 

loappy online. 

Our People. 

Our Products, 

Our Prido. 

EOE-M/F/DA/.-DFW. 

"Coca-Cola" Is a 

trademark ol 

The Coca-Cola 

Company. 



Driver 

Help at Homo Inc., a 
largo regional home care 

provider is seo king a 

Transportation 

Driver lor Waukegan 

ofoa. Wo oiler compel!- 

live wages and 

S.44 cents pormilo. 

Accepting Apps. Bet. 

11am-3:30pm 

2504 Washington St. 

Suite #203 



Driver 

MONEY 4 HOMETIMEI 
WHAT MORE IS THERE? 
Smith Transport has both 

Regional, Short Haul, 
Dedicated Drivers. Homo 
Weekends, SH Pay up to 
75cpmt 1-888-467-64B4 
www.smilhtransporl.com 



DRIVER 

NW Suburban commer- 
cial printing co socks a 
FT driver w/oxc driving 
record lo deliver pkgs lo 
loop and subuiban 
metro areas. Co pro- 
vides competitive wago, 
health & dental Ins, and 
40 IK. Applicant must 
bo 21. Reply to Tod 
847-381-1105 

Driver 

PRIORITY 
TRANSPORTATION 
Class A-CDL Now dedl- 
cated/rogional.long haul 
runs available in your area. 
Excellent benefits & homo- 
time, Consistent miles, 
866-882-0768 or,visil 
www.priority1rucking.com 



Drivor-Co & Ind, Conl, 



Reefer.Flatbed, 
Tanker & OTF 



Homo Most Weekends 

Flatbed Drivers 

Strong Freight Network 

Late Model Equipment 

Med, Don & Ulo Ins. 

Avail 



Drivers 

Class A CDL Drivers Re- 
gional Runs. High Wookfy 
Miles! Excellent Pay and 
Bonelits SI. 000 Sign On 
Bonus (training available) 
Toll Free: 888-343-6601 
www.mlkobrookslnc.com 

DRIVERS 
Want Homo Most Week- 
ends With More Pay? Run 
Heartland's Ohio Regional 
S.45/ mllo company drrvors 
S1.15 for Oporolorsl 12 
months OTR required. . . 
HEARTLAND EXPRESS 
800-441 -4953 www. 
hoartlandoxpross.com 

DRIVERS WANTED 



Landscaping 

LAWN SERVICE 

PROFESSIONAL 

Sorvico Route, 

Unlimited Earnings 

Polonlial, Incentive 

Bonuses, Profit Sharing 

& Unlimited Growth 

Potential, Work 

Outdoors. Sign On 

Bonus for Experienced 

Cortllicd Operators. 

Slate ol Iho Art Training 

Program 

Spring-Green 

1205 Karl Ct.fM 16 

Wauconda, IL. 60004 

847-526-9440 

Fax: 847-526-9484 



886-391-9853 



Prime Inc. 

www.primolnc.com 



DEDICATED 
ROUTES 



• SI ,000/wk guaranteed 

{first lour weeks) 
■32 CPM/S1 70 unload 
'Weekends otl 
•Groal benolits 

Class-A CDL req. CDL 

grads wantod. Open Sun. 

866-475-3621 



U.S. XPRESS 



www.x pros Bdrlvcrs.com 

Drivers- New Equipment 
Hero! Average 1,100 mllo 
lob. Consistent Freight. 
Paid alter each trip. Owner 
Operators and students 
welcome. Illinois 077-405- 
1297 www.willlsshaw.com 



Education 

Childlimo Learning 

Centers socks 

2 Full Time end 2 Part 

Tlmo Teachers 

for our McHonry conler, 
Rcq's: Associate degree 
In ECE or 30 credit hrs 
ol 6 credit hours In ECE. 
Wo offer a competitive 
salary & benefits pkg. 

Call Margo at 

615-363-23 56 or fax 

fesumo 815-363-4790. 

EOE 



MACHINIST 

Wanted experienced ma- 
chinist, full and part time 
available. All candidates 
must bo familiar wilh turn- 
ing and milling oporallons. 
Proto Trak programming a 
plus. 

Apply in person or 

fax resume to: 

Force Mfg., Inc. 

266 Park Avenue 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Fax: (847)265-6556 



Engineering 



EOE 



Driver/Warehouse 

GLS Corporation, a 
loading ihermoplaslic 
elastomers manufactur- 
er Is seeking a Driver lor 
local transfers and do- 
liveries. Other duties in- 
clude shipping and re- 
ceiving. Somo over-time 
required. Ouoliliod can- 
didates must have a 
CDL and lorklift experi- 
ence. 

Wo offer an excel tent 
compensation package. 
Apply at or send ro- 
sume lo: 

GLS Corporation 

Human Resources 

B33 Ridgoview Drive 

McHenrylL, 60050 

Fax:615-759-6702 

resumes 0glscorp.com 

No phono calls, please. 

EOE 



Job Facts 



ATTENTION 
Job Seekers 

According to Iho Newspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca, more lhan 4 En 10 job 
seekers say thoy read 



According to tho Newspa 

per Association of Ameri- ■ 

ca, 41% ol lob sookorsi" DWS P a P° r ^ m ° ro 0,tQn . 

ul^d waekdai or Sunday ldunn 9 m ° lf ob sonfch 
d wee day o gay , n , n did M |h , 



Driver 

DONT JUST START 
YOUR CAREER, START 
n" RIGHTI Co. Sponsored 
CDL training in 3 weeks. 
Must be 21. Havo CDL? 
Tuition Reimbursement! I 
CRST 866-917-2778 

DRIVERS -AS API! 
21 CDL Drivers Needed 
•36-43 CPM/S1 .20' Sign- 
On Bonus SO Lease New 
Trucks Only 3 mos OTR 
required. 600-635-8669 

Drivers - Pay Incroasol 
51,000 Sign On For Expo- 
no need OTR. Dedlcaled & , 



i Manufacturer of Analyti- 
, cat Laboratory Equip- 
ment has Ihe lollowing 
positions available: 

MECHANICAL 
ENGINEER 

Specializing & experi- 
enced In Auto-CAD. Can- 
didate should have oxp In 
production environment, 
This position requires 
strong process or labora- 
tory instrument back- 
ground. Degree In Me- 
chanical Engineering Is a 
must, 

ELECTRONICS 

TECHNICIAN 

, Bench Technician for 

, production of laboratory 

instruments. Knowledge 

of electronics required. 

Some oxp helpful, detail- 

. oriented a must. 

! Oualilied candidates 
send resume wilh salary 
requirements to: 

Illinois Instruments, Inc. 

2401 Hiller Ridge Road 

Johnsburg, IL 60050 

Ph: 815-344-6212 

Fax:815-344-6332 

Email: dmays© 

illinoislnstrumenls.com 



Management 

Assistant Director 

Ida Public Library, 
Bolvldoro, IL. Full-limo 
professional library po- 
sition with supervisory 
and managerial respon- 
sibilily. Requires a 
master's degree in li- 
brary science from an 
ALA accredited school 
and professional library 
experience. Benolils, 
Including ol health In- 
surance. Send cover 
teller, resume, Including 
contact information for 3 
professional references 
lo: 

Director, 
Ida Public Library, 

320 N. State St., 
Belvidoro,IL61008 



Manufacturing 

"Assemblers -Wire" 
rVotv Hiring - Crystal 
Lake. Musi bo detail ori- 
ented wilh 1-2 years ex- 
perience. 

815-444-0507 



Rental Facts 

Most renters consider 
rental rates, floor plans, 
and location the most im- 
portant items ol Informa- 
lion In a rental od. Ron! didntos. call 
your property (aster with , 8237 today! 
help from a Journal Classi- 
fied representative. Call ' 
(800) 589-8237 today. 

Looking lor a 
Career Change? 

According to Ihe Newspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 ol all 
Job chongers said thoy 
wore still checking ads In 
newspapers, and hall that , 
number had been consult- 
ing onlino employment ads 
since their Job chango. ' 
I With the Journal Employ- 
ment section and Chicago- 
Jobs. com, you've gol it 
covered! To connect with 
qualified candidates, call 
(600) 589-8237 today. 



Manufacturing 

Cardinal Hoallh, tho 
loading provider ol 
products, services and 
technologies supporting 
Iho healthcare industry, 
Is currently seeking 
Manufacturing Techs lo 
work in Ihcir Wood- 
stock, IL Incility. 

Manufacturing Techs 

Day Shift - Req tt 

046184 or 04616 

Night ShHl - Req f) 

046183 or 046164 

In this role you will com- 
plete tho sel-up and 
changoovers ol tho 
Blow/Fill/Soal Machines 
per customer require- 
ments. To do so effec- 
tively, you will monitor 
equipment operation 
and troubloslioot prob- 
lems involving mechani- 
cal, electrical, pneumat- 
ic and hydraulic func- 
tions. 

To quality, you need a 
HS diploma with 
demonsfratod mechani- 
cal skills/oxporienco (In- 
cluding pneumatic and 
hydraulic systems) and 
one to three years spent 
In a manufacturing envi- 
ronment. Slrong analyti- 
cal, organizational and 
problem-solving skills 
are crucial lo succeed In 
this role. 

Pro-omploymenl drug 
screening and back- 
ground check required. 
To apply, please visit 
cardinalhoatlh.com. 
EOE, M/F/D/V - Diversi- 
ty Works Hero. 



Curl'H.il-'-.t '!■ 



Ads thai woik pay for 
themselves. Ads that don't 
work aro expensive De- 
scription bnngs results! 
Journal Classified (800) 
589-8237. 

Employ monl 

Look No 
Further! 

According lo Iho Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, 47% of job seekers say 
newspapers ore liieir prin- 
ciple Information source, 
compared lo 15% who cite 
onlino sources. Willi the 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion* & ChicagoJobs.com. 
you've got it coveredl To 



Ollico 

FRONT DESK 
RECEPTIONIST 

and 
OFFICE ASSISTANT 

For Medical Practico 

BARRINGTONAREA- 
Meet and greet patients 
schedule appointments, 
lako medical histories, 
prepare charts and up 
dale insurance Inlorma' 
lion lor busy medical 
practico. Two yoars ol 
lull time ollico oxperi 
erica is required - any 
medical office experi- 
ence ts helpful. You 
must be friendly and 
havo good computer 
skills - Word, somo Ex- 
col, data onl7 & email 
will all be used. 

In addition to on excel- 
lent starting salary 
range, this position also 
Includes full benotils and 
room lor growth. 

For Immediate consider- 
ation, lax 847-854-8622 
or email your resume as 
an attachment to our 
Algonquin office: 
pBrcsumos© 
palgcpcrsonncl.com 



Plastics 

Custom Plastic 
Injection Mfg. 

Molding Supervisor - 

3rd Shili 

Slrong processing and 

supervisory skills req. 

Mamt. skills desired but 

not necessary. 

Q.C, Inspectors - 

All Shifts 

Must have min of 3-5 yrs 

in Custom Inj. Molding. 

Material Handlers - 

All Shifts 

Please submit to our 

growing company. 

Email to: hr@ 

schiffmayorplastlcs.com. 

Fax 847-658-0863 or 

1201 Armstrong SI. 

Algonquin, IL 601 02 



Looking for a 
Career Change? 

According lo Ihe Newspa- 
per Association ot Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 of all 
Job changers said thoy 
wore still checking ads in 
newspapers, and half that 
number had been consult- 
ing onlino job ads since 
their job change. With ihe 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion and ChlcagoJobs.- 
com. you've got it covered! 
connect" with qualified can- To connect wilh qualified 
(000) 589- candidates, call (800) 5Q9- 
8237 today. 




Excel with 

Coldwell Banker 

Careers 

Real estate classes 

are starting In 
your neighborhood. 

ColdwellBankerCareers.com i 

800-608-2776 



coLOUieu. 

BANMBRU 



We at an equal opjwttnty 
emptopr Mff flW 



iGoneral Labor 

CONSTRUCTION 
LABORER SI 0/br. 

Call: 815-678-4377 



Installer 
Residential Garage 

Door Sub Contractor, 
Top pay. Year round 
work. 847-201=8292 



newspapers but not online 
sources, while only 11% 
used onlino sources but 
not weekday or Sunday 
newspapers. When you 
combine Ihe Journal Em- 
ployment and ChicapoJob- 
s.com, youVe gol il cov- 
eredl To connect with 
qualified candidates, call 
(BOO) 589-8237 today. 



time. To conned 
qualified candidates, 
(800) 589-8237 foday. 

Salos 



wilh 
call 



Regional Available Also. 
Owner Operators, Teams 
and CDL grads welcome. 
USA Truck 866-483-3413 

www.metiBnrycounlysportMXHTi 
Local Sports Attitude. 



SOMETHING FOR 
NOTHINGI 

Place a FREE 4-line, 7- 
day ad In Journal Classi- 
' lied to sell any item under 
SI 00. Look for the froe ad 
coupon in our Journal | wnrf ,| imj ^ e 
Classified section. 



TIRED Of SOMEONE 

ALWAYS LOOKING OVER 

YOUR SHOULDER 




Company- provided CDL 
training for qualified candidates 

$33,500-560,500 
(depending on experience) 

Low-tost medical 

and denial insurance 

schn6iderIobs.com 
1-S00-44-PRIDE 

SCHNEIDER. 



NATIONAL 



Printing 

We're growing 

again! 

NEW CAREER 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Account 
Representative 

Join the exciting and 
last-paced lield of Print 

Production. 

•Work directly wilh 
maqazino publishers 
andcatnlogors 
•Multi-task with alien- 
lion lo dolail 
•Work oflociivoty In 
deadline situations 
•Self-start and sell-or- 
ganizo 

•Basic Microsolt Word 
and Excel skills re- 
quired 

•Good math skills es- 
sential 

•No sales involved 
•Excollenl communica- 
tion skills in English re- 
quired 

•Bilingual in Spanish a 
plus 

•Training in printing is 
provided 

Email or send resume 
wilh salary require- 
ments lo: 

Brown Priming 

csr-hr@bpc.com 

P0 Box 1149 

Woodstock, IL 60098 



Need a Home? 

Homo buyers look at loca- 
tion, price, visual image, 
bedrooms, bathrooms and 
square lootago as tho 
most importanl items ol in- 
formation In a real ostate 
for sale ad. Sell your prop- 
erty faster wilh help from a 
Journal Ctassilicd repre- 
sentative. Call (BOO) 569- 
6237 today, 



QUALITY CONTROL 

INSPECTOR 
Fast growing McHonry, 
IL plaslic injection mold- 
or seeks 1st shill Quality 
Control Inspector wilh ot 
least 3 years expenenco 
in Iho quality field. Sulci 
attention lo detail and 
Iho ability to work well 
with others are musts. 
Qualified candidates will 
be able to read and un- 
derstand blueprints and 
be able lo use basic 
handheld Instruments 
(calipers, micromotors, 
height and drop gages). 
Knoivledgo ol SPC a 
plus. Bilingual desired 
but not required. Wo oi- 
ler competitive salaries & 
comprehensive benefits. 

Pleaso lax resume lo: 
81 5-578-8818 or email: 

hrO'wmplasllcs.com 



Quality 

QC Technician 

2nd Shill. Roquiros good 
matti & computer skills 
with knowledge of inspoc- 
lion & dimensional mea- 
surement toots. Will train 
the right individual. Wo oi- 
ler an exc. compensation 
package in a do an work 
environment. Send re- 
sumo lo: Tek Packaging, 
Atln: HR, PO Box 68, 
Hunlley. IL 60142. 

Fax: 847-669-2720 
Email: Imdatyft 

lokpackaqmg.com 
EOE 

Restaurant 

Crystal's Party Bar 
Now Hiring door hosts and 
cocktail servers. Pleaso 
apply In person alter 5pm. 

800S.Rt.31 

Crystal Lake 

OPEN HOUSES 

Walch for the Journal 
Classified Open House Di- 
rectory every Friday, Sol- 
urday and Sunday, in- 
clude your listing by calling 
(800) 589-8237. 



GREAT CAREERS 

DEPARTING DAILY. 

Company-provided CDL training 
for qualified candidates 

$35,500-$58|5Q0 {depending on oxporienco) 

Low-cost medical and dental insurance 
schnciileriobs.com • 1-80D-44-PR IDE 

SCHNEIDER \ 



NATIONAL 



Management 



PLANT SUPERVISOR 

GCS - a company specializing In injection 
molding of resin-based caps and closures lor 
beverage, personal caro, food, and other 
segments - is looking for a Plant Supervisor 
to generate distinctive Ideas for dispensing 
products lor the Health & Beauty. Food. 
Bovcrago and Specialty markets. 

Responsible lor overseeing plastic 
injection mold room In manufacturing plant 
operations. Manages shift employees. 
Ensures that plant operations and activities 
are coordinated and focused on attaining 
assigned safety, quality, and production 
goals while maintaining a positive work 
environment. Qualitlod candidate must 
possess a high school diploma, plus course 
work In management, and at least one 
technical area of responsibility. Five years of 
progrossivo responsibility in a manufacturing 
facility necessary. Specific knowledgo of 
plastic injection molding is strongly desired. 

GCS provides a very competitive total 
compensalion package. Please sond 
resume and . salary history/requirements 
lo: norms.prlce@gcs.com 



S 



globol closure systems 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



Burgess Norton is a world-class, global manufacturer 
of piston pins and powder metal products. 
Headquartered in west suburban Chicago with 
multiple manufacturing locations throughout the 
U.S. and Europe, our reputation for quality and 
value precedes us. We seek an experienced 
Individual to share in our success. 

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC 

1st Shift 

This hands-on professional will troublcshoot & 
repair mechanical; hydraulic, PLC, and pneumatic 
problems. Strong mechanical repair skills, welding, 
and fabricating experience required. Electrical 
troubleshooting a plus. 

As an employee-owned company, we offer 
competitive starting wages, full health and welfare 
benolils package Including an employee stock 
ownership plan, 401(k) with company match, paid 
vacation, a gain sharing program and morel 

For consideration. 

send resume to: 

Burgess-Norton Mfg Co. 

737 Peyton St, 

Geneva, IL 60134 

Fax: 030-232-3700 

Email: hr@burgessnorton.com 

Over WO years of Manufacturing Excellence 
EOE 




NorlhWest News Group, publisher of Northwest Herald, Kane 

County Chronicle, Weekly Journals, Lake County Journals, and 

other print and Internet publications for McHenry, Lake, Kane & 

DeKalb Counties, is expanding our Classified Department! 

The following opportunities are available In our 
Crystal Lake headquarters: 



CLASSIFIED SALES ASSOCIATE 



Assist customers placing advertisements ranging from lost puppies 
to multi-million dollar houses. Prospect new business accounts, sell 
special sections & meet monthly sales goals in multiple publications. 
Job requirements Include a high school diploma, minimum typing 
skills of 35-40 wpm and excellent verbal & written communication 
skills. PART-TIME opportunities are available. Bilingual Spanish- 
English skills are a plus! 



CLASSIFIED RECRUITMENT SPECIALIST 



Sell recruitment advertising, prospect lor new accounts, coordinate 
and sell special projects & maintain exceptional client relationships 
with agencies and employers. Bring your creativity to help us 
continue to growl 

Both positions "require dependability and a demonstrated ability to 
handle multiple priorities quickly and accurately. Must be able to 
function as a member of a team with common goals and missions 
while maintaining individual goals. 

This Is your opportunity to Join the fastest-growing 
Information company In the Chlcagoland areal 

Interested candidates can send their resume to: 
NorthWest News Group 

Human Resources Department 

Attn: (position applying for) 

P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039 

Email : recruitment 6 nwnewsgroup.co m 

Must bo ablo to pass a drug screen and background check. 
Equal Opportunity Employer 




-&^^? 







into a new career! 

Attend our JOB FAIR and learn about Penpod's opportunities at our Lake Zurich Distribution Center. 

WAREHOUSE PRODUCT SELECTORS 

Full-time, 3rd shift (Spm-Gam approx) • Weekend availability required! • Earn $9.75/.hr 
Pick and pack grocery orders for customers, Must be ablo to lilt 50 lbs and stand for at least 8 hours. Must be ablo lo woik in a 
fast-paced environment and have strong attention to detail, 

MECHANIC HELPER 

Full-time, 1st shift > Must bo flexible to work somo days on 1st, 2nd and 3rd shift 
Earn $11-$12/hr based on prior experience* Weekend availability required! 
Maintain shill equipment and spare parts inventory; perform minor building maintenance tasks and preventive maintenance ol H VAC 
and Refrigeration; change and replace chains and sprockols; replace, lace and track conveyor bells, V bells, pulleys end shaft key 
ways; align and lubricate gear boxes; indoor and outdoor coil cleaning; general facility maintenance tasks such ns painting, light 
carpentry, lamp replacement, shoveling, etc; and track Inventory of parts and supplies, 

Peapod offers a competitive starting salary with excellent lull-lime benefits including health, dental, vision, life insurance, 40 IK with 
match, holidays, vacation/sick days, employee stock purchase plan, flexible spending account, diiect deposit, wedit union and 
short/long-term disability. 

Attend our JOB FAIR 

Friday, April 20th • 9am-1pm 

Peapod's Dislribution Center 
1325 Ensell Road • Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

EOE « www.penpod.com 





Peapod* 






A 



Deadline is Monday at 5 pm for line ads, 4 pm Monday for Display Ads. 
Call (800) 589-8237 or fax to (815) 477-8898 for pricing information. 



<< 



< 



Uke County Journals/ lakecountyjournals.com 



CLASSIFIED 



Friday, April 20, 2007 • C7 



General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, PT 3420 General, PT 3420 Medical/Dentnl 

3430 



Restaurant 

Morotti's & Famous 
Froddio's Fox Lake now 
hiring Servers. Oar- 
lendors & Una Cooks! 
Plooso apply In person 
alio r 2pm 

164S.FU12or 
SIOS.PnrkAvo. 



SALES 

Soil subscriptions to the 

Northwest 
Herald 

in our store or field 
sales department. 

* No experience 
necessary 

+ SI5.00onhour- 
pald training 

* Excetlonl commissions 
and Incentives 

* Full-time and part- 
lime hours available 

Call 

847-330-9400 

Ask lor Ashley 
Apply online at: 

wi'.v/unllcdclrculallon.com 



TECHNICAL 

Please see our ad tor 

Electronics Technician 

under Engineering 

In today's paper. 

Illinois Instruments, Inc. 

The more you toll, Iho sur- 
er you'll sell. Journal Clas- 
sified (800)589-8237. 

Looking lor a 
Career Change? 

According to tho Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 ol ell 
job changors said they 
were still checking ads In 
newspapers, and nail that 
number had been consult- 
ing online employment ads 
since their job change. 
With the Journal Employ- 
ment section and Chicago- 
Jobs.com, you've got it 
covered! To connect with 
qualified candidates, call 
(800) 589-8237 today. 

. Employment 

Look No 
Further! 

According to the Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, 47% ol job seekers say 
newspapers are their prin- 
ciple information source, 
compared to 1 5% who cite 
online sources. With tho 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion & ChicagoJobs.com, 
you've got it covered 1 To 
connect with qualified can- 
didates, call (800) 589- 
8237 today! 



Telemarketing 



■■■■■ 



HOW MUCH DO 
YOU WANT 
TO EARN? 

With o no-ceiling com 
mission slructuro, IPA 
Sales Reps, lot (heir tal 
onl and dedication dolor 
mine their income poten- 
tial. We're seeking indi- 
viduals '.villi good phone 
prescnlation skills to sell 
our business develop- 
ment services to busi- 
ness owners throughout 
the US & Canada Irom 
our Buffalo Grove oil ices 
Our top performers are 
earning commissions ol 
SI 50.000 + per year. 
•S50-S75K realistic first 
year commissions 
■Professional develop- 
ment training 
■Leads provided 
'Corporate advancement 
•No evenings or week- 
ends 
•Full benolits 

To schedule an interview 

Call Ms. Flshmnn 

600-531-2542 

Or toward resume 
Fax: 847-495-6763 
E-mail: wondor.pedro® 

lpa-lba.com 
Equal Opportuniiy Employer 
limlnnniniw 

Travel 
A COOL TRAVEL JOBII 
Now hiring 18-24 Guys/ 
Gals to work and travel en- 
tire USA. Paid training. 
Transportation and lodging 
lurnishod. Call today, Start 
today... 1-877-648-5050 

WAREHOUSE/ 
DRIVER 

Valid Drivers License & 
lorklilt exp. Heavy lilting 
roq. OT avail. Call 847- 
438-2000, ask for Terry or 
Apply in person: 20284 N, 
Rand Rd in Palatine 60074 



General, PT 3420 



Contracted Delivery 

7 Day Delivery of 

Newspapers In the 

Woodstock 



'Delivery Hours 3 to 7 am 
Ideal for extra incomel 
' ' SBOO a monlh. 
Must sign contract. 

Call 815-459-8118 



T 



Marketing 



PRICING ANALYST 



GCS - a company specializing In injection 
molding of resin-based C3ps and closures 
for beverage, personal care, food, and 
other segments - Is looking for a Pricing 
Analyst to support the Sales and 
Marketing team In the creation and 
administration of closure pricing, supply 
agreements and other commercial 
functions. In this role, you will develop all 
new project quotations. 

The Ideal candidate will have a Bachelor's 
degree or equivalent experience with 
pricing, along with excellent organization 
and communication skills, SAP experience 
preferred; experience in plastic molding 
environment a plus. Please send resume 
and cover letter with salary requirements 
to: Zeller Plastlk, 1515 Franklin Blvd., 
Llbertyville, Illinois 60048, or fax to 847- 
247-791 1 or email to norma.price@gcs.com 



i global closure systems 



Mcdical/Dcntnl Business Business Business Employment 

3430 Opportunities 3600 Opportunities 3600 Opportunities 3600 Training 3700 



DRIVER 

Looking torn way (o 
earn soma extra $$$$ 

7 Day Delivery of 

News papers in Iho 

CRYSTAL UKE area 

Delivery Hours 4 to 6 am 

$650+ 

Great opportunity to earn 

some oxtra money & still 

ba home in tho ovoning. 

Must sign contract. 

Call 815-459-8118 




Ollico 
RECEPTIONIST 

fof busy real cstalo office. 

- PjT Flexible Hours - 

Call Carolyn 

647-567-3200x126 



Mcdical/Dcntnl 

3430 



General 

DEMONSTRATORS 

Conduct Sampling Events 

in retail /grocery stores. 

Weokonds. $B*S10an 

hour. G hour Evonls. 

Coll Cindy 630-351-1616 

Healthcaro 

People, 

Strength. 

Commitment. 

Promoting tho Indepen- 
dence and Individuality ol 
patients In the carly-to- 
middle stages of 
Alzheimer's disoase-lhafs 
what wo do best at Arden 
Couds of Geneva. Join 
usl 

RESIDENT 
CAREGIVER 

All Shifts 
Full & Part-Time 

Forconsideralion. please 

contact Nina at: 630-262- 

3900 or send re sumo to: 

Arden Courts, 

238BBricherRd., 

Gonova, IL 60134 

Apply online at: 

www.hcr-manorcarc.com 

EEO/Orug Free Employer 

Maintenance PT 

person needed to work 
for Real Estate Man- 
agement Company, il 
you aro bored silting at 
home and can perform 
light maintenance as a 
support person to tie up 
loose ends, call us. 
Work on an as needed 
basis. 0-15 hours per 
week. WE can work to 
your schedule. S1 1 per 
hour. 
Land Management 
815-57B-4334ext.1 



www.mctianivcountysports.com 
Local Sports Attitude. 



DENTAL ASSISTANT FT 
WoodstocWLako Geneva. 
ExrVwill train. Flex/effl- 
cioncy a must. Fax resume 
to:615-64B-28B1 

Dental 

ORTHODONTIC 
CHAIRSIDE ASST 
High quality onho otlice 
has 4-5 day position for a 
chalrsldo clinical asst. 
Must be energetic, 
dependable and possess 
good communication 
skills. Experience pre- 
ferred. Call Janet at 
Conlon & Thompson 

Orthodontics 

B15-344-2040orlax 

resume to 815-344-2859 

OPEN HOUSES 

Watch lor Iho Journal 
Classified Open House Di- 
rectory every Friday, Sat- 
urday and Sunday, In- 
cludo your listing by callinq 
(BOO) 589-8237. 



Healthcaro 

Home Health 
Nurses 

Hcallhlrond Limited, a 
homehoalth agency lo- 
cated In Dos Plaincs has 
growth expansion into 
the Northern Suburbs, 
wo aro currently seeking 
full lime and part time 
RN's and LPN's In tho 
Crystal Lake ' and 
McHonry areas. 

If homohenllh Is your 

'niche and you enjoy 

pcr-riicm visits, plcaso 

coll Kathy Brockmann 

at 847-417-0963, or you 

mnyfiix or email your 

resume to: 

630-323-6653 or 

Irosarlo© 
carccontcrs.com 



Medical Assistant 

Internal Medicine, Lake 

Zurich office. Able lo draw 

blood. 25-30 hrs per week, 

including Saturday. Fax 

resume 847-438-2462. 



Rental Facts 

Most renters consider I '■• 
rental rates, floor plans, 
and location Iho most Im- 
portant items ol informa- 
tion In a rental ad. Rent 
your property faster with 
help from a Journal Classi- 
fied representative. Call 
(800) 509-8237 today. 



Nursing 

RN's/LPN's 

PT-WEEKENDS- 
ALL SHIFTS! 

Non-Corporate. Groat 

Work Environment! 

Recent Grads 

Welcome!! 

Please call or tax 

resume to Allssal 

309 McHonry Ave. 

Woodstock. IL G0098 

Phono: 815-330-1700 

Fax:815-333-1765 



Business 
Opportunities 3600 

All Cosh Candy Route 

Do you earn up to SBOO 
per day? Your own local 
candy route. Includes 30 
Machines and Candy. All 
for S9.995. 800-453-5802 
AINU B0213 

Tho nlcost people rood 
classified ads! Journal 
Classified (800)589-8237. 



ALL CASH VENDING! 
Call us lirst or call us last, 
either way wo can savo 
you SSSS. Under 9K in- 
vestment roq'd, Toll Freo... 
800-9D2-9 169 (24-7} 

Company Expanding 

In Your Area. 

S1400 Weekly Guarantee! 

Work From Homo! FT/PT, 

No Exp Necessary. 

S200 Cash Hiring Bonus! 

800-210-7347 

httpJ/www.Tho 

LPMarke1lngGroup.com 

Void in South Dakota 

Earn Extra Income, as- 
sembling CD cases from 
home. Start immediately, 
No oxp necessary, 1-800- 
341-6573 oxtn- 1395 www. 
easywork-grcatpay.com 

EARN THOUSANDS! 

Sum Enjoying 

tlio Lite You Dosorvoll 

Build C Mh now. DuiU im Worth 

Rcliro w/Finnndnl Ffcodom 

PAOVttf WEU1H MHtog Irttimt 

Ltlding Wtlfntli Company 

www.MyCoOpBlz3.com 

www.chicagojobs.com 

Journal Classiliod 

(800)589-8237. 



FINALLY THE ONE! Havo 
limo to play Golf. Travel, 
whatever you enjoy doing 
with great people! $5000 
mlninum lo start... Wcbalo 

www.sgsprcsentntlons. 

com 1-800-516-8767 

FINALLYI 

A Simple- Home Based 

Business With NO Capital 

Risk, NO Overhead, NO 

Inventory. NO Selling. NO 

Asking Friends & Family 

lor Monoy AND Your 

Training is FREE! For 

More Information Call: 

1-866-236-6926 

LAUNDROMAT McHonry 
County Proliloblo. Newer 
equip. Excellent location. 
S265.000 647-210-9374 

MOVIE EXTRAS 

Mako up to S250/day 

All looks and ages 

1-800-714-7341 

Proud of your company? 
Put your logo in tho ad. 
Journal Classiliod (BOO) 
589-8237. 



Secret Shoppers Needed 
For Store Evaluations. Gel 
paid to shop. Local Stores, 

Reslouranls 4 Tricolors. 
Training Provide, Flexible 

Hours. Email Required. 
1-800-585-9024 OXI6600 

Southland Log Homes 
Dealership Opportunities. 
Sell kits, dry-ins or turn 
keys. Excellent commis- 
sions! Protected territories, 
lends. Requires purchase 
ol at loasl a $39,000 Kit. 

Call Daniel Irons 
Southland Log Homes 
1-800-845-3555 x-1671 



Employment 
Training 37C10 



Part-Time, Iniemet 
Business Earn Potentially 
S500-S1000/rno or more. 
Flexible hours. Training 
provided. No investment 
required. FREE details. 
www.K34B.com 



RAILROAD JQQS; Tram in 
lour to eight weeks to be- 
come a Conductor, Welder 
Mechanical Locomotive, or 
Carmen. Average salaries 
SC3.000.00 Tuition loans 
available. 1-913-3I9-2C03 
www.RoilroadTraininn.coin 

Ads that woik pay loi 
themselves. Arts that don't 
work ore expensive. De- 
scription bnnos results! 
Journal Classified (600) 
5B9-8237. 

Looking tor n 
Career Change? 

According to the Newspa- 
per Association o! Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 ol all 
job changers said they 
weio still checking ads in 
newspapers, and "hall that 
number had been consult- 
ing online ,..r ads since 
llioir job change. With tho 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion and ChogoJobs.- 
com, you'i'o got it covered' 
To connect with qunlilicd 
candidates, call (BOO) 5B9- 
8237 today. 



Great Pay. 
Top Benefits. 



WititVMrWiMrYfqhtW 



Gcncnil Office 

PART-TIME ADMIN. ASST. 

First Bank or I lighland I'nrk is looking Tor nn 
ENTRY-LEVELadmin. asst. to work on a 

PART-TIME basis in Hie Marketing 

department. Duties include, but not limited 

lo: liaison w/media sources, present drafts & 

finalized nds/lettcrs to committee, maintain 

& update marketing calendar, as well ns 

additional admin, duties as needed. 

Qualified candidates MUST be experienced 

in Microsoft Word & Excel (Illustrator & 

Publisher helpful), have a high level of 

initiative, efficiency & accuracy, and have 

the ability lo multi-task. 

Ink-ruled applicants mu) I'liiull/fui/suni! resume lo: 

di"IMoll@firsluunkliri.corii 

Fnx: 847-572.1529 

1835 First St., Highland Park, IL 60035 

rill 1 1 1 performs credit & background checks 
on all job applicants. 

EOE 

&W.WWU W «W M WWWWWWV^^ 



Package Car Drivers 

Openings in Palatine and Waukcgan 

• Ability to drive manual transmission. 

■ Class C, non-CDL required. 

• Must be 2 1 years ol age or alder. 

Walk-Ins welcome - Palatine 
Tues 6 Thurs 10AM - 2PM • 2100 N. Hicks Rd. 

Apply online today: upsjabs.com/chicogo 

UPS It 4n mujl Ofpoitonitf employ 



Care g ivers & CNA's Wanted 

We ore looking for friendly, dependable 
people to help seniors in their homes. 




Flexible Houn • Live In ar Coma A Go 



Emptoyoo Benefit! 



Services Include 



I Icatiix rm< 

Voffllmn 

running 



")utir/turft»<TJH«urvj;i!ri|: * 



i mivn in jjeiiiar bare to. 

t>»' ■f'wrt .. i*i,i-j,',fi,i,;ni 



fomf>i5n* inifip 

Atwjl PntHiratiGit 

fjjvhth 

RatltiHg tirtd f\-r.s<NMjl Cuff 

To apply, pleases call 

847-548-1330 

www.pnrmcrsinscniorcarc.com 




tvurtmawinmnnT 




Coming Soon! New store opening 
in Oswego Commons on US 
Highway 34. 

Do you love sports? Do you want a career with a 
rapidly glowing company? If so, then DICK'S 
Sporting Goods is the company for you. We're 
looking for friendly faces to provide great service 
to our customers. Applicants must be at least 18 
yeais old. 

Great positions available: 

• Sales Associates & Leaders - Appaiel,Footwear, 
Freight Flow, Team Sports, Coll, Lodge 
(Hunting/Camping/ Fishing) 

■ Cashiers 

■ Bike Technicians 

• Running Specialists 

• Fitness Trainer 

• Maintenance/Operations 

• Temporary Associales 

• Coll Club Technician 

Why Work for DICK'S Sporting Goods? 

• Competitive Pay 

■ Excellent Benefits 

• Employee Discount 

» Full and Part Time Schedule 

Apply online at: 
www.dkkssportlnggoods.lobs/newstares 

Or call 1-8B8-383-9024 to apply. 
Interviews by appointment only. 

WIN BIG 

OCCJ i (Aim }T*TNJt UAVTit 




i .: ■ ■ 



We show no signs of slowing down. 



You'll bo amazed ol how far we've come. Growing in size and stability, Mercy Health System has increased ihc biecdili and depth 
of ils services. Which means tho core you'll provide, tho career you'll receive and the family you'll bo o pail ol will bo unmatched in 
iho hoolthcoro industry. In loci, we woro recognized by AARP who named Mercy #1 in tho Nalion for llioir "Best Employers for 
Workers over 50 Program" as well as oy Working Mother magazine who placed Mercy on ils 2006 list ol ihe "Top 100 
Companies for Working Mothers." 



MERCY HARVARD HOSPITAL 



RN 

Emergency - PT, PMs 
Med/Surg - PT, Nights & Pool 

Respiratory Therapist 

Part-Time, Variable shifts 

Physical Therapist 

Part-Time, Days 
Pool position, Days 

CPTA 

Pool position 

COTA 

Full-Time, Days 

Speech Therapist 

Pool position 



MERCY HARVARD CARE CENTER 



Director of Nursing 

Full-Time Sign-on bonui available! 



LPNs 

Parl-Time, Days & PMs 
Sign-on bonus availablel 

CNAs 

Part-Time, Days & Nights 

Occupational Therapist 

Pool position 



MERCY IL MEDICAL CLINICS 



Nurse Practitioner 

Mercy Boriotric Program - FT, Days 

Clinic RN 

Mercy Crystal tako West - 

Pool position, Days 
Mercy Woodstock, Dermatology - 

FT, Doys 

Medical Assistant 

Mercy Woodstock, Peds - FT 
Mercy Woodstock, Plastics - FT 



Dietitian 

Mercy Bciriatric Program - FT, Doys 

Radiology Clinical Coordinator 

Mercy Woodstock - FT 

Dept Secretary 

Mercy Vernon Hills - FT 



MERCY WALWORTH HOSPITAL 
& MEDICAL CENTER 



Staff RN 

Outpatient Surgery - Pool position 

Hospital RN 

Weekends, 6pii 6am 

Clinic RN 

Dermotology - Part-Time (Every Sol] 

Patient Registrar 

Part-Time, Nighls & Weekends 



Contribute to our team and bo reworded with generous benefits: 

Tuition reimbursement • Concierge services • Lowlift program « Work-to-retiro program 

Matched savings program * Commitment to lifelong learning * Clinical ladders • Ana morel 

Join the Mercy Heallh System family todayl 



Visit www.mercyheallhsyslem.org 



to learn mora about current opportunities and far our online application. Or, call our Joblino ol 1*877-408-9383. 



/s\ 



If Mercy Health System 

healing In the broadest strut 



.AARI 1 




EOE M/F/D/V 



Deadline is Monday at 5 pm for line ads, 4 pm Monday for Display Ads. 
Call (800) 589-8237 or fax to (815) 477-8898 for pricing information. 



Assumed Name 

8200 



Assumed Name 
8200 



Assumed Name 
8200 






Nature/Purpose: 
Wood working 

Address(es) where busl- 
r.ess is to be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
1214 Cedar Uke Rd., 
Lake Villa, IL 60046, 847- ' 
356-0125 

Name(s) and post office 
or residence address(es) 
of tho porson{s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Jeffrey Hopkins, 1214 
Cedar Lake Rd., Lake Vil- 
la, IL 60046, 847456- 
0125 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
■ This is lo certify that the 
undersigned inlend(s) to 
conduct Iho above named 
business Irom tho location 
(s) indicated and that the 
trua and legal full namo(s) 
of the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/ Jeffrey HopWns 
April 10.2007 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this 10th day of 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Linda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Received: April 1 0.2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published In the Lake 

County Journals, April 20, 

27 & May 4. 2007.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE! 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
i 

Name ol Business: 
J.C. Photography 

Nature/Purpose: 
Candid capture of 
events, portraiture & 
photographic note cards 
& prints 

Addressfe6) where busi- 



ness is to be conducted or 
transacted in this county: 
309 Terra Springs Cr., 
Volo, IL 60020, 847-231- 

3069 

Name(s) and post ollice 
or residence addresses) 
ol the person (s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Jennl Chase, 309 Terra 
Springs Cr., Volo, IL 
60020, 847-254-50B6 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is to certify that tha 
undersigned inlend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the location 
(5) indicated and that the 
trua and legal full name(s) 
ol the porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Iho business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

Isl Jennl Lee Chase 
March 21. 2007 
Tho foregoing Instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
beloro me by Ihe person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business Ihls 21st day of 
March, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Isabel A. Avakian 

Notary Public 

Received: April 3, 2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published in the Lake 

County Journals. April 13, 

20 & 27 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 



Name(s) and post olfico 
'or residence addressees) 
of Ihe parson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
< business: 

Mary K. Keel, 1822 

Neuway In., Antloch, IL 

60002,847-603.1264 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certily that tho 

undersigned intend(s) lo 

conduct the above named 

business from the location 

. (s) indicated and tha! the 

I true and legal full name(s) 

ol the person(s) owning, 

l conducting or transacting 

the business Is/are correct 

i as shown. 

/s' Mary K. Keel 
April 7. 2007 
The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the porson(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this 7th day ol 
April, 2007. 

DFFir.lAI SFAI 



Assumed Name 
8200 



Is.' Connie Urranik 
Notary Public 
Received: April 10. 20D7' 
Willard R. Helander: 
Lake County Clerk 
(Published in the Lake' 
I County Journals, April 20, . 
27 & May 4, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

! ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 



Name ol Business: 



MelComm 

Nature/Purpose: 
: Construction Consulting 
; Communication 
1 Address(es) where busi- 
ness is lo be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
100 Llncolnwood Ct., 
Spring Grove, IL 60081, 
,847-366-1267 
i Name(s) and post olfice 
I or residence addross(es) 
!ol Ihe person(s) owning, 
'conducllna or transacllno 



Assumed Name 
8200 



businsss; 

Melissa Wllhelm, 100 

Llncolnwood CI., Spring 

Grove, I L 60081, B4 7-366 • 

1267 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is to certify that Ihe 
undersigned inlend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from tho location 
(s) Indicated and that Iho 
true and legal lull name(s) 
of tho person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Ihe business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/ Melissa Wilholm 
Aoril 5. 2007 



1 
Assumed Name Assumed Name Assumed Name Assumed Name Assumed Name 

82001 82001 8200 8200 8200 



Tha foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this 5th day ol 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is! Bar bar a J. Nosier 

Notary Public 

Received: April 5, 2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published in the Late 

County Journals, April 13, 

20 & 27 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 



NAME APPLICATION 

Name o! Business: 
MULCH PLUS 

Nature/Purpose: 
i Mulch Material Services 

Address(es) where busi- 
ness Is to be conducted or 
transacted In Ihls county: 
2346 Masters ' Lane, 
'Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073,847-548-8422; 
: PO Box 886, Lake Villa, 
IL 60046, 847-456-3948 

Name(s) and post ollice 
or residence addressees) 
of the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 



Mark Slociansky|, 2346 
I Masters Lane, Round 
Lake Beach, IL 60073, 
847-548-8422; 
Robin Stoczanskyj, 2346 
Masters Lane, Round 
Lake Beach, IL 60073, 
847-548-8422; 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Inlend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business Irom the location 
(s) Indicated and that tho 
true and legal lull namo(s) 
ol the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
the business is/are correct 



as shown. 

isl Mark Stoczanskyj 
Isl Robin Stoczanskyj 
March 28, 2007 
The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
belore mo by Iho person(s) 
intending to conduct tho 
business this 28" day ol 
March, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Shelly Grons 

Notary Public 

Received: March 28. 2007 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published In the Lake 

County Journals, April G, 

13 S 202007.) 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

-ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name of Business: 
WWW.REALESTATEAUC 
TIONACCESS.COM 

Nature/Purpose: 
Internet Auction Site 

Address(os) where busi- 
ness is lo bo conducted or 
transacted in this county: 
27709 Grass Lake Dr., 
Spring Grove, IL 60081, 
847-356-9500 

Namc(s) and post ollice 
or residence addressfes) 



Name ol Business: 
KEEL APPRAISAL SER- 
VICES 

Nature/Purpose: 
Real Estate Appraisal - 
Single Family 

Address(es) where busi- 
ness Is to be conducted or 
transacted In Ihls county: 
1822 Neuway Ln., Antl- 
och, IL 60002, 847-603- 
1264 



Heed Money? 
Have a Lawsuit? 

You can get cash before 
your accident case settles 
Call Now: Toll Free 
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866-386-3766 * 



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The all Interactive hit, now in our 1 3lh year nationwide 





AN ARTS & CRAFTS AFFAIR 

f America's Finest Artists & Craftspeople from 30 SI 



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AMERICA'S FINEST HANDCRAFTS... ALL FOR SALE 



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>ltll ■ I ■■■■■nil B ts r 



v- 



■>> 



V; 



C8* Friday, April 20, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 



I *KI COUNT* 



OURNALS 



DIAL-A-SERVICE 




Animal Control Carpet 
1027 Cleaning 



Electrical 
1105 Services 



1205 



Home 
Improvement 



MOO 



'Lnndscnping 14C0 Landscaping 1460 




2/ wa 

Ai.i.invrsviii.DLiii 

Nl»Lt:*JHf \lil ii ! > I .1.. Hk 

llnin inr Cijiiir MiiIhiJi 
•Wildlife Removal 

• Anim.'l !'.iiii..,:c 
ttcpali* 

•Anim.il PrtHiIintf 

■Mini Piwfinp 

•lJrc», \V.n|«, I Inriu-i* 

"OJorConifol 

•Trrc Trintinlri; 

815-560-7421 
847-980-5561 
630-291-8274 

Ovrr 20 yt*. 
expcrfcncc 

Licensed & InturuJ 

• RruJi-niial • Cummcn'UI 

• Miinlripil ■tiitlf Dmmn 



Serving Chlttgaliitd 
. ISubarki. ... 

24ttrSerylct 

-: . Arailabto ..- 



Dial /a/ay/ 
815-455-4800 



" ■.■■■■. 



Assumed Nn me 
8200 



of Hig porson(s) owning, 

conducting or transacting 

business: 

Richard A. Dlomond, 

27700 Grnss Lake, Dr., 

Spring Grove, IL 60081, 

647-356-9500 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is to certily thai Uio 
undersigned intond(s) to 
conduct Iho abovo named 
business from tho location 
(s) indicated and that tho 
true and legal lull name(s) 
ol the porsonfs) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
the business is/aro correct 
as shown. 

Is! Richard A. Diamond 
. , March 29, 2007 
Tho loregolng Instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct tho' 
business this 29th day ol 
March, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Linda Tones 

Notary Public 

Received: April 2, 2007 

WillardR.Helandcr 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published In tho Lako 

County Journals, April 13, 

20 & 27 2007.) 



Promotions 

8500 

GUN SHOW April 2) & 22 

BOONE COUNTY 

FAIRGROUNDS 

Befvidere, IL 

Sat 9am-5p / Sun 9am-3p 

BUY. SELL 

TRADE or BROWSE Infon 

563-608-441 

R£?ORT CAMPING!! 

You can CAMP 
from coast to coast. 

Only S8/nighll 

Call now lor details. 

1-800-507-1003 

Proud ol your company? 
Put your logo In the ad. 
Journal Classified (BOO) 
589-8237.. 

Employment 

Look No 
Further 





According to the Nowspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca, 47% ol job seekers say ■ 
newspapers are their prin- ' 
ciplo Information source, | 
compared lo the 15% who 
see online sources. With;' 
Hie Journal Employment 
and ChicagoJobs.com, 
you've got It covorod! To | ' 
connect with qualified can- 
didates, call 
(800) 569-8237 lodayl 



AMMIKEN 
CARPET 

CLEANING 
SERVICE 




■Iftiiiwiinnal f-niiict Oiiuihi! 

■Ihxk ifcuilnlSuvta 

•Cnnnitikii Si')«hilinfl 

•lnnJIv Q*ml nnl()|Malnl 

•BfsHtntiil anil O mirnrm J 

Hiuiiis(!H7) 785-9ti8i 



Lake Co. 
Electric 
Service 



Ceiling Fans 
Outlets Switches 

Light Fixtures 
Recessed Lighting 
Trouble Shooting 

Steve 
847778-1014 





New Concept tn 
Home Maintenance 

Senior Discounts 

Carpentry - Plumbing 

Flcctrical- On/wall -Tile 

Siding • Roofing 

(847)219-7010 



Cut the 
Clutter 




Eliminate Choaa 

• Gel Organized 

• Slay Organized 

blithe Clatter Cutter 
847-223-1833 



IIARDWGOD 
FLOORS 



iWo.tifDiml iriMnlliiticm 

nf uiifiriKlia! liflnlniKxl 

flcKin, jta'fiilhtiLil. 

(.•njJiiiL-tad dlld 

IflriiiiiotL' ftiHinl 

• Sanding 

• Reflnbhlng 

• Repairs 

• Custom Design 

SAMACnONGUAIAHTHD 
FISESHMATU 



6.10/289-8803 



From The 
Grounds Up 

Capitol 
Group LLC 

• flood Afire Restoration 

• Remodeling • Decl* 

• Flooring 

• All Season Rooms 

• Screened Porches 

• Kitrfient • Bathroom! 

• Siding « And More,,. 

Ifnbln Espafsol 
VvOj Iniuml • Kn» Bttlimlra 

1815-790-2416 

815-370-8146 



LSD 
Landscaping! 

SPRING 
CLEAN UP! 

No Jobs Too Big\ 
Or Too Small! 

CUTTING DOWN 

TREES 
STUMP REMOVAL 
Lawn Mowing 
Weed & Edge 
Flower Beds 
Mutch 
Rototllllng 

Small Flower 

Beds a Gardens 
Tree & Hedge 

Trimming ^ a 

Home Iffi? 

847/223-3161 
Cell 
847/845-802 



MARGE'S LANDSCAPING 



FASTRKASO.VADl.K 
OIJ) FASHIONED SERVICE 

i'rofciilonal wirkal 

Very reisonablc prices 

Free Estimates & Design 

NOW BOOKING 
SPRING CLEAN UPS 

llarihiood Mulch 
Delivered 

847-265-5763 

OLD MILL CREEK, IL 




Painting 1535 




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OURNALS 



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Dial-A-Service 

Directory 




Painting, 



-Oivr i7}ttin Mjwrfnire- 

• Owner always on site 

•No job loo small 

•Power Washing 

• Drywpll repair 

Inltrior/bttriw 
hit btmaiit 

(847)838-2275 



Haven't you been 

waiting to hear 

[those words? Noiv 

bu don't need an 

■ ..■ 

excuse. Use our 
Dial-A-Service 
section to get the 
, you want. 






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LAKE COUNTY 



OURNALS 



To place your Dial-A-Service ad call (815) 526-4645. Deadline for Ads is Friday at 4 p.m. 



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JUKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



JA/HEELi 



WHEELS 



April 20, 2007' Page C9 



Looking for a new car? 

Read the Wheels section every week 
in the Market Place section. 



\ 



i 



■ 



Next generation of Auto Dealership Design 
debuts April 20 at Ray SuzuM in Fox Lake 

11 1 ■ * ■*■». . ™ * « * « 



New dealership is 
Part of $230 
million "Suzuki 
Square" Network 

WHAT: Ray Suzuki in Fox 
Lake will be officially dedicat- 
ed by officials April 20th as 
part of a $230-million national 
network of next-generation 
American Suzuki automotive 
dealerships designed to 
attract buyers with such inno- 
vation features as a stress- 
free, open-air marketplace 
design; bold visual styling; 
and themed interior and exte- 
rior displays showing how 



vehicles fit specific customers 
lifestyles. 

Ray Suzuki is among the 
first of nearly 50 "Suzuki 
Square" dealerships nation- 
wide- a now shopper-friendly 
concept in dealership design 
that attempts to take the pres- 
sure out of shopping for and 
buying a new car. 

Koichi Suzuki, President of 
American Suzuki Motor 
Corporation and Gary 
Adkins, Vice President of 
Sales are scheduled to dedi- 
cate the new facility. Mr. 
Suzuki will be available for 
interviews from 3:30 pm to 
4:30 pm. In March, Suzuki 
posted it's biggest sales month 
since 19B8! With all new eye- 
popping product, new show- 



rooms and a new body of ded- 
icated dealerships like the 
Ray & Raymond Auto Group, 
Suzuki is poised for big sales 
gains in 2007. 

WHEN: Friday, April 20th 
2p.m. -6p.m. 

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony 
at 3pm Open House/ 
Receptions/ Interviews from 
3:15pm-6pm 

WHO: Ray Scarpelli- 
Dealer Principal 

WHERE: RAY SUZUKI 
23 N. Route 12 
Fox Lake, IL 
847-587-3300 



I 



- 



LakeCounty's 



... 



mm- 

':.■.. ■.;: :: '. , 




■ 



LAKECQUNTO 

our 



' Community News otLaka County IIHnols\ 



OBITUARIES] 



h ■ \ ■■■ 



■ • ■ 



Teachej 
elemergjf 

new r^ 

ROUNgS 



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:■•■■■.. 

■- ■■■.-■ - f >m 

Breaking and Updated News and Information 



'-. ."■''- .' - ■■■■; ■.■-, ■•■■?&r^*$jVi ; ,.;,-.' ....-;;,.:..■■ 

; Video Broadcasts and Slide Shows 

v : >LINDENHURST^MUNDELEIN- ROUND LAKE 
Searchable News, Sports, Entertainment, Business .. 

."':'■ f /ffWADSWORTH • A^UCONDA ;• WAUKEGAN . • 

' ■ -, -''-r : '----': : ■ .,--; :i\sv. ■:■■■■ ' ■■■ .■■ : '. : - ■■'■:--...- ; ■■ 

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Place a Classified Ad; Look foir Jobs, Homes ,. Autos 

; GURNEE- LAKE VILLA. VLIBERTYVILLE 



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Xihksto Local Business^ Web sites 

LINDENHURST -MUNDELEIN • ROUNDLAKE V' 
Tickets, Online Contests and Polls 

<$£ ; WADSWORTH • Vvvi6cOI^DA • WAUKEGAN : !v ■ ; 

Log drt and join bur community today! v,': : ; 



Choosing the right roadside assistance plan 



Anyone who has ever had a 
roadside assistance plan will 
likely rave about them. A flat 
tire on a rainy day Is a lot eas- 
ier to deal with when you have , 
a competent roadside assis- 
tance plan at your beck and 
call. However, not all roadside 
assistance plans qualify as 
competent, and some can 
actually prove more detri- 
mental than helpful. 

When choosing a roadside 
assistance plan, it's always a 
good idea to do your home- 
work. Several things should 
be taken into consideration 
before signing up for a plan. 



* Reputation: Longevity 
and customer base are two 
strong indicators of a compa- 
ny's reputation. One that's 
been around a long time and 
boasts a large customer base 
is one that has proven satis- 
factory to that customer base 
over the long haul. In addi- 
tion, a company that has a big- 
ger customer base likely has a 
larger network of mechanics 
and auto body shops at its dis- 
posal, which could greatly 
reduce the time spent strand- 
ed on the side of the road. 

• Membership options: 
Most roadside assistance 



plans offer a basic member- 
ship package as well as a pre- 
ferred package, which 
includes all the basics but 
other services as well. For 
example, a basic membership 
might offer 50 miles of free 
towing, whereas a preferred 
membership may orfer 100 
miles of free towing. Other 
benefits apply to preferred 
packages that could be worth 
the extra cost. Inquire as to 
the differences in cost and if 
the difference in price is min- 
imal, the preferred package is 
probably worth the extra 
money 




COUNT 



» • 



»-* n-vs i_is r* 



WN TO GRAND OPENING! 

248 New & Used Cars & Trucks MUST BE SOLD! m oooqe 



(4 



-*_ 






fa 



:L 



ALL NEW 2008 

[Dodge Avenger SXT 

Was 23,075* 

NOW -$21,972* y VwenSt' 



2007 

Dodge Calibers 

Starting At 
$14,381* 

to choose from 



*\/^ 2007 X/" 2008 Chrysler 



Dodge Magnums 

Starting At 

$21,125* appirypn: 

^/ XJlenty to choose from^ / \ ^ J**lvlvl W^^» 



Sebring Convertible 

JUST 



fO 



00 



USED CARS 



,z. 




Co 



2006 
1W9 
2005 
2002 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2003 
2004 



Dodge Stratus 5XT..„„......,.. m «..»......».»m.. H _.„.«..........„.„ BUY FOR $1 1,61 9 or $126/Motirfu 

Jeep Wrangler Sport V6, A/C „ BUY FOR $1 1 ,886 or $129/Month+ 

Solum ION 2. „...„„........„........BUY FOR $1 1 ,946 or Si 30/Month* 

Mitsubishi Montero XLS »....« .BUY FOR $ 1 1 ,997 or $ 1 32/Month+ 

Dodge Stratus SXT V6 »« » BUY FOR $12,323 or $137/Month+ 

Chrysler FT Cruiser LTD.- BUY FOR $1 3,644 or $ 1 55/Month* 

Chovy Molibu LTMi.ntn».t»Mn.*iti*»»»*»*i«t»**#«i«ti«**«*»n»*»****»»*»*t»»***M#*«t*M»*ti*t#m***TiDUT FOR 51 **, 1 uo or ?loi/monm* 

Chevy HHR LT. ........,. m „......... m ...„...«.............».....«.....BUY FOR $14,668 or $1 70/Month+ 

Nissan MaxJma 5E « » —.. BUY FOR $14,995 or $175/Month* 

Chryster Sebring Convertible LTD ...'» ».» BUY FOR $1 5,982 or $ 1 B9/Month» 



2006 
2004 
2006 
2006 
2005 
2005 
2007 
2007 
2005 
2006 



Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Certified.... BUY FOR $15,978 or $1B9/Month+ 

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo.........*.........., «« - BUY FOR $16,475 or $197/Montht 

Chrysler Pactfica Touring™-.. „.....„.....» ~....... BUY FOR $16,776 or $201/Month+ 

Jeep Liberty 4x4, Certified BUY FOR $16,921 or $203/Month+ 

Ford Escape LTD.. «. ■ BUY FOR $17,946 or $219/Monrtu 

Dodge Dakota SIT 4x4, Quad Cab....».... „..........„.„.;..»...« .BUY FOR $19,446 or $240/Month+ 

Jeep Liberty 4x4, Certified (2) „.„....«.-.». .»» « BUY FOR $19,981 or $24B/Montfi+ 

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3), Certified....-.— BUY FOR $20,743 or $259/Monlh+ 

Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi » • BUY FOR $22,468 or $284/Month+ 

Dodge Charger R/T. BUY FOR $25,995 or $336/Month+ 



CHRYSLER LEASE CUSTOMERS.. .We'll Make Your Last 6 Payments! Drive A New Car TODAY!' 



Interest wHRYSLER' 

For60Mon.h« ft OF FpX LAKE 

On Select New 2007 :9i south Route 12 • Fox lake, IL > 

Modeb "V 847-497-4200 



O41CA00 4 
|NOnrHttMllUHOH 



•^^r mm m ^mr m m ^^ i^bf ^^ ■ 

, " ■J-Pantwnta'tki.'tHl oh'S3,WX)' ; do ; Aii oiXHif, littft teejeujS wv. tee nl B ■«*', APR U» vXi inoniiw iVl'jtfjinJ,'iu'mirii trcMi Iv W 'Ft tf >i ifm 



SERVICE/PARTS HOURS: 

MON.-FRI: 7AM-CPM • SAT.: ;AM-IPM 
SALES HOURS: MOM,-FRI.: 6AM-9PM 

SAT.:9AM-0PM 




Interest 

For 72 Monthi 
( v, On Ail New In-Stock 
' • 2006 Vehldcj*** 

••■•■• .» ■ .* * *.•••■ .", . ,.,1 • 

'i'cijb nctuw II nui'e. .4 Joatet idtjunfo'ui. Mist aU<J $«, wte, Lccnsu & o\v f ift&'.:"S«i.u&tel« oY'lah 



,16 Point Inspection 

liColl.for oppolntment. Present coupon ot lime of writeHjp, ; I 
. Expire i 5-03-07 ■ 



V 



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» » i *,» v i ) t > t f » •• f i i »» i u ; i- m »m v » n v •« 



%. ^ . ... \^ *s »- 



CIO ; April 20, 2007 



JflflHEELS. 



LakeCountyJournais.com 





ONTIAC 




ACURAOf LIBERTYVKJUE 

800/588-4187 F3 

www.d cLrdlibtrrlyvllltxom 

MULiERSWOOOITELOACURA 
TON Id H^in I il tft fil • Htflna [jWk It 
847/519-9550 D5 

riiullcfcais.com 



R£)CHERT CHEVROLET 

W»H«fHwf • CrystilUU.IL 
815/459*4000 

Www.felcfiertiutoi.com 



S3 



REICHERT CHEVROLET 

WS S UiUud tr. • trotltltck. II 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.relcherlaulos.com 




SCHAUMBURGAUW 
J» A Cot Rwl ♦ Sflnnfcr*. Il 
800/259-1757 

www.schaumburcjdudf.com 



D5 




ANDERSON BMW 

m H. (T». H • Ccy-.tll LlU, IL 
88B/682-4485 



B3 



BILL JACOBS BMW 

1<64 V. O-611 *,■». • n-jtnltta, IL 

800/731-5824 08 

ww«bilfjacobs£Om 

MOTOR WERXS BMW 

|» nr»-tot I OuKm hi • turrint;^ II 
800/935*5913 D4 

www.m ol of we r Ks.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

Ilk VilJltiiifrT* (trad hlidtt 

Ml V. HWT*. fit 111 II) 

orTaOOAGoMd |lt. Sai, Hjlfrw 

Ertieit, 1 

800/935*5909 05 

www.motoriwfcsxom 




ANTHONY PONTIAC BUICK GMC 

7725 Grant ftvi . Cur**, II WOJt 
800/620-0722 F2 

'.anthonyporttlacxom 



REICHERT BUICK 

SHOW Hay. -tfj-UIUlf.n 
815/459-4000 
f.relcherlautosxom 



GARY LANG BUCK 

ftcut* 31, ttfuwr. Cryttll 111* I H:K* try 

888/794-5502 C3 

.9arYldngaut0.com 



B3 



REICHERT BUCK 

214S 1 fnUD-4 Or. • *whloc», II 
815/338-2780 A2 

WHW.reichertautosxom 

WOODY BWCK PONTIAC GMC 

901 L Clittoi Strut • tlfin II 
800/758-1205 C5 

WKifw.woodycars.com 




ALPIEMONTE 

CADILLAC OF ST CHARLES 

Wit L Mlil SL lit. 641 • SI. CtvlH 
630/513*5353 B6 

www.piemontecadil lac.com 

GARY LANG CADILLAC 

RojU H. ktimn Crr-UI llitt UcKiir- 

888/794-5502 C3 

wjarYlanr-auto.com 



MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC 
205 K. Cork Si. * tjirnttai.il 
800/935-5923 04 

wwwm ot of w*r ks.com 




ALMEMONTE CHEVROLET 

7.-0 Onto* in (it IS] * Cut**, IL 

847/426-2000 C4 

*,pieinon ltgiDup.com 



GARY LANG CHEVROLET 

Rr-jU Jl, Ut*wr, Cr^rlil lilt 1 HcHllO; 

888/794-5502 C3 

Vdxgdrylangauto.com 

RAY CHEVROLET 

3?H.Pjitil2'foiUl».IL 

866/RAY-CHEVY D2 

www.rayc.rttvrolet.com 

RAYMOND CHEVROLET 

11! Rc«1» 17J • JWiocUl 

847/395-3600 Df 

'.raymondcSevrofet.com 



CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

ns si 12. font**, 11 
847/497-4200 D2 

■*w#.rAr)-it»rdod-f»o1roiUli.txom 

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER 

WMS.Rtft*Crp1ill»toUl 
868/800*6100 B3 
www.cl-ej.com 

FENZEL MOTOR SALES 

2Q6 $ Slit* Strut « KmpiM-t, II 
847/683-2424 A4 

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY 
CHRYSLER DODGE 

Pji:ti?*"it:K*'o. l 
815/385-7220 C2 

www.iunr.ysidccQmpany.com 




CHAMPION DODGE 
CHRYSLER JEEP 

MS ftirtt-MIl Hr/ • Bi-ril-rt«l. IL 

888/503-2999 04 

www.charnplonautomall.coni 

CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

JlS.tt.Ttf, F01ltto.lt 
847/497-4200 02 

» ww. cr-.ryi Ieroo5"*o f toi I * Uxom 

DODGE OF ANTWCH 

lOSRLtTJlAitiKn.ll 
888-493-1854 01 

www.dodqeofanllocfi.com 



VIKING DOOGE 

Oi fatt* \U A Biuli u * Cr (il f U»», 1 
815/459-8000 B3 

www.vikingci0d9c.com 




BUSS FORD 

m$.Rt» Jf-Mcri4ir-.il 
815/385-2000 C2 

www.fjuiiloid.com 

EXTREME FORD 

SJ1J it* H»y.« CnJU1UU.il 
815/459-8200 B3 

www.erlremefordkiaxom 

SPRING KILL FORD 

ICO C>j td»» Art. • Cist CintN, 1 
847/551-3300 C4 

TOM PECK FORD 

I39t>*> Atta TAal Dr- • HuiUry, II 
847/669-6060 A4 

www.tompecklord.com 

WOODSTOCK FORD/MERCURY 

[160 S. t utvuoj t>t • tUaJitoct, IL 
800/664-0896 A2 

www.47lotdjcom 




ANTHONY PONTLAC BUICK GMC 

mbCiiitMt, Ojnio.ll4f.OJl 
800/620-0722 F2 

www.anlltonypontlac.com 

CRYSTAL LAKE GMC 

fe»S HpY Hw r . • Cryttil 10*. II 
615/477-8600 B3 

www.cryitaiiakeponUac.com 

GARY LANG GMC 

I'Jttt n bthMtn Crplal LaU t MtHtflry 
888/794-5502 C3 

wwwxjarylangauloxom 

WOODY BUKK PONTIAC GMC 

tt9£.Critt)BUmt'Ct-h,i 
800/758-1205 C5 

wwwwooiiycars.com 




BfifLLAMCE HONDA 

110 ». ft. ft • Rti j| i im . Cr,-Ul l*», 11 
688/380*5336 B3 

brllliancehonda.com 



MOTOR WERKS HONDA 

B imu-ion 1 Omlw tdi • Sirnrqloi, II 

800-935-5913 D4 

www.motorwtrlu.com 




ELGIN HYUNDAI 

OITC Ct<r«'*-S-.*Et-ll,ll 
847/888-8222 C5 

www^tglnhyundalxom 

ROSEN HYUNDAI 

HI S. PuOtt Rt. • Kp.tqn, II 
866/469-0114 B4 

www.rosenrosenrosenxom 

GURNEE HYUNDAI 
t VA Crird Jtntt • Cunwr, It 
800/613-8096 F2 

www.9urnwl1yundal.com 



I N F I N I T I. 




MOTOR WERKS INFINIT1 

fimirqirn 1 Dinlra (di * Sirnrgtoi, II 
800-9355913 04 

www.motbrw*rks.com 

INFINlTI OF HOFFMAN ESTATES 

A MOTOR WOKS COAWft 
10*5 V GUI fld. * H tit ni r CtZiln. II 
886/2606844 D5 

www.lnrinltihoflman.com 



MERCEDES-BENZ OF 

HOFFMAN ESTATES 

A jMOflM WORKS COMPANY 

1:00 * :-i\; W • HofirtM (iittii, it 
888/641*9129 D5 

www.mefcedeihollman.com 

MERCEDES-BENZ OF . 
ST. CHARLES 

22C Hortl jtittflil fi col • St. Cu rlu IL 
800 - NEW BENZ B6 

WWW.mbchI.corn 

MOTOR WERKS MERCEDES-BENZ 

$ j-rnjt.n I turdoi Rti • lHmt$tcc IL 
800/935-5913 04 

www.motorwefli.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

tm fiii luii) f 1 • <*ul IflVcin 

KCI V. Hitor.i U (It. 71) Of IOW VI Ct,l 

id (h. W), H:lf*uiliHIr-,ll 

800/935-5909 D5 

www.motorwerln.com 

Iviercury % 

hw M i« l i--i.t imifiiiiiiifninTi^ 

MITCHELL-POnS 

MERCURY/UNCOLN 

W H, frtnt St lit. Jl) • NtHmcy, II 

815/365-0403 C2 

ww w.|i mpotls.com 

WOODSTOCK FORD/MERCURY 

W60S CiitiMtd It. • Waceittck.ll 
800/664*1727 A2 

www.47ford.com 



ANTHONY PONTIAC BUICK GMC 

J2'SGr'fd'-r.Girit«.a6t>;Jl 
800/620-0722 F2 

www.anthonypoaUac.com 

CRYSTAL LAKE PONTIAC 

&]0lHVKv-.*Cr*t1lll«k«.ll 
815/477-8600 B3 

www.cry3tallakcp0ntfac.com 

GARY LANG PONTIAC 

i u* » ft. t>itwi«t Cr|itj| 1 ji r i vcHnry 

888/794-5502 C3 

www.garylan9aLit0.com 

REICHERT PONTIAC 

2U5S. (ittviol tic • Vttdrttct.U- 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.fcktiertaut0i.com 

WOODY BUICK PONTIAC GMC 

K9f.Cnc4joS:r«iffijn,il 
800/758-1205 C5 

www.woodycari.cwn 



IsUBARLk 

GARY LANG SUBARU 

Rc-jI* Jl, trtANi Cry-til Liltl UcHtin 
888/794-5502 C3 

wnw.garYlangauto.com 




RAY SUZUKI 

2JRtulrT2*Failik« 
888/446-8743 

wnw.raysu/ukLcom 



02 




TOYOTA 




MOTOR WERKS PORCHE 
Kurti-rim I OiMtfl let « BirriiUt, II 
800/935-5913 04 

wwwjnotorwerks.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

!d« MxM luury Pii nt«l VcAifr. 

1001 ft. HiQ-iit f J. (Rl. 71 j ■: f >:CQ % Co H 

RJ.IRL SIX HotfninCt1ttif.il ■ 

800/935*5909 05 

www.motorwtfks.com 



CLASSIC TOYOTA 

■125 Hcf th Cn to toy • VtUtotM, L 

847-336-4300 G2 

rtrtw.cldViicrJirect.com 

ELGIN TOYOTA 

T?OJt ClicajftSt •Etjii.l 

847/741-2100 C5 

elginloyota.com 

PAULY TOYOTA 

CnRt-.i4-CryitilUtt.IL 
815/459-7100 or 
847/658-9050 B3 





CRYSTAL LAKE JEEP 

•M4S.BI Jl'tr|rt*llJH.ll 
886/800-6100 63 
www.cl'cJ,com 

EXTREME JEEP 

3M7n«tH. I'O'i/cHoir/.LL 

815/363-9999 C2 

viww^xtremejeefxcom 



rRiA 



EXTREME Kl A 
ittiUKHwf CryiUlUlr.il 

www.exlremelordkla.com 
815/459/6200 B3 

KIAOf iAUKEGAN 

SCO S Cmn Biy Ad, • Vj)ligif\ II 

847/782-9400 G2 

www.Maotwauktfgan.com 



BILL JACOBS MINI 

\M V. Otdm *H. • viremlb. II 
800/295-0166 D7 

www.bllljacobs.com 




MOTOR WERKS SAAB 

HO N. Ccol Stmt • Bi riiiclw. II 
800/935-5393 04 

www.motofwefks.com 



ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN 

JMM.fc.Jl'Cn-.'jlU»»,U 

888/682-4485 B3 

www.a nd e rsoneara.com 

BILL JACOBS VOLKSWAGEM 

itn tonti iwi w • Uienilb, It 
800/720-7036 D7 

WHW.bllljacobs.com 

GURNEE VOLKSWAGEN 

6}C» Cfni tiirvi * Qntt, II 
847-855-1500 F2 

wwwJGurneeVYf.com 



UBERTYV1UE MITSUBISHI , . 

Tlti 1 MDwtifcp* Avtt. • lilMft-\ill». IL 
847/816-6660 F3 

Wrt-w.liliertyvlllemitsutilstii.com 





PAULY SCION 

OiRffl.M'Cri-tjItali, Il 

815/459-7100 or 
847/658-9050 



B3 



NISSAN OF ST. CHARLES 

;SJSf*nMiiiSL-st.Cto!i'-j[ 
630/584-3900 B6 

www.nlssanolstcharlM.com 



CLASSIC TOYOTA SCION 

41S nortl Crwrtiiv * Vjilrgrrv II 
847-336-4300 G3 

www.dasslcdlrect.com 



BARRINGTON VOLVO 

J CO N. Hei>-L ((T. S*j • turrn-toi, IL 
847/381-9400 D4 



RAYMOND KLA 

IT* fou iTUrtlxtt II 
847/838-7900 

www.faymondklaxom 



DI 



TO BE USTED IN THE LOCAt DEALER SHOWROOM, PLEASE CALL. 

630-845-5233 




B 



BILL JACOBS LAND ROVER 
HINSDALE 

KO irz 0)(« i,v>. • HitwJiii. l 

868/204-0042 F7 

www.billjacobsxoni 

LAND ROVER HOFFMAN ESTATES 

lOSrK.MiO|ill • HillT.11 fruit*, IL 
800/731*5760 D5 

www.billjdcobi.com 

LAND ROVER NAPERV1LLE 

iSSl* Merlin •aj-WHle.K. 

800/731-5605 D7 

www.billjacobi.com 



LINCOLN 




MITCr€LL-P0nS 

UNC0LN7MERCURY 

WT ». rrait St (RL 311 • McH»ir-. Il 

815/3650403 C2 

www.Jimpotts.com 




1 






2 






ANDERSON MAZDA 

y.OH Rt.Ji-cntuiLau.il 

888/682-4489 

www.andensoncars.com 



B3 



BtGGERS MAZDA 

U20 f rJ Ch»-» Sire it • Th» KttU 
MuhMHiRt «'t!t.i».il 
847/628-6000 C5 



SiJ H«tf«n 






JWWlf.. 



Li**. £Fr = TTWTr , 



Ztorv 

'i r 



" UntUnhurM , « 



- '■*• °- 










', 



LAKEC0UfmJoURNAlS.COM 



JMHEELi 



April 20, 2007 'CU 



Four automotive scams to avoid 



The gleam of a new car has 
a distinct appeal to a buyer. 
Many times emotion wins 
over common sense when 
perusing vehicles on the lot. 
This makes a person more 
susceptible to scams. 

While most auto dealer- 
ships are owned and operated 
by honest individuals, there 
are those that are simply 
interested in making as much 
money as possible • even if 
that means taking unsuspect- ■ 
ing consumers for a ride ... 
financially. Avoid these conv 
mon scams. 

1. Financing: Here's a situa- 



tion whole you trade in your 
car or finance a new one out- 
right and the financing man- 
ager tells you your credit is 
fine. You walk out of the door 
with a new car and a good 
interest rate on the loan. Each 
new vehicle purchase has a 
clause in the contract that 
usually states that the deal is 
"subject to loan approval." 
This means that you may 
receive a call a few weeks 
later stating that you really 
didn't qualify for the interest 
rate they gave you and you 
have to pay more on financing 
fees and monthly payments. 



Tli is scam is often pulled on 
those with poor credit scores. 
If you suspect your credit is 
below average, consider 
financing through a third- 
party lender rather than the 
dealership to avoid paying 
more than you have to. 

2. Credit Score: A finance 
manager may tell you that 
your credit score is low so 
that you are not given a com- 
petitive interest rate on the 
loan. Those who don't know 
their credit score may fall vic- 
tim to this. However, simply 
having a copy or your credit 
rating before you enter the 



dealership can nip this scam 
in the bud before it can begin. 
Scores can often be obtained 
at no cost. If your number 
doesn't match the dealer's, 
then look elsewhere. 

3. Forced Warranty: A 
finance manager may tell you 
that you don't qualify for 
financing unless you pay an 
additional $2,000 or more for 
an extended warranty on the 
vehicle. Why would the bank 
refuse to lend you the money 
at a lower cost and then be 
willing to do so when the cost 
is increased? This just doesn't 
make sense, and it is rare that 



the lender requires a warran- 
ty purchase as part of their 
loan qualification. Ask to 
have this "requirement" put 
in writing so that it can be 
verified with the state attor- 
ney's office. You may find that 
the finance manager soon 
changes his story. 

4. Refinancing: Many peo- 
ple refinance the terms of 
their auto loan in the same 
way they would refinance a 
mortgage: to lower payments 
or get a better interest rate. 
Just as the initial loan leaves 
you open to potential scams, 
so does refinancing. Keep 



these things in mind: 

• know your credit score; 

• clear up bad debt before 
applying, such as paying off 
credit cards; 

• make sure you are at a job 
for at least six months prior; 

• make sure you've been at 
the same address for at least 
six months because your 
address is always verified on 
a loan; 

• fix your credit score so it 
is at least 680; and 

• don't pay cash for a loan 
deposit - if the deal goes poor- 
ly you may not be able to get a 
refund. 



www.Rosen 





Test Drive A New Mazda Today! 




www. rosen rosen rose n . com 



ROSEN 
TAKE AM ADDITIONAL 1.000 OFF 



Wioi pi fan* tn Uirtl [WC\. WA KVmA mil Oil nint (tad*. !« dote lor tilth. 






2007 MAZDA CX-7 




•VfAw^L^tnululi*.ltt^lCKF«.Ufibla«Jlnnrtmip(*ed5II-)rO! 



.com 



The All-New 2007 SUZUKI XL-7 - IN STOCK! 

l 




Way of Life! 



www.rosenrosenrosen.com 



SUIUKI OWNERS S.1UE UN $ f% g- f% 

RBBITIONRl dOU 



Willi approved credit. 
On sclficl models 
See drain; lot details 



Sit. #51228 




ONLY 



13.620 



2007 SUZUKI 

FORENZA 

Test Drive A New 
Suzuki Today I 



Compare to Ford Focus 
& Toyota Corolla 



ROSEN MAZDA 

LOCATED IN LAKE VILLA 

855 E. Grand Ave. (Just East of Route 83) 



CALL NOW! 1 -866-875-901 6 



'With approved ciodil. Plus Ion, lillo, liconio and DOC Fee. All applicable robaloj and Iricenlivai applied. Photoi ol can oio lor 
llluittcllon purpoiet only. All often expire 3 day* (torn dale ol publication. 

ROSEN SUZUKI OF LAKE VILLA 

875 East Grand Avenue (Just East of Route 83) 



AMERICA'S #1 WARRANTY 

100.000 MILES • NO DEDUCTIBLE * FULLY TRANSFERABLE 



- EASY Auto Loan In Minutes - 

888-237-4836 

24-Hour Toil-Free Hotline • Call Now! 
or on-line at v*fww.2DriveNow.com 



USED VEHICLE BLOWOUT! 



00 FORD TAURUS s 4,995 

OS SUZUKI RENO s 6,795 

03 CHEVY MONTE CARLO .'7,995 

05 CHEVY CAVALIER s 7,995 

00 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE .'8,295 

02 DODGE CARAVAN HIGHTOP with Entertainment System . .'8,495 

04 PONTIAC GRAND AM .'8,495 

02 OLDSMODILE RRAVADA '8,995 

05 DODGE NEON SXT .'8,995 

03 TOYOTA MATRIX ......'9,895 

06 KIA SPECTRA EX.. '10,495 

03 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE... ....'11,995 

06 FORD FOCUS SX4 SE .... . .'11,995 

01 AUDI A6 '12,295 

03 DODGE DURANGO... ..'12,295 

06 CHEVY HHR .....'12,995 

05 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER '12,995 

04 NISSAN ALTIMA '13,295 

04JEEP LIBERTY '14,395 

03 CHEVY S-10 PICK-UP EXTENDED CAB 4X4 .'14,995 

06 MAZDA J HATCHBACK.. ............... '15,395 

05 DODGE MAGNUM. ........... ,..'15,395 

04 HONDA ACCORD EX .'15,998 

04 NISSAN MAXIMA , ......;.......... ...... ...'18,995 

06 MAZDA 6 SPEED.. '24,295 

Ad price* pka fjutj tide. license & DOC FEE. See oeaief to betUtt. ICJ 04.2047 .' •' ■ . 



v- 



IT 
i 



V.T».-v_A. iiAA*. 



r>i sofc-*! i it j7* *cj»«a< .* 



April 20, 2007 



JftfHEELi 



LakeCountyJournai5.com 



www 



LujI 



wwwatffCT 



omali.co 



7KQ 



on of New & Quality Pre-Drivens on-line @ 
GH AMPION AUTOM ALL COM 



S 



YOU Ml THE BEST DEAL? 
CHEGK-US-QUT, VISIT 

FOR UP TO THE MINUTE PRICING, 

ALL VEHICLES CLEARLY PRICED! 

LI 






i; * : 





—-^fffiFrF----- — 




I Jeep | 

M11P 




YOU WANT THE BEST DEAL? 

CHECK-US-OUT, VISIT 

»HHf,te|l/flllMjW(WIB 

FOR UP TO THE MINUTE PRICING, 
ALL VEHICLES CLEARLY PRICED! 



£ 



I- j 




E 



FOR 



Q D 



NATIONAL 



MINIVAN SALE 

MO tJB.T ** rUI«E DVD, PtfcT.lt 

■♦-I*' P II «*»Hl «**• u>NIII. hM< •«' ■' SUM* W| IhHl <«..!- »..!« 




NO EXTRA CHARGEJVD PIAYER! 

% s^ A 



MEHr 2007 DOME „ 

RJS MEGA CA 

ALL IN-STOCK & READY TO GO!!! 
• 1500 LARAMIE'S & SLT'S • 2500 LARAMIE'S & SLT'S 
3500 LARAMIE'S & SLT'S 






CHRYSLER 



NATIONAL 
MINIVAN SALE 

HO IXTIA CHilOl V D HUII 



NO EXTRA GHARCE DVD PLAYER, 



S 



r- ;■ £; ?: ,&ft£S 




I 



Available! 



JW*' GOOD 



&7B239994, Auto., A/C, A, 
AiWFM w/CD, Floor Mats,} 1 
Intermittent Wipers, Pwr. 
Steering/Brakes & More! 



NEW 2006 DOOGEMMHUrflir 

Slk#D6017, Auto., PAV, A, 
P/L, Rear DVD, Tilt, }' 
Cruise, Keyless, Tinted 
Glass, Alloys, & More! 



BEST 



lammmsn 

SIMD6659, Auto., 3.8L, 6 
P/W, P/L, Keyless, }' 
Stow-N-Go, Quad Seats, 
Rear Heat/Air, LOADEDll! 

OR LEASE FOR: 



- HQMmrmmi 

PcK 27 MONTH LEASE 

lift** 50 Due © inceptioa tax, ttSts. 
Willi Ec & doc, fee due a! sighing. 



10000 

OFF MSRP OH ANY ( 07 RAM 
MEGA.CAB IN STOCK! 



GOOD 



mnsmw 

Slk#C6027, Aula, A/C fc, 

Tilt, Cruise, Alloys, Tinted} 1 

! Glass, Pwr. Steering, Pwr. 
1 Brakes & Morel 



m~ r :7"B;ETTE; 



4^&if'JL ■-*?■} I 



&mi& 




APR 



'lltUMUUi 



FOR 72'lifl05. 



■ I 



vJBB 



Mr 



Stk#C6054, Auto., Pwr; A, 

i .Windows, Pwr. Locks, Tilt,} 1 
, J Cruise, Keyless, Tinted 

I j I Glass, Loaded & More! 



BEST 



OH LIBERTY 



L^n^M^^^M^^^**.*7»Sm I 



3tkW5967;Auto;;;Pw^_ 

: Windows, Pwr, Locks, ; ,3 III 

i Leather, Sunroof, Tow Pka;£3i 

Chr6me;Whls.;.LGADED' y ' ^ ^ 



,VVV"'*' 



£28>* - 



m 




[SOFfeTWiIii 

.^SPEEDIIlt 

SUMMER FUN!!! 



<Ll...'j>c1l.^m*«/>-a'v 



StktfC6669, Auto., P/W, 
P/L, Tilt, Cruise, Keyless, 
P/Hatch, Rear Heat/Air, 
Alloys, Loaded! Loaded!_ 
OR LEASE FOR 



PER "27 MONTH LEASE I 
** SO Due © inceptibn, tax, tide, f 

■ fclfofeedueatsigning. 




IBB 



'00 GMC 
SONOMA 

#P2001A 

$6,997 



'02 MAZDA 
PROTEGE 

#P1893A 

$7,897 



'04 DODGE 
INTREPID SE 

#P20G5, 
loaded, Musi Sec! 

$8,796 



■■'03 CHEVY 
IMPALA 

#PI868 

$8,996 



'02 PONTIAC 
GRAND PRIX GT 

#C5658A 



'03 CHRYSLER 
CONCORDE LXI I 

J/D5194A 



'04 DODGE 



I f THIS WEEK'S 

IlWi , i l i;il(iJ^f:l;|tlli' 



#D4046B 



$9,897 



'05 DODGE 
STRATUS SXT 

#Pl990 

$16,986 



$11,747 



'02 CHRYSLER 

TOWN & COUNTRY LTD, AWD. 
#DC6SB0A 



$11,998 



'06 JEEP LIBERTY RENEGADE 4X4 

StkflP20l5, 3.7L, PAV. P/L. CO. Till, 

Cruise, A/C, Alloys, Buckets, 

Luggage Rack & Morel 

s 1 6,986 




Stk*J6390A. 2Z Monro, Siiede.HMOTKtt 
EVERY FACTOR OFTIO.N"! Leadod! 6K . 

i L> ] • Tiff ■ TTfer iti 



'03 VW 
JETTA SEDAN GLS 

WS715A 

$13,897 



MUSTSEEIII 



'04 CHRYSLER 
j PACIFICA 

#D6675B, Uhr„. . 

., , Leaded! 

$14,997 



T 



'06 JEEP - m 

LIBERTY RENEGADE 4X4 
1 IP2015 

$16,988 



'05 CHRYSLER 
PACIFICA TOURING 

HP203I, 

$16,997 



■1/i«ii^\jLI1mwS 



'02 CHEVY SILVERADO 
Z7I LTK1500 4 DR. 

#P1994 

$17,986 



'06 DODGE 

magnums; 



CHEROKEE 

SP2020. 2SK Mi 
. Block, Aula.', P" 

$26, 



GRAND 



$18, 



LOADED) 



$9,897 



'05 DODGE 
CARAVAN SE 

«D59B4A 

$9,897 



'99 FORD 
EXPEDITION E.B. 

MJ6365A 

$9,897 



/05 DODGE 
NEON SXT 

#PI970 

$9,897 



'01 INFINITI 

130 

WD65S3A IEATIIER & LOADED! 

$11/747 



'03 CHEVROLET 
IMPALA LS 

#D4B19A; 

$11,747 



'02 DODGE 
G. CARAVAN ES AWD. 

#D6129A 

$11,747 



'03 JEEP 
LIBERTY RENEGADE 

#J64B6A ' 

$12,997 



.'03 CHRYSLER 
T&C LXI 

IC6263A • 



$13,897 



'03 DODGE 
DURANGO SLT 4X4 

W6683A 

$13,897 



'03 VOLKSWAGEN 
BEETLE CONVERT. 

#J6836A, 
Ready For Summer! 



$14,997 



'03 FORD 
EXPLORER XLT 

rtC6QBBA 



rToWMimi l 'OB CHHYSLER SEBRING COKVERT. 

" "" " SMP2026, Auto, 2.7L. Leather, 
Air Corel, AM/FM w/CD, T3L 
J^ V : -*^ft CmssaPwr.EwiythingiMore! 

bJ P s 1 6,997 

VtSfcM I !MWil«iill '04 DODGE 

DURANGO 4X4 

#C5499A 
Loododl Lsollicrl 



£=■ 2 TO '* 
& CHOOSE 
- fRClM 1 • 



JETTA SEDAN 2.5 

HJ6353A 



$16,998 



$18,997 



•06 JEEP COMMANDER LTD. AWD. 

SIMP2D29, Auto,, H/Leather, Rear 

Video, Keyless, Pwr. Everything, 

Sunroof, HEMI & More!! 

*'- -m 



5JLHEMIIII I 



'05 IHFINITI G35 SDN. 

SWD6596A, 3.5U Champagne, NO, 

ADS, Leather, Man. 6-MT,Pw, 

Everything, Sunroof & Morel 



£i*£i£ 



y*m '04 DODGE 
^flr^^DURANGO 4WD. 

■*■ K5499A 



\VM$M 



'01 MAZDA 
Ml ATA 

#J6486AA 



$12,997 



'07 DODGE CHARGER 

Sft»P2030, 5.7LHEMI, Leather. Pwr. , 
Everything, Sunroof, Keyless, Low, Low 

Miles, HOT RODIN 
$_ 

'J. 



'01 FORD 
EXPEDITION E.B. 

#D6406B 

$11,747 




'03 JEEP 

WRANGLER SPORT 4X4 

0J6572A, 2-Tapv! Aulo., CD, Till, 
Cruise, 2-TO CHOOSE TROM! 

$13,986 



'03 ACURA '. 
3.2 TL TYPE-S 

KP1986A , 

$14,980 



'06 CHRYSLER 
PACIFICA 

- #J61B1A. 
Only 13K Mllesl 

$15,997 



'04 KIA 
AMANTI 

SPI647 

$16,986 



'04 DODGE 
STRATUS SXT 

SDZ4796 

$16,998 



'04 DODGE RAM 2500 q.C. 4X4 

SBHID6826A. Aulo.. 6-Cyt. 5.9L 
Diesel, Pwr. Everything, A/C, Till, 
' Cruise, ABS, Tow Pkg. 4 Morel 



$18,997 



| -'02TOYOTA 

iTACOMASRSEXT.CAB4X4 

#J66B6A 

$18,998 



'04 GMC 
SIERRA CREW CAB 4X4 

#D5247A 



$21,997 (|i 



'06 CHRYSLER : 
TOWN & COUNTRY 

#P2Q25,Aulo.,3.8L,LealliBr,NAVI ( 
Rear feco, SIGNATURE SERIES! 

$23,997 



'03 MITSUBISHI 

LANCER EVOLUTION AWD. 
#P2024 



$23,997 | 



'05 CHRYSLER^ 

PACIFICA LIMITED AWD. 

SP2008 

$23,997 



BAD CRED T? MO PROBLEM! 

30 MINS OB L£SS. WE-HEI HEfl£TO HELP) 

1 -888-702-7483 




See what prri 

Sprinter can do \K\m 

, , tor yov and • ■v,\LV>'.; , 

your, business. .,-, ^-^g^i'. 

BUSINESS LINK* 





'06 DODGE 
CHARGER R/T 

SOS528A, Eully Lauded! 



'06 CHRYSLER 
300SRT-8 

#J5934A, ' 
Absolutely Loaded!!! 



.- •■ ■ 



■".* v cw. ...... 

NEON SRT-4 

, #P2045, Only UK MILES1 
V • AnUSTSEEi, 

$19,997 



PLUS MANY 
IVIORETO 
CHOOSE FR0IV1S II o 




ESPANOL! 505 W. NORTHWEST HWY. • BARRINCTON 

SmPtm (just 1/2 Mile west of Rte. 59) 



mm 



OU Ponce que ahors c D C C 

so mnentra en L« ■ ■ i 

Champion olBa^ngton CALL! 
:.'otliatafi>au 






i gggBBhJLf WWW.CHAMPIONAUTOMALL.COM 

e All mm & «Wte applied « a pp,ovefj am -i' m ctwscd end lease w10,500 miles per year Rt-sidual JS^^2#j§i!l£ ^ 
.^WM^Ml" " t# m m odeis ;. app-oved ciedii In lieu ol tfites fl Pfl ki 6U months « S16 67 per SlOOO hwndL w «m« fed, In lieu of -obaies AH vtlnclei. m-slock 

'1... .... I„. .11.. „,_,.. ., r.,.; iM«>Mr : hi oirnic All nllort tlirlirO ? &VjK f' iM '! lit' II ,i IlOfl 'M e 




7 HEADQUARTERS! | 

Sfl/es; 
Mon.-Fri. • 9:00AM • 9:00PM 
Saturday < 9:00AM • 6:00PM I 
Serwce: 
:! Mon-Thurs. O00AM-700PH | 
Fndav ■ 7.00AM ■ 6 
Saturday '7fl)AM' 200PM 
Sunday • 7:O0AM • n.ooPM 

SERVICE PHONE: 
'!M 866-279-2908 J 



4 



> ■ 



VMVOT9V9 



ALL CREDIT ACCEPTEPI 




We'll be marking down hundreds of New and Quality Pr^Owned 
vehicles to the lowest prices ever! Now's the time to buy like 

dealers do! Hurry in for best selection!!! 

WED., APRIL 18 !h , 9AM-9PM 
THURS., APRIL 19*, 9AM-9PM 
FRI., APRIL 20\ 9AM-9PM 
SAT., APRIL 21", 9AM-8PM 

MON., APRIL 23 ri , 9AM-9PM 



WE WILL HAVE 

LENDERS ON SITE 

TO ENSURE FAST 

APPROVAL ON THE 

CAR YOU WANT! 




TOP-DOLLAR FOR 
YOUR TRADE 

With the high demand for 
used cars today, you can get 
even more than your 
™> car is worth! 

Appraisers will be on-site to 
bid on your trade. 



MOD 

• Honda • Chevrolet 

• Ford • Dodge 

* Pontiac • Buick 

• Toyota • Kia 
• Suzuki • Cadillac 

• Lexus • GMC 

• Volkswagen • Lincoln 

• Subaru • Jeep • 
Saturn « Mitsubishi 

And Many More! 





I PAG A $ 49 + Y TE LO 

LLEVAS A HAS AS 



PICK A VEHICLE 

Hundreds of new & pre-driven cars, 
trucks, suv's & vans must be sold! 

PICK A PAYMENT 

All vehicles have payments clearly 
marked! Just put $49* down, take 
on the payments & take it home! 



Just bring $49* & your trade, title 

and/or your payment book and be 

prepared to take... 



■*#* 




I 



WED., APRIL 18 th , 9AM-9PM 
THURS., APRIL 19 th , 9AM-9PM 



PiiTTEOBE 



SAT., APRIL 21 st , 9AM-8PM 
MON., APRIL 23 rd , 9AM-9PM 



Please Bring: 'We or Payment Book •Current payoff figure (if trading) • Valid Driver's License • Current Paystub • Proof of Insurance 



>'";>: 



ABSOLUTELY 
ALL APPLICATIONS 
WILL 
ACCEPTED 1 . 




• Incredible discounts 

• Incentives and low-cost financing 

• $49 down payment delivers!* 

• 90 days, no payment 

• Local/regional/national lenders on-site 

• All vehicles clearly marked & priced 

.Forget the MSRP or any price near it. 
This Round Lake Super K-Mart lot is full of 
incredible bargains! 

TRAINED PRODUCT SPECIALISTS ON-SITE. 

• If you have product questions, . 
7 ' professionals 1 Will Be on-hand to answer 
, them.np matter how detailed 

they maybe.- !v ) 



IN SUPER K-MART 

■ . -■'•-•.■■ ■ • ■ - ■ .'•■■.' 

PARKING LOT, 

2 BLOCKS WEST OF 83 

ON ROLLINS RD. 
IN ROUND LAKE BEACH 




NO VEHICLES WILL BE HELD BACK. FIRST COME, FIRST S ERVED BASIS! 

This event will take place, rain or sh'melll 



NO DEALERS 



SEHABLA 
ESPANOL 



(2 BLKS WEST OF 83 H ROUND LAKE SEMM) 



NO DEALERS 



WEDNESDAY 9AWI-9PIVI 

THURSDAY 9AM-9RIVfl 

FRIDAY 9ABVH-9IPIVI 

SATtU3EFBEDAY 9ASV/B-8RIVB 

Hl/DGE)[N]IIDAY 9ABVB-9PIVI 



* 



v 



^"^^ W ■ ■ P ■ ■ 




BELOW IS A SAMPLING OF VEHICLES AVAILABLE! 



a 



j 



1995 TOYOTA TERCEL 
2001 CHEVY CAVALIER 
1999 PONTIAC GRAND AM 
1998P0NTIACSUNHRE 

1996 FORD ESCORT 
1998 NISSAN PATHFINDER 
1994 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 

1997 OLDS AURORA 

1997 MERCURY SABLE 
1996 CHRYSLER LHS 

2001 DODGE NEON 

1996 BUICK ROADM ASTER 

2003 ACURA 3.2TL 

1998 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV 
2006 FORD FREESTYLE 

1999 CHEVROLET LUMINA ? 
2006 BUICK LUCERNE CX 
2006 CHEVROLET COBALT 

2002 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 
2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 
2006 SUZUKI FORENZA 
2006 BUICK LACROSSE CX 

2002 SATURN SC1 

2006 CADILLAC ESCALADE ESV 

2001 BUICK CENTURY CUSTOM 

2004 PONTIAC VIBE 

2005 FORD TAURUS 

1999 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 

2005 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV 

2004 NISSAN SENTRA 

2006 CHEVROLET HHR 

2003 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 

2004 CHEVROLET COLORADO 4X4 

2002 FORD MUSTANG 

2003 MAZDA MIATA CONVT 

2005 CHEVROLET CAVALIER 

2006 CADILLAC CTS 

1998 LINCOLN CONTIENTAL 
2003 BUICK LESABRE LMTD 

2007 CHEVROLET COBALT LS 
1998 DODGE CARAVAN 

2005 CHEVROLET COLORADO 

2005 KIA SPECTRA 

2001 CADILLAC CATERA 

2003 PONTIAC VIBE 

2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA 
2006 CHEVROLET COBALT 

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

2006 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS 
2005 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 

2005 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 

2007 HONDA ODYSSEY 

2005 GMC ENVOY XL f 

2002 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM 

2004 GMC ENVOY XUV 

2006 PONTIAC G6 GTP 
1997 GMC SUBURBAN 
2006 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 
2006 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 

2000 FORD TAURUS 
2006 NISSAN MURANO 

2005 FORD EXPEDITION XLS 

2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 



v *-. 




t< lMr. 

.' >.j' (it 



Rjecibe tu 

XCURSION DE COMPRA 

con valor de 

$1,000 

solo por 
r ^ visitarnos! t y 



• 5-YEAR/1 00,000 



• NO HASSLE, NO HAGGLE 




2006 PONTIAC VIBE 

2004 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM 

2001 FORD ESCAPE XLT 
1999 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 

2007 FORD TAURUS 
2006 CHEVROLET COBALT 

2005 DODGE NEON 

2006 PONTIAC G6 
2004 DODGE DURANGO 
2006 PONTIAC G6 V6 

2004 DODGE NEON 

2006 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 

2005 CHRYSLER 300M LIMITED 
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2004 CHEVROLET CORVETTE CONVT 

2004 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 

2005 KIA OPTIMA 

2007 CHEVROLET CARGO 1500 

2002 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 2DR 
2007 CHEVROLET COBALT 

2006 GMC YUKON 

2002 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 4X4 

2003 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP 
2003 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE 4X4 
2006 BUICK RAINIER 

2006 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 
| 2007 SATURN ION 



Receive a 

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just for coming in!! 



2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 

1998 FORD EXPLORER 

2006 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS 

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2000 CHEVROLET ASTRO 

2004 CHEVROLET COLORADO 4X4 

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2001 CADILLAC DEVILLE 

2002 BUICK RENDEZVOUS CXL PLUS 

1999 PONTIAC TRANS AM 
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2004 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM 

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V 



- ' 

EN EL 

ESTACIONAMIENTO' 

DE SUPER K-MART, 

2 bloques al oeste de la ruta 
83 sobre la calle Rollins en 
t Round Lake Beach! ■ 



f » .• » f •■ ^ t 



ABSOLUTELY 

ALL APPLICATIONS 

WILL BE 

ACCEPTED! 



, 



SEHABLA 
ESPAMOL (2 b 



SUPER K-MART 
PARKING LOT, 

2 BLOCKS WEST OF 83 

ON ROLLINS RD. 
IN ROUND-LAKE BEACH 



(WIS II 



Just bring $49 f & your trade, title 

and/or your payment book and be 

prepared to take... 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY! 



Lf(S WEST OF 83 IN ROUND LAKE BEACH) 



WEDNESDAY 9AM-9RIVI 
THURSDAY 9AM-9RIV1 

FRIDAY 9AM-9RIVI 
SATURDAY 9ABVI-8F»IVfl 

MONDAY 9ASVB-9PIVI 



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Open an Orange 
Savings Account™ ' 

and Earn 8X 

the National Average 

$84 


$450 

Orange 

Savings^ 

Account 

4.50% ;; 


f 




$54 


National 
Average 

0.84% I 




National 
Average 

0.54% 


1 SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT 


MONEY 
MARKET 


ING DIRECT 





I 



Rates are Annual Percentage Yields. ING DIRECT variable rale as ol 11/29/06. 

Chart based on a deposit ol 110,000 lor one year. 

Sources: savings and money market averages Irom Bankrstc, Inc. as ol 10/11/06. 




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It starts with a 




bonus. 




The Orange Savings Account 

•Great Rate e No Fees 
°No Minimums 



ING 




DIRECT 

Save Your Money* 



□ 




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The Orange Savings Account 
4.50% APY 

A great rate with no fees 
and no minimums. 

With an Orange Savings Account" from ING DIRECT, 

you'll earn more with a 4.50% annual percentage yield (variable 
rate, effective since 11/29/06}. All while enjoying the security of 
an FDIC-insured account. 



Sign up by June 30. 2007 
and get your $25 bonus. 



Open an Orange Savings Account, and we'll deposit a $25 bonus to get 
you started. You'll also be on your way to earning more every day! 

Open your Orange Savings Account right now online at 

ingclirect.com/save. 

To get your $25 bonus, don't forget to include your Reference 
Code when opening online. It's printed in the bottom right-hand corner 
of the Activation Form. Or simply complete this form and mail it with your 
initial deposit. Make your personal check payable to yourself. 

ING DIRECT Sales Associates are available to help 7 days a week, 
8 AM to 8PM. 



ING 




FDIC 



DIRECT 

Save Your Money® 




IMPORTANT: S25 Bonus is only available (or now accounts with a now Customer as primary owner. 
S25 Bonus starts earning interest upon account opening, bat Is unavailable for withdrawal (or 3D days. 
Valid through 6/30/07. 




Save more. Earn more. 

As a direct bank, our overhead is low, so we can 
pass the savings along to you. 

Some of the buzz around town... 

ING DIRECT. . . is simply serving up savings with 
unusually high interest rates... 

Time magazine 

• 

...the best money-market account in the country... 
Money magazine 



o Great rate— no minimum 
balance required. Everyone earns 
the same high yield. 

© No fees — every penny you deposit 
goes to work for you. 

o No changing banks — the 
Orange Savings Account is linked 
to your current checking account 

o 24-hour access to your account — 

you're always ready for opportunities. 

o FDIC-insured — your money is 
always safe. 




Call us at: 1-800-ING DIRECT or visit: ingdirect.com/save 

(464-3473) 



The Orange Savings Account Activation Form 



PRIVACY SEAt— MOISTEN HERE 



YOUR INITIAL DEPOSIT AMOUNT 

§ ) ■_■ -.1 i, i 

Please include a PERSONAL CHECK made payable to yourself. 

(We cannot accept starter checks, money orders or third'porlr checks.) 



I 4 I i I ) I I I I • - 

First Namo Initial last Namo 



Get a $25 bonus when you open an account. 




COMPLETE 
and detach 
this lorm. 



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* WRITE 
$$:§ a personal check 
in any amount, 
payable to yourself. 





MAIL 

Enclose check, seal, 
and mail in this 
postage-paid envelope. 



Oaio ol Bulh 



Sociaf Security Number " 



Strool ArJrJiess (No P.O. bones, please) 



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City 

Homo Phono " Business Phono 

JOINT ACCOUNT INFORMATION 



Apt* 

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Email Address 



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Data ol Birth 



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Business Phono 



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] YES! I would like to start an Automatic Savings Plan to maximize my Orange Savings Account 

Automatic withdrawals will be transferred from your linked checking account to your Orange Savings Account. 

mm/dd/yyyy 



Please wiihdraw 



$ L_'_ : _'_-__. | _j_' 



Please start withdrawals on 



□ Weekly □ 2 weeks j ~J Monthly Tfj Bi-Monthly (15th and the last day ol the month) 



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requrritaw«tijdiewWiolJn&ln™!pkwe 



Reference Code: FTJ438/62SJPSA5 



X 



X 



SIGNATURE - REQUIRED 



DATE 



SIGNATURE OF JOINT ACCOUNT HOLDER 



DATE 



PRIVACY SEAT— MOISTEN HERE 



DESDE $99 POR IVIES CON $79 DE CONTADO 



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INFORMAGION DEL VEHIGULO 

TODOS LOS VEHfCULOS HAN S1DO PUESTOS EN CONDICIONES PARA LA VENTA 
INMEDIATA. MUCHOS VEHfCULOS CON GARANTlA DE FABRICA. 

INFORMACION SOBRE LA VENTA k M 

POR SOLO CUATRO Df AS, LA CARPA DE ACTIVOS BANCARIOS OFRECERA ESTOS 
VEHfCULOS PARA LA VENTA DIRECTA AL PUBLICO POR UN MONTO Mf NIMO DE 
$99 D6LARES* POR MES. 

INFORMAGION DE PAGOS 

PAGOINICIAL DE $79+ Y ENTREGA INMEDIATA. PAGOS DESDE $99 POR MES* 
TODOS LOS PRECIOS DE LOS VEHfCULOS SE MARCARAN CON CLARIDAD. LOS 
VEHfCULOS SE ENTREGARAN AL COMPRADOR CON LA PRIMERA OFERTA APROBADA. 

jMAL CREDITO! iNINGUN CREDITO! jNIMGUN PROBLEMA! 

HABRA MAS DE 5 MILLONES DE D6LARES EN CREDITO DISPONIBLES PARA ESTE 
EVENTO. LOS VENDEDORES Y LOS PRESTAMISTAS ESTARAN A SU DISPOSICION 
PARA ASISTIRLO CON LA COMPRA Y LAS NECESIDADES ESPECIALES DE 
FINANCIACldN. SE HA PUESTO SOBRE AVISO A TODOS LOS PRESTAMISTAS. TRAIGA 
SU LICENCIA DE CONDUCIR ACTUAL, CUENTA DE TELEFONO Y LA MAYORf A DE 
LOS COMPROBANTES DE PAGO ACTUALES. 




'MM CREDITO? ML CREDITO? MG(M CREDITO? LIME MORA 



LLAME SIN CARGO AL 

1-800-397-9418 

Se Habla Espanol 

Pnr^nh^orl^** [^CONTAMOS CON (JNA VASTA 
VjcUcUlUZdUU H $ELECCl()HdEVEHlC\)LO$ 

robacion del credito ««»~<™ 



Ap 



ESPERAN EN ROSEN. 




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2650 BELVEDERE RD. la esquina de 
BELVEDERE & GREEN BAY 
EN HOBO'S PARKING LOT 

WAUKEGAN, IL 



DJAS 

INICA- 

MENTE 




MIMES 
18 DEMI 



SUlUDO 
21DEURIL 



$99 PER MO. & UP WITH $79 DOWN 




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ALL VEHICLES HAVE BEEN CLEARED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE. MANY VEHICLES 
STILL UNDER FACTORY WARRANTY. 

FOR FOUR DAYS ONLY, THE BANK ASSET TENT EVENT WILL OFFER THESE 
VEHICLES FOR SALE DIRECT TO THE PUBLIC FOR $99 DOLLARS* PER MONTH 
AND UP. 

PAY THE $79 DMN^^ENt! AND TAKE IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. PAYMENTS 
FOR $99/MO.* & UP! ALL VEHICLE PRICES WILL BE CLEARLY MARKED. VEHICLES 
WILL GO TO THE BUYER WITH FIRST APPROVED OFFER! 

BAD CREDIT! NO CREDIT! WE CAN HELP! MEnDi r 

OVER 5 MILLION IN CREDIT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR THIS EVENT. SALESPEOPLE 
AND FINANCE PEOPLE WILL BE ON HAND TO ASSIST YOU WITH YOUR PURCHASE 
AND SPECIAL FINANCE NEEDS. ALL LENDERS HAVE BEEN PLACED ON FULL CREDIT 
ALERT! BRING CURRENT DRIVERS LICENSE, HOME PHONE BILL AND MOST CURRENT 
PAY STUBS. 







GOOD CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? HO CREDIT? CALL HOW? 



TOLL FREE CREDIT HOTLINE 

1 -888-432- 7928 

Se Habla EspafTol 

(Imrmteed*** [^wehaveahiige selection 

Credit Approval ■uimfrnvanhdi 







2650 BELVEDERE RD. at the comer of 
BELVEDERE & GREEN BAY 
IN THE HOBO'S PARKING LOT 
WAUKEGAN, IL 



DAYS 
ONLY! 



APR18 

9AM-9PM 



THURSDAY 

APB19 

9AM-9PM 



APR 20 
9AM-9PM 



IPR21 
9JUH-6PM 




LAKE COUNTY 



Ji 

J P.O. Box 250 

Crystal Lake, IL 60039 



OURNALS 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST-CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 25 CRYSTAL LAKE IL 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



NORTHWEST NEWS GROUP 

PO BOX 250 

CRYSTAL LAKE IL 60039-9936 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



Don't: laugh! 

We're serious when we sau we can offer the 
best source of Lake Countu news for just 




We deliver -fclne most: 

• Coniimmitij-specific news 

• Local sports 

• Journal Marketplace Classified 

• Area business inserts 

• LakeLife section 

• Real Estate and Auto section 









iu; <W /et yourself go crcax\ for Lake CoumpSSffm 2007 fofjust 01 



Please sign me up for the following 
Lake County Journal: (check one below) 

□ Antioch Journal 
a Fox Lake Journal 

□ Grayslake Journal 
a Gurnee/Wadsworth 
q Round Lake Journal 

q Lake Villa/Lindenhurst 
q Wauconda Journal 

J LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



Name 



Address. 
City 



Phone 



E-mail 



Payment Options 

Q Bill Me Q Check (payable to Lake County Journals) 

Qvlsa Q MasterCard □ Discover 

Debit/Credit Card Number 

Signature 



Exp Date / /_ 



If you select payment by check or credit/debit card, please enclose this card in an envelope and mail to: 
Lake County Journals, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250. Or for faster service, call (815) 459-8118. 

Offer valid to households which have not subscribed to the Lake County Journals 

for the past 30 days and live in the Journal's delivery area. Offer expires without notice. Offer SC20O7 



Don't laugh! 

We're serious when we saif we can offer the 
best source of Lake County news for just 




We deliver the most: 

• Comnumitif-specific news 

• Local sports 

• Journal Marketplace Classified 

• Area business inserts 

• LakeLife section 

• Real Estate and Auto section 





_^Uf*|il* * 



•Sfe* ' ■ / 



gfi^ij 










Shnpiy&ewkwc^ let yourself go crazu for Lake Cowitifmuls in 2007 f6r^ust0„ 



Please sign me up for the following 
Lake County Journal: (check one below) 

□ Antioch Journal 

□ Fox Lake Journal 

□ Grayslake Journal 
a Gurnee/Wadsworth 
q Round Lake Journal 

□ Lake Villa/Lindenhurst 

□ Wauconda Journal 



F 



LAKE COUNTY 



OURNALS 



Name 



Address. 
City 



Phone 



E-mail 



Payment Options 

Q Bill Me Q Check (payable to Lake County Journals) 

□ Visa □ MasterCard □ Discover 

Debit/Credit Card Number 

Signature 



Exp Date. 



./ /_ 



If you select payment by check or credit/debit card, please enclose this card in an envelope and mail to: 
Lake County Journals, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250. Or for faster service, call (815) 459-8118. 

Offer valid to households which have not subscribed to the Lake County Journals 

for the past 30 days and live In the Journal's delivery area. Offer expires without notice. Offer SC2007 




I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 
P.O. Box 250 
Crystal Lake, IL 60039 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST-CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 25 CRYSTAL LAKE IL 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



NORTHWEST NEWS GROUP 

PO BOX 250 

CRYSTAL LAKE IL 60039-9936 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 





Statler Brothers Farewell Concert 

Now Available on CD-OVD-VHS 
It's your chance.to own their Final Appreciation Concert! 

FREE 8"xl 0" Print offer - See Page 1 4 Inside 



Rediscovering 
Jamestown, Va. 

Alabama spreads 
the country gospel 
Two muffin recipes 







=H* 



American 
Profile 




\^ Could you give me some background on Hugh 
Laurie, who plays Dr. House on House M.D,l 
— Dianna Arthur, West Baden Springs, Ind. 



V^ I'm in love with Jack 
on Men in Trees! What can 
you tell me about this new 
TV hunk? 

— Shelly Almrez, Arttsia, N.M. Actor James Tupper 

James Tupper, 37, is making lots of hearts flutter in the hit 
ABC-TV scries as a handsome fish and wildlife biologist 
in small-town Alaska who reels in newcomer Marin Frist 
(Anne Heche), He's appeared in more than 50 stage plays, 
had small roles in the TV shows How I Met Your Mother, 
CSI: New York and Gilmore Girls, appeared in the movies 
Joe Dirt and Corky Romano, and in the TV movie Love's 
Long Journey, Before settling down to become an actor, the 
native Canadian traveled extensively and once owned a cof- 
fee and tea farm in the foothills of Africa's Mount Kenya. 

K£ What's the name of the song at the end of the 
movie The Executioner's Song? It's played when the 
hearse Is taking away the body of Gary Gilmore. 

— Theodore Miller, East Hartford, Conn, 

The late country superstar Waylon Jennings contrib- 
uted several songs to the soundtrack of the 1982 
TV movie about the final days of serial killer Gary 
Gilmore, portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones. The 
closing theme, "Defying Gravity (The Execu- 
tioner's Song)," was included on Jennings' 1987 
album Hangin' Tough. 



Laurie, 46, who plays 
the irreverent, cranky, 
miserable and anti-social 
maverick physician on 
the hit Fox-TV series, 
says he is' hot at all like 
the character — and even 
his American accent is 
fake. Until House M.D., 
the England-born actor's 
highest-profile role in 
. the Un ited . States wa s 
as" : .the 'father, in two 
Stuart Little movies. Mar- 
ried for. 17 years, wife Jo 
stays in London with thei 
frequent breaks from his 













Hugh Laurie plays Dr. House on TV, 

r three children while Laurie takes 
work to fly home. 



$& s 



?■ 



Sally Field stars 
in TV's Brothen 
and Sisters. 



Q I see Sally 
Field doing a lot of 
commercials now. 
Has she quit mak- 
ing movies? We 
"loved her in Steel 
Magnolia* and many 
others. She is still such 
a beautiful lady. 
—Gladys Clark; White Hall, Ark 

:Field,;60|. became a spokes- 
woman' for, the osteoporosis'; 
. me d ication. B on i va'.wheh [she 
rwaS' diagnosed with the .c'onf ; 
'dfriori. NoTOovie roles are on 
, her horizon' at the moment; 
but the I Academy Award-:; 
'winning ' actress, who has 
appeared in nearly«30filmsf 
vcurrently/starsanithe i Sunday) 
r!mg^r-pnme^tfme>ABC:TV' 
"drama. Brothers (and Sisters. 



What is David Hasselhoff doing these days? 

■Terri Brown, Orlando, Fla, 

The former Knight Rider and Baywatch star is 
appearing in a version of the Broadway musi- 
cal comedy The Producers at the Paris Hotel 
inlas Vegas. When Hasselhoff got the part 
of bumbling, cross-dressing director Roger 
DeBris, he recalls the choreographer 
saying, "David,.you're a great singer. 
and you're going to look fantastic 
in a dress." Speaking of clothing, 
Hasselhoff has been creating 
his own line of T-shirts with 
funny sayings such as "Don't 
Hassle the Hoff." Lost year 
he published his autobiogra- 
phy, Making Waves, and. he's 
recording a new CD. He's 
also been going through 
a messy public divorce, "I 
don't like talking about 
the negativity because I'm 
moving on," -he says. "My- 
duty is to be the best father I 
can be, the best human being I 
can and do the best work I can," 
says Hasselhoff, 54, who has 
two teenage daughters. 

* Cover photo by 
Jupiterlmages Corp, 

■ Would ^ouHke: to know more about your 
favorite celebrity, or public figure? 

Send your questions to; 

Ask American. Profile, .34 1 'Cool Springs Blvd., 
Suke -400, Franklin, TN 37067 or e-mail us at 
askus@americanpr<6filexpni. 

•The volume of mall received, prohibit* -us from /giving? pers'on'al'- 
ftpliti — through is-mall or other means. 




Page 2 • www.americanprofile.com 




(I 



> 



Ge!chralht» Hamatincn Life 

Pr«ident& CEO 

Richard G Porter 

Vice President/Group Publisher 

TraceyAhman 

Executive Editor 

Charlie Cox 

Senior Editor Sluart Englert 

Editor Richard McVcy 

Entertainment Editor Neil Pond 

Assistant Editor Jane Srygley 

Food Editor Candace Floyd < 

Contributing Editor MartjAltoun 

Art Director Brcnan Sharp 
Publication Designer ER Elliott 

Photo Editor David Mudd 

Production Manager Sam Payne 

Traffic Coordinator Susan Fisher 

Manager of Internet Content Matt Johnston 

Web Developer Kevin Todd 

ADVERTISING SALES 

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Associate Publisher Amy Chemoff 

NEW YORK 

Eastern Ad Director Donna LirtcWcg 

Regional Ad Director Hafy Birnbaum 

Account Managers Shannon HajiKevb Gannon 

CHICAGO 

Midwest Ad Director Erica Schuhz 

Account Manager Leah Viands 

Southeast/West Coast Ad Director Frank Zer 

Los Arjgeles Account Manager Jamie Rets 

Director of Marketing Jeff Dunetz 

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CIRCULATION SALES 

Vice President/Publisher Relations Jerry Lyles 

Regional Circulation Directors 

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Nashville I-80O-72O-6323 

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Steve Minucci 

CORPORATE & EDITORIAL OFFICES 
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PUBLISHING GROUP-OF AMERICA. 

President & CEO 

Richard G. Porter 

Chief Financial Officer & COO 

Stephen C. Duggan 

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GregCoble 

Network Administrator. Mjke Ofin 

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s$ 



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America, 341 Cool! 
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nliiixul tiuctici and cuntri built ires in Editor, /iwimt 
fnfrU. 34 1 Cuol 5prinj3 Html.. Suite -11)0, Fnnklin, TN 
37ufi7. Piibttiliing Group of America, Inc. will no* be 
rtipuiuibit- fur unsolicited rruHruli, and cannot piuran- 
vx cite mum of any nurcriaU uihmitied ru it, 02<X)7 
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s imk-nurk of iWishinj; Gnwp of America, Inc. All 
rijOitt reserved. iUpniductiun in whole or port of any 
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without lite c*jnen written pmiiiuion of Publishing 
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LOOK IS FRESH AS A DAISY 




„ , ^tn.rfTPKiAwqprenitv's* line of bladder control protection. Andnow our pantiliners, pads and 

Crt . *prff samole call 1-800-317-3450 toll-free or visit www.serehity.cpm 




,'. ... ;. ?i 



Hometown 







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SP% ... 



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by STUART ENGLERT 

Sen tor Editor 



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Danny Schmidt hoists a plastic bucket filled with th .7 ^« d diseast ; *™cion and 

. i , , f r 1 1 ■ t w,tn me Powhatan Indians, they ultimately 

mud from an abandoned water well in Jamestown, endured under the leadership of Capt, John 

Va., unearthing 400 years of history at the first per- Smith and planted the seeds of American 

manent English settlement in the New World. Inside tT^i 7** als ° W ? the f° nti " ent , 

, , . it j r u tne English language, the Anglican Church and 

the bucket IS a shoe sole that belonged to one Ot the tne foe-market system based on the tobacco trade, 
colony's early residents. Today, evidence of the colony is preserved at 

"It's very fragile," says Schmidt, 27, cradling the piece of blackened Historic Jamestowne, a 1,500-acre park admin- 
leather in his hands. "I'm going to take it to the 



Capt. John Smith 



lab right now." 

Within a few hours, Schmidt and three other 
archaeologists sift through five buckets of mud 
containing four shoe soles, an iron sword hilt, a 
ceramic tobacco pipe, a handful of squash seeds, 
and numerous glass and pottery shards. 

"This site is just loaded with artifacts," says archae- 
ologist Carter Hudgins, 28, referring to the well, which 
researchers believe colonists filled with refuse four cen- 
turies ago after it went dry or became contaminated. 

Since 1994, archaeologists have discovered hun- 
dreds of thousands of artifacts, from a tobacco 
seed to a suit of armor, while excavating the site 
of James Fort, a one-acre wooden enclosure built 
by a group of 104 men and boys who landed on 
Jamestown Island on May 13, 1607. 

The colonists arrived aboard three ships, the 
Discovery, Godspeed and Susan Constant, Though 




Archaeologist Danny Schmidt (above) explores an 
abandoned mil in Jamestown, Va., where artifacts, 
such as pottery shards (right), have been discovered 



istered by the National Park Service and the Asso- 
ciation of the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities 
(APVA), which lasc year opened a museum along 
the James River to showcase more than a thousand 
artifacts, including cwo human skeletons, found 
during the ongoing archaeological dig. 
"We haven't found the site of the first church 
yet," says William Kelso, APVA's director of 
archaeology. "That was the heart of the 
operation." 

In 1614, Englishman John Rolfe 
married Pocahontas, the daughter 
of Chief Powhatan, in a Jamestown 
church, ushering in a period of 
temporary peace between the colo- 
nists and native people. Five years later, 
the first general assembly in the West- 
ern Hemisphere convened in the colony's 
church, laying the foundation for the form of 



Page 4 • www.americanprofile.com 



i^b 




Dick Cheatham depicts his ancestor John 
Rolfe, who sowed the seeds of democracy. 

represencative government we have in the 
United States today. 

"The seed of democracy was watered 
by the profits of tobacco," says Dick 
Cheatham, 58, a l4rh-generation 
descendant of Rolfe who portrays his 
pioneering ancestor. Rolfe is credited 
with introducing West Indies tobacco 
in Virginia, crossbreeding it with indig- 
enous strains and providing the colony 
with a cash crop for export to Europe. 

A mile upstream of the original Fort 
James is Jamestown Settlement, a living 
history museum where costumed re-cnac- 
cors teach visitors about sailing aboard 
replicas of the ships that brought the colo- 
nists to Virginia. They also demonstrate 
17th-century skills such as cooking over an 
open hearth, shooting a matchlock musket, 
tanning deer hides and basket weaving in a 
re-created fort and Virginia Indian village. 
(Continued on page 7) , 




Cameron McKay portray* a Powhatan Indian. 
www.americanprofile.com • Page 5 





RECIPE: 






Blueberry Muffins 




Hometown 
Recipes 



Morning 

Glories 

Muffins are a great way to 

start the day, especially for busy families. 
Mix them up and bake them the night 
before so they're ready to grab as you and 
your family members run out the door the 
next morning. 

Helen K, Woronik of Salem, Conn., sent 
us her recipe for Blueberry Muffins. "We 
grow our own blueberries on our farm, and 
for years I searched for the perfect muffin 
recipe. I finally created this recipe, and it 
lias been a hit with my family and friends - e^ '.#3n5S 
for many years " she says. . 

Perfect for holiday mornings and for host- 
ess gifts, Pumpkin Applesauce Muffins from 
Qieri Marcovitch will fill your kitchen with 
the aromas of cinnamon, mace and nutmeg. 
"These muffins area very moist and delicious 
healthful snack," the Santa Qarita, Calif, resi- 
dent says. "1 liave enjoyed making them for 
gift baskets for many years. They are always 
well received." 

As always, American Prtfde looks forward 
to receiving your recipes and sharing them 
with our millions of readers across the nation. 
To submit a recipe of your own, send it, along 
with die story behind it and a color photo- 
graph of yourself, to: Hometown Recipes, 
American Pnftk t $A\ Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 
400, Franldin, TN 37067. $> 



Search Our Recipe Database! 



Our new online recipe database has 

more than 500 Hometown Recipes 

organized by category and keyword. 

Just log on to AtnericanProftk.com 

and dick on Recipes. 

Anicrican/M/fitcom 




Blueberry Muffins 



Muffins: 


1 


cup plus 3 


4 


cups all-purpose 




tablespoons milk 




flour 


1 


teaspoon vanilla 


6 


teaspoons 




extract 




baking powder 


2 


teaspoons 


L 


cup sugar 




almond extract 


Vi 


teaspoon salt 


3 


teaspoons 


1 


cup butter or 




grated orange 




margarine 




rind (optional) 


2 


large eggs, 


2 


cups blueberries, 




slightly beaten 




fresh or frozen 



i. Preheat oven to 375F. Grease cups 'of muffin tin or 
line with baking cups. 

2. Combine flour, baking powder, sugar and sale in a 
large bowl. Cut in. butter using two knives or a pastry 
blender until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Make 
a well in the dry Ingredients and add eggs, milk, and 
vanilla and almond extracts, stirring just until the liquid 
Is absorbed. Gently fold in orange rindy If using, and 
berries, then fill muffin cups with the mixture, 

3. To prepare the topping, blend sugar, flour, cinnamon 
and butter together and sprinkle evenly overtop of 

.muffins. 

4. Bake 23 to;30 minutes, until the center springs back 
to the touch. Yield: 24 medium or 12 large muffins. 



RECIPE 



Pumpkin Applesauce Muffins 



.... - - . . 



KHH 





Pumpkin Applesauce Muffins 



cup solid vegetable shortening 

cups sugar 

eggs 

cup applesauce, any style 

cup canned pumpkin 

cup apple juice 

cups all-purpose flour 

teaspoons baking soda 

teaspoon baking powder 

teaspoons salt 

teaspoon cinnamon 

teaspoon mace 

teaspoon nutmeg 

cup finely chopped walnuts 



I. Preheat oven to 350F. Grease cups of i 
tin or line with baking cups. 
.2. Cream together shortening and sugar. Add V 
eggs one at a time, then stir jn applesauce and 

(pumpkin until well mixed. Add apple juice, 
flour, baking sqda.and baWhg pxjyyder. Don't 
overmix. When batter is just smooth, add" salt, 
cinnamon, mace and nutrneg.Stlr in walnuts. Fill 
muffin cups. 

3. Bake 20 minutes, or until a toothpick insert- 
ed in the center comes out clean; Yield: 24 

7 medium muffins. 




(Continued from page 5) 

"We get our raffia (a plant fiber used 
for weaving) from a supplier in Maryland, 
but the Indians would have used cattails 
from the marshes," says Cameron McKay, a 
Williamsburg, Va., resident who portrays a 
Powhatan Indian. 

Meanwhile, back on Jamestown Island, 
the historic settlement's only modern-day 
residents — William Kelso and his wife, 
Ellen — live in a four- 
room cottage within 
view of the archaeologi- 
cal dig at James Fort. 

"I'm the luckiest 
guy in the world" says 
Kelso, 65. "My dream 
was to find something 
significant in American 
history and then to live 
and breathe it," 
Kelso has accom- 
plished his dream and he hopes further 
excavation at Jamestown reveals more 
clues about the people who gave the 
United States its start 400 years ago. "I'm 
at the epicenter of America," he adds. 
"This is my hometown." ^ 

The 400th anniversary celebration 
of Jamestown is scheduled May II- 
13. Visit www.jamestownl607.org for 
more information. 




William Kelso 






$."« | 



ftS AN telecte Jl FRUIT tuice VITAMINS 



www.americanprofile.com • Page 7 



Cover Story 




At mile 17 of the Houston 

Marathon, Steve Boone, 57, is miserable. He's exhausted, 
overiieatcd and dripping with sweat, but he maintains a 
steady stride through the streets of Texas' largest city, deter- 
mined to cross dve finish line of die 262-mile footrace. 

Seeking a distraction, die founder of the 50 States 
Marathon Club turns to another runner and says, "Look 
for George Bush Sr.; lie and Barbara live liere." The Buslies 
liave been known to watch as runners pass through their 
neighborhood. 

A sighting of the nations 4 1st president would give 
Boone a psychological boost and something to talk 
about for miles. He scans friendly faces in the crowd, 
supporters holding out orange slices and chunks of 
banana to energize the runners. 

"We turned die comer, and he wasn't there," recalls 
Boone, recollecting details of die January race. 

Disappointed, the long-distance runner perse- 
veres toward the finish line, knowing that his wife 
Paula, 40, and dozens of other club members are 
confronting their own physical and mcnral challenges 
along the grueling course. 

"We still have to run the best we can," says Boone, 
a computer software designer from Humble, Texas (poj>. 
14,579). "We will never quit." 

On the road again 

Boone ran his first marathon in Houston in 1988 at 
age 39 after two friends bet he couldn't do ic. He since has 
completed about 340 marathons, including three mara- 
thons in each of die 50 states. Paula has run two mara- 
thons in each state and plans to run her 200th marathon 
in Wilmington, Del., in May, 

The couple met at the Boston Marathon in 1997, 
and together they've seen much of the country on foot. 
They've raced through California's giant redwoods dur- 
ing the Big Sur International Marathon, run through 
the streets of New Orleans' historic French Quarrer 
during the Morel i Gras Marathon and jogged through 
the foggy Appalachian foothills of West Virginia and 
Kentucky during the Hatfield & McCoy Marathon. 

"Our adventure is like a trawl book," lie says, "You 
turn the pages one step at a time." 

The Boones run 30 to 40 marathons a year, 
sometimes two in a weekend. They usually fly to 



out-of-state destinations the day before the race to 
register and get a good night's sleep. 

Join the club 

Boone, a former member of the 50 States and 
D.C.. Marathon Group, founded the 50 States Mara- 
thon Club in 2001 because he wanted to improve 
communication and cooperation among runners by 
launching a website. 




Steve and Paula Boone of Humble,- Texas, have run 
multiple marathons In every state In the nation. 



Both organizations now maintain active web- 
sites, and hundreds of long-distance runners belong 
to both. Boone's club has grown to 1,300 members 
and includes athletes from every state and nine for- 
eign countries. Runners must finish marathons in at 
least 10 states before they can join either club, 

"I was 48 before I started, and I got hooked," 
says Don McNelly, 86, of Rochester, N.Y., who has 
completed more than 720 marathons. "It's an addic- 
tion, really, but a positive addiction." 

The club's youngest member, Brenton Floyd, 21, 
of Harrison, Tenn. (pop. 7,630), finished his first 
marathon at age 10 and has since completed about 
350 marathons and other long-distance races. 

Club members often team up along the course to chit- 
cliat, trade jokes and pass the time. "You look for the 50 
States shirt at races and say, 'Oh, there's somebody I have 
something in common with,"' Paula explains. 

A test of human endurance 

Marathons test human endurance like few odier 
sports. Whetlier a runner is slow or fasr, running 26.2 
miles is a physical and mental challenge that often involves 
muscle cramps and blistered feet, and requires psychologi- 
cal distractions to word off the pain and fatigue 

"Wlien it gets really irritating, I start going through 
particularly bad days at school," says Paula, a former third- 
grade readier. "Correcting papers, all the things I lad to 
do— that seems to pass time." 

"If I'm running with friends, we start cracking 
more jokes," she adds. 

Paula also looks forward to, the traditional kiss 
her husband gives her before and after well race. He 
usually proposes again, too. "Would you marry me 
again, even in Rhode Island? Even in California? Even 
in Kentucky? Even in Iowa?" he asks. The answer is 
always yes, she says. 

Long-distance runners have different motivations 
and abilities. Top athletes crave the competition and 
can run a marathon in a couple of hours. All mara- 
thoners desire the personal challenge, even if they walk 



Page 8 • www.americahprofile.com 



KlS 
le- 



nt 
lut 

pit- 
50 

ave 



i»cr 
16.2 

pves 
fe- 



ting 



.; 



aciws the finish line after the crowds have 
jjone home. 

Iran Drazdz, 63, a motivational speaker 
from Litchfield Park, Ariz, (pop. 3,810), started 
running in 1979 to lose 30 pounds before the 
Honolulu Marathon. Now a veteran of more 
titan 50 marathons, she continues to run "for the 
health of it" and to set a good example for her 
rot* grandsons. 

"They are my heart, and 1 want to be around 
to see them graduate, marry and have children," 
she siys, "1 want my grandsons to know that fit- 
ncss is an everyday thing like brushing your teeth 
and is i»rc of living your life to the fullest". 

Once Drozdz completes a marathon in 
all 50 states — she has run in more than 
30 — she wanes to run marathons on all seven 
continents. "I'm living my life like I have six 
months left to live," she says, "and I am not 
running, anymore for competitive fast times 
but the time of my life." . 




Going the distance 

Nearly an hour after Steve Boone crosses 
the finish line in Houston with a time of 4 
hours, 57 minutes and 43 seconds, his wife 
Paula and fellow runner Dave Bell, 44, of 
Highlands Ranch, Colo. (pop. 70,931). com- 
plete the race amid a cheering crowd. 

"Dave and I crossed the finish line and we 
heard people say, "There's George and Barbara 
Bush,'" Paula recalls. "We walked over and got 
to shake both of their hands. They said, 'Con- 
gratulations, we're proud of you."' 

Shaking hands with a former U.S. presi- 
dent tops the list of marathon memories for 
Paula, who along with her husband has run 
thousands of miles while participating in foot- 
races across the nation. 7? 

Palli Mi/ck is a freelance uriter in Rithmoml, Texas. 

Visit www.SOstatesmatxfthondub.com 
for more information. 



www.americanprofile.com • Page 9 



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by. 

CHRIS 

NEAL 



Goes Bock to Churc 



Randy Owen, lead singer of the 

country £roup Alabama, had a couple of very yood 
reasons for wanting to make a CD of gospel music. 

'There were some songs that I felt like 1 had to rccond 
to make my soul semi-complete," lie says. "And, of course, 
I wanted to make my mother happy." 

Owens mom, Martha, must be beaming. Alabama's 
latest album, Songs of Inspiration, Vol. II, the follow-up 
to last years surprise hit of the same name, is full of 
classic church songs. Both projects were Owens" idea. 

Despite all the band's achievements over the last 
three decades — induction into in the Country Music 
Hall of Fame, more than 40 No. 1 hits and 150 
awards— Songs of Impimtioit was the group's first 
album to debut atop the BilllmnI country albums 
chart, indicating an out-of-the-box sales explosion. 

More important than the project's success, however, 
is the way in which both Songs of Inspiration albums 
reconnected cite members of country musics most suc- 
cessful band wfch their childlioock "The Alabama guys 
grew up in the church, so this is second nature to them," 
says Sony BMG Nashville Chairman Joe Galante, who 
liad been planning the Songs of Inspiration project with the 
band for more tlun a decade. 



The new CD features Alabamas renditions of such 
hymnbook standards as "Church in the Wildwood," 
"Precious Memories," "Love Lifted Me," "Will the Circle 
Be Unbroken" and "Lonesome Valley." 

Owens' parents were musicians who sang at churclies 
all over northern Alabama when he was a child. "My 
mama'd play piano, and sometimes sing," he recalls. "My 
sisters would sing liarmony." Manila still plays piano at 
the Rainsville Community Church in Rainsville, Ala. 
(pop. 4,499). Randy's fadier, Gladstone, died in 1980. 

Owen and his wife, Kelly, attend the First Methodist 
Church in Fore Payne, Ala. (pop, 12,938), his home- 
town and the organizational base of the band. He says 
his faith has sustained him during his experiences in the 
topsy-turvy music business. "There's a goodness about 
faith that helps you through the tough times," lie says. 
"It lets you rejoice with the successes, and yet have a 
deeper meaning in your life." 

Alabama" retired from touring in 2004. Since then, 
Owen, 57, lias spent much of his time writing songs, 
and lie completed the most recent season as a judge on 
die popular USA Network TV talent sliow Nashville 
Star. He also performed on the Christian Country Music 
Associations Inspirational Country Music Awards show 




last November, extending Alabama's reach into the gos- 
pel music community. 

"To liave someone like Randy Owen do a gospel 
album and sing on our awards show is miraculous," says 
CCMA Founder and President Gene Higgins. "It's won- 
derful. It broadens the base." 

In the wake of the band's retirement from the road, 
die rest of the group has kept busy as well. Bass player 
Teddy Gentry, 55, has become a record producer, guitar- 
ist Jeff Cook, 57, has a new duo called Cook & Glenn; and 
drummer Mark Herndon, 51, is a corporate jet pilot. 

The members have been spending plenty of rime 
with their families, too. AH four are married with 
children and continue to live in Alabama. Randy 



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hits two daughters and a son, Mark and Jeff 
each have one daughter, and Teddy has a 
son and daughter, plus five grandchildren. 
Their kids are related to one another, as 
Owen, Gentry and Cook are cousins who 
all grew up in or around Fort-Payne. 

Alabama will continue to make music 
together, says Owen, even if the band won't 
be taking their show on the road anymore. 
"All we said was that we weren't planning 
on touring," he says. "We didn't close any 
doors to anything else." 

Thar may even include a third volume of 
Srmgt </ Insphxtimi. "Yd love to do it," he says. 
"And I'd like to keep on doing it as long as 
I'm able." Zf 

Oms Neal is a writer in Nasbvilk, Tarn. _ 

SpiciAtOFFE 

Alabama's Songs of Inspiration Vol. 2 

These songs of faith will stir your soul 
- 13 favorites from the one and 
only Alabama. Joyfully listen to / Am A 
Pilgrim, Church in 
the Wildwood, 
Will The Circle 
Be Unbroken, If . 
I Could Hear My 
Mother Pray 
Again, Supper- 
time, Down By 
the Riverside, 
Precious Memories, Lonesome Valley, The 
Refrain of John Dillon James, Love Lifted 
Me, When tt Comes My Time, One Life 
and The Star-Spangled Banner. 

Visit americanprofile.com to own your 
copy or have yourcredlt card ready, and , 
call (800) 715-6248 br-send check for- 
$18.98 plus $4.97 delivery to Alabama 
Gospel - Dept. ALGS-A7I6, P.O. Box 
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ILLINOIS — Ship models used in the movies 
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Annie are among more than 200 on exhibit at the 
National Museum of Ship Models and Sea History 
in Sadorus (pop. 426). 

INDIANA — Frankfort (pop. 16,662) nacive 
Will Geer, best known for his role as Grandpa Zeb 
Walton in the 1970s television show TbeWahotts, 
toured the nation during the Depression with folk 
singers Burl Ives and Woody Guthrie, performing 
mostly ac government work camps. 

IOWA — Residents of Rowley (pop. 290) were 
upset when the U.S. Postal Service closed the local 
post office last May. Led by the mayor, townspeople 
waged a letter-writing campaign, and resident Jim 
Graver bought and repaired the post office building. 
In December, the post office reopened, 

KANSAS— At 104, Ralph Waldo McBurney of 
Quinter (pop. 961) continues to work each day, rais- 
ing bees and selling honey, along with his autobiog- 
raphy, Afy First 100 Years: A Look Back front the Finish 
Litre. He was honored as "America's Oldest Worker for 



2006" by Experience Works, a national job-training 
and employment service for seniors. 

MICHIGAN — The 'state's first surviving set of 
sextuplets was bom January 2004 to Ben and Amy Van 
Houten of Hamilton. In September, the Van Houtens 
welcomed their seventh child, a daughter. 

MINN ESOTA— Jim Kramer, 48, a proofreader 
from Roseville(pop. 33,690), put his letter-perfect skills to 
use and won die 2006 US. Scrabble Open and $25,000. 

MISSOURI— In the 1860s, horticulturist 
George Husmann, who established the state's wine in- 
dustry in Hermann (pop. 2,674), helped save Frances 
wine industry when vineyards there were devastated 
by an aphid-like pest. Husmann shipped pest-resistant 
rootstock from wild Missouri vines to France. 

NEBRASKA — Madaline Fennel 1, a sixth-grade 
teacher at Franklin Elementary School in Omaha, was 
named the 2007 Nebraska Teacher of the Year by the 
Nebraska Department of Education. 

NORTH DAKOTA— In 1948, Lloyd E. 
Rigler co-founded Rigler and Deutsch Food Brokers, 



bought the recipe for Adolph's Mear Tenderizer from a 
California restaurant and soon made his fortune. Rigler, 
who was bom in 1915 in Lelir (pop. 114), moved at age 
4 to Wishek (pop. 1 ,122) wliere he ran his own greeting 
card and gift shop ac age 11. 

OHIO — Unable to pay its streetlight bills lost 
summer, Cliauncey (pop. 1,067) came up with a funny 
fund-raiser. An outhouse, dubbed the "Redneck Wish- 
ing Well," is parked on a resident's lawn. After making 
a donation, the resident chooses the next lawn for the 
outhouse to grace. 

SOUTH DAKOTA— In the 1890s, because 
of the state's lax divorce laws, Sioux Falls become a 
hot spot for quickie divorces. That changed in 1908 
when lawmakers raised the residency requirement for 
couples to one year. 

WISCONSIN — Traveling salesman Peter Gil- 
bert of Glendale (pop. 13367) permanendy parked his 
car, a 1989 Saab 900 SPG, ac the Wisconsin Automotive 
Museum in Hartford (pop. 10,905) last year after it logged 
more than 1 million miles. The Saab, with most of its 
original parts, survived eight deer coll isions. Z^> 



ofi 



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STATLER BROTHERS RETIRE! 

Say Goodbye For The Final Time 





iTe«a«. e r- S =nioy a «na. moment together. 



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Farewell Concert Ends Glorious 40 Year 
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CX>, t>Vt> fii*A VU$ of 6x*ejeA tJooo Av*&sW£. 
See Below for FREE 8" x 10" Print Offer 

Staunton, Virginia - Yes, it's true: after 40 years, 32 albums and 100 
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But don't be troubled - even if you weren't one of the lucky few 
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Great Thou Art, Thank You World and Amazing Grace. 

EXCLUSIVE FREE BONUS 8" x 10" Print 

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Order any Stader Brothers Farewell 
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. Please send me: 

SALE! 2-CDs + 2-hour DVD {**/«. 1?% 

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■ Include 


soiti'W&y, money back GUARANTEE (lea »&li) 


Name 


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City 


L . HERE 

Slate 


ZJp- 


Phon«( ) SBFC-A716 



ORDER TODAY -3 EASY WAYS! 

ONLINE:' www.americariproflle.com/store 
MAIL TO: Statler Brothers Farewell Concert, 

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FREE CALL: (800) 715-6248(Ple«th*viyowo«fiie*rilfMdy) 

' C«ifHlW!<!i«tiip««t>WJyoJ.««i<Vmi^c*.miLiJU^mf>iJirtiiK,Kjj(iw(iiftJt» 
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750,000 Ampli-Ear Hearing Amplifiers Sold 



=£ Now You Can... ~y 



NEW, IMPROVED 
AND RISK 
FREE! 



Hear Like Never Before^ 






\l>rv 



Direct From The A M I V 

Manufacturer! UllL I 
Not $500 



s* 



$: 






: : M 



Real Customers Praise 
Ampli-Ear Quality! 

■rProblem Solvedl 

'My husband's habit of losing aids (at $1 ,500 a 
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•-He Loves Itl 
"Yesterday afternoon my husband's Ampli Ear 
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--What He's Been Searching for! 

"I have ordered other hearing devices for my father 
but ihey didn't work for him. -The Ampll Ear is what ' 
he has been searching for. He really likes it."* 
• Mr.A.O„Gastonla;N.C.. 

•-Very Good! 

1 like these a great deal. These are very good.' 
•Mr.G.S,,Lrxkwood l N.Y. . , 

■Tremendous Relief to Hear! 

"I purchased one of.your hearing/devices some 
two or three months ago,) must say how thrilled I 
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have told many of my friends about your product* - ' 
Ms. W.K.- Rock Sprf-igs.'WVr^ 

-Better Than the $1,000 Aid! 

J My husband just received one In the mall and he" 
likes It better than the hearing aid he paid $1 ,000 
for." - Order # X36421443 

"■ Clear Voices I 
"My friend received this miracle of hearing aid 
from his caring and understanding boss as a '»7 , 
present for being so loyal and dependable, (My. 
friend tells) about how wonderful his Ampll Ear Is - 
and how clear the voices of his Wends and ■: 
relatives are and wonderful It Is lb hear the. sounds 
of every day objects and living things:' the sound of 
the wind rustling through" the trees, to the birds ■ 
and the sound of hearing his one year old . 
grandson call him granddaddy" 
■Mr.JA,Sr.,Blythevllle;AR 

«" The Darn Things workl— &LL 

"l purchased two Ampll Ears because someone 
came up with a hearing aid that didn't cost an armb- 
and a leg. I did not expect Is' - that at that price - , : 
the darn mings'workl I couldn't help but write you Vs. 

and thank you for. your continued great success," Y . 
■* Mr. A.F., Racine, Wisconsin^'.-' - 



The Nation's 
Very Best! 

Since the year 2000 - AmpliEar has 
been America's #1 Selling Hearing 
Amplifier. With nearly 750,000 Units 
Sold all across the United Stnies - Ampli- 
Ear has proven itself io be ihc Best, Most 
Reliable Hearing Amplifier in the World 
today - and as always UNDER S35 ! 

Now, in 2007, the Engineers at 
Ampli-Ear have developed an ALL 
NEW lop ofihc line Digital Hearing 
Amplifier ... aptly named the Mega- 
Ampli-Ear 2007. 

All new Digital circuity - and the 
Digital Enhanced Capacitor - amplifies 
sound like never before! American 
Research Institute testing rates the new 
Mega-car 2007 a full 100 out of 100 
points for clarity, amplification, and 
comfort! 

Yes! The NEW Mega Ampli-Ear 2007 
is 100% adjustable (now designed to 
be adjustable for the smallest to the 
largest ear opening), fits both men and 
women - and is nearly invisible in your 
car. So, end those embarrassing 
moments. Never apologize again Tor not 
being able to hear. Begin to: 

♦ Hear the QUIETEST Whispers 

♦ Listen to the FAINTEST Phone 
Conversations 

♦ Watch TV with the volume on LOW 

♦ CLEARLY hear conversations in 
a crowded room 

Trust Ampli-Ear 
Quality 

♦ Mega Comfort - Five silicone Ear tips 

♦ Mega Discrete - New Mega-Small size 

♦ Mega Power- Digital Technology 
Amplifies Like never Before! 

♦ Mega Value - Not $500 - Just $34.50 
Direct From the Manufacturer! 

♦ Mega Easy - Easy sound adjustment 
and Easy battery Changes! 

I *n 1 1 ten A) or «a rti trtrtsfy W W rate Hut) hkaa tol*™* 
n» i imfcat p*aw or a total putfmrg t* *n#-U UU I MM H 
rTBrwiv»a»m>M»^batrtir«OMU«MWM]llrttJ»(nHar 
cotosai t* * taraod ttwa*> tf° wmtaj i I (fame) c* t» or, bob* 
UMM n *n* £jr UN ■ a 1 IrM t* I tartoJ taring »d etoenxr tM*n 
o KM n)pgBimirdn»umtaoi n t» IttnQd li urt v<"^i " lgt * 



Try Ampli-Ear RISK FREE ! Easy. Simple. Honest. 

Try Ampli-Ear for yourself for an entire month. If you arc unhappy 
for ANY reason ... Just send it back for a Complete and Immediate 
Refund. No Questions Asked. Easy. Simple. Honest. 



A Note from the 
President of Ampli-Ear 

Look. I know you may be skepti- 
cal of a S34.50 Hearing Amplifier. I 
would be too since hearing aids can 
sell for thousands of dollars. So how 
do 1 supply a good product at a low 
price? Easy. 

Hearing Amplifiers DONT cosi 
manufacturers thousands, or even 
hundreds of dollars to make. But 
with middle men, mark-ups and 
more mark-ups. the customer - YOU 
- are usually charged sky high prices. 

1 promise you Ampli-Ear is a lop 
quality product... thai will make a 
REAL DIFFERENCE in YOUR quality 
of life. Wilh nearly 3/4 ofa million 
units sold, countless testimonials, and 
factory Direct Pricing - 1 can say wilh 
confidence thai you will be happy 
with your purchase. And if you arcn\ ■ 
- 1 will send your money back, 

So go ahead and order today. You 
have nothing to lose and all ihc 
sounds in the world io gain. I stand 
by Ampli-Ear and I bet you will too. 
Sincerely, 

Christopher England 
President Ampli-Ear 




Our Risk Free 
Guarantee! 

Ampli-Ear is an American Company 
thai docs business the old fashioned 
way - with pride and integrity. We lake 
all ihe worry oul of ordering. 

Try Ampli-Ear RISK FREE. Try it 
yourseir for an ENTIRE MONTH. If you 
arc unhappy for ANY reason... Just send 
it back for a Complete arid Immediate 
Refund. No Questions Asked. Easy 
Simple. Honesi. 

But, wilh over 750,000 units sold ... 
with customers from All 50 States ... wilh 
Ampli-Ear even used by U.S. Soldiers 
serving overseas ... you can place your 
order knowing that Ampli-Ear is (lie 
Worlds #1 selling Hearing Amplifier ... 
and thai it will improve YOUR quality of 
life for the better, Order Now, 



Order Online at: www.AmpliEar.com 



FREE DELIVERY on All Orders! 



Send Order To: American Research Institute, Dept. AP-7 
21 Bridge Square, Westport, CT 06880 

*Q YESl Please RUSH me (1) MEGA Ampli-Ear unit for only $34.50 FREE DELIVERY 

-13 SAVE 1 5%: 2 MESA Ampll-Ears Only $58.65 FREE DELIVERY 

~U SAVE 20%: 3 MEGA Ampll Ears (have an extra on hand!) Only $79.00 freeoeuvery 

*t3 Lifetime Damage Replacement Guarantee $5.95 per unit 

*-Q Bonus Dealt 500 Hours of Batteries Only $4.95! Postpaid! 

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for Only $9,951 Postpaid! 
*-Q Wax Remover Ptease send me a wax removal kit to remove unwanted ear wax from 

my ampliear unit Onh/ $9.95 Postpaid! 
□ Check or money order enclosed 
Q Charge my: QVisa QAmex QMC Q Discover 



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^PEl lPRErtRRED ACCOUNT (D PAJi Offered byOT Bank lo qualified U.S. residents with approved credit. Creditworthiness determined by lender. Taxes, fees, shipping, handling, and any other applicable charges ire exit*, and vary. Monthly 
paymentsoased upon pre-rebate price. Minimum monthly payments ol $1 S or 3% of account balance, whichever Is greater. 

'PRtCtNG/AVAILABUJIY: Prices, specifications, availability and terms of offers may change without notice. Taxes, tees, shipping, handling and any applicable restocking charges are extra, and vary. Offers may be combined with 
other select offers or discounts. Valid for U.S. Cell Home Systems Co. new purchases only. Dell cannot be responsible for pricing or other errors, and reserves the right lo cancel orders arising from such errors. HARD DRIVE; 
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TRADEMARKS/COPYRIGHT NOTICES: Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Celeron, Celeron Inside, Centrino, Centrlno Logo, Intel Core, Core Inside, Pentium, and Pentium Inside are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or Its 
subsidiaries In (he United Stales and other countries. Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks ot Microsoft Corporation. O2007 Dell Inc. AH rights reserved. 



Pentium' D 

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