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4 



GENERAL CATALOG 

and 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 

1966-1967 



CALIFORNIA STATE 
COLLEGE 

AT FULLERTON 

(Formerly Orange State College) 

800 North State College Boulevard, Fullerton, California 
(714) 871-3300 92631 


SI#*** umvereayT'#**® 

Ui'tivsisity A chives 


TABLE OP CONTENTS 


I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Page Page 

Calendar 6 Officers of the Trustees 12 

Trustees of the California State Office of the Chancellor 13 

Colleges 11 The California State Colleges 14 


II. THE COLLEGE 


administratFon 

The College Advisory Board 15 

Advisory councils 16 

College administration 23 

College committees 24 

OBJECTIVES AND HISTORY 

Objectives of the college 27 

The history of the college-. 27 

College accreditation 28 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
AND SERVICES 

International programs 29 

Late afternoon and evening classes 29 

Summer sessions 30 

Extension program and services 3Q 

Library 30 

Audiovisual and Television Center 31 

Computer Center 31 

California State College Foundation 32 


RESEARCH CENTERS AND CLINICS 


Center for Economic Education.— 33 
Center for Governmental Studies.— 33 
Real estate research and 

publications 33 

Speech and hearing clinics 33 

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Student activities and housing 34 

Student organizations 34 

Student publications 34 

Student news bnieau 34 

Athletics 34 

Housing 35 

Student health services 35 

Placement services 36 

Counseling services 38 

Psychological counseling 38 

Testing 38 

Foreign students 38 

International programs 38 

Financial aids 38 


III. ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Procedures 43 

Statement of residence... 43 

Admission requirements 43 

Freshman 43 

Undergraduate transfers 44 

Graduate students 45 

Foreign students 45 

Nonaccredited colleges 45 

Academic probation 45 

Auditors 45 

Credential program! 46 

Cancellation of admission. 46 

Readmission 46 

Honors at entrance 46 


Summer session student 46 

Undergraduate entrance testing 46 

Health requirements 47 

Evaluations 47 

REGISTRATION 

Orientation 50 

Registration 50 

Late registration 50 

Change of program 50 

Concurrent enrollment 50 

Veterans 50 

Selective Service regulations 51 

Fees and expenses.- 51 

Academic advisement 54 


IV. REGULATIONS 


GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Enrollment definitions and 

regulations 57 

Grading practices 57 

Continuous residency regulations ... 59 

Student honors 60 

Student discipline 60 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

General education 62 

Units ; 63 

Scholarship 63 

Major 63 


Minor 63 

Graduation requirement check 63 

Approval and recommendation of 
faculty 63 

THE PROGRAM OF MASTER'S 
DEGREES 

General requirements for the 

master’s degree 64 

Steps in the master’s degree 

program 64 

Graduate policies and procedures... . 67 

Standards for graduate study 68 

3 


TABLE OP CONTENTS-Continued 


V. COLLEGE CURRICULUM 


Page 


Curricula offered 71 

SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, 

AND SCIENCE 

Anthropology 75 

Art — - 76 

Biological science 80 

Chemistiy 83 

Communication 86 

Drama 89 

English 91 

Foreign languages 94 

Geography 96 

History ^ 97 

H umanides — Comparative 

Literature emphasis 99 

Linguistics 99 

Mathematics 100 

Music 102 

Philosophy 109 

Physics 110 

Political science 113 


Page 


Psychology ^ — 115 

Science and mathematics education 117 

Social sciences 118 

Sociology 119 

Speech ^ 121 

DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

Engineering 124 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 

Undergraduate program in bi^iness 

administration and economics 131 

Business education — 133 

Master of Business Administration 134 

Economics 137 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Teacher education curricula 142 

Master of Science in Education 153 

Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education 154 


VI. ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 


General course numbering code 158 

Prerequisites 158 

Independent study 158 

SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS, 

AND SCIENCE 

Anthropology 159 

Art ; 161 

Art education 166 

Biological science 166 

Chemistry 171 

Communication 174 

Comparative literature . . 177 

Drama ^ 178 

Drama education 181 

English 181 

English education ^ 185 

Foreign languages education 185 

French 185 

Geomphy 187 

Geology 190 

German 190 

History 192 

Journalism education 198 

Latin 198 

Mathematics ^ 198 

Mathematics education 200 

Music 201 

Music education 206 

Philosophy 207 

Physical science 209 

Physics 210 

Political science 212 


Portuguese 217 

Psychology 218 

Russian 220 

Science education 221 

Social science education 223 

Social welfare 223 

Sociology 223 

Spanish 226 

Speech ^ : 229 

Speech education 233 

DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

Engineering 234 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 

Accounting 236 

Business administration 236 

Business education 238 

Economics 238 

Finance 242 

Management 243 

Marketing 244 

Quantitative methods 247 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Education, elementary 249 

Education, foundations 251 

Education, school services 252 

Education, secondary 255 

Health education 257 

Physical education 258 

Recreation 261 


VII. FACULTY 


Faculty 263 Cooperating public school teachers 278 

Part-time faculty 274 

4 


ANNUAL CALENDAR 


1 966 


1 967 

JANUARY 

JULY 

JANUARY 

JULY 

8 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 

S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

M 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 

T 

3 

10 

17 

24 

31 

W 

4 

11 

18 

25 

T 

5 

12 

19 

26 

F 

6 

13 

20 

27 

S 

7 

14 

21 

28 

S 

M 

T 

W 

T 

F 

S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

20 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 

3 

10 

17 

24 

31 

4 

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18 

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3 

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31 

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26 

6 

13 

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27 

7 

14 

21 

28 

FEBRUARY 

AUGUST 



F 

EB 

RU 

ARY 




AU 

GUST 



6 

13 

20 

27 

7 

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21 

28 

1 

8 

15 

22 

2 

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3 

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4 

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IS 

2€ 

'7 

14 

u 

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4 

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4 

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5 

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26 

MARCH 

SEPTEMBER 

MARI 

CH 



SEPT 

‘E» 

(BER 


6 

13 

20 

27 

7 

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28 

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L. 

3 

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124 

4 

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7 

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1 

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APRIL 

OCTOBER 

APRIL 

OCTOBER 






1 

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1 

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MAY 

NOVEW 

[B£ 

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1 


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N' 

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[Bi 

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1 

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12 
119 
[26 
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JUNE 

DECEMBER 

JUNE 



D 

EC 

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[Bi 

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1 

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5 


COLLEGE CALENDAR 


1966-67 


SUMMER SESSION 1966 

May 20, Fri Application deadline for master’s degree candidates 

for graduation, summer session 1966 

June 20, Mon Summer session begins 

July 4, Mon. Independence Day (holiday) 

July 29, Fri. Summer session ends 


FALL SEMESTER 1966 

July 15, Fri. Application for admission due in admissions office* 

September 12, Mon. Faculty and student orientation 

September 13-15, 

Tues.-Thurs. Student orientation, advisement and registration 

September 15, Thurs Last day to register without late registration fee 

September 19, Mon Classes begin 

September 20, Tues Last day to register or add classes 

October 21, Fri Application deadline for baccalaureate degree can- 

didates for graduation, spring semester and sum- 
mer session 1967 

October 28, Fri Last day to drop a course with automatic “W” 

November 11, Fri Veterans Day (holiday) 

November 24, 25, 

Thurs., Fri. ...Thanksgiving recess 

December 1, Thurs Application deadline for master’s degree candidates 

for graduation, fall semester 1966 

December 19, Mon Christmas recess begins 

January 3, Tues Classes resume 

January 18, Wed. ... Last day of classes 

January 20-21, Fri.-Sat. 1 .Semester examinations 
January 23-25, Mon.-Wed. J 


SPRING SEMESTER 1967 


December 15, 1966, Thurs. Applications for admission due in admissions office * 

Jan. 31-Feb. 2, 

Tues.-Thurs. Registration for all classes 

February 2, Thurs Last day to register without late registration fee 

February 6, Mon. _.Classes begin 

February 7, Tues Last day to register or add classes 

February 13, Mon. Lincoln’s Birthday (holiday) 

February 22, Wed Washington’s Birthday (holiday) 

March 10, Fri. Application deadline for baccalaureate degree can- 

didates for graduation, fall semester 1967 


* Students are advised to submit their applications earlier than the stated deadline in view of 
possible enrollment limitations. 


6 


College Calendar 


March 17, Fri Last day to drop a course with automatic “W” 

March 20, Mon. .. Spring recess begins 

March 27, Mon. ., Classes resume 

April 13, Thurs Application deadline for master’s degree candidates 

for graduation, spring semester 1967 

April 29, Sat Day of the Titan 

May 30, Tues. — Memorial Day (holiday) 

May 31, Wed Last day of classes 

June 2, 3, Fri., Sat. I Semester examinations 

June 5-7, Mon.-Wed. ) 

June 11, Sun Commencement 


SUMMER SESSION 1967 

May 19, Fri Application deadline for master’s degree candidates 

for graduation, summer session 1967 

June 19, Mon Summer session begins 

Full summer session calendar to be published later 


ORGANIZATION AND 
ADMINISTRATION 


■h'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIII III! Illlllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 
THE CALIFORNIA STATE* COLLEGES 
ADVISORY BOARD AND COUNCILS 


1 


TRUSTEES 

OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


Ex Officio Trustees 

Edmund G. Brown, LL.B. State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Governor of California and President of the Trustees 

Glenn M. Anderson, A.B State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Lieutenant Governor of California 

Jesse M. Unruh, B.A State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Speaker of the Assembly 

Max Rafferty, A.B., M.A., Ed.D._ 721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento 95814 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Glenn S. Dumke, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D 5670 Wilshire 

Chancellor of the California State Colleges Boulevard, Los Angeles 90036 

Appointed Trustees 

Appointments are for a term of eight years expiring March 1 on dates in paren- 
theses. Names are listed in order of accession to the board. 

Louis H. Heilbron, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. (1969) 

14 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 94104 
Donald M. Hart, B.A. (1968) 

2230 Pine Street, Bakersfield 93302 
Charles Luckman, LL.D., A.F.D. (1966) 

9220 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 90046 
Paul Spencer, B.A. ( 1969) 

P.O. Box 145, San Dimas 91773 
Theodore Meriam, A.B. (1971) 

P.O. Box 370, Chico 95927 
Albert J. Ruffo, LL.B., B.S. in E.E. (1971) 

1680 Hedding Street, San Jose 95113 
Mrs. Philip Conley, B.A. (1972) 

3729 Huntington Boulevard, Fresno 93702 
E. Guy Warren, B.A. (1973) 

P.O. Box 59, Hayward 94541 
Daniel H. Ridder, B.A. (1967) 

604 Pine Street, Long Beach 90801 
George D. Hart, A.B. (1967) 

111 Sutter Street, San Francisco 94104 
Gregson E. Bautzer, B.A., LL.B. (1968) 

190 North Canon Drive, Beverly Hills 90210 
Simon Ramo, B.S., Ph.D. (1972) 

8433 Fallbrook Avenue, C^anoga Park 91304 
James F. Thacher, B.A., LL.B. (1970) 

310 Sansome Street, San Francisco 94104 
Victor H. Palmieri, B.A., LL.B. (1970) 

Janss C>)rporation, Kirkeby Center, Wilshire at Westwood, Los Angeles 90024 
Alec L. Coty, B.A., LL.B. (1973) 

U.S. National Bank Building, San Diego 92101 
Chester R. Bartalini (1966) 

240 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 94102 


11 


Trustees 


Officers 

Governor Edmund G. Brown 
President 
Donald M. Hart 
Vice Chairman 


of the Trustees 


Albert J. Ruffo 
Chairman 

Chancellor Glenn S. Dumke 
Secretary-T r easurer 


12 


OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 

OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Lbs Angeles 90036 
213 938-2981 

Chancellor Glenn S. Dumke 

Executive Vice Chancellor Raymond A. Rydell 

Vice Chancellor, Business Affairs Harry E. Brakebill 

Assistant Chancellor, Faculty and Staff Affairs C. Mansel Keene 


13 


THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


California State College at Fullerton 
800 North State College Boulevard 
Fullerton 92631 

Dr. William B. Langsdorf, President 
714 871-3300 

California State College at Hayward 
25800 Hillary Street 
Hayward 94542 

Dr. Fred F. Harcleroad, President 
415 538-8000 

California State College at Long Beach 
6101 East Seventh Street 
Long Beach 90804 
Dr. Carl W. McIntosh, President 
213 433-0951 

California State College at Los Angeles 
5151 State College Drive 
Los Angeles 90032 

Dr. John A. Greenlee, Acting Presi- 
dent 

213 225-1631 

California State College at Palos Verdes 
27608 Silver Spur Road 
Palos Verdes Peninsula 90274 
Dr. Leo F. Cain, President 
213 377-6837 

California State College at San Bernar- 
dino 

5500 State College Parkway 

San Bernardino 92407 
Dr. John M. Pfau, President 
714 887-6311 

California State Polytechnic College 
San Luis Obispo 93402- 
805 546-0111 

Kellogg- Voorhis Campus 
Pomona 91766 
213 964-6424 

Dr. Julian A. McPhee, President 

Chico State College 
First and Normal Streets 
Chico 95927 

Dr. Glenn Kendall, President 
916 343-4411 


Fresno State College 
Shaw and Cedar Avenues 
Fresno 93726 

Dr. Frederic W. Ness, President 
209 222-5161 
Humboldt State College 
Areata 95521 

Dr. Cornelius H. Siemens, President 
707 822-1771 

Sacramento State College 
6000 J Street 
Sacramento 95819 
Dr. Stephen L. Walker, Acting 
President 
916 452-3252 
San Diego State College 
5402 College Avenue 
San Diego 92115 
Dr. Malcolm A. Love, President 
714 286-5000 

San Fernando Valley State College 
18111 Nordhoff Street 
Northridge 91326 
Dr. Ralph Prator, President 
213 349-1200 

San Francisco State College 
1600 Holloway Avenue 
San Francisco 94132 
Dr. Stanley Paulson, Acting President 
415 584-2300 
San Jose State College 
125 South Seventh Street 
San Jose 95114 

Dr. Robert D. Clark, President 
408 294-6414 
Sonoma State College 
265 College View Drive 
Rohnert Park 94928 
Dr. Ambrose R. Nichols, President 
707 545-7220 
Stanislaus State College 
800 Monte Vista Avenue 
Turlock 95380 

Dr. Alexander Capurso, President 
209 634-9101 


14 


THE CALIFORNIA 
STATE COLLEGES 


The California State Colleges are a unique development of the democratic con- 
cept of tax-supported public higher education for all qualified students. 

Spanning the state from Humboldt County in the north to San Diego in the 
south, the 17 campuses of the California State Colleges constitute the largest system 
of public higher education in the western hemisphere and one of the largest in the 
world. Current enrollment exceeds 157,000 full and part-time students. The faculty 
? and administrative staff numbers more than 8,000. 

^ The individual colleges, each with a geographic, curricular and academic char- 
acter of its own, offer solid basic programs in the liberal arts. Beyond this, each 
college is noted for its individuality in academic emphasis which makes for a 
diversified system. Course offerings leading to the bachelor’s and master’s degree 
are designed to satisfy existing student interests and to serve the technical and 
professional manpower requirements of the state. 

The California State Colleges are dedicated to rigorous academic standards. Con- 
stant striving for academic excellence is at the heart of the system. The primary 
responsibility of each faculty within the system is the instructional process on the 
’ teacher-student level, with appropriate recognition of the necessary and construc- 
tive role of research in any institution of higher education. 

Responsibility for the California State Colleges is vested in the board of trustees, 
which is appointed by the Governor, and the board’s administrative arm, the chan- 
cellor. The trustees and the chancellor set broad policy for the colleges while dele- 
gating considerable independent responsibility for implementation at the college 
level. A Statewide Academic Senate, made up of representatives elected by the 
faculty at each college, act as a consultative body to the chancellor on academic 
affairs. 

Although the oldest of the colleges, San Jose State College, dates back a cen- 
tury, the California state college system under an independent board of trustees 
was created by the Donahoe Act of 1960. Formerly, the colleges were under the 
jurisdiction of the State Board of Education. 

Today, the California State Colleges are in a particularly dynamic period of 
their development. Before World War II, there were seven state colleges with a 
peak total enrollment of some 13,000. Sifice 1947, ten new colleges have been 
developed; one is operating in temporary quarters in southwestern Los Angeles, 
and another has been authorized, to be located in Kem County. Enrollment in the 
system is expected to reach 225,000 by 1970. 


CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE AT FULLERTON 

ADVISORY BOARD 


Leland C. Launer, Chairman 

Parmer, Launer, Chaffee and Hanna. .. Fullerton 

Arnold O. Beckman 

Chairman of the Board, Beckman Instruments, Inc ^ Corona del Mar 

Mrs. Nicholas A. Begovich_ .Fullerton 


15 


Advisory Councils 


ADVISORY BOARD-Continued 

E. B. Buster 

Vice President, West Coast, Townsend Company. .. Santa Ana 

Rodney (Bud) (}oulson 

Manager, Aunt Jemima’s Kitchen, Disneyland Anaheim 

Manuel E. Esqueda 

Assistant Cashier, Bank of America Santa Ana 

R. Paul Hughes 

President, Pacific Hawaiian Products Anaheim 

Mrs. Sam P. (Edna) Kraemer 

Honorary Member Placentia 

Leo C. Marshbum 

Marshbum Farms Whittier 

John R. Moore 

President, Autonetics Division, North American Aviation, Inc Los Angeles 

Claude M. Owens 

Judge, Orange CJounty Municipal Court Anaheim 

Charles A. Pearson 

Proprietor, Anaheim Truck and Transfer Anaheim 

J. O’Hara Smith 

President, Occidental Savings and Loan Association Seal Beach 


ADVISORY COUNCILS 


Engineering Advisory Council 
John R. Moore, Chairman 
President, Autonetics 
Anaheim 

Nicholas A. Begovich 
Vice President, Ground Systems 
Group 

Hughes Aircraft Company 
Fullerton 

Alfred V. Gangnes 
President 

Interstate Electronics Corporation 
Anaheim 
Willard Key 
Supervisor of Services 
Research and Development (Denter 
Richfield Oil (Corporation 
Anaheim 
Joseph W. Lewis 
Vice President 
Beckman Instruments, Inc. 
Fullerton 


Frank W. Lynch 
Vice President and Manager 
Systems Support, Nortronics Division 
Northrop Corporation 
Anaheim 
Wendell B. SeU 
President 

Packard-Bell Electronics (Corporation 
Los Angeles 
John L. Sigrist 

Vice President, Space Systems Center 
Douglas Aircraft Company 
Huntington Beach 
Warren E. Wilson 
Professor and Chairman 
Department of Engineering 
Harvey Mudd College 
Claremont 


16 


Advisory Councils 


oundafion Advisory Council 
A. Bryant III 
Rancho Santa Ana 
Anaheim 
Donald S. Burns 
Vice President 
Ekco Products Company 
Newport Beach 
eland M. Cave 
Vice President 
Bank of America 
Fullerton 
L. W. Effinger 
President 

A. W. Effinger Enterprises 
Santa Monica 
. E, Fields 

Executive Vice President 
Maple Investment, Inc. 

Los Angeles 
Lichard L. Gausewitz 
Patent Attorney 
Orange 

Lichard T. Hanna 
Congressman, 34th District 
Washington, D.C., and Anaheim 

ohn J. Jakosky% Jr. 

President 

Electrophysics Corporation 
Costa Mesa 

lorley M. Kasler 
President 

Chris-Craft Sales of California 
Newpon Beach 


William J. Phillips 
Supervisor, Third District 
County of Orange 
Santa Ana 
Frank M. Reid 
Executive Vice President 
Fullerton Chamber of Commerce 
Fullerton 
Jose Rosan, Sr. 

President 
Rosan Company 
Newport Beach 
Joseph Rosener, Jr. 

Management Consultant 
Newport Beach 
Phil N. Scheid 

Manager, Management Operations 
Department 

Ground Systems Group 
Hughes Aircraft Company 
Fullerton 
Lucien D. Truhill 
Manager 

Orange County Chamber of 
Commerce 
Anaheim 
Frank H. Trane 
Director 

Trane Corporation 
Corona del Mar 
Edward W. Smith (ex officio) 
Director of Development 
California State College at Fullerton 
Fullerton 


17 


Advisory Councils 


Humanities Advisory Council 
Louise E. Dowlen 
Chairman, Division of Language 
and Literature 
Orange Coast College 
Costa Mesa 
Charles L. Ford 

Chairman, Division of Humanities 
Santa Ana College 
Santa Ana 
James N. Hines 
Chairman, English Department 
Fullerton Union High School 
Fullerton 

George R. Hoff 
Psychologist 
Santa Ana 
Oscar E. Littleton 
Chairman, Division of English 
Cerritos College 
Norwalk 

Science Advisory Council 
A. L. Antonio 
Group Vice President 
Aerojet-General Corporation 
El Monte 

Merl J. Carson, M.D. 

Medical Director 
Children’s Hospital of 
Orange County 
Orange 

Earl A. Coddington 
Professor of Mathematics 
University of California 
Los Angeles 
Robert P. Dilworth 
Professor of Mathematics 
California Institute of Technology 
Pasadena 
Joseph Kaplan 
Professor of Physics 
University of California 
Los Angeles 
Ernst H. Krause 
Vice President 
Aerospace Corporation 
Newpon Beach 


Fred B. Myers 

Chairman, English Department 
Anaheim High School 
Anaheim 

Leland Oliver 

Leland Oliver Company, Inc. 
Orange 

Mrs. Harry L. Putnam 
Publicist and Projects Consultant 
Corona del Mar 
Dan Russell 
President 

Orange Empire Travel Bureau 
Anaheim 

William F. Smith 
Chairman, Division of Humanities 
Fullerton Junior College 
Fullerton 


H. W. Magoun 
Dean of Graduate Division 
University of California 
Los Angeles 
Thane H. McCulloh 
Professor of Geology 
California Institute of Technology 
Pasadena 

Andreas Rechnitzer 
Project Engineer 
Autonetics, Division of North 
American Aviation, Inc. 
Anaheim 
N. Allen Riley 

Laboratory Director 
Chevron Research Company 
La Habra 

Howard Steinberg 
Vice President and Director of 
Research 

U.S. Borax Research Corporation 
Anaheim 


18 


Advisory Councils 


Teacher Education Advisory Council 

Thomas Byrnes 

Department of Physical Education 
Valencia High School 
Placentia Unified School District 
Placentia 

A. Stanley Corey 
Assistant Superintendent for 
Instruction 

Buena Park School District 
Buena Park 

Mrs. Cymbre P. Ferguson 
Curriculum Consultant 
Centralia School District 
Buena Park 

Francis A. Grunenfelder 
Superintendent 
Orange County Schools 
Santa Ana 

Myrna C. Hotchkiss 
Vice Principal 
Magnolia High School 
Anaheim Union High School District 
Anaheim 

Clarence Johnson 
Senior Counselor 
Westminster High School 
Huntington Beach Union High 
School District 
Westminster 

Mrs. H. D. (June) Joyner 
Member, ^ard of jj^ucadon 
La Habra City School District 
La Habra 

Barron G. Knechtel 
Department of Mathematics 
Orange (Doast College 
Costa Mesa 

Ernest G. Lake 
District Superintendent 
North Orange County Junior 
College District 
Fullerton 

Mrs. Margaret McKillop 
(Doordinator, Child and Welfare 
Attendance 

Garden Grove Unified School 
District • 

Garden Grove 


William E. Montonna 
Principal 

Villa Park High School 
Orange Unified School District 
Villa Park 

Mrs. Edward W. Nelson 
President, Fourth District 
California Congress of Parents 
and Teachers 
Santa Ana 
Edwin N. Norvell 
Dean of Liberal Arts 
Santa Ana College 
Santa Ana 
D. Russell Parks 
District Superintendent 
Fullerton School District 
Fullerton 
Mrs. Jean Reiner 
Chairman, Department of 
Social Science 
Sunny Hills High School 
Fullerton Union High School District 
Fullerton 
Mrs. Marie Smith 
Intermediate Teacher 
Arbolita School 
La Habra City School District 
La Habra 

Mrs. Avery Streech 
Member, Board of Trustees 
Fullerton School District 
Fullerton 
William Stocks 
Assistant Superintendent for 
Instruction and Personnel 
San Joaquin School District 
Irvine 

Mrs. Elizabeth V. Wright 
Department of Life Science 
Fullerton Junior (College 
Fullerton 


19 


Advisory Councils 


Urban Advisory Council 
Ted B. Adsit 
Planning Consultant^ 

Corona del Mar 
Jack H. L. Caldwell 
Vice Chairman, Board of Directors 
Macco Realty Company 
Corona del Mar 
Jerry F. Christie 
Vice President 
Fullerton Savings and Loan 
Association 
Fullerton 
Forest Dickason 
Planning Director 

Orange County Planning Commission 
Santa Ana 

Ralph Diedrich 
Building Contractor 
Buena Park 
Les Fant 

Manager of Real Estate 
The Irvine Company 
Irvine 

William M. Harrison 
President 

Cypress Park Properties, Inc. 

Fullerton 

Donald P. Kennedy 
President, Ojange County Title 
Company, and First American 
Title Insurance and 
Trust Company 
Santa Ana 


William J. McGarvey, Jr. 

President 

McGarvey-Thompson Realty, Inc, 
Fullerton 
John Parker 
Vice President 

Coldwell Banker and Company 
Newport Beach 
Chester Schultz 
Partner, McLean and Schultz 
Consulting Engineers 
Fullerton 

Don N. Schneider 
Owner 

D. N. Schneider Construction 
Company 
Placentia 
Andrew Trevedi 
Economist 

Economic Research Associates 
Los Angeles 
Gin Wong 
President 

W. L. Pereira and Associates 
Los Angeles 
Ray Watson 
Vice President 
The Irvine Company 
Irvine 


20 


THE COLLEGE 


lllllllfflllBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililiiilililiiiiiiitiiiiiiiy^^ 

ADMINISTRATION 
OBJECTIVES AND HISTORY 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 
RESEARCH CENTERS AND CLINICS 
STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 


ADMINISTRATION 


COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 


President William B. Langsdorf 

Director of Development Edward W. Smith 

Administrative Assistant Lois S. Herron 

Executive Dean Stuart F. McComb 

Building Coordinator Milton C. Blanchard 

Vice President, Academic Affairs .* Bernard L. Hyink 

Dean of Educational Services and Summer Sessions Gerhard E. Ehmann 


Director of Extension and Coordinator of Evening Classes R. Harold Van Cleave 


Audiovisual Coordinator _.Raymond E. Denno 

College Librarian^ , — - Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 

Dean of School of Letters, Arts, and Science Miles D. McCarthy 

Dean of School of Business Administration and Economics I>)nald S. Tull 

Dean of Education Kenneth R. Doane 

Coordinator of Elementary Education — Barbara A. Hartsig 

Coordinator of Secondary Education James W. Cusick 

Dean of Engineering Robert G. Valpey 

Dean of Students Ernest A. Becker 

Financial Aids Officer Thomas D. Morris 

Associate Dean of Students — Activities and Housing Roger Nudd 

Activities Adviser Louise Lee 

Housing Coordinator 

Associate Dean of Students — Admissions and Records 

Registrar Mildred Scott 

Admissions Officer Jack Campbell 

Associate Dean of Students — Counseling and Testing Arthur L. Tollefson 

Counselor and Test Officer Arthur W. Lynn 

Counselor Charles W. Buck 

Psychometrist Howard K. Morton 

Director of Relations with Schools — Emmett T. Long 

Director of Placement Services - Max W. Burke 

Placement Supervisor — Bradley Weyman 

College Physician Helen L. Morton, M.D. 

Business Manager J- E- Lyons 

Accounting Officer Stan N. Chase 

Personnel Officer... Marie M. Hoffman 

Public Information Officer John R. Simpson 

Purchasing Officer 

Chief of Plant Operations . Beryl E. Kempton 

Bookstore Manager Keith Nastiuk 

Food Service Manager Earl Maxon 

Foundation Accountant .. Eva Jensen 


23 


Administration 


SCHOOLS, DIVISIONS AND DEPARTMENTS 


School of Letters, Arts and Science 

Anthropology Department 

Art Department 

Biological Science Department 

Chemistry Department ... 

Communication Department 

Drama Department.. 

English Department 

Foreign Languages and Literature Department ... 

Geography Department 

History Department 

Mathematics Department 

Music Department..... 

Philosophy Department 

Physics Department 

Political Science Department 

Psychology Department 

Science and Mathematics Education Department... 

Sociology Department 

Speech Department 


Miles D. McCarthy, Dean 

- -Wayne W. Untereiner 

- Gregory D. Ivy 

(acting) Donald D. Sutton 

— Andrew F. Montana 

J. William Maxwell 

James D. Young 

Orrington C. Ramsay 

— — Walter D. Kline 

Arthur D. Earick 

Giles T. Brown 

Dennis B. Ames 

Joseph W. Landon 

William H. Alamshah 

— Raymond V. Adams 

— Ivan L. Richardson 

Louis G. Schmidt 

George C. Turner 

- F. James Davis 

— Seth A. Fessenden 


School of Business Administration and Economics ^Theodore H. Smith, Dean 

Accounting and Finance Department Dorsey E. Wiseman 

Economics Department™ Norman Townshend-Zellner 

Management Department... Stephen J. Barres 

Marketing and (Quantitative Methods ... Donald S. Tull 

School of Education Kenneth R. Doane, Dean 

Elementary Education Department Barbara A. Hartsig 

Foundations of Education Department (acting) Morton C. Fierman 

Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation 

Department ... Elmer L. Johnson 

School Services Department Louis O. Brockmann 

Secondary Education Department James W. Cusick 

Division of Engineering Robert G. Valpey 


COLLEGE COMMITTEES 1965-66 


President's Cabinet 
W. B. Langsdorf, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
Edwin R. Carr 
Kenneth R. Doane 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 
J. Justin Gray 
Lois M. Herron 


Bernard L. Hyink 
J. E. Lyons 
Stuart F. McComb 
Werner W. Prange 
John R. Simpson 
Edward W. Smith 
Theodore H. Smith 


24 


College Committees 


Faculty Council 
Edwin R. Carr, Chainnan 
James D. Young, Vice Chairman 
Hazel J. Jones, Secretary 
Levem F. Graves, Treasurer 
Raymond V. Adams 
Dennis B. Ames 
Warren A. Beck 
Rae S. Carlson 
Sherwood P. Cummings 
James W. Cusick 
Barbara E. Davis 
Lawrence B. de Graaf 
Seth A. Fessenden 
Morton C. Fierman 

Campus Planning Committee 
William B. Langsdorf, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
Jack C. Emmons, College Facility 
Planner^ Office of Chancellor 
Bernard L. Hyink 

Committee on Relations With Schools 
Emmett T. Long, Chairman 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 

Foundation Board of Trustees 
Charles A. Povlovich, President 
Orrington C. Ramsay, Vice President 
Gordon S. Fyfe, Treasurer 
Ernest A. Becker 


J. Justin Gray 
Bernard L. Hyink 
Vice President^ Academic Affairs 
of the College 
William B. Langsdorf 
President of the College 
J. William Maxwell 
Miles D. McCarthy 
Willis E. McNelly 
Charles A. Povlovich 
Paulina J. Salz 

Norman Townshend-Zellner 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 

Dorsey E. Wiseman 


J. E. Lyons 
Stuart F. McComb 
John W. Olsen 
Herben J. Powell 
Consulting Architect 


Arthur L. Tollefson 
Bernard L. Hyink 


Myrtle M. Imhoff 
William B. Langsdorf 
J. E. Lyons 


STANDING COMMIHEES OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL 

1965-66 


Academic Standards Committee 
Wayne Untereiner, Chairman 
Rae S. Carlson 
Emmett T. Long 

Curriculum Committee 
Donald S. Tull, Chairman 
Bayard Brattstrom 
Kenneth R. Doane 
J. Justin Gray 
Bernard L. Hyink 


Eugene L. McGarry 
Frank L. Roberts 


Jack Pontney 
Orrington C. Ramsay 
Paulina June Salz 
Betty M. Unterberger 


25 


Standing Committees 


Educational Services Committee 
Paul T. Kinney, Chairman 
Don D. Austin 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 

Faculty Affairs Committee 
Leland McCloud, Chairman 
Ida S. Coppolino 
James W. Cusick 

Faculty Personnel Committee 
Louis G. Schmidt, Chairman 
J. William Maxwell 

Library Committee 
Morton C. Fierman, Chairman 
George E. Etue 
Joan V. Greenwood 

Student Affairs Committee 
Lawrence B. de Graaf, Chairman 
Stephen J. Barres 
Ernest A. Becker 
Edwin Duerr 
George Giacumakis 


Norman Townshend-Zellner 
David L. Walkington 


Arthur D. Earick 
Naomi G. Dietz 
Raynolds Johnson 


Barbara A. Hartsig 


Gerald D. Samuelson 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 


Willis E. McNelly 
Edward B. Livengood 
Paul J. Pastor 
Allen M. Zeltzer 


PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL COLLEGE 
COMMITTEES 1965-66 


Premedical Committee 
Andrew F. Montana, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
Harvey Blend 
Miles D. McCarthy 


Helen L. Morton, M.D. 
Edsel F. Stiel 
Donald D. Sutton 


Teacher Education Committee 
John W. Trego, Chairman 
James W. Cusick, Vice Chairman 
Kenneth R. Doane, Secretary 
Robert S. Feldman 
Rita Fuszek 


Barbara A. Hartsig 
Betty L. Heinze 
Robert A. Lemmon 
Robert E. Lepper 


The president of the 
ex officio members of all 


college and the chairman of the faculty council are 
faculty committees. 


26 


OBJECTIVES AND HISTORY 


OBJECTIVES OF CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE 
AT FULLERTON 

The main functions of an institution of higher learning are to disseminate and 
advance knowledge. The philosophy which guides an institution can limit or pro- 
mote the successful achievement of these objectives. Therefore, from its inception, 
the college has directed its educational program toward the fullest possible devel- 
opment of the individuals who participate in it. For both faculty and students this 
entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, a comprehensive rather than 
a narrow approach to major areas of study, and a concern with research and other 
creative activity. 

The college holds to the belief that an enduring educational experience must be 
founded upon exploration of our cultural heritage, through basic studies in the 
liberal arts and sciences, and that it can and should at the same time prepare for 
success in a chosen occupation or profession. Accordingly, the required general 
education program has as its objective the development in each student of: 

1. The effective use and interpretation of the written and spoken language. 

2. An understanding of the wide range of human endeavor and accomplishments 
in liberal arts and sciences, their interrelationships, and the various choices 
and values they represent. 

3. An understanding of information and principles in some areas of the liberal 
arts and sciences in sufficient depth to encourage critical and creative thought 
and expression. 

4. A spirit of inquiry into the past and into the future, ’in order to cope with 
conditions in the continually changing world. 

5. An understanding of the rights, privileges and responsibilities of citizenship 
in the community and nation, and of effective participation in today’s world. 

In addition, the college requires of all students who are candidates for a degree — 
whatever their special purpose — the pursuit of a subject major. 

(For specific details, see page 63). 


HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE 
AT FULLERTON 

Orange County is situated on a coastal plain southeast of the City of Los Angeles. 
A decade ago the county was regarded as being one of rural characteristics, with 
emphasis on the production of oranges and other citrus fruits. Today it is referred 
to as one of the fastest growing counties in the nation, having multiplied its pop- 
ulation almost five times in the last fifteen years. Orange County reached the one 
million mark in population in 1963, to make it the third most populous county in 
California. The median age of the population is 26.6 years, and 42 per cent are 
less than 20 years of age. Much of the county is still rural, the county having a 
population density of 1.37 persons per acre. There are sections, however, that are 
as dense as 16.64 persons per acre. Every indication points to continued growth, 
with a predicted population of two million by 1980. Thousands of acres of irri- 


27 


Accreditation 


gated agricultural land have been converted to subdivisions, business and industry, 
freeways, and schools. The electronics industry is the leader in growth among in- 
dustries and businesses in the county. 

California State College at Fullerton was established by act of the Legislature 
under the terms of Chapter 1681 of the Statutes of 1957. On March 13, 1958, the 
Public Works Board selected the site of the college, located in the northeast section 
of the City of Fullerton. It now consists of 225 acres, and is bounded on the north 
by Yorba Linda Boulevard (formerly Pioneer Avenue), on the west by State 
College Boulevard (formerly Cypress Avenue), on the south by Nutwood Avenue, 
and on the east by the proposed Orange Freeway. The college is located within five 
miles of 60 percent of the industry and within 10 miles of 70 percent of the pop- 
ulation of Orange Ck)unty. It is also within easy driving range of Orange County 
beaches and mountains, and of the other cultural centers of southern California 
and their recreation and entertainment areas. 

Dr. William B. Langsdorf was appointed president of the college on January 16, 
1959, and with two aides came to Fullerton on March 2, 1959, to begin planning 
for the opening of the new college. Arrangements were made with the Fullerton 
Union High School District to lease quarters for the college administrative offices 
on the Fullerton Union High School campus, and to hold classes at the Sunny Hills 
High School for the 1959-60 school year. During the first seven years, the average 
annual enrollment has grown from 4^ to 6,5(X) individuals. Envisioned are average 
annual enrollments of 10,(XX) in 1969-70; 15,0(X) in 1974-75; and 30,(XX) individuals 
when the college reaches its master plan enrollment of 20,000 full time equivalent 
students in the early nineteen eighties. 

In the fall of 1960, the college opened classes on its own campus where it occu- 
pied 12 temporary buildings. The first permanent building, the Letters and Science 
Building, was occupied in 1963. The Music-Speech-Drama Building was completed 
in 1964, the Physical Education Building in 1965, and the Library and Audiovisual 
Center in 1966. Other permanent buildings will be opened in approximately the 
following order: Cafeteria, 1967; Humanities-Social Sciences Building, 1968; Art 
Building, 1969; Administration-Business-Engineering Building, 1970. Additional 
buildings are being planned for the future. 

ACCREDITATION 

The college is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and 
Colleges, California State Board of Education, and the American Association of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. 


28 


SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

The California State Colleges offer academic year programs of study at a number 
of distinguished universities abroad. For 1965-66 the cooperating universities were: 
University of Aix-Marseille, France; Free University of Berlin and University of 
Heidelberg, Germany; Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; University of Granada 
and University of Madrid, Spain; University of Stockholm and University of 
Uppsala, Sweden; National University, Taiwan. A center at the University of 
Florence, Florence, Italy, has been added for 1966-67. Academic work successfully 
completed at the cooperating universities abroad may be applied toward the degree 
requirements of the college in accordance with college regulations. 

A selection among applicants from all California State Colleges is made on the 
basis of academic, linguistic and personal qualifications. The criteria are: 

(a) Upper division or graduate standing by the beginning of the academic year 
abroad; 

(b) Academic achievement; 

(c) Proficiency in the language of instruction; 

(d) Faculty recommendations. 

Cost to the student includes round trip transportation from San Francisco to the 
host university, room and board for the academic year, and medical insurance. 
In 1966-67 these costs are: France, Germany, Spain, Japan: $1,870; Sweden, $2,070; 
Taiwan, $1,370; Italy, $1,970. Payments may be scheduled throughout the year. 

Programs in Japan, Sweden and Taiwan do not require previous linguistic prepa- 
ration; applicants for all other programs must demonstrate adequate facility in the 
language of instruction at the host university. 

Application for the 1967-68 academic year should be made early in the fall 
semester of 1966. Detailed information may be obtained at the counseling center. 
Room S264, or by writing to the Office of International Programs, the California 
State Colleges, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco 94132. 

LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES 

The educational program of the college is offered continuously from 8 a.m. 
until 10 p.m., Monday through Friday. Classes held during the late afternoon and 
evening hours are part of the regular college offering and are taught by the 
college faculty. 

Students enrolling in these classes must be fully matriculated and must have 
met all admission requirements of the college, including the filing of an official 
application for admission, the filing of complete official transcripts from other 
schools and colleges, and in the case of undergraduates, the completion of required 
tests for admission. 

A class schedule, listing all classes meeting in the late afternoon and evening 
hours, may be obtained at the Titan Bookstore or the Office of the Coordinator 
of Evening Classes. Applications of new students for admission to the college 
must be filed with the Office of Admissions prior to the deadline date for filing 
applications. This date, for both the fall and spring semesters, is carried in the 
calendar of this catalog. 


29 


Library 


SUMMER SESSIONS 

The college will conduct a six-week summer session from June 20 through 
July* 29. There will also be two-week and three-week workshops running con- 
currently^. Day and evening classes are scheduled, and credits earned in the 
summer sessions meet degree and credential requirements with the same validity 
as credits secured in the fall and spring semesters. A maximum of one unit of 
college credit may be earned for each week of attendance. 

In addition to much of the regular curriculum, summer offerings include special 
workshops and seminars for teachers and other professional groups. A program of 
recreational activities is planned to serve a wide variety of interests. 

A tuition fee of $18.50 per unit is charged, plus an associated student member- 
ship fee of $2 per person. The summer session class schedule announcing all 
courses is published in March or earlier, and may be obtained by writing the 
dean of summer session. 

EXTENSION PROGRAM AND SERVICES 

The college cooperates with all community agencies (business and professional 
associations, chambers of commerce, school districts, industrial firms, economic 
and cultural groups, city and county governmental units, etc.) in the development 
of educational programs. These activities may be classes, conferences, institutes, 
workshops, seminars or they may be consultant services, depending upon the 
need. In this manner, the college provides opportunities for the professional, 
vocational, and cultural improvement of persons unable to pursue an academic 
program in residence. 

Extension Courses. Off-campus extension courses may be planned for those 
wishing to earn college credit and under certain conditions this credit may be 
applied toward a degree or a teaching credential. Extension offerings are equivalent 
in level and quality to residence courses. These courses may be modified and 
designed to meet the particular needs of certain groups and may be initiated at 
various times during the year. Any adult may enroll in an extension course, 
provided he meets the prerequisites of the course. Matriculation is not required. 
Refer to the section of this catalog on fees and expenses for information on fees. 

Persons wishing information about organizing an extension course or about 
current extension offerings should address inquiries to the director of extension. 

Conferences and Institutes. The college is interested in taking an active part in 
the development of conferences and institutes. The conference director, in cooper- 
ation with the respective academic departments and divisions, will work with 
agency representatives in planning the program, selection of a competent staff, 
and the general conduct of the conference. 

Requests for information or assistance with particular educational problems 
which might be met through the extension program should be directed to the 
conference director. 


THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

The college library is housed in the first and fourth through sixth floors of the 
new Library Building completed in the summer of 1966. The total space occupied 
by the library is approximately 11 5, (XX) square feet. As collections and enrollments 
grow, the Library will occupy the remaining two floors of the building. The floors 
now available are designed to seat approximately 1,625 persons and to house about 
205,000 volumes, besides related materials. Group study rooms, typing rooms. 


30 


Audio-Visual and Television and Computer Centers 

study carrels, seminar rooms, and individual and group music listening rooms are 
available. The library has facilities for Xerox and Filmac copying. 

The main book collection will contain about 108,000 volumes at the beginning 
of the 1966-67 academic year. During the year about 43,000 volumes will be added. 
The library also has about 9,000 volumes of sample elementary and secondary text- 
books and juvenile literature, and a collection of about 6,000 pamphlets and other 
ephemera. 

The library is a selective depository for U.S. government documents. This col- 
lection will reach a total of nearly 50,000 items in the course of the academic 
year. The library is also a depKJsitory for California curriculum materials, which 
will reach about 3,000 items during the year, and for California state documents. 

In addition to these collections the library has about 6,000 reels of microfilmed 
U.S. government documents, chiefly State Department records, but also including 
such items as the Congressional ‘Record and various presidential papers; about 
9,000 reels of other microfilmed materials, mostly files of newspapers and periodi- 
cals, and about 6,500 volumes on micro-opaque cards and sheet microfilm. Readers 
for these materials are available adjacent to their storage area on the fourth floor. 

The library subscribes to about 2,500 periodicals. In addition to the filmed back- 
files mentioned above, the periodicals collection contains about 7,000 bound 
volumes. 

Besides attempting to build a balanced collection of basic works, the library, as 
a part of its development program, has concentrated its effons in several subject 
areas. As a result, relatively strong collections are now available in such fields as 
World War II, international relations since 1870, Kant, Shakespeare, Melville, 
Joyce, historiography and historical bibliography, and contemporary music. As the 
result of a gift, a special collection of about 1,200 volumes on angling is also 
available. These collections will increase in strength and number during the next 
several years. 

Library hours are posted in the elevator lobby and at other convenient loca- 
tions in the building. A library handbook is available at the reference desk, 
where professional librarians are on duty at all times to aid students and faculty 
in the use of library resources. 

AUDIOVISUAL AND TELEVISION CENTER 

The Audiovisual and Television Center is located in the basement of the Li- 
brary Building and occupies approximately 20,000 square feet. Services to faculty 
and students include use of all types of audiovisual equipment and materials 
(motion pictures, filmstrips, instructional kits, tape recordings and study prints); 
campuswide distribution of AV materials and equipment upon request, rental of 
films from major rental libraries in the United States; for faculty: production of 
transparencies, embossograph, charts, posters and diagrams; production of three- 
dimensional media; and all types of still and motion photography. Eight preview 
rooms and four audition rooms are available for faculty and student use. 

COMPUTER CENTER 

The present computing facilities include an IBM 1620, Model 2, with an IBM 
1311 disc drive and other peripheral equipment. This facility is used for college 
administrative applications as well as faculty research and instruction. 

Instruction on computers is offered by several departments in the college. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to use the. computer themselves but processing of students’ 
computer programs by the staff is also available. The Computer Center maintains 
a large library of computer programs and offers consulting facilities. 


31 


College Foundation 

THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE FOUNDATION 

The California State College Foundation was established and incorporated in 
October 1959 to provide essential student and faculty services which cannot be 
provided from state appropriations; to supplement the program and activities 
of the college in appropriate ways; and to otherwise assist the college in fulfilling 
its purposes and in serving the people of the State of California — especially those 
of the area in which the school is located. 

Services provided by the foundation include the operation of various college 
auxiliary organizations, business administration of scholarship and student loan funds, 
sponsored research programs and certain institutes. 

The foundation’s overall policies are administered by a board of trustees made 
up of members of the college faculty and administration. An advisory council 
to the foundation composed of leading indusft-ial, scientific, business and civic 
leaders has also been established to provide the board with counsel and advice. 


32 


RESEARCH CENTERS AND CLINICS 


CENTER FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

The Center for Economic Education is one of 24 such centers at colleges and 
universities in the United States working with the national Joint Council on 
Economic Education to expand economic understanding. Center programs include 
(1) services to schools and colleges, individual educators, and the community; (2) 
research and professional training; and (3) operation of an economic education 
information center. The center consists of a broadly based executive policy board; 
an administrative staff; and formally organized groups of participating users. 

CENTER FOR GOVERNMENTAL STUDIES 

The Center for Governmental Studies is part of the Department of Political 
Science’s expanding research and teaching activities. Established in 1965, the center 
has four major functions: first, to collect and make available fugitive governmental 
and political materials; second, to assist local government agencies and citizen 
groups in the study of local governmental problems; third, to provide students with 
instruction and experience in research techniques and methodology; and fourth, 
to provide facilities for community institutes and seminars. 

REAL ESTATE RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS 

The college participates in a continuing research program, with special emphasis 
on urban development in Orange County. Studies are undertaken in cooperation 
with various public and private agencies. In conjunction with the research program 
the college publishes a quarterly Urban Review, which is distributed nationally 
and sponsored by the California Division of Real Elstate. Opportunities exist for 
student participation in the various research activities. 

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC 

The College Speech and Hearing Clinic operates as a nonprofit California State 
College Foundation agency. In addition is an off-campus clinical program for 
graduate students that involves experiences within medical and paramedical set- 
tings. The primary purpose of the clinics both on campus and off campus is to 
provide opportunities for teaching, service and research. College students receive 
clinical experience and opportunity for observation. 


2 — 66198 


33 


STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 


Student Personnel Services at the college are administered from the Office of 
Admissions and Records, the Counseling and Testing Center, the Activities and 
Housing Office, the Office of Placement Services, and the Student Health Center. 
Collateral responsibilities include foreign student advising, coordination of the 
California State Colleges international student programs, selective service and 
veterans’ affairs, and financial aids. Coordination of this general program rests 
with the dean of students. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND HOUSING 

ACTIVITIES 

The college recognizes the important role of student activities in education. 
The activities program represents a variety of areas intended to serve every student 
according to his interest, ability and available time. 

All registered students are members of Associated Students of California State 
College at Fullerton. The Associated Students are governed through the executive, 
legislative, and judicial branches of the Associated Students organization. The 
president and commissioners constitute the executive branch which has the responsi- 
bility for the development and administration of the program, including such 
activities as publications, drama, religious clubs, intercollegiate athletics, intramural 
athletics, forensics, and music. The Associated Students Senate has full responsi- 
bility for legislation by which this program is directed and for the allocation of 
student funds for the program. The judicial branch serves as the legal body for 
interpretation of the constitution and enforcement of Associated Student policies. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are encouraged and aided by the college whenever stu- 
dents express a desire for activities which add to their educational opportunities. 
As a relatively young institution, the development of new organizations to serve 
the needs of a growing student population is rapid. Organizations now exist with 
their major emphasis on service, social activities, special interests, religious interests, 
professional interests, and academic honors. Several instructional departments spon- 
sor honor societies in recognition and encouragement of excellence in scholarship. 

Student Publications 

The college newspaper, the Titan Times y is published twice a week as a product 
of the journalism classes and financed by the Associated Students. In addition, a 
handbook is available for use by organizations in the development and operation 
of their program. The Fromethean, a literary magazine, is also published by stu- 
dents. The yearbook, the Titan, published annually by the Associated Students, 
records the year’s activities. 

Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1960 to provide the outside press 
with news of student activities on the campus. It is financed by a budgeted alloca- 
tion from Associated Students. 

Athletics 

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of teams in basebaU, basketball, 
cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, water 


34 


Athletics, Housing 

polo and wrestling. New sports will be added to the program as additional staff 
become available. A year-round program of intramural activities includes basket- 
ball, badminton, flagfootball, handball, softball, tennis and wrestling. 

The college is not a member of an established athletic conference, but plans are 
underway for membership in a conference which would be compatible with the 
aims and purposes of the college. Since the fall of 1965 all indoor home athletic 
contests have been played in the Titans’ new Physical Education Building. 

In the spring of 1960, a group of Orange County citizens organized a Boosters 
Qub to help foster intercollegiate athletic competition at California State College 
at Fullerton. Its members are dedicated to the encouragement of a sound program 
of athletics and contribute financially and by way of enthusiasm to helping to 
develop a first-rate athletic program based on a well-rounded concept of the rela- 
tionship between sports and academic achievement. All athletic teams compete 
under rules of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Membership 
is also held in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). 

Intramural Activities 

In cooperation with the Office of the Associate Dean of Students, Activities, the 
intramural program is conducted on a seasonal basis and involves a variety of 
athletic and recreational activities for both men and women. Rules and regulations 
which govern participation in the intramural program are available in the Office 
of the Director of the Intramural Program or in the Office of Student Activities. 

Participation by women in extramural volleyball, basketball, tennis, and golf is 
provided through membership in the Extramural Coordinating Council of Southern 
California and the American Recreation and Athletic Federation for College 
Women. 

HOUSING 

The college provides housing for unmarried students in two modem residence 
halls. Designed for educational living, the halls have study areas for each student, 
plus lounge areas for speakers and discussion groups or meetings. Ample social 
and recreational facilities are available. 

Each room has its own private bath. The buildings are fully air conditioned and 
carpeted. The dining hall is between and attached to the two residence halls. 

The head resident and resident assistants of each hall promote a program which 
supports and expands the classroom experience. The resident has the opportunity 
to study, assume responsibility through hall government, and discuss serious topics 
of the day with guest speakers while in a healthful living situation. 

Because of the importance of the living arrangements to educational achieve- 
ment, California State College at Fullerton requires that all students under 21 
years of age who are not married must live either at home or in college-approved 
housing. Approved housing is at present limited to the residence halls. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

The purpose of the Student Health Center is to help keep the student in class by 
providing high quality medical service early in the course of an illness, to provide 
a healthy and sanitary environment on campus in which to live and study, to 
stimulate better health awareness among the students, and to educate them to the 
high standards of good therapeutic ’and preventive care. 

The Student Health Center is in Room 580 of the Letters and Science Building 
and is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each weekday that classes are in session. No staff 
IS available for night or weekend services of any kind, and there are no off-campus 


35 


Placement 

calls made at any time. Special care and time are given to sympathetic counseling 
of both emotional and physical problems. Several physicians and nurses are con- 
tinuously on duty during the day to care for emergencies and for the treatment 
of immediate illnesses and injuries. 

Among the services presently offered are the following: 

1. Diagnosis and treatment of the usual medical and surgical problems. 

2. Physical examinations as required. 

3. Emergency care. 

4. Routine immunizations. 

5. Laboratory facilities. 

6. Followup care as may be recommended by the student’s private physician 
within the scope of available facilities. 

7. Electrocardiograms. 

8. Physical therapy treatment. 

9. Medical counseling. 

10. Psychiatric counseling and diagnosis. 

11. Specialists’ diagnostic services when directly referred by the Student Health 
Center. 

All fees for care in the Student Health Center, unless otherwise specifically stated, 
have been prepaid by the State of California and by the student’s registration fee. 
All undergraduates and all graduates registering for more than 6 units of credit are 
eligible for all or any of the health services offered. Emergency service is available ^ 
to everyone on campus. 

Health, Accident, Hospital Insurance 

All students are urged to carry this type of insurance. An excellent policy at a 
low premium is available to all students through the Associated Students’ Business 
Office. 

ALL students living in college-sponsored housing, and foreign students, are 
required to be covered by this policy. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

A centralized Placement Office is maintained with responsibilities for assisting 
students in finding both part-time and career employment. The college believes 
that it best serves both the student and employers only when its graduates have 
been placed in the professions for which they are prepared and trained. 

Part-time Placement 

Students wishing part-time jobs either on or off campus are eligible to receive 
the assistance of the office if they are taking seven units or more. New students 
may receive service as soon as they have notice of their admission to the college. 
Secretarial skills are in great demand; but calls for schoolbus drivers, custodians, 
teacher aids, draftsmen, waiters, clerks, youth and recreation leaders, sitters, gar- 
deners, etc., are received. If students must augment their resources while going to 
school they are encouraged to limit their work hours to approximately 10 per week. 

The college cooperates with the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare in providing part-time and summer work-study jobs. This program is 
made possible through the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Students who can 
establish “need eligibility” may work up to 15 hours a week during the school year 
and up to 40 hours in the summer. Under this program there are on-campus oppor- 
tunities such as library and instructional aides, clerks, buildings-and-grounds aides. 


36 


Placement 


computer center aides, and laboratory and research assistants. Off-campus jobs in 
nonprofit community agencies include teacher aides, recreation leaders, office 
trainees, and administrative interns. A Irmited mtmber of these on- and off-campus 
positions are held open for incoming freshmen who qualify. 

Educational Placement 

Students in the teacher education, pupil personnel services, supervision, or admin- 
istration curriculum of the college, who are in the final semester of a credential 
program, or who are in student teaching or directed field work, are eligible to 
register and receive the services of the Placement Office, chief of which is help in 
establishing a professional employment file. Such registrants are supplied informa- 
tion in openings and helped to establish their candidacies in the school districts and 
educational institutions. 

Business, Industry, and Government Placement 

The Placement Office’s assistance to students seeking career employment in busi- 
ness, industry, or public service involves help iri defining occupational preference, 
providing active job leads, making up resumes, and arranging interviews on and 
off campus. 


37 


COUNSELING CENTER SERVICES 


Psychological Counseling 

Students who need assistance with such problems as choosing an academic major 
or vocational goal, with study skills, or with personal problems affecting their 
academic progress may obtain help through the Counseling Center. The staff con- 
sists of professionally trained counseling psychologists who have available a variety 
of resources including occupational information files, special testing materials, col- 
lege catalogs, and directories of various kinds which may be used to assist the 
student. 

The Counseling Center also maintains contact with agencies and professional 
persons in the community to whom students may be referred. 

Counseling services are available only to fully matriculated, registered students. 

Testing 

Testing programs are designed to serve a variety of purposes: 

1. The primary purpose is that of giving instructional faculty and Counseling 
Center personnel supplementary information to use in helping the individual 
student. 

2. Test results are also used to aid in the selection of students who are applicants 
for admission to the college, and to various programs within the college. 

3. A third use is that of identifying students who have deficiencies in specific 
skills, such as English usage and mathematics. 

Testing requirements for students seeking admission are listed in the admissions 
section of the catalog. Students seeking information about testing requirements for 
specific instructional programs should inquire in the appropriate instructional divi- 
sion or the Counseling Center. 

Foreign Students 

Special services for foreign students are coordinated by the foreign student 
adviser. These services include legal problems concerning visa status and em- 
ployment; orientation to academic procedures and requirements; advisement re- 
lated to finances, to social standards and customs; and to resources and oppor- 
tunities offered by campus and community. 

International Programs 

Information concerning study opportunities for American students in foreign 
universities is available in the Counseling Center. The foreign student adviser 
coordinates the selection of students applying for admission to one of the inter- 
national programs operated by the California State Colleges in eight foreign 
countries. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships are available for outstanding students. Qualified 
students should obtain scholarship applications from the Financial Aid Office, 
Room 278, Letters and Science Building, and return by April 15 for the fall semes- 
ter and December 15 for the spring semester. Scholarship applications are evalu- 
ated by the Financial Aids Review Committee. Awards are based on scholastic 
record, financial need and personal qualifications. Some scholarships are limited 


38 


Loans 


to students majoring in specified disciplines. Departmental recommendations weigh 
heavily in such cases. 

Scholarships offered by California State College at Fullerton are made possible 
by interested organizations, business firms and individuals. Recent contributors to 
the scholarship program include: 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc. 

California State Employees Association (CSCF Chapter) 

Edward Mittleman Memorial Scholarship 
Epsilon Lambda Chapter, Epsilon Sigma Alpha Sorority 
Fourth District, California Parents and Teachers Association 
Fullerton District Board of Realtors 
Fullerton Rotary Club 

Gamma Phi Beta Sorority (Orange County Alumnae) 

Kiwanis Club of Greater Fullerton 

Las Damas Club of Whittier 

Los Amigos Club of Fullerton 

Orange County Art Association 

Orange Empire National Bank, Anaheim 

Sadie D. Landon Music Scholarship Fund 

Society of California Accountants (Orange County Chapter) 

Loans 

The generosity of organizations and individuals enables the college to offer short- 
term loans to students who meet unexpected financial diflficulties of a temporary 
nature. Loans from these funds are made for various periods of time and to specified 
categories of students, according to college regulations and the wishes of the 
donors. The prime purpose of these loans is to meet educationally related expenses, 
^nd thus loans cannot be made for the purposes which are normally financed by 
private lending institutions. Application for a short-term loan may be made at any 
time during the school year. 

The following is a listing of the loan funds available during the 1966-67 school 
year: 

Altrusa Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 
Brea Rotary Club Loan Fund 

California Retired Teachers Association (Laura Settle Fund) 

Kenneth G. Ryhal Memorial Loan Fund 

Laura E. Imhoff Memorial Loan Fund 

Pan-Hellenic Club of Northern Orange County Loan Fund 

Rotary Club of Fullerton, Foreign Students Loan Fund 

Soroptimist International Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 

Student Emergency Loan Fund 

Trust-Davis Memorial Loan Fund 

Zonta Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 

California State College at Fullerton joins with the federal government and the 
State of California in making long-term, low-interest loans available to students 
under the National Defense Education Act. Details and applications are available 
at the Financial Aid Office. Deadlines for submissions of applications are December 
1 for the spring semester, April 1 for the summer sessions and August 1 for the 
fall semester. 

All first-time applicants for an NDEA loan are required to file a parents’ confi- 
dential statement with the College Scholarship Service, Box 1025, Berkeley 94701, 
designating California State College at Fullerton as one of the recipients. The 
parents’ confidential statement assists the college to evaluate financial need, and. 


39 


Loans 


since it must be on hand before the loan application can be acted upon, early 
submission is advised. These forms can be obtained at most secondary schools 
or at the Financial Aid Office. 

United Student Aid Funds 

Long-term loans are also available under the United Student Aid Funds program 
to assist students who have completed their freshman year. United Student Aid 
Funds, Inc., a private, nonprofit corporation, will endorse loans to students upon 
recommendation by the college. 

A maximum of $1,000 per year, or a combined total of $3,000, may be borrowed 
for undergraduate or graduate education. The loan is repaid in 36 monthly install- 
ments, beginning the fifth month after the student leaves school. Maximum interest 
rate is 6 percent simple. Applications and additional information are available at 
the Financial Aid Office. 


40 


ADMISSION AND 
REGISTRATION 


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

REGISTRATION 
ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 


• All prospective students must file an application for admission and other related 
documents not later than the published deadline date for the semester for which 
admission is being sought. Permission to register requires authorization from the 
Office of Admisisons. No student may attend any class without written verification 
of acceptance and without registering. 

Procedures for Admission 

All students, both full-time and part-time, will be required to matriculate.* 

(1) Submit a completed application for admission accompanied by the $5 
required application fee. 

(2) Have the high school of graduation send directly to the California State 
College at Fullenon a transcript of record. 

(3) Have each college attended (if any) send directly to California State Col- 
lege at Fullerton a transcript of record. 

(4) If required, submit the scores from one of the two national testing programs 
described below. 

(5) Submit health history and physical examination forms to the Student Health 
Center. Complete other requirements. 

Sf a foment of Residence 

A statement of residence must be completed for each student, day or evening. 
No student in continuous attendance during successive semesters is required to file 
a statement of residence after the initial filing. Any break in attendance, how- 
ever, does require a new statement of residence. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for admission to California State College at Fullerton are in accord- 
ance with Title 5, Clhapter 5, Subchapter 2 of the California Administrative Code 
as amended by the Board of Trustees of the California State College on January 
21, 1965. A prospective applicant who is unsure of his status under these require- 
ments is encouraged to consult with a school or college counselor or to contact the 
college admission office. 

Admission as a Freshman 

An applicant who has had no college work will be considered for admission 
under one of the following provisions. Except as noted, submission of the results 
of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACTT) is 
required. 

California High School Graduates and Residents 
An applicant who is a graduate of a California high school or a legal resident 
for tuition purposes must have a grade point average and total or composite score 
on the SAT or ACT which provides an eligibility index placing him among the 
upper one-third of California high school graduates. The grade point average is 
based upon the last three years and does not include physical education or mili- 

* Persons seeking only audit credit must file the application for admission and required health 
documents. No application fee, transcripts, or test scores are required. Graduates of accred- 
ited institutions who are not seeking a degree or credential need not file transcripts. 


43 


Admission Regulations 


tary science. The table below does not cover every case, but gives several examples 
of the test score needed with a given grade point average to be eligible for admis- 
sion.* 


Grade point average 


(SAT/ACT) needed 


3.20 and above 
2.80 
2.40 
2.00 

1.99 and below 


Eligible with any score 
796/18 
1,196/26 
1,596/34 
Not eligible 


Nonresidents Graduating From High Schools in Other States or Possessions 
An applicant who is a nonresident for tuition purposes and who is a graduate 
of a high school in another state or a U.S. possession must have an eligibility index 
which would place him among the upper one-sixth of California high school 
graduates. 

Non-high-school Graduates 

An applicant who is over 21 years of age, but has not graduated from high 
school will be considered for admission only when his preparation in all other 
ways is such that the college believes his promise of academic success is equivalent 
to that of eligible California high school graduates. 

Other Applicants 

An applicant not admissible under one of the above provisions should enroll in 
a junior college or other appropriate institution. Only under the most unusual 
circumstances will such applicants be permitted to enroll in the college. Permis- 
sion is granted only by special action. 

Recommended Preparation 

Overall excellence of performance in high school subjects and evidence of aca- 
demic potential provide the basis for admission at California State College at 
Fullerton. While no course pattern is required, the applicant to be prepared 
properly to undertake a full program of studies and particularly to pursue the 
required program in general education, is strongly encouraged to include the 
following subjects as minimally adequate background for college work: 

1. College preparatory English. 

2. Foreign language. 

3. College preparatory mathematics. 

4. College preparatory laboratory science. 

5. College preparatory history and/or social science. 

6. Study in speech, music, art, and other subjects contributing to general academic 
background. 


Admission of Undergraduate Transfers 

An applicant who meets the requirements for admission with freshman standing 
and who has earned credit in one or more accredited junior colleges, colleges, or 
universities may be admitted if he has a grade-point average of 2.0 (grade C on a 
five-point scale) or better in the total program attempted at such colleges or 
universities and is in good standing at the last degree-granting college or university 
attended. 

* For 1966-67, the minimum eligibility index is CSAT-3596) (ACT-738). It is computed by 
(muldplying grade point average by 1,000 and adding it to the total SAT score) (multiply- 
ing grade i>oint average by 200 and adding it to 10 times the composite ACT score). 


44 


Admission Regulations 


An applicant who does not meet the requirements for admission with freshman 
standing must as a condition for admission have earned 60 or more units of college 
credit with a grade-point average of 2.0 (grade C on a five-point scale) or better 
in the total program attempted and must be in good standing as noted above. 

Admission of Graduate Students 

All graduate students initially will be admitted in unclassified status. This admis- 
sion requires only submission of proof of an acceptable bachelor’s degree from an 
accredited college or university; or equivalent academic preparation, as determined 
by the college. 

Admission with unclassified status does not constitute admission to graduate 
degree or credential curricula. Students seeking master’s degrees should consult 
“Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” page 64, and students seeking credentials 
should refer to the School of Education section of this catalog. It is essential that 
students determine their degree or credential objectives as soon as possible, even 
though they are taking prerequisite courses. 

Admission of Foreign Students 

At the present, the college usually does not accept foreign student applicants 
directly from foreign countries, with certain very rare exceptions. Only two cate- 
gories of foreign students will normally be accepted: 

(1) Those who have completed a two-year transfer program in a junior college 
in the United States with a good academic record. 

(2) Those who have completed a bachelor’s degree in an accredited college in 
the United States and wish to enroll as graduate students. 

Application procedures are the same as for other students, except that foreign 
language transcripts must be accompanied by certified English translations. 

Admission From Nonaccredited Colleges 

An applicant who has attended a nonaccredited college or university may be 
considered for admission to the college if he meets the standards listed for transfers 
from accredited colleges and universities. 

Admission on Academic Probation 

An applicant who does not meet the requirements set forth above is eligible for 
admission on probation with advanced undergraduate standing if, in the opinion of 
the proper college authorities, he is likely to succeed in an academic program. 

Ordinarily, consideration for probationary admission is granted only to the 
mature applicant who, while his total college record does not meet the admission 
requirements, has demonstrated good academic ability through recently completed 
college work elsewhere. 

Applicants who are admitted with a grade-point deficiency are given probationary 
status and are expected to remove the entrance deficiency during the first year at 
the college. Any student admitted on probationary status may be restricted by his 
adviser to a limited program. 

Admission of Auditors 

A properly qualified student may apply as an auditor and register in classes 
without credit, provided there is space left in the course. An auditor need not meet 
the regular academic standards for admission, but must file an application (foi 
which there is no fee) and allied documents and pay the same registration fees as 
regular students. An auditor may not change his registration to obtain credit. An 


45 


Admission Regulations 

auditor cannot be permitted to take examinations in the course. No credit will be 
granted toward a degree or credential for audited courses. Change of registration 
from credit to audit is not permitted after the sixth week of instruction. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Admission to the college as a student does not constitute admission to the teaching 
credential program. Students who plan to work toward teaching credentials must 
apply to the School of Education during their first semester of attendance. Details 
are available from the School of Education. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student who is admitted to the college for a given semester but who does not 
register in the specified semester will have his admission canceled. The student must 
file a new application form when he again seeks admission and must meet the then 
current admission requirements. 

Readmission 

Students in “good standing” may be readmitted to the college after an absence 
of one or more semesters by filing a new application for admission. Unless the 
student has applied for and been granted a formal leave of absence, the catalog 
requirements in effect at the time of readmission will be ruling. Students who have 
attended another institution since their last attendance at California State College 
at Fullerton must have a transcript of their record from that institution sent directly 
to the Office of Admissions. 

A student may apply to the Office of Admissions for readmission after academic 
disqualification after an absence of one or more semesters. 

Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshmen and transfer students who 
have demonstrated outstanding achievement in past academic work. For first-time 
freshmen with no previous college units earned, a grade-point average of 3.5 on a 
5-point scale must be earned in the coursework considered for admission to the 
college. Students who have completed less than 60 college semester units of credit 
must meet the grade-point average criteria for first-time freshmen and must also 
have earned a 3.5 grade-point average on all this past college work attempted. 
Students who have completed 60 or more semester college units are eligible if a 
grade-point average of 3.5 is earned in all college work completed. 

The Summer Session Student 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the 
same as in the regular session, the college does not require an advance application 
or transcripts from students registering for credit courses in the summer session. 
However, students must be high school graduates and are expected to have satisfied 
the prerequisites for the courses in which they register. Admission to summer 
session does not grant admission to the regular session. 

Undergraduate Entrance Testing Requirements 
All undergraduate students, who have completed less than 60 semester or 90 
quarter units of college work, are required to submit scores from either ONE of 
two national testing programs before eligibility for admission to the college can be 
determined. This requirement DOES NOT affect undergraduate students who 
have previously attended California State College at Fullerton and who have sub- 
mitted ACT or SAT scores at the time of their first admission. 


46 


Admission Regulations 


Tests will be administered at established test centers. Dates that tests are given 
and location of established test centers may be obtained from high school and 
junior college counseling offices, the Testing Office at this college (Room 264, 
Letters and Science Building), or by writing to the testing services. The addresses 
of the testing services are: 

American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 21-4127, Sacramento 95821 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 1025, Berkeley 94701 

T o take one of these tests: 

1. Obtain a registration form and a Student Information Bulletin from your high 
school or junior college counselor, from one of the addresses above, or from 
the Cal State-Fullerton Testing Center (Room S-264). Select a test center near 
your home from the list printed in the Bulletin. 

2. Send the completed registration form and the appropriate test fee to the proper 
address. DO NOT SEND TO THE FULLERTON CAMPUS. 

3. Have your ACTT or SAT scores reported to the Testing Center, California 
State College at Fullerton. These scores should be received before the deadline 
for application. Use the appropriate code number for score reports. 

If you have already taken either the ACT or SAT send $1 to the appropriate 
testing agency and request that your scores be reported to the Testing Center. 
Use appropriate code number when requesting such reports, and provide complete 
information concerning testing date, test center, name and address changes, etc. 
These test scores when included on high school or college transcripts are NOT 
acceptable. 

Health Requirements for Admission 

Undergraduate znd, graduate students registering for seven units or more of credit 
must, upon admission, submit completed health history and physical examination 
forms. In addition, evidence of a negative chest X-ray taken within 12 months 
before their registration must be presented. A tuberculin skin test may be obtained 
in lieu of an X-ray without cost at the Student Health Center. Evidence of a 
smallpox vaccination within the past five years is also required. 

Undergraduate and graduate students registering for six units or less of credit in 
any one semester must comply with the following: 

1. Filing a minimum informational form with the health center. 

2. Presenting evidence of a negative chest X-ray or a negative tuberculin skin 
test, signed by a physician, nurse, or public health department official and 
dated not more than 12 months prior to the date of registration at Cali- 
fornia State College at Fullerton. 

3. Evidence of a smallpox vaccination within the past five years. 

All health requirements must be satisfactorily completed before the student 
will be allowed to pay his fees at registration. It is urged that the health clearance 
be obtained before the date of registration as this will conserve the student’s regis- 
tration time in considerable measure. 

EVALUATIONS 

Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

The Office of Admissions will evaluate previous college work in terms of its 
relationship to the requirements of California State College at Fullerton. All degree 
and credential candidates will be issued a credit summary, which serves as a basis 
for determining specific remaining requirements for the student’s specific objectives. 


47 


Admission Regulations 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as long as the student ma- 
triculates at the date specified, pursues the objective specified, and remains in 
continuous attendance. The student will not be held to additional graduation re- 
quirements unless such requirements become mandatory as a result of changes in 
the California Administrative Code or the California Education Code. If the 
student does not remain in continuous attendance and has not applied for and been 
granted a formal leave of absence, the evaluation issued upon readmission will 
specify the remaining requirements for the student’s specific objectives. 

In view of the foregoing regulations, the student should notify the Office of 
Admissions immediately if he changes the objective specified in his evaluation. 
While the evaluation for a student remains valid, the student is held responsible 
for complying with all changes in regulations and procedures which may appear 
in subsequent catalogs. 

Acceptance of Credit 

Credit for work completed at accredited institutions will be accepted toward 
the satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at the college within limi- 
tations of residence requirements, junior college transfer maximums, and course 
applicability. 

General Policy 

Transfer credit is not limited to those courses which precisely parallel the 
courses offered at the college. Credit is normally granted for all courses completed 
at other accredited institutions which reasonably correspond to one of the various 
curricula described in this catalog. Courses which do not appear to correspond 
with offerings at the college are ordinarily not granted transfer credit. Courses 
in vocational or shop-type courses, and remedial courses are examples of courses 
not accepted for transfer credit. Students who have completed work at professional 
schools in the field of art or music or similar fields may expect a reduction in credit 
if the work completed carries a credit value in excess of that normally allowed for 
corresponding courses or areas at the college. 

Transfer of Credit From a Junior College 

Upper division credit is not allowed for courses taken in a junior college. Cre- 
dential credit is not allowed for courses in professional education taken in a junior 
college. This does not invalidate credit for preprofessional courses taken at a 
junior college, such as introduction to education, art or design, arithmetic and/or 
music for classroom teachers. After a student has completed 70 units of college 
credit, whether at a junior college or a four-year institution, or at both, no further 
junior college units will be accepted for unit credit. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in military service for at least a year may be granted 
six units of credit. Courses taken in service schools may be given credit on the 
basis of an evaluation which determines that they are of college level. Any credit 
for military experience will be given only upon request. Records verifying such 
experience must be filed with the Office of Admissions. 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence and extension courses 
which may be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree is 24 units, of which not more 
than 12 may be transferred from another college or university. 


48 


Admission Regulations 


Credit by Advanced Placement 

Students who have successfully completed courses in the advanced placement 
program (defined as receiving a score of 3, 4 or 5) shall be granted credit toward 
graduation, advanced placement in the college’s sequence courses, and credit for 
curriculum requirements. 

Credit by Examination 

Students may be granted credit for a course toward graduation and to meet 
curriculum requirements by the satisfactory completion of a challenge examina- 
tion in that course requirement. The examinations are to be comprehensive and 
administered by the department in which the course is offered. Well in advance 
of the challenge examination the student will secure written approval of his major 
adviser and the chairman of the department iq which the course is offered. Upon 
the successful completion of the examination, the notation on the permanent 
record of the student will be made as “CR” for the course. “CR” is to indicate 
credit for the course with a passing grade. Upon failure of the examination, the 
notation on the permanent record of the student will be made as “No CR” for 
the course. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum resi- 
dence requirements. The challenge examination for any course may be attempted 
only once. A maximum of 30 credits can be earned by challenge examination, 
including those achieved by advanced placement. 


49 


REGISTRATION 


Orientation 

An orientation program for new students is conducted at the beginning of the 
registration period each semester. At this time, information relating to academic 
planning, student services and activities, and other aspects of college life as well 
as opportunities for student questions are provided. 

Registration 

Registration is the final step in enrollment. When a student has been admitted by 
the Office of Admissions, he should obtain a Class Schedule before the beginning 
of each semester and summer session. The Class Schedule contains details regarding 
courses offered and the registration schedule. Students consult with their assigned 
advisers during registration. 

At registration, every student is required to file a program card with the Office 
of the Registrar. The filing of a program card by the student and its acceptance 
by the college obligates the student to perform the designated work to the best 
of his ability. All undergraduates are urged to declare a major at the earliest 
practicable time and not later than at the time they have completed 60 units of col- 
lege work. Registration is not official until fees have been paid, and no student is 
allowed to attend classes until all steps in the registration process have been com- 
pleted. 

Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be announced in the Class 
Schedule. The college calendar in the front of this catalog contains 1966-1967 
registration dates. Late registrants will find themselves handicapped in arranging 
their programs and must by state law pay a $5 late registration fee in addition 
to regular fees. 

Change of Program 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses he selects and lists when 
he registers. Changes may not be made thereafter without the filing of a change 
of program form in the Office of the Registrar. All applications for courses 
dropped or added cost a $1 change of program fee. No classes may be dropped 
during the last two weeks of instruction, although complete withdrawal from col- 
lege is still possible. 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the college may enroll concurrently for additional courses 
at another institution only with advance written approval from the student’s aca- 
demic adviser. Permission will not be granted when the study load in the proposed 
combined program exceeds the units authorized at this college. 

VETERANS 

California State College at Fullerton is approved by the Bureau of Readjustment 
Education, State Department of Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking 
benefits under state and federal legislation. All students seeking veterans benefits 
must have a degree or credential objective. 


50 


Veterans, Selective Service 


Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in 
which the veteran plans to use these benefits in order to have the authorization 
at the time of registration. 

Monthly Certification 

Each month the veteran must obtain an Attendance Report Form from the 
veterans’ adviser. This form must be signed by each of the veteran’s instructors on 
the last class meeting of the month. This signature will verify satisfactory attend- 
ance for the month. When completed, the Attendance Report Form must be 
returned to the veterans’ adviser and the veteran must sign the IBM certification 
card that is forwarded to the VA. The Attendance Report Form must be returned 
to the veterans’ adviser on or before the fifth of the month to ensure receiving the 
subsistence check on time. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE REGULATIONS 

To qualify for deferment or postponement of military service under Selective 
Service regulations, a student usually must be registered as a full-time student, as 
defined by his local board. The college serves as a reporting agency only, and any 
decisions regarding a student’s Selective Service status will be made by the stu- 
dent’s local board. Certification of registration and attendance to the Selective 
Service Board is provided by the Registrar’s Office on request. 


FEES AND EXPENSES 

Application fee (nonrefundable) $5.00 

Registration Fees 

Regular students 

Materials and service fee $38.00 

Associated Students fee 9.00 

Total per semester . $47.00 

Limited students (1--6 units) 

Materials and service fee $19.50 

Associated Students fee 4.00 

Total per semester $23.50 

Music studio lesson fee 

Per semester $70.00 

Summer Session fees • 

Per unit or fraction of unit -. $18.50 

Associated Students fee 2.00 

Extension fees 

Per unit or fraction of unit ! $13.00-26.00 



Fees 


Other Fees or Charges 

Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees required of resident students, 
except for enrollment in extension or summer session) 

15 units or more per semester $300.00 

Less than 15 units, per unit or fraction of unit 20.00 

Nonresident foreign students (in addition to fees required of resident 
students) 

15 units or more per semester . . .. $127.50 

Less than 15 units, per unit or fraction of unit .. 8.50 

Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above)- 5.00 

Check returned from bank for any cause 2.00 

Change of program fee 1.00 

Transcript fee (no charge for first copy) . .. 1.00 

Failure to meet administrative required appointment or time limit (Special 
aptitude examinations, failure to keep appointments for health exam- 
ination, special final examinations) $2.00 


Auditors pay the same fees as others 

Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of the California State Colleges 

Refund of fees 

Upon withdrawal from college, the materials and service fee may be refunded 
if written application for refund, on forms provided by the college, is submitted 
to the Registrar not later than 14 days following the day of the term that instruction 
begins; provided that the amount of $2 shall be retained to cover the cost of 
registration. Late registration fees, change of program fees and application fees are 
not refundable. 

The entire fee may be refunded if a student is unable to continue his registration 
because of a college regulation or because of compulsory military service. Applica- 
tion for refund under such circumstances may be made at any time before the 
date when the student receives any academic credit for the courses for which he 
is registered. 

The difference between the applicable materials and service fee, less $2, may be 
refunded if the unit load of the student is reduced to a lower materials and service 
fee category within the 14 days following the day of the term that instruction 
begins. 


Parking fees 

Per semester (nonreserved spaces) : 

Semester pass „ $13.00 

Coin-operated parking gate — per admission 25 

Summer session 

6- week period — — 5.00 

4- week period 3.00 


Typical Student Expenses 

Although each student must determine his own budget in keeping with his 
individual needs and resources, the college does provide an estimate for what is 
considered one semester’s minimum expenses for a single student. Not included 
are transportation costs, since distance from home varies with each student. 


52 


Fees 


Students living 
in campus Commuting 

residence halls students 


Materials and service fee * $38 $38 

Associated Students fee 9 9 

Parking and health insurance fees.. 22 22 

Room and board (17 meals per week) 530 

Books and supplies t 60 60 

Clothing 50 50 

Miscellaneous 100 100 


$809 $279 


* Out-of-state students add $300. Music students add $70 for music lesson fee. 
t Art students should budget additional funds for supplies. 


53 


I 


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


All undergraduate students working toward a degree or credential are assigned 
an adviser in the major field. Those seeking a credential will also be assigned a 
professional adviser in the School of Education. 

Graduate students in all instructional areas except education will be assigned a 
major adviser. In education, all will have a professional adviser. Those students 
seeking a credential for teaching secondary schools will be assigned both a pro- 
fessional adviser and a major adviser. 

Advisers are assigned by department chairmen. The adviser is basically a resource 
person who will help the student plan his academic program so that he meets the 
requirements of the major or credential objective in the most desirable manner. 
While the adviser can provide valuable information and suggestions to the student, 
the ultimate responsibility for the program the student plans and the courses he 
chooses lies with the student himself. 


54 


REGULATIONS 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 

BACHELOR’S DEGREE 
THE PROGRAM OF MASTER’S DEGREES 


GENERAL REGULATIONS 


ENROLLMENT DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each college semester unit represents three hours of college work per week for 
one semester. Courses are of three types: 

(1) Lecture — one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory — three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. 

Classification in College 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 semester units of work are 
classified as freshmen, 30-59 semester units as sophomores, 60-89 semester units as 
juniors, and 90 or more as seniors. 

Study List Limits 

A student is normally permitted to enroll in a maximum of 16 units each semester 
(engineering students are excepted), with 12 units considered the rmrmnum full- 
time load. However, upon written approval of his adviser, the student may carry 
additional units. The foregoing limits apply to students who are attending college 
on a full-time basis. Students with outside responsibilities are strongly advised to 
reduce their study load. 

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Level Courses 
Graduate level (500) courses are organized primarily for graduate students. 
Undergraduate students may be permitted to enroll in a graduate level (500) 
course if: 

(a) They are within 9 units of completion of graduation requirements, or 

(b) They are exceptionaUy qualified seniors whose undergraduate work in the 
related field or fields has been of 3.5 grade-point average or better, and 
whose cumulative overall grade-point average is at least 3.25. 

Such cases shall require specific approval by the chairman of the department in 
which the course is offered and by the chairman of the student’s major department. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under (a) above may be applied to a gradu- 
ate program. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under (b) above may be applied to the under- 
graduate program only. 

GRADING PRACTICES 

Grading System 
Satisfactory grade 
C 

A IZ IZ.ZZIZZ 

Cr 


Grade-point value 

2 

3 

4 

— None assigned 


57 


i 


Grading Practices 


Unsatisfactory grade 

D 1 

F 0 

Special grade 

E (Incomplete) 0 

AU (Auditor) (no credit toward degree or credential) . . None assigned 

W (Passing withdrawal) None assigned 


With the exception of the grades of E, AU, W, and Cr, all units attempted are 
computed in the student’s grade-point average. 

Incomplete Work 

A grade of E may be given only when, in the opinion of the instructor, a stu- 
dent cannot complete a course during the semester of enrollment for reasons be- 
yond his control. Such reasons are assumed to include: illness of the student, or 
of members of his immediate family, extraordinary financial problems, loss of out- 
side position, and other such exigencies. In assigning a grade of E, the instructor 
will file with his department a statement of the specific requirements for comple- 
tion of coursework. Such requirements will not include or necessitate retaking 
the course. This statement will also include a provisional grade indicating the 
quality of work completed at that time, and the instructor’s designation of the time 
limit allowed for completion of course requirements. Upon later completion of the 
course requirements, or upon expiration of the time limits for completion of course 
requirements, the instructor shall initiate a change to a grade of A, B, C, D, or F. 
Instructional departments will determine procedures for completion of course 
requirements and assigning grades for such completed course work, in those spe- 
cial circumstances where the instructor is no longer available. 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the end 
of each semester. 

Student Writing 

Students will be required to demonstrate, in all classes where written expression 
is appropriate, their ability to write clearly and correctly about the materials of 
the course. Ability of a student to demonstrate writing proficiency shall be used 
as a part of the final grade determination in any course. 

Examinations 

Final examinations are required in all courses and are given at times scheduled 
by the college. No examination may be scheduled for a class at another time unless 
approved by the dean of the school. No makeup final examination will be given 
except for reason of illness or other verified emergencies. 

Repetition of Courses 

When a course is repeated, the units and grade points of the repetition are 
included in the grade-point average in addition to the units and grade points of 
the original course. When a course is repeated, where the original grade was 
passing, the repetition will carry no subject or unit credit toward a degree or cre- 
dential. Grade point deficiencies incurred in courses completed at California State 
College at Fullerton may not be made up by courses taken at other colleges. 


58 


Continuous Residency Regulations 


TRANSCRIPTS 

Upon request to the Office of the Registrar, each student will be provided with 
one official copy of his college record without charge. A charge of $1 will be made 
for each additional transcript requested by the student. No transcript will be 
supplied for college work taken in other institutions. 

CONTINUOUS RESIDENCY REGULATIONS 

Good Standing 

“Good standing” indicates that a student is eligible to continue or to return, and 
is free from financial obligation to the college and from disciplinary action. A 
student under academic or disciplinary disqualification is not eligible to receive a 
statement of “good standing” on transcripts issued by the college. 

Election of Regulations 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing 
on the same curriculum in a state college may, for purposes of meeting graduation 
requirements, elect to meet the graduation requirements in effect either at the time 
of his entering the curriculum o*r at the time of his graduation therefrom, except 
that substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the 
proper college authorities. 

Leave of Absence 

When circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as illness or military 
service, make it impossible to remain in continuous attendance at the college, a 
leave of absence can be given upon approval of a petition for such a leave. This 
action protects the student’s rights in effect at the time he ceases attendance. It is 
the responsibility of the student to file the required form in the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

Policy on Grades for Withdrawal 

Withdrawal from, or neglect of, any course entered in the program card, or a 
change of program (including a change of section of the same course) without the 
formal permission of the Office of the Registrar , may result in a grade of F. 

Through the sixth week of instruction in the semester, the grade for formal 
dropping of a class will be an automatic W. Beginning with the seventh week, 
students are expected to complete all courses. However, if the student must drop 
a course, because of ill health or other unforeseen problems beyond his control 
prohibiting his normal attention to the course, he may do so and receive a W if 
(a) he is doing satisfactory work in the course and (b) he has the written approval 
of the instructor in the course, and (c) he formally drops the class in the Office 
of the Registrar. 

No classes may be dropped during the last two weeks of instruction, although 
complete withdrawal from college will still be possible. 

Complete withdrawal from the college follows the above regulations except that 
written approval of the instructor is not required. 

If, due to unusual circtmistances, the student does not comply with the above 
regulations, he may receive a grade of W, if he was doing satisfactory work when 
he ceased attending class, by one of the following procedures: 

(a) By the initiation by the instructor of the class of a withdrawal; 

(b) By initiation by the student of a petition for withdrawal with the written 
permission of the instructor. 


59 


Student Honors 


Complete Withdrawal From College 

Students who wish to withdraw from the college must complete a withdrawal 
from college card. Sec section on refund of fees for possible refunds. No student 
may withdraw after the date shown on the college calendar as the last day of 
instruction. 

STUDENT HONORS 

Dean's List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list 
of students whose grade-point average for the previous term has been 3.5 or better. 
Students are notified in writing by the dean of students when they have earned 
this distinction. Eligibility is based on a minimum of 12 units of course work. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation have been defined by the Faculty Council in three classi- 
fications: 

With honors . GPA 3.5 

With high honors GPA 3.85 

With highest honors ^ GPA 4.0 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Academic Probation 

Academic probation serves to identify and to bring to the attention of appro- 
priate college authorities a student who is experiencing academic difficulties. 

A student shall be placed upon academic probation if either his cumulative grade- 
point average or his grade-point average at California State College at Fullerton 
falls below 2.0 (grade of C on five-point scale). The student shall be advised of 
probation status promptly and, except in unusual instances, before the end of the 
first week of instruction of the next consecutive enrollment period. 

A student shall be removed from the probation list and restored to good standing 
when he earns a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 (C) in all academic w’ork 
attempted, and in all such work attempted at California State College at Fullerton. 

Academic Disqualification 

Academic disqualification gives the student an opportunity to review carefully 
his educational experiences away from the college environment. This “break” will 
normally be imposed before the student’s record has reached the point where it 
will preclude a continuation of his educational program later. Usually, students 
whose records fall into the following categories will be subject to disqualification: 

1. As a lower division student (less than 60 semester hours of college work com- 
pleted) if he falls 15 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all 
college units attempted or in all units attempted at this college. 

2. As a junior (60 to 89 semester hours of college work completed) if he falls 
9 or. more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted 
or in all units attempted at this college. 

3. As a senior (90 or more semester hours of college work completed) if he falls 
6 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted 
or in all units attempted at this college. 

4. As a graduate (unclassified or classified) if he falls below a 2.0 (C) average in 
all units attempted at this college following graduation. 


60 


Petition 


Student Conduct 

The college properly assumes that all students are in attendance to secure a sound 
education and that they will conduct themselves as mature citizens of the campus 
community. Compliance with not only the common law but with all regulations 
of the college is therefore expected. If, however, on any occasion a student or an 
organization is known to have compromised accepted standards of conduct and 
good taste, appropriate disciplinary action must be taken by authorities of the 
college. Conduct which is prejudicial to the good name of the institution by any 
student or student group will not under any circumstances be tolerated or over- 
looked. Every effort will be made to encourage and support the development of 
self-discipline and control by students and student organizations. The dean of 
students, aided by all members of the faculty and advised by the Student Affairs 
Committee of the faculty, is responsible to the president of the college for the 
behavior of students in their relationships to the college. The president in turn 
is responsible to the Chancellor and the Trustees of the California State Colleges 
who themselves are governed by specific laws of the State of California. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students may petition for review of certain college academic regulations when 
unusual circumstances exist. In such instances, students are requested to file a 
petition on a form designated for this purpose in the Office of Admissions and 
Records. All petitions must first be reviewed and signed by the student’s adviser. 
The Petitions Committee will then act on the petition and the student will be 
notified of this decision. A copy of the action will also be placed in the student’s 
folder in the Office of the Registrar. 

Students also have the right to appeal certain disciplinary actions taken by 
appropriate college authorities. Regulations governing original hearings and appeal 
rights and procedures have been carefully detailed to provide maximum protection 
to both the individual charged and the college community. Information about the 
operation of the judicial system involving student discipline may be obtained in 
the Office of the Dean of Students. 


61 


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR^S DEGREE 


A student is eligible for graduation if he is in good standing and fulfills the 
following requirements: 

L General Education 

To be eligible for the bachelor’s degree from California State College at F'uller- 
ton, the candidate shall have completed a minimum of 50 semester units of general 
education including at least six units in upper division courses. The courses in 
general education shall be distributed in the following manner: 

Units 

(a) Social sciences 12 

The social sciences shall include required instruction in U.S. history 
(Hist 170 A or Hist 170B), U.S. Constitution and California state and 
local government and American ideals (Pol Sci 100 or a combination of 
Pol Sci 101 and Pol Sci 311), and courses in anthropology, economics, 
geography, history, political science, sociology, and similar fields. 
Courses must be selected from three or more of these fields. 

(b) Natural sciences 9 

The natural sciences shall include at least one course selected from the 
physical sciences and at least one from the biological sciences. The 
physical sciences include astronomy, chemistry, geology and physics. 

The biological sciences include biology, botany, physiology and zoology. 

(c) Humanities 12 

The humanities shall include a year of instruction in college-level Eng- 
lish composition and literature. The remaining units may be chosen 
from the following subject fields: comparative literature, communica- 
tions, English, philosophy, and advanced courses in French, German, 


Spanish, or other foreign languages. 

(d) Fine and applied arts 9 

The fine and applied arts shall include a course in oral communication. 
Additional courses shall be chosen from the following subject areas: 
art, drama and music. 

(e) Psychology - — 3 

This should be the standard introductory course in psychology. 

(f) Economics or mathematics 3 


Either a course in college mathematics which would have as its pre- 
requisite a minimum of two years of high school mathematics or its 
equivalent, or a college-level introductory course in economics will 
meet this requirement. 

(g) Health and physical education 2 

A minimum of two units required by completing four semesters of ac- 
tivity courses which include instruction in health education. Not more 
than one activity course within any one semester may be counted 
toward general education. Credit in intercollegiate athletics courses 
may meet not more than two semesters of the college general educa- 
tion requirement in physical education. Not more than six units of 
credit in physical education activities courses, including intercollegiate 
athletics, may be applied toward credit for graduation. (Persons who 


62 


Bachelor's Degree 


Units 

are over 25 years of age are not required to enroll for courses in physical 
education.) — 

Total 50 

(The above requirements apply to all students who began college-level work 
in any institution in or after the fall semester of 1963. Students who began college- 
level work before the fall semester of 1963 must complete the general education 
requirements outlined in Title 5 of the State Education Code.) 

All baccalaureate degree programs of the college will be expected to meet the 
college general education requirements. However, for certain degree programs, 
other than the bachelor of arts degree, where accreditation or certification may 
require a higher proportion of professional course work, the general education 
requirements as set forth by Title 5, California State Code, may be substituted for 
the college general education requirement^, after due consideration of the alterna- 
tive possibility of expanding the required number of units in the particular degree 
program. 

2. Un/fs 

(a) Total units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for graduation with a bachelor 
of arts degree. The Bachelor of Science in Engineering requires a minimum 
of 136 semester units. 

(b) Upper division units 

Completion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Resident units 

Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residence, is required. At 
least one-half of these units must be completed among the last 20 semester 
units counted toward the degree. Extension credit, or credit by examination, 
may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement. 

3. Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted, 
including those accepted by transfer from another institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted at 
the college granting the degree. 

4. Major 

Ck)mpletion of all requirements for a major as specified by appropriate college 
authority is required. 

5. Minor 

Completion of a minor field is not required for the baccalaureate degree at this 
time. 

6. Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation should file an application for a graduation require- 
ment check in the Office of the Registrar by the end of the fifth week of the 
semester prior to the semester in which he expects to graduate. No graduation 
requirement check should be requested unless and until the senior has completed 
100 semester hours (including the current work in progress). If the candidate does 
not complete the requirements in the semester indicated, he must request a second 
graduation check indicating the new date. 

7. Approval and Recommendation of the Faculty of the College 


63 


THE PROGRAM OF MASTER'S DEGREES 


Master’s degree programs offered at California State College at Fullerton are 
listed on page 71 and are described in the appropriate section of this catalog 
under “College Curricula.” The programs also arc described in the Graduate 
Bullewiy copies of which are available in the Office of Admissions and the Grad- 
uate Studies Office. 

Master’s degrees in other areas arc under consideration and will be announced 
when and if approved. 

General Requirements for the Master's Degree 

General requirements for the master’s degree are 30 semester units of approved 
course work completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average and within 
seven years. Of the 30 units of approved coursework: 

1. No less than 12 shall be in exclusively graduate (500-series) courses. 

2. No more than a total of six shall be in extension and/or transfer credit. 

3. Nor more than six shall be allowed for a thesis, though a thesis is optional 
in some programs. 

Some type of final evaluation, near the end of the student’s work toward his 
master’s degree, is required. It may be a thesis, a project, a comprehensive exami- 
nation, or any combination of these. 

These requirements, except for that concerning “final evaluation,” are drawn 
from the California Administrative Code and apply to all master’s programs in 
all the Califortiia State Colleges. Each master’s degree program has its own 
special requirements. 

Steps in the AAaster's Degree Program 
7. Admission to the College 

Admission is not uniquely a graduate requirement. Every student who wishes 
to begin work at California State College at Fullerton or to resume work after an 
interruption of one semester or more without an authorized “leave of absence” 
must apply for admission to the college. A student who begins graduate work not 
later than the semester succeeding the date of his graduation (baccalaureate) from 
(^CF need not apply for admission; he is a continuing student. The admission 
procedure is described elsewhere in this catalog. 

Once a student who has a bachelor’s degree is admitted to CSCF, he is auto- 
matically an unclassified graduate student. To become a classified student — that is, 
one who has been accepted into a master’s degree program — he must undertake 
certain further steps and satisfy certain further requirements as listed below. 

2. Declaration of Objective 

“Objective” is the particular master’s program the student wishes to enter and 
within that program the particular concentration or emphasis, if any. A student 
may declare his objective by filling in the appropriate space on the application 
form for admission to the college. If he has not done so, or if he is a continuing 
student (or if he has changed his objective), he may declare his objective by 
filling out a change of objective card in the Admissions and Records Office. 

3. Securing Transcripts 

Before a student’s undergraduate preparation for a master’s degree program can 
be evaluated, his adviser must have access to the transcripts of the student’s pre- 


64 


Masfer^s Degree 


vious academic work. It is the student’s responsibility to write to all of the insti- 
tutions of higher learning he has previously attended, requesting that two copies 
of his transcripts be sent to the CSCF Office of Admissions and Records. (One 
copy will be kept in that office; the other will be sent to the department of the 
degree program.) A continuing student must request the Office of Admissions and 
Records to relay to the department of the degree program a transcript of his 
CSCF record. 

4. Taking Tests 

Every master’s program requires the student to take certain tests — usually some 
part of the Graduate Record Examination — before he can be considered for classi- 
fied status. (See program descriptions in this catalog for the types of tests re- 
quired.) The GRE tests are nationally administered and are given only a few 
times a year on specified dates. They may be taken at CSCF — through the services 
of the Office of Counseling and Testing — on only three dates during the year. 
Those dates may be ascertained at the Office of Counseling and Testing or depart- 
mental offices. The student must make written application for the tests on a form 
available at the above offices and he must do so not less than 15 days before the 
test is to be given. Since test results are measured against those of students who 
normally take the tests in their senior year and since they are required before the 
student can be admitted to a degree program (that is, become a classified student), 
the taking of the tests should not be deferred. 

There is no arbitrary level above which scores on tests are satisfactory. In 
making their decisions on a student’s eligibility for a master’s degree program, 
departmental graduate committees consider a combination of factors including, 
besides test scores, the student’s undergraduate record and his performance in 
such postgraduate courses as he may have taken. 

The above two steps should be taken as soon as possible and may be taken 
before the student registers for his first postgraduate courses. Unless he takes the 
steps, the student cannot be classified, and he can have no surety that the courses 
he takes before he is classified will be retroactively applied to his program for 
the master's degree. 

5. Informal Advisement 

This step is necessary only for students who wish to enroll in or who have 
enrolled in postgraduate courses before securing transcripts and taking required 
tests. It is accomplished by the student’s making an appointment with a graduate 
adviser at the appropriate departmental office. The kind of counsel an adviser can 
give at this point is necessarily tentative and cannot be construed as establishing a 
contract between department and student. If the student brings his own copies of 
transcripts with him to the conference, his adviser can be more specific in his 
suggestions, but he can make no formal decisions on the basis of “hand-carried” 
transcripts. 

6. Application for Classified Status 

When the student has allowed sufficient time for his transcripts to arrive and 
no sooner than thirty days after taking his required tests, he should fill out an 
application for classified graduate status card in the Office of Admissions and 
Records and make an appointment through the appropriate departmental office 
with a graduate adviser. In the ensuing conference the first and, if feasible, both 
of the following processes will be accomplished: 


3_66198 


65 


Master's Degree 


a. Evaluation of the student's prerequisites and assignment of courses 
required, if any, to remove deficiences. 

Generally a student must have the equivalent of a CSCF undergraduate 
major in his intended field before he can be admitted to a master’s degree 
program. Most departments also require a specified undergraduate grade-point 
average in either major or all course work. If the student lacks certain courses 
they will be listed on a form, a copy of which will be sent to the student. 
If the student’s undergraduate GPA is below standard, he may be allowed to 
take certain courses, listed on the same form, in which he must earn a B 
average before his entering a master’s program. Coursework undertaken to 
satisfy quantitative or qualitative deficiencies cannot be applied toward a 
master’s degree. Provisions for the student’s fulfilling certain other depart- 
mental requirements, if any, such as foreign language competence, will be 
made. 

b. Drawing up a study plan of coursework and other requirements leading 
to the master's degree. 

The student will work out with his adviser a study plan on which the courses 
or types of courses that he will take are listed. The student will be sent a copy 
of the study plan. 

The above processes may be accomplished in one meeting if the student need 
make up no deficiencies or if the amount of prerequisite work is so limited that 
it may be undertaken concurrently, and at the earliest opportunity, with work on 
the master’s program. If his deficiencies are extensive but remediable he must 
remove them through successful completion of assigned coursework, after which, 
in another meeting, he may work out a study plan with his adviser. If his defi- 
ciencies, in test results as well as in quality of previous coursework, are such that 
he may be ineligible to enter a master’s program, his case will be considered by 
an appropriate departmental committee and he will be notified of their decision. 

After the above processes are completed a departmental committee will act on 
the student’s request for classified status and the student will be notified through 
the Graduate Studies Office of the committee’s decision. In no case will a student 
be recommended jor classified status if his GPA in all the postgraduate coursework 
that he may have undertaken at CSCF is below 3.0. 

7. Advancement to Candidacy 

Upon completion of 12 units of coursework on his master’s degree study plan 
the student should apply for advancement to candidacy by filling out an advance- 
ment to candidacy card in the Office of Admissions and Records. A departmental 
committee will review the student’s record and the student will be notified whether 
his application has been approved, deferred, or denied. Bases for approval are a 
minimum grade point average of 3.0 in graduate coursework and satisfactory 
progress in such other requirements as the department may impose, such as thesis 
or project. 

8. Successful Fulfillment of Study Plan Requirements 

The student must complete the courses on his study plan with at least a 3.0 
grade-point average. A student may, with the written consent of his adviser, 
substitute certain courses in his study plan if he does so before registering for the 
courses. No course may be removed from a study plan after the student has taken 
it. A student may take a course or courses which are not intended as part of his 
requirements for the master’s degree, and the grades in which will not be averaged 
in his GPA, only if he informs his adviser in writing of his intention before 
registering for a course or courses. 


66 


Master's Degree 


If a student approaches the end of his master’s career with less than a 3.0 average, 
he may petition his adviser to be allowed to add no more than 6 units of course- 
work to his study plan to extend his chances of attaining a 3.0 average. 

If a student’s average at any time falls below such a level that it cannot be raised 
to a 3.0 within the prescribed limits of course work, he has in effect withdrawn 
himself from his master’s program. 

9. Final Steps 

At the beginning of his last semester or session, the student must fill out a request 
for graduation check card at the Office of Admissions and Records. He must also 
have consulted with his adviser concerning the fulfillment of thesis and project 
requirements (if any) and make arrangements for taking his comprehensive exam- 
ination. Upon the student’s successful completion of all requirements the depart- 
mental committee will recommend the awarding of the degree. 

GRADUATE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Leave of Absence 

Students who are unable to maintain continuous attendance because of circum- 
stances beyond their control, such as illness or military service, should petition 
on a form available in the Office of Admissions and Records for a leave of absence. 
Unless such a petition is granted, students returning after absence must reapply for 
admission and, when readmitted, will come under regulations of the current catalog. 

Graduate Credit for Seniors 

Students in the last semester of their senior year may petition on a form available 
in the Office of Admissions and Records to receive postgraduate credit for such 
current coursework as is not required for the bachelor’s degree. 

A senior may take a 500-series course if he is within nine units of completion 
of graduation requirements and with the specific approval of the chairman of the 
department in which the course is offered and by the chairman of the student’s 
major department. If he is not within nine units of graduation, he may take a 
500-series course only if in addition to the approval of appropriate chairmen he 
has a minimum overall GPA of 3.25 and of 3.5 in the field or fields of his intended 
graduate program. If he is not within nine units of graduation he may not get 
postgraduate credit for a 500-series course. 

Inapplicable Courses 

Courses numbered 100 to 299 cannot be credited toward a master’s degree. Courses 
numbered 300 to 399 do not give graduate credit unless included on an approved 
graduate study plan. 

Admission From Nonaccredited Schools 
A student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited school must apply for admission 
as an undergraduate to complete requirements for a bachelor’s degree from this 
institution. However, once admitted, a student in this category who gives evidence 
of unusual promise and superior background may petition the department con- 
cerned for reclassification as an unclassified graduate student, and if the petition 
is granted he may then proceed in the graduate program. 

Waiver of Prerequisites 

Graduate students of unusual promise^ who have not met the normal master’s 
degree undergraduate prerequisites in the designated major, may, under careful 


67 


Master's Degree 


review and procedures, be admitted to master’s degree programs, providing they 
demonstrate this unusual promise by substantial evidence that they are superior 
in background to those who normally qualify. Consult the Office of the Coordi- 
nator of Graduate Studies for details. 

Courses Over Seven Years Old 

Students who desire to have courses over seven years old included in the 30 units 
of a study plan for the master’s degree may petition to departmental graduate 
studies committees for a comprehensive examination in the relevant course or 
subject field. 

Graduate Assistanfships 

There are a limited number of appointments as graduate assistants available to 
outstanding graduate students who are working on graduate degree programs. 
These may pay up to $1,100 per semester. If interested, consult the chairman of 
the department in which degree study is being taken. 

Waiver of Nonresident Tuition Fee 

Worthy graduate students who are not residents of California may, under certain 
circumstances, obtain a waiver of the nonresident tuition fee. Inquiries should be 
directed to the Admissions and Records Office or the financial aids officer. 

Minimum Full-Time Load 

Twelve units of course work per semester shall constitute a minimum full-time 
load for graduate students. 

International Study 

The college participates in the California State Colleges’ program of study abroad. 
Under this program, limited studies taken at designated foreign universities, when 
arranged in advance, may be applied toward the requirements of a degree awarded 
by CSCF. It is important that plans be completed several months before starting 
such a program. For details consult the foreign student adviser. 

See general policies stated elsewhere, particularly “Concurrent Enrollment,” 
“Incomplete Work,” and “General Course Numbering Code.” 

Policies and procedures ore subject to change, by proper college authority. 
Students should consult class schedules and other official announcements for 
possible revision of procedures stated herein. 

STANDARDS FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate study deals with more complex ideas and demands more sophisticated 
techniques, searching analysis, and creative thinking than undergraduate study. The 
research required is extensive in both primary and secondary sources and the 
quality of writing expected is high. Reading, writing, and thinking time for a 
graduate course is half again as much as for an undergraduate course. The student 
is advised, therefore, not to undertake more graduate work than he can do full 
justice to. 


68 


COLLEGE 

CURRICULA 


COLLEGE CURRICULA 


California State College at Fullerton offers the following baccalaureate degree 
programs which are described on the pages listed: 


Page Page 

B.A. Anthropology 75 B.A. History 97 

B.A. Art 76 B.A. Humanities 99 

B.A. Biological science 80 B.A. Linguistics 99 

B.A. Business administration 132 B.A. Mathematics 100 

B.A. Chemistry 83 B.A. Music 104 

B.A. Communication 86 B.A. Philosophy 109 

BA. Drama — 89 B.S. Physical education 154 

B.A. Economics 137 B.A. Physics 110 

B.S. Engineering _ 124 B.A. Political science 113 

B.A. English — 91 B.A. Psychology 115 

B.A. French 94 B.A. Sociology 119 

B.A. Geography 96 B.A. Spanish 94 

B.A. German 94 B.A. Speech 121 


The following master’s degree programs are offered : 


Page 


M.A. Art 79 

M.A. Biolo^ 82 

M.B.A. Business administration 134 

M.S. Education (with emphasis in 
school administration or 

school counseling) 153 

M.A. English 93 


Page 


M.A. Foreign languages 95 

M.A. History 98 

M.A. Music 108 

M.A. Political science 115 

M.A. Psycholo^ 116 

M.A. Social sciences 118 

M.A. Sociology 120 

M.A. Speech 123 


The college is accredited by the California State Board of Education for pro- 
grams leading to the following credentials: 

1. Standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary school teaching. 

2. Standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching. 

3. Standard teaching credential with specialization in junior college teaching. 

4. Standard teaching credential with specialization, in lieu of minor, in the 

teaching of exceptional children in the area of mentally retarded children. 

5. Standard teaching credential with specialization, in lieu of minor, in the 

teaching of exceptional children in the area of speech and hearing handicapped 
children. 

6. Standard designated services credential with a specialization in pupil person- 
nel services. 

7. Standard supervision credential. 


71 


LETTERS, ARTS, 
AND SCIENCE 


SCHOOL OF 
LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCE 

Dean: Miles D. McCarthy 


DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professor: Untereiner (chairman) 

Assistant Professors: Hosley, Leder 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The major in anthropology is designed for students desiring a broad generalist 
background, students preparing to become teachers of social sciences, and students 
preparing for graduate work in anthropology and in advanced areal and inter- 
national specializations. 

Unit Requirements 

The required minimum for the major is 45 units, in addition to those taken for 
the general education requirement, distributed as follows: 

Courses in Anthropology 

Thirty-three units must be taken in anthropology, 24 in upper division courses. 
Anthropology 201, 202, 203, 301, 401, 410 and 480 are required. Two courses are 
required from areal offering's in the field: Anthropology 321, 325, 328, 347, 350, and 
360. Two courses are required from theoretical/institutional courses in the field: 
Anthropology 415, 421, 425, 428, and 460. 

Minimum units !? 33 

Related Courses 

Twelve upper division units are to be taken in the related social science fields 
of economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and psychology, to 
be approved by the major adviser. Students with specialized interests as linguistics, 
folklore, archaeology, and physical anthropology may substitute advanced work 
in biological science, the fine and applied arts, or the humanities for some of these 


units with the approval of their advisers. 

Minimum units 12 

Minimum total units for the major 45 


Students considering advanced professional careers in research, teaching, or ap- 
plications of anthropology are urged to explore and sample widely from course 
offerings in the other social sciences, the biological and natural sciences and the 
humanities and arts. The following suggestions may help the student to choose 
courses to broaden his interests and diversify and develop his skills in working 
toward his own career objectives. 

(a) (bourses suggested for preparation for graduate study in anthropology and 
careers in teaching or research: Anthropology 201, 202, 203, 301, 321, 325, 
328, 347, 350, 360, 401, 410, 415, 421, 425, 428, 460, 480; Art 100, 101, 111, 
201 A-B, 411, 412, 421 422; Biological Science 100, 140, 160, 201, 312, 361, 401, 
424, 452, 463 , 465, 471; Chemistry 101 A-B; Communication 218A, 401, 403; 
Comparative Literature 312, 315, 375, 425A-B, 481; Drama 271, 473 A-B, 
475 A-B; Economics 200, 403, 405; Education, Foundations 301, 403; English 


75 


Art 


201, 451, 490; Geography 200, 300, 310, 333, 453; History llOA-B, 300, 301, 
350A-B, 399, 412A-B, 505, 590; Management 341, 544; Mathematics 110, 
250A-B, 304, 305, 335A-B; Music 100, 101, 220, 350, 351A-B; Philosophy 100, 
110, 210, 310, 340, 368, 375, 407, 450, 451, 460; Physical Science 201; Physics 
221A-B-C; Political Science 306, 341, 342, 425; Psychology 101, 161, 231, 302, 
304, 321, 331, 341, 351, 408, 412, 431; Quantitative Methods 264, 364, 461; 
Science EUlucadon 446; Social Sciences Education 442; Sociology 201, 331A-B, 
341, 425, 458, 465, 473, 477, 480, 481; Speech 101, 231, 341, 404, 436; English/ 
Political Science 400; and a reading knowledge of at least one foreign lan- 
guage. 

(b) Courses suggested for general careers in industry or government service: 
Anthropology 202, 301, 350, 360, 401, 410, 415, 425, 460; Art 100, 101, 111, 
201A-B, 402; Biological Science 100, 160, 424; Chemistry lOlA-B; Communica- 
tion 333, 361, 380, 401, 425; Comparative Literature 312, 315; Drama 271, 272, 
380; Economics 100, 200A-B, 362, 401, 402, 431, 451; Education, Foundations 
301, 403; English 201, 451; Geography 200, 300, 310, 333, 471, 481; History 
llOA-B, 170A-B, 401, 474, 475, 476, 485B, 486B; Management 341, 343, 544; 
Mathematics 110, 335A-B; Music 100, 101, 350; Philosophy 100, 210, 250, 
310, 340, 362, 368, 382, 450; Physical Science 201; Political Science 101, 306, 
320, 340, 411, 414, 425; Psychology 101, 161, 231, 311, 331, 351, 391; Quanti- 
tative Methods 264, 361, 362, 364, 461, 462, 560; Sociology 201, 202, 331A-B, 
341, 371, 425, 465, 470, 473, 477; Speech 101, 231, 333, 334, 404, 424, 444; and 
English/Political Science 400. 

(c) Courses suggested for careers in areal and international specializations: An- 
thropology 202, 203, 301, 325, 328, 347, 350, 360, 401, 410, 415, 425, 460; Art 
201A-B, 301, 302, 402, 421, 422; Biological Science 100, 140, 201, 452, 464; 
Chemistry 100; Communication 333, 361, 401, 426; Comparative Literature 
375, 425 A-B, Drama 271, 475 A-B, Economics 200, 322, 403, 404, 431; Edu- 
cation, Foundations 301, 402, 403; English 451; Geography 200, 300, 310, 
333, 433, 434, 435, 436, 438, 439, 445, 481; History llOA-B, 300, 301, 350A-B, 
401, 429, 434B, 456, 461, 466B, 485B; Management 341; Music 351 A-B; Philos- 
ophy 100, 110, 382, Political Science 101, 331, 341, 351, 425, 436, 438, 440, 
461; Psychology 101; Science Education 446; Sociology 201, 341, 348, 361, 
425, 436, 677; Speech 101, 231A-B, 333, 341; and a speaking and reading 
fluency in at least one foreign language. 

Teaching Minor in Anthropology 

The minor in anthropology is intended as a second field for persons completing 
a major in another discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. Twenty-one 
units must be taken in anthropology; 15 of these in upper division courses. Anthro- 
pology 201 or 203 and 202 and 301 are required. Two additional courses must be 
selected from areal offerings in the field: Anthropology 321, 325, 328, 347, 350, 360. 
Another course must be selected from theoretical/institutional courses in the field: 
Anthropology 410, 415, 421, 425, 428, 460. A final course must be either Anthro- 
pology 401 or 480. 


DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professors: Dietz, Hein, Ivy (chairman), Olsen 
Associate Professor: V. Smith 

Assistant Professors: Evjenth, Kerciu, Samuelson, Zammitt 
Instructor: Jordan 
Lecturer: Sullivan 


76 


Art 


The Department of Art offers a program which includes the several fields of 
art history, theory, and appreciation, the fine arts (drawing, painting, and sculp- 
ture), the applied arts (general and specialized design and crafts), and art educa- 
tion. The broadest objective of the program is to contribute to the intellectual, 
social, and creative development of the learner as he prepares himself for citizen- 
ship in a democratic society. More specifically, the art program provides opportu- 
nities for students: (1) to develop a knowledge and understanding of those general 
principles of visual organization and expression basic to all forms and fields of art; 
(2) to develop a critical appreciation and understanding of historical and con- 
temporaty art forms through a study of these principles as they relate to the range 
of artistic production of mankind; (3) to use these general principles as a means 
to express more clearly their ideas, thoughts, and feelings in the creation of visual 
forms; (4) to develop those understandings and skills needed to pursue graduate 
studies in the field, to teach art in the schools, or to qualify for a position in 
business and industry as an art specialist. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the bachelor of arts degree have been de- 
sired to meet the specialized needs of the following groups: (1) students who 
wish to study art as an essential part of their personal and cultural development; 
(2) students seeking vocational competence in art; (3) students planning to teach 
art at the secondary level who wish either a teaching major or minor in art; and 
(4) students planning to teach in the elementary schools who wish to have art as 
either an academic major or minor. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have 
a C average in all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major 
will be allowed for specific major courses in which a grade of D is obtained. As 
is customary, the Art Department reserves the right to hold projects completed by 
a student for class credit for a period of three years. 

MAJOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Four course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and in- 
terests of students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art. 

In the development of specific course offerings which make up these programs, 
it has been the concern of the art faculty to see that each program contains: (1) 
basic courses in art history, theory, appreciation, and studio practice which have 
as their primary focus the study of those general principles of visual organization 
and expression underlying all fields of art; (2) more specialized courses which pro- 
vide for adequate preparation in depth in a single field of art. The teaching of art 
history, theory, and criticism is not confined to courses bearing that title. Rather, 
each studio course involves theory as well as the practice of art, includes as part 
of its content the study and reference to related historical art forms, and has as part 
of its purpose the development of those critical abilities which are necessary to a 
valid evaluation and appreciation of the art expressions of man. 

Plan I provides for an emphasis in the area of art history, theory, and apprecia- 
tion and is particularly recommended for those students who wish to pursue gradu- 
ate studies in art history or museology. 

Plan II is designed for those students who prefer a studio-type program with an 
area of specialization selected from the following: (1) design; (2) crafts; (3) draw- 
ing and painting, or (4) sculpture. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in secondary or junior college teaching; and 

Plan IV is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary teaching. 


77 


Art 


All four plans require a minimum of 48 units in art or approved related courses 
with a minimum of 24 units of upper division in art except for Plan IV which re- 
quires a minimum of 36 units of art including a minimum of 24 units of upper 
division in art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet 
the other college requirements for a bachelor of arts degree (see page 62). Stu- 
dents following Plans III and IV also must meet any specific requirements for the 
desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for School of Education). 
Graduate students who plan to meet the requirement for a standard teaching cre- 
dential with specialization in secondary school teaching with a major in art must 
complete or be enrolled in six units in art as approved by the major adviser on and 
beyond the specific course requirements listed in Plan III before they can be 
recommended by the Art Department for student teaching. 

Beginning with the fall semester, 1965, students following Plan III will divide 
their student teaching between two semesters and will register for three units of 
credit each semester. (See prerequisites and course description for art educa- 
tion 749.) 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION EMPHASIS 

Units 

Lower Division: Art history and appreciation (9 units); art structure (3 
units); approved electives (12 units) in: art, anthropology, drama, foreign 

languages, history, literature, music or philosophy 24 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (24 units), including a minimum 
of 3 units in special studies and coverage of four of the following fields: 
primitive, classical, medieval, renaissance, baroque, modem. Oriental, 

American 24 

Reading knowledge of one modern foreign language 
Comprehensive examination in art history 

PLAN II: STUDIO EMPHASIS 

Lower Division: Art history and appreciation (9 units); drawing and paint- 


ing including life drawing (9 units); design and crafts (6 units) 24 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (6 units) ; area of specialization 
(12 units); art electives (6 units) 24 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
(Secondary or Junior College) 


Lower Dhnsion: Art history and appreciation. Art 201 A, B (6 units); draw- 
ing and painting. Art 107 A, B (6 units); design. Art 103, Art 104 (6 units); 

crafts. Art 106A, Art 205A (6 units) 24 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation. Art 401 or Art 402 (3 units) ; 
drawing and painting. Art 309, elective (4 units) ; design. Art 3 13 A, Art 


323A, Art 338A, Art 353A (12 units); art education. Art Education 360, 

Art 380 (5 units) 24 

PLAN IV: Teaching Emphasis 
(Elementary) 

Lower Division: Basic course in art history and appreciation, drawing and 

painting including life drawing (1 unit), design and crafts 12 

Upper Division: Art history and appreciation (6 units); drawing and painting 
(3 units); design (3 units); crafts (3 units); electives (9 units) 24 


78 


Art 


MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bachelor of arts 
degree of which a minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. In- 
cluded in the program must be a basic course in each of the following areas: (1) 
art history and appreciation; (2) design; (3) drawing and painting; and (4) crafts. 
Those students planning to qualify for a standard teaching credential with special- 
ization in elementary or secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain ap- 
proval from the Art Department for the courses selected to meet the upper divi- 
sion requirements for a minor in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE IN ART 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts degree in art provides a 
balance of theory and practice for those who desire to teach art or wish to develop 
a sound basis for continued advanced work in this field. The program offers each 
student the opportunity to expand his intellectual and technical resources and to 
acquire greater richness and depth in terms of creative understanding and achieve- 
ment in one of the following areas of concentration: (1) art history and appreci- 
ation; (2) drawing and painting; (3) crafts; (4) design; and (5) sculpture. 

Prerequisites for the Program 
Prerequisites to the program include: 

(1) an undergraduate major in art or 24 units of upper division art including at 
least 12 units of upper division study in the elected area of concentration with 
a GPA of 3.0 or better; 

(2) a committee evaluation of the student’s background and record in art, in- 
cluding the presentation of a portfolio of representative work by the student; 

(3) completion not later than the first semester of the aptitude test of the Graduate 
Record Examination 

Program of Studies 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved by the student’s 
graduate committee of which 15 must be 500 level courses. The 30 units are 
distributed as follows: 

Units 

1. 500 level courses in art 15-21 

A. Core courses in art, history, philosophy, analysis and criticism 9 

(1) Art 500: Graduate Seminar in Art (3 units) 

(2) Art 501: Graduate Seminar in Art History and Apprecia- 
tion (6 units) 

(On the recommendation of the adviser, the student may 
substitute 3 units in Philosophy 311, Philosophy of Art, or 
a 400 number art history course as partial fulfillment of this 
requirement.) 

B. Course work in the area of concentration selected from one of 

the following areas 6 

(1) Art history and appreciation 

(2) Drawing and painting 

(3) Crafts 

(4) Design 

(5) Sculpture 

C. Project or thesis 3_6 


79 


Biological Science 


Units 

2. Additional courses 9-12 

A. 500- and/or 400-level courses in art to extend the student’s field 

in depth 3-6 

B. 500-, 400- and/or 300-level courses either in courses outside the 

art department related to the student’s special area of interest 
or in courses within the art department outside the area of 
concentration to expand the student’s field in breadth 6 

Total 30 

All courses must be completed with a B average, and ail courses in the area of 
concentration must be graded B or better. 

Also see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” page 64. 


DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Professors: McCarthy,* McCleary, Sutton (acting chairman) 

Associate Professors: P. Adams, Bradshaw, Brattstrom, Turner 
Assistant Professors: Rothman, Rudersdorf, Walkington 
Lecturers: Warter, Wiggins 

The Department of Biology offers a program leading to the bachelor of arts 
degree in biology for students preparing to enter graduate and professional schools, 
for those preparing to teach, and for those preparing for careers in industry and 
government service. 

It is the conviction of the faculty in biology that the purposes of all these stu- 
dents can best be served by building their curricula on a core of courses funda- 
mental to the science of biology. This core curriculum includes biological prin- 
ciples, genetics, microbiology, and physiology. 

In considering the curricula beyond this core of subjects, the faculty in biology 
has agreed that the interests and goals of individual students can best be satisfied 
through individual counseling rather than through prescribed programs. After dis- 
cussion with their advisers, students will elect those upper division courses which 
will satisfy their individual interests and professional goals. Eight units of electives 
must be in one area of interest (e.g., biology, botany, microbiology, or zoology) 
and four units in another area. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in biological sciences, students must have a 
C average in all courses required for the major including those in the related 
sciences. A proficiency in one modern foreign language (Russian, German, French) 
is required. A reading comprehension of a second modern foreign language is 
strongly recommended for students planning graduate study leading to the Ph.D. 
degree. This requirement is normally met by completing three semesters of a col- 
lege foreign language with a C grade or better or by taking a foreign language 
for two years in high school and one semester of intermediate language in college 
with a minimum of a C grade in the college course. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade D is obtained. 

Advanced students will be permitted to enroll in Biological Science 400, Under- 
graduate Problems in Biology. All upper division students are expected to attend 
the departmental seminars. 

The Department of Biology also offers a curriculum for students majoring in 
other fields who wish to minor in biology. 


* College administrative officer. 

80 


Biological Science 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

One hundred twenty-four units including general education* (see page 62), 
foreign language, 33 units in biology courses, and supporting courses in physical 
sciences and mathematics. The supporting courses must include one year of inor- 
ganic college chemistry including qualitative analysis with laboratory, one semester 
of organic chemistry with laboratory, one semester of college mathematics, and 
one year of college physics with laboratory.^ 

Minimum Course Requirements for the Major ^ 

Lower Diviroon 

Biological Science 

100 Principles of Biology 

140 Principles of Botany 

160 Principles of Zoology 


Units 

2 

3 

3 


Upper Division 

Biological Science 

311 General Microbiology 

312 Genetics Lecture 

315 Molecular Biology or 

412-412L Oil Physiology or 
444 Plant Physiology 

Electives — 14 units, of which 4 must be outside area of 
emphasis . 


8 

Units 

4 

3 

4 
14 


8 


25 25 


SUGGESTED EIGHT-SEMESTER PROGRAM 
Semester I 

Units 


Engl 101 Comp, and World Lit. 3 

Bio Sci 100 Princ. of Biology 2 

Math 150A Analytic Geom. and 

Calc. 4 

Chem lOlA Gen. Chemistry 5 


14 

Semester III 

Physics 211A or 221A . 4-5 

Bio Sci 160 Princ. of Zoology 3 

Hist 170A or 170B U.S. Hist 3 

Pol Sci 100 American Gov 3 

Speech 101 Fund, of Speech 3 


16-17 


33 

OF MAJOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 
Semester II 

Units 


Engl 102 World Lit. and Comp. 3 

Bio Sci 140 Princ. of Botany 3 

Math 150B Analytic Geom. and 

Calc. 4 

Chem 101 B Gen. Chemistry 5 


15 

Semester IV 

Physics 21 IB or 22 IB 4-5 

Bio Sci 315 Molecular Biol 4 

Bio Sci 312-312L Genetics 4 

General education 3 


15-16 


* Transfer students should have completed as many of the general education courses as possible 
possible prior to admission. However, uncompleted units may be satisfied while the upper 
division work IS in progress by concurrent enrollment at a junior college or with appropriate 
courses offered at the college. 

t Those students seeking careers in biology at the Ph.D. level and careers in medicine should 
take a full year of organic chemistry, a year of analytical geometry and calculus, and 
quantitative chemistry with laboratory. 

t Substitutions in the program may be made for transfer students and others upon the recommen- 
dation of the adviser and the approval of the department chairman. 


81 


Bfo/ogfcaf Science 


Semester V 

Bio Sci 311 Gen. Microbiology™ 4 


Chem 301A, 302A Organic 

Chem. 4 

Bio Sci — Upper Div. Elective 4 

General education 3 


Semester VI 

Chem 301 B, 302B Organic 

Chem. 4 

Foreign Language 5 

Psych 101 Introd. Psych 3 

General education 3 


15 


Semester VII 

Bio Sci — Upper Div. Electives 8 

Foreign Language 5 

General education 3 


16 


15 

Semester VIII 

Bio Sci — Upper Div. Elective 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Electives 5 

General education 6 


16 


Four Yi-unit physical education courses are suggested during the first four 
semesters. 

Minimum Requirements for Biological Science Minor t 


Biological science Units 

100, 140, 160 Principles 8 

424 Evolution or 

312 Genetics 3 

311 General Microbiology 4 

361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology or 
315 Molecular Biology or 

444 Plant Physiology 4 

Biological science elective 4 


23 

t Substitutions in the program may be made for transfer students and others upon the recommen- 
dation of the adviser and the approval of the department chairman. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY 

General Characteristics 

The program for this degree is based on the assumption that modem science 
necessitates broad preparation through the master’s level of training. It permits 
breadth of preparation and at the same time concentration in an area such as 
botany, microbiology or zoology. In design it offers sufficient breadth and depth 
to strengthen the student’s academic understanding and improve his competence 
for (a) advanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree in biological science, 
(b) teaching at all levels — elementary, secondary, and junior college, (c) techno- 
logical work in the health sciences, (d) participating in research programs, (e) 
entering the field of public health service, and (f) participating in various field 
service and conservation positions with both the state and national governments. 

Prerequitifes 

Prerequisite to entering the program is a pertinent undergraduate major in biology 
with a GPA of at least a 3.0. Satisfactory scores on the aptitude test of the 
Graduate Record Examination are also required. Students may be admitted pro- 
visionaUy with limited subject or grade deficiencies, but such deficiencies must be 
removed by completing additional courses, selected in conference with the adviser 
with at least a B average. 


82 


Chemistry 


Program of Study 

The degree study plan must include 30 units of adviser-approved graduate 
work, at least 12 of which must be at the 500 level. The study plan may include 
six units of graduate level medical biology taken in an approved clinical laboratory 
school. All study plans must include Bio Sci 500 (Graduate Problems in Biology), 
and Bio Sci 501 (Thesis), and at least one departmental seminar. Twelve units must 
be distributed between two of the following areas: biology, botany, microbiology, 
or zoology. An added six units must be outside the two areas chosen. Funher 
electives may be possible. Required is a thesis or a published paper, or a paper 
accepted for publication, acceptable to the adviser and committee, covering a field 
or laboratory research problem. A final oral examination on his research is also 
required. 

For more detailed information or advisement, students should consult the chair- 
man of the Biological Science Department, or the graduate coordinator of the 
Biological Science Department. 

Also see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professor: Bryden 

Associate Professor: Montana (chairman) 

Assistant Professors: Harris, Langworthy, Pan, Shields, Spenger 
Lecturer: Prenzlow 

The curriculum is planned to provide thorough instruction in the basic principles 
and concepts of chemistry for students who will (1) advance to graduate work 
in chemistry; (2) teach in the science programs of secondary schools; (3) seek 
employment in industry or government; or (4) pursue a chemistry minor of fund- 
amental courses in chemistry in support of other areas such as physics and biology. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, students must have a C 
average in all courses required for the majors including those in the related sci- 
mces. A proficiendy in one modern foreign language (Russian, German, French) 
is required. A reading comprehension of a second modern foreign language is 
itrongly recommended for students planning graduate study leading to the PhD 
degree. This requirement is normally met by completing four semesters of a col- 
lege foreign language with a C grade or better or by taking a foreign language for 
two years in high school and two semesters of intermediate language in college 
w/ith a minimum of a C grade in the college course. Under unusual circumstances 
:he requirement may be met by examination upon approval by the appropriate 
department chairman. Examinations will be given in (October and March of each 
academic year. For details of examination procedure, apply at department office. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
1 grade D is obtained. A placement test will be given to students in the Depart- 
nent of Chemistry to determine whether they are ready to start Chemistry lOlA. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in chemistry are 
:he following*: 

Units 


Required units in chemistry 37 

Elective units in chemistry 9 

Total units in chemistry.... 4(5 45 


^ Substitutions or modifications in the program may be made on approval of the department 
chairman. 

83 


Chemistry 


Units 


Required units in physics, mathematics, and biology 32 32 

Total units in science and mathematics 78 

General education units, not including 12 units of physical science, 
mathematics, and biology (see the general education requirements, 

page 62 38 

Undesignated units 8 

Total units for the B.A. degree in chemistry 124 

The required courses in science and mathematics are as follows: 

Chemistry Units 

General chemistry 10 

Quantitative chemistry 4 

Organic chemistry lOt 

Physical chemistry 6 

Physical chemistry laboratory 3 

Advanced inorganic chemistry 3 

Chemical literature 1 

Total units 37 

Physics, Mathematics, and Biology (satisfies the General Education requirements in 
physical science, mathematics, and biology): 


Physics 13 

Mathematics 14 

Biology 5 

Total units 32 


MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

A minimum of 24 acceptable units of chemistry, including organic chemistry 
(8) and physical chemistry (6), are required for a chemistry minor. 


Suggested Eight Semester Program for a Major in Chemistry 


First Semester (Freshman) 

Units 


Chem 101 A Gen. Chem. 5 

Math 150A Anal. Geo. and Calc. 4 
Eng 101 Composition and Lit..— 3 
Hist 170A or 170B U.S. History 3 
PE Phys. ed. activity. — Vi 


Second Semester (Freshman) 

Units 


Chem lOlB Gen. Chem. 5 

Math HOB Anal. Geo. and Calc. 4 
Phys 221 A Fundamental Physics 4 
Eng 102 Lit. and Composition.— 3 
PE Phys. ed. activity — Vi 


\SVi \6Vi 


t Chemistry maiors in the premedical, predental, and secondary teaching credential programs may 
fulfill this requirement, with their adviser’s approval, by taking only eight units of organic 
chemistry. 


84 


Chemistry 


Third Semester (Sophomore) 

Chem 301 A Org. Chem 3 

Chem 303 A Org. Chem. Lab 2 

Math 250A Inter. Calc. 3 

Physics 22 IB Fundamental 

Physics 5 

Pol Sci 100 Amer. Government 3 
PE Phys. ed. activity Vi 

16*/2 

Fifth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 371 A Physical Chem 3 

Bio Sci 100 Prin. of Biology 2 

For Lang 101 Mod. For. Lang. ._ 4 

General education courses 3 

Chem 212 Quant. Chem. 4 

16 

Seventh Semester (Senior) 

Chem 441 Phys. Chem. Lab. 3 

Chem 491 Chem. Literature 1 

Elective in chemistry 3 

For Lang 203 Inter. For. Lang.. 3 
General education courses 6 


16 


Units 

Fourth Semester (Sophomore) 


Chem 301 B Org. (Chem. 3 

Chem 303B Org. Chem. Lab 2 

Math 250B Inter. Calc 3 

Physics 22 IC Fundamental 

Physics 3 

PE Phys. ed. activity Vi 

General education courses 4 

15»/2 

Sixth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 37 IB Physical Chem. 3 

Bio Sci 140 or 160 Botany or 

Zoo. 3 

Elective in chemistry 3 

For Lang 102 Mod. For. Lang 4 

General education courses 3 


16 


Eighth Semester (Senior) 

Chem 425 Adv. Inorg. Chem 3 

Elective in chemistry 3 

For Lang 204 Inter. For. Lang. . 3 
General education courses 7 


16 


This type of schedule allows the student to elect his last semesters according to 
the branch of chemistry which attracts him the most. 

Below are listed the possible electives which would be available during the stu- 
dents last three semesters in residence. 


Possible electives in the sixth semester: 

C!hem 401 Org. Preps. 

Chem 403 Qual. Org. 

Chem 411 Instr. Anal. 

C^em 431 Adv. Org. 

Possible electives during the seventh semester: 
Same as those of the sixth semester plus 
C^hem 451 Adv. P. Chem. 

C^em 461 Chem. Thermo. 

C^em 472 Chem. Cryst. 

Chem 475 Theo. Spec. 

Chem 495 Senior Research 


Possible electives during the eighth semester: 
Same as those of the seventh semester plus 
(3hem 421 Inorg. Preps. 

C^em 499 Indep. Study 


SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY WITH 
EMPHASIS ON TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

The minimum requirements for this program are the same as stated on page 83 
:or a B.A. in chemistry except that the eight undesignated units are utilized in 
iilfilling requirements of the School of Education. 


85 


Communications 


Suggested Eight Semester Program 

The first, second, third and fourth semesters are exactly as presented for the 
B.A. degree in chemistry. 


Fifth Semester (Junior) 

Units 


Chem 371 A Phys. Chem. 3 

Bio Sci 1(X) Princ. of Bio 2 

For Lang Mod. For. Lang 4 

General education course 7 

16 

Seventh Semester (Senior) 

Chem 441 Phys. Chem. Lab 3 

Chem 491 Chem. Literature 1 

Chem 425 Adv. Inorg. Chem. 3 

Education Found 311 4 

General education course 5 


Sixth Semester (Junior) 

Units 


Chem 37 IB Phys. Chem. 3 

Bio Sci 140 or 160 Bio. or Zoo.._. 3 
For Lang 102 Mod. For. Lang..._ 4 

General education course 3 

Education 340 3 

16 

Eighth Semester (Senior) 

Elective in Chemistry 3 

Elective in Chemistry.. 3 

Sci Ed 442 3 

General education course 7 


16 16 

It should be noted that the major difference between the two programs is that 
the student working for a secondary credential has only one year of a foreign 
language while the other program allows two years. This will allow the student 
following this program to enter graduate school to obtain either a masters degree 
or a Ph.D. since all prerequisites for graduate school will still be met. The other 
difference is one less course of 3 units in chemistry electives. The education course, 
Sci Ed 442, fulfills an elective in chemistry for the student who is following this 
program. 


DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Professor: Maxwell (chairman) 

Associate Professors: Alexander 

Assistant Professors: Johnson, Simpson*, Smythe, Sommer 

The department offers a major in communication with emphases in advertising, 
news communication (journalism), photocommunication, public relations and tele- 
communication. (An emphasis in technical communication is planned for the future.) 

A master of arts in communication is planned, and the department is providing 
program advisement for those persons interested in beginning their work immedi- 
ately toward the master’s degree. 

The communication major helps to prepare those desiring various careers related 
to mass communication — careers that may involve newspapers and magazines, tele- 
vision and radio, advertising, public relations, photography, industrial or govern- 
mental communications, and teaching. Also, because of the program’s emphasis on 
general principles of communication, it can serve well those with aspirations for 
administrative work in many areas of business, industry, government and education. 
Additionally, communication courses will benefit those who wish a better under- 
standing of the functions of the mass media in a democratic society. 

* College administrative officer. 


86 


Communications 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION 

Requirements: A combined total of 48 units — 36 within the Communications 
Department and 12 collateral units * in other departments, as follows: 

Communication Core: (21 units). 

The courses in the core are required of all students majoring in communica- 
tions. 

Communication 101 Reporting and Writing (3) 

Communication 102 Reporting and Writing (3) 

Communication 333 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 
Communication 407 Communication and the Law (3) 

Communication 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 
(3) 

Communication 426 World Communication Systems (formerly World Press and 
Propaganda Analysis) (3) 

Communication 427 Seminar on Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

EMPHASIS FOR COMMUNICATION MAJORS 

Every communication major must select an area of emphasis and complete the 
courses in it. 

t Advertising 

Units 

Comm 353 Advertising Copy and Layout 3 

Comm 356 Advertising Production 0,1) 2 

Comm 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Comm 218B Communications Photography 2 

Comm 358A3 Publications Production (2,2) 4 

Comm 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Requirements in Other Departments 

Art 103 Two-dimensional design 3 

Eng 303 The Structure of Modem English 3 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Phil 310 Ethics 3 

News Communication (Journalism) 

Comm 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Comm 332 Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Comm 335 Reporting of Public Affairs.... 3 

Comm 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Comm 218B Communications Photography 2 

Comm 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Requirements in Other Departments 

Econ 403 Comparative Economic Systems . 3 

Eng 462 Modem British and American Novels 3 

Hist 476 United States Since 1933 3 

Psych 351 Social Psychology 3 


these areas, 
is emphasis 
in it. 


87 


Communications 


* Photocommunication 

Comm 2 18 A Introduction to Photography. 2 

Comm 218B Communications Photography 2 

Comm 375 The Documentary Film 3 

Comm 358A,B Publications Production (2,2) 4 

Comm 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Comm 439 Mass Media Internship.. 2 

Collateral Requirements in Other Departments 

Art 103 Two-dimensional Design 3 

Art 111 Fundamentals of Art . 3 

Exon 201 The American Economy 3 

Psych 351 Social Psychology 3 

* Public Relations 

Comm 361 Theory and Practice of Public Relations 3 

Comm 463 Public Relations Methods 3 

(Domm 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Comm 358 Publications Production 2 

Comm 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Comm 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Courses in Other Departments 

Econ 403 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Eng 303 The Structure of Modem English 3 

Mgmt 341 Principles of Management 3 

Psych 351 Social Psychology 3 

* Telecommunication 

Comm 380 Introduction to Radio and Television 3 

Comm 371 Radio-television News and Public Affairs.. 3 

Comm 375 The Documentary Film 3 

Comm 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Comm 218B Communications Photography 2 

Comm 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Courses in Other Departments 

Drama 276A Beginning Stagecraft 2 

Eng 303 The Structure of Modern English 3 

Psych 351 Social Psychology 3 

Spch 333 Business and Professional Speaking 3 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATION 

This minor offers a basic core of writing and publication courses for teacher 
candidates and others who wish some training in communications. 

Requirements: A combined total of 21 units, as follows: 

Lower division (maximum of 7) 

Communication 101 or 102 (3) 

Communication 218A and 218B (2, 2) 

* This emphasis is still in its developmental stage. Other courses are being prepared for inclusion 

in it. 


88 


J 


Drama 


Upper division (minimum of 14 units) 

• Communication 331 or equivalent (3) 

Communication 333 (3) 

Communication 3 38 A (3) 

(Communication 358A or 358B (2) 

(Communication 425 (3) 

TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

(Communication majors who are teacher candidates should complete the commu- 
nication core and the news communication (journalism) emphasis. They must 
complete Communication 358AB as part of their major requirements. These candi- 
dates must have their minor approved by the chairman of the Communications 
Department and must complete the required professional education courses in 
addition to their major and minor requirements. (See “Journalism Education” 
page 198.) 

DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA 

Professor: Young (chairman) 

Associate Professor: Duerr 
Assistant Professors: Brown, Forest, Zeltzer 
Instructor: McColgan 
Lecturer: Kuni 

The Department of Drama offers a program which includes the several fields of 
theatre history and theory, play writing, acting-directing, technical theatre, inter- 
pretation, and radio-television. The primary purpose of the program is to bring 
the student into contact with one of man’s major cultural institutions, the theatre, 
which has been a vital factor in shaping the attitudes, ideas, mores, and points of 
view of successive generations. More specifically, the course work in the drama 
program provides opportunities for students: (1) to develop an appreciation for 
the theatre as a cultural heritage of man; (2) to become sensitive and responsive 
to the theatre experience in contemporary society; (3) to develop the skills and 
understandings necessary to pursue theatre as a profession; (4) to teach drama 
and television in the schools; and (5) to pursue graduate studies in drama and 
television. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the baccalaureate degree are designed to 
meet the specialized needs of the following groups: (1) students who wish to 
participate in drama and television as an essential part of their personal and 
cultural development; (2) students seeking professional vocational competence 
in interpretation, acting and directing, technical theatre, radio and television, or 
play writing; (3) students planning to teach drama and television at the secondary 
level who wish either a teaching major or minor in drama and television; and 
(4) students planning to teach in the elementary schools who wish to have 
drama as either an academic major or minor. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in drama, students must have 
a C average in all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major will 
be allowed for required major courses in which a grade of D is obtained. 

In addition to specific course requirements, students majoring in drama must 
participate in a minimum of eight theatre or television productions before gradu- 
ation. The productions chosen for credit will be selected with the aid of the 
departmental adviser. 

* Some variation in these requirements may be permitted on the basis of professional experience 

or interest. 


89 


Drama 


MAJOR IN DRAMA FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Four course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and 
interests of students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in 
drama. 

Plan I is for those students who wish to study drama as a cultural contribution 
or who wish to pursue graduate degrees in drama with emphasis in theatre history 
and theory. It is strongly recommended that students electing this plan support the 
major with approved electives from art, drama, music, foreign languages, litera- 
ture, philosophy or speech. 

Plan II is designed for those students who wish to develop the necessary com- 
petence in drama for either pursuing drama as a profession or for pursuing grad- 
uate degrees in drama with an emphasis in an area of concentration other than 
history of the theatre. Areas of concentration are: play writing; acting-directing; 
interpretation; radio-television and technical theatre. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in secondary or junior college teaching; and 
Plan IV is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary teaching. 

All four plans require a minimum of 36 units in drama with a minimum of 
24 units of upper division in drama. The lower division requirements are the same 
for all four plans. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet 
the other college requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following 
Plans III and IV^ also must meet any specific requirements for the desired teaching 
credential (see section in catalog for School of Education). Graduate students who 
plan to meet the requirements for a standard teaching credential with specialization 
in secondary teaching and a major in drama must complete or be enrolled in 
six units in drama as approved by the major adviser on and beyond the specific 
course requirements listed in Plan 111 before they can be recommended by the 
Drama Department for student teaching. 

PLAN I: THEATRE HISTORY AND THEORY EMPHASIS UfUtS 

Lower Division: Oral interpretation (3 units); acting or stage movement (3 

units); technical theatre (4 units); electives (2 units) 12 

Upper Division. Theatre history and analysis (12 units); area of concentration 
other than theatre history (6 units); electives (6 units) 24 

PLAN II: PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN AN AREA OF CONCENTRATION 

Lower Division: Same as Plan 1. 

Upper Division: History of the theatre (6 units); area of concentration in 
either playwriting, acting-directing, interpretation, radio-television, or tech- 
nical theatre (12 units); electives (6 units) 24 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
(Secondary or Junior College) 

Lower Division: Same as in Plan I. 

Upper Division: History of the theater (6 units); acting-directing (6 units); 
theatre (4 units); radio-television (3 units); electives (5 units) 24 

PLAN IV: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
(Elementary) 

Lower Division: Same as in Plan 1. 

Upper Division: History of the theatre (3 units); oral interpretation (3 units); 
dramatic activities for children (3 units); reading theatre (3 units); dance 
theatre (4 units); radio-television (3 units); electives (5 units).— 24 


English 


MINOR IN DRAMA 

The minor in drama consists of 24 units, 14 of which must be in upper division. 
Included in the program must be a basic course in each of the following areas: 
(1) oral interpretation, (2) stagecraft, (3) acting, (4) history of the theatre, and 
(5) television. Students planning to qualify for a standard teaching credential with 
specialization in secondary teaching and drama for a minor must obtain approval 
from the Drama Department for the courses selected to meet the upper division 
requirements for a minor in drama. 

In addition to course requirements, students minoring in drama must panicipate 
in a minimum of four theatre or television productions prior to graduation. The 
productions chosen to meet this requirement are selected with the approval of the 
departmental adviser. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SPEECH 
Concentration in Drama 

Drama is a concentration within the master of arts degree in speech. The degree 
with this concentration is designed to provide opportunity for a balance of theory 
and practice for those who wish to teach drama, to provide a sound basis for 
continued advanced work in this field, and to provide incentive for intellectual 
growth. The student is expected to demonstrate a high degree of intellectual and 
creative competence and to demonstrate mastery of his field of concentration 
in one of the areas of emphasis in drama: (1) acting-directing, (2) oral interpre- 
tation, (3) playwriting, (4) technical theatre, (5) television and radio, (6) theatre 
history and theory. 

Prerequisites 

In addition to the college requirements, students admitted to this program must 
earn 24 units of upper division studies in speech and drama. To advance in the 
program students must demonstrate oral proficiency, complete the graduate record 
examination aptitude test, and maintain a B average. 

Program of studies 

The degree study plan with concentration in drama will include at least 30 
units of adviser-approved graduate studies, 15 units of which must be in 500- 
level courses. Each program will have at least 15 units in drama; a core of six 
units, to include Drama 500 (Introduction to Graduate Study — taken very early 
in the program), and Drama 591 (project or thesis); and six units of adviser-ap- 
proved supporting courses in related fields in other departments. Before the degree 
is granted, each student will pass an oral and written comprehensive examination. 

Also see Department of Speech and “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program” 
on page 64. 


DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH- 

Professors: Ramsay (chairman), Watkin 

Associate Professors: Abraham, Bonazza, Cummings,* Haaker, Jones, McNelly. 
Obler, Salz, Schneider, Wagner 

Assistant Professors: Austin, Callahan, Edwards, Epstein, Friend, Gilde, Green- 
wood, Hodges, Petalas, Scott, Seller, Stuart, Tumas 
Instructors: Hayden, Heinze, Kilker, Mauch, Shapiro 
Lecturer: Farmer 

The study of “English” emphasizes the nature and development of our language, 
the craft of writing, and the imaginative literature of American and British authors 


College administrative officer. 


91 


English 


— prose fiction, poetry, and drama. Except for the required freshman English offer- 
ings, courses in world literature in English translation are listed separately, under 
comparative literature. In addition, the Department of English offers some special- 
ized professional courses. On the senior and graduate levels, various opportunities 
are provided for seminar work and independent study. 

Elnglish 101 and 102 or their equivalents or the consent of the instructor is a 
prerequisite to all English and comparative literature courses numbered 200 and 
above. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: ENGLISH MAJOR 

Requirements: A total of 36 units beyond English 101 and 102 or their equiva- 
lents, with the following distribution: 

Lower division (maximum of 9 units), including: 

211, 212 Masters of British Literature (6 units), or 6 units in American or World 
Literature. 

Lower division elective (3 units) 

Students offering American Literature in the Lower Division must take at least 
nine units in courses in the periods of English literature preceding the modem. Stu- 
dents offering a survey of English or World literature course from the lower divi- 
sion must take six units of American Literature. 

Basic Course (3 units) 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms 
Upper Division (minimum of 27 units) 

Language and composition (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

301 Advanced Ck)mposition 

303 The Structure of Modem English 

490 History of the English Language 
Major Aitthor Courses (9 units) 

333 Chaucer 

334 Shakespeare 

341 Milton and the Seventeenth Century 

Period courses (minimum of 6 units, at least 3 in a period preceding the mod- 
ern), selected from the following; 

335 Elizabethan Drama 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose 

342 The Age of Reason in English Literature 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature 

344 Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century 

345 History and Development of the English Novel 

462 Modem British and American Novels 

464 Modem British and American Drama 

466 Modem British and American Poetry 

Electives to complete a minimum of 36 units selected from additional courses 
in language and composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars, and 
comparative literature. Comparative literature offerings are listed separately, but 
count toward an E>iglish major. 

A program of literary studies gains in perspective through the study of history, 
sociology, philosophy, and psychology. These fields offer vital lifelines which 
nourish and deepen understanding of literature. Students of literature are strongly 
advised to include such courses in their program, particularly in the areas of 
philosophy and psychology. 


92 


ingllsh 


English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire pro- 
ficiency in at least one foreign language. Note: Freshmen intending to major in 
English should complete two years of course work in a foreign language, or dem- 
onstrate equivalent accomplishment by transfer or by examination. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: a total of 21 units. 

Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

201, 211, 212, or any lower division course beyond English 101 and 102 or the 
equivalent. 

Lower Division electives (3 units) 

Upper Division (minimum of 12 units), including: 

Language and composition (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

301 Advanced Composition 

303 The Structure of Modern English 

490 History of the English Language 
Major Author Courses (minimum of 6 units) 

334 Shakespeare 

333 Chaucer or 

341 Milton and the Seventeenth Century 

Electives (minimum of 3 units) 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The degree of master of arts in English requires completion of a minimum of 30 
semester units beyond the bachelor’s degree. Candidates having fewer than 36 units 
of undergraduate English normally will be required to take several additional 
courses to build a full undergraduate major. The 30 units in the graduate program 
are distributed as follows: 


Minimum units in courses restricted to graduate students (500-series) __ 15 

Maximum units in specialized upper division courses in English 9 

Units in subjects related to English 6 

Minimum total 30 

Up to six units of the graduate course work may be in independent study. Three 


of these units may be devoted to a thesis or other written reports and articles, 
individually supervised by a faculty member. 

All candidates must take a graduate course in the English language, in Shake- 
speare, and in at least one other major literary figure studied in depth. Foreign 
language competency, a study in comparative literature or a foreign culture is 
required. In addition he must take the Graduate Record Examination (aptitude and 
advanced test in literature) before his admission to classified graduate status. 

All M.A. candidates beginning their program after the spring semester of 1966 
must enroll in Elnglish 580, Special Graduate Projects, during their last semester of 
work toward the M.A. At the conclusion of this course they will be required to 
take a written comprehensive examination covering the material of the entire M.A. 
program. 

Also see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 


93 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

Professor: Mathieu 

Associate Professors: Arana, Feldman, Kline (chairman), Shapley 
Assistant Professors: Boarino, Merrifield, Van Ginneken 
Instructor: Pena 
Lecturers: Siegfried, Tussing 

The program of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures is de- 
signed to meet the needs of several types of students, including those who seek 
a liberal arts education with an emphasis on a foreign language and its literature; 
those who intend to teach at the elementary, secondary, or college level; those 
who plan to use foreign languages in professional careers; or those who desire 
to pursue graduate studies. The program emphasizes high standards of achievement 
in the practical use of the language, in the study of its literature and its culture, 
in the mastery of applied linguistics, and in methodology of teaching, the latter 
acquired in part through apprenticeship. 

A student may enroll at any point in the sequence of courses for which his 
previous study has prepared him. 

Two awards are available annually to students majoring in this department: 
(1) a cash award to the winner of the F. F. Beer Annual Essay (Contest in French, 
German and Spanish; (2) a cash award, given by the Club Los Amigos of Fullerton, 
to an upper division student who is a prospective teacher of Spanish and whose 
scholarship merits recognition. 

MAJOR IN A SINGLE FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Three options are offered: French, German or Spanish. Requirements: Courses 
101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents, completed satisfactorily; plus 24 
units of upper division courses, including 317, 431, 441, 451, 461, except that six of 
these units may be in another foreign language (other than the major or minor 
languages) at the intermediate level or above, provided they are taken at this col- 
lege. 

During his senior year, the foreign language major will take a comprehensive 
examination, prepared and administered by the department, in the language and 
literature studied. 

Attention is directed to the courses in foreign literatures in translation listed else- 
where in this catalog under comparative literature. These courses may not be 
counted toward a major in a foreign language. 

MAJOR IN TWO FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Two options are offered: romance languages major (French and Spanish) and 
Germanic-Romance languages major (German and French or Spanish). A student 
electing the double major must fulfill all requirements for a major in a single 
language and, in addition, the requirements for a minor in single language. 

MINOR IN A SINGLE LANGUAGE 

Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents, completed 
satisfactorily; plus nine units in upper division courses selected in consultation with 
the adviser. 

MAJOR IN LINGUISTICS 

Requirements for the bachelor of arts degree in linguistics are listed on page 
99 of this catalog. 


94 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 


CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

STANDARD TiACHINO CRIDENTIAL WITH A SRiCIALIZATION 
IN ELEMENTARY HACNING 

Students who are candidates for the standard teaching credential with a special- 
izadon in elementary teaching must also complete the professional requirements, 
including Foreign Languages Education 432. 

STANDARD TEACHING CREDENTIAL WITH A SPECIALIZATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The credendal program is the same as for the liberal arts major, with the fol- 
lowing addidonal requirements: 

Foreign Languages Educadon 442; 

French or German or Spanish Applied Linguisdcs 466; 

plus six units in the major language selected with the approval of the adviser and 
taken in the senior year or thereafter at the 400 and 500 level. 

THE LANGUAGE LADORATORY 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required, in addidon to the 
regular class periods, to pracdce for the minimum of prescribed dme in the lan- 
guage laboratory. The 30-stadon laboratory operates like a library; students may 
use it at a rime most convenient to them, preferably every day in sessions of 15 
to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced by each instructor and by the 
supervisor of the language laboratory. 

Students are invited to make use of the collecdon of literary and cultural record- 
ings in French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish available in the lang^i^gc 
laboratory. 

MASnR Of ARTS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The degree of master of arts in foreign languages, with concentradons in French, 
German, or Spanish, requires a minimum of 30 semester units beyond the bachelor’s 
degree. A candidate presenting a B.A. which has fewer than 24 upper division units 
in the major, or is otherwise inadequate, normally will be required to take addi- 
donal courses to build a full undergraduate major before beginning the graduate 
program. The 30 units in the graduate program are distributed as follows: 


Umts 

Language and linguisdcs courses (minimum of 9 on 500 level) 12 

Literature courses (minimum of 6 on 500 level) 12 

Subjects in an approved related field 6 

Minimum total 30 

A part of the 30 units may be assigned to a thesis. 


The candidate for the master of arts degree must consult a graduate adviser 
before beginning his program. He must take the Graduate Record Elxaminadon 
(apdtude and advanced test in the language area) before being admitted to clas- 
sified graduate status. See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 


95 


Geography 


DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

Associate Professors: Earick (chairman), Reith 
Assistant Professors: Helin, Ketteringham, Sutton 
Lecturer: Winnie 

•ACNELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

The major in geography is designed to contribute to a broad, liberal education 
and to fulfill the requirements of sound, professional preparation. This basic pro- 
gram emphasizes the relationship of man’s complex cultural patterns to the earth’s 
physical foundation. It also provides students with a practical base for intensive 
work in one of the several fields of geography at the graduate level. 

Unit Requirnments 

The major consists of 36 units in geography (of which 24 units must be in upper 
division courses) plus 12 units in related courses. These units are in addition to 
those used in meeting the general education requirements. All students take a core 
of 12 units (A) and one of three required concentrations (B), consisting of 24 
units in geography plus 12 units in related fields. Students will normally indicate 
their choice of concentration upon completion of the geography core and after 
consultation with their adviser. 

Units 


A. Geography core: 200, 300, 310, 343 12 

B. Concentrations: 

Geography 24 

Related courses 12 


1. Courses for students electing a liberal arts program or planning a career in 
'elementary, secondary, or junior college teaching: 

24 upper division units in geography: 

Units 


Physical 6 

Cultural 9 

Geography 363 and 2 other regional 9 


12 upper division units of a student’s teaching minor may be applied to the 
related course requirements. For liberal arts students 12 units will be 
selected with the advice of the geography faculty. 

2. Courses for students electing an advanced academic program leading to 
graduate training in college and university teaching or research: 

24 upper division units in geography: 

Units 

Physical — 6 

Cultural — — — 6 

Techniques 6 

Elective regional or cultural 6 

12 upper division units in related courses would normally comprise an 
areal study (e.g., the history, political institutions, peoples, and lan- 
guages of Latin America or Europe) or a topical concentration (e.g., 
related work in earth science, population studies). Students are advised 
to develop a proficiency in one foreign language. 

3. Courses for students electing a program leading to a career in public 
service: 


96 


History 


24 upper division units in geography: 


Units 

Physical 6 

Cultural 9 

Techniques 6 

Elective 3 


12 upper division units selected from one of the following specializations 
(students may plan with the geography faculty an additional specializa- 
tion not cited below): 

City and Regional Planning: Econ 452, Fin 336, Quan Methods 361, 
Pol Sci 320, Pol Sci 424, Soc 371 

Conservation of Natural Resources: Biol Sci 363, Biol Sci 401, Biol 
Sci 443, Econ 431, Pol Sci 320 

Commerce: Commun 361, Econ 421, Econ 431, Econ 452, Fin 330, 
Fin 336, Mgt 346, Mkt 354, Quan Methods 361, Soc 470 

TEACHING MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography is intended as a second field for persons completing a 
major in another discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. It is designed 
to give a basic understanding of earth science and the geographic relationships 
helpful to the classroom teacher. The program gives a balance between the physical 
and social sciences. 

Required Courses 

Geography 200, 300, 310, 343 
One course from 312, 323, 353 
One course from 333, 383, 453, 471, 481 
One course from 363, 431 through 445 

Minimum requirement 21 units 

CLASSIFICATION OF GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

General: 200, 499 

Physical: 300, 312, 323 

Cultural: 310, 333, 383, 453, 471, 475, 481 

Techniques: 343, 353, 490 

Regional: 363, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436, 438, 439, 445, 463 
Graduate: 513, 523, 599 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Professors: Brown (chairman), Langsdorf,* Povlovich, Unterberger 
Associate Professors: Beck, de Graaf, Toy * 

Assistant Professors; Bellot, Breese, Etue, Feldman, Giacumakis, Jordan, Newby, 
Onorato, Phillips, Pivar, Putnam, Sailor, Van Deventer 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in history is designed to provide an understanding of 
the present through a careful study of the past. This major may be pursued to ful- 
fill various professional and cultural objectives common to a liberal arts program. 
It serves, especially, as a preparation for teaching, law, government, and other pub- 
lic services, and as the foundation for advanced stjidy at the graduate level. 

* College administrative officer. 


4 — 66198 


97 


History 


The major is composed of a minimum of 24 units in the upper division, plus 
the basic courses in world civilizations (History llOA-llOB) and United States 
History (History 170A-170B). The basic courses may also be used to meet general 
education requirements. Students majoring in history are encouraged to include in 
their lower division programs some work in such fields as anthropology, eco- 
nomics, geography, literature, philosophy, political science and sociology. 

Students intending to do graduate work in history should acquire a reading 
knowledge of at least one foreign language appropriate to the pursuit of advanced 
research in a field of history. 

The 24 units of upper division courses required for the major must include: 

History 399 Historiography (3 units) 

Six units in United States history 

Six units in European history (from ancient Greece to modern times) 

Six units in the history of Asia, Africa, and Latin America 

TEACHING MINOR IN HISTORY 

The teaching minor in history is composed of at least 20 units in history exclu- 


sive of the general education requirements: 

Recommended teaching minor: Units 

World civilization (or equivalent) 6 

Upper division work in history 15 

Total 21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts in history is composed of 
30 units approved by the graduate adviser.t Fifteen units of graduate courses (500 
level) must be taken, including: 

History 501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3 units); 

History 590 History and Historians (3 units); and 

History 591 Thesis (3 or 6 units) 

Other course requirements include six units in upper division or graduate work 
outside the History Department but related to the study pattern. 

Students entering the program must demonstrate a broad cultural understanding 
of one or more foreign countries of import to the master’s degree study program. 
This requirement may be met by a reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign 
language or an approved selection of comparative studies, but the method must 
be approved by the student’s adviser. In addition, the completion of the aptitude 
test and the advanced test in history of the Graduate Record Examination is re- 
quired. 

Prerequisite to this master’s degree is an undergraduate major in history with 
a GPA of at least 3.0 in upper division history courses. While students may be 
admitted with limited subject or grade deficiencies, such deficiencies must be made 
up by completing adviser-approved courses in addition to those required for the 
degree, with at least a B average. An oral examination on the thesis and course 
work offered for the degree will be given. 

Before the appointment of an official graduate adviser, the following steps must 
be completed: 

1. Admission to the college as an unclassified graduate student; 

2. Filing in the Office of Admissions of two official sets of transcripts of all 

t Consult adviser about prerequisites. 


98 


Llngulsfks 


collegiate and graduate work; and 

3. Submission of satisfactory results of the Graduate Record Examination. 

In consultation with his graduate adviser, the student will develop a proposed 
rudy plan. When approved by his graduate adviser and pursued satisfactorily the 
rogrammed work can lead to the master’s degree, subject to the completion of all 
ther requirements for the degree. 

See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

HUMANITIES MAJOR: COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
EMPHASIS 

The program in comparative literature is governed jointly by the Departments 
f English and of Foreign Languages and Literatures, with the chairman of the 
English Department acting as chairman of the program. 

The program in comparative literature provides courses in the study of various 
ational literatures from the earliest times to the present, with special emphasis on 
le manifold interrelations of literatures, in theory, genres, ideas, movements, and 
athors. Works are read in English translation and the courses conducted in 
English. For students whose major concentration is not in comparative literature, 
le knowledge of a second language is not required. 

Requirements: A combined total of 36 units beyond general education require- 
lents as follows: 

1. Proficiency in at least one foreign language; this requirement may be satisfied 
y completing with a grade of B or better the fundamental and intermediate 
inguage courses, or by examination. 

2. A combined minimum of 15 units in English and foreign languages and 
teratures. 

3. A minimum of 15 units from the comparative literature offerings. 

4. Electives: 6 units on advisement. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 
(An Interdisciplinary Program) 

The degree in linguistics is an interdisciplinary program administered by the 
department of Foreign Languages and Literatures in collaboration with the 
departments of Anthropology, English, Mathematics, Philosophy, Quantitative 
lethods and Speech through their representatives on the Linguistics Committee. 
This program is designed for students with an exceptional interest in and apti- 
ide for the study of the systems of human communication. It enables the under- 
raduate student to perceive the function of language in the development of 
ivilization; to understand the essential relationships between language and thought 
id language and culture; to gain substantial familiarity with the structure of for- 
ign languages as well as English; to observe several types of linguistic structures; 
id to become conversant with the historical study of language and formal tech- 
iques and theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis. The program will enable 
le student with linguistic and philological interests to grasp the scope of the entire 
eld and, in addition, to determine more accurately the most meaningful concen- 
•ations in graduate study. 


99 


Mirfhematks 


Lower Division Requirements 
One year of Latin or Greek (6) 

Anthropology 202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Philosophy 210 Logic (3) 

Upper Division Requirements (minimum of 30 units) 

Anthropology 410 Language and Culture (3) 

French, German or Spanish 466 Applied and Descriptive Linguistics (3) 
French, German or Spanish 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

French, German or Spanish 490 Seminar in Linguistics (1-4) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

French, German, Russian or Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Compo- 
sition (3) 

Speech 341 Phonetics (3) 

Speech 404 General Semantics (2) 

(Juantitative Methods 364 (Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

One elective (or more) from the following: 

Mathematics 305 Elements of Set Theory (3) 

Philosophy 375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) 

Psychology 161 Elementary Statistics (3) or 

Mathematics 355 A, B Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3, 3) 

Speech 403 Speech Development (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modem English (3) 

Mathematics 304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Psychology 302 Experimental Psychology (3) 

French, German, Russian or Spanish 400, for advanced students (3) 

Students must consult with an adviser in linguistics through the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, before establishing their individual courses of 
study. 


DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors: Ames (chairman), Gilbert 
Associate Professors: Benson, O’Toole, Stiel 
Assistant Professors: V. J. Klassen, V. M. Klassen, Sandberg 
Instructor: Qualls 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS 

The program of studies in mathematics offers courses stressing the understanding 
of mathematical concepts and the axiomatic approach. A sufficient variety of courses 
is given to satisfy the needs of: 

(1) The proficient student aiming toward graduate study, 

(2) The student planning to use mathematics in a career in industry and gov- 
ernment service, 

(3) Preprofessional students in other science areas, 

(4) The prospective elementary and secondary teacher. (See special programs 
of study below.) 

In addition to mathematics, the major candidates will be required to pursue 
a year of general college physics with a calculus prerequisite. Proficiency in one 
modem foreign language (Russian, German, French) is required. 


100 


Mathematics 


For a major in mathematics this language requirement is met by completing 
with at least a C grade« German 203, French 203, Russion 203 or an equivalent, 
the latter to be determined by the appropriate language department. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade of D is obtained. To qualify for a baccalureate degree in mathematics, 
students must have a C average in all courses required for the major including 
those in the related sciences. 

A placement test is given to students in the Department of Mathematics to 
determine their readiness to start the calculus. 

Major Program in Mathematics 


Required Courses Units 

Analytic geometry and calculus 8 

Intermediate calculus 6 

Linear algebra 3 

Modem algebra 3 

Advanced calculus 6 

Topology 3 

Complex analysis 3 

Real analysis 3 

Abstract algebra 3 

Differential geometry 3 


41 

Minor Program in Mathematics 

A mathematics minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework selected from the 
courses offered by the Mathematics Department. They must include Mathematics 
291 and at least six upper division units from the Mathematics Department. Each 
course must be completed with a grade C or better. 


Mojor Program in Mathematics for Teacher Education 
for Elementary or Secondary Education 

Math 150A-B Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Math 250A-B Intermediate Calculus 

Math 291 Linear Algebra 

Math Ed 300 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Algebra 

Math Ed 301 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Geometry . 

Math 320 Projective Geometry 

Math 330 Number Theory 

Math 3 35 A Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

Electives in mathematics, 300 courses or higher 


Units 

8 

6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

9 


41 

Grade requirements, and foreign language and physics requirements, are as stated 
above. 

Minor Program in Mathematics for Teacher Education 

A. For elementary education the minor shall consist of 20 units of course work 
selected from the course listings in mathematics and mathematics education. These 
courses must include Mathematics 150B and Mathematics Education lOOB. 

B. For secondary education the minor shall consist of 20 units of course work 
selected from the course listings in mathematics and mathematics education. These 
courses must include Mathematics 291 and six units of upper division courses in 
mathematics or mathematics education. 


101 


Music 


DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Professors: Landon (chairman). Gray, Thorsen 

Associate Professors: Lewis, Michalsky 

Assistant Professors: Charlton, Fuszek, Karson, Vaughan 

Lecturers in applied music (part time): Boelter (voice), Caudill (string bass), 
Desiderio (clarinet), Johnson (tuba), Kelley (string bass), Kemalyan (voice), 
Lustgarten (cello), Manshardt (piano), Moritz (flute), Morris (trumpet) Mug- 
geridge (oboe), Nowlin (bassoon), Olsson (voice), Patterson (French horn), 
Peebles (trombone), Ramsey (clarinet), Rausch (flute), Remsen (harp), Remsen 
(trumpet), Roberts (voice), Schoenfeld (cello), Schoenfeld (violin), Shaffer 
(organ), Voorhies (piano), Wicks (violin), Whitsett (trombone) 

The Department of Music offers courses in music for both majors and non- 
majors. The fundamental purpose of the music major curriculum leading toward 
the baccalaureate degree is to provide the necessary training in each of the related 
aspects of music such as its history and literature, theoretical studies, and musical 
performance. Such a program of studies is based on the need to provide serious 
students with a core curriculum which will prepare the individual in such areas 
as (a) the knowledge of the history and relationships of music as an art form, (b) 
a comprehensive and analytical understanding of musical literature, (c) a working 
knowledge of music theory and structure, (d) a high degree of competence in a 
performing field, and (e) a specialization within the major. 

The music program is designed to educate: 

1. Students in general, in terms of composite minors, music minors, or broad 
offerings in the humanities or liberal arts. 

2. Students preparing to teach in the elementary and/or secondary schools, with 
a major field concentration in music (special music teachers). 

3. Students preparing to teach in the elementary schools with a major field con- 
centration in music (classroom teachers). 

4. Students preparing to teach in the junior colleges and four-year colleges with 
a major field concentration in music. 

5. Students other than music majors preparing to teach as classroom teachers in 
the elementary schools. 

6. Students wishing to prepare for various vocations in music, such as: 

a. Church music directors and organists 

b. Teachers of music in private studios 

c. Music librarians 

d. Professional performers of music 

e. Com{>osers and arrangers 

f. Industrial and recreational music directors 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. Entrance examinations in basic piano, voice, theory, and music history will 
be given all music majors at the time of entrance to the college and to lower 
division students before acceptance in upper division music major sequence. 
These examinations plus auditions in the major performance areas are for 
placement and to satisfy credential requirements in the minor performance 
fields. Students who are deficient in any of these areas will be expected to 
take additional work as suggested by the faculty adviser. 

2. Music majors will be expected to declare a principal area of performance with 
the approval of the department chairman and faculty adviser, no later than the 
beginning of the junior year. It will be expected that each student will pre- 


102 


Music 


pare for suitable development within this major area of performance, culmi- 
nating in the successful presentation of a senior recital before he may be ap- 
proved for graduation. The following steps should be taken as a part of this 
preparation: 

a. Declaration of an area of performance concentration (voice, piano, instru- 
ment, or combination solo instrument or voice and conducting) at the 
time of entrance to the college. 

b. Demonstration of performance progress before a faculty jury each se- 
mester. 

c. Appearance in at least one minor recital or an assisting performer at 
least once each semester. 

3. All music majors are required to participate in a major performance group 
(band, orchestra, or chorus) each semester of the regular school year. Students 
who are wind or percussion instrument majors in their applied field must 
register for band (or orchestra if designated by instrumental faculty) every 
semester; string majors must register for orchestra every semester; voice majors 
must register for chorus every semester. Music education majors whose per- 
formance area is piano or organ should be assigned to one major performance 
g^oup by academic adviser. Exceptions to this requirement may be made only 
by action of the music faculty. 

4. Instrumental and piano majors are required to take part in small ensembles 
for a minimum of two semesters. 

5. The major area of performance concentration for major in music requires 
work in applied music, as follows: 

a. Piano, voice and instrumental majors — must complete a minimum of 8 
semesters of applied music in the major field of concentration, leading 
toward the successful presentation of a senior recital in the major per- 
formance field. 

b. Choral or instrumental conducting majors — must complete a minimum of 
eight semesters of applied music in the major field of performance con- 
centration, in addition to a minimum of six units in conducting, leading 
toward the successful presentation of a joint recital in the major per- 
forming field or a conducting recital or both. 

c. A functional piano examination in piano will be given during the junior 
year and prior to the end of the senior year for students seeking the 
secondary credential with a major in music. 

d. Composition majors must complete a minimum of eight units, including: 
Mu 322A, B; Mu 370 (2 units); Mu 377 (2-4 units). This course of study 
will culminate in the successful completion of a composition recital, for 
the B.A degree. 

6. Senior transfer students entering California State College at Fullerton with a 
major in music, or graduate students in music entering to complete credential 
requirements are expected to complete a minimum of one semester of suc- 
cessful upper division work in music before they may be approved for di- 
rected teaching. Required courses and competencies expected of all the college 
music majors must be satisfied before endorsement by the faculty committee 
for acceptance in the credential program. 

7. All music majors will be expected to attend a weekly departmental organiza- 
tion class (Mu 400) each semester of enrollment. 


103 


Music 


MUSIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Music offers a variety of courses and programs leading to 
baccalaureate and graduate degrees in teaching and the professions. These degrees 
may be earned in one of three degree patterns; i.e., specializations in elementary 
or secondary music teaching or for noncredential objectives. It is possible to elect 
suitable concentration within these specializations in such areas as composition, 
conducting, vocal or instrumental music. 

Advanced study through upper division and graduate courses is offered in many 
fields of music. Although the masters degree program is not yet available it is 
anticipated that several of these courses soon will be applicable for graduate degree 
preparation. 

OPTION I 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 
(Nonteaching Objectives) 

The program of studies leading toward the bachelor of arts in music is designed 
to provide suitable preparation in such areas as (1) theory and composition, (2) 
performance, (3) nonteaching professions in music and (4) advanced degrees in 
music. The music major, professional degree program shall consist of no fewer 
than 60 semester units, of which at least 36 shall be in the upper division. In addi- 
tion, students are required to take Mu 151A,B or the equivalent as partial fulfill- 
ment of the general education requirement in fine and applied arts. The following 
minimum requirements are basic to this degree objective. 

Lowor Divifion 

Units 


Theory of music (including musicianship, sight singing, dictation, diatonic 

and chromatic harmony and keyboard) 12 

Applied techniques (including ensemble, principal instrument or voice, 
basic piano and voice) 12 

Total 24 

Upper Division 

Theory of music (including counterpoint, composition, analytic techniques 

and orchestration) 8 

Music history and literature 4 

Applied techniques (including ensemble, principal instrument or voice) 8 

Specialization in the major (courses required for area of specialization, to 

incude composition, conducting, instrumental techniques, and theory). 14 

Electives, music 2 

Total 36 

Total units, lower-upper divisions 60 


Note: All candidates for the bachelor of arts music major must complete specific 
requirements for the area of performance concentration in addition to the 
core of studies indicated above. 

OPTION II 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC, MUSICOLOGICAL EMPHASIS 

The program of studies for this concentration is primarily intended as a non- 
performance emphasis and stresses preparation in primary areas of musicology 


104 


Music 


which are a strong part of the liberal arts and humanistic studies of man. This B.A. 
preparation leads to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in musicology. This B.A. with the 
higher degrees which follow are considered logical preparation for certain areas of 
college teaching, although it is not the recommended preparation for persons in- 
tending to teach in public elementary and secondary schools. 


Lower Division Units 

Theory of Music (including musicianship, sight singing, dictation, diatonic 

and chromatic harmony and keyboard) 12 

Music History and Literature..^ 4 

Applied Techniques (including ensemble, principal instrument or voice, 
basic piano and voice)- 8 

Total 24 

Upper Division 

Theory of Music- 15 

History and Literature of Music (including Mu 351A,B and three “period” 

or specialized courses in music history and literature) 12 

Applied Techniques and Electives (including interdisciplinary courses, 
where appropriate, by advisement of the major department) 8 

Total 36 

Total units, lower-upper divisions. 60 


OPTION III 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 
IN MUSIC (MUSIC EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION) f 

Five-year Program Leading Toward the Standard Teaching • 

Credential, Secondary Specialization 

Refer to credential requirements. School of Education, in this catalog. 

In addition to the major field requirements, candidates for the standard teaching 
credential with specialization in secondary school teaching must complete a mini- 
mum of 20 units in another field for a liberal arts or academic minor. Courses in 
the major may be distributed to include the fifth year so the student may complete 
all requirements for general education, the academic minor and professional educa- 
tion (except Mu Ed 749) by the end of the fourth year and before beginning 
student teaching. 

The following is an example of a modified program for the secondary credential: 


Lower Division 

Freshman Year: Units 

Mu 111 A3 Music Theory — 6 

Mu 151 A3 Survey of Musical Literature 4 

Mu 161 Performance Ensemble 2 

Mu 170-176 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 

Mu 282A3 Piano Class for Music Majors 2 

0)llege requirements, including general education 16 

Total 32 


t Holders of the standard teaching credential, secondary specialization, may teach music (as a 
music maior) in either or both secondary and elementary public schools of California. The 
preparation described above is designed for the “music specialist^ who serves at either level. 


105 


Music 


Sophomore Year: Urdu 

Mu 211 A3 Music Theory 6 

Mu 161 Performance Ensemble 2 

Mu 170-176 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 

Mu 283 A3 Voice, Class for Music Majors 2 

College requirements, including general education 20 


Total - - - 32 

Pass proficiency examination in (1) theory, (2) piano, (3) principal instrument or 
voice. 


Upper Division 

Junior Year: 

General education (to complete 50) 

Academic minor (to complete 20 minimum) 

Professional education (Ed Sec 340 and Ed Found 311) 
Music courses, to include: 

Mu 3 12 A Counterpoint — — 

Mu 321 A Form and analysis 

Mu 322A Composition - 

Mu 351 A3 Music History and Literature . 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 

Mu 371-376 Principal Instrument or Voice 

Mu 281A,B Orchestral Instruments 

Mu 391 A,B Choral Conducting 


Units 
. 5-10 
. 5-10 
7 


2 

2 

2 

6 

2 

2 

4 

4 


M7-7 


Total 


34 


Senior Year: Units 

General educatiqn (to complete 50) 5-10 

Academic minor (to complete 20 minimum) 5-10 

Professional education, to include: 

Ed Found 301 ^ 


Music education, to include: 

Mu Ed 441 Teaching Music Theory and Appreciation in the Pub- 


lic Schools 2-3* 

Mu Ed 442 Teaching Vocal Music in the Public Schools . 2-3* 

Mu Ed 443 Teaching Instrumental Music in the Public Schools 2-3* 

Music courses, to include; 

Music theory electives 2 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 2 

Mu 370-378 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 

Mu 281c,d Orchestral Instruments 4 

Mu 392A Instrumental Conducting 2 

Approved music electives 3 

Mu 498 Senior Recital 


7 


13-3 


Total 34 


* Students without teadunjg experience must register for three units credit in one of the follow- 
ing: Mu 441, 442 or 443. 


106 


Music 


Postgraduate Year: 

Professional education, to include: 

Mu Ed 749 Student Teaching in Music in Secondary School 6 

Music courses, to include: 

Mu 361 Performance Ensemble 2 

Mu 570-578 Principal Instrument or Voice 2 

Approved music electives 2 ' 

Courses to complete major or toward higher degree specialization. ... 18 


Total 


30 


OPTION IV 

BACHELOR OF ARTS, WITH CONCENTRATION IN MUSIC 
(FOR ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM TEACHERS) 

This degree program is designed for persons interested in a nonprofessional 
liberal arts emphasis in music. It is a suitable concentration for persons preparing 
as general elementary classroom teachers. It should be emphasized that this degree 
program is not designed for the music specialist in public schools, nor does it 
prepare for advanced degrees in music or for most music professions. This major 
consists of no fewer than S6 semester ttmts, of which at least 24 units must be taken 
in the upper division. In addition, students are required to take Mu 100 or 151A,B 
or the equivalent as partial fulfillment of the general education requirement in 
fine and applied arts. The following distribution of subject matter and com- 
petencies shall be considered to be the core of this major: 


Low«r Division Uruts 

Theory of Music (including music fundamentals, musicianship, sightsinging, 

dictation, and harmony) 8-9 

Applied Techniques (including ensemble, principal instrument or voice, 
basic piano and voice) 3-4 


Total 12 

Upper Division 

Mu 333 Music and Child Development 3 

Mu 151A,B or 351A,B 4-6 

Applied Techniques * (including ensemble, orchestral instruments, conduct- 
ing, piano and voice) 15-17 


Total 


24 


Total, lower-upper divisions 36 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

The minor in music may be used as an appropriate area of study by persons 
whose majors are in other fields, or may be used to satisfy minor field requirements 
for elementary or secondary teaching credentials. A maximum of 12 units from 
the lower division may be included in work counted toward the music minor. The 
music minor requires a minimum preparation of 20 units. 

* Elementary credential candidates must take a minimum of two units each of piano and voice 
(nonprincipal) and pass satisfactorily the iunior level proficiency in each. 


107 


Music 


Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division Units 

Theory of Music (selected from Mu 101, 111A3» 211A,B or any 300- or 

400-level theory classes for which student is qualified) 6 

Music history and literature (Mu 100, 151A,B, 350 or courses at the 300 

or 400 level for which student is qualiHed) 4-6 

Applied Techniques (including ensemble, conducting, piano or voice, or- 
chestral instruments, and principal instrument or voice) 8-10 

Note: Students expecting to use the minor for teaching must complete 
four units (two courses) of Mu 281 a-d, Orchestral Instruments, and a 
minimum of two units in an ensemble appropriate to their area of speciali- 
zation. — 

Total 20 


MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts in music provides advanced 
studies in breadth as well as in an area of graduate specialization. The program 
is further intended to provide advanced course work with a suitable balance in 
such music studies as theory, composition, history, literature and advanced applied 
techniques. There are suitable graduate specializations in the areas of history and 
literature of music; advanced applied techniques; theory-composition; and music 
education. 

The master of arts in music is especially designed for teachers and supervisors 
of music; persons intending to specialize in applied fields in the pursuit of occu- 
pational goals; individuals preparing for college teaching; and persons intending to 
pursue advanced degrees beyond the master’s level. 

Prerequisites for Admission to the Program 

The student must have a baccalaureate degree with a major in music (or the 
equivalent of a major, i.e., 24 upper division courses in music). Opportunity is 
given the student to remove deficiencies by taking certain prescribed courses. 
Such courses cannot be applied to the master’s degree program. The student must 
also take the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination and pass the grad- 
uate music placement-proficiency examination. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study, no more than nine of 
which shall be outside the field of music, and at least 12 of which must be in 
500-level courses in the major. The student will take Music 500 (Graduate Studies 
in Music, two units) early in his program, and must include at least four units in 
history and literature of music, four in advanced techniques, two in theory com- 
position, and an added six units in one of the above, or in music education, as an 
area of specialization. A thesis or project is required, for which from three to six 
units may be granted. In addition, each program will include at least six units of 
study outside the field of music, but supportive to the program. Each program 
is individually designed in conference with the adviser. 

Also see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 

FEES FOR APPLIED MUSIC 

Applied music (private instruction in voice or major instrument), per lesson, 

Average studio lesson fee, including 14 half-hour lessons (one unit) and exami- 
nation, per semester $70-$96. 


108 


Philosophy 


DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Professor: Alamshah (chairman), Becker* 

Associate Professor: Hayner 
Assistant Professor: Silvers 
Instructor: Houlgate 

The aim of the Department of Philosophy is twofold: (1) to present curricular 
offerings in a manner that will awaken an appreciation for philosophical concerns; 
delineate the significant contributions made to the history of ideas by the great 
philosophers; and develop in those who concentrate in the field an appreciable 
degree of precision in communicating the subject matter of philosophy; (2) to 
draw attention to the significance of philosophical analysis in areas of vital concern 
for the life of society. 

Coursework in philosophy, therefore, has the following objectives: 

(1) To help students understand their own philosophical concerns; 

(2) To uncover and to delineate sound methodology for the clarification of 
philosophical problems; and 

(3) To prepare students who are seeking higher degrees in philosophy. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE: PHILOSOPHY MAJOR 


Requirements: A total of 36 units, beyond general education requirements, with 
the following distribution: 

Lower Division (maximum of 12 units, beyond general education requirements) 
Core requirements (6 units) 

21 lA. Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) 

21 IB. Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) 

Electives (6 units) 


Note: Students who have taken their lower division work elsewhere will be 
given credit for equivalent coursework. Up to 12 units of such coursework may 
be allowed for credit at the discretion of the department. 


Upper Division (minimum of 24 units) 

Core requirements (15 units) 

331 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) 

332 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) 
Plus choice of one of the following: 

417A, 417B Aristotle (3,3) 

427A,427B Spinoza (3,3) 

437A, 437B James (3,3) 

447A, 447B Plato (3,3) 

457A, 457B Hume (3,3) 

467 A, 467B Kant (3,3) 

Plus 499 Independent Study (3) 

Electives (minimum of 9 units) 


A program in philosophy profits greatly through the study of literary master- 
pieces, psychology, and the social sciences. Students of philosophy are advised to 
supplement their studies in philosophy with coursework offered in these fields. 
Philosophy majors are urged to acquire proficiency in a foreign language. 


* College administrative officer. 


109 


Physics 


MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 

Requirements: A total of 21 units (beyond general education requirements) 
Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

Core requirements (6 units) 

211 A Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) 

211B Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) 

Electives (3) 

Upper Division (minimum of 12 units) 

Core requirements (6 units) 

331 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) 

332 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) 

Electives (6) 


DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professors: Adams, R. (chairman), Blend 
Associate Professor: Dittman 
Assistant Professor: Crowley 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

The program leading to the bachelor of arts in physics provides the funda- 
mental instruction basic to the needs of the student who is preparing (1) to teach 
in elementary or secondary schools, (2) to undertake graduate work in physics 
or related fields, (3) to pursue additional collegiate studies leading to professional 
degrees in dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, and other professional, related areas, 
and (4) to seek employment in technical and applied fields. 

The faculty is concerned that the student of physics shall have adequate educa- 
tion in other liberal arts subjects, including foreign language. Through curriculum 
requirements and through elective subjects, the physics student will be expected 
to have a broad education in traditional liberal arts subjects, the several sciences, 
and mathematics. In particular, the student is urged to make his selections of 
elective courses outside the field of physics. 

To qualify for the bachelor of arts in physics, students must have a C average 
in all courses required for the major, including those in the related sciences. A 
proficiency in one modem foreign language (Russian, German, or French) is 
required. A reading comprehension of a second foreign language is strongly rec- 
ommended for students planning graduate study leading to the Ph.D. degree. This 
requirement is normally met by completing two semesters of fundamental foreign 
language (10 units) plus one semester of scientific foreign language (3 units) or 
two semesters of intermediate foreign language (6 units) with a grade of C or 
better in each course. Under unusual circumstances the requirement may be met 
by examination upon approval of the department chairman. Application must be 
made in the departmental office by October 15 for examination during the fall 
semester and by February 1 for examination during the spring semester. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade of D is received. 


110 


Physics 


MINIMUM DiPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE • 

Lower Division Ufd 

General chemistry (satisfies general education physical science requirement) 10 
Mathematics: analytic geometry and calculus (satisfies general education 

mathematics requirement) 14 

Fundamental physics 13 

Modem foreign language (Russian, German or French) 

Proficiency in one language required. (For details see paragraph above.) 

Upper Division Physics f 

431 Electricity and Magnetism 3 

441 Analytical Mechanics 3 

411 Theory of Wave Motion 3 

453 Nuclear Physics or 

451 Modem Physics.... 3 

416 Thermodynamics 3 

455 Introduction to Quantum Physics 3 

481A Advanced Physics Laboratory (electrical measurements and elec- 
tronics) 3 

48 IB Advanced Physics Laboratory (mechanics, acoustics, physical optics, 

atomic spectra) 3 

481C Advanced Physics Laboratory (atomic and nuclear physics) 3 

48 ID Advanced Physics Laboratory (selected experiments in classical and 

modem physics) 3 

Total 30 

Required Mathematics 

Mathematics courses in addition to analytic geometry and calculus 9 


MINOR IN PHYSICS 

A minimum of 20 units of physics are required for a minor. These shall include 
12 units of lower division physics (or equivalent as determined by the ^department 
of physics), and a minimum of 8 units of upper division physics, including a mini- 
mum of 2 units of advanced physics laboratory. 

Suggested Eight-semester Program for Major in Physics 


Semester 1. Freshman Ufdts 

Math 150 A Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Engl 101 Composition and World Literature 3 

For Lang 101 Fundamental Russian, German, or French 5 

Any required general education course 3 

Any physical education activity course *4 

Total 

Semester 2. Freshman 

Math 150B Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Engl 102 World Literature and Composition 3 

For Lang 102 Fundamental Russian, German, or French 5 

Phys 221 A Fundamental Physics 5 

Any physical education activity course ^ 

Total ... WVi 


* Substitutions in the program may be made on approval by the department chairman, 
t Theory courses will normally be taken in the order of listing. Laboratory courses will normally 
be taken in numerical order of course number. 


Ill 


Physics 

Units 

Semester 3. Sophomore 

Math 250A Intermediate Calculus 3 

Phys 22 IB Fundamental Physics 5 

For Lang 203 Intermediate Russian, German, or French 3 

Chem lOlA General Chemistry 5 

Any physical education activity course Vi 

Total WA 

Semester 4. Sophomore 

Math 250B Intermediate Calculus 3 

Phys 22 1C Fundamental Physics 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Chem 101 B General Chemistry 5 

Biol 100 Principles of Biology 2 

Any physical education activity course Vi 

Total \6Vi 

Semester 5. Junior 

Math 291 Linear Algebra 3 

Phys 431 Electricity and Magnetism 3 

Phys 481 A Advanced Physics Laboratory 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Biol 160 Principles of Zoology, or 

Bot 140 Principles of Botany .« 3 

Total 18 

Semester 6. Junior 

Math 3 50 A Advanced Calculus 3 

Phys 441 Analytical Mechanics 3 

Phys 48 IB Advanced Physics Laboratory 3 

Any required general education course .. 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Total - 18 

Semester 7. Senior 

Math 350B Advanced Calculus 3 

Phys 411 Theory of Wave Motion 3 

Phys 453 Nuclear Physics or 

Phys 451 Modem Physics 3 

Phys 48 IC Advanced Physics Laboratory 3 

Any required general education course 3 

Total - ^ 15 

(Honor students may add Physics 491, Senior Report (1).) 


112 


Pofitlcol Science 


Semester 8. Senior 

Phys 416 Thermodynamics 3 

Phys 455 Introduction to Quantum Physics 3 

Phys 48 ID Advanced Physics Laboratory 3 

Electives 1 6 

Total 15 


(Honor students may add Physics 492, Senior Report (2).) 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors: Hyink/ Mason, Richardson (chairman) 

Associate Professor: Foster 

Assistant Professors: Ashley, Bell, Cook, Francis, Kerschner, Lepper 
Lecturer: Cunningham 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The undergraduate major in political science prepares students for teaching, gov- 
ernment employment on the local, state and national level, foreign service, grad- 
uate work in political science, law school, or leadership in civic and political ac- 
tivities. Political science is also of value to prospective special librarians and 
journalists. 

Unit and Course Requirements 

The major consists of 36 units in political science of which at least 24 units must 
be in the upper division, plus 12 units in related departments taken with the ap- 
proval of the adviser. These units are in addition to those meeting the general edu- 
cation requirements. Prospective maj ors are encouraged to take courses in anthro- 
pology, economics, geography, history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and 
statistics. 

All majors are required to take: 

(1) Political Science 100, or 
Political Science 101 and 311; 

(2) Political Science 306; and 

(3) At least one course from each of the following groups. 

Political Science Courses 

In each group, the courses marked with a dagger (t) should be taken first. 

Political Theory 

t341 Fundamental Principles of Political Theory 
342 Specific Problems in Political 'f heory 
406 Scope and Theory of Political Science 
440 Recent Political TTiought 

442 American Political Thought 

443 Political Theories of Communist States 

Comparative Government 

t231 Government and Politics of Major Powers 
431 Government and Politics of Democracies 
433 Government and Politics of Totalitarian Systems 
436 Government and Politics of Developing Societies 
438 Latin American Political Behavior 
443 Political Theories of Communist States 
453 Foreign Policy Formulation 


College administrative officer. 


113 


Ph) 


Sem 

iV 

p 

F 

C 

A 


Sem 

M 

P] 

A 

C 

Bi 

A 


Sem 

M 

PI 

PI 

A 

A 

Bi 


Sem 

M 

PI 

PI 

A: 

A; 

A 


Sem 

M 

PI 

Ph 

Ai 


11 ! 


Political Science 


International Relatieni 

t351 International Relations 

450 Current Problems in American Foreign Policy 

451 Problems in International Relations 

452 Conduct of American Foreign Relations 

453 Foreign Policy Formulation 

454 The Soviet Union in World Affairs 

460 International Law 

461 The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations 
463 The International Relations and Problems of Latin America 

Public Administration 

t311 State and Local Government 
t320 Introduction to Public Administration 
416 The American Presidency 

420 Local Government and Administration 

421 Government Finance Administration 

422 Public Personnel Administration 

424 City and Regional Planning 

425 Comparative Public Administration 

426 Government Organization and Management 
429 Government Internship 

452 Conduct of American Foreign Relations 

American Politics 

t311 State and Local Government 
t312 Political Parties and Pressure Groups 
371 The Judicial Process 

414 The Legislative Process 

415 Political Behavior 

416 The American Presidency 
442 American Political Thought 

452 Conduct of American Foreign Relations 

473 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties 

474 Constitutional Law and Governmental Power 

Public Law 

t371 The Judicial Process 
460 International Law 

473 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties 

474 Constitutional Law and Governmental Power 

The department has no rigid concentration requirements. 

Each student will be assigned to a member of the department for individt 
guidance and advice designed to prepare the student for his educational and pr 
fessional objectives. Students planning on a career in the foreign service are e 
couraged to take their elective units in American culture, geography, and histoi 
Proficiency in a foreign language is strongly recommended for students plannii 
on graduate work or the foreign service. A course in statistics is advisable f 
others. 

The public administration program is designed to prepare students for pub) 
service careers with local, state and federal units of government. The progra 
also provides the basis for graduate work for those interested in advanced degret 
Students, in addition to taking the essential courses, will have numerous oppc 
tunities to study, observe, and serve as interns in governmental agencies in the an 

114 


Psychology 


The prelaw student may work out an individual program in consultation with 
his adviser to meet the specific requirements for admission to the law school of his 
choice. Courses in related fields may include work in anthropology, economics, his- 
tory, psychology, and sociology; also in accounting and report writing. 

TEACHING MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The teaching minor is composed of 21 units of political science, in addition 
to those meeting the general education requirements. All minors are required to 
take three courses from any one of the groups listed above. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

This degree is planned for the professional improvement of high school and 
junior college teachers, for government employees on the local, state, and national 
levels (including personnel in the military service), for students interested in ad- 
vanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree in political science, and for indi- 
viduals interested in community and political leadership. It offers concentrations in: 
American government; 

International relations; and 
Public administration. 

Prerequisites 

Students desiring to enter the program must register with the department secre- 
tary. They must have an undergraduate major in political science equivalent to 
that required by California State College at Fullerton, with a GPA of 3.0 or better 
in upper division courses of the major. Each student’s background and record will 
be evaluated carefully. Satisfactory scores on the aptitude test of the Graduate Rec- 
ord Examination are required. The GRE Advanced Test in Government also may 
be required. Reading knowledge of a foreign language will be required of stu- 
dents concentrating in international affairs, if such proficiency is determined by 
the graduate adviser to be pertinent to the student’s professional needs. While 
students may be admitted with limited subject or grade deficiencies, these must be 
removed by completing adviser-approved courses in addition to those required for 
the degree, with at least a B average in political science courses. 

Program of Study 

Thirty units of adviser-approved graduate courses are required on the degree 
study plan. Of these, 12 to 18 will be in the field of concentration, six to 12 in other 
courses to broaden the background in political science, and six units in supportive 
courses in other social sciences or related fields. At least 15 units must be in 500- 
level courses. All M.A. programs will include a minimum of three units in a course 
in research methods, either undergraduate or graduate. Other courses will be se- 
lected in accordance with the professional needs of the student. A thesis or project 
(3-6 units) will be required. 

See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” page 64. 


DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Schmidt (chairman), Lindley, Tsai 

Assistant Professors: Calhou*, Carlson, Curtis, Grayson, Morrow 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The major in psychology consists of 36 units of lower and upper division work 
designed for students (1) who want a sound background in psychology as a science, 
(2) who want a basic understanding of human behavior as a supplement to some 


115 


Psychology 


other major course of study, and (3) those who wish to acquire a thorough under- 
graduate training in psychology in anticipation of graduate study. 

Requirements for the Mojor 
Lower Division 

Units 


Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology 3 

Psychology 161 Elementary Statistics 3 

Psychology 202 Principles of Psychology 3 


Upper Division 

To take upper division work, at least six units of psychology (including Psy- 
chology 101) must have been completed in the lower division. In addition, a mini- 
mum of 27 units of upper division work constitutes a major in psychology. Fifteen 
units are required as follows: 

Psychology 302 Elxperimental Psychology: Learning and Motivation 3 
Psychology 303 Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception 3 


or 

Psychology 321 Physiological Psychology 3 

Psychology 351 Social Psychology or 3 

Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality 3 

Psychology 461 Group Psychological Testing 3 

Psychology 408 History of Psychology 3 


A minimum of 12 additional units in psychology courses will be selected in con- 
sultation with the academic adviser. 

Recommended Related Courses 

Courses from each of the following areas according to the student's interests: 
(1) social sciences; (2) physical sciences; (3) biological sciences; (4) mathematics; 
(5) humanities. 

Students planning to do graduate work in psychology are advised to plan addi- 
tional work in biological and physical sciences and to include at least a one- 
semester course in college mathematics. Undergraduate work in foreign languages 
is also recommended. 


MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

This degree is planned to extend the body of psychological knowledge developed 
in the undergraduate major and result in the development of greater depth in 
understanding the content of psychology; increased skill in research capabilities; 
the professional reporting of research; potential career skills; and sound preparation 
for students planning to go on to advanced graduate work. On completion of this 
program, students will have a better understanding of the many and complex dis- 
ciplines in psychology as well as an understanding of related behavioral and scien- 
tific areas of study. 

Prerequisites 

Students to be admitted to the program must: (1) meet the general prerequisites 
for graduate work formulated and recommended by the college; (2) have com- 
pleted a bachelor’s degree with a major in psychology or 24 units in upper division 
psychology including a course in statistics, a course in the history of psychol- 
ogy, an upper division laboratory course in psychology, at least two of the follow- 
ing courses: physiological psychology, learning, sensation and perception, motiva- 
tion, and at least one of the following courses: social psychology, personality, 
developmental psychology; psychological testing; (3) have completed or must 
complete within the first year of graduate study a course in college mathematics. 


116 


Science and Mathematics Education 


a course in the biological sciences beyond the college’s general education require- 
ment, and a course in sociology or anthropology beyond the college’s general edu- 
cation requirement; (4) have completed a baccalaureate degree with a 2.5 general 
average and a 3.0 average in psychology; (5) show satisfactory performance on 
the aptitude test and the advanced test in psychology, which are parts of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

Program of Study 

The Master of Arts in Psychology requires a minimum of 24 units of approved 
graduate work in the major field, including the completion and acceptance by the 
Psychology Department Graduate Study Committee of a written thesis, plus six 
units of approved work for graduate credit from other related areas. 

The student, in consultation with an adviser on the staff of the Psychology De- 
partment, shall develop a program of studies which will be submitted to the 
Graduate Study Committee of the Department of Psychology for approval. 

Course requirements for the M.A. in Psychology: 

Units Totals 


Psychology 500 Advanced General Psychology 3 

Psychology 510 Advanced Experimental Design 3 

Psychology 520 Seminar: Experimental Psychology ... 3 

Psychology 521 Seminar: Personality and Social Psychology_ 3 

Psychology 599 Thesis 3-6 15-18 

Related courses outside psychology. 6 6 

Elective courses in psychology 6-9 6-9 

Total units for M.A. in psychology 30 


Students will be required to pass a comprehensive examination in psychology in 
addition to satisfactory performance in the above courses. 


DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
EDUCATION 

Professor: Lay 

Associate Professors: Lepper, Turner (chairman) 

Assistant Professor: Fletcher 

The department does not offer any degree program at this time. 

The Department of Science and Mathematics Education prepares students to 
teach in the areas of science and mathematics at the elementary and secondary 
levels, to provide guidance for experienced teachers in the study and use of edu- 
cational practices developed for the teaching of sciences and mathematics and to 
help teachers develop original ideas in their areas of specialization. 

The offerings of this department include basic professional training courses re- 
quired for teacher certification, advanced coursework in science and mathematics 
education, and certain academic content offerings designed especially for teacher 
preparation. 

Requirements for teaching majors and minors in science and mathematics are 
listed under the respective academic departments. 

REQUIRED COURSEWORK 

The following courses offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics 
Education are required for teaching credential candidates. 

Elementary School Credential Candidates— Any Major 

Math Ed lOOA Fund. Concepts of Math. — Arithmetic 
Sci Ed 310 Elementary Experimental Science 


117 


Social Sciences 


Secondary School Credential Candidates— Saence 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 
Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Science — Secondary 

Secondary School Credential Candidates— Moffcematics 

Math Ed lOOB Fund. Concepts of Math. — Arithmetic 
Math Ed 300 Fund. Concepts of Math. — Algebra 
Math Ed 301 Fund. Concepts of Math — Geometry 
Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School 
Math Ed 749 Student Teaching in Mathematics — Secondary 


MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

(An Interdepartmental Program) 

The Master of Arts in Social Sciences allows a student to pursue advanced work 
in two or three related fields.* Selection may be made from the following: eco- 
nomics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. The thirty 
(30) units approved by the graduate adviser, from the department of the student’s 
first field, are to be arranged in one of the following patterns: 

units 
units 


Pattern A (two fields) 

First field 

18 or 15 


Second field . 

12 or 15 



30 30 

Pattern B (three fields) 

First field 

15 or 12 or 


Second field 

9 or 12 or 


Third field 

6 or 6 or 



30 30 


units 
12 units 
9 units 
9 units 


30 units 

Specific requirements include: 

At least 12 units of graduate courses (500 level); 

An upper division or graduate level course in research methods and bibliography 
in one of the social sciences; 

Thesis or project; 

Oral examination on the thesis or project and on the courses offered for the 
degree; 

Satisfactory completion of the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination; 
The area test of the Graduate Record Examination may be required. 

There is no foreign language requirement, but certain fields may require work 
in statistics. An undergraduate major in social sciences, or 24 units of upper divi- 
sion courses in social sciences (approved by the adviser) with a GPA of at least 
3.0 is required. The graduate adviser will be selected from the first field. In case 
of the 15-15 pattern, the adviser is chosen from the department in which the thesis 
or project is written. 

Before the appointment of a graduate adviser, the following steps must be com- 
pleted: 

1. Admission to the college as an unclassified graduate student; 

2. Filing in the Office of Admissions of two official sets of transcripts of all 
collegiate and graduate work; and 

3. Submission of satisfactory results of the Graduate Record Examination (s). 

In consultation with his graduate adviser, the student will develop a proposed 
study plan. When approved by his graduate adviser and pursued satisfactorily the 

* Consult adviser about prerequisites. 

118 


Sociology 

programmed work can lead to the master’s degree, subject to the completion of 
all other requirements for the degree. 

See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professor: Davis (chairman) 

Associate Professor: J. R. Smith 

Assistant Professors: Copp, Faia, Ibrahim, Jacobson, Mend, Palisi, Poorkaj, Works 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The major in sociology provides knowledge concerning the structure and func- 
tioning of human society. It may be applied in a wide range of situations in which 
the student may participate professionally or as a citizen. 

Unit Requirements 

The required minimum for the major is 42 units, in addition to those taken for 
the general education requirement, distributed as follows: 

Courses in Sociology 

Thirty units must be taken in sociology, 24 in upper division courses. Sociology 
201 is required, and 3 additional units are acceptable from lower division offer- 
ings. The minimum of 24 upper division units must include 331 A, 33 IB, 341, 481, 
and at least one of the following: 436, 470, 473, 477. 

Minimum units 30 

Related Courses 

Twelve upper division units are to be taken in the related fields of anthro- 
pology, economics, geography, history, political science, and psychology, to be 


approved by the major adviser. 

Minimum units — 12 

Minimum total units for the major 42 


The following suggestions will enable the student to work towards his own 
career objectives in selecting courses to meet the above requirements for the 
major in sociology: 

(a) Courses suggested for preparation for graduate study in sociology and careers 
in teaching or research: ^ciology 348, 361, 371, 425, 436, 451, 458, 473, 477, 
480; Anthropology 201, 202, 421; Economics 200A, 200B, 302, 303, 326; (Geog- 
raphy 310, 417; History 401, 429, 486A-B; Philosophy 250, 331, 407; Political 
Science 231, 312, 341, 415; Psychology 331, 341, 431; a reading knowledge of 
at least one foreign language. 

(b) Courses suggested for those interested in immediate employment or graduate 
study in social work, corrections and related careers: Social Welfare 311, 
351A, 351B; Sociology 202, 371, 411, 413, 431, 436, 451, 465, 470; Anthropology 
202, 415; Economics 200 A, 201; (Geography 121, 471; Philosophy 310, 331; 
Psychology 341, 342; Political lienee 311, 320, 420. 

(c) Courses suggested for careers in industry or government service, or for 
pre-law: Sociology 202, 361, 371, 411, 465, 470, 473; Anthropology 202, 301, 
360, 425; Economics 200A, 200B, 201, 326, 401; Geography 471, 481; History 
474, 475, 476; Political lienee 320, 414, 420, 436, 461, 473; Psychology 
342, 391. 


119 


Sociology 


TEACHING MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 


For teaching credential purposes a minor consists of 21 units in sociology, dis- 
tributed as follows: 


Credits 


201 - 3 

202 or 411 or 413 or 431 3 

341 or 451 3 

477 or 480 or 481 3 

Electives in sociology 9 


21 

(Recommended that courses be chosen from group “a” as listed above.) 

Social Welfare 

Students seeking employment or graduate study in social work should refer to 
paragraph (b) under the sociology major if they plan to major in sociology; but 
satisfactory preparation is also provided by other majors, such as psychology, 
anthropology, economics, or political science. There is no major in social welfare, 
but three courses — Social Welfare 311, Welfare Institutions; 351 A, Social Work 
Methods; and 35 IB, Social Work Methods — provide a thorough introduction to the 
field by professional social workers. The best preparation for a welfare position 
with the B.A. degree, or for graduate study in social work, is a broad background 
in the social sciences. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The program for this degree provides advanced study in general sociology. 
It offers an opportunity to broaden one’s knowledge of society, to strengthen 
skills of sociological analysis, and to do research in depth in an area of particular 
interest. It may be used as preparation for study toward the doctorate in sociology, 
for junior college teaching, panicipation in research, or for a variety of positions 
in business and industry, corrections, the community, or government. 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the program requires a minimum of 18 upper division units in soci- 
olog>% including the following courses or their equivalents: 

331 A Social Research Methods (design, collecting data, etc.) 

33 IB Social Research Methods (elementary statistics) 

341 Social Interaction 
481 Sociological Theory 

Also required is a GPA of 3.0 (B) for all work in sociology, a 2.5 average for all 
previous college work, and satisfactory performance on the aptitude test of the 
Graduate Record Examination. Students with limited grade or course deficiencies 
may be considered for admission to the program on completion of adviser-approved 
courses with a B average. 


Program of Study 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: Units 

1. Sociology 531 Advanced Methods and Measurements in Sociology — 3 

2. Sociology 581 Analysis of Sociological Theory 3 

3. Sociology 591 Thesis 6 

4. Any two graduate seminars in sociology (3 units each) 6 

5. Upper division or graduate work in sociology 6 

6. Upper division or graduate work in related fields 6 


120 


30 


Speech 


To complete the requirements, the candidate must successfully defend the thesis 
in an oral examination by a committee, and pass a comprehensive examination. 

For requirements “5” and “6” above, any adviser-approved 400-level or 300-level 
course taken as a graduate student may be used. Additional seminars, or Sociology 
599, Independent Study and Research, may be used for requirement “5”, but not 
in lieu of the thesis. Normally the student will register for thesis two different 
times, for three units each semester. 

Also, see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” page 64. 


DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

Professors: Andersen, Fessenden (chairman). Long,* Nelson 

Associate Professor: Granell 

Assistant Professors: Enell, Good, Kaplan 

Cfourse work in the Department of Speech is directed toward five goals: (1) to 
provide an understanding and appreciation of the importance of the role of oral 
communication in our society; (2) to provide professional training in such areas 
as teaching, business, law, and others where the ability to speak well and to 
communicate effectively is basic; (3) to prepare specialists in public address and in 
speech pathology and audiology; (4) to provide active intramural and intercollegi- 
ate forensic programs; and (5) to correlate school and community clinic experi- 
ences with the theory, principle, and history of speech pathology and audiology. 

A master of arts degree program is offered for students who need this level of 
work in their professional fields and those who plan to continue toward the doc- 
torate in speech. 

MAJOR IN SPEECH FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The major requires a total of 36 units, 24 of which must be from 3(X)- and 4(X)- 
level courses. 

Course programs are planned (1) to prepare students who seek to fulfill the 
liberal arts objectives of the college with an emphasis in the field of speech, and 
(2) to prepare students who seek a standard teaching credential. 

A. The liberal arts major is the basic program for all students: 

Lower Division: Speech 101 for general education (not included in the 36 units) 
A course in oral interpretation: Speech 211 or 311 
A basic course in public speaking: Speech 231 
A basic course in logic and evidence: Speech 235 
Upper Division: 

A course in discussion: Speech 324 or 424 
An advanced course in public speaking: Speech 334 
An advanced course in argumentation: Speech 335 
A course in phonetics or speech correction: Speech 341 or 441 
A course in speech development: Speech 403 
A course in rhetoric: Speech 434 or 436 

In addition to the above, the liberal arts major elects nine units from either 
public address or speech pathology and audiology. 

B. The programs for the standard teaching credential vary from the liberal arts 
major in these respects: 

1. For elementary teaching add Speech 202 to lower division requirements and 
301 to upper division requirements. 


College administrative officer. 


121 


Speech 


2. For secondary teaching add Speech 138 to lower division requirements and 
338 to upper division requirements. 

The fifth year is required for either of the above credential programs and is to 
include a minimum of six units of adviser approved electives in speech. Speech 
Ed 442 must be taken by the student seeking the secondary teaching credential 
before he can be approved for student teaching. 

3. For iurdoT college teaching the student follows the program given for the 
secondary school teaching. In addition, the master of arts degree in speech is 
required. 

MINOR IN SPEECH 

The minor in speech is to follow one of these two patterns: 

1. The minor for the elementary teaching credential is 24 units as follows: 
Speech 101 (not to be included as credit for minor), 211 or 311, 231, 235, 301, 334, 
341, 403 or 441, and 434 or 436. 

2. The minor for secondary teaching or junior college teaching is 23 units as 
follows: Speech 101 (not to be included as credit for minor), 138, 231, 235, 324 or 
424, 334, 341 or 403, 434 or 436, and 442. 

SPECIALIZED PREPARATION FOR THE TEACHING OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 
IN THE SPEECH AND HEARING AREA 

Specialized preparation for the teaching of exceptional children in the speech and 
hearing area is a five-year program, is offered in lieu of a minor, and requires an 
academic major, which may appropriately be the program set forth above for 
the elementary teaching credential goal. The following are the programs for which 
the college is accredited and which it is authorized to offer in this field: 

Completion of all of the general education requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree: 50 units to include (a) Mathematics Educ lOOA; (b) a year of English 
and in addition competency in composition; (c) the requirement in United 
States Constitution; and (d) other course work as listed in this catalog. 

This specialized preparation should include the following (courses with an 
asterisk (*) must be included): 

a. Educ Sch Svc 452, •Educ Sch Svc 471, •Speech 403, •Educ Elem 431 

b. •Speech 341, •Speech 351, •Speech 441, •Speech 443, •Speech 404, •Psychol- 
ogy 341 

c. Select with adviser from Speech 451, Speech 452, Psychology 342, Speech 
557A-H, Speech 563 

d. •Speech 461, •Speech 462, •Speech 463 

e. •Speech 458 and/or 558 (minimum of 135 clock hours over a period of three 
semesters), •Speech Educ 459 (minimum of 90 clock hours) 

f. The department offers the student two options: either of which fulfills the 
requirements for the credential. Option A will carry the recommendation of 
the School of Education. Option B is not designed to prepare the student 
for regular classroom teaching; therefore, the student following this option 
will not receive the recommendation of the School of Education for the 
standard teaching credential. 

Students following Option A: 

•Educ Found 301, Educ Found 311, Educ Found 331, and 90 clock hours of 
student teaching in a contained classroom. 

Students following Option B: 

•Educ 301 or Educ 400 
•Psychology 311 or Educ 311 
•Speech 451 and •Speech 452 


122 


Speech 


MASTER OF ARTS IN SPEECH 

General Characteristics: 

This degree, with concentrations in public address, speech and hearing, and 
drama, is designed as a coordinated program of graduate studies to provide incen- 
tive for intellectual growth, to reflect in improvement in teaching and professional 
recognition, and to provide a sound basis for continued graduate study in speech 
and drama. The student is expected to demonstrate a high degree of intellectual 
and creative competence, to evaluate critically, and to demonstrate mastery of his 
field of concentration. 

Prerequisites: 

In addition to the college requirements, students admitted to this program must 
possess at least 24 units of upper division studies in speech and/or drama and they 
must satisfactorily have completed the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination. To advance in the program, students must demonstrate oral proficiency 
and their effectiveness in graduate studies by at least a B average in the initial 
courses of the program. 

Program of Studies: 

The degree study plan will include at least 30 units of adviser-approved graduate 
studies, 15 units of which must be in 500-level courses. Each program will have at 
least 15 units in one of the areas of concentration; a core of six units, to include 
Speech 500 or Drama 500 (Introduction to Graduate Study — taken very early in 
the program), and Speech 591 or Drama 591 (Project or Thesis); and six units of 
adviser-approved supporting courses in related fields in other areas or departments. 
Before the degree is granted, each student will pass an oral and written compre- 
hensive examination. 

See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” p. 64. 


123 


DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 


Professor: Valpey (Chairman) 

COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

The Division of Engineering offers courses at the undergraduate and graduate 
level. These individual courses are described in the section of this catalog on 
announcement of courses. At the undergraduate level, the division prescribes cer- 
tain patterns of courses, combined with those of other academic departments and 
schools of the college, as a program of 136 semester units leading to the bachelor 
of science in engineering. At the graduate level, the division offers a sequence of 
courses as a program of 30 semester units. On approval of the chancellor, this 
program will lead to the master of science in engineering. In both the under- 
graduate and graduate programs specific options in major fields are offered. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN ENGINEERING 

The heart of the engineering program is a core curriculum somewhat broader 
than that of the traditional engineering program. This core includes courses in 
mathematics, physics, chemistry, basic engineering sciences, and the humanities, 
and provides a firm basis for more specialized knowledge at an advanced level. 
Beyond the basic core, the student may choose topics in one of the major subject 
options listed below. A minimum of 27 hours of study will constitute a major 
option. During the first IVi years, all students in engineering will take the same 
program emphasizing the interrelationship of all engineering subjects to form the 
broad background required of all modern engineers. 

The program of 136 semester units presumes that the entering student brings a 
high school preparation which includes geometry, trigonometry, two years of alge- 
bra, either physics or chemistry, and mechanical drawing. Students deficient in 
any of these areas will be expected to make them up during the summer before 
first registration. Placement examinations are required in mathematics. The major 
options in engineering are: 

Electrical engineering 
Mechanical engineering 
Civil engineering 
Engineering science 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE 


Lower Division, Nonengineering (all required for B.S.): Units 

PE (any activities) 2 

Hist 170A or 1708 U.S. History 3 

Speech 101 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Eng 101 Composition and Literature 3 

Eng 102 Literature and Composition 3 

Pol Sci 101 Introduction to Politics and Government 3 

Psych 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Humanities approved elective 3 

Math 150A * Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 

Math 150B * Analytic Geometry and Calculus— 4 


* Students leceiving advanced placement in mathematics will be expected to replace validated 
courses with additional courses in mathematics. 

124 


Engineering 


Units 


Math 250A Intermediate Calculus . . 3 

Math 250B Intermediate Calculus 3 

Chem lOlA General Chemistry 5 

Chem 105 Chemistry (for engineers) 3 

Bio Sci 100 Principles of Biology 2 

Phys 221 Fundamental Physics 5 

Phys 222 Fundamental Physics 5 

57 

Lower Division, Engineering (oil required for B.S.): 

Engr 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computers 1 

Engr 102 Graphical Analysis 2 

Engr 201 Statics 3 

Engr 202 Dynamics 3 

Engr 203 Electric Circuits 3 

Engr 203 A Electric Circuits Laboratory l 

13 

Upper Division, Nonengineering (all required for B.S.): 

Soc Sci Approved upper division elective 3 

Econ 301 Fundamentals of Economics ^ 3 

Mgmt 341 Principles of Management 3 

9 

Upper Division, Engineering (oil required for B.S.): 

Engr 301 Strength of Materials 3 

Engr 302 Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Engr 303 Electronic Circuits 3 

Engr 3 03 A Electronic Circuits Laboratory 1 

Engr 304 Thermodynamics 3 

Engr 305 Fluid Mechanics 3 

Engr 306 Unified Laboratory I 1 

Engr 307 Unified Laboratory II 1 

Engr 308 Engineering Problem Analysis 1 3 

Engr 401 Engineering Problem Analysis II 3 

Engr 310 Engineering Economy 2 

Engr 309 Control Systems 3 

Engr 309A Control Systems Laboratory.. 1 


30 

Upper Division Courses for Option (27 units required for B.S.): 

Four options are offered within the bachelor of science in engineering program: 
electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, and engineering 
science. For each option, 27 units are required for the B.S. The following list may 
not be all-inclusive or restrictive. 

Electrical Engineering Option (27 units required for B.S.): 


Engr 311 Electromagnetic Fields 3 

Engr 311A Electromagnetic Fields Laboratory 1 

Engr 312 Linear Systems Analysis .. 3 

Engr 313 Circuit Theory and Design . .. 3 

Engr 314 Electronic Communications Systems 3 

Engr 314A Electronic Communications Laboratory 1 


125 


Engineering 

Units 

Engr 318 Statistics 3 

Engr 402 Digital Computers 3 

Engr 402 A Digital Computer Laboratory 1 

Engr 403 Numerical Methods 3 

Engr 404 Analog Computers 3 

Engr 404A Analog Computer Laboratory 1 

Engr 405 Properties of Plasmas 2 

Engr 491 A, B Senior Engineering Projects 4 

27 

136 

Mechanical Engineering Option (27 units required for B.S.): 

Engr 315 Machine Design 3 

Engr 316 Thermodynamics II 2 

Engr 317 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 4 

Engr 318 Statistics . - - - - 3 

Engr 319 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 

Engr 320 Physical Metallurgy - 3 

Engr 321 Turbomachinery 3 

Engr 406 Dynamic Response - 3 

Engr 415 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics 3 

Engr 406A Dynamic Response Laboratory 1 

Engr 407 Heat Transfer 2 

Engr 403 Numerical Methods 3 

Engr 408 Stress Analysis 3 

Engr 412 Theory of Elasticity 3 

Engr 492 A, B Senior Engineering Projects 4 

27 

136 

Civil Engineering Option (27 units required for B.S.): 

Engr 322 Measurements .. 2 

Engr 323 Indeterminate Structure 3 

Engr 324 Soil Mechanics 4 

Engr 325 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 

Engr 403 Numerical Methods 3 

Engr 326 Structural Design 3 

Engr 327 Foundation Design 2 

Engr 328 Transport Systems 2 

Engr 329 Highway Engineering 3 

Engr 330 Water and Waste Water Engineering 4 

Engr 409 Advanced Structural Design 3 

Engr 410 Intermediate Dynamics 3 

Engr 411 Dynamics of Structures 3 

Engr 412 Theory of Elasticity 3 

Engr 413 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 

Engr 414 Digital Computers in Structural Design 3 

Engr 439A3 Senior Engineering Projects 4 

27 

136 

126 


Engineering 


Engineering Science Option (27 units required for B.S.): 

The program in engineering science is to be selected by the student and his 
adviser and submitted for approval to a committee of the Division of Engineering 
(supplemented, if appropriate, by members of the science and mathematics fac- 
ulty). The^courses are to be selected from upper division electives in engineering, 
physics, chemistry, mathematics, and biology (additional prerequisites for science 
courses may be required), to meet a special and specific engineering science objec- 
tive of the student, such as engineering physics. 

DETAIL OUTLINE OF TYPICAL EIGHT-SEMESTER PROGRAM 
FOR B.S. IN ENGINEERING 
(136 Units) 

Semester 1 Freshman Units 

PE (any activity) K 

Hist 170A or B U.S. History 3 

Speech 101 Fundamentals of speech 3 

Math 150A Calculus 4 

Chem lOlA General Chemistry 5 

Engr 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computers 1 

16»/2 

Semester 2 Freshman 

Math HOB (Dalculus 4 

Physics 221 Fundamentals of Physics 5 

Chem 105 Chemistry (for engineers) 3 

Bio Sci 100 Principles of Biology 2 

Engr 102 Graphical Analysis 2 

16*/2 

Semester 3 Sophomore 

PE (any activity) *4 

Eng 101 (Composition and Literature 3 

Pol Sci 101 Introduction to Politics and Government 3 

Math 250A Calculus 3 

Physics 222 Fundamental Physics 5 

Engr 201 Statics 3 

17/2 

Semester 4 Sophomore 

PE (any activity) */2 

Eng 102 (Composition and Literature 3 

Math 250B Calculus : 3 

Engr 202 Dynamics 3 

Psych 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Engr 203 Electrical Circuits 3 

Engr 203 A Electrical Circuits Lab I 1 

16/2 


127 


Engineering 


Semester 5 Junior Units 

Engr 301 Strength of Materials 3 

Engr 303 Electrical Circuits II 3 

Engr 303 A Electrical Circuits Lab II 1 

Engr 304 Thermodynamics 3 

Engr 305 Fluid Mechanics 3 

Engr 306 Unified Laboratory I 1 

Engr 302 Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

17 

Semester 6 Junior 

Soc Sci elective 3 

Engr 310 Engineering Economy 2 

Engr 308 Engineering Problem Analysis I 3 

Engr 307 Unified Lab II 1 

Engineering option courses* 9 

18 

Semester 7 Senior 

Econ 301 Fundamentals of Economy 3 

Engr 401 Problem Analysis II 3 

Engr 309 Control Systems 3 

Engr 309A Control Systems Lab 1 

Engineering option courses* 8 

18 

Semester 8 Senior 

Humanities elective 3 

Mgmt 341 Principles of Management 3 

Engineering option courses* 10 

16 

* Each option will require two units per senior semester in senior protects peculiar to that option. 


128 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

AND ECONOMICS 


r 


5--66198 


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Dean: Donald S. Tull 


Department of Accounting and Finance 
Professor: Wiseman (chairman) 

Associate Professors: Kinney, Lane, Nichols, Woo 
Lecturers: Dennison, Hardman 
Department of Economics 
Professor: Townshend-Zellner (chairman) 

Associate Professors: Graves, Phillips, Pontney 
Assistant Professors: Joun, Kasun, Lafky, Schick, Vinod 
Lecturer: Thompson 
Department of Management 
Professor: Barres (chairman) 

Associate Professors: Goodell, McCloud, Trego 
Assistant Professors: Baillie, Colgan, McKee, Shaul 
Department of Marketing and Quantitative Methods 
Professors: Roberts, Smith,* Tull (chairman) 

Associate Professor: Hussain 

Assistant Professors: Beaton, Fyfe, Lange, Sastry 

Lecturer: Colman 

THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Through a study of the various theoretical and practical business policies and 
procedures, the School of Business Administration and Economics seeks to afford 
a basic education for managerial and professional positions in business, government, 
and education. Although emphasis is given to theory, factual content which is essen- 
tial in specific vocations such as accounting, economics, finance, marketing, manage- 
ment, and business education is provided to enable students to enter apprenticeships 
in these fields with the expectation that their education should expedite their prog- 
ress, either to managerial positions or to staff positions as professional accountants, 
economists, educators, and marketing and business consultants. 

In our ever-expanding, complex society, the managers of tomorrow must be men 
and women with breadth of understanding and vision. Students who concentrate 
in a special area are encouraged to elect courses in other divisions of the college, 
particularly in the areas of the behavioral, social, and political sciences, and foreign 
languages. It is assumed that the first half of their college work toward a bachelor’s 
degree represents a required basic education in communication, mathematics, a 
laboratory science, social science, and the humanities. With the broadening of our 
cultural and business horizons, it is desirable to become increasingly better versed in 
the language of our neighbors, Spanish, and in such languages as French, Cjcrman, 
and Russian. Since the understanding of mathematics is becoming increasingly 
important in business and the social sciences, students who contemplate enrollment 
in either business administration or economics are encouraged to take four years of 
high school mathematics. College algebra, or three years of high school mathematics 
including a second course in algebra, will be a minimum prerequisite for entrance 
to the program. 


College administrative officer. 


131 


Business Administration 


If credits for either or both elementary accounting and principles of economics 
have not been earned, it will be necessary to enroll in these courses the first semes- 
ter of the junior year. 

Students enrolled in the school and working toward a college degree are subject 
to the general requirements of the college as to courses and credit hours required 
for graduation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree requirements are as follows: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester credit hours in business administra- 
tion and economics courses in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics, of which 35 semester credit hours must be upper division courses. 

2. Completion of at least 15 semester credit hours in the School of Business 
Administration and Economics at the college. 

3. Completion of the required core courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics. Students in business administration are required to 
take Mathematics 120 (Finite Mathematics) or equivalent as prerequisite to 
Quantitative Methods 361. 

4. Completion of 12 semester credit hours of required courses in an area of 
concentration to be selected by the student. 

5. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than business 
administration and economics. 

6. Students must attain at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all 
college work attempted, in all courses taken in the School of Business Admin- 
istration and Economics, and in his area of concentration. 

CORE: The business administration and economics courses listed below are re- 
quired of all students majoring in business administration: 


Course Units 

Economics 1(X) American Economic History 3 

Economics 200 or 200 A-B Principles of Economics 5-6 

Quantitative Methods 264 (Computer Programming 1 

Accounting 1(X)A-B, or 200 Elementary Accounting 6-5 

Finance 330 Business Finance - - 3 

Management 341 Principles of Management 3 

Management 346 Business Law 3 

Management 449 Seminar in Business Policies * 3 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Quantitative Methods 361 Business and Economic Statistics 3 


32-34 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR MAJORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student in business administration should select an area of concentration by the 
second semester of the junior year and take the required courses in the area. 


Accounting Units 

301A-301B Intermediate Accounting 6 

302 Cost Accounting 3 

And at least one of the following courses: 

303 Governmental Accounting 3 

308 Federal Income Tax 3 

401 Advanced Accounting 3 

402 Auditing 3 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems 3 


* Students taking business economics as their area of concentration will take Econ 401 — Govern- 
ment and Business — in lieu of Mgmt 449 — Business Policies. 

132 


Business Administration 


Economics UrutS 

302 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

303 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy. 3 

Management 446 Managerial Economics 3 

Finance 

324 Money and Bankings 3 

331 Financial Analysis 3 

And at least two of the following courses: 

335 Investment Principles and Practices 3 

337 Real Estate Finance 3 

431 Capital and Money Markets 3 

433 Problems in Business Finance 3 

Management 

342 Production Management 3 

343 Personnel Management 3 

444 Management of Systems 3 

446 Managerial Economics 3 

Marketing 

353 Marketing Administration 3 

452 Marketing Research _ 3 

459 Marketing Problems 3 

A minimum of one of the following courses: 

307 Distribution Costs 3 

354 Principles of Advertising 3 

355 Credit and Credit Administration 3 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing 3 

357 Industrial Purchasing 3 

358 Physical Distribution 3 

Quantitative Methods 

362 Introduction to Econometrics 3 

461 Advanced Statistics 3 

462 Mathematical Models in Business and Economics 3 

At least one of the following three courses: 

364 Computer Logic and Programming 3 

463 Statistical Decision Theory . 3 

465 Linear and Non-Linear Proj. amming 3 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Students who wish to major in Business Administration in preparation for a 
career as a secondary school teacher in business subjects must meet the require- 
ments of the School of Business Administration and Economics and the secondary 
school teacher education program including the requirements for the proper cre- 
dential as outlined in the catalog. 

The requirements for a major in this area are as follows: 

1 . The core requirements as set forth for all business administration majors, 
page 132. 

2 . Twelve hours of advanced work in one of the six areas of concentration: 

a. Accounting 

b. Economics 


133 


Business Administration 


c. Finance 

d. Management 

e. Marketing 

f. Quantitative methods 

3. Completion of four to six credit hours of electives which may include secre- 
tarial studies • to meet the School of Business minimum requirement of 50 
credit hours in business administration and economics courses. 

4. A maximum of 12 credit hours in the secretarial field, including those applied 
as electives, may count toward the degree in business administration and 
economics.* 

5. Completion of at least 62 credit hours in areas other than business administra- 
tion and economics are required for the degree. 

Education courses required for a credential will be detailed by the School of 
Education. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

Applicants, as well as continuing students should read carefully the college 
requirements for master’s degree programs, page 64. 

The procedural steps for admission to and the completion of the master of 
business administration are as follows: 

Admission Requirements 

1. Apply for admission to the college in unclassified graduate status and declare 
the objective to be a master of business administration degree. Proof of a degree 
from an accredited college or university must be supplied. This must be taken 
care of at the Office of Admissions before the dates established in the college 
calendar. 

2. Apply for admission to the School of Business Administration and Economics 
M.B.A. program. This must be taken care of at the office of the School of Business 
Administration and Economics after admission to the college but before regis- 
tration. 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires the completion of the following pre- 
requisites or equivalent with a grade-point average of not less than 2.5. 


Units 

Math 120 Finite Mathematics or 

Math 250A Calculus 3 

QM 264 Computer Programing 1 

Acctg 300 Accounting Fundamentals 3 

Econ 300 Basic Economics 3 

Fin 330 Business Finance 3 

Mgmt 341 Principles of Management — 3 

Mgmt 346 Business Law 3 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

QM 361 Business and Economic Statistics - 3 

Total 25 


In addition, the student must take the admission test for graduate study in busi- 
ness before or during the first semester of residence or at the earliest possible date. 

* The college does not o£Fei work in secretarial training, typewriting, or business machines. Con- 
sult the dean of the School of Business Administration and Economics to arrange for transfei 
of approved courses to satisfy these requirements. 


134 


i 


Business Administration 


Advancement to Classified Graduate Status 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Completion of all prerequisites with a grade point average of not less than 2.5-, 

2. Making a satisfactory score in the admission test for graduate study in business; 

3. Filling out an application for classified status card in the Office of Admissions 
and Records and making an appointment with an adviser. 

4. Preparing in consultation with his adviser an approved graduate study plan. 

Upon satisfactory completion * of the above, the student’s application for classi- 
fied status will be subject to the approval of the Graduate Office and/or the Gradu- 
ate Studies Committee. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Having been granted classified status in the M.B.A. program; 

2. Having completed 12 units of coursework on his master’s degree study plan, 
including six units of 500-level courses with a G.P.A. of not less than 3.0; 

3. Filing an advancement to candidacy card in the Office of Admissions and 
Records and making an appointment with his adviser. 

Graduation 

Final achievement of the M.B.A. degree requires: 

1. Having been admitted to candidacy status; 

2. Having completed 30 units of approved work with an overall G.P.A. of not 
less than 3.0; 

3. Having passed satisfactorily the comprehensive examination for the M.B.A. 
degree; 

4. Receiving approval by the faculty of the School of Business Administration 
and Economics and the college officer of graduate studies. 

The Program for the M.B.A. Degree Are Outlined As Follows t 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers two plans for the 
M.B.A. degree. 

Plan I is a broad integrated program designed primarily for engineers and sci- 
entists. To insure breadth in the program, the student is not permitted to take more 
than nine units in any one functional area. 

Plan II is an integrated program for management allowing some concentration 
in an area of specialization. Under this plan the student is required to complete 
12 units in an area of concentration. It is designed specifically for students with 
baccalaureate degrees in business administration and economics, for students desir- 
ing to pursue further graduate work, and for teachers. 

The degree is earned by completion of 30 units in courses approved for graduate 
work of which not less than 15 units must be at the 500 course level with an 
overall grade-point average of not less than 3.0. 

The M.B.A. degree can be achieved via three combinations: 

a. 30 units of coursework; or 

b. 27 units of coursework and an approved project; or 

c. 24 units of coursework and an approved thesis. 

Candidates for the M.B.A. degree must complete the prescribed coursework, 
must satisfactorily pass a comprehensive examination and must receive the endorse- 
ment of the faculty of the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

• Students completing the above but falling below the satisfactory grade-point average and/or the 
satisfactory test score, may petition for classified status and continuance in the program on 
the basis of extenuating circumstances. See your adviser, 
t Plan n for the M.B.A. dfegree, while outlined here, is not scheduled to be offered until the 
academic year 1967-68. 


135 


Business Administration 


PLAN I CURRICULUM 

The coursework required of all candidates (24 units) under this option is as 
follows: 

Accounting 

Required Units 

500 Industrial Accounting . 3 

501 Administrative Accounting 3 

Electives 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems 3 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory 3 

504 Seminar in Contemporary Managerial Accounting Problems 3 

Other 400- and 5(X)-level accounting courses 

Economics 

Required 

403 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

510 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 3 

Electives 

511 Economic Problems and Public Policy 3 

Other 4(X)- and 5(X)-level economics courses 

Finance 

Required 

532 Corporate Financial Management : 3 

Electives 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration 3 

534 Seminar in Financial Markets 3 

Other 400- and 500-level finance courses 

Management 

Required 

544 Organization Behavior, Theory, and Administration 3 

Electives 

442 Labor Law 3 

445 Production Control Analysis 3 

446 Managerial Economics 3 

449 Seminar in Business Policies 3 

541 Seminar in Production Problems— 3 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration 3 

Other 400- and 500-level management courses 

Marketing 

Required 

551 Seminar in Marketing Problems— 3 

EJectives 

452 Marketing Research 3 

552 Seminar in Pricing and Price Policy 3 

553 Seminar in Product Planning 3 

Other 400- and 500-level marketing courses (except Marketing 459) 


136 


Economies 


Quantitative Methods 

Required Units 

463 Statistical Decision Theory, or 

560 Operations Research 3 

Electives 

461 Advanced Statistics 3 

462 Mathematical Models in Business and Economics 3 

464 Computer Applications in Industry 3 

465 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 3 

565 Seminar on Computers in Industry 3 

Other 400- and 500-level courses 


PLAN II CURRICULUM 

In addition to the prerequisites listed above, there are three more units in ac- 
counting and three more units in economics. Each student will be held responsible 
to the department of his choice for the specialized background prescribed for that 
area of concentration. The area of concentration shall currently be selected from 
accounting, finance, management, marketing and quantitative methods. 

The required graduate core program in the Plan II M.B.A. shall be 15 to 18 units: 


Acctg 501 Administrative Accounting 3 

Fin 532 Corporate Finanical Management . .. 3 

Mgmt 544 Organizational Behavior, Theory, and Administration 3 

Econ 403 Comparative Economic Systems, or 

Econ 510 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 3 

Mktg 551 Seminar in Marketing Problems 3 

QM 463 Statistical Decision Theory, or 
QM 560 Operations Research 3 


In addition to the graduate core, each student shall elect an area of concentration 
of at least 12 but not more than 15 units to be approved by an adviser, the depart- 
ment chairman concerned, and the graduate coordinator. 

See also “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” beginning on p. 64. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ECONOMICS 

The economics major is designed to prepare students for positions in business 
education, and government, and for graduate work in economics and related dis- 
ciplines. 

Required of all students for the degree: 

1. Completion of 37 semester credit hours of courses in business administration 
and economics in the School of Business Administration and Economics, of 
which 24 semester credit hours must be in upper division courses. 

2. O)mpletion of at least 15 semester hours in the School of Business Admin- 
istration and Economics at the college. 

3. Completion of the major course requirements for economics majors, in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics. Students in economics 
are required to take Mathematics 120 (Finite Mathematics) or equivalent as 
prerequisite to Quantitative Methods 361. 

4. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than business 
administration and economics. 


137 


Economics 


5. Students must attain at least 2.0 grade-point average (C average) in all college 
work attempted, in all courses in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. 

Business administration and economics courses required of all students majoring 

in economics are listed below: 

Lower Division 

Course Units 

Econ 100 American Economic History 3 

Econ 200 or 200A-B Principles of Economics 5-6 

Acctg 101 A-B or 200 EJementary Accounting 6-5 

Total 13-15 

Upper Division 

Course Units 

Econ 302 Intermediate Economic Analysis. 3 

Econ 303 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

Econ 324 Money and Banking - 3 

Econ 401 Government and Business — - 3 

Econ 402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy 3 

QM 361 Business and Economic Statistics — 3 

Six hours of electives in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics approved by the student’s major adviser 6 

Total 24 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

A minor in economics may be achieved by taking the following courses: 

Economics Units 

100 American Economic History 3 

200 Principles of Economics 5 

302 or 303 Intermediate Economic Analysis 3 

401 Government and Business or 

402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy 3 

403 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Elective 3 

Total 20 


138 


education 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Dean: Kenneth R. Doane 


1965-66 Staff 

Department of Elementary Education: 

Professor: Hartsig (chairman) 

Associate Professors: Croy, Golden, Holmes, Kravitz 
Assistant Professors: Donoghue, Lance, Lemmon 
Department of Foundations of Education: 

Professors: Carr, Coppolino, Doane, Imhoff 
Associate Professor: Fierman (acting chairman) 

Department of School Services: 

Professors: Brockmann (chairman), Denno,* McComb * 

Associate Professors: A. Smith, ToUefson * 

Assistant Professors: Bleecker, Gould, Preble 
Department of Secondary Education: 

Professor: Ehmann * 

Associate Professor: Cusick (chairman) 

Assistant Professors: McGarry, Sica 

Department of Health Education, Physical Education, and Recreation: 
Professors: E. Johnson (chairman). Pastor 
Associate Professor: Omalev 

Assistant Professors: Barrett, Fulton, Schild, Schultz, Stovall 
Instructor: Witchey 

The courses, programs, and services of the school are directed toward the 
following objectives of students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration in school administration or 
school counseling 

2. Preservice teacher education (elementary school, secondary school, junior 
college, mentally retarded) 

3. In-service teacher education 

4. Professional preparation of administrative and counseling personnel for the 
public schools 

5. Major in physical education leading to the bachelor of science degree 

6. The portion of the general education requirements in physical education and 
health 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of human behavior, human 
development, human learning, individual differences, physical activity, the school 
as a basic institution of our culture, the methods and materials associated with 
effective teaching, school administration, school counseling, and the current and 
persistent problems that confront administrators, teachers, counselors and other 
professional workers in educational institutions. In addition to using published 
source materials and attending class sessions for presentations and discussions, many 
of the school’s courses require field work in schools and other educational agencies. 

* College administrative officers. 


141 


Education 


TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 

California State College at Fullerton is accredited by the California State Board 
of Education for programs leading to the following credentials; 

1. Standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary school teaching 

2. Standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching 

3. Standard teaching credential with specialization in junior college teaching 

4. Standard teaching credential with specialization, in lieu of minor, in the 
teaching of exceptional children in the area of mentally retarded children 

5. Standard teaching credential with specialization, in lieu of minor, in the teach- 
ing of exceptional children in the area of speech and hearing handicapped 
children 

6. Standard designated services credential with a specialization in pupil personnel 
services 

7. Standard supervision credential. 

The programs in teacher education operate under policies established by the 
Teacher Education Committee, a collegewide committee of faculty members. The 
School of Education has administrative responsibility for the respective programs. 
All curricula provide for completing the requirements for graduation with the 
bachelor of arts degree at the end of the usual four collegiate years and an addi- 
tional year of work to satisfy requirements for a teaching credential. Preparation 
for teaching in a junior college requires the master’s degree. Details of the pro- 
grams are provided in special brochures available from the School of Education or 
the Credentials Office. Information about the professional services authorized by 
the above credentials will be provided by professional advisers or the Credentials 
Office. 


CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION * 

The program leading to the recommendation for the standard teaching creden- 
tial with specialization in elementary school teaching includes the following: 

1. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper 
division or graduate level. (If the student does not complete all requirements, 
the credential may be awarded on the basis of partial fulfillment at the end 
of four or more years of work if he has a bachelor’s degree from an approved 
institution, has an approved major, has completed the student teaching re- 
quirement, has an affidavit of a teaching position, and has the acceptance of a 
proposed program to complete all requirements within the first seven years of 
teaching.) 

3. A minimum of 45 semester hours in five of the following six areas: (1) social 
sciences, (2) natural sciences, (3) humanities (excluding foreign languages), 
(4) fine arts, (5) mathematics, and (6) foreign languages. The humanities 
requirement must include a year of English, and, a course in composition. 
Eng 101 and Eng 102 and an additional course in English meet this require- 
ment. 

To satisfy requirements for a credential, a student must have a course in mathe- 
matics; Math Ed lOOA meets this requirement. To complete credential requirements 
and to prepare himself to meet professional responsibilities, an elementary school 
teacher education candidate should include in his program Art 100, Music 101, 
PE 123, PE 142, and Speech 101 or Speech 231. These 45 semester hours of course- 

* Regiilations for the credential are subject to change by the State Board of Vacation and any 
curricular changes udll be available in later college publications. 


142 


Cdue€ttion 


work for the credential can be met through the college general education require- 
ments for the bachelor’s degree with the proper selection of courses. (Not more 
than six hours of course work taken to satisfy these requirements shall apply 
toward the fulfillment of the requirements for cither a major or a minor.) 

4. One of the following: 

a. A major consisting of at least 24 semester hours of upper division or gradu- 
ate level courses in an academic subject matter area commonly taught in the 
public elementary schools. 

These majors are currently available for this specialization at the college: 
art, biological science, chemistry, drama, economics, English, French, geog- 
raphy, German, history, humanities with comparative literature emphasis, 
mathematics, music, physics, political science, Spanish, speech. (Note: the 
specifications above are state minima, and do not necessarily satisfy require- 
ments for a major for graduation from the college.) 

b. A major and a minor, each of which is in a subject matter area commonly 
taught in the public elementary schools, and one of which is in an aca- 
demic subject matter area. The academic major shall consist of at least 
24 semester hours of upper division or graduate coursework. If the major 
is not an academic one, it shall consist of 28 semester hours of upper division 
or graduate coursework. This minor shall consist of a minimum of 20 
semester hours of coursework. When the major is in an academic subject 
matter area specialized preparation in such areas as mentally retarded or 
speech and hearing handicapped may be substituted. 

c. Two minors in subject matter areas commonly taught in the public elemen- 
tary schools and a major, other than education and educational methodology, 
not commonly taught therein. If the major is not in an academic subject 
matter area, each minor shall be in an academic subject matter area. If the 
major is in an academic subject matter area, one of the minors shall be in 
an academic subject matter area. These minors shall consist of a minimum 
of 12 semester hours of coursework, Specialized preparation in such areas 
as mentally retarded or speech and hearing handicapped may be substituted 
for one of the minors. 

5. Courses in allied studies: 

These courses supplement the general education and academic speciali- 
zation of the elementary school teacher. They are offered by the academic 
departments as a part of the basic preparation of the teacher. 

Elng 433 Children’s Literature (3 units) 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3 units) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3 units) 

PE 333 Physical Education and Human Development (3 units) 

6. Professional education requirements which are currently met by the following 
program at the college: 

Educ Found 311 Psychological Foundations of Education (4 units) 

Educ Elem 331 Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods (8 
units) 

Educ EJem 339 739 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (8 units) 

Elduc Found 301 Social, Historical, and Philosophical Foundations of Exlu- 
cadon (4 units) 

COMPOSITE LOWER DIVISION, UPPER DIVISION, AND FIFTH YEAR WORK 

A student seeking recommendation for the standand teaching credential with 
specialization in elementary school teaching after five years of preservice teacher 
education should complete — 


143 


Education 


In the lower and upper division: 

1. Coursework in general education and in his major. 

2. Allied studies and other courses required for a credential. With careful plan- 
ning it is possible for a student to complete courses in allied studies and their 
prerequisites in addition to the required course in mathematics in his under- 
graduate program. 

3. Courses in professional education 
Junior year, Educ Found 311 (4) 

Senior year, second semester, Educ Elem 331 (8) 

4. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser. 

In the fifth year: 

1. Courses in professional education 
First semester, Educ Elem 739 (8) 

Second semester, Educ Found 301 (4) 

2. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser. 

(The applicant for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
elementary school teaching must complete 30 units of upper division and/or 
graduate work after he has completed all requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree.) 

A student seeking recommendation for the standard teaching credential with 
specialization in elementary school teaching on partial fulfillment of requirements 
should complete — 

In the lower and upper division: 

1. Coursework in general education and in his major. 

2. Allied studies and other courses required for a credential. With careful plan- 
ning it is possible for a student to complete courses in allied studies and 
their prerequisites in addition to the required course in mathematics in his 
undergraduate program. 

3. Courses in professional education 
Junior year, Educ Found 311 (4) 

Senior year, first semester, Educ EUem 331 (8) 

Senior year, second semester, Educ Elem 339 (8) 

4. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser. 

In the fifth year (to be completed during the first seven years of teaching) : 

1. Courses in professional education 
Educ Found 301 (4) 

2. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser. 

(The applicant for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
elementary school teaching must complete 30 units of upper division and/or 
graduate work after he has completed all requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree.) 

CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION * 

Composite of Requirements in Lower Division, Upper Division, and 
Graduate Work Leading to the Standard Teaching Credential 
With Specialization in Secondary School Teaching 

Credential requirements and the program leading to the recommendation for 
the standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching 
includes the following: 

* This is the curriculum for the standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary 
school teaching. Credential requirements are subject to regulatory changes. Any such changes 
will be described in later college publications. 

144 


Education 


1. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper 
division or graduate level. (The postgraduate year is defined by California 
State College at Fullerton as 30 semester units of upper division or graduate 
level coursework.) 

3. Forty-five semester hours of coursework, including the English and the com- 
petency described below, and including four of the following six areas: (1) 
humanities (excluding foreign languages), (2) social sciences, (3) natural 
sciences, (4) mathematics requiring as a prerequisite an understanding and 
knowledge of high school algebra and geometry, (5) fine arts, and (6) foreign 
languages. The humanities requirement must include a year of English, and 
in addition, the applicant for the credential shall demonstrate competence in 
composition either by passing a course in composition or by passing an exam- 
ination in lieu thereof. (Note: The English requirement including competence 
in composition is met at this college by English 101, Composition and World 
Literature; English 102, World Literature and Composition (or the equivalents 
of these two courses), and an additional course in English. This 45 semester 
hours of coursework for the credential can be met through the college gen- 
eral education requirement for the bachelor’s degree with proper selection of 
courses. Not more than six hours of coursework taken to satisfy requirements 
to be met through general education shall apply toward the major or minor 
for the credential.) 

4. Preparation in subject matter areas commonly taught in the public secondarv 
schools for the purpose of credential requirements for majors and minors. 

a. Major requirements for the credential must include at least 24 upper divi- 
sion and graduate level units. At least six units in the major must be taken 
at the graduate level. Six postgraduate units in the minor may be taken in 
lieu of this requirement for the major. See the general course numbering 
code on page 158 for the description of graduate level courses for the cre- 
dential. Also see the appropriate sections of this catalog for descriptions of 
requirements in specific majors. 

b. Minor requirements vary, but must include 20 units in a single subject in 
this credential program at CSCF. (Note: the college secondary school 
teacher education program requires a major and a minor in subjects com- 
monly taught in the public secondary schools. A minor is not required for 
graduation from the college. 

Each student will complete a major planned with and approved by his 
major adviser. Majors presently available are: art, biology, business admin- 
istration, chemistry, communications with journalism emphasis, drama, 
economics, English, French, geography, German, history, mathematics, 
music, physical education, physics, political science, Spanish, and speech. 

Each student will complete a minor planned with and approved by his 
professional adviser. Minors presently available are: art, biology, communi- 
cations with journalism emphasis, drama, economics, English, French, geog- 
raphy, German, history, mathematics, music, physical education, physics, 
political science, Spanish and speech. Students may also present specialized 
preparation to serve as a teacher of exceptional children in the area of the 
mentally retarded or speech and hearing handicapped in lieu of the minor. 

Students majoring in business administration, communications with a 
journalism emphasis, and physical education must have an academic minor 
with a minimum of 20 units in subjects commonly taught in the public 
secondary schools. Students with these majors must complete 12 units of 
upper division or graduate level work in the minor area. 


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145 


^5 


Education 


5. Credential requirements in courses for preservice professional education are 
met in the following program in professional education: 

COURSES IN PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Units 

Educ Sec 340 Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education — 3 

Educ Found 301 Sociological, Historical, and Philosophical Foundations of 

of Education - ^ 

Educ Found 311 Psychological Foundations of Education 4 

Educ Sec 442 Teaching (art, English, etc.) in the Secondary Schools (also 

listed in respective departments) 3 

Educ Sec 749 Student Teaching (art, English, etc.) in the Secondary School 
and Seminar (also listed in respective departments) 6 

Students normally will begin their work in professional education in the junior 
year, and it is expected that, except for Education Foundation 301, the courses 
above will be taken in the indicated sequence. Students who begin their work in 
professional education as seniors or as graduate students will follow a somewhat 
different sequence, and should consult professional advisers when planning their 
programs. Graduate students without professional education backgrounds may be 
required to extend their program beyond a single academic year to complete the 
college secondary school teacher education program. In all cases students are re- 
quired to take Education Secondary 340 the first semester they are enrolled in 
professional education. 

NOTE: Admission to the college does not include admission to the secondary 
school teacher education program. See the description on page 149 for the 
procedures for admission to teacher education which does include admission to this 
credential program. It is the responsibility of each student to file his application 
for admission to teacher education by the end of the semester in which he com- 
pletes Education Secondary 340. It is also the responsibility of each student to 
arrange to complete his requirements for admission to teacher education early in 
his work in professional education. Students must be admitted to teacher education 
prior to taking Education Secondary 442. 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. 
See the description of the procedures for admission to student teaching on page 
150. The student must observe the deadline and must meet other requirements for 
admission to student teaching. 

CURRICULUM IN JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHER EDUCATION 
(Administered in the Department of Secondary Education) 

The program requirements leading to the college-recommended standard teach- 
ing credential with a specialization in junior college teaching are: 

1. A master’s or higher degree from CSCF or from an accredited institution. 

2. Completion of 45 hours of course work as described in (3) under the creden- 
tial requirements for the specialization in secondary school teaching on 
page 144. 

3. Preparation in subject matter areas commonly taught in public junior colleges 
in either of the following: 

a. An academic major in a single subject commonly taught in public junior 
college. (The subject in which a master’s degree has been granted consti- 
tutes a major in that subject for these purposes.) 


146 


Education 


b. If the major is nonacademic (the candidate holds a master’s degree in a 
subject such as business administration, physical education, or journalism), 
the candidate must have an academic minor of a minimum of 20 semester 
hours in a single subject commonly taught in the public junior college. 
Twelve of the units in the minor must be of upper division or graduate 
level. 

4. Professional education requirements in CSCF recommended program: 

Units 

Educ Sec 744 Principles of Junior College Teaching 3 

Educ Sec 799 Junior College Student Teaching and Seminar 4 

ADMISSION TO JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Admission to the college does not constitute admission to junior college teacher 
education. 

The candidate must: 

1. Have a master’s or higher degree from a fully accredited institution in a field 
in which the college offers a major 

or 

have classified graduate status (master’s degree candidacy) at (DSCF and 
possess a baccalaureate degree. 

2. Be admitted to junior college teacher education 

Admission to junior college teacher education is included in the procedures 
described on page 149. The student is responsible for filing his application for 
admission as early as possible and is also responsible for admission to teacher edu- 
cation. 

Admisison to the junior college student teaching and seminar is not included in 
admission to the program. The student is responsible for following the procedures 
listed on page 150 under “Admission to Student Teaching.” 

The course in professional education listed above will be taken in sequence. The 
student must have postgraduate standing before he enrolls in these courses. Student 
teaching may be taken in either the last semester in which the master’s degree will 
be completed or after the degree has been granted. 

CURRICULUM IN PREPARATION OF TEACHERS OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED 

Students preparing to become teachers of the mentally retarded must complete 
the curriculum in either elementary or secondary school teacher education as 
described on pages 142-146. When the major is in an academic area commonly 
taught in the elementary or secondary schools (as appropriate), the 22 units of 
specialized preparation described below (not including student teaching) may be 
substituted for the minor. On successful completion of the program the student 
will be recommended for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
elementary or secondary teaching with specialized preparation to serve as a teacher 
of exceptional children, area of the mentally retarded. Upon receipt of this creden- 
tial, the student will be authorized to teach in special classes for the mentally 
retarded as well as in regular classes at the appropriate level. 

Students desiring to prepare as teachers of the mentally retarded should proceed 
as follows: 

1. Apply for admission to teacher education as described on page 149. 

2. File the “Application to Enter the Program for Specialization in the Teaching 
of Alentally Retarded Pupils” at the same time as application is made to be 
admitted to teacher education. (Application forms are available from the 
School of Education.) 


147 


Education 


3. Arrange for a personal interview with a faculty member involved in the 
program. This faculty member will advise the student about the appropriate 
sequence of courses. 

4. Upon completion of the necessary prerequisite courses, apply for admission 
to student teaching as described on page 150. Students in this specialized 
program will have their student teaching assignment divided between regular 
classes and special classes. 

Students seeking recommendations for this special credential to teach the men- 
tally retarded should complete the courses listed below in lieu of the minor 
required for the Standard Teaching Credential. 

Units 


Educ Sch Serv 471 Exceptional Children 3 

Educ Elem 473 Mental Retardation: Educational Development — 3 

Educ Elem 474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the 

Mentally Retarded 3 

Educ Elem 475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the 

Mentally Retarded 3 

Educ Elem 779 Student Teaching with Alentally Retarded Pupils 4 

Educ Sch Serv 452 Counseling Theories and Processes 3 

Speech 403 Speech Development 3 

Electives from courses related to teaching the mentally retarded (4 units); 
electives must be approved by the adviser 


Total number of units in special education not 
including student teaching . 22 


RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE OF COURSES IN PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR 
STUDENTS PREPARING AS TEACHERS OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED 


Junior year, first semester .... 
Junior year, second semester 

Senior year, first semester ... 

Senior year, second semester 

Fifth year, first semester 

Fifth year, second semester 


Elementary 

. Educ Found 311 (4) 
Educ Sch Serv 471 (3) 

Educ Elem 331 (8) 
Educ Elem 473 0) 

Educ Elem 474 (3) 

Educ Elem 475 (3) 
Educ Sch Serv 351 (2) 
Speech 403 (3) 
Electives in special 
education (4) 

Educ Found 301 (4) 
Educ Elem 779 (4) 
Educ Elem 739 (4) 
Educ Sch Serv 452 (3) 


Secondary 

Educ Found 311 (4) 
Educ Sch Serv 471 (3) 
Educ Sec 340 (3) 

Educ Sec 442 (3) 

Educ Elem 473 (3) 
Educ Elem 474 (3) 
Educ Found 301 (4) 
Educ Elem 475 (3) 
Educ Sch Serv 351 ^2) 
Speech 403 (3) 
Electives in special 
education (4) 

Educ Elem 779 (4) 
Educ Sec 749 (2) 

Educ Sch Serv 452 (3) 


CURRICULUM IN PREPARATION OF TEACHERS OF SPEECH 
AND HEARING HANDICAPPED 

Details of this teacher education program are found on pages 122. The program 
is administered by the Speech Department in consultation with the School of 
Education. 


148 


Iff 


Sdueation 

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS 
FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching in California elementary 
schools and secondary schools are included in the above curricula. In addition, an 
applicant for a credential for teaching is asked questions about his citizenship, and 
about his ethical and moral character. The applicant must sign an oath of allegiance, 
must present a certificate of health from a qualified physician, and present official 
transcripts of collegiate studies. The applicant must present two sets of personal 
identification cards, including fingerprints. He must present evidence of having 
passed a course or suitable examination on the United States Constitution. Each 
application for a credential must be accompanied with a fee of $10 in the form of 
a money order, cashier’s check, or certified check. 


PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER 
EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a public school credential and a 
bachelor of arts degree. Before registration, the student should consult an adviser 
in the division in which he expects to major and an adviser in the School of 
Education who will help him select courses and build his program. A student 
from another institution should bring transcripts of previous work and a tentative 
selection of courses. Each student is responsible for meeting all requirements set 
forth in the catalog and supplements. 

During the student’s first semester after matriculation, he will receive from the 
Office of Admissions an evaluation of his credits which will list the requirements 
he must meet to earn the credential and the degree he has listed as his objective. 
If a student changes his degree or credential objective, he must have an evaluation 
for each new credential. The evaluation will serve as a guide for the student and 
the advisers in planning a complete program. Any deviation from this evaluation 
must be approved through written petitions submitted to the dean of the School 
of Education. Transferred courses must be of upper division level and taken within 
the past 15 years to be applicable to upper division credential requirements.* 


ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Admission to CSCF does not constitute admission to teacher education curricula. 
To become a candidate for a teaching credential, the student must be matriculated 
in good standing, and must file the “Application for Admission to Teacher Edu- 
cation” in the Office of the School of Education. This application should be filed 
during the first semester of the junior year or the first semester of attendance at 
the college, if the student enters with advanced standing. 

Admission to teacher education is required of all students prior to seeking ad- 
mission to student teaching. 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant’s intel- 
lectual resources and mastery of important concepts in the common curricular 
areas of higher education, command of fundamental skills of communication 
(English language usage, written composition, speech, hearing, reading compre- 
hension, handwriting, mathematical skills), scholarship, personality and character 
interest in teaching, and health. Data related to these criteria are gathered from* 
transcripts and records from other schools and colleges, group and individual 

* Selected courses completed in lower division at institutions outside of the State of California 
may be applied to professional education credential requirements. ^ 


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5 


Education 


tests, personality inventories, estimates of the potential of the applicant, and from 
the Student Health Center. Students should normally qualify for admission and 
be advised of their status during the second semester of the junior year or their 
first semester of attendance if they enter with advanced standing with degrees from 
accredited colleges. 

Students who show weaknesses in any of the fundamental skills of communication 
are advised of their standing. If there are weaknesses in only one or two of the 
areas noted above, the student will be advised of refresher courses and given a 
specified time to meet the standard. 

If the applicant has serious deficiencies in communication skills or does not meet 
the standards of mastery in the common curricular areas, personality and character, 
scholarship, interest in teaching, or health, the faculty committee will deny ad- 
mission to teacher education. 

The student must arrange to take the required battery of group and individual 
tests and inventories necessary to provide information needed by the faculty 
committee. The tests of breadth of understanding, reading, English usage, number 
skills, composition, handwriting, and personality are given by the School of Educa- 
tion for admission to teacher education; consult the director of admissions to 
teacher education for dates. 

The student who comes to CSCE to work toward a credential for teaching in a 
secondary school and who already has a bachelor’s degree must, before he is ad- 
mitted to teacher education, consult with an adviser in the major and must submit 
a statement, signed by the adviser, which indicates the following: 

1. That the student’s undergraduate preparation in his major is considered to be 
adequate for the credential sought, or 

2. Specific courses which the student must complete to have a major adequate 
for the credential sought, and which he must complete before he will be 
admitted to student teaching. These may be in addition to the minimum of the 
six upper division or graduate units required in the major in the postgraduate 
year, or may, in part or in whole, satisfy this six unit minimum requirement. 

Full details on standards and procedures for admission to teacher education are 
described in “Instructions and Standards for Admission to Teacher Education,” 
which is available from the School of Education. 


ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING 

Admission to teacher education as described above is the first step in a cumulative 
and continuing evaluation of a candidate’s fimess to teach. The applicant for 
admission to student teaching must have a grade-point average of 2.5 in the major, 
2.5 in the minor, and 2.5 in professional education. Marks of C, or better, are 
required in all professional education courses. Applicants for admission to elemen- 
tary school student teaching must be classified as postgraduate students or be within 
15 units of the baccalaureate degree. Applicants for admission to secondary school 
student teaching or to junior college student teaching must be classified as post- 
graduate students. All applicants must have completed at least 12 units at California 
State College at Fullerton. The applicant must present a favorable report on health 
status arid history. He must present evidence of readiness for student teaching 
responsibility as testified by the major adviser, the professional adviser, and other 
college faculty. This evidence relates to scholarship, breadth of understanding, 
command of the subjects to be taught, fundamental skills of communication, person- 
ality and character, interest and potential for teaching, and health. 

Competence is required in all subjects and skills for which the candidate is seeking 
a credential. For the elementary school teacher education student, this includes all 


150 


Education 


jbjects and skills commonly taught in the first eight grades of the public schools, 
econdary school and junior college teacher education students must meet the 
equirements for major and minor (s) as specified by the academic divisions. 

All instructors of the college are asked to participate in the continuing evaluation 
f students in relation to those aptitude, personality and character traits which are 
onsidered essential to admission to the teaching profession. Dependability in 
ulfilling assignments, class attendance, ability to get along with people, industry, 
nd emotional stability are representative criteria. In addition to the evaluations 
•y instructors, the applicants may be interviewed by a faculty committee, and 
ttention will be directed to general appearance, dress, vitality, poise, temperament, 
itegrity, and social attitudes. 

The application for admission to student teaching is submitted to the coordinator 
if elementary education or the coordinator of secondary education. The application 
[lust be submitted by October 15 or March 1 of the semester preceding the 
emester in which the student teaching assignment is expected. A faculty committee 
viW gather the information described above and report to the student in time to do 
ilanning for the following semester. 

Except for graduate students who are in their first semester of study at C5CF, 
pplications will be accepted only from those who have completed all requirements 
or admission to teacher education. 

Full details on standards and procedures are described in “Instructions and 
Standards for Admission to Student Teaching,” available in the Office of the School 
►f Education. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Each candidate for the standard teaching credential with specialization in elemen- 
ary school teaching will do his student teaching in the last semester he is in the 
eacher education curriculum or in his postgraduate year at the college. Each 
candidate for the standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary 
chool teaching, or for the standard teaching credential with specialization in junior 
:ollege teaching will do his student teaching during a postgraduate year. Details 
ibout student teaching in special education classes are available in the Office of the 
ichool of Education. Student teaching assignments are made in the elementary and 
econdary schools of districts geographically accessible to the college. Junior college 
tudent teaching assignments are made in nearby junior colleges. Students will be 
issigned to work under the supervision of carefully selected supervising teachers; 
t college supervisor makes frequent visits to the student teacher and the supervising 
eacher. Student teachers meet in a weekly seminar under the leadership of the 
college supervisor to discuss performance and problems. 

STUDY LIMITS OF STUDENT TEACHERS 

Students who enroll in Educ Elem 339 or 739, Student Teaching in the Elemen- 
ary School, will be limited to one additional course for that semester. Students 
^ho enroll in Educ Sec 749, Student Teaching in the Secondary School, will be 
imited to two additional courses for that semester. It is expected that students 
^vill not carry out-of-college work responsibilities during the semester of the student 
"caching assignment. 

If a student is under hardship because of these limitations, he may submit a 
petition to the coordinator of elementary education or to the coordinator of 
secondary education, as appropriate, requesting permission to carry not more than 


151 


Education 


13 units, including student teaching. The petition must set forth, in full, the 
circumstances necessitating the petition. 


PERMISSION TO SUBSTITUTE TEACHING EXPERIENCE 
FOR STUDENT TEACHING 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had two years of successful, 
regular teaching experience must petition the School of Education, through his 
professional adviser, for permission to substitute such experience for the student 
teaching requirement. Substitution of teaching experience for student teaching will 
be considered only if the applicant: 

1. Has been admitted to teacher education at the college. 

2. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, 
or superintendent to the School of Education certifying at least two years of 
successful, regular teaching experience at the appropriate level. A form for 
this verification is available in the Office of the School of Education. 


OTHER CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

Administration and Supervision 

Students must take Educ Found 503, Foundations for Educational Leadership, 
during their first registration in these fields. To continue in the program beyond 
this course, the student must be granted a “letter of admission to the program” 
and possess an official CSCF program evaluation. The program is an integrated 
whole. Thus, students who desire only isolated courses from the program are 
normally denied admission to such courses. Details of this program are contained 
in a brochure available from the School of Education. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Students must take Educ Sch Serv 452, Counseling Theories and Processes (pre- 
requisite: Educ Sch Serv 351, Principles of Guidance) during their first registration 
in this field. To continue in the program beyond this course, the student must be 
granted a “letter of admission to the program” and possess an official CSCF program 
evaluation. Details of this program are contained in a brochure available from the 
School of Education. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration in school administration 
and school counseling. 

2. Principles underlying preservice teacher education at California State College. 

3. Admission to teacher education standards, instructions, application. 

4. Admission to student teaching standards, instructions, application. 

5. Program in elementar>^ school teacher education. 

6. Program in secondary school teacher education. 

7. Program in junior college teacher education. 

8. Program in teaching mentally retarded children. 

9. Program in teaching children with speech and hearing handicaps. 

10. Program in school administration and supervision. 

11. Program in pupil personnel services. 

12. Program for specialists in reading. 


152 


Education 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

ineral Characteristics 

This degree is reserved for professionally qualified graduate students who desire 
prepare for or advance their careers in either school counseling or school 
nnmstration. Most students can meet credential requirements in either counseling 
administration (including supervision) while completing the degree. 

erequisites 

Only students who have a teaching credential, successful teaching experience, an 
proved academic major, acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination 
tea tests), 30 units of adviser-approved study past the baccalaureate degree, a 
GPA on previous academic and related work, and who have been screened 
:o the program on these and professional leadership criteria, may proceed to 
e last 30 units of study on the program. Credit will be given for previous post- 
ccalaureate studies when possible. While otherwise well-qualified students may 
admitted with limited subject or grade deficiencies, these may often be removed 
the first 30 units of postbaccalaureate study. 

ogram of Study 

Students concentrating in school counseling will take Educ Sch Serv 452, Conn- 
ing Theories and Processes (prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 351, Principles of 
uidance), and in school adrmnistration will take Educ Found 503, Foundations 
r Educational Leadership, as soon as they identify their interest in this M.S. 
gree. Detailed evaluations and M.S. study plans will be developed for each stu- 
nt at this time. 

The final adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) of study for the degree will 
elude the course of the above paragraph, 6 units of degree “core” studies (in 
rvey of educational research, and social, historical or philosophical aspects of 
location), 6 units of adviser-approved supporting courses from other disciplines, 
d an added 16 units in the area of concentration. The latter will include a cul- 
inating project, designed to assure depth of scholarship and integration of ele- 
ents of the program. 

The 16 additional units in the concentration in school administration (referred 
above) are as follows: 

Units 

Educ Found 505 Foundations for Improving Instruction. 4 

Educ Sch Serv 561 Organization of School Systems 3 

Educ Sch Serv 563 Principles of School Personnel Administration 2 

Educ Sch Serv 567A, B Field Work and Seminar in School Administration 2, 2 
One of the following: 

Educ Sch Serv 566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor...-. 3 

Educ Sch Serv 586 The Secondary School Principal and Supervisor 3 

The 16 additional units in the concentration in school counseling (referred to 
•ove) are as follows: 

Units 


Educ Sch Serv 551 Educational and Career Orientation. 3 

Educ Sch Serv 552 Group Processes in Guidance 3 

Educ Sch Serv 553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel 

Services 3 

Educ Sch Serv 557 A,B Seminar in School Counseling- 1, 1 

Educ Sch Serv 559A,B Field Work in Pupil Personnel Services — 2-3 


Also see “Steps in the Master’s Degree Program,” beginning on p. 64. 


153 


Education 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The department offers a bachelor of science in physical education for students 
preparing to teach, for those preparing to pursue graduate work in physical edu- 
cation and for those preparing for careers in business, industry and government 
service. 

The major consists of 40 units in health education, physical education and recre- 
ation, and six units of electives in upper division in supporting and related fields. 
Electives are to be approved by the students’ departmental adviser. Requirements 
for the major, including proficiency requirements, prerequisite and lower division 
courses, are indicated below. 

Proficiency Requirements for Ma/or Students 

All physical education majors must demonstrate proficiency in the areas of 
aquatics, rhythms, gymnastics, combatives (men), modem dance (women) and in 
individual and team sports. Intensive skill courses in these areas should be taken 
in the lower division. All major students must attain satisfactory proficiency in all 
categories listed below in any one of the following ways: 

1. Complete course with grade of C or better. 

2. Pass proficiency screening test as administered by the course instructor. 

PROFICIENCY SERIES 

Aquatics: PE HIM, PE 11 IW, PE 113 (select one) 

Combatives: PE 132M Combatives (M) 

Rhythms: PE 141 or PE 142, PE 143 (W), PE 144 (W) 

Gymnastics: PE 131M or PE 131W 

Individual sports: PE 130, PE 136, PE 137, PE 139, PE 138 or PE 135 

Team sports *: PE 121M and 122M, PE 121W and 122W 


MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Prerequisites Units 

Chemistry 100 Introductory Chemistry 5 

Biology 100 Principles of Biology 2 

Biology 160 Principles of Zoology 3 

Biology 361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology 4 

Physics 211 A Elementary Physics 4 

Total - 18 

Electives: Interdisciplinary 

Six units of electives in upper division in supporting or related fields. Elec- 
tives will be approved by the student’s departmental adviser 6 

Total - 6 

Courses in Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
Lower Division (all required) 

HE 101 Personal and Ck)mmunity Health 2 

HE 102 Prevention and First Aid 2 

PE 201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation 3 

Rec 203 Recreation Programs and Activities 2 

Total 9 


* Two semesters of team sport competition on an intercollegiate team may be taken in lieu of 
team sports requirement (applies to both men and women). 


154 


Education 


Upper Division (all required) Units 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 3 

PE 325 Case Studies in Human Motor Learning 3 

PE 416 Kinesiology (pre/Bio 361) 3 

PE 417 Physiology of Exercise (pre/Bio 361) 3 

PE 418 Adapted and Corrective Activities (pre/PE 416) 3 

HE 419 Environmental Health (pre/HE 101) 3 

PE 420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education 3 

Total 21 

Upper Division (any five courses) f 

PE 311 Analysis of Aquatics 2 

PE 312 Analysis of Combatives 2 

PE 313 Analysis of Folk, Square, and Social Dance 2 

PE 314 Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports 2 

PE 315 Analysis of Modem Dance (W) 2 

PE 317A,B Analysis of Team Sports (W) 4 

PE 318 Analysis of Team Sports (M) 2 

PE 319 Analysis of Gymnastics and Tumbling 2 

Total 10 

)tal in health, physical education and recreation 40 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A minor consists of 22 units of work as listed below: 

Lower Division: HE 102, PE 201, Rec. 203. 

Upper Division: PE 324, PE 416 or PE 417, PE 419 or PE 420 and select any 
three courses (6 units) from the analysis series: t 
PE 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317A, 317B, 318, 319. 

For information about teaching credentials, consult the Credentials Office or the 
airman of the department. 


to enrollxnant in any of the courses listed in the series PE 311—319. 


155 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
OF COURSES 

AND 

FACULTY DIRECTORY 


FOR 19<;-66 


GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

100-299 Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open also 
to upper division students. 

300-399 Upper division courses of junior and senior level, which do not give 
graduate credit unless included on an approved graduate study plan (such 
as a credential or graduate degree program) for a specific graduate 
student. 

400-499 Upper division courses of junior and senior level which give graduate 
credit when taken by a graduate student. (Note limitations in specific 
graduate programs.) 

500-599 Graduate courses organized primarily for graduate students.* 

700-799 Graduate professional courses in the postgraduate program, not applicable 
to graduate degrees. 


PREREQUISITES 

Students are expected to meet stated prerequisites for all courses. However, in 
exceptional cases, and at the discretion of the division in which the course is taught, 
students may be allowed to meet prerequisites by examination. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Under the independent study program, the upper division student can pursue 
topics or problems of special interest beyond the scope of a regular course under 
the supervision of a faculty adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, 
and normally culminates in a paper, project, comprehensive examination, or per- 
formance. Before registering, the student must get his topic approved by the pro- 
fessor who will be supervising independent study. The catalog number for inde- 
pendent study in all departments is 499. Independent study courses may be repeated, 
but 3 units is the maximum credit that may be earned in one semester. 

Independent study is not limited to honors students, but all those in the honors 
program are especially urged to undertake some of this work in the major field. 
The student who can be expected to profit from independent study has excep- 
tional initiative and persistence, and a desire to delve into some special project on 
his own. 


Note exceptions on p. 57. 


CHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCE 


ANTHROPOLOGY 

11 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) F, S (Formerly 201 A) 

Man in biological and evolutionary perspective. Methods, findings, concepts, and 
lues in the study of primates, fossil men, and races. 

12 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) F, S (Formerly 201 B) 

Variations, integrations, and change in human cultures, and particularly pre- 
erate ones. Cultural analyses of such institutional forms as the family, economy, 
)vernment, religion and art. A consideration of central problems of cultural 
>mparison and interpretation. 

(3 Introduction to Archaeology (3) F, S 

The development of the Paleolithic, Mesolithic, and Neolithic cultures of the 
Id and New Worlds-, the ordering and interpretation of archaeological data; 
boratory and field techniques; the relationship between human cultural and 
ological evolution; theories of cultural evolution and diffusion. 

11 World Ethnography (3) ¥, S 

A general survey of-- the peoples of the world and a study of representative cul- 
ires with special reference to their situation in the history and geography of the 
orld. 

The American Indians (3) F, $ 

Prerequisite; Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Physical and 
iltural characteristics of the native peoples of the New World. Prehistory and 
le impact of contacts with the Europeans. Major tribes of all the Americas are 
eluded in an overview, but emphasis is placed on Indians of North and Central 
merica. 

15 Peoples of South America (3) (Planned for 1967) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey 
: South America. Description of selected cultures representative of different cul- 
iral areas before and after contacts with Western countries. 

18 Peoples of Africa (3) F 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. A cultural 
irvey of Africa. Description of selected cultures representative of different cultural 
eas before and after contacts with Western and Asian countries. 

17 Peoples of the Pacific (3) S 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. A survey of the 
itive peoples and cultures of the Pacific Islands, including Australia; the social 
id cultural patterns of representative cultures of various areas; special ethno- 
igical and theoretical problems. 

SO Peoples of Europe (3) F 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Representative 
roups considered in modern and historical perspective, stressing especially rural- 
rban relationships and the dynamics of change. 


159 


I 


Anthropology 


360 Contemporary American Culture (3) S 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Application of 
anthropological methods, categories of analysis, and types of interpretation to 
American culture. Survey and critique of selected community studies and other 
kinds of relevant research. 

401 Anthropological Research Methods (3) F 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 201 or 203 and 202 and 6 additional units of anthro- 
pology or consent of instructor. The philosophy and methodology of science and 
history as they^ are expressed in anthropological research. Research planning, or- 
ganizing, data collection and recording, categorization and interpretation of re- 
sults, and reporting. Recent methodological developments. 

410 Language and Culture (3) S 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The study of language 
as a factor in culture. Introduction to anthropological linguistics. Trends in the 
study of language and culture. 

415 Culture and Personality (3) S 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202, Psychology 331 or 351, or Sociology 341. Com- 
parative study of the relationship between the individual and his culture. Child 
training in non-Westem cultures. Survey of important concepts, studies, and re- 
search techniques. Changing viewpoints and new directions in culture-personality 
studies. 

421 Primitive Religion (3) F, $ 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Beliefs and prac- 
tices in preliterate religious systems; the forms, symbolism, and social and cultural 
roles of these systems. Includes such topics as magic, animism, art and religion, 
shamans and priests, and cults. 

425 Primitive Law and Government (3) F 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Sources of law- 
government in primitive societies; the cultural background of law; the functions 
and development of law and government in primitive polities; transitions to and 
comparisons with classical and modem legal and political systems. 

428 Primitive Social Organixation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. A study of the 
social organization of societies of varying degrees of complexity; kinship systems, 
marriage patterns, and corporate groups; religious, political, and economic organi- 
zation; social stratification, nativism, and the effects of cultural change. 

460 Culture Change (3) F 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or 301 or consent of instructor. Interrelations 
between cultural, social and psychological processes in the dynamics of culture 
growth and change. Impact of western technology on tribal and peasant societies. 
Anthropological contributions to the planning of directed sociocultural change in 
selected areas. 

480 History of Anthropology (3) S 

Prerequisite: At least 12 units of anthropology or consent of instructor. His- 
torical antecedents of modern anthropology. A systematic survey of the develop- 
ment of anthropology as a scientific field; an examination of the principal contribu- 
tions of leading anthropologists, past and present. Reinterpretations and emerging 
trends. 


160 


Anthropology; Art 


? Independent Study (3) F, $ 

^Prerequisite: At least 15 units of anthropology and consent of the adviser. Stu- 
it selection of an individual research project involving either library or field- 
>rk. There are conferences with the adviser as necessary, and the work results 
one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 

ART 

9 Exploratory Course in Art (3) F, S 

exploration and creative use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. 
:ld trips required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of the 
t Department. (6 hours activity) 

I Introduction to Art (3) F 

V course for the general student designed to develop an understanding of his- 
ical and contemporary art forms. Illustrated with examples of painting, sculp- 
e, architecture, and design. Field trips required. Not open to art majors for 
:dit except by permission of the Art Department. 

I Two-dimensional Design (3) F, 5 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as re- 
id to a two-dimensional surface. (6 hours activity) 

I Three-dimensional Design (3) F, S 

rhe inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as re- 
id to three-dimensional surfaces and forms. (6 hours activity) 

^A,B Beginning Ceramics (3,3) F, S 

V basic course in the study of form as related to ceramic materials, tools, 
)cesses, and concepts. (6 hours activity) 

rA,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) F, S 

leginning work in the creative use of the materials of drawing and painting with 
phasis on visual concepts and use of medium, individual exploration, growth, 
nning and craftsmanship. (9 hours laboratory) 

I Fundamentals of Art (3) F, S 

comparative study of the elements of plastic organization in relation to per- 
lal and cultural aesthetic expression and concepts. Fundamental art ideas, prob- 
is of organization and structure, and terminology. Field trips required. 

rA3/C,D Life Drawing (1,1,1, 1) F, S 

)rawing from the live model. 117B will include working from the model with 
ee-dimensional materials. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

IA,B Art and Civilization (3,3) F, S 

V. comparative survey of the basic ideas, forms, and styles of the visual arts as 
y developed in various cultures from prehistoric time to the present day. 

iA,B Beginning Crafts (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or Art 100. A study of form as related to the concepts, 
terials, and processes involved in the making of both two- and three-dimensional 
forms from wood, metal, plastics, and paper. (6 hours activity) 

^A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 117A3» Art 107 A3, Art 103, or the equivalents. An intensive 
dy of devices and means for representing volume, structure, and character of 


6—66198 


161 


Art 


objects. Emphasis in 207 A on the use of drawing materials in relation to manmade 
and nature objects and in 207B on the use of painting materials in relation to the 
head and figure. (9 hours laboratory) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 104. An introductory course in sculpture with emphasis on the 
creative use of wood and metal, power equipment and hand tools. (6 hours activity) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A, 117 A. A study of the history, design, and use of 
letter forms including techniques for rough and comprehensive layouts and the 
use of both hand-lettered forms and handset type. (6 hours activity) 

286 Design for the Theater (3) S 

See page 89 under “Drama” for description and prerequisites. 

301 Western Art: Ancient to Classic (3) F 

A study of the developments in art from prehistoric time to the classic period in 
Greek art. 

302 Western Art: Classic to Renaissance (3) $ 

Provides broad familiarity with the major styles of classic, medieval, and Russian 
art. Lectures, discussions and field trips. 

305A,B Crafts (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104, or 205A, or 100 and 432 or the equivalent. A 
study and evaluation of basic craft concepts, processes, and materials as they relate 
to the development of utilitarian forms. (6 hours activity) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 106A or 106B. Further experiences in the study and evaluation 
of form as related to the creative use of ceramic concepts and materials including 
design, forming, glazing, and firing. (6 hours activity) 

307A,B Advanced Drawing and Painting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: one semester of drawing and one semester of painting. The study, 
evaluation and creative use of the concepts and materials of drawing and painting 
with emphasis on individual exploration, growth, planning and craftsmanship. (9 
hours laboratory) 

309 Art Techniques (3) F, $ 

Prerequisite: Art 100 or the equivalent. Creative use of a variety of drawing 
and painting materials. (6 hours activity) 

311 Western Art: Renaissance and Baroque (3) F 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance and 
Baroque periods. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Also recommended for hu- 
manities and history students. 

312 History of Art Since 1800 (3) S 

Art of the 19th century and its development into contemporary times. 

313A,B Interior Design (3,3) S 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107 A,B. Development and projection of ideas in re- 
lation to the functional, social, and aesthetic problems involved in the design and 
planning of living spaces for homes and small offices. (6 hours activity) 


162 


Art 


fion 


6A,B Sculpture (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 205 A3* Theory, study and practice of basic sculpture processes 
ing a variety of materials. (6 hours activity) 

7A,B Advanced Life Drawing (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from 
e live model (9 hours laboratory) 

3A,B Advertising Design (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B. Development and projection of ideas in rela- 
►n to the technical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. (6 
urs activity) 

3A,B Industrial Design (3,3) (Offered in alternate years) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A, 107 A, B. Planning and designing of projects 
relation to the technological, psychological, and social aspects of contemporary 
ciety. (6 hours activity) 

8A,B Creative Photography (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and Communication 218A, or its equivalent, or consent 
the instructor. Photography as an art medium with emphasis on the creative 
2 of photographic concepts, materials, processes and techniques. Field trips to 
arranged. (6 hours activity) 

7A,B Printmaking (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and Art 117A,B,C. An introduction to concepts and 
iterials involved in printmaking including lithography, etching, woodcut, aqua- 
t, monoprint and serigraphy. (9 hours laboratory) 

0A,B Painting for Non-Art Majors (3,3) F, S 

Opportunities for students with little or no background in art to work creatively 
th various painting media both indoors and outdoors. (9 hours laboratory) 

3A,B Textile Design (3,3) S 

Prerequisite: Art 1(X) or Art 103. The creative exploration and design of fabrics 
ative to the needs of apparel, furniture, architecture, and interiors using both 
inted and woven processes. (6 hours activity) 

0 Art and Child Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 100 and Education 311. The study and evaluation of art con- 
pts, materials, and processes as they relate to and promote child development, 
hours activity) 

1 Contemporary Art (3) F 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphics, and photography. 

2 Contemporary Art (3) S 

Fundamentals of modem architecture, interior design, sculpture, and industrial 
sign. Lectures, discussions, and field trips. 

1 Primitive Art: the Pacific Perimeter (3) F 

\ study of the art of primitive groups and cultures in California and the Pacific 
rimeter. 

2 Primitive Art: The Americas (3) S 

\ study of the art of primitive groups and cultures in North and South America. 


news 

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163 


^5 


Art 


421 Oriental Art: China (3) F 

A study of the historical development of the arts of China and their relation 
to Chinese philosophy and culture. 

422 Oriental Art: Japan (3) S 

A study of the historical development of the arts of Japan and their relation to 
Japanese philosophy and culture. 

453A,B Display and Exhibition Design (2,2) F, S 

A course in the appropriate and creative use of materials, processes, and design 
concepts as they relate to the special problems involved in the planning and pre- 
paring of displays, exhibits, bulletin boards, wall cases, and art portfolios. (6 hours 
laboratory) 

481 Special Studies in Art History and Appreciation (1-3) F, S 

Prequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunities for intensive study and 
evaluation in one area of art history and appreciation. 

483 Special Studies in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
design areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 8 
units, but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a 
single semester. 

483a Advertising Design (F, S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483b Interior Design (S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483c Design and Composition (F, S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483d Display Design (F, S) (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

483e Textile Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
craft areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of eight 
units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one area in 
a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

485a Jewelry (S) 

485b General Crafts (F, S) 

485c Ceramics (F, 5) 

485d Weaving (5) 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (1—3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 316A3 and permission of the instructor. Opportunity for 
intensive study in the following sculptural processes: modeling, carving, fabrication 
and casting. May be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three 
units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting (1—3) ^ 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
drawing and painting areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a 
maximum of eight units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtained 
in any one area in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 


164 


Art 


487a 

Painting (F, 

S) 

487b 

Life Drawing 

(F, 5) 

487c 

Drawing (F) 


487d 

Printmaking 

(F, S) 


500 Graduate Seminar in Art (3) F 

Selected advanced problems in art and art education. Each student will present 
research results in oral or written form. 

501 Graduate Seminar in Art History and Appreciation (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Art 500. Directed research with emphasis on the relationship between 
historical backgrounds and developments in art and the student’s area of concen- 
tration. May be repeated to a maximum of eight units. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (1—3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the design areas listed below. 
May be repeated to a maximum of eight units in each area, but no more than three 
units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. 

503a Advertising Design (F, S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503b Interior Design (S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503c Design and Composition (F, 5) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503d Display Design (F, S) (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

503e Textile Design (S) (2 hours activity for each unit) 

505 Graduate Problems in Crofts (1—3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the crafts areas listed below. 
May be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three units of 
credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

505a Jewelry (S) 

505b General Crafts (F, 5) 

505c. Ceramics (F, S) 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (1—3) F, S 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on 
planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. May be 
repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three units of credit may 
be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (1—3) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the drawing and painting areas 
listed below. May be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three 
units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each 
unit) 


507a 

Painting (F, 

S) 

507b 

Life Drawing 

(F, S) 

507c 

Drawing (S) 


507d 

Printmaking 

(F, 5) 


165 


Art, Art Education; Biological Science 

59B Graduate Project or Thesis (3—6) F, S 

Prerequisites: Art 500, Art 501, and recommendation of the student’s graduate 
committee. Art 501 may be taken concurrently with Art 598 on approval of 
instructor. Development and presentation of a thesis or creative project in the area 
of concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. No more than three units 
may be taken in any one semester. 

ART EDUCATION 

332 Industrial Arts for Elomontary Teachers (2) (Offered in alternate years) 

Prerequisite: Ed Found 311 or consent of the instructor. Creative selection, 
organization and use of materials and tools in construction activities. Includes 
correlation experiences with the social studies, science, and other units of work. 
(4 hours activity) 

360 Elementary School Crafts (2) (Offered in alternate years) 

Studio activities and techniques of crafts appropriate to the elementary school. 
Strongly recommended for elementary teaching credential candidates. (4 hours 
activity) 

370A,B Art Activity (2,2) F, S 

Opportunities to observe, analyze, and evaluate child growth in and through 
creative art experiences. (4 hours activity) 

429A,B Arts and Crafts for Teaching Exceptional Children (2,2) S 

Methods of using a variety of art materials and processes with emphasis on those 
experiences which meet the needs of retarded or handicapped children. (4 hours 
activity) 

442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2-3) F 

Prerequisite: Education Found 311, Education Sec 340, admission to teacher 
education, senior standing or consent of the instructor. See pages 144-146 under 
Secondary Education for description of standard teaching credential program. 
Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching 
art in secondary schools. Required, before student teaching, of students presenting 
majors in art for the standard teaching credential. Students without teaching 
experience must register for three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in 
their schedules, at the same hour each day, so they can serve as teacher aides in 
secondary schools. (2 hours lecture, 5 hours clinical practice) 

749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (3,3) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

BIOLCX5ICAL SCIENCE 

100 Principles of Biology (2) F, S 

An introduction to basic concepts of structures and function in living organisms 
and to modern biological problems. Required of all biology majors. 

140 Principles of Botany (3) F, S, 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 100. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamic aspects of 
botany although the traditional areas of morphology and classification will not be 
neglected. This course is designed to integrate with Bio Sci 100, Principles of 
Biology. Required of all biology majors. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 


166 


Biological Science 


160 Principles of Zoology (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 100. An introduction to the principles of animal biology 
with special reference to the structure, classification, physiology, behavior and 
ecology of animals. This course is designed to integrate with Bio Sci 100, Principles 
of Biology. Required of all biology majors. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

201 Field Oiology (3) S 

Prerequisites: one year of biological science and/or permission of instructor. A 
course for nonmajors designed to acquaint the interested student with the plant and 
animal life of this region. Several weekend field trips will be arranged to study 
different biotic communities. ( 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

311 General Microbiology (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: one semester courses in biology and chemistry. An introduction 
to the study of the morphology, growth and physiology of the bacteria and other 
microorganisms. A consideration of the role of microorganisms as agents of change 
in the natural processes important in health, industry and agriculture. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

312 Genetics Lecture (3) F 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or permission of the instructor. The 
general principles and modern developments in the study of heredity. 

31 2L Genetics Laboratory (1) F 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 312 (may be taken concurrently). (3 hours laboratory) 

314 Readings in Biological Sciences (1) F 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 100 or equivalent. Directed readings of classical and con- 
temporary biological literature with periodic group discussions concerning the 
methods and principles studied. This course is designed for the nonmajor and is 
open to seniors only. (3 hours laboratory) 

315 Molecular Biology (4) F 

Prerequisite: a year of general chemistry and two semesters of college biology. 
An introduction to the physical and chemical aspects of biological science, using 
subcellular activities as the primary focus of the course. Topics include studies of 
modem data-gathering methods, subcellular structure and function, bioenergetics, 
biosynthesis and an introduction to heredity at the molecular level. (2 hours lec- 
ture, 6 hours laboratory) 

342 Plant Anatomy (4) F 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or one year of college biology or equivalent. The 
origin, development, and maturation of leaves, stems, roots, and flowers of vascular 
plants. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

343 Plant Microtechnique (2) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or permission of the instructor. Theory and practice 
of the preparation of plant cells, tissues and organs for microscopic study, (6 hours 
laboratory) 

344 Plant Morphology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or one year of college biology or equivalent. A study of 
the morphology and classification of the lower plant groups and a general survey 
of the major groups of plants exclusive of angiosperms and gymnosperms. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


167 


Biological Science 


361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology (4) S 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or permission of instructor. Study of the 
structure and function of the human organism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

362 Histological Technique (3) S 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or permission of instructor. Theory and 
practice of the preparation of cells and tissues for microscopic study. 1 hour lec- 
ture, 6 hours laboratory) 

363 Wildlife and Conservation (3) S 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 140 and 160 or equivalents or permission of instructor. A 
study of the relationship of land, water and wildlife with an analysis of manage- 
ment techniques. 

400 Undergraduate Problems in Biology (1—3) F, S 

Open to advanced standing students in biology by permission of a staff member 
only. May be repeated for credit. 

401 Biogeogrophy (3) S 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 140 and 160 or equivalents or permission of instructor. A 
study of the present day distribution of plants and animals based upon classification, 
fossil records, morphology and geography. 

402 Biological Preparations (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: three semesters of college biology, including Bio Sci 311 and 362. 
An introduction to the problems and practices of preparing materials for teaching 
and research in biology. May include preparation of whole organism specimens, 
histological specimens and media for characterization of microorganisms. (6 hours 
laboratory per week) 

412 Cell Physiology and Metabolism (2) S 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology and one semester of organic chemistry 
or permission of the instructor. Characteristics of life at the cellular level; processes 
by which the cell obtains energy and material and forms new cell substances; con- 
trol of these processes by the cell; organization of structures and enzyme systems 
within the cell. 

412L Cell Physiology Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 412 (maybe taken concurrently). (6 hours laboratory) 

413 Pathogenic Microbiology (2) S 

Prerequisite: one semester of microbiology or bacteriology. Study of the biology 
of infectious disease: mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity; host defenses; mode 
of action of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents; characteristics of specific 
pathogenic bacteria, fungi and viruses. 

41 3L Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 413 (normally taken concurrently) or permission of the 
instructor. (6 hours laboratory) 

414 Immunology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 311 and 315 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 
Study of the nature of antibodies and antigens, their role in immunity, and the 
specificity of their reactions. Laboratory experiments will show the kinetics of 
antibody formation and the mechanisms of antibody-antigen reactions. Techniques 
in serodiagnosis will be performed. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


168 


Biological Science 


424 Evolution (3) S 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or permission of the instructor. A study 
of evolution, including the history of evolutionary thought; origin of universe, 
earth and life; geological and paleontological history of the earth; evidences for 
evolution derived from comparative anatomy, embryology, genetics, zoogeography; 
mechanisms of evolution. 

424L Evolution Laboratory (1) S 

Prerequisite: Biology 424 (may be taken concurrently). (3 hours laboratory) 

425 Marine Biology (4) F 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 100 and Physical Science 201 or equivalent, or permission 
of the instructor. Physical and chemical aspects of the ocean as a background for 
the study of marine organisms and habitats, including a study of currents, tides, 
food cycles, productivity, biotic associations, succession, and communities. Habits, 
identification, ecology, methods of collecting, preserving and maintaining alive 
local marine algae, invertebrates, and fish. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or 
field work) 

436 Microbial Growth and Physiology (4) S 

Prerequisites: one semester courses in microbiology and organic chemistry. An 
advanced treatment of the growth, physiology and structures of the microorgan- 
isms, with emphasis on study of the free-living bacteria, yeasts and molds. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

439 Microbiol Ecology (2) S 

Prerequisite: one semester of microbiology or bacteriology. The interaction of 
microbes and their environment; the influence of physical and chemical factors on 
the distribution and activities of microbial populations; the effects of microbes on 
the living and nonliving environment. 

439L Microbial Ecology Laboratory (2) S 

Prerequisite: one semester of microbiology; 439 is normally taken concurrently. 
Basic principles of microbial enrichment, selection and succession. On completion 
of the basic experiments each student will select and perform a field and laboratory 
study in microbial ecology. (6 hours laboratory) 

441 Plant Taxonomy (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or one year of college biology or equivalent. An intro- 
duction to the study of classification of conifers and the flowering plants through 
field collecting and laboratory study and identification of representative kinds. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

443 Plant Ecology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Plant Taxonomy 441. Relation of plants to their environment with 
emphasis on climatic and soil factors influencing their structure, behavior, and 
distribution. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

444 Plant Physiology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or equivalent and one semester of organic chemistry or 
permission of the instructor. A study of plant growth, nutrition, food synthesis, and 
metabolism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

445 Mycology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140. A study of the comparative morphology and taxonomy 
of the fungi with an emphasis on morphological, physiological and reproductive 


169 


Biological Science 


characteristics demonstrating evolutionary relationships. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

446 Algology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 140 or equivalent. A study of the comparative morphology 
and taxonomy of the algae including a consideration of the physiological and 
chemical characteristics demonstrating evolutionary relationships. (2 hours lecture, 
6 hours laboratory or field work) 

452 Economic Botany (3) F 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 140 or permission of the instructor. An examination of 
man’s dependence upon and economic interest in plants throughout the world. 

461 Invertebrate Zoology (4) F 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 160, or a year of college biology or permission of instructor. 
Evolution, classification, physiological adaptations, and biology of invertebrate 
animals. Includes dissection, identification and observation of living animals. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, or field work) 

463 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4) F 

Prerequisite: a year course in general zoology or biology, or permission of the 
instructor. A comparative study of the chordates, with emphasis on morphology 
and evolution of various organ systems from fish through mammals. Includes thor- 
ough dissection of dogfish, necturus, and cat. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

464 Embryology (4) S 

Prerequisite: a year course in general zoology or biology or permission of the 
instructor. Study of development from fertilization through organogenesis with 
laboratory work on the frog, chick, and pig. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

465 Animal Ecology (4) F 

Prerequisite: three semesters of college biology or permission of the instructor. 
A survey of the physical, chemical, and biological factors of the environment as 
they affect the distribution and mode of life of animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

467 Entomology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 160, or a year of college biology or permission of instructor. 
Anatomy, physiology, evolution, and biology of insects and other terrestrial arthro- 
pods. Laboratory includes detailed dissection, collection, identification, and obser- 
vation of living anhropods. (2 hours lecture, and 6 hours laboratory or field work) 

471 Natural History of the Vertebrates (4) S 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology; comparative vertebrate anatomy, or 
permission of the instructor. Natural history, behavior, distribution, and ecology of 
the vertebrates. Laboratory and field emphasis on identification, behavior, mainte- 
nance of living and preserved animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or 
fieldwork) 

472 Parasitology (4) S 

Prerequisite: one year of general biology or permission of instructor. A con- 
sideration of the symbiotic relationships existing at all levels of animal organization. 
Emphasis will be placed on the natural history, biology, physiology, ecology and 
laboratory recognition of symbiotic organisms. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours labo- 
ratory) 


170 


Biological Science; Chemistry 


500 Graduate Problems in Biology (1--3) F, S 

Open to graduate students only by permission of a staff member. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

501 Thesis (1-3) F, S 

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units of credit. 

502 Seminar in Biology (2) F, S 

Open to graduate students only by permission of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

511 Seminar in Microbiology (2) F, 5 

Open to graduate students only by permission of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

516 Viruses and Virus Infections (4) S 

Prerequisite: a course in microbiology or bacteriology. A study of viruses as 
molecules, as living organisms and as infectious agents. Further consideration of 
virus infections of man, other animals, bacteria and plants; comparison of viruses 
with rickettsiae and other obligate parasites. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

540 Seminar in Botany (2) F, S 

Open to graduate students only by permission of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

560 Seminar in Zoology (2) F, S 

Open to graduate students only by permission of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

100 Introductory Chemistry (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: one year of high school mathematics. Fundamental principles of 
chemistry with emphasis placed on the chemistry of inorganic compounds. Does 
not apply as credit for majors in the physical or biological sciences or for minors 
in the physical sciences. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

101 A, B General Chemistry (5,5) F, 5 

Prerequisites: high school algebra and either high school chemistry or high 
school physics or Chemistry 100. High school physics and trigonometry strongly 
recommended. Intended for majors and minors in the physical and biological 
sciences. 

101 A— The fundamental principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, gas 
laws, solid and liquid states, changes of state, modern atom concepts, chemical 
bonding and chemical equilibrium with emphasis on quantitative acid-base chem- 
istry. Laboratory: experiments applying elementary physical chemistry and volu- 
metric quantitative analysis. (3 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

1 01 B— Oxidation-reduction chemistry, introduction to chemical thermodynamics 
and chemical kinetics, discussions of the chemistry of representative and transition 
elements, and introductions to biochemistry, organic and nuclear chemistry. Labo- 
ratory: Experiments concerning gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis, 
selected topics in qualitative analysis and inorganic preparations. (3 hours lecture 
discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 


171 


Chemistry 


105 General Chemistry for Engineers (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry lOlA. Description the same as Chemistry lOlB. Open 
only to engineering majors. Not open to students with credit in Chemistry lOlB. 

201 Modern Physical Science (4) F, S. (See course description under Physical 
Science) 

205 Glassblowing (1) F, S 

Elementary training in the manipulation of glass leading to the construction of 
scientific glass apparatus. Enrollment limited with preference given to junior and 
senior physical science majors. (4 hours laboratory) 

211 Quantitative Analysis (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: two semesters of college chemistry. Stoichiometry and the funda- 
mentals of volumetric and gravimetric quantitative analysis. Students completing 
Chemistry 101 B with a grade of C or better will not receive credit. (2 hours lec- 
ture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

212 Quantitative Chemistry (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 A3i (grade C or better) or Chemistry 211. Physics 
211A,B, or Physics 221A,B strongly recommended. Modem analytical chemistry 
including contemporary separation methods, nonaqueous quantitative chemistry, 
and introductions to instrumental methods of analysis in electrochemistry, absorp- 
tion spectroscopy, and radiochemistry. (2 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours lab- 
oratory) 

251 Elementary Organic Chemistry (4) F, S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 100 or equivalent. A course for nonchemistry majors 
designed to provide an introduction to the properties, methods of preparation, and 
reactions of the more important classes of organic compounds. (3 hours lecture 
discussion, 3 hours laboratory) 

301A/B Organic Chemistry (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry lOlB or equivalent and concurrent enrollment in either 
Chemistry 302A,B or Chemistry 303A,B. A comprehensive course in organic chem- 
istry with emphasis on the modern theories of structure and reaction mechanism. 

302A,B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1,1) F, S 

Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 301A3- A course designed to 
give training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including 
synthesis of typical aliphatic and aromatic compounds. (3 hours laboratory) 

303A,B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 301A,B. Experiments illustrat- 
ing laboratory techniques, syntheses, and instrumental methods used in the modern 
organic chemistry laboratory. Recommended for chemistry majors. (6 hours lab- 
oratory) 

351 Introduction to Biochemistry (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 251 or Chemistry 301B and five units of biology. A 
survey of the chemistry and metabolism or proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, hor- 
mones, in plants, animals, and microorganisms. (3 hours lecture discussion, 3 hours 
laboratory) 


172 


Chemistry 


371 A,B Physical Chemistry (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 250A3, Physics 221A3* and Chemistry lOlB. Chem- 
istry 212 recommended. Equivalent courses may be substituted. A study of the 
fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Thermodynamics, solutions, chemical 
and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, transport phenomena, atomic and molecular 
structure, and kinetics are the major topics discovered. Discussions with emphasis 
on the use of fundamental principles to solve problems. 

401 Organic Preparations (2—3) S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30lA,B or equivalent. Laboratory exercises using ad- 
vanced methods and techniques for the preparation of organic compounds. Library 
work required. (6 or 9 hours of laboratory) 

403 Characterization of Organic Compounds (4) F 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301A,B or equivalent. The identification of organic com- 
pounds as pure substances or in mixtures. (2 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours labo- 
ratory) 

411 Instrumental Analysis (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, 301 A,B, Chemistry 371 A (concurrent enrollment 
acceptable), and Physics 221 A3- Advanced topics in absorption and emission spec- 
troscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, mass spectrometry, 
gas chromatography. X-ray methods, electrochemistry and radiochemistry. (2 hours 
lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

425 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101A,B or equivalent and Chemistry 30lA,B and Chem- 
istry 371 A3- A comprehensive inorganic chemistry course with an introduction to 
modern theories of chemical bonding and structure. Theoretical treatments include 
molecular orbital and ligand field theory with their extensions, coordination and 
transition metal chemistry, various aspects of nonmetal chemistry and a discussion 
of hydride properties. 

426 Inorganic Preparations (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 212, 301 A,B and 425 or its equivalent. Laboratory exer- 
cises in the preparation and identification of inorganic compounds. There is a mini- 
mum of five required preparations each of which is representative of a different 
class of compounds. Library work required. (1 hour lecture discussion, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

431 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 301 A,B, Chemistry 371 A and Chemistry 37 IB (or con- 
current enrollment). Theoretical aspects of organic chemistry with emphasis on the 
modem concepts of structure and chemical reactivity. 

441 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B. May be taken concurrently with Chemistry 
37 IB with the permission of the instructor. Laboratory exercises illustrating the 
physical principles of chemistry. (1 hour lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

451 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) F 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B. An introduction to the application of quantum 
mechanics and statistical mechanics in chemistry. 

461 Chemical Thermodynamics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B or equivalent. A study of thermodynamic prin- 
ciples and their application to chemical processes. 


173 


Chemistry; Communication 

472 Chemical Crystallography (3) S 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 A, B and Physics 221 A3 or equivalent courses. An 
introduction to the fundamentals of morphological crystallography and ctystal 
symmetry, the nature of X-rays and X-ray diffraction, the recording and inter- 
pretation of diffraction phenomena, and the analysis of crystal structures with ap- 
plications in chemistry. 

475 Theory of Spectroscopy (3) F 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B or equivalent. An introduction to the theory of 
the structures of the electronic spectra of diatomic and simpler polyatomic mole- 
cules, transition rules, group theory, and UV, IR, NMR, and Raman spectra. 

491 Chemical Literature (1) F, S 

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. An introduction to the types and use of 
chemical literature. 

495 Senior Research (1-3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Consent of supervising instructor. Open only to students with a 
3.0 grade point average in chemistry. An introduction to the methods of chemical 
research through a research project carried out under the supervision of one of 
the Chemistry Department faculty. May be repeated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Study of some special topic in chemistry, selected in consultation with the in- 
structor and carried out under his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Research in Chemistry (1—6) F, S 

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate standing and prior arrangements with the 
instructor. Research in one of the fields of chemistry on an individual basis under 
the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. 

511 Theory of the Chemical Bond (3) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and Chemistry 37lA,B and Chemistry 425 or 
their equivalents. An introduction to the principles of molecular formation, elec- 
tronic configurations in ground states of molecules, resonance energies, electronega- 
tivity, bond energies, hybrid bonds, three center bonds, calculation of bond lengths, 
and ionization potentials. 

COMMUNICATION 

101 Reporting and Writing (3) F, 5 

Introduction to news reporting and writing, with emphasis on news gathering, 
evaluation, and the principles of clarity and conciseness. Typing ability required. 

102 Reporting and Writing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Communication 101 or permission of instructor. Concentration on 
writing of more advanced news stories and news features. Typing ability required. 

21 8A Introduction to Photography (2) F, S 

An introductory lecture and laboratory course in photographic theory and the 
application of photographic principles. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 

21 8B Communications Photography (2) F, S 

A lecture and laboratory course applying photographic principles to the require- 
ments of mass communications. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) 


174 


Communication 


331 News Communication (3) F 

An introduction to the news communication media, with experience in news 
writing. A writing course open to nonmajors and recommended for credential 
candidates. (Not open to students with credit in (Dommunication 101-102.) 

332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) S 

Prerequisite: Communication 101 and 102, or permission of instructor. Practice 
and theory of editing information materials for publication in newspapers and 
magazines. (6 hours activity) 

333 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) S 

The basic structure and the interrelationships of newspapers, magazines, films, 
radio, television, in terms of their significance as social instruments and economic 
entities in modem society. 

334 Feature Article Writing (3) S 

Nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines, including study of sources, 
methods, and markets. Open to nonmajors. 

335 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Communication 101 and 102, or permission of instructor. Coverage 
in depth of significant events pertinent to operations of governmental units and 
related organizations. 

338 Newspaper Production (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A lecture and activity course in which 
members of the class constitute the editorial staff of the college newspaper. The 
group meets four hours per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing 
and makeup, followed by production. With consent of instructor, the course may 
be repeated up to a maximum of 9 units credit. (9 hours lab) 

353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) F 

Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales appeals, 
attention factors, and illustrations. (6 hours activity) 

356 Advertising Production (1) F, S 

Preparation of advertisements for the college newspaper, magazine and yearbook. 
Advertising accounts assigned to each student. Weekly critique sessions. Individual 
consultation with instructor. (5 hours lab) 

358A,B Publications Production (2,2) F, S 

A workshop for students engaged in the production of the college magazine and 
yearbook and other types of student publications, as scheduled by appropriate 
college authorities. Activities will include writing, editing, photography, art work, 
and layout. Open to nonmajors. (6 hours lab) 

361 Theory and Practice of Public Relations (3) F 

Examination of basic principles of public relations and their application in non- 
commercial as well as commercial fields, including industry, education, government 
and welfare. 

371 Radio-television News and Public Affairs (3) S 

Theory and practice of covering news events and public affairs for radio and 
television. Student material will be prepared for broadcast locally. (6 hours activity) 


175 


Communication 


375 The Documentary Film (3) F 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Purpose and development of the documentary; 
current trends; critical analysis; production requirements; future of the medium 
in business, government and education, and television. Students will analyze selected 
documentary films. 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) F, S 

The history and development of the broadcasting industry and its impact and 
influence on our society. A study of the basic broadcasting practices, audiences, 
production, and programming. (Same as Drama 380) 

401 Report Writing (3) F 

Planning, organizing and writing of various kinds of reports for business, educa- 
tion and government. Consideration will be given to use of graphic aids and 
preparation of copy for reports that are to be printed. Recommended for non- 
majors. 

403 Technical Writing (3) F 

The study of uses of technical writing in industry, science and engineering, and 
the completion of written assignments designed to test understanding of, and pro- 
vide experience with various forms. 

407 Communication and the Law (3) S 

Development of Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and press; 
statutes and administrative regulations affecting freedom of information and of 
publishing, advertising and telecommunications. Problems of libel and slander, 
rights in news and advertising, contempt, copyright, and invasion of privacy. Open 
to nonmajors. 

425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) F 

The development of American mass communication beginning with newspapers 
and periodicals and continuing through radio and television. Includes ideological, 
political, social and economic aspects. 

426 World Communication Systems (3) F 

The examination of major mass communication systems, both democratic and 
totalitarian, and the means by which news and propaganda are conveyed inter- 
nationally. 

427 Seminar on Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Consideration of problems such as the extent 
to which the mass media should be regulated by the government, “objective” 
versus “interpretive” news reporting, and ethical and legal questions of particular 
cases. 

439 Mass Media Internship (2) F, S 

According to his vocational preference, the student serves a supervised intern- 
ship with a newspaper, magazine, radio or television station, press association, adver- 
tising agency, or public relations firm. 

499 Icidependent Study (2) ¥, S 

Prerequisite: consent of the department chairman. Individually supervised mass 
media activities, on and off campus. Projects may involve newspapers, magazines, 
radio, television, and public relations agencies. 


176 


Communication; Comparative Literature 


463 Public Relations Methods (3) S 

Prerequisite: Communication 361 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 
Means by which public relations concepts are carried out through the mass media. 

500 Mass Communication Theory (3) S 

Prerequisite: B.A. degree, background in mass communications, or consent of in- 
structor. Theory of mass communication in terms of communicator, media, and 
audience. Consideration of extensive research regarding probable effects of mass 
communications. 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(Offered by the Department of English) 

312 The Bible as Literature (3) F, S 

The evolution of major ideas and attitudes in the Old and New Testaments; the 
influence of the Hebraic-Christian tradition in shaping the values of Western 
civilization. 

315 Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) F 

The origins, elements, forms and functions of classical mythology in works from 
the earliest times to the present. 

332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) S 

Representative works in translation, from Beowulf to Dante. 

333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) F 

Major phases of the Renaissance as a literary movement, from Erasmus to 
Montaigne and Cervantes. 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) S 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of selected works by Pushkin, Dostoyev- 
sky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, and others, and their relationship to Western 
literature. 

375 Hispanic Literature and Culture (3) 5 

A survey of Hispanic contributions to world culture, with emphasis on under- 
standing contemporary Latin American civilization. 

425A Oriental Literature (3) F 

A study of selected translations of Indian and Cliinese literature. 

425B Oriental Literature (3) S 

A study of selected translations of Japanese literature. 

453 The Novel in France and Germany (3) S 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding novels in translation with 
a view toward determining some principles of the narrative arts. Emphasis on 
Goethe, Stendahl, Flaubert, Mann, Kafka, Proust; and others. 

473A,B World Drama (3^) F, S 

Reading, discussion and interpretation of great plays of the world in translation, 
emphasizing them as literature for performance. First semester from ancient Greece 
through the mid-19th century; second semester, from Ibsen to the present. (Same 
as Drama 473A,B.) 


177 


Comparative Literature; Drama 


481 Senior Seminar: Ethical Problems in Literature (3) F 

A systematic investigation of ethical assumptions displayed in representative 
samples of the greatest Western cultures and literary types. Involves aesthetics, 
ethics, philosophy, and human social behavior. 

491 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) S 

Fifth century Greek tragedy through the extant works of Aeschylus and 
Sophocles, and ten plays of Euripides. (Same as Drama 491.) 

582 Graduate Seminar: Dante (3) S 


DRAMA 

211 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101, a high school speech course, or consent of instructor. 
A fundamentals course devoted to theory, methods, and practice in the perform- 
ance of oral communication of different types of literature. (Same as Speech 211.) 

271 Introduction to Theatre Arts (3) F, S 

A study of the evolution of theatre, motion pictures, radio and television as 
composite arts. Emphasis is placed on the visual and production aspects as influ- 
enced by different cultures, traditions, and technologies. Field trips to certain 
significant productions. 

272 Understanding Theatre (3) f, 5 

A nontechnical survey course for the general student leading to an appreciation 
and understanding of the theatre as a medium of communication and entertainment 
and as an art form. Field trips to certain significant productions. 

273A,B Acting (3,3) F, S 

Laboratory practice and discussions of the form and content of the art of acting: 
(A) action, motivation and circumstances of behavior on stage; (B) problems in 
characterization. (6 hours — activity) 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (2,2) F, S 

Participation in the preparation and execution of the departmental and student 
productions: (A) production organization; scenic forms; construction, tools and 
materials; properties; (B) scene painting, lighting fundamentals, sound. (6 hours — 
production) 

286 Design for the Theatre (3) S 

Prerequisite: Art 103, 104 or Drama 276A or 276B, or consent of instructor. 
Study and practice in the principles of designing for the stage. Practical work in 
the designing and planning of sets for drama productions. (Same as Art 286.) 

311 Oral Interpretation (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Drama 211 or Speech 211 or consent of instructor. The principles 
and practice of reading aloud from the printed page. Analysis of selections from 
prose and poetry are emphasized. The development of voice control and projection 
of idea and motion. (Same as Speech 311.) 

314A,B Reading Theatre (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Drama 211 or Speech 211. Oral reading in which the emphasis is 
placed on group and individual reading of dramatic literature. The first semester 
will emphasize modem and contemporary dramatic literature and the second semes- 
ter will include selections from the Elizabethan, Renaissance and Romantic periods. 


178 


Drama 


341 Phonetics (3) F 

The study of the history and theory of the speech sounds including the morpho- 
logical aspect of linguistics; the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet; the 
various factors influencing articulation and pronunciation. (Same as Speech 341) 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Evidence of student’s previous interest in creative writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group 
criticism and evaluation of each student’s independent work, as it relates to play- 
writing. (Same as English 364) 

373A,B Advanced Acting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Drama 273A,B. A study of historical theories and techniques of 
styles of acting as an art form. The first semester will include Greek through 
Neoclassic periods and the second semester will include the 18th century to con- 
temporary styles. (6 hours — activity) 

374A,B Dance Theatre and Production (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 143 or the equivalent or consent of instructor. 
Theory and practice of creative and expressive movement in relation to the theatre 
and dance production. (6 hours — production) 

376A,B Advanced Stagecraft (2,2) F, S 

Participation in the supervising of major areas of technical production; stage 
management, lighting design, production management, house management. (6 hours 
— production) 

377A,B Costume and Makeup (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Stagecraft 3 76 A or permission of instructor. Principles and theory 
of costume and makeup for stage and television including both historical and con- 
temporary techniques and application. (6 hours — production) 

378A,B Experimental Theatre (1-3) F, S 

An activity course in which dramatic principles are applied through production 
of full length and one-act plays using various styles of acting and staging. (3 
hours — production per unit) 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) F, S 

The history and development of the broadcasting industry and its impact and 
influence on our society. A study of the basic broadcasting practices, audiences, 
production and programming. (Same as Communication 380) 

382 Television Techniques (3) F, S 

Survey of the development and current trends in television techniques, program- 
ming, and production. 

383 Radio and Television Writing (3) S 

Study of the principles and practices and experience in the writing of scripts 
and other forms of continuity for both radio and television. 

402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) F, S 

Theory and practice in the use of creative dramatics, storytelling, puppetry, 
assembly programs, role-playing, and other aspects of dramatics as tools for the 
teacher, group worker, recreation major, and others who work with children. 


179 


Drama 


470A,B Directing (3,3) F, S 

Theory and practice in directing scenes from plays for their oral and visual 
values as theatre. Second semester students will each direct public performances of 
two one-act plays. (6 hours activity) 

473A,B World Drama (3,3) F, S 

Reading, discussion and interpretation of great plays of the world in translation, 
emphasizing them as literature for performance. First semester, from ancient Greece 
through the mid- 19th century; second semester, from Ibsen to the present. (Same 
as Comparative Literature 47 3 A3) 

474 Special Studies in Dance Theatre and Production (1—3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Drama 374A,B or the equivalent and consent of instructor. Oppor- 
tunity for intensive study in theory and practice in dance theater and production. 
May be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three units of 
credit may be obtained in a single semester. (3 hours production per unit) 

475A,B History of the Theatre (3,3) F, S 

Examinations of the evolution of all major aspects of world theatre. (A) From 
ancient Greece to the end of the 18th century; (B) 19th and 20th centuries. 

478A,B Rehearsal and Performance (1-^,1 -3) F, S (Formerly 379A,B) 

Acting in stage productions. Any upper division or graduate student who desires 
to be considered for roles in the major productions should enroll. This class cannot 
be taken concurrently with either 376 A3 or 378 A,B. (3 hours production per unit) 

491 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) S 

Fifth century Greek tragedy through the extant works of Aeschylus and 
Sophocles, and ten plays of Euripides. (Same and English 491.) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in drama with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Drama (3) F, S 

Introduction to methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source 
materials, including library and original data; research and project design and 
execution; interpretation of researches. 

501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory and Appreciation (3) F 

Directed research with emphasis on the relationship between historical back- 
grounds and developments in the theatre and the student’s area of concentration. 
May be repeated to a maximum of six units. 

511 Graduate Seminar in Interpretation (3) F, S 

The historical and philosophical backgrounds in the development of interpreta- 
tion and its relationship to contemporary theory and practice. (Same as Speech 
511.) 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) F, S 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering Shake- 
speare. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the 
section appropriate to his program. (Same as English 571.) 


180 


Drama, Drama Education; English 


572 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) F 

History and philosophy of production problems in theatre arts. Organization of 
the college theatre as it relates to the total college program. Planning of the 
production within the limitations of budgets and physical facilities. 

591 Graduate Project or Thesis (3) F, S 

Development and presentation of a thesis or creative project in the area of con- 
centration beyond regularly offered course work. 

DRAMA EDUCATION 

442 Teaching Drama in the Secondary School (2—3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Education Found 311, Education Sec 340, senior standing. Ad- 
mission to teacher education, or consent of instructor. Objectives, methods and 
materials for teaching drama in secondary schools required before student teaching 
by majors in drama for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
secondary teaching. Students without teaching experience must register for three 
(3) units of credit and must allow sufficient time in their schedules at the same 
hour each day so that they can serve as teacher aides in secondary schools. 

484 Educational Television Production (3) F, S 

Theory and practice in the activities, methods of lesson preparation, and pre- 
sentation of educational television productions. 

749 Student Teaching in Drama in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, 5 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

ENGLISH 

For world literature in English translation see courses under Comparative Litera- 
ture. 

101 Composition and World Literature (3) F, S 

Analytical and critical writing based on the study of representative works from 
Classical and Biblical literature to the Renaissance. 

102 World Literature and Composition (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: English 101 or the equivalent. The study of representative works 
from the Renaissance to the modern age, as a basis for continuing practice in 
analytical and critical writing. 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) F, S 

The main literary forms — prose fiction, poetry, and drama — are studied and ana- 
lyzed. Various critical methods are applied to representative works mainly from 
English and American literature. Especially recommended for prospective teachers 
of literature. 

202 The Short Story (3) F, S 

Critical analysis of selected American and European short stories, aimed at an 
understanding of the structure and technique of the short story. 

211 Masters of British Literature (3) F 

Prerequisite: English 101, 102, or consent of instructor. An introduction to major 
periods and movements, major authors, and major forms through 1760. 


181 


English 


212 Masters of British Literature (3) S 

Prerequisite: English 101, 102, or consent of instructor. An introduction to major 
periods and movements, major authors, and major forms from 1760 through modem 
times. 

301 Advanced Composition (3) F, S 

Exercises in creativity, analysis, and rhetoric as applied in expository writing. 

303 The Structure of Modern English (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary English applied to 
problems in writing. Modern English usage. Strongly recommended for all teacher 
candidates. 

321 American Literature to Whitman (3) F, S 

Emphasis on major writers: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whit- 
man, and others. 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) F, S 

Emphasis on Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

333 Chaucer (3) F, S 

Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, read in Middle English. Close attention to 
the vocabulary, structure, and pronunciation of Chaucer’s language, as indispensable 
to literary appreciation. 

334 Shakespeare (3) F, S 

Intensive study of selected major plays illustrating Shakespeare’s development, 
dramatic art, and insight into human nature. 

335 Elizabethan Drama (3) S 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of the instructor. Marlowe, Kyd, Greene, 
Jonson, and others are studied as representative of dramatic trends in Elizabethan 
England. 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) F 

The poetry of Wyatt and Surrey, Jonson, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, and others; 
and the prose of Bacon, Greene, Lodge, Lyly, Nashe, and others. 

341 Milton and the Seventeenth Century (3) F, S 

A study of the development of Milton’s art and of the ideological backgrounds 
of his thought. Includes also Donne, the metaphysical poets, the Cavaliers, Burton, 
Browne and Bunyan. 

342 The Age of Reason in English Literature (3) F 

Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Addison, and Steele. The Restoration, the Age of 
Reason, and foreshadowings of Romanticism. 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) S 

Bums, Blake; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The reaction 
against rationalism, the rise of revolutionary and liberal thought, humanitarianism, 
and emphasis on individual creativity. 

344 English Literature of the Late Nineteenth Century (3) F 

Roots and development of social and aesthetic problems in essayists and poets 
of the late and middle 19th century, including Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Mill. 
Pater, Huxley, Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti and Hopkins. 


182 


English 


345 History and Development of the English Novel (3) F, 5 

From the Renaissance to the modems, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th cen- 
turies: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Austen, Bronte. Thackeray, Dickens, 
Eliot, Meredith, Hardy. 

346 The Age of Dryden (3) F 

A study of the work of representative poets, prose writers and dramatists of the 
Restoration period. Emphasis on the ideas which infomi the work of Dryden, 
Hobbes, Rochester, Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Temple and others. 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) F, S (Formerly 362, 366 and 368) 

Prerequisite: Evidence of student’s previous interest in creative writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group 
criticism and evaluation of each student’s independent work. Depending on the 
specialized writing field of the instructor, the various sections will concentrate on 
fiction, plays, or poetry. May be repeated for credit. 

400 Humanities and Social Sciences: A Critical Analysis (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Explores the basic assumptions and 
methodology of the social sciences and the humanities. The focus will be on 
those areas in which both disciplines can offer insights, on the conflicts — real or 
apparent — between these disciplines, and on the trends developing in each of 
them. (Same as Political Science 400.) 

423 Early American Literature (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: English 321 or 6 other units of American literature. Literature of 
colonial and revolutionary America, including the Puritans, 18th century deism 
and rationalism, and the literary antecedents of American democratic thought. 

433 Children's Literature (3) F, S 

A study of masterpieces of the world’s literature for children. Illustrates literary 
qualities appealing to children and demonstrates the ways in which children’s 
literature reflects the particular cultural differences of the various Oriental, classi* 
cal and modern cultures. 

435 Shakespeare's History Plays and Comedies (3) S 

An intensive study of the history plays and comedies, designed to provide a 
broader comprehension of Shakespeare’s dramatic art, social and historical com- 
mentary, and human insight. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) F, S 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and philoso- 
phers as Freud, Spengler, Schopenhauer, Nietzcshe, and Kierkegaard. (Same as 
Philosophy 451.) 

462 Modern British and American Novels (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American, or world literature*, an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The development of modern 
British and American novels from 1900 to 1950. 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) S 

The novel in English since World War II. 


183 


English 


464 Modern British and Americon Drama (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American, or world literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. Ehe development of British 
and American drama from 1900 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The development of British 
and American poetry from 1900 to the present. 

490 History of the English Language (3) S 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English 
vocabulary, phonology, morphology, and syntax from Indo-European to modern 
American English. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) S (Formerly 492, 495, 496 and 498) 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in the area to be studied, a B average or 
better in subsequent English courses, or consent of the instructor. 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering selected 
topics from language studies, intensive studies of major writers, criticism, and 
literary types, periods, and ideological trends. 

570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) F, S (Formerly English Ed 571) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering philology, 
historical development, and structure of English. Individual offerings under this 
course number may deal with only one aspect of language studies. The student 
should consult his advisor and the schedule of classes for the sections appropriate 
to his graduate program. This course number may be repeated with different con- 
tent for additional credit. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) F, S (Formerly 572-578) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures cov- 
ering major figures such as: Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Melville, Twain, Haw- 
thorne, Joyce, and Coleridge. The student should consult his adviser and the sched- 
ule of classes for the sections appropriate to his graduate program. This course 
number may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

579 Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) F, S 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering historical 
development and schools of criticism. Individual offerings within this course 
number may deal with only one aspect of critical problems. The student should 
consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the sections appropriate to his 
graduate program. This course number may be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

580 Special Graduate Projects (3) F, S 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered course work. 
Oral and written reports. This course number may be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 

581 Graduate Seminar: Modern British Novel (3) F, S 

A study of the problems in the modern British novel as represented by the major 
writers James, Conrad, Lawrence, and selected minor writers. 


184 


English Education; Foreign Languages Education; French 

ENGLISH EDUCATION 

432 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prequisite: Education Found 311, admission to teacher education. The importance 
of the language arts to satisfactory personal, social, and professional life. Methods to 
help develop in children the skills needed for listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing are studied and their effectiveness evaluated. 

442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (2-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Education Found 311, Admission to Teacher Education. Principles, 
methods, and materials of teaching English in the secondary school. 

749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

432 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Methods of teaching FLES: foreign languages in elementary schools. Critical 
review of materials, audio-lingual-visual aids, and current research. Conducted in 
English, with practice by students in the language they plan to teach. 

442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2-3) S 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311, Educ Sec 340, admission to teacher education, 
senior standing or consent of the instructor. See pages 144-146 under Secondary 
Education for description of standard teaching credential program. 

The theory and practice of language learning and language teaching with special 
emphasis on the audiolingual method in combination with electromechanical aids. 
Conducted in English, with practice by students in the language they plan to teach. 
Required, before student teaching, of students presenting majors in foreign lan- 
guages for the standard teaching credential with a specialization in secondary edu- 
cation. Students without teaching experience must register for three units of credit 
and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at the same hour each day, so 
they can serve as teacher aides in secondary schools. (2 hours lecture-discussion, 
1 hour activity) 

749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary 
School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

FRENCH 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

101 Fundamental French (5) F, S 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. 

102 Fundamental French (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: French 101 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structure of French. Audiolingual assignments are an integral part 
of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. 


185 


French 


203 Intermediate French (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: French 102 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204 Intermediate French (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: French 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) F, S 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with French 203. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) F, 5 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with French 204. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

315 Introduction to French Civilixation (3) F 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussions to develop a 
view of the French tradition (its social, intellectual and literary evolution) while 
at the same time strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division 
students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in French. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with the 
consent of the instructor. Designed to give the student special competence in 
the control of French as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in French. 

325 Contemporary French Civilixation (3) S 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion to develop under- 
standing of the social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions of pres- 
ent-day France, while at the same time strengthening facility with the language. 
Open to lower division students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in 
French. 

400 French for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) S 

Prerequisite: French 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
French, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken and 
written language. Modern writings in various fields, as well as developments in 
methodology and texts, serve as the basis for intensive practice. Conducted in 
French. 

431 French Literature in the Middle Ages and Renaissance (3) F 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The development of French 
literature from the 12th through the 16th centuries, through analysis of representa- 
tive works. Conducted in French. 

441 French Literature in the Century of Revolution (3) 5 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The principal authors and 
movements (romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism) of the 19th century. 
Conducted in French. 


186 


French; Geography 


451 French: Literature in the Baroque and Classic Age (3) F 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The essence and evolution of 
17th-century classicism, studied principally in the major authors (Corneille, 
Moliere, Racine, La Fayette) and in the dominant genre (the theater). Clonducted 
in French. 

461 French Literature in the Age of Enlightenment (3) S 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. Two complementary aspects 
of the 18th century: reason and feeling, the philosophes and the current of sensibil- 
ity. Emphasis on major authors (Marivaux, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos). 
Clonducted in French. 

466 Applied and Descriptive Linguistics (3) F 

Introduction to the nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morpholog- 
ical and syntactic structures of languages are examined through the use of tech- 
niques for describing these structures. The application of linguistic analysis to the 
teaching of modern foreign languages. (Same as German 466, Spanish 466) 

471 Senior Seminar: Contemporary French Literature (3) S 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The major figures of the 20th 
century, including the generations of Proust, Apollinaire, Malraux, Sartre and 
Robbe-Grillet. Conducted in French. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Supervised projects in French language or literature to be taken with the consent 
of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) F 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) S 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of the instructor. 

557 Graduate Seminar: French Poetry (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, (inducted in French. 

571 Graduate Seminar: French Prose (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

575 Graduate Seminar: French Drama (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in 
French. 

580 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. 

GEOGRAPHY 

200 Geography of Man (3) F, S (Formerly 131) 

Man’s distribution and activities within the framework of world geographic 
regions, with emphasis on the differing uses of various environments and the ef- 
fects of geographic conditions on man. 


187 


Geography 


300 Physical Geography (3) F, S (Formerly 111) 

Prerequisite: Geography 2(X). A study of the basic elements of the physical en- 
vironment (e.g., climate, land forms, vegetation and soils) with particular em- 
phasis on the world patterns and interrelationships. Does not give graduate credit. 

310 Cultural Geography (3) F, S (Formerly 121) 

Prerequisite: Geography 200. The study of the basic cultural elements of ge- 
ography (e.g., population distributions and migrations, land use patterns, settle- 
ments, trade, health and nutrition) and their correlations with the physical environ- 
ment. Does not give graduate credit. 

312 Geomorphology (3) F 

Prerequisite: Geography 300. A study of the development of land forms and 
the processes which alter them, with emphasis on present landscapes in the United 
States and the interpretation of topographic maps. 

323 Climatology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 3(X) or consent of the instructor. A study of the basic 
climatological elements and processes, climatic types and the importance of climate 
in the natural and cultural landscape. 

333 Economic Geography (3) f, 5 

Prerequisite: Geography 310, or consent of instructor. A study of the produc- 
tion and distribution of the world’s agricultural, mineral and industrial commodi- 
ties, and analysis of the related economic, political and physical factors. 

343 Maps and Map Interpretation (3) F 

Sources, evaluation, uses, and planning of various types of maps and graphic aids 
for teaching and research, with emphasis on the principles of effective cartographic 
representation. 

353 Cartography (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 343 or consent of instructor. The compilation and con- 
struction of maps, charts, and graphs as geographic tools. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

363 Geography of California (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the geographic 
regions of California — their environmental diversity, settlement patterns, economic 
development, and current problems. 

383 Conservation of Natural Resources (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Geography 310 or consent of the instructor. The principles of con- 
servation and their application as they relate to soil, water, forests, minerals, and 
air, especially in the United States. 

432 Geography of Anglo-America (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200, or consent of instructor. A regional study of the 
United States and Canada emphasizing the interrelated physical and cultural fea- 
tures, that give geographic personality, both to the individual regions as well as the 
individual countries. 

433 Geography of Europe (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200, or consent of instructor. Description and analysis 
of physical environments and human occupance patterns in Europe west of the 
Soviet Union. 


188 


Geography 


434 Geography of Latin America (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200, or consent of instructor. A regional study of middle 
and South American nations emphasizing interrelated physical and cultural char- 
acteristics, with attention given to special hemispheric relationships involving these 
countries and the United States and Canada. 

435 Geography of Asia (3) F 

Prerequisite: Geography 200, or consent of instructor. A regional study of Asiatic 
nations, exclusive of the Soviet Union and Southwest Asia, showing the interrela- 
tionships of physical and cultural characteristics with special emphasis on the grow- 
ing significance, in economic, social, and political terms, of such countries as China, 
India and Japan. 

436 Geography of Africa (3) F 

Prerequisite: Geography 200 or consent of instructor. The physical foundations 
and cultural landscapes of civilization in sub-Saharan Africa, with emphasis on re- 
gional socioeconomic problems and changes. 

438 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200 or consent of instructor. Character of and bases 
for the regional diversity of man and land in the Soviet Union. 

439 Geography of the Middle East (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200 or consent of instructor. The physical foun- 
dations and cultural landscapes of civilization in the Middle East, with emphasis 
on contemporary political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes. 

445 Australia and the Pacific Islands (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Geography 200, or consent of the instructor. The physical, cultural, 
and regional geography of Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, and 
Polynesia. 

453 World Land Problems (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 300, 310 or consent of instructor. A survey and analysis 
of man’s pressing resource problems on a global basis, with especial reference to 
population, food, migration and land settlement, and land reform. The course con- 
siders the intentional and unintentional modifications of man’s environment and the 
importance of man’s changing attitudes toward natural resources. 

463 Problems of California Geography (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 363 or consent of instructor. Special studies of specific 
geographic problems in such areas as land use, water, urbanization, population, 
transportation and air pollution. Field observation of problems. 

471 Urban Geography (3) F 

Prerequisite: Geography 310 or consent of instructor. The city as a geographic 
unit; urban settlements as regional centers; city-region relationships; the structure 
of villages, towns and cities, and their historical development; case studies. 

475 Land Use Analysis and Classification (3) F 

Prerequisite: Geography 300, 310 or consent of instructor. Analysis and inter- 
pretation of rural and urban land use and settlement with specific reference to 
city and regional planning problems. The course involves field study in local 
geography. 


189 


Geography; Geology; German 

481 Political Geography (3) S 

Prerequisite: Geography 310 or consent of instructor. The world political pat- 
tern with specific reference to politically organized areas as objects of geographic 
study. 

490 Geographic Literature and Research (3) F 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of the instructor, and 18 hours of geog- 
raphy courses. Introduction to geographic literature and research methodologies, 
with a discussion of major geographic research themes, leading scholars, problems 
of methodology. The student will be expected to prepare several papers of varying 
length as based on library research. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in geography by permission of the chairman of the 
department. May be repeated once for credit. 

513 Seminar in Regional Geography (3) F 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected 
regions of the world. May be repeated once for credit. 

523 Seminar in Cultural Geography (3) S 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected 
topics pertaining to the political, economic and social relationships in the geog- 
raphy of man. May be repeated once for credit. 

599 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Open to graduate students in geography by permission of the chairman of the 
department. May be repeated once for credit. 

GEOLOGY 


100A Physical Geology (4) F, S 

The origin, composition and distribution of earth materials will be studied. 
Special emphasis will be given to the modification of earth materials through 
mechanical and chemical processes. 

100B Historical Geology (4) S 

Prerequisite: Geology lOOA. Studies of evolutionary history of the earth includ- 
ing the theories of the earth’s origin. Paleontological evidences for earth’s evolu- 
tion will be examined. 


GERMAN 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

101 Fundamental German (5) F, S 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of German. 
Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared 
in the language laboratory. 

102 Fundamental German (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structure of German. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. 


190 


German 


203 Intermediate German (3) F, S 

Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing based on 
cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 

204 Intermediate German (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: German 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) F, S 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with German 203. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) F, S 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with German 204. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) F 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussions in German 
literature, arts and institutions to develop insights into German culture, while 
strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor, (inducted in German. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Designed to give the student special competence in 
the control of German as an instrument of free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in German. 

325 Modern German Thought in Science and Culture (3) 5 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussion of modern 
German thought in science, literature, philosophy and art, designed to acquaint 
the student with a broad range of German contributions to present-day civilization 
while strengthening facility with German language. Open to lower division stu- 
dents with consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

400 German for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) S 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
German, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken and 
written language. Modem writings in various fields, as well as developments in 
methodology and texts, serve as the basis for intensive practice. Conducted in 
German. 

431 The Works of Lessing and Schiller (3) F 

The major works of Lessing and Schiller illustrating their thought and art. Con- 
ducted in German. 

441 The Works of Goethe (3) 5 

Selected works of Goethe illustrating his thought and art. Conducted in German 

451 German Literature to the Baroque (3) F 

Important works from the Hildebrandslied to Shnplicissimus in the setting ol 
their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in German. 


191 


German; History 


461 German Literature Since Goethe (3) S 

Important works illustrating the development from romanticism to expressionism 
in the setting of their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in German. 

466 Applied and Descriptive Linguistics (3) F 

Introduction to the nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morpho- 
logical and syntactic structures of languages are examined through the use of tech- 
niques for describing these structures. The application of linguistic analysis to the 
teaching of modern foreign languages. (Same as French 466, Spanish 466) 

475 Senior Seminar: The German Drama (3) S 

The leading dramatists from Gryphius to Frisch, including works by Kleist, 
Grillparzer, Hebbel, Hauptmann, Brecht, with emphasis on various approaches to 
this genre. Conducted in German. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Supervised research projects in German language or literature to be taken with 
the consent of the instructor and the department chairman. May be repeated for 
credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) F 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) S 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. 

557 Graduate Seminar: German Poetry (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

571 Graduate Seminar: German Prose (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

575 Graduate Seminar: German Drama (3) F 

Prerequisite: (Consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in 
German. 

580 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. 

HISTORY 

110A World Civilizations to the 17th Century (3) F 

The story of man from the beginning of civilizations and historical records until 
the middle of the 17th century. 

11 OB World Civilizations from 1648 (3) S 

The story of man from the end of the religious, wars to the present. Deals with 
the rise of science, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and the rise of 
the ideologies of the 20th century. 


192 


History 


170A United States to 1877 (3) F 

A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the 
United States from the discovery to 1877. Attention is given to the Old World 
background, the rise of the new nation, sectional problems, and the Civil War 
and Reconstruction. 

170B United States Since 1877 (3) S 

Survey of United States history since the period of Reconstruction, covering 
political, economic, social, and biographical subjects. 

300 Africa and the Middle East Since 1945 (3) F 

A survey of the Middle Elast and Africa since 1945, concentrating on the de- 
velopment of their present civilizations, political and economic problems, and 
their place in world affairs. 

301 Far East and Latin America Since 1945 (3) S 

A survey of present governments and civilizations in the Far East and Latin 
America, summarizing the background of present developments and problems in 
these areas. 

340A History of England and Great Britain (3) F 

A study of the political, economic, and social history of England and her afhliated 
nations and territories from the earliest times to the later Stuarts. Particular stress 
is placed upon the growth of the parliamentary sysem of government and upon 
English overseas activities. 

340B History of England and Great Britain (3) S 

A study of the political, economic, and social history of Great Britain from the 
later Stuarts to the present. Particular stress is placed upon the modification of the 
parliamentary system and the growth of economic and social democracy within 
Britain and upon the development of responsible political systems in the dependent 
territories. 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) F 

A survey of the pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portugal 
and the European background of these countries; the development of the socio- 
economic, cultural, and governmental institutions in colonial life; the background of 
revolutions and the wars for independence. 

350B Republican Latin America (3) S 

A survey of the Latin American republics from 1826 to 1945 emphasizing the 
struggle for responsible government, socioeconomic, and cultural changes, and the 
role of United States foreign policy. 

381 Westward Movement in the United States (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170A-B or equivalent. A survey of the expansion of the 
United States population and sovereignty from the eastern seaboard to the Pacific, 
colonial times to 1900, and a history of regional development during the frontier 
period. 

383 History of California (3) F 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of California from the 
aboriginal inhabitants to the present, tracing the development of contemporary 
institutions and the historical background of current issues. 


7—66198 


193 


History 


399 Historiography (3) F, S 

Introduction to nature and discipline of history. A study of methods of historical 
research and writing, of bibliography, and of major problems of historical in- 
terpretation. Required of history majors. 

401 European Intellectual History from 1648 to the Present (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The history of the competing ideas in 
European history from 1648 to the present which have entered into the formation 
of modem European institutions. 

41 2A Ancient Near East—Mesopotamia (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA. A study of the political, socioeconomic, religious, 
and literary history of Mespotamian culture from the rise of the Sumerian city- 
states to Alexander the Great, a period of over three millenia. This will include 
discussion of the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Hurrians, and Persians. 

41 2B Ancient Near East— Syro-Palestine and Egypt (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA. A study of ancient Egypt from early dynastic times 
in the third millennium B.C. to the conquest of Alexander the Great. The history 
of the Syro-Palestinian region will be studied in light of its migrations and inter- 
national culture. A careful study of the Hebrews and their contributions to modem 
civilization will be included. 

41 5A Classical Greece (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA or consent of instructor. A study of the civilization 
of ancient Greece. This course traces the rise and flourishing of the classical city- 
states; considerable attention is devoted to the literary and philosophic contribu- 
tions to our modem civilization. 

41 SB Hellenistic Civilization (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA or consent of instmctor. A study of the Hellenistic 
synthesis and the new patterns in government, the arts and sciences, philosophy 
and literature that appeared between the Macedonian conquest and the interven- 
tion of Rome. 

417A Roman Republic (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA or consent of instructor. A study of the development 
of Roman social and political institutions under the republic. 

417B Roman Empire (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA or consent of instructor. A study of Roman imperial 
institutions and culture. Attention is also given to the rise of Christianity. 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1050 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA. The genesis of European society and culture from 
the decline of Rome to the mid-llth century: the medieval church, the Barbarian 
migrations, the Byzantine and Islamic cultures and the establishment of feudalism 
in western Europe. 

423B Medieval Europe, 1050-1400 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History llOA. A continuation of History 423 A. The stmggle be- 
tween church and state, the rise of feudal monarchies and the intellectual, scientific 
and artistic expressions of European civilization in the later Middle Ages. 


194 


History 


425A The Renaissance (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The history of Europe from 1400 to 1525 
with emphasis upon the beginnings of capitalism, the beginnings of the modern 
state, humanism, the pre-Reformation and the church on the eve of the Reforma- 
tion. 

425B The Reformation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The history of Europe from 1525 to 1648; 
deals with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the religious wars; the price 
rise; royal absolutism; the rise of science. 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1763 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. European diplomatic history and the balance of 
power from 1648 to 1763. Attention is given to the social and philosophical devel- 
opments of the period. 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 5 

A survey of European history from 1763 to 1815. Emphasis is placed on the 
politics, society, and culture of the Old Regime, the influence of the Enlighten- 
ment, the impact of the French Revolution on Europe, and the establishment of 
French hegemony by Napoleon. 

428 19th Century Europe (3) F 

Europe from 1815 to 1914. An examination of the political, economic, social, and 
cultural trends in European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak 
of World War I. Special attention is given to the emerging forces of nationalism, 
liberalism, socialism, and secularism. 

429 Europe Since 1914 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. Survey of events from the beginning of World War 
I to the present. Special emphasis given to the economic, political, social, diplo- 
matic, and intellectual trends of 20th Century Europe. 

432 Germany Since 1648 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOA-B. The evolution of Germany from the Peace of 
Westphalia to the present. Emphasis is placed on political, social, economic, diplo- 
matic and cultural trends in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History HOB. An analysis of the historical developments from the 
establishment of the Russian state at Kiev through the great reforms and reaction 
of the 19th century. Emphasis is placed upon the shaping of contemporary Russia. 

4348 The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3) S 

An evaluation of the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the subsequent consolidation 
of power under the Communist regime. Chief emphasis is placed upon the con- 
tinuity and change in Russian social, political, cultural institutions and foreign 
policy effected by the impact of Marxist-Leninist-Stalinist ideology. 

456 History of Africa to 1945 (3) F 

A history of Africa from the earliest times to World War II. 

461A The Far East (3) F 

A study of the Western impact upon the institutions of China, Japan, India and 
Southeast Asia prior to World War I. 


195 


History 


461 B The For East (3) S 

A study of the developments in China and Japan that led to the Sino-Japanese 
conflict, Japan’s decision to fight the United States, and the establishment of the 
independent states of South and Southeast Asia. 

466A Middle East to the Crusades (3) F 

Prerequisite: History llOA. The study of the events transpiring in the Middle 
East from the Roman world to the period of the Crusades. This will include the 
impact of the Islamic civilization upon the Middle East society. 

466B Middle East Since the Crusades (3) S 

Prerequisite: History HOB. The development of the countries of the Middle East 
following the Crusades to the present. This will include the Ottoman Empire, Eu- 
ropean colonialism in the Middle East, and the modem Middle East. 

471 American Colonial Civilization (3) F 

The settlement of Nonh America and the growth of Anglo-American civiliza- 
tion to 1763, stressing the development of political and economic institutions and 
a distinctive American culture. 

472 United States from Colony to Nation (3) S 

Establishment of an independent government, and growth of a national economy 
and culture from 1763 to 1815. 

473 Sectionalism and Civil War (3) F 

Slavery, sectionalism, and Civil War, and the impact of these forces upon na- 
tional life and thought from 1815 to 1865. 

474 The Growth of Modern United States (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170B or consent of instructor. A study of Reconstruction, 
the growth of the national economy, political reform movements, the rise to a 
world power and cultural developments from the Civil War to 1900. 

475 United States from 1900 to 1932 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History 170B or equivalent. A study of the political, economic, 
social, diplomatic, and intellectual trends and problems from 1900 to the election 
of 1932. Course will stress the reconsideration of traditional national policies toward 
the government, economy, and role of the United States in world affairs. 

476 United States Since 1933 (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170B or equivalent. A study of United States history from 
the New Deal to the present. Includes political, social, economic, diplomatic, and 
intellectual developments and issues. Stresses the emergence of the national gov- 
ernment as a factor in American life and the expansion of U.S. activity in foreign 
affairs. 

482A Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) F 

Prerequisite: History 170 A or consent of the instructor. The course explores the 
interaction of social and economic factors upon each other in the development of 
American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and labor in 
economic change. The first semester covers the development of a colonial economy 
and the early national economy. 

482B Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) S 

Prerequisite: History 170B or consent of the instructor. The course continues to 
explore the interaction of social and economic factors upon each other in the devel- 


196 


History 


opment of American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and 
labor in economic change. The second semester begins with the “takeoff stage of 
economic development” and ends with contemporary America. 

484A American Constitutional History to 1865 (3) F 

Prerequisite: History 170A. English and colonial origins, the growth of democ- 
racy, the slavery controversy, and the sectional war as they reflect constitutional 
development. 

4848 American Constitutional History from 1865 (3) 5 

Prerequisite: History 170B. Constitutional problems involved in the post-Civil 
War era, the expansion of business. World War I, the New Deal, World War II, 
and civil rights in the postwar era. 

485A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) F 

A comprehensive survey of the foreign relations of the United States from the 
beginning of the nation until 1900. Particular attention is given to bases of policy, 
critical evaluation of major policies and relationships between domestic affairs and 
foreign policy. 

4858 United States Foreign Relations from 1900 (3) S 

Relations from 1900 to the present. An analysis of the rise of the United States 
as a world power in the 20th century with special emphasis on the search for world 
order and the diplomacy of the atomic age. 

486A Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) F 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the 
Puritans to the Civil War. 

4868 Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) S 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the 
Civil War to the present. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in history with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

505 Seminar in Analysis of Recent Interpretations in History (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

520 Seminar in European History (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

570 Seminar in American History (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

590 History and Historians (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the writings, personalities, and 
philosophies of representative historians from Herodotus to the present. 


History; Journalism Education; Latin; Mathematics 

591 Thesis (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Study and Research (3) F, S 

Open to graduate students in history with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

JOURNALISM EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Communications) 

442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (2—3) S 

Prerequisite: Education Found 311, Education Sec 340, Admission to Teacher 
Education, or consent of the instructor. Theory and technique of advising school 
newspaper and yearbook staffs and teaching journalism. Relation of classroom 
instruction to staff assignments. 

499 Independent Study (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised projects 
relating to journalism education. 

749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

LATIN 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

101 Fundamental Latin (3) F 

Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading knowledge and a funda- 
mental writing ability in Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will be 
applied. 

102 Fundamental Latin (3) S 

Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice to develop a compre- 
hensive reading knowledge and a fundamental writing ability in Latin. Modem 
techniques of language instruction will be applied. 

MATHEMATICS * 

110 Methods and Concepts of Mathematics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: V/i years of high school mathematics, including one year of algebra 
and one year of geometry. Selected topics in algebra, number theory, geometry, 
set theory, probability and analysis with special emphasis on the ideas and methods 
involved. Not open for credit to mathematics majors. 

120 Finite Mathematics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: three years of high school mathematics or its equivalent. This is a 
course comprising introductions to the following topics: logic, set theory, matrices, 
and probability. It is particularly suited to students of economics, the biological and 
social sciences. 

* Prerequisites may be waived in any mathematics course by the consent of the instructor. 


198 


Mathematics 


150A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4/4) F, S 

Prerequisites: four years of high school mathematics inclusive of trigonometry 
and a passing score in the placement test. An introduction to analysis including 
analytic geometry, functions, continuity, differentiation, the definite integral, in- 
tegration, applications. 

250A,B Intermediate Calculus (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Math 150A-B or equivalent. A continuation of Math 150. Topics 
include Taylor’s theorem, infinite series, functions of several variables, partial dif- 
ferentiation, multiple integrals, linear differential equations. 

291 Linear Algebra (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 150B. The study of matrices, determinants, vector spaces, 
linear transformations. 

302 Modern Algebra (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math 291. The integers, rational numbers, real and complex num- 
bers, polynominal domains, introduction to groups, rings, integral domains and 
fields. 

304 Mathematical Logic (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 150B. An introductory course in the elements of mathematical 
logic. 

305 Elements of Set Theory (3) F 

Prerequisite: Math 250B or Math 291. Operations on sets; functions; cardinals 
and ordinals; ordering, well ordering; axiom of choice; transfinite numbers. 

310 Ordinary Differential Equations (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 250B and Math 291. An introduction to existence theorems 
and the theory of differential equations. 

314 Elementary Topology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math 2 SOB. An introductory course in point set and algebraic topol- 
ogy- 

315 Euclidean Geometry (3) F 

Prerequisite: Math 250B. Selected topics in advanced Euclidean geometry such as 
convexity, transformation theory and w-dimensional Euclidean space. 

320 Projective Geometry (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Math 291. Homogeneous coordinates, projective group, cross-ratio, 
duality, point and line conics. 

330 Number Theory (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Math 2 SOB or Math 291. Divisibility, congruences, prime number 
theory, Diophantine problems. 

335A,B Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3,3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Math 2S0B. An introductory Course in probability theory in and its 
applications, based on use of the calculus. 

350A,B Advanced Calculus (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 2S0B, Math 291. Designed to introduce the student to rigorous 
proofs in analysis. Topics include the real number system, continuity, differentia- 
tion and integration of functions of several variables, infinite integrals and series. 


Mathematics, Mathematics Education 


407A,B Abstract Algebra (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 302. Sets, mappings, groups, rings, modules, fields, homo- 
morphisms, advanced topics in vector spaces and theory of linear transformations, 
matrices, algebras, ideals, field theory, Galois theory. 

412A,B Complex Analysis (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 350A. Complex differentiation and integration, Cauchy’s 
theorem and integral formulas, maximum modulus theorem, harmonic functions, 
Laurent series, analytic continuation, entire and meromorphic functions, conformal 
transformations and special functions. 

425A,B Differential Geometry (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 350A. Manifolds, curves and surfaces in Euclidean three-space, 
hypersurfaces of -R”, tensors and forms, Riemannian manifolds and submanifolds, 
topics in Riemannian geometry. 

430 Partial Differential Equations (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 350B. Cauchy-Kowalewsky and other existence theorems, 
theory of first order equations, classification of equations of higher order, detailed 
study of elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic equations, applications of functional 
analysis to partial differential equations. 

450A,B Real Analysis (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 350A. An introductory course in modern functional analysis. 
Measure theory, differentiations and theories of integration. Hilbert and Banach 
spaces, linear transformations and spectral theories. 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics Education) 

100A,B Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics— Arithmetic (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: one year of algebra and one year of geometry. The structure of 
the real number system and its subsystems. Numeration systems. Elementary num- 
ber theory. Equations and inequalities. Elementary set theory and logic. 

300 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics— Algebra (3) F 

Prerequisite: Math 150B. Selected topics in modern algebra. .Designed especially 
for teachers and prospective teachers of secondary mathematics. 

301 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics— Geometry (3) S 

Prerequisite: Math 150B. Selected topics in elementary geometry. The study of 
various axiom systems for Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry; projective, 
metric, and affine geometry. Designed especially for teachers and prospective 
teachers of secondary mathematics. 

432 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math Educ lOOB. Objectives, content, materials, pupil experiences, 
methods of instruction, and evaluation in arithmetic. The nature and scope of 
arithmetic in the elementary school. 

442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (2—3) S 

Prerequisites: Education Found 311, Education Sec 340, Admission to Teacher 
Education, senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Objectives, methods, and 
materials for teaching mathematics in secondary schools. Required, before student 
teaching, of students presenting majors in mathematics for the general secondary 
credential. Students without teaching experience must register for three units credit, 

200 




Mathematics Education; Music 


and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at the same hour each day, so 
that they can serve as teacher aides in high schools. The requirements for the 
major must include Math Educ lOOB, 300, and 301. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activ- 
ity — 1 hour teacher aide) 

749 Student Teaching in Mathematics in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(6) F, 5 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

750 Seminar in Mathematics Education (2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. Study of selected 
problems in elementary or secondary education. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSIC 

100 Introduction to Music (3) F, S 

A basic approach to listening to music with understanding and pleasure through 
a general survey of musical literature representative of various styles and perform- 
ance media. Music will be related to other arts through lectures, recordings, and 
concerts. Closed to music majors. 

101 Music Theory for Nonmusic Majors (3) F, S 

Basic theory and practical applications to further understanding of basic music 
principles and to improve music performance and listening skills. Includes sight- 
singing and relationship to keyboard and simple melodic instruments. Not open to 
music majors. 

111A,B Music Theory (3,3) F, S 

A year course covering diatonic harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and 
intervals, triads and their inversions, harmonizations, nonharmonic tones, modula- 
tion and dominant seventh chords. Practical applications, to include sight singing, 
dictation and keyboard harmonizations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

151A,B Survey of Musical Literature (2,2) F, S 

Open to music majors and minors and qualified students by consent of instruc- 
tor. Two hours lecture, one hour listening. An introductory course for majors in 
the study of the history and literature of music in Western civilization. Students 
must be able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, design and style. 

161a, 361a Symphony Orchestra (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. Per- 
formance of standard representative symphonic works. (3 hours major production) 

161b, 361b College Choir (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1,1, 1) 

Open to all college students. Study and performance of standard representative 
choral literature works. (3 hours major production) 

161c, 361c Symphonic Band (1) F, S (1,1,1, 1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. 
Performance of standard representative symphonic band literature. (3 hours major 
production) 

161d, 361d Opera Workshop (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Study of roles and representative excerpts from standard and contemporary 
operas and the basic musical, dramatic and language techniques of the musical 


201 


i 


Music 


theatre. Performance of operatic excerpts and complete operas. (3 hours major 
production) 

161e, 361e College Singers (1) F, S (1, 1,1,1) 

Membership restricted to advanced voice students or those passing voice test. 
Performs finest representative choral literature. (3 hours major production) 

162b, 362b Wind Ensemble (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Open to qualified wind students by audition or consent of the instructor. Per- 
forms representative wind ensemble literature. (2 hours activity) 

162c, 362c Vocal Ensemble (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Study and performance of choral literature of the Renaissance and Baroque 
periods. Open only to students by audition. Public performance required. (2 hrs. 
activity) 

163, 363 Chamber Music Ensembles (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string, or keyboard students. Various ensembles will 
be formed to study, read, and to perform representative chamber literature of all 
periods. (2 hrs. activity) 

170, 370 Instruction, Principal Instrument or Voice (1) F, S (1,1, 1,1) (1,1, 1,1) 

Instruction in the principal instrument or voice for intermediate and advanced 
students. Open only to students whose placement-proficiency examination reveals 
deficiencies in the major performing field. (See 371-8) 

171—178, 371—378, 571—577 Studio (Private Instruction) Principal Instrument 
or Voice (1) F, 5 (1,1,1,1) (1, 1,1,1) (1,1) 

Individual on-campus lessons with approved instructors. One unit per semester 
required of all music majors in the principal performing field. SOO-level courses 
provide advanced training in the technique and repertoire at the graduate level in 
the student’s principal performance medium. Required of graduate students whose 
terminal project is the graduate recital. Special fee. 

171, 371, 571 Voice, Intermediate and Advanced 

172a, 372a, 572a Violin, Intermediate and Advanced 

172b, 372b, 572b Viola, Intermediate and Advanced 

172c, 372c, 572c Cello, Intermediate and Advanced 

172d, 372d, 572d String Bass, Intermediate and Advanced 

172e, 372e, 572e Harp, Intermediate and Advanced 

172f, 372f, 572f Guitar and/or Lute, Intermediate and Advanced 

173a, 373a, 573a Oboe, Intermediate and Advanced 

173b, 373b, 573b Flute, Intermediate and Advanced 

173c, 373c, 573c Clarinet, Intermediate and Advanced 

173d, 373d, 573d Bassoon, Intermediate and Advanced 

174a, 374a, 574a Trumpet, Intermediate and Advanced 

174b, 374b, 574b Trombone and Baritone, Intermediate and Advanced 

174c, 374c, 574c French Horn, Intermediate and Advanced 

174d, 374d, 574d Tuba, Intermediate and Advanced 

175, 375, 575 Percussion, Intermediate and Advanced 

202 




Music 


176a, 376a, 576a Piano, Intermediate and Advanced 
176b, 376b, 576b Organ, Intermediate and Advanced 
377, 577 Composition, Advonced 
378 Conducting, Advanced 

184A,B Piano Class for Teachers (1,1) F, S (Formerly 384AB) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Elementary and intermediate instruction in 
basic piano techniques, with special emphasis on application to appropriate song 
materials and simple accompaniments used in the elementary school. Required of 
candidates for general elementary credential who specialize in music and those 
preparing to teach in kindergarten and first grades. (2 hours activity) 

211A,B Music Theory (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Mu lllB, or equivalent. A year course covering secondary domi- 
nants, diminished 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords, sequence and chromatic chords. 
Practical applications to include sight singing, melodic and harmonic dictation, and 
keyboard harmonizations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

281 Orchestral Instruments (2) (Formerly 181, 381) 

Required of all music degree candidates and for music teaching credentials. May 
be repeated for a maximum of 8 units. (4 hours activity) 

281a String Instruments (2) F 

Specialization on violin, with related work on standard instruments of the string 
family. (4 hours activity) 

281b Woodwind Instruments (2) F 

Specialization on clarinet, with related work on standard instruments of the 
woodwind family. (4 hours activity) 

281c Brass Instruments (2) S 

Specialization on trumpet, with related work on standard instruments of the 
brass family. (4 hours activity) 

281 d Percussion Instruments (2) 5 

Specialization on snare drum, with related work on standard instruments of the 
percussion family. (4 hours activity) 

281 e Survey of Orchestral Instruments (2) F, 5 

A general survey of orchestral instrument practices for elementary credential 
candidates. (4 hours activity) 

282A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) F, 5 (Formerly 182A,B, 382A,B) 

Prerequisite: declaration of the music major and consent of instructor. Designed 
to meet music major piano requirements for degree and teaching credentials. Funda- 
mentals of keyboard technique for students whose major performance field is not 
piano. Not required for piano majors. (2 hours activity) 

283A,B Voice Class for Music Majors (1,1) F, 5 (Formerly 183A,B, 383A,B) 

Prerequisite: declaration of the music major and consent of instructor. Designed 
to meet voice requirement for instrumental and piano majors and to prepare candi- 
dates for proficiency requirement for teaching credential. Not required for voice 
majors. (2 hours activity) 


203 


Music 


312A,B Counterpoint (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Music 111 A3 and 211 A3- Basic 18th century counterpoint in 
two, three and four parts, double counterpoint, canon, and fugue forms. 

321A,B Form and Analysis (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of structural elements of music such 
as motive, phrase, and period; binary, ternary, rondo, sonato-allegro and larger mu- 
sical forms in representative musical works. 

322A,B Composition (2,2) F, S 

A — Prerequisite: elementary counterpoint. Mu 211B or consent of instructor. 
Ear training, analysis of smaller forms, simple composition of two three-part song 
form styles. B — Analysis and writing of more complex musical forms. 

323A,B Orchestration (2) S 

Prerequisite: Mu 21 IB and consent of instructor. Writing and analysis of orches- 
tral music. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 or equivalent or successful completion of proficiency test. 
Study of the relationship of music to child growth and development, with em- 
phasis on the child from 5 to 12. 

350 Music in Our Society (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. Designed to increase interest and 
an understanding of music in its relation to our general culture. Emphasis on struc- 
ture, analysis and aesthetic principles through the study of masterpieces of musical 
literature of various historical periods. 

351A,B History and Literature of Music (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Mu 351 A, History and Literature of Music. A — A study of the 
history and literature of music from early Greek beginnings through the Renais- 
sance. B — A study of the history and literature of music covering the Baroque, 
Classic, Romantic period and the 20th century. (Required of all music majors.) 

382A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) F, S 

Prerequisite: Mu 282B. Continuation of piano requirement for qualified upper 
division students. (2 hours activity) 

385A,B Voice Class for Elementary Teachers (1,1) F, S 

Basic techniques of singing, adaptation of the adult voice for singing with chil- 
dren. Emphasis on singing materials from children’s music books used in the ele- 
mentary school. Primarily intended for candidates for elementary credential. (2 
hours activity) 

386 Piano Accompanying (1) F, S 

The study and application of playing accompaniments for instrumentalists, vocal- 
ists, and ensembles. Participation in rehearsals, recitals, and concerts required. (2 
hours activity) 

391A,B Choral Conducting (2,2) F, S 

Principles, techniques, and methods of conducting choral groups. Laboratory 
work with class and vocal ensembles, using standard choral repertoire. Required 
of all music education majors. (4 hours activity) 


204 


Music 


392A,B Instrumental Conducting (2,2) f, 5 

Principles, techniques, and methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. 
Laboratory experience in conducting instrumental groups, using standard instru- 
mental literature. (4 hours activity) 

436 Survey of Song Literature and Repertoire (2) S 

Study and performance of representative styles and schools of vocal music litera- 
ture. Emphasis on performing and listening. Building concert repertoire. Materials 
include 18th-, 19th-, 20th-century music. 

451 Music of the Baroque Period (2) F 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Musical forms, styles, and 
performance practices of the Baroque period. Detailed analysis of significant repre- 
sentative works. (2 hours lecture and discussion, 1 hour weekly listening) 

452 Music of the Classic and Romantic Period (2) S 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. A study of the history and 
literature of music from approximately 1750 to 1900. Detailed analysis of important 
representative works. (2 hours weekly lecture and discussions, 1 hour per week) 
listening. 

453 20th Century Music (2) S 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Developments in the music of 
western Europe and the western hemisphere since 1890. Intensive study of con- 
temporary music and its structure. 

458 Collegium Musicum (2) S 

The study and performance of rare and old music, both instrumental and vocal. 
Techniques of musical research will be applied. Students should be competent 
performers. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (2) F, S 

Required of all graduate music majors. Study of basic bibliography, literature, 
and research techniques and materials useful in graduate music study. 

522 Contemporary Techniques of Composition (2) $ 

Advanced techniques of composition, as applied to the student’s area of graduate 
specialization. 

523 Advanced Orchestration (2) S 

Prerequisite: Mu 323B. Analysis and practice of traditional and contemporary 
orchestration techniques. Scoring of music for large ensembles such as orchestra, 
band, chorus and orchestra, or band and orchestra. 

550 Seminar in Music History (2) F 

Prerequisites: At least two from the following: Mu 451, 452, and/or 453, and con- 
sent of instructor. Detailed investigation and analysis of specific developments in 
musicology including exercises in transcriptions from old notations and historical 
investigations prepared by members of the seminar. 

591 Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) F 

Prerequisite: Mu 391B, conducting experience, or consent of instructor. Advanced 
problems in choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on laboratory work with 
student groups and in concert conducting. (4 hours activity) 


205 


Music, /Music Education 

592 Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) S 

Prerequisite: Mu 392B, conducting experience, or consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced study of baton technique with emphasis on interpretive and stylistic prob- 
lems in the conducting of major works. (4 hours activity) 

598 Thesis or Project (3-6) F, S 

Individual investigations of specific problems in the area of concentration by 
candidates for the M.A. degree. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

430 Special Projects in Music Education (1—3) F, S 

Advanced projects relating to particular areas of teaching specialization for 
teachers and supervisors of music. Instructor’s permission required. 

435 Children's Literature in Music (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Mu 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of books and listening 
materials for preschool and elementary age children, with techniques of presenta- 
tion. Designed for the classroom teacher or general student. 

441 Teaching Music Theory and Appreciation in the Public Schools (2—3*) F 

Prerequisite: 20 units in music, Educ Found 311, or consent of instructor. 
Required of all music majors working for the standard teaching credential, sec- 
ondary specialization. The history and organization of the teaching of music theory 
and appreciation in the public schools. Interrelation of general and specialized 
classes and their place in the total school program. Music literature, materials, and 
techniques for producing effective musical growth. (2 hours lecture, 1 hour field- 
work) 

442 Teaching Vocal Music in the Public Schools (2—3) S 

Prerequisites: 20 units in music to include Mu 391 A (for those doing student 
aide), Educ Sec 340, Educ Found 311, Admission to Teacher Education, senior 

standing or consent of the instructor. See pages under Secondary Education 

for description of standard teaching credential program. Objectives, methods, and 
materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching music in the secondary 
schools. The history and organization of the teaching of vocal and choral music 
in public education. Planning sequential vocal training and performance organiza- 
tions for the total school program. Study of choral literature and techniques of 
instruction. (2 hours lecture, 1 hour fieldwork) 

443 Teaching Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (2-3*) S 

Prerequisite: 20 units in music, Educ Found 311, senior standing or consent 
of instructor. Required of all music majors working for the standard teaching 
credential, secondary specialization. The history and organization of the teaching 
of instrumental music in public education. Study of music literature and appropriate 
curricula for the development of concert bands, symphony orchestras, and cham- 
ber music ensembles for the total school program. (2 hours lecture, 1 hour field- 
work) 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) S 

Studies in the trends and application of educational theory in relation to the 
teaching of music in the public schools. 

* Students without teaching experience must register for three units credit in one of the follow- 
ing: Mu 441, 442 or 443, and must allow sufficient time in their schedules at the same 
hour each day so that they can serve as teacher aides in public schools. 


206 


Musfc Education; Philosophy 


544 Curriculum Planning and Construction in Music (2) S 

Principles and practices of curriculum planning in music education, with special 
reference to the public elementary, junior and senior high school. Required of 
majors who intend to complete supervision credential. 

545 Supervision and Administration of Music in the Public Schools (2) S 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. Philosophy, prin- 
ciples and practices of supervision of music in the public elementary and secondary 
schools. Emphasis on modern principles of leadership, types of services, organiza- 
tion, management and evaluation of programs of instruction. Required of candi- 
dates for supervisory credential. 

749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 for description and prerequisite. 

PHILOSOPHY 

100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) F, S 

An introduction to the nature, methods and some of the main problems of 
philosophy. 

110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) S 

A study of man’s religious impulse as viewed from the philosophical standpoint. 
An attempt will be made to analyze and to compare religious experience as ex- 
pressed in Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. 

210 Logic (3) F, S 

Analysis of the various forms given to propositions and the basic requirements 
necessary for valid inference. 

211 A Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) F 

Classical emphases concerning metaphysics, knowledge and related inquiries. 

2118 Classical Schools of Philosophy (3) S 

Classical emphases concerning man’s social relations and human values. 

250 Philosophy of Ideas (3) F, 5 

Analysis of basic ideas which have shaped modern thought. 

310 Ethics (3) F, S 

An analysis of the problems of human conduct: motivation, valuing, norms, so- 
cial demands, and personal commitments. 

311 Philosophy of Art (3) F, S 

An investigation into the conditions and the aims of aesthetic experience. 

323 Contemporary Existentialism (3) F 

An analysis of the meaning of the existentialism in modern philosophy. 

331 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) F 

The rationalism of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and the empiricism of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. 

332 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) S 

The empiricistic and rationalistic influences on Kant, followed by a study of the 
major trends in 19th-century philosophy. 


207 


Philosophy 


340 Theory of Knowledge (3) F 

An investigation of the concepts of knowledge, belief and certainty, and a study 
of representative theories concerning man’s knowledge of the external world, the 
past, and other minds. 

347 Selected Problems in Philosophy (3) F 

An investigation into the significant contributions made to human culture through 
philosophic analysis. 

368 Symbolic Logic (3) F 

The recognition and construction of correct deductions in the sentential logic 
and the first-order predicate calculus with identity. 

375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) F 

An introduction to the major issues in semantical theory: truth, meaning, ana- 
lytic-synthetic, semiotics. 

380 Introduction to Phenomenology (3) F 

An investigation into the historical background and basic viewpoints which have 
provided a framework for philosophical research and study in the writings of 
Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. 

382 Contemporary Philosophy <3) F 

A survey and analysis of the main trends of 20th century philosophy. Emphasis 
will be placed on such trends as pragmatism, linguistic analysis, and existen- 
tialism. 

407 Seminar in Basic Concepts of Philosophy and Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: three units in both philosophy and psychology. An interdisciplinary 
study of significant interrelationships which obtain betw een basic concepts common 
to both philosophy and psychology. 

412 Metaphysics (3) S 

An examination of the philosophical problems of freedom and determinism, 
mind and body, time and becoming, causation, deity, substratum, personal identity. 

417A Seminar in Aristotle's Scientific and Speculative Views (3) F 

An intensive study of the great philosopher’s views concerning the nature and 
function of science, logical reasoning, and the status of universal. 

417B Seminar in Aristotle's Social and Aesthetic Views (3) S 

A study of the problems of human conduct, government and art. 

427A Seminar in Spinoza's Ethics and Metaphysics (3) F 

A detailed and critical study of Spinoza’s views concerning the nature of man 
and the problems of conduct as developed in the Ethics. 

427B Seminar in Spinoza's Political Theory (3) S 

A detailed and critical study of the Tractatus Politicus and the Tractatus Theo- 
logico-Politicus. 

437A Seminar in the Philosophy of William James (3) F 

A detailed study of James’ psychological and epistemological views. 


208 


Philosophy; Physical Science 


437B Seminar in the Philosophy of William James (3) S 

A detailed study of James’ social, ethical, and religious views. 

447A Seminar in the Development of Plato's Philosophy (3) F 

A critical and detailed study of the early and middle Dialogues^ terminating with 
The Republic. 

447B Seminar in Plato's Later Dialogues (3) S 

A critical and detailed study of the later Dialogues which follow The Republic, 
terminating with The Laws. 

450 Philosophy of Science (3) S 

An investigation into the methodologies of the deductive and inductive sciences. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) F, S 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and' philoso- 
phers as Freud, Spengler, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Kierkegaard. (Same as 
English 451.) 

457A Seminar in Hume's Philosophy of Science (3) F 

A detailed study of Book I of the Treatise on Hu?ftan Nature and the Enquiry 
; Concerning Human Under stoTiding. 

'■ 457B Seminar in Hume's Ethical Views (3) S 

A detailed study of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion and the Enquiry 
Concerning the Principles of Morals. 

460 Philosophy of History (3) S 

A study of the metaphysical and the logical problems of history. 

467A Kant's Theory of Knowledge (3) F 

A critical and detailed study of The Critique of Pure Reason. 

467B Kant's Theory of Ethics and Aesthetics (3) S 

j A critical and detailed study of The Critique of Practical Reason and The Cri- 
^ tique of Judgment. 

j 499 Independent Study (1-3) F, 5 

i Prerequisites; minimum of 12 units in philosophy and approval of the depart- 
: ment. Such study is designed to develop greater competency in research. May be 
repeated for credit. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

(Offered by the Departments of Chemistry and Physics) 

. 201 Modern Physical Science (4) F, S 

j Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra or equivalent, or permission of the 
) instructor. Taught jointly by the departments of chemistry and physics, this 
c course presents the essential unifying features of the basic physical sciences, chem- 
istry, chemistry and physics; the modern concepts of the physical and chemical 
; theory of atomic and molecular structure form the unifying course material, 
r Selected physical and chemical theory (from the fields of mechanics, electricity 
\ and magnetism, light, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, quantum theory, and inor- 
j ganic and organic chemistry) are included to provide the necessary background 
i material. Credit will not be given to students who have had a college course in 
chemistry or physics. 


I 

\ 


209 


Physics 


PHYSICS * 

201 Modern Physical Science (4) F, S (See course description under 
Physical Science 201) 

211A,B Elementary Physics (4,4) F, S 

Prerequisites: high school algebra, 1 Vz years; trigonometry, Vi year. Elementary 
physics taught without the use of calculus. Covers principally the fields of 
mechanics, theromodynamics and electricity and magnetism in the first semester, 
and principally the fields of waves, relativity, quantum mechanics and the search 
for the ultimate constituents of matter in the second semester. (3 hours lecture, 

3 hours laboratory) 

221A Fundamental Physics (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math. 150A; corequisite: Math 150B. Fundamental classical physics 
including mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, acoustics, and wave motion. (4 
hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

221B Fundamental Physics (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: Physics 221 A. Fundamental classical and modern physics, including 
physical optics, electricity and magnetism, and an introduction to modern physics. 
(4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

221C Fundamental Physics (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Physics 22 IB. Fundamental physical concepts are presented in a 
unifying framework, using the postulational approach. The five major theories — 
classical mechanics, relativity, electricity, quantum mechanics, and statistical 
mechanics — form the principal material for this course, which is designated for the 
student who has just completed the 10-unit sequence. Physics 221 A and 22 IB. 

41 1 Theory of Wave Motion (3) F 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 150B. The properties of wave motion — 
production, propagation, refraction, diffraction, interference, and transmission 
through surfaces of waves — as applied to mechanics, electromagnetism and quantum 
mechanics. 

416 Thermodynamics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. A postulational study of thermo- 
dynamics with emphasis on thermodynamic states rather than on thermodynamic 
processes. An introductory course in the basic concepts and postulates, conditions 
of equilibrium, formal relationships, processes and thermodynamic engines, stability 
of thermodynamic systems, first- and second-order phase transitions, the Nernst 
postulate, and representative applications. 

431 Electricity and Magnetism (3) F 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. Theories of electrostatics, electro- 
dynamics, and electromagnetic waves. Introduction to magnetohydrodynamics. 

441 Analytical Mechanics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. Principles of Newtonian me- 
chanics applied to the statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Introduc- 
tion to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian equations. 

For all raurses, prerequisites not requiring^ consent of the department chairman may be waived 
the instractor of the course if ^ he is satisfied that the student is qualified to undertake 
the course. A grade of C or better is required for all prerequisite courses. 


210 


Physics 


451 Modern Physics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. Discussion of experiments and 
introduction to theory for selected topics in atomic, nuclear, and «;olid state physics. 

452 Introductory Radiology (3) S 

Prerequisite: one year college physics. X-rays, radioactivity, interaction of radia- 
tion with matter, detection of radiation, applications to health physics. Especially 
suitable for biology, chemistry, and premedical students who expect to work in 
radiation biology, radiation chemistry, or medical radiology. 

453 Nuclear Physics (3) F 

Prerequisites: Physics 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. Properties of nuclei, radioactivity, 
elementary particles, nuclear reactions. Introductory discussion of theories of 
nuclear structure and nuclear processes. 

454 Introduction to the Solid State of Matter (3) 5 

Prerequisite: one course in atomic or nuclear physics, differential equations. An 
introduction to the physical properties of matter in the solid state, as explained by 
atomic theory. Structural, mechanical, and growth properties of crystals; atomic 
bonding; electrical, magnetic, and thermal properties of metals, semiconductors, 
and insulators. 

455 Introduction to Quantum Physics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 431, Physics 441, differential equations. An introduction to 
the concepts and theory of quantum physics. 

471 Electronic Circuit Theory (3) F 

Prerequisites: Physics. 22 IB, Mathematics 250B. Operating characteristics of 
vacuum tubes, transistors, and semiconductor diodes. Linear circuit theory for 
alternating currents and for transient currents. Introduction to switching and pulse 
circuits. 

481A Experimental Physics (3) F 

Prerequisite: Physics 22 IB; corequisite: Physics 431. Selected experiments in elec- 
trical measurements and electronics, with emphasis on precision of measurement 
and standardization of instruments. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per week.) 

481B Experimental Physics (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Physics 481 A; corequisite: Physics 441. Selected experiments in 
mechanics, acoustics, physical optics, and atomic spectra. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory per week.) 

481 C Experimental Physics (3) F 

Prerequisite or corequisite: one course in nuclear or modem physics. Selected 
experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. (1 hour lecture and 6 hours laboratory 
per week.) 

4810 Experimental Physics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Physics 481A,B,C or consent of department chairman. Selected 
experiments in classical and modern physics. ( 1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory per 
week) 

491 Senior Report (1) F, S 

Prerequisite: Consent of department chairman. Selection and design for indi- 
vidual project, oral and written reports. 


211 


Physics; Political Science 


492 Senior Report (2) S 

Prerequisite: Physics 491 and consent of department chairman. Laboratory work 
on individual project, oral and written progress reports, oral and written final 
report. (1 hour lecture-recitation and 6 hours laboratory per week) 

531 Electricity and Magnetism (3) F 

Prerequisite: mathematics through partial differential equations. An advanced 
course in electromagnetic field theory beginning with Maxwell’s equations. Treated 
are: vector and scalar potentials, boundary value problems, electrostatics, mag- 
netostatics, wave propagation, and related topics. 

541 Analytical Mechanics (3) 5 

Prerequisite: mathematics through partial differential equations. A thorough 
theoretical treatment of classical mechanics including the important motions of a 
point, general principles of work and energy, the principle of least action, Lagrange 
and Hamiltonian equations, the dynamics of rigid bodies, and related topics. 

555 Quantum Physics (3) (Offered in alternate years) 

Prerequisite: mathematics through partial differential equations. A course in the 
theory of quantum physics including the physical bases of quantum physics, oper- 
ator formulations, matrix mechanics, commutator bracket formulation, perturbation 
theory, quantum statistics. 


POLITICAL SCIENCE 

100 American Government (3) f, 5 

Structure and functions of the United States government; the federal system; 
the organization, powers and functions of the executive," legislative, and judicial 
branches; the relationship between federal, state and local units of government, 
the structure and functions of state and local government with special attention 
to California. This course satisfies the state requirements in U.S. Constitution and 
California state and local government. 

101 Introduction to Politics and Government (3) F, 5 

An examination of political movements, their aims, strengths and ideologies. 
Contemporary issues at all levels of government; resultant patterns, with emphasis 
on their form in the United States and in California. This course satisfies the state 
requirement in U.S. Constitution. 

231 Government and Politics of Major Powers (3) F (Formerly 331) 

Governmental structures, policies, and problems of major powers in Europe and 
Asia; constitutional characteristics; major political parties; election systems; fed- 
eralist and Unitarian features; comparative analysis. 

306 Research Methods in Political 5cience (3) F, 5 

An introduction to the application of basic research techniques, materials, an- 
alysis, sources of data, and their relationship to concepts and areas of study. An in- 
troduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, research design, and source 
evaluation. This course is designed for students who will be taking upper di- 
vision political science and is required of political science majors. 

311 5tate and Local Government (3) F, 5 

Development and role of state constitutions; the political, administrative and 
judicial systems of state, county, and city governments; relations of local govern- 
ments to the state government, with special reference to California. This course 
satisfies the state requirement in California state and local government. 

212 


Politkal Science 


312 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3) F 

The American two-party system; party organization, nominating procedures, 
campaign methods; problems of party responsibility and party leadership. The 
power and growth of farm, labor, business, and noneconomic pressure groups; 
interest-group activity in Congress, administration, and courts. 

320 Introduction to Public Administration (3) F 

Prerequisites: Political Science 100 and 311, or consent of the instructor. The 
nature and scope of public administration and its role in a democratic society; 
basic problems in the execution of public policies in the federal, state and local 
government units, such as organization, personnel, finance, internal management, 
administrative powers and responsibilities, intergovernmental relationships, and the 
impact on administration of public opinion. 

340 Democracy and Communism (3) F 

Recommended for nonmajors. The democratic tradition, especially in the United 
States and Great Britain; the theory and practice of communism in Soviet Russia, 
Yugoslavia, and Red China; authoritarian political thought in Italy, Germany, and 
Spain. 

341 Fundamental Principles of Political Theory (3) F 

Problems of the relationship of man and morality in their relationship to the 
state; emphasis on the period from Plato to the Renaissance. 

342 Specific Problems in Political Theory (3) S 

Problems of liberty and obligation, of forms of government and of the economy; 
emphasis on the period from the Renaissance to the present day. 

351 International Relations (3) F, S 

A study of the diplomatic, political, economic, and cultural relations of nations; 
the modem systems of nation states; basic factors of power; sovereignty, nation- 
alism; imperialism; colonialism, the rise to influence of the developing nations; the 
peaceful settlement of disputes. 

371 The Judicial Process (3) F (Formerly 411) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100 or consent of the instructor. The nature of the 
American judicial system; the courts in a federal system and their relationship to 
other branches of government. A study of the adversary process and the jury 
system. Judicial review and the political uses of the political process. 

400 Humanities and Social Sciences: A Critical Analysis (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Explores the basic assumptions and 
methodolgy of the social sciences and the humanities. The focus will be on those 
areas in which both disciplines can offer insights, on the conflicts — real or apparent 
— between these disciplines, and on the trends developing in each of them. 

406 Scope and Theory of Political Science (3) S 

The nature of the discipline, approaches, tools, concepts and theories. Highly 
recommended for all graduate students and senior political science majors. 

414 The Legislative Process (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100. The nature of the legislative process in the 
United States including the organization and procedures of legislative bodies, direct 
legislation and the relationships of the legislative branch to other branches of gov- 
ernment. Comparative legislative systems will be analyzed. 


213 


Political Science 


415 Political Behavior (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100. The application of behavioral methodology to 
the understanding of individual political behavior within various governmental and 
social situations. The formation of attitudes and opinions, their measurement and 
relationship to political behavior. 

416 The American Presidency (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100. A study of the growth of the office and power 
of the President, of his relationship to his advisers and the executive departments. 
Congress and the courts, state governments and the public. The role of the Presi- 
dent as chief policymaker and administrator, party and public opinion leader, with 
particular attention to developments during international and domestic crises. 

420 Local Government and Administration (3) F 

Legal and historical framework of local government with emphasis on municipal 
government and the functional fields of management. 

421 Government Finance Administration (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of the instructor. The role of 
finance administration and budgeting in the determination of public policy, and 
in the administrative planning and management of governmental operations. Exam- 
ines the relationship of assessment administration to governmental revenues and 
expenditures, the principles and practices of cost accounting, treasury manage- 
ment, and capital budgeting. 

422 Public Personnel Administration (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of the instructor. 7'he growth and 
development of the civil service and the merit system; an evaluation of recruitment 
procedures and examinations; an analysis of such topics as position classification, 
salary structures, retirement plans, in-service training, employees organizations, 
and personnel supervision. 

424 City and Regional Planning (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of the instructor. The origins and 
development of city and regional planning; the legal bases and fundamental con- 
cepts of planning are defined; and the organization and administration of the plan- 
ning activity are examined. Attention is given to the major elements of the general 
plan, zoning laws and administration, urban renewal, and capital programming. 

425 Comparative Public Administration (3) S 

A cross cultural comparison of the U. S. administrative system with those of 
selected developing nations; the development process; the role and functions of 
public administration in different cultural settings. 

426 Government Organization and Management (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of the instructor. An analytical 
examination of public administration organization, and the techniques and processes 
of public management; the growth and development of bureaucratic administration; 
the functions of administrative authority; and the importance of communication, 
coordination, and leadership to organizational action. 

429 Government Internship (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Public Administration concentration and consent of the instructor. 
Sui>ervised work experience in governmental agencies for the purpose of increasing 
student understanding of the nature and scope of governmental operations. Super- 
vision is provided by the faculty and cooperating agencies. Student time required 
in an administrative assignment ranges from five to twenty hours per week, de- 
pending upon the number of credits sought and whether compensation is involved. 

214 


Political Science 


431 Government and Politics of Democracies (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 231 or consent of the instructor. A comparative 
treatment of the institutions, traditions, and political behavior of the world’s con- 
stitutional democracies, including western Europe, the older commonwealth coun- 
tries, the U.S.A., and Japan. 

433 Government and Politics of Totalitarian Systems (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 231. A comparative analysis of the structure and 
functions of the political systems of totalitarian states. 

436 Government and Politics of Developing Societies (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 231 or consent of the instructor. A comparative 
analysis of the structures and functions of the political systems of developing 
societies, with special emphasis on selected countries in Asia and Africa. Cultural 
and economic factors involved in the evolution of developing societies into mod- 
em states; role of external influences such as colonialism, foreign ideologies and 
international organizations; problems of reconciling traditional patterns of authority 
with modern institutions of government and politics. 

438 Latin American Political Behavior (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 431 or consent of the instructor. Consideration of 
the role of church, military, business, peasant and bureaucratic groups in Latin 
American society with particular interest in their impact on the quest for govern- 
mental stability and economic development. 

440 Recent Political Thought (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 341 or 342 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of selected modern political thinkers. 

442 American Political Thought (3) S 

American political thought from the Colonial period to the present day including 
the ideas of such thinkers as Cotton, Paine, Publius, Calhoun, Wilson, Dewey, and 
Lippmann. 

443 Political Theories of Communist States (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 341, 342, or consent of the instructor. A study of 
the political theory of Marxism from its pre-Hegelian roots to the contemporary 
revisions in Soviet Russia, Yugoslavia, Cuba and Red China. 

450 Current Problems in American Foreign Policy (3) F 

An examination of the impact of the United Nations, alliances, propaganda, 
military strategy and economics on U.S. foreign policy. Particular emphasis will 
be given such problems as Viet Nam, the Caribbean, the Sino-Soviet split, and the 
aspirations of developing nations. 

451 Problems in International Relations (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. Examination of 
selected problems in various countries and geographic areas with a definite impact 
on International Relations, such as nationalism, colonialism, anticolonialism, neu- 
tralism, racism, ethnic and linguistic minorities, border disputes, governmental 
instability, economic poverty, disease, illiteracy and overpopulation. 

452 Conduct of American Foreign Relations (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100. Formulation and execution, of foreign policy. 
The roles and powers of the President, Senate, and House of Representatives. The 
functions of the Department of State and Foreign Service, United States Informa- 


215 


Political Science 


tion Agency, Agency for International Development (AID); the role of the 
Pentagon; public opinion and pressure groups. Separation of powers, checks and 
balances, and cooperation in the conduct of American foreign policy. 

453 Foreign Policy Formulation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 331 or 351 or consent of the instructor. A seminar 
type discussion of the formulation and implementation of the foreign policy of a 
selected country or countries with particular reference to the implementation of 
that policy in the United Nations, regional organizations or alliances. May be 
repeated for credit. 

454 The Soviet Union in World Affairs (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351, 433 or consent of the instructor. Theory and 
practice of Soviet Russia’s foreign policies; the international relations theories of 
Marx, Lenin, Stalin, and Khrushchev; practices of the Kremlin; world strategy 
and tactics of the Soviet Communist movement. 

460 International Law (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. The sources and 
nature of international law; its role in a world of sovereign states; the law of 
war and peace; the rights and duties of nations in their international relationships. 
The World Court; purpose, problems, and prospects. 

461 The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 351 or consent of the instructor. The nature, scope, 
and role of public international organizations; evaluation of the League of Nations; 
analysis of the United Nations; its functions, purposes and problems; role of the 
World Court; International Labor Organization. Functions of UNESCO, UNICEF, 
and similar organizations. 

463 The International Relations and Problems of Latin America (3) S 

A study of the foreign policies of the individual Latin American states, prob- 
lems presented by the cold war and U.S. policies, the O.A.S., current efforts for 
economic cooperation, and Latin America’s role in the U.N. 

473 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties (3) F (Formerly 413) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100 or consent of the instructor. Case studies in- 
volving first amendment freedoms; equal protection of the law; and procedural 
rights stemming from due process. 

474 Constitutional Law and Governmental Power (3) S 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100 or consent of the instructor. Case studies in- 
volving the balance of power among courts. Congress, and the President; between 
national and state governments; and the extent of judicial review of laws involving 
social and economic problems. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) f, S 

Open to advanced students in political science by permission of the department 
chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

511 Advanced Studies in American Politics (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. A comprehensive examination of the 
political process in the United States. 


216 


Political Science; Portuguese 


521 Seminar in Administrative Theory (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. An intensive study and analysis of the 
historical and theoretical foundations of public administration. 

526 Seminar in Public Administrative Behavior (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Concepts, functions and techniques of 
administrative leadership; group dynamics; decision making; the organization and 
the individual. 

541 Advanced Studies in Political Theory (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. A comprehensive examination of ideolo- 
gies, concepts, methods and trends in political theory. 

551 Advanced International Relations (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Study of selected problems in inter- 
national relations with emphasis on individual research and contributions within 
the framework of a seminar. May be repeated for credit. 

571 Advanced Studies in Public Law (3) F 

Prerequisite: Political Science 371 (formerly 411), 473 or 474. Selected studies of 
the relationship of the judicial process to legislative decision making; executive 
power; local government; the initiation process; and public opinion. 

591 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

599 Independent Study and Research (1—3) F, 5 

Open only by permission of the chairman of the department. May be repeated 
for credit. 

PORTUGUESE 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

101 Fundamental Portuguese (4) F 

Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Portuguese. (3 
hours lecture-discussion, 2 hours laboratory) 

102 Fundamental Portuguese (4) S 

Prerequiste: Portuguese 101 (or equivalent). Listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading comprehension, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic 
forms and structure of Portuguese. (3 hours lecture-discussion, 2 hours laboratory) 

203 Intermediate Portuguese (3) F 

Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing based on 
cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 

204 Intermediate Portuguese (3) S 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, un- 
derstanding, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

^99 Independent Study (1—3) F, 5 

Supervised projects in Portuguese language or literature to be taken with the 
consent of the instructor and the department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


217 


Psychology 


PSYCHOLOGY 

101 Introductory Psychology (3) F, S 

General introduction to basic concepts and problems in psychology as a behav- 
ioral discipline. Emphasis upon the human organism as an adapting system, with 
attention to genetic origins; normal development and capacities; problem-solving 
and adjustment to stress. 

161 Elementary Statistics (3) F, S 

An introductory course in descriptive statistics with an introduction to inferen- 
tive methods. 

202 Principles of Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. A course for psychology majors covering selected basic 
areas of psychology in depth. Special emphasis on the methods of studying physio- 
logical factors, adaptive behavior, perception, cognition and motivation. (2 hours 
lecture and 3 hours laboratory) 

231 Psychology of Personal Adjustment (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Dynamics of personal adjustment and interpersonal 
relations. Nature of conflict and frustration; demands of changing social roles; and 
attitudes, opinions and prejudices as they affect the individual and his relationships 
to others. 

Note: All Upper Division courses require a minimum of six lower division units 
in psychology. 

302 Experimental Psychology: Learning and Motivation (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 161 or permission of instructor. Selected experi- 
mental investigations in human and animal learning, memory, thinking, problem 
solving, and motivation with appropriate lecture and discussion. (2 hours lecture 
and 3 hours laboratory) 

303 Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception (3) S 

Prerequisites: Psych 101; 202; 161 or permission of instructor. Selected experi- 
mental investigation with appropriate lecture and discussion. (2 hours lecture and 
3 hours laboratory) 

304 Experimental Psychology: Comparative (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Psych 101; 202; 161 or permission of instructor. 

Behavioral similarities and differences between species as related to their position 
on the phylogenetic scale; the relation of changes in activity, motivation, emo- 
tionality, complexity, plasticity and adaptiveness of behavior to changes in sensory, | 
motor, endocrine and neural structures as well as genetic and environmental factors. 
(2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) 

311 Educational Psychology (3) F, S 

Application of psychological research and theory to the educative process. Major! 
attention given to the problems of learning, individual differences, child capacities, 
and behavior. (Not open to students who have taken Educ 311.) 

321 Physiological Psychology (3) F 

Survey of relations between behavior and biological processes. Anatomy and ! 
physiology of the nervous system, role of neural and humoral agents in perception 
and complex behavior (emotion, etc.), behavioral effects of brain lesions, the effects' 
of drugs on behavior, psychosomatic disorders and motivation. 


218 


j 


Psychology 


331 Psychology of Personality (3) F 

Concepts of personality development, structure, and dynamics, with emphasis 
upon problems, methods, and findings in the study of personality. 

341 Abnormal Psychology (3) F, S 

Dynamics, symptoms, causes, treatment, and prevention of neuroses, psychoses, 
alcohol and drug addiction, psychosomatic illnesses, and character disorders. 

342 Mental Health (3) S 

Social and emotional dynamics of the adjustment processes, including an analysis 
of the concepts of mental health. Emphasis upon positive factors in the individual, 
group, and community conducive to improving mental health. (Credit not given 
as part of psychology major.) 

351 Social Psychology (3) F, S 

Study of phenomena of social interaction and the nature of group processes and 
influences. Attention paid to the intrapsychic effects of group influences on the 
individual’s behavior. 

391 Industrial Psychology (3) F 

Study of psychological principles and techniques in industrial and business set- 
tings. Includes selection, placement, training, human factors, environmental influ- 
ences, problems of people at work, and consumer behavior. 

408 History of Psychology (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: 12 upper division units in psychology or permission of instructor. 
Survey of the development of psychology from early times to the present. 

412 Psychology of Learning (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or permission of instructor. Principles of learning ac- 
cording to the major theoretical systems. Critical evaluation of the theories and 
systems. 

413 Perception (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych 303 or permission of instructor. Psychological problems in 
perception. 

431 Theories of Personality (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych 331 or permission of instructor. Personality structure, devel- 
opment, and dynamics according to major theories. Research methods as they apply 
to personality theory. 

441 Group Psychological Testing (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych 161 or equivalent. Intelligence, aptitude, interest, and per- 
sonality testing. TTieory, construction, evaluation, interpretation, and uses of psy- 
chological tests. 

465 Advanced Psychological Statistics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Psych 161 or permission of instructor. Quantitative methods in psy- 
chology with particular emphasis on correlation, small sample theory, nonpara- 
pietrics and some complex analysis of variance procedures. 

481 Survey of Clinical Psychology (3) F 

Prerequisites: Psych 331, 341, and 461. Development and contemporary aspects 
of the field. Methods, diagnosis, therapeutic techniques, research, and problems. 


219 


Psychology; Russian 


499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor. Individual library 
study or experimental investigation under direction of a staff member. May be 
repeated for credit. 

500 Advanced General Psychology (3) F, S 

An integration of key concepts in learning, motivation, perception, personality 
and social psychology. 

510 Experimental Design (3) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Psych 161 and 465. Principles and methods of planning and carry- 
ing out systematic investigations on the behavior of complex organisms, interde- 
pendence of experimental design and statistical evaluation of results, and the oppor- 
tunity for practice in formulation of testable hypotheses. 

511 5eminar in Psychological Measurement (3) 5 

Logic and methodology of measurement in the areas of intelligence, personality, 
judgment, and attitudes: problems of test construction and validation. 

520 Seminar: Experimental Psychology (3) F 

Prerequisites: graduate standing; Psych 465 and Psych 500. Study in depth of the 
data, methods, problems and current developments in sensation-perception; animal 
learning; human motor and verbal learning; thinking and problem solving; and 
motivation. 

521 Seminar: Personality and Social Psychology (3) 5 

Prerequisites: graduate standing; Psych 500. An intensive study of central prob- 
lems in personality and social psychology. Intensive study current problems and 
theories in these areas. 

531 Individual Mental Testing (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Psych 461. Study of the major tests of intelligence. Emphasis upon 
practical experience in administration, scoring, and interpretation of these instru- 
ments. 

591 Thesis (3-6) F, 5 

Prerequisites: formal admission to candidacy; permission of instructor. The 
writing of a thesis based on a major study or experiment in psychology. 

RUSSIAN 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures) 

101 Fundamental Russian (5) F, 5 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Russian. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the 
language laboratory. 

102 Fundamental Russian (5) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Russian 101 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structures of Russian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. 


220 


j 


Russian; Science Education 


203 Intermediate Russian (3) F 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204 Intermediate Russian (3) S 

Prerequisite: Russian 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 (or equivalent). Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Designed to give the student special competence in the 
control of Russian as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted 
in Russian. 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) S 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
Russian, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken 
and written language. Modern writings in various fields, as well as developments 
in methodology and texts, serve as the basis for intensive practice. Conducted in 
Russian. 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A study of major literary works of the first 
half of the 19th century which exemplify cultural and intellectual movements in 
Russia. Conducted in Russian. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) ¥, S 

Supervised projects in Russian language or literature to be taken with the con- 
sent of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics Education) 

310 Elementary Experimental Science (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Completion of general education natural science requirements or 
consent of instructor. A laboratory centered course in the physical sciences appro- 
priate for prospective elementary schoolteachers and other youth workers. The 
course covers, by both lectures and laboratory investigations, selected content 
areas from the fields of chemistry, physics, geology, oceanography, astronomy, and 
meteorology that are commonly found in elementary school science programs. 
Heavy emphasis is placed on laboratory and field investigations of a kind adaptable 
for children. This course may not be used to fulfill General Education require- 
ments nor is it appropriate for science majors. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

432 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2) S 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311 (or equivalent), a science course or consent of 
the instructor. Objectives and methods of science teaching at the elementary school 
level are developed. Demonstrations and student experiences are provided in 
organizing and presenting science lessons appropriate at the various grade levels. 
The new elementary school science curriculum projects are investigated. (1 hour 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 


221 


Science Education 


434 Elementary School Science— New Curricula (3) F (Offered alternate years) i 

Prerequisites: Sci Educ 310 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor. The content, 
philosophy and techniques of the new curricula for elementary science courses | 
are studied. At present the course is designed to prepare teachers for the AAAS ; 
process approach to elementary science. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (2—3) F 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311 (or equivalent), Education Sec 340, Admission to 
Teacher Education, senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Objectives, 
methods and techniques of science teaching are investigated. Student activities in- | 
elude the formulation and carrying out of teaching plans, the use of equipment 
and materials peculiar to science instruction, and the direction of laboratory ex- 
periences. Students without teaching experience must register for three units credit, 
and must allow sufficient time in their schedules to serve as teacher aides at the 
same hour each day. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

443 Secondary Science Education— Biology (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sci Educ 442 (or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. Educa- 
tional practices particular to the teaching of biology are studied. Special emphasis 
is placed on recent curricular developments in this area. Presently the course is 
designed to instruct teachers in the theory, content and methodology developed 
by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

444 Secondary Science Education— Chemistry (3) S 

Prerequisites: Sci Educ 442 (or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. Similar 
to Sci Educ 443 with the emphasis on chemistry. Presently the course is oriented 
around the programs developed by the Chemical Educational Materials Study 
(CHEMS) and the Chemical Bond Approach (CBA) to teaching chemistry. Needs 
of participating teachers will determine which program will be emphasized. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

445 Secondary Science Education— Physics (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sci Educ 442 (or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. Similar | 
to Sci Educ 443 with the emphasis on physics. Presently the course is oriented 
around the Physical Science Study Committee program (PSSC) and the Harvard 
Project Physics (HPP) physics courses. Needs of the participants will determine 
which program will be emphasized. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

446 Secondary Science Education— Earth Science (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Sci Educ 442 (or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. The 
content, philosophy, and techniques of teaching earth science on the secondary 
level are studied. This course is designed to prepare teachers in the theory, content 
and methodology in the earth science course develop>ed by the Earth Science 
Curriculum Project (ESCP). (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) F, S 

Study of some special topic in science education, selected in consultation with the 
instructor and carried out under his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

710 Seminar in Science Education (2) S 

Prerequisites: an A.B. degree, teaching credential, or consent of instructor. 
Designed for postgraduate science students who wish to investigate recent develop- 
ments in teaching the sciences. New courses and materials for the various subject 
matter fields will be researched and demonstrated. Areas of concentration will 


222 


j 


Science Education; Social Sciences Education; 

Social Welfare; Sociology 

depend on interests and training of the seminar participants. May be repeated for 
credit. 

749 Student Teaching in Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION 

442 Teaching Social Sciences in the Secondary School (2—3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Education Found 311, Education Sec. 340, Admission to Teacher 
Education, senior standing, or consent of the instructor. Objectives, methods, ma- 
terials, curriculum in social studies in secondary schools. Includes consideration of 
new trends and new interpretations in the social sciences; development, present 
status, problems, and trends in the secondary school social studies curriculum; and 
professional growth of the social studies teacher. See listing under School of 
Education for details. 

749 Student Teaching in Social Sciences in the Secondary School (6) F, 5 

SOCIAL WELFARE 

(Offered by the Department of Sociology) 

311 Welfare Institutions (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. An introduction to the field, taught by 
an experienced social worker. Consideration of the philosophy, structure, function- 
ing, and coordination of welfare agencies. Designed for students interested in social 
work and such related professions as teaching, counseling, public administration, 
law, medicine, and religious vocations. 

351A Social Work Methods (3) F (Formerly 351) 

Prerequisite: Social Welfare 311, Psychology 331 or Sociology 341 or consent 
of the instructor. An introduction to case work, group work, and community 
organization, using case work materials, group work experiences, workshops in 
community activities and interviewing techniques. Designed for candidates for 
graduate study and for preprofessional employment in agencies. 

35 IB Social Work Methods (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Social Welfare 351A. An extension of 351A with more intensive 
emphasis on practical experiences in case work, group work, and community 
organization, to enable the student to formulate a basic frame of reference for 
relating to troubled people seeking help. 

SOCIOLOGY 

301 Introduction to Sociology (3) F, S 

A general introduction to the basic concepts of sociology, and the scientific study 
of human society. Among topics included are social interaction, culture, personality, 
social processes, population, social class, the community, social institutions, and 
sociocultural change. 

202 Social Problems (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Study of the extent, causes and consequences of a 
number of social problems, with emphasis on twentieth-century America. Prob- 
lems are viewed in the context of the changing society. 


223 


Sociology 


271 Education for Marriage (3) S 

A sociopsychological study of marital adjustment. Dating and mate selection; 
factors associated with successful marriages; principal areas of adjustment; parent- 
child relationships; causes and results of divorce. 

331A Social Research Methods (3) P, 5 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or consent of the department. Research design and 
methods of gathering data, especially by interview and questionnaire, are empha- 
sized. Among other topics are the role of theory in research, and sampling methods 
and problems. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

33 IB Social Research Methods (3) P, S 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201, 331 A, or consent of the department. Elementary 
statistical analysis of social data is emphasized, with some consideration of prob- 
lems of measurement and of the writing of research reports. (2 hours lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

341 Social Interaction (3) P, 5 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 3 units of psychology'. Inquiry into the social 
and sociopsychological dimensions of group behavior and the socialization of the 
individual. Social interaction and its impact on the individual and personality 
formation. 

348 Collective Behavior (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Characteristics of crowds, mobs, publics. Analysis of 
social movements and revolutions, their relation to social unrest and their role in 
developing and changing social organization. 

361 Population Problems (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Population composition, growth and movement. 
Social factors affecting birth rates, death rates, and migration. Attention is given 
to the population of the United States and to selected areas of the world. 

371 Urban Sociology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. I'hc population and ecology, patterns of growth, 
institutions, characteristic social interaction, values, and problems of the urban 
community. 

411 Criminology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. The extent, causes and control of criminal behavior. 
Includes study of the criminal law, causal factors and theories, correctional insti- 
tutions, probation and parole, and preventive efforts. 

413 Juvenile Delinquency (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Juvenile delinquency as a social problem. Sociological 
study of the causes of delinquent behavior, and programs of control, treatment and 
prevention. 

425 Comparative Social Change (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Comparative analysis of changing community, insti- 
tutional, technological, and social class patterns in selected societies, with emphasis 
on differences between “developed’’ and developing areas. 

431 Minority Group Relations (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Study of racial, national and religious minorities, 
especially in the United States. Includes study of discrimination, prejudice, different 
patterns of intergroup adjustment, and attempts to change group status. 


224 


Sociology 


436 Social Stratification (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Social class structures and their functions. Different 
styles of life; determinants of class status; vertical social mobility; change in class 
systems. 

4S1 Sociology of the Family (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. The family as a social institution. Historical and 
cross-cultural perspectives; social change affecting marriage and the family; anal- 
ysis of American courtship and marriage patterns; the psychodynamics of fam- 
ily life. 

458 Sociology of Religion (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Theoretical analysis of religion as a social institu- 
tion in complex societies. The structure and functioning of religious organizatipns; 
roles and role relationships; types of religious organizations and leadership; the 
relationships of religion to other social institutions; religion and social change. 

465 Law and Society (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. The law and lawyers in the context of human so- 
ciety. Law as formal social control, variations in legal systems, social change and 
selected areas of law, the legal profession. 

470 Sociology of Occupations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Sociological analysis of work roles in technologically 
advanced societies. Career patterns, occupational recruitment, job mobility, organ- 
izational demands. The nature and development of the professions, their ideologies 
and images. 

473 Complex Organizations (3) S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Sociological analysis of formal organizations (indus- 
trial, governmental, welfare, military, medical, educational, correctional, etc.) as 
systems of social interaction. Includes such topics as blueprinted vs. informal struc- 
ture, authority, decision-making, role conflicts, communication and morale. 

477 Social Organization (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201; six upper division sociology units, or consent. 
Theories of social organization and the structure of various social groups are 
anaylzed, with a comparative analysis of social structures and systems. The various 
levels of groups are discussed and interrelated. 

480 Development of Social Thought (3) F 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Social thought and civilization since early times; 
comparative study of the orientations of earlier writers towards the nature of man 
and society. 

481 Sociological Theory (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 and consent of the department. A comprehensive 
survey of the main schools of sociological thought, both European and American, 
with emphasis on systems of theory, methodology of theorists, cultural change, and 
social institutions. 

^99 Independent Study (1—3) F, S 

Prerequisites: At least 12 hours of sociology and consent of the adviser. Student 
selects an individual research project, either library or field. There are conferences 
with the adviser as necessary, and the work culminates in one or more papers. May 
fie repeated for credit. 


8 — 66198 


225 


Sociology; Spanish 


531 Methods and Measurements in Sociology (3) S 

Prerequisites: Sociology 331 A, 33 IB, or their equivalents, or consent of the de- 
partment. A critical analysis of basic problems of social research. Casual inferences, 
value bias, and measurement, especially the construction of scales. 

536 Seminar in Ethnic Stratification (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sociology 431, Sociology 436, or consent of the department. An- 
alysis of the stratification of racial and ethnic groups throughout the world. Proc- 
esses leading to, sustaining, and associated with changes in systems of ethnic 
stratification. 

541 Seminar in Social Interaction (3) S 

Prerequisites: Sociology 341 or consent of the department. Advanced social- 
psychological study of social interaction, including sociological factors in person- 
ality development and analysis of primary group behavior. 

561 Seminar in Social Change (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Patterns and processes of social change, 
with opportunities for application to selected aspects of both advanced and newly 
developing societies. 

577 Seminar in Social Organization (3) S 

Prerequisites: Sociology 477 or its equivalent and consent of the department. 
A critical treatment of various theoretical approaches to the analysis of social 
organization. Specific areas of social organization. 

581 Analysis of Sociological Theory (3) F 

Prerequisites: Sociology 481 or equivalent and consent of the department. Exam- 
ination of the basic elements and key problems in constructing a systematic socio- 
logical theory. A detailed, comprehensive and critical analysis of selected theo- 
retical works. 

591 Thesis (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Acceptance as a candidate for the M.A. in sociology, and approval 
of the topic. Individual research under supervision, reported in a thesis, and de- 
fended in an oral examination conducted by a faculty committee. Must be taken 
2 semesters for a total of six units. 

599 Independent Study and Research (1—3) P, S 

Prerequisite: consent of the graduate adviser, and the department. Individual 
research on either a library or empirical project, with conferences with the adviser 
as necessary, culminating in one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 

SPANISH 

(Offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and literatures) 

101 Fundamental Spanish (5) F, S 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Spanish. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. 

102 Fundamental Spanish (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 


226 


Spanish 

basic forms and structure of Spanish. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language, laboratory. 

203 Intermediate Spanish (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

204 Intermediate Spanish (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 203 (or equivalent). Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) f, S 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Spanish 203. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) F, S 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Spanish 204. Required of all majors and minors at the 
intermediate level; optional to others. 

315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) F 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussions in Spanish lit- 
erature, arts and institutions to develop insights into Spanish culture, while strength- 
ening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with the consent 
of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) S 

Reading and discussion in Spanish-American literature, arts and institutions to 
develop insights into Spanish-American literature and culture while strengthening 
facility with the language. Open to lower division students with the consent of the 
instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) F 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with the 
consent of the instructor. Designed to give the student special competence in the 
control of Spanish as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Ck)nducted 
in Spanish. 

400 Spanish for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
Spanish, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken 
and written language. Modern writings in various fields, as well as developments 
in methodology and texts, serve as the basis for intensive practice. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

431 The Golden Age (3) S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. Major works including Mys- 
ticism, the Picaresque and Pastoral Novels, the theater of Lope de Vega and his 
contemporaries. Conducted in Spanish. 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) F 

Prerequisite: Spanish 316 or consent of instructor. The chronicle, short story, 
prose and poetry from colonial times to the present. Conducted in Spanish. 


227 


Spanish 


451 Spanish Literature to the Golden Age (3) F 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. Cantor de Mio Cid and other 
epic poetry, the early ballads and lyric literature, the prose of Juan Manuel, the 
Renaissance lyrics of Garcilaso de la Vega, El libro de buen amor and La Celes- 
tina. Conducted in Spanish. 

461 Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) S 

Representative works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Analysis of romanticism, 
eclecticism, naturalism, realism, and Tremendisvto. Conducted in Spanish. 

466 Applied and Descriptive Linguistics (3) F 

Introduction to the nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morpho- 
logical and syntactic structures of languages are examined through the use of 
techniques for describing these structures. The application of linguistic analysis 
to the teaching of modern foreign languages. (Same as French 466, German 466.) 

472 Senior Seminar: Cervantes and the Age of Humanism (3) S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 431 or consent of instructor. Cervantes’ artistic creation and 
its relation to the culture of the 16th century. Special emphasis on Don Quixote and 
the Novelas ejeniplares. 

475 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) F 

The Generation of ’98 and 20th-century theater, poetry and novel. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) F, S 

Supervised research projects in Spanish language or literature to be taken with 
the consent of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for 
credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) F 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. 

556 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Poetry (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

557 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Poetry (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

567 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Novel (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Prose (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Drama (3) F 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. May be repeated for 
credit. 


228 


Spanish; Speech 


580 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Prerequisite; Recommendation of student’s graduate committee. 

SPEECH 

101 Fundamentals of Speech (3) F, S 

Provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of rhetoric and 
oral communication, including listening, as well as with experiences in such activi- 
ties as discussion, oral reading, and public speaking. 

138 Forensics (2) f, 5 

Prerequisite: Speech 101. Investigation and practice in the background, format, 
procedures, and evaluation criteria of the various forensic events. Students must 
participate in at least two intercollegiate tournaments. May be repeated for credit. 
(1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

202 Voice and Diction (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101. The study of principles and practice of correct sound 
formation, voice production, and manner of speaking. 

211 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) F, $ 

Prerequisite: Speech 101, a high school speech course, or consent of instructor. 
A fundamentals course devoted to theory, methods, and practice in the performance 
of oral communication of different types of literature. (Same as Drama 211.) 

231 Essentials of Public Speaking (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Speech 101, a high school course in speech, or consent of in- 
structor. The composition and delivery of talks to inform and to persuade. Logical 
organization and substantive development are stressed. 

235 Essentials of Debate (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101 or 231. Investigation of the forms and skills of debate 
in our society. Use of evidence and case construction are emphasized. Parliamen- 
tary, symposium, and debate are emphasized. 

301 Speech for Teachers (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101 or graduate standing. This course is designed to help 
teachers to use speech and dramatized activities effectively in the classroom. The 
normal speech development of children is examined, and consideration is given 
to the identification and handling of speech, hearing, and listening problems. 

311 Oral Interpretation (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Drama 211 or Speech 211 or consent of instructor. The principles 
^nd practice of reading aloud from the printed page. Analysis of selections from 
piose and poetry are emphasized. The development of voice control and projection 
of idea and motion. (Same as Drama 311.) 

324 Dynamics of Small Group Discussion (3) F 

Prerequisite; Speech 101. Study and practice of the principles of group dynamics, 
interpersonal communication, and the process by which individuals work effec- 
tively in the solution of problems, share ideas, and become sensitive to the en- 
vironment in which they work with others. 


229 


Speech 


333 Business and Professional Speaking (3) f, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 231 or graduate standing. Particular attention is given to 
the interview, speeches for special occasions, information giving, and business con- 
ferences. Not open to speech majors for major credit. 

334 Advanced Public Speaking (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: 231 or equivalent. Investigation of the problems and techniques 
of a series of speeches directed toward a predetermined goal- emphasis on pro- 
gressive use of persuasive materials. 

335 Advanced Argumentation (3) F 

Prerequisite: 235. Argument as applied to advocacy; special attention is given 
to logic and evidence as related to analysis of significant issues. 

338 Intercollegiate Forensics (2) F, S 

Directed activity in debate and other forensic events. Participation in intercol- 
legiate competition is required for credit. May be repeated for credit. (1 hour 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

341 Phonetics (3) F 

Prerequisite: Speech 101 or graduate standing. The study of the history and 
theory of speech sounds including the morphological aspect of linguistics; the 
use of the International Phonetic Alphabet; the various factors influencing articu- 
lation and pronunciation. Same as Drama 341. 

351 Speech Science (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101. Anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism 
with emphasis on respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation, and hearing; the 
physical and acoustical aspects of the speech process. 

403 Speech Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101 or graduate standing. Study of linguistic development 
and speech disorders, and the psychological aspects of oral communication. De- 
signed to meet the language and speech development and disorders requirement for 
specialized preparation to serve as teachers of exceptional children. 

404 General Semantics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 101 or graduate standing. An examination of the basic 
principles underlying the influence of language on human action and interaction. 

424 Discussion and Group Leadership (3) f, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 324 is recommended. The principles and practices of leader- 
ship of groups in discussion. Survey of classical and modern backgrounds and uses 
of discussion. The logic and ethics of problem-solving discussion. The use of 
discussion as a means of public presentation. 

433 British Public Address (3) F 

Prerequisite: six units of upper division speech. A rhetorical study of the times, 
issues, proofs, structure, and style of selected speeches on British political, social, 
and religious topics. 

434 American Public Address (3) S 

Prerequisite: Six units of upper division speech. A rhetorical history of the United 
States from the colonial period to the present. The influence of selected speeches 
and speakers on the development of American culture. 


230 


Speech 


436 Survey of Rhetoric (3) F 

Prerequisite: Six units of upper division speech. A survey of ancient, medieval 
and modem rhetoric. 

441 Introduction to Speech Correction (3) P, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 401 or graduate standing; Speech 341 for speech and hearing 
students. Speech pathology with special emphasis on the identification of the most 
commonly experienced si>eech problems of a nonorganic nature, such as, articula- 
tion, stuttering, voice delayed development, areas of mental retardation, and emo- 
tional problems of children; basic principles of therapy in the clinic and in the 
classroom; parent conferences and referrals. 

443 Advanced Speech Correction (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 441 or equivalent. Etiologies, evaluation, and treatment of 
speech defects of an organic nature (cleft palate, cerebral palsy, aphasia, voice, 
hearing, dental abnormalties and laryngectomy). 

444 Persuasion (3) S 

Prerequisite: Six units of upper division speech. The study and application of 
psychological principles used by writers and speakers to effect social control: 
audience analysis and the use of persuasive techniques to influence the thought and 
behavior; the function of ethos. 

451 Diagnostic Methods in Speech and Hearing (3) F 

Prerequisite: Speech 443 or concurrent registration in Speech 443 or consent of 
instructor. Provides the student with information about various diagnostic pro- 
cedures that can be used by him and in consultation with members of related 
disciplines: psychologist, pediatrician, otologist, orthodontist, neurologist. 

452 Therapeutic Procedures in Speech and Hearing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 443 or concurrent registration in Speech 443 or consent of 
instructor. Observation and supervised experience in recommended procedures and 
use of instructional aids with speech-handicapped children, including the prepara- 
tion and utilization of speech correction and speech improvement materials. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

458 Clinical Practice (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 451 or 452 or concurrent registration in one of the courses, 
and approved application for clinical practice. Practice in the correction of speech 
in children and adults under supervision. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. (1 
hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

461 * Audiometry and Aural Rehabilitation (3) F 

Prerequisite: Speech 351, 441, or consent of instructor. Equipment, principles, 
methods and procedures used in conducting school and industrial hearing conser- 
vation programs. Attention is given to techniques of audiometric testing and the 
use of audiograms. Care and use of audiometers, both air-conduction and bone- 
conduction. Partially fulfills the state requirements for public school audiometrist. 

462 Speech Reading (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 341 or consent of instructor. Historical backgrounds of lip- 
reading, methods used in visual reading of speech, and the techniques commonly 
used in the teaching of speech reading to the aurally handicapped. 


231 


Speech 


463 Audiology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Speech 351, 441, or consent of instructor. The nature of auditory 
functioning, physical and psychological. A detailed consideration of the anatomy 
of the auditory mechanism, pathological changes and medical treatment. A survey 
of the rehabilitation facilities for the aurally handicapped; e.g. agencies, hearing 
aids, auditory training, speech reading, etc. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) F, S 

Open to advanced students in speech with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Speech and Drama (3) F, S 

Introduction to methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source 
materials, including library and original data; research and project design, and 
execution; interpretation of researches. 

503 Communication Theory (3) S 

Critical analysis of the background, theory, research, and applications of the 
process of communication. 

511 Graduate Seminar in Interpretation (3) P, S 

The historical and philosophical backgrounds in the development of interpreta- 
tion and its relationship to contemporary theory and practice. (Same as Drama 
511.) 

524 Seminar in Discussion and Debate (3) S 

Analysis of significant literature, major trends, and theories of argumentation, 
discussion, and debate, and an intensive study of the relationship of these areas 
to each other. 

536 Seminar in Rhetorical Theory (3) S 

Analysis of major rhetorical treaties, 400 B.C. to A.D. 18(X). 

543 Major Problems in Speech and Hearing (3) F 

Selected problems in speech pathology and audiology approached through an 
investigation of the literature and clinical research. 

557 A— H Seminar in Speech Problems (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 16 units, but 
no individual seminar may be repeated for credit: A, cleft palate; B, stuttering; 
C, aphasia; D, cerebral palsy; E, aphasoid child; F, voice disorders; G, articulation 
problems; H, mentally retarded. 

558 Advanced Clinical Practice (2) P, 5 

Advanced clinical practice with children and adults, having communication pro- 
grams encountered in professional setting such as the college clinic, public schools, 
hospitals, crippled children clinics, etc. Students will work with clients with dis- 
orders of voice, deafness, aphasia, dysarthria, stuttering. May be repeated for credit. 

563 Seminar in Audiology (3) S 

Investigation into a particular area or areas of audiology with selected problems. 
Emphasis is upon research and contributions within the framework of the seminar. 

591 Project or Thesis (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Speech 500. The selection, investigation, and written presentation 
of a selected problem in the field of speech. 


232 


Speech Edecafion 


SPEECH EDUCATION 

442 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (2-3) F 

Prerequisites: Education Found 311, Education Sec. 340, Admission to Teacher 

Education, senior standing or consent of the instructor. See pages under 

Secondary Education for description of standard teaching credential program. 
Objectives, methods, and materials for teaching speech in secondary schools. Re- 
quired, before student teaching, of students presenting majors in speech for the 
standard teaching credential. Students without teaching experience must register for 
three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in their schedules, at the same 
hour each day, so that they may serve as teacher aides in secondary schools. 

459 Clinical Practice and Student Teaching in Speech Correction and Lip 
Reading (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: Education Found 311 and 24 units in the area of speech and hear- 
ing handicapped children in the public schools. Experiences include working in 
small groups and in individual therapy sessions with speech and hearing handi- 
capped children enrolled in regular school classes, participation in parent coun- 
seling conferences and conferences with school personnel including administrators, 
classroom teachers, and nurses. Planning of curriculum materials to integrate 
speech and hearing therapy with regular classroom instruction will be stressed. 
This meets the directed teaching requirements for the credential to teach speech 
and hearing handicapped in remedial classes. 

749 Student Teaching in Speech in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 


233 


DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 


101 Introduction to Engineering and Computers (1) F 

An introduction designed to familiarize the student with the nature, respon- 
sibilities and opportunities of the profession coupled with an introduction to 
computer programming. 

102 Graphical Analysis (2) S 

Prerequisites: one semester of high school graphics. Emphasizes graphical com- 
putation, vectors, nomography, representations and analysis of empirical data. (6 
hours laboratory) 

403 Numerical Methods (3) F 

Numerical techniques for solving engineering problems, finite differences, nu- 
merical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. 

407 Heat Transfer (2) F 

The mechanics of heat transfer by radiation, conduction, and convection under 
steady state and transient conditions. Basic design considerations for heat ex- 
changers. 

409 Theory of Elasticity (3) F 

Three-dimensional stress and strain. Failure prediction. Differential equations in 
three dimensions. Analytical solutions of the plane state and torsion. 

410 Intermediate Dynamics (3) S 

Fundamentals of mechanical vibrations, Fourier components. Free, forced, and 
transient vibrations, damping, vibration isolation, coupled oscillations. 

414 Digital Computers in Structural Design (3) S 

Applications of the digital computer to structural design problems in steel and 
concrete. 

415 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics (3) F 

Dynamics of nonviscous and viscous fluids; potential motion, boundary layers, 
turbulence, compressibility, vortex motion, Navier-Stokes equation. 

502 Advanced Control Systems (3) F 

Compensation techniques. Performance criteria. Sample data control systems, 
Z-transforms, data reconstruction. Root-locus and frequency response methods. 
Jury’s stability criteria. 

503 Information Theory (3) F 

Statistical theory of communications. Description of periodic and random signals. 
Theory of information measure and channel capacity. Analysis of circuits with 
random inputs and optimization systems. 

504 Network Analysis (3) S 

Frequency domain analysis by pole-zero concepts, transfer functions, positive 
real functions, root-locus diagrams, and Nyquist stability criteria. 

507 Statistical Communication Theory (3) S 

A continuation of 503. Transmission of band-limited signals, stochastic pro- 
cesses, and group coding. 


234 


Engineering 


508 Gas Dynamics (3) S 

Considerations of the flow of compressible fluids in conduits. Shock fronts, un- 
steady flow and real gases. 

509 Transport Phenomena (3) S 

The interrelation between heat, mass, and momentum transfer. Fundamental 
equations of fluid flow. Boundary layer solutions in laminar and turbulent flow. 

510 Advanced Theory of Elasticity (3) S 

Continuation of 409 into advanced topics. Stress concentration, thermal stresses, 
generalized coordinates. 

518 Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3) S 

Fluid kinematics and kinetics. Conservation of mass, energy, and momentum, 
applied to Newtonian fluids. Navier-Stokes equations. Couette and Poiseuille flow. 
Potential flow. Introduction to turbulence and boundary layer theory. 


235 


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 


ACCOUNTING 

(Offered by the Department of Accounting and Finance) 

101A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlA must be taken before taking Accounting lOlB. 
These courses are to be taken by sophomores to fulfill the core requirements in 
accounting. 

Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the administration of a business 
enterprise; analyzing and recording financial transactions; preparation of financial 
statements; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; introduction to man- 
ufacturing accounts and reports. 

200 Elementary Accounting (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: junior standing. This course is to be taken only by transfer students, 
with junior standing. Duplicates lOlA and lOlB. 

Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the administration of a business 
enterprise; analyzing and recording financial transactions; preparation of financial 
statements; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; introduction to man- 
ufacturing accounts and reports. 

300 Accounting Fundamentals (3) F, S (Open only to graduate students) 

The basic fundamentals of accounting as they apply to the accumulation, organ- 
ization, and interpretation of financial and quantitative data relevant to the activi- 
ties of the corporate business enterprise. 

301A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlB or 200. The quantification, recording, and presen- 
tation of balance sheet and income statement items with particular emphasis on the 
corporate type of organization; statement of application of funds; cash flow state- 
ment; basic concepts of accounting theory; interpretation of financial statements. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlB or 200. The development of accounting informa- 
tion for management of manufacturing enterprises; cost records; cost behavior and 
allocation; standard costs; and an introduction to cost control. 

303 Governmental Accounting (3) F 

Prerequisite: one course in accounting. A consideration of the accounts and 
reports of nonprofit institutions, municipalities, state and federal governments; 
organization, procedures, budgets. 

304 Managerial Accounting (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlB or 200. This course is intended for students whose 
area of cencentration is not accounting. Analysis, interpretation, and application 
of accounting information for managerial decision making; budgets and budgetar>' 
control; special-purpose reports; differential cost analyses. 


Accounting 


307 Distribution Costs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Accounting lOlB or 200, and Marketing 351. The development of 
quantitative measures for marketing activity; costs of distributing through dif- 
ferent channels of distribution, advertising vs. personal selling, and movement 
activities; development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual 
performance in the light of budgets and standards. (Same as Marketing 307.) 

308 Federal Income Tax (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlB or 200. Basic consideration of the history, theory, 
and accounting aspects of federal income taxation. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 301B. A study of partnerships, statements for special 
purposes, receiverships, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting and 
foreign exchange. 

402 Auditing (3) S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301B and 302. Nature of an audit, auditing standards 
and procedures, audit reports; professional ethics and responsibilities of the inde- 
pendent public accountant; introduction to internal auditing. 

406 Cost Control (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. A study of current and persistent problems in cost 
accounting; theories of cost allocation and absorption; flexible budgeting; responsi- 
bility accounting; and distribution cost control. 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting lOlB or 300 and Quant Meth 264. Integrated systems 
for the collection, processing, and transmission of information; management aspects 
of the information service function; feasibility studies; case studies of operating 
systems. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Research in problems of taxation with emphasis 
on income taxes as they relate to corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries. 

409 C.P.A. Problems and Theory (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 401, or consent of the instructor. Selected problems and 
questions as found in the uniform C.P.A. examination; preparation, analysis and 
revision of financial statements; assets, liabilities and ownership equities; income 
determination; cost accounting; governmental and institutional accounting; ac- 
counting theory. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chairman. Open 
to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent in- 
quiry. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Industrial Accounting (3) f, S 

Prerequisite: Accounting lOlB, or 200, or 300. 

This course is intended for students whose area of concentration is not account- 
ing. Accounting information for industrial management; elements of manufacturing 
cost; cost systems; standard costs; costs reports; distribution cost analysis. 

^01 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 500 and consent of the instructor. Accounting, finan- 
cial, and other quantitative data for managerial decision-making; long-term and 

237 


Accounting; Business Education; Economics 

short-term profit planning; budgetary control; cost analysis and special reports; 
financial analysis and planning; the financial and taxation aspects of business deci- 
sions. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301B, graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 
The concepts and theory of accounting; the effects of professional, governmental, 
business, and social forces on the evolution of accounting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Financial Accounting Problems (3) S 

Prerequisite: Accounting 502. A critical examination of the current problems 
and areas of controversy in financial accounting. 

504 Seminar in Contemporary Managerial Accounting Problems (3) F 

Prerequisites: Accounting 500 or Accounting 302, graduate standing and consent 
of the instructor. A critical examination of the current problems and areas of 
controversy in managerial accounting. 

597 Project (3) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (2—3) F 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311, Education Sec 340, Admission to Teacher Edu- 
cation, senior standing or consent of the instructor. See pages 144-146 under Sec- 
ondary Education for description of Standard Teaching Credential program. 
Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching 
business in secondary schools. 

749 Student Teaching in Business in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) F, S 

See page 146 under Secondary Education for description and prerequisites. 

ECONOMICS 

100 American Economic History (3) P, S 

The evolution of American economic institutions and their relation to the devel- 
opment of industry, commerce, transportation and finance. 

200 Principles of Economics (5) F, S 

Prerequisite: open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 200A-B) 

An introduction to the principles of economic analysis and policy including the 
central problem of scarcity, basic economic institutions of the United States, re- 
source allocation and income distribution, economic stability and growth, and the 
role of public policy. 

200A Principles of Economics (3) F, S 

The first half of a two-semester sequence. An introduction to the principles of 
analysis and policy including the central problem of scarcity, basic economic insti- 
tutions of the United States. Emphasizes economic stability and growth and the 
role of public policy. 


238 


Economics 


200B Principles of Economics (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200A, or equivalent. The second half of a two-semester 
sequence. Continuation of an introduction to the principles of economic analysis 
and policy. Emphasizes resource allocation and income distribution, international 
economics, comparative economic systems, and the role of public policy. 

201 The American Economy (3) F, S 

A survey of the basic economic concepts and processes of a private enterprise 
economy. Included is a consideration of such topics as resource allocation, income 
distribution, problems of economic stability and growth and the appropriate role 
of government in a private enterprise society. Not open to students majoring in 
business administration and economics. 

300 Basic Economics (3) F, S, (Open only to graduate students) 

A concentrated study of the principles of economic analysis and policy and the 
basic economic institutions of the United States. 

302 Intermediate Economic Analysis (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A,B, or 201, or 300, or equivalent. A theo- 
retical formulation of the principles of the determination of prices and output of 
goods and productive services in a market system. 

303 Intermediate Economic Analysis (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Exonomics 200, or 200A,B, or 201, or 300, or equivalent. A theo- 
retical formulation of the principles of the determination of the level and fluctua- 
tions in real and money income, and the forces underlying economic growth. 

322 European Economic History (3) F 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. The evolution of European economic 
institutions and their relation to the development of industry, commerce, trans- 
portation, and finance in the principal European countries. 

324 Money and Banking (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A, B, or 201. A study of the structure ^d 
operation of commercial banks and financial institutions including a consideration 
of the impact of money and capital market developments on economic activity. 
(Same as Finance 324.) 

326 Labor Economics (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200A,B, or 201. An analysis of the basic eco- 
nomic and institutional influences operating in labor markets. Considers relevant 
aspects of resource allocation, income distribution, economic stability, and growth. 

362 Introduction to Econometrics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Quantitative Methods 361 (to have been taken or being taken con- 
currently) and Economics 200A,B. An introduction to basic mathematical tools 
and their application in economic analysis. The measurement and verification of 
economic relationships by statistical methods. Consideration of some econometric 
models. (Same as Quantitative Methods 362.) 

401 Government and Business (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A,B, and 302. An economic study of busi- 
ness organization, conduct and performance followed by an analysis of the ra- 
tionale and impact of public policy on various segments of business and business 
activities, including the regulated industries, sick industries, and antitrust policy. 


239 



Economics 


402 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) f, 5 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, 303. A study of the techniques of monetary and 
fiscal policy and an appraisal of their relative roles in promoting economic stability 
and growth. 

403 Comparative Economic Systems (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A, B, 300, or consent of the instructor. An 
analytical comparison of unplanned and planned systems of economic organization 
as to their theoretical foundations, existing economic institutions, and achieve- 
ments and failures; capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism will be examined 
as exemplified by the United States, England, Russia and prewar Germany. 

404 The Soviet Economy (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A,B, or 201. An analytical evaluation of 
Soviet economic development including the structure and performance of the 
Soviet economy and problems of planning and control. 

405 History of Economic Thought (3) S 

Prerequisites: Economics 302, 303. A study of the development of economic 
thought as reflected in the evolution of major schools of thought and of leading 
individual economists as they influenced economic thought and policy. 

421 International Trade (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200A,B, or 201. An examination of the theory 
or international trade and the means and significance of balance of payments ad- 
justments, with an analysis of past and present developments in international com- 
merical and monetary policy. (Same as Marketing 421) 

431 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) S 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, or 200A,B, or 201, and consent of instructor, or 
equivalent. An examination of the processes of economic growth with special 
reference to developing areas. (Considers capital formation, resources allocation, 
relation to the world economy, economic planning, and institutional factors, with 
appropriate case studies. 

451 Economics of Taxation (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200A,B, or 201. A study of government finance 
at the federal, state, and local levels with particular reference to administrative 
problems of public finance, the ethical aspects of taxation, and the impact of tax- 
ation and spending on resource allocation and income distribution. 

452 Economics of Location (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200A,B, or 201. The theory and principles un- 
derlying the location of economic activity. 

462 Advanced Econometrics (3) S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200A-B; QM 361 and 362. Development of ad- 
vanced statistical methods and their application in economic research. Advanced 
concepts in model building; development of different types of economic models. 
The use and effect of economic models in public policy. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Exonomics major or concentration, senior standing and approval 
by the department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring 
to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


240 


Economics; Finance 


510 Completion, Monopoly, and Public Policy (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 300, or 302. An examination of the economic im- 
plications of various forms of market structure and business conduct and con- 
siders the application of public policy to various segments of business and business 
activities, including antitrust policy and regulation of business. 

511 Economic Problems and Public Policy (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 300, or 303. An examination of the nature and 
implication of the major economic problems facing the economy and an evaluation 
of current and alternative policies for their solution. Problems considered will 
include price level stabilization, balance of payments equilibrium, economic growth, 
and cyclical and technological unemployment. 

597 Project (3) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

FINANCE 

(Offered by the Department of Accounting and Finance) 

324 Money and Banking (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200 A ,B, or 201. A study of the structure and 
operation of commercial banks and financial institutions including a consideration 
of the impact of money and capital market developments on economic activity 
(same as Econ. 324). 

330 Business Finance (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 10 IB, or 200, and Economics 200, or 200B. Sources 
and uses of long-term and short-term capital in business firms, and analysis of 
business finance situations. 

331 Financial Analysis (3) F, S ^ 

Prerequisite; Finance 330. The techniques of financial analysis and their appli- 
cation to business situations. 

333 Personal Finance (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: None. (This course may not be taken for credit by students electing 
the finance area of concentration.) Financial problems of the household in allo- 
cating resources and planning expenditures. Consideration of housing, insurance, 
installment buying, medical care, savings and investments. 

334 Principles of Insurance (3) S 

Prerequisites; Economics 200, or 200B, and Quant Meth 361. Principles of life, 
casualty and liability insurance; individual and group insurance programs; methods 
of establishing risks and rates. 

335 Investment Principles end Practices (3) F, S (Formerly 432) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Principles underlying the selection and management 
of portfolios, analysis of different types of corporate securities — commercial, in- 
dustrial, and public utility; the role of mutual funds and investment trusts. 


241 


Finance 


336 Principles of Real Estate (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200, or 200B. Survey of urban real estate principles 
and practices; structure and growth of cities; basis of real property values; real 
estate development and financing. 

337 Real Estate Finance (3) S 

Prerequisite: Finance 336. Instruments of real estate finance; factors affecting 
the supply and cost of real estate credit; primary and secondary mortgage markets; 
real estate as an investment medium. 

431 Capital and Money Marlkets (3) F 

Prerequisites: Finance 330 and either Finance 324 or Economics 324, or consent 
of instructor. Role of capital and money markets in the American economy; mar- 
kets for new corporate and government issues; secondary markets; interrelation of 
financial institutions; factors influencing yields and security prices. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) S 

Prerequisite: Finance 331. Comprehensive case studies including problems of 
estimating funds requirements, long-term financial planning, controlling and eval- 
uating cash flows, and financing acquisitions and mergers. 

439 Social Insurance (3) F 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Financial problems and policies in old age pensions, 
health insurance, unemployment insurance, workman’s compensation, and private 
pension plans. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chairman. Open 
to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent in- 
quiry. May be repeated for credit. 

532 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Finance 330, and graduate standing. Financial policies and structure 
of corporations; acquisition and administration of funds; financial control. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) S 

Prerequisite: Finance 532. Optimal financing and asset administration; advanced 
techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical methods to the admini- 
stration of the finance function of the business firm. 

534 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) F 

Prerequisites: Finance 431 or Finance 324 and consent of the instructor. Structure 
and operations of major financial institutions; portfolio composition, price-cost 
problems, and market behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and interrela- 
tion of financial institutions and markets. 

597 Project (3) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) F, S, 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 


242 


Management 


MANAGEMENT 

341 Principles of Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 200 A,B- The fundamentals of management uni- 
versal to all organizations; covers such studies as planning, organizing, activating, 
and controlling. 

342 Production Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Management 341. The study of modern manufacturing and its 
methods of operation; the efficient use of management, labor, and productive 
equipment; and demonstrations of techniques. 

343 Personnel Management (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of the instructor. A study of the per- 
sonnel function, its activities, and its problems. Emphasis upon management’s re- 

I sponsibilities for selection, development, and effective utilization of personnel. 

344 Human Relations in Management (3) F 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of the instructor. The human rela- 
tions problems of work situations pertaining to concepts such as motivation, leader- 
ship, organizational health, and adapting to change. Special emphasis is placed upon 
I the contributions of authorities, case studies, and audiovisual presentations. 

346 Business Law (3) f, S 

[i The philosophy, institutions and role of the law in business and society, with 
I emphasis upon the functions of courts and attorneys, and upon case studies in the 
( areas of contracts and corporation law. 

347 Business Law (3) S 

Prerequisite: Management 346. The philosophy, institutions and role of the law 
in commercial transactions, with emphasis upon the uniform commercial code and 
case studies in the areas of sales, security devices, personal property, bailment and 
negotiable instruments. 

441 Labor-Management Relations (3) F 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of the instructor. The course provides 
an understanding of the impact of labor-management relations upon labor, manage- 
J nient, and the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining, and the 
settlement of disputes are among the subjects that are examined. 

442 Labor Law (3) S 

Prerequisites: Management 341, 346 or consent of the instructor. The study of 
labor law and its effects upon American society. Federal and state legislation, and 
actions of regulatory bodies are explored by means of case studies. 

444 Management of Systems (3) S 

Prerequisite: Management 342. The theory and management of systems and pro- 
cedures applied to the control and coordination of the whole complex of operations 
In modern institutions. The course explores work such as charting, design of sys- 
tems and procedures, work measurement, and general systems theory. (2 hours lec- 
ture; 2 hours activity) 

445 Production Control Analysis (3) F 

Prerequisites: Management 342, introductory calculus, statistics, and principles of 
economics or consent of the instructor. The quantitative analysis of production 
^nd quality control, involving group problems related to such areas as mathe- 
uiatical programming, statistical analysis, and economic analysis. 


243 


Management; Marketing 


446 Managerial Economics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Quantitative Methods 361, Management 341, and consent of the 
instructor. The use of applied economics, analyses, and statistical methods in the 
decision making process, by means of group problems; the character of the firm’s 
demand, costs, prices, and profits; short-' and long-run planning for a business 
enterprise; and the relationship between the firm and the economy. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) F 

Prerequisites: The business administration core or consent of the instructor. A 
simulation of an oligopolistic industry to provide the student with an opportunity, 
through group problems, to use statistics and other analytical tools to make man- 
agerial decisions in the functional areas of management. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours 
activity) 

449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Accounting 101A,B, or 200, Finance 330, Management 341, Mar- 
keting 351, and senior standing. The seminar is limited to seniors and graduate 
students. Through an analysis of integrative cases and problems the student is 
encouraged to use his business and liberal arts training. Individual and team efforts 
resolve decision-making policies and actions. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
depanment chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

541 Seminar in Production Problems (3) S 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and the consent of the instructor. A seminar 
designed to focus attention on current production problems, trends, and applica- 
tion of dynamic techniques. Current literature review, case study analysis, and 
special projects are basic elements. 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) F 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and the consent of the instructor. The seminar 
provides the graduate student with an opportunity to study cases, problems, and 
significant literature in the field in order to develop a comprehensive understanding 
of personnel administration and human relations. 

597 Project (3) P, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) F, 5 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

544 Organizational Behavior, Theory, and Administration (3) 5 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Management 341, and consent of the instructor. 
The analysis of human behavior in organization, studies in organizational theories, 
and administrative action. 

MARKETING 

(Offered by the Department of Marketing and Quantitative Methods) 

307 Distribution Costs (3) 5 

Prerequisites: Accounting 101 B, or 200, and Marketing 351. The development of 
quantitative measures for marketing activity; costs of distributing through different 

244 


fAarkeflng 


channels of distribution, advertising versus personal selling, and movement activi- 
ties; development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual per- 
formance in the light of budgets and standards. (Same as Accounting 307) 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. Marketing organization and methods for the indi- 
vidual business with serious consideration of the social and economic aspects of 
the distribution task. Topics include the consumer, his place and his problems in 
the marketing area; marketing functions, institutions, and policies; legal and 
political environment for marketing activity; and an evaluation of the present 
marketing system. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) F 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Retail problems of location; organization; buying; 
selling media and methods; pricing; and merchandising. Emphasis will be placed 
upon operating procedures and control, planning, budgeting, and costs. 

353 Marketing Administration (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Survey of the major problems facing the marketing 
executive, including product planning, pricing, market and analysis, sales potentials, 
marketing organization, and administration of the sales force. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the advertising function, in- 
cluding the role of advertising in marketing strategy, budgetary considerations, 
allocation among media, measurement of effectiveness, administration and control, 
and its economic and social implications. Case method of instruction is emphasized. 

355 Credit and Credit Administration (3) F 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The general nature and functions of credit, credit 
instruments; the operation of the credit department; sources of credit information; 
acceptance of credit risk; establishment of credit limits; and the problem of col- 
lections. 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Personal salesmanship and the application of the 
findings of the behavioral sciences to selling and group dynamics as they relate to 
the creative and promotional aspects of the business. 

357 Industrial Purchasing (3) S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The principles and practices of purchasing for 
industrial organizations. Major buying policies, sources of materials, quantity and 
quality considerations, and the relation to production cost. 

358 Physical Distribution (3) F 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Consideration of the logistics problems of physically 
distributing products and the principles and practices of solving them. An evalua- 
tion of the transportation and storage of products based on considerations of cost, 
time, and service. 

421 International Trade (3) F 

Prerequisite: Economics 2(X). An examination of the theory of international trade 
and the means and significance of balance of payments adjustments, with an analysis 
of past and present developments in international commercial and monetary policy. 
(Same as Economics 421) 


245 


Marketing 


452 Marketmg Research (3) S 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, and Quantitative Methods 361. The application of 
scientific methodology as an aid in solving problems of product planning, pricing, 
promotion, and distribution. Practical application is emphasized through class proj- 
ects and case problems. 

453 Marketing to the Government (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and nondefense products 
to the government. The nature and administration of contractual agreements with 
government agencies. 

454 Advertising Problems (3) F 

Prerequisites: Marketing 354 or consent of the instructor, plus senior standing. 
Management of the advertising function in the marketing program. A study of the 
formulation of advertising policies, involving primarily an analysis of cases dealing 
with the role of advertising in marketing, the definition and choice of advertising 
objectives, strategy, appropriation policy, media selection, evaluation of advertising 
results, and the organization and implementation of the advertising program. Cases, 
simulations, and readings. 

459 Marketing Problems (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. It is recommended that the student have completed 
at least two advanced marketing courses or have equivalent business experience. 
Case studies of problems facing the marketing executive; identification and analysis 
of the problems; selection and evaluation of alternative solutions; and implementa- 
tion of recommended solutions. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Marketing concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

551 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and graduate standing. A managerial approach to 
the major marketing problems faced by industry: e.g., definition of and organiza- 
tion for the marketing task; demand analysis; decisions concerning product, price, 
promotion, and trade channels. A firm’s adjustment to its marketing environment 
with emphasis on competitive strategy. The case approach supplemented with 
simulations and topical readings. (Credit not given for master’s degree candidates 
who have previously taken Mktg 459.) 

552 Seminar in Pricing and Price Policy (3) S 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. A critical analysis of the pricing problems of a firm 
with alternative choices and diverse objectives. The pricing function will be 
examined from the standpoints of economic theory, management science, business 
practices, legal constraints, and ethical considerations. Relationship of pricing objec- 
tives, policies, strategies, and methods to market behavior and the goals of the firm. 
Pricing policies among businesses and their economic and social implications. 

553 Seminar in Product Planning (3) F 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. A course designed to assist marketing management 
in the formulation and execution of marketing plans for new and existing products. 
An examination of the management decision areas and procedures required for 
search, preliminary evaluation, development and testing, and commercialization of 
products. Particular emphasis on solving problems arising from product programs 
developed to assure corporate growth. 

246 


Marketing; Quantitative Methods 


597 Project (3) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) F, 5 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

QUANTITATIVE METHODS 

(Offered by the Department of Marketing and Quantitative Methods) 

264 Computer Programming (1) F, S 

Introduction to problem-oriented languages of computers. The solving of prob- 
lems using computer programming methods and techniques. 

361 Business and iconomic Statistics (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Math 120 or equivalent. The collection, analysis and presentation of 
statistical data; theory of probability, sampling, experimental method, correlation, 
time series and index numbers, and their application to business and economic 
problems. 

362 Introduction to Econometrics (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Quant Meth 361 (may be taken concurrently), and Economics 
200A,B. An introduction to basic mathematical tools and their application in eco- 
nomic analysis. The measurement and verification of economic relationships by 
statistical methods. Consideration of some econometric models. (Same as Econ. 
362) 

364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) F 

Prerequisite: College algebra, Quant Meth 264, or equivalent. An introduction 
to computer systems; elements of symbolic logic and number systems; program- 
ming methods, techniques, and applications. 

461 Advanced Statistics (3) F 

Prerequisites: Math 150B or equivalent, Quant Meth 361. An advanced treatment 
of the theory and application of the topics covered in Quant Meth 361, using the 
methods of the calculus where appropriate. 

462 Mathematical Models in Business and Economics (3) S 

Prerequisites: Math 120, Quant Meth 361, and Math 150A, or Quant Meth 362, 
or equivalent. The construction and application of mathematical models to business 
decision and economic analysis. 

463 Statistical Decision Theory (3) S 

Prerequisites: Math 120 and Quant Meth 361. The analysis and application of 
advanced statistical techniques to the problems of management decision making 
under conditions of uncertainty. 

464 Computer Applications in Industry (3) S 

Prerequisites: Quant Meth 264 or consent of instructor. An examination of the 
role of computers in industrial processes and automation, its effects on economic 
efficiency, control, feedback communication, consideration of real time on-line 
systems, and functional applications of computers in business and industry. 


247 


Quantitative Methods 


465 Linear and Nonlinear Programming (3) F 

Prerequisites: Quant Meth 264, Math 120 or equivalent, Quant Meth 361. The 
study of the decomposition principle. Problems of data collection, problem speci- 
fication, computation. Applications of quantitative programming to industrial and 
management problems. 

499 Independent Study (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: quantitative concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

560 Operations Research (3) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Math 150B, or equivalent, and Quant Meth 361, or consent of the 
instructor. An examination of the nature and scope of operations research, its 
methodology, and applications. Emphasis will be placed on model construction and 
models on inventory control, queuing, sequencing, scheduling, replacement, and 
mathematical programming. 

565 Saminar on Computers in Industry (3) 5 

Prerequisites: Quant Meth 364, Quant Meth 464 or consent of instructor. An 
examination of developments and innovations concerning computers in industry. 
Artificial intelligence, information retrieval, and time sharing. 

597 Project (3) F, 5 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-^) F, S 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 


248 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 


! 


EDUCATION, ELEMENTARY 

331 Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods (8) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311, Engl 433, Art 380, Music 333, PE 333, Math 
Ed lOOA, Sci Educ 310, and admission to teacher education. Principles, curricula, 
methods, and materials of elementary school instruction with major emphasis on 
reading, language arts, arithmetic, social studies, and science. Includes audiovisual 
instruction, methods, and techniques. Required field work. Required of all candi- 
dates for the standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary school 
teaching or its equivalent. (6 hours lecture, 2 hours activity, and 3 hours labora- 
tory) 

339 Student Teaching in the Elementary School and Student Teaching Seminar 
(8) F, S 

Prerequisites: t'duc Elem 331 and admission to student teaching. Participation 
in a regular elementary school teaching program for the greater part of every 
school day. Includes a two-hour seminar each week in problems and procedures 
of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enrollment in other courses is dis- 
couraged. (Minimum of 30 hours a week in an elementary school, 2 hours per 
week seminar.) 

431 Principles and Curricula of the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 311 or consent of the instructor. An introductory 
course in elementary education. Stress on major principles and basic curricular 
considerations. Importance of the elementary school system to society. 

432 Teaching— in the Elementary School 

Prerequisites: Educ Elem 311 or consent of the instructor. A series of courses, 
listed dually in the School of Education and in the other appropriate divisions, 
dealing with objectives, methods, and materials of teaching the various subjects and 
areas in the elementary schools. The courses are professional education courses and 
applicable toward credential requirements. Detailed descriptions of the courses are 
to be found in the materials of other departments and divisions within this catalog. 

For Lang Ed 432 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary Schools (2) 

F,S 

The following courses have been designed specifically for students who are 
part-time students: 

Eng Ed 432 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Alath Ed 432 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Sci Ed 432 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

Soc Sci Ed 432 Teaching Social Sciences in the Elementary School (2) F, S 

^6 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 331 or permission of the instructor. This course deals 
'vith the techniques the classroom teacher may use in understanding individual 
children within his classroom who do not respond to the teacher and his peers 
typical ways. 

437 Problems in Early Elementary Education (3) S 

Prerequisites: Educ Elem 339 and consent of instructor. Study of current litera- 
ture and recent research in the area of education of young children through indi- 


249 


Education, Elementary 


vidual and group study. Emphasis will be placed on problems centered in cog- 
nitive processes, content structure and instruction at the early elementary edu- 
cation level. 

473 Mental Retardation: Educational Development (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 471. Organic and cultural basis of mental retarda- 
tion, including social, psychological, and vocational problems. Child growth, sensory 
development, learning characteristics of mentally retarded, and techniques of work- 
ing with parents will be considered. 

474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 475 and Educ Elem 331 or Educ Sec 442. Curriculum 
development, methods, and materials for teaching the educable and trainable men- 
tally retarded at the elementary and secondary levels. 

475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the Mentally Retarded (3) F 

Prerequisite; Educ Elem 474. Supervised observation and participation with the 
educable and the trainable mentally retarded at both the elementary and secondar> 
levels of education. (Three hours of observation and participation per week plus 
two hours of lecture and discussion.) 

477 The Educationally Handicapped Child (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 471 and consent of instructor. Behavioral charac- 
teristics of the educationally handicapped child, the child with a neurological 
handicap or a behavioral disorder as defined by the California Education Code. 
Educational procedures, perceptual and motor training, evaluation, parent guidance. 

481 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (3) ¥, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 339 or 739 and consent of the instructor. Analysis and 
diagnosis of reading difficulties. Psychological bases of the reading process. Tech- 
niques and methods of prevention and treatment. (2 hours lecture and 2 hours 
activity) 

482 Analysis of Corrective Reading Practices (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 481 and consent of the instructor. Critical examinations 
of reading and remedial reading practices. Short-term project in a school situation. 
(2 hours lecture and 2 hours activity) 

506 Curriculum and Research in Elementary Education: Reading (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 339 or consent of instructor. Study of curriculum and 
research in reading, including materials, organization, and methods of instruction. 

507 Curriculum and Research in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 5 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 339 or consent of instructor. Study of significant re- 
search developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving social 
studies programs, and current techniques of teaching. 

508 Curriculum and Research in Elementary Education: Foreign Languages (3) $ 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 339 or permission of instructor. Study of pertinent 
investigations and their application in the classroom together with significant 
curriculum developments and organization in the newest area facing the elemen- 
tary school educator. Criteria for appraising programs, personnel, and materials 
also will be discussed. 


250 


Education, Elementary, Foundations 


537 Seminar for Elementary Education (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 339 or 739 or consent of the instructor. Persistent 
problems in elementary education and survey of literature; causes and solutions 
for these related problems. Application of scientific method to educational prob- 
lems, sources of education research, and to techniques of cooperative thinking. 

709 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) F 

Prerequisite: Possession of a teaching credential and one year of teaching ex- 
perience. Designed for teachers who supervise student teachers. Emphasis on prin- 
ciples and procedures of effective supervision and research. 

739 Student Teaching in the Elementary School and Student Teaching Seminar 
(8 or 4) F, S 

Prerequisites: E^uc Elem 331, admission to student teaching, and postgraduate 
status. Participation in a regular elementary school teaching program for the 
greater part of every school day. Includes a two-hour seminar each week in prob- 
lems and procedures of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enrollment in 
other courses is discouraged. (Minimum of 30 hours a week in an elementary 
school, 2 hours per week seminar.) 

779 Student Teaching With Mentally Retarded Pupils (4) S 

Prerequisites: Educ Elem 475 and concurrent enrollment in Educ Elem 339 or 
739 (for four units) or Educ Sec 749 (for two units). Student teaching in a special 
class program for the educable or trainable mentally retarded at either the ele- 
mentary or secondary level. (Elementary level: minimum of 30 hours a week in 
an elementary school; 2 hours per week in seminar. Secondary level: minimum of 
15 hours a week in a secondary school; 2 hours per week in seminar.) 

EDUCATION, FOUNDATIONS 

301 Sociological, Historical, Philosophical Foundations of Education (4) F, S 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education or consent of the instructor. Survey 
of social, historical, and philosophical foundations of education from ancient times 
to the present, discussed in the light of their effect upon modem educational 
theory and practice. 

311 Psychological Foundations of Education (4) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Prerequisite to other courses in the professional edu- 
cation sequence. Learning theory, thinking processes, and human growth and de- 
velopment. (3 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. A comprehensive study of human growth and develop- 
nient with emphasis on childhood, adolescence, and middle and old age. Includes 
niental, social, emotional, and physical development. 

402 Comparative Education (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ Elem 331 or Educ Sec 442 or consent of the instructor. A 
^udy of (1) problems, factors and efforts in education throughout the world, 
^nd (2) the philosophies and practices in administration, control, financing and 
operation of educational systems of selected areas and countries. 

403 History of Education (3) F 

Prerequisites: history of world civilization and Educ Elem 331 or Educ Sec 
"^2 or consent of the instructor. The main streams of educational history in 


251 


Education, Foundations, School Services 

Europe and America, with particular emphasis on the ways these main streams have 
affected the current scene in the United States. 

406 Educational Sociology (3) S 

Prerequisite: Educ Elcm 331 or Educ Sec 442, or consent of the instructor. The 
school in the social order; analysis of cultural factors affecting school, and the 
special culture of the school; consideration of research in selected areas of the 
school-culture relationship. 

416 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) F 

Prerequisite: Education 481, teaching experience, and consent of instructor. 
Studies of the factors underlying learning disabilities in reading in children, adoles- 
cents and young adults. 

501 Philosophy of Education (3) S 

Prerequisites: postgraduate standing and Educ Elem 339 or 739 or Educ Sec 
749, or consent of the instructor. Uses of theories of knowledge, value and reality 
in dealing with educational problems; application of contemporary systems of 
thought to education. 

503 Foundations for Educational Leadership (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Seminar on cultures and values to which 
schools must contribute: introduction to community sociology, tax systems and 
public administration; the literature of leadership. Screening for admission to pro- 
gram. Occasional special meetings. Required of all students during first registra- 
tion in school administration and supervision at this college. 

505 Foundations for Improving Instruction ( 4 ) P, 5 

Prerequisite: Educ Found 503. Seminar on development of a quality program of 
instruction in both elementary and secondary schools; appraisal of programs of 
instruction; advanced principles of curricular review and modification. 

Evaluation of subject matter competence in area of supervisory specialization. 
Meets credential requirements in principles of curriculum construction and evalua- 
tion; supervision of instruction and curriculum in both elementary and secondary 
schools. 

511 Survey of Educational Research (3) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 451 or equivalent; teaching experience. Review 
of descriptive statistics as applied to educational problems. Survey of elements of 
current research types. Principles of research design. 

721 Philosophy and Objectives of Junior College Education (2) F 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing or consent of instructor. Origins of the 
junior college movement in higher education in the United States; economic, tech- 
nological, and social forces creating needs for new and different post-high school 
education; objectives of junior college education; relationships to secondary and 
higher education; functions of the junior college; curriculum development and 
organization. 


EDUCATION, SCHOOL SERVICES 

351 Principles of Guidance (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Psych 311 or Educ Found 312. Guidance related to educational 
objectives and needs of youth. Seminar on special needs created by size and com- 
plexity of the modern educational system and modern society; general require- 
ments, services, organization, and structure of a successful guidance program. 


252 


Education, School Services 


451 Principles of Educational Measurement (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Found 311 or Psych. 311. Development, validation, and appli- 
cation of the principles of educational measurement. Construction and use of in- 
formal and standardized achievement tests. Summary and interpretation of results 
of measurement. 

452 Counseling Theories and Processes (3) f, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 351. Dynamics of counselor and client relationships, 
techniques and processes of various levels, and relation to personality theory. Major 
project and supervised clinical practice required. Student seeking the credential to 
teach exceptional children will emphasize the counseling and guidance of the 
handicapped. 

471 Exceptional Children (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Educ 311. Seminar on the study of children who deviate from the 
average in the elementary and the secondary schools; physically handicapped, men- 
tally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, emotionally disturbed, and delinquent. 
Special educational services, curriculum, procedures, and materials necessary to 
promote their maximum development. 

472 Gifted Children (2) F 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311 and Educ Elem 331, or Educ Elem 431, or Educ 
Sec 442. Identification, principles of instruction, grouping, individualized instruc- 
tion, classroom enrichment. Problem solving and research experiences in science, 
social studies, and mathematics, reading programs and literature, creative writing, 
oral language. 

491 Audiovisual Education (2) F, 5 

Prerequisites: Educ Found 311, Educ Sec 442, or consent of the instructor. 
Media in communication, psychological bases, development, curricular function, 
evaluation. Survey of equipment and materials available, preparation of instructional 
materials for classroom use. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

499 Independent Study (1—3) F, S 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing, approval of instructor and department 
prior to registration. Conduct of an individual investigation under supervision of 
a faculty member; investigation might be an experiment, a library study, or a 
creative project; only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be 
approved; adequate prerequisite study necessary. May be repeated for credit. 

551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) F, 5 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 452 or permission of instructor. Principles of evalu- 
ating, classifying, and disseminating occupational and educational information in 
the guidance program; sources of occupational literature, occupational research, 
vocational surveys, and methods of studying the individual as a unique whole to 
help him develop his greatest career potential. Emphasis on the psychological, 
sociological, economic, and clinical implications of career and educational choice. 
A major project in career information is developed under supervision. 

552 Group Processes in Guidance (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv. 452 or permission of instructor. Intensive study of 
the dynamics of group processes including the function of leadership, effective 
membership and techniques of group problem solving. Special emphasis on clinical 
group counseling including a semester project in a school setting. 


253 


Education, School Services 

553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs (3) S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 452, 551 or permission of instructor. Development, 
organization, and administration of the pupil-personnel services. Seminar on analysis 
and evaluation of pupil personnel services by the case study method, curriculum, 
counselor competencies, staffing. 

555 Individoal Diagnosis (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 451, 452. Clinical study of the techniques of indi- 
vidual diagnosis including the synthesis and interpretation of information. Use of 
the life or developmental record, self-ratings, behavior ratings and tests as they 
relate to the normal and abnormal pupil. 

557A,B Seminar in School Counseling (1,1) f, 5 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 559A or concurrent enrollment in Educ Sch Serv 
559B and consent of instructor. Final two-semester terminal sequence for the master 
of science in education with a concentration in school counseling. Supervised 
individual project or thesis required for the degree. 

559A,B Field Work in Pupil Personnel Services (2—6) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 551, 552, 555, admission to the CSCE pupil personnel 
credential program and permission of instructor. Guidance and counseling in the 
school setting under the supervision of local coordinator and college staff. Work 
assignments vary for school counselors, psychometrists, and child welfare workers. 
Work in a counseling relationship, parent conferences, and follow-up studies. 
May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 units. (6 hours weekly field- 
work; 2 hours weekly conference) 

561 Organization of School Systems (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 503. Seminar on structure, functions, trends, fiscal 
responsibilities and issues in respect to the government of education at federal, 
state, county and local district levels. Emphasis on intergovernmental relations and 
impact at local level. 

563 Principles of School Personnel Administration (2) f, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 503. Seminar on principles of organizational be- 
havior, social processes inherent in effective leadership, and techniques of school 
* personnel management. 

564 Seminar in School Law (2) S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School law as a reflection of public policy; 
the California Administrative Code, Title 5; the roles of courts, county counsel, 
and attorney general in interpreting law; how law is made. Intended an an elective 
course in school administration. 

565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration, and Buildings (3) S 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Emphasis on school finance, business adminis- 
tration, and buildings as they implement an effective educational program. 

566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 503, 505, 511, 561, 563. May be taken concurrently 
with Educ Sch Serv 569. Seminar on leadership roles of elementary school principal 
and supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in elementary school; 
working relations and morale among staff, community and pupils; parent education; 
relations with central district staff; management and recordkeeping functions; 
teacher evaluation. 


254 


education. School Services 


567A,B Fieldwork and Seminar in School Administration (2,2) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 566 or 586 or concurrent registration, and consent 
of instructor. Two-semester terminal sequence required for the M.S. in Education 
with a concentration in school administration. Includes directed field work in 
selected public schools and district offices. Supervised project or thesis required 
for degree. (4 hours weekly fieldwork, 2 hours weekly conference) 

586 The Secondary School Principal and Supervisor (3) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sch Serv 503, 505, 511, 561, 563. May be taken concurrently 
with Educ Sch Serv 589. Seminar on leadership roles of secondary school principal 
and supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in the secondary school; 
the development and administration of vocational and adult education; working 
relations and morale among staff, community and pupils; relations with central 
district staff, the management and recordkeeping functions; teacher evaluation. 

769 Directed Fieldwork in Elementary School Administration and Supervision (2) 
F, S 

Prerequisite: ELduc Sch Serv 566 or concurrent registration. Work in selected 
elementary schools and district offices. Further details in special publications. 
(8 hours weekly fieldwork, 1 hour weekly conference) 

789 Directed Fieldwork in Secondary School Administration and Supervision (2) 
F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Sch Serv 586 or concurrent registration. Work in selected 
secondary schools and district offices. Further details in special publication. (8 hours 
weekly fieldwork, 1 hour weekly conference) 

EDUCATION, SECONDARY 

340 Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education (3) F, S 

Required first course in the professional sequence for the standard teaching 
credential with specialization in secondary teaching. Principles of secondary edu- 
cation in the United States: organization, curriculum, and teaching practices. Cor- 
related with methods and materials courses in the major. Two hours of observa- 
tion per week in selected junior and senior high school classes. Application for 
admission to teacher education is included. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours fieldwork) 

442 Teaching— in the Secondary School 

Prerequisites: 20 units in the major. Education E'ound 311, Education Sec 340, 
admission to teacher education, and senior standing; or consent of the instructor. 
A series of courses, listed dually in the School of Education and in the other 
appropriate departments, dealing with objectives, methods, and materials of teach- 
ing, including audiovisual instruction, the various subjects and areas in secondary 
schools. Required, before student teaching, of students presenting majors in these 
areas or subjects for the general secondary credential or the standard teaching cre- 
dential with specialization in secondary school teaching. Students without teaching 
experience register for three units credit, and must allow sufficient time in their 
schedules, at the same hour each day, so that they can serve as teacher aides in 
high schools. (2 hours lecture, 5 hours clinical practice) 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2-3) F 
Bus Ed 442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (2—3) F 
Drama Ed 442 Teaching Drama in the Secondary School (2-3) S 
Engl Ed 442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (2—3) F, S 


255 


Education, Secondary 


For Lang Ed 442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2—3) S 

Journ Ed 442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (2—3) S 

Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (2—3) S 

Mus Ed 442 Teaching Vocal Music in the Public Schools (2—3) S 

Mus Ed 443 Teaching Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (2—3) S 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (2-3) F 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (2—3) F 

Soc Sci Ed 442 Teaching Social Sciences in the Secondary School (2—3) F, S 

Speech Ed 442 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (2—3) F 

443 Principles of Core Curriculum (2) S 

Prerequisite: teaching experience or consent of the instructor. Unity and inter- 
relationships of human learning and behavior and the curricular processes and 
arrangements by which this may be achieved. Seminar on development, principles, 
and application of core curricula; guidance functions; evaluation; and roles of the 
teacher. 

445 Junior High School Education (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ Sec 442 or Educ Elem 331 or consent of instructor. Seminar 
on principles and procedures for developing the junior high school program. 
Purposes, curriculum, and organization of the junior high school are stressed 
including examination of recent innovations and proposals. Designed for students 
with elementary or secondary backgrounds who plan to teach in the junior high 
school. 

446 Secondary School Curriculum (3) f, 5 

Prerequisite: student teaching or teaching experience or consent of instructor. 
Fundamentals of curriculum development. Seminar on current issues within sec- 
ondary education. Curricular organization and current practices. Survey and evalu- 
ation of newer curricular programs. Paper or project of creative, analytic or review 
of literature type is required. Designed for experienced teachers interested in cur- 
riculum development and/or instructional supervision. 

547 Seminar for Secondary Education (3) F 

Prerequisite: Educ 749 or consent of the instructor. Persistent problems in sec- 
ondary education and survey of related literature; causes of and solutions for these 
problems. Application of scientific method to educational problems, sources of 
educational research, and to techniques of cooperative thinking. 

744 Principles of Junior College Teaching (3) S 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing or consent of instructor. Psychological foun- 
dations of junior college teaching, measurement and evaluation of learning. Edu- 
cational and philosophical bases for instructional procedures in the junior college. 
Instructional procedures including audiovisual materials, junior college class 
observations. (2 hours seminar, 2 hours fieldwork) 

749 Student Teaching In— in the Secondary School and Seminar (6 or 2) F, S 

A series of courses in student teaching and seminars listed dually in the School 
of Education and in the other appropriate departments. 

Prerequisites: Educ Sec 442, admission to student teaching. Student teaching 
for the general secondary credential or the standard teaching credential with 
specialization in secondary school teaching. Participation in a regular secondary 
school teaching program for half-days for a full semester. Includes a seminar each 
week in problems and procedures of secondary school teaching, under the direc- 


256 


Education, School Services; Health Education 

tion of the respective college supervisor. Students with majors in art will divide 
their student teaching between two semesters, and will register for three units 
credit each semester. (Minimum of 15 hours a week in a secondary school; 2 
hours per week in seminar) 

Art Ed 749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(3,3) F, S 

Bus Ed 749 Student Teaching in Business in the Secondary School and Semi- 
nar (6) F, S 

Drama Ed 749 Student Teaching in Drama in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

Engl Ed 749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

For Lang Ed 749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary 
School and Seminar (6) F, S 

Journ Ed 749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

Math Ed 749 Student Teaching in Mathematics in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

Mus Ed 749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(6) F, S 

PE 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) P, S 

Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Science in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(6) F, S 

Soc Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Social Science in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

Speech Ed 749 Student Teaching in Speech in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

799 Junior College Student Teaching and Seminar (4) F, S 

Prerequisites: Educ Sec 744. Student teaching in the student’s major field in a 
cooperating junior college for one semester. Weekly seminar on curriculum devel- 
opment and organization in the junior college, instructional procedures and ma- 
terials, and instructional problems of the junior college student teacher. (Minimum 
of 9 hours a week in a junior college; 2 hours per week in seminar) 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Health Education, Physical Education, 
and Recreation) 

HE 101 Personal and Community Health (2) F, S 

Meaning and significance of physical, mental and social health as related to the 
individual and to society; alcohol and narcotics education; fire prevention; public 
safety and accident prevention. 

HE 102 Prevention and First Aid (2) F, S 

Study of the hazards in man’s environment and the common accidents related 
thereto. Emphasis is placed upon both the care and prevention of accidents. Stu- 
dents will be certified in standard and advanced American Red Cross first aid 
procedures. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

HE 419 Environmental Health (3) F 

Prerequisite: FfE 101 or equivalent. The theoretical considerations of the complex 
relationship of the physical environment to preventive medicine and public health. 


9—66198 


257 


Physical Education 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Offered by the Department of Health Education, 

Physical Education and Recreation) 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All students must succesfully complete four semesters of physical education 
activity courses of one-half unit each to fulfill the general education requirement 
for the baccalaureate degree. Students on a normal schedule will be expected to 
complete this requirement during the freshman and sophomore year. Not more than 
six units of credit in physical education activities, including intercollegiate athletics 
courses, may be applied toward credit for graduation. Credit in intercollegiate 
athletics courses may not meet more than two semesters of the college general 
education requirement. Physical education activities courses may not be repeated 
for credit. Upper division students who have completed the general education 
requirement in physical education may elect additional activities. 

EXEMPTIONS OR POSTPONEMENTS 

Students 25 or older are exempted from the physical education requirement.* 

The college physician may postpone the enrollment of a student in a physical 
education activity course. 

Students unable to participate in the regular physical education program will 
be assigned to an adapted physical education class. 

To assure a balanced program for each student, physical education activities are 
classified into four categories: (1) aquatic activities, (2) group and team activities, 
(3) dual and individual activities, and (4) dance activities. Students are counseled 
to complete no more than two courses from any given category. 


• FOR MEN 


AQUATIC 

ACTIVITIES: 

(PE no Scries) 

GROUP AND 
TEAM ACTIVITIES: 
(PE 120 Series) 

INDIVIDUAL 

ACTIVITIES: 

(PE 130 Series) 

DANCE 

ACTIVITIES: 

(PE 140 Series) 

111m Swimming F, S 

121m Team 

Sports F 

122m Team 

Sports S 

131m Gymnastics 
and 

Tumbling F, S 
132m Combatives F, S 
133m Physical 

Conditioning F, S 
134m Adapted 

Physical 

Education F, S 



• FOR WOMEN 


lllw Swimming F, S 

121w Team 

13 Iw Gymnastics 



Sports F 

and 



122w Team 

Tumbling F, S 



Sports S 

133w Physical 




Conditioning F, S 




134w Adapted 




Physical 




Education F, S 



* Interpretation: A student under 25 years of age at the time of admission to the college is 
required to take all four semesters of the requirement. 


258 


Physical Education 


COEDUCATIONAL 


113 Lifesaving and 

Water Safety F, S 


123 Group Games 
(Open only to 
prospective 
elementary 
school 

teachers) F, S 


130 

Badminton 

F, S 

135 

Intermediate 



Tennis 

F, S 

136 

Archery 

F, S 

137 

Golf 

F, S 

138 

Tennis 

F, S 

139 

Handball 

F, S 


141 Social Dance F, S 

142 Folk and 

Square Dance F, S 

143 Modern Dance F, S 

144 Intermediate 
Modern Dance F, S 


COURSES IN INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Consent of the coach of the sport is required for enrollment. Each semester of 
enrollment carries one unit of credit. Credit in intercollegiate athletics courses 
may not meet more than two semesters of the college general education require- 
ment in physical education. Not more than six units of credit in physical education 
activities, including intercollegiate athletics courses, may be applied toward credit 
for graduation. May be repeated for a maximum of six units. 


PE 

181 

Baseball (1) S 

(Formerly 317) 

PE 

182 

Basketball (1) 

F (Formerly 318) 

PE 

183 

Cross Country (1) F (Formerly 319) 

PE 

186 

Golf (1) S (Formerly 321) 

PE 

187 

Gymnastics (1) 

F 

PE 

192 

Soccer (1) F 


PE 

193 

Swimming (1) 

S 

PE 

194 

Tennis (1) S 

(Formerly 324) 

PE 

195 

Track and Field 

(1) S (Formerly 325) 

PE 

196 

Water Polo (1) 

F 

PE 

197 

Wrestling (1) 

F 


PROFESSIONAL THEORY COURSES 

PE 201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation (3) F 

Introduction to physical education programs in public and private agencies, per- 
sonal, social and professional requirements of the physical education teacher and 
recreation leader, includes the origin and development of the professions of health 
education, physical education and recreation with emphasis upon their signficance 
and function in contemporary American culture. 

PE 311 Analysis of Aquatics (2) F 

Prerequisites: PE 113 or equivalent and permission of the instructor. Analysis of 
diving, swimming, lifesaving including water safety procedures (1 hour lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

PE 312 Analysis of Combatives (2) S 

Prerequisite: PE 132M Combatives or equivalent. Analysis of judo (jujitsu), 
wrestling and self-defense. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 313 Analysis of Folk, Square and Social Dance (2) S 

Prerequisite: PE 141, PE 142 or equivalent. Analysis of basic dance skills, inter- 
national folk, square, round and social dancing. (1 hour lecture, ,2 hours activity) 

PE 314 Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports (2) F 

Prerequisites: proficiency in skills covered and permission of the instructor. 
Analysis of archery, badminton, golf and tennis. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


259 


Physical Education 

PE 315 Analysis of Modern Dance (2) F 

Prerequisites: PE 143, PE 144 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Analysis 
of modem dance including choreography, program planning and dance accompa- 
niment. ( 1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 317A Analysis of Team Sports (W) (2) F 

Prerequisites: proficiency in the skills covered and permission of the instructor. 
Analysis of basketball, field hockey and soccer. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 31 7B Analysis of Team Sports (W) (2) S 

Prerequisites: proficiency in the skills of the sports covered and permission of the 
instructor. Analysis of speedball and speed-a-way, softball and volleyball. (1 hour 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 318 Analysis of Team Sports (M) (2) F 

Prerequisites: PE 12 IM, PE 122M or equivalent and permission of the instructor. 
Analysis of soccer, softball, speedball, and volleyball. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

PE 319 Analysis of Gymnastics and Tumbling (2) F 

Prerequisites: PE 13 IM, PE 13lW or equivalent and permission of the instructor. 
Analysis of apparatus gymnastics and tumbling. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 320 Theory of Coaching Basketball (2) S 

Prerequisites: proficiency in basketball and permission of the instructor. Analysis 
of skills, instructional procedures and coaching techniques necessary in coaching 
competitive basketball. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 321 Theory of Coaching Baseball (2) S 

Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and upper division standing. This course 
is designed to help prepare the student as a coach of baseball. Emphasis is on 
offensive and defensive coaching techniques as well as conditioning, budget prepa- 
ration, purchase and care of equipment, scheduling, officiating, and design and care 
of facilities. ( 1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) F 

Prerequisites: PE 201 and permission of the instructor. An analysis of current 
theories of motor learning as related to human performance. Philosophical bases 
are developed from which basic principles are evolved. 

PE 325 Case Studies in Human Motor Learning (3) 5 

Prerequisite: PE 324. Case studies involving human physical performance. Se- 
quence of activities, individual needs, institutional patterns of organization and pro- 
gramming. 

PE 333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) F, S 

Prerequisite: Educ Pound 311. Emphasis is placed upon characteristics of the 
child, particularly as these relate to physical growth and development; basic 
mechanical principles underlying efficient movement; and programs for physical 
needs of children in the elementary school. 

PE 416 Kinesiology (3) F 

Prerequisite: Bio 361 or equivalent. The study of human motion. 


260 


Physical Education; Recreation 


PE 417 Physiology of Exercise (3) F 

Prerequisite: Bio 361 or equivalent. The study of physiological processes in 
physical activities and the effects of training upon performance. 

PE 418 Adapted and Corrective Activities (3) S 

Prerequisite: PE 416. The study and selection of activities and programs for 
students physically unable to participate in the regular physical education program. 

PE 420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3) S 

A study of the development and use of tests and measurements in physical 
education in the evaluation of objectives, programs, and student achievement. 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (2-3) F 

PE 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) F, S 

RECREATION 

(Offered by the Department of Health Education, 

Physical Education and Recreation) 

Rec 203 Recreation Programs and Activities (2) S 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Theory and activity course, leadership 
in recreation programs, activities in recreation agencies. Laboratory experiences 
and practice included. (4 hours activity) 


261 


FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 

1965-1966 


(Year in parentheses indicates date of appointment) 

LANGSDORF, WILLIAM B. (1959), President and Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Occidental College; Ph.D., University of California 
ABRAHAM, JOHN A. (1965), Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B., Marquette University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
ADAMS, PHILLIP A. (1963), Associate Professor of Biology 
B.S., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
ADAMS, RAYMOND V. (1960), Professor of Physics and Chairman, Physics Department 
B.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 
ALAMSHAH, WILLIAM H. (1959), Professor of Philosophy and Chairman, Philosophy 
Department 

M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D., University of Southern California 
ALEXANDER, JAMES P. (1960), Associate Professor of Communication 
B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 

ALLEN, HOLLIS P. (1960), Professor of Education and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 
Emeritus since 1965 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Ed.D., Stanford University; LL.D., Claremont Graduate School 
AMES, DENNIS B. (1960), Professor of Mathematics and Chairman, Mathematics Department 
B.A., M.A., Bishop's University; Ph.D., Yale University 
ANDERSEN, MARTIN P. (1965), Professor of Speech 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
ARANA, OSWALDO (1965), Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Texas Christian University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado 
’^ASHLEY, THOMAS J. (1961), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Fresno State College; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 
AUSTIN, DON D. (1963), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Redlands; Ph.D., University of Washington 
BACON, JUNE (1962), Librarian II 

B.A., University of California; M.S. in L.S., University of Southern California 
BAILLIE, ALLAN S. (1965), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.Sc., B.S.M.E., Ohio University; M.B.A., University of Washington 
BARRES, STEPHEN J. (1961), Professor of Labor Relations and Management and Chairman, 
Management Department 

B.A., Texas Western College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
BARRETT, JEAN A. (1963), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Cortland State Teachers; Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Buffalo 
BEATON, CHARLES (1964), Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods 
B.A., Willamette University 

BECK, WARREN A. (1961), Associate Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Wayne University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
BECKER, ERNEST A. (1959), Dean of Students and Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Amherst College; B.D., Hartford Theological Seminary; M.A., Ed.D., University of 
Southern California 

BELL, CHARLES G. (1964), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Pomona College; M.A., University of Southern California 
BELLOT, LELAND J. (1964), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Lamar State College; M.A., Rice Institute 
BENSON, RUSSELL V. (1965), Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.E.E., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 
BLANCHARD, MILTON C. (1961), Building Coordinator 
B.S., M.Ed., Tufts University 


* On leave 1965-66. 


263 


Faculty and Administration 


BL££CK£R, £UG£N£ (1964), Assistant Protessor of £ducation 

B.A., M.A., San Diego State College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
BL£ND, HARVEY (1963), Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Texas; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
BOARINO, GERALD L. (1965), Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California 
BONAZZA, BLAZE (1964), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Los Angeles State College; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

BRADSHAW, L. JACK (1965), Associate Professor of Biology 
B.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

BRATTSTROM, BAYARD H. (1960), Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S., San Diego State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
BREESE, LAUREN W., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
BRISTOW, RONiALD M. (1959), Associate Dean of Students, Activities, and Assistant Professor 
B.A., M.A., University of Southern California 

BROCKMANN, LOUIS O. (1963), Professor of Education, and Chairman, School Services 
Department 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
BROWN, EDWARD D. (1963), Assistant Professor of Drama 

B.A., Louisiana State University; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., University of Denver 
BROWN, CJILES T. (1960), Professor of History, Chairman, Division of Social Sciences, and 
Chairman, History Department 

B.A., San Diego State College; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate 
School 

BRYDEN, JOHN H. (1961), Professor of Chemistry and Acting Chairman, Division of Science 
and Mathematics 

B.S., College of Idaho; M.S., California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University o( 
California, Los Angeles 

BUCK, CHARLES W. (1964), Counselor in Counseling and Testing, and Assistant Professor 
B.A., Occidental College; M.A., University of Oregon 
BURKE, Max W. (1960), Director of Placement Services and Associate Professor 
B.A., University of Iowa; B.D., Colgate-Rochester Divinity School 
CALHOUN, ROLAND L. (1961), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Claremont Men’s College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
CALLAHAN, ROBERT D. (1965), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., University of Washington 
CARLSON, RAE S. (1961), Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Nebraska; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
CARR, EDWIN R. (1960), Professor of Education 

B.A., Jamestown College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
CHARLTON, F. ANDREW (1965), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.Ed., Pepperdine College; M.A., Los Angeles State College 
CHEN, WILLIAM P. (1960), Ubrarian IV 

B.A., National Wu-Han University, China; M.S. in L.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
COLGAN, FRED R. 0 965), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern California 

COLMAN, RONALD (1964), Systems Analyst for College Computer Center and Lecturer of 
Quantitative Methods 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
COOK, BEVERLY B. (1962), Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 
COPP, CAROL M. (1965), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., University of Michigan 
COPPOLINO, IDA S. (1960), Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Utah; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., University of California, 
Los Angeles 

CROWLEY, RONALD J. (1965), Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S., M.A., University of Southern California 
CROY, HAZEL M. (1960), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Redlands; Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 


264 


Faculty and Administration 


CUMMINGS, SHERWOOD P. (1963), Professor of English and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 
B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
CUNNINGHAM, WALTER M. (1965), Lecturer in Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Los Angeles State College 
CURTIS, DWIGHT W., JR. (1965), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., College of the Pacific; M.A., Sacramento State College 
CUSICK, JAMES W. (1961), Associate Professor of Education, Coordinator of Secondary 
Education and Chairman, Secondary Education Department 
B.S., Montana State College; M.A., Washington State University; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 

DAVIS, BARBARA E. (1960), Librarian IV 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; B.Mus., University of Wisconsin; M. in L.S., (Carnegie 
Library School 

DAVIS, F. JAMES (1962), Professor of Sociology and Chairman, Jiociology Department 
B.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa 
t DE GRAAF, LAWRENCE B. (1959), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
DENNISON, WALTER J. (1965), Lecturer in Accounting and Finance 
B.B.A., University of Miami; M.S., Columbia University; C.P.A. 

DENNO, RAYMOND E. (1961), Audio-Visual Coordinator and Professor of Education 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.S., University of Southern California; Ed.D.. 
University of California, Los Angeles 
DIETZ, NAOMI G. (1960), Professor of Art 

B.S., Whitworth College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 
DITTMAN, ROGER R. (1964), Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.S., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University' 
of Southern California 

DOANE, KENNETH R. (1960), Professor of Education and Dean, School of Education 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, La Crosse; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

DONOGHUE, MILDRED R. (1962), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Detroit; Ed.D., University of California, 
Los Angeles 

DUERR, EDWIN (1964), Associate Professor of Drama 
B.A., University of California; M.A., Cornell University 
EARICK, ARTHUR D. (1960), Associate Professor of Geography and Chairman, Geography 
Department 

B.A., Indiana University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
EDWARDS, RICHARD A. (1964), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.A., Yale University 
EHMANN, GERHARD E. (1959), Dean of Educational Services and Summer Session, and 
Professor of Education 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Ed.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
ENELL, GEORGE O. (1965), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Pomona College; B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Southern 
California 

EPSTEIN, CYRIL R., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.A., Yale University 
ETUE, GEORGE E. (1963), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Union College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California 
EVJENTH, HENRY A. (1964), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College 
FAIA, MICHAEL (1964), Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., University of Chicago 
FARMER, MARJORIE M. (1965), Lecturer in English 
B.A., M.A., California State College at Fullerton 
FELDMAN, DAVID M. (1964), Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 
FELDMAN, ROBERT S. (1964), Assistant Professor of History 
B.S., Dlinois State University; M.A., Indiana University 


t On leave Spring 1966. 


265 


Faculty and Administration 


t FESSENDEN, SETH A. (1959), Professor of Speech and Chairman, Speech Department 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., New York University 
FIERMAN, MORTON C. (1963), Associate Professor of Education and Acting Chairman, 
Foundations of Education Department 

B.A., Western Reserve University; Hebrew Union College; M.A., Tulsa University; 

Ed.D., Arizona State University 

FLETCHER, ROBERT F. (1965), Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education 
B.A., M.A., San Diego State College 
FOREST, GEORGE C. (1965), Assistant Professor of Drama 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Art Institute of Chicago; B.M., M.M., Roosevelt University; Ph.D., Stanford 
University 

FOSTER, JULIAN F. S. (1963), Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A., M.A., New College, Oxford, England; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
FRANCIS, MICHAEL J. (1965), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Fort Hays Kansas State College 
FRIEND, GEORGE L. (1964), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Miami University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
FULTON, MARTIN W. (1965), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.A., M.A., Los Angeles State College; H.S.D., Indiana University 
FUSZEK, RITA M. (1964), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M., Butler University; M.M., Michigan State University 
FYFE, GORDON S. (1960), Assistant Professor of Marketing 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
GIACUMAKIS, GEORGE JR. (1963), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Shelton College; M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University 
GILBERT, RICHARD C. (1963), Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Harvard CoDege; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
GILDE, JOSEPH M. (1965), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
* GOLDEN, LORETTA (1961), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ed.D., Stanford University 
GOOD, KAYE M. (1963), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Washington State College; M.A., Long Beach State College 
GOODELL, ROBERT A. (1964), Associate Professor of Management 
B.A., Augustana College; M.A., Ph.D., State University of low'a 
GOULD, BETTY W. (1965), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., Fresno State College 
GRANELL, LEE E. (1960), Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., San Diego State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 
GRAVES, LEVERN F. (1960), Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Ph.D., University of California 

GRAY, J. JUSTIN (1961), Professor of Music and Acting Dean, School of Letters, Arts and 
Science 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music; D.Mus., University of 
Southern California 

GRAYSON, THERESA S. (1965), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., San Diego State College; Ph.D., University of California 
GREENWOOD, JOAN V. (1963), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 
HAAKER, ANNABELLE M. (1965), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D., Shakespeare Institute, 
University of Birmingham 

HARDMAN, O. CLYDE (1965), Lecturer in Accounting and Finance 
B.S., M.S., University of Utah 

HARRIS, ARLO D. (1965), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Dayton; Ph-D., Tulane University 


t On leave Spring 1966. 
* On leave 1965-66. 


266 


Faculty and Administration 

HARTSIG, BARBARA A. (1959), Professor of Education, Coordinator of Elementary Education 
and Chairman, Elementary Education Department 
B.A., Occidental College; M.S., University of Southern California; Ed.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

HAYDEN, MARY H. (1965), Instructor in English 

B.A., California State College at Fullerton; M.A., University of California at Riverside 
HAYNER, HELEN L. (1965), Librarian H 

B.A., State University of New York; B.S. in L.S., Syracuse University 
HAYNER, PAUL C. (1964), Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Union College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia University 
HEIN, RAYMOND (1961), Professor of Art 
B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College 
HEINZE, BETTY L. (1965), Instructor in English 

B.A., California State College at Fullerton; M.A., University of Southern California 
HELIN, RONALD A. (1963), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Miami University 
HODGES, ROBERT R. (1965), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., Stanford University 
HOKANSON, DON C. (1964), Lecturer in Physics 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
HOLMES, EMMA E. (1961), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., State University of Iowa 
HOSLEY, EDWARD H. (1965), Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., University of California; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
HOULGATE, LAURENCE D. (1964), Instructor in Philosophy 
B.A., Los Angeles State College 

HUSSAIN, KHATEEB M. (1963), Director of the Computer Center and Associate Professor of 
Marketing and Quantitative Methods 

B.S., Aligarh University, India; D.I.A., London University; Ph.D., University of California 
HYINK, BERNARD L. (1960), Vice President, Academic Affairs, and Professor of Political 
Science 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

IBRAHIM, AZMY I. (1964), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., University of Alexandria; Ph.D., University of Colorado 
IMHOFF, MYRTLE M. (1960), Professor of Education 

B.A., Harris Teachers College; M.A., St. Louis University; Ph.D., Washington University 
IVY, GREGORY D. (1965), Professor of Art and Chairman, Department of Art 
B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., Columbia University 
HERMAN, LINDA E. (1965), Librarian II 

B.A., Los Angeles State College; M. in L.S., University of California, Los Angeles 
JACOBSON, PERRY E., JR. (1963), Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Hamline University; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
JOHNSON, ELMER L. (1964), Professor of Physical Education, and Chairman, Health Educa- 
tion, Physical Education and Recreation Department, and Director of Athletics 
B.A., Moorhead State College; M.Ed., University of Minnesota; Ed.D., University of Southern 
California 

JOHNSON, RAYNOLDS (1961), Assistant Professor of Communication 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; M.A., Stanford University 
JONES, HAZEL J. (1960), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Western State College of Colorado; M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern California 
JORDAN, JAMES E. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Washburn University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California 
JORDAN, JOHN R. (1965), Instructor in Art 

B.A., M.F.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
JOUN, YOUNG P. (1965), Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Seoul National University; M.A., University of Washington 
KAPLAN, DONALD E. (1964), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Long Beach State College 
KARSON, BURTON L. (1965), Assistant Professor of Music 
B.A., M.A., D.M.A., University of Southern California 


267 


Faculty and Administration 


KASUN, JACQUELINE R. (1965), Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., University of California; M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University 
RERAN, DONALD W. (1961), Librarian III 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.S. in L.S., University of Southern California 
KERCIU, GEORGE R. (1963), Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 
KERSCHNER, LEE R. (1961), Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Georgetown University 
KETTERINGHAM, WILLIAM J. (1966), Assistant Professor of C^iography 
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Stanford University 
KILKER, DOROTHY K. (1965), Instructor in English 
B.A., M.A., California State College at Fullerton 
KINNEY, PAUL T. (1963), Associate Professor of Finance 

B.A., San Jose State College; Ph.D., University of Southern California 
KLASSEN, VURYL J. (1965), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Butler University; M.S., University of Arizona 
KLASSEN, VYRON M. (1965), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Butler University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
KLINE, WALTER D. (1963), Associate Professor of Spanish and Chairman, Foreign Languages 
and Literatures Department 

B.A., Indiana State Teachers College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

KRAVITZ, BERNARD (1961), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., Ed.D., University of California 
KUNI, MASAMI (1964), Lecturer in Drama 

B. Humanities, Matsue Kota Gakko University, Japan; Bungakushi, Tokyo Imperial University; 
Ph.D., Friedrich Wilhelm University 
LAFKY, JOHN D. (1963), Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., New Mexico State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas 
LAKE, JEANETTE M. (1964), Librarian II 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College: M.S., University of Southern California 
LANCE, WAYNE D. (1964), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Redlands; Ed.D., George Peabody College 
LANDON, JOSEPH W. (1960), Professor of Music and Chairman, Music Department 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ed.D., University of Southern 
California 

LANE, SYLVIA (1965), Associate Professor of Accounting and Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Southern California 
LANGE, IRENE L. (1965), Assistant Professor of Marketing 
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

LANGWORTHY, WILLIAM C. (1965), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Tufts University; Ph.D., University of California 
LAY, L. CLARK (1960), Professor of Mathematics Education 

B.S., Aurora College; M.A., University of Southern California; Ed.D., University of California, 
Los Angeles 

LEDER, HANS H. (1965), Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
B.A., New York University; M.A., Stanford University 
LEE, LOUISE G. (1964), Activities Adviser 
B.S., University of Wisconsin 

LEMMON, ROBERT A. (1963), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., M.A., Ohio State University 

LEPPER, MARY K. (1965), Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
LEPPER, ROBERT E. (1965), Associate Professor of Science Education 
B.S., M.A., San Jose State College; Ph.D., The Florida State University 
LEWIS, DANIEL G. (1963), Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., San Diego State College; M.A., Claremont Graduate School 
LINDLEY, RICHARD H., Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Ph.D., University of California 
LIU, GEORGE B. (1961), Librarian III 

B.A., Fresno State College; M.A., M.L.S., University of Illinois 


268 


Faculty and Administration 


LIVENGOOD, EDWARD B. (1960), Librarian II 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.S. in L.S., University of Southern California 
LONG, EMMETT T. (1959), Associate Dean of Students, Admissions and Records, and Associ- 
ate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Pepperdine College; B.A., M.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

JLYNN, ARTHUR W. (1962), Test Officer, Counseling and Testing, and Associate Professor of 
Education 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., Claremont Graduate School 
LYONS, JACK E. (1959), Business Manager 
B.A., University of Southern California 

t MASON, John B. (1960), Professor of Political Science and Chairman, Political Science 
Department 

B.A., Butler University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
MATHIEU, GUSTAVE (1960), Professor of French and German 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
MAUCH, ANNETTA B. (1965), Instructor in English 

B.A., Mexico City College; M.A., California State College at Fullerton 
MAXWELL, J. WILLIAM (1960), Professor of Communication and Chairman, Communication 
Department 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.S., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa 

t McCarthy, miles D. ( 1959), Dean, School of Letters, Arts and Science, Professor of Biology 
B.S., Westchester State Teachers College, Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
*McCLEARY, JAMES A. (1960), Professor of Botany 

B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
McCLOUD, LELAND W. (1962), Associate Professor of Quantitative Methods and Management 
B.S., M.S., North Texas University; Ph.D., University of Texas 
McCOLGAN, HARRY B. (1964), Instructor in Drama 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Northwestern University 
McCOMB, STUART F. (1959), Executive Dean and Professor of Education 

B.A., Arizona State University; M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern California; LL.D., Upper 
Iowa University 

McGARRY, EUGENE L. (1962), Assistant Professor of Education and Coordinator of Academic 
Advisement 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., State University of Iowa 
McKEE, KENT E. (1964), Assistant Professor of Business Law 
B.B.A., University of Toledo; LL.B., University of Michigan 
McNELLY, WILLIS E. (1961), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Central YMCA College; M.A., Loyola University (Chicago); Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 

MEND, MICHAEL R. (1965), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
MERRIFIELD, DORIS F. (1965), Assistant Professor of German 
M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas 
MICHALSKY, DONAL R. (1960), Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., University of Southern California; D.M.A., University of Southern California 
MONTANA, ANDREW F. (1963), Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chairman, Chemistry 
Department 

B.S., Seattle Pacific College; Ph.D., University of Washington 
MORRIS, THOMAS D. (1964), Financial Aids Officer and Assistant Professor 
B.A., M.Ed., Gonzaga University 

MORROW, JOSEPH E. (1965), Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Sacramento State College; Ph.D., Washington State University 
MORTON, HELEN L. (1963), CoUege Physician 

B.A., University of Nevada; M.D., Medical College of Virginia 


J On leave Spring 1966. 
t On leave Fall 1965. 

* On leave 1965—66. 


269 


Faculty and Administration 


NELSON, MAX (1965), Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of Akron; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
NEWBY, IDUS A. (1963), Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.A., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

NICHOLS, JOHN R,. JR. (1965), Associate Professor of Finance 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University « 

OBLER, PAUL C. (1962), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., American University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers LIniversity 
OLSEN, JOHN W. (1961), Professor of Art and Chairman, Division of Fine and Applied Arts 
B.Ed., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University 
OMALEV, ALEXANDER (1960), Associate Professor of Physical Education and Coach of 
Basketball 

B.A., M.S., University of Southern California 
ONORATO, MICHAEL P. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 
B.S., St. Peter’s College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
O’TOOLE, JOHN B. (1962), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Duquesne University; Lit.M., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
PALISI, BARTOLOMEO J. (1963), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

* PAN, DOROTHY (1964), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Universtiy of Oklahoma; M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Case Institute of 
Technology 

PASTOR, PAUL J. ( 1960), Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College; Ed.D., University of Oregon 
PENA, ERVIE (1963), Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., Mexico City College; M.A., University of Southern California 
PETALAS, URANIA C. (1965), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., San Fernando Valley State College 
PHILLIPS, DORIS G. (1965), Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Ph.D., University of California 
PHILLIPS, EARL H. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., California State College at Los Angeles 
PIVAR, DAVID J. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Millersville State College; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
PONTNEY, JACK A. (1961), Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
POORKAJ, HOUSHANG (1965), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., M.A., University of Southern California 
POVLOVICH, CHARLES A. (1960), Professor of History 

B.A., University of Kansas City; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

PRANGE, W. WERNER (1965), Assistant to the President 
B.A., Paedagogium, Bad Godesberg; Ph.D., University of Bonn 
PREBLE, KENNETH J., JR. (1963), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., University of Miami; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
PRENZLOW, CARL F. (1965), Lecturer in Chemistry 

B.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Washington 
PUTNAM, JACKSON K. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., University of North Dakota; Ph.D., Stanford University 
QUALLS, CLIFFORD R. (1964), Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Long Beach State College; M.A., University of California, Riverside 
RAMSAY, ORRINGTON C. (1960), Professor of English, Chairman, Division of Humanities and 
Chairman, English Department 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
REITH, GERTRUDE M. (1961), Associate Professor of Geography 
B.A., M.A., University of Washington; Ph.D., Clark University 
RICHARDSON, IVAN L. (1964), Professor of Political Science 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 

* On leave 1965-66. 


270 


Faculty and Administration 


ROBERTS, CECIL E. (1963), Librarian III 

B.A., M.A., University of Iowa; M.L.S., University of Illinois 
ROBERTS, FRANK L. (1961), Professor of Management and Marketing 

B.S., University of Arkansas; M.B.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
ROTHMAN, ALVIN M. (1964), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; D.Sc., The Johns Hopkins University 
RUDERSDORF, WARD J. (1963), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Wisconsin State College; M.S., Utah State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University 
t SAILOR, DANTON B. (1962), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
SALZ, PAULINA J. (1961), Associate Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 
SAMUELSON, GERALD D. (1962), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 
SANDBERG, ROLLIN T. (1964), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Alfred University; M.A., University of Buffalo; Ph.D., University of Arizona 
SASTRY, RAMA M. V. (1965), Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods 

B.A., Andhra University, India; M.A., Gujarat University; Ph.D., Iowa State University 
SCHICK, GUY A. (1964), Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S., M.S., Purdue University 

SCHILD, RICHARD J. (1965), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Wisconsin State University 

SCHMIDT, LOUIS G. (1961), Professor of Psychology and Chairman, Psychology Department 
B.S., Stout State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
SCHNEIDER, CLARENCE E. (1962), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

SCHULTZ, DEANNA L. (1965), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., University of California at Los Angeles; M.P.H., University of Florida 
SCOTT, MILDRED H. (1965), Registrar 
B.A., University of California 
SCOTT, SARI E. (1963), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University 
of Iowa 

SELLER, HOWARD J., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 
SHANER, RICHARD H. (1964), Housing Coordinator and Assistant Professor 
B.A., University of Missouri; B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary 
SHAPIRO, SHIRLEY (1965), Instructor in English 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of Washington 
SHAPLEY, CHARLES S. (1962), Associate Professor of French 
B.A., M.A,, Ph.D., University of California 
SHAUL, DONALD R. (1964), Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
SHIELDS, LORAN D. (1963), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of California, Riverside; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
SICA, MORRIS G. (1964), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ed.D., Florida State University 
SIEGFRIED, CLAUDE L. (1965), Lecturer in French 
Lie en Droit, University of Paris 
SILVERS, STUART (1965), Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgli 
SIMPSON, JOHN R. (1965), Public Information Officer 
B.S., M.S., University of Oregon 
SMITH, ALDEN (1964), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
SMITH, EDWARD W. (1964), Director of Development 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.S., University of Southern California 


t On leave Fall 1965. 


271 


Faculty and Administration 


SMITH, J. REX (1961), Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Phillips University; B.D., Yale University, Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Southern California 

SMITH, THEODORE H. (1960), Dean of School of Business Administration and Economics 
and Professor of Finance and Marketing 

B.A., Heidelberg College; M.B.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
SMITH, VICTOR V. (1962), Associate Professor of Art 
B.A., M.A., Long Beach State College 
SMYTHE, TED C. (1963), Assistant Professor of Communication 
B.S., Sterling College; M.S., University of Oregon 
SOMMER, MICHAEL H. (1965), Assistant Professor of Communication 
B.A., University of California; M.S., University of California at Los Angeles 
SPENCER, ROBERT E. (1964), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
STIEL, EDSEL F. (1962), Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
STOVALL, EULA M. (1965), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Colorado State College of Education; M.A., San Francisco State College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Southern California 

STUART, WALTER H. (1963), Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Harvard College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
SULLIVAN, JAMES E. (1965), Lecturer in Art 
B.A., M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

SUTTON, DONALD D. (1960), Professor of Biology and Acting Chairman, Biological Science 
Department 

B.A., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Davis 
SUTTON, IMRE (1964), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
THOMPSON, CECIL B. (1965), Lecturer in Economics 
B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
TEEL, ERIC A. (1966), Librarian II 

B.A., St. John’s College, Annapolis; M.S. in L.S., Western Reserve University 
THORSEN, DAVID O. (1960), Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Redlands; M.A., Occidental College 

TOLLEFSON, ARTHUR L. (1962), Associate Dean of Students, Counseling and Testing and 
Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., Concordia College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

TOWNSHEND-ZELLNER, NORMAN (1964), Professor of Economics and Chairman, Economics 
Department 

B.S., Ph.D., University of California 

TOY, ERNEST W., JR. (1959), College Librarian and Associate Professor of History 

B.A., College of St. TTiomas; M.S., University of Southern California; M.A., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

TREGO, JOHN W. (1964), Associate Professor of Management 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Temple University 
TSAI, LOH SENG (1965), Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Nanking University; M.S., Fuh Tan University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
TULL, DONALD S. (1961), Professor of Quantitative Methods, Economics and Marketing, and 
Chairman, Marketing and Quantitative Methods Department 
B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
1 UMAS, ELENA V. (1965), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Immaculate Heart College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 

TURNER, GEORGE C. (1960), Associate Professor of Science Education and Chairman, Science 
and Mathematics Education Department 

B.A., Stanford University; M.S., Utah State University; M.Ed., Eastern Washington College of 
Education; Ed.D., Arizona State University 
TOSSING, MARJORIE O. (1965), Lecturer in German 
B.A., Whittier College; M.A., Middlebury 
UNTERBERGER, BETTY M. (1961), Professor of History 

B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Radcliffe-Harvard; Ph.D., Duke University 


272 


Faculty and Administration 

UNTEREINER, WAYNE W. (1964), Professor of Anthropology and Chairman, Anthropology 
Department 

B.A., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
VALPEY, ROBERT G. (1965), Professor of Engineering, and Chairman, Engineering Division 
B.S., United States Military Academy; B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., University of 
Colorado; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

VAN CLEAVE, R. HAROLD (1965), Director of Extension and Coordinator of Evening Classes 
B.S., M.S., Indiana State University 
VAN DEVENTER, DAVID E. (1965), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Western Reserv'e University 
VAN GINNEKEN, EVA (1964), Assistant Professor of French 
B.A., M.A., Wayne University; Ph.D., Brown Universtiy 
VAUGHAN, RODGER D. (1965), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Kansas at Lawrence; M.Mus., University of Kansas at Wichita 
VINOD, HRISHIKESH D. (1965), Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.Com., B.M., College of Commerce, Poona, India; M.A., Delhi School of Economics 
WAGNER, M. JOHN (1964), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern University 
WALKINGTON, DAVID L. (1963), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.S., Arizona State University; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 
t WANG, PHYLLIS T. (1964), Librarian II 

B.A., Rockford College; M.A., University of Arkansas; M.S., Simmons College 
WARTER, JANET K. (1965), Lecturer in Biology 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
WATKIN, LAWRENCE E. (1965), Professor of English 
B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Harvard University 
WEYMAN, BRADLEY S. (1965), Placement Supervisor 
B.A., M.A., San Francisco State College 
WIGGINS, IRA L. (1965), Lecturer in Biology 

B.A., Occidental College; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 
: WINNIE, WILLIAM W. (1965), Lecturer in Geography 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Horida 

WISEMAN, DORSEY E. (1961), Professor of Accounting and Finance and Chairman, Account- 
ing and Finance Department 

B.S., West Virginia University; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois; C.P.A. 

WITCHEY, RONALD L. (1965), Instructor in Physical Education 
B.A., Denison University; M.Ed., Bowling Green State University 
WOO, JOHN C. U. (1962), Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.A., National University, Nanking, China; M.A., San Francisco State College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of California 

WORKS, ERNEST (1964), Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Arkansas A.M. & N. College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
YOUNG, JAMES D. (1960), Professor of Drama and Chairman, Drama Department 
B.S., Pepperdine College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California 
ZAMMITT, NORMAN C. (1965), Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Otis Art Institute 

ZELTZER, ALLEN M. (1963), Assistant Professor of Drama 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 


t On leave Fall 1965. 

+ On leave Spring 1966. 


273 


PART-TIME FACULTY 
1965HS6 


AGRANOWITZ, ALEEN (1966), Assistant Professor of Speech 
B.S., Worcester State Teacher’s College 
ASH, EDWARD C. (1962), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern California 
AUSTIN, JACKSON J. (1965), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., M.S., Kansas State Teachers College 
BEAMER, EDWIN (1964), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S., State College, Indiana, Pennsylvania; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 
BEECHER, LLOYD (1965), Graduate Assistant of Histor>’ 

B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
BERNHAGEN, ROBERT (1966), Graduate Assistant of History 
B.A., California State College at Long Beach 
BERTHA, BRIAN A. (1965), Instructor of Finance 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.B.A., University of California at Berkeley 
BLANK, LANE (1966), Assistant Professor of Business Statistics 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of California at Los Angeles 
BLAU, LEONARD I. (1966), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A., California State College at Los Angeles 
BOELTER, CAROL Y. (1964), Lecturer of Music 

B.A., San Diego State College; M.M., University of Southern California 
BOND, THOMAS G. (1964), Instructor of Marketing 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.B.A., Arizona State University 
BRADY, MELVIN (1963), Assistant Professor of Marketing 

B.S., University of Utah; M.B.A., University of Southern California 
BUNCH, LARRY L. (1964), Graduate Assistant of Psychology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
CANFIELD, MARILYN (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
CANNON, JOHN P. (1962), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., C^ifomia State College at Long Beach; M.A., Mexico City College; Ph.D., University 
of Mexico 

CHETRON, MARTIN R. (1965), Assistant Professor <rf Management 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.B.A., University of Southern California 
COCHRUM, ELLEN J. (1962), Instructor of Russian 
COLLINS, CHARLENE S. (1966), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.S., University of Arizona 

COMP, ALLAN (1965), Graduate Assistant of History 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
CONRAD, GLADYS K. (1965), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Washington University; M.A., M.D., University of Wisconsin 
CORBIN, ROSS (1965), Lecturer of Drama 
COURTER, GENE W. (1966), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.S., Central Michigan University; M.A., University of Michigan 
COX, MIRIAM (1961), Assistant Professor of English 
B.S., Utah State University; M.S., University of Idaho 
DASTYCK, RICHARD D. (1966), Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.S., Northwestern University 
DEMES, STANLEY B. (1964), Librarian II 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; A.M., Washington University; M.S. in L.S., 
University of Southern California 
DERUGIN, GEORGE (1965), Associate Professor of Russian 

B.S., Russian-German Secondary, Berlin; M.A., Ph.D., Friedrich Wilhelm University 


274 


Part-time Faculty 


DESFOR, DONALX) M. (1966), Associate Professor of Art 

A. B., University of Southern California; M.A., Califrania State College at Long Beach 
DISIDERIO, ANTHONY R. (1965), Lecturer of Music 

B. M.E., M.M.E., University of Michigan; D.M.A., University of Southern California 
DRAPKIN, ETHEL (1965), Instructor of French 

B.A., Brooklyn College 

EELLS, MURRAY (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.S., California State Polytechnic College 
FISHER, JOEL M. (1966), Lecturer of Political Science 

B.S., University of Southern California; M.A., University of California at Berkeley 
FOREST, ELIZABETH (1965), Instructor of Speech 
B.F.A., M.F.A., Art Institute of Chicago 
FORLEY, MAURICE (1962), Associate Professor of Speech 
Ph.B,, Yale College; J.D., Northwestern Law School 
FRANKEL, DEXTRA L. (1964), Assistant Professor of Art 
GRANT, WILLIAM E. (1965), Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., University of Denver; M.S., California State College at Long Beach 
GUSSOW, MARGARET B. (1962), Librarian II 

B.A., Queen’s University; M.S.C. in L.S., University of Southern California 
GUST, ERNEST (1965), Graduate Assistant of History 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
HAIL, JOEL (1965), Lecturer of Physics 

B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.S., Iowa State University 
HALDEMAN, WILLIAM K. (1965), Lecturer of Music 

B.A., Upland College; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D., Eastman School of Music 
HAMILTON, KENNETH (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.S., Bates College 

HARRIS, RALPHE W. (1963), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., University of Louisville; M.S., Kent School of Social Work 
HAVEN, DAVID F. (1964), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., University of Redlands 

HAYS, DONALD (1963), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Arizona State College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
HEMANN, RAYMOND G. (1965), Lecturer of Business Statistics 
B.S., Florida State University 

HOLDEN, DANIEL W. (1962), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.S., University of California; LL.B., Loyola University 
HOLDGRAFER, COURTLAND (1964), Instructor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., California State College at Long Beach 
HOLTRUST, MARGARET (1965), Graduate Assistant of Political Science 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
HOOPER, JEFFERSON (1965), Assistant Professor of Finance 
B.S., McMurray College; M.A., Sul Ross State College 
HUNTINGTON, JOHN (1965), Instructor of Art 
B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
HURT, JAMES (1965), Graduate Assistant of Art 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
KARRENBROCK, RODGER E. (1964), Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.S., M.B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
KELLER, ALVIN (1965), Lecturer of Drama 

B.A., University of CaUfomia at Los Angeles; M.F.A., Yale University 
KINCAID, DESMOND (1965), Lecturer of Music 

B.A., University of California at Santa Barbara; M.A., University of Washington 
KING, THOMAS (1964), Lecturer of Physics 
KIRBY, STANLEY D. (1965), Lecturer of Physics 
B.S., Arizona State University 
KRAUZE, MARINA (1966), Instructor of Russian 
B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 


275 


Part-time Faculty 


LAGERSTROM, JAMES R. (1966), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of California; B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary; M.A., University of 
Southern California 

LAKE, ERNEST G. (1963), Professor of Education 

B.A., Montana University; Ed.M., Ed.D., Harvard University 
LARSON, THALIA (1964), Instructor of Speech 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., California State College at Long Beach 
LAWRENCE, JOHN E. (1965), Instructor of Communications 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; B.P.A., Art Center School 
LIEDLICH, RAYMOND D. (1961), Assistant Professor jf English 

B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Los Angeles State College 
LOGAN, PATRICIA (1965), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
LYNN, JOANNE L. (1964), Instructor of English 
B.A., Pomona College 

MANOOGIAN, LORRAINE (1966), Instructor of Geography 
B.A., M.A., San Fernando Valley State College 
MARCUS, SHIRLEY, (1965), Lecturer of Music 
B.M., University of Southern California 
McCarthy, warren F. (1963), Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Harvard University; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
McCarthy, frank (1965), Lecturer of Music 
B.A., San Diego State College 
McKinney, DOYLE G. (1963), Lecturer of Speech 

B.S., Southwest Missouri State; M.A., Northwestern University 
MeSHERRY, ELIZABETH (1966), Assistant Professor of Art 
B.S., M.A., Columbia University Teacher's College 
McWilliams, Robert G. (1964), instructor of Finance 
B.S., Boston College; M.B.A., Harv'ard University 
MEHR, NORMAN H. (1965), Lecturer of Music 

BA., Birmingham Southern College; M.A., Teachers Ck)llege at Columbia University 
MILLS, JIMMY T. (1964), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.M.Ed., Midwestern University 
MYRES, BRIAN C. (1964), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
NICHOLS, E. RAY (1966), Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

ODELL, ROBERT M. (1966), Lecturer of Political Science 

A.B., Washburn University; M.P.A., Maxwell Graduate School at Syracuse University 
OLEYAR, RITA D. (1964), Instructor of English 

A. B., Seton Hill College 

PATTERSON, PIERCE (1959), Assistant Professor of Education 

B. S., Montana State College; M.A., San Diego State College 
PAUL, JOAN S. (1965), Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., California State College at Sacramento 
PETERSON, TENOLD (1965), Instructor of Art 
B.A., M.A., California State College at Long Beach 
PHILIPP, DONALD A. (1965), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; M.A., University of Minnesota 
PIERNO, ANTHONY R. (1961), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.A., Whittier College; LL.B., Stanford Law School 
RANSFORD, H. EDWARD (1965), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Occidental College; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 
RAVEN, NANCY (1965), Instructor of Art 
B.A., California State College at Long Beach 
REZ, JAMES M. (1965), Lecturer of Political Science 
B.A., Occidental College 

RILEY, GLYNDON D. (1964), Assistant Professor of Speech 
B.A., M.A., Pepperdine College; Ph.D., Florida State University 


276 


Part-time Faculty 


ROEMMICH, OTTO (1966), Professor of Education 

B.S., Jamestown College; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ed.D., University of Southern 
California 

ROTHMAN, JERRY (1963), Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Otis Art Institute 

SABINS, FLOYD (1965), Assistant Professor of Geology 
B.S., University of Texas; Ph.D., Yale University 
SCHOENHERR, ALLAN (1965), Lecturer of Biology 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern California 
SCHMIDT, MERCEDES W. (1962), Librarian II 

B.M., Northwestern University; M.A., University of Illinois 
SCHUTZ, HOWARD G. (1963), Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Illinois; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology 
SEIBEL, ROBERTA V. (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
SILVER, ROBERT E. (1965), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., Ed.D., University of Washington 
SMITH, DEBORAH K. (1964), Assistant of Art 

A. B., California State College at Long Beach 

STACK, GENEVIEVE C. (1965), Assistant Professor of Education 

B. A., B.S., Oklahoma College for Women; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Ed.M., Mills 
College 

TERRY, REX N. (1964), Instructor of Spanish 
B.A., M.A., Brigham Young University 
TORESDAHL, DAVID (1965), Graduate Assistant of Art 
B.A., Mankato State College 

TUCKER, ROY T. (1963), Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., M.A., Ohio State University 
VAUPEL, JAMES A. (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., University of California at Berkeley 
VENITSKY, JULIETTE L. (1964), Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A., California State College at Long Beach 
WADE, RUTH S. (1965), Graduate Assistant of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Colorado 
WALKUP, FAIRFAX P. (1964), Lecturer of Drama 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., University of Utah 
WEIDERT, CARL L. (1965), Graduate Assistant of Biology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
WELDS, MAURICE W. (1964), Assistant Professor of Management 
B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Columbia University 
WHEELER, OSBORNE R. (1959), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Washington; Ed.D., University of Southern California 
WILSON, HOWARD S. (1965), Assistant Professor of Business Education 
B.S., University of California at Los Angeles; M.A., Stanford University 
WILSON, WEBSTER D. (1963), Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A., Ed.D., University of California 
WULFING, MARY (1965), Graduate Assistant of Psychology 
B.A., California State College at Fullerton 
YARBOUGH, RHODA (1965), Instructor of Accounting 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; LL.B., University of Southern California 
YURKOWSKY, WILLIAM (1965), Assistant Professor of Business Statistics 
B.S., Ohio State University; M.B.A., Western Reserve University 


PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS COOPERATING IN 
STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM 1965 

ANAHEIM CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Barbara Alman, Gayel Arason, Sally Baines, Hallan Berry, Helen Betts, Irene Chun, Sue 
Claus, Julie Douglas, Betty Elliott, Sallie Jo Funk, Sue Funkhauser, Margaret Haugh, Bette 
Hayes, Sue Karnopt, Jean Laube, Mary Messecar, Joanne Plummer, Sylvia Shuler, Mary Smith, 
Marian Wenker 

ANAHEIM UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

A1 Baker, Deni Bomschlegel, Rex Boyer, Genevieve Brown, Charlotte Charbonneau, Ventura 
Cornejo, Clifford Crews, Harvey Croft, Gerald Curry, Jerry DiCarlo, Hildegard Evans, Bruce 
Hamilton, George James, Les Johnson, Robert Linn, Robert Rawlings, Thomas Stannard, Peg 
Taylor, Norman Terkelson, Harry Weston 
BREA SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Peggy Cole, Virginia Erb, Elizabeth French, Marjory Hathcock, Leotta Hitt, Rowena Larsen, 
lone Salzer, Marion Withey 

BREA-OLINDA UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Charles Cookson 

BUENA PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Adeline Civretta, Diane Coffee, Jiggers Garner, Peggy Hayes, Patricia Kennard, Winifred 
Robling, Elizabeth McFarland, Constance Tonsend, Christine Wieseltier. 

CAPISTRANO UNIHED SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Jane Cimolino, Virginia Severs 
CENTRAUA SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Harriett Britton, Y. Hing Fong, Dick Gabryth, Margaret Harvey, Betty Saunders, Claire Schultz, 
Leslie Shane 

COSTA MESA UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Lillian Austin, Donna Carpenter, Harry G. Earle, L. Pauline Gardner, Arlene Kirk, Jill Kuli, 
Judy Mitchell, Josephine Pitton, Joan Rea, Arlene Roby, Alan Schwalbe, Marie Stanley, Rose- 
mary Stewart, Susan Stinchlfield, Sharon Walters, Alan Wilkinson, Lenore Wilson, Jane Wyman 
COVINA-V ALLEY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Joana Atkinson, Carol Bennewitz, Clarissa Butler, Wilma Chapman, Dorcille May, Joan Pierce 
FULLERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Maxgaret Bortz, Juneva Brown, Janet Chadwick, Virginia Demise, Helen Dorn, Crusa Ferrara, 
Katherine Gabrielse, Patricia Haag, Lois Horton, Violet Johnson, Mary Jane Kofford, Margaret 
Kretzchmar, Joyce Lang, Barbara McIntosh, Blanche Melgren, Eilene Miller, J. C. Morris, 
Melinda Morris, Judy Obermayr, Marjorie Pogue, Sibyl Potts, Ann Robillard, Emile Smyth, 
Thelma Spaulding, Marguerite Spitzer, Dorothy Young, Phyllis Ziemer 
FULLERTON UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Louis Armijo, Norma Beebower, Joann Bennett, William Campbell, Margaret Chaconas, David 
L. Coerper, Bonnie Coghill, James Crippen, John Dewey, Charles Fein, G. Jack Fisk, Frank 
Ford, George Fowler, George Francisco, Elizabeth Prates, Marvin Freitag, Pernell Gault, John 
Hamilton, Thomas Hewiston, Darwin Johnson, Duane Johnson, Duncan Johnson, Jr., Lindell 
Jones, Elizabeth Joy, Theophilc Karem, Anne Kline, Donald Knorr, Sachiko E. Kusachi, Margery 
Lash, Robert Linn, Matthew Mantz, Alfred Matzer, Charles Peters, Lee Quigley, Aria D. Smith, 
Rex Terry, Robert Tomes, Helen Walther, Norma Wilson, Robert Wood, James Young 
GARDEN GROVE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Jessie Dobson, Lou Floodman, Nina Griffin, Margaret Heinisch, Cecilia Jones, William Meyers. 
Donita Reynolds, Stuart Rogers, Sybil Ward, Emma Williams 
LA HABRA CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Victoria Ducote, Betty Eddy, Ruth Fehr, Mark Fowler, Florence Gaspee, Phyllis Glass, Eileen 
Hogue, Ruth Lengyl, Reita Lutz, Jeanne Morgan, Ardyth Nobbe, Ann Prestridge, Nadine 
Proud, Nina Ralston, Ann Schweizer, Marie Smith 
LOWELL JOINT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Viola Holiday, Amy Ishizu, Ken Matias, Ruth Neil, Harriett Nelson, Florence Noriega, Sid 
Norris, Ann Packer, Shirley Patterson, Florence Rhoads, Orena Roach, Pattiann Schepmann, 
Mollie Schwantz, Maxine Swaim, Doretta Wedin, Evelyn Wright 
NEWPORT HARBOR UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Robert Wentz, Francis Wright 

NORWALK-LA MIRADA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Evelyn Oilman, Kathryn Rai>er, Toni Sims, Constance Smith 


278 


Cooperating Public School Teachers 


ORANGE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Eulyne Anrecht, Marilyn Arbenz, Leah Bailey, Mary Bishop, Robert Casias, Jeannette Clark, 
Beverly Cole, Marjorie Cutler, Jo Ditmore, Joan Edman, Sharon Foster, Pauline Herstein, 
Alfrida Hull, Dorothy James, Glenda Johnson, Joyce King, Violet Kjer, Katherine LaBee, 
Norma Lewis, Tony Nash, Shirley Rather, Marjorie Reid, Jack Rowe, Forrest Shattuck, Leo 
Snedaker, June Solow, Dolores Weiss, Wilma Witman 
PLACENTIA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Marvin Briggs, Thomas Byrnes, Helen Chuvarsky, Emilie Disen, Vickie Duft, Miriam Dutcher, 
Elizabeth Graffis, Vera Graves, Gayle Hickok, Frances Johnston, Robert Jones, Valerie Jorgenson, 
Erma Lofing, Irene Long, Gloria Mackie, Dale Malone, Jack Meadows, Duane Mendel, Anthony 
Miscione, Carol Norman, Joan O’Dale, Mary Schmidt, Kay Schneider, Judy Sherman, Robin 
Sindorf, Barbara Vignone, Winifred Walker 
SANTA ANA UNIHED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

John Bouchard, Barbara Boyd, Melvin Garrison, Virginia Johnson, John Lippeatt, Barbara 
McDonald, Marjorie Sewell 
SAVANNA SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Jean Hylton, Corlyss Squier 
TUSTIN UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICl 

Caroline Keller, Mary Martire, Ken Turknette, Donald Wagoner 
YORBA LINDA SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Jack Forney, Marguerite Stanton 


279 


INDEX 


Academic advisement, 54 
Academic Standards Committee, 25 
Accounting courses, 236 
Accreditation, 28 
Administration, 15 
college, 23 
departments, 24 
divisions, 24 
schools, 24 
Admission, 43 

application for, 43, 45 
cancellation of, 46 
from nonaccredited colleges, 45 
health requirements for, 47 
honors at entrance, 46 
of auditors, 45 
of foreign students, 45 
of freshmen, 43 
of graduates, 45 
of nonresidents, 44 
of summer session students, 46 
of undergraduate transfers, 44 
on academic probation, 45 
readmission, 46 
to credential programs, 46 
to the college, 43 

undergraduate entrance testing, 46 
Advanced placement, 49 
Advisement, academic, 54 
Advisory board, 15 
Advisory councils, 16 
Announcement of courses, 157 
Anthropology, 75, 159 

bachelor of arts degree, 75 
courses, 159 
department, 75 
minor, 76 
Art, 76, 161 

bachelor of arts degree, 77 
courses, 161 
department, 76 

education courses, 78, 146, 166 
master of arts degree, 79 
minor, 79 

Athletics, 34, 154, 258 
Audiovisual services, 31 
Bachelor’s degree, general requirements, 62 
Biological science, 80, 166 
bachelor of arts degree, 81 
courses, 166 
department, 80 
master of arts degree, 82 
minor, 82 

Business administration, 131, 236 
bachelor of arts degree, 132 
courses, 236 
school of, 131 
majors, 132 
master’s degree, 134 
Business education, 133 
courses, 238 
major, 133 
Calendar, 5, 6 

California State Colleges, 14 
Campus Planning Committee, 25 
Chancellor’s Office, 13 


Change of program, 50 
Chemistry, 83, 171 

bachelor of arts degree, 83 
courses, 171 
department, 83 
minor, 84 

Classification in college, 57 
College curricula, 71 
Committees of the college, 24 
Communication, 86, 174 
bachelor of arts degree, 87 
courses, 174 
department, 86 
minor, 88 

Comparative literature, 99 
courses, 177 
Computer center, 31 
Concurrent enrollment, 50 
Conferences, 30 
Continuous residency, 59 
Correspondence courses, 48 
Counseling, 38 
Course numbering codes, 158 
Credential programs, 46, 142 
Credit 

acceptance of, 48 
advanced placement, 49 
by examination, 49 
by challenge, 49 
correspondence course, 48 
extension course, 48 
for military service, 48 
transfer, 47 
unit of, 57 

Curriculum Committee, 25 
Dean’s list, 60 
Discipline, 60 
Disqualification, 60 
Drama, 89, 178 

bachelor of arts degree, 90 
courses, 178 
department, 89 

master’s degree in spjeech with 
drama emphasis, 91 
minor, 91 

Economic Education Center, 33 
Economics, 137, 238 

bachelor of arts degree, 137 
courses, 238 
department, 131 
minor, 138 
Education, 139 

credential programs, 46, 142 
courses, 249 
publications, 152 
school, 141 

Educational services committee, 26 
Elementary education, 142, 249 
courses, 249 

elementary school teacher education, 142 
Engineering, 124, 234 
Advisory Council, 16 
bachelor of science degree, 124 
courses, 234 
division, 124 


281 


INDEX— Continued 


English, 91, 181 

bachelor of arts degree, 92 
courses, 181 
department, 91 
education courses, 185 
master of arts degree, 93 
minor, 93 
Enrollment, 57 
concurrent, 50 
definitions, 57 

Entrance examinations, 43, 44, 46, 47 
Evaluations, 47 
Evening Classes, 29 
Examinations, 58 

credit by (challenge), 49 
final, 58 

Extension program, 30 
Faculty, 25, 26, 263 
Affairs committee, 26 
council members, 25 
council standing committees, 25 
directory, 263 
personnel committee, 26 
Fees, 51 

Finance courses, 242 
Financial aids, 38 

Foreign language, 94, 185, 190, 198, 

217, 220, 226 
credential programs, 95 
education courses, 185 
majors, 94 
minors, 94 

Foreign languages and literatures, 94 
bachelor of arts degree, 94 
department, 94 
master of arts degree, 95 
Foreign students, 38, 45 
Foundation, 32 

advisory council, 17 
board of trustees, 25 
California State College, 32 
Foundations of education, 141 
courses, 251 
French courses, 185 
General education, 62 
Geography, 96, 187 

bachelor of arts degree, 96 
courses, 187 
department, 96 
teaching minor, 97 
Geology, 190 
courses, 190 
German courses, 190 
Good standing, 46, 59 
C^vernmental Studies Center, 33 
Grade reports, 58 
Grading system, 57 

Graduate students general information, 45, 64 
Graduate policies, 67 

admission, nonaccredited schools, 45 
assistantships, 68 
coursework over 7 years old, 68 
graduate credit for seniors, 67 
international study, 38 
leave of absence, 59 
minimum full-time load, 57 
standards for graduate study, 68 
waiver of nonresident tuition fee, 68 
waiver of prerequisites, 67 


Graduation requirements, 62, 64 
Health education courses, 257 
Health requirements, 47 
Health services, 35 
History, 97, 192 

bachelor of arts degree, 97 
of the college, 27 
courses, 192 
department, 97 
master of arts degree, 98 
teaching minor, 98 
Honors, 46, 60 
at entrance, 46 
dean’s list, 60 
at graduation, 60 
Housing, 35 
Humanities, 99, 177 
Advisory council, 18 
bachelor of arts degree, 99 
Incomplete work, 58 
Independent study, 158 
International programs, 38 
Intramural activities, 35 
Journalism education courses, 198 
Junior college teacher education, 146 
Language laboratory, 95 
Late registration, 50 
Latin courses, 198 
Leave of absence, 46, 59 
Library, 30 
library committee, 26 
Loans, 39 

Management courses, 243 
Marketing courses, 244 
Master’s degree general requirements, 64 
Mathematics, 100, 198, 200 
bachelor of arts degree, 100 
courses, 198 
department, 100 
education courses, 200 
minor, 101 
Music, 102 

bachelor of arts degree, 104 
courses, 201, 206 
department, 102 
education courses, 206 
master of arts degree, 108 
minor, 107 

Objectives of the college, 27 
Orientation, 50 
Parking fees, 52 
Part-time faculty, 274 
Petition, 61 
Philosophy, 109, 207 

bachelor of arts degree, 109 
c-ourses, 207 
department, 109 
minor, 110 

Physical education, 154, 258 
bachelor of science degree, 154 
courses, 258 
minor, 155 

Physical science courses, 209 
Physics, 110, 210 

Bachelor of arts degree, 110 
courses, 210 
department, 110 
minor. 111 


282 


INDEX— Continued 


Placement services, 36 
Political science, 113, 212 
bachelor of arts degree, 113 
courses, 212 
department, 113 
master of arts degree, 115 
teaching minor, 115 
Portuguese courses, 217 
Premedical committee, 26 
Preprofessional committees, 26 
President’s cabinet, 24 
Probation, academic, 60 
admission on, 45 
Professional committees, 26 
Professional education, 146 
Psychology, 115, 218 

bachelor of arts degree, 115 
courses, 218 
department, 115 
master of arts degree, 116 
Quantitative methods courses, 247 
Readmission, 46 
Real estate research, 33 
Recreation courses, 261 
Registration, 50 
Regulations, election of, 59 
Repetition of courses, 58 
Research centers and clinics, 33 
Residence, 59 
Right of petition, 61 
Russian courses, 220 
Scholarships, 38 
School services courses, 252 
Science Advisory Council, 18 
Science education courses, 221 
Science and mathematics education depart- 
ment, 117 

Secondary education courses, 255 

secondary school teacher education, 144 
Selective Service, 51 
Social sciences, 118, 223 
education courses, 223 
master of arts degree, 118 
Social welfare courses, 223 


Sociology, 119, 223 

bachelor of arts degree, 119 
courses, 223 
department, 119 
master of arts degree, 120 
teaching minor, 120 
Spanish courses, 226 
Speech, 121, 229 

and hearing clinics, 33 
bachelor of arts degree, 121 
courses, 229 
department, 121 
master of arts degree, 123 
minor, 122 
Student activities, 34 
athletics, 34 
conduct, 61 

intramural and extramural, 34 
news bureau, 34 
organizations, 34 
publications, 34 
Student Affairs Committee, 26 
personnel services, 34 
Study list limits, 57 
Summer sessions, 30 
Teacher education, 142 
admission, 46 
advisory council, 19 
committee, 26 

Teaching credential statutory requirements, 
142 

Testing, 38 
Transcripts, 43, 52 

1 rustees of the California State Colleges, 1 1 
Undergraduate 
admission, 43 

enrollment in graduate level courses, 57 
testing, 38, 46 
transfers, 44 
Units 

for graduation, 63 
of credit, 57 
resident, 63 
Veterans, 50 
Withdrawal 

from college, 59 
grades, 58, 59 


O 


printed in California office of state printing 
3-66 17,500 


A 66198—701 


NOTES 


NOTES 


NOTES 


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