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Historic, Archive Document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



4 



IT 



-.grlcuJti 
.*nitfgton, D. C. 




awornia. 



Pomona, 
California 




INDEX 







. 13 






American Beaut y . 





Jo 


i..aO\ V 1 < 1 1 ! 1 1 1 ' 1 ! : . ~ 


43 


Anne de Diesbach . 




38 


La France . _ . . _ 


16 






■7 




on 


\ ^rippma 




18 


1 aurette 


36 


















r . . , . 


2/ 


Baby Rambler . 






Mad Alf Carriere ... 


40 


Mardo Jon 




36 


Mad Car Testout. _ _ 


_19 






QG 


\Tort Act Alfitrn t 

.uaci ue Aiarrai 


OKI 


Beauty of Glazenwood . 




Qft 
- OO 




16 


Bessie Brown. . . 




A(K 






Bride. 




on 




35 






tf\ 


Mad Mina Brabanson _ 


QQ 
OO 


Burbank ... 




1 1 


Mad W agram _ . 


1 K 
J O 








Magna Charta. . 


21 


r< 4- nu ■ 




24 


Maman Cochet _ _ 


44 


Cath Alermet 




48 


Mar \iel 


41 






21 


Mane \ an Houtte 


91 

-Ol 










99 






40 




1 c 








March of Lome. 


Af\ 


pi : 






Meteor 








9. ^ 


Mrs. John Laing 


i i 
1 1 


CI Bridesmaid 




38 


Airs. ^\Iawlev 


32 


CI Cecil Brunner 




21 


Mrs. Robt Garrett 


32 






43 




41 






22 




OQ 


CI Mad Car Testout 




37 






CI Malmai^on 




40 


Papa Gontier 


29 








Paul Neyron 


2° 


L 1 .Meteor . 




OO 










43 


Perle von Godesburg 


22 






AT 


Prince of Bulgaire. 


AQ 


Co<| de Lyon 




29 


P C de Rohan 


27 


Crimson Rambler .. 




A') 












Queen . 




Dorothea Perkm** 




1 4 




43 


Duch de Brabant 




48 


Queen of Edglev 


42 


FJucli of A Ibany . . 




7 














g 


Farl of Dufferin 




7 


R M Henriette 


8 


Etoile de France 




12 


Reine Olga "Wurtemburg 


16 






24 


rteve u Ur _ _ _ 


i a 






99 


Richmond _ _ . _ _ 


on 
Oi) 








Robert Scott 


34 


17 T " 




40 




9Q 






30 




V! 


Frau Karl Druschki 




32 












Safrano.. - 


1 ft 


Gainsborough 




18 




i n 


Gardenia . 




1 c 




9 ft 


Gen. Jack 





7 


Sou du Pres Carnot 


. 41 


Gen. Robt. E. bee 




7 










28 




36 


( 1 1( >ric i le bhjon — . — . — _ _ _ . 




33 




43 


Glorie de Margottin 




. . 7 






Glorie des Rosamones 




43 


Illrich Bruniipr 


17 


( 1 1 \ ] t \ t*r* ( I'll t± 






Visa T*Vil lr^itonf* 


22 


( ' ■ ■ ■ TV* 




14 


Whit(? I^Il 11 lv >1 'i 


' ? 6 










45 


I Felena ( lanbier 




7 


Wm R»icti£H*clsoii 


3."> 










94. 


Homer . ... 




7 












V. " f\VU 


41 


Ideal 




35 














26 


Ivory. 




8 




6 








Club Orders 


.James Sprunt 




15 


Money for all 


t» 


Joanne Wessenhoff. 






We Express 


2 


Jubilee 




46 




2 










2 






8 




3 


Killarney 




18 




2 








9 


I. a Detroit . . . ... 




.28 


How to Plant ami Care for Roses. .. ... 


5 



ILLUSTRATED AND DESCRIPTIVE BOOK 

. . . OF. . . 

FIELD GROWN 



ROSES 




For the People — all of them — Kind Nature has Worked Such Marvelous 
Wonders and has been so Bounteous, Of Choice by the 
People, the Queen of all Flowers. 

OPEN GROUND CULTURE EXCLUSIVELY 



GROWN AND FOR SALE BY 

CALIFORNIA ROSE CO. 

(Incorporated) 

Pomona, Los Angeles County, California 

(The Only Exclusive Rose Concern in the World) 



ISSUED FOR FALL of 1907 AND SPRING of 1908 TRADE 



2 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



SPECIAL DIRECTIONS TO CORRESPONDENTS AND INTENDING 

PURCHASERS. 

Our Roses Delivered to Your Home with Absolutely No Cost to You for Transportation. 

After a perusal of our catalogue we believe that you will not have the slightest difficulty in 
coming to the conclusion not only that we are entitled to your trade in Rose Bushes, but as well 
that you really cannot afford to buy elsewhere. 

Our business is Roses — nothing else — fine, sturdy, field-grown stock; we are growing them 
in enormous quantities, and we depend upon trade all over the United States; therefore we have 
determined to place all our friends and customers on a basis of living next door to us by delivering 
our Rose Bushes to them at their homes anywhere in the U. S. without cost to them for transporta= 
tion. As our prices are not raised and are positively as low as good, reliable, field-grown stock 
has ever been sold anywhere, you are bound to realize that the cost of transportation comes out 
of our pockets. 

PRICE LIST — All 25 cent Roses are $2.75 for one dozen; two dozen for $5.00; 100 for $20.00. 
All 35 cent Roses are $3.50 per dozen; two dozen for $6.00; 100 for $25.00. Dozen rates do not 
apply on mixed varieties. 

EXTRA LARGE, SELECTED, HEAVY STOCK.— In quite a few varieties, especially in 
Mar. Niel, Papa Gontier, Kaiserin, Perle des Jardins, Etoile de Lyon, Coq. de Lyon, Mad. Car. 
Testout, we will have some unusually HEAVY stock which will be sold at fifty cents per plant. 
Any customer wishing his order filled with extra strong stock should make a reasonable addition 
to his remittance over regular price. We believe, however, that our regular grade of plants should 
give the best of satisfaction any and everywhere. 

Varieties listed at more than 25 cents each are mostly new and very choice, and for the most 
part extra large, select plants. 

Express charges prepaid by us to your express office. We cannot pay transportation on stage 
routes, as they are usually very heavy. 

NOTE : — No order shipped amounting to less than $2.00 unless express paid by purchaser. 

TERMS. — Cash must invariably accompany orders. Our prices are very low — as low as 
consistent with honest treatment and first-class stock — and we cannot under any circumstances 
open an account or do a credit business regardless of how responsible a customer may be. Our 
liberal terms of prepayment and low prices will not admit of it. 

C. O. D. ORDERS. — We cannot send goods "collect on delivery" unless one-half the amount 
accompanies the order, as a guarantee of good faith, and even then the buyer must pay return 
charges on money. Therefore it is undesirable. We make no charges for packing, boxing or de- 
livery to express office. 

WHEN TO ORDER. — Our shipping season begins the 1st of November and we ship every 
day up to the 1st of April. We aim to ship an order the same day that it is received. Orders 
are filled in rotation as received, or according to when ordered shipped. No stock is reserved 
for a customer unless paid for when ordered. Stock thus procured direct from the growers, with 
no chance of deterioration or mixing of varieties, and in the highest state of freshness and vigor, 
is sure to give the highest results and satisfaction. 

SUBSTITUTIONS. — As a rule we do not substitute unless given permission to do so; oc- 
casionally out of a large list of varieties called for a variety may be sold out, and on so small 
an item it is generally better to make a good substitute than to send order this small item short. 
In ordering late in the season it is always best to name a second choice — but it is always cutsomer's 
privilege to order "no substitutions." We rarely have to substitute unless at the last end of the 
season, but it is best to provide for the contingency. 

MAKING OUT AN ORDER. — Please write out all orders plainly. Positively be sure to 
sign your name to the order, and as surely give your postoffice address, county and state; also, 
express office, if different from postoffice. Please keep a copy of your order, so as to check up 
stock on arrival. Make remittances by any of the following methods: Bank draft on Los An- 
geles, San Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis, New York, Postoffice or Express Money order; or by 
registered letter if foregoing is not obtainable. Please do not send stamps in payment of an order 
as we have all we can use. 

SAFE ARRIVAL GUARANTEED. — We guarantee all stock to reach cutosmers in good 
condition. Any just complaint should be made at once upon receipt of shipment. We ship to 
nearly every state in the Union and with our twenty years' experience in packing and shipping, 
we can safely agree to deliver stock to the most distant points in good condition. In case of un- 
reasonable delay in arrival of stock ordered, notify us and send copy of order, stating when orig- 
inally mailed and by what means remitted and amount. 

GUARANTEE OF STOCK.— We guarantee all stock sent out to be true to name to the 
extent that we will replace free any article which dees not so prove. Every rose bush shipped 
between December 1st and March 15th we guarantee to grow, replacing without charge for the 
plants all stock which fails to grew, provided such loss is reported to us within two months from 
time of shipment. 

This offer is NOT EQUALED BY ANY HOUSE IN THE U. S. 

ADDRESS all orders and make all remittances payable to 

CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY. 

Pomona, California. 



WE BEGIN SHIPPING THIS YEAR FIRST WEEK IN NOVEMBER. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



3 



Some of the Reasons Why We Ask Your Trade 

in Roses 

Firstly, we claim to be able to give you better value for your money than 
you can obtain elsewhere. 

Our roses are Large Field-grown Plants and have bloomed profusely this season. 
We have no One Year Old Plants to offer. 

Considering the quality and grade of our stock, the fact that we guarantee 
plants to grow and be true to name, and that we deliver the gocds to you with- 
out cost for transportation, our prices are fully fifty per cent, lower than any house 
in the United State. 

Our business is growing and selling roses — not a general business. We occupy 
a position by ourselves as we are the only house throughout the country who can 
claim the distinction of being exclusive Rose Growers. If you are about to pur- 
chase a valuable piece of jewelry, you naturally go to the exclusive jewelry es- 
tablishment, not to the department store handling a few cdds and ends of all lines. 
It is reasonable to assume that you will get better value by so doing. This is a 
good rule to apply to other lines of purchase. 

Our men in direct charge of propagating and growing roses have had from 
fifteen to twenty-five years' experience in the work. 

We claim to have growing more Roses than any house west of the Mississippi 
river, and of Field-grown of the best Tea and H. T. sorts, more than any concern 
in the United States. We also claim to have the only large assortment, includ- 
ing the best Tea and H. T. varieties, of exclusively Field-Grown Roses, on their 
Own Roots, in the United States. We believe we can, therefore, justly claim to 
be the Headquarters for Roses. 

We do not grow or list five hundred or a thousand varieties of roses because 
they are in existence and called roses. A large share of them are worthless and 
of no value whatever to the amateur grower; such a collection catalogued only tends 
to muddle the buyer, and in selecting unknown and new sorts, he is bound to get 
some which will prove worthless. We list herein only such varieties as we actually 
have growing and can supply; they comprise the best sorts of actual known and es- 
tablished worth. 

FIELD=GROWN ROSES. 

Our roses are grown out of doors in the open ground;' at best, pot -grown plants 
are of small value compared to field-grown stock. It requires but slight calcula- 
tion to appreciate the value of roses grown in the open ground with plenty of room 
for growth and expansion of roots under liberal cultivation, over a plant grown in 
a pot with roots cramped and bound in hard dirt and no cultivation. 

Our field-grown roses make a large growth and many sorts are cut back some- 
what before shipping. Roses should generally be cut back when transplanted; 
it is the new wood — the new growth — which produces the flowers, and if the bush 
is well pruned each season, allowing the whole strength of the roots to be put forth 
in producing this new growth, with not too large a top to work on, the quicker plenty 
of blooms will be obtained and the quality improved. Our roses bloom before being 
sent out and when transplanted will bloom again practically as soon as in full foliage. 
Tea roses, nursery grown are out of the question in the East, as the climate will not 
permit of keeping them in the nurseiy rows during the winter. With splendid 
field-grown roses of the grade we offer, and at such low prices, no one can afford 
to plant little pot -grown plants (even if given to them) and wait a couple oi years 
for any satisfactory bloom. People who buy green-house roses through Eastern 
catalogues, order them because they are cheap, while if they could see the plants, 
or would stop to consider that they are nothing but little slips grown in two inch 
pots, they would never order them, at least, not when good, large, field-grown plants 
are to be had for only a few cents more. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS 



4 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



ALL OUR ROSES ARE GROWN ON THEIR OWN ROOTS AND ARE FAR SU= 
PERIOR TO BUDDED PLANTS. 



They Never Sucker or Produce Wild Roses. Impossible to Produce Anything But 
the Genuine Variety. They Make Shapely, Sightly and Symmetrical Bushes 
for Lawn and Garden, and are Easily Cared For. 



The old method of growing roses of distinct varieties was ,by "budding; that is to say budding 
the desired species onto the root of a wild rose. The most prominent rose growers of today are 
getting to grow roses on their own roots, fully recognizing their superiority for the garden and 
the lawn. With the average amateur rose grower, it is, in nine cases out of ten, a question of 
only a short time before "suckers" from the wild rose root of the budded plant will entirely run 
out the variety budded in; the planter then has nothing but a wild Manetti rose. Thousands 
of them have so turned out on this coast as well as throughout the country. Very often it hap- 
pens that the shoot of the variety budded on to the wild root will be broken off in packing or after 
planting, or for some reason dies down; the plant is then entirely worthless. With an "own root" 
rose you may break it or cut it back clear down to the roots without harm as in sprouting from 
the roots the genuine variety only will be produced. In cold sections tender sorts often winter- 
kill from the top down to roots; a budded plant in such a case is thereafter worthless, but not so 
with an own root one. Many of the budded plants are so ungainly, crooked and scraggly that 
shapely plants cannot be made out of them and in consequence they are totally unfit for the lawn 
and garden. Nearly all budded roses are grown on the wild Manetti rose stock; it is natural for 
this stock to go dormant or partially so during the winter, and therefore when an ever-blooming 
variety is budded on this stock it is bound to impair the blooming quality of the plant for quite 
a portion of the year; a rose grown on its own roots, very naturally, the roots and top will work 
in unison; this is an important point, especially on this coast or wherever roses can be kept in 
bloom the greater portion of the year. 

It follows therefore, that only professional gardeners, who thoroughly understand the science 
of budding and the training of budded roses, should ever undertake the planting of budded roses. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GROWN ROSE BUSHES ARE LARGEST, HARDIEST 

AND BEST. 

In certain sections here we claim to have the most perfect conditions and soil for produc- 
inx, the best and most healthy rose bushes in the world. We have virgin soil; not exhausted and 
worn out by years of constant cropping, or infested by injurious insects. In short, we produce 
rose bushes which are in perfect health and vigor and more suitable for transplanting to all sec- 
tions, including the east and south, than plants produced in these sections. It is reasonable to 
believe that a plant reared under every favorable condition is more robust, hardy and of better 
constitution than one produced in a section where it has had to combat the conditions of worn- 
out soil, unfavorable climate, insects and pests. This is why our plants go into nearly every state 
of the Union and thrive. 

OUR ROSES ARE GUARANTEED TO GROW. 

Does this proposition look as if we had faith in our plants? Do you know of any other house 
in the United States doing a large business who has the same faith in their stock and customers? 

SUCCESS SUCCEEDS. 

We succeed in selling our rose bushes for the very good reason that our customers have suc- 
cess in making them grow and bloom. The success of our customers is primarily our success. 
A satisfied cutomer is our best advertisement. Can you appreciate, therefore, that we are bound, 
as the prime key to our success, to do our very utmost to give the highest value for money for- 
warded to us, and to stand by our customers and see to it that they get complete satisfaction. 

The illustrations in this Catalogue are actual reproductions from photographs, and as true 
to nature as it is possible for a photograph to be. There are no drawings from fancy or imagina- 
tion, but every cut represents a photographic view of the flower or plant in actual life and exist- 
ence. 

WE WISH TO EXPRESS OUR THANKS. 

To our many cutsomers of the past for their liberal patronage and courteous treatment; 
every order is highly appreciated, be it large or small. During shipping season it is impossible 
to acknowledge receipt of all orders and thank customers for them. An order will convince us 
that you appreciate our placing this book in your hands and our work; or should it so happen 
that the planting of roses is impossible for you, your appreciation can be as fully demonstrated by 
your turning the book over to some friend or neighbor who is in position to plant, adding a word 
of interest from yourself. Remember that we guarantee satisfaction to all. We thank you in 
advance for favors you may show us. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



5 



How to Plant and Care For Rose Bushes 



If convenient to do so it is a good plan to plant late in the day or during cloudy weather. 
To begin with have your ground well prepared; good sized, liberal holes dug to accommodate the 
roots without cramping or bending; make the hole considerable larger than necessary and then 
partially fill in with finely pulverized, mellow soil, so as to afford a good mellow surrounding for 
the roots to start in; the use of good surface soil or decayed sod or something of this nature is good 
for the filling in and to place about the roots, being a little richer and more mellow generally than 
the soil removed in digging. 

Now remove all packing from the plants, moss, etc. from roots. Handle your plants in a 
shady spot and protect from dry winds; keep the roots covered well with moist soil after unpack- 
ing until ready to plant. Next, prune your roses severely, regardless of how small it leaves them 
for planting; remove all small weak wood, leaving only two to three strong and not too long canes 
of the hardest wood and strongest eyes, shaping the plant to a symetrical form; with the Hybrid 
Perpetuals, they should be trimmed back to about two canes (the strongest and hardest wood ) 
and not over from four to six inches high. It will pay you to use the knife not sparingly; your 
plants will ccme on quicker and faster and be larger in a few weeks than if left unpruned, and they 
stand a much better chance of living. Having properly attended to the tops attend to the roots; 
it is generally desirable to prune the roots somewhat — sort of balance up your plant and cut off 
all roots above any bruises or breaks, at every cut the roots when planted will at once throw a 
good supply of fibers. Use a sharp knife or pruning shears for all pruningwork. Now set your 
plant in the hole prepared for it, sifting in with the and finely pulverized soil previously prepared, 
slowly and press down firmly as you go that each root and part of root may come in firm contact 
with the soil; continue this operation in layers until covered to within a little less than the final 
desired depth, leaving just enough of the basin to hold water; now water liberally to thoroughly 
settle the soil about the roots; after well drained into the ground, complete filling up the hole leav- 
ing the plant at about the same depth as it stood in the nursery and work up the surface soil nice 
and loose. If a few inches of mulch is now applied about the plants (old litter, leaves, leaf mould, 
clippings from the lawn ) it will keep the ground of a more even temperature and prevent drying 
out; this plan is much preferable to continual watering. No manure of any kind should be used in 
the soil at planting time, as apt to burn off the new fibers as they .-Tart from the roots; manure 
may be applied from the top after plants in full foiliage. If planting is done in very warm weather 
it is a good plan to shade the plants for a few days, thus helping to prevent the tops from start- 
ing before the roots get hold of the soil. If you are troubled with alkali in your soil, you should 
prepare for proper drainage before planting, this may be done by making a good sized excava- 
tion so as to permit of filling in at the bottom with eight inches to a foot of cobble stones directly 
under where your roses are to be planted; this makes excellent drainage and will prevent the al- 
kali rising. 

Plant your roses where they will have plenty cf sunshine; where you can control watering; 
where you can properly cultivate and where a good circulation of air is to be had; give them 
the best of cultivation. Do not expect them to produce perfect bloom every week day and twice 
on Sunday; they must have some rest or they get "fagged out" like the rest of us; right here is 
where so many err in growing in this state; plants should be rested two or three months of the 
year; this can be best done during latter part of the summer months of the year (when bloom is 
poor at best ) by simply with-holding the water from them, allowing them to be absolutely quiet 
— no growth — and if the foilage withers and drops so much the better; just keep the wood from 
shriveling, that's all; after thus properly rested go after them with the pruning shears, remov- 
ing all scraggelly, weak and small wood, and shaping your plant up — don't be afraid of over- 
doing it — cutting the Hybrid Perpetuals back as outlined for first planting out; this done, if you 
are ready to start them up, give them a good dressing of well rotted cow manure and a thorough 
soaking of the ground. Properly done you will be surprised to see how promptly and vigorousiy 
they will awake and the quality of bloom they will hand you. 

Do not over water your rose; keep the ground mulched, or at least, the soil worked up nice 
and loose, and water say once in ten days or a month, according to nature of soil, etc., over water- 
ing only produces mildew, rust and disease; water in the morning — never at night. Climatic 
conditions, sudden changes, continuous foggy weather, etc. will sometimes produce mildew, etc. 
regardless of every care, but even so, you can aid in warding it off by proper care. Flowers of 
sulphur applied dry when foilage is damp will check mildew if applied as it first appears. "Black 
Spot" and red rust are also caused by over-watering, or unfavorable weather; foliage once thus 
infected cannot be cured and it should be removed and burned. Aphis or Green Fly is generally 
prevalent during the spring months; these are not serious and regardless of the many "remedies" 
which can be applied, such as soap-suds, kerosene emulsion, tobacco juice, etc., they will return 
for the time being and keep coming until the little red lady bugs devour them. The most simple 
remedy we know of is to use a good strong spray of water from the hose which easily washes them 
off; repeat as often as necessary. 

Yours very truly, 

CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



6 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



Club Orders 



MONEY FOR THE BOYS AND OTHERS WITH A LITTLE TIME 



As Well, Help to Beautify Your Town or City and Give it a Reputation. 



Orders for 150 Roses we w 



11 pay you$ 3.50 in Roses or $ 2.00 cash. 



200 " 




" " 5.00 


3.00 


300 " 




" " 6.50 


5.00 


400 " 


it a 


" " 8.50 


7.00 


500 " 




" " 12.50 


10.00 


700 " 


a it 


" " 17.00 


15.00 


" 1000 " 


u 11 


" " 29.00 


25.00 


" 2000 " 




" " 60.00 


55.00 


" 3000 " 




" " 95.00 


85.00 


" 4000 " 


It 11 


" 125.00 


115.00 


" 5000 " 


it it 


" " 165.00 


150.00 



To the one sending us the largest amount of orders in dollars by or before the 
loth of March, 1908, we will make a present of ten dollars cash. To the one sending 
the next largest amount, five dollars cash. 

. The orders are to be sent to us accompanied by the cash to pay for the same 
and we will ship the total quantity of rose bushes to you by express, transportation 
prepaid. The orders are to be made out separately by you showing the full name 
and address of the buyer and we will pack each order in a bundle by itself and prop- 
erly tag so that upon arrival all you will have to do is to turn over to each customer 
the bundle bearing his or her name. Orders should be sent to us as fast as you have 
orders in total for 150 roses; and if you desire to let the matter of your compensation 
run along until you secure further business you can do so. We will send more cata- 
logues for your use if you require. 

With our stock and our liberal prices, etc. it is an easy matter for one with a 
little enthusiasm to start in and sell from one hundred to five hundred roses in a day. 
It is as well a pleasing past time and you have the agreeable satisfaction of know- 
ing all the while that you are in reality helping the parties to whom you sell and 
helping to beautify the community. 

Just a little enthusiasm; just a little push and every little home will ha ve a nice 
bush (many of them, we hope. ) 

Yours truly, 

CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, 

Pomona, California. 

SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



GENERAL JACQUEMINOT. (H. R. ) 

This grand old variety is too well-known to require a description at length; 
One of the very best growers and easiest of cultivation; never failing to produce 
a fine crop of rich, dark red flowers. Will grow anywhere and everywhere. Its 
fragrance is lasting and delightful. 25 cents each. 

ANTOINE RIVOIRE. (H. T.) 

A new rose of much merit and value for garden culture; a handsome, clean 
and vigorous grower and profuse bloomer. Color, rosy-flesh, on a yellow ground, 
often shaded with a border of carmine; flowers of extra large size, delicately formed 
and moulded and open in the most charming manner, petals reflexing and rolling 
back not unlike a Camelia blossom. 35 cents each. 

QLORIE DE MARGOTTIN. (H. R. ) 

A most valuable hardy rose; of splendid growth, liberal dark green foliage; 
color, extremely brilliant scarlet — live and lasting; flowers large, reasonably full, 
globular, of good shape, pretty in bud, extremely beautiful, distinct and attractive 
when open; borne on very long stems. 25 cents each. 

EARL OF DUFFERIN. (H. R.) 

Originated by the famous rose growers, Dickson & Sons. Color, rich, brilliant, 
velvety crimson, shaded with dark maroon; large, full and superbly formed; the most 
delightful fragrance imaginable. 25 cents each. 

HOMER. (T.) 

An old-timer; grown for its pretty buds; cream color shaded pink. 25 cents 
each. 

GEN. ROBT. E. LEE. (T.) 

Lemon-yellow; pretty buds. Not a very strong grower. 25 cents each. 

DUCHESS OF ALBANY. (H. T. ) 

Quite commonly called "Red La France." Tins is a superb rose, resembles 
La France, but color of flower much deeper and richer. It is a continuous and free 
bloomer, producing a great abimdance of the most lovely buds and flowers month 
after month, apparently needing little or no rest. Flower is extra large, elegant in 
form, very double, full and remarkably fragrant; color, brilliant rose-pink, exquis- 
itely shaded. 25 cents each. 

HELENA CANBIER. (H. T. ) 

A charming new rose of French origin; hardy and a continuous and free bloomer; 
a free grower, making a shapely, compact bush; flowers of good size, of splendid 
substance and lasting; color, copper-yellow to deep amber-yellow, changing to lem- 
on-yellow in outer petals, making a pretty and striking combination. A splendid 
garden sort. 35 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



8 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA. (H. T. ) 

(See illustration opposite page. ) 

This is easily the grandest and most beautiful white ever-blooming rose ex- 
tant; we can say this with no fear of being contradicted by any one competent to 
speak. Although a Hybrid Tea and hardy for cold sections; it is one of the very 
best bloomers in the rose family, throughout the entire year; it will produce half a 
dozen or more blooms to one of Bride, a far better grower, flowers produced on better 
and longer stems and the color more satisfactory; there is not the slightest greenish 
tinge in the bloom; it is, in fact, a most clear, shining, lustrous white, with just 
enough of the lemon cast in the centre to make it perfect; the foliage is a marked con- 
trast to some of the best Tea sorts, being large, profuse and healthy; although grown 
extensively under glass, it is essentially a garden rose "for the people." It is equally 
handsome in bud or open flower; the flowers are very large, and although it opens 
wide and full, petals reflexing and rolling back to the stem, the center is not shown; 
the petals reflex, curve and roll back as it opens until the appearance is strikingly 
like a perfect bloom of the Camelia; petals of thick leathery substance; highly per- 
fumed. 25 and 50 cents . 

CLIMBING MARIE GUILLOT. (T. ) 

(This rose has been sold under various names, notably President Cleveland 
and Frances Willard.) Identical with Marie Guillot, except its strong climbing 
habit. Pure white; bloom very large, solid and full. Does best in the hot sections 
of the South. 25 cents each. 

RAINBOW. (T.) 

A very useful and pretty striped variety, strong and vigorous in habit. It 
makes fine buds and flowers of a beautiful shade of pink distinctly striped and 
mottled with bright crimson shaded and toned rich amber-yellow. 25 cents each. 

REINE MARIE HENRIETTE. (T. ) 

Seedling from "Mme. Berard," fertilized by "Gen. Jacqueminot." A strong 
grower, constantly in bloom and very free. The flowers are of enormous size, ex- 
quisitely shaped, both as to bud and flower, and richly Tea-scented. The color 
is marvelously rich and glowing crimson, and retains its color far better than the 
average rose. We have cut flowers of this variety which were as perfect in every 
way as any rose we have ever seen. W 7 herethe climate will permit of its being grown, 
it will positively give the very highest satisfaction. Not free from mildew. 25 
cents each. 

IVORY. (T. ) (White Golden Gate. ) 

This new rose is a sport from the well-known rose," Golden Gate," Color, ivory 
white; seems to be identical with its parent except in color. 35 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



9 




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SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



11 




MRS. JOHN LAING. (H. R.) 

A most beautiful rose of long standing popularity, and finds a place in nearly 
all choice collections. A seedling from "Francois Michelon;" soft pink, large and 
of fine form, produced on long, strong stems; exceedingly fragrant and flowers con- 
tinually when grown as a garden rose. 25 cents each. 



BABY RAMBLER. (P.) 

(Madame Norbert Levavasseur. ) 

This new dwarf everblooming Rambler has created a great commotion through- 
out the whole country, and is a decidedly sensational variety. It blooms all the 
time, its clusters of rich crimson flowers completely hiding the whole plant. 50 
cents each; $5.00 per doz. See illustration opposite page. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS 



12 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




Etoile de France. 



ETOILE de FRANCE. (H.T.) 

A new French rose which now promises to become the most popular rich red 
rose for garden culture. It is certainly a most grand and charming rose in all ways. 
It is a good and clean grower; upright in habit; foliage good and nice dark green in 
color; the bloom is produced continually; is of large size, full and borne on good long 
and stiff stems; the color is ;i mosl charming shade of ri-ch velvety crimson and docs 
not fade; is highly fragrant. 75 cents each; $8.00 per dozen. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



AMERICAN BEAUTY. (H. R.) 

An American rose, said to have originated on the grounds of Mr. Bancroft, 
the Historian. Too well-known to require a lengthy description. American 
Beauty in its prime is simply grand — grand rose, as we all know and appreciate. 
In some sections, however, it does not prove a first-class garden rose and wherever 
grown to produce satisfactory results it requires skilled treatment and handling 
to produce good results. 35 and 50 cents. 

BURBANK. (Bourbon.) 
A rose of California; produced by the "Wizard of Horticulture," Mr. Luther 
Burbank. A hardy, strong and vigorous grower, bushy in habit; a constant and 
heavy bloomer; flowers of medium size, full and fragrant; color, a pleasing shade of 
pink. 25 cents. 




Burbank. 



ADMIRAL DEWEY. (H. T. ) 

The originator's description is as follows: "Delicate blush pink, shading 
to white, globular, expanding into a full flower without showing center. A sport 
from Madame Caroline Testout, more vigorous in habit and a very free bloomer. 
50 cents each: $5.00 per dozen. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS 



14 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



GRUSS AN TEPLITZ. (H. T. ) 

One of the brightest colored roses extant, of peculiar lasting qualities, retain- 
ing its magnificent vivid, rich, fiery red coloring even during the hottest summer 
weather. A handsome, clean grower; pretty foliage. Flowers of good size and 
continuous bloomer. 25 cents each. 




Gruss an Teplitz. 

DOROTHEA PERKINS. (P. ) 

A new rose, praised yery highly in the East, where it originated. Of crimson 
Rambler type, but much prettier foliage and free from mildew; color, a pretty pink. 
A strong climber. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



15 



HELEN GOULD. (H. T. ) 

A remarkably fine, new rose of German origin. This sort having been sold 
under various names when first brought to this country, there has been much dis- 
cussion regarding it and some dispute as to its parentage, but the most authentic 
report points to Kaiserin X Testout. In color it resembles Mad. Caroline Testout 
closely — a rich, solid, bright pink; shape of buds are the ideal, and when full blown 
the petals reflex similar to Kaiserin. Bloom not quite so large as Kaiserin, nor 
have the petals so much substance, but nevertheless a most sweet and charming 
thing, and possessing a color rare in roses. Symmetrical in growth; a constant and 
prolific bloomer. 25 cents each. 




Helen Gould 



JAMES SPRUNT. (Bourbon. ) 
A strong robust and constant bloomer; foliage dark, medium size and pro- 
fuse; flowers of medium size, very double, full and fragrant; color, very rich cherry- 
red, making a most charming sight. 25 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



1G 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



MADAME WAGRAM. (H. T. ) 

(Sometimes called Climbing Paul Neyron. ) 

In this sort we !.ave the very best all-round distinctly pink, constant-bloom- 
ing, climbing rose r )wri — a rose for the people everywhere; a heavy and constant 
bloomer, and at the same time hardy. An enormous grower, good foliage and free 
from disease. Color, a most charming semi-transparent, clean, solid pink, which 
does not fade out to a dirty cream pink. Flowers large, full and double; buds of 
charming form— fragrant. Sure to please YOU. 25 cents. 

MADAME DE VATRY. (T. ) 

One of the good all-rourid garden roses; color, dark red, changing to silvery 
pink; flowers large and full. 25 cents each. 

LA FRANCE. (H. T. ) 

We winder if there is a lover of roses in the count ry who does not know and 
appreciate this superb old standard variety. Produced in 1867, and was raised 
from seed of a Tea Rose, Description: Delicate silvery rose, changing to silvery 
pink; very large, full of fine globular form; a most constant bloomer. Highly 
fragrant and hardy. 25 cents each. 

REINE OLGA WURTEMBURG. (H. T. ) 

A climbing rose of much merit; if you have visited the south of France, you 
have seen them in their "glory," making beautiful thousands of homes. A good 
grower and rapid climber; flowers large, very double and full, splendidly formed 
and of very rich deep red color. The only objection to this rose is that it is not a 
constant bloomer; will please highly if you will be satisfied not to pick bloom from 
it the year through. 25 cents. 

REVE D'OR. (N. ) 

One of the grandest climbing roses; a splendid robust climber with the very 
best of foliage; a good plant will soon go to the top of a two-story house and cover 
space proportionately large the other way; such a plant in full bloom, with its grace- 
ful flowers of delicate coloring is a charming sight . Color, apricot-yellow with orange 
and fawn tints; petals of superb and delicate texture; flowers moderately full; al- 
ways pretty and graceful, whether in bud or full open; a very profuse bloomer. 
25 cents. 

SAFRANO. (T.) 

One of the oldest varieties (1849), but of such decided merit that we doubt 
if as many plants of this sort were ever put out as during the past year. Very 
justly popular. A fine, clean grower, free from disease and profuse and constant 
bloomer. Color, bright apricot-yellow, changing to orange and fawn. Petals of 
the most superb and delicate texture, but lasting . 25 cents. 

SOLFATERRE. (N. ) 

Sulphur-yellow; of good size; very pretty indeed, and a good robust climber. 
Makes a splendid contrast planted with other climbers. 25 cents. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



17 




Ulrich Brunnei . 

v ULRICH BRUNNER. (H. R. ) 

One of the very best roses grown, and we regard it as the best all-round rose 
of its class. No other sort so handsome of growth, foliage, wood, etc,; free from 
disease; very upright growth and free practically from thorns. Color, very rich 
cherry-red, with no maroon or dirty purple about it; bloom large to very large; 
full, of the best substance and as fragrant as anything in the rose family; borne on 
very long and stiff stems. A valuable feature of this sort is that while a Hybrid it 
is one of the very few of this class that are continuous bloomers. Very much su- 
perior to American Beauty as a garden rose. 25 cents. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



18 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



MARQUISE DE QUERHOENT. (T. ) 

Another good new rose which we shall grow more largely of each year. Of 
good strong growth, making a splendid bush for the garden; clean healthy wood 
and persistent bloomer. Bloom of good size, prime substance, full and sweet. 
Color, beautiful china rose, salmon, copper and golden yellow — a combination 
rarely seen. 25 cents each. 




Marquise de Querhoent. 

KILLARNEY. (H. T.) 

Distinct, of English origin; growth upright and strong; bloom of good size; 
not very full; very handsome in bud; graceful and unique when full bloom. Color, 
pink, changing to flesh. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

GARDENIA. (H. T. ) 

A very pretty blush colored bedder; flowers of medium size, produced in great 
profusion and very fragrant. 25 cents each. 

AGRIPPINA. (Bourbon.) 

An old, well-known sort. Pretty growth; best of foliage. Very profuse 
bloomer; color, dark red; lasting and fragrant. 25 cents. 

GAINSBOROUGH. (H. T.) 

Here is a good new rose and a valuable acquisition to our climbing roses — color 
being flesh pink. It is a sport from Vis. Folkstone and the bloom identical; flower 
large, very full, rich fragrance and prime substance. One of the strongest climbers. 
25 cents. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE 



19 



MADAME CAROLINE TESTOUT. (H. T. ) 

A most grand and distinct variety; hardy a nd a continuous bloomer. It is 
an especially valuable and desirable garden sort, being a pretty and symmetrical 
grower; free from disease; wood and foliage very dark in color; foliage very large 




- Madame Caroline Testouf * . ... 

ecfrf prettily marked; flowers produced on straight, and stiff stems; buds and blooms 
large to very large, distinct and pretty information, with that brilliant satiny- 
pink coloring so pleasing to the eye, while its fragrance is delicious. 25 and 50 cents. 

WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



20 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




Lady^Butli rs< a . 



LADY BATTERSEA. (H. T.)] 

Here is a "grand "good new rose, which we predict w ill become more popular 
than Papa Gontier. One of the prettiest of growers — upright and clean; excellent 
foliage. Color, rich red; style of bud as good as Xiphetos and Papa Gontier; of better 
substance than either. 50 cents each. 

BRIDE. (T.) 

Produced in 1885, at Summit, N; J. A sport from Catherine Mermet. Is 
more largely grown under glass in the East than any other white variety, ^'ell- 
known and highly prized everywhere. The buds are extremely large, most ex- 
quisitely shaped and moulded, very long and artistically pointed; color, white; in 
this immediate section and the extreme South the outer petals are tinged with rose. 
25 cents. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



21 



MADAME CECILE BRUNNER. (P.) 

Plant of dwarf growth, excellent for bordering. Color, salmon-rose. "We 
think, the most beautiful and lovely of the miniature roses. Very fragrant. 25 
cents each. 




Madame Cecile Brunner. 

J 

MAGNA CHARTA. (EL R.) 
Old and very well known (1876). Pink suffused with carmine, full and glob- 
ular. Foliage and wood light green, and highly ornamental when planted with 
other varieties; fragrant. 25 cents each. 

CLIMBING CECILE BRUNNER. 

Easily the most charming and popular of the Polyantha roses. Very ro- 
bust and one of the strongest climbers in the rose family. Hardy and suitable for 
all sections. 25 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



22 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



CLIMBING KAISERIN AUGUSTA VICTORIA. (H. T. ) 

See illustration on opposite page. 

This is the grandest acquisition to the climbing rose family yet produced, and 
is unquestionably the very best climbing white rose in existence. We produced 
and sold the first field-grown plants of this sort in the United States, and we have 
yet to hear of a single complaint or disappointment regarding it. It originated at 
Wilmington, Del., and the original plant in a four-inch pot was sold for the sum 
of $500.00. A very strong, thrifty grower, free from disease, unusually pretty 
foliage, and the flowers produced on stout, long stems. Although a Hybrid Tea, 
it is one of the best bloomers we know of for the entire year and will produce more 
flowers than many of the Teas or Noisettes. Be it remembered, at the same time, 
that it is perfectly hardy even for cold sections. The flowers are identical in every 
way with its parent "Kaiserin Augusta Victoria," which is well known by all lead- 
ing Nurserymen and Florists as the best white ever-blooming rose grown. The 
flowers are exquisitely grand — all of them — perfect in shape, size, substance, frag- 
rance, lasting qualities and fullness of flower; bloom will stay on the plant remain- 
ing in perfect condition longer than any rose we know of. In this section and else- 
where during trying hot and dry weather so many of our best roses go to pieces at 
once they are full blown, but not so with "Kaiserin"; it opens up full and broad, 
petals reflexing and rolling back until it assumes the appearance of a perfect blossom 
of the Camelia. Words fail to do this grand rose justice; to be appreciated it must 
be growing and blooming at your home. 35 cents each. 

PERLE VON GODESBURG. (H. T. ) 

This new yellow rose is identical with Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, in every way 
save in color. Is sure to become very popular. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

VISCOUNTESS FOLKSTONE. (H. T. ) 

A tip-top good sort in every sense of the word: one of the best all round garden 
varieties, being a prime grower, clean, well shaped and producing bounteous supply 
of bloom at all times; flowers large, full, splendidly formed and of nice substance 
and fragrance; color, a delicate transparent flesh, deepening towards the center. 
25 cents each. 

MARSHALL P. WILDER. (H. E. ) 

Another grand old sort which is still popular. Produced in 1884, being raised 
from seed of General Jacqueminot. Flowers large, semi-globular, full and well 
formed; color, rich cherry-carmine and extremely fragrant. Continues to bloom 
profusely long after other sorts of this class are out of flower. 25 cents each. 

QUEEN. (T.) 

A pure snowy-white sort which is proving a first-class success as a garden 
soil; flower of good size, nice shape and of much substance; freeand abundant 
bloomer; fragrant. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 23 



24 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




Etoile de Lyon. 



ETOILE DE LYON. (T. ) 

One of the best and most beautiful yellow Tea roses for general planting. Of 
good constitution; in fact, one of the very hardiest of the Teas, and with proper 
care will bloom the entire year. Flowers nearly as large as Marechal Niel, perfect 
in form, fragrance, full and beautiful in coloring. 25 and 50 cents. 

CAPTAIN CHRISTY. (H. It.) 

A grand hardy variety and free bloomer; flowers large, very double and beau- 
tiful; color, fresh, delicate pink with deeper shading in center of flower. Valuable 
for all sections. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



25 



PERLE DES JARDINS. (T. ) 

This lovely yellow, constant blooming rose still holds it great popularity, with 
an increasing demand as it is more generally planted. The cut flowers of this va- 
riety with Bride and Bridesmaid have paid for more homes, gowns and innumer- 




Perle des Jar dins. 

able things, than perhaps all other varieties combined. Makes an excellent garden 
sort. Flowers large, full and globular, { with great depth and substance; richly per- 
fumed; color, a clear golden yellow of a most rich and pretty shade, quite distinct 
from any other variety. 35 and 50 cents. 

AUGUSTINE GU1NOISEAU. (H. T. ) (White La France.) 

A grand rose for universal planting, especially adapted to garden culture, 
doing well seemingly under all conditions; it is an exceedingly profuse bloomer 
for the entire years; color, a delicate soft flesh, at times almost pure white; flowers 
large, full, of good substance and highly fragrant. 25 cents each. 



WE^PAY THE EXPRESS. 



26 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA 



LAMARQUE. (N. ) 

For a climbing white, continuous blooming rose this has been the best up to 
the time of production of the Climbing Kaiserin Augusta Victoria. It is still a grand 
sort in all ways but is not hardy r s "Kaiserin." In nearly all sections where the 
winter temperature will admit it, Lamarque has been grown and is well known. 
Will stand perfectly in the Pacific Coast States and the South. 25 cents each. 




WHITE BANKSIA. (Banksia. ) 
Well-known, distinct and valuable as a rapid growing climber; valuable for 
covering arbors, ragged hedges, walls, trunks of trees; thornless; flowers white and 
very small but borne in great profusion. 25 cents each. 

YELLOW BANKSIA. (Banksia. ) 
Same as White Banksia excepting color, which is yellow. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



27 



MADAME ABEL CHATENAY. (H. T. ) 

A good rose which is being extensively grown under glass; on account of its 
fine growing qualities, hardiness and freedom of bloom, it makes a valuable garden 
sort. Flowers of good size and beautifully shaped and moulded; the buds are ex- 
quisite; the color is a beautiful creamy-rose shaded with rose vermillion and tinged 
with salmon; the base of petals being highly colored. 25 cents each. 




Maaame'Abel Chatenay. 

J 

PRINCE CAMILLE DE ROHAN. (H. R. ) 

Well-known in most sections, and very highly prized as being one of the very 
darkest, rich, velvety red roses in existence; has been sold quite extensively under 
the name of "Black Prince." We think the coloring as good and rich as Meteor; 
a fine symmetrical grower and prolific bloomer of its class; will do well in all sections; 
flowers large, very full, of great substance and fragrance. 25 cents. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



28 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




Gladys Harkness. 



GLADYS' HARKNESS. (H. T. ) 

One oi the prettiest roses in our fields. Of very upright growth much like 
the Hybrids. Bloom large and full, pretty, in bud and flower; color, rich cerise 
pink which does not fade; very fragrant. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

LA DETROIT. (H. T. ) 

Of recent introduction; a strong vigorous grower, and a very profuse bloomer. 
Color, shell pink, shading to soft rose. You will be delighted with it. 50 cents 
each. $5.00 per dozen. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSESFOR THE PEOPLE. 



29 



J PAPA GONTIER. (T. ) 

Probably the most popular and widely sought for rose 




Papa Gontier. 



ever produced; people 
wh o have not 
planted of this va- 
riety insist upon 
getting it, and 
those who have 
planted a bush in- 
variably plant sev- 
eral more. It is 
truly a grand rose 
and one of the most 
incessant bloomers 
for whole year in 
the entire rose fam- 
ily. A splendid 
grower and makes a 
shapely and hand- 
some bush. It pro- 
duces the most per- 
fect shaped, lovely 
buds imaginable 
and of the deepest 
glowing crimson 
color. Flowers are 
of great depth and 
substance and will 
keep longer after 
being cut than 
most any other 
sort. Fragrant and 
sweet. 25 and 50 
cents. 

PAUL NEYRON. 

(H. RO 

Very well-known 
and popular; said 
to produce the 
largest flowers of 
any rose in exist- 
ence. A seedling 
from Victor Ver- 
dier, fertilized by 
Anne de Diesbach; 
a handsome, up- 
right grower pro- 
ducing a flower at 
the end of every 
long stiff stem simi- 
lar to American 
Beauty; color deep 
rose; a free bloom- 
er. 25 cents each. 



COQUETTE DE LYON. (T. ) 

A very pretty canary yellow; a good clean grower and constant bloomer, the 
bloom always seeming to be produced in the most perfect condition. Valuable 
for bedding and very desirable in a collection of roses. 25 and 50 cents. 

WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



30 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




Bridesmaid. 



ta BRIDESMAID. (T. ) w 

Of American origin; a sport of C. Mermet, possessing all the good qualities of 
the parent variety, but surpassing it in color, being a more deep, brilliant pink and 
constant in color under all conditions. Flower very large, full, perfect, shape, fra- 
grant and a constant bloomer. 25 cents. 

METEOR. (H. T.) 

This extremely distinct and valuable variety is well known in most every garden 
and all cut-flower establishments. It is one of the very brightest colored deep red 
roses in existence, and one of the few which seems to be able to hold its grand color- 
ing under all conditions and circumstances. It is a rich, dark velvety crimson color; 
a constant bloomer, generally in full flower when many of the highly prized sort are 
doing but little; healthy and entirely free from mildew; flowers very double and 
compact and borne on good stems, especially adapted for cutting. Very fragrant. 
The only point against this rose is that it cannot always be depended upon to open 
good during the coldest weather; it requires heat and plenty of it; the flowers are 
truly grand. 25 cents each. 

FRANZ DEEQEN. (H. T. ) 
Obtained from a cross between Kaiserin and Sunset. A good grower, of good 
foliage; bloom as large as Kaiserin and very much of the same style; in short, it 
might be called a yellow Kaiserin. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

MAD. de MATRAT. (T. ) 
(Yellow Cochet. ) 

Claimed to be a sport from Cochet; not so strong of growth as the Cochets 
and bloom not quite so large although similar in style. Classed in the yellow roses 
but has more or less of a pink shade at times. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



31 




Marie Van Houtte. 



MARIE VAN HOUTTE. (T. ) 

A most grand and justly popular rose. If you desire a rose that will always 
be in bloom, and magnificent flowers at that, doing well under all conditions and 
circumstances, plant liberally of Marie Van Houtte. An exceedingly strong and 
vigorous grower, and we think, will produce as many perfect flowers in a vear as 
any sort in existence. Of a beautiful straw color, with outer petals edged with bright 
rose; occasionally the entire flower is suffused with light pink. Flowers large, very 
full and fragrant. In every way a most charming and satisfactory garden rose. 
25 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



32 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



MRS. ROBERT GARRET. (H. T. ) 

A valuable new variety raised by Mr. John Cook, of Baltimore, McL, who has 
produced a number of grand sorts. A cross between Sombreuil and Madame Caro- 
line Testout; in growth it is quite similar to the latter sort ; it is essentially a garden 
rose and will attract instant attention among a large collection of the very best sorts; 
as to blooming qualities, it would seem that its mission was to produce bloom and 
to see how much better it could do than its many good rivals. The coloring is a 
rich, deep, yet soft shell-pink, a color hard to correctly describe and one which comes 
only from petals of great substance; its fragrance is very sweet. 25 cents each. 




Mrs. Robert Garrett. 



FRAU KARL DRUSCHKI. (H. R.) 

A most grand rose of recent introduction from England. A strong grower with 
clean, light green very pretty foliage. This is another prime acquisition to the 
Hybrid class on account of its splendid blooming qualities; producing beautiful 
flowers when such sorts as "Jack" Prince Camille de Rohan, Wilder, Clio, etc., are 
doing nothing. Flowers are very large, deep, full of exquisite substance and 
texture and very fragrant. Color, pure waxy white. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

MRS. MAWLEY. (T. ) 

One of the newer roses. Of medium growth— not extra strong. Bloom simi- 
lar in style and coloring to Maman Cochet; stems inclined to be weak; flowers of extra 
good quality, handsomely formed, full and of good keeping qualities. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



33 



CLARA WATSON. (H. T. ) 

A new ever-blooming rose of English origin; of good robust growth and heatlhy; 
flowers of large size, good form and rich fragrance; the color is blush-pink with a 
shading of yellow at the base of petals. This is one of the grandest roses we grow 
and cannot be praised too highly. 25 cents each. 




Clara Watson. 



GLORIE DE DIJON. (T. ) 

A well-known climber of much merit; a strong grower and constant bloomer. 
Flowers, buff color, shading to yellow. Full and fragrant. 25 cents each. 

MADAME MINA BRABANSON. (H. T. ) 

A seedling from Mme. Caroline Testout and Mme. Abel Chatenay. One of the 
new Hybrid roses of good quality. Bloom large, very full, exquisitely shaped; color, 
soft shell pink. 50 cents each. 

ELI BEAUVILLIAN. (T. ) 

A rich free blooming climber; color, salmon-fawn, very desirable. 25 cents 
each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



34 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMON * 



WINNIE DAVIS. (H. T.) 

A new rose of rare merit and one of the prettiest Hybrid Teas grown. A val- 
uable garden sort, making a neat, strong and upright bush, wood and foliage healthy 
and clean; a profuse bloomer. Bloom of good size, buds extremely pretty, close 
and well formed; not so full as to be heavy and ungraceful, but graceful and charm- 
ing; color, a clean and pretty apricot-pink. This variety produced by a cross be- 
tween Kaiserin and Belle Siebrecht. 25 cents each. 




Winnie Davis. 



ROBERT SCOTT. (H. R.) 

A new seedling from Merville de Lyon crossed with Belle Siebrecht, retaining 
t he large, size, form, rich fragrance and growth of the Hybrid Perpetual with the 
ever-blooming qualities of the Hybrid Tea; in short a Hybrid Perpetual, which is an 
ever-blooming rose, like unto Mrs. John Laing; color, a magnificent clear rosy pink 
of that peculiar shade seen only in Hybrids. 50 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



3o 



CLIMBING BELLE SIEBRECHT. (H. T. ) 

A most lovely thing in a climber; color, solid cerise pink; Jeautiful in bud ard 
flower; bloom of good 'size and reasonably full; fragrant; strong climbing habit. 25 
cents each. 




Climbing Belle Siebrecht. 



ROSMAINE GEREVAUX. (H. T. ) 

Another Hybrid Tea of English origin and proving itself a good garden rose. 
A prime grower; flowers are borne on long strong, stiff stems; very large, full and 
fragrant; veiy pretty in bud; color, rosy flesh. 50 cents each. 

MADAME LOUISE POIRET. (H. T. ) 

Very distinct; of very upright habit, similar to the Perpetuals but more slender 
of growth; flowers of good size, full, somewhat globular, very fragrant; color, solid 
dark pink. 50 cents each. 

IDEAL. (H. T.) 

Another new variety which will appeal to the lover of good roses. Color, a 
beautiful shade of pink, of the La France type, 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 

WM. ALLEN RICHARDSON. (N. ) 

A very pretty climbing rose and good grower; color, copper-yellow, flushed 
with carmine; flowers of good size. 25 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



36 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



BEAUTY OF QLAZENWOOD. (Commonly called "Gold of Ophir.") 

A distinct and grand climber; of very rapid growth and not subject to disease; 
color, a combination of copper, carmine and salmon-yellow — most varied in its 
shadings and markings; flowers nearly single and produced in the most wonderful 
profusion during the spring months; a plant in full bloom with its perfect mass of 
varied colorings is one of the prettiet sights imaginable. 25 cents each. 

CHRISTINE DE NOUE. (T.) 

Quite popualr. A strong and clean grower, making a symmetrical and handsome 
bush. Buds long and finely pointed; color, rich crimson maroon, sometimes streaked 
with silvery white. 25 cents each. 

TRIOMPHE DE PERNET PERE. (H. T. ) 

A first-class garden rose; upright and clean of growth, good foliage, etc.; con- 
stant and heavy bloomer; flowers large, full and double and fragrant; color, a pretty 
red. 25 cents. 

BARDOU JOB. (Bourbon. ) 

One of the most showy of roses. The growth is so strong and robust that it 
is almost a climber; hardy, foliage libera], large and leathery and resists disease; 
flowers are very large, saucer shape; semi-double; color, deepest velvety-crimson; 
extremely showy for decoration. 25 cents. 

LAURETTE. (T. ) 

A very pretty rose indeed. The foliage is unusually handsome and attractive 
being a peculiar shade of dark shining green and lustrous; Flowers of good size 
and lovely in form, only a portion of petals reflexing, and, contrary to most sorts, 
retaining its lovely form until petals drop or wither. Color, creamy white, shaded 
rose; a continuous bloomer. 25 cents each. 

SOUVENIR DE WOOTTEN. (H. T.) 

Produced by the famous rose grower, Mr. John Cook, from seed of Bon Silene 
fertilized with Louis Van Houtte. A splendid grower and free from disease; the 
flower is large and full; petals heavy and of great substance. The color is a beaut iful 
shade of carmine-crimson, oftentimes as dark as the well-known "Jack" rose. Alto- 
gether, one of the best red sorts and is becoming more and more popular wherever 
known. 25 cents each. 

HERMOSA. (Bourbon). 

One of the oldest roses; hardy and well-known. Of bushy, compact growth; 
clean foliage; flowers medium size, full and fragrant. Color, pink. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



37 




Climbing Testout. 



CLIMBING MME. CAROLINE TESTOUT. (H. T. ) 

A sport from the bush sort of the same name; bloom identical with its parent. 
One of the strongest growers in the climbing family of roses. A plant of this in full 
bloom is one of the most pleasing sights we know of in the way of climbing rose; 
bloom is very large; color, a solid cerise pink and does not fade. Highly fragrant. 
35 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



38 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



CLIO. (H. R.) 

Raised by Wm. Paul & Son, the celebrated English rose growers. Awarded 
first-class certificates by Royal Horticultural Society. Of vigorous growth and 
good foliage, flowers very large, of fine globular form and freely produced; color, 
flesh, shaded in center to rosy pink. Style of growth similar to Bar. Rotshchild, 
which variety it rivals as an exhibition rose. Undoubtedly the finest pink Hybrid 
Perpetual grown. 25 cents. 




Clio. 



MURIEL GRAHAM. (T. ) 

A comparatively new rose of value. With us the style of flower is very similar 
to Bride, but bloom is of a transparent flesh white with no greenish tinge; pink edge; 
a stronger grower than bride; bloom large, full and as well formed as Bride. 25 cents. 

J ANNE DE DIESBACH. (H. R. ) 

(Glory of France. ) 

Well known; a good hardy variety. Flowers extremely large, full and fragrant ; 
color, a beautiful shade of carmine-rose. 25 cents each. 

CLIMBING BRIDESMAID. (T. ) 

Identical with its parent (Bridesmaid) except of climbing habit. 25 cents 
each. 

CLIMBING METEOR. (H. T. ) 

A sport from Meteor. Of robust climbing habit, a constant and free bloomer, 
perfectly hardy and free from disease; as to coloring, there is no richer, velvety 
crimson in the rose family. Should be planted where it will get the sun all day, if 
possible. 25 cents. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



39 



JOANNE WESSENHOFF. (H. T. ) 
Of good robust, upright style of growth; very pretty buds; color, yellow. 50 
cents each; S5.00 per dozen. 




Joanne WessenhofJ. 

BARON de BONSTETTIN. (H. R. ) 

A large flowering variety; very double and full; color, a rich dark red; very 
fragrant. 25 cents each. 

ROSALIND ORR ENGLISH. (H. T. ) 

New seedling from Mme. Chatenay, beautiful both in bud and when fully ex- 
panded. Very free grower and bloomer. Color. Salmon-pink. 50 cents each. 

RICHMOND. (H. T.) 

A very free bloomer much in demand in the east for cut flowers. Color, 
bright red of a very pleasing shade. 50 cents each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



40 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



CLIMBING MALMAISON. (B. ) 

Bloom identical with Souv. de la Malmaison; a constant and free bloomer; 
perfectly hardy in cold sections; an unusually strong climber.like nearly all Bour- 
bons it is very fragrant. 25 cents each. 

MARCH. OF LORNE. (H. R. ) 

One of the very fine garden roses of recent introduction. Strong and graceful 
in growth; liberal foliage of rich dark color and free from disease; color, a very hand- 
some cerise pink. 25 cents each. 




March, of Lome. 



MADAME ALFRED CARRIERE. (Hybrid Noisett.) 

One of the fine, light-colored climbing roses. A strong grower, good foliage 
and good bloomer. Flowers of good size, very double and deep, highly fragrant; 
color, a rich, creamy white, tinged with blush and pale yellow. 25 cents. 

FRANCISCA KRUQER. (T. ) 

Produced in 1879 by Mr. Nabonnand. A good grower and still quite popu- 
lar; style of flower very similar to Catherine Mermet; color, coppery-pink, vaired 
with lighter tints. 25 cents. 

CHROMATELLA, OR CLOTH OF GOLD. (N. ) 

A most lovely, clear bright yellow climbing rose. Very full and double, beauti- 
fully formed buds and flowers; very fragrant. Similar to Marechal Niel; a better 
grower, but not quite so profuse a bloomer or so rich in coloring. Valuable. 25 
cents. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



41 




Souvenir da President Carnot. 

I 

SOUVENIR DU PRESIDENT CARNOT. (H. T. ) 

All prominent growers concede this to be strictly the grandest rose of its color 
produced within the last ten years. It is superbly lovely in every way and no des- 
cription or illustration can do it justice on account of its delicacy of texture and 
coloring, as well as its perfect form. Succeeds admirably as a garden rose, is hardy 
and does well at all seasons of the year; a continuous and free bloomer; thrifty, up- 
right, and symmetrical in growth, flowers of good size; buds most exquisitely formed 
and moulded; full and compact, opening into a most beautiful rose; in color, it can 
be termed a most delicate rosy flesh, shaded to the prettiest rosy pink at the center 
imaginable; while the petals are of good substance, the texture is as fine and deli- 
cate as anything we have ever seen in a rose; flowers produced on splendid stems. 
25 cents. 

MARECHAL NIEL. (X.) 
It really seems uncalled for to enter any description of this truly grand and 
lovely yellow climbing rose, with its world-wide reputation. If you live in a section 
where tender roses will grow, and do not possess several good plants of this variety 
it should by all means be the first on your order. It is unquestionably the very- 
best yellow ever-blooming climbing rose, with no fear of a successful rival. Pro- 
duced in 1864 and said to be a seedling of "Isabella Gray." Perfect in form, both 
as to bud and flower; very large, very full; globular, and of the most delightful and 
lasting fragrance; color, deep, rich yellow. One of the very few old roses which are 
planted more and more extensively each year. It should not be pruned. 25 and 
50 cents. 

XAVIER OLIBO. (H. R. ) 

One of the very darkest, rich velvety red Hybrids and as is the case with nearly 
all this class of roses, the bloom is very large, full and highly scented. Foliage extra 
large, robust and rich in color. 25 cents each. 

MRS. R. G. SHARMAN CRAWFORD. (H. R. ) 

One of the new roses and well liked. Upright of growth, pretty, light green 
foliage and blooms more than most of the roses of this class; flowers, large, full and 
highly fragrant; color, a delicate shade of pink. 50 cents each; $5.00 per dozen. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



42 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



MADAME LAMBARD. (T. ) 

A very good rose indeed, and in considerable demand; a free grower and in- 
cessant bloomer; flowers of good size and heavy substance; color, rosy-bronze, 
shaded with carmine, changing to salmon and fawn; shape of flower very handsome; 
pretty, pointed buds, the petals reflexing in the most graceful manner as it opens; 
fragrant. 25 cents each. 



iL • Si 




Mad. Lambard. 



QUEEN OF EDGELEY. (H. R. ) 

A sport from the famous American Beauty and very similar in style of as the 
parent variety. 50 cents each. 

CRIMSON RAMBLER. (P.) 

So widely advertised and planted during the past few days, that it is now well 
known. An enormously strong and rapid climber, and perfectly hardy for the 
coldest sections. Flowers produced in pyramidal panicles, carrying from thirty 
to forty blossoms; flowers, bright, crimson and of small size. 25 cents each. 



SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



43 



PRINCE OF BULGAIRE. (H. T. ) 

Another new Hybrid Tea and a grand good one. A good grower, nice foliage 
and a heavy bloomer; flowers of nice size, very full, pretty shape both in bud and open 
bloom; of delicate yellow color; highly scented. 35 cents. 

CLIMBING PERLE. (T. ) 

Bloom identical with Perle des Jardins. 35 cents. 

GLORIE DES ROSAMONES. (Ragged Robin.) 

A wild rose well known in this vicinity; and planted considerably on account 
of its brilliant colored bloom and strong growing qualities; flowers single. 25 cents 
each. 

LADY CLANMORRIS. (H. T. ) 

Of recent introduction. Of fair growth and branching habit; flowers of good 
size and form and nice substance; color, creamy white with salmon center; outer 
edges of petals often tinged pink. 25 cents each. 

CLIMBING DEVONIENSIS. (T. ) 

Identical with the bush sort except in habit of growth. Often called the "Mag- 
nolia Rose" on account of its delicate perfume. Bloom of nice size, perfectly formed 
and moulded; of the most beautiful texture; color, creamy white, delicately 
flushed with pink. 25 cents each. 

ISABELLA SPRUNT. (T.) 

One of the old sorts. Not extra robust of growth; flowers of medium size and 
not very full; color, canary-yellow. 25 cents each. 

QUEEN SCARLET. (B. ) 

A splendid variety where a hardy, constant blooming, rich red rose is desired; 
a strong and thrifty grower and a most profuse bloomer for the entire year; flowers 
of medium size, full and fragrant; color, a bright scarlet which remains constant. 
25 cents. 

Standard or Tree Roses. 

We can supply but a limited variety in Tree Roses, and if ordered, the variety 
must be left to our selection. Prices, 50 cents, seventy-five cents and one dollar 
each. 



WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 



44 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 




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ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



45 




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WE PAY THE EXPRESS 



46 



CALIFORNIA ROSE COMPANY, POMONA. 



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SEE PRICE LIST PAGE 2. 



ROSES FOR THE PEOPLE. 



47 




WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 




WE PAY THE EXPRESS. 











AND 






ABBREVIATIONS 





A complete index is printed on page 2 of cover, which will enable one to readily 
refer to any desired variety. 

ABBREVIATIONS, Following the name of each sort, will be noted the abbrevia- 
tion denoting the class to which the variety belongs. By observing these and reading 
the following descriptions of such abbreviations anyone may intelligently make selec- 
tions for all sections and to suit any purpose. 

BANKSIA. These varieties are tender and will not stand cold sections. Plants 
of slender, straight growth, free from thorns, with small foliage; flowers very small, but 
full and compact; violet scented. 

B. — BOURBON. These are hardy except in the coldest sections, and even in se- 
vere climates will stand well with winter protection. They are continuous bloomers 
and fragrant. 

H. R. — HYBRID REMONTANT or HYBRID PERPETUAL. These are the hard- 
iest of the rose class and very many of them will stand the coldest section of the coun- 
try. They are generally vigorous and easy of culture, producing large flowers fine in 
form and usually fragrant; many of them are more fragrant than some of the highly 
prized Tea sorts. '\Yhile they are not strictly perpetual or ever-blooming, no rose gar- 
den can be complete and satisfactory without a fair assortment of the best class of these 
roses. 

H. T. — HYBRID TEA. These are produced from crossing Teas with Hybrid Per- 
petuals, and as a rule they are as free flowering and as constant bloomers as the Tea 
sorts. They are hardier than the Teas, but as a rule not so hardy as the H. R.'s. Many 
of this class, however, are particularly hardy and a few very hardy. The l a France 
is the oldest variety of the class. 

T. — TEA. The Tea rose may well be taken as a synonym for all that is delicately 
beautiful. The most tender of the rose class; some varieties are of very delicate con- 
stitution and require especial care and treatment. As a rule, they are inferior to the 
Hybrid Perpetuals in brilliancy of color and fullness of flower, but for boquets and cut 
flowers the t v excel all other classes. This class is not suitable for garden culture in very- 
cold sections only during the summer months; they may, however, be potted in the fail 
and kept in the house during the winter, or they may be taken up with naked roots and 
stored in a frost-proof cellar, by simply covering the roots with dirt or sand, and planted 
again in the spring. 

N. — NOISETTE. A product of America, and obtains its name from Philipe Nois- 
ette, a florist of South Carolina. They are vigorous of growth, hardy as a rule, ever- 
blooming and have the general characteristics of the Tea rose. 

P. — POLYANTHA. An interesting group from Japan. The foliage and flowers 
are usually small: flowers produced in panicles. They are hardy, ever-blooming, and 
many of the sorts are extremely charming. Valuable for borders, pot culture, etc. 

REMEMBER 

We Deliver the Roses to You anywhere in the U. S. 

That it costs you nothing for transportation ; we prepay the express 
charges through to your express office. That it costs you no more for 
rose bushes than if you lived right at our door. See page 2. ■ 



Geo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) Press, L. A 



f > 



INDUCEMENTS 

FOR YOU TO JOIN 
OUR THRONG OF 

ROSE PLANTERS 



1. We deliver our ROSES to you===express paid by us free===no 

matter where you live. (See page 2.) 

2. We guarantee safe arrival. 

3. We guarantee our roses to grow and be true to label. (See 

page 2.) 

4. We give you large FIELD GROWN bushes which will bloom 

profusely as soon as planted and growing. 

5. We grow nothing but Roses. 

6. Our prices are as low as even ordinary roses were ever sold for in 

the United States. 

7. We offer you the best varieties of known merit===no fakes or old 

re=named sorts. 

8. Considering these facts we are warranted in asserting that we 

are offering you inducements not equaled by any reputable 
house in the country. 

8. How can we do it ? On account of the volume of our trade and 
that we confine our business to ROSES.