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PROVISIONAL 



CATALOGUE and STUDENT HANDBOOK 

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(including Spring i960 Schedule «f Classes) 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Map of Fullerton area page 3 

California State College Administration. ... U 

Calendar for 1959-1960 5 

College Administration 6 

OCS Faculty. 7 

College Committees . 10 

College Philosophy 11 

History of the College 12 

Admissions Information 13 

Academic Regulations. 15 

Graduation and Certification Policy 18 

Veterans Information 20 

Fee Schedule 22 

College Foundation 23 

Directory for Students 2h 

Student Services. 25 

Student Activities. . . 27 

Academic Offerings in 1960-1961 . 28 

Baccalaureate & Credential Programs in Elem. Educ 29 

Requirements for Graduation. ... 30 

Graduation Checklist. . 31 

Course Numbering System . 33 

Course Descriptions 3U 

Schedule of Classes for Spring i960 UO 


REGISTRATION DATES FOR THE 

SPRING SEMESTER 

Thursday, February U, I960 9-12 a.m. 1-U p.m. 6-8 p.m. 

Friday, February 5, i960 9-12 a.m. 1-U p.m. 6-8 p.m. 

at Science Building L, Sunny Hills High'' School 



ORANGE FREEWAY (Proposed) 


ADMINISTRATION 


CALIFORNIA ST ATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 


Roy E. Simpson Superintendent of Public Instruction 

and State Director of Education 


J. Burton Vasche Associate Sixperintendent of Public 

Instruction and Chief, Division of 
State Colleges and Teacher Education 


Don Youngreen . Assistant Chief, Division of State 

Colleges and Teacher Education 


CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 


William L. Blair, President . ..... Pasadena 

Wilber D, Simons, Vice-President . Redding 

Byron H. Atkinson Los Angeles 

Thomas W, Braden Oceanside 

Raymond J. Daba Atherton 

Louis H. Heilbron San Francisco 

Dr. Mabel E. Kinney Los Angeles 

Mrs. Seymour Mathiesen Fresno 

Mrs. Eva C. Noland ......... Salinas 

Thomas L. Pitts Los Angeles 


Roy E, Simpson, Secretary and Executive Officer 


ORANGE COUNTT STATE COLLEGE 
Fullerton, California 

CALENDAR 1959-1960 

Fall Semester 


August 

31, Monday 

-Applications for admission and transcripts 
due in Admissions Office 

September 

Hi, Monday 

-College Faculty Meeting 

September 

15, Tuesday 

-Student programming, testing, and 
registration begins 

September 

18, Friday 

-Student programming, testing and 
registration endsj last day to register 
without extra fee 

September 

21, Monday 

-Classes begin 

October 

2, Friday 

-Last day to add courses to program 

October 

16, Friday 

-Last day to drop a course without penalty 
of grade F (failure) 

November 

11, Wednesday 

-Veterans day holiday 

November 

26 , Thursday ) 

-Thanksgiving vacation 

November 

27, Friday ) 

December 

21, Monday ) 

-Christmas vacation 

January 

1 , Friday ) 


January 

li, Monday 

-Classes resume 

January 

22, Friday 

-Instruction ends 

January 

25, Monday 

-Semester examinations begin 

January 

29, Friday 

-Semester examinations end 

Spring Semester 

January 

22, Friday 

-Applications for admission and transcripts 
due in Admissions Office 

February 

2, Tuesday 

-Student programming, testing, and 
registration begins 

February 

5, Friday 

-Student programming, testing, and registration 
ends; last day to register without extra fee 

February 

8, Monday 

-Classes begin 

February 

12, Friday 

-Lincoln’ s Birthday holiday 

February 

19, Friday 

-Last day to add courses to program 

February 

22, Monday 

-Washington’ s Birthday holiday 

F ebruary 

26 , Friday 

-Last day to drop a course without penalty 
of grade F (failure) 

April 

11, Monday ) 

-Spring vacation 

April 

15 , Friday ) 


April 

18, Monday 

-Classes resume 

May 

30, Monday 

-Memorial Day holiday 

June 

3, Friday 

-Instruction ends 

June 

6, Monday 

-Semester examinations begin 

June 

10, Friday 

-Semester examinations end 


COLLEGE ADMINIS TRAT ION 


EXECUTIVE 


President. ••• William B. Langsdorf 

B.A., M.A., Occidental College 
Ph.D., University of California 

Executive Dean. .•*•.•••••••• * . . * Stuart F. McComb 

B.A., Arizona State University 
M.S.,Ed. D., University of Southern California 
LL.D. , Upper Iowa University 

Building Coordinator Charles F. Grant 

B.A. , M.B .A. , Stanford University 


INSTRUCTION 


Dean of Instruction Gerhard E. Ehmann 

B.A., Occidental College 
M.A., Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

College Librarian .............. Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 

B.A., College of St. Thomas 
M.S., University of Southern California 
M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

Librarian II. ..... Lola M. Stephens 

B.A., Pepperdine College 

STUDENT PERSONNEL 


Dean of Students. .......... ...... Ernest A. Becker 

B.A., Amherst College 
B.D., Hartford Theological Seminary 
M.A., University of Southern California 

Associate Dean, Admissions and p v ecords Emmett T. Long 

B.A., Pepperdine College 
B.A., University of California 
M.A., University of California 

Evaluation Technician Ronald M. Bristow 

B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 


Business Manager Jack.E. Lyons 

B.A., University of Southern California 

Accounting Officer . Richard A. Wilcott 

Account Clerk ...... .... George Alexander 


- 6 - 


Property Clerk 


....... Robert J. Ryan 

B.A., College of the Pacific 


SECRETARIAL STAFF 


Secretary to the President . • * . . 

Secretary to the Executive Dean . . 
Secretary to the Dean of Instruction 
Secretary to the Faculty. ..... 
Secretary to the Librarian . . . . . 
Secretary to the Dean of Students . 
Secretary to Assoc. Dean, Adm. & Rec 
Secretary to the Business Manager . 


Lois S. Herron 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

Lorene Wise 

..... Doris Kostal 

Marilyn C. Greene 

» Martha A. Vaughn 

Patricia Kingsbury 

Doris Grant 

.... Kay Trust 


FACULTY 
(# Full Time) 

Biological Science 


*Miles D. McCarthy, Professor; Chairman, Division of Science; B.S., West- 
chester State Teachers College: Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 


Business 


A. C. Newsom, Asst. Prof.; A.B., College of Emporia; M.S., Kansas State 
College. 


Education 


William L. Bastendorf, Asst. Prof.; B.A., Pomona College; M.S., University 
of Illinois. 

^Lester Beals, Professor; B.A., M.A., University of Nebraska; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Oregon. 

Elizabeth G. Biesiot, Asst. Prof.; B.A., M.F.A., University of Washington; 
M.Ed., Cornell University 

Charles A. Boyd, Jr., Instructor; B.A., M.A., Colorado State College of 
Education 

John William Brown, Instructor; B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College. 

William R. Corser, Jr., Asst. Prof.; B.A., University of California, Los 
Angeles 


Jesse Paul Doss, Assoc. Prof.; B.A., Fresno State College; M.S., Ed.D, 
University of Southern California 

^Barbara A. Hartsig, Professor; B.A., Occidental College; M.A., University 
of Southern California; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

Josephs. Landon, Asst. Prof.; B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Claremont 
Graduate School; Ed.D., University of Southern California 

Yula S. Moore, Asst. Prof.; B.A., Occidental College 

Stan F. Ostling, Asst. Frof.; B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 

D. Russell Parks, Assoc. Prof.; B.S., M.S., University of Southern Calif- 
ornia 

Pierce E. Patterson, Asst. Prof.; B.S., Montana State College; M.S., 

San Diego State College 

Mary S. Reed, Asst. Prof.; B.S., M.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 
Terre Haute 

Tom Earl Smith, Instructor; B.A., Whittier College; M.A., Claremont 
Graduate School 

Glenn E. Starr, Asst. Prof.; B.P.S.M., M.S., Indiana University 

Richard M. Swinehart, Instructor; B.A., College of the Pacific 

Elizabeth L. Tunison, Instructor; B.A., Whittier College 

Alton C. Wagner, Asst. Prof,; B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 

Peru; M.A., University of Nebraska 

Gunnar L. Wahlquist, Assoc. Prof.; B.A., M.S., Ed.D., University of 
Southern California 

William P, Wewer, Asst, Prof.; B.S., State Teachers College, Kutztown, 

Penna,; M.A., San Diego State College; Ed.D., University of Calif- 
ornia, Los Angeles 

Osborne R. Wheeler, Asst. Prof.; B.A., M.A., University of Washington; 
Ed.D., University of Southern California 


English 

Jeanette S. Nelson, Asst. Prof.; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Industrial Arts 

Allen B. Cuppy, Instructor; B.S., Central State College, Edmond, Okla.; 
M.A., Long Beach State College 


- 8 - 


Philosophy 

William H. Alamshah, Assoc. Prof.; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph,D., 


Physical Education 


Alex Omalev, Assoc. Prof,, Coach of Basketball; B.A., M.S., University of 
Southern California 


Social Sciences 


^Lawrence B. de Graaf , Instructor; B.A., Occidental College; M.A., 
University of California, Los Angeles 


Speech 


Verna A. Breinholt, Asst. Prof.; B.A., M.A., Brigham Young University 

#Seth A. Fessenden, Professor,; B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; 
Ph.D., hew York University. 


COLL EGE COMMITTEES 
(1959-1960) 

Members of Orange County State College committees 
are appointed by President Langsdorf. 


EXECUTIVE STAFF 

President Langsdorf, Dean McComb, Dean 
Ehmann, Dean Becker and Mr, Lyons 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

President Langsdorf, Dean McComb, Dean 
Ehmann, Dean Becker, Mr. Lyons, Chairman 
of the Faculty and the Student Body 
President 

COLLEGE FOUNDATION 

President Langsdorf, Dean Becker and 

Mr. Lyons. Lester Beals, Seth A, 
Fessenden, Barbara A. Hartsig and Miles 

D, McCarthy 

STUDENT LOAN COMMITTEE 

Dean Becker, Mr. Lyons and Mr. de Graaf. 

BUILDING DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE 

Dean McComb, Mr, Lyons, Mr. Grant and 

Dr. McCarthy, Executive Staff, ex 
officio members. 

MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE 

Executive Staff, Mr. Grant and Chief 
of Maintenance (when appointed) 

COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC 
STANDARDS 

Dean Long, Barbara A. Hartsig, Miles 

D. McCarthy; Ex Officio members; 

Dean Ehmann and Dean Becker 


STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Mr. Bristow, Mr. Wilcott and Mr. de Graaf 


- 10 . 


PHILOSOPHY 


Orange County State College assumes that a college education must provide 
students with a broad liberal background and at the same time can and should 
furnish the practical base for success in a chosen occupation or profession. 


To accomplish the latter, the College offers a number of curricula in 
such fields as business administration, teaching, and science. These are closely 
related to occupational and professional requirements, and to the particular 
needs of the Orange County region. 


Equally as important, however, are the college requirements which implement 
the law authorizing state colleges to be broad liberal arts institutions. Like 
other state colleges, Orange County has a breadth requirement in general education, 
largely met prior to admission at the junior year. We are unique, however, in 
also requiring depth in one particular field of knowledge. All students, in 
addition to any occupational or professional program, are expected to complete a 
liberal arts major. Through this requirement the College hopes to assure for its 
graduates depth in at least one field of knowledge, depth which alone can provide 
perspective and appreciation of our magnificent cultural heritage, the vast scope 
of knowledge, and the narrow limits which ignorance and superficiality impose. 


By these several means the College hopes to fulfill its highest purpose — 
that of helping students to equip themselves through knowledge and understanding 
to participate effectively as citizens of their community and country and as 
worthy heirs of a great civilization. 


W, B. Langsdorf 
President 


- 11 - 


HISTORY OF ORANGE COUNTY STATE COLLEGE 


Orange County State College was established by act of the Legislature of 
the State of California under the terms of Chapter 1681 of the Statutes of 1957# 
Chapter 1681 also carried an appropriation in the amount of $1,650,000 for site 
acquisition and construction. 

The Public Works Board, after the study of 19 possible sites in Orange 
County, on March 13, 1958, selected 160 acres located in the north-east section 
of the City of Fullerton. The original acreage has since been augmented by two 
additions, one of 75 acres and the other of 17 acres. The site now consists of 
252 acres bounded on the north by Pioneer Avenue, on the west by Cypress Avenue, 
on the South by the extension of Nutwood Avenue, and on the east by the proposed 
north-south freeway. 

The appointment of the college president, made by Superintendent Simpson, 
was approved by the State ~oard of Education January 16, 1959. Beginning March 1, 
additional appointments have been made until at present there are forty-six em- 
ployees, including twenty-four part-time faculty. 

The President was authorized to establish a program for majors in elementary 
education and business administration and to grant the bachelor’s degree in those 
fields. Admission to the college was limited to those who had completed approxi- 
mately 51 units of lower division college work and otherwise met state college 
admission requirements. 

Arrangements were made with the Fullerton Union High School District to 
lease quarters for the college administration offices on the Fullerton Union High 
School campus, and for the holding of college classes at the Sunny Hills High 
School for the school year 1959-60, 

Applications for admission of students were accepted during the spring and 
summer, and at the close of registration for the fall semester there were U59 
students enrolled, of whom 107 were regular students and 352 limited students 
carrying six units or less. The full-time equivalency of those enrolled is 17U 
students. 

The President of Orange County State College originally was instructed to 
master plan the institution for 15,000 students to be reached in the early 1970's. 
Later the instruction was changed to master plan for 35,000 students to be reached 
in 1980. 

In the 1960-61 school year the college will be on its own ground, housed in 
temporary buildings. The first permanent building is expected to be completed in 
1963. Enrollment for 1960-61 is predicted to be 700 students. This figure will 
grow year by year until 1,800 students will be in attendance when the first per- 
manent building is occupied. 


- 12 - 


ADMISSIONS 


Application Procedure 


To apply for admission, applicants must 

1. File all papers not later than September 1 for the Fall semester, 

January 22 for the Spring semester, June 15 for the Summer session. 

2. Submit a completed application for admission. 

3. Have the high school of graduation send directly to Orange County State 
College a transcript of record. This requirement is waived for college 
graduates. 

Li. Have each college attended send directly to Orange County State College 
a transcript of record. 

Admissions Requirements 

1. All Students, both full-time and part-time, will be expected to follow 
matriculation procedures outlined above. 

2. Applicants are ADMITTED to regular standing if they meet all of the follow- 
ing standards: 

a. Completion of fifty-four college level semester units. 

b. A 2.0 (C) average in all units attempted. 

c. Completion of all the state college General Education requirements. 

d. Applicant must be in "Good Standing" at previous institutions attended. 

Probationary and Provisional Admission 

1. Applicants who are admitted with a grade point deficiency are given PRO- 
BATIONARY status and must remove the entrance deficiency during their first 
year at Orange County State College. A student admitted on PROBATIONARY 
status may be restricted by his adviser to a limited program. 

2. State law provides that applicants who apply with credit from nonaccredited 
schools, may be considered for provisional admission. An applicant who has 
attended a nonaccredited college or university may be admitted to a state 
college if he meets the standards listed above for transfers from degree 
granting colleges and universities. 

Readmission 

1. Matriculated students in good standing may be readmitted to classes without 
formal clearance from the Admissions Office after an absence of one or more 
semesters if they have not attended another institution in regular standing 
since their last attendance at Orange County State College. A statement of 
intention to enroll must be filed by the filing deadline for new students. 

2. Students who have attended another institution as a matriculated student 
since their last attendance at Orange County State College must make formal 
application for admission to the Admissions Office by the filing deadline 
for net* students. 


- 13 - 


Acceptance of Credit 


Credit for work completed at accredited institutions will be accepted toward 
the satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at Orange County 
State College within limitations of residence requirements, junior college 
transfer maximums, and course applicability. 

Transfer of credit from a junior college 

Not more than 61* semester units may be allowed for credit earned in a 
junior college. Upper division credit is not allowed for courses taken 
in a junior college. Credential credit is not allowed for professional 
courses in education taken in a junior college. This does not invalidate 
credit for pre-professional courses taken at a junior college, such as 
courses in Introduction to Education, Art or Design, Arithmetic for class- 
room teachers and/or music. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in military services for at least a year may be 
granted six units of credit. Courses taken in service schools may be given 
credit on the basis of an evaluation which finds that they are of college 
level. Any credit for military experiences will be given only upon request. 
Records verifying such work must be filed with the Admissions Office. 

Credit from non-accredited institutions 

Credit may be accepted from non-accredited institutions toward graduation 
requirements only after a student has earned 2h semester units with at 
least a C average at Orange County State College. 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence courses and extension 
courses which may be allowed toward the bachelor's degree is 2h units, not 
more than 12 of which may be transferred from another college or university. 

Statement of Residence 

A Statement of Residence must be completed prior to registration for each 
student, day or evening. Students (day or evening) in continuous attend- 
ance during successive semesters are not required to file Statements of 
Residence after the initial filing. Any break in attendance requires a 
new Statement of Residence. 


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 


Grading System 

— ■ ii n —>J» ■ i m>m 


Grade 


Grade Point Value 


A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 


Excellent 
Above Average 
Average 

Barely passing 
Incomplete 
Failure 
Auditor 

Passing Withdrawal 

Credit for course, no grade assigned 


h 

3 

2 

1 

0 

0 


AUD 


None Assigned 
None Assigned 
None Assigned 


W 

CR 


With the exception of the grades of AUD, W and CR, all units attempted are 
computed in the student's grade point average. 


Removal of Grade of E ( Incomplete work ) 


A student may remove a grade of E (Incomplete work) by satisfactory com- 
pletion of course requirements with the instructor and the grade will be 
changed on the student' s permanent record card to that designated by the 
instructor. If the grade of E is not removed within one calendar year, 
unless this period is extended by proper college authority, the grade of 
E will be considered a permanent grade of F. 


Repetition of Courses 


W : hen a course is repeated the units and grade points of the repetition are 
included in the grade point average in addition to the units and grade points 
of the original course. When a course is repeated, vhere the original grade 
was passing, the repetition will carry no subject or unit credit toward a 
degree or credential. Grade point deficiencies incurred by courses com- 
pleted at Orange County State College may not be made up by courses taken 
at other colleges. 


Good Standing 


"Good Standing" indicates that a student is eligible to continue or to return, 
and is free from financial obligation to the college and from disciplinary 
action. A student under Academic or Disciplinary Dismissal is not eligible 
to receive a statement of "Good Standing" on transcripts issued by Orange 
County State College, 


Residence Requirements for All Degrees 


A minimum of 2h semester units shall be earned in residence at Orange County 


State College. At least one-half of such units shall be completed among 
the last 20 semester units counted toward the degree. 

Academic Probation 

It is the purpose of academic probation to identify and to bring to the 
attention of the counseling office the student who is experiencing academic 
difficulties. Therefore students whose records fall into any one of the 
following categories are placed on academic probation: 

1. Where the cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at all in- 
stitutions attended is below a n C w (2.0). 

2. Where the cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at Orange 
County State College falls below a "C" (2.0). 

3. Where the record shows below a "C" (2.0) average in any one semester or 
summer session regardless of the cumulative grade point average. (This 
does not apply to the non-matriculated summer student.) 

Academic Dismissal 

It is the purpose of Academic Dismissal to give the student an opportunity 
to review carefully his educational experience away from the college en- 
vironment. This '’break" will normally be imposed before the students' 
record has reached the point where it will preclude a continuation at a 
later date of his educational experience. Therefore students whose records 
fall into the following categories will be SUBJECT TO DISMISSAL and action 
will be taken before the next semester begins. Records will be reviewed 
individually* 

1. Where the record shows below a "C" (2.0) average in a regular semester or 
summer session when the student is already on academic probation. (This 
category does not apply to students admitted on probation) 

2, Where after two semesters on probation a student has not attained a grade 
point average of "C" (2.0) on all work attempted at Orange County State 
College and on all work attempted at all collegiate institutions attended. 

Removal of Probation 

1. A student will be automatically removed from academic probation when all the 
following conditions are met: 

a. The student's cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at 
Orange County State College is a "C" (2.0) average, 

b. The student's cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at 
all collegiate institutions attended is a "C" (2.0) or above. 

c. A "C" (2.0) grade point average is attained on the last semester of 
work attempted. 


Readmission after Academic Dismissal 

A student may apply to the Dean of Students for readmission after academic 
dismissal upon completion of the period of dismissal. Normally this period 
will be one semester in length. 


- 16 , 


Change of Program 

Students who wish to drop a class or withdraw from college should fill out 
a "CHANGE OF PROGRAM" card in the Dean of Students office. This card is 
completed by the student and must be signed by the instructor who also 
assigns a grade of W or F‘. All grades for withdrawal - through the first four 
weeks of instruction of the semester will be W. After that date, grades 
assigned will be ¥ if the student is passing at the time he withdraws or 
F is the student is failing at the time he withdraws. 

Examinations 

Final examinations are required in all courses. No final examinations 
shall be given to individual students before the regularly scheduled time. 

Any student who finds it impossible to take a final examination on the date 
scheduled must make arrangements in advance with the instructor to have an 
"Incomplete" grade reported and must then follow the regulations concerning 
make-up of "Incomplete" grades. Mo exception will be made to this rule with- 
out the written approval of the instructor, the Division Chairman, and the 
Dean of Instruction. 


Classification in College 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 units of work are classified 
as freshmen, 30-59 units as sophomore, 60-89 units as juniors, and 90 or 
more as seniors. 


Transcripts 


Upon the request to the Registrar, each student will be provided with one 
official copy of his college record without charge. A charge of $1 will 
be made for each additional transcript requested by the student. No trans- 
cript will be supplied for college work taken in other institutions. 

Study List Limits 

A matriculated student is normally permitted to enroll in 16 units each 
semester. However, upon written approval of his adviser, the student may 
carry up to 18 units. The foregoing limits apply to students vrho are attend- 
ing college on a full-time basis. Students with outside responsibilities 
are strongly advised to reduce their study load. 

Auditors 


A properly qualified student may register in classes as an auditor. The 
student must meet the regular college entrance requirements and must pay 
the same fees as other students. An auditor may not change his registration 
to obtain credit after the last date to add courses to the study list. An 
auditor is not permitted to take examinations in the course. 


- 17 - 


Dual Registration 

A student enrolled at Orange County State College may enroll concurrently 
for additional courses at another institution only with advance written 
approval from the Academic Standards Committee# Permission will not be 
granted when the study load in the proposed combined program exceeds the 
units authorized at this college# 


GRADUATION AND CERTIFICATION POLICY 

Requirements for Graduation and Certification 

A student is eligible for graduation and/or certification for a credential 
if he is in good standing and fulfills the following requirements: 

a. Completion of the required number of units for the degree or credential. 

b. Completion of the course sequence required for the degree or credential. 

c. Satisfaction of the residence requirement. 

d. Achievement of a "C M (2.0) grade point average on all work attempted 

at all institutions attended and on all work attempted at Orange County 
State College. 

e. Recommendation by the faculty. 

Requirements for Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation will be awarded to students who meet all of the 
following requirements: 

a. Completion of at least hB units in residence. 

b. Achievement of the required grade point average in all work attempted 
at all colleges. 

c. Achievement of the required grade point average in all work attempted 
at Orange County State College. 

Honor grade point average requirements: 

a. Honor 3.50 

b. High Honor 3.75 


EVALUATION 

An evaluation will be made of the transfer credit of each student prior to 
program planning for his first semester at OCS and this evaluation will be 
made available to the student and his adviser. An official evaluation form 
will be sent to each student during his first semester of attendance. 


REGISTRATION 

Registration is the final step in the matriculation process. ^Tien a 
student has been admitted by the Admissions Office and has decided upon the 
subjects he wishes to take in conference with his assigned adviser, he is 
ready for registration. This occurs during the week immediately prior to 
the opening of classes in the fall, and during the week between semesters 
for the spring term. 


-18 


A schedule of classes containing details regarding courses offered and 
procedures to be followed for registration is made available prior to the 
beginning of each semester and summer session. 

At the time of registration, every student is required to file Program 
card with the Registrar. The filing of a Program card by the student 
and its acceptance by the college is evidence of an obligation on the part 
of the student to perform the designated work to the best of his ability. 
Withdrawal from, or neglect of, any course entered on the Program card, or 
a change of program, including a change of section of the same course, 
without the formal permission of the Registrar, will result in a grade of 
"F" . 

A student may not receive credit in any courses in which he is not 
registered . 


Late Registration 

Students who have been cleared by the Admissions Office but who are un- 
able to register at the announced time may register late only with the 
approval of the Registrar. Late registrants will find themselves severely 
handicapped in arranging their programs and must by State law pay a five 
dollar (|>5) late registration fee in addition to the regular fees. The 
last day to register late each semester will be announced in the Schedule 
of Classes. 


>19 


VETERANS 


Orange County State College is approved by the Bureau of Readjustment 
Education, State Department of Education, to offer programs to veterans 
seeking benefits under state and federal legislation. 

All students seeking veterans benefits must be matriculated students. 
Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in 
which the veteran plans to use these benefits in order to have the authoriza- 
tion at the time of registration. 


P. L. 550 


APPLICATION 

IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED AN INSTITUTION UNDER P. L. 550 BENEFITS BEFORE: 

Through the Office of Veterans Affairs at the institution you last 
attended under P, L. 550 benefits file an Application for Change of Place of 
Training (VA form 1995). 

IF YOU HAVE NOT ATTENDED AN INSTITUTION UNDER P. L. 550 BENEFITS BEFORE: 
Obtain the application forms from the Veterans Adviser at OCS. 

MONTHLY CERTIFICATION 


Each month you will receive an Atten d ance Report Form from the Veterans 
Adviser. You must have this signed by each of your instructors on the 
last class meeting of the month. This signature will verify your satis- 
factory attendance for the month. 1T hen completed, the Attendance Report 
Form must be returned to the Veterans Adviser and you must sign the IBM 
certification card that is forwarded to the VA. The Attendance Report 
Form must be returned to the Veterans Adviser on or before the 5th of 
the month to ensure receiving your check on time. 

SUBSISTENCE CHECKS 

You should receive your check on the 20th of the month following the 
month of certification. Under no circumstances should this check be 
cashed if the amount is more than you should have received. An over- 
payment accepted by you will cause an indefinite delay or loss of fu- 
ture benefits. If you have not received your subsistence check by the 
end of the month following the month of certification you should speak 
to the Veterans Adviser at OCS. 

CHANGE OF STATUS 

The Veterans Adviser at OCS should be notified IMMEDIATELY of any 
change of address, major, unit load, number of dependents or any other 
change of status which may affect your benefits. 


20 « 


UNIT LOAD AND SUBSISTENCE; 


UNITS 

LOAD 

SINGLE 

1 DEPENDENT 

2 DEPENDENTS 

1U or mere 

Full 

$110 

$135 

$160 

10 to 13 

3 A 

$ 80 

$100 

$120 

7 to 9 

1/2 

$ 50 

$ 60 

$ 80 

1 to 6 

Less than 

Fees in 

monthly subsistence form (total for mon. 



thly payments equals amount of 

fees by the end 



of the 

semester.) 



CAL VET 


APPLICATION 

IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED AN INSTITUTION UNDER CAL VET BENEFITS BEFORE; 

Obtain your IBM card authorization for training from the Office of 
Veterans Affairs at the last institution you attended under Cal 
Vet benefits. This IBM card must be filed with the Veterans 
Adviser at OCS. 

IF YOU HAVE NOT ATTENDED AN INSTITUTION UNDER CAL VET BENEFITS BEFORE; 
Obtain the application forms from the Veterans Adviser at OCS. 
PAYME NT OF FEES ; 

If you have filed your IBM authorization card with the Veterans 
Adviser at OCS prior to or at registration your fees will be paid 
by the State. If you file the IBM authorization card after regis- 
tration you may receive a check to cover your fees upon direct 
application to Cal Vet. 

MAINTENANCE AL]J3~ T 'NC5 ; 

If you are registered for a full load at OCS you may receive approx- 
imately $50 a month from Cal Vet as a maintenance allowance. 

ENROLIMENT ATTENDANCE CERTIFICATE 

When you register you must complete an Enrollment Certificate. You 
must fill out an Attendance Certificate on the 15th of each month 
ONLY if you are receiving the maintenance allowance. 

VETERANS ATTENDING UNDER OTHER STATE OR FEDERAL LEGISLATION 

Veterans anticipating attendance at OCS under other state or federal 
legislation should see the Veterans Adviser for further information. 

DEPENDENTS OF DISABLED OR DECEASED VETERANS 

Dependents of disabled or deceased veterans should see the Veterans 
Adviser for information concerning state and federal legislation which pro- 
vides for the waiver of fees or for educational benefits. 


- 21 . 


ORANGE COUNTY STATE OOLLEGE 
FEE SCHEDULE 
SPRING I960 



Material and 

Student 

Total Resident 

Non-Res 

UNITS 

Service Fee 

Body Fee 

Fee 

Fee 

1 

17.00 

l*.oo 

21.00 

8.50 

2 

17.00 

1*.00 

21.00 

17.00 

3 

17.00 

l».oo 

21,00 

25.50 

U 

17.00 

1*.00 

21.00 

3 U .00 

5 

17.00 

U.00 

21.00 

1 * 2.50 

6 

17.00 

u.00 

21.00 

51.00 


Non-Resident 
Total Fees 

29.50 
38.00 
1 * 6.50 

55.00 

63.50 

72.00 


T~ 

33.00 

9.00 

C 2 T 0 S 

5935 

I 0130 

8 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

68.00 

110.00 

9 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

76.50 

118.50 

10 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

85-00 

127.00 

11 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2. 00 

93.50 

135.50 

12 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

102.00 

11*1*. 00 

13 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

11030 

152.50 

1U 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

119.00 

161.00 

1$ or over 

33.00 

9.00 

1*2.00 

127.50 

169.50 


Fees charged on or after 2/8/60 (in addition to above) 

Late Fee 5.00 

Change of Program Fee 1.00 

Checks should be made payable to "Orange County State College" in the 
exact amount of your total fees. Have your check made out before reaching 
Fee Payment Station. A FEE OF 2.00 WILL BE CHARGE FOR ANY RETURNED CHECK 
FROM YOUR BANK FOR ANY CAUSE. 


REFUND SCHEDULE 

February 8 through. February 22, I960 - the State will refund the 
total Material and Service Fee, less $2.00, upon written application forms 
provided by and returned to the Registrar. The total Student Body Fee will 
be refunded by the Associated Students upon proper application during the 
period February 8 through February 22, i 960 . 

For each unit of Non-Resident Fee charged the state will refund the 
entire fee charged during the first week (February 8-12) of the semester; 
thereafter: 


Second Week .... .90$ 

Third Week 70$ 

Fourth Week 50$ 

Fifth Week 30$ 

Sixth Week. .... »2C$ 


From the seventh week on— no refund. 


22 


ORANGE COUNTY STATE COLLEGE FOUNDATION 


The Orange County State College Foundation has been organized to pro- 
vide essential student and faculty services which cannot be provided from 
state appropriations. The Foundation was incorporated in October, 1959. 

The Board of Trustees is made up of members' of the College faculty and ad- 
ministration. 

It is contemplated that the Foundation will have overall policy control 
of the College book store and food service. In order to allow students a 
means of participating in the formulation of the policies for the book store 
and food service, the Foundation Board plans to delegate specific responsibil- 
ities in these areas to student committees. 

During the Soring semester, I960, the Foundation operation will be con- 
fined to a minimum food service, a small emergency loan program, and operation 
of the book store. 

It is hoped that during the Spring semester the book store will be able 
to provide both new and used required texts for all of the classes offered at 
the College. The book store will also carry a small inventory of essential 
supplies . 

As the College grows, the Foundation will be able to provide many ser- 
vices to the students. These will include a well stocked book store, a com- 
plete food service, student loans, scholarships, opportunities to assist 
members of the faculty in sponsored research and special internship and ex- 
perience programs that cannot be financed with state funds. 


• 23 ' 


DIRECTORY FOR STUDENTS 


Academic Problems ......... • Assigned Academic Advisers 

Dr. Hartsig 
Dr. Beals 
Dr. McCarthy 
Dr. Fessenden 
Mr. de Graaf 


Teacher Training Dean of Instruction, Dr. Ehmann 

Directed Teaching 

Books and Supplies Business Office, Mr. Lyons and 

Fees Mr. Wilcott 

Parking 


Publications (general college publicity). . * Executive Dean, Dr. McComb 
Campus Development 

Library Services Mr. Toy and Library Staff 

The following problems are handled in the office of the Dean of Students. 
When an individual is named, he alone will assume responsibility for 
the immediate problem. Otherwise, any member of the Office staff may be 


consulted . 

Admissions Problems ............. Dean Long 

Relations with Schools 

Transcript Evaluation ..... • Mr. Bristow 

Veterans Affairs 

Personal Counseling Dean Becker 


Scholarships and Loans 
Health Problems 

Student Activities, Including newspaper 
Athletics 

Probation and disqualification 

Housing ) 

Jobs ) 

Lost and Found ) 

Scheduling Problems ) 

Registration Problems ) 

Withdrawal from College ) Any member of the Office 

Program Changes ) ********* of Dean of Students 

Registration Problems ) 

Petitions ) 

Graduation ) 

Credential Requirements ) 


STUDENT SERVICES 


The student personnel services of Orange County State College are centered 
in the Office of the Dean of Students. The three major divisions are 
admissions and records, counseling and testing, and student activities. 
Additional services are offered as the needs of the students are expressed 
and as the growth of the college continues. Student health, student place- 
ment, housing, part-time employment and other similar concerns are handled 
in this office. 


Housing 

No dormitories will be constructed on the college campus for some years. 
However, an approved list of rooms and apartments in the community is being 
prepared by the Dean of Students Office and those who wish to live away 
from home may inquire there for possible lodging. 

Student Health 

It is expected that in the Fall of I960 limited health facilities on the 
college campus will be available to students. This will include the 
services of a physician in addition to a graduate nurse. 

During 1959-60, students are expected to consult their own physician when 
more than temporary treatment is needed. Each student is required to sign 
a "Permission To Treat" statement which allows the college to call an 
ambulance in case of emergency illness. Health Record forms are also re- 
quired of all students. 


Program Advisement 

Program advisement is the direct responsibility of the division in which 
the student is pursuing his major. He therefore makes an appointment with 
his assigned adviser to discuss the courses he should take to fulfill his 
major. This may be done at any time following his formal admission to the 
college by the Admissions Office. Appointments may be made in the Dean of 
Student's Office. 


Counseling and Testing 

Personal counseling other than academic advisement is available at all 
times in the Dean of Student's Office. Students are encouraged to talk over 
matters of concern that may affect their ability to do satisfactory work 
in college. 

Under the direction of the Test Officer, standardized tests are adminis- 
tered for purposes of class placement and entrance into directed teaching. 
Arrangements may be made for taking a study habits inventory, vocational 
interest inventory, temperament and personality tests, and other similar in- 
struments, with interpretation available by either the Test Officer or other 
members of the Dean of Student's staff. 


Remedial Work 


Students admitted with either subject or grade point deficiencies may 
be required to take remedial work as a condition of their continuance in 
college for a second semester. Since no remedial courses are offered at the 
upper division level, students are advised to take such necessary courses at a 
junior college. Concurrent enrollment is permissable but only upon applica- 
tion and approval by the Admissions Office and by the Counseling Center of 
the junior college concerned. 


Scholarships and Loans 

Funds are not yet available for the awarding of scholarships. However, 
Orange County State College is a participant in the program resulting from 
the National Defense Education Act of 195>8. By this legislations, more than 
&U,000 in loan funds have been made available to college students by both the 
federal and the state government during the present year. 

In general, the following conditions must be met for a student to qualify 
for a loan: 

1. He must be a citizen of the United States or an American national. 

2. He must be in good standing at the college. 

3. He must be a full-time student, carrying a minimum of 12 units at OCS. 

U. He must demonstrate financial need. 

5. He must submit a loan application which includes a budget, personal 
data, parents' financial status (if the students is under 21 years 
age) and at least two references. 

The loan when granted is to assist the student to remain in college and 
complete his education. Funds are not granted for the purchase of new auto- 
mobiles, homes, for paying off accumulated debts or for other non-college re- 
lated expenses. The student is required to sign a promissory note for repay- 
ment of the loan and an oath of allegiance to the United States. The princi- 
pal amount of the loan must be repaid to the college beginning one year after 
the borrower ceases to be a full-time student. By law, interest is 3 % per 
annum and is not charged until repayment begins. The borrower has 10 years to 
complete payment. Full-time elementary or secondary school teachers, not in- 
cluding junior college instructors, are entitled to a £0$ forgiveness of the 
principal. 

Application should be made at the Dean of Student's Office. No deadline 
for applying has been set and a student may apply at any time during the 
semester that an urgent need becomes apparent. Loans are granted on a semester 
basis, and a student would normally be expected to apply not more than once 
each semester. 

The Student Loan Committee which is charged with responsibility for this 
program consists of one member of the OCS faculty, the Business Manager and 
the Dean of Students 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES 


Orange County State College recognizes that student activities con- 
stitute an important educational laboratory in democratic living. The 
scope of the activities program includes areas of interest to both day and 
evening students attending the college and every student is encouraged to 
participate in as many activities as free time allows. 

Within a month of the opening of classes for the first time, the 
studentflof the college voted decisively to organize as Associated Students 
of Orange County State College, at the same time electing their student 
government officers. The first major step was then taken when, at the re- 
quest of the students, the President of the college called a special election 
for December 9, 1959* to determine whether a student body fee should be re- 
quired. Again by an overwhelming margin the students demonstrated their 
approval of the plans formulated by their officers by voting a mandatory 
student body fee of $9*00 a semester for regular students and $U,00 a sem- 
ester for limited students. Summer school students will pay $2.00. 

Also selected at this first general election was the nickname of 
"Titans," a name which is rich in mythology and one that will lend readily 
to imagery and personification. 

Volume I, Number I, of the student body newspaper came off the press 
in time to greet students returning after the Christmas holidays. The 
Publications Committee anticipates editing other publications such as a year- 
book and various literary endeavors. 

In addition to social and cultural interest groups it is anticipated 
that college-wide events, such as film festivals, lecture series, sports 
nights, picnics, all -college sings, and coffee socials which have proven 
popular at other institutions during their first years of development, will 
be established. 

Officers elected for 1959-1960 are Joe Stephens, President; Joe Moody, 
Vice-President; Betty Buck, Secretary; and Joe Clayes, Treasurer. Mike Lynes 
was appointed Activities Commissioner while Chuck Loyd was asked to head the 
Publications Committee. 


ATHLETICS 


Announcement was made in mid-December 1959 of the decision by students 
and administration to enter intercollegiate athletics in the 1960-61 season, 
by fielding a basketball team. Alex Omalev, for many years the highly re- 
garded coach of the Fullerton Junior College "Hornets," will join the faculty 
in February, i960 as basketball coach. It is expected that a 25-game 
schedule will be arranged. including a home-and-home series with other state 
colleges and single games with many independent colleges and universities. 

As players are available and needed facilities are developed on our 
Cypress Avenue site, swimming, tennis, track, and other intercollegiate teams 
will be organized. 


ACADEMIC OFFERINGS IK 1960-1961 


While curriculum projections even for a year or more in advance must 
be to some extent tentative, the following major areas will most probably 
constitute the college offerings in 1 960-1961. 


1. Credential programs in: 

Elementary Education 
Secondary Education 
Business Education 


2. Beginnings of master's program in: 
Elementary Education 


3. Beginnings of major programs in: 

Business Administration 

Business Education 

English 

History 

Mathematics 

Biology 

Music 

Speech 

Geography 

Social Sciences 

U. Liberal Arts and science (limited offerings) 

Psychology 

Philosophy 

Music 

Art 

Foreign Languages (French, German and Russian) 

Drama 

Journalism 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Physics 


BACCALAUREATE AND CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 


The Bachelor of Arts program in Elementary Education at Orange County 
State College includes all the requirements for the General Elementary Cre- 
dential. NO BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
MAY BE GRANTED UNLESS THE CANDIDATE HAS COMPLETED ALL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
GENERAL ELEMENTARY CREDENTIAL. 

Students possessing an acceptable Bachelor's degree who are seeking a 
General Elementary Credential only and who intend to do their directed 
teaching at Orange County State College must have completed all the requirements 
in education courses in the Bachelor of Arts degree program before admission 
to directed teaching. At least 12 of the units in education must have been 
completed at Orange County State College. 

Students who are seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Edu- 
cation who have had teaching experience may satisfy the requirement of directed 
teaching by the presentation of a letter from a school district verifying two 
years, with at least one year on the Elementary level, of satisfactory teaching 
experience. Satisfaction of the requirement in directed teaching by experience 
may reduce the requirement of 30 units in Education courses upon approval of 
the student's departmental adviser, but in no instance can there be less than 
2h •units in Education courses in the program. 

Work taken prior to 19^0 in Education may not be counted toward the satis- 
faction of requirements in education unless approved by the Division of Edu- 
cation. 

Students with a Bachelor's degree and teaching experience who wish to 
meet specific State subject requirements for the General Elementary Credential 
may do so through the following courses at Orange County State College: 

CALIFORNIA STATE REQUIREMENTS ORANGE COUNTY STATE COLLEGE COURSES 

WHICH MEET THESE REQUIREMENTS 


1. 

Principles and Curricula of 

Education U31 or Education 331 


Elementary Education 


2. 

Elementary methods in basic 

Education 331, U32MA, U32LA, 

( 

subjects 

U32R, U32SS, U32Sc 

3. 

Child Growth and Development 

Education 311, 312 

H. 

Audio-Visual Education 

Education 331, U91 


. All students should apply directly to the State Department of Education 
for their credentials. Applications may be obtained at the Admissions Office. 
Transcripts from each institution attended must be included with the applica- 
tion. 


29 < 


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 


Summary 


A. GENERAL EDUCATION 

» 

1. Required Courses 31 

2. Elective Courses lli. 


“TS” U5 

B. MISCELLANEOUS ELECTIVES 9 


USUAL MINIMUM FOR ADMISSION . . ~$T~ 5U 

(This amount may vary from 5h to 6U units 

which is the maximum acceptable from a 
junior college) 


C. EDUCATION MAJOR -30 

(A minimum of 12 units must be taken in this 
category at 0C3 in addition to directed 
teaching. Experience offered in lieu of 
directed teaching does not reduce this 
amount) 


D. ^LIBERAL ARTS MAJOR 2U 

E. GENERAL ELECTIVES 16 


(Ten of these units may be taken in lower 
division when 6h rather than the minimum 
5U are offered for admission) 


70 


70 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. . 1W 

(Bachelor of Arts Degree) 


* Not required 1959-1960 


BACHELOR 0 F ARTS - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
(including General Elementary teaching credential) 1959-60 


REQUIREMENTS 
FOR GRADUATION 


Min. 

Unit to be 

Req. Met Compl 


EDUCATION MAJOR 30 


A minimum of 12 units in Education courses must be comple- 
ted at Orange County State College in addition to directed 
teaching. 


SEMESTER I - BLOCK IN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS. . Educ. 311 (6 units) 

With the approval of a departmental adviser, students who have 
completed the major portion of the block or who will be attend- 
ing late afternoon or evening classes only may satisfy the 
block requirement with the following separate courses: 


Human Growth and Development 
Educational Psychology . . . 
Counseling and Guidance . . 


Educ. 312 (3 units) . 
Educ. 313 (2 units) . 
Educ. 351 (2 units) . 


SEMESTER II - BLOCK IN TEACHING METHODS. . . Educ. 331 (8 units) . 

With the approval of a departmental adviser, students who have 
completed the major portion of the block or who will be attend- 
ing late afternoon or evening classes only may satisfy the 
block requirement with the following separate courses: 






Principles and Curricula of Elem. Educ. . 

Elem, Sch. Arithmetic 

Elem. Sch. Language Arts . 

Elem. Sch. Reading ... 

Elem. Sch. Social Studies 

Audio-Visual Education 

Elem. Sch, Science Education ...... 


Educ. U31 (2 units) , 
Educ. U32Ma(2 units) • 
Educ. 1*32LA(2 units) . 
Educ. li32R (2 units) • 
Educ. U32SS(2 units) . 
Educ. U91 (2 units) . 
Educ. U32Sc(2 units) . 


31 - 


BACHELOR 0 F ARTS - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (continued) 

, . REQUIREMENTS 

(including General Elementary teaching credential) 1959-60 FOR GRADUATION 


Min. 

Unit to be 

Req. Met Compl. 

SEMESTER III - SUPPLEMENTARY TEACHING METHODS (6 units) 

Elem. Sch. Art Educ. 1 j 32B (2 units) . . 

Elem. Sch. Music Educ. U32D (2 units) . . | 

Elem, Sch. P.E. Educ. U32G (2 units) , , 


SEMESTER IV - PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (10 units) 

Directed Teaching 

& Directed Teaching Seminar ...... (10 units) . . 


The directed teaching requirement may be satisfied by the 
presentation of a letter from a school district verifying two 
years, with at least one year on the elementary level, of 
satisfactory teaching experience. This may reduce the require- 
ment of 30 units in Education courses upon approval of the 
student's departmental adviser, but in no instance can there be 
less than 2k credits in education courses or their equivalents 
as approved by the dean of instruction* 


LIBERAL ARTS MAJOR 2k 

Area of major 

Twelve units of this major may be taken in lower division. Units 
used to complete General Education requirements may not apply on 
the minimum unit requirements for the major. Students should 
consult their adviser concerning this major. This major is not 
required in 1960-61. 

9 / 25/59 


>32 


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 


First Digit of Course Number 

Although all categories listed are not applicable at the present time, 
the following course numbering system will prevail: 


1-99 

100-299 

300-399 

hOO-h99 


500-599 


courses carrying no degree or credential credit 

lower division courses, open to upper division students 

upper division courses carrying no graduate credit toward a 

master's degree when taken by graduate students 

upper division courses carrying graduate credit toward a 

master's degree when taken by graduate students and approved 

by an academic adviser 

graduate courses limited to graduate students 


The second digit of the course number indicates course area within the 
division. 

Second Digit of Course Number 
(Division of Education) 

00 Introductory course, orientation 

10 Educational Psychology and Psychological Foundations 
20 Educational Sociology and Sociological Foundations 
30 Elementary Curricula and Methods 
hO Secondary Curricula and Methods 
50 Guidance 
60 Administration 
70 Special Education 
80 Adult Education 

90 Audio-Visual Education and miscellaneous 


Third Digit of Course Number 

0 Independent Study 

1 Beginning and Core Courses 
2-6 Used to show sequence 

7 Seminars 

8 Workshops 

9 Directed Teaching and Field Work 


- 33 ' 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


Department 
& Number 

5 10 « Sc l • 
302 


5 10 • Sci. 
303 


Business 

301 


Education 

311 


Education 

312 


Course Title 


Units 


Fhysiological Bases Individual Diff.: a lecture J 

course designed to acquaint the student with the 
general principles and modern developments of hered- 
ity, Special attention will be given to the inher- 
itance of human characters. 

Growth & Life Processes: a lecture -demonstration 3 

course in which the basic concepts of anatomy, physiology, 
genetics, and embryology necessary for an understanding 
of growth and life processes in the human will be present- 
ed. 

Business Principles for Consumer: an understanding of 3 

the capitalistic system in America. A survey of the 
problems of the consumer and of general principles of 
consumer buying, budgeting, and investing. Shopping 
and buying techniques and analyses of advertisements 
are emphasized. Also an examination of modern business 
functions and institutions, including the nature and 
problems of business operation, the functions of market- 
ing, manufacturing, employee relations, budgeting, legal 
problems in business, physical and human resources, and 
various operational policies and procedures. 

Psychological Foundations of Education: the basic psy- • 6 

chology course in teacher education. Required of all 
teaching credential candidates who have not previously 
had education courses. Includes all subject areas needed 
by students beginning their upper-division professional 
education. Satisfies state requirements for educational 
psychology or learning processes, human growth and devel- 
opment, counseling and guidance of pupils, and mental hy- 
giene. Studies the society in which children grow. In- 
volves observation of children and youth, testing of en- 
rollees for teaching fitness as required in the Credentials 
Selection Program, and opportunities for enrollees to de- 
velop their own personality dynamics in terms of teaching 
effectiveness and personal relationships to children and 
youth. 

Human Growth & Development: a comprehensive study of 3 

Human Growth and Development, with emphasis on child- 
hood and adolescence, and including middle and old age. 

Aspects covered include mental, social, emotional and 
physical development. 


-3U- 


Department 
& Number 

Education 

332 


Education 

331 


Education 

339 


Education 

351 


Education 

U31 


Course Title 


Units 


Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers: for the 2 

upper division student or elementary teacher who 
desires experiences in selecting, organizing and 
using materials and tools in construction activities 
correlated with the Social Studies, Science and other 
units of work. 

Elementary School Principles, Curricula & Methods: (Pre- 8 

requisite: Education 311) a lecture and laboratory course 
covering principles, curricula, methods, and materials of 
elementary school instruction, with major emphasis on read- 
ing, language arts, arithmetic, social studies, and science. 
Includes audio-visual instruction, methods and techniques. 
Students are expected to observe and participate in se- 
lected elementary school classrooms as planned by the 
course instructor. Required of all candidates for general 
elementary credential (or its equivalent). 

Elementary Schools Directed Teaching & Directed Teaching 10 

Seminar: directed teaching for elementary education cre- 
dential, Participation in a regular elementary school 
teaching program for the greater part of every school day 
Includes two hour seminar each week in problems and pro- 
cedures of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enroll- 
ment in education courses is discouraged. Prerequisites, 
Education 3H and Education 331 or their equivalent, Ed- 
ucation U32A, U32Mu, U32P. Additional prerequisites are 
satisfactory accomplishment in special tests in speech, 
reading, written language, health, and verbal and qualita- 
tive skills. Any deficiency must be made up by class in- 
struction and/or other requirements. 

Principles of Guidance: the relationship of counseling 2? 

and guidance to educational objectives and needs of 
youth is the goal of this course. The course includes 
study of special needs created by size and complexity of 
modem educational system and modem society; general re- 
quirements, services, organization, and structure of a 
successful guidance program; counseling service; and ser- 
vices to students and administration. 

Principles & Curricula of Elem. Educ.: this course is 2 

designed as an introductory course in elementary educa- 
tion. The content of the course introduces the student 
of elementary education to various aspects of the teach- 
ing profession. Stress will be on attempting to define 
major principles of education and indicating basic cur- 
ricular consideration. Particular emphasis will be made 
to portray the importance of our elementary school system 
in our society. 


■ 35 - 


Department 
& Number 


Education 

U32Ma 


Education 

U32A 


Education 

U32LA 


Education 

U32Mu 


Education 

U32P 


Education 

U32R 


Education 

U32SS 


Course Title 


Elementary School Arithmetic: objectives, content, 
materials, pupil experiences, methods of instruction 
and evaluation in arithmetic. The nature and scope 
of arithmetic in the elementary school. Historical 
development of notation and numeration. 

Elementary School Art: lecture and laboratory work 
work designed to acquaint the elementary teacher 
with the reasons for and use of Art Education in 
the school program, the creative process of the 
child, the elements of visual and tactile art and 
its relation to the total program, the selection 
of media, and methods of teaching that succeed in 
art for the normal and unusual child. 

Elementary School Language Arts: this course is designed U* 2 
to show how essential the language arts are to a satis- 
factory personality, social, and professional life. 

Methods to help develop in children the skills needed 
for listening, speaking, and writing are studied and 
their effectiveness evaluated. Reading is offered in 
a separate course. 

Elementary School Music: principles of musical growth 2 

related to children's learning experiences in the el- 
ementary school j music in the elementary classroom, with 
enrohasis on singing, listening, use of instruments, rhy- 
thms and other activities. Methods and materials of teach- 
ing, with emphasis on use of State and current supplemen- 
tary music texts. 

Elementary School Physical Education: physical education 2 

techniques and materials for elementary school teachers-. 

Methods of teaching games, sports, rhythms and dances 
commonly taught in elementary schools. Observation and 
laboratory practice included. 

Elementary School Reading: elementary school reading 2 

is concerned with the nature of the reading process, the 
development of reading skills at various levels, and the 
relationship of the developmental reading program to child 
growth and development. 

Elementary School Social Studies: elementary school social 2 
studies is concerned with understanding the need of social 
studies education for our children, evaluating the purpose 
of social studies in this atomic age, and techniques and 
methods of teaching a thorough knowledge of democracy. 

Emphasis will be given toward gaining knowledge and better 
understanding of the current practices and philoscphy of 
elementary school social studies. 


Units 

2 

2 


- 36 - 


Department 
& Number 

Education 
1+32 Sc 


Education 

1*71 


Education 

hSl 


Education 

1*91 


English 

U33 


Geography 

301 


Course Title 


Units 


Elementary School Science: the course will cover the 2 

nature and place of science in the elementary school 
program without treating exhaustively any specific 
phase of science. It is intended to supply enough ideas 
and materials so that the teacher can help the children 
look at the world about them in a truly scientific man- 
ner. Five areas of science will be touched upon during 
the course. These areas are} Plant and Animal Life, 

Earth and Sky, Matter and Energy, Conservation, and 
Health and Safety. 

Gifted Children: this course outlines ways for iden- 2 

tifying gifted and more able learning children, sets up 
guidelines for meeting their needs, suggests effective 
ways of grouping, explains the meaning of individualized 
instruction, and explores classroom enrichment procedures. 
Emphasis is on problem solving and research experiences in 
science, social studies and mathematics. Self-elective 
reading programs and ways to extend interests in litera- 
ture are considered. Techniques for developing creative 
writing and oral language projects are reviewed. Con- 
sideration is given to working with community and parent 
groups . 

Tests, Measurements and Evaluations: this course will 2. 

cover the historical development and current thinking of 
the field of measurement. A study will be made of construc- 
tion and use of both informal and standardized tests. Sum- 
marization and interpretation of test results will be covered. 

Audio-Visual Methods: a lecture-lab demonstration of equip- 2 
ment and materials for use in the classroom, i.e., movie 
projector, flannel board, filmstrips, models, tape record- 
ing, television, etc. Assistance will be given to teach- 
ers and future teachers in how to devise their own effec- 
tive audio-visual aids from the material at hand at the 
time of need. 

Children's Literature: Principles for interpreting, se- 2 

lecting and evaluating childen' s literature} the parts 
played by literature in the education of children in and 
out of school. 

California Geography: a study of the natural environment 2 

of California in its relationship to man. This course 
covers all periods of human settlement, the problems each 
met in dealing with the environment, the changes each made 
in the environment, and their permanent effects. Most em- 
phasis is placed upon contemporary changes, conditions, 
and problems. 


Department 
& Number 

History 

301 


History 

381 


Philosophy 

Uoi 


Philosophy 

U02 


Philosophy 

hh2 

Soc. Sci. 
301 


Speech 

301 


Speech 

308 


Speech 

332 


Course Title 


California History: political, economic, social and 
intellectual growth of California from Spanish times 
to the present, with emphasis on current characteris- 
tics and problems. 

The Westward movement: study of the advance and 
characteristics of frontier areas of the United States 
from colonial times through the nineteenth century. 

Study of development of the western United States in 
the past fifty years* 

Philosophy of Ideas: a philosophic analysis of basic 
ideas which have shaped modem thought. The approach 
used will include the historical development of such 
concepts as well as a critical examination of the assump- 
tions involved. Readings will be directed to the writ- 
ings of the great philosophers . Requirements will in- 
clude extensive class discussions and a term paper. 

Selected Problems in Philosophy: a critical analysis of 3 

philosophic problems which issue from the organizational 
life of society. Investigation will be limited to the 
institutions of Government, the Community, and Science 
and the Arts. Reading assignments of the course will 
include class discussions and a term paper, 

Plato: an analysis of the basic ideas and development of 3 

the Platonic philosophy. 

United States Foreign Policy: survey of factors and forces 3 
entering into the formation and carrying out of American 
foreign policy, with special emphasis on contemporary pro- 
blems in cooperative efforts to attain political, economic, 
and military balances* 

Voice and Diction: provides for speech improvement of the 2 
individual student through the study and practice of cor- 
rect sound formation, voice production, pronunciation, and 
manner of speaking. Emphasis developed largely oral and 
choral reading. A personal improvement course. 

Speech Improvement Lab.: Individual clinic work with 0 

identified speech problems to assist teacher candidates 
to meet established speech standards for teachers. Not in- 
tended to train speech teachers. 

Speech and Speech Evaluation: a principal emphasis will 2 

be upon the development of critical listening to colleague 
speeches and oral readings in order to judge the quality 
of the presentations* Improvement in the skills of both 
speaking and listening is the goal. 


Units 

3 

3 

3 


-38 


Department 
& Number 

Course Title 

Units 

Speech 

U32 

Speech Problems of Children: Methods by which elemen- 
tary teachers can recognize and deal with speech pro- 
blems experienced by the children in their classes. 
Involves identification of problems, basic help, re- 
ferral to speech specialist, parent conferences, men- 
tal health, etc* 

3 


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