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UnfversWf 
University Archives 










1963-1964 



ORANGE STATE 
COLLEGE 


800 North State College Boulevard, Fullerton, California 








CONTENTS 


Page 


Calendar 7 

Trustees of The California State 

Colleges 8 

Office of The Chancellor 9 

Orange State College Advisory 

Board . 9 

College Administration — 9 

Faculty — - 11 

College Committees - 19 

Advisory Committees 21 

The California State Colleges. 23 

Philosophy and Objectives of 

Orange State College - - 23 

History of Orange State College— 24 

College Accreditation — 25 

College Membership in 

Organizations 25 

Library 25 

Summer Session 25 

Extension Program 26 

Foundation 26 

Student Personnel Services 27 

Student Activities 27 

Student Organizations 27 

Student Publications — 27 

Student News Bureau 27 

Athletics 27 

Alumni 28 

Housing 28 

Other Activities 28 

Student Health Services 28 

Office of Placement Services 29 

Counseling Center 29 

Academic Advisement 29 

Counseling 29 

Testing 30 

Financial Aids 30 

Admission to College 31 

Admission with Freshman 

Standing 3 1 

Admission with Advanced Un- 
dergraduate Standing 31 

Evaluations 34 

Registration 35 

Fees and Expenses 35 

Student Expenses 36 

Records 37 

\^cterans 37 


PaRf 


Academic Regulations — 38 

Definitions and Other 

Regulations . 39 

General Graduation 

Requirements 40 

General Education 41 

Units - 43 

Scholarship — 43 

Scholastic Regulations - 43 

Right of Petition 45 

Curricula Offered 46 

Course Numbering Code 48 

Business Administration and 

Economics 49 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 

Business Administration 49 

Majors in Business 

Administration 50 

Business Education 51 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 

Economics 51 

Minor in Economics 52 

Courses 52 

Accounting 52 

Economics 54 

Engineering 136 

Finance 55 

Management 56 

Marketing 57 

Quantitative Methods 59 

Business Administration 59 

Business Education 59 

Education and Psychology .. 61 

New Credential Regulations 62 

Pre-Service Education 62 

Elementary School Teacher 

Education 63 

Four Year Curriculum 63 

Five Year Curriculum 64 

Secondary School Teacher 

Education 65 

Personnel Services for Teacher 

Education Students 67 

Admission to Teacher Education 68 
Admission to Student Teaching.. 69 

Student Teaching 69 

Study List Limits 70 


Substitution of Teaching Experi- 
ence for Student Teaching.. 70 


[3] 


CONTENTS — Continued 


Pas?e 

Provisional Credential Renewal 70 


Available Publications 71 

Courses 71 

Foundations of Education. 71 

Elementary Education 72 

Secondary Education 73 

School Services 74 

Health, Physical Education, 

and Recreation 77 

Psychology 78 

Public School Teachers Coop- 
erating in Student Teacher 

Programs gl 

Fine and Applied Arts _ 87 

Art 87 

Major in Art-Bachelor of 

Arts Degree 88 

Minor in Art-Bachelor of 

Arts Degree 89 

Courses 89 

Art History, Theory, and 

Appreciation 89 

Studio Courses 90 

Art Education 93 

Music 93 

Music Requirements 94 

Music Degree Programs 95 

Bachelor of Arts in Music 96 

Bachelor of Arts in Music- 

Elementary Teachers 96 

Minor in Music 97 

Bachelor of Arts in Music- 

Music Education 97 

Courses for General 

Elementary Credential 99 

Courses 99 

Theory and Basic Music 100 

Music History and Literature 101 
Applied Music Techniques 101 
Class and Individual 

Instruction 102 

Music Education 103 

Speech and Drama 104 

Major in Speech and Drama „ 105 
Speech and Drama Emphasis . 105 

Credential Programs 105 

Minor in Speech and Drama _ 106 

Courses 106 

Drama — 1O6 

Speech 106 

Public Address 107 

Speech Therapy and 

Audiology 108 



Page 

Humanities 

. Ill 

Comparative Literature 

111 

Courses .... 


Maior .. 

112 

Minor 

112 

English 

112 

Courses 

114 

Major . 

113 

Minor 

113 

Foreign Languages 

117 

Major 


Minor 

1 17 

French 

118 

Courses 

1 18 

Maior 

1 17 

Minor 

117 

German 


Courses ... 

119 

Major 

1 17 

Minor 

1 17 

ffumanities 

333 

Journalism ... 

122 

Courses 

123 

Minor _ 


Language Arts . 

114 

Major 


Language Laboratory 

118 

Philosophy 


Courses _ t-.. 

Major 

12? 

Aiinor _ 

... - 126 


Courses 

Spanish 

Courses 

iMajor 

Minor 


120 

120 

121 

121 

117 

117 


129 


130 


Science, Mathematics, and 

Engineering . 

Bachelor of Arts in Biological 

Sciences 

Courses J3Q 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 

Chemistry 133 

Courses . 13^ 

Engineering 33^ 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 

Mathematics 13^ 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 
.Mathematics— Teacher 

Education 137 

Courses 337 


[4] 


CONTENTS— Continued 


Page 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in 


Physics - - 139 

Courses 141 

Mathematics Education 143 

Science Education 143 

Social Sciences 145 


Major in Social Sciences— Gen- 
eral Elementary Credential 146 
Major in Social Sciences— Gen- 
eral Secondary Credential — 146 
Minor in Social Sciences— Gen- 
eral Secondary Credential _ 147 


Major in Geography 148 

Courses 148 


Page 

Major in History 150 

Courses HO 

Alajor in Political Science 153 

Political Science Emphasis 154 

International Affairs Emphasis 154 
Public Administration 

Emphasis 155 

Courses - 155 

Major in Sociology 159 

Courses 159 

Social Sciences 161 

Courses 161 

Social Sciences Education 161 

Masters Degrees Supplement 163 

Index - 167 


[5] 



V V 




ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 

Fullerton, California 


COLLEGE CALENDAR: 1963-64 


Sommer Session 1963 
June 17 Mon. 

July 4 Thurs. 

July 26 Fri. 

Fall Session 1 963 
August 15 Thurs. 


September 16-17 
September 17 
September 18-19 
September 19 


Mon.-Tues. 
Tues. (A.M.) 
Wed.-Thurs. 
Thurs. 


September 23 Mon. 

September 27 Fri. 

November 1 Fri. 

November 11 Mon. 

November 28-29 Thurs.-Fri. 
December 19 Thurs. 

January 2 Thurs. 

January 23 Thurs. 

January 24-25 Fri.-Sat. 

January 27-30 Mon.-Thurs. 

Spring Session 1964 


January 

15 

Wed. 

February 

5-6 

Wed.-Thurs. 

February 

6 

Thurs. 

February 

10 

Mon. 

February 

12 

Wed. 

February 

14 

Fri. 

March 

6 

Fri. 

March 

23 

Mon. 

March 

30 

Mon. 

May 

8 

Fri. 

May 

27 

Wed. 

May 

2^29 

Thurs.-Fri. 

June 

1-4 

Mon.-Thurs. 

June 

7 

Sun. 


Summer Session 1964 


June 

15 

Mon. 

July 

24 

Fri. 

July 

27 

Mon. 

August 

21 

Fri. 


Summer Session begins 
Independence Day (holiday) 
Summer Session Ends 


Application for admission and transcripts due 
in Admissions Office 
College orientation 

Advisement and registration for Freshmen 
Advisement and registration for all others 
Last day to register without late registration 
fees 

Classes begin 

Last day to register or add classes 

Last day to drop a course with automatic ‘VV” 

Veterans’ Day (holiday) 

Thanksgiving recess 
Christmas recess begins 
Classes resume 
Classes end 


Semester examinations 


Application for admission and transcripts due 
in Admissions Office 
Registration for all classes 
Last day to register without late registration 
fees 

Classes begin 

Lincoln’s birthday (holiday) 

Last day to register or add classes 

Last day to drop a course with automatic “W” 

Spring recess begins 

Classes resume 

Day of the Titan (not a holiday) 

Classes end 


I 


Semester examinations 
Commencement 


First Summer Session begins 
First Summer Session ends 
Second Summer Session begins 
Second Summer Session ends 


[7] 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE 
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 
2930 West Imperial Highway 
Inglewood, California 


EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Kdniund G. Hrovvn, LL.B. Sacramento 

Governor of California and President of the Trustees 

Glenn M. Anderson, A.B. Sacramento 

Lieutenant Governor of California 

Je!«e M. Unruh, B.A Sacramento 

Speaker of the Assembly 

Alax Rafferty, B.A., M.A., Ld.D. Sacramento 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Glenn S. Dumke, A.B., Al.A., Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D Inglewood 

Chancellor, California State Colleges 

APPOINTED MEMBERS 

Gregson E. Bautzer, A.B., LL.B . Beverly Hills 

John E. Carr, B.A. Newport Beach 

William K. Coblentz, A.B., LL.B San Francisco 

Airs. Phillip Conley, B.A Fresno 

Donald A1. Hart, B.A. RakersfiplH 

George D. Hart, A.B San Francisco 

Louis H. Heiibron, A.B., LL.B,. LL.D. . . San Francisco 

Charles Luckman, LL.D., A.F.D Los Angeles 

Theodore Meriam, A.B. Chico 

Thomas L. Pitts San Francisco 

Daniel H. Ridder, B.A _Long Beach 

Albert J. Ruffo, LL.B., B.S. in E£. San Jose 

Paul Spencer, B.A San Dimas 

Allen J. Sutherland, A.B San Diego 

George A. Thatcher Inglewood 

E. Guy Warren, B.A Hayward 

OFFICERS OF THE TRUSTEES 

Edmund G. Brown, Governor Sacramento 

President 

Ltmis H. Heiibron Francisco 

Chairman 

J- Sutherland San Diego 

Vice Chairman 

Glenn S. Dumke, Chancellor Inglewood 

Secretary -T reasurer 


[ 8 ] 


OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR OF THE 
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


2930 West Imperial Highway 
Inglewood, California 

Chancellor .. .Glenn S. Dumke 

Vice Chancellor - - Don M. Muchmore 

Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs . Raymond A. Rydell 

Vice Chancellor, Business Affairs John F. Richardson 

Assistant Chancellor, Faculty and Staff Affairs .. C. Mansel Keene 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE ADVISORY BOARD 

Leland C. Launer, Chairman 

Arnold O. Beckman 

E. B. Buster 

Rodney (Bud) Coulson 

Harold E. Coward — 

R. Paul Hughes 

Mrs. Sam P. Kraemer 

L. C. Marshburn 

Thomas W. Mathew.. 

John R. Moore 

Charles A. Pearson - — 

Angus M. Tierney 


Fullerton 

Corona del Mar 
Santa Ana 

.....Anaheim 

Laguna Beach 

Anaheim 

Placentia 

Whittier 

_. . Laguna Beach 

Los Angeles 

Anaheim 

....Garden Grove 


COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 


EXECUTIVE 


President 

Executive Dean„ 


Building Coordinator.. 


..William B. Langsdorf 

Stuart F. McComb 

Milton C. Blanchard 


Publications Manager and Administrative Assistant to the President 

Raynolds Johnson 

INSTRUCTION 

Dean of Instruction Bernard L. Hyink 

Dean of Educational Services and Summer Session Gerhard E. Ehmann 


Business x\dministration and Economics Division, 

Chairman Theodore H. Smith 

Accounting and Finance Department, Chairman — Dorsey E. Wiseman 

Economics Department, Acting Chairman Theodore H. Smith 

Management Depanment, Chairman Stephen J. Barres 

Marketing and Quantitative Methods Department, Chairman..... Donald S. Tull 

Education and Psychology Division, Chairman Kenneth R. Doane 

Elementary Education Department, Chairman Barbara A. Hartsig 

Secondary Education Department, Chairman — Edwin R. Carr 

Psychology Department, Chairman Louis G. Schmidt 


2—83902 


[9] 


10 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Fine and Applied Arts Division, Chairman John W. Olsen 

Art Department, Chairman John W. Olsen 

Music Department, Chairman Joseph W. Landon 

Speech and Drama Department, Chairman Seth A. Fessenden 

Humanities Division, Chairman Gerhard G. Friedrich 

English Department, Chairman Gerhard G. Friedrich 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Department, Chairman Gustave Mathieu 

Journalism Department, Chairman J. William Maxwell 

Philosophy Department, Chairman William H. Alamshah 

Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Department, Chairman . Miles D. McCarthy 

Biological Science Department, Chairman Miles D. McCarthy 

Chemistry Department, Chairman John H. Bryden 

Engineering Department 

Physics Department, Chairman. Raymond V. Adams 

Social Sciences Division, Chairman Giles T. Brown 

Geography Department, Chairman Arthur D. Earick 

History Department, Chairman Giles T. Brown 

Political Science Department, Chairman. John Brown Mason 

Sociology Department, Chairman F. James Davis 

College Librarian ; .Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 

Audio-Visual Services Coordinator... Raymond E. Denno 

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Dean of Students Ernest A. Becker 

Associate Dean of Students, Activities and Housing Ronald M. Bristow 

Associate Dean of Students, Admissions and Records Emmett T. Long 

Registrar Carol N. Burns 

Associate Dean of Students, Counseling and Testing Arthur L. Tollefson 

Counselor and Test Officer Arthur W. Lynn 

College Physician . Harold L. Graber, M.D. 

Director of Placement Services Max W. Burke 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

Business Manager j £ Lyons 

Accounting Officer Stanley N. Chase 

Personnel Officer Mrs. Marie M. Hoffman 

Chief of Plant Operations Beryl E. Kempton 

Supervisor of Building Trades A. T. Clark 


FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 1962-63 

(Year in parentheses indicates date of appointment) 


LANGSDORF, WILLIAM B. (1959) President and Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Occidental College; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

ADAMS, RAYMOND V. (1960) Professor of Physics and Chairman, 

Physics Department 

B.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

ALAMSHAH, WILLIAM H. (1959) Professor of Philosophy and Chairman, 

Philosophy Department 

M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D., University of Southern California 

ALEXANDER, JAMES P. (1960) Assistant Professor of Journalism 

B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 

ALLEN, HOLLIS P. (1960) — Professor of Education 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ed.D., Stanford University; LL.D., Claremont 
Graduate School 


AMES, DENNIS B. (1960). 


Professor of Mathematics and Chairman, 

Mathematics Department 

B.A., M.A., Bishop’s University; Ph.D., Yale University 

ASHLEY, THOMAS J. (1961) Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Fresno State College; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 

BACON, JUNE (1962) ^ ^ Librarian II 

B.A., University of California, M.S. in L.S., University of Southern California 

BARRES, STEPHEN J. (1961) Associate Professor of Labor Relations and 

Management and Chairman, Management Department 
B.A., Texas Western College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

BECK, WARREN A. (1961) Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Wayne University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

BECKER, ERNEST A. (1959) . Dean of Students and Associate Professor 

of Philosophy 

B.A., Amherst College; B.D., Hartford Theological Seminary; M.A., University 
of Southern California 

^^^TON C. (1961) .... Building Coordinator 

B.S., M.Ed., Tufts University 

BRATTSIROM, BAYARD H. (1960) Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., San Diego State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

BM^INHOLT, VERNA A. (1961).. Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., M.A., Brigham Young University 

BRIDGMAN, DONALD C. (1960) Professor of Education 

B.A., Chapman College; M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern California 

BRISTOW, RONALD M. (1959) Associate Dean of Students, Activities, and 

^ . Instructor in Education 

B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 

BROWN, GILES T. (1960) Professor of History and Chairman, Division of 

Social Sciences, and Chairman, History Department 
B.A., San Diego State College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. 
Claremont Graduate School * 

BRUNELLE, EUGENE A. (1962) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Harvard College; M.S., Simmons College; M.A., University of California, 
Berkeley 


[ii] 


12 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


BRYDEN, JOHN H. (1961)— Professor of Chemistry and Chairman, 

Chemistry Department 

r>.b., College of Idaho; M.S., California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of California, Los Angeles 

BURKE, MAX W. (1960). Director of Placement Services and Assistant 

„ . _ _ . . ^ Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Iowa; B.D., Colgate-Rochester Divinity School 

BURNS, CAROL N. (1963) Registrar 

B.A., Fresno State College 

CALHOUN, ROLAND L. (1961) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Claremont Men’s College; M.A., Ph.D., L^niversity of Michigan 

CARLSON, RAE S. (1961) .Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Nebraska; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Michigan 

CARR, EDWIN R. (1960) Professor of Education and Economics and Coordina- 
tor of Secondary Education and Chairman, Secondary Education Department 
B.A., Jamestown College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 

CHEN, WILLIAM P. (1960) ... Librarian IV 

B.A., National Wu-han University, China; M.S. in L.S., M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Illinois 

COOK, BEVERLY B. (1962)... Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School 

HAZEL M. (1960) Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Redlands; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

CUSICK, JAMES W. (1961) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S. Montana State College; M.A., Washington State University 

Librarian IV 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.L.S., Carnegie Library School; B.Mus., 
University of Wisconsin 

(1962) Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

DE GRAAF, LAW RENCE B. (1959). Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
DENNO, RAYMOND E. (1961) — Audio-Visual Coordinator and Professor 

DA TT- • . of Education 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.S., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

(I960) Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., Whitworth College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

DOANE, KENNETH R. (1960) Professor of Education and Chairman, 

Division of Education and Psychology 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, La Crosse; iVI.S., Ph.D., University of YVisconsin 

DONNELL, ROBERT M. (1962) Librarian I 

B.S., Arizona State University; M.A., University of Denver 

. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A University of Michigan; M.A., University of Detroit; Ed.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

EARICK, ARTHUR D. (1960) Associate Professor of Geography and 

Chairman, Geography Department 
B.A., Indiana University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


13 


EHMANN, GERHARD E. (1959) Dean of Educational Services and 

Summer Session and Professor of Education 
B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

FESSENDEN, SETH A. (1959) Professor of Speech and Chairman, 

Speech and Drama Department 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., New York University 

FRIEDRICH, GERHARD G. (1961) Professor of English and Chairman, 

Division of Humanities and Chairman, English Department 
B.A., Guilford College; M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Minne- 
sota 

FYFE, GORDON S. (1960) — Assistant Professor of Marketing 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

GOLDEN, LORETTA (1961) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Stanford University 

GRABER, HAROLD L. (1960) College Physician 

B.S., Washburn College; M.D., Kansas University 

GRANELL, LEE E. (1960) Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., San Diego State College; M.A., University of Southern California 

GRAVES, LEVERN F. (1960) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of California, Berkeley 

GRAY, JUSTIN (1961) Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; Mus.M., Eastman School of Music; D.Mus., 
University of Southern California 

HARRIS, HARVEY R. (1962) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Columbia University; M.A., University of Redlands; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Southern California 

HARTSIG, BARBARA A. (1959) Professor of Education and Coordinator 

of Elementary Education and Chairman, Elementary Education Department 
B.A., Occidental College; M.S., University of Southern California; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles 

HEIN, RAYMOND (1961) — Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College 

HILL, IDA S. (1960) . Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Utah; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

HOLMES, EMMA E. (1961) . Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa 

HYINK, BERNARD L. (1960) Dean of Instruction and Professor 

of Political Science 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California 

IMHOFF, iMYRTLE M. (1960) Professor of Education 

B.A., Harris Teachers College; M.A., St. Louis University; Ph.D., Washington 
University 

JAMES, C. EVAN (1962) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Southern California; Ed.D., Stanford University 

JOHNSON, RAYNOLDS (1961) Publications Manager and Administrative 

Assistant to the President and Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; M.A., Stanford University 

JONES, HAZEL J. (1960) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Western State College of Colorado; M.S., University of Southern California 

KANE, LOUISE (1962) . Librarian II 

B.A., M.A. in L.S., University of Michigan 


14 

ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 

reran, DONALD W. (1961) 

KERSCHNER, lee R. (1961) T . „ 

KR A^vixvT John7Hopkins UniveSty 

KRAVITZ, BERNARD (1961) a ■ , 

LANDON, JOSEPH W. ^ 

^LARK (I960) n r__ r m , 

“■ of -^-Aaoci.^ p,ok^, 

LI, DAVID H. (1960) a • ^ , 

B.A., St. John’s University, Shanghai-’ MB A' twfv Professor of Accounting 
University of Illinois "»"8nai, M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 

LIU, George B. (1961) 

B.A., Fresno State College; M^AirMlZ; Uni^e^^^^^ Librarian II 

LIVENGOOD, EDWARD B. (i960) 

long EiME^rToit’ " 

LONG. EMMETT T. . Asod.y De„ „, Sn.*™, Adm™. .„d 

lvnI;; aS?™” ■■ c=.-£X”' ’^'■ 

LYNN. ARTHUR W. (,«2)___ _Co„„,dor .„d T«, Oflicr. .nd A»oci.„ 

B.A., University of Southern Califomia - Business Manager 

mason. JOHN B. (1«0) Professor of Politicd Science ,nd Chsimisn. 

MAtoS' G ulV'jIS 

:iz:pbSSs™ 

maxwell. J. william Associsre Profes^r of Joern.Bsm .„d 

ve^i.y''on'.r coEj’iirss;: 

M^LEARY, JAMES A. (1960) 

B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Ohio Universitv- PhlSIrT^' Botany 

McCLOUD, LELAND W 1962^ University of Michigan 

aimj w. (1962) Associate Professor of Business Statistics 

’ University; Ph.D., The University of TeS 

LL.D., Upper Iowa Univer^i^^’ ° ’ °f Southern Califomia; 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


15 


McGARRY, EUGENE F. (1962) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., State University 
of Iowa 

McNELLY, WILLIS E. (1961) - Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Central YMCA College; M.A., Loyola University (Chicago); Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 

MICHALSKY, DONAL R. (1960) - . Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Mus.M., University of Southern California 

MITCHELL, VIRGINIA A. (1962). - - Librarian II 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers College 

NELSON, CECELIA R. (1962) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., State Teachers College, Valley City, N.Dak.; B.Mus., Concordia College; 
M.Mus., Eastman School of Music 

OBLER, PAUL C. (1962)„ Associate Professor of English 

B.A., American University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers Uni- 
versity 

OLSEN, JOHN W. (1961) Professor of Art and Chairman, Division of Fine 

and Applied Arts, and Chairman, Art Department 
B.Ed., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University 

OMALEV, ALEXANDER (1960) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

and Coach of Basketball 

B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 

O’TOOLE, JOHN B. (1962) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Duquesne University; Lit.M., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

PASTOR, PAUL J. (1960) Associate Professor of Education 

and Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College; Ed.D., University of Oregon 

PONTNEY, JACK A. (1961) Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., Northwestern University 

POVLOVICH, CHARLES A., JR. (1960) Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Kansas City; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Southern California 

RAMSAY, ORRINGTON C. (1960) Professor of English 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

REITH, GERTRUDE M. (1961) Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., Ai.A., University of Washington; Ph.D., Clark University 

ROBERTS, FRANK L. (1961) Associate Professor of Management 

and Marketing 

B.S., University of Arkansas; M.B.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 

SAILOR, D ANTON B. (1962) — Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

SALZ, PAULINA J. (1961) Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 

SAMUELSON, GERALD D. (1962) Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

SCHMIDT, LOUIS G. (1961) Professor of Education and Acting Chairman, 

Psychology Department 

B.S., Stout State (College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

SCHNEIDER, CLARENCE E. (1962) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University 
of Southern California 

SHAPLEY, CHARLES S. (1962) Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 


16 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


SMITH, J. RFX (1961) . . „ , 

B.A., Phillips Univcrsirv BD VTI^- ^ Professor of Sociology 

University of SouE California P^.D. 

all>n™Sn of Sss “‘J 

Chairman! Econo::.ls Oepartrnt^‘^^ -‘J Acting 

UihveBity College; M.B.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Ohio State 

SMITH, VICTOR V. (1962) . . 

B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College Assistant Professor of Art 

SriEL, EDSEL F. (1962) » . „ 

SUTTON^■;nM^ Califo7nTa7tosrgd Mathematics 

SUTTON, DONALD D. (I960) a 

B.A University of California, Berkeley ' M A ~Ph n°T7- °f Biology 

Davis ’ ''1-A., Ph.D., University of California, 

THORSEN, DAVID O. (I960) a 

B.Mus., University of RedlandsV'M.AT, bTddental Colf^^^^ Professor of Music 

•■kSON, ARTHUR L. (1962) Associate Dean of Students, Counseling and 

TOT eS;:s?“w ': r‘ 

College Librarian and Associate Professor 

Califorl^Sr 

MS?ke64!^?nJchafrman Ma^rir^^^ grsiness Statistics, Economics and 
B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Chicalo Methods Department 

turner, GEORGE C. (i960) a • „ 

B.A., Stanford University- M s" ub'lT cVT ■'rT • Professor of Biology 

ington College of Educldon ’ University; M.Ed., Eastern Wash- 

UNTERBERGER, BETTY M. (1961) a • ^ 

B..'^., Syracuse University; .M..A. Radcliffe Ha'rvi A Prnf“sor of History 

VVISE.MAN, DORSEY E. !l961 ) Ph-U- Duke University 

6ir.ri Professor of Accounting and Finance 

B.S., ^^^est Virginia University; iS.ruk.ierskvi^^^ Department 

vcrsity of Illinois ’’ Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Uni- 

WOO, JOHN C. H. (1962) a • 

B.A., National University, Nanking China. \T Professor of Accounting 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Californk, Bereiet ’ Collegel 

YOUNG, JAMES D. (1960) ^ . 

B.S., Pepperdine College; M.A., p'h.D., U^T^r^i^y'^f 

PART-TIME FACULTY 1962-63 

AHUMAD.A, RODOLFO (1962) a • 

B.A., M.A., Mexico City College ssistant Professor of Philosophy 

ARONSON, EDWIN C. (1963) a • 

B.S., Los Angeles State College; M.B^a!' lJnivers7^'nT<f''°u^''°7°^ Management 
ASH, EDWARD C. (1962) ‘versity of Southern Cahfomia 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern California ** **^^"’' Professor of Management 
BEATON, CHARLES R. (1962) . . 

B.A., Willamette University Assistant Professor of Finance 

BEDDO\VS, HAROLD R. (1962) 

B.S., Thiel College; M.S., Univei^ity'^f'South^rn 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


17 


BROWN, EDWARD D. (1962) .. .Assistant Professor of Drama 

B.A., Louisiana State University; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Denver 

CALLACI, CHARLES A. (1962) Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Emerson College; M.A., San Francisco State College 

CANNON, JOHN P. (1962) ...Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., Long Beach State College; M.A., Mexico City College; Ph.D., University 
of Mexico 

COCHRUM, ELLEN (1962) Instructor of Russian 

COX, MIRIAM (1961) Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Utah State University; M.S., University of Idaho 

DURYEA, LESLIE N. (1962)...... Associate Professor of Management 

B.S., Purdue University; LL.B., Stanford University 

FORLEY, MAURICE (1962) Associate Professor of Speech 

Ph.B., Yale College; J.D., Northwestern Law School 

FROLA, FRANCIS R. (1962) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., San Jose State College 

GOOD, KAYE M. (1961) Instructor of Speech 

B.A., Washington State College 

GRATNER, PAULINE (1962) Assistant Professor of Art 

B.E., University of California, Los Angeles 

GUSSOW, MARGARET B. (1962) Librarian I 

B.A., Queen’s University; M.S. in L.S., University of Southern California 

HARRINGTON, ERNEST R. (1960) Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., M.A., University of Washington; Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

HAUCK, ELDON (1963).... Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Utah State College; M.Ed., University of Washington 

HAYS, DONALD G. (1963) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Arizona State College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

HOFF, GEORGE R. (1960) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Pepperdine College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern California 

HOLDEN, DANIEL W. (1962) Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., University of California, Berkeley; L.L.B., Loyola University 

HOLDGRAFER, PATRICIA J. (1963) Instructor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College 

JORDAN, CLIFFORD W. (1963) Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Whittier College; M.S. Ed.D., University of Southern California 

KAPLAN, DONALD E. (1960) Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Long Beach State College 

KETTERINGHAM, WILLIAM J. (1962) Instructor of Geography 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Stanford University 

LAKE, ERNEST G. (1963) ..Professor of Education 

B.A., Montana University; M.Ed., Ed.D., Harvard University 

LASSWELL, THOMAS E. (1962) Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Arkansas College, M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern California 

LYNAM, WILLIAM C. (1963) Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods 

B.S., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University; M.A., Graduate School 
of Western Reserve University 

McOLASH, FRANCIS J. (1962) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Macalester College; B.D., Bethel Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University 
of Southern California 


18 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


PARKS, DAVID R 0959) a • r 

B.S., M.S., University of Southern Professor of Education 

PATTERSON, PIERCE E 0959) a • r 

B S s.„e Col4S^S„ bS„ “™ 

PIERNO, ANTHONY R 0961) a * nr 

B.A., Whittier College; LL^B., Swnforf Law Management 

REAMS, L. MAXINE 0 962) a • , 

B.A., State University of Iowa Assistant Professor of Journalism 

RICHARDSON, HAROLD E 0960 a • nr 

B'BA.,M’B.Afu^Jv^ityo^/Mrchig^^^^^ Associate Professor of Management 


SCHEID, PHIL N. (I961).._ 

B.A., B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology 
SCHMIDT, MERCEDES W. (1962) 


Associate Professor of Psychology 




SMITH, PHYLLIS H. (1962). 

B.A., B.L.S., University of Buffalo 
SMITH, TOM E. (1959) 


Librarian II 
Assistant Professor of Education 


STOCKrWlIulM^^ ^ 

^.kem &ott '^•A:University^ T:Z£f,K uli““f 

WAGNER, EDYTHE E fl960) a • 

B.S., University of North Dakota- MS M»,., v i tt Marketing 

versity of Illinois ’ Umversity; Ph.D., Uni- 


COLLEGE COMMITTEES 1962-63 


President's Cabinet 

W. B. Langsdorf, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 
Bernard L. Hyink 

Faculty Council 

Orrington Ramsay, Chairman 
David H. Li, Vice-Chairman 
Paul J. Pastor, Secretary 
Ida S. Hill, Treasurer 
William H. Alamshah 
Dennis B. Ames 
Ernest A. Becker 
Giles T. Brown 
Lawrence B. deGraaf 
Kenneth R. Doane 
Arthur D. Earick 
Seth A. Fessenden 
Gerhard G. Friedrich 

Campus Planning Committee 

William B. Langsdorf, Chairman 

Bernard L. Hyink 

J. E. Lyons 

Stuart F. McComb 

John W. Olsen 

Committee on Relations with Schools 

Emmett T. Long, Chairman 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 

Disaster Committee 

Milton C. Blanchard, Director 

Raymond V. Adams 

Donald C. Bridgman 

Ronald M. Bristow 

James W. Cusick 

John F. Daly 

Raymond E. Denno 

Foundation Board of Trustees 

W. B. Langsdorf, President 
Raymond V. Adams, Vice-President 
J. E. Lyons, Treasurer 
Ernest A. Becker 


J. E. Lyons 
Stuart F. McComb 
Faculty Council Chairman 
Raynolds Johnson (ex officio) 


Lever n F. Graves 
Barbara A. Hartsig 
Joseph W. Landon 
William B. Langsdorf 
President of the College 
Gustave Mathieu 
Miles D. McCarthy 
James A. McCleary 
J. Rex Smith 
Theodore H. Smith 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 
Donald S. Tull 
Betty M. Unterberger 


Herbert J. Powell 
Consulting Architect 
Joseph K. Thomas 
College Facility Planner 
Office of the Chancellor 


Bernard L. Hyink 
Arthur L. Tollefson 


Harold L. Graber, M.D. 
Raynolds Johnson 
Beryl E. Kempton 
J. E. Lyons 
Stuart F. McComb 
Paul J. Pastor 


Seth A. Fessenden 
Gordon S. Fyfe 
Charles A. Povlovich, Jr. 


20 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Health and Safety Committee 

Raymond V. Adams, Chairman 
Milton C. Blanchard 
Ronald Al. Bristow 
Louisa V. Couper, R.N. 

Harold L. Graber, M.D. 

STANDING COAVMinEES OF 

Committee on Academic Standards 

H. Ernest Lewald, Chairman 
Donald C. Bridgman 
Emmett T. Long 

Committee on Educational Services 

John H. Bryden, Chairman 
Raymond E. Denno 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 

Committee on Faculty Affairs 

Charles A. Povlovich, Jr., Chairman 
Levern F. Graves 
J. Justin Gray 

Committee on Faculty Personnel 

Dennis B. Ames, Chairman 
Raymond V. Adams 

Committee on Graduate Studies 

Hollis P. Allen, Chairman 
Gerhard G. Friedrich 
Bernard L. Hyink 


Beryl E. Kempton 

Paul J. Pastor 

Robert G. Ryan 

Two Student Representatives 


THE FACULTY COUNCIL 1962-63 


Miles D. McCarthy 
Betty M. Unterberger 


Paulina J. Salz 
Donald S. Tull 


J. E. Lyons 
J. William Maxwell 


Seth A. Fessenden 


John B. Mason 
Theodore H. Smith 


Committee on Instruction and Curriculum 


Bernard L. Hyink, Chairman 

Giles T. Brown 

Kenneth R. Doane 

Gerhard G. Friedrich 

Miles D. McCarthy 
John W. Olsen 
Theodore H. Smith 

Committee on the Library 


Ernest W. Toy, Jr., Chairman 
Warren A. Beck 

Hazel J. Jones 

Willis E. McNelly 

Donal R. Alichalsky 
John B. O’Toole 
Dorsey E. Wiseman 

Committee on Student Affairs 


James A. McCleary, Chairman 

Ernest A. Becker 

Milton C. Blanchard 

Arthur D. Earick 

Lee E. Graneli 

Raynolds Johnson 
Joseph W. Landon 
Louis G. Schmidt 

J. Rex Smith 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


21 


'I 


I 

j 

j 


i 


I 


s 

I 

i 


I 

j 


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I 


I 


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PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL COLLEGE 
COMMITTEES 1962-63 

Premedical Committee 

Miles D. McCarthy, Chairman 
William H. Alamshah 
Dennis B. Ames 
Ernest A. Becker 

Teacher Education Committee 

Arthur D. Earick, Chairman 
Edwin R. Carr 
Kenneth R. Doane 
Barbara A. Hartsig 
James A. McCleary 

The President of the College and the Chairman of the Faculty Council are 
ex-officio members of all faculty committees. 


John H. Bryden 
Harold L. Graber, M.D. 
Donald D. Sutton 


John W. Olsen 
Frank L. Roberts 
Louis G. Schmidt 
C. Elmer Schneider 


ADVISORY COMMITTEES 


Engineering Advisory Committee 
John R. Moore, Chairman 
Anaheim, California 
Nicholas A. Begovich 
Fullerton, California 
Willard Key 
Anaheim, California 

Humanities Advisory Committee 

Miss Louise E. Dowlen 
Costa Mesa, California 
Charles L. Ford 
Costa Mesa, California 
James N. Hines 
Fullerton, California 


Paul H. Reedy 
Anaheim, California 
Wendell B. Sell 
Los Angeles, California 
Warren E. Wilson 
Claremont, California 


Oscar E. Littleton 
Long Beach, California 
Fred B. Myers 
Newport Beach, California 
William F. Smith 
Fullerton, California 


Scholarship Advisory Committee 

Dr. Clair G. Blauvelt 
Corona del Mar, California 
Mrs. Dorman L. Commons 
Fullerton, California 
Mrs. Eugene L. Kinsbury 
La Habra, California 


Daniel L. Stack 
Fullerton, California 
H. Nelson Warren 
Fullerton, California 
Duane Winters 
Fullerton, Calif orma 


Teacher Education Advisory Committee 

Mrs. Zoe Rae Barlow 
Balboa Island, California 
Thomas Burns 
Placentia 

Mrs. Nina Decker 
Garden Grove, California 
J. Frank Gruenf elder 
Santa Ana, California 


Milton Sanden 
Santa Ana, California 
Robert E. Shanks 
Anaheim, California 
Mrs. Harold Sprague 
Garden Grove, California 
Mrs. Avery Streech 
Fullerton, California 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


22 

Dr. Ernest G. Lake 
Fullerton, California 
Ken Mackay 
Fullerton, California 
Leslie Miller 
Costa Mesa, California 
Stan Ostling 
Santa Ana, California 
Mrs. Mary Reed 
F ullerton, California 
William Rickel 
Anaheim, California 


Thomas Trawick 
Santa Ana, California 
Mrs. Mignon Waters 
Garden Grove, California 
Dr. Norman E. Watson 
Costa Mesa, California 
K. E. Whiteneck 
Newport Beach, California 
Dr. Elizabeth V. Wright 
Fullerton, California 


THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 

The California State Colleges are a unique development of the democratic con- 
cept of tuition-free public higher education for all qualified students. ^ 

Spanning the state from Humbolt County in the north to San Diego in the 
south, the 16 campuses of the California State Colleges (with two additional cam- 
puses in the planning stage) represent the largest system of public higher education 
in the Western Hemisphere and, one of the largest in the world. Current enroll- 
ment is some 118,000 full and part-time students. The faculty and administrative 

staff numbers some 7,000. . . 

The individual colleges, each with a geographic, curricular and academic 
character of its own, offer a solid basic program in the liberal arts. Beyond this, 
each college is noted for its individuality in academic emphasis which makes for a 
diversified system. Course offerings leading to the bachelor s and master s degree 
are designed to satisfy existing student interests and to serve the technical and 
professional manpower requirements of the state. 

The California State Colleges are dedicated to rigorous academic standards. 
Constant striving for academic excellence is at the heart of the system. Each 
faculty within the system is a ‘teaching faculty’ whose primary responsibility is 
the instructional process on the teacher-student level, with appropriate recognition 
of the necessary and constructive role of research in any institution of higher edu- 
cation. , r T- 

Responsibility for the California State Colleges is vested in the Board of Trustees, 
which is appointed by the Governor, and the Board s administrative arm, the 
Chancellor. The Trustees and the Chancellor set broad policy for the colleges 
while delegating considerable independent responsibility for implementation at the 
college level. 

Although the oldest of the colleges, San Jose State College dates back a century , 
the California State College system under an independent Board of Trustees was 
created by the Donahoe Act of 1960. Formerly, the colleges were under the 
jurisdiction of the State Board of Education. • j r 

Today, the California State Colleges are in a particularly dynamic period of 
their development. Prior to World War II, there were seven State Colleges with a 
peak total enrollment of some 13,000. Since 1947, nine new campuses have been 
developed and two more are scheduled to begin operation with the next three 
years. Enrollment in the system is expected to reach 180,000 by 1970. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 

The main functions of an institution of higher learning are to disseminate and 
advance knowledge. The philosophy which guides an institution can linriit or 
promote the successful achievement of these objectives. Therefore, from its incep- 
tion, Orange State College has directed its educational program toward the fullest 
possible development of the individuals who participate in it. For both faculty and 
students this entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, a compre- 
hensive rather than a narrow approach to major areas of study, and a concern 
with research and other creative activity. 

The College holds to the belief that an enduring educational experience must 
be founded upon exploration of our cultural heritage, through basic studies in the 
liberal arts and sciences, and that it can and should at the same time prepare for 
success in a chosen occupation or profession. Accordingly, the required General 
Education program has as its objective the development in each student of: 

1. The effective use and interpretation of the written and spoken language. 


24 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


in"ubera? ’’T®" ^"<1 accomplishments 

and values ■nterrelanonships. and the various choices 

AmTn^d ii^ormation and principles in some areas of the Liberal 

and expre^s^m “ encourage critical and creative thought 

4. A spirit of inquiry into the past and into the future, in order to cope with 

conditions in the continually changing world. ^ 

5. An understanding of the rights, privileges and responsibilities of citizenship 
m the community and nation, and of effective participation in today’s world^ 

requires of all students who are candidates for a degree 
-whatever their special purpose-the pursuit of a subject major. ® 

(ror specific details, see page 41.) 

HISTORY OF ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 

A County is situated on a coastal plain southeast of the City of Los Angeles 

eight percent of the population is under 25 vears of n ’ Forty- 

Mill lunl. tha coumy h.,i„g popul.,iSTnti " “u"; Jmo'L,°U''KS"’?hei‘ 

The first six months of 1962 saw the use of 1 447 acre.! of lanA t 

culture to subdivisions, business and industry, delays an?scho^.rs^The 

‘ omnysStVSg^ ,Tn 

of Chapter 1681 of the Statutes of 1957 M°arch^^T91^^^^ 

Avenue, on the west bvTate CoLl. Ro ? . ^ P" Pi°n«r 

tile south by the extension of Nutwood a*^®'**^ (formerly Cypress Avenue), on 

north-south'^freewa>^ The Collie I iatd^vhhin fi"" 

dustry and within 10 miles of 70°/ of rhp r»n i e miles of 60% of the in- 

within easy driving range of Orange Count\^ berc^h^c^ Orange County. It is also 
o.h., c„l,p„l „n.a„ s«u.h„„ Cdl,o„i, 

on the Fullenon Union High School camni^ t- k m f administrative offices 
High School for the 1959-60 school yew Durint di^'fi'^ f 
annual enrollment has grown from 466 to 2 540 ind' the average 

annual enrollments of 7,750 in 1967-68- 15 W in ' 19727 ^ Envisioned are average 
when ,ha Collega ra.cha. i„ Al>,.r £ ,2^ ” J-™. ^ 

students m the early nineteen eighties. ^ ^ ^ equivalent 

In the Fall of 1960, the College onenpH 
occupied twelve temporary buildings. The first oei^ O'^ campus where it 
Building, was completed in 1963. Thereafter orhlr building, the Science 

opened in approximately the following order- buildings will be 

Gymnasium, 1965; Library, 1966; Art buildim? and p building and 

room building. Health C;nter, ’ 

buildmg m 1969. Additional buildings are being planned foX fumre 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


25 


ACCREDITATION 


Orange County State College is fully accredited by the Western Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Western College Association, and the California State Board 


of Education. 

MEMBERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS 


The College is a member of the following distinguished educational bodies; 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 
American Council on Education 
Association of State Colleges and Universities 
Western Association of Schools and Colleges 


THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 


The College Library is housed in the basement of the Science ^ 

occupies an area of approximately 30,000 square feet Seating is provided for 390 
persons. Group study rooms, a typing room, carrells, and individual and group 

music listening spaces are available. u u • • « 

The main book collection will contain about 53,000 volumes at the begmnmg 
of the 1963-64 academic year. During the year about 12,000 volumes will be added 
to it. The Library also has a collection of about 6,500 volumes of sample elemen- 
tary and secondary text books and juvenile literature, and a collection of about 

2,000 pamphlets. „ ^ i -ru* 

The Library is a selective depository for U.S. Government documents. 1 ms 
collection will reach a total of about 5,000 items in the course of the academic 
year. The Library is also a depository for the pilot program of the California 
Curriculum Project. This collection, combined with previously purchased materials, 


will contain about 1,200 items. . 

In addition to these coUections the Library has about 4,000 reels of microfilmed 
U.S. Government documents, chiefly State Department records, but also in- 
cluding such things as the Congressional Record, about 4,000 reels of other micr^ 
filmed materials, mostly files of newspapers and periodicals, and about 1,0^ 
volumes on micro-opaque cards. Readers for these materials are available in the 

Periodicals and Documents area. . . u r i a 

The Library subscribes to about 1,200 periodicals. In addition to the filmed 
backfiles mentioned above, this collection contains about 2,500 bound volumes. 

Besides attempting to build a balanced collection of basic works, the Library 
as a part of its development program, has concentrated its efforts in several sub) ect 
areas. As a result relatively strong collections are now available in such fields as 
World War 11, international relations since 1870 Kant, Shakespeare and Melville. 
These collections wiU increase in strength and number during the next several years. 

Library hours are posted at the main entrance. A Library handbook is available 
at the Reference Desk. Professional librarians are available at all times to aid 
students and faculty in the use of all library resources. 


SUMMER SESSION 

The College conducts a six-week summer session which begins one week after 
the close of the spring semester, followed by a four-week post-session. Day and 
evening classes are scheduled and credits earned in the summer session meet degree 
and credential requirements with the same validity as credits secured in the fall 
and spring semesters. A maximum of one unit of college credit may be earned for 

each week of attendance. . . i j • i 

In addition to much of the regular curriculum, summer offerings include special 
workshops and seminars for teachers and other professional groups. A program 
of recreational activities is planned to serve a wide variety of mterests. 

A tuition fee of $11.50 per unit (subject to change) is charged. The Summer 
Session Class Schedule announcing all courses is published in March and may be 
obtained by writing the Dean of Educational Services and Summer Session. 


26 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


EXTENSION PROGRAM 

prSrCh'SifS™ E»nsi«„ 

distance from the campus, find it^^difficult *to 

instances, extension classes may be undertaWen ar I courses. In some 

special facilities which are not availabfe on campj?““°"* 

Courses may be modified and Tsi^eH r * credential, 

groups and may initiated at various^imes during' ^yea?'*""'*' 

For fuU details concerninR extension wort courses (subject to change), 

and Summer Session. ’ Dean of Educational Services 

the orange state college foundation 

student ^nTfLS^e^!c?s%S'^crnTot‘'b^^ “ 

tions. The Foundation was incorporated in Ocrober 1959 tL^'r"’ ^ppropria- 

"’'Th^F^iTdari^^h"^ administration. “ 

food service. In oOde/*to"albw smdenK^^ meOnO^of^ and 

tion of the policies for the book store and fooH -• Fa^^^J^'Pa^'ng in the formula- 
delegated specific responsibilities in these areas tn Foundation Board has 

Among the services the Foundation orovidps f student members, 

program, a well-stocked book store a comoIetP fnld a residence hall 

ships, opportunities to assist members of the facnltt'^^^*'^^’ j *°ans, scholar- 


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Student services of Orange State College are centered in the Office of the Dean 
of Students. The major divisions are admissions and records, counseling and testing, 
student activities, health services and student placement. Housing, part-time em- 
ployment, intercollegiate and intramural athletics, and other similar concerns are 
also the direct responsibility of this office. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The faculty of the College recognizes the important role of student activities 
in the growth and development of young people in our society. The scope of 
the activities program includes areas of interest to both day and evening students 
attending the College. Every student is encouraged to participate in as many ac- 
tivities as his free time allows. r c 

All registered students are members of Associated Students of Orange State 
College. The governing body of Associated Students is the Student Council 
which meets weekly to initiate, organize, and administer the student government 
program. The Student Council is responsible for the disbursement of student 
body fees for such activities as student publications, intercollegiate athletics, intra- 
mural athletics, forensics, music, social affairs, and student body organizations. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are encouraged and aided by the College whenever students 
express a desire for activities which will add to the educational opportunities of 
the College. Present organizations include special interest, service, social, honorary, 
Greek, and religious organizations: the Art Club, Associated Women Students, 
Baseball Club, Christian Science Organization, Circle K, Delta Chi Delta (social 
sorority). Delta Tau Upsilon (social fraternity). Democrats Qub, Deutscher 
Verein, Elephant Racing Club, Forensics Club, International Relations Club, Liter- 
ary Society, Oracles (men’s service), Oral-Interpretation Club, Orange State Edu- 
cation Association, Music Educators Association, Phi Alpha Theta (honorary his- 
tory), Pi Kappa Delta (honorary speech). Sigma Phi Omega (social fmernity). 
Society for the Advancement of Management, Newman Club (Catholic), Titan 
Christian Fellowship (non-denominational). Titan Hall (residence hall). Young 
Republicans, and Zeta Phi Lambda (social sorority). 

Student Publications 

The weekly College newspaper, the Titan “Times,” and the Orange State College 
magazine, published three times a year, are products of the journalism classes. 
In addition, a student handbook and an organizational handbook are available 
for distribution. The “Promethean,” a literary magazine, is also published by 
students. 

Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1960 to provide the outside press 
with news of student activities on the campus. It is financed in part by a budgeted 
allocation from Associated Students and in part by scholarships from newspaper 
publishers. 

Athletics 

A year-round program of intramural athletics includes flag-football, softball, 
tennis golf, volleyball, basketball, and other sports. Participation by students and 
faculty is encouraged. Intercollegiate athletics consist of teams in cross-country, 


[27] 


28 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


gram of athletics and are contrS "nTfin^ encouragement of a sound pro- 
helping to develop a first-rate arhlpi-if-^ cially and by way of enthusiasm to 

of the%elationS bemln spoS " “ well-rounded concept 

with the exception of basebah comnlr ^ “f'^'^'^fment. All athletic teams. 

Athletic Association (NCAA) ’ Membershb fs*^ Ikn\°hl Collegiate 

ciation of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). National Asso- 

Alumni 

formed of activities a^d*devebpment”o"tl^*r graduates in- 

among the members of tre Tsodatio^ T^e ?" “'""’'^nication 

point of alumni activities The yearly Homecoming is the high 

Housing 

thl? fJe^dence Idl"fo?2’oo"'m?„ ''a"®" 

the Fall 1963 semester (^£ rTstdence hlirTe ^e completed for 

rooms, apartments and houses for rent in fhf» ^ stage. A list of 

the Office of Student WWer anS is 

lodging adjacent to the campus.' students who may desire 

Other Activities 

formances open to the^emb^s^of^r^r ^nd instrumental per- 

Drama Department The Speech "and 

play each semester. The Forensics team hL audition to a regular three-act 
and achievements has gained wide spread recognid^in'cS^^^^^ 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

TThe Student Health Center is ooen from o.^n m 

direction of the College Physician*^ emereencv rrp'^!^ Under the 

examinations for credential purposes are riven^ Also^^^ available and health 

offered. Any student requiring follotiJ^p^medicd care Program is 

personal physician may obtain such services tlu-oueh tL 
of consulting specialists has been established and fts ^ 

to specific needs. At the time of application for utilized according 

IS completed which is filed in the Health Center wh^rf °u’ “ history form 

are kept. Students requiring credential examinarinnt 1 health records 

their own physicians if desired. Otherwise appomm'^mQ f*''® completed by 
made in the Student Health Center. ’ for this purpose may be 

Health, Accident, Hospital Insurance 

Application forms for supplementary health accident .nA l • . • 
such as IS available on a voluntary basis at low nr» •’ 1. hospital insurance, 

Acuvioes Office, are recommended to be obtained'^bv all'l"lt.*A‘^°“^*’'T^‘® 
cover,,, „ rloc. ,1,. co» o( m.dS “f 

son. of „,.,o, diner, or Ininry which i, beyond ,he C= Id SlJS 
Night Services 

No staff is available for night services of ijnv j i 

calls made at any time. ^ are no off-campus 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


29 


OFFICE OF PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The Office of Placement Services serves the student during his college years, as 
well as at the time of graduation. 

Part-time Placement 

Assistance in securing part-time employment, needed by many to complete their 
education, is given by this office. Students wishing part-time work, either on or oft 
campus, must register for such employment at the beginning of each semester. 
Secretarial skills are in most demand, but calls come for school bus drivers, 
custodians, clerks, youth leaders, tutors, sitters, gardeners, etc. 

Teacher Placement 

For students who are in the final semester of the teacher education curriculum, 
the Placement Office provides a distinctive set of services, looking toward employ- 
ment by the school districts. One such service is to gather and keep current a 
personal file of professional information, which is copied and mailed to employing 
districts, on request. Another service is to receive and make available information 
on teacher openings. 

Business, Industry and Government Placement 
The Office’s service to students seeking business or public service careers involves 
assistance in defining occupational preference, providing active job leads, making 
up resumes, and arranging interviews, either on or off campus. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

From time to time, all students need assistance in solving educational, vocational, 
or personal problems. Orange State College provides assistance in these matters 
through the advisement, counseling, and testing programs. 

Academic Advisement 

All undergraduate students working toward a degree or credential are assigned 
an adviser in the major field. Those seeking a credential wiU also be assigned a 
professional adviser in the Division of Education and Psychology. .,1 « 

Graduate students in all divisions, except Education and Psychology, will be 
assigned a major adviser. In Education and Psychology, all will have a profession^ 
adviser. Those students seeking a credential for teaching in secondary schools will 
be assigned both a professional adviser and a major adviser.^ 

Advisers are assigned by division chairmen. The adviser is basically a resource 
person who will help the student plan his academic program so that he meets the 
requirements of the major or credential objective in the most desirable manner. 
While the adviser can provide valuable information and suggestions to the student, 
the ultimate responsibility for the program the student plans and the courses he 
chooses lies with the student himself. 

Coordination of the advisement program is under the direction of the Associate 
Dean of Students, Counseling and Testing. 

Counseling 

Students who need assistance with such problems as choosing an acadenuc major 
or vocational goal, with study skills, or with personal problems affecting their 
academic progress may obtain help through the Counseling Center. The profes- 
sional counseling staff has available a variety of resources including occupational 
information files, special testing materials, college catalogs, and directories of various 
kinds which may be used to assist the student. 

The Counseling Center also maintains contact with agencies and professional 
persons in the community to whom students may be referred. 


30 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Testing 

puIposer“"^ State College are designed to serve a variety of 

“«■> - *« Ad™»i,„ 

^ecific programs should inquire in tL an^ testing requirements for 

Counseling Center. ^ appropriate instructional division or the 

Scholarships ^i^ANOAl AIDS 

.ndSr.3^Lt,„t£xr„d”S'^^ 

Scholanhip applications are cirfSly ev^ted' bT^he f Spring semester, 
view Committee, and awards are based on Scholarship and Loan Re- 

qualifications, and financial need. Some slho"arshTJs°are P«sonal 

ing in specified fields; departmental recommenAa^ awarded to students major- 
instances. partmental recommendauons are heavily weighted in such 

Emergency Loans 

College, a small Eme^rgency’ Loan Fund'^hrs^been esShed in Orange State 

c“?(5ffi:^r:^^"“ APPlicationfs^Sd^^br^^^^^^^^ T S 

National Defense Student Loans 

California in m^kbg ^loam ''Iva'ihbr' to''^^^^ Government and the State of 
National Defense Education Act. students under the provisions of the 

are eligible to apply, ahhoug^ the 1aw'*provfd7s"th^^ ^ 

given to (a) students with superior academTc^hart consideration shall be 

teach in elementary or secondary schoSs ™ d fh^ =» desire to 

ground indicates a superior capacity or preparatiL ^ academic back- 

neering, or a modem foreign language. ^C'^nce, mathematics, engi- 

The maximum loan to one individual is f i non in 
$5,000 total. The average loan at Orange State is usiwl? "^1 more than 

Loans must be repaid with 3 percent interest over a maximum, 

one year after the individual ceases to be a full rimp ^ years beginning 

vi&tcCr. 

April 1 to April JO for Novem^^^ Financial Aids officer 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


31 


United Student Aid Funds 

Long term loans to help finance college expenses are also available to deserving 
students who have completed the freshman year. USA Funds, a private, non-profit 
corporation, will endorse low-cost, long-term bank loans upon recommendation of 
the College. The College also participates through contributions to the USA Funds 
reserve. 

A maximum of $1,000 a year— or a combined total of $3,000— may be borrowed 
for undergraduate and/or graduate education. The student repays the loan in 36 
monthly installments beginning four months after he leaves school. Interest maxi- 
mum is 6% simple. Applications and information are also available from the 
Financial Aids officer. 


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Freshman admission requirements as adopted by the Trustees of the California 
State Colleges are stated in the California Administrative Code, Title 5, Chapter 5, 
Subchapter 2, Article 3, Paragraph 40800.1. Transfer students are governed by 
Article 4 of the same section, Paragraphs 40901 and 40902. 

Undergraduate Student Requirements 

1. ADMISSION WITH FRESHMAN STANDING 

For admission to Orange State College, a high school graduate must, as a 
minimum, meet one of the following: 

(a) Have earned 14 or more semester grades of A or B (70 semester periods 
or 7 Carnegie units) on a five-point scale in subjects other than physical 
education, military science, and remedial courses during the last three years 
in high school, including at least 10 college preparatory subject grades. Col- 
lege preparatory courses include one or more of the following fields: 

(1) English, including speech, drama, and journalism, other than activity 
courses 

(2) Foreign languages 

(3) Mathematics 

(4) Natural Sciences 

(5) Social Sciences 

(b) Have earned ten or more semester grades of A or B (50 semester periods 
or 5 Carnegie units) on a five-point grading scale in subjects other than 
physical education, military science, and remedial courses during the last 
three years in high school and have attained the fortieth percentile on na- 
tional college freshman norms of a standard college aptitude test. 

(c) An applicant may be admitted when, in the judgment of the appropriate 
College authorities, he has equivalent preparation to that in (a) or (b) 
above. 

2. ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE STANDING 

Students will be admitted as advanced undergraduates to Orange State College 
if they meet one of the following requirements: 

(a) The applicant was eligible for admission in freshman standing on the basis 
of his high school record (based on Freshman admission requirements in 
effect at the time of graduation from high school) and has completed S4 
semester units of college credit with a grade point average of 2.0 (grade C 
on a five-point scale) in one or more accredited degree-granting colleges 
or universities. 

(b) If the applicant was not eligible for admission in freshman standing on the 
basis of his high school record, he must have completed 60 semester units 
with a grade point average of 2.0 (grade C on a five-point scale) in one 
or more accredited colleges or universities. 

(c) An applicant who does not meet the above requirements is eligible for 
admission with advanced undergraduate standing on probation if in the 
opinion of the proper College authorities he can succeed in college. 


32 


OR.<VNGE STATE COLLEGE 


Procedures for Admission (All Undergraduate Students) 

Ai students, both full-time and part-time, will be required to matriculate. 
quS appSrfl =‘-o-Panied by the $5 re- 

a^ttlL^iSrectd'!* State CoUege 

-<1 ‘’■-tly to Orange State College 
betwi' testing programs described 

Undergraduate Entrance Examinations 

College for thi fim^timTare requked^to submh"Lr^ frtS? ONf“ f 
testtng programs l^efore pennisdon to enroll in tZTs bTJ;.nur° 


AMERICAN COLLEGE 
TESTING PROGRAM (ACT) 

Test Dates 
June 22, 1963 
November 9, 1963 
February 15, 1964 
April 25, 1964 
June 20, 1964 
Address inquiries to: 

Dr. Robert T. Littrell 
Coordinator, Southern California 
American College Testing Pro- 
gram 

Box 6758 

Long Beach 15, California 


SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE 
TEST (SAT) 

Test Dates 
November 2, 1963 
December 7, 1963 
January 11, 1964 
March 7, 1964 
May 2, 1964 
July 8, 1964 
Address inquiries to: 

C<^lege Entrance Examination 
Board 

Educational Testing Service 
4640 Hollywood Boulevard 
Los Angeles 27, California 


on^h “d”" throughod, ,h« Unired Sta.e, 

Worn.™ ,„„di„g »"•«<>"•'■ i". ><!•.«,. 

may be obtained from high school and iunin^^rr^li ’ ^ registration forms 

the addresses above. Close of SiadM foTth. h ^® counselors or from one of 
weeks in advance. registrauon for the above tests ts usually about three 

t "IIS "rr”,'”™ "» 

already been completed, the student must cortfsoonV^^” i°^ 

tesang agency and request that scores be sent to^^the appropriate 

State College. 0®ce of Admissions, Orange 

for admission w puwf^schoof cred^enriaUnd o^^^ undergraduate classes and 
^out the specific requirements will be released from* ^"^°miation 

Division Offices concerned at appT^L 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


33 


Graduate Students Requirements 

A student who has earned an acceptable bachelor’s degree from an accredited 
college or university may be admitted in unclassified graduate status. Admission 
with unclassified graduate status does not constitute acceptance as a master s degree 
candidate. 

Courses at the 400 and 500 level completed by students in graduate unclassified 
status may not be applied to a master’s degree program at Orange State College 
until all of the following conditions have been met: 

(1) Orange State College has been approved for and offers a master’s program in 
the field in which the student is taking work 

(2) The student qualifies for graduate classified status. This status may not be 
granted until the master’s degree program is offered. 

(3) The course or courses have been approved as a part of the program for the 
master’s degree. This approval may not be granted until the student has been 
admitted to graduate classified status. 

Procedures for Admission (Graduate Students) 

(1) Students planning to work toward a degree or credential at Orange State Col- 
lege will follow the same precedure shown for undergraduate students with the 
exception that no high school transcript need be submitted. 

(2) Students not planning to work toward a degree or credential at Orange State 
College and wishing to take a maxmmm of 6 units any semester will submit the 
following: 

(a) A completed Application for Admission accompanied by required $5.00 
application fee 

(b) Satisfactory proof of degree, e.g. college diploma 

(c) No evaluation of transfer credit will be given to such students and no 
regular advisement is offered. Students desiring advisement should follow 
the procedure listed immediately above in paragraph No. 1. 

Admission of Foreign Students 

Special application forms are required of foreign student applicants. Such forms 
and directions for their use may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 

Students from other countries are required to submit with their applications 
evidence of competence in the English language, a medical certificate of health, 
and evidence of financial resources adequate to provide for all expenses during the 
period they expect to be registered as students in the college. 

Transcripts required are the same as for other applicants. It should be noted, 
however, that foreign language transcripts must be accompanied by certified Eng- 
lish translations. 

Special counseling problems of foreign students after they have been admitted 
are the responsibility of the Foreign Students Adviser in the Counseling Center. 

Admission from Non-accredited Colleges 

An applicant who has attended a non-accredited college or university may be 
considered for admission to a state college if he meets the standards listed for trans- 
fers from accredited colleges and universities. 

Admission on Academic Probation 

Applicants who are admitted with a grade point deficiency are given proba- 
tionary status and are expected to remove the entrance deficiency during the first 
year at Orange State College. A student admitted on probationary status may be 
restricted by his adviser to a limited program. 




34 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Admission of Auditors 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Cancellation of Admission 

current admission requirements. ^ ^ admission and must meet the 

Readmission 

"’"a"';”'' “ f' p"'"' » •‘■»n<» 

have attended another institution since their *13 Adi^sion. Students who 

Hmilli^ns* that institution sTnT dkect?y"?o fhe'oSS 

Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

relationship to the^equkemLK'ofOranKeStatrr’V°*'^AMT°*^'^ *" 

candidates will be issued a Credit Summi^v J • degree and credential 

specific remaining requtn^en^^^^^^^^ for determining 

to a student, the evaluation remains valid as Iona ^ objectives. Once issued 
date specified, pursues the objective specified Lh stu^^ent matriculates at the 
ance. The student will not be held tn remains in continuous attend- 

such requirements become mandatory as a 're'sult^o*f*^'^h^'°" ^^ 9 ““^emcnts unless 
Administrative Code or the California Education Code '^e California 

AdL^rollme'diftTS^rfha^r*^ ‘he Office of 

While the evaluation L a smdent r“mW v^l’id '^K his evaluation, 

for complying with all changes in regulations and responsible 

in subsequent catalogs. ^ procedures which may appear 

Acceptance of Credit 

the^"arisfa'cdon°J d^r^ ‘"--d 

Within limitations of residence requirements^ iuni^rcnlf College 

and course applicability. ’ college transfer maximums, 

Transfer of Credit from a Junior College 

Upper division credit is not allowed for mnrc^o .1 • . . 

Credential credit is not allowed for courses in ^ college, 

junior coUege. This does not invalidate credit fm r education taken in a 

.. . iunio, cll.g,, ..eh „ .d.e..V.'f nSi^rSetalS 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


35 


and/or music for classroom teachers. After a student has completed 70 units of 
college credit, whether at a junior college or a four-year institution, or at both, 
no further junior college units will be accepted for unit credit. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in military service for at least a ye^ may be granted 
six units of credit. Courses taken in service schools may be given credit on the 
basis of an evaluation which determines that they are of college level. Any credit 
for military experience will be given only upon request. Records verifying such 
experience must be filed with the Office of Admissions. 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 
The maximum amount of cfedit through correspondence and extension courses 
which may be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree is 24 units, of which not 
more than 12 may be transferred from another college or university. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration is the final step in the matriculation process. When a student h^ 
been admitted by the Office of Admissions and has decided in a conference with 
his assigned adviser which subjects he wishes to take, he is ready for registration. 

A Class Schedule containing details regarding courses offered and procedures 
to be followed for registration is made available prior to the beginning of each 

semester and summer session. . . , a 

At the time of registration, every student is required to file a program card 
with the Office of the Registrar. The filing of a program card by the student 
and its acceptance by the College is evidence of an obligation by the student to 
perform the designated work to the best of his ability. Withdrawal from, or 
neglect of, any course entered on the program card, or a change of program 
(including a change of section of the same course) without the formal permission 

of the Office of the Registrar, will result in a grade of F. 

A student may not receive credit in any courses in which he is not registered. 


FEES AND EXPENSES 

•Application Fee 

Registration Fees 

Regular Students 

Materials and service fee 

Associated Students fee 

Total per semester — 

Limited Students (1-6 units) 

Materials and service fee — 

Associated Students fee — 

Total per semester — 

Summer Session 

Per unit or fraction of unit — — 

Associated Students fee — — 

Extension 

Per unit or fraction of unit — — — 

Music Studio Lesson Fee 

Per semester - 


I 5.00 


$38.00 

9.00 

47.00 


$19.50 

4.00 

23.50 


11.50 

2.00 


... $ 10 . 00 - 20.00 

70.00 


Other Fees or Charges 

Non-resident tuition fee (in addition to fees required 
for enrollment in extension or summer session) : 

15 units or more per semester 

Less than 15 units, per unit or fraction of unit — 


of resident students, except 

$247.50 

16.50 


The Application Fee is not refundable. 


36 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


5.00 

1.00 
2.00 
1.00 


2.00 


Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above) 

Change of program fee 

Check returned from bank for any cause . ” 

Transcript fee (no charge for first copy) 

anr required appointment or time HmirCsp^^^^^^ 

aptitude examination, failure to keep appointments for health examination 

^^^ditors Pay the Same Fees as Others 
{Fee Schedule Subject to Change by State Authority) 

Refund of Fees 

Upon withdrawal from College, the Materials and Service fee mav be rpfnn<1,>H 
application fee are not refundable H K am tees, as well as the 

to ,,.og„,y „„h,„ to 14 <l.y, following to d.y of to ,h„ 

Parking Fees 
Non-reserved Spaces 

Regular students (over 6 units) per semester 

Limited students (1 to 6 units) wiU use the coin operated^parkingTaK ' 

Coin operated parking gate-controlled spaces per admission . _ ‘ ,5 

Fees for portions of a semester and refunds are pro-rated Informf..ip„ 
cerning this is available in the College Accounting OfRcl Information con- 

TYPICAL STUDENT EXPENSES 

The following is an estimate of the major items of exnencp i j 

tending Orange State College. It is n^«- l ^ ^ single students 

should be recognized that considerable 
shown are for one semester. 

Students Living 

r ^ in Campus 

Expenses Residence Halls 

Materials and Service Fee* | ^7 

21 
200 


$13.00 


is. not intended to be an exhaustive°listrand ‘it 
variation exists on living expenses. Amounts 


Other Fees (Parking, Health Insurance) 

Room . 

Board 


Students Commuting 
from Home 
$ 47 
21 


200 


Books and Supplies 

Clothing 

Laundry and Cleaning 

Recreation _ 

Transportation for Commuting Students .7 


75 

25 

75 


— $693 

» Note; Out-of-state students add an additional fee of $250 each semester. 


50 

75 

25 

75 

100 

$393 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


37 


RECORDS 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the end 
of each semester. 

Transcripts 

Upon request to the Office of the Registrar, each student will be provided with 
one official copy of his college record without charge. A charge of $1 will be made 
for each additional transcript requested by the student. No transcript will be sup- 
plied for college work taken in other institutions. 


VETERANS 

Orange State College is approved by the Bureau of Readjustment Education, State 
Department of Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking benefits under state 
and federal legislation. All students seeking veterans benefits must have a degree or 

credential objective. • u* u 

Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in which 
the veteran plans to use these benefits in order to have the authorization at the time 
of registration. 

P.L. 550 

Application 

If the veteran has attended an institution under P.L. 550 benefits before, the vet- 
eran must file an Application for Change of Place of Training (VA form 1992) 
through the Office of Veterans Affairs at the institution last attended under P.L. 550 
benefits. 

If the veteran has not attended an institution under P.L. 550 benefits before, appli- 
cation forms may be obtained from the Veterans Adviser at OSC. 

Monthly Certification 

Each month, the veteran must obtain an Attendance Report Form from the vet- 
erans adviser. This form must be signed by each of the veterans instructors on the 
last class meeting of the month. This signature will verify satisfactory attendance 
for the month. When completed, the Attendance Report Form must be returned to 
the veterans adviser and the veteran must sign the IBM certification card that is 
forwarded to the VA. The Attendance Report Form must be returned to the veter- 
ans adviser on or before the 5th of the month to ensure receiving the subsistence 
check on time. 


Subsistence Checks 

The subsistence check should be received on the 20th of the month following the 
month of certification. Under no circumstances should this check be cashed if the 
amount is more than the veteran should have received. An overpayment accepted 
by the veteran will cause an indefinite delay or loss of future benefits. If the check 
has not been received by the end of the month following the month of certification, 
the veteran should notify the veterans adviser at OSC. 


Change of Status 

The Veterans adviser at OSC must be notified immediately of any change of 
address, major, unit load, number of dependents or any other change of status which 
may affect benefits. 


Unit Load and Subsistence 


Units 
14 or more 
10 to 13 
7 to 9 
Ito 6 


Load 

Full 

% 

Yi 

Less than Yi 


Single 

1 Dependent 

2 Dependents 

$110 

$135 

$160 

80 

100 

120 

50 

60 

80 


Fees in monthly subsistence form (total 
for monthly payments equals amount of 
fees by the end of the semester). 


38 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 

X Cal Vet 

Application 

wi^*: V rr,r» '=■' ">« 

Payment of Fees 

If the veteran has filed his IBM authorization card with the veterans adviser sr 

from the Veterans^Adviser. ’ *PPl>cation for refund may be obtained 

Maintenance Allowance 

If the veteran is registered for a full load (12 semester unitsl at n<;r 
r.«.v. .pp™,™.,|y , 5 „ , cd V„ . “>■ 

Enrollment Attendance Certificate 

Veterans Attending Under Other State or Federal Legislation 

shou1“thrvr2lS^^^^^ 

Dependents of Disabled or Deceased Veterans 
Dependents of disabled or deceased veterans should see the V'eterans Adviser f«r 

of r rf^ the :ii::; 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Students who have been admitted to the college are «- • . 

be^ « announced times and locations. Registration is not officfal untiffeS have 
been paid, and no student is allowed to attend classes until all u 

tration process have been completed. 

A number of Academic Regulations related to registration arp licrp^ k i j 
Statement of Residence 

A Statement of Residence must be completed prior to registration for each stti 
dent, day or evening No student m continuous attendance during successive semes 

[ratr^enT"" of Residence after the initial filing. Any S 

m attendance, however, does require a new Statement of Residence. ^ 

Late Registration 

Tl^ last day to register late each semester will be announced in the Class Sched- 
ule. The college calendar in the front of this catalog contains 19rt? ioaa -■ 

L.,e will S„d K.n&.pwZ S.SXi 'K™ 

and must by state law pay a $5 late registration fee in addition to regular f!el 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


39 


Change of Program 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses listed at the time of regis- 
tration. Changes may not be made thereafter without the filing of a Change of 
Prograni form in the Office of the Registrar. All applications for courses dropped 
or added incur a $1 Change of Program fee. 

Withdrawal from College 

Students who wish to withdraw from college must complete a Withdrawal From 
College card in the Counseling Center. The student will then be directed to the 
Office of the Registrar where his official withdrawal becomes complete. 

All grades for withdrawal through the first six weeks of instruction of the semes- 
ter will be W. Beginning with the seventh week, grades assigned will be W if the 
student is passing at the time he withdraws, or F if the student is failing at the time 
he withdraws. 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at Orange State College may enroll concurrently for addi- 
tional courses at another institution only with advance written approval from the 
student’s academic adviser. Permission will not be granted when the study load in 
the proposed combined program exceeds the units authorized at this College. 


OTHER DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each college semester unit represents three hours of college work per week for 
one semester. Courses are of three types: 

(1) Lecture— one hour in class plus two hours of study 

(2) Activity— two hours of class plus one hour of study 

(3) Laboratory— three hours in class 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. 


Classification in College 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 units of work are classified as 
freshmen, 30-59 units as sophomores, 60-89 units as juniors, and 90 or more as 
seniors. 


Study List Limits 

A student is normally permitted to enroll in a maximum of 16 units each semester. 
However, upon written approval of his adviser, the student may carry additional 
units. The foregoing limits apply to students who are attending college on a full- 
time basis. Students with outside responsibilities are strongly advised to reduce their 
study load. 


Grading System 
Satisfactory Grade 

C .. 

B 

A 

Cr 

Unsatisfactory Grade 

D 

F 


Grade Point Value 
2 

. ... 3 
„.... 4 

None assigned 

- .... 1 

0 


Special Grade 

E (Incomplete) 0 

AU (Auditor) (no credit toward degree or credential) None assigned 

W (Passing withdrawal) None assigned 


With the exception of the grades of E, AU, W, and CR, all units attempted are 
computed in the student’s grade point average. 


40 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Incomplete Work 

designated by the instructor *if the"Brade * Permanent record card to that 

unless this period s extend bv nrnn r t^ “ not removed within one semester, 
considered a permanent grie of F authority, the grade of E will be 

Repetition of Courses 

inckl;::; rthrgradVpohri.e«get“adS '^e repetition are 

the original cour^ VVhe" a cTur^e k In 

Semiaf Gr"d"e“poin"td"fi """ ^ «ed^to3‘‘l 

Colle“t at Orang^e State 

Examinations 

,i‘i' rrr r ■■ *■« •'‘''‘""■o 

the Dean of Instruction n 4 make un '^e office of 

reason of illness or offi"; amrgenc^es v4ffiea ^"«P' 

Student Writing 

i. t^roSa'icl'chiSv “ i'TrSrt- " ‘J' ™ ^pr^lca 

« . P.r, o, n, /jUd“ S””™ ::Z’ >" “■< 

Student Conduct 

The College properly assumes that all students are in attendance fnr rh. 
of securing a sound education and that they will conduct theme l Purpose 
citizens of the campus community. Compliance with nm f 'h®mselves as mature 
with all regulations of the College is therefore exoectea I*4h common law but 
Sion a student or an organization is known to havi^ ' any occa- 

of conduct and good taste annroDrirtrH; 

authorities of the College. Conduct which . ^‘^‘P.‘”afy action must be taken by 
institution by any student or student emn Pfj^'^'^'^al to the good name of the 
tolerated or overlooked Every effort will h " under any circumstances be 

development of self disdSne anf consol H *'“PP“« 

The Dean of Students, aWed by aU meler^ of th”“f °'Sanizations. 

Student Affairs Committee of the LX 1^4 and advised by the 


OfcNtRAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

n..1;.TKtrLte*s£f.'i f '»"■ 

semester prior to the semester in which h ^ d of the fifth week of the 

requmement check should be requested unless'anrunffi the seffior4a°s fomS 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


41 


100 semester hours (including the current work in progress). If the candidate does 
not complete the requirements in the semester indicated, he must request a second 
graduation check indicating the new date. A student is eligible for graduation if 
he is in good standing and fulfills the following requirements; 


(1) General Education 
(See following pages) . 


General Education Program for Students Entering with Freshman Status 
(For the philosophy and objectives of the Colie ge^ including the required Gen- 
eral Education program, see pp. 23-24 in the Introductory pages) 

To be eligible for the bachelor’s degree at Orange State College, the candidate 
shall have completed 50 semester units of general education including at least 6 
umts in upper division courses. The courses in general education shall be distributed 
in the following manner: 


(a) 


(b) 


(c) 


(d) 


Minimum 

Units 

Social Sciences 12 

Courses in the Social Sciences shall include the following: 

1. History 170A (3) or History 1706 (3)— meets the state requirement 
in U.S. History. 

2. Political Science 210 (3) or a combination of Political Science 200 
(3) and Political Science 311 (3)— meets the state requirement in 
U.S. Constitution and California State and Local Government. 

3. A minimum of 6 additional units required with at least one course 
from each of the following two groups: 

a. Geography 131 (3), Sociology 201 (3) 

b. Geography 111 (3), Geography 131 (3), History IlOA (3), His- 
tory HOB (3), History 170A (3), History 170B (3), Political Sci- 
ence 200 (3), Political Science 331 (3), Political Science 340 (3), 
Political Science 351 (3), Sociology 201 (3) or Sociology 202 (3). 

Natural Sciences 9 

Courses in the Natural Sciences shall include: 

1. Biological Science 100 (2) and Biological Science 140 (3) or Bio- 
logical Science 160 (3) 

2. A minimum of 4 units from the following: Chemistry 201 (4-5), 
Physics 201 (4-5), Chemistry 101A3 (5-5), Physics 221 (4) or 
Physics 222 (5). 

Humanities 12 

Courses in the Humanities shall include: 

1. English 101 (3) and English 102 (3) 

2. A minimum of 6 additional units required, consisting of three units 
each from the two groupings below. 

a. Philosophy 101 (3), Philosophy 201 (3), Philosophy 301 (3), 
Philosophy 401 (3), Philosophy 411 (3) 

b. English 221 (3), English 222 (3), English 334 (3), English 411 
(3), Comp. Lit. 315 (3), Comp. Lit. 425 (3), or any upper divi- 
sion course in French, German or Spanish. 

Fine and Applied Arts — 9 

Courses in the Fine and Applied Arts shall include: 

1. A minimum of 3 units from the following: 

Speech 101 (3), Speech 231 (3) or Drama 211 (3) 

2. A minimum of 6 additional units required which shall include at 
least one course from two of the following groups: 

a. Art 100 (3), Art 101 (3), Art 103 (3), Art 104 (3), Art 107A,B 
(3-3), Art 111 (3), Art 401 (3), Art 402 (3) 


3—83902 


42 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Minimimt 

. Units 

b. Drama 271 (3), Drama 272 (3) 

c. Music 100 (3), Music 151A (2), Music 151B (2), Music 350 (3), 

Music 451 (2), Music 452 (2). 

(e) Psychology ^ 

Psychology 201 (3) 

(f) Economics or Mathematics 3 

A minimum of 3 units from the following: 

Economics 200 (5), Economics 201 (3), Economics 200A (3), Eco- 
nomics 200B (3), Mathematics 120 (3), Mathematics 150A (4), Mathe- 
matics lOOA (3), Mathematics 250A (3), or any upper division mathe- 
matics course. 

(g) Health and Physical Education _ 2 

A minimum of 2 units required by completing four semesters of 
activity courses which include instruction in health education. A physi- 
cal education activity course taken in the summer session may be 
counted in lieu of a semester. Not more than one activity course 
within any one semester may be counted toward general education. 
(Persons who are over 25 years of age are not required to enroll for 
courses in physical education.) 


Total 


50 


thlreTften)"''*^ 

General Educafion Program for Transfer Students 

(For students transferring to Orange State College after completion of 30 or 
more college transfer units.) k n ;>u or 

eUgible for the bachelor’s degree from Orange State College, the candidate 
r/T'' ^0 semester units of general education includ- 
Jhf sam! h ^ ‘^'7‘sion courses. This program, while providing for 

he same breadth as required for students entering as freshmen, allows for the 

nece^ary fle.\ibility for the transfer student. The courses in general education shall 
be distributed in the following manner: oueanon snau 

(a) Social Sciences 

include required instruction in U.S. History 
U.S Constitution, California State and Local Government and American 
ideals, and courses m the subject fields of: anthropology, economics 
geography, history, political science, sociology, and similar fields. Courses’ 
must be selected from two or more of these fields. 

(b) Natural Sciences 

The natural sciences shall include the fields of ' astro^^^^^^ 

chemistry, geology, physics, physiology, zoology, and similar fields At 

least one course must be selected from a physical science and one from a 
life science. ixuui a 

(c) Humanities 

The humanities shall include a year of instruction in collw^le^ 
pghsh composition and literature. The remaining units may be chosen 
from the following subject fields: comparative literature, English philos- 
ophy and advanced courses in French, German, Spanish, or other for- 
eign languages. ’ 

(d) Fine and Applied Arts 

tion Additional courses shall be chosen from the following subject areas- 
art, drama and music. areas. 


12 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


43 


Minimum 

Units 


(3) Psychology 3 

This should be the standard introductory course in psychology. 

(f) Economics or Mathematics 3 


Either a course in college mathematics which would have as its pre- 
requisite a minimum of two years of high school mathematics or its 
equivalent, or a college-level introductory course in economics will meet 
this requirement. 

(g) Health and Physical Education 2 

In addition to physical education activity, instruction in health educa- 
tion is required. 

Total 50 

(These requirements will apply to students entering college in the fall semester 
of 1963 and thereafter.) 

(2) Units 

(a) Total Units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for graduation with a Bach- 
elor of Arts degree. 

(b) Upper Division Units 

Ck)mpletion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Resident Units 

Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residence is required. At 
least one-half of these units must be completed among the last 20 semester 
units counted toward the degree. Extension credit, or credit by examina- 
tion, may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement. 

(3) Scholarship 

(a) A grade point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted, 
including those accepted by transfer from another institution. 

(b) A grade point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted 
at the college granting the degree. 

(4) Major 

Completion of all requirements for a major as specified by appropriate college 
authority is required. 

(5) Minor 

Completion of a minor field is not required for the B.A. at this time. 

(6) Approval and Recommendation of the Faculty of the College 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

Honors At Graduation 

Honors at graduation have been defined by the Faculty Council in three classi- 


fications: 

With Honors GPA 3.5 

With High Honors GPA 3.85 

With Highest Honors GPA 4.0 


Dean's List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list 
of students whose grade point average for the previous term has been 3.5 or 
better. Students are notified in writing by the Dean of Students when they have 
earned this distinction. 


44 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Academic Probation 

It is the purpose of academic probation to identify and to bring to the attention 
of appropriate authorities the student who is experiencing academic difficulties. 
Therefore, students whose records fall into any one of the following categories 
are placed on academic probation: 

(1) \yhere the cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at all in- 
stitutions attended is below a C (2.0). 

(2) Where the cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at Orange 
State College falls below a C (2.0). 

(3) Where the record shows below a C (2.0) average in any one semester or 
summer session regardless of the cumulative grade point average. 

Academic Dismissal 

It is the purpose of academic dismissal to give the student an opportunity to 
review carefully his educational experiences away from the college environment. 
This break will normally be imposed before the student’s record has reached 
the point where it will preclude a continuation of his educational program at a 
later date. Therefore, students whose records fall into the following categories 
will be sul^ject to dismissal and action will be taken before the next semester be- 
gins. Records will be reviewed individually. 

(1) Where the record shows below a C (2.0) average in a regular semester or 
summer session when the student is already on academic probation. (This 
category does not apply to students admitted on probation.) 

(2) Where after two semesters on probation a student has not attained a grade 
point average of C (2.0) on all work attempted at Orange State College 
and on all work attempted at all collegiate institutions attended. 

(3) Where the academic record of the student indicates serious academic dif- 
ficulty. 

Removal of Probation 

A student 'vill be automatically removed from academic probation when all the 
following conditions are met: 

(1) The student’s cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at 
Orange State College is a C (2.0) or above. 

(2) The student’s cumulative grade point average on all work attempted at aU 
collegiate institutions attended is a C (2.0) or above. 

(3) A C (2.0) grade point average is attained on the last semester or summer 
session of work attempted. 

Readmission After Academic Dismissal 

A student may apply to the Office of Admissions for readmission after academic 
dismissal upon completion of the period of dismissal. 

Good Standing 

“Good standing” indicates that a student is eligible to continue or to return 
and IS free from financial obligation to the College and from disciplinary action’ 
A student under academic or disciplinary dismissal is not eligible to receive a state- 
ment of “good standing” on transcripts issued by Orange State College. 


OIL\NGE STATE COLLEGE 


45 


RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students have the right to petition any academic action taken by the College in 
accordance with established regulations. When a problem arises where this petition 
right should be exercised, the student should be referred to the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records. He will be permitted to file a petition on a form designated 
for this purpose. All petitions must first be reviewed by the student’s adviser and 
initialed by him. The Petitions Committee will then take action on the petition 
and the student will be notified of this decision. A copy of the action will also be 
placed in the student’s folder in the Office of the Registrar. > 

Students also have the right to appeal any disciplinary action taken by appropri- 
ate College authority. This may be done by requesting a hearing at a regular 
meeting of the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs, or at a special meeting if 
the matter is deemed urpnt. Such requests should be filed in the Office of the 
Dean of Students who will schedule a hearing at the earliest possible time. 


CURRICULA OFFERED 


Orange State College has been authorized to offer the following degree programs. 
A full description of each major degree program appears later in this catalog. 


B.A.-Art 

B.A.~Biological Science 

B.A.— Business Administration 

B.A.— Chemistry 

B.A.— Economics 

B. A. —English 

B.A.— French 

B.A.— Geography 

B.A.— German 

B.A.— History 

B.A.— Humanities 


B.A.— Language Arts 
B.A.— Mathematics 
B.A.— Music 
B.A.— Philosophy 
B.A.— Physics 
B.A.— Political Science 
B.A.— Psychology 
B.A.— Social Sciences 
B.A.— Sociology 
B.A.— Spanish 
B.A.— Speech 


Courses of study are organized into six instructional divisions of the College: 
Business Administration and Economics, Education and Psychology, Fine and 
Applied Arts, Humanities, Science, Mathematics and Engineering, Social Sciences. 
These courses are listed below by subject-matter field and instructional divisions: 


Courses 


Divisions 


Accounting Business Administration and Economics 

Art Pine and Applied Arts 

Art Education Fine and Applied Arts, Education and Psychology 

Biological Science — Science, Mathematics and Engineering 

Business Education Business Administration and Economics, 

. Education and Psychology 

Chemistry Science, Mathematics and Engineering 

Comparative Literature Humanities 

Economics . .. - ^ ^ Business Administration and Economics 

Education— Administration and Supervision Education and Psychology 

Education-Elementary Education and Psychology 

Educauon-Foundations ... Education and Psychology 

Education-School Services Education and Psychology 

Education— Secondary — Education and Psychology 

English Humanities 

English Education Humanities, Education and Psychology 

Finance Business Administration and Economics 

Foreign Languages Education Humanities, Education and Psychology 

- - - - - . Humanities 

Geography Sciences 

German . „ Humanities 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Education and Psychology 

History. Social Sciences 

Journa ism Humanities 

Journalism Education Humanities, Education and Psychology 

Language Arts Humanities, Fine and Applied Arts 

iManagement Business Administration and Economics 

Aiarketing Business Administration and Economics 

Mathematics ^ Science, Mathematics and Engineering 

Aiathematics Education Science, Mathematics and Engineering, 

Education and Psychology 
- Fine and Applied Arts 


[46] 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


47 


Music Education.- . Fine and Applied Arts, Education and Psychology 

Philosophy Humanities 

Physics Science, Mathematics and Engineering 

Political Science Social Sciences 

Psychology Education and Psychology 

Quantitative Methods Business Administration and Economics 

Russian Humanities 

Science Education Science, Mathematics and Engineering, 

Education and Psychology 

Social Sciences Social Sciences 

Social Science Education Social Sciences, Education and Psychology 

Sociology Social Sciences 

Spanish Humanities 

Speech Fine and Applied Arts 

Speech Education Fine and Applied Arts, Education and Psychology 


GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

1-99 Courses which carry no credit toward a degree or credential 
100-299 Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open 
also to upper division students 
300-499 Upper division courses of junior and senior level 
500-599 Courses on the graduate level 

Note: The figure in parentheses following each course title indicates the number 
of semester units. The F and S (abbreviations for Fall and Spring) after the 
parentheses indicate when a course is offered. 

PREREQUISITES 

Students are expected to meet stated prerequisites for all courses. However, in 
exceptional cases, and at the discretion of the division in which the course is taught, 
students may be allowed to meet prerequisites by examination. 




DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 

I Professors: Smith (Chairman), Carr, Tull, Wiseman 
Associate Professors: Barres, Li, McCloud, Roberts 
Assistant Professors: Fyfe, Graves, Pontney, Woo 
(1962-1963 Faculty) 

Through a study of the various theoretical and practical business policies and 

■ procedures, the Division of Business Administration and Economics seeks to afford 
a basic education for managerial and professional positions in business, government, 
and education. Although emphasis is given to theory, factual content which is essen- 
tial in specific vocations such as accounting, economics, finance, marketing manage- 
ment, and business education is provided to enable students to enter apprenticeships 
in these fields with the expectation that their education should expedite their prog- 
ress, either to managerial positions or to staff positions as professional accountants, 
economists, educators, and marketing and business consultants. 

In our ever-expanding, complex society, the managers of tomorrow must be men 
and women with breadth of understanding and vision. Students who concentrate in 
a special area are encouraged to elect courses in other divisions of the college, par- 
ticularly in the areas of the behavioral, social, and political sciences, and foreign 
languages. It is assumed that the first half of their college work toward a bachelor’s 
degree represents a required basic education in communication, mathematics, a lab- 
oratory science, social science, and the humanities. With the broadening of our cul- 
tural and business horizons, it is desirable to become increasingly better versed in 
the language of our neighbors, Spanish, and in such languages as French, German, 
and Russian. Since the understanding of mathematics is becoming increasingly im- 
portant in business and the social sciences, students who contemplate enrollment in 
either business administration or economics are encouraged to take four years of 
high school mathematics. College algebra, or three years of high school mathematics 
including a second course in algebra, will be a minimum prerequisite for entrance 
to the program. 

If credits for either or both elementary accounting and principles of economics 
have not been earned, it will be necessary to enroll in these courses the first semester 
of the junior year. 

Students enrolled in the division and working toward a college degree are subject 
to the general requirements of the college as to courses and credit hours required 
for graduation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree requirements are as follows: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester credit hours in business administra- 
tion and economics courses in the Division of Business Administration and 
Economics, of which 35 semester credit hours must be upper division courses. 

2. Completion of at least 15 semester credit hours in the Division of Business 
Administration and Economics at Orange State College. 

3. Completion of the required core courses in the Division of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics. Students in Business Administration are required to 
take Mathematics 120 (Finite Mathematics) or equivalent as prerequisite to 
Quantitative Methods 361. 

4. (Completion of 12 semester credit hours of required courses in an area of con- 
centration to be selected by the student. 


[49] 


50 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


5. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than Business 
Administration and Economics. 

6 . Students must attain at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all college 
work attempted, in all courses taken in the Division of Business Administration 
and Economics, and in his area pf concentration. 

Core; The business administration and economics courses listed below are required 


of all students majoring in business administration; 

Course Units 

Economics 100 American Economic History 3 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics •' ■ ' ^ 5 

Accounting 200 Elementary Accounting r: ■ ■ 5 

Finance 332 Business Finance . 3 

Management 341 Principles of Management ■ 3 

Management 346 Business Law - r--, • ; ; 1 t 1 3 

Management 449 Business Policies * ^ fi-:.. 3 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing .- !. n xm, u' - ->■; • ■ 3 

Quantitative Methods 361 Business and Economic Statistics oiii 3 

Total — 1 . 31 


* Those students taking Business Economics as their area of concentration will take Econ. 401^ — 
Government and Business — in lieu of Mgmt. 449 — Business Policies. 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR MAJORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student in business administration should select an area of concentration by the 
second semester of the junior year and take the required courses in the area. 


Accounting (Chairman, Wiseman) 

301A-301B Intennediate Accounting 

Units 

A 

302 Cost Accounting . . .. 


And at least one of the following courses; 

303 Governmental Accounting ■ - 

3 

308 Federal Income Tav v - 

3 id 

401 Advanced Accounting ^ ■ . . . . 

3 

402 Auditing 

3 

Business Economics (Acting Chairman, Roberts) 

302 Intermediate Economic Analvsis 

? 

303 Intermediate Economic Analysis . 


402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy . . ^v ^ 

. - 'L ifi iJ.'Iif ‘ 3 

Management 446 Managerial Economics 


Finance (Chairman, Wiseman) 

324 Money and Banking ‘ H . 1 c : 

: . r . , i ^ 

432 Investment Principles and Practices / / . . . 

. ii: ' i . ti J'i ^ ;J|y j l .■ T 

433 Problems in Fijiance ^ 


Accounting 304 Managerial Accounting 

f . ^ 

Management (Chairman, Barres) 

342 Production Management .... 


343 Personnei Management and Human Relations 


444 Motion and Time Study 


446 Managerial Economics 


Marketing (Chairman, Tull) 

353 Marketing Administration 


452 Marketing Research 

•TV j ',)‘J ’J< i f-j 3 

459 Marketing Problems 

- - - - - 3 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


51 


A minimum of one of the following courses: Units 

307 Distribution Costs 3 

354 Principles of Advertising 3 

355 Credit and Credit Administration 3 

356 Creative Motivation 3 

Business Education 

Students who wish to major in Business Administration in preparation for a 
career as a secondary school teacher in business subjects must meet the requirements 
of the Division of Business Administration and Economics and the secondary school 
teacher education program including the requirements for the proper credential 
as outlined in the catalog. 

Units 

Core requirements for all students majoring in Business Administration 


(see page 107) 31 

Geography 203 Economic Geography 3 

Course in Typewriting * 2 

Course in Business Machines 2 

Accounting as an area of concentration (see page 109) 12 

Nine or ten units in one of the following areas: 9-10 

Management 

Marketing 

Secretarial training * 

Total 59-60 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ECONOMICS 

The economics major is designed to prepare students for positions in business 
education, and government, and for graduate work in economics and related disci- 
plines. 

Required of all students for the degree: 

1. Completion of 37 semester credit hours of courses in business administration 
and economics in the Division of Business Administration and Economics, of 
which 24 semester credit hours must be in upper division courses. 

2. Completion of at least 15 semester hours in the Division of Business Admin- 
istration and Economics at Orange State College. 

3. Completion of the Major course requirements for Economics majors, in the 
Division of Business Administration and Economics. Students in Economics are 
required to take Mathematics 120 (Finite Mathematics) or equivalent as pre- 
requisite to Quantitative Methods 361. 

4. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than Business 
Administration and Economics. 

5. Students must attain at least 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all college 
work attempted, in all courses in the Division of Business Administration and 
Economics, and in the area of his concentration in Economics. 

Business Administration and economics courses required of all students majoring 
in economics are listed below: 


Lower Division 

Course U nits 

Economics 100 American Economic History — 3 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics 5 

Accounting 200 Elementary Accounting 5 


Total 13 


* Orange State College does not ofiFer work in secretarial training, typewriting, or business 
machines. Consult the Chairman of the Division of Business Administration and Economics 
to arrange for transfer of approved courses to satisfy these requirements. 


52 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Upper Division 

Course [/mw 

Economics 302 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

Economics 303 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

Economics 324 Money and Banking . 3 

Economics 401 Government and Business 3 

Economics 402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy..- 3 

Quantitative Methods 361 Business and Economic Statistics ! 3 

Six hours of electives in the Division of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics to be approved by the student’s major adviser 6 



MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

A minor in Economics may be achieved by taking the following courses: 


Economics Units 

100 American Economic History _ 3 

200 Principles of Economics 5 

302 or 303 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

401 or 402 Government and Business or Monetary and Fiscal Policy 3 

403 Comparative Economic Systems _ 3 

Elective 3 


Total 20 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS COURSES 

ACCOUNTING 

200. Elementary Accounting (5) F 

Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the administration of a business 
enterprise; analyzing and recording financial transactions; preparation of financial 
statements; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; introduction to 
manufacturing accounts and reports. 

300g. Accounting Fundamentals (3) F, S. (Open only to graduate students) 

The basic fundamentals of accounting as they apply to the accumulation, organ- 
ization, and interpretation of financial and quantitative data relevant to the ac- 
tivities of the corporate business enterprise. 

301A-301B. Intermediate Accounting (3-3) F, S 
Prerequisite for 301A: Accounting 200. Prerequisite for 301B: Accounting 301A. 
The quantification, recording, and presentation of balance sheet and income state- 
ment items with particular emphasis on the corporate type of organization; state- 
ment of application of funds; cash flow statement; basic concepts of accounting 
theory; interpretation of financial statements. 


302. Cost Accounting (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 200. The development of accounting information for 
rnanagement of manufacturing enterprises; cost records; cost behavior and alloca- 
tion; standard costs; and an introduction to cost control. 

303. Governmental Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: One course in Accounting. A consideration of the accounts and 
reporK of non-profit institutions, municipalities, state and federal governments- 
organization, procedures, budgets. * 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


53 


304. Managerial Accounting (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 200. This course is intended for students whose area 
of concentration is not accounting. Analysis, interpretation, and application of 
accounting information for managerial decision-m?iking; budgets and budgetary 
control; special-purpose reports; differential cost analyses. 

307. Distribution Costs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, Accounting 200. The development of quantitative 
measures for marketing activity. The costs of distributing through different chan- 
nels of distribution, advertising vs. personal selling, and movement activities. The 
development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual perform- 
ance in the light of budgets and standards, v 

308. Federal Income Tax (3) F 

Prerequisite: Accounting 200. Basic consideration of the history, theory, and 
accounting aspects of federal income taxation. 

401. Advanced Accounting (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 30 IB. A study of partnerships, statements for special 
purposes, receiverships, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting and 
foreign exchange. 

402. Auditing (3) S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301B, 302. Nature of an audit, auditing standards and 
procedures, audit reports; professional ethics and responsibilities of the independent 
public accountant; introduction to internal auditing. 

405. Industrial Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: One course in Accounting. This course is intended for students 
whose area of concentration is not accounting. Accounting information for indus- 
trial management; elements of manufacturing cost; cost systems; standard costs; 
costs reports; distribution cost analysis. 

406. Cost Control (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302 or 405. A study of current and persistent problems 
in cost accounting; theories of cost allocation and absorption; flexible budgeting; 
responsibility accounting; and distribution cost control. 

408. Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, and the consent of the instructor. A survey of 
integrated systems for the collection, processing, and transmission of information; 
management aspects of the information service function; feasibility studies; intro- 
duction to programming; case studies of operating systems. 

409. C.P.A. Problems and Review (3) S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 401, 402, or concurrent enrollment therein, or consent 
of the instructor. Selected problems and questions as found in the uniform C.P.A. 
Examination; preparation, analysis and revision of financial statements; assets, lia- 
bilities and ownership equities; income determination; cost accounting; govern- 
mental and institutional accounting; accounting theory. 

498. Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and an overall 3.25 grade average. Open to quali- 
fied undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. 

501. Administrative Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisites: Accounting 405, Finance 332, and consent of the instructor. Ac- 
counting, financial, and other quantitative data for managerial decision-making; 
long-term and short-term profit planning; budgetary control; cost analyses and 
special reports; financial analyses and planning; the financial and taxation aspects 
of business decisions. 


54 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


ECONOMICS 

100. American Economic History (3) F, S 
The evolurion of American economic institutions and their relation to the 
development of industry, commerce, transportation and finance. 

200. Principles of Economics (5) F 

An introduction to the principles of economic analysis and policy including the 
central problem of scarcity, basic economic institutions of the United States, re- 
source allocation and income distribution, economic stability and growth, and the 
role of public policy. 

200A-200B. Principles of Economics (3-3) F, S 
(Planned for 1964-65) 

201. The American Economy (3) F, S 

A survey of the basic economic concepts and processes of a private enterprise 
economy. Included is a consideration of such topics as resource allocation, income 
distribution, problems of economic stability and growth and the appropriate role 
of government in a private enterprise society. 

300g. Basic Economics (3) F, S 

A concentrated study of the principles of economic analysis and policy and the 
basic economic institutions of the United States. Open only to graduate students. 

302. Intermediate Economic Analysis (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 201, or 300g, or consent of the instructor. A 
theoretical formulation of the principles of the determination of prices and output 
of goods and productive services in a market system. 

303. Intermediate Economic Analysis (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 201, or 300g, or consent of the instructor. A 
theoretical formulation of the principles of the determination of the level and 
fluctuations in real and money income, and the forces underlying economic growth. 

3 22. European Economic History (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. The evolution of European economic 
institutions and their relation to the development of industry, commerce, trans- 
portation, and finance in the principal European countries. 

324. Money and Banking (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. A study of the structure and operation of com- 
mercial banks and financial institutions including a consideration of the impact of 
money and capital market developments on economic activity. 

326. Labor Economics (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. An analysis of the basic economic influences operat- 
ing in labor markets: Impact of productivity and labor market organization on 
resource allocation, income distribution, economic stability, and growth. 

401. Government and Business (3) S 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, 302, or consent of instructor. A study of business 
organization, conduct and performance followed by an analysis of the rationale 
and impact of public policy on various segments of business and business activities, 
including the regulated industries and antitrust policy. 

402. Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) F 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, 302. A study of the techniques of monetary and 
fiscal policy and an appraisal of their relative roles in promoting economic stability 
and growth. 


li 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


55 


403. Comparative Economic Systems (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, 301, or consent of the instructor. An analytical 
comparison of unplanned and planned systems of economic organization as to 
their theoretical foundations, existing economic institutions, and achievements and 
failures; capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism will be examined as exempli- 
fied by the United States, England, Russia, and Germany. 

404. The Soviet Economy (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. An analytical evaluation of Soviet eco- 
nomic development including the structure and performance of the Soviet economy 
and problems of planning and control. 

405. History of Economic Thought (3) S 

Prerequisites: Economics 302, 303. A study of the development of economic 
thought as reflected in the evolution of major schools of thought and of leading 
individual economists as they influenced economic thought and policy. 

421. International Trade (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. An examination of the theory of international trade 
and the means and significance of balance of payments adjustments, with an anal- 
ysis of past and present developments in international commercial and monetary 
policy. 

451. Economics of Taxation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or consent of the instructor. A study of govern- 
ment finance at the federal, state, and local levels with particular reference to 
administrative problems of public finance, the ethical aspects of taxation, and the 
impact of taxation and spending on resource allocation and income distribution. 

452. Economics of Location (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. The theory and principles underlying the location 
of economic activity. 

498. Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Economic concentration, senior standing, and an overall 3.25 grade 
average. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed in- 
dependent inquiry. 

510. Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 300g, or 302. An examination of the economic 
implications of various forms of market structure and business conduct and con- 
siders the application of public policy to various segments of business and business 
activities, including antitrust policy and regulation of business. 

511. Economic Problems and Public Policy (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 300g, or 303. An examination of the nature and 
implication of the major economic problems facing the economy and an evaluation 
of current and alternative policies for their solution. Problems considered will 
include price level stabilization, balance of payments equilibrium, economic growth, 
and cyclical and technological unemployment. 

FINANCE 

3 24. Money and Banking (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. A study of the structure and operation of com- 
mercial banks and financial institutions including a consideration of the impact of 
money and capital market developments on economic activity. (Same as Econ. 324). 

33 2. Business Finance (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 200. Types of business organizations, their sources and 
uses of long-term and short-term capital, and analysis of business finance situations. 


56 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


3 34, Principles of Insurance (3) S 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, and Quant. Meth. 361. The principles of life, health 
and accident, liability and social insurance, property and business insurance, and 
methods of establishing risks and rates. 

3 36. Principles of Real Estate (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. The survey of urban real estate theory and prac- 
tice; structure and growth of cities, basis of real estate values; zoning for com- 
mercial, industrial, and residential areas; financing of real estate transactions. 

431. Capital and Money Markets (3) S 

Prerequisites: Finance 324 and 332. The role of capital and money markets in 
the American economy; investment banking and other financial institutions and 
the flow of funds; the regulation of investment banking, securities markets, and 
other financial institutions. 

43 2. Investment Principles and Practices (3) F 
Prerequisite: Finance 332. Principles underlying the selection and management 
of portfolios, analysis of different types of corporate securities-commercial, in- 
dustrial, and public utility; the role of mutual funds and investment trusts. Special 
consideration is given to investment purposes and objectives. 

43 3. Problems in Finance (3) F 

Prerequisite: Finance 332. Case studies of problems in the financing of the firm; 
organization, acquisition, mergers, consolidation, and dissolution; consideration 
and evaluation of alternative sources of capital of the going concern. 

498. Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and an overall 3.25 grade average. Open to quali- 
fied undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. 

MANAGEMENT 

341. Principles of Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. The fundamentals of management universal to all 
organizations; covers such studies as planning, organizing, activating, and con- 
trolling. 

342. Production Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Management 341. The study of modern manufacturing and its meth- 
ods of operation. Major emphasis is placed upon the efficient use of management, 
labor, and productive equipment. 

343. Personnel Management and Human Relations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Management 341, or consent of the instructor. An inquiry into the 
problems of personnel relating to the firm, community, and economy; the im- 
portance of good human relations; and management’s responsibilities in the efficient 
direction of personnel. 

346. Business Law I (3) F, S 

The philosophy, institutions and role of the law as it applies to business opera- 
tions. A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the scope 
and extent of basic subjects in the area of business law as well as a knowledge of 
the operation, function, and structure of courts and administrative agencies. Anal- 
ysis of the areas of contracts, agency, sales, and personal property with emphasis 
upon the principles involved and the conditions requiring professional legal advice. 


J 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


57 


47. Business Law II (3) S 

Prerequisite: Bus. Law I. The philosophy, institutions and role of the law as it 
pplics to business operations. Analysis of the areas of bailments, sales, negotiable 
nstruments, patents, employment relations, and business organizations. Law in its 
elationship to business with special emphasis on current problems. 

441. Labor-Management Relations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of the instructor. The course provides 
an understanding of the impact of labor-management relations upon labor, manage- 
ment, and the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining, and the 
settlement of disputes are among the subjects that are examined. 


442. Labor Law (3) S 

Prerequisites: Management 341, and consent of the instructor. The history of 
labor law, the investigation of federal and state legislation, and its effects upon 
American society. 

444. Motion and Time Study (3) S 

Prerequisites: Alanagement 341, 342. The fundamentals of motion and time study 
as applied to modem work simplification, the reduction of waste and inefficiency, 
and the responsible consideration of the employee. 

445. Production Control Analysis (3) F 

Prerequisite: Mgt. 342, introductory calculus, statistics, and a course in economic 
principles or consent of the instructor. The quantitative analysis of production and 
quality management related to such areas as mathematical programming, statistical 
analysis, and economic analysis. 

446. Managerial Economics (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, and consent of the instructor. The application of 
economic analysis to the solution of business problems; the character of the firm s 
demand, costs, prices, and profits; short- and long-run planning for a business 
enterprise; and the relationship between the firm and the economy. 

449. Business Policies (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 200, Finance 332, Management 341, and Marketing 
351, and senior standing. The course is generally limited to seniors and graduate 
students. An integrative course examining various problems in the several fields 
of management. Through analysis of cases and problems and decision simulation, 
the student is encouraged to recognize the usefulness of other disciplines than 
business, as well as the role of individual and team action in the decision-making 
process. 

498. Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Alanagement concentration, senior standing, and an overall 3.25 
grade average. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue di- 
rected independent inquiry. 

544. Organizational Behavior, Theory, and Administration (3) S 
Prerequisite: Alanagement 341. The analysis of human behavior in organization 
including studies in classical theories of management, status, motivation, conflict, 
and administrative action. 

MARKETING 

307. Distribution Costs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Alarketing 351; Accounting 200. The development of quantitative 
measures for marketing activity. The costs of distributing through different chan- 
nels of distribution, advertising versus personal selling, and movement activities. 
The development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual per- 
formance in the light of budgets and standards. (Same as Accounting 307) 


58 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


3 51. Principles of Marketing (3) F, S 

Marketing organization and methods for the indi- 
the nlr^’^K consideration of the social and economic aspects of 

e distribunon task. Topics include the consumer, his place and his problems in 
the marketing area; marketing functions, institutions, and policies;*^ legal and 
markering'^sysKm"’''"' marketing activity; and an evaluation of the present 

3 52. Principles of Retailing (3) F 

351. Retail problems of location; organization;* buying 
selling media and methods; pricing; and merchandising. Emphasis will be placed 
upon operating procedures and control, planning, budgeting, and costs. ^ 

3 5 3. Marketing Administration (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Survey of the major problems facing the marketing 
executive, including product planning, pricing, market and analysis, sales potentialf 
marketing organization, and administration of the sales force. 

3 54. Principles of Advertising (3) S 

cliuw'’rh’'"'^‘ management of the advertising function in- 

cluding the role of advertising in marketing strategy, budgetary considerations 

media, measurement of effectiveness, administration and comrol’ 
and Its economic and social implications. ’ 

3 5 5. Credit and Credit Administration (3) F 
Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The general nature and functions of credit credit 

acclptTnce''o?crX/rT ^t hr department; sources of credit inforJnation; 

lections ^ of credit limits; and the problem of col- 

3 56. Creative Motivation (3) S 

')'’“'teting 351. Personal salesmanship and the application of the 
finings of the behavioral sciences to selling and group dynamics « they relate 
to the creativ e and promotional aspects of the business. ^ 

421. International Trade (3) F 

452. Marketing Research (3) S 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, and Quant. Meth. 361. The application of scienrifir 
merhrfoloK, a, „d m »lving problem, ol prodocc pl.iming^prie™ 

sip,”i.r“' ' dte p~;~ a 

459. Marketing Problems (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. It is recommended that the student have comoleted 
^^'^anced markeung courses or have equivalent business experience 
Case studies of problems facing the marketing executive- identifirarirTn T 

of the problems; selection and evaluation of alternau^^^^^ and analysis , 

tion of recommended solutions. iternanve solutions, and implementa- 

498. Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Marketing concentration, senior standing, and an overaU 3 25 

fndtx-froSf,;; " ""-i™ i-i™. » pm,r dLS 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


59 


>52. Seminar in Product Planning and Price Policy (3) F 
Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The product planning problem and its implications 
or the marketing area and other areas of the business. An examination of pricing 
i )roblems and objectives and policies for solution and implementation. 

iS3. Marketing to the Government (3) S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and non-defense products 
to the government. The nature and administration of contractual agreements with 
government agencies. 

QUANTITATIVE METHODS 

361. Business and Economic Statistics (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or equivalent. The collection, analysis and pre- 
sentation of statistical data; theory of probability, sampling, experimental method, 
correlation, time series and index numbers, and their application to business and 
economic problems. 

364. Computer Logic and Programming (3) F 
Prerequisite: College algebra or equivalent. An introduction to computer logic 
including elements of symbolic logic and number systems; programming methods 
and techniques. 

461. Advanced Statistics (3) F 

Prerequisites: Math. 150B or equivalent, Quant. Meth. 361. An advanced treat- 
ment of the theory and application of the topics covered in Quant. Meth. 361, 
using the methods of the calculus where appropriate. 

462. Mathematical Models in Business and Economics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Math. 120, Quant. Meth. 361, and Math. 150A. The construction 
and application of mathematical models to business decisions and economic analysis. 

463. Statistical Decision Theory (3) S 

Prerequisite: Quant. Meth. 361. The application of advanced statistical techniques 
to the problems of management decision-making under conditions of uncertainty. 

560. Operations Research (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math. 150B or equivalent and Quant. Meth. 361, or consent of the 
instructor. An examination of the nature and scope of operations research, its 
methodology, and applications. Emphasis will be placed on models and model 
building with applications to selected problems in areas such as transportation, 
warehousing, inventory control, and marketing. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-ECONOMICS 

598. Project (3) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

599. Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

442. Teaching Business in the Secondary School (2-3) S 
Prerequisites: Education 311, admission to teacher education. Principles, methods, 
and materials of teaching business subjects in secondary schools. 



Gymnasium, scheduled for occupancy in the Fall semester of 1965 



i^ymnasium, scheduled for occupancy in the Fall semester of 1965 


DIVISION OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

'rofessors: Doane (Chairman), Allen, Bridgman, Carr, Denno,* Ehmann,* Hartsig, 
Imhoff, AicComb,* Schmidt. 
issociate Professors: Croy, Hill, Lynn,* Omalev, Pastor, Tollefson.* 
isststant Professors: Burke,* Calhoun, Carlson, Cusick, Donoghue, Golden, Holmes, 
James, Jones, Kravitz, Me Garry 
nstructor: Bristow * 

C 1962-1963 Faculty) 

The courses, programs, and services of the Division are directed toward the fol- 
lowing objectives of students: 

1. Pre-service teacher education 

2. In-service teacher education 

3. Professional preparation of administrative and counseling personnel for the 
public schools 

4. Major in psychology 

5. The portion of the general education requirements in psychology, physical 
education, and health 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of human behavior, human de- 
[velopment, human learning, physical activity, the school as a basic institution of our 
culture, the methods and materials associated with effective teaching, school admin- 
listration, school counseling, and the current and persistent problems that confront 
■teachers and other professional workers in educational institutions. In addition to 
■using published source materials and attending class sessions for presentations and 
■discussions, many of the Division’s courses require field work in schools and other 
|educational agencies. 

The pre-service teacher education programs of the college comprise a balance 
■among studies which provide intellectual breadth, studies which provide intellectual 
■depth, and studies which provide the professional preparation for a career as a 
■teacher. The student who completes a teacher education curriculum is a liberally 

■ educated person who is prepared to begin a career as a teacher and who possesses 
I capacity for self direction in the learning process. The professional education of the 
I teacher spans the years of pre-service preparation and the years of professional 

■ service throughout his career; the pre-service segment emphasizes those elements 
I related to the initial years of the career and lays a foundation for continued profes- 
Isional development. Only those students who demonstrate suitable personal, intellec- 
I tual, and social qualities are admitted and retained in the teacher education curricula. 

The in-service teacher education programs of the college are designed to serve 
I immediate and long-range needs of teachers and school systems. A variety of courses 
I is offered to assist teachers to do their jobs better and to find solutions to problems 
that confront them in their professional work. The resources of the Division are 
available to school systems for the purpose of making improvements in instructional 
programs, school administration, pupil personnel practices, and in conducting studies 
I and surveys related to these needs. 

The College offers a program for the preparation of school supervisors and admin- 
I istrators based on the assumption that instructional excellence is the primary goal 
I of educational leadership. Emphasis is placed on the art of school and community 
understanding, an appreciation of the cultural stream of which schools are a part 
and to which they must contribute, a sense of statesmanship in educational matters 
and a background of technical competence to make them possible. 

• College Administrative OfiBcers. 


[6i] 


62 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


The program for the preparation of school counselors, psychometrists, and child 
welfare workers is committed to the principle that the effectiveness of the school is 
determined by the extent to which each individual child or youth reaches his highest 
intellectual and personal potential. The program is devised to select pupil personnel 
wor ers carefully and to provide the technical competence necessary to assist school 
pupils in making the decisions they must make as they grow up 
The offering in health, physical education, and recreation are limited to service 
functions at this time but the College expects to offer courses to support a ml or 
m one or more of these disciplines in two or three years. Presently, most of the 
courses are directed toward the general education requirements or the pre-service 
preparation of elementary school teachers. ^ 

“ designed for students who (1) desire to prepare fori 
graduate work m psycholop, (2) wish to enter fields related to psychology and 
not requiring paduate work, (3) are pursuing credentials for which a psycMog>- 
major would be appropriate, (4) desire to extend their liberal education with*^a 
concentration m ppchology, and (5) plan to enter one of the several professional 
areas m which a substantial preparation in psychology is essential. 

NEW CREDENTIAL REGULATIONS 

The Certificated Personnel Law of 1961 provided for the modification of the 

V" s'^hools, secondary schools, and 

junior colleges pd for serving in other professional capacities such as counselor 
supervisor or admnistrator. At the time that this catalog copy was prepared, the 
Stare Board of Education had not announced the new regulations. The College will 
publicize Its programs re ated to the new credential regulations as soon as pLible. 
Ine new regulations will become operative on July 1, 1963. 

CURRICULA IN PRE-SERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION 

Orange State College offers two pre-service elementary school teacher education 
curricu a and one pre-service secondary school teacher education curriculum. Each 
curriplum povides for completing all requirements for graduation with the Bache- 
lor of Am degree at the end of the usual four collegiate years for the student who 
satisfies the requirements. Each curriculum provides for the completion of all re- 
quirements for tp poper California State Teaching Credential; the two curricula 
in elementary school teacher education lead to the General Elementary Credential 
pd the secondary school teacher education program leads to the General Secondan) 
Credential. All curricula provide for completing a minimum liberal am major, or 
more, m an academic field of study offered by the College. The following curricula 
assume a pre-education objective in the lower division or junior college. 

The four-year curriculum in elementary school teacher education is a minimal 
propam in general pucation, academic specialization, and professional education 
The five-year curriplum m elementary school teacher education is an enriched 
program for the student who wants the opportunity to equip himself for the 
complex rMponsibihties of an educated individual, citizen, cultural leader and 
professional worker. ’ 

The rapid expansion of human knowledge and the complicated culture in which 
we live have created circumstances for which teachers should have five years of 
pre-service preprapn. The five-year curriculum in elementary school teacher 
educauon prpides for the breadth of preparation and the intensity of study in one 
or more academic disciplines that will make for enlightened professional service 
so necessar>' for the cruc al times in which we live. The student who completes the 
five-year propam is hkely to be eligible for a better professional opportunity and 
a better mitial salar>- than the student who completes the minimal four-vear 
program. ^ 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


63 


1 


J The five-year curriculum in secondary school teacher education is correlated 
\v ith the requirements for the General Secondary Credential. The program includes 
breadth and depth of preparation in liberal arts studies. Thirty units of work 
are required beyond the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Further details on these curricula are available from the Division of Education 
and Psychology. The student will need these materials before completing his plans. 

FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TEACHER EDUCATION * 


lower Division Units 

Required Courses 31 

Natural Science 9 

Social Science 9 

Humanities 6 

Communication 3 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Psychology 2 

Elective Courses 23-33 


Courses in behavioral science, fine arts, humanities, natural science or 
social science to diversify the intellectual background toward fulfillment 
of the goals of liberal education. 

Total Lower Division Units 54-64 

Academic Major 

Each student will complete a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major planned and 
approved by his major adviser and his professional adviser. Majors presently avail- 
able are: art, biological sciences, business administration, chemistry, economics, 
English, French, geography, German, history, humanities, language arts, mathe- 
matics, music, physics, political science, psychology, social sciences, sociology, 
Spanish, and speech. The composition of these majors is described in other sections 
of the catalog and is also described in “Regulations and Program Components of 
the Elementary School Teacher Education Program” available from the College. 

Allied Studies 

Each student will consult with his professional adviser to plan for the completion 
of a suitable distribution of studies in courses other than those of his major or 
professional education. 

Professional Education 

Semester I Units 

Block in Psychological Foundations of Education — Educ. 311 6 

This course is for the regular student who expects to complete the Upper 
Division requirements in two years. 

With the approval of the professional adviser, students who have completed 
the major portion of this block may satisfy the remaining requirements by 
taking the appropriate courses from the following: 


Human Growth and Development Educ. 312 3 

Educational Psychology - - Psych. 311 3 

Principles of Guidance Educ. 351 2 


• Only those students who have heen admitted to the teacher education program at Orange 
State College prior to July 1, 1963, may qualify under this program. 


64 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Semester II 

Separate Courses in Methods and Alaterials of Teaching in the Special 

Fields 

Teaching Art in the Elementary School Art Ed. 432 2 

Teaching Music in the Elementary School Mus. Ed. 432 2 

Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School™ P.E.432 2 


Units 

6 


Semester III 

Block in Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods Educ. 331 8 

This course is for the regular student who expects to complete the Upper 
Division requirement in two years. The course should be taken in the 
semester preceding student teaching. 

With the approval of the professional adviser, students who have com- 
pleted the major portion of this block or who are part-time students may 
satisfy the requirement of this block by taking the following courses: 


Principles and Curricula of Elementary Education .....Educ. 431 2 

Teaching Reading in the Elementary School Educ. 432R 2 

Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School.. . Eng. Ed. 432 2 

Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School Math. Ed. 432 2 

Teaching Science in the Elementary School Sci. Ed.432 2 

Teaching Social Science in the Elementary School S.S. Ed.432 2 

Audio-Visual Methods Educ. 491 2 

Semester IV 

Student Teaching in the Elementary Schools and Student Teaching 

Seminar Educ. 339 10 


This course is taken in the last semester of work toward the degree or 
the credential. 

The Student Teaching requirement may be satisfied by a student who 
has had two or more years of successful, regular teaching experience; 
details for this waiver are described in this catalog.* 

Total Upper Division _ 

Total Units Required for the Bachelor of Arts Degree ] 


FIVE-YEAR CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION 


COMPOSITE OF LOWER DIVISION, UPPER DIVISION 
AND POSTGRADUATE WORK 

I. Courses for Distribution in Liberal Arts (Minimum) 

At least 12 units of the following must be taken from the Upper Divi- 
sion. The remainder may be presented from Lower Division work. The 
number shown below are minimal in each category of distribution. 


Units 

English 6 

History and Political Science 6 

Health and Phys. Educ 2 

Psychology 3 

Speech 3 


Units 


Alathematics or Economics 3 

Fine and Applied Arts 6 

Humanities 5 

Natural Sciences 9 

Social Sciences 6 


The balance of courses for the purposes of satisfying the distribution requirement 
must be taken in the above fields and exclude the major, minor, or professional 
education. 


However, a mmimum of 24 units of Education courses must be 
for the General Elementary Credential, 
t Includes Lower Division, Upper Division, and Postgraduate work. 


presented by any applicant 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


65 


II. Courses for the Major Units 

Each student will complete a major planned with and approved by his 
major adviser and his professional adviser. Majors presently available are: 
art, biological sciences, English, French, geography, German, history, hu- 
manities, language arts, mathematics, music, political science, social sci- 
ences, Spanish, and speech. The composition of these majors is described 
in this catalog by the division or department offering the major. 

[II. Courses for the Minor 

Each student will complete a minor planned with and approved by his 
major adviser and his professional adviser. Minors presently available are: 
art, biological sciences, English, French, German, geography, history, hu- 
manities, language arts, mathematics, music, political science, social sci- 
ences, Spanish, and speech. 

IV. Courses for the Pre-Service Professional Education of the 

Elementary School Teacher. (Minimum) 32 

The details of this segment of the teacher education program will be 
described in a publication available from the Division of Education and 
Psychology. 

V. Elective Courses 

Minimum units required to complete the curriculum leading to the Gen- 
eral Elementary Credential 154® 

The Bachelor of Arts degree may be conferred at the end of four years 
if requirements shown in the OSC catalog for 1963-1964 are completed. 

The student is expected to fulfill all institutional and statutory require- 
ments bearing upon the elementary school teacher education program 
and the General Elementary Credential. 

CURRENT CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION 

COMPOSITE LOWER DIVISION, UPPER DIVISION AND GRADUATE WORK 


Units 

Courses for Distribution in Liberal Arts 50t 

See page 92 for description of requirements. 

Courses for the Liberal Arts Major .. 36t 


A maximum of 12 units of Lower Division work may be counted toward 
the major. The major must include a minimum of 6 units of postgraduate 
work. 

Each student will complete a major planned with and approved by his 
major adviser and his professional adviser. Majors presently available are: 
art, biological sciences, business administration, chemistry, economics, Eng- 
lish, French, geography, German, history, humanities, mathematics, music, 
philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social sciences, sociology, 
Spanish, and speech and drama; other majors are being developed and will 
be available to students. 

Courses for the Liberal Arts Minor 20ff 

A maximum of 12 units of Lower Division work may be counted toward 
the minor. 

Each student will complete a minor planned with and approved by his 
major adviser and his professional adviser. Minors include: biological sci- 
ence, English, French, German, journalism, language arts, mathematics, 
music, social science, Spanish and speech; other minors are being developed 
and will be available to students. 


* Includes Lower Division, Upper Division, and Postgraduate work, 
t To be interpreted as a minimum of 50 units, minimum of 36 units, etc. 


66 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Units 

Courses for the Pre-Service Professional Education 24+ 

Regular Pre-Service Professional Education Program (for the student who 
has completed junior college, only) . 

The requirements of 36 units in the major and 20 units in the minor are state 
credential minima. College requirements are sometimes higher. See descriptions of 
specific major requirements in the various division listings. Not all of the majon 
listed by the College are accepted by the state as credential majors. Consult with 
your adviser to make sure the major you choose will meet credential requirements. 


Elective Courses 24 

Minimum units required to complete the curriculum leading to the General 
Secondary Credential 154 


The Bachelor of Arts degree may be conferred at the end of four years if 
requirements shown in the OSC catalog are completed. 

N.B. The applicant for the General Secondary Credential must complete 30 units 
after the completion of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. The 
30 semester units must include at least 6 units of pre-service professional educa- 
tion courses and 6 units in subject fields commonly taught in junior and senior 
high schools. The student is responsible for arranging his schedule to satisfy 
these graduation and credential requirements. 

THREE-YEAR PROGRAM IN PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

(For the student who has completed lower division at OSC or at a junior 


college) • 

First Year 

Semester I Units Semester U Units 

Educ. 340A Practicum in Second- Educ. 340B Practicum in Second- 
ary Education 1 ary Education 1 

Second Year 

Educ. 311 Psychological Founda- Educ. 441 Principles and Curricula 

tions of Education 6 of Secondary Education 2 

442. Teaching (the major) in the 
Secondary School 3 


Third Year 

Educ. 549 Student Teaching in the Educ. 501 Philosophy of Education 3 

Secondary School and Student 
Teaching Seminar .. 8 

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching in California elementan' 
schools and secondary schools are included in the above curricula. In addition, an 
applicant for a credential for teaching is asked questions about his citizenship, and 
about his ethical and moral character. The applicant must sign an oath of Allegiance, 
must present a certificate of health from a qualified physician, and present official 
transcripts of collegiate studies. The applicant must present two sets of personal 
identification cards, including fingerprints. He must present evidence of having 
passed a course or suitable examination on the United States Constitution. Each 
application for a credential must be accompanied with a fee of $8 in the form of 
a money order, cashier’s check, or certified check. 

t To be interpreted as a minimum of 50 units, minimum of 36 units, etc. 

* Students who have completed three years of college or who come to Orange State College 
with degrees should consult advisers in the Division of l^ucadon and Psychology rega:^ 
ing courses and course programs in professional education. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


67 


Students with a bachelor’s degree and teaching experience who wish to meet 
specific requirements for the General Elementary Credential may do so through 
the following courses at Orange State College: 

Orange State College Courses 
Which Meet These 

California State Requirements Requirements 

1. Principles and Curricula of Elementary Education Education 331, 431 

2. Elementary methods in basic subjects Education 331, Art Ed. 432, 

For. Lang. Ed. 432, Educ. 
432R, Eng., Speech Ed. 432, 
Math. Ed. 432, Mus. Ed. 
432, P.E. 432, Sci. Ed. 432, 
Soc. Sci. Ed. 432 

3. Child Growth and Development..— Education 311, 312 

4. Audio-Visual Education Education 331, 491 

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS IN 
ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

Students must take Education 503, Foundations for Educational Leadership, dur- 
ing their first registration in these fields. To continue in the program beyond 
this course, the student must be granted a “Letter of Admission to the Program” 
and possess an official OSC program evaluation. The program is an integrated 
whole. Thus, students who desire only isolated courses from the program are 
normally denied admission to such courses. Details of this program are contained 
in a brochure available from the Division of Education and Psychology. 

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS IN 
PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Students must take Education 351, Principles of Guidance or Education 452, 
Counseling Theories and Processes, during their first registration in this field. 
To take courses beyond these courses, the student must be granted a “Letter of 
Admission to the Program” and possess an official OSC program evaluation. Details 
of this program are contained in a brochure available from the Division of Educa- 
tion and Psychology. 

PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a public school credential and a 
bachelor of Arts degree. Prior to registration, a student should consult an adviser 
^ the division in which he expects to major and an adviser in the Division of 
Education and Psychology who will help the student select courses and build his 
program. A student from another institution should bring transcripts of previous 
''^ork and a tentative selection of courses. Each student is responsible for meeting 
^1 requirements set forth in the catalog and supplements. 

During the student’s first semester after matriculation, he will receive from the 
Dffice of Admissions an evaluation of his credits which will list the requirements 

must meet in earning the credential and the degree he has listed as his objective. 

a student changes his degree or credential objective, he must have an evaluation 
^or each new credential. The evaluation will serve as a guide for the student and 
the advisers in planning a complete program. Any deviation from this evaluation 
^vist be approved through written petitions submitted to the Chairman of the 
piyision of Education and Psychology. Transferred courses must be of upper 
division level and taken within the past fifteen years to be applicable to upper di- 
vision credential requirements.* 

Selected courses completed in lower division at instimtions outside of the State of California 
be applied to professional education credential requirements. 


68 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION ^ 

Admission to Orange State College does not constitute admission to the teacher | 
education curricula. To become a candidate for a teaching credential, the student 
must be matriculated, in good standing, and must file the “Application for Ad- 
mission to Teacher Education” in the Office of the Division of Education and| 
Psychology. This application should be filed during the first semester that the| 
student takes courses at the college. 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant’s intel- 
lectual resources and mastery of important concepts in the common curricular I 
areas of higher education, command of fundamental skills of communication! 
(English language usage, written composition, speech, hearing, reading compre- 
hension, handwriting, mathematical skills), scholarship, personality and character. ^ 
interest in teaching, and health. Data related to these criteria are gathered from 
transcripts and records from other schools and colleges, group and individual 
tests, personality inventories, estimates of the potential of the applicant, and from 
the Student Health Center. Students should normally qualify for admission and 
are advised of their status during the second semester of the junior year or their I 
first semester of attendance if they enter with advanced standing with degrees fromj 
accredited colleges. 

Admission to teacher education is required of all students prior to seeking ad- 
mission to student teaching. 

Students who show weaknesses in any of the fundamental skills of communication 
are advised of their standing. If there are weaknesses in only one or two of the! 
areas noted above, the student will be advised of refresher courses and given a 
specified time to meet the standard. 

If the applicant has serious deficiencies in communication skills or does not meet| 
the standards of mastery in the common curricular areas, personality and character,! 
scholarship, interest in teaching, or health, the faculty committee will deny thCj 
applicant admission to teacher education. 

The student must arrange to take the required battery of group and individual 
tests and inventories necessary to provide information needed by the faculty’ 
committee. The test of general aptitude is included in the College admissions 
procedure. The tests of breadth of understanding, reading, English usage, number! 
skills, composition, handwriting, and personality are given by the Testing Office 
for admission to teacher education; consult the Testing Office for dates. Informa- 
tion regarding the speech and hearing examinations is available in the office of I 
the Chairman, Department of Speech. 

The Student who comes to OSC to work toward a General Secondary Credential | 
and who already has a bachelor’s degree must, before he is admitted to teacher I 
education, consult with an adviser in the major and must submit a statement, signed 
by the adviser, which indicates the following: 

1. that the student’s undergraduate preparation in his major is considered to be 
adequate for the credential sought, or 

2. that the specific courses wfiich the student must complete in order to have 
a major adequate for the credential sought, and which he must complete 
before he will be admitted to student teaching. These may be in addition ' 
to the minimum of the six upper division or graduate units required in the ; 
major in the post graduate year, or may, in part or in whole, satisfy this 
six unit minimum requirement. 

Full details on standards and procedures for admission to teacher education are : 
described in “Instructions and Standards for Admission to Teacher Education” 
which is available from the Division of Education and Psychology. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


69 


ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING 

Admission to teacher education as described above is the first step in a cumu- 
lative and continuing evaluation of a candidate’s fitness to teach. The applicant 
for admission to student teaching must have a grade point average of 2.5 in the 
major, 2.5 in the minor, and 2.5 in professional education. Marks of C, or better, 
arc required in all professional education courses. Applicants for admission to 
elementary student teaching must be within 15 units of the baccalaureate degree. 
Applicants for admission to secondary student teaching must be classified as post- 
graduate students. All applicants must have completed at least twelve units at 
Orange State College. The applicant must present a favorable report on health 
status and history. He must present evidence of readiness for student teaching 
responsibility as testified by the major adviser, the professional adviser, and other 
college faculty. This evidence relates to scholarship, breadth of understanding, com- 
mand of the subjects to be taught, fundamental skills of communication, personality 
and character, interest and potential for teaching, and health. 

Competence is required in all subjects and skills for which the candidate is 
seeking a credential. For the elementary school teacher education student, this in- 
cludes all subjects and skills commonly taught in the first eight grades of the 
public schools. Elementary candidates must complete Art 100 and Music 232, or 
their equivalents, prior to taking the methods courses in art and music. Some 
music skill is required of all elementary candidates. Secondary school teacher edu- 
cation students must meet the requirements for their major and minor (s) as speci- 
fied by the academic divisions. 

All instructors of the college are asked to participate in the continuing evaluation 
of students in relation to those aptitude, personality and character traits which are 
considered essential to admission to the teaching profession. Dependability in ful- 
filling assignments, class attendance, ability to get along with people, industry, and 
emotional stability are representative criteria. In addition to the evaluations by 
instructors, the applicants may be interviewed by a faculty committee, and atten- 
tion will be directed to general appearance, dress, vitality, poise, temperament, in- 
tegrity, and social attitudes. 

The application for admission to student teaching is submitted to the Coordinator 
of Elementary Education or the Coordinator of Secondary Education. The ap- 
plication must be submitted by October 15 or March 1 of the semester preceding 
the semester in which the student teaching assignment is expected. A faculty 
committee will gather the information described above and report to the student 
in time to do planning for the following semester. 

Full details on standards and procedures are described in “Instructions and 
Standards for Admission to Student Teaching” available in the Office of the Divi- 
sion of Education and Psychology. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Each candidate for the General Elementary Credential will do his student teach- 
ing in the last semester he is in the teacher education curriculum or in his post 
graduate year at Orange State College. Each candidate for the General Secondary 
Credential will do his student teaching during the postgraduate year. Student teach- 
ing assignments are made in the elementary and secondary schools of districts 
geographically accessible to the college. Students will be assigned to work tinder 
the supervision of carefully selected supervising teachers; a college supervisor makes 
frequent visits to the student teacher and the supervising teacher. Student teachers 
meet in a weekly seminar under the leadership of the college supervisor to discuss 
performance and problems. 


70 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


STUDY LIMITS OF STUDENT TEACHERS I 

The college offers two courses in student teaching: Education 339, Student ■ 
Teaching in the Elementary School and Student Teaching Seminar, 10 units; and! I 
Education 549, Student Teaching in the Secondary School and Student Teaching! I 
Seminar, 8 units. | I 

Students enrolled in either of these courses have heavy responsibilities for plan- 1 I 
ning, preparation of instructional materials, developing appropriate resource ma-l ■ 
terials, evaluating pupil performances, participating in conferences with supervising! I 
teachers and college supervisors, and the many other details that must be executed} M 
with efficiency to make the teaching-learning process of maximum value to pupils j I 
and to the student teacher. We know that teaching requires extra energy, bothj 9 
mental and physical, beyond that necessary for the completion of tasks associated! I 
with the college-student role. I I 

Students who enroll in Education 339, Student Teaching in the Elementan j I 
School and Student Teaching Seminar, 10 units, will be limited to one course ini I 
addition for that semester. Students who enroll in Education 549, Student Teaching} ■ 
in the Secondary School and Student Teaching Seminar, 8 units, will be limited} m 
to two courses in adition for that semester. It is expected that students will not} I 
carry out-of-college work responsibilities during the semester of the student teach-} I 
ing assignment. } I 

If a student is under hardship because of the above limitations, he may submit aj I 
petition to the Coordinator of Elementary Education or the Coordinator of Sec- 1 
ondary Education requesting permission to carry not more than 15 units, including ■ 
Education 339 or Education 549. The petition must set forth the reasons for the I 
petition and a full description of the impiortant factors related to the student’s) I 
load during the semester, especially his employment or other conditions that may I I 
interfere with his success in Education 339 or Education 549. The petition will be| M 
granted if the reviewing committee considers the load to be reasonable and thej I 

supporting rationale to be sound. I 

PERMISSION TO SUBSTITUTE TEACHING EXPERIENCE | 

FOR STUDENT TEACHING I 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had teaching experience mustj I 
petition the Division of Education and Psychology, through his professional adviser. ■ 
to substitute two full years of successful, regular teaching experience at the level I 
at which the credential is expected. If the petition is granted, the candidate for I 
the General Elementary Credential must present not less than 24 units in profes*! I 
sional education, and the candidate for the General Secondary Credential must I I 
present not less than 22 units in professional education. The substitution will be| 
considered only if the applicant: 

1. Has been admitted to teacher education at the college. 

2. Has been admitted to student teaching at the college. 

3. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, or' fl 

superintendent to the Division of Education and Psychology certifying at least > I 
two years of successful, regular teaching experience at the appropriate level | I 
A form for this verification is available in the Office of the Division of Edu- 1 I 
cation and Psychology. ] 

PROVISIONAL CREDENTIAL RENEWAL j 

Orange State College is prepared to cooperate with students seeking renewal of i 

provisional credentials awarded by the State Department of Education. However. | 
a letter of recommendation to the State Department of Education for renewal of } 
the provisional^ credential will be written for the student only if he following | 

conditions have been fulfilled. | 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


71 


1. The applicant has been admitted to teacher education at the college. 

2. The applicant has completed the six semester unit requirement established by 
the State Department of Education at the college. 

Detailed statements of requirements for credentials and degrees are available in 
the Office of the Division of Education and Psychology. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION OF 
EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Admission to teacher education 

1.1 Instructions 

1.2 Application 

1.3 Standards for admission 

2. Admission to student teaching 

2.1 Instructions 

2.2 Application 

2.3 Standards for admission 

3. Elementary school teacher education 

3.1 Current program 

3.2 Five-Year Program 

3.3 Programs for holders of baccalaureate degrees 

3.31 Full residence at the college 

3.32 Partial residence at the college 

4. Secondary school teacher education 

4.1 Guide to the secondary school teacher education program 

5. School administration and supervision 

5.1 Program in school administration and supervision 

6. Pupil personnel services 

6.1 General pupil personnel services credential program 

7. 1963 Credential Program Revisions 

7.1 Guide to the new credential requirements 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY COURSES 

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 

311. Psychological Foundations of Education (6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201. Prerequisite to other courses in the professional education 
sequence. Satisfies the statutory requirement for educational psychology. Covering 
(1) learning theory, and thinking processes, (2) human growth and development, 
guidance and counseling of pupils as practiced by the teacher in the promotion of 
effective intellectual and emotional growth and including the psychological services 
provided by the school districts. Requires laboratory assignment, individual case 
study, and some consideration of tests, measurement and evaluation. 

312. Human Growth and Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201. A comprehensive study of human growth and develop- 
ment with emphasis on childhood, adolescence, and middle and old age. Includes 
mental, social, emotional, and physical development. 

402. Comparative Education (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 331 or Educ. 441 or consent of the instructor. A study of 
(1) problems, factors and efforts in education throughout the world, and (2) the 
philosophies and practices in administration, control, financing and operation of 
educational systems of selected areas and countries. 


72 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


403. History of Education (3) F 

Prerequisites: History of World Civilization and Educ. 331 or Educ. 441, or 
consent of the instructor. The main streams of educational history in Europe and 
America, with particular emphasis on the ways these main streams have affected the 
current scene in the United States. 

406. Educational Sociology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 331 or Educ. 341, or consent of the instructor. The school in 
the social order; analysis of cultural factors affecting school, and of the special 
culture of the school; consideration of research in selected areas of the school- 
culture relationship. 

SOI. Philosophy of Education (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Postgraduate standing and Educ. 339 or Educ. 549, or consent of 
the instructor. Uses of theories of knowledge, value and reality in dealing with edu- 
cational problems; application of contemporary systems of thought to education. 

503. Foundations for Educational Leadership (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. The cultures and values to which schools 
must contribute: introduction to community sociology, tax systems and public 
administration; the literature of leadership. Screening for admission to program. 
Occasional special meetings. Required of all students during first registration in 
school administration and supervision at this college. 

504. Foundations for Policy and Program Development (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate or graduate courses in guidance; child growth and 
development or child psychology; tests and measurements; Educ. 503, 561, 562, 564 
and 565. Administrative and supervisorial policy as related to the learner, the learn- 
ing process and the appraisal of pupil aptitudes; adjustments for individual differ- 
ences; research related to these fields. Meets credential requirement in administration 
of special schools and pupil personnel. 

50 5. Foundations for Improving Instruction (4) F 
Prerequisite: Educ. 504. The development of a quality program of instruction in 
both elementary and secondary schools; appraisal of programs of instruction; ad- 
vanced principles of curricular review and modification. 

Evaluation of subject matter competence in area of supervisory specialization. 
Meets credential requirements in principles of curriculum construction and evalua- 
tion; supervision of instruction and curriculum in both elementary and secondary 
schools. 

511. Survey of Educational Research (2) F 
Prerequisites: Educ. 451 or equivalen^, teaching experience. Review of descriptive 
statistics as applied to educational problems. Survey of elements of current research 
types. Principles of research design. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

331. Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods (8) F, S 
Prerequisites: Educ. 311, Art Ed. 432, Mus. Ed. 432, P£. 432, and admission to 
teacher education. Principles, curricula, methods, and materials of elementary school 
instruction, with major emphasis on reading, language arts, arithmetic, social stud- 
ies, and science. Includes audio-visual instruction, methods, and techniques. Required 
field work. Required of all candidates for the General Elementary Credential or its 
equivalent. (6 hours lecture, 2 hours activity, and 3 hours laboratory per week.) 



ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


73 


339. Student Teaching in the Elementary School and Student Teaching 
Seminar (10) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 331 and admission to student teaching. Student teaching for 
the General Elementary Credential. Participation in a regular elementary school 
teaching program for the greater part of every school day. Includes a nvo-hour 
seminar each week in problems and procedures of elementary school teaching. Con- 
current enrollment in other professional education courses is discouraged. 

431. Principles and Curricula of the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 311 or consent of the instructor. An introductory course in 
elementary education. Stress on major principles and basic curricular considerations. 
Importance of the elementary school system to society. 

432. Teaching — in the Elementary School 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311 or consent of the instructor. A series of courses, listed 
dually in the Division of Education and Psychology and in the other appropriate 
divisions, dealing with objectives, methods, and materials of teaching the various 
subjects and areas in elementary schools. The courses are professional education 
courses and applicable toward credential requirements. Detailed descriptions of the 
courses are to be found in the materials of other departments and divisions within 
this catalog. 

Art Ed. 432. Teaching Art in the Elementary School (2) F, S 
For. Lang. Ed. 432. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary Schools (2) 
F,S 

Mus. Ed. 432. Teaching Music in the Elementary School (2) F, S 
P.E. 432. Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

The following courses have been designed specifically for students who have 
completed the major portion of Education 331 or who are part-time students. With 
the approval of the professional adviser the requirement of Education 331 may be 
satisfied with these courses. 

Educ. 432R. Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (2) F, S 
Eng. Ed., Sp. Ed. 432. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) 
F, S 

Math. Ed. 432. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Sci. Ed. 432. Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2) F 

Soc. Sci. Ed. 432. Teaching Social Sciences in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

43 2R. Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (2) F, S 
Prerequisite: Educ. 311 or consent of the instructor. Reading process, sequential 
development of reading skills, relationship of developmental reading to child 
growth and development, and place of reading in the culture. 

537. Seminar for Elementary Education (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Educ. 339 or consent of the instructor. Persistent problems in ele- 
mentary education and survey of literature; causes and solutions for these related 
problems. Application of scientific method to educational problems, sources of 
education research, and to techniques of cooperative thinking. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

540A,B. Practicum in Secondary Education (1-1) F, S 
Required first course in the professional sequence for the General Secondary 
Credential for those who begin their work toward the credential as juniors. Two 
hours observation per week in selected high school and junior high school classes 
and one hour per week in campus discussion groups. Includes application for ad- 
mission to teacher education. 


A — 83902 


74 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


441. Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311, admission to teacher education or consent of the in- 
structor. Principles and philosophy of secondary education in the United States: 
organization, curriculum, evaluation, and teaching practices including audio-visual 
methods and materials. Correlated with methods and materials courses in the 
majors. Required of all candidates for the General Secondary Credential. 

442. Teaching — in the Secondary School 

A series of courses, listed dually in the Division of Education and Psychology 
and in the other appropriate divisions, dealing with objectives, methods, and mate- 
rials of teaching the various subjects and areas in secondary schools. Required, 
before student teaching, of students presenting majors in these areas or subjects 
for the General Secondary Credential. Students without teaching experience must 
register for three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at 
the same hour each day, so that they can serve as teacher aides in high schools. 
Prerequisites: 20 units in the major. Education 311, Education 340, and senior 
standing; or consent of the instructor. 

Art Ed. 442. Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2-3) F 
Bus. Ed. 442. Teaching Business in the Secondary School (2-3) S 
Eng. Ed. 442. Teaching English in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 
For. Lang. Ed. 442. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2-3) F 
Journ. Ed. 442. Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (2-3) (Planned for 
1964-65) 

Math. Ed. 442. Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (2-3) S 
Mus. Ed. 442. Teaching Music in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 
P.E. 442. Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (Planned for 
1964-65) 

Sci. Ed. 442. Teaching Science in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Soc. Sci. Ed. 442. Teaching Social Sciences in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Speech Ed. 442. Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

443. Principles of Core Curriculum (2) S (Not offered in 1963-1964) 

Prerequisites: Teaching experience or consent of the instructor. Unity and inter- 
relationships of human learning and behavior and the curricular processes and 
arrangements by which this may be achieved. Development, principles, and appli- 
cation of core curricula; guidance functions; evaluation; and roles of the teacher. 

547. Seminar for Secondary Education (3) F 
Prerequisite: Educ. 459 or consent of the instructor. Persistent problems in sec- 
ondary education and survey of related literature; causes of and solutions for these 
problems. Application of scientific method to educational problems, sources of 
educational research, and to techniques of cooperative thinking. 

549. Student Teaching in the Secondary School and Student Teaching 
Seminar (8) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 441 and 442, admission to student teaching. Student teaching 
for the General Secondary Credential. Participation in a regular secondary school 
teaching program for half days for a full semester or full days for a half semester. 
Includes a two-hour seminar each week in problems and procedures of secondary 
school teaching. 

SCHOOL SERVICES 

3 51. Principles of Guidance (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 311 or Educ. 312. Guidance related to educational objectives 
and needs of youth. Special needs created by size and complexity of the modern 
educational system and modern society; general requirements, services, organiza- 
tion, and structure of a successful guidance program; counseling service. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


75 


451. Principles of Educational Measurement (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 311 or Psych. 311. Development, validation, and application 
of the principles of educational measurement. Construction and use of informal and 
standardized achievement tests. Summary and interpretation of results of measure- 
ment. 

452. Counseling Theories and Processes (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Psych. 441 or Educ. 351. Introduction to counseling. Dynamics of 
counselor and client, techniques and processes of various levels, and relation to 
personality theory. Major project required. Student seeking the credential to 
teach exceptional children will emphasize the counseling and guidance of the 
handicapped. 

471. Exceptional Children (3) F, S (Formerly 472) 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311 and Educ. 331, or Educ. 431, or Educ. 441. Study of 
children who deviate from the average in the elementary and the secondary schools; 
physically handicapped, mentally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, emotionally 
disturbed, and delinquent. Special educational services, curriculum, procedures, 
and materials necessary to promote their maximum development. 

472. Gifted Children (2) F (Formerly 471) 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311 and Educ. 331, or Educ. 431, or Educ. 441. Identifica- 
tion, principles of instruction, grouping, individualized instruction, classroom en- 
richment. Problem solving and research experiences in science, social studies, and 
mathematics, reading programs and literatpre, creative writing, oral language. 

491. Audio-Visual Education (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311, Educ. 441, or consent of the instructor. Media in com- 
munication, psychological bases, development, curricular function, evaluation. Sur- 
vey of equipment and materials available, preparation of instructional materials for 
classroom use. Includes laboratory. 

5 51. Educational and Career Orientation (3) F 
Prerequisite: Educ. 351 or permission of instructor. Principles of evaluating, 
classifying, and disseminating occupational and educational information in the 
guidance program; sources of occupational literature, occupational research, voca- 
tional seurveys, and individual assessment for potential occupational choice. Em- 
phasis on the psychological and sociological implications of career and educational 
choice. 

552. Group Processes in Guidance (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ. 452 or permission of instructor. Intensive study of dynamics 
of group process, leadership, role playing, sociometric techniques, and group 
counseling. 

5 53. Administration and Organization of Pupil-Personnel Programs (3) S 
Prerequisites: Educ. 452, Educ. 551 or permission of instructor. Development, 
organization, and administration of the pupil-personnel services. Analysis and 
evaluation of pupil personnel services by the case study method, curriculum, 
counselor competencies, staflSng. 

5 54. Laws Relating to Child Welfare (3) S 
Prerequisite: Educ. 452 or permission of instructor. Study of state, federal, and 
local laws affecting the child. Educational and statutory regulations will be covered 
in detail. 

^5 5. Individual Diagnosis (3) S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 451 and Educ. 452. Intensive study of the techniques of 
individual diagnosis including the synthesis and interpretation of information. 
Case study and case conference approach to diagnosis. 


76 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


5 59AB. Field Work in Counseling (3,3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Guidance and counseling in the school 
setting under the supervision of local coordinator and college staff. Work assign 
ments vary for school counselors, psychometrists, and child welfare workers. Work 
in a counseling relationship, parent conferences, and follow-up studies. 

560. Practicum in School Administration (2) S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 503. Observation and limited participation in variety of ad- 
ministrative situations. Background for studies and selecting areas of specialization. 
Class meetings and added Saturday morning session. Does not meet “directed field 
work” requirement of credentials. 

561. The Government of Schools in the U.S. (2) F 

Prerequisite: Educ. 503. Meets credential requirements in Federal, state and 
county school administration. Structure, functions, trends and issues at each level. 
Emphasis on intergovernmental relations and impact at local level. 

562. Administration of Local School Systems (2) S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 503. Meets credential requirement in city school administra- 
tion. School districts and their reorganization; school boards, the superintendency; 
principles of internal organization of central staff and functions; basic principles 
of personnel administration. 

564. School Law (2) F 

Prerequisite: Educ. 561, 562. Meets credential requirement. School law as a 
reflection of public policy; the California State Code; Title 5; the roles of courts, 
county counsel and Attorney General in interpreting law; how law is made. Gives 
minimal preparation for positions as superintendents or business officials. Does not 
meet “laws relating to children” requirement for Pupil Personnel Credential. 

565. School Finance, Business Administration and Buildings (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 564. Meets credential requirements. Emphasis on these as they 
implement an effective educational program. Gives minimual preparation for posi- 
tions as superintendents or business officials. 

566e. Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 503, 504, 505, 511, 561, 562, 564, and 565. May be taken con- 
currently with Educ. 569E. Leadership role of elementary school principal, pupil 
personnel and instructional program in the elementary school; working relations 
and morale among staff, community and pupils; parent education; relations with 
central district staff; management and record keeping functions; teacher evaluation. 
Meets credential requirement. 

566s. Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools (3) F 
Prerequisites: Educ. 503, 504, 505, 511, 561, 562, 564, and 565. May be taken 
concurrently with Educ. 569S. Leadership role of secondary school principal, 
pupil personnel and instructional program in the secondary school; the develop- 
ment and administration of vocational and adult education; working relations 
and morale among staff, community and pupils; relations with central district staff, 
the management and record keeping functions; teacher evaluation. Meets credential 
requirement. 

569e. Directed Field Work in Elementary School Administration and 
Supervision (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 566E or concurrent registration. Work in selected elementary 
schools and district offices. Further details in special publications. Meets cre- 
dential requirement. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


77 


5698 . Directed Field Work in Secondary School Administration and Supervision (2) F 

Prerequisites: Educ. 566S or concurrent registration. Work in selected secondary 
schools and district offices. Further details in special publication. Meets credential 
requirement. 

HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 
HEALTH EDUCATION 

101. Personal and Community Health (2) F, S 

Meaning and significance of physical, mental and social health as related to 
the individual and to society, alcohol and narcotics education; fire prevention; 
public safety and accident prevention. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical education activities courses are designed to offer the student opportuni- 
ties to develop optimal skills, knowledge, and confidence in terms of mental, social, 
and physical fitness for educational, recreational, and utilitarian purposes in our 
democratic society. 

All students must successfully complete four semesters of physical education ac- 
tivity courses, starting with the first semester of attendance (summer session 
excluded) as partial fulfillment of the general education requirements for the 
baccalaureate degree. Each course carries Yi unit credit. A series of health educa- 
tion lectures is included with the first physical education activity course taken. 
(The student may elect HE 101 in lieu of the health lectures.) 

Students carrying fewer than 12 units during any semester may postpone taking 
physical education but are not exempt from this requirement. The program is 
organized and conducted on a planned basis to enable each student to receive 
instruction in the following areas: 

• FOR MEN 


AQUATIC 

GROUP AND TEAM 

INDIVIDUAL 


DANCE 

ACTIVITIES: 

ACrriVITIES: 

ACTIVITIES: 


ACTIVITIES: 

(PE no Series) 

(PE 120 Series) 

(PE 130 Series) 


(PE 140 Series) 

111 m Swimming F, S 

121 m Group 

131 m Gymnastics, 




Games F 

Tumbling, 




122 m Group 

and Rebound 




Games S 

Tumbling F, 

S 




132 m Combatives F, 

133 m Individual 

S 




Physical 

(Condition- 





ing F, 

S 




134 m Adapted 





Physical 
Education F, 

S 




135 m Track and 





Field F, 

S 


— 






• FOR WOMEN 


111 w Swimming F, S 

121 w Group 

131 w Gymnastics, 



Games F 

122 w Group 

Games S 

Tumbling, 
and Rebound 
Tumbling F, S 

133 w Individual 

Physical 
Conditioning 
and Self- 
Defense F, S 

134 w Adapted 

Physical 
Education F, S 



78 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


• CO-EDUCATIONAL 


113 Life-Saving and 

123 Group Games 

136 Archery 

F. S 

141 Social Dance F, S 

Water Safety F, S 

(Open only to 

137 Golf 

F. S 

142 Folk and Square 

prospective 

elementary 

school 

teachers.) F, S 

138 Tennis 

F. S 

Dance F, S 

143 Modem Dance S 


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Consent of the coach of the sport is required for enrollment. Each semester of 
participation carries 1 unit of credit. Participation on an athletic team or teams may 
be used to meet one semester of the general education requirement. The student 
must enroll concurrently in a physical education activities class until squad member- 
ship is verified by the coach. The physical education activity course may then be 
dropped if the student desires. 

318. Basketball (1) F, S 

319. Crosscountry (1) F 

43 2. Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ. 311. Physical education rationale, techniques, and materials 
for elementary school teachers. Methods of teaching games, sports, rhythms and 
dances commonly taught in elementary schools. Observation and laboratory prac- 
tice included. (4 hours activity per week.) 

442. Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (2-3) 

Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisites: 20 units in physical education, Educ. 311, Educ. 340, senior stand- 
ing, or consent of the instructor. Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching 
physical education in secondary school. Required before student teaching, of sni- 
dents presenting majors in physical education for the General Secondary Credential. 
Students without teaching experience must register for three units credit, and must 
allow sufficient time in their schedules at the same hour each day, so that they can 
serve as teacher aides in high schools. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity.) 

Recreation 

443. Theory of Recreation (2) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Introduction to recreation principles*, 
planning, organizing, administering, and evaluating recreation programs. Personal, 
social, and professional requirements of the recreational leader. (1 hour lecture, 2 
hours activity.) 

444. Recreation Programs and Activities (2) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Theory and activity course, leadership in 
recreation programs, activities in recreation agencies. Laboratory experiences and 
practice included. (4 hours activity per week.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Requirements for the Major 

Lo*iver division: In order to take upper division courses in psychology, at least six 
units of psychology must be offered from the student’s lower division work. 

Upper division: A minimum of 27 units of upper division work will constitute a 
major in psychology. Fifteen units are prescribed below: 

Units 
3 
3 
3 


Psych. 301 Experimental Psychology 

Psych. 408 History of Psychology . 

Psych. 461 Group Psychological Testing 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


79 


Units 


Psych. 351 
or 

Psych. 431 
Psych. 421. 
or 

Psych. 412 


Social Psychology . - 

Theories of Personality . 
Physiological Psychology 

Psychology of Learning .. 


3 

3 


A minimum of 15 units additional including 3 units of elementary statistics and 
12 units in psychology courses will be selected in consultation with the academic 
adviser. 

RECOMMENDED RELATED COURSES 


Courses from each of the following areas according to the student’s interests: 
(1) social sciences; (2) physical sciences; (3) biological sciences, preferably physi- 
ology; (4) mathematics; (5) humanities, such as philosophy, literature. Psychology 
majors planning to do graduate work are urged to take work in foreign languages. 


161. Elementary Statistics (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Two years of algebra or equivalent. An introductory course in 
descriptive statistics. 


201. Introductory Psychology (3) F, S 

General introduction to basic concepts and problems in psychology as a behav- 
ioral discipline. Emphasis upon the human organism as an adapting system, with 
attention to genetic origins; normal development and capacities; problem-solving 
and adjustment to stress. 


202. Principles of Psychology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201. A course for psychology majors covering selected basic 
areas of psychology in depth. Special emphasis on the methods of studying physi- 
ological factors, adaptive behavior, perception, cognition and motivation. 

301. Experimental Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Psych. 201, Psych. 202. Emphasis on basic concepts of scientific 
research in psychology, and on training in research practices. Experience in the for- 
mulation of hypotheses, collection and interpretation of data, and report-writing. 


311. Educational Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Psych. 201. Application of psychological research and theory to the 
educative process. Major attention given to the problems of learning, individual 
differences, child capacities, and behavior. (Not open to students who have taken 
Educ. 311.) 


312. Human Growth and Development (3) F, S 
See Educ. 312. . 


341. Abnormal Psychology (3) F, S (Formerly 441) 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201 and Psych. 202. Dynamics, symptoms, causes, treatment, 
and prevention of neuroses, psychoses, alcohol and drug addiction, psychosomatic 
illnesses, and character disorders. Field trips as arranged. 

342. Mental Health (3) S (Formerly 442) 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201 and Psych. 202 or permission of instructor. Social and 
emotional dynamics of the adjustment processes. Emphasis upon positive factors in 
the individual, group, and community conducive to improving mental heatlh. (Credit 
not ordinarily given for both Psych. 341 and 342.) 


80 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


3 51. Social Psychology (3) F (Formerly 45 1 ) 

Prerequisites: Psych. 201, Psych. 202, and Soc. 301. Study of phenomena of social 
interaction and the nature of group processes and influences. Attention paid to the 
intra-psychic effects of group influences. (Credit not given for both Psych. 351 and 
Soc. 341.) 

391. Industrial Psychology (3) F (Formerly 49 1 ) 

Prerequisite: Psych. 201 and Psych. 202 or permission of instructor. Study of 
psychological principles and techniques in industrial and business settings. Includes 
selection, placement, training, human factors, promotion, environmental influences, 
and problems of people at work. 

400. Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor. Individual library 
study or experimental investigation under direction of a staff member. 

407. Seminar in Basic Concepts of Philosophy and Psychology (4) F, S 
Prerequisite: 3 units of philosophy and Psych. 201. An interdisciplinary study 

of significant interrelationships which obtain between basic concepts common to 
both philosophy and psychology. 

408. History of Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: 12 upper division units in psychology or permission of instructor. 
Survey of the development of psychology from early times to the present. 

412. Psychology of Learning (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 311. Variables, processes, influences, factors, conditions, and 
elements of learning according to the major theoretical systems. Critical evaluation 
of the theories. 

413. Perception (3) S 

Prerequisites: Psych. 301 and a course in statistics or permission of instructor. 
Psychological problems in perception. Emphasis on dynamic conception of the 
process of perception; relationship of perception to learning, cognition, and moti- 
vation. 

421. Physiological Psychology (3) F 

Prerequisite: Physiology or permission of instructor. Survey of relations between 
behavior and biological processes. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, 
role of neural and humoral agents in perception and complex behavior (emotion, 
etc.), behavioral effects of brain lesions, the effects of drugs on behavior, psycho- 
somatic disorders and motivation. 

431. Theories of Personality (3) S 

Prerequisite: Three units of upper division psychology. Personality structure, 
development, and dynamics according to major theories. Research methods as they 
apply to personality theory. 

461. Group Psychological Testing (3) F 

Prerequisites: Psych. 161 or equivalent. Intelligence, aptitude, interest, and per- 
sonality testing. Theory, construction, evaluation, interpretation, and uses of psy- 
chological tests. 

462. Individual Psychological Testing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych. 461. Major tests of intelligence. Practice in administration, 
scoring, and interpretation of these instruments. 

471. Exceptional Children (3) F, S (Formerly 472) 

See Educ. 471. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


81 


472. Gifted Children (2) F (Formerly 471) 

See Educ. 472. 

481. Survey of Clinical Psychology (3) F 

Prerequisites: Psych. 341, 431, and 461. Development and contemporary aspects 

of the field. Methods, diagnosis, therapeutic techniques, research, and problems. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS COOPERATING IN 
STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1962 
Elementary 

Alamitos Elementary School District 

Lauretta Bennett, Carlton Corey, Patricia Graham, Alice Hammond, Carol Ann 
Kolson, Mrs. Lucia Shifflette, Jean Turnbaugh 

Anaheim City School District 

Ruth Chambers, J. R. Cobum, Jr., Mrs. Adele Cooke, Elizabeth Elmore, Joan 
Frank, Marcy McCall, Frances McClease, Mrs. Velma McCormack, Prudence 
B. Mitchell, Mrs. Marilyn Warner, Virgene Wessman, Janet C. Young 

Brea Elementary School District 

Opal Hassing, Mrs. Margery C. Hathcock, Mrs. Reita M. Lutz, AnDeanne 
Spencer, Mrs. Georgann Watson, Mrs. Marian P. Withey 

Buena Park School District 

Mrs. Lola Eldridge, Marie Gramlich, Rudolph Johnson, Mrs. Adeline LaPan, 
Mrs. Mary Parkin, Elizabeth McFarland, Harold Sloat, Albert E. Stuart 

Centralia School District 

Frances Carey, Mrs. Carol Fox, Mrs. Dorothy Grimes, Mrs. Mary Jane Pender- 
ghast, Mrs. Eunice Porter, Mrs. Anna Speck 

Costa Mesa Union School District 

Preshie Beck, Gay M. Fisher, Marie Hammons, Naomi Hayes, Mabel Koral, 
Nellie G. Long, Mrs. Richard McAdoo, Jean Marie Sprague, Bernice Turner, 
Harmon Weston, Leonore F. Wilson 

Fullerton School District 

Jeanne K. Brown, Mrs. Lucille Cooper, Minard Duncan, Wilma Gibbs, Charles 
Horton, Marjorie Hunt, Kenneth Mackay, Mrs. Blanche Melgren, Carmen 
Pelton, Mrs. Myrtle Reno, Dorothy Rhodes, Mrs. Lorna Smith, Eva Steinberg, 
SaUy B. Wilson 

Garden Grove Elementary School District 

Donald E. Brown, Mrs. Velma L. Fuller, O. L. Hoover, David P. Jenkins, Gayle 
Knapp, Audrey McGregor, Rachel McVicker, Mignon Waters 

LaHabra City School District 

Jacqueline Bettick, Harriet Hermann, Wyman L. Hill, Betty Hines, Roger 
Membrez, Ann Prestridge, Mrs. Mary M. Sheller, Robert M. Townsend 

Magnolia School District 

Mrs. Sara Borden, Mrs. Thelma Buhlie, Vivian Chichester, Sandra E. Finchum, 
Ruth Hain, Mrs. Lonnelle Judson, Virginia Krill, Mrs. Betty Larsen, Mrs. 
Celia Lockiuso, Dorothy S. Long, Linda Moore, Mrs. Charloma A. Schwan- 
kovsky 


82 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Ontario Elementary School District 

Dorothy Gunn, Mrs. Cleobelle Heiple, Gladys Henry, Mrs. Marguerite Bossier, 
Mrs. Betty Miller, Mrs. Jane Naisbitt, Mrs. Ineta Robinson, Mrs. Judith Troxel 

Orange Unified School District 

Mrs. Lilyan M. Bois, Margaret G. Cornett, Charles I. Jones, Mrs. Elma Kadau, 
Mrs. Marjorie Kauth, Jean Laylin, Mildred Lussier, Mrs. Carol Perry, Ruth A. 
Reich, Barbara E. Sears, Mrs. Janel J. Seeley, Mrs. Beverly Shaw, Elva B. 
Spencer, Ralph Whitford 

Placentia Unified School District 

Dorothy Gardiner, Hattie B. Hodkins, Dorothy Hoover, Erma H. Lofing 
Santa Ana Unified School District 

Theodore Beasley, Jane Capozzoli, Reveillee Dohnalek, Carol Freeman, Joan C. 
Hill, Mrs. Margaret Jenkins, Mel Maxwell, Mrs. Elaine Parke, Joan Ranney, 
Mrs. Carole Walsh, Darrel Wilson, Natalie Woodson 

Savanna School District 

JoAnn Clevenger, Jose Martinez, Reita Smith, Corlyss Squier 
Whittier City School District 

Mrs. Beverly Christiansen, Mrs. \^irginia Graham, Mrs. Grace Hanson, Mary Lee 
Holton, Ardith Johnson, Mr. Marion Martin, Merle Seymour, William L. 
Wilkins 

FALL SEMESTER 1962 
Elementary 

Anaheim City School District 

Donald Bahret, Mrs. James Coburn, Mrs. Janice Kim, Mrs. Velma McCormick, 
Mrs. Ivy McKeown, Charles Prentis, Mrs. Silvia Thomas, Mrs. Marilyn Warner 

Alamitos Elementary School District 

Mrs. Elizabeth Allen, Mrs. Fern Berg, Mrs. Lois Cole, Mrs. Avanell Howk, Mrs. 
Ferol Markwell, Mrs. Margaret Pearson, Mrs. Lucia Shifflette 

Brea Elementary School District 

Mrs. Helen Boswell, Mrs. Virginia Erb, Mrs. Carol Guelker, Miss Rose Marie 
Hutchins, Anthony Lombard, Ken Reed, Mrs. lone Salzer, Mrs. Marian Withey 

Buena Park School District 

Mrs. Josephine Burdell, Mrs. Lola Eldridge, Mrs. J. Garner, Norman C. Martin, 
Mrs. Virginia McCue, iMrs. Mary Padfield, Mrs. Daisy Preston, Miss Mignon 
Price 

Fullerton Elementary School District 

Mrs. Dorothy Carter, Mrs. Marguerite Green, Mrs. Mae Henderson, Mrs. Grace 
Kent, Mrs. Joyce Lang, Mrs. Blanche Melgren, Mrs. Virginia Sellers, Mrs. 
Lottie White 

Garden Grove Elementary School District 
Mrs. Virginia Graetz, Mrs. Gayle Knapp, Mrs. Anneva Riddick, Robert Sampecia, 
Mrs. Mignon Waters, Miss Judy Zimba 

LaHabra City School District 

Mrs. Florence Cunningham, Mrs. Harriet Hermann, Gerald Hund, Eddie Ikard, 
Mrs. Lorraine Kliem, Roger Membrez 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


83 


Magnolia Elementary School District 

Mrs. Deanna Carter, Mrs. Evalyn Chambers, Mrs. Myra Hochheim, Mrs. Lonnie 
Judson, Mrs. Carolyn Krutsinger, Miss Ann Morris 

SPRING SEMESTER 1962 
Secondary 

Anaheim Union High School District 
Anaheim High School 
Paul M. Bajema, Buford Smith 
Magnolia High School 
Howard Hovey, Lester Johnson 

Fullerton Joint Union High School and Junior College District 
Buena Park High School 

Donald Bryant, Frank Form, Jack Holm, H. L. Looney, Mr. Pantages 
Fullerton Union High School 

Lloyd Alford, Harold Beddows, Melvin Bennett, Elizabeth Brunskill, Norman 
Cottom, Mary Davis, William H. Gienapp, Donald Knorr, Roger Guy Logan, 
Leona Quigley 
Fullerton Junior College 
Phillip Borst 
La Habra High School 

Mrs. Bea King, George Francisco, William Lennertz, Edward Martin, Mrs. 
Jean Roy, Lee Thompson 
Sunny Hills High School 

Miss Gale Aalbu, Mary Louise M. Moore, Mrs. Louise Vinson, Mrs. Margaret 
Zwick 

Fullerton School District 
Nicholas Junior High School 
Mrs. Helen Dom, Mrs. Martha Steams 
Wilshire Junior High School 
Miss Maude Minnick, Mrs. Sally Warner 

Garden Grove School District 
Ocia A. Peters Intermediate School 
Constance McBade, Doris Morehouse 

Garden Grove Union High School District 
Bolsa Grande High School 
Robert Day 

Orange Unified School District 
Portola Junior High School 
Mrs. Marian Darsie, John Thomas 

Placentia Unified School District 
Valencia High School 
Thomas Avery, Donald Shaffer 

Santa Ana Unified and Junior College District 
Santa Ana Valley High School 
Katherine Berry, Louis Bums, Daniel Hohneker 



84 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


FALL SEMESTER 1963 
Secondary 

ANAHEIM UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Anaheim High School 

Vernon Jones, Mrs. Carolyn Jo Kent, Richard Lovegren, Fred Myers 

Western High School 
Robert Clough, Miss Margaret Taylor 

FULLERTON UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Fullerton High School 

Mrs. Virginia Cables, James N. Hines, Guy Logan, Don Oseid, Joseph Yelle 

La Habra High School 
Mrs. Mary Jane Flaa 

Sunny Hills High School 
John Dewey and Mrs. Juana White 

GARDEN GROVE SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Rancho Alamitos High School 
Roscoe Jackman and Elias Ramirez 

EXCELSIOR UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
La Mirada High School 

Mrs. Dorothy Dick, Mrs. Susan Kent, William McMaster 

NEWPORT HARBOR UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Costa Mesa High School 

Ken Cave, William Clarke, Mrs. Bea Irwin, Donald Miller 

SANTA ANA UNIFIED AND JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT 
Santa Ana High School 
Thomas Baldwin, Leland Doughty 

WHITTIER UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
California High School 
Russ Maggio 




Building, now under construction and scheduled for occupancy in the Spring semester of 1965 



DIVISION OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

Professors: Olsen (Chairman), Fessenden, Landon 

Associate Professors: Breinholt, Dietz, Gray, Hein, Long,* Thorsen, Young 
Assistant Professors: Grannell, Michalsky, Nelson, Saniuelson, Smith 
Lecturers in Applied Music (Part-thne): Caudill (string bass), Fengler (violin, 
viola), Fessenden (oboe), Huntington (organ), Muggeridge (oboe), Norman 
(voice), Nowlin (bassoon), Phillips (voice), Pyle (French horn), Remsen 
(trumpet brass), Schoenfeld, A. (violin, viola), Schoenfeld, E. (’cello). Singer 
(’cello), Wade (flute), Wagner (piano). 

(1962-1963 Faculty) 

The Division of Fine and Applied Arts includes academic offerings in the Depart- 
ments of Art, Music, and Speech and Drama. Programs in these disciplines are 
provided both in breadth and depth; i.e., they are intended both for the major as 
well as the non-major. The broad areas of Fine and Applied Arts are conceived of 
as the study of those practical and aesthetic experiences necessary to the education 
of all persons in our modern society. Persons may elect to take courses leading 
toward a liberal arts degree, teaching credentials or for professional preparation in 
art, drama, music, speech, or speech and hearing therapy. 

Academic programs in the Division of Fine and Applied Arts include the areas 
of theory, history, and practice. Departmental majors within the Division are 
encouraged by this means to become widely acquainted with the broad contribu- 
tions to society made by their major field, as well as the concentrated application 
of this area of study. Students are encouraged to stimulate their intellectual curiosity 
and to synthesize many areas of knowledge by means of careful planning of 
electives in various subject matter areas. To this end, the major adviser will assist 
each student in planning his major and minor programs and in the selection of 
appropriate interdisciplinary courses. 

MAJOR PROGRAMS 

The curriculum in the Division of Fine and Applied Arts enables the college to 
offer the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in Art, Language Arts, Music, and 
Speech. 

Courses leading toward clinical certification by the American Speech and Hearing 
Association are included in the speech therapy curriculum. Minors are offered in 
art, music and speech. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

The Department of Art offers a program which includes the several fields of art 
history, theory, and appreciation, the fine arts (drawing, painting, and sculpture), 
the applied arts (general and specialized design and crafts), and art education. The 
broadest objective of the program is to contribute to the total development of the 
learner as he prepares himself for citizenship in a democratic society. More specif- 
ically, the art program provides opportunities for students: (1) to develop a critical 
appreciation and understanding of the range of artistic production of mankind; (2) 
to express their ideas, thoughts, and feelings in visual forms; and (3) to develop 
those understandings and skills needed to pursue graduate studies in the field, to 
teach art in the schools, or to qualify for a position in business and industry as an 
art specialist. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree have been 
designed to meet the specialized needs of the following groups: (1) students who 
^ish to study art as an essential part of their personal and cultural devolpment; 

* College Administrative OflBcer. 


[87] 



88 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


(2) students seeking vocational competence in art; (3) students planning to teach 
art at the secondary level who wish either a teaching major or minor in art; and 
(4) students planning to teach in the elementary schools who wish to have art as 
either an academic major or minor. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have 
a C average in all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major 
will be allowed for specific major courses in which a grade of D is obtained. As 
is customary, the Art Department reserves the right to hold projects completed by 
a student for class credit for a period of three years. 

MAJOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Four course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and in- 
terests of students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art. 

Plan I provides for an emphasis in the area of art history, theory, and apprecia- 
tion and is particularly recommended for those students who wish to pursue gradu- 
ate studies in art history or museology. 

Plan II is designed for those students who prefer a studio-type program with an 
area of specialization selected from the following: (1) design; (2) crafts; (3) draw- 
ing and painting, or (4) sculpture. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in secondary or junior college teaching; and 

Plan IV is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary teaching. 

All four plans require a minimum of 48 units in art or approved related courses 
with a minimum of 24 units of upper division in art except for Plan IV which re- 
quires a minimum of 36 units of art including a minimum of 24 units of upper 
division in art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet 
the other college requirements for a bachelor of arts degree (see page 92). Stu- 
dents following Plans III and IV also must meet any specific requirements for the 
desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for Division of Education and 
Psychology). Graduate students who plan to meet the requirement for a general 
secondary credential with a major in art must complete or be enrolled in 6 units 
in art as approved by the major adviser on and beyond the specific course require- 
ments listed in Plan III before they can be recommended by the Art Department 
for student teaching. 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION EMPHASIS 

Lower Division: Art history and appreciation (9 units) ; Art Structure (3 
units); approved electives (12 units) in: art, anthropology, foreign 
languages, history, literature, music or philosophy 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (24 units), including a mini- 
mum of 3 units in special studies and coverage of four of the following 
fields: primitive, classical, medieval, renaissance, baroque, modem. 

Oriental, American 

Reading knowledge of one modern foreign language 

Comprehensive examination in art history 

PLAN II: STUDIO EMPHASIS 

Lower Division: Art history and appreciation (9 units); drawing and 
painting including life drawing (9 units); design and crafts (6 units) 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (6 units) ; area of specializa- 
tion (12 units); art electives (6 units) 


24 units 

24 units 

24 units 
24 units 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


89 


PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
(Secondary or Junior College) 

Lower Division: Same as Plan II above 


24 units 


Upper Division: Contemporary art (3 units); drawing and painting (3 
units); display and exhibition design (2 units); crafts (3 units); 
sculpture or ceramics (3 units); 6 units selected from advertising de- 
sign, industrial design, costume design, interior design, or fabric design; 
electives (4 units) 


24 units 


PLAN IV: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
(Elementary) 

Lower Division: Basic course in art history and appreciation, drawing 

and painting, design, and crafts - - 12 units 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (6 units) ; drawing and 
painting, (3 units); design (3 units); crafts (3 units); electives (9 
units) - - - - 24 units 

MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bechelor of arts 
degree of which a minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. In- 
cluded in the program must be a basic course in each of the following areas: (1) 
art history and appreciation; (2) design; (3) drawing and painting; and (4) crafts. 
Those students planning to qualify for a standard teaching credential with special- 
ization in secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain approval from the 
Art Department for the courses selected to meet the upper division requirements 
for a minor in art. 

ART DEPARTMENT COURSES 

ART HISTORY, THEORY AND APPRECIATION 

101. Introduction to Art (3) F 

A course for the general student designed to develop an understanding of his- 
torical and contemporary art forms. Illustrated with examples of painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, and design. Field trips required. Not open to art majors for 
credit except by permission of the Art Department. 

111. Fundamentals of Art (3) S 

A comparative study of the elements of plastic organization in relation to per- 
sonal and cultural aesthetic expression and concepts. Fundamental art ideas, prob- 
lems of organization and structure, and terminology. Field trips required. 

201A,B. Art and Civilization (3,3) F, S (Planned for 1964-6 5) 

A comparative survey of the basic ideas, forms, and styles of the visual arts as 
they developed in various cultures from prehistoric time to the present day. 

302. Western Art: Classic to Renaissance (3) F (Formerly Art 403 ) 

Provides broad familiarity with the major styles of classic, medieval, and Russian 
art. Lectures, discussions and field trips. 

310. Western Art: Renaissance and Baroque (3) S (Formerly Art 404) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance and 
Baroque periods. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Also recommended for Hu- 
manities and history students. 

312. History of Art Since 1800 (3) F (Formerly Art 311) 

Art of the Nineteenth Century and its development into contemporary times. 


90 


ORANGE STATE CX)LLEGE 


401. Contemporary Art (3) F (Formerly Art 3 21) 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphics, and photography. 

402. Contemporary Art (3) S (Formerly Art 322) 

Fundamentals of modern architecture, interior design, sculpture, and industrial 
design. Lectures, discussions, and field trips. 

411. Primitive Art (3) S (Formerly Art 381) (Planned for 1964-65 and alternate 
years) 

A Study of the art of primitive groups and cultures. 

421. Oriental Art (3) S 

The major styles of Oriental art including ancient cultures and recent trends 
in Japan, China, India, and Islam. Lectures, discussions, and field trips. Also recom- 
mended for humanities and history students. 

481. Special Studies in Art History and Appreciation (1-3) S 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunities for intensive study and 
evalution in one area of art history and appreciation. 

STUDIO COURSES 

100. Exploratory Course in Art (3) F, S (Formerly Art 3 00) 

Exploration and creative use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. 
Field trips required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of the 
Art Department. 

103. Two-Dimensional Design (3) F (Formerly Art 371 A) 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as 
related to a two-dimensional surface. 

104. Three-Dimensional Design (3) S (Formerly Art 3 7 IB) 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as 
related to three-dimensional surfaces and forms. 

106A,B. Beginning Ceramics (3,3) F, S 

A basic course in the study of form as related to ceramic materials, tools, proc- 
esses, and concepts. 

107A,B. Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) F, S 
Beginning work in the creative use of the materials of drawing and painting 
with emphasis on visual concepts and use of medium, individual exploration, 
growth, planning and craftsmanship. 

117A,B,C,D. Life Drawing (1,1, 1,1) F, S 

Drawing from the live model. 117B will include working from the model with 
three-dimensional materials. 

205A,B. Beginning Crafts (3,3) F, S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or Art 100. A study of form as related to the concepts, 
materials, and processes involved in the making of both two and three-dimensional 
art forms from wood, metal, plastics, and paper. 

305A,B. Crafts (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 103 and 104, or 205 A, or 100 and 432 or the equivalent. Craft 
processes, techniques, and concepts as related to the design and making of utili- 
tarian objects with emphasis on the use of hand tools. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


91 


306A,B. Advanced Ceramics (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 106 A or 106B. Further experiences in the creative use of ceramic 
materiak including design, fonning, glazing and firing. 

307A,B. Drawing and Painting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: One semester of drawing and 1 semester of painting. Creative use 
of materials of drawing and painting with emphasis on individual exploration, 
growth, planning, and craftsmanship. 

309. Art Techniques (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 100 or the equivalent. Creative use of a variety of drawing and 
painting materials. 

313A,B. Interior Design (3,3) S (Formerly Art 412) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107 A,B. Development and projection of ideas in re- 
lation to the functional, social, and asthetic problems involved in the design and 
planning of living spaces for homes and small offices. 

316A,B. Sculpture (3,3) S 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. A study of basic sculptural processes using a 
variety of materials and processes. 

317A,B. Advanced Life Drawing (3,3) F, S 
Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from 
the live model. 

323A,B. Advertising Design (3,3) F 

Prerequisite: Art 103, 104, 107A,B. Development and projection of ideas in rela- 
tion to the technical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. 

333A,B. Industrial Design (3,3) (Planned for 1964-65 ) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A, 107 A, B. Planning and designing of projects 
in relation to the technological, psychological, and social aspects of contemporary 
society. 

347A,B. Printmaking. (3,3) S 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and Art 117A,B,C,D. An introduction to the graphic 
medium. Instruction in the techniques of lithography, etching, woodcut, aquatint, 
monoprint and serigraphy. 

350A,B. Painting for Non-Art Majors (3,3) F, S 
Opportunities for students with little or no background in art to work creatively 
with various painting media both indoors and outdoors. 

3 53 A,B. Textile Design (3,3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Art 100 or Art 103. The creative exploration and design of fabrics 
relative to the needs of apparel, furniture, architecture, and interiors using both 
printed and woven processes. 

453A,B. Display and Exhibition Design (2,2) F, S 
A course in the appropriate and creative use of materials, processes, and design 
concepts as they relate to the special problems involved in the planning and pre- 
paring of displays, exhibits, bulletin boards, wall cases, and art portfolios. 

483. Special Studies in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
design areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 8 units, 
but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single 
semester. 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


483a. Advertising Design (F) 

483b. Interior Design (S) 

483c. Design and Composition (F, S) 

483d. Display Design (F, S) 

483e. Textile Design (Planned for 1964-65) 

48 5. Special Studies in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
craft areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 8 units, 
but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single 
semester. 

485a. Jewelry (S) 

485b. General Crafts (F, S) 

485c. Ceramics (F, S) 

485d. Weaving (Planned for 1964-65) 

486. Special Studies in Sculpture (1-3) S 

Prerequisite: Art 316 A, B and permission of the instructor. Opportunity for 
intensive study in the following sculptural processes: modeling, carving, fabrication 
and casting. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units but no more than 3 units 
of credit may be obtained in a single semester. 

487, Special Studies in Drawing and Painting (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
drawing and painting areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a 
maximum of 8 units, but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any 
one area in a single semester. 

487a. Painting (F, S) 

487b. Life Drawing (F, S) 

487c. Drawing (F) 

487d. Printmaking (S) 

505. Graduate Problems in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the crafts areas listed below! 
May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units but no more than 3 units of credit may 
be obtained in a single semester. 

505a. Jewelry (S) 

505b. General Crafts (F, S) 

505c. Ceramics (F, S) 

506. Graduate Problems in Sculpture (1-3) S 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on plan- 
ning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. May be re- 
peated to a maximum of 8 units but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained 
in a single semester. 

507. Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the drawing and painting areas 
listed below. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units but no more than 3 units 
of credit may be obtained in a single semester. 

507a. Painting (F, S) 

507b. Life Drawing (F, S) 

507c. Drawing (S) 

507d. Printmaking (S) 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


93 


ART EDUCATION 

332. Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers (2) F 
Prerequisite: Ed. 311 or consent of the instructor. Creative selection, organization 
and use of materials and tools in construction activities. Includes correlation experi- 
ences with the social studies, science, and other units of work. 

360. Elementary School Crafts (2) S 

Studio activities and techniques of crafts appropriate to the elementary school. 
Strongly recommended for elementary teaching credential candidates. 

370A,B. Art Activity (2,2) F, S 

Opportunities to observe, analyze, and evaluate child growth in and through 
creative art experiences. 

429 A, B. Arts and Crafts for Teaching Exceptional Children (2,2) 

(Planned for 1964-65) 

Methods of using a variety of art materials and processes with emphasis on those 
experiences which meet the needs of retarded or handicapped children. 

432. Teaching Art in the Elementary School (2) F, S 
Prerequisite: Ed. 311, Art 100 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 
Objectives and methods of the elementary art program. Studio activities, creative 
experience and techniques appropriate to the elementary school. Lectures and studio 
projects. Required of elementary teaching credential candidates. 

442. Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2-3) F 
Prerequisites: Education 311, Education 340, senior standing, or consent of the 
instructor. Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching art in secondary schools. 
Required, before student teaching, of students presenting majors in art for the 
General Secondary Credential. Students without teaching experience must register 
for three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at the same 
hour each day, so they can serve as teacher aides in high school. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

The Department of Music offers courses in music for both majors and non- 
majors. The fundamental purpose of the music major curriculum leading toward 
the baccalaureate degree is to provide the necessary training in each of the related 
aspects of music such as its history and literature, theoretical studies, and musical 
performance. Such a program of studies is based on the need to provide serious 
students with a core curriculum which will prepare the individual in such areas 
as (a) the knowledge of the history and relationships of music as an art form, 
(b) a comprehensive and analytical understanding of musical literature, (c) a 
working knowledge of music theory and structure, (d) a high degree of competence 
in a performing field, and (e) a specialization within the major. 

The music program is designed to educate: 

1. Students in general, in terms of composite minors, music minors, or broad 
offerings in the humanities and/or liberal arts. 

2. Students preparing to teach in the secondary schools, with a major field 
concentration in music. 

3. Students preparing to teach in the elementary schools with a major field 
concentration in music (special music teachers) . 

4. Students preparing to teach in the junior colleges and four-year colleges with 
a major field concentration in music. 




94 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


5. Students preparing to teach as classroom teachers in the elementary school 
completing work in basic musicianship and music methods for teaching general 
elementary classroom music. 

6. Students wishing to prepare for various vocations in music, such as: 

a. Church music directors and organists 

b. Private teachers of music 

c. Music librarians 

d. Professional performers of music 

e. Composers and arrangers 

f. Industrial and recreational music directors 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. Entrance examinations in basic piano, voice, theory, and music history will 
be given all music majors at the time of entrance to Orange State College, 
and to OSC lower division students prior to acceptance in upper division 
music-major sequence. These examinations plus auditions in the major per- 
formance areas are for placement and to satisfy credential requirements in 
the minor performance fields. Students who are deficient in any of these 
areas will be expected to take additional work as suggested by the faculty 
adviser. (See Entrance Placement and Proficiency Examinations) 

2. Music majors will be expected to declare a principal area of performance with 
the approval of the Department Chairman and faculty adviser, no later than 
the beginning of the junior year. It will be expected that each student will 
prepare for suitable development within this major area of performance, 
culminating in the successful presentation of a senior recital before he may be 
approved for graduation. The following steps should be taken as a part of 
this preparation: 

a. Declaration of an area of performance concentration (voice, piano, instru- 
ment, or combination solo instrument or voice and conducting) at the 
time of entrance to OSC. 

b. Demonstration of performance progress before a faculty jury each se- 
mester. 

c. Appearance in at least one minor recital or an assisting performer at 
least once each semester. 

3. All music majors will be required to participate in a music performance group 
each semester. Music majors are required to participate in a large ensemble 
each semester. Instrumental and piano majors are required to take part in 
small ensembles for a minimum of two semesters in addition. 

4. A maximum of 10 units in music performing groups can be counted toward 
the bachelor of arts degree, not more than 8 of which may be in any one 
activity. 

5. The major area of performance concentration for major in music requires 
work in applied music, as follows: 

a. Piano, Voice and Instrumental majors— must complete a minimum of 8 
semesters of applied music in the major field of concentration, leading 
toward the successful presentation of a senior recital in the major per- 
fonnance field. 

b. (Dhoral or Instrumental Conducting majors — must complete a minimum of 
8 semesters of applied music in the major field of performance con- 
centration, in addition to a minimum of 6 units in conducting, leading 
toward the successful presentation of a joint recital in the major per- 
forming field and/or a conducting recital. 



OIL\NGE STATE COLLEGE 


95 


6. Performance requirements for music majors, not in the area of performance 
concentration will be expected as follows: 

a. Transfer students will be required to take entrance voice and keyboard 
proficiency examinations. Additional work in class or applied piano or 
voice will be expected of students not demonstrating a reasonable level 
of proficiency in both fields. 

b. Where no transfer college level courses in voice or piano have been 
taken prior to admission, students will be expected to take a minimum of 
2 semesters each of piano and voice. 

c. A credential proficiency examination in both piano and voice must be 
satisfactorily passed before music majors may begin directed teaching. 
These tests are usually given at the end of the junior year. 

7. Senior transfer students entering Orange State College with a major in music, 
or graduate students in music entering to complete credential requirements 
will be expected to complete a minimum of one semester of successful upper 
division work in music before they may be approved for directed teaching. 
Required courses and competencies expected of all OSC music majors must 
be satisfied prior to endorsement by the faculty committee for acceptance in 
the credential program. 

8. Students intending to teach music in the public elementary or secondary 
schools and junior colleges will be required to complete the program leading 
toward the Bachelor of Arts, Music Education concentration. This is a five- 
year program, normally including one year beyond the completion of the 
B.A. Suitable advisement should be sought leading toward the level as well 
as the fields in which the student is preparing to teach. 

9. All music majors will be expected to attend a weekly departmental organiza- 
tion class each semester of enrollment. 

10. Major students expecting to qualify for teaching credentials must meet all 
college requirements in general education and special requirements for certifi- 
cation (including those of the Division of Education and Psychology). A 
grade point average of 2.5 is required by the Department before candidates 
will be recommended for admission to student teaching. 

FEES FOR APPLIED MUSIC 

Applied Music (private instruction in voice or major instrument), per lesson 
$l.(X)-$6.00. 

Average fee, including 16 half-hour lessons and examination, per semester $70.00. 

MUSIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Music, Orange State College offers a variety of courses and 
programs leading to baccalaureate and graduate degrees in teaching and the profes- 
sions. These degrees may be earned in one of three degree patterns; i.e., specializa- 
tions in elementary or secondary music teaching or for non-credential objectives. 
It is possible to elect suitable concentrations within these specializations in such 
areas as composition, vocal or instrumental music. 

Advanced study through upper-division and graduate courses is offered in many 
fields of music. Although the masters degree program is not yet available it is 
anticipated that several of these courses soon will be applicable for graduate degree 
preparation. 

All students seeking music degrees are required to study in suitable areas of 
specialization and to take coordinate courses in musicology, aesthetics, and general 
studies. The intent of this program is to develop broadly educated persons who 
also are competent in a craft area of music. 


96 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 
(Minimum Requirements) 

The program of studies leading toward the B.A. in music is designed to provide 
suitable preparation in such professional areas as (1) music for teaching, (2) theory 
and composition, (3) performance, (4) non-teaching professions in music, (5) musi- 
cology, and (6) advanced degrees in music. The music major, professional degree 
program shall consist of no fewer than 60 semester units, of which at least 36 shall 
be in the upper division. In addition, students are required to take Alu. 151A,B or 
the equivalent as partial fulfillment of the general education requirement in Fine 
and Applied Arts. The following minimum requirements are basic to this degree 
objective. 

Lower Division 

Theory of Music Units 

(including musicianship, sight-singing, dictation, diatonic and chromatic 

harmony and keyboard) 12 

Applied Techniques 

(including ensemble, principal instrument or voice, basic piano and voice) 12 

Total, Lower Division 24 

Upper Division 

Theory of Music 

(including counterpoint, composition, analytic techniques and 


orchestration) g 

Alusic History and Literature 4 

Applied Techniques 

(including ensemble, principal instrument or voice) 8 

Specialization in the Major 

(courses required for area of specialization, to include conducting, instru- 
mental techniques, music education and theory) 14 

Electives, music 2 

Total, Upper Division 36 

Total Units, Lower-Upper Division 60 


Note: All candidates for the B.A. Degree with the music major must complete 
specific requirements for the area of performance concentration in addition 
to the core of studies indicated above. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS, WITH CONCENTRATION IN MUSIC 
FOR ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM TEACHERS 

This degree program is designed for persons interested in a non-professional 
liberal arts emphasis in music. It is a suitable concentration for persons preparing 
as general elementary classroom teachers. It should be emphasized that this degree 
program is not designed for the music specialist in public schools, nor does it 
prepare for advanced degrees in music or for most music professions. This major 
consists of no fewer than 36 semester units, of which at least 24 units must be taken 
in the upper division. In addition, students are required to take Alu. 100 or 151A,B 
or the equivalent as partial fulfillment of the general education requirement in 
Fine and Applied Arts. The following distribution of subject matter and com- 
petencies shall be considered to be the core of this major: 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


97 


Lower Division 

Theory of Music Units 

(including music fundamentals, musicianship, sight-singing, dictation, and 

harmony) 8-9 

Applied Techniques 

(including ensemble, principal instrument or voice, basic piano and voice) 3-4 

Total, Lower Division 12 

Upper Division 

Theory of Music 2-4 

Music History and Literature 4 

Applied Techniques * 

(including ensemble, orchestral instruments, conducting, piano and voice) 16 

Total, Upper Division - 24 

Total Units, Lower-Upper Division 36 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

(General Secondary Teaching Credential) 

The Minor in Music is intended as a second field for persons completing a 
minimum 36 unit major in another discipline in preparation for the General Secon- 
dary Teaching Credential. A maximum of 12 units from the lower division may 
be included in work counted toward the music minor. The music minor requires 
a minimum preparation of 20 semester units. 

Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division 

Theory of Music Units 

(selected from musicianship, sight-singing, dictation, harmony, analytic 

techniques, and counterpoint) 6 

Music History and Literature (MU 151A,B or selected from courses at the 

300 or 400 level) - - 4 

Applied Techniques 

(including ensemble, conducting, piano or voice, orchestral instruments, 

and principal instrument or voice) - — 10 

Note: Students expecting to use a minor teaching area in instrumental music 
are advised to complete Mu. 181a-d and/or 381a-d. Orchestral Instru- 
ments (4 units). 

Total Units 20 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE BACHELOR OF 
ARTS IN MUSIC, MUSIC EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION 

(Music for Teaching) 

Five Year Frogram Leading Toward the General Secondary Teaching Credential: 

Refer to credential requirements. Division of Education and Psychology, 1963-64 
Catalog. 

In addition to the major field requirements, candidates for the general secondary 
credential must complete a minimum of 20 units in another field for a liberal arts 
or academic minor. Courses in the major may be distributed to include the fifth 
year in order that the student complete all requirements for general education, the 

* General Elementary Candidates must take a minimum of 2 units each of piano and voice 
(non-principal) and pass satisfactorily the junior level proficiency in each. 


98 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


academic minor and professional education (except Ed. 549 and Ed. 501) by the 
end of the fourth year and prior to beginning student teaching. 

The following is an example of a modified program for the general secondary 
credential: 


Lower Division, OSC Student 

Freshman Year: 

Mu lllA.B Music Theory 5 units 

Mu 151 A, B Survey of Music (General Education) 4 units 

Mu 161 Performance Ensemble - . 2 units 

Mu 170-176 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 units 

Mu 182A,B Piano, non-principal 2 units 

College requirements, including general education 16 units 


- 32 units 

Sophomore Year: 

Mu 211A,B Music Theory 5 units 

Mu 161 Performance Ensemble 2 units 

Mu 170-176 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 units 

Mu 183A,B Voice, non-principal 2 units 

College requirements, including general education 20 units 


lotai 32 

Pass Proficiency Examination in (1) Theory, (2) Histor>' and Literature, (3) Piano, 
(4) Voice, (5) Principal Instrument or Voice. 


Upper Division, Including Transfer Students 

Junior Year: 

General Education (to complete 50).. 

Academic Minor (to complete 20 minimum) 

Professional Education (Ed. 340A,B) 

(Practicum in Secondary Education) 
Music Courses, to include: 


Mu 3 12 A Counterpoint 2 units 

Mu 321 A Form and Analysis 2 units 

Mu 322A Composition 2 units 

Mu 351A,B Music History and Literature 6 units 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 2 units 

Mu 371-376 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 units 

Mu 381 A, B Orchestral Instruments 2-A units 

Mu 391A,B Choral Conducting 4 units 


Total . - - 

Sensor Year: 

General Education (to complete 50) 

Academic Minor (to complete 20, minimum) 

Professional Education, to include: 

Ed 311 Psychological Foundations 6 units 

Ed 441 Principles and Curriculum of Sec. Ed 2 units 

MuTd. 442 Teaching Music in the Secondary 

School 2-3 units 


... 5-10 units 
_ 5-10 units 
_ 2 units 


22-12 units 


34 units 

5-10 units 

5-10 units 


11 units 



ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


99 


Music Courses, to include: 

Mu.Ed. 432 Teaching Music in the Elementary 


School - - 2 units I 

Mu.Ed. 441 General Music in the Junior High / 

School 2 units I jj.j 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 2 units / 

Mu 370-376 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 units \ 

Mu 381c.d Orchestral Instruments 2^ units j 

Mu 392A Instrumental Conducting 2 units / 


Total 

Fost graduate Year: 

Professional Education, to include: 

Ed 549 and Mu 549 Student Teaching 10 units / 

Ed 501 Philosophy of Education 2 units \ 

Music Courses, to include: 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 2 units \ 

Mu 370-376 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 units ( 

Courses to complete major or toward higher degree ( 

specializations - 16 units / 


34 units 


12 units 


20 units 


Total 


32 units 


MUSIC COURSES FOR GENERAL ELEMENTARY 
CREDENTIALS CANDIDATE 

Required Courses 

Mu.Ed. 232 Fundamentals of Music for Classroom Teachers 3 

Mu.Ed. 432 Teaching Music in the Elementary School 2 

Electives 

Mu.Ed. 435 Children’s Literature in Music 2 

Mu. 376A or Mu 384A3 Applied Piano or Piano Class for Teachers 1 

Required for kindergarten-primary specialization 
Mu 383A,B Voice Class for Music Majors. Strongly recommended for those 1 
having little or no previous experience in basic vocal techniques and singing. 

CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. Candidates for the General Secondary Credential, with a major in mi^ic must 
complete OSC general education and Education Division requirements, including 
a year of postgraduate work beyond the baccalaureate degree. Music Department 
requirements for the General Secondary include those specified for the Special 
Secondary Credential in Music. Preparation for the General Secondary Creden- 
tial with a major in music is designed for teachers of music in the public elemen- 
tary, junior and senior high schools, and junior colleges of the State of California. 

MUSIC COURSES 

100. Introduction to Music (3) F, S 

A basic approach to listening to music with understanding and pleasure through 
a general survey of musical literature representative of various styles and perform- 
ance media. Alusic will be related to other arts through lectures, recordings, and 
concerts. Meets general education requirement. Closed to music majors. 


100 


OIL\NGE STATE COLLEGE 


Theory and Basic Music 

Music Theory (3,3) F, S 

Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. A year course covering diatonic 
harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and intervals, triads and their inversions, 
harmonizations, non-harmonic tones, modulation and dominant seventh chords. 
Practical applications, to include sight-singing, dictation and keyboard harmoniza- 
tions. 

211A,B. Music Theory (3,3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Three hours lecture, one hour laboratory. A year course covering secondary 
dominants, diminished seventh, ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords, sequence 
and chromatic chords. Practical applications to include sight-singing, melodic and 
harmonic dictation, and keyboard harmonizations. Prerequisite: Mu lllB, or 
equivalent. 

220. Structures of Music (2) S (Formerly Mu 320) 

A non-technical course in the study of the form and design of music. De- 
signed to acquaint the general college student and elementary credential candi- 
date with the elements of musical structure, as applied to masterpieces of musical 
literature. Consent of instructor required. 

310. Theory Review (3) F (Formerly Mu 226) 

Review of materials covered in Mu 111A,B and Mu 211A,B. For regular or 
transfer students whose junior placement-proficiency examination indicates need 
for further study prior to taking upper division theor>^ Includes sequence, second- 
ar>^ dominants, modulations and chromatic harmony and sight-singing and dictation 
based upon the materials of Mu 21L\,B. 

312A. Counterpoint (2) F (Formerly Mu 423 ) 

Prerequisites: Music 111A,B and 211A,B. Basic 18th Century counterpoint in two, 
three, and four parts. 

312B. Counterpoint (2) S (Formerly Mu 424) 

Prerequisites: Mu 312A or consent of instructor. Double counterpoint, canon, 
and fugue forms. 

321 A. Form and Analysis (2) F (Formerly Mu 421 A) 

Analysis of structural elements of music such as motive, phrase, and period; 
binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata-allegro forms in representative musical works. 
Consent of instructor required. 

321B. Form and Analysis (2) S (Formerly Mu 421B) 

Prerequisite: Music 321 A or consent of instructor. Analysis of the larger musical 
forms. 

3 22 A. Composition (2) F 

Prerequisites: elementary counterpoint. Music 211B or consent of instructor. Ear 
training, analysis of smaller forms, simple composition of two-three part song form 
styles. 

322B. Composition (2) S 

Analysis and writing of more complex musical forms. Prerequisite: Mu 322A. 

3 23 A. Orchestration (2) S (Formerly Mu 426) 

Writing and analysis of orchestral music. Prerequisite: Music 211B and consent 
of instructor. 

421A,B. Keyboard Harmony (2) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Basic principles of harmonic structure as applied to the piano. Diatonic harmony 
and chromatic alterations. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


101 


Music History and Literature 

151A,B. Survey of Musical Literature (2,2) F, S 
Open to music majors and minors and qualified students by consent of instruc- 
tor. Two hours lecture, one hour listening. An introductory course for majors in 
the study of the history and literature of music in Western civilization. Students 
must be able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, design and style. 
Meets general education requirement. 

350. Music in Our Society (3) F, S (Formerly Mu 343) 

Open to all students interested. Three hours lecture and discussion, one hour 
listening. A non-technical course designed to increase interest and an understanding 
of music in its relation to our general culture. Emphasis on structure, analysis 
and aesthetic principles through the study of masterpieces of musical literature of 
various historical periods. Meets upper division general education requirement. 
Open to general students and elementary credential candidates. 

351A. History and Literature of Music (3) F (Formerly Mu 441 A) 

A Study of the history and literature of music from early Greek beginnings 
through the Renaissance. (Required of all music majors.) 

3 5 IB. History and Literature of Music (3) S (Formerly Mu 44 IB) 

A Study of the history and literature of music covering the Baroque, Classic, 
Romantic, and 20th Century. Prerequisite: Music 351 A, History and Literature of 
Music. (Required of all music majors.) 

451. Music of the Baroque Period (2) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Two hours lecture and discussion, one hour weekly listening. Detailed analysis 
and comparison of selected instrumental, vocal and keyboard musical compositions 
of the baroque period. 

452. Music of the Classic and Romantic Period (2) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Two hours weekly lecture and discussion. One hour per week listening. The 
development of music in the classic and romantic periods including the beginnings 
of opera, instrumental and symphonic developments from Haydn to Berlioz, key- 
board and vocal music. 

Applied Music Techniques 
161, 361. Performance Groups and Ensembles 

161a, 361a. Symphony Orchestra (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) (Formerly Mu 3 1 1 A) 
Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. Per- 
formance of standard representative symphonic works. 

161b, 361b. Symphonic Choir (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) (Formerly Mu 3 1 IB) 
Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. 
Performance of standard representative symphonic works. 

161c, 361c. Band (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. 
Performance of standard representative band literature. 

162a, 362a. String Orchestra (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) (Formerly Mu 3 12A) 
Open to qualified string students by audition or consent of instructor. Performs 
representative string literature. 

162b, 362b. Wind Ensemble (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) (Formerly Mu 312B) 

Open to qualified wind students by audition or consent of the instructor. Per- 
forms representative wind ensemble literature. 


102 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Class and Individual Instruction 

170- 176, 370-376. Principal Instrument or Voice 

170, 370. Class Instruction, Principal Instrument or Voice (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) 

( 1 , 1 , 1 , 1 ) 

Class instruction in the principal instrument or voice for intermediate and ad- 
vanced students. Open only to students whose placement-proficiency examination 
reveals deficiencies in the major performing field. (See 371-6, 471-6, following) 

171- 176, 371-376. Studio (Private) Instruction, Principal Instrument or Voice (1) 

F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) (Formerly Mu 371) 

Individual on-campus lessons with approved instructors. One unit per semester 
required of all music majors in the principal performing field. Special Fee. 

Voice: 

171, 371. Voice, Intermediate and Advanced 

Strings: 

172a. 372a. Violin, Intermediate and Advanced 
172b, 372b. Viola, Intermediate and Advanced 
172c, 372c. *Cello, Intermediate and Advanced 
172d, 372d. String Bass, Intermediate and Advanced 

Woodwinds: 

173a, 3 73a. Oboe, Intermediate and Advanced 
173b, 373b. Flute, Intermediate and Advanced 
173c, 373c. Clarinet, Intermediate and Advanced 
173d, 373d. Bassoon, Intermediate and Advanced 

Brass: 

174a, 374a. Trumpet, Intermediate and Advanced 

174b, 374b. Trombone and Baritone, Intermediate and Advanced 

174c, 3 74c. French Horn, Intermediate and Advanced 

174d, 374d. Tuba, Intermediate and Advanced 

Percussion: 

175, 375. Percussion, Intermediate and Advanced 

Keyboard: 

176a, 376a. Piano, Intermediate and Advanced 
176b, 376b. Organ, Intermediate and Advanced 

Class Instruction, Instruments or Voice, Non-Principal 

*181, 381. Orchestral Instruments (1,1, 1,1, or 2, 2, 2, 2) (1,1, 1,1 or 2, 2, 2, 2) 

(Formerly Mu 481) 

Required of all degree candidates and for specialization in teaching. 

181a, 381a. String Instruments (1-2) F 

Specialization on violin, with related work on standard instruments of the string 
family. 

181b, 3 81b. Woodwind Instruments (1-2) F 
Specialization on clarinet, with related work on standard instruments of the 
woodwind family. 

* Instrumental majors are required to take a minimum of 8 units of orchestral instruments, 
Mu 181-381. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


103 


181c, 3 81c. Brass Instruments (1-2) S 

Specialization on trumpet, with related work on standard instruments of the 
brass family. 

181d, 381d. Percussion Instruments (1-2) S 
Specialization on snare drum, with related work on standard instruments of the 
l)ercussion family. 

182A,B, 382A,B. Piano Class for Music Majors (1) F, S (Formerly Mu 473) 
Prerequisite: declaration of the music major and consent of instructor. Designed 
to meet music major piano requirements for degree and teaching credentials. 
Fundamentals of keyboard technique for students whose major performance field 
is not piano. Not required for piano majors. 

183A,B, 383A,B. Voice Class for Music Majors (1) F, S (Formerly Mu 477) 
Prerequisite: declaration of the music major and consent of instructor. Designed 
to meet voice requirement for instrumental and piano majors and to prepare candi- 
dates for proficiency requirement for teaching credential. Not required for voice 
majors. 

384A,B. Piano Class for Teachers (1) F, S (Formerly Mu 472) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Elementary and intermediate instruction in 
basic piano techniques, with special emphasis on application to appropriate song 
materials and simple accompaniments used in the elementary school. Required of 
candidates for general elementary credential who specialize in music and those 
preparing to teach in kindergarten and first grades. 

391A,B. Choral Conducting (2,2) F, S (Formerly Mu 491 ) 

Principles, techniques, and methods of conducting choral groups. Laboratory 
work with class and vocal ensembles, using standard choral repertoire. Required 
of all music education majors. Mu 391A is pererquisite for 391B. 

392A,B. Instrumental Conducting (2,2) F, S (Formerly Mu 492) 

Principles, techniques, and methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. 
Laboratory experience in conducting instrumental groups, using standard instru- 
mental literature. Mu 392A is prerequisite for 392B. 

591. Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) F 

Advanced problems in choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on laboratory 
work with student groups and in concert conducting. Prerequisite: Mu 391B, con- 
ducting experience, or consent of instructor. 

592. Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) S 

Advanced study of baton technique with emphasis on interpretive and stylistic 
problems in the conducting of major works. Students will be expected to prepare 
works for public performance. Prerequisite: Mu 392B, conducting experience, or 
consent of instructor. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

232. Fundamentals of Music for Classroom Teachers (3) F, S (Formerly Mu 3 3 2) 
The Study and application of music theory as apphed to skills needed as a pre- 
requisite for Mu 432, Music in the Elementary School (methods). Includes basic 
theory, musicianship and practical application of techniques of singing and playing 
basic instruments such as the piano, autoharp, recorder and song bells. Required 
of all elementary credential candidates who have not previously completed the 
course prior to entrance at OSC. 


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430. Special Projects in Music Education (1-3) F, S (Formerly Mu 410) 

Advanced projects relating to particular areas of teaching specialization for 
teachers and supervisors of music. Instructor’s permission required. 

432. Teaching Music in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

(Same as Elementary Education 432). Prerequisite: Mu 232, Fundamentals of 
Music for Elementary Teachers, or successful completion of proficiency test. Re- 
quired of all music education majors and classroom teachers. The study and ap- 
plication of music in the modern elementary school. Problems, methods, and ma- 
terials, including such areas as singing, listening, rhythms, use of instruments, 
creative music, music for special interests, and music correlated with other areas 
of the elementary school curriculum. Required of all elementary teaching credential 
candidates. 

43 5. Children’s Literature in Music (2) S (Formerly Mu 453) 

A survey of books and listening materials for pre-school and elementary age 
children, with techniques of presentation. Designed for the classroom teacher or 
general student. Prerequisite: Mu 432, or consent of instructor. 

441. General Music in the Junior High School (2) F (Formerly Mu 442) 

Required of all music majors working for the General Secondary Credential. 

Problems, materials, and methods of organization and teaching general music in 
the secondary school. Emphasis on the relationship of general music to the choral 
and instrumental program. 

442. Teaching Music in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Required of all music majors working for the General Secondary Credential. 
Students without teaching experience must register for three units’ credit and must 
allow sufficient time in their schedules at the same hour each day so that they 
can serve as teacher aides in high schools. Prerequisite: 20 units in music. Educa- 
tion 311, Education 340, senior standing or consent of instructor. 

442a. Instrumental Methods (Formerly Mu 464) 

Study of problems, materials, organization and methods of teaching the school 
marching band, concert band, and concert orchestra. 

442b. Choral Methods (Formerly Mu 465) 

Study of choral literature, with particular reference to use in public schools, 
colleges, community and adult education. Methods of instruction in actual use 
with choirs and choruses. 

545. Supervision and Administration of Music in the Public Schools (2) S 
Open to music education majors with teaching experience. Philosophy, prin- 
ciples and practices of supervision of music in the public elementary and secondary 
schools. Emphasis on modem principles of leadership, types of services, organiza- 
tion, management and evaluation of programs of instruction. Required of candidates 
for supervisory credential. 

549. Student Teaching, Music (Taken concurrently with Ed 549) (2) F, S 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND DRAMA 

The Department of Speech and Drama provides for students who wish (1) to 
study the liberal arts program with an emphasis in an area of speech or drama, 
(2) to work toward professional training in an area of public address, drama, 
interpretation, radio television, or speech therapy and audiology, or (3) to plan 
for a teaching career in which speech and/or drama is either the major or minor 
subject. 


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In addition, specialized course work is provided in the fields of oral communica- 
tion for prospective teachers on any level whose major or minor programs are in 
other areas but who wish to enhance their skill and understanding in the oral 
aspects of teaching and learning, for students in the business and other pro- 
fessional fields where ability to communicate effectively with others is important, 
and for all who wish specific instruction or experience in the professional and 
cultural phases of oral communication, drama, or speech therapy or audiology. 

For both the regular and the part time students, a comprehensive forensic pro- 
gram is conducted, theatre opportunities are provided through experimental and 
play production classes, and participation in both on and off-campus speech events 
is encouraged. For the students in the speech and hearing program, opportunities 
are provided for work in the campus clinic with both children and adults, in 
community institutions for the speech and hearing handicapped, and in public 
schools. The Department of Speech and Drama seeks in all ways possible to 
develop an appreciation of the importance of skillful and responsible oral com- 
munication in our society. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Requirement: A total of thirty-six upper and lower division units. 

Lower Division: A maximum of twelve units in speech and/or drama. 

Upper Division: A minimum of twenty-four units. 

COURSE PROGRAM FOR EMPHASIS IN DRAMA 

Lower Division: Speech 101 (part of General Education requirement). Speech 231, 
Drama 211, Drama 271 or 272 (part of General Education requirement in Fine 
Arts), Drama 273. 

Upper Division: Drama 311, Drama 314, Speech 341, Drama 376A,B, Drama 378 
(3 units). Drama 379 (3 units). Drama 382, Drama 473 or 475, Speech 490, and 
Speech 499 (3 units special project in Drama). 

COURSE PROGRAM FOR EMPHASIS IN PUBLIC ADDRESS 

Lower Division: Speech 101 (part of General Education requirement). Speech 138, 
Speech 231, Drama 211, Drama 271 or 272 (part of General Education require- 
ment in Fine Arts). 

Upper Division: Drama 311, Speech 341, Speech 334, Speech 335, Speech 338 (2 
units). Speech 424, Speech 434, Speech 436, Speech 444, Speech 490, and 499 (2 
unit special project in Public Address). 

COURSE PROGRAM FOR EMPHASIS IN SPEECH 
THERAPY AND AUDIOLOGY 

Lower Division: Speech 101 (part of General Education requirement). Drama 211, 
Speech 231, Drama 271 or 272 (part of General Education requirement in Fine 
Arts). 

Upper Division: Speech 341, Speech 351, Speech 404, Speech 441, Speech 443, Speech 
451, Speech 452, Speech 458 (4 units). Speech 461, Speech 490, Speech 499 (3 
unit project in speech therapy or audiology). 

COURSE PROGRAMS FOR TEACHING CREDENTIALS 

1. For the secondary, by completing one of the above major programs for the 
bachelor’s degree and the addition of six units of upper division or graduate 
course work in any of these areas during the post-graduate year, and Speech 442. 


5—83902 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


2. For the elementary, by completing a twenty-four unit major which includes 
Drama 211 and Speech 231 (or equivalents) and these specific courses: Speech 
301, Drama 402, Speech 403, Speech 441, and three units of upper division work 
in drama; an additional six units of upper division or graduate course work is to 
be taken in any area of emphasis during the post-graduate period, and Speech 432. 

3. For the program leading to the special credential to teach exceptional children 
in the field of speech correction and lip reading, by completing the course program 
for emphasis in any area of speech and drama for the bachelor’s degree require- 
ment, a regular teaching credential and including during the undergraduate or 
post-graduate period these specific courses: Education 452, Education 472, Drama 
402, Speech 458 (for a total of 6 units). Speech 459, Speech 462, Speech 463, and 
Speech 557 (a minimum of 4 units). 

MINOR IN SPEECH AND DRAMA 

Reqwrenient: A total of twenty-four upper and lower division units. Nine of 
these must be upper division. 

There are no specified courses for the minor; Speech 442 is recommended for 
students using speech and drama for a minor in the secondary program. 

SPEECH AND DRAMA COURSES 
Drama 

211. Introduction to Oroal Reading (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101, a high school speech course, or consent of instructor. A 
fundamentals course devoted to theory, methods, and practice in the performance 
of oral communication of different types of literature. 

271. Introduction to Theatre Arts (3) F, S 

A Study of the evolution of theatre, motion-pictures, radio and television as 
composite arts. Emphasis is placed on the visual and production aspects as influ- 
enced by different cultures, traditions, and technologies. Field trips to certain 
significant productions. 

272. Understanding Theatre (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

A non-technical survey course for the general student leading to an appreciation 
and understanding of the theatre as a medium of communication and entertainment 
and as an art form. Field trips to certain significant productions. 

273. Elementary Acting (3) F (Planned for 1964-65) 

The study and command of the techniques of the art of acting. A study of style 
and the visual aspects of characterization appropriate to the demands of a script. 
Performance of laboratory scenes, readings, and exercises. 

311. Oral Reading (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 211 or consent of instructor. The principles and practice 
of reading aloud from the printed page. Analysis of selections from prose and 
poetry are emphasized. The development of voice control and projection of idea 
and motion. 

314. Reading Theatre (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 211 or 311. Oral reading in which the emphasis is placed 
on group and individual reading of dramatic literature. 

376A,B. Stagecraft (2,2) F, S 

Technical theatre practices including study of design, equipment, construction, 
scene painting, stage make-up, lighting, and costuming. Experience is provided in 
the actual mounting of plays. 


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107 


378A,B. Experimental Theatre (3,3) F 

An activity course in which dramatic principles are applied through production 
of full length and one-act plays using various styles of acting and staging. Oppor- 
tunities are given for student directors to prepare and to present experimental 
productions for invited audiences. 

379A,B. Play Production (3,3) S 

The rehearsal and performance of various types of dramatic works. Entire pro- 
duction and group scenes are prepared for invited audiences and for the general 
public. 

382. Television Techniques (3) F, S 

Survey of the development and current trends in television techniques, pro- 
gramming, and production. 

383. Radio and Television Writing (3) S (Planned for 1964-6 5) 

Study of the principles and practices and experience in the writing of scripts 
and other forms of continuity for both radio and television. 

402. Dramatic Activities for Children (3) F, S 

Designed to develop skills in the use of creative dramatics, storytelling, puppetry, 
assembly programs, role-playng, and other aspects of dramatics as tools for the 
teacher, group worker, recreation major, and others who work with children. 

473. Analysis of Drama (3) F 

Nature and purpose of drama as a living art. A study of the changing forms 
in the theatre in production and the influence of these forms on the culture of 
the time. 

475. History of the Theatre (3) S 

Development of the physical stage, styles of acting, makeup, costuming types, 
and forms of drama from ancient to modern times. 

484. Educational Television Production (3) F, S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Some of the activities, methods of lesson preparation, and presentation of edu- 
cational television productions. 

Public Address 

101. Fundamentals of Speech (3) F, S 

This course is designed to give the student training in the basic principles of 
speaking and oral reading. Discussion, oral reading, and public speaking projects 
are used to approach these goals: The improvement of personal speech habits, the 
development of cooperative deliberation, the ability to listen with improved under- 
standing and discrimination, and the development of some proficiency in the 
organization and presentation of ideas. 

138A,B. Forensics (2,2) F, S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Investigation and practice in the background, format, procedures, and evaluation 
criteria of the various forensic events. Students must participate in at least two 
intercollegiate tournaments. 

231. Essentials of Public Speaking (3) F, S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Speech 101, a high school speech course, or consent of instructor. 
The composition and dehvery of talks to inform and to persuade. Logical organ- 
ization and substantive development are stressed. 

331. Public Speaking (3) F, S 

Preparation and presentation of various types of public speaking. Particular em- 
j phasis is given to the substantive development and organization of materials. Open 
to students who have had a beginning course in public speaking, fundamentals of 
speech, or the consent of the instructor. 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


3 33. Business and Professional Speaking (2) F, S 

Particular attention is given to the interview, sales talk, and speeches for special 
occasions such as introductions, goodwill talks, and information giving. 

3 34. Advanced Public Speaking (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 231 or equivalent. Investigation of modern rhetorical theory 
as applied to platform speaking. Particular attention to the use of various techniques 
under specific circumstances. 

3 3 5. Argumentation and Debate (3) F 

Argumentation as applied to formal speaking and debate. Special attention is 
given to logic and evidence as related analysis of significant questions for debate; 
case structure, and refutation. 

338. Forensic Workshop (2,2) F, S 

Directed activity in debate and other forensic events. Participation in intercolle- 
giate competition is required for credit. (May be repeated for a total of six units.) 

404. General Semantics (2) S 

An examination of the basic principles underlying the influence of language on 
human action and interaction. 

424. Discussion and Group Leadership (3) F, S 

The principles and practices of small groups in discussion with special emphasis 
on committee work, sensitivity training, problem solving and preparation for 
group consideration of ideas in education, business, and community. 

434. American Public Address (3) F (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Speech 436 or consent of the instructor. A rhetorical history of 
the United States from the colonial period to the present. The influence of selected 
speeches and speakers on the development of American culture. 

436. Survey of Rhetoric (3) F 

A survey of ancient, medieval and modem rhetoric. 

444. Persuasion (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 334 or 335. The study and application of psychological prin- 
ciples used by writers and speakers to effect social control: audience analysis and 
the use of persuasive techniques to influence the belief and conduct of groups and 
individuals. 

490. Senior Seminar (1,1) F, S 

Research and research methods in speech; an examination of current research in 
the several areas of speech and drama. 

499 A-E. Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Opportunity to study in one of the following 
areas or to conduct under supervision an independent project in; A. Stagecraft, B. 
Acting, C. Play Production, D. Public Address or Forensics, E. Speech Therapy or 
Audiology. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 8 units but no 
more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. 

Speech Therapy and Audiology 

301. Speech for Teachers (3) F, S 

Four general areas of speech which relate directly with teaching proficiency are 
examined: the speech of the teacher, the speech and hearing problems of children, 
the use of speech as a teaching device, and the speech of the teacher in public and 
group situations. 


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109 


302. Voice and Diction (2) F, S 

Provides for speech improvement through the study and practice of correct 
sound formation, voice production, and manner of speaking. Recommended for 
students who need speech proficiency improvement for teaching. 

308. Speech Improvement Laboratory (1) F, S 
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Chairman of Department. This course provides 
for individual help on speech problems; provides for training in articulation and 
voice control. Designed to aid students who fail to pass the speech proficiency 
test for teaching. 

341. Phonetics (3) F 

The study of speech sounds based on the use of the International Phonetic Alpha- 
bet and the various factors influencing articulation and pronunciation. Consideration 
is given to the historical development of American speech and the resultant 
dialects. 

3 51. Speech Science (2) S 

Anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms. 

403. Speech Development (3) S 

Study of the development of normal speech in children, typical and common 
speech problems as well as classroom procedures for improvement. 

441. Introduction to Speech Correction (3) F, S 

Speech correction with special emphasis on the identification of the most com- 
monly experienced speech problems; basic principles of therapy in the clinic and in 
the classroom; importance of referral, parent conferences, mental health, etc. 

443. Advanced Speech Correction (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 341 and 441 or equivalent. Etiologies, diagnosis, and remedial 
procedures of speech defects and voice problems, both functional and organic, 
and cenain major disorders including stuttering, cleft palate, cerebral palsy, aphasia, 
and tongue thrust. 

451. Diagnostic Methods in Speech and Hearing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Provides the student with information about 
various diagnostic procedures that can be used by him and in consultation with 
members of related disciplines: psychologist, pediatrician, otologist, orthodontist, 
neurologist. 

452. Methods in Speech Correction (3) F 

Prerequisite: Speech 443, and consent of instructor. Observation and supervised 
experience in recommended procedures and use of instructional aids with speech- 
handicapped children, including the preparation and utilization of speech correc- 
tion and speech improvement materials. 

458. Clinical Practice (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 443 and approved applictaion for clinical practice which 
must be submitted during semester preceding registration for course. Practice in the 
correction of the speech in children and adults under supervision. May be repeated 
for a total of 6 units. 

461. Audiometry and Aural Rehabilitation (3) F 

Equipment, principles, methods, and procedures used in establishing and conduct- 
ing school hearing conservation programs. Attention is given to techniques of 
audiometric testing and use of audiograms, principles, and methods of hearing 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


consen^ation; psychology of the acoustically handicapped child; relationship 
between speech and hearing; hearing aids and their use; care and use of group 
puretone audiometers. Meets the state requirement for public school audiometrist. 

462. Speech Reading (2) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 341 or consent of the instructor. Historical backgrounds of 
lip reading, methods used in visual reading of speech, and the techniques commonly 
used in the teaching of speech reading to the aurally handicapped. 

463. Audiology (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Speech 461. Diagnostic and predictive tests of auditory functioning; 
types and characteristics of hearing aids; clinical practice. 

5 57A-F. Seminar in Speech Problems (2) F, S 
May be repeated for a total of 12 units, but no individual seminar may be 
repeated for credit: A. Cleft Palate, B. Stuttering, C. Aphasia, D. Cerebral Palsy, E. 
Aphasoid Child, F. Voice Disorders. 

Speech Education 

432. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Education 311, admission to teacher education. The importance of 
the language arts to a satisfactory personal, social, and professional life. Methods 
to help develop in children the skills needed for listening, speaking, and writing 
are studied and their effectiveness evaluated. (Reading is offered in a separate 
course.) 

442. Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: n^-enty units in speech. Education 311, Education 340, senior 
standing, or consent of the instructor. Objectives, methods, and materials for teach- 
ing speech in secondary schools. Required, before student teaching, of students 
presenting majors in speech for the General Secondary Credential. Students 
without teaching experience must register for three units credit, and must allow 
sufficient time in tlieir schedules, at the same hour each day, so that they can 
serve as teacher aides in high schools. 

459. Clinical Practice and Student Teaching in Speech Correction and 
Lip Reading (4) S 

Prerequisites: Education 339 or 549 or equivalent, and 24 units in the area of 
speech and hearing therapy. Provides the student with the necessary skills and 
knowledges to work with speech and hearing handicapped children in the public 
schools. Experiences include working in small groups and in individual therapy 
sessions with speech and hearing handicapped children enrolled in regular school 
classes, participation in parent counseling conferences and conferences with school 
personnel including administrators, classroom teachers, and nurses. Planning of 
curriculum materials to integrate speech and hearing therapy with regular classroom 
instruction will be stressed. This meets the directed teaching requirement for the 
credential to teach speech correction and lip reading in remedial classes. 


DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Professors: Friedrich (Chairman), Alamshah, Ramsay 

Associate Professors: Becker,* Harris, Lewald, Mathieu, Maxwell, Obler, 
Schneider 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Brunelle, Johnson,* McNelly, Salz, Shapley 
(1962-1963 Faculty) 

The Division of Humanities includes the departments of English, Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures, Journalism, and Philosophy. The Humanities faculty is 
therefore concerned with the teaching of various languages and effective com- 
munication, critical appreciation of man’s imaginative achievements, and the ex- 
ploration of ideas and values. 

The offerings in the Humanities coiyribute significantly to a general, liberal 
education, in addition to preparing for the teaching profession, graduate study, 
and other occupational pursuits. 

The Humanities recognize that to be humane is at once the most difficult and 
the most precious achievement of man. It requires not only an understanding of 
the things that are but a vision of things that ought to be. So conceived, humanistic 
studies attempt to develop an enlarged sensibility as to the possibilities of human 
experience. 

At present, the following majors and minors are offered: 

Major in English 
Minor in English 

Majors in French, German, and Spanish 

Minors in French, German, and Spanish 

Major in Humanities: Comparative Literature Emphasis 

Minor in Humanities: Comparative Literature Emphasis 

Major in Journalism 

Minor in Journalism 

Major in Language Arts 

Major in Philosophy 

Minor in Philosophy 

The instructional program of the Division is strengthened by the Humanities 
Series of visiting lecturers, rapidly expanding library resources, and a divisional 
collection of literary recordings. 

(The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures publishes MLabstracts, 

. a quarterly of authoritative resumes relevant to the teaching of Modem Languages.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The program in Comparative Literature is governed jointly by the Departments 
of English and of Foreign Languages and Literatures, with the chairman of the 
Humanities Division acting as chairman of the program. 

The program in Comparative Literature provides courses in the study of various 
national literatures from the earliest times to the present, with special emphasis 
on the manifold interrelations of literatures, in theory, genres, ideas, movements, 
and authors. Works are read in English translation and the courses conducted in 
English. For students whose major concentration is not in Comparative Literature, 
the knowledge of a second language is not required. 

* College Administrative Officers. 


[m] 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

HUMANITIES MAJOR: COMPARATIVE LITERATURE EMPHASIS 

Requirements: A combined total of 36 units beyond General Education require- 
ments as follows: 

1. Proficiency in at least one foreign language; this requirement may be satisfied 
by completing with a grade of B or better the fundamental and intermediate 
language courses, or by examination. 

2. A combined minimum of 15 units in English and Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

3. A minimum of 15 units from the Comparative Literature offerings. 

4. Electives: 6 units on advisement. 

MINOR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Requirements: A combined total of 21 units, as follows: a maximum of 9 lower 
division units plus a minimum of 12 upper division units. 

312. The Bible as Literature (3) F, S 

Study of the Old and New Testaments as literary art, reflecting insight into 
human nature and providing a foundation for understanding subsequent writings 
based on the Judeo-Christian tradition. 

315. Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) S (Formerly 371) 

The origins, elements, forms and functions of classical mythology in works from 
the earliest times to the present. 

332. Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) S (Formerly English 3 32) 
Representative works in translation, from Beowulf to Dante. 

3 51. Masters of World Drama (3) S 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding plays in translation with 
a view toward determining some principles of the dramatic art. Emphasis on major 
figures from Aeschylus to Brecht. 

3 53. Masters of World Fiction (3) S 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding novels in translation with 
a view toward determining some principles of the narrative arts. Emphasis on 
Goethe, Stendhal, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Mann, Kafka, Proust, and others. 

373. Masters of Russian Literature (3) S 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of selected works of Pushkin, Dostoyev- 
sky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, and others, and their relationship to Western 
literature. 

375. Hispanic Literature and Culture (3) F 

A survey of Hispanic contributions to world culture, with emphasis on under- 
standing contemporary Latin American civilization. 

42 5. Literary Masterpieces of the Orient (3) F 

A Study of selected works from Persian, Indian, Chinese and Japanese literature 
and their significance in the light of Western thought. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

The study of “English” emphasizes the nature and development of our language, 
the craft of writing, and the imaginative literature of American and British authors— 
prose fiction, poetry, and drama. Except for the required Freshman English offer- 
ings, courses in world literature in English translation are listed separately, under 
Comparative Literature. In addition, the Department of English offers some spe- 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


113 


cialized professional courses. On the senior and graduate levels, various opportunities 
are provided for seminar work and independent study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: ENGLISH MAJOR 

Requirements: A total of 36 units beyond General Education requirements, with 
the following distribution: 

Lower Division— Maximum of 9 units, including: 

221, 222. American Literature (6 units) 

Lower Division elective (3 units) 

Note: Students planning to transfer into the program at the beginning of the junior 
year, after taking their lower division work elsewhere, are advised to take 
freshman and sophomore courses as nearly equivalent as possible to the 
requirements listed above. 

Upper Division (Minimum of 27 units) 

Language and Composition (Minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 
301. Advanced Composition 
303. The Structure of Modern English 
454. History of the English Language 
Major Author Courses (9 units) 

333. Chaucer 

334. Shakespeare 

341. Milton and the Seventeenth Century 

Period Courses (Minimum of 6 units, at least 3 in a period preceding the mod- 
em), selected from the following: 

335. Elizabethan Drama 

336. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose 

342. The Age of Reason in English Literature 

343. The Romantic Movement in English Literature 

344. Literature of the Victorian Period 

345. History and Development of the English Novel 
462. Modem British and American Novels 

464. Modem British and American Drama 
466. Modem British and American Poetry 

Electives (Minimum of 9 units), selected from additional courses in language 
and composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars, and Compara- 
tive Literature. Attention is directed to the fact that Comparative Literature offer- 
ings are listed separately, but count toward an English major. 

A program of literary studies gains in perspective through the study of history, 
sociology, philosophy, and psychology. These fields offer vital lifelines which 
nourish and deepen understanding of literature. Students of literature are strongly 
advised to include such courses in their program, particularly in the areas of 
philosophy and psychology. 

English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire pro- 
ficiency in at least one foreign language. 

TEACHING CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

English majors who are also candidates for a teaching credential must take the 
required professional education courses in English in addition to fulfilling all 
requirements for the major indicated above. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: A total of 21 units 

Lower Division (Maximum of 9 units), including: 

221, 222. American Literature, or the equivalent 
Lower Division electives (3 units) 


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ORANGE STATE CX)LLEGE 


Upper Division (Minimum of 12 units), including: 

Language and Composition (Minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 
301. Advanced Composition 
303. The Structure of Modem English 
454. History of the English Language 
Major Author Courses (Minimum of 6 units) 

334, Shakespeare, and 333, Chaucer, or 341, Milton and the Seventeenth Century 
Electives (Minimum of 3 units) 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: LANGUAGE ARTS MAJOR 

Language Arts combines courses in English, speech, and journalism. This major, 
providing a broad background in the areas of oral and written communication, is 
suitable for the teacher in the elementary school, where a basic function is to help 
children learn to read, write, speak, and listen effectively. 

Requirements: A total of 36 units beyond General Education requirements, with 
the following distribution: 

Lower Division (Maximum of 12 units) 

Composition 

World, American, or English Literature 
Course work in journalism 
Course work in speech or drama 

Upper Division (Minimum of 24 units) 

English courses (9 units) 
including: 

English 301. Advanced Composition, or 
English 303. The Structure of Modern English 
English 334. Shakespeare 

English 345. History and Development of the English Novel 


An advanced course in journalism 

selected from Journalism 331, 334, or 338A,B,C, 
Speech courses 


3 units 


7-9 units 


including at least one from each of the following three groups: 

Speech 301 

Speech 311, 314, or 402 
Speech 334, 403, 404, or 424 

Electives from English, journalism, or speech — 3-5 units 


ENGLISH 

Language and Composition Courses 

101. Composition and World Literature (3) F, S 

Analytical and critical writing based on the study of representative works from 
Classical and Biblical literature to the Renaissance. 

102. World Literature and Composition (3) S 

Prerequisite: English 101 or the equivalent. The study of representative works 
from the Renaissance to the modern age, as a basis for continuing practice in 
anal>tical and critical writing. 

301. Advanced Composition (3) F, S 
Designed to improve a writer’s thinking and the thinker’s writing. 

303. The Structure of Modern English (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. The grammar of contemporary^ English applied to 
problems in writing. Modem English usage. Strongly recommended for all teacher 
candidates. 


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387A,B,C. Creative Writing Seminar (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Evidence of student’s previous interest in creative writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. 

Instruction in A. Play Writing, B. Fiction Writing, and C. Poetry Writing. Study 
of superior models, development of style, and group criticism and evalution of 
each student’s independent work. 

388. Creative Writing Projects (3) S 

Prerequisite: English 387 or consent of the instructor. 

454. History of the English Language (3) S 
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English 
vocabulary, phonology, morphology, and syntax from Indo-European to modern 
American English. 

590. Graduate Seminar: Problems in Language (3) F 

Literature Courses 

201. Analysis of Literary Forms (3) F, S 

The main literary forms— prose fiction, poetry, and drama— are studied and 
analyzed. Various critical methods are applied to representative works mainly 
from English and American literature. Especially recommended for prospective 
teachers of literature. 

211, Masters of British Literature (3) S 

An introduction to major periods and movements, major authors, and major 
forms. A concentrated course designed for students who are not majoring in 
Fnglish. 

221. American Literature to Whitman (3) F, S (Formerly 321) 

Emphasis on major writers: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Wit- 
man, and others. 

222. American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) F, S (Formerly 3 22) 
Emphasis on Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

333. Chaucer (3) F, S 

Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. 

334. Shakespeare (3) F, S 

Intensive study of selected major plays illustrating Shakespeare’s development, 
dramatic art, and insight into human nature. 

33 5. Elizabethan Drama (3) F 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of the instructor. Marlowe, Kyd, Greene, 
Jonson, and others are studied as representative of dramatic trends in Elizabethan 
England, including Shakespeare’s more popular histories and comedies. 

336. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) S 

The poetry of Wyatt and Surrey, Jonson, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, and others; 
and the prose of Bacon, Greene, Lodge, Lyly, Nashe, and others. 

341. Milton and the Seventeenth Century (3) F, S 

A Study of the development of Milton’s art and of the ideological backgrounds 
of his thought. Includes also Donne, the metaphysical poets, the Cavaliers, Burton, 
Browne and Bunyan. 

342. The Age of Reason in English Literature (3) F 

Dry den. Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Addison, and Steele. The Restoration, 
the Age of Reason, and foreshadowings of Romanticism. 


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343. The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) S 

Burns, Blake; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The reaction 
against rationalism, the rise of revolutionary and liberal thought, humanitarianisni, 
and emphasis on individual creativity. 

344. Literature of the Victorian Period (3) F, S 

Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Rosetti, Swinburne, Morris, Pater, Wilde and 
others. The effort to synthesize rationalism, romanticism, and realism in an area 
of materialism and puritanism. 

345. History and Development of the English Novel (3) F 

From the Renaissance to the moderns, with emphasis on the eighteenth and nine- 
teenth centuries: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Austen, Bronte, Thackeray, 
Dickens, Eliot, Meredith, Hardy. 

411. Contemporary Interpretation of Man (3) F, S 

An interdisciplinary course stressing the dominant rw^entieth-century philosoph- 
ical interpretations of man and the imaginative expression of those views in major 
literary works. 

462 . Modern British and American Novels (3) F, S 

Prerequisites; Survey of English, American, or World literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The developments of modern 
British and American novels from 1900 to the present. 

464. Modern British and American Drama (3) F, S 
Prerequisites: Survey of British, American, or World literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The development of British and 
American drama from 1900 to the present. 

466. Modern British and American Poetry (3) F, S 
Prerequisites: Survey of English, American or World literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The development of British 
and American poetry from 1900 to the present. 

491. Senior Seminar: Studies in Chaucer (3) S 

Prerequisites: English 333, B average or better, and consent of the instructor. 
Emphasis on Troilus and Criseyde and other works. 

492. Senior Seminar: Studies in the English Renaissance (3) S 

Prerequisites: English 334, 335, or 336, B average or better, and consent of the 
instructor. Directed research. 

495. Senior Seminar: Studies in New England Transcendentalism (3) S 
Prerequisites: English 221 and 222, B average or better, and consent of the in- 
structor. Emphasis on the relationship between philosophy and literature. 

496. Senior Seminar: Studies in the American Novel (3) F 

Prerequisites: B average or better, English major, and consent of the instructor. 
Directed research. 

498. Senior Seminar: Literary Criticism (3) S 

Prerequisites: B average or better, English major, and consent of the instructor. 
Theory and application to selected texts. 

580. Independent Study (3-6) F, S 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered course 
work. Oral and written reports. 

592, Graduate Seminar: Problems in Shakespeare (3) F 


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595. Graduate Seminar: Melville (3) F 

596. Graduate Seminar: Twain (3) S 

598. Graduate Seminar: Joyce (3) S 

599. Graduate Seminar: Comparative Literature (3) S 

For World Literature in English translation see courses under COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE. 

English Education 

432. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Education 311, admission to teacher education. The importance of 
ttie language arts to satisfactory personal, social, and professional life. Methods 
to help develop in children the skills needed for listening, speaking, reading and 
writing are studied and their effectiveness evaluated. 

43 3. Children’s Literature (2) F, S 

A Study of masterpieces of the world’s literature for children. Illustrates literary 
qualities appealing to children and demonstrates the ways ^ in which children s 
literature reflects the particular cultural differences of the various oriental, classical 
and modern cultures. 

442. Teaching English in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 
Prerequisites: Education 311, Admission to Teacher Education. Principles, meth- 
ods, and materials of teaching English in the secondary school. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Courses are designed to meet the needs of several types of students, including 
those who seek a liberal arts education with an emphasis on a foreign language 
and its literature. A student may enroll at any point in the sequence of courses for 
which his previous study has prepared him. Those who intend to teach at the 
elementary, secondary, or college level; those who plan to use foreign languages 
in professional careers; or those who desire to pursue graduate studies. The pro- 
gram emphasizes high standards of achievement in the practical use of the lan- 
guage, in the study of its literature, in the mastery of applied linguistics, and in 
methodology of teaching, the latter acquired in part through apprenticeship. 

MAJOR IN A SINGLE FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Three options are offered: French, German or Spanish. 

Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, or their equivalents, completed satis- 
factorily; plus 24 units in upper division courses, including 317 (or equivalent), 
351, 361,* 451, 461, except that six of these units may be in another field selected 
with the approval of the advisor, including 6 lower division units in a third lan- 

^A^^ntion is directed to the courses in foreign literatures in translation listed 
elsewhere in this catalog under Comparative Literature. 

Major in Two Foreign Languages 

Two options are offered: Romance Languages^ Major (French and Spanish) and 
Germanic-Romance Languages Major (German and French or Spanish). A stu- 
dent electing the double major must fulfill all the requirements for a Major in a 
Single Language and, in addition, the requirements for a Minor in a Single Lan- 
guage. 

Minor in a Single Language 

Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, or their equivalents, completed satis- 
factorily; plus 9 units in upper division courses selected in consultation with the 
advisor. 


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CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 
General Elementary Credential 

Students who are candidates for the General Elementary Credential must also 
complete the professional requirements, including Foreign Languages Education 
432. 

General Secondary Credential 

The credential program is the same as for the liberal arts major, with the fol- 
lowing additional requirements: 

Foreign I.anguages Education 442; 

Foreign Languages Education 455; 

plus 6 units in the Major language selected with the approval of the advisor and 
taken in the senior year or thereafter at the 400 and 500 level. 

THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required, in addition to the 
regular class periods, to practice for the minimum of prescribed time in the 
Language Laboratory. The 30-station laboratory operates like a library; students 
may use it at a time most convenient to them, preferably every day in sessions of 
15 to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced by each instructor and by 
the Supervisor of the Language Laboratory. 

French 

101. Fundamental French (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) F 
Listening-comprehension, speaking, reading-comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. 

102. Fundamental French (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: French 101 (or equivalent). Listening-comprehension, speaking, 

reading-comprehension, and writing to develop control of the basic forms and 
structure of French. 

203. Intermediate French (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) F 
Prerequisite: French 102 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204. Intermediate French (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: French 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

315. Introduction to French Literature (3) F 
Reading and discussion to develop insights into French literature and culture 
while strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Conducted in French. 

317. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) S (Formerly 316) 

Designed to give the student special competence in the control of French as an 
instrument for free oral and written expression. Open to lower division students 
with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in French. 

3 51. French Literature to 1800 (3) 

Evolution of French literature and thought, through analysis of representative 
works, from the chaiison de geste to Pre-Romanticism. Conducted in French. 


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361. French Literature Since 1800 (3) 

The principal movements and authors of the 19th and 20th centuries (Romanti- 
cism, Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, Surrealism, etc.), through analysis of repre- 
sentative works. Conducted in French. 

400. French for Teachers (3) S (Formerly 41 1 ) 

Intensive review of spoken French using recent developments in methodology 
and texts as subject materials. 

451. French Classicism (3) F 

Essence and evolution of le classicisme, studied principally in the works of the 
major 17th century authors (Corneille, Moliere, Racine, La Fontaine, La Roche- 
foucauld) and in the dominant genre (the theater). Conducted in French. 

461. The Age of Enlightenment (3) S 

Two complementary aspects of the 18th century: leason and feeling, the philos- 
ophies and the current of sensibility. Emphasis on major authors (Voltaire, Rous- 
seau, Diderot, Marivaux, Laclos). Conducted in French. 

471. Contemporary French Literature (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

An introduction to the major figures of the 20th century, including the genera- 
tions of Proust, Apollinaire, Malraux, Sartre and Robbe-Grillet. Conducted in 
French. 

480. Independent Study in French (1-3) F, S 

Supervised projects in French language or literature to be taken with the consent 
of the Department Chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. 
Selection of subject to be studied varies. May be repeated for credit. 

557. Seminar in French Lyric Poetry (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

The evolution of the lyric from the Troubadours to the present, with emphasis 
on its changing form and function. Conducted in French. 

German 

101. Fundamental German (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) F 

Listening-comprehension, speaking, reading-comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of German. 

102. Fundamental German (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: German 101 (or equivalent). Listening-comprehension, speaking, 

reading-comprehension, and writing to develop control of the basic forms and 
structure of German. 

203. Intermediate German (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) F 

Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing based on cul- 
tural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 

204. Intermediate German (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) S 

Prerequisite: German 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

315. Introduction to German Literature (3) F 

Reading and discussion to develop insights into German literature and culture 
while strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Conducted in German. 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


317. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) S (Formerly 316) 

Designed to give the student special competence in the control of German as an 
instrument for free oral and written expression. Open to lower division students 
with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in German. 

3 51. The Works of Lessing and Schiller (3) F 

Intensive study of the major works of Lessing and Schiller illustrating their 
thought and art. Conducted in German. 

361. The Works of Goethe (3) S 

Intensive study of selected works of Goethe illustrating his thought and art. (Don- 
ducted in German. 

400. German for Teachers (3) (Formerly 411) 

Intensive review of spoken German using recent developments in methodology 
and texts as subject materials. 

451. German Literature to Goethe (3) 

Analysis of important works from the Nihelungenlied to Faust in the setting of 
their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in German. 

461. German Literature Since Goethe (3) 

Anal>'^is of major works illustrating the development from Romanticism to Ex- 
pressionism in the setting of their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in 
German. 

471. The German Novelle (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

A Study of the German Novelle from Goethe to the present, including works by 
Kleist, Mann, Kafka, Diirrenmatt, with emphasis on the uniqueness of this genre. 

475. The German Drama (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

A Study of the leading dramatists from Gryphius to Frisch, including works by 
Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann, Brecht, with emphasis on various ap- 
proaches to this genre. 

480. Independent Study in German (1-3) F, S 

Supervised projects in Gemian language or literature to be taken with the consent 
of the Department Chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. 
Selection of subject to be studied varies. May be repeated for credit. 

Russian 

101. Fundamental Russian (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) F 
Listening-comprehension, speaking, reading-comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and basic forms and structure of Russian. 

102. Fundamental Russian (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent. Listening-comprehension, speaking, read- 
ing-comprehension, and writing to develop control of the basic forms and structure 
of Russian. 

203. Intermediate Russian (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) F 
Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204. Intermediate Russian (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: Russian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understand- 
ing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis 
from sound to sentence. 


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480. Independent Study in Russian (1-3) F, S 
Supervised projects in Russian language or literature to be taken with the consent 
of the Department Chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. 
Selection of subject to be studied varies. May be repeated for credit. 

Spanish 

101. Fundamental Spanish (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) F 
Listening-comprehension, speaking, reading-comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Spanish. 

102. Fundamental Spanish (4) (3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent. Listening-comprehension, speaking, 

reading-comprehension, and writing to develop control of the basic forms and 
structure of Spanish. 

203. Intermediate Spanish (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) F 
Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204. Intermediate Spanish (3) (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) S 
Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

315. Introduction to Spanish Culture and Literature (3) F 

Reading and discussion to develop insights into Spanish literature and culture 
while strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division students 
with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

316. Introduction to Latin-American Literature (3) S 

Reading and discussion to develop insights into Latin-American literaure and 
culture while strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division 
students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

517. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) S (Formerly 316) 

Designed to give the student special competence in the control of Spanish as an 
instrument for free oral and written expression. Open to lower division students 
with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

551. The Golden Age (3) F 

Intensive study of the works of the major writers, including Cervantes, Lope de 
Vega, Tirso and Calderon. Conducted in Spanish. 

561. Latin American Literature (3) S 

The novel, essay and poetry from 1800 to the present. Conducted in Spanish. 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


400. Spanish for Teachers (3) S (Formerly 411) 

Intensive review of spoken Spanish, using recent developments in methodology 
and texts as subject material. 

451. Spanish Literature to the Golden Age (3) 

Analysis of major works against the historical-cultural background of the various 
literary periods. Conducted in Spanish. 

461. Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) 

Analysis of representative works of the 19th and 20th century, from Neoclassi- 
cism to ^‘‘‘treinendimio^' against the historical-cultural background of the time. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

471. Literature of the Nineteenth Century in Spain (3) 

The literary currents and foreign influences on Spanish literature. Analysis of 
Romanticism, Eclecticism, Realism, and Naturalism. Conducted in Spanish. 

47 5. Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) 

The Generation of the ’98, the theatre of Benaventc and Lorca, modernista and 
post-viodernista poetry, and the '‘''treviendista^'' novel. Conducted in Spanish. 

480. Independent Study in Spanish (1-3) F, S 

Supervised projects in Spanish language or literature to be taken with the con- 
sent of the Department Chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. 
Selection of subjects to be studied varies. iMay be repeated for credit. 

5 57. Seminar in Latin American Poetry (3) F (Planned for 1964-65) 

Study of the viodemimio movement. 

567. Seminar in the Latin American Novel (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Naturalism, Regionalism, and the novel of the Mexican Revolution. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION 

43 2. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Methods for teathing FLES: Foreign Languages in Elementary Schools. Critical 
review of materials, audio-lingual-visual aids, and current research. Conducted in 
English, with practice by students in the language they plan to teach. 

442. Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2-3) F 

The theory and practice of language learning and language teaching with special 
emphasis on the audio-lingual method in combination with electro-mechanical aids. 
Conducted in English, with practice by students in the language they plan to teach. 

45 5. Applied Linguistics in the Teaching of French, German, or Spanish (3) 

Introduction to general linguistics with emphasis on the relation of speech and 
writing, the theory and practice of pronunciation, and the phonemic and morpho- 
phonemic structure of the language under study. 


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123 


DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

The journalism program serves students with interests in mass communication by 
offering a curriculum integrating the liberal arts and professional courses in basic 
media techniques. The department helps to prepare those desiring careers in news- 
paper and magazine writing and editing, advertising, television and radio news- 
casting, public relations, industrial editing, and the teaching of Journalism-English. 
Its courses will also benefit those who wish only a better understanding of the 
functions of the mass media in a democratic society. 

MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

Requirements: A combined total of 21 units, as follows: 

Lower Division (Maximum of 7) 

Journalism 101 (3) 

Journalism 218 AB (2-2) 

Upper Division (Minimum of 14 units) 

Journalism 331 or equivalent 

At least five units from the following: Journalism 332, Journalism 338 AB, 
Journalism 358 AB, or Journalism 448. 

At least six units from the following: Journalism 333, or Journalism 425, Jour- 
nalism 426 or Journalism 427. 

Electives approved by the adviser to complete the 21 units requirement. 

JOURNALISM 

101. News Writing (3) F 

Introduction to news reporting and writing, with emphasis on news gathering, 
evaluation, and the principles of clarity and conciseness. 

102. News Writing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Journalism 101. Concentration on writing of more advanced news 
stories and news-features. 



Portion of the future campus of Orange State College 



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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


218 A, B> Press Photography (2) F, S 

A lecture and laboratory course in photographic theory and the application of 
photographic principles. 

331. News Communication (3) F 

An introduction to the news communication media, with experience in news 
writing. (Recommended for credential candidates.) 

3 32. Copy Editing and Makeup (3) S 

Practice and theory of editing of materials for various types of publications, in- 
cluding selection of materials, copyreading, headline writing, proofreading, and 
makeup. 

333. Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) S 
The basic structure and the interrelationships of newspapers, magazines, films, 
radio, television, in terms of their significance as social instruments and economic 
entities in modern society. 

3 34. Feature Article Writing (3) S 

Non-fiction writing for newsapers and magazines, including study of sources, 
methods, and markets. Open to non-majors. 

33 5. Reporting of Public Affairs (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Coverage in depth of significant events pertinent to operations of governmental 
units and related organizations. 

338A,B,C. Newspaper Production (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A lecture and activity course in which 
members of the class constitute the editorial staff of the student newspaper. The 
group meets four hours per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing 
and makeup, followed by production. 

3 53. Advertising Copy and Layout (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales appeals, 
attention factors, and illustrations. 

3 58A,B. Publications Production (2) F, S 
A w^orkshop for students engaged in the production of annual, quarterly, monthly, 
and other types of student publications, as scheduled by appropriate college au- 
thorities. Activities will include writing, editing, photography, art work, and lay- 
out. 

361. Theory and Principles of Public Relations (3) S 
Examination of basic principles of public relations and their application in non- 
commercial as well as commercial fields, including industry, education, govern- 
ment, and w’elfare. 

401. Report Writing (3) F 

Planning, organizing and writing of various kinds of reports for business, educa- 
tion, and government. Consideration will be given to use of graphic aids and 
preparation of copy for reports that are to be printed. 

42 5. History and Philosophy of American Journalism (3) F 

The development of American mass communication, with emphasis on news- 
papers and periodicals, and their ideological, political, social, and economic aspects. 

426. World Press and Propaganda Analysis (3) F 

Examination of major news communication systems, both democratic and totali- 
tarian, and the means by which news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 


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125 


427, Seminar on Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Consideration of such problems as the 
extent to which the mass media should be regulated by the government, “objective” 
versus “interpretive” news reporting, and ethical and legal questions of particular 
cases. 

439. Mass Media Internship (2) F, S 

According to his vocational preference, the student serves a supervised summer 
(or equivalent) internship with a newspaper, magazine, radio or television station, 
press association, advertising agency, or public relations firm. 

448 A, B. Special Projects in Mass Communication (2) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairman. Individually supervised mass 
media activities, on and off campus. Projects may involve newspapers, magazines, 
radio, television, and public relations agencies. 

JOURNALISM EDUCATION 

442. Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) (Formerly 411) 

(Planned for 1964-65). Theory and technique of advising school newspaper and 
yearbook staffs. Relation of classroom instruction to staff assignments. Designed for 
credential candidates in English and Language Arts who may supervise school 
publications. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophical study seeks to investigate human ways of thinking and valuing, 
and to draw out the implications of these activities for the life of society. (Dourse 
work in philosophy is designed to provide both breadth and depth of understanding 
in these areas for all students, those who are preparing for other professions as will 
as those who intend to pursue graduate work in this field. 

The philosophy curriculum has therefore the following objectives: 

(1) to help students clarify their own philosophical concerns; 

(2) to uncover and to discuss sound methodology for the solution of philo- 
sophical problems; 

(3) to prepare students seeking higher degrees in philosophy. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: PHILOSOPHY MAJOR 

Requirements: A total of 36 units, beyond General Education requirements, with 
the following distribution: 

Lower Division (Maximum of 12 units, beyond General Education requirements) 
101. Ethics (3) 

201. Logic (3) 

211. The Older Schools of Philosophy (3) 

212. The Modern Schools of Philosophy (3) 

Note: Students who have taken their lower division work elsewhere will be 
given credit for equivalent course work. 

Upper Division (Minimum of 24 units) 

Core Requirements (12 units) 

331. The History of Philosophy: Problems of Being and Becoming (3) 

332. The History of Philosophy: Problems of Knowledge and Valuing (3) 

Plus choice of one of the following: 

417A, 417B. Aristotle (6) 

427A, 427B. Spinoza (6) 

447 A, 447B. Plato (6) 

467 A, 467B. Kant (6) 

480. Independent Study (3) 

Electives (Minimum of 9 units) 


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A program in philosophy profits greatly through the study of literary master- 
pieces, psychology, and the social sciences. Students of philosophy are advised to 
supplement their studies in philosophy with course work offered in these fields. 
Philosophy majors are urged to acquire proficiency in a foreign language. 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 

Requirements: A total of 2 1 units. 

Lower Division (Maximum of 9 units), selected from: 

101. Ethics (3) 

102. Logic (3) 

211. The Older Schools of Philosophy (3) 

212. The Modem Schools of Philosophy (3) 

Upper Division (Minimum of 12 units) 

331. History of Philosophy: Problems of Being and Becoming (3) 

332. History of Philosophy: Problems of Knowledge and Valuing (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

Philosophy Courses 

101. Ethics (3) F, S (Formerly 301 ) 

Analysis of problems of human conduct: the problems of motivation, valuing, 
norms, social demands, and personal commitments. 

201. Logic (3) F 

Analysis of the various forms given to propositions and the basic requirements 
necessary for valid inference. 

211. The Older Schools of Philosophy (3) F 

A Study of the viewpoints which constitute such world-views as Materialism, 
Platonism, Stoicism, Mysticism, and Scholasticism. 

212. The Modern Schools of Philosophy (3) S 

A study of the viewpoints which constitute the world-views of Idealism, Realism, 
Positivism, Pragmatism, and Existentialism. 

250. Philosophy of Ideas (3) F (Formerly 311) 

Analysis of basic ideas which have shaped modem thought. 

301. Comparaive Study of the World’s Great Religions (3) S 

A study of man’s religious impulse from the philosophical standpoint. An attempt 
will be made to analyze and to compare the religious impulse as expressed in the 
theologies of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. 

3 31. History of Philosophy: Problems of Being and Becoming (3) F 
Analysis and survey of the two fundamental problems of philosophy: Being and 
Becoming. The contributions of the great philosophers to these problems will be 
considered. 

332. History of Philosophy: Problems of Knowledge and Valuing (3) S 
Analysis and survey of the problems of Knowledge and Valuing. The contribu- 
tions of the great philosophers to these problems will be considered. 

401. Philosophy of Aesthetics (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

An investigation into the conditions and the requirements of aesthetic experience. 

407. Seminar in Basic Concepts of Philosophy and Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: 3 units in both Philosophy and Psychology. An interdisciplinary 
study of significant interrelationships which obtain between basic concepts common 
to both philosophy and psychology. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


127 


411. Contemporary Interpretations of Man (3) F, S 

An interdisciplinary course stressing the dominant twentieth-century philosophical 
interpretations of man and the imaginative expression of those views in major 
literary works. 

41 7 A. Seminar in Aristotle’s Scientific and Speculative Views (3) F 

An intensive study of the great philosopher’s views concerning the nature and 
function of science, logical reasoning, and the status of universal. 

417B. Seminar in Aristotle’s Social and Aesthetic Views (3) S 

A study of the problems of human conduct, government, and art. 

427A. Seminar in Spinoza’s Ethics and Metaphysics (3) F (Planned for 1964-65) 

A detailed and critical study of Spinoza’s views concerning the nature of man 
and the problems of conduct. 

427B. Seminar in Spinoza’s Political Theory (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

A detailed and critical study of the Tractatus. Theologies— Foliticus and the 
Tractatus Foliticus. 

447A. Seminar in the Development of Plato’s Philosophy (3) F 

A critical and detailed study of the early and middle Dialogues, terminating 
with The Republic. 

447B. Seminar in Plato’s Later Dialogues (3) S 

A critical and detailed study of the later Dialogues which follow The Republic, 
terminating with The Laws. 

467A. Kant’s Theory of Knowledge (3) F (Planned for 1964-65) 

A critical and detailed study of The Critique of Fure Reason. 

467B. Kant’s Theory of Ethics and Aesthetics (3) S (Planned for 1964-65) 

A critical and detailed study of The Critique of Fractical Reason and The 
Critique of Judgment. 

480. Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Minimum of 12 units in Philosophy and approval of the Depart- 
ment. Supervised projects in philosophy designed to develop capacities for research. 



New Letters and Science Building, now housing the entire College until the next permanent buildings are completed 


DIVISION OF SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS 
AND ENGINEERING 

Professors: McCarthy (Chairman), Adams, Ames, Bryden, Lay, McCleary 

Associate Professors: Brattstrom, ()’Toole, Sutton, Turner 

Assistant Professor: Stiel 
(1962-1963 Faculty) 

(The following additional appointments have been authorized for the Academic 
Year 1963-64: Two in Biology, two in Chemistry, one in Engineering, two in 
Mathematics, two in Physics.) 

The Division of Science provides fundamental instruction basic to the needs of 
students preparing (1) to pursue graduate and professional training,* (2) to teach, 
and (3) to seek employment in technical and applied fields. 

It is the concern of the faculty that science instruction shall not be circumscribed 
by limited disciplines, but shall embrace related scientific subject-matter fields as 
well as liberal arts subjects and foreign language. We hold firmly to the conviction 
that the trained scientist of today and in the future must be one conversant with 
the general principles of all scientific disciplines and one adequately prepared in 
depth in a major field. He must be one who has been nurtured in the development 
of ideas, not merely in technical skills. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in science or mathematics major programs, 
students must have a C average in all courses required for the majors including 
those in the related sciences. A proficiency in one modern foreign language (Rus- 
sian, German, French) is required. A reading comprehension of a second modern 
foreign language is strongly recommended for students planning graduate study 
leading to the Ph.D. degree. This requirement is normally met by completing four 
semesters of a college foreign language with a C grade or better or by taking a 
foreign language for two years in high school and two semesters of intermediate 
language in college with a minimum of a C grade in the college course. The re- 
quirement may also be met by examination. For details of examination procedure, 
apply at Division Office. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade D is obtained. A placement test will be given to students in the division of 
science in order to determine whether they are ready to start the calculus. 

Non-science major students admitted to the College directly from high school 
or transfer students with 30 units or less will normally expect to satisfy the college 
general education natural science requirements for the B.A. degree by completing 
the following courses: 

Physics or Chemistry 201 

Biology 100 

Biology 140 

or 

Biology 160 



4 units 4 

2 units 2 


3 units 

3 

— 3 units 


[129] 


130 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

One hundred twenty-four units including general education (See page 41), 
foreign language* (See divisional requirement page 129), 32 units in biology 
courses, and supporting courses in physical sciences and mathematics. The support- 
ing courses must include one year of inorganic college chemistry including qualita- 
tive analysis with laboratory, one semester of organic chemistry with laboratory, 
one semester of analytical geometry and calculus, and one year of college physics 
with laboratory. 

Minimum Course Requirements for the Major f 


Lower Division 

Biological Science Units 

100 Principles of Biology 2 

140 Principles of Botany 3 

160 Principles of Zoology 3 


8 - 

Upper Division 

Biological Science Units 

311 General Microbiology 4 

312 Genetics Lecture 3 

412 Cell Physiology and Metabolism 2 

412L Cell Physiology Laboratory 2 

400 Undergraduate Problems in Biology 1 

Electives— 12 units, of which 4 must be outside area of 
emphasis 12 


8 


24 - -_-24 


32 

Minimum Requirements for Biological Science Minor j 


Biological Science Units 

100, 140 and 160 8 

424 Evolution with laboratory 

or 4 

312 Genetics with laboratory 

311 General Microbiology 4 

Biological Science Elective. 4 

400 Undergraduate Problems in Biology 1 


21 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Biological Principles 

100. Principles of Biology (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: None. An introduction to basic concepts of structures and function 
in biological organisms and to modern biological problems. Required for all 
Biology majors and suggested course for non-science majors for completing the 
general education requirements of the natural sciences. (2 hours lecture per week.) 

* Transfer students should have completed the foreign language requirement and as many of 
the general education courses as possible prior to admission. However, uncompleted units 
may be satisfied while the upper division work is in progress by concurrent enrollment at 
a junior college or with appropriate courses offered at Orange State College, 
t Substitutions in the program mav be made for transfer students and others upon the recommen- 
dation of the adviser and the approval of the Department Chairman. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


131 


201. Field Biology (3) S 

Prerequisite: 1 year of biological science and/or permission of instructor. A course 
for non-majors designed to acquaint the interested study with the plant and 
animal life of this region. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) Several 
week-end field trips will be arranged to study different biotic communities. 

312. Genetics Lecture (3) S 

Prerequisite: 1 year of college biology or permission of the instructor. The gen- 
eral principles and modern developments in the study of heredity. (3 hours lecture 
per week.) 

312L. Genetics Laboratory (1) S 

Prerequisite: Bio.Sci. 312 (may be taken concurrently). (3 hours laboratory per 
week.) 

400. Undergraduate Problems in Biology (1-3) F, S 
Open to advanced standing students in Biology by permission of a staff member 
only. May be repeated for credit. 

412. Cell Physiology and Metabolism (2) F 
Prerequisites: 1 year of college biology and 1 semester of organic chemistry or 
permission of the instructor. Characteristics of life at the cellular level; processes 
by which the cell obtains energy and material and forms new cell substances; con- 
trol of these processes by the cell; organization of structures and enzyme systems 
within the cell. (2 hours lecture per week.) 

41 2L. Cell Physiology Laboratory (2) F 

Prerequisite: Bio.Sci. 412 (may be taken concurrently). (6 hours laboratory per 
week.) 

424. Evolution (3) S 

Prerequisite: 1 year of college biology or permission of the instructor. A study 
of evolution, including the history of evolutionary thought; origin of universe, 
earth and life; geological and paleontological history of the earth; evidences for 
evolution derived from comparative anatomy, embryology, genetics, zoogeography; 
mechanisms of evolution. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

424L. Evolution Laboratory (1) S 

Prerequisite: Biology 424 (may be taken concurrently). (3 hours laboratory per 
week.) 

425. Marine BioRgy (3) F 

Prerequisites: Bio.Sci. 100 and Physics-Chemistry 201 or equivalent, or permission 
of the instructor. Physical and chemical aspects of the ocean as a background for 
the study of marine organisms and habitats, including a study of currents, tides, 
food cycles, productivity, biotic associations, succession, and communities. Habits, 
identification, ecology, methods of collecting, preserving and maintaining alive 
local marine algae, invertebrates, and fish. (2 hours lecture. 3 hours laboratory or 
field work per week.) 

500. Graduate Problems in Biology (1-3) F, S 
Open to graduate students only by permission of a staff member. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

Botany Area 

140. Principles of Botany (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: None. This course is designed to integrate with the Principles of 
Biology course. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamic aspects of botany 
through the traditional areas of morphology and classification will not be neglected. 


132 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Required for all Biology majors and suggested course for non-science majors for 
completing the general education requirements of the natural sciences. (2 hours 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week.) 

141. General Botany (4) F 

Brief survey of lower plant life. More detailed study of flow’ering plants. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

342. Plant Anatomy (4) F 

Prerequisite: General Botany or 1 year of college biology. The origin, develop- 
ment, and maturation of leaves, stems, roots, and flowers of vascular plants. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

344. Plant Morphology (4) S 

Prerequisite: General Botany or 1 year of college biology. A study of the 
morphology and classification of the lower plant groups and a general survey of 
the mapor groups of plants exclusive of angiosperms and gymnosperms. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

441. Plant Taxonomy (4) S 

Prerequisite: General Botany or 1 year of college biology. An introduction to 
the study of classification of conifers and the flowering plants through field col- 
lecting and laboratory study and identification of representative kinds. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

443. Plant Ecology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Plant Taxonomy 441. Relation of plants to their environment 
with emphasis on climatic and soil factors influencing their structure, behavior, 
and distribution. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

444. Plant Physiology (4) S 

Prerequisites: General Botany and 1 semester of organic chemistry or permis- 
sion of the instructor. A study of plant growth, nutrition, food synthesis, and 
metabolism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

Microbiology Area 

311. General Microbiology (4) F 

Prerequisite: 1 year of college biology. Consideration of the diverse biological 
characteristics of bacteria and other microorganisms will be extended to study of 
these life forms as agents of change in natural processes. The laboratory will in- 
troduce the methods used to study microbes and will demonstrate the roles of 
microbes in agriculture, industry and in health. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

413. Basic Pathogenic Microbiology (2) S 

Prerequisite: 1 semester of microbiology or bacteriology. Selected topics in the 
biology of infectious disease: A biological view of parasitism, pathogenicity of the 
microorganisms, and defenses of the host, the microbiological bases of disinfection, 
chemotherapy and antibiotic therapy. (2 hours lecture per week.) 

41 3L. Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: Bio.Sci. 413 (may be taken concurrently) or permission of the in- 
structor. (6 hours laboratory per week.) 

439. Microbial Ecology (2) S 

Prerequisite: 1 semester of microbiology or bacteriology. The interaction of 
microbes and their environment: the influence of physical and chemical factors on 
the distribution and activities of microbial populations; the effects of microbes on 
the living and nonliving environment of the earth’s surface. (2 hours lecture per 
week.) 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


133 


43 9L. Microbial Ecology Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: 1 semester microbiology; normally Bio.Sci. 439 will be taken concur- 
rently. Laboratory experiments will show basic principles of enrichment, selection 
and succession. On completion of the basic experiments each student will select and 
perform an independent study in microbial ecology. (6 hours laboratory per week.) 

Zoology Area 

160. Principles of Zoology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: None. An introduction to the principles of Animal Biology with 
special reference to the structure, classification, physiology, behavior and ecology 
of animals. Required for all Biology majors and suggested course for non-science 
majors for completing the general education requirements of the natural sciences. 
(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week.) 

361. Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology (4) F, S (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: 1 year of college biology or permission of instructor. Study of the 
structure and function of the human organism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

362. Animal Histological Technique (2) S 

Prerequisite: 1 year of college biology or permission of instructor. Theory and 
practice of the preparation of animal cells and tissues for microscopic study. (6 
hours laboratory per week.) 

463. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4) F 

Prerequisite: A year course in general zoology or biology, or permission of the 
instructor. A comparative study of the chordates, with emphasis on morphology 
and evolution of various organ systems from fish through mammals. Includes thor- 
ough dissection of dogfish, Necturus, and cat. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

464. Embryology (4) F 

Prerequisite: A year course in general zoology or biology or permission of the 
instructor. Study of development from fertilization through organo-genesis with 
laboratory work on the frog, chick, and pig. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

465. Animal Ecology (4) F 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of college biology or permission of the instructor. A 
survey of the physical, chemical, and biological factors of the environment as they 
affect the distribution and mode of life of animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours labora- 
tory per week.) 

471. Natural History of the Vertebrates (4) S 

Prerequisites: 1 year of college biology; comparative vertebrate anatomy, or per- 
mission of the instructor. Natural history, behavior, distribution, and ecolo^ of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory and field emphasis on identification, behavior, maintenance 
of living and preserved animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or field work 
per week.) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum is planned to provide thorough instruction in the basic principles 
and concepts of chemistry for students who will (1) continue on to graduate work 
in chemistry; (2) teach in the science programs of secondary schools; (3) seek em- 
ployment in industry or government; or (4) pursue a chemistry nunor of funda- 
mental courses in chemistry in support of other areas such as physics and biology. 


134 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in chemistry are 


given below: * 

Lower Division Chemistry 16 

Upper Division Chemistry 18 

Electives in Chemistry 9 

Total Units in Chemistry 43 43 

Required Science and Mathematics Courses (other than Chemistry) 31 31 

Total Science and Mathematics Units 74 

General Education units (in addition to 12 units of Physical and Bio- 
logical Science and Mathematics) 38 38 

Undesignated electives 12 12 

Total units for the B.A. degree 124 

The required Science and Mathematics courses are as follows: 

Lower Division 

General Chemistry 10 

Quantitative Analysis 6 


16 

8 
6 
3 
1 

18 

12 
14 
5 

31 

Proficiency in one modem foreign language (Russian, German, French) is required. 
(See Divisional requirement, page 129.) 

Minor in Chemistry 

A minimum of 22 units of Chemistry, including 9 upper division units, are needed 
for a minor. These should include General Chemistry (10), or equivalent. Quanti- 
tative Analysis (3), and either Organic Chemistry (10), or Physical Chemistry (6) 
and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3). It is recommended that both Physical 
Chemistry (6) and Organic Chemistry (8) be taken (14 upper division units). 

Chemistry 

101A,B. General Chemistry (5,5) F, S 

Prerequisites: High school algebra and either high school chemistry or physics. 
The fundamental principles of chemistry with emphasis on the chemistr>’ of inor- 
ganic compounds. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

201. Physical Science for Non-Science Majors (4 or 5) F, S 

Prerequisites: 1 year of high school algebra or equivalent, or permission of in' 
structor. Taught jointly by the departments of chemistry and physics, this course 
presents the essential unifying features of the basic physical sciences, chemistry and 
physics. The modem concepts of the physical and chemical theory of atomic and 


Required Science Prerequisites: 

Physics 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Biology 


Upper Division 

Organic Chemistry 

Physical Chemistry 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory 
Chemical Literature 


Substitutions in the program may be made upon approval of the department chairman. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


135 


molecular structure form the unifying course material. Selected physical and chern- 
ical theory (from the fields of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light, kinetic 
theory, thermodynamics, quantum theory and inorganic chemistry) are included to 
provide the necessary background material. Meets the general education physical 
science requirement. May not be taken for credit by science majors or mathematics 
majors. 4 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation per week.) 

211A,B. Quantitative Analysis (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 A,B. or equivalent. The fundamentals of volumetric 
and gravimetric methods of analysis are covered in the first semester. The second 
semester continues with advanced volumetric, gravimetric methods, and electro- 
analytic methods. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

301A,B. Organic Chemistry (4,4) F, S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 A, B. or equivalent. The classification, fundamental 
theories, preparation, and properties of the carbon compounds are discussed. Experi- 
ments illustrating the properties and preparative methods of representative aliphatic 
and aromatic compounds are performed in the laboratory. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory per week.) 

302A,B. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1,1) F, S 
Taken concurrently with Chemistry 301A,B. Additional experiments in organic 
chemistry. Recommended for Chemistry majors. (3 hours laboratory per week.) 

371 A,B. Physical Chemistry (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Calculus, college physics, and two years of college chemistry. A 
study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Thermodynamics, solu- 
tions, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, atomic and molecular struc- 
ture, and kinetics are covered. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

400. Independent Study and Research (1-3) F, S 

Open to students with advanced standing in Chemistry by permission of a staff 
member only. May be repeated for credit. 

401. Organic Preparations (2-3) S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301A,B or equivalent. Laboratory exercises using ad- 
vanced methods and techniques for the preparation of organic compounds. Li- 
brary work required. (6 or 9 hours of laboratory per week.) 

403. Characterization of Organic Compounds (4) F 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 A, B or equivalent. The identification of organic com- 
pounds as pure substances or in mixtures. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory per 
Week.) 

411. Instrumental Analysis (4) F 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, 301A,B or equivalent. Utilization of modern in- 
struments in the solution of analytical problems (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

421. Inorganic Preparations (2, 3) F 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212 and 301 A. Laboratory exercises in the preparation 
of inorganic compounds. Library work required. (6 or 9 hours laboratory per 
Week.) 

441. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3) F, S 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B. May be taken concurrently with Chemistry 372 
with the permission of the instructor. Laboratory exercises illustrating the physical 
principles of chemistry. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 


136 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


451. Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) F 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371 A3- An introduction to the application of quantum 
mechanics and statistical mechanics in chemistry. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

461. Chemical Thermodynamics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371 A3- The application of thermodynamic principles 
to chemical processes. 

471. Chemical Constitution (3) F 

Prerequisite: 2 years of college chemistry or permission of the instructor. Ad- 
vanced discussion of topics related to the chemical bond. The periodic system, 
bond types, and the structure of molecules and crystals. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

472. Chemical Crystallography (3) S 

Prerequisite: 1 year each of college chemistry and physics or permission of the 
instructor. The fundamentals of crystallography, X-rays and X-ray diffraction, and 
crystal chemistry. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

491. Chemical Literature (1) F, S 

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. An introduction to the types and use of 
chemical literature. (1 hour lecture per week.) 

ENGINEERING 

A program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in physical 
science and engineering is being planned. Freshman students wishing to elect such 
a program will be accepted for the academic year 1963-64 and will be expected to 
follow the program recommended for the physics major during their first year. 
The engineering major will not be available to upper division transfer students 
during the academic year 1963-64. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS 

The program of studies in mathematics offers courses stressing the understanding 
of mathematical concepts and the axiomatic approach. A sufficient variety of 
courses is given to satisfy the needs of 

(1) The proficient student aiming toward graduate study, 

(2) The student planning the use of mathematics in a career in industry and 
government service, 

(3) Preprofessional students in other science areas, 

(4) The prospective elementary and secondary teacher. (See special programs 
of study below.) 

In addition to mathematics, the major candidates will be required to pursue 
a year of general college physics with a calculus prerequisite. Proficiency in one 
modern foreign language (Russian, German, French) is required. (See Divisional 
requirement, page 129.) Attention is called to all divisional requirements on page 
129. 


Minimum Requirements 


Required Courses Units 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 14 

Linear Algebra 3 

Differential Equations 3 

Advanced Calculus 6 

Modern Algebra 3 

Complex Analysis and/or Real Analysis 6 

Differential Geometry or Projective Geometry 3 

Elements of Set Theory or Elementary Topology 3 


41 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


137 


Bachelor of Arts Degree Major Program in Mathematics for Teacher Education 


I. Elementary Education Units 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus Math 150A-B 8 

(These or equivalent courses arranged by conference) 

Math. 250 Intermediate Calculus 6 

Math. 330 Number Theory - - 3 

Math. 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics-Geometry 3 

One of: 

Math. 291 Linear Algebra — 3 

Math. 300 Fundamentals of Mathematics- Algebra 

One of: 

Math. 310 Differential Equations — - 3 

Math. 292 Mathematical Logic - 

18 18 

Total - - - 26 

II. Secondary Education Units 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 8 8 

(These or equivalent courses arranged by conference) 

Math. 250 Intermediate Calculus - - 6 

Math. 310 Differential Equations 3 

Math. 300 Fundamentals of Mathematics- Algebra 3 

Math. 301 Fundamentals of Mathematics-Geometry 3 

Math. 330 Number Theory 3 

One of: 

Math. 291 Linear Algebra 3 

Math. 292 Mathematical Logic 

29 29 

Post-graduate Year: 

Math. 305 Elements of Set Theory 3 

Math. 407 Modem Algebra 3 

Math. 413 Elementary Topology 3 

9 9 

Total 38 


MATHEMATICS 

lOOA. Axiomatic Arithmetic (3) F (Formerly Math. 231 A) 

Prerequisites: Beginning in 1965 a prerequisite for this course will be two years 
of high school algebra. The logical structure of arithmetic from an axiomatic 
viewpoint. Emphasis will be on the contrast between models of the number sys- 
tem and numbers as mathematical objects. Axioms and theorems in calculation 
with applications. 

lOOB. Axiomatic Arithmetic (3) S (Formerly Math 23 IB) 

Prerequisite: Math. lOOA. A continuation of Math. lOOA. 

120. Finite Mathematics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: three years of high school mathematics or its equivalent. This is 
a course comprising introductions to the following topics: logic, set theory, 
niatrices, probability, theory of games and linear programming. It is particularly 
^ited to students of economics, the biological and social sciences. 


6 — 83902 


138 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


150A. Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics inclusive of trigonometry and 
a passing score in the placement test. 

150B. Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) F, S 

An introduction to analysis including analytic geometry, functions, continuity, 
differentiation, the definite integral, integration, applications. 

2 50A. Intermediate Calculus (3) F (Formerly Math. 290A) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A-B or equivalent. 

250B. Intermediate Calculus (3) S (Formerly Math. 290B) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. A continuation of Math. 150. Topics include Taylor’s 
theorem, infinite series, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple 
integrals, applications. 

291. Linear Algebra (3) F (Formerly Math. 390) 

Co-requisite: Math. 250A. The study of matrices, determinants, vector spaces, 
linear transformations. 

292. Mathematical Logic (3) S (Formerly Math. 414) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250A. An introductory course to the elements of mathe- 
matical logic. 

300. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Algebra (3) F (Formerly Math. 409) 
Prerequisite: Math. 150B. Selected topics in modem algebra. Designed especially 
for teachers and prospective teachers of secondary mathematics. 

3 01. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Geometry (3) S (Formerly Math. 408) 

Prerequisite: Math. 150B. Selected topics in elementary geometry. The study of 
various axiom systems for Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean geometry; projec- 
tive, metric, and affine geometry. Designed especially for teachers and prospective 
teachers of secondary mathematics. 

305. Elements of Set Theory (3) F (Formerly Math. 411) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. Operations on sets; functions; cardinals and ordinals; 
ordering, well ordering; axiom of choice; transfinite numbers. 

310. Differential Equations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. An introduction to existence theorems and the theory 
of differential equations. 

3 20. Projective Geometry (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math. 291. Homogeneous coordinates, projective group, cross-ratio, 
duality, point and line conics. 

3 25. Differential Geometry (3) F (Formerly Math. 405) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. An introductory course in differential geometry. 

3 30. Number Theory (3) S (Formerly Math. 410) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. Divisibility, congruences, prime number theory, Dio- 
phantine problems. 

3 3 5. Probability and Mathematics Statistics (3) S (Formerly Math. 400) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B. An introductory course to probability theory and its 
applications, based on use of the calculus. 

350A. Advanced Calculus (3) F (Formerly Math. 403A) 

Prerequisite: Math. 250B, Math. 291. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


139 


3 50B. Advanced Calculus (3) S (Formerly Math. 403B) 

Prerequisite: Math. 3 50 A. Designed to introduce the student to rigorous proofs 
in analysis. Topics include the real number system, continuity, differentiation and 
integration of functions of several variables, infinite integrals and series. 

406A. Applied Mathematics (Multilinear Analysis) (3) F 
Prerequisites: Math. 291, Math. 350A. Linear algebra, tensor products and 
Grassman products, geometric interpretation. Multilinear algebra, convergence, 
Hilbert space, Daniell integral, distributions, spectral theory of linear operators. 

406B. Applied Mathematics (Functional Equations) (3) S 

Prerequisites: Math. 406A, Math. 350B. Applications of multilinear analysis, 
integral transformations, approximation theory, difference equations, ordinary and 
partial differential equations, harmonic analysis, integral equations. 

407A. Modern Algebra (3) F 
Prerequisite: Math. 291. 

407B. Modern Algebra (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math. 407 A. Sets, mappings, groups, rings, modules, fields, homo- 
morphisms, integers, rational and real numbers, advanced topics in vector spaces 
and theory of linear transformations, matrices, algebras, ideals, Galois theory. 

41 2 A. Complex Analysis (3) F 
Co-requisite: Math. 350A. 

412B. Complex Analysis (3) S 

Co-requisite: Math. 3 SOB. An introduction to the study of functions of a com- 
plex variable. 

413. Elementary Topology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math. 350A. An introductory course to point set and algebraic 
topology. 

450 A. Real Analysis (3) F 
Prerequisite: Math. 3 SOB. 

450B. Real Analysis (3) S 

Prerequisites: Math. 3S0B, Math. 450A. An introductory course in modem func- 
tional analysis. Measure theory, differentiations and theories of integration. Hilbert 
and Banach spaces, linear transformations and spectral theories. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in physics provides the 
fundamental instruction basic to the needs of the student who is preparing (0 
to teach in elementary or secondary schools, (2) to undertake graduate work in 
physics or related fields, (3) to pursue additional collegiate studies leading to pro- 
fessional degrees in dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, and other professional, 
related areas, and (4) to seek employment in technical and applied fields. 

The faculty is concerned that the student of physics shall have adequate educa- 
tion in other liberal arts subjects, including foreign language. Through curriculum 
requirements and through elective subjects, the physics student will be expected 
to have a broad education in traditional liberal arts subjects, the several sciences, 
^nd mathematics. In particular, the student is urged to make his selections of 
elective courses outside the field of physics. 


140 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


The minimum departmental requirements for the degree are given below.* 

Required Courses 
Lower Division 

General Chemistry (10), units distributed: 4 to General Education, 6 to de- 
partmental requirement ^ 6 

Mathematics-Analytic Geometry and Calculus (14), units distributed: 3 to 

General Education, 11 to minor requirement 11 

Physics (12), prerequisite to major 12 

Total 29 

Proficiency in one modern foreign language (Russian, German, Erench) is re- 
quired. (See Divisional requirement, page 129.) 

Upper Division 
Physics Courses 

t441. Analytical Mechanics ^ 

1431. Electricity and Magnetism — ^ 

1411. Theory of Wave Motion (acoustics, physical optics, and atomic spectra) 3 

t453. Nuclear Physics or 451 Modern Physics 3 

t416. Thermodynamics and Introduction to Kinetic Theory 3 

t455. Introduction to Quantum Physics 3 

381. Advanced Physics Laboratory (electrical measurements and electronics) 2 

382. Advanced Physics Laboratory (mechanics, acoustics, physical optics, 

atomic spectra) 2 

481. Advanced Physics Laboratory (atomic and nuclear physics) 2 

482. Advanced Physics Laboratory (selected experiments in classical and mod- 
em physics) 2 

Total - 26 

MATHEMATICS 

Courses in advanced calculus, differential equations, modem algebra, modem 
analysis, etc., chosen in consultation with physics department adviser to fulfill minor 
requirement ^ 

Total upper division requirement 35 

Mathematics Minor 

A minor in mathematics is required for the B.A. degree. The minor consists of 
20 units (minimum) of mathematics, of which a minimum of 9 must be upper 
division courses. (These units have been included in the above description of 
required courses.) 

Summary of Degree Requirements (Minimum) 

Total required units prerequisite to major, in major, and in minor, both 

upper and lower division 64 

Total general education requirements 50 

Total electives (students are advised to choose electives outside the major 
field) 10 

Total minimum units required for degree 124 

Minor in Physics 

A minimum of 20 units of physics are required for a minor. These shall include 
12 units of lower division physics (or equivalent as determined by the department 
of physics), and a minimum of 8 units of upper division physics, including a mini- 
mum of 2 units of advanced physics laboratory. 


t These courses will normally be taken m the order listed. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


141 


PHYSICS * 

201. Physical Science for Non-Science Majors (4 or 5) F, S 
Prerequisite: 1 year of high school Algebra or equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. Taught jointly by the departments of chemistry and physics, this 
course presents the essential unifying features of the basic physical sciences, chem- 
istry and physics; the modem concepts of the physical and chemical theory of 
atomic and molecular structure form the unifying course material. Selected physi- 
cal and chemical theory (from the fields of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism, 
light, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, quantum theory, and inorganic chemistry) 
are included to provide the necessary background material. Meets the general 
education physical science requirement. May not be taken for credit by science 
majors or mathematics majors. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation per week.) 

221. Fundamental Physics (4) F, S 

Prerequisite: 4 units of Analytic Geometry and Calculus; corequisite: additional 
4 units of Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Fundamental classical physics includ- 
ing mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, acoustics, and wave motion. (4 hours 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week.) 

222. Fundamental Physics (5) S 

Prerequisite: Physics 221 with a grade of C or better. Fundamental classical and 
modem physics, including physical optics, electricity and magnetism, and an 
introduction to modern physics. (5 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory per week.) 

223. Fundamental Physics (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Physics 222 with a grade of C or better. Fundamental physical 
concepts are presented in a unifying framework, using the postulational approach. 
The five major theories: classical mechanics, relativity, electricity, quantum me- 
chanics, and statistical mechanics form the principal material for this course, which 
is designated for the student who has just completed the 9 units of Fundamental 
Physics I and II. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

381. Advanced Physics Laboratory (2) F 

Prerequisite; Physics 222 with a grade of C or better. Selected experiments in 
electrical measurements and electronics, with emphasis on precision of measurement 
and standardization of instruments. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

382. Advanced Physics Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: Physics 381 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. 
Selected experiments in mechanics, acoustics, physical optics, and atomic spectra. 
(1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

411. Theory of Wave Motion (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus. The properties of wave motion: 
production, propagation, refraction, diffraction, interference, and transmission 
through surfaces of waves, as applied to physical optics, acoustics, heat radiation, 
^d wave mechanics. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

416. Thermodynamics and Introduction to Kinetic Theory (3) S 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus, differential equations. A postula- 
tional study of thermodynamics with emphasis on thermodynamic states rather 
than on thermodynamic processes. An introductory course in the basic concepts 
and postulates, conditions of equilibrium, formal relationships, processes and ther- 
niodynamic engines, stability of thermodynamic systems, first- and second-order 
phase transitions, the Nernst postulate, and representative applications. (3 hours 
lecture per week.) 

* For all courses, prerequisites not requiring consent of the departinent chairman may be waived 
by the instructor of the course if he is satisfied that the student is qualified to undertake 
the course. 


142 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


431. Electricity and Magnetism (3) F 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus. Corequisites: advanced calculus, or 
permission of the instructor. Theories of electrostatics, electrodynamics, and electro- 
magnetic waves. Introduction to magnetohydrodynamics. (3 hours lecture per 
week.) 

441. Analytical Mechanics (3) S 

Prerequisites: 1 ye^ college physics, calculus, or permission of the instructor. 
Principles of Newtonian mechanics applied to the statics and dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian equations. (3 hours 
lecture per week.) 

451. Modern Physics (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus or permission of instructor. Discus- 
sion of experiments and introduction to theory for selected topics in atomic, nuclear, 
and solid state physics. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

452. Physics of Nuclear Radiation (3) F 

Prerequisite: 1 year college physics. X-rays, radioactivity, interaction of radiation 
with matter, detection of radiation, applications to health physics. (3 hours lecture 
per week.) 

453. Nuclear Physics (3) F 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus, or permission of the instructor. 
Properties of nuclei, radioactivity, elementary particles, nuclear reactions. Introduc- 
tory discussion of theories of nuclear structure and nuclear processes. (3 hours 
lecture per week.) 

454. Introduction to the Solid State of Matter (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 
Prerequisite: 1 year college physics, one course in atomic or nuclear physics, 

calculus, differential equations. An introduction to the physical properties of matter 
in the solid state, as explained by atomic theory. Structural, mechanical, and growth 
properties of crystals; atomic bonding; electrical, magnetic, and thermal properties 
of metals, semiconductors, and insulators. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

45 5. Introduction to Quantum Physics (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, one course in ana^Tical mechanics, one 
course in electricity and magnetism, differential equations. An introduction to the 
concepts and theory of quantum physics. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

471. Electronic Circuit Theory (3) F 

Prerequisites: 1 year college physics, calculus or permission of the instructor. 
Operating characteristics of vacuum tubes, transistors, and semiconductor diodes. 
Linear circuit theory for alternating currents and for transient currents. Introduc- 
tion to switching and pulse circuits. (3 hours lecture per week.) 

481. Advanced Physics Laboratory (2) F 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 1 course in nuclear or modem physics. Selected experi- 
ments in atomic and nuclear physics. (1 hour lecture and 6 hours laboratory per 
week.) 

482. Advanced Physics Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 381, 382, and 481 with a grade of C or better or consent of 
department chairman. Selected experiments in classical and modem physics. (1 hour 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

491. Senior Report (1) F, S 

Prerequisite: Consent of department chairman. Selection and design for individual 
project, oral and written reports. (1 hour lecture-recitation per week.) 


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492. Senior Report (2) S 

Prerequisite: Physics 491 with a grade of C or better. Laboratory work on indi- 
vidual project, oral and written progress reports, oral and written final report. (1 
hour lecture-recitation and 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

432. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Objectives, content, materials, pupil experiences, methods of instruction, and eval- 
uation in arithmetic. The nature and scope of arithmetic in the elementary school. 
Historical development of notation and numeration. (2 hours lecture per week.) 

442. Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (2 or 3) S 

Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching mathematics in secondary schools. 
Required, before student teaching, of students presenting majors in mathematics for 
the General Secondary Credential. Students without teaching experience must reg- 
ister for three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at the 
same hour each day, so that they can serve as teacher aides in high schools. See 
Education listing for professional prerequisites. (2 hours lecture per week.) 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

432. Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2) F 

A series of lecture discussion-demonstration periods will begin the course. These 
meetings will be supplemented by reading assignments, films, and exhibits appropri- 
ate to the subject under consideration. Students will be given ample opportunity 
to develop materials and techniques for science teaching. After a foundation in 
philosophy, objectives, methods, content, materials, and evaluation techniques appro- 
priate for elementary science has been established, the students will develop and 
present short teaching units before the class. These presentations will follow a 
scope and sequence pattern similar to that developed in the state-adopted textbooks. 
(One 2J4 hour meeting per week plus 1 hour laboratory period per week by 
arrangement.) 

442. Teaching Science in the Secondary School (2 or 3) F, S 

Various areas of investigation have been selected to offer the student a maximum 
of value in organizing his own course in the secondary science field. These areas of 
concentration include: an introduction into the philosophical, psychological, social, 
and historical backgrounds of science education; an investigation of the objectives, 
methods, and techniques of science teaching; practice in formulating ideas and infor- 
mation into a teaching plan; experience in using the equipment available in the 
science class, and conducting short laboratory exercises before the group. See Edu- 
cation listing for professional prerequisites. (One 3^ hour meeting per week plus 
1 hour laboratory period per week by arrangement.) 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Professors: G. T. Brown (Chairman), F. J. Davis, Hyink,* Langsdorf,* Mason 

Associate Professors: Earick, Povlovich, Toy,* Unterberger 

Assistant Professors: Ashley, Beck, Cook, de Graaf, Reith, Sailor, J. R. Smith 

Instructor: Kerschner 
(1962-1963 Faculty) 

The Division of Social Sciences offers courses in the fields of Geography, His- 
tory, Political Science, and Sociology, and accepts certain courses in Economics 
toward the divisional major. In each field, classes are provided for students who 
are preparing for graduate study and professional work. The offerings of this 
division are designed to provide a better understanding of the present world, of 
the developments which have shaped it, and of the significant contemporary prob- 
lems. All majors who are candidates for teaching credentials are required to take 
some course work in the subjects they will most likely need as teachers. In order 
to ensure a sufficiently broad background, some course work is required in the 
culture, geography, and history of Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and 
Asia (Social Science 330A-B), and in the recent history of the United States (His- 
tory 476.) 

The following majors and minor are offered by the Division: 

Major in Social Sciences 

Major in Social Sciences with a General Elementary Credential 

Major in Social Sciences with a General Secondary Credential 

Minor in Social Sciences with a General Secondary Credential 

Major in Geography 

Major in History 

Major in Political Science 

Major in Sociology 

MAJOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A student majoring in Social Sciences is permitted to select, in consultation with 
his major adviser, either of the options set forth below. The fields in which he 
may concentrate are Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociol- 
ogy. The major adviser must approve each course as an appropriate part of the 
student’s program before it can be counted toward the major. 

No units counted toward the General Education requirements may be counted 
toward the major. Proficiency in at least one foreign language is strongly recom- 
mended for all degree candidates in this division. Minimum requirements for a 
major are: 

Option I: Two Fields Units 

First field (including 12 upper division units) H 

Second field (including 9 upper division units) . . 15 

Additional work chosen from the two fields (including 3 upper division 
units) ^ 

Total 36 

* College Administrative Officers. 


[ 145 ] 


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ORANGE STATE CX)LLEGE 


Option II: Three Fields 

First field (including 9 upper division units) . 

Second field (including 6 upper division units) 

Third field (including 6 upper division units) — - 

Additional work chosen from any of the three fields (must be upper di- 
vision work) 


Units 
15 
. 9 
9 

3 


Total 


36 


MAJOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES WITH A GENERAL 
ELEMENTARY CREDENTIAL 

This major consists of a minimum of 24 units selected in consultation with the 
major adviser. At least 12 of the units must be in upper division courses. These 
units are in addition to the General Education requirements. 

Economics: 

200. Principles of Economics (or equivalent) (5 units) 

Geography: 

•ill. General Physical Geography or 131 World Regional Geography 
351. Geography of California 
History: 

381. Westward Movement 

383. History of California (or lower division equivalent) 

429. Europe Since 1914 
•476. United States Since 1933 
Political Science: 

•210. American Government 
311. State and Local Government 
331. Governments and Politics of Major Powers 
351. International Relations 
Sociology: 

•201. Introduction to Sociology 
202. Social Problems 
431. Minority Group Relations 
451. Sociology of the Family 
Social Sciences: 

•3 30 A. Contemporary Civilizations and U.S. Foreign Policy 
(Africa, Middle East, and Asia) 

•330B. Contemporary Civilizations and U.S. Foreign Policy 
(Europe and Latin America) 

MAJOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES WITH A GENERAL 
SECONDARY CREDENTIAL 

This major consists of a minimum of 36 units selected from the following fields: 
Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. At least 24 of the 
units must be in upper division courses. The major adviser must approve each 
course as an appropriate part of the student’s program before it can be counted 
toward the major. 

Lower Division 

The nine units in social sciences required for graduation may not be counted 
toward the major. Other courses in anthropology, economics, geography, history, 
political science and government, and sociology taken in the lower division inay 
be credited toward the major upon the approval of the major adviser. 


Required. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


147 


Upper Division 

(24 units minimum) 

The following courses or their equivalent are required: 

Hist. 476. United States Since 1933 . r 

Soc. Sci. 330x\-B. Contemporary Civilizations and United States Foreign Policy 
(Africa, Middle East, Asia, Europe, Latin America) 

Some course work must be taken in at least jour of the following fields: (All 
courses are 3 units except Econ. 200) 

Economics: 

100. American Economic History 

200. Principles of Economics (or equivalent) (5 units) 

322. European Economic History 

Geography: 

111. General Physical Geography 
131. World Regional Geography 
262. Maps and Map Interpretation 
351. Geography of California 

History: 

415. Ancient Greece 
417. Ancient Rome 
423A-B. Middle Ages 

428. l?th Century Europe 

429. Europe Since 1914 

472. United States from Colony to Nation 

474. The Growth of Modern United States 

475. United States from 1900 to 1932 

Political Science: 

210. American Government 

311. State and Local Government 

331. Governments and Politics of Major Powers 

351. International Relations 

412. Political Parties and Pressure Groups 

452. American Diplomacy 

461. The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations 
Sociology: 

201. Introduction to Sociology 

202. Social Problems 
371. Urban Sociology 

431. Minority Group Relations 

Total units 36 

MINOR IN SOCIAL SCIENCES WITH GENERAL 
SECONDARY CREDENTIAL 

This minor is composed of a minimum of 20 units. At least 8 of these must be in 
the upper division to be selected from the following in consultation with the 
adviser. These units are in addition to the 9 units in Social Sciences required in 
general education. Work offered for this minor should be taken in three of the 
following fields, but a minimum of 12 units must be taken in one field: 

Economics Political Science 

Geography Sociology 

History 

Note: Courses listed as “Social Sciences” may be applied, with consent of the ad- 
viser, to any field listed above. 


148 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The maior in Geography is designed to contribute to a broad, liberal education 
and to fulfill the requirements of sound, professional preparation in geography at 
the undergraduate level. This basic program emphasizes (1) the relationship of 
man’s complex cultural patterns to the earth’s physical foundations, and (2) areal 
differentiation. It also provides students with a practical base for intensive work 
in one of the various fields of geography at the graduate level. Depending on indi- 
vidual interest, students may plan the major program to emphasize either cultural 
or physical geography. 

Unit Requirements: 

The major in Geography calls for the completion of a minimum of 48 units of 
course work. These units are in addition to those which have been used to meet 
the General Education requirement. Unit requirements are as follows: 

Geography Courses: 

As many as 12 units are acceptable from lower division offerings. Upper division 
courses must be selected from offerings in both systematic and regional geography. 
The following courses are required of all majors: Geography 111, 131, 262, 323. 

Units 

Minimum of 36 

Related Courses: 

Courses at upper and lower division levels in such fields as anthropology, 
astronomy, botany, chemistry, economics, geology, history, physics, political 
science, sociology, and statistics. 

Minimum of 12 

Total 48 

Students intending to take graduate work in geography should acquire a read- 
ing knowledge of at least one modem foreign language. 

GEOGRAPHY 

111. General Physical Geography (3) F, S (Formerly 311) 

A study of the basic elements of the physical environment (climate, land forms, 
water resources, vegetation, and soils) with particular emphasis on their world 
patterns and interrelations. Meets General Education Physical Science requirement. 

131. World Regional Geography (3) F, S (Formerly Geography 33 1 ) 

Man’s distribution and activities within the framework of world geographic 
regions, with emphasis on the differing uses of various environments and the effects 
of geographic conditions on man. 

203. Economic Geography (3) F, S (Formerly Geography 3 33) 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of instructor. A smdy of the 
production and distribution of the world’s agricultural, mineral, and industrial 
commodities, and analysis of the related economic, political and physical factors. 

262. Maps and Map Interpretation (3) F, S (Formerly Geography 362) 

The planning, design, evaluation, and use of maps and graphic aids for research 
and teaching, with emphasis on the effectiveness of cartographic representation. 

312. Geomorphology (3) (Formerly Geography 412) (Planned for 1964-65) 
Prerequisite: Geography 111. A study of the development of landforms and 
the processes which alter them, with emphasis on present landscapes in the United 
States and the interpretation of topographic maps. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


149 


323. Climatology (3) S (Formerly Geography 413 ) 

Prerequisite- Geography 111. A study of the basic climatological processes, cli- 
matic types and the importance of climate in the natural and cultural landscape. 

351. Geography of California (3) F, S i j- v . 

Analysis of the Geographic regions of California-their environmental diversity, 
settlement patterns, economic development, and current problems. 

3 53. Cartography and Graphics (2) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 262. Construction of maps, charts and graphs as geo- 
graphic tools. 

432. Geography of North America (3) F, S * • i j 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of 
of the United States and Canada emphasizing 

features and conditions that give geographic personality, both to the mdivid 
regions as well as to the individual countries. 

43 3. Geography of Europe (3) F, S * • i j 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of the instructor. A regional study 
of the countries of Europe, exclusive of the Soviet Union, emphasizing interrelated 
physical and cultural features and conditions, with special attention given to im- 
portant economic, social and political conditions and problems. 

434. Geography of Latin America (3) S * • i J 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of the instructor. A regional stiidy 
of the Middle and South American countries emphasizing interrelated physical 
and cultural features and conditions, and special hemispheric relationships invo v- 
ing these countries and the United States and Canada. 

43 5. Geography of Asia (3) F * • i j 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of the instructor. A regional study 
of the\siatic countries, exclusive of the Soviet Union, surveying interrelated 
physical and cultural features and conditions with special emphasis on the growing 
Kortance, in economic, social, and political terms, of such countries as China, 
Japan, and India. 

43 6. Geography of Africa (3) F * • i j 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of the instructor. A regional study 
of the countries and cLnies of Africa and the Middle Ea« surveying ‘nt^rolated 
physical and cultural conditions with special emphasis on the rapid development o 
political, social, and economic conditions and problems. 

43 8. Geography of the Soviet Union (3) S • i j 

Prerequisite: Geography 111 or 131 or consent of the instructor. A regional study 
of the Soviet Union emphasizing the resource base and related occupance patterns. 

471. Urban Geography (3) F , ■ • i 

Prerequisite Geography 111 or 131. The city as a geographic unit; urban settle- 
ments as regional centers; city-region relationships; the structure of villages, towns 
and cities, and their historical development; case studies. 

481. Political Geography (3) S . 

Prerequisites: nine units of regional geography. The political units as an area 
and element of geographic study with special emphasis on the influence of related 
geographic conditions. 


150 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


MAJOR IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in History is designed to provide the student with an 
understanding of the present through a careful suidy of the past. This major may 
be pursued to fulfill various professional and cultural objectives common to a liberal 
arts program. It serves, especially, as a preparation for teaching, law, ^vernment, 
and other public services, and as the foundation for advanced study at the graduate 

The major is composed of a minimum of 48 units of which 36 must be in the 
upper division. These units are in addition to those meeting the requirements in 
General Education. Students are encouraged to include in the lower division some 
courses in fields such as anthropology, economics, geography, literature, philosophy, 
political science and sociology. All potential majors should have a full y^ear survey 
of United States history in the lower division usually taken as part of the General 
Education requirements. As many as 6 units of World Civilization and 6 units of 
lower division History courses may be substituted, with the approval of the adviser, 
for the appropriate courses listed below. . 


Twelve (12) units selected from; History 412, 415, 417, 423A, 423B, 425, 
426, 428 . - - - 

Six (6) unit7sek^ed froniT Social Sciences 330A, 330B; History 330A, 

350B, 461, 466 ; 

Six (6) units selected from: History 471, 472, 473, 474, 475 

History 476 — ; * 

History 399 (to be taken in first semester of junior year) 

History^ 490 (to be taken in last semester of senior year). 

Upper division electives approved by adviser 


12 

3 

6 

6 

3 

3 

3 

6 


Total History units ^ ^ 

A related field of 6 upper division units approved by the adviser o 

Minimum total for the major 

Students intending to do graduate work in History should acquire a reading 
knowledge of at least one modern foreign language. 


HISTORY 

llOA. World Civilizations to the 17th Century (3) F 
The Story of man from the earliest times until the 17th century. 

HOB. World Civilizations from 1648 (3) S 
The story of man from the end of the religious wars to the present. Deals with 
the rise of science, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and the rise of 
the ideologies of the Twentieth Century. 

170A. United States to 1877 (3) F 

A sur\'ey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the 
United States from the discovery to 1877. Attention is given to the old world 
background, the rise of the new nation, sectional problems, and the Civil \\ar 
and Reconstruction. 

170B. United States Since 1877 (3) S 

Survey of United States History since the period of Reconstruction, covering 
political, economic, social, and biographical subiects. Fulfills the general educaaon 
requirement in U.S. history. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


151 


340A. History of England and Great Britain (3) F 

A Study of the political, economic, and social history of England and her affiliated 
nations and territories from the earliest times to the later Stuarts. Particular stress 
is placed upon the growth of the parliamentary system of government and upon 
English overseas activities. 

340B. History of England and Great Britain (3) S 

A Study of the political, economic, and social history of Great Britain from the 
later Stuarts to the present. Particular stress is placed upon the modification of the 
parliamentary system and the growth of economic ^d social democracy within 
Britain and upon the development of responsible political systems in the dependent 
territories. 

3 50A. Colonial Latin America (3) F 

A survey of the pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portupl 
and the European background of these countries; the development of the socio- 
economic, cultural, and governmental institutions in colonial life; the background of 
revolutions and the wars for independence. 

3 SOB. Republican Latin America (3) S 

A survey of the Latin American republics from 1826 to 1945 emphasizing the 
struggle for responsible government, socio-economic, and cultural changes, and the 
role of United States foreign policy. 

3 81. Westward Movement in the United States (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170AB A survey of the expansion of the United States 
population and national sovereignty from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific, 1750 
to 1900, including other areas of United States history and geography which are 
related to the frontiers. 

3 83. History of California (3) F 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of California from the 
aboriginal inhabitants to the present, tracing the development of contemporary 
institutions and the historical background of current issues. 

399. Historical Method (3) F 

An introduction to historical method and bibliography, designed especially to 
equip the history major for historical research and the proper handling of historical 
materials. Required of all history majors. Recommended for junior year. 

400. Independent Study and Research (1-3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in history with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

412. Ancient Near East (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 110 A. A study of the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Meso- 
potamia, and the lands neighboring them. This course covers the prehistoric cultures, 
the growth of civilizations, and the competition and mutual influences among them 
to the time of Alexander; considerable attention is given to the background of 
Judaeo-Christian ideas and to the indebtedness of later peoples to these early 
societies. 

415. Ancient Greece (3) F • t'u* 

Prerequisite: History llOA. A study of the civilization of ancient Greece. This 
course covers the prehistoric Aegean cultures, the classical city-states, and t e 
Hellenistic Age; considerable attention is devoted to the literary and philosophic 
contributions to our modem civilization. 


152 


ORANGE STATE CDLLEGE 


417. Ancient Rome (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA. A study of the civilization of ancient Rome. Political 
institutions are emphasized from the earliest times to Christianization of the Empire 
in 325 A.D.; attention is also given to the rise of Christianity. 

423A. Early Middle Ages, 325-1095 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA. History of Europe from Constantine to the eve of the 
Crusades. The course covers the transformation of European society and culture 
through the Barbarian invasions, the Byzantine and Islamic cultures, and the estab- 
lishment of the feudal order in Western Europe. 

423B. Later Middle Ages, 1095-1400 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA. History of Europe from the Crusades to Dante, 
emphasizing the political, economic, literary, and artistic changes of the period. 

425. Renaissance and Reformation, 1400- 1648 (3) F 

History of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages through the classical revival, 
the Protestant revolt, and the Thirty Years’ War to the Peace of Westphalia, 1648. 

426. Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1815 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. European diplomatic history and the balance of power 
from 1648 to 1815. Attention is given to the social and philosophical developments 
of the period. 

428. 19th Century Europe (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOB. History of Europe from 1815 to 1914. This course 
covers the Industrial Revolution, the rise of middle-class democracy and economic 
liberalism, and the forces of imperialism which led to World War I. 

429. Europe Since 1914 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. Surv^ey of events from the beginning of World War I 
to the present. Special emphasis given to the economic, political, social, diplomatic, 
and intellectual trends of 20th century Europe. 

43 4B. Russia to the 1917 Revolution (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. An analysis of historical developments from the estab- 
lishment of the Russian state at Kiev to the 1917 Revolution. Emphasis is placed 
upon the 18th and 19th centuries, the expansion of the empire, and the unique social 
and political currents which preceded the Soviet seizure of power. 

434C. Russia Since 1917 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOB. An historical analysis of the Bolshevik Revolution and 
subsequent consolidation of power under the Communist regirne. Chief emphasis is 
placed upon Soviet foreign policy and fundamental social, political, and cultural in- 
sdtutions and policies based upon iMarxist-Leninist-Stalinist ideology. 

461. Far East Since 1850 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOA An historical analysis of the Western impact on 
Eastern Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries with special emphasis on politics and 
diplomacy, the breakdown of the traditional societies, and the rise of communism 
in the 20th century. 

466. Middle East (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOA-B. Introduction to the origins and development of the 
countries of the Middle East, including the impact of Islamic civilization. Special 
attention given to the last two centuries. 

471. American Colonial Civilization (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOA or consent of the instructor. The settlement of North 
America and the growth of Anglo-American civilization to 1763, stressing the devel- 
opment of political and economic institutions and a distinctive American culture. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


153 


472. United States from Colony to Nation (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of the instructor. The growth of an inde- 
pendent government, economy, and culture from 1763, and leading national issues 
and developments through the Jacksonian period. 

473. Sectionalism and Civil War (3) (Planned for 1964-65 ) 

Prerequisite: History 170 A or consent of the instructor. The slavery issue and 
the rise of sectional differences and the Civil War. 

474. The Growth of Modern United States (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170B or consent of the instructor. The growth of the 
national economy, political repercussions and reform movements, the rise to a world 
power, and cultural developments from the Civil War to 1900. 

475. United States from 1900 to 1932 (3) F 

Prerequisites: History 170B or equivalent. A study of the political, economic, 
social, diplomatic, and intellectual trends and problems from 1900 to the election of 
Roosevelt. Will stress the relationship between an industrial economy and the 
government and major social and political movements. 

476. United States Since 1933(3)F, S 

Prerequisites: History 170B or equivalent. A study of United States history from 
the New Deal to the present. Includes political, social, economic, diplomatic, and 
intellectual developments and issues. Stresses the emergence of the national govern- 
ment as a factor in American life and the expansion of U.S. activity in foreign 
affairs. Required of all History majors and all Social Science majors working for 
teaching credentials. 

48 5 A. American Foreign Policy tol900(3)F 

Prerequisite: History 170A-B. A survey of the relations of the United States with 
foreign nations from the American Revolution to 1900. 

485B. American Foreign Policy from 1900 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170A-B. A survey of the relations of the United States from 
19(X) to the present. 

490. History and Historians (3) S 

Prerequisite: Open only to history majors in senior standing or by permission of 
the department. A study of the writings, personalities, and philo^phies of repre- 
sentative historians from Herodotus to the present. Includes the intellectual proc- 
esses by which history is written, the results of these processes, and the sources and 
development of history. 

501. Seminar in History (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Studies in United States and modern 
European history. 

502. Readings in History (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Directed study in significant historical 
areas. 

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The major is composed of a minimum of 48 units of which 36 must be in the 
upper division; units are in addition to those meeting the requirements in General 
Education. Prospective majors are encouraged to take lower division courses m 
Economics, and/or Geography, History and Sociology. i * rr • 

Concentrations are offered in general Political Science, International Affairs, and 
Public Administration. All majors take the Political Science core and selected 
courses in their area of major concentration. The core provides a common back- 
ground and introduces the student to various aspects of Political Science. 


154 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


POLITICAL SCIENCE CORE 

Twelve units selected from: 

Political Science: 200, 210, 311, 321, 331, 341A-B, 351, 412, 415. 


GENERAL POLITICAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS 

The general political science major prepares the student for graduate work in 
Political Science, for government service, or for leadership in civic activities. It is 
also an excellent major for pre-law students. Students particularly interested in law 
should take four years of English, Grammar and Composition, or and, preferably, 
English Constitutional History. Some law schools recommend Accounting. Law 
school catalogs should be consulted for other requirements or suggestions. 

Twelve units selected from: 

Political Science: 341A-B, 412, 413, 414, 415, 423, 440, 442. 


Six units selected from: 

Political Science: 432, 433, 434, 435, 453. 

Six units selected from: 

Political Science: 351, 452, 453, 454, 460, 461. 

Twelve lower or upper division units, selected with the approval of the adviser, 
in Economics, Geography, History, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Units 


Core program 

Political Science __ 
Electives 


12 

24 

12 


INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS EMPHASIS 


48 


The political science major with a concentration in international affairs provides 
the broad background and education necessary for advanced work in international 
affairs or for government service. Students particularly interested in the Foreign 
Service are encouraged to take their elective units in American culture, geography, 
government and histo^>^ They are strongly urged to become proficient in one 
foreign language. 

Twelve units selected from: 

Political Science: 351, 452, 453, 454, 460, 461. 

Six units selected from: 

Political Science: 432, 433, 434, 435, 453. 

Nine units selected from: 

History: 350B, 428, 429, 434C, 461, 475, 476, 485B. 

Three units selected from: 

Geography: 433, 434, 435, 436, 438, 481. 

Six lower or upper division units, selected with the approval of the adviser, in 
such cultural fields as American and foreign literature, art history or history of 
music. 

Core program 

Political Science 

History and Geography 
Electives 


Units 
. 12 
. 18 
. 12 
. 6 


48 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


155 


PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION EMPHASIS 

The political science major with a concentration in public administration pro- 
vides training and education for government service. 

Eighteen units selected from: 

Political Science; 321, 322, 323, 412, 413, 415, 423, 424, 426, 429, 432, 442. 

Six units selected from; 

Business Administration and Economics: Economics 201, 451, Accounting 200. 


Six units selected from: 
Geography: 471 
History: 475, 476 
Sociology: 311, 341, 371. 


Six upper or lower division units, selected with the approval of the adviser, in 
report writing and professional speaking. 

Units 

Core program — - 12 

Political Science 18 

Business Administration and Economics, Accounting 6 

History, Sociology, and Geography 6 

Electives ^ 


POLITICAL SCIENCE 


48 


200. Foundations of Political Science (3) F, S 

An introduction to the fundamentals of political science as a discipline; an 
examination of the basic ideas underlying modern forms of government. A study 
of institutions, behavior and processes of politics, with particular emphasis on 
American national government. A study of legal, political and institutional aspects 
of international affairs. This course meets the general education requirement for 
U.S. Constitution. It is required for majors. 


210. American Government (3) F, S (Formerly 3 10) 

Structure and functions of the United States Government; the federal system; 
cbe organization, powers and functions of the executive, legislative, and judicial 
branches; the relationship between federal, state and local units of government, 
the structure and functions of state and local government with special attention 
to California. This course satisfies the state requirements in U.S. Constitution and 
California state and local government. 

311. State and Local Government (3) F, S 

Development and role of state constitutions; the political, administrative and 
■judicial systems of state, county, and city governments; relations of local govern- 
ments to the state government, with special reference to California. This course 
satisfies the state requirement in California state and local government. 


321. Introduction to Public Administration (3) F 

Prerequisites; Political Science 210 and 311, or consent of the instructor. The 
nature and scope of public administration and its role in a democratic society ; 
basic problems in the execution of public policies in the federal, state and local 
government units, such as organization, personnel, finance, internal management, 
administrative powers and responsibilities, intergovernmental relationships, and the 
impact on administration of public opinion. 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


3 22. Public Personnel Administration (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 321 or consent of the instructor. The growth and 
development of the civil service and the merit system; an evaluation of recruitnient 
procedures and examinations; an analysis of such topics as position classification, 
salary structures, retirement plans, in-service training, employee organizations, 
and personnel supervision. 

3 23. Government Finance Administration (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 321 or consent of the instructor. The role of 
finance administration and budgeting in the determination of public policy, and 
in the administrative planning and management of governmental operations. Ex- 
amines the relationship of assessment administration to governmental revenues and 
expenditures, the principles and practices of cost accounting, treasury manage- 
ment, and capital budgeting. 

3 31. Governments and Politics of Major Powers (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 200, 210 or consent of the instructor. Govern- 
mental structures, policies, and problems of major powers in Europe and Asia; 
constitutional characteristics; major political parties; election systems; federalist 
and Unitarian features; comparative analysis. 

340. Democracy and Communism (3) F 

Recommended for social science majors. The democratic tradition, especially in 
the United States and Great Britain; the theory and practice of Communism in 
Soviet Russia, Yugoslavia, and Red China; authoritarian political thought in Italy, 
Germany, and Spain. 

341 A. History of Political Thought to Machiavelli (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or consent of the instructor. Political thought 
from Plato to Machiavelli; the development of the concepts of natural law, com- 
munity, state, and obligation. 

34 IB. History of Political Thought From Machiavelli (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or consent of the instructor. Political thought 
from Machiavelli to present; the development of the concepts of power, function, 
rights, and will. 

3 51. International Relations (3) F, S 

A study of the diplomatic, political, economic, and cultural relations of nations; 
the modem systems of nation states; basic factors of power; sovereignty, nation- 
alism; imperialism; colonialism, the rise to influence of the developing nations; the 
peaceful settlement of disputes. 

400. Independent Study and Research (1-3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in Political Science by permission of the chairman 
of the department. May be repeated for credit. 

412. Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3) F (Formerly 420) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 210. The American two-party system; party organ- 
ization, nominating procedures, campaign methods; problems of party responsibility 
and party leadership. The power and growth of farm, labor, business, and non- 
economic pressure groups: interest-group activity in (Dongress, administration, and 
courts. 

413. The Supreme Court and Constitutional Law (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or 210. General principles of constitutional 
law, both federal and state; relations and respective powers of the national gov- 
ernment and the states; limitations on both the federal and state governments; the 
rights of individuals. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


157 


414. The Legislative Process (3) S 

Prerequisites: Political Science 210. The nature of the legislative process in the 
United States including the organization and procedures of legislative bodies, di- 
rect legislation and the relationships of the legislative branch to other branches of 
government. Comparative legislative systems will be analyzed. 

415. Public Opinion and Politics (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 210. The nature of public opinion in democratic 
and totalitarian societies; the manipulation of public opinion by interest groups, 
party organizations and government agencies. The relationship of propaganda to 
other forms of political power. The methods and value of polls and opinion studies. 

423. Urban Problems and Administration (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 321 or consent of the instructor. Administrative 
organization as a framework for decision-making and communication; the role of 
political power in the making of public policy; the element of hurnan behavior in 
supervision and management; the practices and techniques of municipal and county 
management; and the impact of metropolitan growth on the activities of local 
government. 

424. City and Regional Planning (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 321 or consent of the instructor. The origins and 
development of city and regional planning; the legal bases and fundamental con- 
cepts of planning are defined; and the organization and administration of the 
planning acticity are examined. Attention is given to the major elements of the 
General Plan, zoning laws and administration, urban renewal, and capital pro- 
gramming. 

426. Government Organization and Management (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 321 or consent of the instructor. An analytical 
examination of public administration organization, and the techniques and processes 
of public management; the growth and development of bureaucratic administration; 
the functions of administrative authority; and the importance of communication, 
coordination, and leadership to organizational action. 

429. Government Internship (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Public Administration concentration and consent of the instructor. 
Supervised work experience in governmental agencies for the purpose of increasing 
student understanding of the nature and scope of governmental operations. Super- 
vision is provided by the faculty and cooperating agencies. Student time required 
in an administrative assignment ranges from five to nv'enty hours per week, depend- 
ing upon the number of credits sought and whether compensation is involved. 

432. Government and Politics of Great Britain (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or consent of the instructor. Examination of 
the dynamics of the British system; class structure; political parties; public opinion 
and pressure groups; the bureaucracy. 

43 3. Government and Politics of Soviet Russia (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or consent of the instructor. The principles 
of Marxism-Leninism underlying the Soviet government, as modified by Stalin and 
Khrushchev; constitutional provisions and political practices; the Communist party 
and mass organizations; elections and election campaigns; the press; education and 
religion; relation to the international Communist movement and the satellite gov- 
ernments. 

434. Government and Politics of France (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or consent of the instructor. Divisions in French 
society and their effect on the political institutions; traditions of authoritarianism 


158 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


and democracy, of stability and instability. Comparison of the basic features of the 
5th French Republic with previous French constitutional structures; future possi- 
bilities. 

43 5. Government and Politics of Germany (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or consent of the instructor. A comparative 
study of basic features of German government and parties under the Empire, 
Weimar Republic, National Socialism, and the present Bonn Republic. The East- 
“German Democratic Republic” is studied as an example of a West European 
country under Communist rule. 

440. Recent Political Thought (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 341 -A-B. A study of selected modern political 
thinkers. 

442. American Political Thought (3) (Planned for 1964-65) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or 210. American political thought from the 
Colonial period to the present day including leaders such as Thomas Jefferson, 
Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow \\ ilson, and Walter Lippmann. 

45 2. American Diplomacy (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. The formulation 
of American foreign policy and conduct of diplomacy; evaluation of both tra- 
ditional and current practices, policies, and proposed major changes. 

453. Foreign Policy Formulation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or 351 or consent of the instructor. A seminar 
type discussion of the formulation and implementation of the foreign policy of a 
selected country or countries with particular reference to the implementation of 
that policy in the United Nations, regional organizations or alliances. May be 
repeated for credit. 

454. The Soviet Union in World Affairs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Political Science 200, 351 or consent of the instructor. Theory 
and practice of Soviet Russia’s foreign policies; the international relations, theories 
of Marx, Lenin, Stalin, and Khrushchev; practices of the Kremlin; world strategy 
and tactics of the Soviet Communist movement. 

460. International Law (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. The sources and 
nature of international law; its role in a world of sovereign states; the law of 
war and peace; the rights and duties of nations in their intenational relationships. 
The World Court; purpose, problems, and prospects. 

461. The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations (3) F 
Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. The nature, scope, 

and role of public international organizations; evaluation of the League of Nations; 
analysis of the United Nations; its functions, purposes and problems; role of the 
World Court; International Labor Organization. Functions of UNESCO, UNICEF, 
and similar organizations. 

500. Independent Study and Research (1-3) F, S 

Open to graduate students only by permission of the chairman of the department. 
May be repeated for credit. 

501. Seminar in Political Science (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Selected studies in political science with 
emphasis on individual research and contributions. May be repeated for credit. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


159 


521. Seminar in Public Administration (3) S 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Advanced study in the theory and prac- 
tice of public administration. Attention will be given to selected problems in 
governmental administration, with emphasis on individual research and student 
contributions. May be repeated for credit. 

5 51. Advanced International Relations (3) F 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Study of selected problems in inter- 
national relations with emphasis on individual research and contributions within 
the framework of a seminar. May be repeated for credit. 


SOCIOLOGY 

The major in sociology provides knowledge concerning the structure and func- 
tioning of human society. It may be applied in a wide range of situations in which 
the student may participate professionally or as a citizen. 

Unit requirements. The required minimum for the major is 48 units, in addi- 
tion to those taken for the General Education requirement, distributed as follows: 
Required Courses in Sociology: 201 and 202, or their equivalents must 
be taken, and up to 6 additional units are acceptable from lower division 
offerings. The minimum of 24 upper division units in sociology must 
include 341, 480, 481, and 492. 

Minimum units 36 

Related Courses. Twelve units in such related fields as economics, 
geography, history, philosophy, political science, and psychology, to be 
approved by the major adviser. 

Minimum units 12 


Minimum total units 48 

The following suggestions will enable the student to work toward his own 
career objectives in selecting courses for the major: 

(a) Courses suggested for those interested in immediate employment or graduate 
study in social welfare, corrections, and related careers (including the min- 
istry): 311, 371, 401, 411, 431, 451, 473; Economics 200; Psychology 341, 342; 
Philosophy 331; Political Science 311, 321, 322, 423. 

(b) Courses suggested for careers in industry or government service, or for pre- 
law study: 361, 371, 411, 473; Economics 200, 201, 326, 401; Geography 471, 
481; History 475, 476; Political Science 321, 322, 413, 414, 423, 424, 461; Psy- 
chology 391. 

(c) Courses suggested for preparation for graduate study in sociology and 
careers in teaching or research: 361, 371, 401, 436, 451, 473; Economics 200, 
302, 303, 326; Geography 471; History 381, 429, 474, 475, 476; Philosophy 
250, 331, 407; Political Science 331, 412, 415, 440, 442; Psychology 301, 312, 
341, 431; work in statistics and a reading knowledge of at least one foreign 
language. 

SOCIOLOGY 

201. Introduction to Sociology (3) (Formerly 301) F, S 

A general introduction to the basic concepts of sociology and the scientific study 
of human society. Among topics included are social interaction, culture, personality, 
social processes, population, social class, the community, social institutions, and 
socio-cultural change. 


202. Social Problems (3) (Formerly 302) F, S 
Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Study of the extent, causes and conse- 
quences of a number of social problems with emphasis on Twentieth Century 
America. Problems are viewed in the context of society as a whole. 


160 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


271. Education for Marriage (3) S 

A socio-psychologiciil study of marital adjustment. Dating and mate selection; 
factors associated with successful marriages; principal areas of adjustment; parent- 
child relationships; causes and results of divorce; the family of tomorrow. 

311. Welfare Institutions (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent, or consent of the Department. An 
introduction to the field of social work. Sociological analysis of the structure, func- 
tioning, and coordination of welfare agencies. Designed for students interested in 
professional social work and in such related professional areas as teaching, counsel- 
ing, public administration, the ministry, law or medicine. 

341. Social Interaction (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 or equivalent; 3 units of psychology. Inquiry into the 
social and socio-psychological dimensions of group behavior and the socialization 
of the individual. Social interaction and its impact on the individual and personality 
formation. Credit can be given for this course or Psychology 351, but not both, 

361. Population Problems (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Population composition, growth, and 
movement. Social factors affecting birth rates, death rates, and migration. Emphasis 
on American population, but some attention is given to undeveloped areas and to 
world population growth. 

371. Urban Sociology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. The population and ecology, patterns 
of growth, institutions, characteristic social interaction, values, and problems of the 
urban community. 

400. Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: At least 12 hours in sociology and consent of the adviser. Student 
selects an individual research project, either library or field. There are conferences 
with the adviser as necessary, and the work culminates in a paper. 

401. Social Disorganization (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Social and personal disorganization 
treated as a consequence of role conflict, competition, social conflict, and normless- 
ness. The impact of social change on the person who becomes a problem to himself 
and to society. 

411. Criminology (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. The extent, causes and control of crime 
and delinquency. Includes study of the criminal law, causal factors and theories, 
correctional institutions, probation and parole, and preventive efforts. 

431. Minority Group Relations (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Study of racial, national and religious 
minorities, especially in the United States. Includes study of discrimination, preju- 
dice, different patterns of inter-group adjustment, and attempts to change group 
status. 

43 6. Social Stratification (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Social class struemres and their func- 
tions. Different styles of life; determinants of class status; vertical mobility; change 
in class systems. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


161 


451. Sociology of the Family (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. The family as a social institution. His- 
torical and cross-cultural perspectives; social change affecting marriage and the 
family; analysis of American courtship and marriage patterns; the psychodynamics 
of family life. 

473. Complex Organizations (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Sociological analysis of formal organi- 
zations (industrial, governmental, welfare, military, medical, educational, correc- 
tional, etc.) as systems of social interaction. Includes such topics as blue-printed vs. 
informal organizational structure, authority, decision-making, role conflicts, com- 
munication, and morale. 

480. Development of Social Thought (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or equivalent. Social thought since early times; com- 
parative study of the earlier writers on the nature of man and society and the lead- 
ing sociologists of the Nineteenth Century. 

481. Contemporary Sociological Theory (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 and consent of the Department. The main schools of 
contemporary sociological thought, both European and American, with emphasis 
on systematic theory, methodology of theorists, cultural change, and social institu- 
tions. Ward, Sumner, Durkheim, Pareto, Weber, Sorokin, Parsons, and others are 
stressed. 

492. Social Research Methods (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or consent, and knowledge of descriptive statistics is 
desirable. An introduction to the problems, logic, and procedures of social research. 
Emphasis is on research designing, and the gathering of data, especially by question- 
naire and interview. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

3 30A. Contemporary Civilizations and U.S. Foreign Policy (3) F, S 
A survey of the Middle East, Asia, and Africa, concentrating on the development 
of their present civilizations, political and economic problems, their place in world 
affairs, and policies followed by the United States in each of these areas. * 

3 3 OB. Contemporary Civilizations and U.S. Foreign Policy (3) F, S 
A survey of present government and civilizations in Europe and Latin America, 
summarizing the background of present developments and problems and studying 
policies followed by the United States in each of these areas. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION 

432. Teaching Social Sciences in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ. 311, admission to teacher education. Principles, methods and 
materials of teaching the social studies in the elementary school. 

442. Teaching Social Sciences in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Prerequisite to student teaching in social studies. Objectives, methods, materials, 
curriculum in social studies in secondary schools. Includes consideration of new 
trends and new interpretations in the social sciences; development, present status, 
problems, and trends in the secondar>’^ school social studies curriculum; and profes- 
sional growth of the social studies teacher. See listing under Division of Education 
and Psychology for details. 


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GRADUATE DEGREE SUPPLEMENT 

ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 
Fullerton, California 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM 

Fall 1963 

Orange State College has been authorized to grant the following graduate degrees: 

Master of Arts in English 
Master of Arts in History 
Master of Arts in Social Sciences 
Master of Business Administration 

ADMISSION OF GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Admission with Graduate Standing: Unclassified, (a) For admission with gradu- 
ate standing as an unclassified graduate student, a student shall have completed a 
four-year course and hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution; or shall have completed equivalent academic preparation as determined 
by the College, (b) Admission to the College with graduate standing does not con- 
stitute admission to graduate degree curricula. 

Admission to Graduate Degree Curricula: Classified. A Student who has been 
admitted to unclassified standing at the College may, upon application, be admitted 
to an authorized graduate degree curriculum of the College as a classified graduate 
student if he satisfactorily meets the scholastic, professional, personal, and other 
standards for graduate study, including qualifying examinations, as required by the 
Graduate Studies Committee and the instructional divisions and departments which 
offer the particular master’s degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

To be eligible for the master’s degree, the candidate shall have completed the 
following requirements: 

A. Advancement to Candidacy, For advancement to candidacy for the master’s 

degree, the applicant shall have met the following minimum requirements: 

(1) The completion of requirements for admission to classified graduate 
standing. 

(2) Such scholastic, professional, and personal standards, the passing of exam- 
inations, and other qualifications as the College may prescribe. 

B. Requirements for the Degree. 

(1) Thirty semester units of approved graduate work completed within seven 
years of the date when all the requirements for the degree are completed, 
except that the College, at its option, may extend the time for students 
w'ho pass a comprehensive examination in the relevant course or subject 
field. Of the 30 semester units: 

(a) Not less than 24 shall be completed in residence. 

(b) Not less than 12 shall be in courses organized primarily for gradu- 
ate students. 

(c) Not more than 6 shall be in extension or transfer credit. 

(d) Not more than 6 shall be allowed for a thesis, but the requirement 
of a thesis is optional with the College. 


[163] 


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ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


(2) A grade-point average of 3.0 (grade of B on a five-point scale) or better 
in all courses taken to satisfy the requirements for the degree. 

(3) The completion of a satisfactory pattern of study in the approved field 
of concentration. 

For further information concerning admission to graduate work, requirements 
for the master’s degree, and procedure to follow in obtaining the master’s degree, 
please write or contact the Office of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Orange 
State College, 800 North State College Boulevard, Fullerton, Cahfornia. 


MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Graduate students who intend to work toward the degree of Master of Arts in 
English should, in consultation and agreement with their graduate adviser, decide 
upon a plan of study, including a minimum of 15 units in regular graduate (500) 
courses, a maximum of 9 units in specialized senior level courses to permit round- 
ing out of earlier work in English, both in breadth and depth, and 6 units outside 
the English Department but related to their particular interests and purposes. 

It is recommended that the graduate student’s plan of study include: 

English 590, Graduate Seminar: Problems in Language (3 units), and 
English 592, Graduate Seminar: Problems in Shakespeare (3 units). 


Additional 500 level courses available at this time are: 

English 595, Graduate Seminar: Melville (3 units); 

English 596, Graduate Seminar: Twain (3 units); 

English 598, Graduate Seminar: Joyce (3 units); and 

English 599, Graduate Seminar; Comparative Literature (3 units). 

Graduate students also have available— under English 580, Independent Study— 
the option of up to 6 units of project work, usually divided between reading and 
writing on a carefully defined subject. 

Eligible 400 level courses offered at his time are: 


English 454, History of the English Language (3 units); 

English 462, Modern British and American Novels (3 units); 

English 464, Modern British and American Dramg (3 units); 

English 466, Modern British and American Poetry (3 units); 

English 491, Senior Seminar: Studies in Chaucer (3 units); 

English 492, Senior Seminar: Studies in the American Renaissance (3 units); 
English 495, Senior Seminar: Studies in New England Transcendentalism (3 
units) ; 

English 496, Senior Seminar: Studies in the American Novel (3 units); 

English 498, Senior Seminar: Literary Criticism (3 units); and 
Comparative Literature 425, Literary Masterpieces of the Orient (3 units). 


The 6 units to be taken outside the English Department may be in comparative 
literature, foreign languages and literatures, history, philosophy, psychology, or 
other recommended academic areas. 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


165 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The program of studies leading to the Master of Arts Degree in History is com- 
posed of thirty (30) units approved by the graduate adviser. Fifteen (15) units of 
graduate courses (500 level) must be taken including: 

History 501, Content and Method of History (3 units); and 
History 591, Thesis (3 to 6 units). 

Other course requirements are: * 

History 490, History and Historians (3 units); and 

six (6) units in upper division or graduate work outside the History Depart- 
ment but related to the study pattern. 

In addition, a reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign language and the 
completion of the Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test in History of the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination are required. Currently the College is offering five gradu- 
ate seminars in History and over twenty upper division History courses from 
which a degree program can be developed. An oral examination on the thesis 
and course work offered for the degree will be given. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Master of Arts degree in Social Sciences allows a student to pursue ad- 
vanced work in two or three related fields. Selection may be made from the 
following: Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology. The thirty (30) approved units which are to be offered for the degree 
are to be arranged in one of the following patterns: 


Pattern 

A 

(two fields) 

First field 

18 

15 

units 




Second field 

12 

15 

units 





30 

or 30 

units 

Pattern 

B 

j(three fields) 

First field 

15 

12 

12 units 




Second field 

9 

12 

9 units 




Third field 

6 

6 

9 units 





30 

or 30 or 

30 units 


Specific requirements include: 


At least twelve (12) units of graduate courses (500 level) 

An upper division or graduate level course in Research Methods and Bibliogra- 
phy in one of the Social Sciences 

Thesis or project 

Oral examination on the thesis or project and on the courses offered for the 
degree 

Satisfactory completion of the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination 

(The Area Test of the Graduate Record Examination may be required.) 

There is no foreign language requirement, but certain fields may require work 
in Statistics. The graduate adviser will be selected from the first field. All work 
must be completed within five years from the time graduate classified standing has 
been attained. 


166 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


A student with an undergraduate major in a field other than Social Sciences may 
demonstrate his ability to do satisfactory work in this area by taking the number 
of units of upper division Social Sciences courses equal to the difference between 
nventy-four (24) units and the number he has taken exclusive of general educa- 
tion. These courses must be approved by the graduate adviser prior to enrollment 
and passed with a grade of B or better. A student may petition the Division of 
Social Sciences for permission to apply up to six (6) of these units toward the 
Master’s Degree. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Graduates of accredited Colleges and Universities may declare an interest in this 
program by (1) applying for admission at the Admissions Office, and (2) obtain- 
ing an interview with a Business Administration or Economics staff member rela- 
tive to admission and the requirements necessary to gain the degree. 

The program requires 24 credit hours in Mathematics and in Business Admin- 
istration and Economics as prerequisites to admission to candidacy for the MBA, 
and 30 credit hours in graduate course study of which at least 15 credit hours must 
be in the 500 course level. 

Required courses of this program include: 

Accounting 

405 Industrial Accounting 

SOI Administrative Accounting 

Economics 

405 Comparative Economic System 

510 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 

Management 

544 Organizational Behavior, Theory, and Administration 

Marketing 

459 Corporate Financial Management 

Quantitative Methods 

560 Operations Research, or 

463 Statistical Decision Theory 

Electives of 6 credit hours may be taken in the areas of Accounting, Finance, 
Management, Marketing and Quantitative Methods to complete the 30 credit hours 
required. 


INDEX 


Academic R^uladons, 38 
Accounting Courses, 52 
Accounting and Finance Department, 52 
Administration and Supervision Credential 
Requirements, 67 

Admission, Academic Probation, 33 
Admission, Advanced Undergraduate Standing, 

Admission, Auditors, 34 
Admission, Cancellation, 34 
Admission to the College, 31 
Admission, Credential Programs, 33 
Admission, Foreign Students, 33 
Admission, Freshman Standing, 31 
Adm^sion from Non- Accredited Colleges, 33 
Adm^ion Procedures, Graduates, 33 
Admission Procedures, Undergraduates, 32 
Admission to Student Teaching, 69 
Admission to Teacher Education, 68 
Advisement, 29 
Advisory Board, 9 
Alumni, 28 

Art, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 88 
Art Courses, 89 
Art Department, 87 
Art Education Courses, 93 
Art History, Theory and Appreciation Courses, 
89 

Art Studio Courses, 90 
AAletics, 27 

Bitdo^cal Science, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 

Biological Science Courses, 134 
Biological Science Department, 130 
Board of Trustees, 8 

Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts 
Degree, 49 

Business Administration Courses, 59 
Business Administration and Economics 
Division, 49 

Business Administration, Majors, 50 

Busmess Education, 5 1 

Business Education Courses, 59 

California State Colleges, 23 

Curricula OflFered, 46 

Change of Program, 39 

Chancellor’s Office, 9 

Chemjstr>', Bachelor of Arts Degree, 133 

Chemistry, Courses, 134 

Chemistry Department, 133 

Chemistry, Minor, 134 

College Accreditation, 25 

College Administration, 9 

College Calendar, 7 

College Committees, 19 

College Membership in Organizations, 25 

Comparative Literatxire, 111 

Comparative Literattire Courses, 112 

Comparative Literature, Minor, 112 

Concurrent Enrollment, 39 

Course Numbering Code, 48 

Counseling, 29 

Counseling Center, 29 

Credential Regulations, 62 

Credit, Acceptance, 34 

Extension and Correspondence Courses, 

Credit, Military Service, 35 

Credit, Transfer from Junior College, 34 

Dean’s List, 43 

Dismissal, 44 

Drama Courses, 106 

Economics, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 51 

Economics Courses, 54 

Economics Department, 51 

Economics, Minor, 52 

^ucation and Psychology Courses, 71 

Education and Psychology Division, 61 


Education and Psychology, Publications 
Available, 71 

Elementary School Teacher Education, Five 
Year Curriculum, 64 

Elementary School Teacher Education, Four 
Year Curriculum, 63 
Elementary Education Courses, 72 
Engineering Department, 136 
English, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 113 
English Department 112 
English Education Courses, 114 
English Language and Composi ion Courses, 114 
English Literature Courses, 114 
English, Minor, 113 

English Teaching Credential Requirements, 113 
Entrance Examinations, 32 
Evaluations, 34 

Evaluation, Transfer Credits, 34 
Examinations, 40 
Extension Program, 26 
Faculty, 1 1 

Fees and Expenses, 35 
Fees, Parking, 36 
Fees, Refund, 36 
Finance Courses, 55 

Finance (and Accounting) Department, 55 
Financial Aids, 30 
Fine and Applied Arts Division, 87 
Fine and Applied Arts, Major Programs, 87 
Foreign Languages, Education Courses, 122 
Foreign Languages and Literatures Credential 
Programs, 118 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Department, 
117 

Foreign Languages and Literatures, Majors, 117 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, Minor, 117 
Foundation, 26 

Foundations of Education Courses, 71 
French Courses, 118 
General Education, 40 
General Education Requirements, 40 
Geography, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 148 
Geography Courses, 148 
Geography Department, 148 
German Courses, 119 
Good Standing, 44 
Grade R^orts, 37 
Grading System, 39 
Graduate Degrees, 163 
Graduate Student Requirements, 33 
Graduation Requirements, 40 
Health, Accident, Hospital Insurance, 28 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
Courses, 77 

History, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 150 
History Department, 150 
History of the College, 24 
History Courses, 150 
Honors at Graduation, 43 
Housing, 28 

Humanities, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 
Comparative Literature Emphasis, 111 
Humanities Division, 111 
Incomplete Work, 40 
Journalism Courses, 123 
Journalism Department, 122 
Journalism Education Courses, 125 
Journalism, Minor, 123 
Language Arts, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 114 
Language Laboratory, 118 
Late Registration, 38 
Library, 25 
Loans, 30 

Management Courses, 56 
Management Department, 56 
Masters Degrees, 163 
Marketing Courses, 57 


[ 167] 


168 


ORANGE STATE COLLEGE 


Marketing and Quantitative Methods 
Department, 57 

Mathematics, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 136 
Mathematics, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 

Teacher Education, 137 
Mathematics Courses, 137 
Mathematics Department, 136 
Mathematics Education Courses, 143 
Music Applied Techniques Courses, 101 
Music, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 96 
Music, Bachelor of Arts Degree, Elementary 
Teacher, 96 

Music, Bachelor of Arts Degree, Music 
Education Specialization, 97 
Music Class and Individual Instruction 
Courses, 102 

Music Courses, General Elementary Credential, 
99 

Music Degree Programs, 95 
Music Department, 93 
Music Education Courses, 103 
Music Fees, 95 

Music History and Literature Courses, 101 

Music Minor, 97 

Music Requirements, 94 

Music Theory and Basic Music Courses, 100 

Night Services, 28 

Philosophy, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 125 

Philosophy Courses, 126 

Philosophy Department, 125 

Philosophy, Minor, 126 

Philosophy and Objectives of the College, 23 

Physics, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 139 

Physics Courses, 141 

Physics Department, 139 

Physics, Minor, 140 

Placement Services, 29 

Prerequisites, 31 

Pre-Service Teacher Education Curricula, 62 
Probation, 44 
Probation Removal, 44 
Professional Committees, 21 
Political Science, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 153 
Political Science Courses, 155 
Political Science Department, 153 
Political Science, General Emphasis, 154 
Political Science, International Affairs 
Emphasis, 154 

Political Science, Public Administration 
Emphasis, 155 

Provisional Credential Renewal, 70 
Psychology Courses, 78 
Psychology Department, 78 
Public Address Courses, 107 
Public School Teachers Cooperating in Student 
Teaching Program, 81 

Pupil Personnel Credential Requirements, 67 

8 uantitative Methods Courses, 59 
uantitative Methods (and Marketing) 
Department, 57 
Readmission, 34 
Readmission After Dismissal, 44 
Records, 37 


Recreation Courses, 78 
Registration, 35 
Repetition of Courses, 40 
Right of Petition, 45 
Russian Courses, 120 
Scholarships, 30 
Scholastic Regulations, 43 
School Services Courses, 74 
Science Education Courses, 143 
Science, Mathematics and Engineering 
Division, 129 

Secondary' Education Courses, 73 
Secondary Education Department, 65 
Secondary School Teacher Curriculum, 65 
Social Sciences, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 161 
Social Sciences, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 
Elementary Credential, 146 
Social Sciences, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 
Secondary Credential, 146 
Social Sciences Courses, 161 
Social Sciences Division, 145 
Social Sciences Education Courses, 161 
Social Sciences Minor, Secondary Credential, 
147 

Sociology, Bachelor of Arts Degree, 159 
Sociology Courses, 159 
Sociology Department, 159 
Spanish Courses, 121 
Speech Courses, 106 
Speech and Drama Courses, 106 
Speech and Drama Credential, 105 
Speech and Drama Department, 104 
Speech and Drama Emphasis Courses, 105 
Speech and Drama, Major, 105 
Speech and Drama, Minor, 106 
Speech Education Courses, 110 
Speech Therapy and Audiology, 108 
Standing Committees, 20 
Statement of Residence, 38 
Student Activities, 27 
Student Athletics, 27 
Student Conduct, 40 
Student Expenses, 36 
Student Health Services, 28 
Student News Bureau, 27 
Student Orgaiuzations, 27 
Student Personnel Services, 27 
Student Publications, 27 
Student Teacher Study List Limits, 70 
Student Teaching, 69 
Student Writing, 40 
Study List Limits, 39 
Summer Session, 25 
Table of Contents, 1 
Teacher Education Student Personnel 
Services, 67 

Teaching Credential Requirements, 62 
Testing, 30 
Transcripts, 37 
Veterans, 37 

Withdrawal from College, 39 


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