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Historic, Archive Document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 

FOR 

COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 

and 

FEDERAL -STATE -PRIVATE COOPERATIVE SNOW SURVEYS 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of AGRICULTURE-SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

and 

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 
STATE ENGINEER of COLORADO 
and STATE ENGINEER of NEW MEXICO 

Data included in this report were obtained by the agencies 
named above in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, 
U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service i Corps of Engineers 
and other Federal, State, and private organizations. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIAS OFIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I 
MAY 1, 1967 

IllllllllllllllllllllH 



TO RECIPIENTS OF WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK REPORTS: 



Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and 
spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Since the runoff from precipitation as snow is delayed, 
estimates of snowmelt runoff can be made well in advance of its occurrence. Streamflow forecasts published in this report are 
based principally on measurement of the water equivalent of the mountain snowpack. 

Forecasts become more accurate as more of the data affecting runoff are measured. All forecasts assume that climatic 
factors during the remainder of the snow accumulation and melt season as they affect runoff will add to be an effective average. 
Early season forecasts are therefore subject to a greater change than those made on later dates. 

The snow course measurement is obtained by sampling snow depth and water equivalent at surveyed and marked locations in 
mountain areas. A total of about ten samples are taken at each location. The average of these are reported as snow depth and 
water equivalent. These measurements are repeated in the same location near the same dates each year. 

Snow surveys are made monthly or semi-monthly from January 1 through June 1 in most states. There are about 1400 snow 
courses in Western United States and in the Columbia Basin in British Columbia. In the near future, it is anticipated that 
automatic snow water equivalent sensing devices along with radio telemetry will provide a continuous record of snow water 
equivalent at key locations. 

Detailed data on snow course and soil moisture measurements are presented in state and local reports. Other data or 
reservoir storage, summaries of precipitation, current streamflow, and soil moisture conditions at va I ley elevations are also 
included. The report for Western United States presents a broad picture of water supply outlook conditions, including selected 
streamflow forecasts, summary of snow accumulation to date, and storage in larger reservoirs. 

Snow survey and soil moisture data for the period of record are published by the Soil Conservation Service by states about 
every five years. Data for the current year is summarized in a West -wide basic data summary and published about October 1 
of each year . 

Listed below are water supply outlook reports based on Federa I -State -Private Cooperative snow surveys. Those published 
by the Soil Conservation Service may be obtained from Soil Conservation Service, Room 507, Federal Building, 701 N. W. 
Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97209. 

PUBLISHED BY SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 
D. A. WILLIAMS, Administrator 

The Soil Conservation Service publishes reports following the principal snow survey dates from January 1 through June 1 in 
cooperation with state water administrators, agricultural experiment stations and others. Copies of the reports for Western 
United States and all state reports may be obtained from Soil Conservation Service, Western Regional Technical Service Center, 
Room 507, 701 N. W. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97209. 

Copies of state and local reports may also be obtained from state offices of the Soil Conservation Service in the following 
sta tes: 



STATE 


ADDRESS 


Alaska 


P. O. Box "F", Palmer, Alaska 99645 


Arizona 


6029 Federal Building, Phoenix, Arizona 85205 


Colorado (N. Mex.) 


12417 Federal Building, Denver, Colorado 80202 


Idaho 


P. O. Box 38, Boise, Idaho 83701 


Monta na 


P. O. Box 855, Bozeman, Montana 59715 


Neva da 


P. O. Box 4850, Reno Nevada 89505 


Oregon 


1218 S. W. Washington St., Portland, Oregon 97205 


Utah 


4001 Federal Building, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 


Washington 


840 Bon Marche Bldg., Spokane, Washington 99206 


Wyoming 


P. O. Box 340, Casper, Wyoming 82602 



PUBLISHED BY OTHER AGENCIES 

Water Supply Outlook reports prepared by other agencies include a report for California by the 
Water Supply Forecast and Snow Surveys Unit, California Department of Water Resources, P. O. 
Box 388 , Sacramento , California 95802 — and for British Columbia by the Department of Lands, V 
Forests and Water Resources, Water Resources Service, Parliament Building, Victoria, British Columbia\^^^_____.^^ 




CONSERVATION OF WATER 
BEGINS WITH THE 
SNOW SURVEY 



FEDERAL-STATE COOPERATIVE 
SNOW SURVEYS AND WATER SUPPLY FORECASTS 

for 

COLORADO RIVER, PLATTE RIVER 
ARKANSAS RIVER AND RIO GRANDE DRAINAGE BASINS 

issued 

May 1, 1967 

Report Prepared By 

Jack N. Washichek, Snow Survey Supervisor 
and 

Donald W. McAndrew, Assistant Snow Survey Supervisor 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



United States Department of Agriculture State Engineer of Colorado 

Soil Conservation Service Denver, Colorado 

and and 
Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station State Engineer of New Mexico 

Fort Collins, Colorado Santa Fe, New Mexico 

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 




THE MAP ON THIS PAGE INDICATES THE MOST PROBABLE WATER SUPPLY AS 
OF THE DATE OF THIS REPORT. ESTIMATES ASSUME AVERAGE CONDITIONS OF 
SNOW FALL, PRECIPITATION AND OTHER FACTORS FROM THIS DATE TO THE END 
OF THE FORECAST PERIOD. AS THE SEASON PROGRESSES ACCURACY OF ESTI- 
MATES IMPROVE. IN ADDITION TO EXPECTED STREAMFLOW, RESERVOIR STOR- 
AGE, SOIL MOISTURE IN IRRIGATED AREAS, AND OTHER FACTORS ARE CONSIDERED 
IN ESTIMATING WATER SUPPLY. ESTIMATES APPLY TO IRRIGATED AREAS ALONG 
THE MAIN STREAMS AND MAY NOT INDICATE CONDITIONS ON SMALL TRIBUTARIES. 



GENERAL SERIES PAPER 
845 




WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK FOR COLORADO AND NEWMEXICO 

asof 

May 1 , 1967 



^ffcOLORADQ 



- All of Colorado's streams are expected to flow less than normal this year, however, 
the Colorado mainstem and streams to the north should not experience any major shortage. 
Despite the late spring snow storms, the Colorado snow pack remains below normal. 

The South Platte and Arkansas Basins on the east slope will have considerably less than 
normal streamflow, but have good reservoir storage for supplemental supplies. The 
Arkansas Basin has 160% of average carryover. 

The Rio Grande Basin streams should flow about 65% of normal and storage is below normal 
Streams in San Juan Basin should flow 60% of the 15 year average. 

Soils are in fair condition throughout most of the state. 

Conserve your water! 




NEW MEXlCO-Water shortages will exist over most of New Mexico this summer unless spring and summer 

rainfall is much above normal. Most of the snow in New Mexico is gone. In the headwater 
areas of the Rio Grande and San Juan Drainages the high elevation snow pack is still good, 
but medium to low snow has melted. 

Reservoir carry-over storage is less than normal, but will be of some help during the 
summer. Valley soils throughout the state are generally dry. 

Forecasts are far less than one-half the normal flows in all streams in New Mexico. 
Conservation of water should be the by-word this summer. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK BY MAJOR WATERSHED AREAS 
WATERSHED I WATERSHED V 



SOUTH PLATTE RIVER WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in Fort Collins, Big Thompson, 
Longmont, Boulder Valley, Jefferson, Teller-Park, Douglas County, 
Morgan, Kiowa, West Arapahoe, West Adams, East Adams, Platte 
Valley, Southeast Weld, and West Greeley Soil Conservation Dis- 
tricts. 

WATERSHED H 
ARKANSAS RIVER WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in Lake County, Upper Arkansas, 
Fremont, Custer County Divide, Fountain Valley, Black Squirrel, 
Horse-Rush Creek, Central Colorado, Turkey Creek, Pueblo, Bes- 
semer, Olney Boone, Cheyenne, Upper Huerfano, Stonewall, Spanish 
Peaks, PurgatO're, Branson Trinchera, Western Baca County, 
Southeastern Baca County, Two Buttes, Bent, Timpas, Northeast 
Prowers, Prowers, West Otero, East Otero, and Big Sandy Soil 
Conservation Districts. 

WATERSHED m 
RIO GRANDE WATERSHED (COLORADO) 

Describes water supply conditions in Rio Grande, Center, Mosca 
Hooper, Mt. Blanca, Sanches, and Culebra Soil Conservation Dis- 
tricts. 

WATERSHED TV 
RIO GRANDE WATERSHED (NEW MEXICO) 

Describes water supply conditions in Lower Cebolla, Abiquiu- 
Vallecitos, Eastern Taos, Lindrith, Coyote-Canones, Espanola 
Valley, Pojoaque, Jemez, Santa Fe-Sandoval, Tijeras, Cuba, and 
Englewood Soil Conservation Districts. 



DOLORES, SAN JUAN, AND ANIMAS RIVERS WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in San Miguel Basin. Dove Creek, 
Dolores, Mancos, LaPlata, Pine River, San Juan, and Glade Park 
Soil Conservation Districts. 

WATERSHED VI 

GUNNISON RIVER WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in Delta, Gunnison. Cimarron, 
Shavano, and Uncompahgre Soil Conservation Districts. 

WATERSHED VTI 

COLORADO RIVER WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in DeBeque, Lower Grand Valley, 
Bookcliff, Eagle County, Middle Park, Glade Park, Upper Grand 
Valley, Plateau Valley, South Side, and Mt. Sopris Soil Conservation 
Districts. 

WATERSHED VTH 

YAMPA, WHITE AND NORTH PLATTE RIVERS WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in Yampa, Moffat, West Routt, 
East Routt, North Park, Upper White River, Lower White River, and 
Douglas Creek Soil Conservation Districts. 

WATERSHED DC 

LOWER SOUTH PLATTE RIVER WATERSHED 

Describes water supply conditions in Sedgwick, South Platte, Haxton 
Peetz, Padroni, Morgan, Rock Creek and Yuma Soil Conservation 
Districts. 



WATERSHED 

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

SOUTH PLATTE RIVER WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




The snow pack in the mountain watersheds of the South Platte River and its tributaries remains below normal. 
Even with the big storm of April 13th, the snow pack remains at only 67% of average over the entire basin. There are 
a few isolated areas in the basin that have a near normal snow pack. These are mostly in the very high elevations. 

The water held in the reservoirs throughout the basin remains similar to last month at 107% of average. 
This water will be an excellent supplement this summer. Following the good rains in the area during this last 
month most of the irrigated areas are reporting good soil moisture conditions. This situation will help the below 
normal streamflow as it will lessen the demands on the early flows. 

Mountain soil moisture is slightly below normal for this time of year. Some of the snow water will be used 
to wet up the soil mantle before the spring runoff starts. 

Streamflow forecasts range from a high of 90% of average on Clear Creek to a low of 73% on the Cache La Poudre. 
The Big Thompson, Boulder Creek and Saint Vrain Rivers will flow between 77 to 85% this year. The mainstem of the 
South Platte will probably flow less than 70% this summer. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist tt a i 

Colorado v * uorasi > E. A. Nicholson, Area Conservationist, 

Littleton, Colorado 

"THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



CURRENT INFORMATION 



PAST RECORD RESERVOIR STORAGE (1,000 Acre-Feet) 







Dat 6 


Snow 




Water 


Content 






(Inches) 


Snow Co hits s 




Ul 




C out £n t 


Last 


Avg. 








I Tnphpc 




Year 


/ Q en 
4o— DZ 


South Platte River 8 


Tri butanes 












Bal timore 




4/27 


0 


0 


0 


- - 


Berthoud Falls 




4/27 


19 


7.2 


8.4 


13.8* 


Big South 




4/29 


3 


0.4 


0 


0.8 


Boulder Falls 




4/29 


22 


9.2 


5.0 


13.2* 


Cameron Pass 




4/26 


82 


33.9 


21.9 


28.1 


Chambers Lake 




4/30 


14 


6.1 


0 


5.5 


Como 




4/26 


6 


2.1 




- - 


Copeland Lake 




4/28 


0 


0.0 


0 


2.3* 


Deadman Hill 




4/27 


48 


17.1 


13.0 


18.1 


Deer Ridge 




4/27 


1 


0.5 


0 


3.5* 


Empi re 




4/27 


22 


8.4 


4.2 


7.1* 


Geneva Park 




4/26 


5 


2.1 


0.5 


1.9* 


Grizzly Peak 


(B) 


4/27 


49 


18.4 


10.7 


21 .1 


Hidden Valley 




4/27 


29 


10.6 


6.9 


13.6 


Hoosier Pass 




4/26 


33 


11.6 


6.0 


12.9 


Horseshoe 




4/26 


18 


6.0 




- - 


Hour Glass Lake 




4/27 


12 


4.1 


1.4 


7.5 


Jefferson Creek 




4/27 


17 


5.8 


1.9 


8.0* 


Lake Irene 


(B) 


4/26 


61 


21.8 


12.0 


24.7 


Long's Peak 




4/29 


33 


12.1 


6.5 


13.4* 


Lost Lake 




4/30 


32 


7.7 


1.9 


10.2* 


Love! and Lift No. 


1 


4/28 


76 


27.5 


15.1 


- - 


Loveland Pass 




4/28 


33 


13.7 


4.9 


16.4 


Mosquito 




4/26 


3 


1.1 






Pine Creek 




4/27 


0 


0.0 


0 




Red Feather 








0.7 


4.9* 


Two Mile 




4/27 


53 


17.3 


9.8 


17.8* 


Trout Creek 




4/28 


0 


0.0 






University Camp 




4/29 


35 


14.1 


8.2 


24.9 


Ward 




4/27 


11 


4.1 


0.4 


6.0* 


Wild Basin 




4/27 


24 


7.6 


5.1 


14.8 



SOIL MOISTURE 





Date 








Avg. 


Station 


of 


Capacity 


This 


Last 


All 




Survev 


Cinches) 


Year 


Year 


Data 


Alpine Camp 


4/27 


6.9 


3.5 


4.1 


4.3 


Beaver Dam 


4/27 


7.3 


4.8 


5.2 


4.7 


Clear Creek 


4/28 


9.5 


5.8 


6.4 


5.9 


Feather 


4/28 


10.1 


6.5 


9.4 


8.1 


Guard Station 


4/29 


6.9 


4.9 


4.6 


4.7 


Hoop Creek 


4/26 


4.9 


3.5 


3.5 


2.9 


Hoosier Pass 


4/26 


7.8 


4.8 


6.3 


5.9 


Kenosha Pass 


4/27 


4.4 


4.0 


3.3 


3.7 


Laramie Road 


4/30 


12.4 


8.1 


9.1 


9.0 


Two Mi 1 e 


4/27 


9.1 


4.3 


5.5 


5.6 


ALL PROFI1 


iS 4 FEET D 











RETURN IF NOT DELIVERED 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT O F AG R ICU LTU R E 

■ OIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 











15 Year 


Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


Average 




Capacity 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 




Antero 


33.0 


14.5 


15.9 


13.4 


Barr Lake 


32. 2 


15.7 


28. 3 


24 7 


Black Hollow 


8.0 


3.3 


4.1 


o • o 


Boyd Lake 


58.0 


28.5 


40.6 


20.8 


Cache La 










Poudre 


9.5 


8.3 


9.0 


7 7 


Carter Lake 


108. 9 


95.7 


107.3 


79.0 


Chambers Lake 


8.8 


3.2 


6.7 


2.8 


Cheeseman 


79.0 


31 .8 


77.2 


54.3 


Cobb Lake 


34.3 


0 


7.3 


9.2 


Eleven Mile 


81 .9 


90.9 


92 .3 


74. 6 


Fossil Creek 


11.6 


8.0 


10.1 


7.1 


Gross 


43.1 


19.0 


24.2 




Hal 1 i gan 


6.4 


6.4 


6.4 


3.9 


Horsetooth 


143.5 


116.8 


120.3 


85.6 


Lake Loveland 


13.6 


4.1 


8.3 


7.4 


Lone Tree 


9.2 


5.4 


8.3 


7.9 


Mariano 


5.4 


5.3 


5.6 


3.2 


Marshal 1 


10.3 


2.1 


7.4 


4.4 


Mars ton 


18.9 


15.9 


15.3 


15.2 


Mi Iton 


24.4 


6.9 


18.4 


12.5 


Standly 


18.5 


9.8 


20.6 


12.6 


Terry Lake 


8.2 


4.3 


5.9 


5.2 


Union 


12.7 


6.8 


12.7 


8.2 


Windsor 


18.6 


6.3 


13.1 


11.4 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 
STREAMFL0W FORECAST (1,000 Acre-Feet) 





Forecast 


This 




Stream and Station 


Period 


Year 


Avg. 




April - 


% of 


1948- 




Sept. 


Avg. 


1962 



Big Thompson at Drake (2) 


85 


77 


110 


Boulder at Orodell 


46 


85 


54 


Cache La Poudre at Canon 








Mouth (1) 


180 


73 


246 


Clear Creek at Golden (3) 


120 


90 


134 


Saint Vrain at Lyons 


65 


81 


80 



CD 



(2) 

(3) 



Observed flow minus diversions from 
Michigan, Colorado and Laramie Rivers, plus 
diversions for irrigation and municipal use 
above station. 

Observed flow plus by-pass to power plants. 
Observed flow minus diversions through 
Jones Pass. 



NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted average) 
NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 

This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



WATERSHED II 

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

ARKANSAS RIVER WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




The mountain snow pack on the Arkansas River Drainage is only 57% of average. However, the snow ranges 
from exactly normal in the Fremont Pass area to much below normal in the southern mountains. The snow courses 
located in the headwaters area of the Purgatoire and Cucharas Drainages are completely void of snow. 

The soil moisture conditions in the mountains is better than average and similar to last year. Low 
elevation snow melt probably accounts for this condition. Soil moisture in the irrigated areas however, is 
reported to be only poor to fair. As of this writing the streamflow is below normal in the Arkansas River 
and its tributaries. 

Water held in storage is still the only bright spot in the water outlook for the Arkansas Valley. Currently 
storage is 160% of average. There is nearly 300,000 acre-feet of water stored in the major reservoirs in the 
Arkansas River Watershed, however, nearly 140,000 acre-feet of this is in John Martin. This reservoir 
storage will be an excellent supplement for the deficient streamflow this season. 

Streamflow forecasts range from a low of 38% of average on the Purgatoire to 65% of normal for the Arkansas 
at Salida. The streams in the wet mountain valley area will flow only half of normal this year. Streamflow 
on the Huerfano, Cucharas and Purgatoire Rivers will be about 40% of average this year. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, Will D. McCorkle, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado L a Junta, Colorado 



"THE .CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY 



SNOW 



CURRENT INFORMATION 



PAST RECORD 



SOIL MOISTURE 











Water 


Content 




Date 


Snow 


Wetter 


(Inches) 


Snow Course 


of 


Depth 


Content 


Last 


Ave . 




SuTvev 


C Inches ) 


( Inches ) 


Year 


48-62 


Arkansas River 








0 




Bigelow Divide 


4/28 


0 


0 


_ _ 


Bou rbon 


4/27 


0 


0 


0 


2.9* 


Cooper Hill 


4/26 


43 


12.6 


6.8 


_ _ 


Cucharas Pass 


4/28 


0 


0 


1.6 


_ _ 


East Fork 


4/26 


16 


5.2 


2.0 


13.4 


Four Mile Park 


4/28 


0 


0 


0 


1 .0 


Fremont Pass 


4/26 


57 


19.5 


10.3 


19.5 


Garf iel d 


4/28 


3 


1.5 


3.1 




LaVeta Pass (B) 


4/28 


0 


0 


0 


1.7 


Monarch Pass 


4/28 


14 


6.8 


9.3 


18.4 


St. Elmo (Air) 


4/27 


19 


6.7 


5.6 


11.8 


Tennessee Pass 


4/28 


8 


2.7 


5.0 


8.5 


Tnmi rhi 


4/28 


6 


2.2 


5.5 




Twin Lakes Tunnel 


4/28 


24 


8.8 


4.0 


9.1 


Westcliffe 


4/28 


0 


0 


0 


1.1 





Date 








Avg. 


Station 


of 


Capacity 


This 


Last 


All 




Survev 


(Inches) 


Year 


Year 


Data 


Garfield 


4/26 


6.7 


6.1 


6.3 


4.3 


Ki ng 


4/28 


3.3 


3.0 


3.0 


2.1 


LaVeta Pass 


4/28 


11.9 


11.7 


11.9 


11.8 


Leadvi lie 


4/26 


7.8 


5.7 


5.7 


4.8 


Twin Lakes Tunnel 


4/26 


4.5 


2.9 


4.2 


3.1 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1 ,000 Acre-Feet) 











15 Year 


Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


Average 




Capacity 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 



Adobe Creek 


61 


6 


21 


5 


54.4 


13 


0 


Clear Creek 


11 


4 


6 


8 


11.2 


4 


7 


Cucharas 


40 


0 


0 


1 


0 


5 


3 


Great Plains 


150 


0 


71 


8 


123.3 


44 


4 


Horse Creek 


26 


9 


5 


7 


21 .0 


5 


6 


John Martin 


366 


6 


136 


9 


352.5 


64 


6 


Meredith 


41 


9 


4 


6 


24.5 


10 


4 


Model 


15 


0 








2 


2 


Sugar Loaf 


17 


4 


8 


7 


11.3 


6 


.8 


Twin Lakes 


57 


9 


18 


3 


41.0 


17 


.2 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFLOW FORECAST (1 .000 Acre-Feet) 





Forecast 


This 






Period 


Year 


Avg. 


Stream and Station 


April - 


% of 


1948- 




Sept. 


Avg. 


1962 


Arkansas at Pueblo (4) 


194 


60 


323 


Arkansas at Sal i da (4) 


225 


65 


345 


Cucharas nr LaVeta 


6 


43 


14 


Purgatoire at Trinidad 


17 


38 


45 



ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 



(4) Observed flow plus change in Clear Creek, 

Twin Lakes, and Sugar Loaf Reservoirs minus 
diversions through Busk-Ivanhoe and Twin 
Lake Tunnels and Ewing, Fremont Pass, Wurtz 
and Columbine Ditches. 



NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

■ OIL CONSERVATION SSNVICS 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



WATERSHED III 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

UPPER RIO GRANDE WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




Streamflow will be less than normal and unless spring and summer rainfall is above normal, water 
shortages will exist. Flows should drop off rapidly and late season streamflow will be very low. 

All the low to medium elevation snow pack is gone. The snow line now is about 10,000 feet. The snow 
pack above 10,000 feet is nearly normal. This high elevation snow pack will not provide adequate runoff 
this summer. 

Practically all of the snow pack in the Sangre De Christo Range is gone and still streamflow remains 
near normal . 

Carry-over storage in the major reservoirs in the basin contain 74% of normal storage. 
Mountain soils are drier than normal despite the snow melt. This will tend to reduce runoff still 
further. 

Forecasts are computed assuming normal precipitation for the remainder of the year. 

The Rio Grande in Colorado should flow near 65% of the 1948-62 average. The Alamosa and South Fork should 
flow about 70%. Streams originating in the Sangre De Cristo Range will flow far below normal. 
Water will have to be conserved to the utmost this summer. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, R. K. Griffin, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado Durango, Colorado 



"THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



SNOW 



Snow Course 



CURRENT INFORMATION 



Date 
of 
Survey 



Snow 
Depth 
(Inches) 



Water 
Content 
(Inches) 



PAST RECORD 



Water Content 
(Inches) 



Last 
Year 



Avg. 
48-62 



K 1 0 branos in COIOrduU 












1 


Cochetopa Pass 




4/27 


0 


0 


0 


2.7* 


Hi way 




4/27 


64 


25.4 


25.7 


27.8* 


Lake Humphreys 




4/26 


0 


0 


0.4 


0.2* 


Pass Creek 




4/27 


0 


0 


2.2 


3.3* 


Pool Table 




4/26 


0 


0 


1 S3 
1 . o 


i . y 


P n 1 1 n i n p 
r ui \* u \j i lie 




4/25 


8 


2.5 


7.4 


6.8* 


Dorl Mrn infan n Dace 

KcU rlUUil La 1 It r abb 






fil 


?5 n 

LJ.U 


25.5 


31 .4* 


JdH La 1 la r 1 a 




4/28 


n 
\j 


n 

U 


o 


0.5 


Upper Rio Grande 




4/27 


0 


0 


1.8 


2.3 


Wolf Creek Pass 




4/27 


52 


24.5 


23.2 


24.7 


Wolf Creek Summit 


(B) 


4/27 


73 


29.3 


32.2 


30.2 


-\ I dlllUba (\l Vci 












0.5 


Silver Lakes 




4/27 


0 


0 


0 


Summitville 




4/24 


54 


17.4 


17.6 


20.5 


lonejos River 










11.8 


12.5 


Cumbres Pass 




4/29 


29 


14.4 


Platoro 




4/27 


30 


11.5 


9.2 


10.9* 


River Springs 




4/27 


0 


0 




0.7 


Sangre De Cristo Range 










1.6 




Cucharas Pass 


(B) 


4/28 


0 


0 




Culebra 




4/28 


1 


0.4 


5.3 


5.2 


LaVeta Pass 




4/28 


0 


0 


0 


1.7 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1.000 Acre-Fept) 











15 Year 


Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


Average 




Capacity 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 



Continental 


26 


7 


5 


2 


10.1 


7. 


7 


Platoro 


60 


0 


3 


0 


17.3 






Rio Grande 


45 


8 


10 


3 


39.8 


14 


8 


Sanchez 


103 


2 


9 


9 


15.1 


12 


3 


Santa Maria 


45 


0 


3 


6 


18.4 


7 


8 


Terrace 


17 


7 


5 


9 


10.8 


4 


8 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFL0W FORECAST (1,000 Acre-Feet 





Forecast 


This 






Period 


Year 


Avg. 


Stream and Station 


April - 


% of 


1948- 




Sept. 


Avg. 


1962 


Alamosa abv Terrace 


48 


71 


68 


Conejos nr Mogote 


130 


66 


196 


Culebra at San Luis (6) 


8 


38 


21 


Rio Grande at 30 Mile 








Bridge (5) 


85 


64 


132 


Rio Grande nr Del Norte 








(5) 


275 


56 


492 


South Fork at South Fork 


80 


66 


122 



SOIL MOISTURE 



ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 





Date 








•••• 


Station 


of 


Capacity 


This 


Last 


All 




Survey 


(Inches) 


Year 


Year 


Data 


Alberta Park 


4/24 


8.2 


5.7 


7.1 


5.6 


Bristol View 


4/26 


6.1 


3.7 


f ." 


4.4 


LaVeta Pass 


4/28 


11.9 


11.7 


11.9 


11.8 


Mogote 


4/27 


10.7 


8.2 


8.6 


9.0 



(5) Observed flow plus change in storage in 
Santa Maria, Rio Grande and Continental 
Reservoir. 

(6) Observed flow plus changes in storage in 
Sanchez Reservoir. 

NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 



RETURN IF NOT DELIVERED 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 



Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
VJS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 



RIO GRANDE WATERSHED IN NEW MEXICO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 



COLORADO 




April snowfall did not improve the water supply outlook in New Mexico. All but the extremely high 
snow pack is gone in New Mexico. The snow in the headwaters of the Rio Grande in Colorado is also melted 
below 10,000 feet. Although the extremely high elevation snow pack is good it will not hold up summer flows. 

Carry-over storage in major reservoirs on the Rio Grande is 65\- of normal, but will still be a good 
supplement. 

Storage in Conchas is 164,500 acre-feet compared to a normal of 229,500 acre-feet. 

The two reservoirs on the Pecos River, Alamorgordo and McMi 11 an-Aval on , contain 74,300 acre-feet which 
is almost exactly normal for this date. 

Mountain soils are wetter than normal, which may be caused by the early snow melt. 

Valley soils in the upper basin contain only fair amounts of moisture, while all other areas of the State 
report dry soils. 

Forecasts of summer streamflow are all less than half of normal. 

Strict conservation measures will have to be employed by water users throughout the State this summer. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

Einar L. Roget, State Conservationist, Walter B. Rumsey, Area Conservationist, 

Albuquerque, New Mexico Santa Fe, New Mexico 



THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



Snow Course 


Date 
of 
Survey 


Snow 
Depth 

(Inches) 


Water 
Content 
(Inches) 


Water Content 
(Inches) 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 
48-62 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1,000 Acre-Feet) 



Rio Grande (Colorado) 
Cul ebra 
Cumbres Pass 
LaVeta Pass 
PI atoro 
River Springs 
Santa Maria 
Silver Lakes 
Summi tvi 1 le 
Upper Rio Grande 
Wolf Creek Pass 

Big Tesuque (New Mexico) 
Chamita 



4/28 
4/29 
4/28 
4/27 
4/27 
4/28 
4/27 
4/24 
4/27 
4/27 

4/27 
4/27 



1 

29 
0 

30 
0 

0 
0 

54 
0 

52 

0 
0 



0.4 

14.4 
0.0 

11.5 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 

17.4 
0.0 

24.5 

0.0 
0.0 



5.3 


5 


2 


11.8 


12 


5 


0 


1 


7 


9.2 


10 


g* 




0 


7 


0 


0 


5 


0 


0 


5 


17.6 


20 


5 


1.8 


2 


3 



SOIL MOISTURE 



Station 


Date 
of 
Survey 


Capacity 
(Inches) 


This 
Year 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 
All 
Data 


Colorado 












Alberta Park 


4/24 


8.2 


5.7 


7.1 


5.6 


Bristol View 


4/26 


6.1 


3.7 


6.1 


4.4 


Mogote 


4/27 


10.7 


8.2 


8.6 


9.0 


New Mexico 












Aqua Piedra 


3/29 


7.2 


5.1 


5.3 


3.7 


Bateman 


3/22 


6.7 


4.5 


4.8 


2.6 


Big Tesuque 


3/31 


3.7 


3.3 


1.9 


1.7 


Chamita 


3/30 


8.0 


8.0 


8.0 


3.7 


Fenton Hill 




6.5 




6.5 


4.5 


Red Summit 


3/28 


4.8 


1.5 


1.5 


2.1 


Rio En Medio 


3/31 


3.5 


1.0 


1.6 


1.1 


Taos Canyon 


3/29 


3.3 


2.5 


2.5 


2.3 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 



Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


15 Year 


Capacity 


Year 


Year 


Average 










1948-62 



Al amorgordo 


122 


1 


69 


0 


27 


8 


63 


8 


Cabal lo 


344 


0 


94 


3 


103 


4 


102 


1 


Conchas 


280 


3 


164 


5 


239 


3 


229 


5 


Elephant Butte 


2206 


8 


222 


8 


479 


4 


354 


0 


El Vado 


194 


5 


13 


6 


13 


0 


55 


1 


McMi 1 1 an- 


















Avalon 


37 


0 


5 


3 


11 


5 


10 


6 


Red Bluff 


















(Tex.) 


307 


0 






52 


7 


59 


1 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFL0W F0RECAST(1 ,000 Acre-Feet) 





Forecast 


This 


Avg. 


Stream and Station 


as 


Year 


1948 




% of 






Indicatee 


Avg. 


- 62 










Costilla at Costilla (8) 


8 AS 


32 


25 


Pecos at Pecos 


20 AS 


38 


53 


Rio Chama nr La Puenta 


100 AS 


47 


214 


Rio Grande at Otowi (7)* 


250 MJ 


41 


609 


Rio Grande at San Marcial 








(7)* 


95 MJ 


22 


424 


Rio Hondo nr Valdez 


9 AS 


50 


18 


Red River at Questa** 


9 AJ 


36 


25 



The Forecast of the Rio Grande at San Marcial is 

14 % of the Average used by the Elephant 
Butte Irrigation District. 

A-S is April through September. 
A-J is April through July. 
M-J is March through July. 

(7) Observed flow plus changes in storage in El 
Vado and Abiquiu Reservoirs. 

(8) Observed flow plus changes in storage in 
Costilla Reservoir. 



NOTE 



* 
NS 
(A) 
(B) 



1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NO SURVEY 

AIR OBSERVED 

ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



OFFICIAL ■UIINItS 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK WATERSHED V 

FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

SAN MIGUEL - DOLORES - ANIMAS - SAN JUAN 
WATERSHEDS IN COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




o 



GENERALLY ADEQUATE 
100% OR MORE 



LI M ITEO SHORTAGE 
75% - 100% 



r f ^ SEVERE SHORTAGE 
l + f + J 75% OR LESS 



# SNOw COURSE 

Soil yoisr u"E Station 
A FORECAST point 
•^•^ DRAINAGE 
- . HIGHWAY 

WATERSHED GOuHOART 

O TOWN 



30 AO MILES 



High elevation snow pack remains good, but low snow has already melted. Snow pack on the San Juan 
stands at 87% of normal, however, this is not a true picture of conditions. Only high elevation snows 
"are used in this average. The snow pack on the Animas River is 43% of normal and on the Dolores only 30%. 

Low and medium elevation snow pack has already melted. Streamflow has not increased materially with 
all the low snows gone. 

Carry-over reservoi r storage is about normal in Groundhog and Vallecito Reservoirs, Navajo Reservoir 
contains 379, OQO acre-feet as of May 1. This will be an excellent supplement for water users under that 
irrigation system. 

Mountain soils contain slightly more moisture than usual. This may be caused by the early snow melt. 
•Some shortages will exist in this area unless spring and summer rains are above normal. The San Juan, Animas, 
and Dolores Rivers are expected to flow only about 60% of normal. Piedra Creek and Los Pinos should flow 
slightly better, possibly as 'high as 70% of the 1948-62 average. 

Forecasts are based on normal precipitation during the remainder of the forecast period. 

The conservation of water is a must in this area this summer. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F A Mark, State'Conservationi st, E. L. Roget, State Conservationist, 

Coloracto Albuquerque, New Mexico 

R. K. Griffin, Area Conservationist, W. B. Rumsey, ^"^'J™}^ 

Duran.go, Colorado ianta re, new ne*n,u 

D. B. Beach, Area Conservationist, 

Grand Junction, Colorado 

'THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



SNOW 



CURRENT INFORMATION 



PAST RECORD 



Snow Course 


Date 
of 
Survey 


Snow 
Depth 
(Inches) 


Water 
Content 
(Inches) 


Water Content 
(Inches) 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 
48-62 




San Juan River 














Chama Divide 


(B) 


4/28 


0 


0 


0 


- - 


Chami ta 


(B) 


4/28 


0 


0 


0 


- - 


Upper San Juan 




4/27 


48 


21 .0 


23.1 


30.2 


Wolf Creek Pass 


(B) 


4/27 


52 


24.5 


23.2 


24.7 


Wolf Creek Summit 




4/27 


73 


29.3 


32.2 


30.2 


Animas River 














Cascade 




4/28 


0 


0 


2.8 


3.0 


Howardvi 1 1 e 




Destroy 


ed 




9.0 


7.4* 


Ironton Park 


(B) 


4/27 


0 


0 


0 


7.1 


Mineral Creek 




4/28 


0 


0 


11.3 


12.1* 


Molas Lake 




4/28 


0 


0 


5.4 


7.8* 


Red Mountain Pass 




4/28 


61 


25.0 


25.5 


31.4* 


Silverton Sub-Station 




4/28 


0 


0 


0 


0.1 


op uu nu U 1 1 Let 1 II 




4/28 


36 


14.6 


18.2 


23.8* 


Dolores River 














Lizzard Head 




4/28 


15 


6.3 


13.2 


13.7 


Ri co 




4/28 


0 


0 


0 


1.0 


Tel 1 uri de 




4/27 


0 


0 


0 


0.7 


Trout Lake 




4/27 


3 


1.3 


3.6 


9.9* 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1,000 Acre-Feet) 



Reservoir 


Usable 
Capacity 


This 
Year 


Last 
Year 


15 Year 
Average 
1948-62 


Groundhog 
Navajo 
Val leci to 


21.7 
1036.0 
126.3 


10.3 
379.0 
56.0 


21.7 
255.5 
88.0 


8.6 
50.9 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFLOW FORECAST (1,000 Acre-Feet) 



Stream and Station 


Forecast 
Period 
April - 
Sept. 


This 
Year 
% of 
Avg. 


Avg. 

1948- 

1962 


Animas at Durango 




280 


61 


456 


Dolores at Dolores 




150 


58 


260 


La Plata at Hesperus 




17 


63 


27 


Los Pinos at Bayfield 


(9) 


155 


70 


220 


Piedra Creek nr Piedra 




120 


66 


182 


San Juan at Rosa (9) 




360 


60 


597 



SOIL MOISTURE 



Station 


Date 

of 
Survey 


Capacity 
(Inches) 


This 
Year 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 

All 

Data 


Cascade 


4/28 


9.1 


8.6 


9.1 


6.8 


Dol ores 


4/28 


19.6 


12.7 


15.1 


11.4 


Lizzard Head 


4/28 


11.8 


7.6 


8.6 


8.5 


Mineral Creek 


4/28 


5.7 


5.4 


5.6 


4.1 


Molas Lake 


4/28 


9.4 


6.4 


9.4 


5.8 


Ri co 


4/28 


13.8 


9.7 


13.8 


9.0 



(9) Observed flow plus changes in storage in 
Vallicito Reservoir. 



NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 



ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

■■rum IF NOT OKLlVKltaD U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOU. CONSERVATION tlRVICI 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 



WATERSHED VI 



GUNNISON RIVER WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




SI LVERTON 



GENERALLY ADEQUATE 
100% OR MORE 



LIMITED SH0RTA8E 
TS^ - 100% 



SEVERE SHORTAGE 
75% OR LESS 



O SNOW COURSE 

# SOU- MOISTURE STiTiON 

A PRECAST POINT 
drainage 

^ = highway 

— WATERSHEO BOUNDARY 

O TOWN 




10 20 30 40 MILES 



Again this month the snow pack decreased throughout the headwaters of the Gunnison River. Snow 
courses in the Lake City, Monarch Pass, and Taylor Park areas are currently about 50% of normal. In this 
area there has been less snow than now, once in recent history. That year was 1954. 

The Grand Mesa area still remains one of the best spots in the State. Here the snow pack is 108% 
of average. This will help the water users on the streams originating in that area. 

Snow pack on the Uncompahgre Drainage is similar to the Gunnison at 56% of the 1948-62 average. 

Mountain soil moisture is better than average for the entire area covered by this report. 

The streamflow forecasts issued in this report are revised downward from those issued last month. This 
is due primarily to the lack of snowfall during April. The Gunnison River is now expected to flow 750,000 
acre-feet which is 57% of average. The Uncompahgre River is forecast at 68% of normal for the coming season. 
Streamflow on the North Fork of the Gunnison should be slightly better and near 75%. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 



F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, Dearl Beach, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado Grand Junction, Colorado 

"THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



-.-11 ' -:-e- r ;;: 



Szcv Zz-rse 



Gunnison River 
: -- :e _=•; = ; 
Black Mesa 
Blue Mesa 
Butte 

Cochetopa Pass 
Crested Butte 
\e_.s~cre 
Lake City 
Long Gulch 

'■'eS; _=v53 

Monarch Pass 
McClure Pass 
Mineral Creek 
North Lost Trail 
Park Cone 
Park Reservoir 
Porphyry Creek 

Trickle Divide 
z i ■•• 

Lizzard Head 

Lone Cone 

Red Mountain Pass 

Telluride 

Trout Lake 



_ are 

Of 
Szrvev 



Szcv 
I er. z- 
Izcr.es 



Water 
I : ztezt 
(Inches) 



_SS c 

Tear 





• - : 
- — 




1- . - 


15.7 


23.0 




no 












. - - 

«T/ CI 


n 
u 


n n 


0 


2.3* 




6.101 
— - 


; 


: . : 


: 






A/97 
CI 


n 




: 


2.7* 




■ - - 

h/ CI 


n 


o o 
. . _ 


o 


7.5 




A/97 
*t/ CI 




- - ; 

_ . . 


8.7 






■ ~ - 
- - - 


n 
u 


n n 


: 


3.5 




no 










(B) 


- r 


3 c 


13.7 


9.6 


15.9 


(B) 


- n 


14 


5 . £ 


Q "X 




- :- 


20 


7.4 


2.2 


10.1* 


(B) 


- ii 


: 


: . : 


11.3 


12.1* 


(B) 


- i- 


10 


3.4 


1.0 


8.7 


4/27 




-.1 


5.2 




- 11 


67 


27.5 


21 .4 


25. 5 




- 11 


22 


3.3 


" : . . : 


17.7 




- 11 


6 


2.2 


5.5 




(B) 


- 11 


68 


27.7 


11. 1 


11.1 




4/27 


0 


0.0 


: 


7.1 




- 11 


" -: 


6.3 


13.2 


13.7 




- r 


6 


2.6 


4.7 




(B) 


- ii 


61 


25.: 


25.5 


3" .- 




- r 


0 


:.: 


0 


0.7 




- i: 


3 


1.3 


3.6 













15 Tear 


r.eservcir 


Dsable 


This 


Last 


Average 




'. £C S ZtZJ 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 


Taylor 


106.2 


3" .3 


88.7 


60.3 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 







This 








Year 


Avg. 






zz 


15-5- 








Zizl 


Gunnison nr Grand Jet. 








Surface Creek nr 






17 




"3 


88 


17 


Uncompahgre at Colona 


95 


68 


139 



NClI: * - 19-5-61 , = rc;: = : averages; 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 













AVE . 


Grand Mesa 
King 

Mineral Creek 
Placita 


- 13 

- 33 

- 33 


3.3 
5.7 
9.3 


3.0 
5.4 
7.8 


' , r 
3.0 
5.6 
7.5 


co i- ro i 



.res • 

Izzalc V 
: : 1 : rsr : 



-ac.-; : . a;rirre ; : azc 
::il Iczservacirz Service, 
rsity, Fort Collins, Colo. 



All ??.:?_1IS - T: 



RETURN IF NOT DU.IVIKID 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 



7CST--.SE >jc rss; 
v_s. DiPAJi7i.r£)'"T :r as?.::vc. .r— 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



WATERSHED VII 

WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 



COLORADO RIVER WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1 , 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




SCALE 10 0 iO 2D X> «0 MILES 



Water users on the Colorado River mainstem should have adequate water this summer. Mountain snow pack now 
stands at 85% of the 15 year normal. Some of the high elevation snow courses are above normal, due primarily 
to the late April storms. Two storms dropped as much as three inches of water in some locations. Some melting 
occurred during the month especially at the lower elevations, however, streamflow has not raised materially. 
Cool weather could delay runoff for some time. 

Mountains soils as of May first contained nearly normal amounts of moisture. Valley soils in the upper 
basin are in good condition, while the lower areas are reporting only fair soil moisture. 

Forecasts on the Colorado mainstem range from 85% of normal at Glenwood to 103% at Granby. This should 
be adequate for most water users. 

The Roaring Fork and Williams Fork Rivers should flow about 85% of the forecast period. 

If spring temperatures remain below normal, runoff will be delayed and flows will be less than expected. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, D. B. Beach, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado Grand Junction, Colorado 

R. L. Porter, Area Conservationist, 

Glenwood Springs, Colorado 

f 'THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



SN QW 











/later Content 




Date 


Snow 


Water 


(Inches) 


Snow Course 


of 


Depth 


Content 


Last 


Avg. 




Survev 


(Inches) 


(Inches) 


Year 


48-62 




Colorado River 












Arrow 


4/26 


27 


10.9 


5.3 


9.1 


Berthoud Pass 


4/25 


43 


16.2 


8.4 


15.7 


Berthoud Summit 


4/27 


55 


18.1 


13.5 


21.6 


Blue River 


4/26 


4 


1.1 


0 


8.0* 


Cooper Hill 


4/26 


43 


12.6 


6.8 


- - 


Fiddlers Gulch 


4/28 


35 


11.9 


7.4 


17.0 


Fremont Pass 


4/26 


57 


19.5 


10.3 


19.5 


Frisco 


4/27 


3 


1 .2 


1 .2 


5.6* 


Glen Mar Ranch 


4/24 


1 


0.4 


0.5 


4.8 


Gore Pass 


4/25 


16 


5.7 


1.3 


7.9* 


Granby 


4/24 


10 


3.7 


2.3 


3.3* 


Grand Lake 


4/26 


14 


4.8 


0.5 


3.7* 


Grizzly Peak 


4/27 


49 


18.4 


10.7 


21.1 


Hoosier Pass (B) 


4/26 


33 


11.6 


6.0 


12.9 


Jones Pass 


4/25 


38 


15.0 


9.1 


16.9* 


Lake Irene 


4/26 


61 


21 .8 


12.0 


24.7 


Lapl and 


4/26 


17 


6.7 


0.2 


9.3 


Lulu 


4/28 


54 


19.2 


10.5 


19.8 


Lynx Pass 


4/25 


22 


7.4 


1.6 


7.8 


McKinzie Gulch 


4/26 


0 


0.0 


0 


- - 


Middle Fork Campground 


4/24 


9 


3. 1 


4.2 


6.4 


Mi 1 ner 


4/26 


38 


15.1 


7.4 


12.1* 


Monarch Lake 


Destroy 


■ed 




1.3 


6.4 


North Inlet to Grand Lake 


4/26 


18 


6.5 


2.5 


6.7 


Pando 


A / 9fi 
Hy CO 


1 A 


0 . 0 


7 A 


o . o 


Phantom Valley 


4/26 


20 


8.4 


0.5 


7.0 


Ranch Creek 


4/26 


28 


9.4 


4.2 


9.6* 


Shrine Pass 


4/27 


48 


18.9 


9.6 


20.2 


Snake River 


4/28 


0 


0.0 


0 


5.1* 


Summit Ranch 


4/25 


6 


2.2 


1.6 


6.1* 


Tennessee Pass 


4/28 


8 


2.7 


5.0 


8.5 


Vail Pass 


4/27 


32 


14.2 


6.6 


16.3* 


Vasquez Creek 


4/26 


39 


12.9 


8.0 


14.0 


Willow Creek Pass 


4/25 


35 


13.5 


6.5 


12.0 


Roaring Fork River 












Aspen 


4/28 


45 


16.1 


12.0 




Independence Pass Tunnel 


4/27 


38 


17.0 


10.1 


17.6 


Ivanhoe 


4/27 


46 


18.5 




19.2 


Lift 


4/28 


53 


18.2 


11.4 


17.8* 


McClure Pass 


A 1 OA 


on 


7 A 


0 o 
L . C 


IU. I x 


Nast 


4/28 


0 


0.0 


0 


1.7 


North Lost Trail 


4/24 


10 


3.4 


1.0 


8.0 


Plateau Creek 












Alexander Lake (B) 


4/28 


62 


24.4 


15.7 


23.0 


Mesa Lakes 


Mil 


36 


13.7 


9.6 


15.9 


Park Reservoir (B) 


4/28 


i 67 


27.5 


21 .4 


25.5 


Trickle Divide 


4/28 


1 68 


27.7 


23.8 


28.8 


SOIL MOISTURE 















Date 








Avg. 


Station 


of 


Capacity 


This 


Last 


All 




Survey 


(Inches) 


Year 


Year 


Data 


Berthoud Pass 


4/25 


3.9 


3.2 


3.5 


2.8 


Blue River 


4/26 


4.2 


2.8 


4.2 


2.7 


Gore 


4/25 


4.9 


4.9 


4.5 


4.4 


Grand Mesa 


4/28 


12.5 


9.0 


12.5 




Muddy Pass 


4/28 


11.1 


9.3 


11.1 


8.5 


PI acita 


4/28 


9.3 


7.8 


7.5 


8.1 


Ranch Creek 


4/26 


8.7 


4.9 


5.9 


6.5 


Vail 


4/27 


12.3 


9.0 


9.1 


11.0 


Vasquez Siphon 


4/26 


11.0 


9.4 


8.6 


9.2 



mTuminoTDiLivnin ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

• OIL CONSERVATION SBRVICB 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1,000 Acre-Feet) 











15 Year 


Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


Average 




Capacity 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 



Granby 


465 


5 


55 


3 


219 


6 


85.0 


Green Mountain 


146 


9 


39 


0 


63 


4 


46.9 


Vega 


32 


9 


8 


1 


26 


0 




Williams Fork 


96 


8 


5 


9 


17 


9 





MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFLOW FORECAST (1 .000 Acre-Feet.) 



Stream and Station 



Forecast 
Period 
April - 
Sept. 



Blue River abov. Green 

Mt. (10) 
Colo. River nr Granby 
(11) 

Colo. River abv Glenwood 

Springs (12) 
Roaring Fork at Glenwood 

Springs (14) 
Williams Fork nr Parshall 
(15) 

Wi 1 1 ow abv Wi 1 1 ow Cr . 
Colo, nr Cameo (12) 



220 

240 

1325 

625 

65 
45 
1950 



This 
Year 
% of 
Avg. 



103 

85 

82 

84 
94 



Avg. 

1948- 

1962 



274 

233 

1556 

762 

77 
48 
2213 



(10) Observed flow plus change in storage in 
Dillon Reservoir. 

(11) Observed flow diversions by Adams Tunnel 
and Grand River Ditch plus change in storage 
in Granby Reservoir. 

(12) Observed flow plus the changes as indicated 
in (11) plus Moffat Ditch. 

(14) Observed flow plus diversion through Twin 
Lakes Tunnel . 

(15) Observed flow plus diversions through Jones 
Pass Tunnel. 



NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Soil Conservation Service, Fort Collins, Colo. 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



OFFICIAL. BU8INI9P 



WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK WATERSHED VIII 

FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

YAMPA, WHITE. AND NORTH PLATTE 
RIVERS WATERSHEDS IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1, 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OP COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




Water supplies in this area should be adequate this summer. The snow pack on the North Platte, is 
the best in the state and is 97% of normal. 

The Yampa snow pack is only 77% and the White 62%, however, no appreciable water shortage is expected. 
Snow was still falling over most of this area as of May 1st, so some small increase of the snow pack is expected. 

Low elevation snow has started to melt, but the river's flow has not increased yet. 

Mountain soils contain about normal moisture, but not as much as last year at this time. 

Forecasts assume normal precipitation for the remainder of the season. If this occurs the North Platte 
should flow 105% of normal, the Yampa and White Rivers about 73%. 
The Little Snake should flow just about average. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, R. L. Porter, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado Glenwood Springs, Colorado 

"THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



SNOW 



CURRENT INFORMATION 



PAST RECORD 



Snow Course 


Date 
of 
Survey 


Snow 
Depth 
(Inches) 


Water 
Content 
(Inches) 


flater Content 
(Inches) 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 
48-62 


M/\wfh Dl atf o D"i\/ov 
IN U f LN r 1 G LLC l\ 1 Vci 












Cameron Pass 




9.9 


33 Q 
jo. ? 


21.9 


28.1 


Columbine Lodge 




40 


18 4 


9.6 


22.9 


Deadman Hill " (B) 


4/27 


48 


17.1 


13.0 


18.1 


Mclntyre (B) 


4/22 


24 


9.9 


5.8 


10.2* 


Northgate 


4/25 


8 
19 


1.9 


0.4 


3.0* 


Park View 


4/25 


7.1 


3.0 


6.8 


Roach 


4/22 


51 


16.8 


16.4 


21.0 


Willow Creek Pass (B) 


4/25 


35 


13.5 


6.5 


12.0 


• 

Yampa River 






6.0 






Bear River 




1 6 


1 . 1 


8.3* 


l i arK 


4/28 


7 


2.8 


6 




Columbine Lodge (B) 




40 


18.4 


9.6 


22.9 


Dry Lake 


4/27 


38 


14^2 


6.8 


17.2 


Elk River 


4/28 


38 


16.3 


9.3 


13.4 


Hahn's Peak 


4/28 


19 


8.3 


1.7 




Lynx Pass 


4/25 


22 


7.4 


1.6 


7.8 


Rabbit Ears 


4/28 


47 


19.9 


16.1 


27.9 


Yampa View 


4/27 


0 


0.0 


1.3 


9.7* 


Whi te Ri ver 












Burro Mountain 


4/25 


34 


11.1 


4.3 


15.8 


Rio Blanco 


4/29 


13 


5.1 


0 


10.5 





Forecast 


This 






Period 


Year 


Avg. 


Stream and Station 


April - 


% of 


1948- 




Sept. 


Avg. 


1962 


Elk at Clark 


190 


93 


205 


Laramie at Jelm 


121 


108 


112 


Little Snake at Lilly 


321 


100 


321 


INOrLil r I dlLc aL iNurtnyaLc 


919 
CI c 


1 Uj 


?fi0 


White at Meeker 


250 


75 


332 


Yampa at Maybell 


830 


90 


923 


Yampa at Steamboat Spr. 


225 


77 


292 



SOIL MOISTURE 



Station 



Date 

of 
Survey 



Capacity 
(Inches) 



This 
Year 



Last 
Year 



Avg. 

All 

Data 



Hahn's Peak 
Laramie Road 
Muddy Pass 
Two Mi 1 e 
Willow Pass 



4/28 
4/30 
4/28 
4/27 
4/25 



19.0 
12.4 
11.1 
9.1 
9.5 



13.3 
8.1 
9.3 
4.3 
6.5 



11.2 
9.1 

11.1 
5.5 
9.5 



9.0 
8.5 
5.6 
6.9 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

return if not DELIVERED U s DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

Snow Survey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



WATERSHED IX 

"WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK 
FOR THE SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICTS IN THE 

LOWER SOUTH PLATTE RIVER WATERSHED IN COLORADO 

as of 

May 1 , 1967 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE - SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

COLORADO EXPERIMENT STATION - STATE ENGINEERS OF COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO 




The snow pack in the mountain watersheds of the South Platte River and its tributaries remains below normal. 
Even with the big storm of April 13th, the snow pack remains at only 67% of average over the entire basin. There are 
a few isolated areas in the basin that have a near normal snow pack. These are mostly in the very high elevations. 

The water held in the reservoirs throughout the basin remains similar to last month at 107% of average. 
This water will be an excellent supplement this summer. Following the good rains in the area during this last 
month most of the irrigated areas are reporting good soil moisture conditions. This situation will help the below 
normal streamflow as it will lessen the demands on the early flows. 

Mountain soil moisture is slightly below normal for this time of year. Some of the snow water will be used 
to wet up the soil mantle before the spring runoff starts. 

Streamflow forecasts range from a high of 90% of average on Clear Creek to a low of 73% on the Cache La Poudre. 
The Big Thompson, Boulder Creek and Saint Vrain Rivers will flow between 77 to 85% this year. The mainstem of the 
South Platte will probably flow less than 70% this summer. 



Issued By: Soil Conservation Service 

F. A. Mark, State Conservationist, J. L. Hall, Area Conservationist, 

Colorado Sterling, Colorado 

"THE CONSERVATION OF WATER BEGINS WITH THE SNOW SURVEY" 



so. 




T N?CRy--ic:; 


?,.SZ 7ZZ1Z 




Date 


Snow 


Water 


Water Content 
(Inches) 


Snow Course 


of 

: . . . 


Depth 
(Inches) 


Content 
(Inches) 


Last 
Year 


Avg. 
48-62 



South Platte River & 


















--z -- - -- 




4/27 


0 


0 


0 


- 


- 


Berthoud Falls 




4/27 


19 


7 


.2 


8.4 


13 


8* 


Big South 




4/29 


3 


0 


.4 


0 


0 


8 


Boulder Falls 




4/29 


22 


9 


.2 


5.0 


13 


2* 


Cameron Pass 




4/26 


82 


33 


9 


21.9 


28 


1 


Chambers Lake 




- V, 


14 


6 


.1 


0 


5 


5 


Como 




4/26 


6 


2 


1 


- - 


- 


- 


Copeland Lake 




4/28 


0 


0 


0 


0 


2 


3* 


Deadman Hill 




4/27 


48 


17 


1 


13.0 


18 


1 


Deer Ridge 




4/27 


1 


0 


5 


0 


3 


5* 


Empi re 




4/27 


22 


8 


4 


4.2 


7. 


1* 


Geneva Park 




4/26 


5 


2 


1 


0.5 


1 


9* 


Grizzly Peak 


(B) 


4/27 


49 


18 


4 


10.7 


21. 


1 


Hidden Valley 




Mil 


29 


10 


6 


6.9 


13. 


6 


Hoosier Pass 




A/26 


33 


11 


6 


6.0 


12 


9 


Horseshoe 




4/26 


18 


6 


0 




- 


- 


Hour Glass Lake 




4/27 


12 


4 


1 


1.4 


7 


5 


Jefferson Creek 




4/27 


17 


5 


8 


1.9 


8. 


0* 


Lake Irene 


(B) 


4/26 


61 


21 


8 


12.0 


2- 


7 


Long's Peak 




4/29 


33 


12 


1 


6.5 


13. 


4* 


Lost Lake 




4/30 


32 


7 


7 


1.9 


10. 


2* 


Loveland Lift No. 


1 


4/28 


~z 


27 


5 


15.1 






Loveland Pass 




4/28 


33 


13 


7 


4.9 


16. 


4 


Mosquito 




4/26 


3 


1 


1 








Pine Creek 




Mil 


0 


0 


0 


0 






Red Feather 












0.7 


4. 


9* 


Two Mile 




Mil 


53 


17 


3 


9.8 


17. 


8* 


Trout Creek 




4/28 


0 


0 


0 








University Camp 




4/29 


35 


14 


1 


8.2 


:- 


9 


Ward 




Mil 


11 


4. 


1 


9.4 


6. 


0* 


Wild Basin 




Mil 


24 


7. 


6 


5.1 


14. 


8 



SOIL MOISTURE 





Date 








Avg. 


Station 


of 


Capacity 


This 


Last 


All 




Survey 


(Inches) 


Year 


Year 


Zaza 


Alpine Camp 


- 2~ 


6.9 


3.5 


4.1 


4.3 


Beaver Dam 


4/27 


7.3 


4.8 


5.2 


4.7 


Clear Creek 


4/28 


9.5 


5.8 


6.4 


5.9 


Feather 


- 11 


10.1 


6.5 


9.4 


8.1 


Guard Station 


- 25 


6.9 


4.9 


4.6 


4.7 


Hoop Creek 


4/ 26 


4.9 


3.5 


3.5 


2.9 


Hoosier Pass 


4/26 


7.8 


4.8 


6.3 


5.9 


Kenosha Pass 


4/27 


4.4 


4.0 


3.3 


3.7 


Laramie Road 


4/30 


12.4 


8.1 


9.1 


9.0 


Two Mile 


4/27 


9.1 


4.3 


5.5 


5.6 



RESERVOIR STORAGE (1,000 Acre-Feet) 











15 Year 


Reservoir 


Usable 


This 


Last 


Average 




Capacity 


Year 


Year 


1948-62 



Carter 

Eleven Mile 
Empire 
Horsetooth 
Jackson 
Julesburge 
Point of Rocks 
Prewitt 
Riverside 



108.9 
79.0 
81.9 
37.7 

143.5 
35.4 
28.2 
70.0 
32.8 
57.5 



95.7 
31 .8 
90.9 
28.3 
16.8 
33.8 
21.7 
65.4 
6.3 
55.7 



107.3 
77.2 
92.3 
34.1 

120.3 
34.9 
23.2 
72.0 
30.2 
56.1 



79.0 
zZ. 2 
74.6 
29.6 
11. z 
34.2 
22.0 
61.6 
21.7 
51 .0 



MEASURED FIRST OF MONTH 



STREAMFL0W FORECAST (1,000 Acre-Feet) 



Stream and Station 


Forecast 
Period 
April - 
Sept. 


This 
Year 
% of 
Avg. 


Avg. 

1948- 

1962 


Big Thompson at Drake (2) 


85 


77 


110 


Boulder at Orodell 


-z 


85 


54 


Cache La Poudre at Canon 








Mouth (1) 


180 


73 


246 


Clear Creek at Golden (3) 


120 


90 


134 


Saint Vrain at Lyons 


65 


81 


80 



CD 



(2) 
(3) 



Observed flow minus diversions from 
Michigan, Colorado and Laramie Rivers, plus 
diversions for irrigation and municipal use 
above station. 

Observed flow plus by-pass to power plants. 
Observed flow minus diversions through 
Jones Pass. 



RETURN IF NOT DELIVERED 



ALL PROFILES 4 FEET DEEP 



NOTE: * - 1948-62 (adjusted averages) 

NS - NO SURVEY 

(A) - AIR OBSERVED 

(B) - ON ADJACENT DRAINAGE 



This Report Prepared by Jack N. Washichek and 
Donald W. McAndrew, Soil Conservation Service, 
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. 



POSTAGE AM) FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

5-:-- 5-rvey 

Colorado State University 
Fort Collins. Colorado 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



LIST of COOPERATORS 



The following organizations cooperate in snow surveys for the Colorado, 
Platte, Arkansas and Rio Grande watersheds. Many other organizations 
and individuals furnish valuable information for the snow survey reports. 
Their cooperation is gratefully ackncw 'edged. 



STATE 

Colorado State Engineer 
New Mexico State Engineer 
Nebraska State Engineer 
Colorado Experiment Station 

Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station 
FEDERAL 



Department of Agriculture 

Forest Service 

Soil Conservation Service 

Department of Interior 

Bureau of Reclamation 
Geological Survey 
National Park Service 
Indian Service 

Department of Commerce 

Wea ther Bu reau 



War Department 

Army Engineer Corps 

Atomic Energy Commission 

INVESTOR OWNED UTILITIES 

Colorado Public Service Company 
Public Service Company of New Mexico 

MUNICIPALITIES 

City of Denver City of Greeley 

City of Boulder City of Fort Collins 

WATER USERS ORGANIZATIONS 

Arkansas Valley Ditch Association 
Colorado River Water Conservation District 

IRRIGATION PROJECTS 

Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company 
San Luis Valley Irrigation District 
Santa Maria Reservoir Company 
Costilla Land Company 

Uncompahgre Valley Water Users' Association 
Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Company 
Trinchera Irrigation Co. 



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