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CALIFORNIA 


STATE 
COLLEGE 
FULLERTON 
CATALOG 1971-72 

* / •. A 

/ . r, 

J r 5 

■ ■ , '• ■ / 





GENERAL CATALOG 


1971-72 



CALIFORNIA STATE 
COLLEGE, FULLERTON 

800 North State College Boulevard, Fullerton, California 
(714 ) 870-2011 92631 


All material herein is subject to change without prior notice 
Effective Date: September 20, 1971 


COMPLIMENTARY COPY 















- 

































TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION — College Calendar 8, California State Colleges 
5, California State College, Fullerton 15, The College: An Overview 26, 
Student Services and Activities 41 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, RECORDS AND REGULATIONS— 51 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS— Bachelor's Degree 73, Master's Degrees 77 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT— 85 

COLLEGE CURRICULA— 91 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS— 99 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS— 141 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION— 173 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING— 225 

ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS— 247 

DIVISION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY AND SPECIAL STUDIES— 257 

SCHOOL OF LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCES— 273 

DIVISION OF LIBRARY SCIENCE— 435 


DIRECTORIES— 441 







THIS CATALOG 

Within this catalog may be found general academic and administrative informa- 
tion as well as specific descriptions of the departments, their majors and the 
courses offered in each. The first major part contains orienting information such 
as the calendar, materials on the California State Colleges, a listing of individuals 
and groups participating in the governance of the college, an overview of Cali- 
fornia State College, Fullerton and facts about student services and activities on 
the campus. 

The subsequent sections of the catalog are concerned with: admission, registra- 
tion, records and regulations; academic advisement; and college courses. The next 
sections, organized by schools and divisions, describe the departments and the 
programs of study and courses they offer. The final part of the catalog contains 
directories with information on advisory councils, auxiliary' organizations, and the 
faculty' and administration. An index can be found at the end to help the reader 
locate specific items he needs or wishes to know about. 

Because this catalog must be prepared well ahead of the academic year it covers, 
changes in some programs and rules occur. The class schedule (and subsequent 
errata sheets) are the final authority in regard to classes offered, instructors and 
revisions of regulations. This publication can be bought for a small fee from the 
Titan Bookstore. 

This year a number of revisions have been made in the contents, format and 
organization of the catalog. The academic and administrative departments of the 
college provide the materials on their own programs and activities. Two college 
committees, one in 1969 chaired by Professor Joseph Gilde and a currently func- 
tioning group led by r Professor Martin Klein, have worked on restructuring and 
improving this catalog. Students and faculty' from the Department of Communi- 
cations have done much of the work on restyling this catalog with the help of 
the staff from the Audiovisual Services Department. Ronald Bayhan of the Depart- 
ment of Art designed the cover, and Charlie Gibbs took most of the photographs. 
The final organizing and editing was done by Doris Carlton and Way'ne Untereiner 
in the Office of Academic Planning and Jill Case and Jerry Keating in the Office 
of Public Affairs. 


6 





COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 1971-72 


1971 


JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 IS 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


S M 


JULY 

T W T 


ta 


1 2 
8 9 


F S 


6 7 

12 13 14 15 16 
18 19 20 21 22 23 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 

10 

17 

24 

31 


AUGUST 

T W T F S 

3 4 5 6 7 

10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

SMT W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 0 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 28 30 


S M 


OCTOBER 

T W T F 

1 

5 6 7 8 
J12 13 14 15 
19 20 21 22 
24 25 26 27 28 29 

31 


S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


Class** 


8 


SUMMER SESSION 1971— First Session 

May 10, Monday- 

June 4, Friday Inclusive dates for early regis- 
tration for summer session 

June 21, Monday.. First summer session begins— 

registration and classes 

July 5, Monday Independence Day holiday — all 

offices closed 

July 30, Friday First summer session ends 

SUMMER SESSION 1971— Second Session 

August 2, Monday Second summer session begins — 
registration and classes 

September 6, 

Monday Labor Day holiday; all offices 

closed; no instruction 

September 10, 

Friday Second summer session ends; 

effective date of graduation for 
those completing baccalaureate 
requirements 

FALL SEMESTER 1971 


November 1, 1970 

Initial period for filing applications for admis- 
sion to the fall semester 1971 begins for all new 
students and former students not in attendance 
during the spring semester 1971. All applications 
received by November 30 will have equal con- 
sideration for inclusion in enrollment quotas. 
Applications will continue to be accepted after 
November 30 for consideration in any unfilled 
category within the policies of the statewide 
common admissions program. 


September 20, 
Monday 


September 24, 
Friday 


September 27, 
Monday 


Academic year begins. Advise- 
ment, orientation and registra- 
tion week begins. See class 
schedule for details 

Last day to register without 
late registration fee. Application 
deadline for baccalaureate de- 
gree candidates for graduation, 
June 1972 and September 1972 

Instruction begins 


NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 S 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1972 


S M 


JANUARY 

T W T 


3 4 
10 11 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 


S 

1 

8 

15 


2 
9 

16 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


S M 


FEBRUARY 

T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 [2j] 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 


S M 


MARCH 
T W T 
1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 
12 13 14 15 16 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


F S 

11 

17 18 



October 11, Monday Columbus Day holiday— all of- 
fices closed. No instruction 

October 25, Monday Veterans Day holiday — all of- 
fices closed. No instruction 

November 1, 

Monday Deadline for January 1972 mas- 

ter’s degree candidates to re- 
quest a graduation check 

November 25-26, 

Thursday-Friday Thanksgiving recess — all offices 
closed 

December 20, 

Monday Winter recess begins 

January 3, Monday Instruction resumes 

January 19, 

Wednesday Last day of classes 

January 20-21, 

Thursday-Friday Kxamination study days 

January 24, Monday Semester examinations begin 

January 28, Friday Semester examinations end; se- 
mester ends. Effective date of 
graduation for those completing 
requirements 

SPRING SEMESTER 1972 


August 2, 1971 

Initial period for filing applications to the 
spring semester 1972 begins for all new students 
and former students not in attendance during 
the fall semester 1971. All applications received 
by August 31 will have equal consideration for 
inclusion in enrollment quotas. Applications 
will continue to be accepted after August 31 
for consideration in any unfilled category 
within the policies of the statewide common 
admissions program. 


February 7, Monday Semester begins. Advisement, 

orientation, and registration 

week begins 

February 10, 

Thursday Last day to register without late 

registration fee. Application 

deadline for baccalaureate de- 
gree candidates for graduation 
January 1973 

February 14, Monday Instruction begins 

February 21, Monday Washington’s Birthday holiday 
— all offices closed. No instruc- 
tion 


■ Classes 


9 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


7 

14 

21 

28 


1 2 3 4 5 

8 9 10 11 12 

15 16 17 18 19 

22 23 24 25 26 

29 30 31 


6 

13 

20 

27 


JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


25 


19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


S M 


2 

9 

16 

23 


JULY 

T W T 


F S 


3^4J 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 


30 31 [ 


S M 


6 

13 

20 

27 


AUGUST 
T W T 


12 3 4 
7 8 9 10 11 
14 15 16 17 18 
21 22 23 24 25 
28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 
M T W T F 

1 

7 8 


305 


6 


2 
9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


■ Classes 


March 1, Wednesday Application deadline for June 
1972 and September 1972 mas- 
ter’s degree candidates to re- 
quest a graduation check 

March 27, Monday Spring recess begins 

April 3, Monday Instruction resumes 

April 13, Thursday Martin Luther King, Jr., me- 
morial observance 

May 8, Monday- -Early registration for summer 

session begins 

May 29, Monday Memorial Day holiday — all of- 

fices closed. No instruction 
May 31, Wednesday Last day of classes 
June 1-2, 

Thursday-Friday Examination study days 


June 5, Monday Semester examinations begin 

June 9, Friday Semester examinations end. Se- 

mester ends. Effective date of 
graduation for those completing 
requirements 

June 9, Friday Commencement 


SUMMER SESSION 1972— First Session 


May 1, Monday- 

May 29, Monday Inclusive dates for early regis- 
tration for summer session 

June 19, Monday First summer session begins — 

registration and classes 

July 4, Tuesday Independence Day holiday — all 

offices closed. No instruction 

July 28, Friday First summer session ends 


SUMMER SESSION 1972 — Second Session 

July 31, Monday Second summer session begins 
— registration and classes 

September 4, 

Monday Labor Day holiday; all offices 

closed; no instruction 

September 8, 

Friday Second summer session ends; 

effective date of graduation for 
those completing baccalaureate 
requirements 


10 



TRUSTEES 

OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


lx Officio Trustees 

Hon. Ronald Reagan State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Governor of California and President of the Trustees 

Hon. Ed Reinecke State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Lieutenant Governor of California 

Hon. Wilson Riles 721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento 95814 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Hon. Bob Moretti State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Speaker of the Assembly 

Glenn S. Dumke 5670 Wilshire 

Chancellor of the California State Colleges Boulevard, Los Angeles 90036 

Appointed Trustees 

Appointments are for a term of eight years expiring March 1 on dates in paren- 
theses. Names are listed in order of accession to the board. 

Charles Luckman (1974) 

9220 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 90069 
Mrs. Philip Conley (1972) 

3729 Huntington Boulevard, Fresno 93702 
E. Guy Warren (1973) 

P.O. Box 59, Hayward 94541 
Daniel H. Ridder (1975) 

604 Pine Avenue, Long Beach 90801 
George D. Hart (1975) 

111 Sutter Street, San Francisco 94104 
Alec L. Cory (1973) 

530 B Street, Suite 1900, San Diego 92101 
William A. Norris (1972) 

609 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles 90017 
Edward O. Lee (1974) 

P.O. Box 23361, Oakland 94623 
Karl L. Wente (1976) 

5565 Tesla Road, Livermore 94550 
Dudley Swim ( 1976) 

Route 2, Box 5000, Carmel Valley Road, Carmel 93921 
W. O. Weissich (1977) 

1299 Fourth Street, San Rafael 94901 
Robert A. Hornby (1978) 

P.O. Box 60043 Terminal Annex, Los Angeles 90060 
Mrs. Winifred H. Lancaster (1977) 

P.O. Drawer JJ, Santa Barbara 93102 
Wendell W. Witter (1979) 

45 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 94106 
William McColl (1979) 

1433 West Merced Avenue, West Covina 91790 
Gene M. Benedetti (1978) 

8990 Poplar Avenue, Cotati 94952 


li 


Trustees 


Officers of the Trustees 


Governor Ronald Reagan 
President 

E. Guy Warren 
Chairman 


Alec L. Cory 
Vice Chairman 

Chancellor Glenn S. Dumke 
Secretary -T reasurer 


12 


OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 
OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles 90036 
213 938-2981 


Glenn S. Dumke 

Harry E. Brakebill 

Norman L. Epstein 

D. Dale Hanner 

Harry W. Harmon 

C. Mansel Keene 

William B. Langsdorf 


Chancellor 

Executive Vice Chancellor 

: Vice Chancellor and General Counsel 

Vice Chancellor, Business Affairs 

Vice Chancellor, Physical Planning and Development 

Assistant Chancellor, Faculty and Staff Affairs 

Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 


13 


THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


California State College, Bakersfield 
9001 Stockdale Highway 
Bakersfield 93309 
Paul F. Romberg, President 
803 833-2011 

California State College, Dominguez 
Hills 

1000 East Victoria Street 
Dominguez Hills 90247 
Leo F. Cain, President 
213 532-4300 

California State College, Fullerton 
800 North State College Boulevard 
Fullerton 92631 
L. Donald Shields, President 
714 870-2011 

California State College, Hayward 
25800 Hillary Street 
Hayward 94542 
Ellis EL McCune, President 
415 538-8000 

California State College, Long Beach 
6101 Blast Seventh Street 
Long Beach 90801 
Stephen Hom, President 
213 433-0951 

California State College, Los Angeles 
5151 State College Drive 
Los Angeles 90032 
John A. Greenlee, President 
213 224-0111 

California State College, 

San Bernardino 
5500 State College Parkway 
San Bernardino 92407 
John M. Pfau, President 
714 887-6311 

California State Polytechnic College, 
Kellogg- Voorhis, Pomona 
3801 West Temple Avenue 
Pomona 91766 

Robert G Kramer, President 
213 964-6424 

California State Polytechnic College, 
San Luis Obispo 
San Luis Obispo 93401 
Robert EL Kennedy, President 
805 546-0111 


Chico State College 
Chico 95926 

Stanford Cazier, President 
916 345-5011 
Fresno State College 
Shaw and Cedar Avenues 
Fresno 93726 

Norman A. Baxter, President 
209 487-9011 
Humboldt State College 
Areata 95521 

Cornelius H. Siemens, President 
707 826-3011 

Sacramento State College 
6000 J Street 
Sacramento 95819 
Bernard L. Hyink, President 
916 454-6011 
San Diego State College 
5402 College Avenue 
San Diego 92115 
Malcolm A. Love, President 
714 286-5000 

San Fernando Valley State College 
18111 Nordhoff Street 
Northridge 91324 
James W. Cleary, President 
213 349-1200 

San Francisco State College 
1600 Holloway Avenue 
San Francisco 94132 
S. I. Hayakawa, President 
415 469-9123 
San Jose State College 
125 South Seventh Street 
San Jose 95114 
John H. Bunzel, President 
408 294-6414 
Sonoma State College 
1801 East Cotati Avenue 
Rohnert Park 94928 
Thomas H. McGrath, President 
707 795-2011 
Stanislaus State College 
800 Monte Vista Avenue 
Turlock 95380 
Carl Gatlin, President 
209 634-9101 


14 


THE CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES 


Academic year 1971-72 marks for the California State Colleges the beginning of 
their second decade of service to the people of California as a unified system of 
public higher education — the largest such system in the Western Hemisphere and 
one of the largest in the world. Brought together as a system under an independ- 
ent Board of Trustees as a result of the Donahoe Higher Education Act in the 
early 1960s, the California State Colleges now number 19, covering the state from 
Humboldt State College in the north to San Diego State College in the south. 
Current enrollment exceeds 244,000 full- and part-time students, with a faculty 
of approximately 14,000. 

Responsibility for the California State Colleges is vested in the Board of Trustees, 
whose members are appointed by the Governor, and the Chancellor, who is the 
executive officer of the system. The Trustees and the Chancellor develop system- 
wide policy, with implementation taking place at the campus level. The Academic 
Senate of the California State Colleges, made up of elected representatives of the 
faculty from each college, recommends academic policy to the Board of Trustees 
through the Chancellor. 

Each college in the system has its own unique geographic and curricular char- 
acter, but all emphasize the liberal arts and sciences. Programs leading to the 
bachelor’s and master’s degrees are master-planned to anticipate and accommodate 
student interest and the educational and professional needs of the State of Cali- 
fornia. A limited number of joint doctoral programs are also offered. Although 
there is increasing recognition of the importance of research to the maintenance 
of quality teaching, the primary responsibility of the faculty continues to be the 
instructional process. 

While San Jose State College, the oldest, was founded over a century ago, prior 
to World War II only seven State Colleges were in existence, with a total enroll- 
ment of 13,000. Since 1947, 12 new colleges have been established, and sites have 
been selected for additional campuses in Ventura, San Mateo and Contra Costa 
counties. California State College, Bakersfield, the newest, was opened to students 
only last year. Enrollment in the system is expected to pass 400,000 by 1980. 


15 


California State College, Fullerton 


ADVISORY BOARD 

The California State College, Fullejton Advisory Board consists of community 
leaders interested in the development and welfare of the college. The board serves 
the President in an advisory capacity, particularly in matters which affect college 
and community relations. Members are nominated by the President and appointed 


by the Board of Trustees for terms of four years. 

EL B. Buster, Chairman 

Vice President, West Coast, Townsend Company Santa Ana 

William J. McGarvey, Jr., Vice Chairman 

McGarvey-Thompson Realty, Inc. — Fullerton 

Arnold O. Beckman 

Chairman of the Board, Beckman Instruments, Inc. Corona del Mar 

Mrs. Nicholas A. Bcgovich Fullerton 

Donald S. Bums 

President, Don Burns, Inc. — Volkswagen Corona del Mar 

H. L. Jack Caldwell 

Partner, Baker and Caldwell Newport Beach 

C. Stanley Chapman 

Chapman Ranch Fullerton 

Rodney (Bud) Coulson Anaheim 

Lcland C. Launer 

Partner, Launer, Chaffee and Hanna Fullerton 

Charles A. Pearson 

Anaheim Truck and Transfer .. Anaheim 

Philip S. Twombly 

Executive Vice President, VIM Corp. Fullerton 

Harold M. Williams 

Dean, School of Business, UCLA .. Beverly Hills 


GOVERNANCE 

Governance on the campus level at California State College, Fullerton is the 
responsibility of the President and his administrative staff. Working closely with 
the President arc a number of faculty and student groups w'hich initiate, and 
review and recommend for approval college programs, policies and procedures. 
Although the President is vested with the final authority on all college activities, 
the traditions at Fullerton have been to encourage maximum faculty and staff 
participation in campus decision-making and governance. Increasingly, students are 
becoming involved and active, too, and some student representatives are found on 
most college, school, and departmental committees and policy-making bodies. 



16 


COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 


President 

Executive Assistant 


L. Donald Shields 


Director of Facility Planning 
Building Coordinator 


Chief of Plant Operation 

Director of Public Affairs and Publications Manager 

Contracts and Grants Assistant — 

Vice President, Administration 


James B. Sharp 
Milton C. Blanchard 
Beryl E. Kcmpton 

Jerry J. Keating 

Helen C. Carter 


Executive Assistant to the Vice President, Administration; 
Coordinator of Community Relations; and 

Director of Conferences and Institutes 

Personnel Officer _ 

Personnel Management Specialist 

Coordinator for Campus Police, Safety and Security 

Foundation Manager 

Vice President, Academic Affairs 

Administrative Assistant — 

Dean, School of the Arts 

Dean, School of Business Administration and Economics 

Dean, School of Education 

Dean, School of Engineering 

Dean, School of Letters, Arts and Sciences 


Robert E. Sandoval 
Kenneth W. Todd 
Marie M. Hoffman 
Russell J. Kccley 
Walter J. Dennison 
Miles D. McCarthy 
Doris B. Carlton 
J. Justin Gray 


Jack W. Coleman 
(Acting) Ida S. Coppolino 

Robert G. Valpcy 

Hazel J. Jones 

Director of Office of Faculty Records Lois S. Herron 

Associate Vice President, Academic Services and 

Academic Planning 

Dean of Continuing Education 

Administrative Assistant, Evening Classes 

Dean of Graduate Studies- _ 

Administrative Assistant 1 

Director of Academic Advisement 

Director of Instructional Media 

Audiovisual Services Department 

Division of Health Education/Physical Education/ 

Rccreation/Athletics 


Wayne W. Untcrciner 
Gerhard E. Ehmann 
James T. Mavity 
Giles T. Brown 
Virginia P. Davis 
Otto J. Sadovszky 
Allen M. Zeltzer 
Raymond E. Denno 


Division of Interdisciplinary and Special Studies 

Division of Library Science 

College Librarian 

Bibliographic Services Department 

Reader Services Department 

Processing Services Department 


Paul J. Pastor 

Paul C. Oblcr 

Doris H. Banks 

Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 
Donald W. Keran 
Barbara E. Davis 
Herta D. Fischer 


Eugene L. McGarry 
Ralph Emerson Bigelow 


.Associate Vice President, Academic Administration 

Dean of Admissions and Records 

Associate Dean of Admissions and Records, and 

Director of Relations with Schools and Colleges Emmett T. Long 

Director of Admissions-. Mildred H. Scott 

Associate Director of Admissions and Registrar John B. Sw'ccney 

Associate Director of Admissions and Records Gregory D. Vermillion 

Director of Institutional Research Kenneth R. Doane 

Director of Computer Center Gene H. Dippel 

Director of Academic Staffing Services John D. Parker 

Dean of Students _ (Acting) Charles W. Buck 

Administrative Assistant Ronald Langdon, Jr. 

Director of New Educational Horizons 

Associate Dean of Students and Director of 
Counseling Center.. 


Clinical Psychologist, Mental Health 


(Acting) Edward Jacobson 
Anthony R. Hybl 


17 


Schools, Divisions and Departments 


Psychiatric Counselor- 

Counselor 

Counselor 

Counselor 

Counselor 

Counselor 

Counselor 


Lincoln Shumate, M.D. 
Daniel T. Kawakami 

Arthur W. Lynn 

Jack Russell 

— Treva R. Sudhalter 

Frances C. Nardi 

Nathaniel L. Simms 


Counselor and Adviser to International Students Louise G. Lee 

Testing Program Supervisor and Research Analyst Howard K. Morton 

Psychometrist Roberta F. Browning 

Associate Dean of Students and Director of 
Judicial Affairs and Special Projects 
Assistant Director of Judicial Affairs 

and Special Projects 

Associated Students Administrator and Director 

of Student Activities — 

Associate Director of Student Activities „ 


James L. Catanzaro 
William J. Reeves 


Assistant Director of Student Activities. 


William G. Pollock 

James H. Gallaher 

Harvey A. McKee 

Assistant Director of Student Activities Terre Ann Stier 

Director of Housing - ... Thomas H. Urich 

Residence Hall Director David Brown 

Director of Placement Services Fmest A. Becker 

Placement Supervisor Mary G. Condon 

Placement Supervisor Eva C. Jensen 


Director of Financial Aids 

Director of Student Health Center 

Staff Physician 

Staff Physician 

Staff Physician 
Staff Physician.. 


Thomas D. Morris 

William H. Wickett, Jr., M.D. 

Arthur E. Alne, M.D. 

Robert J. McFerran, M.D. 

Iris O. Moremen, M.D. 

Helen L. Morton, M.D. 

Staff Psychiatrist. Robert A. Rounds, M.D. 

Staff Physician Edward L. Russell, M.D. 

Staff Dermatologist- Norman A. Soderquist, M.D. 

Staff Physician Harrec Siler, M.D. 

Staff Physician. Edwin B. Whiting, M.D. 

College Business Manager — Thomas A. Williams 

Administrative Assistant Dennis C. Wharton 

Budget Analyst — — Robert G. Fecarotta 

Accounting Officer Glenn R. Mitchell 

Procurement and Support Services Officer — Paul H. Rodet 

SCHOOLS, DIVISIONS AND DEPARTMENTS 


J. Justin Gray, Dean 
Gerald D. Samuelson 
Masami Kuni 
...Leo E. Kreter 
Alvin J. Keller 


School of the Arts 

Art Department 

Dance Department 

Music Department. 

Theatre Department 

School of Business Administration and Economics Jack W. Coleman, Dean 

John W. Trego, Associate Dean 
James K. Hightower, Associate Dean 

Accounting Department.. Robert A. Meier 

Economics Department John D. Lafkv 

Finance Department B. E. Tsagris 

Management Department- Donald R. Shaul 

Marketing Department Frank L. Roberts 

Ben C. Edmondson 


Quantitative Methods Department- 

18 


Schools, Divisions and Departments 


School of Education (Acting) Ida S. Coppolino, Dean 

Donald E. D. Pease, Associate Dean 

Behavioral Sciences in Education Department — —Calvin C. Nelson 

School Administration/Social Foundations Department Ernest G. Lake 

Teacher EdocttlOO Department Bernard Kravit/ 

School of Engineering Robert G. Valpey, Dean 


Faculties 

Gvil Engineering/Engineering Mechanics George C. Chiang 

Electrical Engineering Eugene B. Hunt 

Mechanical/ Aerospace Engineering Floyd W. Thomas, Jr. 


School of Letters , Arts and Sciences Hazel J. Jones, Dean 

James D. Young, Associate Dean 
William C. Langworthy, Associate Dean 


Afro-Ethnic Studies Department- 

American Studies Department 

Anthropology Department , 

Biological Science Department 

Chemistry Department — 

Chicano Studies Department — ~ 

Communications Department 

English Department 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Department 

Geography Department 

History Department 

Linguistics Department 

Mathematics Department 

Philosophy Department 

Physics Department 

Political Science Department. 

Psychology' Department 

Religious Studies Department 

Science and Mathematics Education Department 

Sociology' Department 

Speech Communication Department 


Michael A. Finnic 

David J. Pivar 

Hans H. Leder 

Donald B. Bright 
Carl F. Prenzlow 

Robert Serros 

J. William Maxwell 
Joan V. Greenwood 
Walter D. Kline 

Ronald A. Helin 

— B. Carmon Hardy 
David M. Feldman 

.Edsel F. Stiel 

Paul C. Hayner 

Fred M. Johnson 

Charles G. Bell 
Ernest H. Dondis 
Donald H. Gard 

George C. Turner 

Ernest Works 

Lee E. Granell 


Division of Health Education/Physical Education/ 

Recreation/ Athletics — Paul J. Pastor, Chairman 

Athletics Department John E. Caine 

Physical Education Department Eula M. Stovall 


Division of Interdisciplinary and Special Studies Paul C. Obler, Chairman 


Programs and Directors 

Interdisciplinary Center Paul C. Obler 

Environmental Studies William C. Langworthy 

Latin American Studies William J. Kcttcringham 

Master of Arts Degree in Social Science _ George Giacumakis, Jr. 

Russian Area Studies Robert S. Feldman 

Technological Studies Barry E. Gerber 

Urban Studies —Arthur D. Earick 


Division of Library Science 


Doris H. Banks 


19 


COLLEGE COMMITTEES, 1970-71 


President's Cabinet 

L. Donald Shields, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
George O. Enell 
George L. Friend 
Larry L. Green 


Faculty Council 

George L. Friend, Chairman 
Lcland J. Bcllot, Vice Chairman 
Gerald C. Marley, Secretary 
Harvey P. Grody, Treasurer 
Natalie Barish 
•David N. Brown 
Jack \V. Coleman 
Sherwood P. Cummings 
Ben C. Edmondsen 
George O. Enell 
Robert S. Feldman 
Rita M. Fuszek 
Donald H. Gard 
George Giacumakis, Jr. 

•Robert A. Goulart 
JLevern F. Graves, ex officio 
•Richard R. Hopkins 
•Andrea G. Johnson 
Hazel J. Jones 
Jesa H. Kreiner 
•Charles M. Loveless, ex officio 
Miles D. McCarthy 
Edith L. McCullough 

Staff Council 

Larry L. Green, Chairman 

Charles Rcdmon, Vice Chairman 

Gloria A. Dwinell, Secretary 

Margaret H. Chase, Treasurer 

Kay M. Adams 

Patricia A. Ainsworth 

John W. Anderson 

Don J. Boos 

Isabelle L. Burleigh 

Juan R. Casas 

Myrl A. Conklin 

Jane Estes 

George L. Friend, ex officio 
Phyllis J. Harley 
Laela E. Hendrikse 


Jerry J. Keating 
•Charles M. Loveless 
Miles D. McCarthy 
James B. Sharp 
John W. Trego 
Thomas A. Williams 


Kent E. McKee 
Robert B. McLaren 
E. Ray Nichols, Jr. 
Ervie Pena 
Joyce E. Pickersgill 
Houshang Poorkaj 
John E. Reynolds, Jr. 
•Brent F. Romney 
Herbert C. Rutemiller 
Donald A. Sears 
Howard J. Seller 
L. Donald Shields 
Dudley A. Stier 
JEric A. Teel, ex officio 
Eva R. Van Ginneken 
David L. Walkington 
Margaret S. Woyski 
Michael Yessis 
James D. Young 
Allen M. Zeltzer 
t Charles A. Povlovich 
Parliamentarian 


Julie A. Ireland 
Elaine R. Lekich 
Catherine V. Lisej 
Margaret McKenna 
Virginia T. Miller 
Kathy S. Morton 
Leroy Page 
Joan L. Perkins 
Beverly’ A. Roberge 
Toby L. Shumaker 
DeAun R. Stone 
Joseph Theus, Jr. 

Kenneth W. Todd, ex officio 
John W. Trego, ex officio 
Dale J. Trust 
LaVonne I. Virbila 


* Student. 

t Member of Statewide Academic Senate, 
t Nonvoting. 


20 


College Committees 


Campus Planning Committee 

L. Donald Shields, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker 
Jack C. Emmons, College Facility 
Planner , Office of the Chancellor 
George L. Friend 
Charles M. Loveless 
Miles D. McCarthy 

Academic Affairs Cabinet 

Miles D. McCarthy, Chairman 

Doris H. Banks 

Ernest A. Becker 

Ralph E. Bigelow 

Giles T. Brown 

Doris B. Carlton 

Jack W. Coleman 

Kenneth R. Doane 

Gerhard E. Ehmann 

James C. Fleming 

George L. Friend 

J. Justin Gray 

James K. Hightower 

Graduate Council 

Giles T. Brown, Chairman 
Doris H. Banks 
George 1. Cohn 
Anne T. Feraru 
J. Justin Gray 

Student Personnel Services Cabinet 

Ernest A. Becker, Chairman 
Ralph Emerson Bigelow 
Bruce Bimey 
Charles W. Buck 
Max W. Burke 
James L. Catanzaro 

Student-Faculty Athletics Board 

Frank L. Roberts, Chaintian 
John E. Caine, Executive Secretary 
Ernest A. Becker, ex officio 
Robert C. Belloli 
•Gregory S. Bishop 
James L. Catanzaro 

Student-Faculty Public Events Board 

•James L. Fitzpatrick, Chairman 
Ernest A. Becker, ex officio 
Herbert W. Booth 
•John C. Braithwaite 
John H. Bryden 


• Student. 


Howard H. Morgridge, Consulting 
Architect 
John VV. Olsen 
James B. Sharp 
John W. Trego 
Wayne W. Untereiner 
Thomas A. Williams 


Emma E. Holmes 
Hazel J. Jones 
William C. Langworthy 
Emmett T. Long 
Eugene L. McGarry 
Paul C. Obler 
Charles A. Povlovich 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 
Wayne W. Untereiner 
Robert G. Valpey 
James D. Young 
Allen M. Zeltzer 


James K. Hightower 

Emma E. Holmes 

Miles D. McCarthy, ex officio 

Alvin H. Rothman 

James D. Young 


Emmett T. Long 

Thomas D. Morris 

David L. Perrault 

William G. Pollock 

Dudley A. Stier 

William H. Wickett, Jr., M.D. 


•Eugene F. Hains 
•Gerald N. Page 
Paul J. Pastor 
William G. Pollock 
Danton B. Sailor 


James L. Catanzaro 
George O. Enell 
Morton C. Fierman 
•Willard R. Haynes 


21 


College Committees 


Student-Faculty Publications Board 

Sally R. Romotsky, Chairman 
J. William Maxwell, Executive 
Secretary 

Gordon M. Bakken 
t Ernest A. Becker, ex officio 
f James L. Catanzaro 
•Steven C. Eddy 
James L. Gilmore 
tMary A. Koehler 
tjerry J. Keating 


•fjoy M. Mellen 
•tSylvia J. Onalfo 
tWayne E. Overbeck 
•t Andrea S. Peterson 
tWilliam G. PoUock 
tjoseph W. Sawicki 
•Ginger L. Sumrall 
•Richard H. Vallens 
•tLori E. Zink 


Student-Faculty Lecture Series Committee 

•James L. Fitzpatrick, Cochairman 
•Lance S. Powers, Cochairman 
Ernest A. Becker, ex officio 
•Samuel C. Bordeaux 
Donald B. Bright 
Samuel J. Cartledge 


James L. Catanzaro 
•Dennis E. Crooks 
•William J. Flores 
Lucy M. Keele 
Jerry Lemorex 
Araminta A. Little 


t Nonvoting. 
* Student. 


Standing Committees 


STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
COUNCIL 1970-71 


Academic Standards 

Eugene L. McGarry, Chairman 
•Daniel M. Estrada 
•Robert L. Fitzgerald 
Sundaram Krishnamurthy 
Gerald C. Marley, ex officio 

All-College Faculty Personnel 

Bayard H. Brattstrom, Chairman 

Ida S. Coppolino 

George L. Friend, ex officio 


•Brent F. Romney 
John B. Sweeney, ex officio 
David E. Van Deventer 
Eva R. Van Ginneken 


Paul C. Hayner 
Herbert C. Rutemiller 
Edsel F. Stiel 


Computing Facilities and Institutional Research 


Wen Mou Chou, Chairman 
Charles W. Buck 
George C. Chiang 
Gene H. Dippel, ex officio 
Kenneth R. Doane, ex officio 
•Henry V. Eggers 

Curriculum 

Alvin H. Rothman, Chairman 
Giles T. Brown, ex officio 
•Anthony G. Espinoza 
George L. Friend, ex officio 
•Barrett A. Hill 
Hazel J. Jones 


Pat N. Lackey 
Kent E. McKee 
Louis G. Schmidt 
•Leslie M. Tacger 
Allen M. Zeltzer, ex officio 


William J. Kctteringham 
Irene L. Lange 
•Jean M. Liebhard 
Jackson K. Putnam 
Gerald D. Samuelson 
Wayne W. Untereiner, ex officio 


Educational Development and Innovation 


Deborah S. Osen, Chairman 
•Stanwood C. Johnson 
•Charles M. Loveless, ex officio 
Miles D. McCarthy, ex officio 
Kenneth L. McWilliams 

Educational Services 

J. Bryan Moffet, Chairman 
Gerhard E. Ehmann, ex officio 
Joyce Flocken 
George L. Friend, ex officio 

Elections 

Frances I. Mathews, Chairman 
James P. Alexander 
Granville W. Hough 

Faculty Affairs 

David L. Walkington, Chairman 
W. Garrett Capune 
Haney P. Grody, ex officio 
Barbara A. Harris 


R. Kirk Mee 
*H. Lyndon Porter 
•Margaret M. Saito 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr. 
Margaret S. Woyski 


James K. Hightower 
Donald W. Keran 
•Gerald C. Upson 
•Andrea G. Johnson 


Dorothy K. Kilker 

Jesa H. Kreiner 

Gerald C. Morley, ex officio 

Gertrude M. Reith 


Sidney Klein 
Edith L. McCullough 
Jerry V. Pickering 


Student. 


23 


Standing Committees 


Fiscal Affairs and Statewide Issues 

Joyce E. Pickersgill, Chairman 
John W. Bedell 
Ben C. Edmondson 
Levern F. Graves, ex officio 
Louise G. Lee 
•John P. Norton 

International Education 

Donald B. Bright, Chairman 
Giles T. Brown, ex officio 
•Bulbul Alibulla 
Joan V. Greenwood, ex officio 
Walter D. Kline 
Louise G. Lee, ex officio 

Library 

Nelson E. Woodard, Chaiarman 
•Anita M. Castro 
George L. Friend, ex officio 
Rita M. Fuszek 

Research 

George Giacumakis, Jr., Chairman 
Walter J. Dennison, ex officio 
J. Justin Gray 
Linda E. Herman 
Emma E. Holmes 


•Dan G. Ryan 
Eric A. Teel, ex officio 
John W. Trego, ex officio 
•W. William Whiteside 
Thomas A. Williams, ex officio 


•Kenneth E. Murphy 
Ruth A. Nycum 
Houshang Poorkaj 
•Bcmd F. Reumann 
Mildred H. Scott, ex officio 


Jane W. Hipolito 
Marvin J. Rosenberg 
Ernest W. Toy, Jr., ex officio 
•Leo B. Hurd 


Calvin C. Nelson 
Rita D. Oleyar 
L. Donald Shields, ex officio 
Robert E. Spenger 
Norman Townshend-Zellner 


Student Affairs 

•Gregory S. Bishop, Chairman 
James A. Baur 
Ernest A. Becker, ex officio 
Thomas W. Laga 
Michael T. Lyon 


George A. Mastroianni 
•Connie G. O’Braun 
# C. Barry Rosenfeld 
•Enrique H. Zuniga 
George L. Friend, ex officio 


The President of the college and the chairman of 
ex officio members of all faculty committees. 


the Faculty Council are 


* Student. 


\ 


24 


ASSOCIATED STUDENTS 


Executive Officers 

Charles M. Loveless, President Patricia J. Ducey, Executive Secretary 

Charles L. Rough, Jr., Controller 


Administrative Officers 

William G. Pollock, Administrator 

Senate 

Brent F. Romney, Speaker 
Doug Ammerman 
Brent W. Bailey 
•Leland J. Bcllot 
Gregory S. Bishop 
David N. Brown 
Lawrence S. Dickman 
Jimmie R. DeBosc 
Daniel M. Estrada 
Robert A. Goulart 


CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE 

Board of Trustees 

Hilton L. Dalessi, President 
Orville F. Recht, Vice President 
Margaret A. Twombly, Secretary 
Richard M. Wagner, Treasurer 
•Sidney Baldwin 
•Ernest A. Becker 
*L. Jack Bradshaw 
t Charles M. Loveless 
Thomas A. Mathew 

Administrative Officers 

Walter J. Dennison, Foundation 
Manager 


James H. Gallahcr, Associate 
Administrator 

Richard R. Hopkins 
Andrea G. Johnson 
Stan wood C. Johnson 
Larry A. Lindelof 
Johanna Mathewson 
•David L. Perrault 
C. Barry Rosenfield 
Dan G. Ryan 
Richard D. Sherwood 
James D. Spear 
James W. Thornton 

FULLERTON FOUNDATION 


David L. Palmer 
•Orrington C Ramsay 
\ Brent F. Romney 
•William C. Rubenstein 
Clarence J. Schwartz 
Robert M. Shaughnessy 
# L. Donald Shields 
•John W. Trego 


Douglas W. Pittman, Bookstore 
Manager 


25 


THE COLLEGE: AN OVERVIEW 


PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The main functions of an institution of higher learning are to disseminate and 
advance knowledge. The philosophy which guides an institution can limit or pro- 
mote the successful achievement of these objectives. Therefore, from its inception, 
the college has directed its educational program toward the fullest possible devel- 
opment of the individuals who participate in it. For both faculty and students this 
entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, a comprehensive rather than 
a narrow approach to major areas of study, and a concern with research and other 
creative activity. 

The college holds to the belief that an enduring educational experience must be 
founded upon exploration of our cultural heritage, through basic studies in the 
liberal arts and sciences, and that it can and should at the same time prepare for 
success in a chosen occupation or profession. Accordingly, the required general 
education program has as its objective the development in each student of: 

1. The effective use and interpretation of the written and spoken language. 

2. An understanding of the wide range of human endeavor and accomplishments 
in liberal arts and sciences, their interrelationships, and the various choices 
and values they represent. 

3. An understanding of information and principles in some areas of the liberal 
arts and sciences in sufficient depth to encourage critical and creative thought 
and expression. 

4. A spirit of inquiry into the past and into the future, in order to cope with 
conditions in the continually changing world. 

5. An understanding of the rights, privileges and responsibilities of citizenship 
in the community and nation, and of effective participation in today’s world. 

In addition, the college requires of all students who are candidates for a degree— 
whatever their special purpose — the pursuit of a subject major. 

(For specific details, see page 74.) 

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT 

California State College, Fullerton was the 12th State College in California 
to be authorized by the Legislature. The following year, 1958, resulted in the 
designation of a site in northeast Fullerton, and 1959 saw the purchase of the site, 
the appointment of Dr. William B. Langsdorf as the founding president, the 
selection of the first staff, and the planning for the opening of the new college 
in the fall. Orange County State College started classes for 452 full-time and 
part-time students in September, 1959, using leased quarters for its administrative 
offices on the Fullerton Union High School campus and for its classrooms at 
Fullerton’s Sunny Hills High School. In the fall of 1960, the college opened 
classes on its own campus where it occupied 12 temporary buildings. The name 
changed to Orange State College in July, 1962, to California State College at 
Fullerton in July, 1964, and to California State College, Fullerton in July 1968. 
The first permanent building, the six story Letters and Science building, was 
occupied in 1963. 

Today, there are many dramatic evidences of additional, very rapid growth. 
Nine permanent buildings have been completed. The enrollment of students was 
14,149 in the fall of 1970 when Dr. Langsdorf relinquished the presidency to 
accept an appointment as the vice chancellor for academic affairs of the California 
State Colleges and Dr. L. Donald Shields was named the acting president. Since 

26 


Natural and Cultural Ecology 


1963, the curriculum has expanded to include lower division work and many 
graduate programs. More than $50 million already has been invested in land, 
buildings and equipment — a sum expected to increase appreciably by the 1980s when 
the college is due to reach its projected peak enrollment of nearly 30,000. 

During this rapid growth, the college also has achieved a growing reputation 
for academic excellence. California State College, Fullerton began this spectacular 
development at a period when the citizens and government of California were 
revising and greatly expanding their commitments to quality public higher educa- 
tion. The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960 established the California State 
Colleges as a system under an independent Board of Trustees, redefined the func- 
tions of the State Colleges, and related them to both the community colleges and 
to the University of California system. In this atmosphere of public support, Cali- 
fornia State College, Fullerton was the first of the State Colleges to submit and 
secure approval for a five-year master curricular plan and one of the first three to 
secure approval of a master building plan and one that was able to think in terms 
of its ultimate enrollment objectives from the beginning. During the same period, 
Orange County was experiencing its own unprecedented growth. 

In 1969-70, it became apparent that colleges and universities statewide and 
nationally were entering a new period of development. Growing financial problems 
on all levels of government, mounting criticisms of contemporary educational 
policies and practices, and a loss of much public support for education were 
symptomatic of much deeper and more widespread problems and changes in our 
society and its schools. In the context of what increasingly seemed to be the 
emergence of a new, and in many ways, different type of culture and world, the 
colleges and universities (like other major institutions) were acutely experiencing 
the confusions and conflicts such basic and rapid cultural transformations generate. 

Like other colleges and universities, California State College, Fullerton, currently 
is reexamining and reevaluating even its most basic educational goals and assump- 
tions and practices. It is not yet clear how higher education can more effectively 
assume its central responsibilities for teaching, developing knowledge, and providing 
public service in the future that lies ahead. It is clear, however, that higher educa- 
tion must become more aware of, more articulate about, and more scholarly regard- 
ing the learning experiences that occur on and outside campuses. It is clear, too, 
that vigorous and imaginative and pluralistic educational experimentation needs 
to be rapidly and greatly increased and that students as well as members of the 
larger community have vital and increasing roles to play in these processes. There 
are developing, too, deepening and widening convictions that: educators may have 
underestimated the potentialities and learning capacities of people, and that new 
teaching strategies and curriculum materials could result in higher, and an increas- 
ingly widespread attainment of, educational standards. 

California State College, Fullerton is looking forward to increasing the con- 
tribution it may make in the work ahead. This college already is rethinking and 
improving the quality of its part in higher education so that people will have more 
freedom to shape and create the sort of future they value and that is possible with 
the resources and knowledge that man now has. 

NATURAL AND CULTURAL ECOLOGY 

Fullerton, a city of 85,000 inhabitants, is located in northern Orange County, 
about 30 miles southeast of central Los Angeles. It is in the center of the new 
Southern California population center and within easy freeway access of all the 
diverse natural and cultural attractions of this region. 

Orange County, with an area of 782 square miles, is the 48th in size of Cali- 
fornia’s 58 counties, but it is the second largest county in population (1.4 million 
plus), and in total personal income. Orange County has experienced during the 
last 20 years almost unprecedented growth of population, economic and other 
activities: it was the fastest growing area in the United States. This expansion came 
partly because of the proximity of Orange County to rapidly expanding Los 

27 


Natural and Cultural Ecology 


Angeles; the increasing access through the developing freeway system; and natural 
attractiveness of the beaches, countryside, and climate. 

In 20 years what had been a predominantly, slowly-changing agricultural and 
resort area, was transformed into a dynamic and predominantly industrial growth 
center for new types of manufacturing and commercial and cultural enterprises. 
Much land in Orange County, however, still is available and comparatively un- 
touched. Agriculture, and particularly orange groves and cattle ranching, still are 
highly visible activities. But space-age industries and industrial parks, new schools 
and shops and housing developments, tourist facilities and imaginative cultural 
attractions, and large scale planned communities continue to encroach upon the 
diminishing expanses of habitable land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture of the old and new economic and 
life styles in Orange County'. Underneath the soil, archeologists and bulldozers 
uncover traces of the hunting and gathering Indian bands which flourished as early 
as 4,000 y r ears ago in what was a benign and bountiful region. More visible traces 
remain of the Spanish and Mexican periods and cultures: Mission San Juan Capis- 
trano, which began the agricultural tradition in Orange County, and subsequent 
adobes from the great land grants and ranches that followed. Additionally, both 
customs and many names persist from this period, and so does some ranching. 
The architectural and other evidences of the subsequent pioneer period are still 
quite visible: farmsteads, old buildings from the new towns that then were estab- 
lished in the late 1800s, mining operations, and traces of early resort and other 
types of promotional activities. For about 100 years, farming was the main economic 
activity with products such as grapes, walnuts, vegetables, and increasingly oranges 
replacing the older wheat and cattle ranches. Today, agriculture still is very 
important, and Orange County ranks sixth among California’s counties in mineral 
production with its oil, natural gas, sand and gravel, and clay r mining and processing 
activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 miles of beaches in Orange County’ and 
the development of such attractions as Disneydand, Knott’s Berry Farm, the Laguna 
Festival of Arts and Pageant of Masters, and the Anaheim Stadium and Convention 
Center continue to make tourism an increasingly important activity'. So does the 
Mediterranean-type climate with: rainfall averaging 14 inches per year; and gen- 
erally mild days (with either freezing or 100-degrec temperatures uncommon) 
with frequent morning fogs during the summer. Both downtown Los Angeles and 
the Pacific Ocean can be reached by car in half an hour, and mountain and desert 
recreation areas are as close as an hour’s drive from the campus. 


Campus and Buildings 


THE CAMPUS AND ITS BUILDINGS 

Once part of a vast orange grove, the attractively' landscaped campus now con- 
sists of 225 acres bounded on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the west by State 
College Boulevard, on the north by Yorba Linda Boulevard and on the east by the 
Orange Freeway. The portion of Orange County' immediately surrounding the 
college is predominantly suburban: it includes housing tracts, apartment complexes, 
shopping centers, space-age industrial firms and still remaining orange groves and 
undeveloped hills and fields. 

The campus itself has a high density urban layout of buildings and facilities 
developed to sene a predominantly commuting public. The college’s modern 
buildings were planned so that no student should need more than 10 minutes to 
go from one class to another. The campus is surrounded with well-lighted and 
landscaped parking facilities. Shopping and scnices are available in College Park, 
a commercial establishment just adjacent to the campus on the south near the 
Othrys Hall student residence. 

Even though most of the campus has been converted into modern buildings, 
facilities for athletic activities, parking lots, or attractively landscaped areas, there 
still remain about 40 acres of the original orange grove, several older buildings, 
one which has been converted into the attractive Faculty' Center and another into 
the Foundation headquarters, and many of the original temporary' buildings. 

The first permanent building, the Letters and Science Building, was occupied 
in 1963. This imposing structure, master planned to serve ultimately as a facility 
for undergraduate and graduate science instruction and research, has been used to 
house other programs until they could warrant new facilities of their own. 

Since 1963, growth has been rapid. The Music-Speech-Drama Building was com- 
pleted in 1964, the Physical Education Building in 1965, the Library-Audiovisual 
Center in 1966, the College Commons cafeteria facility in 1967, the Humanities- 
Social Sciences Building and Art Center in 1969, and the Administration-Business 
Administration Building and Engineering Building in 1971. 

The latter two reflect a commitment to programs with high community involve- 
ment. In addition to the many undergraduate students who will study and learn 
in these buildings, many professional engineers and local businessmen also will use 
these very advanced facilities to continue their educations. 

New buildings are being planned to keep pace with college enrollment increases. 
At least one new academic facility and several building additions are contemplated 
for the 1970s. A 25,000-square-foot, ultramodern Student Health Center and a 



29 


Students of the College 


large College Union are presently on the drawing board. These facilities will be 
available by the mid-1970s. 

The ample freeway and surface street accommodations that approach the main 
entrance to the college’s modem campus also provide comparatively easy access 
to the great and diverse learning resources available in Southern California: many 
other colleges and universities; museums, libraries, art galleries; zoos; and the wide 
variety of economic, governmental, social, and cultural activities and experiments 
that may be found in this dynamic and complex region of California and the 
United States. 


STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 

Much of the distinctive character and learning atmosphere of any campus comes 
from the nature and vitality of its students. Diversity, the synthesis of academic 
with work and family interests, strong high school records and relative maturity 
arc some of the predominant characteristics of the student body at California State 
College, Fullerton. The campus is both a large and a still rapidly growing one 
despite its comparative newness. More than 14,000 students were enrolled in 1970- 
71, and this year’s total is expected to exceed 16,000. 

The college is a commuter institution: less than 5 percent of the students live 
on campus; 29 percent work 35 hours a week or more; and yet 65 percent take 
12 or more units of courscwork each semester. Seventy-five percent come from a 
radius of 15 miles from the campus, but many have lived elsewhere before coming 
to Orange County. 

About one quarter are lower division students, one half are college juniors and 
seniors, and another quarter are doing graduate work. Fifty-nine percent are men, 
and the median age is 23. Forty-one percent are women, and the median age is 22. 
Forty-one percent are married. One third of the students participate in both the 
day and evening programs during the regular semesters, and one tenth are involved 
only in the late afternoon or evening program. 

Many already have clearly defined disciplinary, professional, and artistic inter- 
ests. Some still are searching for a meaningful vocation and are in the process of 
exploring different fields of knowledge and the work that might develop from 
them. Most are trying to understand themselves and their world better so that 
they can become more effective human beings and citizens. 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

Central to the effectiveness of any college is the quality’ and dedication of its 
faculty’. California State College, Fullerton is proud of the high caliber of its 
faculty’ and of the commitments of its individual faculty members to teaching 
and scholarship. 

In the fall of 1970, there were 547 full-time and 250 part-time faculty members 
teaching on the campus. For the full-time faculty’ members the median age was 
35, and almost all had had some previous college teaching experience before 
coming to Fullerton. Faculty members also have a wide variety of experiences 
and accomplishments in research, the arts, professional work, consulting, and other 
creative activities. Sixty-five percent of the full-time faculty have earned their 
doctorate degrees, and these have come from more than 100 major colleges and 
universities. 

Criteria for selection to the faculty include mastery of knowledge in an academic 
specialty, demonstrated skill and experience in teaching, and continuing interest 
in scholarly study and research. Retention and promotion criteria also include 
service to the college and to the community’. 


30 


Academic Programs 


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

The college offers a full four-year program of freshman through senior work 
as well as credential programs for teachers and graduate, master’s level work in 
many disciplines and professional fields. The college provides a diversity of edu- 
cational opportunities to satisfy the broad range of backgrounds and interests 
of its students. Approximately 1,500 courses have been developed to provide 
learning from introductory to highly specialized, in-depth and advanced, work in 
a wide variety and growing number of fields of study. 

Fullerton currently awards the baccalaureate degree in 33 fields of knowledge. 
More advanced work and the master’s degree are awarded in 28 programs. Many 
of the baccalaureate and master’s degree programs offer a choice of specializa- 
tions (or options or emphases). Additionally, at least a few courses arc given in 
many fields or subject matter areas in which some other colleges and universities 
offer full degree programs. Often these courses are given by a number of different 
departments. Such an interdisciplinary trend fits not only with broader, cultural 
integrations of knowledge but also with the recent development of a growing 
number of interdisciplinary efforts, including some new degree programs, at 
Fullerton. 

Certain patterns have developed with the academic programs at California State 
College, Fullerton. One is that of relative balance in strength of the programs 
in the physical sciences, the social sciences, the humanities and the fine arts. 
Another is that of academic excellence in the various specializations offered by 
the college and the comparative freedom given to departments and professional 
schools to develop the depth programs for their majors. Another pattern is the 
great freedom given to most students in selecting courses to satisfy their general 
education or breadth requirements. Still other tendencies include the encourage- 
ment of: a diversity of approaches to teaching; experimentation and innovation in 
courses and programs; and student participation in curricular planning and deci- 
sion-making. 


ACCREDITATION 

The college is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Col- 
leges. Specific programs have been accredited by the California State Board of 
Education, the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, the National 
Association of Schools of Music, the American Chemical Society, American Speech 
and Hearing Association, the American Council on Education for Journalism and 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (in elementary edu- 
cation, secondary education, special education, and speech and hearing audiology). 

California State College, Fullerton is a member of the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States and the Western Association of Graduate Schools. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

The regular, educational program of the college is offered continuously from 
8 a.m. until 10 p.m., Monday through Friday. A class schedule, listing all classes 
meeting during these hours, is prepared for each semester and can be bought at the 
Titan Bookstore. 

The classes held during the late afternoon and evening hours are a growing 
part of the regular college offering and are taught by the full-time and part-time 
college faculty members. Students enrolling in these classes must have met all 
admission requirements of the college, including the filing of an official appli- 
cation for admission, the filing of complete official transcripts from other schools 
and colleges, and in the case of lower division applicants, the completion of 
required tests for admission. 

The classes given during the summer sessions and by the Extension Office do 
not require admission to the college, but specific courses frequently require satisfy- 
ing particular prerequisites. Separate schedules are provided for the summer sessions 
and extension programs. 


31 


Summer Sessions 


SUMMER SESSIONS 

Nature of the Summer Sessions 

The summer session is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested 
in the enrichment of their educational background as well as completing require- 
ments for a degree or credential. Summer session courses are the equivalent of 
college courses offered in the fall and spring semesters, and apply toward gradu- 
ation and residence requirements as well as teaching credential requirements. Both 
day and evening classes arc scheduled. Many courses have prerequisite requirements 
which students must meet. Master’s degree work is also offered. 

The college usually conducts two six-week sessions which run consecutively. The 
dates for the 1971 sessions will be June 21 through July 30 for the first session, and 
August 2 through September 10 for the second. Also offered are a number of two- 
and three-week workshops. In addition to much of the regular curriculum, summer 
offerings include many unique and innovative programs for teachers and other pro- 
fessional groups. The Associated Students Office offers a program of recreational 
activities and a lecture series to sene a wide variety of interests. 

A summer sessions class schedule is usually available by February* and may be 
obtained by writing the dean of continuing education. This schedule contains infor- 
mation on matters such as costs and registration. 

Admission to the Summer Sessions 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the 
same as in the regular session, the college does not require an advance application 
or transcripts from students registering for credit courses in the summer session. 
However, students arc expected to have satisfied the prerequisites for the courses in 
which they register. Admission to summer session does not grant admission to the 
regular session. Admission to the summer sessions is completed at registration. 

Authorized Student Load 

Title 5 of the California State Administrative Code states, “Not more than one 
semester unit may be earned for each week of attendance in summer session, except 
that upon approval of appropriate college authorities, additional semester units may 
be earned at the rate of one-half unit for each three units of credit for which a 
student is registered.” 

This means that combinations can be arranged so that a student may' earn up to 
seven units during either of the two six-week summer sessions when a total of 
not more than two courses is involved (i.e., a four-unit course and a three-unit 
course, or a five-unit course and a two-unit course). Any student who enrolls by 
error in more than seven units during a six-week summer session will find that 
credit for excess units will not be counted toward a degree , credential or other 
objective. Any other exceptions must be petitioned through the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records. 

EXTENSION PROGRAM AND SERVICES 

Through the extension program, the resources of the college are made available 
to those who are unable to take college work in residence but who wish to pursue 
college-level study for purposes of resuming an interrupted or incompleted edu- 
cation, to enhance professional or vocational abilities, or for personal growth and 
fulfillment. 

Extension offerings include regularly' established college courses as well as courses 
and workshops designed to meet the needs of particular groups and communities, 
and may’ be initiated at various times during the year. Any’ adult may r enroll in an 
extension course provided he meets the prerequisites of the course; it is not neces- 
sary’ that he also be enrolled in the college. 


32 


Conferences and Institutes 


The maximum extension credit which will be accepted toward baccalaureate de- 
grees is 24 semester units, of which not more than 12 units may be transferred from 
another college or university. Six semester units of extension and/or transfer credit 
may be applied toward a master’s degree with appropriate approvals. Extension 
credit may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirements for gradua- 
tion. 

Veterans may use the educational benefits available to them under federal and 
state laws to enroll in college extension courses provided the classes arc part of 
their prescribed and recognized objectives as approved by the Veterans Admin- 
istration. 

For information about establishing an extension course, or for current offerings, 
write or telephone the Extension Office. 

CONFERENCES AND INSTITUTES 

The college is interested in taking an active part in the development of confer- 
ences and institutes. The conference director, in cooperation with the respective 
academic departments and schools, will work with agency representatives in plan- 
ning the program, selection of a competent staff, and the general conduct of the 
conference. 

Requests for information or assistance with particular educational problems which 
might be met through the extension program should be directed to the conference 
director. 


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

A study abroad program of global scope is offered by the California State Col- 
leges through the California State Colleges International Programs. Study oppor- 
tunities for students from all 19 campuses include full-year curricula at distinguished 
institutions of higher learning throughout the world. 

Cooperating universities abroad include University of Aix-Marseillc, France; 
Free University of Berlin and University of Heidelberg, Germany; University of 
Athens, Greece; University of Florence, Italy, University of Coimbra and Uni- 
versity of Lisbon, Portugal; University of Stockholm and University of Uppsala, 
Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Madrid and Uni- 
versity’ of Granada, Spain; State University of Leningrad, U.S.S.R.; Tel Aviv 
University and Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; American University of 
Beirut, Lebanon; VVaseda University, Japan; National Chemgchi University, Tai- 
wan; Andhra University and the Universities of Benares and Delhi, India; Catholic 
University, Peru. In the United Kingdom, cooperating universities, which may 
vary from year to year, have included Birmingham, Bristol, Dundee, Exeter, 
Leicester, Liverpool, London, Nottingham, Oxford, Sheffield, Southampton and 
Wales. Cooperative arrangements also exist with Netherlands School of Business, 
Netherlands, and Centro de Estudios Universitarios Colombo-Amcricano 
(CEUCA), Colombia, and study opportunities are offered in Ghana, Africa. 

Selected students remain enrolled and continue to cam residence credit at the 
home campus. Academic work successfully completed at the cooperating institu- 
tions abroad is applied toward the degree requirements of the college in accordance 
with college regulations. Students are selected from each college on the basis of 
academic, linguistic and personal qualifications, as well as career objectives. Re- 
quirements include: 

Upper division or graduate standing by the beginning of the academic year 

abroad. 

Grades of B (3.0) or better in 30 semester units or 45 quarter units. 

Proficiency in the language of instruction, as specified below. 

Faculty recommendations. 


2—81593 


33 


Instructionolly Related Services 

Cost to the student ranges from $2,000 to $2,500 and includes round-trip trans- 
portation from San Francisco to the study centers, room and board for the aca- 
demic year, and health and accident insurance. For 1971-72, these costs are: 
Taiwan, $2,000; France, Germany, Ghana, Portugal, Spain, $2,200; Colombia, 
Israel, Lebanon, Peru, U.S.S.R., $2,300; Italy, Japan, $2,400; Denmark, Greece, 
India, Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom, $2,500. Students remain eligible 
for any financial aids available at the college, and payments may be made in 
installments over the year. 

Proficiency in the language of the host country is a requirement for the Pro- 
grams in France, Germany, Latin America, Portugal, Spain and the U.S.S.R. 
Ordinarily, two years of college-level study of the language, or the equivalent, 
will satisfy this requirement. In the U.S.S.R., however, three years language study 
is mandatory. Even where language proficiency is not required, however, compe- 
tence in the language of the host country will assure broader curricular oppor- 
tunities. 

Application for the 1972-73 academic year should be made early in the fall 
semester of 1971. Detailed information may be obtained from the campus Interna- 
tional Education Office or by writing to the California State Colleges International 
Programs, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco 94132. 

INSTRUCTION ALLY RELATED SERVICES 

The college provides an extensive program of instructionally related services for 
its students and faculty. These include the collegcwide services of the college 
Library', the Instructional Media Center, and the Computer Center described in 
the following sections. Two offices, Academic Planning and Institutional Research, 
make studies on college programs and assist in coordinating and planning educa- 
tional operations and sharing information on educational trends and innovations 
on the Fullerton campus with those going on elsewhere. 

The College Library 

The college Library is housed on the first and third through sixth floors of the 
Library-Audiovisual Center, which was completed in 1966. As its collection grows 
and the enrollment increases, the Library will occupy two more floors of the 
building. Designed presently to seat approximately 1,150 persons and to house 
about 300,000 books as well as related materials, the building contains group study 
and seminar rooms, study carrels for graduate students and facilities for individual 
and group listening, for the reading of microform materials and for copying 
materials in book and microform. 

The main book collection will contain about 300,000 volumes at the beginning 
of the 1971-72 academic y ear. During that year about 50,000 volumes w ill be added. 
Besides attempting to build a balanced collection of basic works, the Library has 
concentrated its efforts in several subject areas. As a result relatively strong 
collections are now available in such fields as World War II, international relations 
since 1870, Kant, Shakespeare, Melville, ichthyology, angling, historiography and 
historical bibliography', library' science, and mathematics. 

A selective depository' for U.S. government documents since 1964, the library 
will house about 98,000 U.S. documents by the beginning of the 1971-72 academic 
year. The library has, in addition, some 10,000 reels of microfilmed U.S. govern- 
ment documents, chiefly State Department archives, but also such items as the 
Congressional Record and the papers of various presidents as well as microfiche 
copies of the material in Project ERIC. The library is a depository* for California 
state documents and for California curriculum materials, including current samples 
of state adopted texts, curriculum guides from all over the United States, and 
non-book instructional materials. 


34 


Instructionally Related Services 


The Library subscribes to over 4,000 periodicals. It has some 18,000 volumes 
of bound periodicals and has extensive microform holdings in backfiles of periodi- 
cals and of local, national, and international newspapers. 

Among its major holdings are the Human Relations Area Files, the British 19th 
Century Parliamentary Papers, the Parliamentary Debates, a microfilm edition of 
the Published Colonial Records of the American Colonies, 1619-1800, and in con- 
junction with the Patrons of the Library, the Langsdorf Anniversary Collection 
of Grabhorn Press and Book Club of California books. 

Library hours are posted in the lobby and listed in the library handbook which 
is available at the reference and circulation desks. Librarians with various subject 
backgrounds are on duty at all times to aid students and faculty in the use of 
library resources. 

Instructional Media Center 

The Instructional Media Center includes both the extensive Audiovisual Services 
located in the lower level of the Library Building and the Instructional Television 
Services located in the TV Studio of the Music-Specch-Drama Building. Services 
to faculty and students include use of all types of audiovisual equipment and 
materials, rental of films from major rental libraries, and for faculty: production 
of transparencies, charts, posters, embossographs and diagrams plus all types of 
still and motion picture photography. Television services include videotaping facili- 
ties and playback both in the studio and on or off campus. 

The center is responsible for the coordination and development of instructional 
applications of media, and the improvement of programs and materials designed for 
instructional use. Liaison and service relations are maintained with other media 
learning-oriented units on the campus. Personnel of the center are prepared to 
assist the college faculty in their analysis of media needs as related to the pro- 
curement or production of materials pertinent to instructional development. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center, located on the second floor of the Administration-Business 
Administration Building, serves as the central computing facility for all of the 
college. As the central campus computing facility, it provides instructional, re- 
search and administrative computing services. 

The computing system is a CDC 3150 with 16,000 word (65,000 character) 
memory, card reader, card punch, line printer, two disk drives, and two magnetic 
tape drives. Data communications equipment connects this system to a larger 
CDC 3300 computer located at a regional center in Los Angeles; hence, campus 
users also have access to the CDC 3300 for uses beyond the capability of the 
CDC 3150. Peripheral equipment such as keypunches and a sorter arc available 
in an open shop area in the Computer Center for student use. 

Instruction in computer programming is offered by several departments at the 
college. Many other departments require use of the computer facility in their 
coursework. Students’ programs are batch-processed several times daily, and a 
consulting service to assist users is available. The Computer Center maintains a 
library of application programs for general use. This library will be augmented 
as new programming languages are supported by the Computer Center: FOR- 
TRAN, COBOL, ALGOL and COMPASS (Assembly Language for the CDC 
3150). 

Office of Academic Planning 

In 1969 the Office of Academic Planning was created to coordinate the develop- 
ment of educational programs, to provide an all-college perspective on educational 
activities at the campus, and to stimulate academic innovations. A dean of academic 
planning was appointed to provide leadership for this office and to work closely 
with the vice president, academic affairs and the Curriculum Committee and other 


35 


Research Organizations and Services 

individuals and groups concerned with changing and improving the educational 
programs of the college. 

This office currently is responsible for preparing the schedule and catalog and 
for some of the college-level reviewing and approving of new courses and programs. 
It also makes studies of important educational problems and activities on the campus. 
Additionally, it does the preliminary fact finding and staff work for some of the 
new plans, policies and procedures designed to improve the quality and vitality 
of the learning climate and experiences on the campus. 

Office of Institutional Research 

The Office of Institutional Research serves as an information center and a prob- 
lem-solving agency which collects, interprets and disseminates information. These 
data include enrollment histories and projections, distributions of data classes ac- 
cording to selected factors (e.g. level, type of instruction, unit value), summaries 
of student characteristics, and other statistics related to student population, course 
offerings and resources. Most of the data collection and analysis is related to the 
reporting requirements of the California State Colleges and other agencies. How- 
ever, the office evaluates data, provides assistance in design of specialized studies 
and also conducts analytic studies to serve the decision-making and policy-formu- 
lating needs of the college. 

RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICES 
AND SPECIAL STUDY CENTERS 

Much and varied research is going on at Fullerton. Most of this is being done by 
individual faculty members and students as part of their scholarly and professional 
development activities. Research training is an important part of the education for 
more advanced work in most disciplines and professions, and many of our students 
are encouraged and assisted to learn and apply research skills in either independent 
or team projects. 

The Research Committee of the Faculty Council and the Contracts and Grants 
Office provide stimulus, coordination and direction to the research efforts of the 
college. 



36 


Research Organizations and Services 


A Student Research Fellowship program and a F acuity Research Grant program 
award “seed grants” to promising research projects every year. Services supporting 
research are given by the College Foundation, the college Computer Center, and 
the college Library* Augmenting the on-campus aids to research arc the great and 
diverse resources available for study in the Southern California area. 

A number of special centers with specific research objectives arc operating at 
the college. These include the Center for Research in Business, Kconomics and the 
Community (with its affiliated Center for Economic Education, the Real Estate 
Research Institute, the Technological Studies Institute and the Joint Institute for 
Urban Studies), the Center for Governmental Studies, the Institute for Molecular 
Biology, the Reading Center, the Laboratory for Phonetic Research, the Special 
Education Clinic, the Speech and Hearing Clinic and the Tucker Wildlife Sanc- 
tuary. 

Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community 

The Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community provides: 

(1) School of Business Administration and Economics and other faculty with 
additional opportunity to participate in research activities in order to 
improve and reinforce teaching and professional competence; 

(2) Professional research and consultation services to the local area normally 
considered as being serviced by the college, including private business, 
labor, agriculture, and local government agencies; 

O) Educational services, e.g., seminars and conferences, to improve the level 
of understanding and competence of local decision-makers in specialized 
areas relating to business administration and economics; and 

(4) A focus, through research, for the education of students and citizens in 
the business and economic problems of the local community, and for the 
involvement of faculty in such educational programs. 

The operations of the center are carried out by constituent institutes, programs, 
and projects for which the center provides overall leadership and coordination. 
The institutes are long-term, continuing organizations designed to operate in se- 
lected major problem and functional areas of strategic significance and concern 
to the school. Programs and projects within the center arc organized to carry 
on work outside the Institutes’ area of interest, which arc a smaller scale and for 
a shorter time-span. 

Currently included within the Center for Research in Business, Economics and 
the Community are: the affiliated Center for Economic Education; the Real Estate 
Research Institute; the Technological Studies Institute; and the Joint Institute 
for Urban Studies. 

Center for Economic Education 

The Center for Economic Education is one of many such centers at colleges 
and universities in the United States working with the national Joint Council on 
Economic Education to expand economic understanding. Center programs include 

(1) services to schools and colleges, individual educators, and the community; 

(2) research and professional training; and (3) operation of an economic education 
information center. The center consists of a broadly based executive policy board; 
an administrative staff; and formally organized groups of participating users. Al- 
though operating autonomously, the center is affiliated with the Center for Research 
in Business, Economics and the Community. . 

Real Estate Research Institute 

The Real Estate Research Institute conducts a continuing research program, 
with special emphasis on urban development in Orange County. Studies are under- 
taken in cooperation with various public and private agencies, including the 
University of California, but primary funding is from the Department of Real 
Estate of the State of California. Opportunities exist for student participation in 
the various research activities. 


37 


Research Organizations and Services 


Technological Studies Institute 

The Technological Studies Institute conducts an interdisciplinary program of 
technological studies including research activities closely integrated with special 
course offerings and a library collection on technology. Research activities include 
study of methodology and techniques for measuring and analyzing technological 
change and its economic and social impacts; study of technology transfer and 
applications; and analysis of impacts of technological change on individuals, indus- 
tries and society. Curriculum activities of the program are coordinated through 
the Interdisciplinary Center of the college and courses included in the program 
arc listed with that center’s courses in this catalog. 

Joint Institute for Urban Studies 

The Joint Institute for Urban Studies represents a cooperative effort by Cali- 
fornia State College, Fullerton and the University of California, Irvine to study 
the processes and problems of urban development with special reference to Orange 
County. 

Center for Governmental Studies 

The Center for Governmental Studies is part of the Department of Political 
Science’s expanding research and teaching activities. Established in 1965, the center 
has four major functions: first, to collect and make available fugitive governmental 
and political materials; second, to assist local government agencies and citizen 
groups in the study of local governmental problems; third, to provide students with 
instruction and experience in research techniques and methodology; and fourth, 
to provide facilities for community institutes and seminars. 

Institute for Molecular Biology 

The Institute of Molecular Biology was established for the purpose of promoting 
an atmosphere congenial to research and creative activity in the molecular biologi- 
cal sciences. It is an interdisciplinary organization comprised of certain faculty 
from the Departments of Biological Science, Chemistry and Physics. The institute 
is dedicated to the pursuit of problems of human welfare, utilizing an approach at 
the cellular and molecular level of inquiry. Its purposes are (1) to foster and 
encourage communication of ideas and information among its membership for 
mutual professional improvement; (2) to encourage students to adopt affiliation 
with the membership and to adopt an interdisciplinary understanding of their 
particular areas of emphasis; (3) to foster an active research program on the part 
of the membership on problems best approached by the integration of chemistry, 
physics and biology; and (4) to seek ways of improving the individual teaching 
performance of its membership through interdisciplinary' communication at all 
levels of instruction. 

It is intended that the institute will function as a service to the departments 
that it represents. The institute sponsors a series of special seminars devoted to 
topics in the molecular biological sciences, featuring speakers from its own per- 
sonnel and from other campuses. 

Reading Center 

The Reading Center is located in the School of Education. Its primary purpose 
is to sene as a clinic and laboratory' for graduate students in the reading option 
of the Master of Science in Education. Children from the college community 
schools attend the Reading Center for diagnosis and remediation. The center 
houses materials and equipment relating to reading instruction. 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 

The Laboratory' for Phonetic Research is a major research and training facility 
in the Department of Linguistics at California State College, Fullerton. It is 

38 


College Foundation 

equipped with the necessary electromechanical facilities required for the acoustical, 
psychoacoustical, and physiological study of human speech. 

Its objectives are threefold: 

Instruction . To provide teaching, training and experience for students who 
will serve during their professional lives to assist the language handicapped. 
Research. To provide advanced students and faculty with facilities for re- 
search on language function and dysfunction. 

Cortwntmty service. To provide qualitative diagnostic assistance to the college 
community to the extent possible. 

The courses which center about the laboratory are designed to prepare students 
as operators in the electromechanical aspects of clinical and research work in the 
analysis of normal and disordered speech. 

Advanced students and faculty use the laboratory to carry out significant research 
projects in acoustical, articulatory and experimental phonetics. To date, a wide 
range of such projects have either been completed or are currently in progress. 
The Laboratory publishes the Research Reports series, available internationally 
through the ERIC system. 

Special Education Clinic 

The primary purpose of the Special Education Clinic is to provide intensive 
experiences for students with children referred by schools and other agencies in 
the community. The experiences involve educational assessment, instructional 
methodology and evaluation. All students participating in the clinic attend clinic 
seminars and prepare cases for presentation at the seminars. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The College Speech and Hearing Clinic operates as a nonprofit California State 
College, Fullerton Foundation agency. In addition is an off-campus clinical program 
for graduate students that involves experiences w'ithin medical and paramedical 
settings. The primary purpose of the clinics both on campus and off campus is 
to provide opportunities for teaching, service and research. College students receive 
clinical experience and opportunity for observation. The on-campus clinic is ac- 
credited by the Board of Examiners of the American Speech and Hearing Asso- 
ciation and the California State Department of Education. 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 

The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary operates as a nonprofit California State College, 
Fullerton Foundation agency. The sanctuary provides for a program of continuing 
educational service to the community; a research center for biological field studies; 
a facility for teacher education in nature interpretation and conservation education; 
and a center for training students planning to enter into the public service field of 
nature interpretation. 

CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, FULLERTON FOUNDATION 

The California State College, Fullerton Foundation, was established and incorpo- 
rated in October 1959 to provide essential student and faculty services which cannot 
be provided from state appropriations; to supplement the program and activities 
of the college in appropriate ways; and to assist otherwise the college in fulfilling 
its purposes and in serving the people of the State of California— especially those 
of the area in which the school is located. 

Services provided by the foundation include the operation of various college 
auxiliary organizations including the Titan Bookstore, residence halls and food 
service; business administration of scholarship and student loan funds; sponsored 
research programs; Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary; and certain institutes. 


39 


College Foundation 

The foundation’s overall policies are administered by a board of trustees made 
up of members of the college faculty, administration and students as well as com- 
munity leaders. 

Titan Bookstore 

Students arc able to purchase or order books and supplies as needed for classes 
from the on-campus bookstore, owned and operated by the College Foundation. 
The Titan Bookstore is a nonprofit operation: its proceeds are used to further the 
educational aims of the college. It is located directly east of the Letters and Science 
Building and is closely adjacent to the new Business Administration-Administration 
Building. 

Food Services 

On the campus, the Canteen Corporation is franchised to provide food in the 
College Commons and in a snack bar in the lower level of the Letters and Science 
Building. Vending machines also are located at other locations. A variety of 
restaurants and eating places also may be found within a short walking or driving 
distance from the college. 


40 


STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 


The college provides many academically-related services for its students so that 
they can derive greater value from attendance at Fullerton. Included among the 
areas in which professionally staffed services are provided arc relations with 
schools, counseling and testing, the extensive area of student activities and govern- 
ment, a student residence center, health, financial aid, vocational rehabilitation, in- 
ternational education, placement, judicial affairs and alumni affairs. The offices 
which provide these services operate under the auspices of the dean of students. 
The many functions of the Office of Admissions and Records, which also is an 
integral part of Student Personnel Services, arc described in later sections of this 
catalog. 

Opportunities arc provided for students to become involved in all phases of 
college life at California State College, Fullerton. The choices of activities range 
from membership in small hobby groups to service with members of the faculty 
and administration on major fact-finding, decision-making and policy- recommend- 
ing groups. An extensive organization of clubs, interest groups, boards, councils, 
and committees has been created within the student l>ody and college community 
so that opportunities to participate in activities arc available for all interested stu- 
dents. 


OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS 

Coordination of Student Personnel Services centers in the Office of the Dean of 
Students. The professional functions of this area arc directly administered by the 
Office of Admissions and Records, the Office of Relations with Schools, the Coun- 
seling and Testing Center, the Activities Office, the Student Residence Center, the 
Office of Placement Services, the Financial Aids Office, the Office of Judicial 
Affairs, and the Student Health Center. Collateral responsibilities include foreign 
student advising, coordination of the California State Colleges’ international stu- 
dent programs, selective service, veterans’ affairs and the alumni program. 

RELATIONS WITH SCHOOLS 

The Office of Relations with Schools administers a collcgcwidc program to 
assist undergraduate students in the transition from high school to college. This 
assistance is provided in the form of preadmissions guidance to prospective high 
school or undergraduate transfer students, counseling with parents, provision of 
current information about the college’s curricula and requirements to high school 
and college counselors, and research into the articulation problems of the transfer 
student. 


COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES 

Counseling 

Students who need assistance with such concerns as choosing an academic major 
or vocational goal, with study skills, or with personal problems affecting their aca- 
demic progress may obtain help through the Counseling Center. The staff of 
professionally trained counselors and psychologists has available a variety of re- 
sources including occupational information files, vocational and psychological tests, 
college and graduate school catalogs and directories of various kinds to assist the 
student. 

The Counseling Center also maintains contact with agencies and professional 
persons in the community to whom students may be referred. 

Counseling services are available only to fully matriculated, registered students. 

41 


Student Activities 


Testing 

Collegewide testing programs are coordinated and administered by the Testing 
Center. These include college admissions tests and general tests for graduate school 
admission. In addition, the Testing Center provides advice and consulting services 
to instructional departments in the development and administration of admission, 
selection, and placement tests for use by a specific department. 

The Testing Center also conducts ongoing research on the validity and appro- 
priateness of tests used in college testing programs. 

Testing requirements for students seeking admission are listed in the admissions 
section of the catalog. Students seeking information about testing requirements for 
specific instructional programs should inquire in the appropriate instructional divi- 
sion or the Counseling and Testing Center. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The college recognizes the important role of student activities. An extensive 
organization of clubs, interest groups, commissions, councils and communities has 
been created within the student body structure so that opportunities are available 
to every student according to his interest, ability and available time. 

Student Activities Center 

The Student Activities Center provides a wide range of service for individual 
students and organizations. A professional staff provides aid and consultation to 
individuals and groups as well as assisting the Associated Students in planning and 
implementing programs, events and projects. The staff advises all student organi- 
zations concerning established policies and procedures, and aids students in 
arranging for use of college services and facilities. 

Student Government 

All registered students are members of Associated Students of California State 
College, Fullerton. The Associated Students are governed through the executive, 
legislative, and judicial branches of the Associated Students organization. The 
president and commissioners constitute the executive branch which has the responsi- 
bility for the development and administration of the program, including such 
activities as publications, religious clubs, intercollegiate athletics, intramural athletics, 
forensics, and music. The Associated Students Senate has full responsibility for 



42 


Student Activities 


legislation by which this program is directed and for the allocation of student funds 
for the program. The judicial branch serves as the legal body for interpretation of 
the constitution and enforcement of Associated Student policies. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are encouraged and aided by the college whenever stu- 
dents express a desire for activities which add to their educational opportunities. 
As a relatively young institution, the development of new organizations to serve 
the needs of a growing student population is rapid. More than 75 organizations 
are now recognized, including one local and eight national social fraternities, five 
national social sororities, departmental professional fraternities, and many service, 
special interest and religious groups. 

Student Publications 

The college newspaper, the Daily Titan , is published as a product of the journal- 
ism classes and financed by the Associated Students. In addition, a handbook is 
available for use by organizations in the development and operation of their pro- 
gram. Two magazines. Focus and the Provtethean y are also published by students. 

Athletics 

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of teams in baseball, basketball, 
cross country, football, golf, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, 
water polo and wrestling. A year-round program of intramural activities includes 
basketball, badminton, flag football, handball, softball, tennis and wrestling, swim- 
ming and weight lifting. 

The college is a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association 
(CCA A). All athletic teams compete under rules of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA). 

Intramural Activities 

The intramural program is conducted on a seasonal basis and involves a variety of 
athletic and recreational activities for both men and women. Rules and regulations 
which govern participation in the intramural program are available in the Office 
of the Director of the Intramural Program or in the Student Activities Center. 

Extramural Activities 

Participation by women in extramural volleyball, basketball, tennis, swimming, 
track, and golf is provided through membership in the Extramural Coordinating 
Council of Southern California and the American Recreation and Athletic Federa- 
tion for College Women. 

College Recreation Association 

Individual recreation opportunities in weight training, swimming, handball, volley- 
ball, basketball and badminton are available through membership in the College 
Recreation Association to members of the student body, faculty and staff. 

Draft Advisement and Information 

A professional staff provides information, guidance and referrals for students 
of the college on all questions and problems stemming from Selective Service 
requirements. This service, provided by the Associated Students, works closely 
with the Selective Service assistant in the Admissions and Records Office as well 
as all other areas of Student Personnel Services. 

Birth Control Information Services 

Birth control counseling at the Student Health Center has been supplemented 
by a new Birth Control Information Service, financed and operated by the Associ- 
ated Students under the direction of the college medical director. A part-time 

43 


Student Activities 

coordinator is available in the College Union to make appointments with a Student 
Health Center physician. The physician advises the patient on the advantages and 
disadvantages of the various methods of birth control as well as giving the neces- 
sary physical examination. 

Campuswide Events 

Student boards, organized by the Associated Students, sponsor many campus- 
wide events. The lecture series, pop concerts, film series and special events are part 
of the on-going program. All recognized student organizations frequently co- 
sponsor events in the area of their interests. 

Child Care Center 

Sponsored by the Associated Students is the Children’s Center which provides 
daytime nursery care for children of Cal State Fullerton students for a nominal 
fee. The professionally staffed center, located near the campus, is licensed by the 
State of California. 

Experimental College 

The Experimental College is a program created and funded by the Associated 
Students. A student director and his staff coordinate, guide, plan and publicize 
the program to the college community. The Experimental College is recognized 
by the college community as a creative, positive cocurricular program that is a 
supplement to the regular instructional program of the college. 

Legal Information and Referral 

This unique office provides assistance to students on matters pertaining to law 
and makes referrals in cooperation with the Orange County Bar Association and 
the Legal Aid Society. A full-time law student attending a recognized school of 
law maintains scheduled office hours in the College Union. 

Mutual Ticket Agency 

The Associated Students, through its business office, operates a ticket agency 
for the benefit of all students. Purchases for drama, music, shows and sporting 
events may be made during regular office hours. The agency is located in the 
College Union. 

Student Advocates 

Ten students from the Office of Student Advocates, organized under the Associ- 
ated Students Senate guidelines, provide advice and assistance to any Cal State 
Fullerton student with problems and grievances. The advocates also serve as 
facilitators to student issues and concerns by participating as appropriate in the 
resolution of the issue. A major task of the advocates is to provide research 
into overall relations between students and the college community in an effort 
to improve the atmosphere on campus. 

Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1960 to provide the outside press 
with news of student activities on the campus. It is financed by a budgeted alloca- 
tion from Associated Students. 

College Union 

The College Union is leased by the Associated Students from the college. This 
facility houses the Associated Students government offices and business office, as 
well as the Student Activities Center, student organizations rooms and a snack bar. 
Facilities are available to all students for meeting rooms, pool, cards, films, and 
small discussion groups. The union is located in the lower level of the Letters 
and Science Building. 


44 


Student Residence Center 


STUDENT RESIDENCE CENTER 

Othrys Hall provides housing for 561 unmarried students in two modem co- 
educational residence halls located adjacent to the campus. Rooms arc mostly four- 
person occupancy; however, a few small doubles are also available. Each room has 
its own private bath. The buildings arc fully air-conditioned and carpeted. Among 
specially designed facilities arc a library and swimming pool. Dining facilities arc 
conveniently located on campus in the College Commons. 

The residence hall director, assistant hall director, faculty resident, residence hall 
ombudsman, and resident advisers in Othrys Hall attempt to promote a social, 
cultural and educational program which supports and expands the classroom 
experience. The resident has the opportunity to study, assume responsibility 
through hall government, and discuss serious topics of the day with guest speakers. 
A new program in experimental education, Project Titan, was begun in fall 1967. 
Regularly scheduled college classes arc scheduled in the residence hall in order to 
promote a meaningful dialog between faculty members and students in an informal 
setting. 

The Freshman Sponsor Program, initiated in fall 1969, is a program in which 
selected upperclassmen live with small groups of freshmen and act as adviser- 
counselor-friend to these groups. The purpose of the Freshman Sponsor Program 
is to facilitate the transition of freshmen students from high school to a col- 
legiate environment. A tutor service is also available to Othrys Hall students. 

The Student Residence Center maintains listings of apartments and houses for 
students and faculty who arc interested in off-campus living. For students looking 
for roommates, a bulletin board with names of persons currently with an apart- 
ment to share is also provided. Further information regarding housing may be 
obtained from the Student Residence Center. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

The purpose of the Student Health Center is to provide high quality medical 
service early in the course of an illness, to promote a healthful and sanitary en- 
vironment on campus in which to live and study, to stimulate better health aware- 
ness among the students, and to educate them to the high standards of good thera- 
peutic and preventive care. 

The Student Health Center is in Room 553 of the l>cttcrs and Science Building 
and is open from 8 ajn. to 9 pju. Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. to 


Financial Aid 


5 p.m. on Friday of each weekday that classes are in session. No staff is available 
when the Student Health Center is not open for off-campus calls. Special care and 
time are given to counseling of both emotional and physical problems. Physicians 
and nurses are continuously on duty during the day to care for emergencies and 
for the treatment of illnesses and injuries. 

Among the services presently offered are the following: 

1. Emergency care 

2. Diagnosis and treatment of medical and surgical problems 

3. Medical counseling 

4. Psychiatric counseling and diagnosis 

5. Specialists* diagnostic services when directly referred by the Student Health 
Center. 

6. Follow-up care as may be recommended by the student’s private physician 
within the scope of available facilities. 

7. Electrocardiography 

8. Physical therapy treatment 

9. Routine immunizations 

10. Laboratory and X-ray facilities 

All fees for care in the Student Health Center, unless otherwise specifically stated, 
have been prepaid by the State of California and by the student’s registration fee. 
Only registered undergraduates and graduates are eligible for all or any of the 
health services offered. Emergency service is available to everyone on campus. 

Health, Accident, Hospital Insurance 

All students are urged to carry this type of insurance. An excellent policy at a 
low premium is available to all students through the Associated Students’ Business 
Office. Medical care when the Health Center is not open is an expense of the stu- 
dent. Such insurance will defray much of the cost of private medical care. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Financial Aid Office provides personal guidance and assistance in financial 
matters to all students. Financial aid administers all scholarships, emergency loans, 
grants, National Defense Loans and the work-study programs. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships are available for outstanding students. Qualified 
students should obtain scholarship applications from the Financial Aid Office, and 
return by April 15 for the fall semester and December 15 for the spring semester. 
Scholarship applications are evaluated by the college Scholarship Committee. 
Awards are based on scholastic record, financial need and personal qualifications. 
Some scholarships are limited to students majoring in specified disciplines. Depart- 
mental recommendations weigh heavily in such cases. 

Scholarships offered by California State College, Fullerton are made possible by 
interested organizations, business firms and individuals. Recent contributors to the 
scholarship program include: 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc. 

CSCF Computer Center Scholarship Fund 

California State Employees’ Association (CSCF Chapter) 

California State Firemen’s Association 

Delta Delta Delta East Orange County Alumnae Chapter 

Donna Cherry Memorial Scholarship 

Edward Mittleman Memorial Scholarship 

Fourth District, California Parents and Teachers Association 

Fullerton Rotary Club 

Gamma Phi Beta Sorority (Orange County Alumnae) 

Los Amigos Club of Fullerton 

46 


Financial Aid 


Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Coulson (President’s Award) 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship Fund 
Orange County Engineering Council Scholarship 
Roberta King Maxwell Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Sadie Landon Memorial Music Scholarship Fund 
Sheryl Cummings Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Loons 

The generosity of organizations and individuals enables the college to offer short- 
term loans to students who meet unexpected financial difficulties of a temporary 
nature. Loans from these funds arc made for various periods of time and to specified 
categories of students, according to college regulations and the wishes of the 
donors. The prime purpose of these loans is to meet educationally related expenses, 
and thus loans cannot be made for the purposes which are normally financed by 
private lending institutions. Application for a short-term loan may be made at any 
time during the school year. 

The following is a listing of the loan funds available during the 1971-72 school 
year: 

Altrusa Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 
Associated Students Foreign Student Loan Fund 
Brea Rotary Qub Loan Fund 

California Retired Teachers Association (Laura Settle Fund) 

CSCF Faculty Women’s Qub Loan Fund 

Gordon S. Fyfe Memorial Loan Fund Trust 

James Merrick Memorial Loan Fund 

Kenneth G. Ryhal Memorial Loan Fund 

Laura E. Imhoff Memorial Loan Fund 

Mary Virginia Lopez Memorial Loan Fund 

Michael R. Young Memorial Loan Fund 

Pan-Hellenic Qub of Northern Orange County Loan Fund 

Robert E. Edwards Memorial Loan Fund 

Rossmoor Women’s Qub Loan Fund 

Rotary Qub of Fullerton, Foreign Students Loan Fund 

Soroptimist International Qub of Fullerton Loan Fund 

Stan Chase Memorial Loan Fund 

Trust-Davis Memorial Loan Fund 

Zonta Qub of Fullerton Loan Fund 

National Defense Student Loans \ 

California State College, Fullerton joins with the federal government and the 
State of California in making long-term, low-interest loans available to students 
under the National Defense Education Act. Details and applications are available 
at the Financial Aid Office. Deadlines for submissions of applications are December 
1 for the spring semester, April 1 for the summer sessions and June 1 for the 
fall semester. 

All unmarried applicants under age 25 are required to file a Parents* Confidential 
Statement with the College Scholarship Service, Box 1025, Berkeley 94701, desig- 
nating California State College, Fullerton as one of the recipients. The Parents’ 
Confidential Statement assists the college to evaluate financial need, and, since it 
must be on hand before the loan application can be acted upon, early submission 
is advised. These forms can be obtained at most secondary schools or at the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Federal Insured Loan Program 

The college cooperates with the federal government and private lending insti- 
tutions in making guaranteed loans available to full-time students. A loan recipient 
under this program must meet the following qualifications: 


47 


Vocational Rehabilitation Services 

a. have an adjusted family income of less than $15,000 per year 

b. be a full-time student 

c. be enrolled and in good standing at the college or accepted for enrollment. 

The interest on these loans is 7 percent per annum on the unpaid balance. The 

United States Office of Education will pay all interest while the student is en- 
rolled as a full-time student. Repayment ranges from 5 to 10 years following 
graduation, according to arrangements made with the lender. Applications and 
further information may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. 

College Work-Study Program 

The college cooperates with the federal government in providing work-study 
jobs. Students who can establish “need eligibility” may work up to an average of 
15 hours a week during the school year and up to 40 hours in the summer. Under 
this program there arc on-campus opportunities such as library and instructional 
aides, clerks, computer center aides, and laboratory and research assistants. Off- 
campus jobs in nonprofit community agencies include teacher aides, recreation 
leaders, office trainees, and administrative interns. Interested students should consult 
the Financial Aid Office for eligibility requirements. 

Educational Opportunity Grants 

Federal funds have been made available to the College to use in making grants 
to undergraduate students who display “exceptional financial need” and who would 
otherwise be unable to continue their education. These grants range from $200 to 
$1,000 per year and are non-repayable. These grants are always awarded in con- 
junction with other forms of aid, and thus a Parents’ Confidential Statement is 
required. Deadlines are the same as for the National Defense Student Loans. 

Combined Intern-teaching and Master's Degree 

A National Science Foundation supported program in biology was started in 1967. 
This program permits a limited number of qualified biology teachers to attend 
CSCF a half-day, each day, for two academic school years, in order to complete 
the regular master’s degree in biology. These teachers receive their full salaries from 
their school districts. Concomitantly, an equal number of qualified graduate students 
also seeking a master’s degree in biology are provided with stipends which permit 
them to continue their own graduate work, replace the teacher during these half 
days (as intern teachers), and complete the Standard Teaching Credential with 
specialization in secondary school teaching. Additional coursework in science educa- 
tion is required through consultation with the Department of Science and Mathe- 
matics Education. 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Students who have a physical, emotional or other disability which handicaps them 
vocationally may be eligible for the services of the State Department of Rehabilita- 
tion. These services include vocational counseling and guidance, training (with pay- 
ment of costs such as books, fees and tuition) and job placement. Under certain 
circumstances students may also qualify for help with medical needs, living ex- 
penses and transportation. 

Contact the State Department of Rehabilitation, 421 North Brookhurst Street, 
Anaheim 92801. Telephone number (714) 635-5500. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Foreign Students 

Special sen ices for foreign students are coordinated by the international student 
counselor. These services include aid with problems concerning visa status and 
employment; orientation to academic procedures and requirements; advisement 
related to finances, social standards and customs; and to resources and opportunities 
offered by campus and community. 

48 


New Educational Horizons 


International Programs 

Information concerning study opportunities for American students in foreign 
universities is available in the International Student Office. The international student 
counselor coordinates the selection of students applying for admission to one of the 
international programs operated by the California State Colleges in Colombia, Den- 
mark, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, 
Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, United Kingdom and the 
U.S.S.R. 

(See also International Programs on page 33.) 

NEW EDUCATIONAL HORIZONS 

New Educational Horizons, an Educational Opportunity Program, is an innova- 
tive educational program designed to provide comprehensive services for culturally 
different students. These services include the identification, selection, and counsel- 
ing of students who, because of academic, ethnic, financial, or motivational barriers 
would not normally acquire a college education. 

N E H gives each of the students in its program much individual attention. It 
also uses knowledge of the culturally different student’s distinctive patterns of 
social behavior, learning styles, and motivations and aspirations to assist students 
in realizing their full potentialities. Special tutorial and counseling activities arc 
used so that N E H students will be more effective in their regular coursework 
at the college. New Educational Horizons also strives to develop esprit and a sense 
of community among its students through a variety of creative and identity- 
seeking activities. 

Its students are encouraged not only to understand the background and strengths 
of their own particular ethnic groups but also to work together in support of 
central, universal human values. N E H also is keenly interested in advancing the 
understanding of different cultural groups on this campus and an awareness of 
their problems and potentialities. It has been active in supporting the ethnic studies 
departments and their courses. N E H also has worked effectively to bring college 
students and faculty and administrators into more frequent and meaningful con- 
tacts with students and community members from culturally different groups. 

The service departments of New Educational Horizons include counseling, 
tutorial, faculty liaison, and research evaluation. Other components structured to 
assist students are special activities, recruitment, and supporting secretarial services. 
Working closely with the current 13 staff members, 10 student counselors and 
chairmen of the program are 20 elected representatives from the N E H Student 
Voice Committee. 

With 1970-71 its third year, N E H has grown from an initial enrollment of 
53 students to 340. This rapid increase in size may convey some feeling for the 
dynamism and vitality of an innovative program that already has received recogni- 
tion on the national as well as the state levels for its excellence and creativity. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

A centralized Placement Center is maintained with responsibilities for assisting 
students in finding both part-time and career employment. The college believes 
that it best serves both the student and employers only when its graduates have 
been placed in the professions for which they are prepared and trained. 

Part-time Placement 

Students wishing part-time jobs either on or off campus are eligible to receive 
the assistance of the office if they are taking three units or more. New students 
may receive service as soon as they have notice of their admission to the college. 
Secretarial skills are in great demand; but calls for schoolbus drivers, custodians, 
teacher aids, draftsmen, waiters, clerks, youth and recreation leaders, sitters, gar- 

49 


Judicial Affairs 


deners, etc., are received. If students must augment their resources while going to 
school they are encouraged to limit their work hours to approximately 10 per week. 

Business, Industry and Government Placement 

The career placement interviewer assists graduating seniors and graduate students 
seeking career employment in business, industry, or public service through personal 
counseling in defining occupational preference, providing active job leads and 
making up r6sum£s. 

In addition, the Placement Center makes arrangements for the on-campus recruit- 
ment program which brings the employers to the students. Also available through 
the center arc applications for computerized job placement service operated by the 
College Placement Council. It is called GRAD (Graduate Resume Accumulation 
and Distribution) and it is for the CSCF alumni seeking new professional oppor- 
tunities. 

Located in the Placement Center is the Career Library with an ever-expanding 
selection of resource materials on career opportunities. Federal, state, county, city 
and armed forces brochures and applications are also available for student access. 

The Placement Center serves as liaison office for the Peace Corps, the military 
and VISTA offering counseling and information brochures to any interested 
student. 

Educational Placement 

Students in the teacher education, pupil personnel services, or administration 
curriculum of the college, who are in the final semester of a credential program, 
or who are in student teaching or directed field work, are eligible to register and 
receive the services of the Placement Center, chief of which is help in establishing 
a professional employment file. Such registrants are supplied information on open- 
ings and helped to establish their candidacies in the school districts and educational 
institutions. 

Students who are not in the student teaching program but who are completing 
their credential program at the college are also eligible for service. This includes 
those about to receive their master’s degree, who plan to apply for a community 
college credential. 

JUDICIAL AFFAIRS 

The Office of Judicial Affairs is concerned with formulating and adjudicating 
student rights and grievances as well as clarifying diverse responsibilities which are 
essential to a vigorous, responsive and productive educational community. This 
purpose is accomplished through the coordination and implementation of the 
judicial procedures of the college related to student conduct and academic appeals; 
reviewing policies involving student rights and responsibilities as outlined in Col- 
lege Policy Statement 300.000, Statement of Students Rights and Responsibilities, 
discipline, advocacy and the like in order to recommend which benefit students 
and the college community as a whole. 

Additionally, the Office of Judicial Affairs provides liaison and coordination in 
the alumni program as well as carrying out other special projects related to Student 
Personnel Services. 


ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

The Alumni Association of California State College, Fullerton provides the 
opportunity for alumni to maintain contact with the college after graduation 
through various publications, information about continuing education programs 
as well as special social and service events at the college. Further information 
regarding membership and the programs can be obtained by calling the Office 
of Alumni Affairs or the Office of the Dean of Students. 


50 



ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, 
RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 


***" -j 


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 


Requirements for admission to the California State Colleges are in accordance 
with Title 5, Chapter 5, Subchapter 2, of the California Administrative Code as 
amended by the Board of Trustees of the California State Colleges on November 
24, 1970. A prospective applicant who is unsure of his status under the require- 
ments is encouraged to consult his school or college counselor or the college 
Admissions Office. 

ADMISSION AS A FIRST-TIME FRESHMAN 

Applicants who have no college work after high school graduation will be con- 
sidered for admission under the following provision. Except as noted, results of 
either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) 
are required. 

California high school graduates or legal residents for tuition purposes must have 
a grade-point average and total score on the SAT, or composite score on the 
ACT, which together provide an eligibility index placing them in the upper 
one-third of California high school graduates. For 1971-72 the minimum eli- 
gibility index is 3,072 using the SAT or 721 using the ACT. 

High school graduates frovt other states or possessions who are nonresidents 
for tuition purposes must present an eligibility index which places them in the 
upper one-sixth of California high school graduates. For 1971-72, the minimum 
required eligibility' index is 3,402 using the SAT or 826 using the ACT. 

The eligibility index is computed either by multiplying the grade-point average 
by 800 and adding it to the total SAT score, or multiplying the grade-point 
average by 200 and adding it to 10 times the composite ACT score. Grade-point 
averages arc based on w'ork completed in the last three years of high school, 
exclusive of physical education and military' science. 

As an alternative, the following table may' be used to determine the eligibility of 
graduates of California high schools (or California legal residents) for freshman 
admission to a California State College. This table is based on the eligibility index. 
Scores shown are the SAT Total and the ACT Composite. Students with a given 
GPA must present the corresponding test score. Conversely, students with a 
given ACT or SAT score must present the corresponding GPA in order to be 
eligible. 


52 


Admission to the College 


ADMISSIONS TABLE FOR CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
OR CALIFORNIA LEGAL RESIDENTS 


GPA 

ACT 

Score 

SAT 

Score 

GPA 

ACT 

Score 

SAT 

Score 

GPA 

ACT 

Score 

SAT 

Score 

( )' 



2.80 

19 

832 

2.39 

27 

1160 

3.20 

11 

512 

2.79 

19 

840 

2.38 

27 

1168 

3.19 

11 

520 

2.78 

19 

848 

2.37 

27 

1176 

3.18 

11 

528 

2.77 

19 

856 

2.36 

27 

1184 

3.17 

11 

536 

2.76 

19 

864 

2.35 

28 

1192 

3.16 

11 

544 

2.75 

20 

872 

2.34 

28 

1200 

3.15 

12 

552 

2.74 

20 

880 

2.33 

28 

1208 

3.14 

12 

560 

2.73 

20 

888 

2.32 

28 

1216 

3.13 

12 

568 

2.72 

20 

896 

2.31 

28 

1224 

3.12 

12 

576 

2.71 

20 

904 

2.30 

29 

1232 

3.11 

12 

584 

2.70 

21 

912 

2.29 

29 

1240 

3.10 

13 

592 

2.69 

21 

920 

2.28 

29 

1248 

3.09 

13 

600 

2.68 

21 

928 

2.27 

29 

1256 

3.08 

13 

608 

2.67 

21 

936 

2.26 

29 

1264 

3.07 

13 

616 

2.66 

21 

944 

2.25 

30 

1272 

3.06 

13 

624 

2.65 

22 

952 

2.24 

30 

1280 

3.05 

14 

632 

2.64 

22 

960 

2.23 

30 

1288 

3.04 

14 

640 

2.63 

22 

968 

2.22 

30 

1296 

3.03 

14 

648 

2.62 

22 

976 

2.21 

30 

1304 

3.02 

14 

656 

2.61 

22 

984 

2.20 

31 

1312 

3.01 

14 

664 

2.60 

23 

992 

2.19 

31 

1320 

3.00 

15 

672 

2.59 

23 

1000 

2.18 

31 

1328 

2.99 

15 

680 

2.58 

23 

1008 

2.17 

31 

1336 

2.98 

15 

688 

2.57 

23 

1016 

2.16 

31 

1344 

2.97 

15 

696 

2.56 

23 

1024 

2.15 

32 

1352 

2.96 

15 

704 

2.55 

24 

1032 

2.14 

32 

1360 

2.95 

16 

712 

2.54 

24 

1040 

2.13 

32 

1368 

2.94 

16 

72a 

2.53 

24 

1048 

2.12 

32 

1376 

2.93 

16 

728 

2.52 

24 

1056 

2.11 

32 

1384 

2.92 

16 

736 

2.51 

24 

1064 

2.10 

33 

1392 

2.91 

16 

744 

2.50 

25 

1072 

2.09 

33 

1400 

2.90 

17 

752 

2.49 

25 

1080 

2.08 

33 

1408 

2.89 

17 

760 

2.48 

25 

1088 

2.07 

33 

1416 

2.88 

17 

768 

2.47 

25 

1096 

2.06 

33 

1424 

2.87 

17 

776 

2.46 

25 

1104 

2.05 

34 

1432 

2.86 

17 

784 

2.45 

26 

1112 

2.04 

34 

1440 

2.85 

18 

792 

2.44 

26 

1120 

2.03 

34 

1448 

2.84 

18 

800 

2.43 

26 

1128 

2.02 

34 

1456 

2.83 

18 

808 

2.42 

26 

1136 

2.01 

34 

1464 

2.82 

18 

816 

2.41 

26 

114 * 

2.00 

35 

1472 

2.81 

18 

824 

2.40 

27 

1152 

( )’ 




Graduates of High Schools in a Foreign Country 

Applicants who are graduates of foreign high schools must have preparation 
equivalent to that required of eligible California high school graduates. The college 
will carefully' review the previous record of all such applicants and only those 
with promise of academic success equivalent to that of eligible California high 
school graduates will be admitted. Such applicants are not required to take either 
the SAT or ACT. Ordinarily, the college docs not accept foreign student appli- 
cations directly from foreign countries. 


1 Students earning grade-point averages above 3.20 are eligible for admission. 

* Students earning grade-point averages below 2.0 are not eligible for admission. 


53 


Admission of Undergraduate Transfer Students 


Non-High School Graduates 

Applicants who arc over 21 years of age, but have not graduated from high 
school, will be considered for admission only when preparation in all other w ays 
is such that the college believes promise of academic success is equivalent to that 
of eligible California high school graduates. 

High School Students 

Students still enrolled in high school will be considered for enrollment in 
certain special courses and programs if recommended by their principal and if in 
the judgment of the college their preparation is equivalent to that required of 
eligible California high school graduates. Such admission is only for a given 
course or program and does not constitute the right to continued enrollment. 

Recommended Preparation 

Overall excellence of performance in high school subjects and test score evidence 
of academic potential provide the best bases for predicting success at California 
State College, Fullerton. While no specific course pattern is required, prospective 
students are strongly encouraged to include the following subjects in their prepara- 
tion for work at Fullerton: college preparatory English; another language; mathe- 
matics; laboratory' science; history or social science (or both); and study in 
speech, music, art and other subjects contributing to a well-rounded academic 
background. Students who anticipate intensive study in science are urged to take 
four years of mathematics and three years of foreign language in high school. 

ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission as undergraduate transfers will be considered for admis- 
sion under one of the following provisions: 

Applicants wfx> have successfully completed 60 or more semester units , or the 
equivalent, are eligible for admission if they have achieved a grade point average 
of 2.0 (C) and were in good standing at the last college attended. Nonresident 
applicants must have earned a grade point average of at least 2.4 (C+). 

Applicants who have successfully cmnpleted fewer than 60 semester units , 
or the equivalent, are eligible for admission if they meet the above require- 
ments and the current first-time freshman requirements. Applicants for admis- 
sion as transfer students who have been continuously enrolled at a college since 
graduation from high school are eligible if they r meet the first-time freshman 
requirements in effect at the time of their high school graduation. Either SAT 
or ACT test results are required of transfer applicants with fewer than 60 
semester units. 

Other Applicants 

Applicants not admissible under one of the above provisions should enroll in a 
community' college or other appropriate institution. Only' under the most unusual 
circumstances, and then only' by special action, will such applicants be permitted 
to enroll in the college. 


REDIRECTION 

It is not possible for the college to accommodate all qualified applicants. If an 
application is accepted and it later becomes evident that admission will not be 
possible, the application will, at the applicant’s request, be forwarded to any 
other California State College where space is still available. No additional appli- 
cation fee then will be required. 


54 


Admission of Graduate Students 


ADMISSION OF GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Unclassified Graduate Status 

For admission with graduate standing as an unclassified graduate student, a stu- 
dent: must have completed a four-year college course and hold an acceptable bacca- 
laureate degree from an accredited institution; or must have completed equivalent 
academic preparation as determined by the appropriate college authorities; and 
additionally must satisfactorily meet the professional, personal, scholastic and other 
standards for graduate study (including qualifying examinations), that the appro- 
priate college authorities may prescribe. Such admission does not, however, consti- 
tute acceptance to specific graduate degree or credential curricula. 

Classified Graduate Status 

A student who has been admitted to a California State College under the unclassi- 
fied graduate requirement above may, upon application, be admitted to an author- 
ized graduate degree or credential curriculum if he satisfactorily meets the profes- 
sional, personal, scholastic, and other standards for admission to the graduate 
curriculum (including qualifying examinations), that the appropriate college au- 
thorities may prescribe. 

Note: All baccalaureate recipients at California State College, Fullerton who 
wish to enroll in graduate degree curricula following the receipt of their bacca- 
laureate must file applications for admission and be approved for admission under 
the same criteria and procedures as new applicants. Students enrolled in five-year 
teacher education programs may continue into their fifth year without filing an 
application; however, such students must apply for and be admitted to a subse- 
quent term if they later wish to pursue graduate degree programs. Enrollment in 
the fifth year of teacher education provides no guarantee of admission to graduate 
degree curricula. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES 

At the present, the college usually does not accept applicants directly from other 
countries. Only two categories of such students normally will be accepted: 

(1) Those who have completed a two-year transfer program in a community 
college in the United States with a good academic record. 

(2) Those who have completed a bachelor’s degree in an accredited college in 
the United States and wish to enroll as graduate students. 

Application procedures are the same as for other students, except that foreign 
language transcripts must be accompanied by certified English translations. 

SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the 
same as in the regular session, the college does not require an advance application 
or transcripts from students registering for credit courses in the summer session. 
However, students must be high school graduates and are expected to have satisfied 
the prerequisites for the courses in which they register. In addition, students are ex- 
pected to file a request to register in the summer session. Admission to summer 
session does not grant admission to the regular session. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student previously enrolled in the college, planning to return after an absence 
of one or more semesters, must file a new application for admission in accordance 
with procedures set forth below. The application fee is required if the student was 
not enrolled in either of the two semesters prior to the semester to which he is 
seeking admission or if he was enrolled in another institution during his absence 
from California State College, Fullerton. Unless a leave of absence was granted, 
catalog requirements at the time of readmission will apply. 


55 


General Procedures for Admission 


Former Students in Good Standing 

A student who left the college in good standing will be readmitted provided 
any academic work attempted elsewhere since the last attendance does not change 
his scholastic status. Transcripts of the record of any work attempted in the 
interim are required. 

Former Students Who Were on Probation 

A student on probation at the close of his last enrollment will be readmitted 
on probation provided he is otherwise eligible. The student must furnish tran- 
scripts of any college work taken during his absence. 

Former Students Who Were Disqualified 

The readmission of a previously disqualified student is by special action only. 
Ordinarily the college will consider an application for reinstatement only after the 
student has remained absent for a minimum of one year following disqualification 
and has fulfilled all recommended conditions. In every instance, readmission action 
is based on evidence, including transcripts of study completed elsewhere subsequent 
to disqualification, which in the judgment of the college warrants such action. If 
readmitted, the student is placed on scholastic probation. 


GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR ADMISSION 


Application Procedure for 1972-73 

All prospective students must file a completed application for admission within 
the appropriate filing period. The completed application includes the application 
form, the California State College Residence Questionnaire, and the nonrefundable 
application fee of $20. Each applicant may file only one application for any one 
term within the California State College system. The application should be ob- 
tained from, and filed with, the college of first choice. Alternative choice campuses 
may be listed on the application. 


Application Schedule for 1972-73 

Initial Filing Period 


Summer quarter 1972 
Fall semester 1972 
Fall quarter 1972 
Winter quarter 1973 
Spring semester 1973 
Spring quarter 1973 


Jan. 3-31, 1972 
Nov. 1-30, 1971 
Nov. 1-30, 1971 
June 1-30, 1972 
Aug. 1-31, 1972 
Aug. 1-31, 1972 


Late Filing Period 

Feb. 1-April 28, 1972 (or earlier if 
quotas are filled) 

Dec. 1-June 30, 1972 (or earlier if 
quotas are filled) 

Dec. 1-June 30, 1972 (or earlier if 
quotas are filled) 

July 3-Oct. 13, 1972 (or earlier if 
quotas are filled) 

Sept. 1-Nov. 30, 1972 (or earlier if 
quotas are filled) 

Sept. 1, 1972-Jan. 31, 1973 (or earlier 
if quotas are filled) 


SEMESTER TERM STATE COLLEGES 


QUARTER TERM STATE COLLEGES 


Chico 

San Diego 

Bakersfield 

Fresno 

San Fernando 

Dominguez Hills 

Fullerton 

San Francisco 

Hayward 

Long Beach 

San Jose 

Humboldt 

Sacramento 

Sonoma 

Los Angeles 

56 




Pomona 
San Bernardino 
San Luis Obispo 
Stanislaus 


General Procedures for Admission 


Initial Filing Period — Space Reservations 

All applications received during the initial filing period will receive equal consid- 
eration within the colleges’ established enrollment categories and quotas, irrespective 
of the time and date they are received. 

Applicants who can be accommodated within enrollment quotas will receive con- 
firmation of space reservation. Although the space reservation is not a statement of 
admission, it is a commitment on the part of the college to admit a student once 
eligibility has been determined. When the student receives notice of the space 
reservation, he should initiate action to have required transcripts of academic work 
sent to the state college where space has been reserved. The college will inform 
him of the number of copies of transcripts required, dates for submittal, and 
where they should be sent. The student should not request that transcripts be sent 
until requested to do so by the college where space has been reserved. 

Applications of students who cannot be accommodated at their first choice college 
will automatically be forwarded to their second choice, and, if they cannot be 
accommodated there, to their third choice, etc. 

Each college has established procedures to consider qualified applicants who 
would be faced with an extreme hardship if not admitted. Prospective hardship pe- 
titioners should contact the concerned college regarding specific policies governing 
hardship admission. 

Late Filing Period 

Colleges not filling enrollment categories during the initial filing period will con- 
tinue to accept applications during the late period until quotas are filled. Enroll- 
ment priorities within the late period will be granted in chronological order of 
application receipt by the colleges. 

How to Apply 

1. Submit a completed application for admission, including the statement of resi- 
dence, within the announced filing period accompanied by the required appli- 
cation fee. 

2. Request required transcripts of record of all previous scholastic work from 
each school or college attended. The transcripts must be sent by the issuing 
institution directly to: 

Office of Admission and Records 
California State College, Fullerton 
800 North State College Boulevard 
Fullerton, California 92631 

Do not request transcripts sent until requested to do so by the college where 
space has been reserved for you. 

The transcripts required are 
— for undergraduates — 

(a) the high school transcript, and 

(b) a transcript from each college or university attended. Undergraduate 
applicants for a teaching credential must submit two copies of the 
transcript from each college or university attended; 

— f or graduates — 

(a) applicants for unclassified graduate standing with no degree or cre- 
dential objective must submit a transcript from the college or univer- 
sity where the baccalaureate was earned. 

(b) applicants for a master’s degree or teaching credential, or both, must 
submit two copies of the transcript from each college or university 
attended. 


57 


General Procedures for Admission 

All students are advised that they should also have a complete set of college 
transcripts for their personal use at all times of advisement. 

All transcripts must be received directly from the issuing institution to be 
considered official and cannot be returned to the student. Foreign language 
transcripts must be accompanied by certified English translations. 

3. If required, submit the scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test or 
the American College Test. Scores are required for all undergradute appli- 
cants with fewer than 60 completed semester units of study (90 quarter 
units). Applicants to classified graduate curricula must submit the scores of 
any qualifying examinations required in their prospective program of study. 

Statement of Residence 

All applicants for admission to the College must file a Statement of Residence with 
their application. Students in continuous attendance during successive semesters are 
not required to complete this form after the initial filing unless there has been a 
change in their status. Students are held responsible for reporting any change in 
residence status to the Office of Admissions and Records. Any interruption in 
attendance requires a new Statement of Residence before re-entrance. 

The determination of residence status is governed by laws found in the Govern- 
ment Code and the Education Code, and by court cases interpreting these statutes. 
For admission and tuition purposes “a resident student” means any person who has 
been a bona fide resident of the State of California for more than one year im- 
mediately preceding the opening of the semester. The residence determination date 
is established by the Board of Trustees. 

Normally, the legal residence of an unmarried minor is that of his parents. Excep- 
tions to the rules on residency determination, or waivers of nonresident tuition, 
apply under certain conditions for exchange students, a child or spouse of an aca- 
demic or administrative employee of the California State Colleges, a minor child 
of an active member of the Armed Forces stationed in California, and full-time 
teachers in the public schools holding a valid credential and pursuing instruction 
for required certification qualification for their current position. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Admission to the college as a student does not constitute admission to the teaching 
credential program. Students who plan to work toward teaching credentials must 
apply to the School of Education following procedures available from the School 
of Education. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student who is admitted to the college for a given semester but who does not 
register in the specified semester will have his admission canceled. The student must 
file a new application form when he again seeks admission and must follow the 
complete application procedure and meet the then current admission requirements. 

Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshman and transfer students who 
have demonstrated outstanding achievement in past academic work. For first-time 
freshmen with no previous college units earned, a grade-point average of 3.5 on a 
5-point scale must be earned in the coursework considered for admission to the 
college. Students who have completed fewer than 60 college semester units of credit 
must meet the grade-point average criteria for first-time freshmen and must also 
have earned a 3.5 grade-point average on all this past college work attempted. 
Students who have completed 60 or more semester college units are eligible if a 
grade-point average of 3.5 is earned in all college work completed. 


58 


General Procedures for Admission 


Undergraduate Entrance Testing Requirements 

All undergraduate students, who have completed fewer than 60 semester or 90 
quarter units of college work, are required to submit scores from either one of 
two national testing programs before eligibility for admission to the college can be 
determined. This requirement does not affect undergraduate students who have 
previously attended California State College, Fullerton and who have submitted 
ACT or SAT scores at the time of their first admission. 

Registration forms for either test may be obtained from high school and com- 
munity college counselors, California State College testing offices or directly from 
the testing service at the address below: 

SAT 

College Entrance Examination Board 
Box 1025 

Berkeley, California 94701 
Dates Test Given: 

July 10, 1971 
Oct. 9, 1971 
Nov. 6, 1971 
Dec. 4, 1971 
Jan. 8, 1972 
Mar. 4, 1972 
Apr. 15, 1972 
July 8, 1972 

To take one of these tests: 

1. Obtain a registration form and a Student Information Bulletin from your high 
school or community college counselor, from one of the addresses above, or 
from the College Testing Center. Select a test center near your home from 
the list printed in the Bulletin. 

2. Send the completed registration form and the appropriate test fee to the 
proper address. Do not send to the Fullerton campus. 

3. Have your ACT or SAT scores reported to the Testing Center, California 
State College, Fullerton. These scores should be received before the deadline 
for application. Use the appropriate code number for score reports. 

If you have already taken either the ACT or SAT send $1 to the appropriate 
testing agency and request that your scores be reported to the Testing Center. 
Use appropriate code number when requesting such reports, and provide complete 
information concerning testing date, test center, name and address changes, etc. 
lnese test scores when included on high school or college transcripts are not 
acceptable. 

Health Requirements for Admission 

h ^ n /* er ? rac * uate graduate students must, upon admission, submit completed 
calth history and physical examination forms. In addition, evidence of a negative 
chest X-ray taken within 12 months before their registration must be presented. 

tuberculin skin test may be obtained in lieu of an X-ray. Evidence of a smallpox 
' a ^ nation w j t hin the past 10 years is also required. 

I he following services may be completed at the Student Health Center for a 
C AlP °^ 1: urin . al y sis » hemotocrit, tuberculin skin test and smallpox vaccination. 

All health requirements must be satisfactorily completed before the student 
will be allowed to complete registration. It is urged that the health clearance be 

o tamed before the date of registration as this will conserve the student’s registra- 
tion time. 


ACT 

American College Testing Program 

P.O. Box 414 

Iowa City, Iowa 52240 

Dates Test Given: 

July 17, 1971 
Oct. 16, 1971 
Dec. 11, 1971 
Feb. 12, 1972 
Apr. 22, 1972 
July 15, 1972 


59 


Evaluations of Academic Records 

EVALUATIONS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

The Office of Admissions will evaluate previous college work in terms of its 
relationship to the requirements of California State College, Fullerton. All degree 
candidates will be issued a credit summary during the first semester of attendance 
which serves as a basis for determining specific remaining requirements for the 
student's specific objectives. 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as long as the student en- 
rolls at the date specified, pursues the objective specified, and remains in con- 
tinuous attendance. The student will not be held to additional graduation re- 
quirements unless such requirements become mandatory as a result of changes in 
the California Administrative Code or the California Education Code. If the 
student does not remain in continuous attendance and has not applied for and been 
granted a formal leave of absence, the evaluation issued upon readmission will 
specify the remaining requirements for the student’s specific objectives. 

In view of the foregoing regulations, the student should notify the Office of 
Admissions immediately if he changes the objective specified in his evaluation. 
While the evaluation for a student remains valid, the student is held responsible 
for complying with all changes in regulations and procedures which may appear 
in subsequent catalogs. 

Acceptance of Credit 

Credit for work completed at accredited institutions will be accepted toward 
the satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at the college within limi- 
tations of residence requirements, community college transfer maximums, and 
course applicability. 

General Policy 

Credit for coursework completed at accredited institutions will be accepted 
toward the satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at the college within 
limitations of residence requirements and community college transfer maximums. 

Transfer of Credit From a Community College 

Upper division credit is not allowed for courses taken in a community college. 
Credential credit is not allowed for courses in professional education taken in a 
community college. This does not invalidate credit for preprofessional courses 
taken at a community college, such as introduction to education, art or design, 
arithmetic, or music for classroom teachers. After a student has completed 70 units 
of college credit, whether at a community college or a four-year institution, or at 
both, no further community college units will be accepted for unit credit. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in active military service for at least a year may be 
granted six units of undergraduate credit. Courses taken in service schools may be 
given credit on the basis of an evaluation which determines that they are of 
college level. Any credit for military experience will be given only upon request. 
Records verifying such experience must be filed with the Office of Admissions. 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence and extension courses 
which may be allowed toward the bachelor's degree is 24 units, of which not more 
than 12 may be transferred from another college or university. 


60 


Evaluations of Academic Records 


Credit by Advanced Placement 

Students who have successfully completed courses in the advanced placement 
program (defined as receiving a score of 3, 4 or 5) shall be granted credit toward 
graduation, advanced placement in the college’s sequence courses, and credit for 
curriculum requirements. 

Credit by Examination 

Students may be granted credit for a course toward graduation and to meet 
curriculum requirements by the satisfactory completion of a challenge examina- 
tion in that course requirement. The examinations are to be comprehensive and 
administered by the department in which the course is offered. Well in advance 
of the challenge examination the student will secure written approval of his major 
adviser and the chairman of the department in which the course is offered. Upon 
the successful completion of the examination, the notation on the permanent 
record of the student will be made as “CR” for the course. “CR” is to indicate 
credit for the course with a passing grade. Upon failure of the examination, the 
notation on the permanent record of the student will be made as “No CR” for 
the course. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum resi- 
dence requirements. The challenge examination for any course may be attempted 
only once. A maximum of 30 credits can be earned by challenge examination , 
including those achieved by advanced placement. 

College Level Examination Program 

Operating under a one-year interim policy, California State College, Fullerton 
may grant credit and advanced standing based upon examination results from the 
College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board 
using as minimum standards: 

General Examinations 

1. That the student achieve a score at or above the 50th percentile, college 
sophomore norms. 

2. That no unit credit be granted for any test in 'he general examinations, but 
that six units of general education requirements be waived for each test com- 
pleted with the appropriate score. 

Subject Examinations 

1. That the student submit a score at or above the 50th percentile of those in 
the norming group who earned a mark of C or better. 

2. That equivalency to California State College, Fullerton courses be determined 
by the appropriate academic department in conjunction with the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

3. That college credit shall have not been previously earned in the courses in 
question. 

In no case will credit so awarded count towards residence credit. 


61 


REGISTRATION 


Orientation 

Various opportunities are provided for new students to obtain information re- 
lating to academic programs, student services and activities, and other aspects of 
college life. Information about specific programs will be published separately. 

Registration 

Class Schedule: A complete listing of courses offered will be found in the class 
schedule published prior to the start of each semester. This publication, which may 
be purchased in the Titan Bookstore for a nominal charge, also states detailed in- 
formation pertaining to the semester including class enrollment and fee payment 
procedures. 

It is important that each student familiarize himself not only with the academic 
policies stated in the catalog but also with the requirements and procedures in the 
class schedule as both are used in the selection of classes for the semester. 

Course Selection: California State College, Fullerton, believes its students have 
the intelligence and capability to plan their schedules each semester and to make a 
selection among available sections of a course. Such matters are the responsibility 
of the student and permit him to develop an individualized class schedule for each 
semester to meet the student’s academic program requirements as well as his own 
unique personal requirements (study, work, etc.). 

Course selection should be based on an adviser-approved formal academic pro- 
gram, course descriptions in the current catalog (including course prerequisites), 
and courses offered as listed in the semester class schedule. With this information 
each student should be able to determine courses needed, courses available, and 
eligibility for enrolling in them. The study list resulting from such an appraisal 
forms the basis for completing the official program card which is used in registra- 
tion. 

Registration: Registration is made up of two steps — class enrollment and fee 
payment. At registration, every student is required to file a program card with the 
Office of the Registrar. The filing of a program card by the student and its ac- 
ceptance by the college obligates the student to perform the designated work to 
the best of his ability. All undergraduates are urged to declare a major at the 
earliest practicable time and not later than at the time they have completed 60 
units of college work. 

It is emphasized that registration does not become official until fees have been 
paid. 

Computerized Records System 

The student personnel records system, including the registration process, is com- 
puter based. This means that records and repons are produced from an information 
data file maintained in the college Computer Center. It is a fact of life in a large 
institution such as Fullerton that use of the computer is essential. Thus, there is a 
requirement for data cards, code numbers, student file numbers and for meeting 
precise criteria for data input and stringent deadlines. All of this introduces an 
clement of the impersonal in the student records system. Despite these conditions, 
every effort is made to provide courteous, efficient and personalized service to 
students and the entire college community. To assist in providing this service, 
students are urged to be extremely careful and accurate in preparing data cards, 
especially the official program card and change of program card, for entry into the 
information file. Accurate input of information will assure each student of error- 
free records. 


62 


Veterans 


Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be announced in the class sched- 
ule. Late registrants will find themselves handicapped in arranging their programs 
and must pay a $5 late registration fee in addition to regular fees. 

Changes in Program 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses he lists when he registers. 
Changes may not be made thereafter without the filing of a change of program 
(add-drop) form in the Office of the Registrar. All requests for courses to be 
added or dropped, and other changes, are processed without a fee charge during 
the announced schedule adjustment period (normally the first week of instruction). 
After the announced period there is a $1 fee charged for change of program in- 
volving dropped classes. Classes may be added only during the schedule adjustment 
period. 

Failure to file an official change of program request in the case of dropped 
classes may result in a penalty mark being recorded. Through the fourth week 
of instruction in the semester no record of enrollment is made of dropped classes. 
After four weeks students are expected to complete all courses in which they 
are enrolled. However, for reasons of ill health or reasons involving other serious 
and unforeseen problems, the student may drop a class or classes and receive a 
W (Withdrawal) or F (Failure) by obtaining the signature of the professor(s) 
involved and filing the change with the registrar on the form provided. 

No classes may be dropped during the last four weeks of instruction, although 
complete withdrawal from college is still possible (See page 70). 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the college may enroll concurrently for additional courses 
at another institution only with advance written approval from the student’s 
academic adviser on official forms filed in the Office of the Registrar. Permission 
will not be granted when the study load in the proposed combined program ex- 
ceeds the units authorized at this college. 

Auditors 

A properly qualified student may enroll in classes as an auditor. The student 
must meet the regular college admission requirements and must pay the same fees 
as other students. An auditor may not change his registration to obtain credit after 
the last date to add courses to the study list. An auditor is not permitted to take 
examinations in the course. 

Handicapped Students 

Students physically handicapped who require assistance should contact the Office 
of the Registrar prior to the announced semester registration period so that special 
arrangements for them can be made. 

VETERANS 

California State College, Fullerton is approved by the Bureau of Readjustment 
Education, State Department of Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking 
benefits under state and federal legislation. All students seeking veterans’ benefits 
must have a degree or credential objective. 

Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in 
which the veteran plans to use these benefits in order to have the authorization 
at the time of registration. 


63 


Selective Service 


SELECTIVE SERVICE 

Male students requiring certification of their student status may request the Office 
of Admissions and Records to submit the appropriate forms to their draft board. 

Undergraduate students shall normally be enrolled for 12 units a semester to be 
considered full time. Graduate students enrolled for nine units of study may be 
considered full time provided at least three units are 500-level courses. 

All students are advised that by enrolling each consecutive term at the minimum 
level to qualify for full-time certification they may not achieve the degree and 
credential programs within the time limit allowed by the Selective Service System. 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

California State College, Fullerton does not have a Reserve Officers’ Training 
Corps program. However, a two-year program is available to eligible male students 
through cooperation with the University of Southern California where an Air 
Force ROTC program is conducted. For complete information, write the Professor 
of Aerospace Studies, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90007. 

FEE SCHEDULE, 1971-72 

Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California. The following are the 
fees and expenses currently assessed. 


All Students 

Application fee (nonrefundable) 

. Payable by check or money order at time of applying $20 

Materials and Service fee: Semester 

Fewer than 4 units $39 

At least 4 but fewer than 8 units $44 

At least 8 but fewer than 12 units $49 

12 or more units $59 

Fewer than 8 units or 
8 units more 

Facilities fee $ 3 $ 3 

Associated Students fee $10 $10 

College Union fee $ 4 $ 8 


Nonresidents 


Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees required of resident students, except 
for enrollment in extension or summer session) 

15 or more units, maximum $555 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit $37 

Per academic year — $1,110 


Foreign-Visa Students 

Nonresident foreign-visa students (in addition to fees required of resident 


students) 

15 or more units, maximum $300 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit $20 


The rate of tuition required of each nonresident student who: 

— is a citizen and resident of a foreign country; and 

— is enrolled in the California State Colleges during the fall term of the 1970-71 
college year; or who has been accepted for admission on or before November 
24, 1970, to a California State College for any subsequent semester or quarter 
to the 1970-71 college year; and 

— remains in continuous attendance as a full-time student at the California State 
Colleges, making normal progress toward a degree objective; and 


64 


Fee Schedule 


— has not been awarded a baccalaureate degree or graduate degree from the 
California State Colleges subsequent to the commencement of the fall term of 
the 1970-71 academic year; 

shall be at the rate of $600 per academic year per full-time student for all academic 
terms commencing prior to the 1974-75 fiscal year, and shall be at the rate of 
tuition charged nonresident students who are not citizens and residents of a for- 
eign country for all academic terms commencing during the 1974-75 fiscal year 
and thereafter. 

Commencing with the 1971 winter quarter at colleges on quarter system year- 
round operations, and with the 1971 spring semester at all other colleges, and for 
each term thereafter, the rate of tuition for each nonresident student who is a 
citizen and resident of a foreign country and who docs not satisfy all of the fore- 
going provisions of the preceding paragraph shall be at the rate of tuition charged 
nonresident students who are not citizens and residents of a foreign country. 


Summer Session 

Per summer semester unit $24 

Associated Students fee S 3 

College Union fee $ 4 

Extension Fees 

Per Unit or Fraction of Unit $19 to $38 

Other Fees or Charges 

Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above) $5 

Check returned from bank for any cause $2 

Change of program fee $1 

Transcript fee (no charge for first copy) $1 

Failure to meet administrative required appointment or time limit $2 

Auditors pay the same fees as others. 


Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of the California State Colleges. 

Refund of Fees 

Upon withdrawal from college, the materials and service fee may l>c refunded 
if written application for refund, on forms provided by the college, is submitted 
to the registrar not later than 14 days following the day of the term that instruc- 
tion begins; provided that the amount of $10 shall be retained to cover the cost 
of registration. Late registration fees, change of program fees and application fees 
are not refundable. 

The entire fee may be refunded if a student is unable to continue his registra- 
tion because of a college regulation or because of compulsory military service. 
Application for refund under such circumstances may be made at any time before 
the date when the student received any academic credit for the courses for which 
he is registered. 

No refund of fees will be given if the unit load of the student is reduced to a 


lower material and service fee category. 

Parking Fees 

Semester pass (nonreserved spaces): 

Regular and limited students. — $13.00 

Coin operated gate, per admission 25 

Summer session, each six-week period 5.00 

Typical Student Expenses 


Typical school year budgets for California residents living in the college resi- 
dence hall will be approximately $2,110. Budgets for students living at home or 
making other housing arrangements will vary widely. It is estimated that, including 
an $800 yearly allowance for room and board, the cost will approximate $1,600. 
Nonresident students must also allow for nonresident tuition. 


3— 81593 


65 


RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 


ENROLLMENT DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each college semester unit represents three hours of college work per week for 
one semester. Courses are of three types: 

(1) Lecture— one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory— three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. 

Classification in College 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 l A semester units of work are 
classified as freshmen, 30-59 Vi semester units as sophomores, 60-89 Vi semester units 
as juniors, and 90 or more as seniors. 

Maximum Number of Course Units 

Undergraduate students attending college on a full-time basis are normally 
permitted to enroll in a maximum of 16 units each semester (except for engi- 
neering students who may enroll for a maximum of 17 units). The minimum full- 
time load is 12 units. 

A student whose academic record justifies a study list in excess of the normal 
may request to be allowed to carry extra units. Request forms may be obtained 
from the Office of the Registrar and arc submitted during the first week of in- 
struction. In general, only students with superior academic records are allowed 
to enroll for more than the maximum unit load. In addition, the need to carry 
an overload must be established. Factors such as time spent in employment or 
commuting, the nature of the academic program, extracurricular activities and the 
student’s health should be considered in planning a study load. Students who are 
employed or have outside responsibilities arc advised to reduce their program of 
study. 

The minimum full-time program of study for graduate students is defined in the 
“Graduate Policies and Procedures” section of this catalog. 

Initial Class Meeting 

It is important that students attend the first meeting of a class. In closed classes 
students who arc absent from the first meeting without notification of the instructor 
or departmental office within 24 hours may be denied admission to the class. In- 
structors are privileged to deny admission to absentees in order to admit any 
persons on waiting lists in their places. Students who are denied admission to class 
must file a drop request card with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Level Courses 

Graduate level (500) courses arc organized primarily for graduate students. 
Undergraduate students may be permitted to enroll in a graduate level (500) 
course if: 

(a) They are within 9 units of completion of graduation requirements, or 

(b) They are exceptionally qualified seniors whose undergraduate work in the 
related field or fields has been of 3.5 grade-point average or better, and 
whose cumulative overall grade-point average is at least 3.25. 


66 


Grading Policies 


Such cases shall require specific approval by the instructor and also chairman 
of the department in which the course is offered and by the chairman of the 
student’s major department. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under (a) above may be applied to a gradu- 
ate program. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under (b) above may be applied to the under- 
graduate program only. 


GRADING POLICIES 


Grading System 

Satisfactory grade Grade-point value 

A 4 

B 3 

C 2 

CR None assigned 

Unsatisfactory grade 

D 1 

F 0 

NR (No Report) 0 

Special grade 

£ (Incomplete) 0 

AU (Auditor) (no credit toward degree or credential) None assigned 

W (Passing withdrawal) — None assigned 

NC (No credit) None assigned 


With the exception of the grades of E, AU, W, CR and NC, all units attempted 
are computed in the student’s grade-point average. 

Incomplete Work 

A grade of E may be given only when, in the opinion of the instructor, a stu- 
dent cannot complete a course during the semester of enrollment for reasons be- 
yond his control. Such reasons are assumed to include: illness of the student, or 
of members of his immediate family, extraordinary financial problems, loss of out- 
side position, and other such exigencies. In assigning a grade of E, the instructor 
will file with his department a statement of the specific requirements for comple- 
tion of coursework. Such requirements will not include or necessitate retaking 
the course. This statement will also include a provisional grade indicating the 
quality of work completed at that time, and the instructor’s designation of the time 
limit allowed for completion of course requirements. Upon later completion of the 
course requirements, or upon expiration of the time limits for completion of course 
requirements, the instructor shall initiate a change to a grade of A, B, C, D, CR, NC 
or F. Instructional departments will determine procedures for completion of course 
requirements and assigning grades for such completed coursework, in those spe- 
cial circumstances where the instructor is no longer available. 

Credit/No Credit 

Each student shall be permitted to select courses in subjects outside of the major 
requirements on a Credit/No Credit basis. For purposes of Credit/No Credit, the 
phrase “major requirements” can be taken to include core plus concentration (or 
option) requirements in departments using such terms, and professional course 
requirements in teacher education curricula. 


67 


Grading Policies 


The term “Credit” signifies that the student’s performance in the course was 
such that he was awarded full credit toward his degree objective without comment 
as to the quality level of achievement and without further qualification. “No 
Credit” signifies that the student attempted the course but that his performance 
did not warrant credit toward his objective. The level of work for which a 
“Credit” grade will be given will be determined by the individual professor for 
each class. However, the level of performance required for a CR grade will be 
no higher than that now required for satisfactory work. At the beginning of each 
class, the professor will thoroughly explain the amount and level of work required 
for a CR grade. 

The student must declare his intention to take a course on a Credit/No Credit 
basis when he registers. Under no circumstances will he be permitted to change 
his declaration after the first week of classes in any given semester. Any student 
attempting a course on a Credit/No Credit basis must meet the prerequisites for 
that course. 

The policy of Credit/No Credit applies to undergraduate students, non-objective 
graduate students, and to classified graduate students for courses not included in 
the approved study plan. 

When a student changes his major field of study to one where he has completed 
courses on a credit basis, such lower division courses shall be included in his major 
requirements. Upper division courses may be included at the option of the de- 
partment. 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the 
end of each semester. Many students also leave self -ad dressed post cards for 
teachers of specific courses to send them slightly faster evaluations of their work. 

Communication Skills 

Skills in written, oral, and gestural communication are important tools and 
marks of well educated men and women. Great competencies in both articulation 
and advocacy arc arts well- worth attaining for living effective, full and civic lives 
and for achieving excellence in vocational careers. 

A variety of experiences at college provide opportunities to practice and de- 
velop communications skills. The acts of w ritten and oral expression also serve to 
consolidate, synthesize, and develop thinking and personality. 

Students will be required to demonstrate, in all classes w here written expression 
is appropriate, their ability to write clearly and correctly about the materials of 
the course. Ability of a student to demonstrate writing proficiency shall be used 
as a part of the final grade determination in any course. 

Examinations 

Final examinations, if required by the instructor, will be given at times scheduled 
by the college. Once established, the final examination schedule may not be changed 
unless approved by the dean of the school. No makeup final examination will be 
given except for reason of illness or other verified emergencies. 

Grade-Point Averages ; Repetition of Courses 

Grade-point averages are calculated by dividing grade points earned by units 
attempted. Work attempted at all institutions, including California State College, 
Fullerton, is included in all-college calculations. Work attempted at other insti- 
tutions will not be included in CSCF-only averages. 

When any course is repeated both grades are considered in computing grade- 
point averages. However, successful repetition of a course originally passed carries 
no additional unit credit towards a degree or credential. 


68 


Transcripts 


TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of courses taken at the college are issued only with the writ- 
ten permission of the student concerned. Partial transcripts are not issued. A stu- 
dent is entitled to one free transcript; a fee of $1 for each additional transcript 
issued must be received before the record can be forwarded. 

Normally transcripts are available within three working days, except at the end 
of the semester when the student should allow about 10 days after the last day of 
the semester. 

Transcripts from other institutions, which have been presented for admission or 
evaluation, become a part of the student’s permanent academic file and are not 
returned or copied for distribution. Students desiring transcripts covering work 
attempted elsewhere should request them from the institutions concerned. 

CONTINUOUS RESIDENCY REGULATIONS 

Good Standing 

“Good standing” indicates that a student is eligible to continue and is free from 
financial obligation to the college. A student under academic disqualification, dis- 
ciplinary suspension or disciplinary expulsion is not eligible to receive a statement 
of “good standing” on transcripts issued by the college or on other documents. 

Choice of Catalog Regulations for Meeting Degree Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing 
on in the same curriculum in any state college, in any of the California community 
colleges or in any combination of California community colleges and California 
State Colleges, may, for purposes of meeting graduation requirements, elect to 
meet the graduation requirements of the California State College from which he 
will graduate in effect either at the time of his entering the curriculum or at the 
time of his graduation therefrom, except that substitutions for discontinued courses 
may be authorized or required by the proper college authorities. 

Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Students 

A graduate student with a degree objective is expected to maintain continuous 
enrollment in the college (summer sessions and extension excluded) until comple- 
tion of the degree. If a student pursuing an advanced degree finds it impossible 
to attend during a certain semester, and is not eligible for a leave of absence, as 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog, he may request permission to register in Graduate 
Studies 700, a Credit/No Credit course with one unit of credit, which does not 
require class attendance. A student may not register in Graduate Studies 700 for 
more than two consecutive semesters. 

A graduate student who fails to register has severed his connection with the 
college. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may petition for a leave of absence and if approved may upon his 
return continue under the catalog requirements that applied to his enrollment prior 
to the absence. Except in the case of required military service a leave of absence 
may be granted for a maximum of one year. Illness and compulsory military 
service are the only routinely approved reasons for a leave of absence. Students 
should realize that an approved leave of absence does not reserve a place for them 
in the college. 


69 


Student Honors 


Complete Withdrawal From College 

Students who wish to withdraw from the college must complete a withdrawal- 
from-collcgc card. Sec section on refund of fees for possible refunds. No student 
may withdraw after the date shown on the college calendar as the last day of 
instruction. Complete withdrawal from college is accomplished by following the 
procedures for dropping classes (see Change of Program) in addition to procedures 
for withdrawal. 


STUDENT HONORS 

Dean's List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list 
of students whose grade-point average for the previous term has been 3.5 or better. 
Students are notified in writing by the dean of students when they have earned 
this distinction. Eligibility is based on a minimum of 12 units of coursework. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation have been defined by the Faculty Council in three classi- 


fications: 

With honors GPA 3.5 

With high honors GPA 3.85 

With highest honors GPA 4.0 


PROBATION AND DISQUALIFICATION 

Academic Probation 

Academic probation serves to identify and to bring to the attention of appro- 
priate college authorities a student who is experiencing academic difficulties. 

A student shall be placed upon academic probation if either his cumulative grade- 
point average or his grade-point average at California State College, Fullerton 
falls below 2.0 (grade of C on five-point scale). The student shall be advised of 
probation status promptly and, except in unusual instances, before the end of the 
first week of instruction of the next consecutive enrollment period. 

A student shall be removed from the probation list and restored to clear standing 
when he cams a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 (C) in all academic work 
attempted, and in all such work attempted at California State College, Fullerton. 

Academic Disqualification 

A student on academic probation shall be subject to academic disqualification if: 

1. As a lower division student (fewer than 60 semester hours of college work 
completed) he falls 15 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all 
college units attempted or in all units attempted at this college. 

2. As a junior (60 to 89 Yi semester hours of college work completed) he falls 
9 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted 
or in all units attempted at this college. 

3. As a senior (90 or more semester hours of college work completed) he falls 
6 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted 
or in all units attempted at this college. 

A graduate student (unclassified or classified) shall be disqualified if he falls 
below a 2.0 (C) average in all units attempted at this college as a graduate student. 


70 


Probation and Disqualification 


Student Conduct 

The college properly assumes that all students are in attendance to secure a sound 
education and that they will conduct themselves as mature citizens of the campus 
community. Compliance ivith all regulations of the college is therefore expected. 
If, however, on any occasion a student or an organization is alleged to have com- 
promised accepted college policies or standards , appropriate judiciary procedures 
shall be initiated through the established college judicial process. Every effort will 
be made to encourage and support the development of self-discipline and control 
by students and student organizations. The dean of students, aided by all members 
of the faculty and advised by the Student Affairs Committee of the faculty, is 
responsible to the President of the college for the behavior of students in their 
relationships to the college. The President in turn is responsible to the Chancellor 
and the Trustees of the California State Colleges who themselves are governed 
by specific laws of the State of California. 

Students have the right to appeal certain disciplinary actions taken by appropri- 
ate college authorities. Regulations governing original hearings and appeal rights 
and procedures have been carefully detailed to provide maximum protection to 
both the individual charged and the college community. Information about the 
operation of the judicial system involving student discipline may be obtained in 
the Office of the Associate Dean of Students, Judicial Affairs. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students may petition for review of certain college academic regulations when 
unusual circumstances exist. It should be noted, however, that academic regulations 
when they are contained in Title 5, California Administrative Code, are not sub- 
ject for petition. 

Petition forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records and must 
first be reviewed and signed by the student’s adviser. Action will then be taken 
on the petition and the student will be notified of this decision. A copy of the 
action will also be placed in the student’s folder in the Office of the Registrar. 




71 


Right of Academic Appeal 

RIGHT OF ACADEMIC APPEAL 

The student who believes he has been graded capriciously or treated with 
obvious prejudice by faculty or administrators may initiate steps for an academic 
appeal. In all cases the student should first make an effort to resolve the issue by 
consulting the faculty' or administrator concerned. If the issue cannot be resolved 
the student should follow the procedures outlined in the Students Rights and Re- 
sponsibilities document (CPS300), or consult with the dean of students or associate 
dean of students, judicial affairs. 


72 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 


A student is eligible for graduation if he is in good standing and fulfills the 
following requirements: 

1. General Education 

To be eligible for a baccalaureate degree from California State College, Fuller- 
ton, the student shall have completed a minimum of 45 semester units of general 
education courses selected in accordance with the pattern designated below. Such 
courses may be lower division courses or upper division courses for which the 
student qualifies. 

/. Natural Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of two courses, one from each of two 
fields which shall include the following: biological sciences, chemistry, earth 
sciences, physics and physical science. 

II. Social Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three 
fields which shall include the following: anthropology, economics, geography, 
history, political science, psychology and sociology. 

Note: Of the courses taken to meet the requirements in United States History, 
Constitution, state and local government (California Administrative Code, Sec- 
tion 40404), a maximum of three units may be applied for credit in Section II. 

III . Arts — Humanities Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three 
fields which shall include the following: art, drama, language (English, intermedi- 
ate or advanced courses in foreign languages), literature (American, compara- 
tive, English, foreign), music, philosophy and speech. 

IV. Basic Subjects Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three 
fields which shall include the following: computer science, elementary foreign 
languages, health education, mathematics, oral communication, physical educa- 
tion, reading, statistics and writing. 

V. General Education Electives 

The student may fulfill any remaining units required for general education by 
selecting any undergraduate course offered by the college for credit except 
courses which apply to the student’s major or credential program. 

Transfer students certified under provisions of California Administrative Code, 
Title V, as having met the 40-unit minimum general education requirements will 
be required to complete five additional units in general education selected from 
two or more sections, I - V above. 

2 . Statutory Requirements in American Institutions and Values 

In addition to general education-breadth requirements California Administrative 
Code, Section 40404, states that for graduation the student is required “to demon- 
strate competence in the Constitution of the United States, and in American His- 
tory including the study of American institutions and ideals, and of the principles 
of state and local government established under the Constitution of this State.” 

74 


Bachelor's Degree 


To meet this requirement, the student may select fi*om the following alternatives: 
1) pass a comprehensive examination in these fields, 2) pass Political Science 100 
and a course in U. S. history, 3) pass a combination of Political Science 300 and 
History 170A or 170B. Course work completed to satisfy Section 40404 may be 
applied in the social sciences area of general education to a maximum of three 
units. 

3. Electives 

After fulfilling the requirements in general education, American institutions and 
values, and a specific major (and possibly a minor), each student is free to choose 
the rest of the courses needed to complete the 124 semester units required for 
graduation. Different majors vary considerably in both the number of units they 
require in their own and related fields. They also vary considerably in the amount 
of latitude or choice they permit in selecting courses to satisfy the major require- 
ment. The general education requirement encourages great freedom of choice 
within the broad categories of the natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humani- 
ties, and basic subjects. Students at the college use their electives to broaden their 
general educations, deepen some aspect of their specialties, pursue work in related 
fields, and satisfy curiosities and enthusiasms for particular subjects or areas of 
interest. 

4. Units 

(a) Total units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for graduation with a bachelor 
of arts degree. The Bachelor of Science in Engineering requires a minimum 
of 136 semester units. 

(b) Upper division units 

Completion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Resident units 

Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residence is required. At 
least one-half of these units must be completed among the last 20 semester 
units counted toward the degree. Extension credit, or credit by examination, 
may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement. 

5 . Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted, 
including those accepted by transfer from another institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted at 
California State College, Fullerton. 

6 . Major 

Completion of all requirements for a majoi* as specified by appropriate college 
authority is required. 

7 . Multiple Majors and Second Baccalaureate Degrees 

Second Majors 

Within the units required for the baccalaureate it is possible for a student to 
complete the requirements for more than one major within a degree program 
when the additional major is within the degree program of the first major. 
The student shall declare the additional major with the appropriate department 
not later than the beginning of the student’s final year of study. The com- 
pletion of additional majors will be noted at the time of graduation by appro- 
priate entries on the academic record and on the commencement program. 


75 


Bachelor's Degree 


Second Baccalaureate 

(a) First degree completed elsewhere, second at CSCF 

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree from CSCF after having received a 
baccalaureate from another institution may qualify for graduation with 
the approval and recommendation of the faculty upon completion of the 
following: 

(1) general education requirements 

(2) all requirements in the major field of study 

(3) residence and scholarship requirements 

(b) Two baccalaureates from CSCF 

A student completing a baccalaureate program at CSCF will have com- 
pleted the general education, residence, and scholarship requirements. With 
the approval and recommendation of the faculty, he may qualify for a 
second baccalaureate under the following circumstances: 

(1) The second field of study is offered in a different program (e.g. 
bachelor of arts to bachelor of science) 

(2) At least 24 units are earned in residence beyond the requirements 
for the first degree 

(3) All requirements of the major are fulfilled 

Units included in second baccalaureate programs may not apply to gradu- 
ate degrees or credential programs. 

8. Minor 

Completion of a minor field is not required for the baccalaureate degree at this 
time. 

9. Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation should file an application for a graduation require- 
ment check in the Office of the Registrar during registration for the semester 
prior to the semester in which he expects to graduate (please refer to the current 
schedule of class for the deadlines applied to requesting and returning graduation 
checks). A senior should have completed at least 100 units (including the current 
work in progress) and a substantial portion of his major requirements before re- 
questing a graduation check. If the candidate does not complete the requirements 
in the semester indicated, he must file a change of graduation date in the Office 
of the Registrar. The original graduation check is valid as long as a student is in 
continuous attendance and is completing the major under which the graduation 
check was requested. 

10. Approval and Recommendation by the Faculty of the College 


76 


THE PROGRAM OF MASTER'S DEGREES 


Master’s degree programs offered at California State College, Fullerton are listed 
on page 92 and are described in the appropriate section of this catalog under 
“College Curricula.” Program descriptions and additional information arc con- 
tained in the Graduate Bulletin, copies of which are available in the Office of Ad- 
missions and the Graduate Office. 

Master’s degrees in other areas are under consideration and will be announced 
when approved. 

STANDARDS FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate study deals with more complex ideas and demands more sophisticated 
techniques, searching analysis, and creative thinking than undergraduate study. The 
research required is extensive in both primary and secondary sources and the 
quality of writing expected is high. The student is advised to consider these 
factors when deciding upon the amount of coursework to be undertaken during 
any one semester. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
MASTER S DEGREE 

General requirements for the master’s degree include a study plan consisting of 
a minimum of 30 semester units of approved upper division or graduate course- 
work completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average. The coursework 
should normally be completed within five years (see “Time Limit for Completion”). 
For specific requirements of particular programs, please see the descriptions else- 
where in this catalog. 

Of the minimum of 30 units of approved coursework: 

1. No less than 24 shall be completed in residence. 

2. No less than 15 shall be in graduate (500-level) courses. 

3. No more than a total of six shall be in extension and/or transfer credit. 

4. No more than six shall be allowed for a thesis, if a thesis is required. 

5. Six shall be in related fields outside the department or concentration. 

Some type of final evaluation, near the end of the student’s work toward his 
master’s degree, is required. It may be a thesis, a project, a comprehensive exami- 
nation, or any combination of these. 

Each student’s program for a master’s degree (including his eligibility, classified 
status, candidacy, and award of the degree) must be approved by an adviser and/ 
or coordinator, school or department committee, and the dean of graduate studies. 

GRADUATE REGULATIONS 

The following are in addition to other policies and procedures applying to both 
undergraduates and graduates described elsewhere in this catalog and in the appro- 
priate class schedule. Requirements of individual programs are shown in the 
appropriate sections of this catalog. Students are advised also to consult the 
Graduate Bulletin for detailed instructions concerning steps in the master’s 
degree program. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the requests for classified 
status, advancement to candidacy, and for a completion review for award of the 
rnaster’s degree (graduation check) in the Graduate Office at the appropriate 
rimes. The deadline for requesting the completion review appears in the official 
college calendar for each semester. 


77 


Master's Degree 


Since all policies and procedures arc subject to change, by appropriate college 
authority, students should consult class schedules and other official announcements 
for possible revision of policies and procedures stated herein. 

Admission With Graduate Standing: Unclassified 

For admission with graduate standing as an unclassified graduate student, a stu- 
dent shall have completed a four-year college course and hold an acceptable bac- 
calaureate degree from an accredited institution; or shall have completed equivalent 
academic preparation as determined by the appropriate college authorities; and 
must satisfactorily meet the professional, personal, scholastic, and other standards 
for graduate study, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate college 
authorities may prescribe. 

Admission to a state college with graduate standing does not constitute admission 
to graduate degree curricula. 

Admission to Graduate Degree Curricula: Classified 

A student who has been admitted to a state college in unclassified graduate status 
may, upon application, be admitted to an authorized graduate degree curriculum 
of the college as a classified graduate student if he satisfactorily meets the profes- 
sional, personal, scholastic, and other standards for admission to the graduate degree 
curriculum, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate college authorities 
may prescribe. Only those applicants who show promise of success and fitness will 
be admitted to graduate degree curricula, and only those who continue to demon- 
strate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and fitness, as determined by the 
appropriate college authorities, shall be eligible to continue in such curricula. 
Students whose performance in a graduate degree curriculum is judged to be un- 
satisfactory by the authorities of the college may be required to withdraw from 
all graduate degree curricula offered by the college. 

Note: All baccalaureate recipients at California State College, Fullerton who 
wish to enroll in graduate degree curricula in the next term following the receipt 
of their baccalaureate must file applications for admission and be approved for ad- 
mission under the same criteria and procedures as new applicants. Students enrolled 
in five-year teacher education programs may continue into their fifth year without 
filing an application; however, such students must apply for and be admitted to 
a subsequent term if they later wish to pursue graduate degree programs. Enroll- 
ment in the fifth year of teacher education provides no guarantee of admission to 
graduate degree curricula. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

A student who has been classified (as above) may, upon application, be advanced 
to candidacy, following the satisfactory' completion of a minimum of 12 units of 
courscwork on the approved study plan. A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 
in all courscwork on the study plan is required; other scholastic, professional and 
personal standards, the passing of examinations, and other qualifications, may be 
prescribed. 

Completion of Requirements 

The degree is awarded upon the satisfactory’ completion of all general and 
specific requirements for the particular program, the recommendation of the ap- 
propriate school or department adviser and/or coordinator and committee, and 
the approval of the dean of graduate studies and the faculty' of the college. 

Admission From Nonaccredited Schools 

A student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited school must apply for admission 
as an undergraduate to complete requirements for a bachelor's degree from this 
institution. However, once admitted, a student in this category who gives evidence 
of unusual promise and superior background may petition the school or department 

78 


/Wester's Degree 

concerned for reclassification as an unclassified graduate student, and if the petition 
is granted he may then proceed in the graduate program. 

Election of Curriculum Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing 
in the same curriculum may elect to meet the degree requirements in effect either 
at the time of his classification or at the time of the completion of degree require- 
ments, except that substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or 
required by the proper college authorities. 

Continuous Enrollment 

A graduate student with a graduate degree objective is expected to maintain 
continuous enrollment during regular semesters of the college (summer sessions 
excluded) until award of the degree. Enrollment in extension classes does not con- 
stitute enrollment in the college. 

A graduate student who fails to register has severed his connection with the 
college and with the school or department of his graduate degree program. If 
he wishes to resume his studies, he must reapply for admission to the college and his 
degree program. The policy is designed to eliminate the need for readmission 
to the college, provide opportunity for continuous use of college facilities, includ- 
ing the Library, and assure the development of an integrated program, adequately 
supervised, and effectively terminated within the time limitations allowed by 
regulations. 

Students who may have completed all coursework, but who may not have satis- 
factorily completed a comprehensive examination or other requirement, must 
maintain continuous enrollment. 

If a student pursuing an advanced degree finds it impossible to attend during a 
certain semester, and is not eligible for a leave of absence, as detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog, he may request permission to register in Graduate Studies 700, a 
credit/no credit course with no units of credit, which does not require class at- 
tendance. Registration in Graduate Studies 700 will normally be restricted to 
graduate students who have been classified or who are in a prescribed prerequisite 
program for a specific degree. A student may not register in Graduate Studies 700 
for a third consecutive semester. 

Applicability of Courses Taken During Summer Sessions 

California State College, Fullerton normally conducts two six-week summer 
sessions. Appropriate courses taken during the summer sessions may be applied to 
a graduate degree program, providing the courses are approved in advance by the 
proper college authorities. Since the funding of graduate work during the summer 
months does not include the necessary advisement and supervision, appropriate 
advisers and committees may not be available. 

It should be noted that enrollment in a summer session does not constitute admis- 
sion to the college (matriculation) and that any student desiring a master’s degree 
must be admitted to a regular semester (fall or spring) and is expected to be 
enrolled continuously until award of the degree (see “Continuous Enrollment”). 

Grade-Point Average Standards 

The required GPA for admission to a master’s degree program (classified status) 
varies with the school or department. Consult school or department descriptions 
of programs elsew r here in this catalog and in the Graduate Bulletin. However, a 
student must have earned a 3.0 average in all postbaccalaureate coursework taken 
at this college plus such transfer courses as are applied to his study plan. Exception 
to this rule may be granted by a school or department in response to a student 
petition only if it is evident that courses whose grades are not to be computed 
in the GPA are inapplicable and inappropriate to the degree program. 


79 


Master's Degree 


The 30 semester units of approved courscwork required for the degree 
must be completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average. If a student ap- 
proaches the completion of the degree requirements with less than a 3.0 average, 
he may request a change in his study plan to add no more than six units of course- 
work in order to achieve at least a 3.0 average (see “Changes in Study Plan,” as 
follows). If a student’s average at any time falls below such a level that it cannot 
be raised to a 3.0 within the prescribed limits of coursework, he has in effect 
withdrawn himself from his master’s program. 

Tests Required for Admission to Master's Degree Programs 

Many of the master’s degree programs require the student to take certain tests, 
usually some part of the Graduate Record Examination, before he can be con- 
sidered for classified status. See program descriptions in this catalog for the types 
of tests required. The GRE tests arc nationally administered and are given only 
a few times a year on specified dates. A current list of these dates is available at 
the Office of Counseling and Testing, school and department offices. The student 
must make written application for the tests on a form available at the above offices 
which must be submined to the particular testing service office by the applicable 
deadline. Since test results are measured against those of students who normally 
take the tests in their senior year and since they arc required before the student 
can be admitted to a degree program (that is, become a classified student), the 
taking of the tests should not be deferred. 

Limitation on Preclassification Coursework 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken at California State College, 
Fullerton prior to classified status may be applied to a student’s master’s degree 
study plan. Any acceptable transfer work is excluded from the nine units per- 
mitted. Students who receive postgraduate credit for courses taken during their 
final semester as a senior may accumulate as many as 12 units. 

Inapplicable Courses 

Courses numbered 100 to 299 and in the 700 series cannot be applied toward a 
master’s degree. Courses numbered 300 to 399 do not give graduate credit unless 
included on an approved graduate study plan. 

Courses taken to meet baccalaureate degree requirements, or postgraduate course- 
work taken to satisfy quantitative or qualitative deficiencies cannot be applied 
toward a master’s degree. 

Workshop, extension, and institute coursework offered either by this college or 
other colleges or universities is not normally acceptable as part of a master’s degree 
study plan. A student who desires to utilize such coursework must obtain approval 
from the adviser and/or coordinator and committee in the school or department 
offering the particular degree, and from the dean of graduate studies. When such 
coursework has been taken elsewhere, the student should provide evidence that the 
college or university concerned would consider such coursework acceptable toward 
a comparable graduate degree. Any such courses offered by other institutions, but 
which are not acceptable for their owti graduate degrees, may not be accepted by 
this college for a graduate degree. 

Also see the sections following on “CR, S, or P Grades,” and “Time Limit for 
Completion.” 

CR, S, or P Grades 

Any course taken at this college with a grade of CR, P, S, or similar, cannot be 
accepted on a masters degree study plan. 

A course taken at another college or university with a grade of CR, P, S, or 
similar, cannot be accepted on a master’s degree study plan unless such a course 
w'ith such a grade is acceptable at that college or university for a graduate degree. 

80 


Masters Degree 


Declassification 

Graduate students in classified graduate status may be declassified, upon the 
recommendation of the school and/or department, reverting to unclassified status, 
when one or more of the following conditions exist: 

1. The student’s request for declassification is approved by his graduate com- 
mittee. 

2. The student fails to maintain the grade-point average required in the master’s 

degree program. 

3. The student’s professional performance is judged to be unsatisfactory by 

other criteria established by the school or department. 

4. The student fails to petition for an extension of the time limit. 

Time Limit for Completion 

All coursework on the master’s degree study plan should normally be completed 
within five years, except that, upon petition to the Graduate Office, two additional 
years may be allowed. The college, at its option, may further extend the time for 
students who pass a comprehensive examination in the relevant course. Requests 
to take such comprehensive examination should be made to school or department 
graduate studies committees. 

When an examination is administered, a report of successful completion will be 
made to the dean of graduate studies. The grade received on the original course 
will be used on the master’s degree study plan, rather than the CR grade used 
for challenge examinations. 

The following shows the dates of expiration of courses according to the five- 
year limitation: 

Courses taken in Will expire in 

19 66 1971 

1967 1972 

1968 1973 

1969 1974 

1970 1975 

1971 1976 

1972 1977 

The five-year period is computed as being the time between the actual date of 
completion of the earliest course and the month the degree is granted. 

Changes in Study Plan 

The student must complete the courses shown on his approved study plan on 
file in the Graduate Office and in the school or department office with at least a 
^•0 (B) GPA. If a student wishes to make a change in his study plan, he should 
file the appropriate form (copies available in the Graduate Office, schools and de- 
partments) in the school or department of his master’s degree prior to registration. 
The recommendation for a change must be signed by his adviser. No course for 
which a grade has been assigned may be removed from a study plan. 

Minimum Full-Time Load 

Ordinarily, nine units of coursework a semester shall constitute a minimum 
full-time program for graduate students, provided at least three units are in 500- 
level or higher courses. 


81 


Master's Degree 

Maximum Unit Load 

Twelve units is considered to be a maximum load for graduate students, but, on 
the approval of an adviser, in exceptional cases, a student may take more. 

Theses and Projects 

When a thesis is required, the approved original copy, in the approved binding, 
and a microfilm of it, must be deposited in the college Library . An abstract, of not 
more than 150 words, must accompany the thesis, and will be published in the 
journal. Master's Abstracts. Arrangements for the binding, microfilming and pub- 
lication of the abstract must be completed by the last day of classes of the se- 
mester in which the degree is to be granted and are made through the college 
Foundation Office. The current fee for microfilming, publication of the abstract, 
and the archival copy is $18 (for theses with more than 240 pages there is an ad- 
ditional charge). The fee for binding is $7.50. 

When a project is required, it will be filed with the school or department of the 
degree program. Some record of the project, or the project itself, is preserved in 
the school or department and, when appropriate, in the college Library. When the 
school or department recommends, a project or its written record may be treated 
as a thesis. 

The thesis and where appropriate the project must conform in matters of style 
and format to the rules in “Thesis Procedures and Regulations,” duplicated in- 
structions available in school or department offices, the Graduate Office, and the 
Library' Reference Room. Since adherence to these rules must be checked and ap- 
proved, and valuable assistance can be given with problems associated with illus- 
trations, etc., students are advised to consult the Library' adviser (in the Reference 
Room) well in advance of the final typing of the thesis. In addition, schools and 
departments have adopted particular form books and/or style sheets, which are 
to be followed in matters of documentation and bibliography (consult Graduate 
Office, or appropriate school or department). 

It is the student’s responsibility to become acquainted with the appropriate rules 
and regulations and to make all necessary' arrangements for the typing of the thesis, 
including instruction of the ty'pist, if other than himself. Adequate time should be 
allowed for reading and criticism by the adviser, the committee members, and the 
librarian, for revisions, as needed, and for completion of the final edition of the 
thesis, including approvals. 

The deadline for submission of the completed thesis to the adviser and committee 
is six weeks in advance of the last day' of classes of the semester in which the 
student hopes to be awarded the degree, unless other arrangements are made 
with the school or department. The deadline for depositing the approved original 
copy of the thesis in the college Foundation Office and making the arrangements 
for binding, microfilming and publication of the abstract is the last day of classes 
of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. If a student’s program 
requires a thesis, or if the project has been determined to be regarded as a thesis, 
the master’s degree cannot be awarded unless the notification that the student has 
completed this final step is received by the dean of graduate studies. 

Graduate Assist ant ships. Fellowships, and Financial Aids 

There are a limited number of appointments as graduate assistants available to 
outstanding graduate students who are working in graduate degree programs. 
These may pay up to $1,250 per semester. If interested, consult the chairman of 
the department in which degree study is being taken. Teaching fellowships are not 
currently available. 


82 


Master's Degree 


The State of California each year awards a certain number of graduate fellow- 
ships (payment of fees only). Qualified students who are residents of California 
may make application for these through the Financial Aid Office. 

For information concerning other financial aids and part-time placement services, 
see pages 46 and 49, respectively. 

International Study 

The college participates in the California State Colleges’ program of study abroad. 
Under this program, limited studies taken at designated foreign universities, when 
arranged in advance, may be applied toward the requirements of a degree awarded 
by Cal State Fullerton. It is important that plans be completed several months 
before starting such a program. For details consult the foreign student adviser. 

Second Master's Degree 

A graduate student desiring to work for a second master’s degree at Cal State 
Fullerton must request permission from the school or department concerned and 
the Graduate Council to declare an objective of a second master’s degree program 
(in unclassified status). If the request is granted the student must as a minimum 
satisfy all prerequisites and all requirements of the new degree program. Approval 
of classified status for the second degree will be given only after the first degree 
has been awarded. 

Postgraduate Credit for Seniors 

Students in the last semester of their senior year may petition on a form available 
in the Office of Admissions and Records to receive postgraduate credit for such 
current course work as is not required for the bachelor’s degree. The applicability 
of such coursework to a master’s degree program must be determined by separate 
action by the appropriate school or department. Usually the student must have 
attained graduate standing and applied for classified status before this latter action 
is accomplished. 



83 


Moster's Degree 


Enrollment in 500-Level Courses by Seniors 

A senior may take a 500-level course if he is within nine units of completion of 
graduation requirements and with the specific approval of the chairman of the 
department or dean of the school in which the course is offered and by the chair- 
man or dean of the student’s major department or school. Postgraduate credit and 
applicability of such coursework to a master’s degree is determined as indicated 
under “Postgraduate Credit for Seniors.” 

A senior who is not within nine units of graduation may take a 500-level course 
only if in addition to the approval of the appropriate chairmen or deans he also 
has a minimum GPA of 3.5 in the field or fields of his intended graduate program 
and of 3.25 overall. Under these circumstances, postgraduate credit may not be 
given for a 500-level course. 


84 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


Choosing an Undergraduate Major 

Every srudcnt is expected to choose a major or field of concentration by the 
beginning of the junior year. The majors currently offered at this college are de- 
scribed in the next sections of this catalog. Most major requirements allow 
students the freedom to take a number of courses in fields other than in their 
majors or closely related fields. 

Lower division students who are uncertain about their primary vocational goals 
or educational interests may, and probably should, enroll as undeclared majors. 
Then, and during their freshman and sophomore years, such students should 
explore the possibilities open to them that will meet their interests and potentiali- 
ties. To help students in their searching and selecting, the college has available a 
number of useful resources: an Office of Academic Advisement; orientation pro- 
grams that are given every year; a variety of counseling and testing services pro- 
vided by the Counseling and Testing Centers; and the different department and 
school offices for information and advice on particular fields, their programs of 
study and later work opportunities. There also is a collection of college catalogs 
available in the college Library. Additionally, there are a growing number of stu- 
dent organizations on the campus that are organized in terms of disciplinary and 
professional interests. The Placement Center also has much useful information on 
vocations and specific work opportunities. 

Most students have general ideas about some subjects in which they might like 
to major, and almost all students are aware of the fields in which they do not wish 
to major. The task of selecting a major (and often a minor or other complementary 
specialization) then becomes one of crystallizing these earlier ideas on the basis of 
experiences in specific courses, discussions with other students and faculty, etc. 
Before commitment to a specific major, students should be sure that they have not 
rejected a field of study because of some wrong preconceptions or inaccurate 
information. Students also should not overlook interests and potentialities that they 
previously may not have discovered. The option of taking a limited number of 
courses on a Credit/No Credit basis often will be helpful in these pursuits. 

Students, however, must be very careful to plan freshman or sophmore programs 
which will permit their entering or taking advanced courses in fields they think 
they may want to be their majors. Such students should check such major require- 
ments as mathematics, chemistry, foreign language, etc. which must be taken 
before the junior year or perhaps even begun during the freshman year. Students 
anticipating graduate or professional study in a certain field should exercise special 
care in planning their undergraduate programs, and they should seek faculty 
counseling in the fields concerned. Such choices do not have to be made during 
the first two years, and may or may not be made during the second two. How- 
ever, careful and advance examination of the possibilities of graduate or profes- 
sional study often will be helpful to students who have fairly clear ideas of the 
educational and vocational objectives they would like to seek. 

Students also should be careful about concentrating so heavily in a particular 
field that they cannot change majors to a different field should they wish to do so. 
A growing number of our students come to the campus with no clear idea of 
the field in which they would like to major. Such students, and others whose 
goals and objectives have not yet firmly crystallized, will have opportunities to take 
courses in various fields and make up their minds during their lower division 
work. They should, however, take full advantage of the opportunities that exist 
on and outside the campus to learn more about available fields of study and oc- 
cupational fields. 


86 


Academic Advisement 


Planning a Major Program 

When students have selected a major field, they should study carefully all the 
requirements which are specified in the catalog under their chosen degree pro- 
gram. Then they should make a tentative semester by semester plan for com- 
pleting the requirements, with careful regard for courses which are prerequisite 
to others. They should discuss this plan with their major advisers who will be 
able to help them with any problems. 

In addition to courses in the major department, related courses in other fields 
and supporting courses in basic skills also may be required. These, too, should 
be included in the tentative semester by semester plan. These auxiliary require- 
ments are described in the degree program for each major. 

Some departments require placement tests prior to admission to classes. The 
time and place for such tests is given in the class schedule, often before registra- 
tion. Students should purchase a copy of the class schedule at the bookstore well 
before registration for classes begins. 

Choosing General Education Courses and Electives 

In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the college requires its graduates to 
have sampled a variety of disciplines as pan of their general education. The broad 
categories of general education courses are presented in the catalog section on 
“Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree”. Through these require- 
ments students are introduced to the worlds of values, ideas, and beauty, to man- 
kind and his problems, to the natural world in which man lives, and to skills 
essential for scholarship. 

To many students the selection of general education courses and electives 
poses many difficult choices. With well over a thousand courses to choose from 
and over forty fields of specialization that can be sampled, some demanding de- 
cisions must be made. Various aids or resources are available. Among these are: 
the catalog and the class schedule with their descriptions of regular and new and 
experimental courses; informal consultations with other students and faculty mem- 
bers; A Guide to Courses and Faculty at Cal State Fullerton f published by the 
Associated Students; and advisers in the Office of Academic Advisement. 

The reasons for selecting particular general education courses and electives 
include: the need to explore potential major or vocational interests, curiosity 
about or enthusiasm for a particular subject; the desire to clarify thinking and 
values on problems and issues of personal and social significance; the urges to 
broaden and synthesize work in a specialization with perspectives and skills from 
other fields; and desires to deepen understanding and improve skills for such 
central human activities as personal relationships, family and commuuity life, 
citizenship activities, and leisure pursuits. Other kinds of reasons include the 
interests in experiencing the varying approaches and teaching methods of dif- 
ferent, talented teachers or of sharing learning experiences with friends. 

Change of Major, Degree or Credential Objective 

A student who wishes to change his major, degree, or credential objective must 
obtain the required form in the Office of Admissions and Records. Such a change 
is not official until the form has been signed and filed in the Registrar’s Office. A 
student should be aware that he will be responsible for the requirements for the 
new choice of major, degree, or credential that are in the catalog in effect at the 
time he files a change. 


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Each undergraduate student is assigned an adviser who will help the student 
plan an academic program. The adviser is a resource person who can provide 
valuable information and suggestions and who can assist the student to find the 


87 


Preprofessional Programs 

most desirable ways to meet the requirements for graduation and for his major or 
credential. Although the adviser is consulted, the final choice of courses and the 
responsibility for the program lies with the student himself. 

Academic program advisers are able to offer better advice when consulted if 
students come prepared with lists of courses they already have taken and their 
own copies of transcripts from colleges previously attended (if students are new 
to California State College, Fullerton). 

An undergraduate student who has declared a major will be assigned an adviser 
by the chairman of his major department. Those seeking a credential will also be 
assigned a professional adviser by the School of Education. Students who have not 
yet decided upon a major (undeclared majors), or who are not seeking a degree 
will be advised in the Office of Academic Advisement. 

Graduate students will be assigned a major adviser in their fields of specializa- 
tion, except in education where all will have a professional adviser from the 
School of Education. Those students seeking a credential for teaching in secondary 
schools will be assigned both a professional and a major adviser. 

In the School of Engineering, each student will be assigned an adviser by the 
dean of the school and is expected to meet with that adviser at least once a se- 
mester. He is required to file an adviser-approved program plan before the begin- 
ning of the second semester of the junior year. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

The academic programs of the college provide appropriate preparation for grad- 
uate work in a variety of fields. Students who have made tentative decisions about 
institutions in which they may wish to pursue graduate work should consult the 
catalogs of those graduate schools as they plan their undergraduate programs. Stu- 
dents planning to undertake graduate work should supplement their undergraduate 
programs by anticipating language requirements at major graduate schools and 
by intensive work in areas of special relevance to their intended gradaute work. 
Professional schools in many universities either require or recommend that appli- 
cants complete four-year programs for admission. Although the professional 
schools do not always require a bachelor’s degree, they generally encourage basic 
preparation and a broad general education leading to that degree before beginning 
specialization. 

The college offers a number of professional programs through the master’s 
degree. These include programs in the fine arts, business administration, communi- 
cations, education, engineering, health education and physical education and recrea- 
tion, library sicencc, public administration, and speech pathology-audiology. Stu- 
dents interested in preparing for professional careers in these areas, either here or 
in other educational institutions, arc encouraged to seek assistance and guidance 
from our faculty members in these fields. 

Paramedical Health Sciences 

(Pental Technican, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Optometry, 

Physical Therapy, Podiatry) 

Although no specific bachelor’s or master’s degree program is available in the 
professional areas of dental technician, nursing, occupational therapy, optometry, 
physical therapy, podiatry, academic preparatory courses for these professions are 
given in the science departments. Students should register their specific interest 
preference in either the Office of the Academic Vice President or the Department 
offices in Biology or Chemistry. 


88 


Preprofessional Programs 


Prelegal Preparation 

Students planning to enter law school may elect any one of several majors. In 
general, the better law schools require that an applicant hold a baccalaureate 
degree. Although there is no uniform pre-legal course of study or specific college 
major required, it is recommended that prospective law students prepare themselves 
in such fields as English, American history, economics, political science (particu- 
larly the history and development of English and American political institutions) 
and such undergraduate courses as judicial process, administrative law, constitu- 
tional law and international law, philosophy (particularly ethics and logic), busi- 
ness administration, anthropology, psychology, and sociology. 

The major chosen and many of the courses selected should demand a high level 
of performance in reading difficult material, understanding abstract and complex 
concepts, and speaking and writing clearly and persuasively. Pre-legal students are 
advised to take the minimum program to meet the requirements of their chosen 
major and courses beyond the introductory survey level in other selected fields. 
A distribution of course sequences among the social sciences, the natural sciences 
and the humanities is desirable. Students with interests in becoming lawyers should 
contact the Pre-law Society. Some faculty members in the School of Business 
Administration and Economics and the Department of Political Science also can 
provide advice and assistance. 

Premedical-Predental Committee 

Student counseling with respect to preprofessional programs in medicine, den- 
tistry and other health sciences as well as professional school admission problems 
are the concern of this committee. (See membership listing, page 443.) All students 
wishing to prepare for dental or medical careers should register in the Office of 
the Academic Vice President or either the department offices in Biology or Chem- 
istry. 

Premedical Preparation 

Medical schools are currently seeking applicants with as broad and liberal an 
educational experience as possible. They recommend that applicants pursue collegi- 
ate major programs which arc of vital interest to the student. However, all medical 
schools require a basic minimal training in the natural sciences and the premedical- 
prcdental committee upon review of these admission requirements recommends the 
following coursework which satisfies this minimum training: 

one year of English 

three semesters of biology (including embryology and genetics) 

one year of general chemistry 

one year of organic chemistry with laboratory 

one year of college physics with laboratory 

one year of calculus 

Most medical school applicants complete a baccalaureate degree program prior 
to beginning their medical training. However, applications to medical school are 
processed normally at the termination of the sixth semester (junior year). The 
medical college admission test, required of all medical school applicants, is taken 
normally during the spring of the sixth semester (junior year). The prospective 
medical school applicant should therefore normally plan to complete the above 
natural science minimal requirements by the end of the junior year. Thus he should 
begin general chemistry in his freshman year in order to satisfy the prerequisite 
requirements for the advanced courses in chemistry. 

Since medical school admissions are limited, the best prepared applicants are 
likely to have an advantage. Many medical schools recommend certain courses in 
the natural sciences in addition to those listed above in the minimal requirements. 

89 


Preprofessional Programs 

The prospective applicant is advised to consult the catalogs of those medical schools 
to which he anticipates applying for additional recommended preparatory subjects. 
He is further advised to consult a member of the Pre-medical Committee for assist- 
ance in planning his total collegiate program and to obtain copies of optimal 
programs from the chairman of the Pre-medical Committee. 

Medical Technology 

An emphasis in medical technology is available under the M.A. in Biology 
with a medical biology' concentration. Students electing this must take as part of 
their course requirements Biological Science 514 A-E (6 units). These courses are 
given at an approved cooperating hospital laboratory school. For further details 
consult Dr. Calvin A. Davenport, Department of Biological Science. 

Social Welfare 

Full preprof cssional training usually consists of two years of graduate training 
leading to the degree of Master of Social Welfare. Students who plan to seek 
employment in social work or social welfare after the completion of their B.A. 
degrees should prepare themselves in the fields of psychology (particularly child 
and adolescent psychology'), sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, 
and research methods in social science. 

Students who intend to enter a professional school following undergraduate 
training should learn about the specific prerequisites for admission to the graduate 
school of their choice. Ordinarily a major in one of the social sciences, and some 
additional work in at least several other social sciences, is recommended. 

Pretheological 

Students who might be interested in pursuing careers in counseling, social work, 
the teaching of religion, and the ministry and associated fields should take some 
courses in religion, psychology', anthropology', sociology, philosophy, education, 
communications, history', English, speech communications, and a foreign language. 
Students desiring assistance and counseling regarding advanced work or professional 
careers may seek help from the faculty in the Department of Religious Studies. 


90 



COLLEGE CURRICULA 


DEGREE PROGRAMS 

California State College, Fullerton offers the following baccalaureate degree pro- 
grams which are described on the pages listed: 


Page 

B.A. American Studies 274 

B.A. Anthropology 276 

B.A. An 100 

B.A. Biological Science 284 

B.A. Business Administration 143 

B.A. Chemistry 296 

B.A. Communications 306 

B.A. Comparative Literature 316 

B.S. Computer Science • 

B.A. Earth Science 409 

B.A. Economics 150 

B.S. Engineering 226 

B.A. English 322 

B.A. Ethnic Studies 248 

B.A. French 330 

B.A. Geography 345 

B.A. German 330 


Page 

B.A. History 351 

B.A. Latin American Studies 263 

B.A. Linguistics 361 

B.A. Mathematics 369 

B.A. Music 120 

B.M. Music 121 

B.A. Philosophy 377 

B.S. Physical Education 187 

B.A. Physics 381 

B.A. Political Science 389 

B.A. Psychology 399 

B.A. Religious Studies 405 

B.A. Russian Area Studies 266 

B.A. Sociology 418 

B.A. Spanish 330 

B.A. Speech 425 

B.A. Theatre Ans 131 


The following master’s degree programs are offered: 


Page 


M.A. Anthropology 277 

M.A. An 103 

M.A. Biology 285 

M.B.A. Business Administration 147 

M.A. Chemistry 299 

M.A. Communications 309 

M.A. Comparative Literature 316 

ALA. Economics 151 


M.S. Education (with emphasis in 
elementary education, read- 
ing, school administration, 
school counseling or spe- 
cial education) 180 

MS. Engineering 230 

M.A. English 323 

M.A. French 331 


Page 


M.A. Geography 346 

M.A. German 331 

M.A. History 351 

M.S. Library Science 436 

M.A. Linguistics 362 

M.A, Mathematics 371 

M.A. Music 121 

M.S. Physical Education 190 

M.A. Political Science 389 

M.A. Psychology 399 

M.P.A. Public Administration 390 

M.A. Social Sciences 268 

M.A. Sociology 418 

M.A. Spanish 331 

MA. Speech 428 

M.A. Theatre Arts 134 


The college is accredited by the California State Board of Education and the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (in elementary educa- 
tion, secondary education, special education, and speech and hearing audiology) 
for programs leading to the credentials listed under Teacher Education. 

* For information regarding this new program, consult the Department of Mathematics or the 
Department of Quantitative Methods or the School of Engineering. 


92 


SUBJECT FINDER 

The listing of degree programs does not include all of the fields or subject 
matter areas in which some courses currently are being offered at the college. 
Additionally, different colleges differ in the names they assign to degrees, curric- 
ular programs, and the academic units offering courses. The following “subject 
finder” lists some of the most commonly used terms for fields with information on 
where courses or programs on these subjects can be located at Fullerton and in 
this catalog. 

Subject Page 

Accounting — 153 

African Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, Geography, 

History, Political Science) 

Afro-American Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies) 248 

\M<> 1 thnic Studies 248 

American Studies 274 

Anthropology 276 

Art 100 

An Education 114 

Asian Studies (See Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Geography, 

History, Political Science) 

Astronomy 384, 412 

Behavioral Sciences in Education 182 

Biological Science — 284 

Business Administration 141 

Chemistry 296 

Chicano Studies 252 

Classics (See Comparative Literature, History and Latin) 

Communications 306 

Comparative Literature — — 316 

Computer Studies (See Engineering, Mathematics, Quantitative Methods) 169 

Dance - 115 

Drama (See Theatre) 131 

Drama Education (See Theatre Education) 140 

Earth Science 412 

Economics 150, 156 

Education 173 

Behavioral Sciences in Education 174 

School Administration/Social Foundations 199 

Teacher Education 205 

Engineering 225 

English 322 

English Education 329 

1 nvironmental Studies 258 

Ethnic Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies and Chicano Studies) 247 

Finance 160 

Folklore (See Anthropology and Comparative Literature) 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 330 

Foreign Languages Education 332 

French 332 

Geography 345 

Geology 412 

German 335 

Graduate Studies 97 

Health Education — — — 187 

Hebrew — — — 338 

History . .. 351 

Interdisciplinary Center 260 

International Relations (See Political Science, Economics, History) 

International Study — 97 

93 


Subject Page 

Italian - 339 

Journalism (See Communications) 

Journalism Education 315 

Latin 339 

Latin American Studies 263 

Law (Sec Political Science, Management) 162 

Library Science 435 

Linguistics 361 

Management 162 

Marketing 166 

Mathematics 369 

Mathematics Education— 414 

Medical Biology Courses 294 

Mexican-American Studies (See Chicano Studies) 

Music 118 

Music Education 129 

Mythology (See Anthropology' and Comparative Literature) 

Native American Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies) 

Naim Inttrpfotatian 415 

Oceanography 295, 415 

Philosophy 377 

Photography (See An and Communications) 

Physical Education 187 

Phvsical Science 305, 384 

Physics — 381, 384 

Political Science 389 

Portuguese — 339 

Psychology’ 399 

Public Administration (See Political Science) 

Public Relations (See Communications) 

Quantitative Methods 169 

Radio (See Theatre and Communications) 

Reading 217 

Recreation 187 

Religious Studies 405 

Russian 266, 340 

Russian Area Studies 266 

Sanskrit (Sec Linguistics) 

School Administration 199 

Science Education 409, 416 

Social Foundations of Education 199 

Social Sciences 268 

Social Welfare — 90 

Social Work (See Social Welfare) 

Sociology 418 

Spanish 342 

Speech (See Speech Communication) 

Speech Communication 425 

Speech Education 434 

Sports (See Physical Education) 

Statistics (See Mathematics and Quantitative Methods) 169 

Student-to-Student Tutorial 98 

Swahili 344 

Teacher Education 205 

Technological Studies 270 

Television (See Theatre and Communications) 131 

Theatre 131 

Theatre Education 140 

94 


Course Descriptions 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions briefly describe the content or subject matter to be covered 
and provide additional information on units of credit, the level of instruction 
(general course numbering code), prerequisites, and the type of course (lecture, 
laboratory, activity, seminar, and individually supervised work). Information on 
specific offerings of courses (times, rooms, instructors) will be found in the class 
schedule which is printed in advance of the fall and spring semesters. Information 
on additional (new, special, or experimental) courses for each semester also can 
be found in these class schedules. The Associate Students also publishes A Guide 
to Courses and Faculty at Cal State Fullerton. Although not complete, this provides 
much additional information on some courses and teachers at the college as well 
as results of student polling from a number of the courses in the Guide. 

Some of the courses listed in the catalog are not taught every year. Many are 
taught once only every year. Others are taught every semester, and often in many 
sections. Advance information regarding the plans for offering particular courses 
may be obtained from the offices of the departments teaching them. 

The forms and methods of teaching vary widely in specific classes, depending 
on the subject matter and purposes and the particular instructor and students. The 
more traditional methods of lecturing, discussion, laboratory work, and individ- 
ually supervised research or projects increasingly are being supplemented by such 
learning resources as group and individual exercises, television, and films and 
records, videotaping, and the use of the computer. Modern specialized facilities 
and equipment are used in many courses in different fields. These include: lab- 
oratories for teaching the sciences; studios for teaching the fine arts; a small 
museum and archaeology /physical anthropology laboratory; a variety of facilities 
for teaching communications; a language laboratory for teaching foreign languages 
and linguistics courses; a speech and hearing clinic; and the Tucker Wildlife 
Sanactuary. 

The college encourages experimentation and innovation in teaching and wel- 
comes a diversity of approaches. Increasingly, and with growing help from stu- 
dents, efforts are being made on the campus to examine and evaluate and improve 
the learning experiences in some classrooms in more scholarly ways. Students also 
are being provided more opportunities to learn through teaching experiences in 
activities such as tutoring and organizing and conducting courses in the experi- 
mental college. 


SCHEDULES 

A new class schedule is published in advance of the fall and spring semesters. 
I his general, college schedule contains not only detailed information on times, 
places, and instructors for specific courses but also materials on registration, new 
courses that are not in the catalog, the times for final examinations, and many other 
useful items for course and program planning. The class schedule may be bought 
at the Titan Bookstore. Separate and free schedules are provided for the summer 
sessions and extension programs: these may be obtained from the office of the dean 
of Continuing Education. The Experimental College of the Associated Students also 
distributes a schedule in advance of its programs of course offerings. 


95 


General Code Numbering Code 

GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open also 
to upper division students. 

Upper division courses of junior and senior level, which do not give 
graduate credit unless included on an approved graduate study plan (such 
as a credential or graduate degree program) for a specific graduate 
student. 

Upper division courses of junior and senior level which give graduate 
credit when taken by a graduate student. (Note limitations in specific 
graduate programs.) 

Graduate courses organized primarily for graduate students.* 

Graduate professional courses in the postgraduate program, not applicable 
to graduate degrees. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

Because of the differences in the organization and content of the various disci- 
plines and professions, there is no uniform, reasonable way of numbering courses 
that would be equally useful for all fields of knowledge. Some of the departments 
explain the logic of their own course numbering system in this catalog. 

In general it may be assumed that increases in class (freshman, sophomore, junior, 
senior, or graduate) and certainly division level (lower, upper, graduate) correlate 
with more difficult and challenging academic work. Sometimes, however, disciplines 
organize their course numbering partly in terms of criteria other than degree of 
difficulty: e.g. anthropology numbers its area courses in the 300’s and its theoretical 
or institutional courses in the 400’s. It should be noted, too, that some students find 
introductory courses to be more demanding than advanced, specialized courses: in 
such courses, a more comprehensive approach and the first exposure to new ways of 
thinking may be harder for some individuals than covering a smaller, and by new 
more familiar area, in much greater detail. 

SPECIAL COURSE NUMBERS 

For uniformity, certain types of courses have been listed by all departments and 
schools with the same numbers: 499 and 599 are used for undergraduate and gradu- 
ate “independent study”; 196 or 496 for student-to-student tutorials; 597 for a grad- 
uate “project”; and 598 for a graduate thesis. The course numbers for senior sem- 
inars arc not so uniform but they tend to be numbered 485, 490, 491, or 495. 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NOTATIONS 

Certain notations are uniformly used in the course descriptions in the catalog. 

1. The figure in parentheses following the course title indicates the number of 
semester units for the course. Courses offered for varying units are indicated 
as (1-3) or (3-6). 

2. A course description such as Anthropology 453 (3) (Same as Geography 453) 
indicates that: the same course is “cross-listed” by both departments, i.e. a stu- 
dent can choose to take the course and count it as either an anthropology or a 
geography course, the complete course description will be found with the 
geography courses; and probably the instructor will be a member of the 
Geography Department. For this same cross-listed course, the Geography De- 
partment will indicate after the course description “(Same as Anthropology 

453)” 

3. A notation such as (Formerly 433) following the course title and the number 
of units indicates the same course previously was numbered 433. 


100-299 

300-399 

400-499 

500-599 

700-799 


* Note exceptions on page 66. 

96 


Prerequisites 


PREREQUISITES 

Students are expected to meet stated prerequisites for all courses. However, in 
exceptional cases, and at the discretion of the division in which the course is taught, 
students may be allowed to meet prerequisites by examination. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Under the independent study program, the upper division student can pursue 
topics or problems of special interest beyond the scope of a regular course under 
the supervision of a faculty adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, 
and normally culminates in a paper, project, comprehensive examination, or per- 
formance. Before registering, the student must get his topic approved by the pro- 
fessor who will be supervising independent study. The catalog numbers for inde- 
pendent study in departments are 499 and 599. Independent study courses may be 
repeated. A student wishing to enroll in more than six units of independent study 
in any one semester must have the approval of his major adviser and of the chair- 
man of the department (s) in which the independent study is to be conducted. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDY COURSES 

California State College, Fullerton students under the California State Colleges 
International Study Programs register concurrently at California State College, 
Fullerton and at the host institution abroad, with credits assigned to the student 
which are equivalent to courses offered at California State College, Fullerton. 
Undergraduate students who discover appropriate study opportunities at the host 
institution but no equivalent course at California State College, Fullerton may 
use Independent Study (499) and International Study 292 or 492. Graduate stu- 
dents may use Independent Graduate Research (599) and International Study 592. 

292 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1—6 lower division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State Colleges International Programs. 
Study undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of the California 
State Colleges. 

492 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 upper division units; maximum 12) 

Open to students enrolled in California State Colleges International Programs. 
Study undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of the California 
State Colleges. 

392 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 graduate units; maximum 12) 

Open to students enrolled in the California Colleges International Programs. 
Study undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of the California 
State Colleges. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 700 

A no (O)-unit, Credit/No Credit course, which is designed to ensure continuous 
registration for those graduate students with an advanced degree objective who find 
that they are unable to enroll in regularly offered coursework, and who are not 
eligible for a leave of absence. This course does not require class attendance. Per- 
mission to register in Graduate Studies 700 must be given by appropriate college 
authorities. A student may not register in Graduate Studies 700 for a third consecu- 
tive semester. 

Students are reminded that units in a 700-level course may not be applied toward 
fulfillment of requirements for an advanced degree. 


4—81593 


97 


Student-to-Student Tutorials 

STUDENT-TO-STUDENT TUTORIALS 

The college has begun a program of experimentation with and development of 
“student-to-student tutorials.” One of the fastest and profoundest ways to learn is 
to teach. The “student-to-student tutorial” will provide a formal way to encourage 
students to learn through teaching. It will expand significantly the opportunities for 
students to have meaningful experiences as teachers. At the same time, it greatly 
will increase the amount of tutoring available and will extend tutoring to all of the 
kinds of students who need and want tutorial assistance. 

Students electing to be tutors not only will increase their mastery of particular 
subject matters but also will have practice in developing their communication, 
cooperation and interpersonal relationship skills. Most important adult roles and jobs 
also involve a teaching dimension and the tutorial experience will provide op- 
portunities to develop awareness of teaching problems and competence in teaching 
techniques. 

Each department will decide whether or not it wishes to offer this course. 
Departments choosing to offer the student-to-student tutorial course will follow 
the rules listed in the following course description. 

The course number will be 196 or 496, and one to three units of credit can 
be given for each course. 

Prerequisites: A 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or consent of instructor 
and simultaneous enrollment in the course or previous enrollment in a similar course 
or its equivalent. The tutor and his tutee or tutees will work in mutually ad- 
vantageous ways by allowing all involved to delve more carefully and thoroughly 
into the materials presented in this specific course. One to three students may be 
tutored by' the tutor unless the instructor decides that special circumstances warrant 
increasing the usual maximum of three tutees. Three hours of work are expected 
for each unit of credit, and this work may include, apart from contact hours with 
tutees, such other activities as: tutorial preparations; consulting with instructors; 
reporting, analysis and evaluation of the tutorial experiences; and participation 
in an all-college orientation and evaluation program for tutors. A maximum of 
three units can be taken each semester and nine units of any combination of 196 
and 496 for an undergraduate program. This course must be taken as an elective 
and not counted toward general education, major or minor requirements. The 
course can be taken on a credit/no credit basis by the tutor. Requests for tutors 
must be initiated by tutees and can be initiated up until the official college date 
for dropping a class with a W. Tutors electing to respond to such requests will 
receive credits at the end of the semester and can register in the course until the 
official college date for dropping a class with a W. Both tutors and tutees must 
submit written reports, anal\*ses and evaluations of their shared tutorial experience, 
and both must participate in an all-college orientation program as well as in any 
conferences or critiques that the instructor of the course may require. 

Further information can be obtained from the department in which the student 
is interested in student-to-student tutorials. 


98 




Dean: J. Justin Gray 


SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 


DEPARTMENT OF ART 

FACULTY 
Gerald D. Samuclson 
Department Chairman 

Alvin Ching, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Naomi Dietz, Henry Evjenth, 
Robert Ewing, Dextra Frankel, Raymond Hein, Gregory Ivy, George James, 
G. Ray Kerciu, Thomas Klobe, Donald Lagerberg, Michael Lyon, Martin Mack, 
Clinton Mackenzie, John Olsen, Robert Partin, Jerry Rothman, Victor Smith, 
Jon Stokesbary, Howard Warner 

The Department of Art offers a program which includes the several fields of 
art history, theory, and appreciation; drawing, painting, sculpture; design and 
crafts; and art education. The broadest objective of the program is to contribute 
to the intellectual, social, and creative development of the student as he prepares 
for citizenship in a democratic society. More specifically, the art program provides 
opportunities for students: (1) to develop a knowledge and understanding of those 
general principles of visual organization and expression basic to all forms and fields 
of art; (2) to develop a critical appreciation and understanding of historical and 
contemporary art forms through a study of these principles as they relate to the 
range of anistic production of mankind; (3) to use these general principles as a 
means to express more clearly their ideas, thoughts, and feelings in the creation of 
visual forms; (4) to develop those understandings and skills needed to pursue gradu- 
ate studies in the field, to teach art in the schools, or to qualify for a position in 
business and industry as an art specialist. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the bachelor of arts degree have been de- 
signed to meet the specialized needs of the following groups: (1) students who 
wish to study art as an essential part of their personal and cultural development; 
(2) students seeking preprofessional preparation in art; (3) students planning to 
teach art at the secondary level who wish either a teaching major or minor in art; 
and (4) students planning to teach in the elementary schools who wish to have 
art as either an academic major or minor. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have 
a C average in all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major 
will be allowed for specific major courses in which a grade of D is obtained. As 
is customary, the Art Department reserves the right to hold projects completed by 
a student for class credit for a period of three years. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

Five course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and in- 
terests of students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art. 

In the development of specific course offerings which make up these programs, 
it has been the concern of the art faculty to see that each program contains: (1) 
basic courses in art history, theory, appreciation, and studio practice which have 
as their primary focus the study of those general principles of visual organization 
and expression underlying all fields of art; (2) more specialized courses which pro- 
vide for adequate preparation in depth in a single field of art. The teaching of art 
history, theory, and criticism is not confined to courses bearing that title. Rather, 
each studio course involves theory as well as the practice of art, includes as part 
of its content the study and reference to related historical art forms, and has as part 
of its purpose the development of those critical abilities which are necessary to a 
valid evaluation and appreciation of the art expressions of man. 

100 


Art 


Plan I provides for an emphasis in the area of art history, theory, and apprecia- 
tion and is particularly recommended for those students who wish to pursue gradu- 
ate studies in art history or museology. 

Plan II is designed for those students who prefer a studio-type program with a 
preprofessional orientation and an area of specialization selected from the follow- 
ing: (1) drawing and painting; (2) printmaking; (3) sculpture; (4) crafts; (5) 
ceramics; (6) graphic design; (7) illustration; (8) environmental design, or (9) 
creative photo. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in secondary teaching. 

Plan IV is for those students who wish to meet the requirements of the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary teaching. 

Plan V is for those students who wish to meet the requirements for teaching 
in junior college. 

All five plans require a minimum of 60 units in art or approved related courses 
with a minimum of 30 units of upper division in art except for Plan IV which re- 
quires a minimum of 45 units of art including a minimum of 27 units of upper 
division in art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet 
the other college requirements for a bachelor of arts degree (see page 74). Stu- 
dents following Plans III and IV also must meet any specific requirements for the 
desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for School of Education). 
Graduate students who plan to meet the requirement for a standard teaching cre- 
dential with specialization in secondary school teaching with a major in art must 
complete six units in art as approved by the major adviser on and beyond the 
specific course requirements listed in Plan III before they can be recommended 


by the Art Department for student teaching. 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY EMPHASIS Units 

Preparation for the Major: Art history 201 A, B (6 units); 6 units of studio 
courses; aproved electives (12 units) in art, anthropology, drama, foreign 

languages, history, literature, music or philosophy 24 

The Major: Art history (36 units) including one course from each of 
the following six groups: 301-302; 411-412; 421-422; 431-432; 451-452; 
461-462-471; Six courses in not more than three of the above groupings 

and three courses (9 units) of approved electives — _ 36 

Reading knowledge of one modem foreign language 

PLAN II: STUDIO EMPHASIS 
Drawing and Painting 


Preparation for the Major: Art 103, 104; 107 A,B; 117A,B,C; 201 A, B; 207 A,B, 


and 3 units of electives. (Recommended electives: Art 216A or 247 A) 30 

The Major: Art 307 A,B; 317A,B: 487 A,B or C (6 units); 6 units of upper 
division art history; and 6 units of electives in art 30 

Printmaking 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A,B; 107A,B; 247; 117A,B,C; 103; 104 

and 6 units of electives 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division art history. Art 347 A,B, 487D (6 
units), 307 A, 317A and 6 units of electives in art 30 

Sculpture 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B, 107A,B, 103, 104, 216A,B, 117A,B,C, 

and 205 A 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division art history'. Art 316A.B, 486 (6 units), 
336A,B and 6 units of electives in art 30 


101 


Art 


Crafts Units 

Preparation for the Major: An 201 A, B, 123 A, 107A,B, 103, 104, 205 A and 

6 units selected from An 106A, 205B, 216A or U7A,B,C„. 30 

The Major — General Concentration: 6 units of upper division an history, 

An 305A, 3 15 A, 325A, 355A or 365 A and 12 units selected from An 
305B, 31 5B, 316A, 325B, 338A, 485 A, 485B, 485C or 485D or 485E 30 


The Major— Jewelry /Metalnnithing Concentration: 6 units of upper divi- 
sion art history. An 305A, 315A,B, 325A,B, 3 units selected from An 
305B, 355A, 365A or 338A and 6 units selected from Art 485A or 4850— 30 

The Major — Textile concentration: 6 units of upper division art history. 

An 355A,B, 365A,B, 6 units selected from 355B, 365B, 485D, or 485E 
and 6 units of electives in an 30 

Ceramics 

Preparation for the Major: An 201 A, B, 107A,B, 103, 104, 106A,B, 117A,B,C 
and 3 units of electives 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division an history, An 306A,B, 484 (6 units), 

406 A,B and 6 units of electives in an 30 

Graphic Design 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B, 107 A, B, 103, 104, 123A, 117A,C,D, 
223A,B 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division an history. An 323A,B, 483A (6 
units), 338A, 317 A, 363 A, 3 units selected from An 338B, 317B or 363B 
and 6 units of electives in an — 30 

Illustration 

Preparation for the Major: An 201A,B, 107A,B, 103, 104, 123A3, 117A,C,D, 
223B 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division art history. An 363A,B, 483C (6 
units), 317A,B, 323A, 3 units selected from An 338A, 307A, 487B 30 

Environmental Design 

Preparation for the Major An 201A,B, 107A,B, 103, 104, 123A3, and 6 
units selected from An 106A, 205A, 216A or 223A,B _ 30 

I he Major Interior Space Planning Concentration: 6 units of upper divi- 
sion an history , An 313A,B 483B (6 units), 453A,B and 8 units selected 
from An 333A, 355A, 365A, 483D or 363A 30 

7V>e Major Product Design Concentration: 6 units of upper division an 
history. An 333A,B, 483C (6 units), 323A, 453A,B and 5 units of electives 
in an }0 

Creative Photo 

Preparation for the Major: An 201 A3, 103, 104, 107 A3, 117A,C,D, 247A 
and 6 units of clcctivcs 30 

The Major: 6 units of upper division an history. An 338A,B, 489 (6 
units), 347 A and 9 units selected from 323A, 363A, 307A or 347B. 30 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 

Secondary 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A,B, 107A3, 125A or equivalent 10} 

104, 106A and 205A ’ 2 7 

The Major: 9 units of upper division art history to include Art 411 or 412, 
310A.B, 338 A, 380, 6 units of upper division design to include Art 323 a' 
and 6 units of art electives « 


102 


Art 


Fifth Year Credential Program : In the five-year program for the standard teaching 
credential, secondary, to be eligible for consideration for student teaching by 
the art faculty, the student must meet the following requirements: 

1. Be assigned by the Art Department chairman to a faculty adviser in art 
concerned with teacher education. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in this catalog within the School Ed- 
ucation for the curriculum on secondary school teacher education. 

3. Meet requirements listed under Plan III, Teaching Emphasis (Secondary) 
for the bachelor’s degree in art. 

4. Complete Art 380 and Art Ed 441, Educ 411 and Educ 340 prior to enroll- 
ment in Art Ed 442. 

5. Complete six additional upper division or graduate level units in art in an 
area of emphasis as part of the 30 units required beyond the bachelor’s 
degree. 

6. Obtain recommendation of the faculty adviser in art concerned with teacher 
education. 

7. Submit a portfolio of art work to be evaluated by the art faculty. 

PLAN IV: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
Elementary 

Preparation for the Major: 6 units art history, Art 103, 104, 107A and 107B 18 
The Major: Art 411 or 412, 310A, 323 A, 380, 6 units upper-division crafts 
and 9 units upper-division art electives 27 

PLAN V: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
Community College 

Preparation for the Major: Same as Plan II. 

The Major: Same as Plan II. 

See Community College Teacher Education Program, page 214. 

MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bachelor of arts 
degree of which a minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. In- 
cluded in the program must be a basic course in each of the following areas: (1) 
art history and appreciation; (2) design; (3) drawing and painting; and (4) crafts. 
Those students planning to qualify for a standard teaching credential with special- 
ization in elementary or secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain ap- 
proval from the Art Department for the courses selected to meet the upper divi- 
sion requirements for a minor in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts degree in art provides a 
balance of theory and practice for those who desire to teach an or wish to develop 
a sound basis for continued advanced work in this field. The program offers each 
student the opportunity to expand his intellectual and technical resources and to 
acquire greater richness and depth in terms of creative understanding and achieve- 
ment in one of the following areas of concentration: (1) drawing and painting 
(including printmaking); (2) crafts (including ceramics); (3) design; and (4) 
sculpture. 

Prerequisites for the Program 
Prerequisites to the program include: 

(1) an undergraduate major in art or 24 units of upper division art including at 
least 12 units of upper division study in the elected area of concentration with 
a GPA of 3.0 or better; 

(2) Portfolio Review — before any units may apply to the approved study program 
for the degree, the student must arrange for a faculty committee evaluation 

103 


Art 


of the student's background, including a statement of purpose by the stu- 
dent, and review of creative work. Portfolio review dates are May 1 for the 
following fall semester, and December 1 for the following spring semester of 
each year. Arrangements may be made through the Art Office to meet these 
deadlines. 

Program of Studies 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved by the stu- 
dent’s graduate committee of which 15 must be 500-level courses. The 30 units are 
distributed as follows: 

Units 

1. 500-level courses in art 15-21 

A. Core courses in an, history, philosophy, analysis and criticism 9 

(1) Art 500 Graduate Seminar in Art (3 units) 

(2) Art 501 Graduate Seminar in Major Field (6 units) 

(On the recommendation of the adviser, the student may 
substitute 3 units in Philosophy 311, Aesthetics, or a 400 
number art history course as partial fulfillment of this re- 
quirement.) 

B. Coursework in the area of concentration selected from one of 


the following areas 6 

(1) Drawing and painting 

(2) Crafts 

(3) Design 

(4) Sculpture 

C. Project or thesis J_6 

2. Additional courses — - 9-f2 

A. 500- and/or 400-lcvel courses in art to extend the student’s field 
in depth 6 


B. 500-, 400- and/or 300-lcvel courses, cither in courses outside the 
Art Department and related to the student’s special area of in- 
terest, or in courses within the Art Department but outside the 
area of concentration, to expand the student’s field in breadth 3-6 

Total 30 

All courses must be completed with a B average, and all courses in the area of 
concentration must be graded B or better. The Department of Art requires the 
candidate for the Master of Arts in Art degree to exhibit his or her project in the 
department upon completion of the Master of Arts in An degree and the art 
faculty reserves the right to retain an example from the student’s master’s exhibit 
for the college collection. 

For further information, consult the Department of Art. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 



104 


Art 


ART COURSES 

100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Exploration and creative use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. 
Field trips required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of the 
Art Department. (6 hours activity) 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

A course for the general student designed to develop an understanding of his- 
torical and contemporary art forms. Illustrated with examples of painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, and design. Field trips required. Not open to art majors for 
credit except by permission of the Art Department. 

103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as re- 
lated to a two-dimensional surface. (6 hours activity) 

104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as re- 
lated to three-dimensional form. (6 hours activity) 

106A,B Beginning Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A basic course in the study of form as related to ceramic 
materials, tools, processes, and concepts. (6 hours activity) 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Beginning work in the creative use of the materials of drawing and painting with 
emphasis on visual concepts, use of medium, individual exploration, and growth, 
planning and craftsmanship. 107A emphasizes drawing; 107B emphasizes painting. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

111 Fundamentals of Art (3) 

A comparative study of the elements of plastic organization in relation to per- 
sonal and cultural aesthetic expression and concepts. Fundamental art ideas, prob- 
lems of organization and structure, and terminology. Field trips required. 

117A,B,C,D Life Drawing (1,1, 1,1) 

Drawing from the live model. 117B will include working from the model with 
three-dimensional materials. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

123A,B Descriptive Drawing (3.3) 

An intensive study of traditional and contemporary drawing techniques and 
theories. Emphasis in 123 A on representation of nature forms and in 123B on man- 
made and mechanical forms including linear perspective. (9 hours laboratory) 

201 A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

A comparative survey of the basic ideas, forms, and styles of the visual arts as 
they developed in various cultures from prehistoric time to the present day. 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and 
evaluation of craft concepts, processes and materials as they relate to the develop- 
ment of aesthetic forms based on function. (6 hours activity) 

20SB Beginning Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and 
evaluation of woodworking concepts and processes as they relate to the develop- 
ment of wood into aesthetic form based on function. (6 hours activity) 


105 


Art 


207 A, B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and Materials) (3^) 

Prerequisites: Art 117A,B, Art 107A,B or the equivalents. An intensive study of 
traditional and contemporary methods and materials as they relate to current 
approaches in drawing and painting. (9 hours laboratory) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 104. An introductory course in sculpture with emphasis on the 
creative use of wood and metal, power equipment and hand tools. (6 hours activity) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A study of the history, design and use of letter forms in- 
cluding techniques for rough and comprehensive layouts and the use of both 
hand-lettered forms and handset type. (6 hours activity) 

247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B. An introductory course of all printmaking forms to 
include litho, etching, woodcut and serigraphy. (6 hours activity) 

2B6 Design for the Theatre (3) 

(Same as Theatre 286) 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the Paleolithic to the period of late 
antiquity. 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the period of late antiquity through 
the Gothic. 

305 A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205A. Study and evaluation of craft concepts, processes, and 
materials as they relate to the development of utilitarian and aesthetic form. (9 
hours laboratory) 

305 B Advanced Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205B. A study and evaluation of craft concepts and processes 
as they relate to the development of wood into utilitarian and aesthetic form. (9 
hours laboratory) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 106AJ3. Further experiences in the study and evaluation of form 
as related to the creative use of ceramic concepts and materials including design, 
forming, glazing, and firing. (6 hours activity) 

307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117A,B,C, 107A,B, 207A,B or equivalents. The study, evaluation 
and creative use of the concepts and materials of drawing and painting with 
emphasis on individual exploration, growth, planning and craftsmanship. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

310A,B Drawing and Painting: Techniques and Approaches for the Classroom 
Teacher (3,3) ^ 

Prerequisite: Art 100. The study’ and development of painting and drawing ma- 
terials and approaches as they relate to elementary and secondary education. (6 
hours activity) 

313A Interior Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 123A, B. Aesthetic and economic considerations in- 
volved in the visual organization of the environment in relation to human needs 
with emphasis on interior space planning. (6 hours activity) 

106 


Art 


313B Inferior Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 3 13 A. Aesthetic and economic considerations involved in the 
visual organization of the environment in relation to human needs with emphasis 
on professional practice including material analysis and business procedures. (6 
hours activity) 

315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. Design 
and creation of jewelry. (9 hours laboratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 216A. (9 hours laboratory) 

317A,B Advanced Life Drawing (3) 

Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from 
the live model. (9 hours laboratory) 

320 Paper: Structural and Decorative Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. An exploration of the structural and decorative 
aspects of construction with paper, emphasizing three-dimensional design. Such 
techniques as papier mache, paper sculpture, paper folding and paper applique will 
be considered through a variety of paper surfaces. (6 hours activity) 

323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 223A. Development and projection of ideas in relation 
to the technical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. (6 hours 
activity) 

325A,B Metalsmithing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. A 
study and evaluation of fundamental metalsmithing concepts, processes and ma- 
terials as they relate to the aesthetic development of utilitarian forms, raising, 
silversoldering, forging, casting, engraving, chasing and repousse. (9 hours labor- 
atory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Development of basic ceramic technology into individual sculptural forms and 
techniques. (6 hours activity) 

329A,B Art and Technology (3,3) 

Creative activity in the context of modem technology. (9 hours laboratory) 

330 Textile Design: Threads and Fibers, Non-woven Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A or B, or consent of instructor. Concepts and 
processes of design as they relate to non-loomed structures, to include macrame, 
crochet, stitchery and knitting. (6 hours activity) 

333A,B Product Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 123A3- Planning and designing of projects in 
relation to the technological, psychological and social aspects of contemporary 
society. (6 hours activity) 

336A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 316A. Projects in various waxing molding and metal casting 
techniques. Media with emphasis on aluminum and bronze and the lost wax process. 
(9 hours laboratory) 


107 


Art 


338A Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. Exploration of the photographic media 
as a means of personal expression. Historical attitudes and processes are discussed 
in relationship to new materials and contemporary aesthetic trends. Field trips 
required. (9 hours laboratory) 

338B Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A. Further exploration of the photographic medium as a 
means of personal expression. Historical and new processes introduced as a vehicle 
toward the individual student’s personal goal. Field trips required. (9 hours labora- 
tory) 

340 Ceramics: Techniques for the Classroom Teacher (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 100. Beginning work in the creative use of hand building 
processes, and glazing of ceramic ware. Related information on decorating 
processes, drying and firing kilns as they apply to appropriate teaching levels. 
Historical development of ceramics as it relates to various cultures. 

347A Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and 117A,B,C. Development of concepts and explora- 
tion of materials involved in printmaking including etching, woodcut, aquatint, 
monoprint and scrigraphy. (9 hours laboratory) 

3478 Printmaking— Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and 117A,B,C. Development of concepts and explora- 
tion of materials and techniques involved in lithography printing. (9 hours lab- 
oratory) 

350A,8 Painting for Non-Art Majors (3,3) 

Opportunities for students with little or no background in art to work creatively 
with various painting media both indoors and outdoors. Not open to art majors. 
(9 hours laboratory) 



108 


Art 


355A/B Textile Design and Construction: Fabric Printing (3,3) (Formerly 353A) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or B or consent of instructor. Concepts and proc- 
esses of design as they relate to fabric surfaces with emphasis on various printing 
and dyeing techniques. (6 hours activity) 

360 Elementary School Crafts (2) 

Studio activities and techniques of crafts appropriate to the elementary school. 
Strongly recommended for elementary teaching credential candidates. (4 hours 
activity) 

363A,B Illustration (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107 AJB and 117A,B,C. Development and projection of ideas 
relative to the needs of story, book, and magazine, and film illustration. (6 hours 
activity) 

363A,B Textile Design and Construction: Weaving (3,3) (Formerly 353B) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, Art 104 or 205 A, B or consent of instructor. Concepts and 
processes of design as they relate to fabric construction with emphasis on various 
weaving techniques. (6 hours activity) 

380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisites: An 100 or equivalent. The study and evaluation of art concepts, 
materials, and processes as they relate to and promote child development. (6 hours 
activity) 

401 A,B Criticism of the Arts (3,3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Ans. Other majors 
by consent of instructor. 401 A is prerequisite to 401 B except by consent of in- 
structor. Criticism which in the first semester will develop criteria and vocabulary 
applicable to criticism in the visual and performing ans through lectures, readings, 
discussions, and attendance at exhibits and performances. Emphasis on oral and 
written skills in the communication of anistic concepts and critical evaluations. 
Second semester emphasizes practical aspects of writing newspaper reviews and 
speculative essays based on musical concerts, dramatic productions, and exhibits 
of visual ans. 

406A,B Ceramic Analysis (3,3) 

Prerequisites: An 106A,B and 306A. An introduction to the physical and chemical 
aspects of ceramic materials. Study and evaluation of ceramic materials as they are 
related to the development of the ceramic art form. (6 hours activity) 

411 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting and sculpture of the Realism, Impressionism, Post 
Impressionism periods. 

412 Art of the 20th Century-1900 to Present (3) 

Fundamentals of modem painting, graphics, and architecture. 

421 Oriental Art: China (3) 

A study of the historical development of the arts of China and their relation 
to Chinese philosophy and culture. 

422 Oriental Art: Japan (3) 

A study of the historical development of the ans of Japan and their relation to 
Japanese philosophy and culture. 

426 Glass Forming (3) 

Prerequisites: An 106A,B, An 306 A, and approval of instructor. A course in the 
chemistry, handling and manipulation of glass and its related tools and equipment 
for the ceramic artist. (6 hours activity) 


109 


Art 


431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance period. 
Lectures, discussion and field trips. 

432 Raroque and Rococo Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Baroque and 
Rococo period. Lectures, discussion and field trips. 

443A,B Film Making (3,3) 

Development of film as a visual art form. 

451 Oceanic Art (3) 

An introductory survey of the styles of the aboriginal people of the following 
regions: Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Indonesia. 

452 Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3) 

An introduction by region and tribal group to the art forms of West Coastal 
Africa and the Sudan, Niger River kingdoms, Yourba kingdoms, Cameroon chief- 
tainships. Congo tribes, Central Africa and East Coastal Africa. 

453A,B Display and Exhibition Design (2,2) 

A course in the appropriate and creative use of materials, processes, and design 
concepts as they relate to the special problems involved in the planning and pre- 
paring of displays, exhibits, bulletin boards, wall cases, and an portfolios. (More 
than 6 hours laboratory) 

441 Art of North American Indian (3) 

An introduction to the art forms and style groupings of the following American 
Indian groups: Eskimo, Pacific Northwest, California, Eastern Woodlands, Mound 
Builders, Southwestern and Northern Mexico. 

462 Art of Mesoamerica (3) 

An introduction to the art and architectural forms of Mesoamerica from the 
early, formative stages to the Spanish Conquest. 

471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

An introduction to the art styles and cultural regions of Central America and 
South America. 

461 Special Studies in Art History (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunities for intensive study and 
evaluation in one area of art history and appreciation. 

453 Special Studies in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
design areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 12 

units, but no more than 3 units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a 

single semester. 

483a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483b Interior Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

483 f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 


no 


Art 


484 Special Studies in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units in ceramics. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of 12 units, but not more than three units of credit 
may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each 
unit) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of sue upper division units in designated area or con- 
sent of instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the craft areas listed 
below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 12 units, but no 
more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single 
semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

485a Jewelry 

485b General Crafts 

485c Metalsmithing 

485d Textile Design — Weaving, Threads and Fibers (Formerly 483e) 

485e Textile Design — Fabric Printing (Formerly 483e) 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of instructor. Opportunity for intensive 
study in the following sculptural processes. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 
units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. 
(2 hours activity for each unit) 

486a Modeling and Fabrication 

486b Casting 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and Printmaking (1—3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Opporunity for intensive study in the draw- 
ing and painting areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum 
of 12 units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one 
area in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

487a Painting 
487b Life Drawing 
487c Drawing 
487d Printmaking 

488A,B Advanced Scene Design (3,3) 

(Same as Theatre 488A, B) 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A,B. Advanced projects in photography as a means of per- 
sonal expression. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than 
three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for 
each unit) 

500 Graduate Seminar in Art (3) 

Selected advanced problems in art and art education. Each student will present 
research results in oral or written form. 

501 Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 5 00. Directed research with emphasis on the relationship between 
historical backgrounds and developments in art and the student’s area of concen- 
tration. May be repeated to a maximum of eight units. 


Ill 


Art 


507 Seminar in Contemporary Art (3) 

Selected advanced problems and directed research in relation to the contempo- 
rary art form. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the design areas listed below. 
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units in each area, but no more than three 
units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. 

503a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503b Interior Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

503f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development and evaluation of individual projects in ceramics. May be repeated to 
a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in 
a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

N 

505 Graduate Problems in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the crafts areas listed below. 
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of 
credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

505a Jowolry 

505b Goneral Crafts 

505c Metalsmithing 

505d Textile Design — Weaving-Threads and Fibers (Formerly 503e) 

505e Textile Design — Fabric Printing (Formerly 503e) 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on 
planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. May be 
repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of credit may 
be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (1-3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper division drawing and painting. Intensive study 
with emphasis on planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in 
the drawing and painting areas listed below. May be repeated to a maximum of 
12 units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single 


semester. 

(3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

507a 

Painting 

507b 

Life Drawing 

507c 

Drawing 

507d 

Printmaking 

112 



Art 


397 Project ( 9 - 6 ) 

Prerequisites: Art 500, 501 and recommendation of the student’s graduate com- 
mittee. Art 501 may be taken concurrently with Art 597 on approval of instructor. 
Development and presentation of a creative project in the area of concentration 
beyond regularly offered coursework. 

598 Thetis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500, 501 and recommendation of the student’s graduate com- 
mittee. Art 501 may be taken concurrently with Art 598 on approval of instructor. 
Development and presentation of a thesis in the area of concentration beyond regu- 
larly offered coursework. No more than three units may be taken in any one 
semester. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1—3) 

Open to graduate students in art with the consent of the department chairman. 
May be repeated for credit. 



113 


Art Education 


ART EDUCATION COURSES 

332 Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or consent of instructor. Creative selection, organiza- 
tion and use of materials and tools in construction activities. Includes correlation 
experiences with the social studies, science, and other units of work. (4 hours 
activity) 

370A,B Art Activity (2,2) 

Opportunities to observe, analyze, and evaluate child growth in and through 
creative art experiences. (4 hours activity) 

429A,B Arts and Crafts for Teaching Exceptional Children (2,2) 

Methods of using a variety of art materials and processes with emphasis on those 
experiences which meet the needs of retarded or handicapped children. (4 hours 
activity) 

441 Studio Problems in Secondary Art Education (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Art, or consent of instructor. Advanced indi- 
vidual studio problems with projects related to specific learning experiences in Art 
Education at the secondary school level. (6 hours activity) 

442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 340, Educ 411, Art 380, Art Ed 441, admission to teacher 
education, senior standing or consent of instructor. See pages 212-213 under Sec- 
ondary Education for description of standard teaching credential program. Ob- 
jectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching 
art in secondary schools. Required, before student teaching of students presenting 
majors in an for the standard teaching credential. The student who has not had 
teaching experience must register concurrently in Educ 449. 

749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Sec page 223 for description and prerequisites. 


114 


Dance 


DEPARTMENT OF DANCE 

FACULTY 
Masami Kuni 

Department Chairman 
Miriam Tait, John Dougherty (Part-time) 

The program of studies in the Department of Dance provides training in each 
of the related aspects of dance such as its history, theory, composition including 
space forming and choreography, and the technics of movement leading to dance 
performances and productions. The curriculum is designed in accordance with the 
following three objectives: (1) to prepare the student who wishes to enter dance 
as a profession, either in teaching, choreography, or performance; (2) to provide 
for the general college student the opportunity for a personal involvement in dance 
as an art form and as a basic movement experience; (3) to offer curricular experi- 
ences in dance for the student who is majoring in fields of study that are closely 
related to dance such as art, music and theatre. 

A major in dance is not offered at this time. Refer to the Department of Theatre 
which offers both the B.A. and M.A. degrees with areas of concentration in dance. 


DANCE COURSES 

101 Introduction to Dance (2) 

Historical and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form, to provide student 
with basic knowledge and aesthetic values in ballet, modem dance, educational 
dance, theatrical dance as well as ethnic dance. Field trips. Open to all students. 

125A,B Improvisation (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Dance 125A is prerequisite for Dance 125B. Theory and practice 
of improvisation in movement. The student will be taught to overcome inhibitions, 
to move freely and naturally and to improvise imaginatively in movement. (1 hour 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

135A,B Movement and Rhythm (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135 A is prerequisite for 135B. Designed to equip the stu- 
dent with higher kinesthetic and kinetic ability. Basic movement experience for 
dance, drama, art, music as well as the general student. (4 hours activity) 

210 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 101 and 135 A3- Designed not only for the student who 
is going to teach children how to create dance, but also for the student who is 
going to be a dance creator. Basic dance subjects in relation to the growth of 
children from 5 to 17 years of age. How to make a dance motif and how to 
compose simple dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

227A,B Space Forming in Dance (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B. 2 27 A is prerequisite for 227B. Theory of space and 
principle of space forming to train students to understand spacial movement, so 
that they can master movement on stage, stage design and the basic skills of 
choreography. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

245A,B Mime and Pantomime (2,2) 

Prerequisite: 245 A is prerequisite for 245 B. Theory and practice of mime and 
pantomime for drama, dance and education (expression and gesture). Historical 
and contemporary knowledge and techniques with emphasis on individual develop- 
ment of creative skill in mime and pantomime. (4 hours activity) 


115 


Dance 


255 Jazz Dance (2) 

Prerequisites: Dance 101 and 135A,B. Designed to the basic rhythm of jazz and 
to equip the students with the technique of classic and modern jazz dances. (4 
hours activity) 

311A,B Elements and Forms of Dance Composition (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 135A,B and 227A,B. 311 A is prerequisite to 3 1 lB. Basic 
forms and elements of dance composition will be offered; Simultaneous Symmetry, 
Alternate Symmetry, A-Symmetry, Simple Contrast, Compound Contrast, Balance 
and Unbalance, 4-units Rule, 6-units Rule, Rondo, Canon. Dances in which these 
rules must be applied will be composed by the student. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity') 

33 1 A,B Character Dance for Theatre (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B or consent of instructor. Basic Character dances 
such as Mazurka, Czardas, Friska, Polonaise, Fandango, Tarantella, along with the 
Court Dances such as Minuet and Galliard. Forms and techniques as well as 
costume and accompanying music will be included in each character style. De- 
signed for students who aim to be professional performers or choreographers on 
stage, film and television, as well as for actors and directors of theatre. Helpful 
for schoolteachers who direct dance production and theatre production. (4 hours 
activity) 

358 Philosophy and Methodology of Educational Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 125A,B and Dance 311A,B or consent of instructor. A short 
history' of dance education; principles and objectives of modern educational dance 
and the methodology to meet these objectives; principle and structure of curricu- 
lum for educational dance. 

374A,B Dance Theatre and Production (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B and 227A,B or consent of instructor. Cannot be taken 
concurrently with Theatre 478AB. Theory and practice of creative and expressive 
movement in relation to the theatre and dance production. (More than 9 hours 
production) 

401 A,B Criticism of the Arts (3,3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts. Other majors 
by consent of instructor. 401 A is prerequisite to 401 B except by consent of in- 
structor. Criticism which in the first semester will develop criteria and vocabulary 
applicable to criticism in the visual and performing arts through lectures, readings, 
discussions, and attendance at exhibits and performances. Emphasis on oral and 
written skills in the communication of artistic concepts and critical evaluations. 
Second semester emphasizes the practical aspects of writing newspaper reviews 
and speculative essay's based on musical concerts, dramatic productions, and exhibits 
of visual arts. 

441 Seminar in Ethnic Dance as Culture Phenomena (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the mutual influence and relation 
between the religion, living form, habits and economical-political-geographical en- 
vironment and dance form (including music and costume) of the major ethnic 
groups of the world. 

450 Creative Dance for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 135A.B and 358, or consent of instructor. Study and analysis 
of creative dance and its relation to dance education in elementary and secondary' 
schools. Recommended for students of dance, theatre, music and art as well as 
practising teachers. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

116 


Dance 


474 Special Studies in Dance Theatre Production (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 374 A, B or the equivalent and consent of instructor. Oppor- 
tunity for intensive study in theory and practice in dance theatre and production. 
May be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three units of 
credit may be obtained in a single semester. (More than 3 hours production per 
unit) 

476A/B History of Dance (3,3) 

History of dance from primitive times to the present. Covers development of 
dance in Europe, the Orient, Asia, America (including American Indian) in its 
general relation to culture history. 

477 Dance Aesthetics (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 101 and 374A,B and/or consent of instructor. Philosophical 
as well as theoretical knowledge of dance as an art form. A study of the processes 
of dance creation, movement and image; the problems of music accompaniment 
in dance, and dance as an art form of metaphysical beauty. 

484 Survey of Contemporary Dancers (3) 

Survey of great dancers and choreographers of the 20th century in Europe, Asia 
and the Americas; their biography, works, and philosophy. 

486 Choreography (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 374A,B or the equivalent and consent of instructor. Theory 
and practice of notating dance. Provide choreographic skill with emphasis on 
individual creativity. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Directed reading, reports, creation and performance according to predetermined 
arrangements with instructor and department chairman. 

585 Seminar in Educational Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion and analysis of principle, forms 
and methods of dance education in the world. Survey of the literature relating to 
dance education. 



117 


Music 


DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

FACULTY 
Leo E. Kreter 
Department Chairman 

Carole Chadwick, F. Andrew Charlton, Hugh Ellison, Bruce Foote, Rita Fuszek, 
J. Justin Gray*, Burton Karson, Desmond Kincaid, Joseph Landon, Gary Maas, 
Frank McCarty, Donal Michalsky, Benton Minor, M. Jane Paul, Robert Stewart, 
David Thorsen, Gary Unruh, Rodger Vaughan 

PART-TIME 

Vera Barstow (Violin, Viola), Naoum Benditsky (Violoncello), Caiman Bloch 
(Clarinet), Alberto Bolet, Phyllis Cartledge, Marrianne Caudill (String Bass), 
Joachim Chassman (Violin, Viola), M’Lou Dietzer (Piano), Kenneth Fiske, 
Norman Fleming (Trombone-Baritone), Walter Goodwin (Percussion), Jay 
Grauer (String Bass), Thomas Greer (French Horn), Mario Guameri (Trum- 
pet), Su Harmon (Voice), Robert Henderson (French Horn), Elizabeth Hol- 
bom (Violin, Viola), Luella Howard (Flute), Cornel Imry (Guitar), Malcolm 
McNab (Trumpet), Donald Maggeridge (Oboe), Raymond Nowlin (Bassoon), 
Harvey Pittcl (Saxophone), Dorothy Rcmsen (Harp), Leona Roberts (Voice), 
Charles Shaffer (Organ), Susan Stockhammer (Flute), Earle Voorhies (Piano) 

The Department of Music offers courses in music for both majors and non- 
majors. The fundamental purpose of the music major curriculum leading toward 
the baccalaureate degree is to provide the necessary training in each of the related 
aspects of music such as its history and literature, theoretical studies, and musical 
performance. Such a program of studies is based on the need to provide serious 
students with a core curriculum which will prepare the individual in such areas 
as (a) the knowledge of the history and relationships of music as an art form, (b) 
a comprehensive and analytical understanding of musical literature, (c) a working 
knowledge of music theory and structure, (d) a high degree of competence in a 
performing field, and (e) a specialization within the major. 

The music program is designed to educate: 

1. Students in general, in terms of composite minors, music minors, or broad 
offerings in the humanities or liberal arts. 

2. Students preparing to teach in the elementary and/or secondary schools, with 
a major field concentration in music (special music teachers). 

3. Students preparing to teach in the elementary schools with a major field con- 
centration in music (classroom teachers). 

4. Students preparing to teach in the junior colleges and four-year colleges with 
a major field concentration in music. 

5. Students other than music majors preparing to teach as classroom teachers in 
the elementary schools. 

6. Students seeking undergraduate preparation for other vocations in music, 
normally requiring advanced training. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. Placement examinations in basic piano, voice, theory and performance will 
be given to all music majors at the time of entrance to the college. Demon- 
strable proficiency in the piano and voice placement examinations will satisfy 
the requirement in piano and voice proficiency (see 5d and 7 following). 
Students deficient in any of the above areas will be expected to take additional 
work as recommended. 

* College administrative officer. 


118 


Music 


2. Music majors will be expected to declare a principal performance area with 
the approval of the faculty adviser. It will be expected that each student will 
demonstrate satisfactory progress within this principal performance area, cul- 
minating in the successful presentation of a senior recital before he may be 
approved for graduation. With the written approval of the coordinator of the 
principal performance area the recital requirement may be fulfilled by con- 
ducting, composition, lecture, or any combination of these with performance. 

3. All music majors are required to participate in a major performance group 
(band, orchestra, opera or chorus) each semester of the regular school year 
(minimum: B.A. six semesters, B.M. eight semesters). Students who declare 
wind or percussion as their principal performance area must register for band 
(and/or orchestra, if designated by the instrumental coordinator); string 
majors must register for orchestra; and voice majors must register for chorus 
(or opera if designated by the choral-vocal coordinator). A music major 
whose principal performance area is piano or organ shall be assigned to an 
appropriate performance group by his faculty adviser. 

4. All music majors whose principal performance area is an orchestral instrument 
or piano are expected to take part in small ensembles for a minimum of two 
semesters. 

5. The principal performance area for the major in music requires work in 
applied music, as follows: 

a. Piano, voice and instrumental majors must complete a minimum of eight 
semesters (six semesters B.A.) of applied music in the principal performance 
area. 

b. A composition major must complete eight units of applied music in a 
principal performance area, and eight units of composition culminating in 
the successful presentation of a senior recital of his own compositions. 

c. Choral or instrumental conducting majors must complete a minimum of 
eight semesters (six semesters B.A.) of applied music in the principal per- 
formance area, in addition to a minimum of six units in conducting. 

d. All music majors will take the piano proficiency examination during the 
junior year. This requirement may also be satisfied by successful completion 
of Music 282B. 

6. Senior transfer students entering California State College, Fullerton with a 
major in music, or graduate students in music entering to complete credential 
requirements are expected to complete a minimum of one semester of suc- 
cessful upper division work in music before they may be approved for di- 
rected teaching. Required courses and competencies expected of all the college 
music majors must be satisfied before endorsement by the faculty committee 
for acceptance in the credential program. 

7. All credential candidates are required to pass functional examinations in piano 
and voice (in addition to the piano proficiency described in 5d above) before 
being approved for graduation. This requirement may also be satisfied by 
successful completion of Music 382 and 283B. 

8. All music majors will be expected to attend a weekly departmental organiza- 
tion class (Music 400) each semester of enrollment (maximum of eight se- 
mesters) . 

9. Any exception to a departmental requirement must be made by petition. 

The Department of Music offers a variety of courses and programs leading to 
baccalaureate and graduate degrees in teaching and the professions. The baccalau- 
reate degree may be earned in two degree patterns. Within these patterns, a student 
will normally pursue an emphasis in applied music, composition, conducting, music 
education or music history, theory and literature. 


119 


Music 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

This program prepares students in (1) music history, theory and literature or 
(2) music for elementary classroom teachers. 

The music history, theory and literature emphasis is a general degree, providing 
suitable preparation for advanced degrees in theory, literature or musicology and 
basic preparation for advanced study in other fields, such as musical acoustics, 
music therapy, ethnomusicology, library science in music and music in industry 
and recreation. 

The emphasis for classroom teaching is not designed for the music specialist in 
public schools (see Bachelor of Music). Additional coursework would be required 
if this emphasis is used as preparation for most graduate degrees in music. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Music shall consist of no fewer than 45 units, of which 
at least 25 shall be in the upper division. The following minimum requirements 
arc basic to this degree objective: 


Music Requirements 

Lower Division Units 

Music Theory (Mu 11 1 A,B, 211) 9 

Music Literature (Mu 251) 3 

Applied Techniques (Ensemble 4, principal performance area 4) 8 

20 

Upper Division 

Music Theory (Mu 320, 321A)_ 5 

Music History and Literature (Mu 351A,B) 6 

Applied Techniques (Ensemble 2, principal performance area 2) 4 

Specialization in the major 10 

Music History , Theory and Literature Classroom Teaching 
Emphasis Units Emphasis Units 

Elective courses in music history Mu 333 3 

and literature 6 Mu 381A,B 4 

Mu 316, 322A 4 Mu 435 3 

Total 45 

Allied Requirements 

Music History, Theory and Literature Emphasis Units 

1. An academic minor, with approval of the faculty adviser 20 

2; Foreign language, preferably German, to be satisfied by one of the 
following: 


(a) four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level, 

(b) a pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures, or 

(c) completion of the second semester of the beginning college course 
in foreign language. 

Classroom Teacher Emphasis 

1. Diversified studies in academic areas appropriate for classroom teachers such 
as English, literature, mathematics, science, an, drama, social sciences, foreign 
language, and physical education and health by consultation with the major 
and professional advisers. 

2. Elementary credential candidates majoring in music (B.A. in Music) are re- 
quired to take Mu 599 for one unit concurrently with student teaching. 

3. Completion of Educ 411, Educ 331 and admittance to teacher education. 


120 


Music 


BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This degree program is for the development of persons specializing in per- 
formance and applied music techniques.* 

The music major, professional degree program, shall consist of no fewer than 
64 semester units, of which at least 32 shall be in the upper division. The following 
minimum requirements are basic to this degree objective: 


Lower Division Units 

Music Theory (Mu 111A,B, 211) 9 

Music Literature (Mu 251) 3 

Principal Performance Area 4 

Major Performance Ensemble 4 

Applied Techniques (by advisement) 4 


Upper Division 

Music Theory (Mu 316, 320, 321 A, 322A) 9 

Music History and Literature (Mu 351 A, B) 6 

Principal Performance Area 4 

Major Performance Ensemble 4 

Specialization in the Major (by advisement) 17 


Total 40 

Total, lower and upper division 64 


MINOR IN MUSIC 

The minor in music may be used as an appropriate area of study by persons 
whose majors are in other fields, or may be used to satisfy minor field requirements 
for elementary or secondary teaching credentials. A maximum of 12 units from 
the lower division may be included in work counted toward the music minor. The 
music minor requires a minimum preparation of 20 units. 

Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division Units 

Theory of Music (selected from Mu 101, 111A,B, 21lA,B or any 300- or 

400-level theory classes for which student is qualified) ~ 6 

Music History and Literature (Mu 100, 251, 350 or courses at the 400- 

or 500-level for which student is qualified) - 5-6 

Applied Techniques (including ensemble, conducting, piano or voice, or- 
chestral instruments, and principal instrument or voice) 8-9 


Total 20 

Note: Students expecting to use the minor for teaching must complete four units 
of Mu 281a-d and/or Mu 381 A,B Orchestral Instruments and a minimum of two 
units in an ensemble appropriate to their area of specialization. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The program of studies leading to the Master of Arts in Music provides advanced 
studies in breadth as well as in an area of graduate specialization. The program 
is further intended to provide advanced course work with a suitable balance in 

* This program also can prepare the student for a teaching career as a music specialist in the 
public elementary or secondary schools and junior colleges of California. The music education 
emphasis is a five year program leading toward the Standard leaching Credential, Secondary 
School Teaching Specialization. Holders of this credential, secondary specialization, may teach 
music in either or both secondary and elementary public schools of California. For complete 
professional education requirements, see School of Education section. In the post-graduate 
year, students must complete the music education techniques block (Mu Ed 441, 442, 443 
and 449) before admission to student teaching. 


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Music 


such music studies as theory, composition, history, literature and advanced applied 
techniques and music education. There are suitable graduate specializations in the 
areas of history and literature and performance. 

The Master of Arts in Music is especially designed for teachers and supervisors 
of music; persons intending to specialize in applied fields in the pursuit of occu- 
pational goals; individuals preparing for college teaching; and persons intending to 
pursue advanced degrees beyond the master’s level. 

Prerequisites for Admission to the Program 

The student must have a baccalaureate degree with a major in music (or the 
equivalent of a major, i.e., 24 upper division courses in music). Opportunity is 
given the student to remove deficiencies by taking certain prescribed courses. 
Such courses cannot be applied to the master’s degree program. The student must 
also take the aptitude and advanced music tests of the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination and pass the graduate music placement-proficiency examinations. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study, no more than nine of 
which shall be outside the field of music, and at least 15 of which must be in 
500-level courses in the major. The student will take Mu 500 (Introduction to 
Graduate Studies in Music, 2 units) within the first nine units included on the 
study plan in his program. The degree program offers two options: Option I in 
History' and Literature, or Option II in Performance. A thesis or project is re- 
quired in both options. In addition, in Option I the program will include at least 
six units of study' outside the field of music, but supportive to the program. Each 
program is individually designed in conference with the adviser. 

For further information, consult the Department of Music. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


MUSIC COURSES 

100 Introduction to Music (3) 

A basic approach to listening to music with understanding and pleasure through 
a general survey of musical literature representative of various styles and perform- 
ance media. Music will be related to other arts through lectures, recordings, and 
concerts. Closed to music majors. 

101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Basic theory and practical applications to further understanding of basic music 
principles and to improve music performance and listening skills. Includes sight- 
singing and relationship to keyboard and simple melodic instruments. Closed to 
music majors. 

1 1 1 A,B Music Theory (3,3) 

A year course covering diatonic harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and 
intervals, triads and their inversions, harmonizations, nonharmonic tones, modula- 
tion and dominant seventh chords. Practical applications, to include sight singing, 
dictation and keyboard harmonizations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

161a, 361a Symphony Orchestra (1) 

Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. Per- 
formance of standard representative symphonic works. (More than 3 hours major 
production) 


122 


Mus/c 


161b, 361b College Choir (1) 

Open to all college students with permission of instructor. Study and per- 
formance of standard representative choral literature works. (More than 3 hours 
major production) 

161c, 361c Symphonic Band (1) 

Open by audition to college students and qualified adults in the community. 
Performance of standard representative symphonic band literature. (More than 
3 hours major production) 

161d, 36 Id Opera Theatre (1) 

Study of roles and representative excerpts from standard and contemporary 
operas and the basic musical, dramatic and language techniques of the musical 
theatre. Performance of operatic excerpts and complete operas. (More than 3 
hours major production) 

161e, 361 e College Singers (1) 

Membership restricted to advanced voice students or those passing voice test. 
Performs finest representative choral literature. (More than 3 hours major produc- 
tion) 

161f, 361f Symphonic Winds (1) 

Membership limited to advanced woodwind, brass and percussion students by 
audition. Performance of original literature for symphonic band and large wind 
ensemble. (More than 3 hours major production) 

162b, 362b Wind Ensemble (1) 

Open to qualified wind students by audition or consent of the instructor. Per- 
forms representative wind ensemble literature. (2 hours activity) 

162c, 362c Vocal Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of choral literature of the Renaissance and Baroque 
periods. Open only to students by audition. Public performance required. (2 hours 
activity) 

162d, 362d Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of music written for the Percussion Ensemble. Open to 
any qualified student with consent of instructor. (2 hours activity) 

163, 363 Chamber Music Ensembles (1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string, or keyboard students. Various ensembles will 
be formed to study, read, and to perform representative chamber literature of all 
periods. (2 hours activity) 

171, 271, 371, 471 Individual Instruction (1) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual study with approved instructor 
with emphasis on technique and repertory. Music majors must register for a mini- 
mum of one unit per semester. Jury examination required. 

182A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) 

Fundamentals of keyboard technique for students whose major performance in- 
strument is not piano. (2 hours activity) 

184A,B Piano Class for Non-Majors (1,1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101. Beginning and elementary instruction in basic piano tech- 
niques for the non-music major. (2 hours activity) 


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Music 


211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 111B or equivalent. A continuation of Mu 111A, B with em- 
phasis on the chromatic harmonic practice of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes 
secondary dominants; ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords; sequence, and chro- 
matically altered chords. Practical applications to include sight singing, melodic 
and harmonic dictation, and keyboard practice. Required of all music majors. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

251 Survey of Musical Literature (3) 

An introductory course required of majors in the study of the literature of 
music in Western civilization. Open to minors and qualified students by consent of 
instructor. Students should be able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, 
design and style. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory) 

281 a-d Orchestral Instruments (1) 

Courses in this area are required of all music credential candidates. (4 hours 
activity) 

281a String Instruments (1) 

Specialization on violin, with related work on standard instruments of the 
string family. (2 hours activity) 

281b Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Specialization on clarinet, with related work on standard instruments of 
the woodwind family. (2 hours activity) 

281c Brass Instruments (1) 

Specialization on trumpet, with related work on standard instruments of 
the brass family. (2 hours activity) 

281d Percussion Instruments (1) 

Specialization on the snare drum and mallet-played instruments with re- 
lated work on other standard percussion instruments. Special consideration 
given to typical problems encountered with percussion in the public schools. 
(2 hours activity) 



124 





Niuslc 


282A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1/1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 182B or placement by instructor. Designed to meet music major 
minimum piano proficiency requirements for degree. Fundamentals of keyboard 
technique for students whose major performance field is not piano. Not required 
for piano majors. (2 hours activity) 

283A/B Voice Class (1,1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Required of all credential candidates. 
Not required for voice majors. (2 hours activity) 

316 16th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. Sixteenth-century counterpoint in 
two, three and four parts, covering motet, canon, double counterpoint. Required of 
all music majors pursuing the B.M. degree. 

318 18th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 316 or consent of instructor. Eighteenth-century counterpoint 
in two, three and four parts, covering invention, canon, double and triple coun- 
terpoint and fugue. 

320 20th-Century Harmony (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211. A survey of the harmonic practices of the 20th century 
with emphasis on written exercises in the various styles. Practical applications to 
include sight singing, keyboard practice, and dictation. Required of all music 
majors. (2 hours lecture, 1 hour activity) 

321A,B Form and Analysis (3,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. A— Analysis of structural elements 
of music such as motive, phrase, and period; binary, ternary* rondo, sonato- 
allegro and larger musical forms in representative musical works. Required of all 
music majors. B — Continuation of A, with emphasis on larger musical works. 

322A,B Composition (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 316, 320 and 321 A or consent of instructor. A— Ear training, 
analysis of smaller forms, simple composition of two- and three-part song form 
styles. B— Analysis and writing of more complex musical forms. 

323A,B Orchestration (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 316 or consent of instructor. Writing and analysis of orchestral 
music. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 or equivalent or successful completion of proficiency test. 
Study of the relationship of music to child growth and development, with em- 
phasis on the child from 5 to 12. 

341 Survey of the Symphony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of the history and litera- 
ture of symphonic music from the 18th through the 20th centuries, with special 
emphasis on the relationships between musical composition and the general artistic 
temper of historical periods. For non-music majors only. 

342 Survey of the Concerto (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of the history and lit- 
erature of the concerto from the 17th century to the present. The nature of the 
soloist and the social display of virtuosity will be considered. For non-music 
majors only. 


125 


Music 


343 Survey of Choral Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of choral music through 
the ages, from Gregorian Chant to contemporary forms, concentrating on choral 
works of the great composers of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras. For 
non-music majors only. 

350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. Designed to increase interest and 
an understanding of music in its relation to our general culture. A sociological 
approach which includes musical criticism and journalism, concert life, audience 
psychology, and the political/religious/business aspects of the American musical 
scene. 

351 A/B History and Literature of Music (3/3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 251. A — A study of the history and literature of music from 
early Greek beginnings through the Renaissance. B— A study of the history and 
literature of music covering the Baroque, Classic, Romantic period and the 20th 
century. (Required of all music majors) 

353 Survey of Instrumental Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392 A. Through examination and analysis of multiple examples of 
the repertory, this course is designed to develop skills in the practical use of instru- 
mental literature for performance in secondary schools and community' colleges. 

3B1A Survey of Orchestral Instruments (2) (Formerly 281e) 

A general survey of orchestral instrument practices for elementary credential 
candidates. (4 hours activity') 

381B Survey of Recreational Instruments (2) (Formerly 281f) 

A general survey of recreational instrument practices for credential candidates. 
(4 hours activity') 

382 Piano Class (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Required of all credential candidates. 
(2 hours activity) 

384 Piano Accompanying (1) 

Prerequisite: by' audition only'. The study' and performance of piano accompani- 
ments for instrumentalists, vocalists, and ensembles. Participation in rehearsals, re- 
citals, and concerts required. (2 hours activity') 

387 Church Service Playing (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. Transposition and improvisation of 
interludes and playing of hy mns, chants and accompaniments. Includes character- 
istics of services of various denominations and a survey of suitable organ literature. 
Can be repeated for credit. 

390A/B/C Diction for Singers (1/1,1) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Study of proper 
singing diction, may not be considered a substitute for formal language study. Ex- 
amples from standard vocal literature explained through the use of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. A— Italian, English. B— German. C — French. 

391 A/B Choral Conducting (1,2) 

Prerequisite: one semester of voice class or consent of instructor. A — Principles, 
techniques, and methods of conducting choral groups. Required of all music edu- 
cation majors. (2 hours activity') B — Continuation of A including laboratory’ work 
with class and vocal ensembles, using standard choral repertoire. (4 hours activity) 


126 


Music 


392A,B Instrumental Conducting (1/2) 

Prerequisite: two courses from 281 a-d or consent of instructor. A — Principles, 
techniques, and methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. Required of all 
music education majors. (2 hours activity) B — Continuation of A including labora- 
tory experience in conducting instrumental groups, using standard instrumental 
literature. (4 hours activity) 

401 A,B Criticism of the Arts (3,3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts. Other majors 
by consent of instructor. 401 A is prerequisite to 401 B except by consent of instruc- 
tor. Criticism which in the first semester will develop criteria and vocabulary, appli- 
cable to criticism in the visual and performing arts through lectures, readings, dis- 
cussions, and attendance at exhibits and performances. Emphasis on oral and written 
skills in the communication of artistic concepts and critical evaluations. Second 
semester emphasizes the practical aspects of writing newspaper reviews and specu- 
lative essays based on musical concerts, dramatic productions, and exhibits of visual 
arts. 


450 History and Literature of Instrumental Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. The development of instru- 
ments and instrumental forms from the Middle Ages to the present, with emphasis 
on the analysis of compositional techniques and stylistic development. (3 hours 
lecture and discussion, 1 hour listening) 

451 History and Literature of Vocal Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351AJB or consent of instructor. A study of solo and ensemble 
vocal literature, including opera, from the Middle Ages to the present, with em- 
phasis on the analysis of compositional and vocal techniques and stylistic develop- 
ment. (3 hours lecture and discussion, 1 hour listening) 

453A,B Choral Literature and Interpretation (2/2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 391A or equivalent and 351A3- A — The study of choral 
literature from the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras analyzed in historical 
perspective. Appropriate performance practices will be examined. B — Continuation 
of A with representative examples from the Classic, Romantic and Contemporary 
eras. 

454 Piano Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B and junior level piano standing. Study and perform- 
ance of representative styles and schools of piano literature, particularly with ref- 
erence to solo and ensemble works. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

455 Instrumental Chamber Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Open to all music majors, or to non-majors by consent of instructor. Members 
of the class will be grouped into ensembles for demonstration purposes. Emphasis 
will be placed on the stylistic differences required in performing works of all 
periods. 

456 Opera Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A3 or consent of instructor. Study of all periods and 
nationalities, including stylistic and historical connotations. 

457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390B or consent of instructor. Study and performance of Ger- 
man Lieder with representative examples of periods and styles. 


127 


Music 


457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390A or consent of instructor. Study and performance of 
Italian, French, Russian, English and American art songs, with representative ex- 
amples of periods and styles. 

458 Collegium Musicum Practicum ( 2 ) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. The study and performance 
of rare and old music, both instrumental and vocal. Techniques of musical research 
will be applied. Students should be competent performers. 

467 Plano Pedagogy (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 454 or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of piano pedagogy, 
with reference to studio and public school teaching. Organization, materials and 
methods of teaching piano in beginning, intermediate, and advanced classes. 

498 Senior Recital (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive preparation of representative works 
in the principal performance area. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Study of a special topic in Music selected in consultation with the instructor and 
carried out under his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (2) 

Required of all graduate music majors. Study of basic bibliography, literature, 
and research techniques and materials useful in graduate music study. 

522 Contemporary Techniques of Composition (2) 

Advanced techniques of composition, as applied to the student’s area of graduate 
specialization. 

523 Advanced Orchestration (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 323B. Analysis and practice of traditional and contemporary 
orchestration techniques. Scoring of music for large ensembles such as orchestra, 
band, chorus and orchestra, or band and orchestra. 

551 Seminar in Music of the Medieval Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A detailed study of the music forms, struc- 
tures and styles from 500 to 1450. Detailed analysis of important representative 
works as well as the contributions of individual composers and theoretical writers. 

552 Seminar in Music of the Renaissance (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of the forms, styles, 
and developmental characteristics of music between 1450 and 1600. Detailed analy- 
sis of selected works by representative composers and theoretical writers. 

553 Seminar in Music of the Baroque Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A3 or consent of instructor. Musical forms, styles, and 
performance practices of the Baroque period. Detailed analysis of significant repre- 
sentative works. 

554 Seminar in Music of the Classic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A3 or consent of instructor. A study of the history and 
literature of music from approximately 1750 to 1900. Detailed analysis of important 

representative works. 


128 


Music 


555 Seminar in Music of the Romantic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An intensive study of the structure and 
development of music in the 19th century. Detailed analysis of important repre- 
sentative works. 

556 Seminar in 20th-Century Music (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Developments in the music of 
western Europe and the western hemisphere since 1890. Intensive study of con- 
temporary music and its structure. 

557 Seminar in Musicology (2) 

Prerequisites: at least two from the following scries: Mu 551-556, and consent 
of instructor. Detailed investigation and systematic analysis of specific develop- 
ments in musicology including exercises in transcriptions from old notations and 
historical investigations prepared by members of the seminar. 

558 Collegium Musicum (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced studies in the performance of 
rare and old music. (See Mu 458 for general description.) May be repeated for 

credit. 

571 Individual Instruction (1) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual instruction with approved instruc- 
tor with emphasis on performance techniques and repertory. Minimum of one 
unit must be taken per semester. Required of all graduate students whose terminal 
project is the graduate recital. 

591 Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391B, conducting experience, or consent of instructor. Advanced 
problems in choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on laboratory work with 
student groups and in concert conducting. (4 hours activity) 

592 Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392B, keyboard facility for score reading and consent of in- 
structor. Advanced study of conducting technics through assignments with the 
college symphony. Interpretive problems of each period covered in lectures. (4 
hours activity) 

597 Project (3) 

Systematic study and report of a significant undertaking in the area of musical 
composition, musical performance, or other related creative activity. A written 
critical evaluation of the work or activity will be required. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Individual investigations of specific problems in the area of concentration by 
candidates for the MA. degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in music and permission of instructor. Research 
and study projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. 
Oral and written reports required. 

MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES 

435 Music in the Modern Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of 20th-century materials 
and techniques, of recordings for creative movement to music, and of basic con- 
ducting techniques for song leading in the elementary school. Adaptation of mate- 
rials for use in classroom music. 

129 


5—81593 


Music Education 


Music Education Techniques Block: * 

* 441 Teaching Music Theory and Appreciation in the Public Schools (2) 

Prerequisite: 20 units in music; Educ 411, or consent of instructor; admission to 
teacher education. Required of all music majors working for the standard teaching 
credential, secondary specialization. Interrelation of general and specialized classes 
and their place in the total school program. 

* 442 Teaching Vocal Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Prerequisites: 20 units in music to include Mu 391 A (for those doing student 
aide), Educ 340, Educ 411, Educ 496, admission to teacher education, senior stand- 
ing or consent of the instructor. See page 212 under Secondary Education for 
description of standard teaching credential program. Objectives, methods, and 
materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching music in the secondary 
schools. The history' and organization of the teaching of vocal and choral music 
in public education. Planning sequential vocal training and performance organiza- 
tions for the total school program. Study of choral literature and techniques of 
instruction. 

* 443 Teaching Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Prerequisite: 20 units in music, Educ 411, Educ 496, admission to teacher educa- 
tion, senior standing or consent of instructor. Required of all music majors work- 
ing for the standard teaching credential, secondary’ specialization. The history and 
organization of the teaching of instrumental music in public education. Study of 
music literature and appropriate curricula for the development of concert bands, 
sy’mphony orchestras, and chamber music ensembles for the total school program. 
444 Administration, Materials and Arranging for the Marching Band (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 32 3 A or consent of instructor. A study of techniques, materials, 
administration and arranging for marching band. Includes charting for the football 
field, parade activities, and practical experience in the scoring of music for march- 
ing band with particular emphasis on the needs of school bands. (2 hours lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

530 Practicum of Research in Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music; completion of Mu 500. Research tech- 
niques and procedures in music education. Students will be required to complete 
a creative project or research paper. 

531 Foundations of Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music; completion of Mu 500. Study of the 
philosophical and historical bases which have influenced music education in the 
United States. Identification of philosophic frames of leading educators, past and 
present. Contemporary’ issues and trends which affect the teaching of music in the 
schools. Prerequisite for all music education courses at the graduate level. 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) 

Studies in the trends and application of educational theory in relation to the 
teaching of music in the public schools. 

544 Curriculum Planning and Construction in Music (2) 

Principles and practices of curriculum planning in music education, with special 
reference to the public elementary, junior and senior high school. Required of 
majors who intend to complete supervision credential. 

545 Supervision and Administration of Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. Philosophy, prin- 
ciples and practices of supervision of music in the public elementary and secondary 
schools. Emphasis on modem principles of leadership, ty'pes of services, organiza- 
tion, management and evaluation of programs of instruction. Required of candi- 
dates for supervisory credential. 

749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Prerequisites: Mu 441, 442, 443 and Educ 449. See page 224 for description. 

130 


Theatre 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 

FACULTY 
Alvin J. Keller 

Department Chairman 

Teri Allen, Ronald Dieb, Edwin Duerr, R. Terry Ellmore, Donald Henry\ Dean 

Hess, Thomas Laga, La Nor Lollich, R. Kirk Mee, S. Todd Muffatti, Dwight 

Odle, Jerry Pickering, Robert Renee, Douglas Taylor, Marguerite VanderHoek, 

James Young*, Allen Zeltzer* 

The Department of Theatre program includes the several fields of playwriting, 
oral interpretation, acting-directing, technical theatre, theatre history and theory, 
radio-television and dance. Specifically, the course work is arranged to provide 
opportunities for students (1) to develop an appreciation for the theatre; (2) to 
become aware, as audience or participants of the shaping force of the theatre in 
society; (3) to improve the understandings and skills necessary for work in the 
theatre as a profession; (4) to prepare for teaching theatre; and (5) to pursue 
graduate studies. 

Theatre majors must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average in their major for gradu- 
ation. In addition to course requirements, all students will usher for major produc- 
tions at least once a semester. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

Four course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and inter- 
ests of students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in Theatre 
Arts. 

Plan I is for those who wish to study theatre as a cultural contribution or who 
wish to pursue graduate degrees in theatre with emphasis in theatre history and 
theory. It is strongly recommended that students electing this plan support the 
major with approved electives from art, theatre, music, foreign languages, litera- 
ture, philosophy, or speech. 

Plan II is designed to develop the necessary competency for pursuing theatre 
as a profession, or for pursuing graduate degrees in theatre with an emphasis in 
an area of concentration other than history of the theatre. Areas of concentration 
are: playwriting; acting-directing; interpretation; radio-television, technical thea- 
tre and dance. 

Plan III meets the requirements of the standard teaching credential with speciali- 
zation in elementary teaching. 

• College administrative officer. 



131 


Theatre 


Plan IV meets the requirements of the standard teaching credential with speciali- 
zation in secondary or junior college teaching. A minor is required and will be 
selected with the aid of the departmental adviser. 

All four plans require a minimum of 36 units in theatre with a minimum of 
24 units of upper division in theatre. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet 
the other college requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following 
Plans III and IV also must meet any specific requirements for the desired teaching 
credential (see section in catalog for School of Education). Graduate students who 
plan to meet the requirements for a standard teaching credential with specialization 
in secondary teaching and a major in drama must complete or be enrolled in 
six units in theatre as approved by the major adviser beyond the specific course 
requirements listed in Plan IV before they can be recommended by the Theatre 
Department for student teaching. 

PLAN I: THEATRE HISTORY AND THEORY EMPHASIS 

Lower Division : Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 263A 
or B, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A or B, Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, 
Costume Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 285A, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 

211, Oral Interpretation (3) 17-18 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A or B, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 475A, 
B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 477, Contemporary Critical Techniques 
(3); Theatre 472, American Theatre (3); electives (3 units) 24 

PLAN II: PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN AN AREA OF CONCENTRATION 

Lower Division: Same as in Plan I, with exception of acting, radio-television, dance 
and technical theatre. 

Upper Division: In one of the following areas of concentration: 

Play writing — Theatre 364, Seminar in Playwriting (6), or Theatre 364 (3) and 
Theatre 383, Television Writing (3); Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Direct- 
ing (6); Theatre 468, Experimental Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World 
Theatre (12); Theatre 477, Contemporary Critical Techniques (3) 30 

Oral Interpretation— Theatre 311, Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 411A,B,C, Oral 
Interpretation of Prose, Poetry, Drama (9); Theatre 414A,B, Reading Theatre 
(6); 1 heatre 475A,B,C, or D (6); electives, six upper-division units selected from 
the following courses: Theatre 386, Stage Lighting; Theatre 472, American Thea- 
tre; Theatre 475A,B,C or D, World Theatre; Theatre 477, Senior Seminar in Con- 
temporary Critical Techniques 30 

The major in theatre with an emphasis in oral interpretation requires a minor 
consisting of 21 units in comparative literature, English or speech and completion 
of 11 units in supportive courses from related areas such as art, anthropology’, 
comparative literature, English literature, linguistics, speech, philosophy to be se- 
lected in consultation with the student’s adviser. 

Acting — Lower Dk'ision: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6) ; Theatre 
241, Voice Production for the Actor (2); Theatre 263A or B, Beginning Acting 
(3); Theatre 276A or B, Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3) 
or Theatre 285A, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation 

(3) 19-20 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 
363A,B, Intermediate Acting (6); Theatre 463 A,B, Advanced Acting (6); Theatre 
475A,B,C,D, W orld Theatre (12); Dance 374, Dance Theatre & Production (6); 
Theatre 480, Radio & Television Production & Direction (3) or Theatre 382, 
Television Dramatic Techniques (3) . 39 


132 


Theatre 


Radio-Television — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre 
(6); Theatre 241, Voice Production for the Actor (2); Theatre 263A or B, 
Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A or B, Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, Costume 
Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 285A, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 211, Oral 

Interpretation (3) - 19-20 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 380, 
Introduction to Radio & Television (3); Theatre 381, Radio & Television An- 
nouncing (3); Theatre 382, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); Theatre 383, 
Television Writing (3); Theatre 480, Radio and Television Production and Di- 
rection (3); Theatre 475A,B,C or D, World Theatre (6); collateral requirements 
in Communications Department (3); six units chosen from advanced courses in 
directing, acting or technical theatre — 36 

Diracting— Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 470 A,B, Di- 
recting (6); Theatre 470A,B, Directing Lab (2); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World 
Theatre (12); Theatre 468, Experimental Theatre (3); Theatre 480, Radio and 
Television Production and Direction (3) or Theatre 382, Television Dramatic 
Techniques (3); Dance 374, Dance Theatre and Production (3); electives, 3 upper 
division units in technical theatre 18 

Technical Thaatr* — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to Theatre (6); 
Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft (6); Theatre 285A, Theatrical Makeup (2); 
Theatre 263 A, Beginning Acting (3) or Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation (3); 
Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 286, Design for Theatre 

( 3 ) 20 

Upper Division: Theatre 376A,B, Advanced Stagecraft (6); Theatre 377A and/or 
B, Stage Costuming (3-6); Theatre 370A, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 
475A,B,C, or D, World Theatre (6); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 
488A and/or B, Advanced Scene Design (3-6); Theatre 480, Radio and Television 
Production and Direction (3); one semester of upper division electives in techni- 
cal theatre (3) 33-39 

Dane* — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to Theatre (6); Dance 101, 
Introduction to Dance (2); Dance 135A,B, Movement and Rhythm (4); Dance 
227A,B, Space Forming (6); Dance 245A,B, Mime and Pantomime (4); two units 
selected from Dance 125A or B, Improvisation; Dance 255, Jazz Dance; two- 
three units selected from Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals; Theatre 285A 
or B 26-27 

Upper Division: Dance 311A,B, Elements and Forms of Dance Composition (6); 
Dance 374A,B, Dance Theatre Production (6); Dance 476A,B, History of Dance 
(6); Theatre 363 A or B, Intermediate Acting and Characterization (3); Theatre 
386, Stage Lighting (3); three units selected from the following: Dance 331A,B, 
Character Dance for Theatre; Dance 450, Creative Dance for Teachers; Theatre 
370A or B, Fundamentals of Directing; Theatre 377A or B, Stage Costuming; 
three units selected from the following: Theatre 403, Children’s Theatre; Theatre 
450, Theatre Management; Theatre 463A or B, Advanced Acting; Theatre 468, 
Experimental Theatre; Theatre 470, Directing, Dance 474, Special Studies in 
Dance; Theatre 486, Advanced Theatrical Lighting; six units selected from 
Theatre 471, Kabuki Theatre; Theatre 475A,B,C or D, World Theatre 36 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
Elementary 

Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 211, 
Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 263 A or B, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 
276A or B, Beginning Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); 
Theatre 285 A, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 286, Design for Theatre (3) — 23 


133 


Theatre 


Upper Division : Theatre 311, Oral Interpretation (3) ; Theatre 41 4 A or B, Reading 
Theatre (3); Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Dance 374, Dance 
Theatre and Production (3); Theatre 402, Dramatic Activities for Children (3); 
Theatre 403, Children’s Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C or D, World Theatre (3); 
Theatre 478A or B, Rehearsal and Performance (1) 25 

PLAN IV: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
Secondary or Community College 

Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 211, 
Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 263 A or B, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 
276A or B, Beginning Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); 

Theatre 285A, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 286, Design for Theatre (3) 23 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 386, 
Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 450, Theatre Management (3); Theatre 472, Ameri- 
can Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12) 27 

MINOR IN DRAMA 

The minor in drama consists of 23 units, 12 of which must be in upper division: 
Lower Division: Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 263 A or B, Be- 
ginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A or B, Beginning Stagecraft (3); Theatre 285 A, 
Theatrical Makeup (2) 11 

Upper Division: Theatre 414A or B, Reading Theatre (3); Theatre 370A, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (3); Theatre 475A,B,C or D, World Theatre (6) 12 

Candidates for the secondary teaching credential who wish to minor in theatre 
must obtain approval from the Theatre Department and must enroll for Theatre 
Education 442, Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (2). 

MASTER OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

The Master of Arts in Theatre Arts is designed to provide a program of 
coordinated graduate studies built on the framework of the undergraduate prepa- 
ration; to provide added incentive for intellectual growth reflected in improvement 
in teaching and professional recognition; and to provide a sound basis for con- 
tinued graduate study in the field of theatre. The student is expected to demon- 
strate a high degree of intellectual and creative competence and to demonstrate 
mastery of one of the areas of emphasis in theatre (I) theatre history, (2) dramatic 
literature and criticism, (3) acting and directing, (4) play writing, (5) technical 
theatre, (6) oral interpretation, (7) radio and television, (8) dance, (9) children’s 
theatre. 

Prerequisites 

In addition to the college requirements, students admitted to this program must 
have an appropriate undergraduate major in theatre, with a grade-point average 
of 3.0 in all upper division work in the major, or at least 24 units of appropriate 
upper division work in theatre, with a GPA of 3.0, before being classified. Students 
will complete an oral interview before being admitted to a program of studies. 

Program of Studies 

The degree study plan in theatre will include at least 30 units of adviser-approved 
graduate studies, 15 units of which must be in 500-level courses. Each program 
will have 24 units in theatre, including a core of six units (Theatre 500, Introduc- 
tion to Graduate Study— taken very early in the program; Theatre 597, Project; 
or Theatre 598, Thesis); and six units of adviser-approved supporting courses in 
related fields either in other departments or within the Theatre Department but 
outside the area of emphasis. Before the degree is granted each student will pass 
an oral and written examination. 

For futher information, consult the Department of Theatre. See also “The 
Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

134 


Theatre 


THEATRE COURSES 

100A,B Introduction to the Theotre (3,3) 

A study of the evolution of theatre, motion pictures, radio and television as com- 
posite arts. Emphasis is placed on the historical, dramatic, and production aspects 
as influenced by different cultures, traditions, and technologies. Required of all 
theatre majors during their freshman year. 

211 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Speech Communication 100, a high school speech course, or consent 
of instructor. A fundamentals course devoted to theory, methods, and practice in 
the performance of oral communication of different types of literature. (Same as 
Speech Communication 211) 

241 Voice Production for the Actor (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fundamental techniques, methods, and train- 
ing to give the actor maximum use of his voice in theatre. Correction of speech 
faults and regional accents. Introduction to problems of stage dialects. Study of 
basic interpretative material. May be repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

263A3 Beginning Acting (3,3) 

Laboratory practice and discussions of the form and content of the art of acting. 
A — Action, motivation and circumstances of behavior on stage and television. 
B — A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. Problems in characterization. 
(6 hours activity) 

272 Understanding Theatre (3) 

A nontechnical survey course for the general student leading to an appreciation 
and understanding of the theatre as a medium of communication and entertainment 
and as an art form. Field trips to certain significant productions. 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (2,2) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Stagecraft Lab (1 unit) and Rehearsal and 
Performance (1 unit). Lecture prepares the student for planning, constructing, 
painting and operating basic scenery for the stage and television. Students will 
act as crew for several productions. 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft Lab (1,1) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Beginning Stagecraft lecture. Practice in the 
safe and efficient use of hand and power tools and standard stage equipment. Prac- 
tice in reading technical drawings and building scenic items. Scenery for depart- 
mental major and class productions are used as lab projects. Student crew produc- 
tions. (6 hours activity) 

377 Costume Fundamentals (2) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Costume Fundamentals Lab. Principles of 
costume and procedures of costuming a theatrical and television production. Lec- 
ture and discussion in basic construction techniques, organizing and executing the 
duties of the costume crew. Designed primarily for non-tech majors within the 
department and as an introductory course for tech majors. 

377 Costume Fundamentals Lab (1) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Costume Fundamentals lecture or consent of 
instructor. Practical experience in executing class project assignments and in con- 
struction and organization of costumes for actual production. (4 hours activity) 

135 


Theatre 


285A,B Theatrical Makeup (2,2) 

Theory and practice in makeup for stage and television. Emphasis on develop- 
ment of individual skill in techniques of character analysis, application in pig- 
ment, plastic, hair makeup, and selection and use of makeup equipment. (4 hours — 
activity) 

286 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or Theatre 276A or 276B, or consent of instructor. 
Study and practice in the basic principles of designing scenery for the stage and 
television. Work in the designing and planning of sets for theatre productions. 
(Same as Art 286) 

290 History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3) 

History and development of motion pictures as an art form combining lec- 
tures, readings, discussion, and screening of films. (Same as Communications 290) 

311 Oral Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or Speech Communication 211 or consent of instructor. 
The principles and practice of reading aloud from the printed page. Analysis of 
selections from prose and poetry are emphasized. The development of voice con- 
trol and projection of idea and motion. (Same as Speech Communication 311) 

341 Phonetics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 341, Linguistics 341) 

363A,B Intermediate Acting and Characterixation (3/3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 263. 363 A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. 
Continuation of Theatre 263A,B. Emphasis on extended and integrated speech and 
movement problems in characterization. Encouraging the student to begin develop- 
ment of style and ensemble acting. Laboratory scenes, extensive analysis and ex- 
ploration. (6 hours activity) 

364 Sominar in Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: evidence of student’s previous interest in creative writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group 
criticism and evaluation of each student’s independent work, as it relates to play- 
writing. May be repeated for credit. (Same as English 364) 

370A/B Fundamentals of Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisite: A, prerequisite to B. Consent of instructor. The study of prere- 
hcarsal problems and procedures, of the structural analysis of plays, and of com- 
position, picturization, pantomimic dramatization, movement, and rhythm onstage 
and in television. Practice in directing scenes. (6 hours activity) 

376A/B Advanced Stagecraft (2,2) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Advanced Stagecraft Lab (1 unit) and Re- 
hearsal and Performance (1 unit). Lecture prepares student to plan and execute 
complex scenery and sound for stage and television. Special analysis will be placed 
on new materials and techniques within the field. 

376A/B Advanced Stagecraft Lab (1,1) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Advanced Stagecraft lecture or consent of 
instructor. Special construction and rigging problems are executed as they appear 
in production. The scenery for departmental major and class productions are used 
as laboratory projects. Students are crew heads for the productions. (6 hours ac- 
tivity) 


136 


Theatre 


377 A,B Stage Costuming (2,2) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in 377 A,B Stage Costuming Lab. A — History of 
costume for the stage; a chronological study of fashions and textiles of major 
historical periods, methods of costume research, and the means of interpreting 
historical costume for theatrical statement. B — A study of the techniques of de- 
signing and constructing costumes of various historical periods, with emphasis on 
creative planning. 

377A,B Stage Costuming Lab (1/1) 

Requires concurrent enrollment in Stage Costuming lecture or consent of in- 
structor. Practical experience in solving advanced problems in costume design, 
construction, and organization through participation in major productions of the 
department. (4 hours activity) 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

The history and development of the broadcasting industry and its impact and 
influence on our society. A study of the basic broadcasting practices, audiences, 
production and programming. (Same as Communications 380) 

381 Radio and Television Announcing (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of con- 
trol room operation. Lectures and practice in microphone and camera techniques, 
commercial announcements; interviewing, sportscasting, narration, foreign pro- 
nunciations, and continuity. (6 hours activity) 

382 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 370 or consent of instructor. Survey of the development 
and trends in television techniques and production. Primarily for theatre majors 
to train the director, actor and designer in the elements of televised drama. 

383 Television Writing (3) 

Study of the principles and practices and experience in the writing of scripts 
and other forms of continuity for television. 

386 Stage Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A,B or equivalent. Theory and practice in stage light- 
ing and television presentations. Emphasis is given to design and the technology for 
its illumination. (More than 6 hours activity) 

401 A,B Criticism of the Arts (3,3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts. Other majors 
by consent of instructor. 401 A is prerequisite to 401 B except by consent of instruc- 
tor. Criticism which in the first semester will develop criteria and vocabulary 
applicable to criticism in the visual and performing arts through lectures, readings, 
discussions, and attendance at exhibits and performances. Emphasis on oral and 
written skills in the communication of artistic concepts and critical evaluations. 
Second semester emphasizes practical aspects of writing newspaper reviews and 
speculative essays based on musical concerts, dramatic productions, and exhibits 
of visual arts. 

402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

Theory and practice in the use of creative dramatics, storytelling, puppetry, 
assembly programs, role-playing, and other aspects of dramatics as tools for the 
teacher, group worker, recreation major, and others who work with children. 

403 Children's Theatre (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 263 A or B; 276A and 370AB or equivalent; or consent of 
the instructor. Theories and principles of production in the formal theatre arts for 
children. Analysis and evaluation of appropriate theatrical forms. 


137 


Theatre 


411 A Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or 311 or consent of instructor. The oral interpretation 
of prose literature. Emphasis will be upon the application of relevant critical tech- 
niques to close study of various types of prose literature and to the development 
of oral interpretation skills appropriate to these types. 

41 IB Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or 311 or consent of instructor. The oral interpreta- 
tion of poetic literature. Emphasis will be upon the application of critical tech- 
niques to close study of various types of poetry and to the development of ap- 
propriate oral interpretation skills. 

41 1C Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or 311 or consent of instructor. The oral interpreta- 
tion of drama. Emphasis will be upon the application of relevant critical techniques 
to the drama and upon the development of oral interpretation techniques appropri- 
ate to drama. 

414A,B Reading Theatre (3,3) (Formerly 314A,B) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 311 (or Speech Communication 311) or Theatre 363 A or 
B. Oral reading in which the emphasis is placed through activity, on group and 
individual reading of literature. The first semester will emphasize modern and 
contemporary literature and the second semester will include selections from 
Elizabethan, Renaissance and/or Romantic periods. (6 hours activity) 

450 Theatre Management (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion and practice of the basic ele- 
ments of public relations as applied to theatre with a detailed analysis of various 
advertising mediums and experimentation in their use. A study of the various 
financial aspects of academic, community, and professional theatre operations in- 
cluding practical experience in front-of-the-house management and box office 
operation through the department’s public presentations. (6 hours activity) 

463A,B Advanced Acting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 363 A,B. 463 A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. 
A study of historical theories and techniques of styles of acting as an art form. 
The first semester will include Greek through Renaissance periods and the second 
semester will include the Neoclassic periods to contemporary styles. (6 hours 
activity) 

468 Experimental Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Cannot be taken concurrently with Theatre 
478AB. An activity course in which dramatic principles are applied through pro- 
duction of full length and one-act plays using various styles of acting and stagring. 
May be repeated up to six units for credit. (More than 3 hours production per 
unit) 

470A,B Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 370A,B or consent of instructor. Requires concurrent en- 
rollment in Theatre 470A,B Lab. Readings in theory, analysis of scripts, and 
problems in directing plays for their oral and visual value as theatre. 

470A,B Directing Lab (1,1) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 370A,B or the consent of instructor. Requires concurrent 
enrollment in Theatre 470A,B directing lecture. A — Each student directs public 
performances of a one-act play. B — Each student directs public performances of 
two-act plays, or equivalent. (3 hours laboratory) 


138 


Theatre 


471 Kabuki Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. A study of the 
history and development of the Kabuki Theatre, emphasizing the three types of 
Kabuki plays (Jidaimano, Sewamono, Shosagoto) and theories of production of 
Kabuki drama. 

472 American Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The development of the art of theatre in the 
United States from colonial times to the present day; its place and potentialities 
as a force in a democratic society. 

475A / »,C / D World Theatre (3,3,3,31 

Examination of the historical and dramatic evolution of world theatre. A — Ancient 
Greece and Rome, Middle Ages; Italian Renaissance; B— England from 1558-1790; 
16th- and 17th-century Spain and France; C — 18th- and 19th-century Europe and 
Russia; 19th-century England; D — 18th- and 19th-century America; the Orient; the 
modern world. Students registering for Theatre 475 must have completed the re- 
quirements for upper division standing. 

477 Senior Seminar in Contemporary Critical Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Introduction to major contemporary modes 
of criticism and their application to selected plays and area productions. 

478A,B Rehearsal and Performance (1-3) 

Acting in stage productions, major technical assignments in stage productions, 
or participation in television or children’s theatre productions. Any upper division 
or graduate student who is interested should enroll. This class cannot be taken 
concurrently with Theatre 468. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 

4B0 Radio and Television Production and Direction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 370, 380, or consent of instructor. Theory and practice 
in the production of radio and television programs and announcements: the plan- 
ning, organizing, directing, rehearsing, performing, recording and editing of tele- 
vision programs and announcements. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

436 Advanced Theatrical Lighting (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 386 or consent of instructor. The design and technology 
of lighting. Student will be prepared to design for the stage, dance, pageant, dis- 
play, film and television. Student will do at least one major lighting project as 
part of the course. (6 hours activity) (Same as Art 486) 

483A,B Advanced Scene Design (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 286, or equivalent beginning work in design. Lecture in 
scene design with emphasis on style, ornamentation and illusion leading to prac- 
tical problems in designing for the stage and television. (Same as Art 488A,B) 

491 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 491) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in theatre with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

300 Introduction to Graduate Study in Theatre (3) 

Introduction to methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source 
materials, including library and original data; research and project design and 
execution; interpretation of researches. 


139 


Theatre 


501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory and Appreciation (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 500. Directed research with emphasis on the relationship 
between historical backgrounds and developments in the theatre and the student’s 
area of concentration. 

511 Graduate Seminar in Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The historical and philosophical backgrounds 
in the development of interpretation and its relationship to contemporary theory 
and practice. (Same as Speech Communication 511) 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering Shake- 
speare. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the 
section appropriate to his program. (Same as English 571) 

572 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) 

History and philosophy of production problems in theatre arts. Organization of 
the college theatre as it relates to the total college program. Planning of the 
production within the limitations of budgets and physical facilities. 

573 Graduate Seminar, Literary Genres (3,3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. As appropriate to the specialized research 
and publications of the instructor, this course will offer directed research and 
writing, group discussion and lectures covering such major literary types as: 
tragedy, comedy and historical drama. With consent of the adviser, this course 
may be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as English 572) 

597 Project (3) 

Development and presentation of a creative project in the area of concentration 
beyond regularly offered course work. May be repeated to a maximum of six units. 

598 Thetis (3) 

Development and presentation of a thesis in the area of concentration beyond 
regularly offered coursework. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in theatre with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

THEATRE EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: Education 340, Education 411, admission to teacher education, 
senior standing or consent of the instructor. The student who has not had 
teaching experience must register concurrently in Education 449. See page 212 
under Secondary Education for description of Standard Teaching Credential pro- 
gram. Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruction for 
teaching in secondary schools. 

484 Educational Television Production (3) 

Theory and practice in the activities, methods of lesson preparation, and pres- 
entation of educational television productions. 

749 Student Teaching in Theatre in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 223 for description and prerequisites. 


140 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Dean: Jack W. Coleman 


Department of Accounting: Robert A. Meier, Chairman 
Donald Barnett, Eugene Corman, A. Jay Hirsch, Robert Vanasse, Jacob Waxman, 
John Williams, Dorsey Wiseman, John Woo 
Department of Economics: John D. Lafky, Chairman 
Scung Chul Ahn, Mary anna Boynton, John Cayton, Kwang-wen Chu, Franz 
Dolp, Levern Graves, Robert Harlow, Melvin Horton, Sidney Klein, Wayne 
Lancaster, Robert Michaels, Morris Morkre, Gary Pickersgill, Joyce Pickersgill, 
Jack Pontney, Guy Schick, Norman Townshend-Zellner 
Department of Finance: B. E. Tsagris, Chairman 
Kenneth Daanc, Peter Mlynaryk, John Nichols, Frank Roebuck, Radha Sharma, 
Perry Stickels, Marco Tonietti 
Department of Management: Donald Shaul, Chairman 
Fred Colgan, Leo Guolo, William Hall, Granville Hough, Ramchand Kirpalani, 
Michael Lockareff, William Lyle, Lcland McCloud, Kent McKee, Richard 
Mushegain, Forrest Pine, Ronald Smith, John Trego*, Edgar Wiley 
Department of Marketing: P'rank Roberts, Chairman 
William Bell, Richard Buskirk, C. Dorsey Forrest, Lynn Harris, Raymond 
Johnson, Lawrence King, Irene Lange, William Lundstrom, Robert Olsen, 
Theodore Smith (Emeritus), Donald Vinson 
Department of Quantitative Methods: Ben C. Edmondson, Chairman 
Gerald Brown, William Busby, Wen Mou Chow, Ronald Colman, William 
Heitzman, James Hightower, Phillip Mitchell, Frederick Mueller, Herbert Rute- 
miller, David Stoller 

Academic Objectives of the School 

The faculty of the school believes that it can best optimize its effectiveness in 
achieving the broad educational objective of the college by concentrating its 
energies on the exploration and teaching of relevant concepts, principles and 
practices, including interrelationships. Additionally, the faculty recognizes the need 
for integrating and relating the various disciplines into a balanced and thought- 
provoking educational experience for the student While considerable emphasis 
must be placed on the need for breadth of knowledge and creativity in thought 
and actions, there must also be emphasis on exploration and analysis in some 
depth of those disciplines most relevant to the business profession. These dis- 
ciplines are recognized to be interrelated and are to be integrated through the 
application of economics, behavioral and quantitative sciences, systems theories and 
concepts, decision theories, computer sciences, logic, and theoretical and applied 
research methodology. 

In addition, the faculty of the school has set forth specific objectives for its 
curriculum and related programs. A summary statement of these objectives is as 
follows: 

1. Educational and Professional 

Through a study of the various theoretical and practical business and eco- 
nomic models, policies and procedures, each student is to be afforded and 
provided with technical expertise in a chosen discipline — accounting, eco- 


* College administrative officer. 

142 


Business Administration 


nomics, finance, management, marketing, quantitative methods and business 
education — to a depth acceptable to prospective employers for beginning 
professional employment. 

2. Human and Ethical 

A major part of effective society and business leadership is related to organi- 
zation and direction of human resources to achieve general and specific goals. 
Therefore, a knowledge of human values — the ethical, psychological and 
sociological foundation for human behavior — is essential. This includes an 
awareness and understanding of the nature of human values, of individual 
goals and the forces which lead to their achievement; the function of leader- 
ship in relating individual and enterprise goals; the impact of group dynamics, 
informal organizations, and interpersonal relationships on the administrative 
process; and the need for a personal code of ethics. 

3. Socioeconomic, Political and Cultural Environment 

Firms do not operate in a vacuum, and information about the external forces 
and constraints which bear on the enterprise comprises a necessary body of 
knowledge for competent business planners and administrators. In particular, 
development of economic literacy to support rational choice; recognition of 
economic implications resulting from economic policy decisions by various 
levels of government; and a conceptualization of the impact of the various 
institutions on the enterprise and the impact of business leadership decisions 
on the social system as a whole are stressed. 

Undergraduate Program in Business Administration and Economics 

In our ever-expanding, complex society, the managers of tomorrow must be men 
and women with breadth of understanding and vision. Students who concentrate 
in a special area are encouraged to elect courses in other divisions of the college, 
particularly in the areas of the behavioral, social, and political sciences, and foreign 
languages. It is assumed that the first half of their college work toward a bachelor’s 
degree represents a required basic education in communication, mathematics, a 
laboratory science, social science, and the humanities. Since the understanding of 
mathematics is becoming increasingly important in business and the social sciences, 
students who contemplate enrollment in either business administration or economics 
are encouraged to take four years of high school mathematics. College algebra, or 
three years of high school mathematics including a second course in algebra, will 
be a minimum prerequisite for entrance to the program. 

If credits for either or both elementary accounting and principles of economics 
have not been earned, it will be necessary to enroll in these courses the first semes- 
ter of the junior year. 

Students enrolled in the school and working toward a college degree are subject 
to the general requirements of the college as to courses and credit hours required 
for graduation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree requirements are as follows: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 50 semester credit hours in business administra- 
tion and economics courses in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics, of which 35 semester credit hours must be upper division courses. 

2. Completion of at least six of the 12 units of concentration and 15 of the last 
24 units are required in residence in the School of Business Administration 
and Economics for the B.A. degree. 

3. Completion of the required core courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics. 

4. Completion of 12 semester credit hours of required courses in an area of 
concentration to be selected by the student. 


143 


Business Administration 


5. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than business 
administration. Students may elect to apply economics core courses outside 
the School of Business Administration and Economics to fulfill this require- 
ment. 

6. Students must attain at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all 
college work attempted, in all courses taken in the School of Business Admin- 
istration and Economics, and in his area of concentration. 

CORE: The business administration and economics courses listed below are re- 


quired of all students majoring in business administration: 

Units 

Economics 100A,B, or 200 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory or 

Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory t 3 

Quantitative Methods 265 Computer Methods 3 

Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting 6 

Finance 330 Business Finance 3 

Management 341 Organization and Management Theory 3 

Management 346 Business Law 3 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Quantitative Methods 360 Math Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Quantitative Methods 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Management 449 Seminar in Business Policies • 3 


38-39 


AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR MAJORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student in business administration should select an area of concentration by 
the second semester of the junior year and take the required courses in the area. 


Accounting 

301 A, B Intermediate Accounting 

302 Cost Accounting 

And at least one of the following courses: 

308 Federal Income Tax 

401 Advanced Accounting 

402 Auditing 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems 


Units 
. 6 
. 3 


3 

3 


Economics 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Economics Elective, 400-level 3 

Management 446 Managerial Economics 3 


Finance 

331 Financial Analysis » 3 

And at least three additional courses offered by the Finance Department 


Management 

In consonance with college and school objectives, the major goals of the Manage- 
ment Department are to: 

1. Provide students with foundational competence in the utilization of the factors 
of production. * 

t Students should ascertain departmental requirement. 

* Students taking business economics as their area of concentration will take Econ 410, Govern- 
ment and Business — in lieu of Mgmt 449, Business Policies. 


144 


Business Administration 


2. Develop in each student an understanding of the theory and practices needed 
for successful performance in managerial and staff positions in business, gov- 
ernment, and the community. 

3. Provide students with a knowledge of human values — the ethical, psychological, 
and sociological foundation for human behavior, and the impact of group 
dynamics, informal organizations, and interpersonal relationships on the ad- 
ministrative process. 

Students must choose one of the four following emphases: 

Administrative Management Emphasis: Designed for students interested in all 
aspects of business or in general supervision of organized activity. 

342 Production Operations 

343 Personnel Management 

444 Management of Systems 

446 Managerial Economics or 447 Management Decision Games 

Operations Management Emphasis: Designed for students who have interest in and 
aptitude for managing new projects and production operations in both manufactur- 
ing and non-manufacturing. 

342 Production Operations 

445 Advanced Production Operations 

340 Fundamentals of Behavioral Science for Management or 343 Personnel 
Management 

446 Managerial Economics or 447 Management Decision Games 

* Industrial Relations Emphasis: Designed for students interested in industrial rela- 
tions or in managing labor unions as organized enterprises. 

343 Personnel Management 
444 Management of Systems 

441 Labor-Management Relations 

442 Labor Law 

* Behavioral Science for Management Emphasis: Designed for students interested 

in interpersonal relations and group leadership opportunities in all organizations 
but specifically found in manpower management, small business, hospital and wel- 
fare administration, and organizations carrying out social change. 

340 Fundamentals of Behavioral Science for Management 
343 Personnel Management 

443 Dynamics of Individual, Interpersonal, and Group Behavior for Manage- 
ment 

444 Management of Systems 

Marketing 

353 Marketing Administration- — - — 

452 Marketing Research 

459 Marketing Problems 

A minimum of one of the following courses: 

352 Principles of Retailing - - - 

354 Principles of Advertising- - 

355 Credit and Credit Administration 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing—— 

357 Industrial Purchasing — — 

358 Physical Distribution 

454 Advertising Problems 

457 Sales Analysis and Control 

458 International Marketing — — 

* The student must complete the following collateral courses for this emphasis 
Speech Communication 324 Dynamics of Small Croup Discussion 
Speech Communication 333 Communication in Business and Industry 
Psychology 351 Social Psychology 
Sociology 473 Complex Organizations 


- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 

- 3 


145 


Business Administration 


Quantitative Methods 

The objective of the Quantitative Methods Department is to prepare the student 
to utilize quantitative information and methods effectively in evaluating alterna- 
tives and making decisions. Emphasis is placed on the theory and practice of 
quantitative methods, especially those topics contributed by the disciplines of 
statistics, operations research and computer science. 

Quantitative Methods majors are required to take Math 150A,B, Calculus* 


461 Advanced Statistics 3 

463 Management Science 3 


A major field study plan in Quantitative Methods, approved by the student’s 
adviser, consisting of at least two courses. These courses may include any of the 
following, as well as approved courses in other disciplines. 

Computer Science 

364 Computer Logic and Programming 

382 Machine Language Programming and Information Structures 
446 Computer Programming Theory 

464 Information Structures, Information Storage and Retrieval 

485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing 

486 Automata Theory 

487 Artificial Intelligence 

Operations Research 

448 Digital Simulation 

465 Linear Programming 

466 Nonlinear Programming 

490 Stochastic Models in Business and Economics 

Statistics 

467 Quality Control 
469 Reliability Statistics 
475 Multivariate Analysis 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Students who wish to major in Business Administration in preparation for a 
career as a secondary school teacher in business subjects must meet the require- 
ments of the School of Business Administration and Economics and the secondary' 
school teacher education program including the requirements for the proper cre- 
dential as outlined in the catalog. 

The requirements for a major in this area are as follows: 

1. The core requirements as set forth for all business administration majors, 
page 144. 

2. Twelve hours of advanced work in one of the six areas of concentration: 

a. Accounting 

b. Economics 

c. Finance 

d. Management 

e. Marketing 

f. Quantitative methods 

3. Meet the School of Business minimum requirement of 50 credit hours in 
business administration and economics courses. 

4. A maximum of 12 credit hours in the secretarial field, including those applied 
as electives, may count toward the degree in business administration and 
economics.t 

5. Completion of at least 62 credit hours in areas other than business administra- 
tion and economics are required for the degree. 

•Quantitative Methods majors may elect to take Math 150A,B with the credit/no credit option, 
t The college does not offer work in secretarial training, typewriting, or business machines. 
Consult the Dean of the School of Business Administration and Economics to arrange for 
transfer of approved courses to satisfy these requirements. 

146 


Business Administration 


Education courses required for a credential will be detailed by the School of 
Education. 

The requirements for a minor in this area are as follows: 


Units 

Economics 100A-B or 200 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Accounting 201 A-B Elementary Accounting 6 

QM 264 Computer Programming 1 

One of the following: 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Fin 330 Business Finance 3 

Mgmt 346 Business Law 3 

QM 265 Computer Methods 3 3 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in Secondary School 2 

t Electives 6 


MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


22-24 


Applicants, as well as continuing students, should read carefully “The Program 
of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and consult the Graduate Bulletin , particularly the 
“Steps in the Master’s Degree Program.” 

Note: The School of Business Administration and Economics requires that a 
student be classified in order to enroll in graduate courses (500-level) or receive 
prior permission from the associate dean for graduate programs in the School of 
Business Administration and Economics. 


Programs of Study 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers two plans for the 
M.B.A. degree. 

Plan I is a broad integrated program designed primarily for students with an 
undergraduate degree in a field other than business administration or economics. 
To insure breadth in the program, the student is not permitted to take more than 
nine units in any one functional area. 

Plan II is an integrated program allowing some concentration in an area of spe- 
cialization. Under this plan the student is required to complete 12 units in an area 
of concentration. It is designed primarily for students with baccalaureate degrees 
in business administration and economics. 

The degree is earned by completion of 30 units in courses approved for graduate 
work with an overall grade-point average of not less than 3.0. 

The M.B.A. degree can be achieved via three combinations: 

a. 30 units of coursework; or 

b. 27 units of coursework and an approved project; or 

c. 24 units of coursework and an approved thesis. 

The procedural steps for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Busi- 
ness Administration degree follow: 

Admission as an Unclassified Graduate Student 

1. Apply for admission to the college in unclassified graduate sums and declare 
the objective to be an M.B.A. Plan I or an M.B.A. Plan II. If the student specifies 
the M.B.A. Plan II, he must also specify his area of concentration. This must be 
accomplished at the Office of Admissions and Records before the dates estab- 
lished in the college calendar. 

2. Apply for admission to the M.B.A. program and secure informal advisement 
from the Graduate Office of the School of Business Administration and Eco- 

t A maximum of six units of secretarial courses, including those applied as electives, may 
count toward the minor in Business Education. 


147 


Business Administration 


nomics. The informal advisement should occur at least three weeks prior to your 
first registration, but in any event during the first semester of work. 

Admission to Classified Graduate Status 

Please contact the Graduate Office of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics for advisement prior* to your first registration, but in any event during 
the first semester of residence. 

Admission to classified status in the graduate program of the School of Business 
Administration and Economics at California State College, Fullerton requires: 

1. A bachelor’s degree from a fully accredited college or university. 

2. At least a 2.15 GPA on upper division work (the last 50 per cent of course- 
work) at the undergraduate level. 

or 

At least a 3.0 GPA on the sequential 60 semester units immediately preceding 
the application for classified standing, provided that these 60 units are approved 
by the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

3. Completion of the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business before or 
during the first semester of residence with a minimum score of 450. 

4. Completion of all prerequisite courses (basic business core subjects) within a 
seven-year period prior to being classified with an overall GPA of 3.0 and 
with no grade lower than 2.0 (C). 

5. Satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination on prerequisite courses 
(basic business core subjects). 


PLAN I 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires the completion of the following pre- 
requisites or equivalent with a grade-point average of not less than 3.0. 

Units 


•QM 265 Computer Methods 3 

Acctg 300 Accounting Fundamentals 3 

Econ 300 Basic Economics 3 

Fin 330 Business Finance 3 

Mgmt 341 Organization and Management Theory 3 

Mgmt 346 Business Law 3 

Mkrg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Total — 24 


Curriculum 

Candidates under the M.B.A. Plan 1 Program are required to complete 30 units 
of which 6 units are electives. 

Required Courses 

The required courses (24 units) under this option are as follows: 
tAcctg 500 Seminar in Industrial Accounting 
Acctg 501 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 
Econ 510 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy 
Econ 512 Comparative Economics Seminar 
Fin 532 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management 
Mgmt 544 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 
Alktg 551 Seminar in Marketing Problems 
QM 560 Operations Research or 
QM 56 3 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis 

* Math 120, Elementary Probability, and QM 264, Computer Programming, will satisfy the 
mathematics and programming requirements of QM 265, respectively, 
f Accounting majors must substitute an acceptable course for Accounting 500. 

148 




Business Administration 


Elective Courses 

In addition to the required courses, and with the approval of the graduate co- 
ordinator six units shall be selected from courses offered in the School of Business 
Administration and Economics at the 400 or 500 level. Under no circumstances is 
a 300 level course acceptable on the M.B.A. study plan. Further, no more than 
nine units (combined elective and required) may be selected from any one de- 
partment. 

PLAN II 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires the completion of the following pre- 
requisites or equivalent with a grade-point average of not less than 3.0. 

Units 

•QM 265 Computer Methods 

Acctg. 201 A3 Elementary Accounting 

Econ 100A,B Principles of Economics 

Fin 330 Business Finance 

Mgmt 341 Organization and Management Theory 

Mgmt 346 Business Law ; 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing... — 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 

Total — 

In addition to the prerequisites listed above, each student will be held responsible 
to the department of his choice for the specialized undergraduate background (pre- 
requisites) prescribed for that area of concentration. The area of concentration 
shall be selected from finance, management, marketing, and quantitative methods. 

* Math 120, Elementary Probability, and QM 264, Computer Programming, will satisfy the 
mathematics and programming requirements of QM 265, respectively. 




149 


Economics 


The curriculum required of candidates under the M.B.A. Plan II is as follows: 

Core 

The required graduate core program in the Plan II M.B.A. shall be 18 units. 

Acctg 500 Seminar in Industrial Accounting or 

Acctg 501 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 

Econ 510 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy or 

Eicon 512 Comparative Economics Seminar 

Fin 532 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management 

Mgmt 544 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 

Mktg 551 Seminar in Marketing Problems 

QM 560 Operations Research or 

QM 563 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis 

Concentration 

In addition to the graduate core, each student shall elect an area of concentra- 
tion of at least 12 units but not more than 15 units to be approved by an adviser, 
the department chairman concerned, and the associate dean, graduate programs. 
At least 24 units must be at 500 level. The remaining 6 units may be at either the 
400 level or the 500 level. Under no circumstances is a 300 level course acceptable 
on an MJ3~A. study plan. 


Advancement to Candidacy 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Completion of 12 credit hours of graduate work of which 6 units must be 
500- level with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. 

2. Completion of an application form (in the Graduate Office) approved by the 
adviser, the associate dean, graduate programs, and/or the Graduate Studies 
Committee. 


Complotion 

Comprehensive Examination 

Candidates for the M.B.A. degree must complete the prescribed coursework of 30 
units (at least 24 of which nntst be at the 500 level). They must satisfactorily pass 
a comprehensive examination and must receive the endorsement of the faculty of 
the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

For further information, consult the associate dean, graduate programs, in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The economics major is designed to prepare students for positions in business 
education, and government, and for graduate work in economics and related dis- 
ciplines. 

Advanced Placement Program in Economics 

An Advanced Placement Program in Economics has been established by the De- 
partment of Economics, the Center for Economic Education, and the Center’s 
affiliated Leadership Group of High School Teachers of Economics. Three semester- 
units of college academic credit in principles of economics and advanced place- 
ment are offered to students taking economics in high school who enroll in the 
program and pass the Advanced Placement Examination in Economics given at 
the college at the end of each Fall and Spring semester. To enroll in the program 
contact Dr. Norman Townshend-Zellner, director, Center for Economic Education. 


ISO 


Economics 


Requirements 

Required of all students for the degree: 

1. Completion of 41 semester credit hours of courses in business administration 
and economics in the School of Business Administration and Economics, of 
which 27 semester credit hours must be in upper division courses. 

2. Completion of at least 15 semester hours in the School of Business Admin- 
istration and Economics at the college. 

3. Completion of the major course requirements for economics majors, in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics. Students in economics are 
required to take Quantitative Methods 265 or equivalent as prerequisite to 
Quantitative Methods 361. 

4. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than business 
administration and economics. 

5. Students must attain at least 2.0 grade-point average (C average) in all college 
work attempted, and in all courses in the School of Business Administration 
and Economics. 

Business administration and economics courses required of all students majoring 
in economics are listed below: 


Lower Division 


Units 


Econ 200 or 100A3 Principles of Economics 

Acctg 201 A,B Elementary Accounting 

QM 265 Computer Methods 


5-6 

6 

3 


Total 


14-15 


Upper Division 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory — 3 

Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Exon 420 Money and Banking 3 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Industry -- 3 

QM 360 Math Methods in Business and Economics or Math 150A Analytic 

Geometry and Calculus 3 

Fifteen hours of upper division electives in economics approved by the stu- 
dent’s adviser 13 


Total 


30 


MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

A minor in economics may be achieved by taking the following courses: 


Economics Units 

200 or 100 A3 Principles of Economics 5-6 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Electives 9 


Total 20-21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The Master of Arts in Economics is a pan-time, evening (and late-aftemoon) 
degree program, designed especially for candidates who will be employed full or 
part-time while working for the M.A. degree. 

The procedural steps for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Arts 
in Economics degree follow. 


151 


Economics 


Admission Requirements 

1. Apply for admission to the college in unclassified graduate status and declare 
the objective to be a Master of Arts in Economics degree. This must be accom- 
plished at the Office of Admissions before the dates established in the college 
calendar. 

2. Apply for admission to the Master of Arts in Economics program. Please read 
carefully page 78, and as indicated secure informal advisement from the Graduate 
Office of the School of Business Administration and Economics. The informal 
advisement should occur at least three weeks prior to your first registration, but 
in any event during the first semester of work. Specific admission requirements 
include: 

a. An overall grade-point average in all undergraduate work of not less than 2.7. 

b. Competency in mathematics through fulfillment of one of the following: 
Courses in college algebra and calculus; completion of California State College, 
Fullerton courses QM 265 and QM 360 (or equivalent); satisfactory com- 
pletion of a mathematics proficiency test developed by the Department of 
Economics, comprising mathematical applications in economics. 

c. Satisfactory level of performance in a written examination in economics. 

d. Satisfactory level of performance on the Graduate Record Examination 
(verbal and quantitative), aptitude only. 

e. Interview. 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires the completion of the following pre- 
requisite courses, or equivalent: 

1. For students without an undergraduate major in economics (a grade-point 
average of not less than 3.0 in the following prerequisites is required): 

Units 


Principles of economics 6 

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Statistics (analytical) 3 

Money and banking 3 

Total 18 


2. For students with an undergraduate major in economics : 24 semester units of 
work in economics or related courses (e.g., statistics), with a minimum grade- 
point average of 3.0. The 24 units must include the following courses or 
their equivalent, with a minimum grade of 3.0 in each course: Intermediate 
Microeconomic Analysis, Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis, Statistics 
(analytical), money and banking. 

Program of Study 

1. A core of 12 graduate units in economics is required: 

Units 


Economics 502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Economics 503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Economics 505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar 3 

Economics 506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic 

Applications ( project required) 3 

Total 12 


152 


Accounting 


2. Electives*: 

a. Elect one graduate course in economics (other than the required core 

courses, and outside the quantitative field) 3 

b. Elect one 400-level or graduate-level course in quantitative or math- 

ematical economics 3 

c. Elect two 400-level or graduate-level courses in fields other than 

economics, yet related to economics and approved as part of the 
student’s integrated program 6 

d. Elect two 400-level or graduate-level courses both in economics 

or both in other related fields, or one in economics and one in 
other related fields 6 

Total 18 

For further information, consult the associate dean, graduate programs, in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ACCOUNTING COURSES 

201A,B Elementary Accounting (3/3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A must be taken before taking Accounting 201 B. 
Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the administration of a business 
enterprise; accounting as a process of measuring and communicating economic 
information; analyzing and recording financial transactions; preparation of finan- 
cial statements; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; introduction to 
manufacturing accounts and reports; the interaction of accounting with the areas 
of finance, quantitative methods, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data- 
information systems. 

300 Accounting Fundamentals (3) 

Open only to graduate students. The basic fundamentals of accounting as they 
apply to the accumulation, organization, and interpretation of financial and quan- 
titative data relevant to the activities of the corporate business enterprise. The 
interaction of accounting with the areas of finance, interpersonal relations, moti- 
vation, and data-information systems. The fund flow statement. 

301 A/B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. The quantification, recording, and presentation 
of balance sheet and income statement items with particular emphasis on the cor- 
porate type of organization; statement of application of funds; cash flow statement; 
basic concepts of accounting theory; interpretation of financial statements. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. The development of accounting information for 
management of manufacturing enterprises; cost records; cost behavior and alloca- 
tion; standard costs; and an introduction to cost control. 

303 Governmental Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: one course in accounting. A consideration of the accounts and 
reports of nonprofit institutions, municipalities, state and federal governments; 
organization, procedures, budgets. 

* If or more units are taken in fields outside economics in elective areas c. and d., then 
three of these units must be at the graduate level. 


153 


Accounting 


304 Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201B. This course is intended for students whose area of 
concentration is not accounting. Analysis, interpretation, and application of ac- 
counting information for managerial decision making; budgets and budgetary con- 
trol; special-purpose reports; differential cost analyses. 

307 Distribution Costs (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB and Marketing 351. The development of quanti- 
tative measures for marketing activity; costs of distributing through different chan- 
nels of distribution, advertising vs. personal selling, and movement activities; devel- 
opment of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual performance in 
the light of budgets and standards. (Same as Marketing 457) 

308 Foderol Income Tax (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201B. Basic consideration of the history, theory, and 
accounting aspects of federal income taxation. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 301 B. A study of partnerships, statements for special 
purposes, receiverships, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting and 
foreign exchange. 

403 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B and 302. Nature of an audit, auditing standards 
and procedures, audit reports; professional ethics and responsibilities of the inde- 
pendent public accountant; introduction to internal auditing. 

406 Cost Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. A study of current and persistent problems in cost 
accounting; theories of cost allocation and absorption; flexible budgeting; responsi- 
bility accounting; and distribution cost control. 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B or 300 and QM 264 or 265. Integrated systems 
for the collection, processing, and transmission of information; aspects of the in- 
formation service function; feasibility' studies; case studies of operating systems. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Research in problems of taxation with emphasis 
on income taxes as they relate to corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries. 

409 C.P.A. Problems and Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 401, or consent of the instructor. Selected problems and 
questions as found in the uniform CPA. examination; preparation, analysis and 
revision of financial statements; assets, liabilities and ownership equities; income 
determination; cost accounting; governmental and institutional accounting; ac- 
counting theory. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chairman. Open 
to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent in- 
quiry. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Seminar in Industrial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201B, or 300, graduate standing and consent of the 
instructor. Accounting information for industrial management; elements of manu- 
facturing cost; cost systems; standard costs; cost reports; distribution cost analy'sis. 

154 


Business Administration 


501 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302, or 304, or 500, graduate standing and consent 
of the instructor. Accounting, financial, and other quantitative data for managerial 
decision-making; long-term and short-term profit planning; budgetary control; 
cost analysis and special reports; financial analysis and planning; the financial and 
taxation aspects of business decisions. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B, graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 
The concepts and theory of accounting; the effects of professional, governmental, 
business, and social forces on the evolution of accounting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Financial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 502. A critical examination of the current problems 
and areas of controversy in financial accounting. 

504 Seminar in Contemporary Managerial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 500 or 302, graduate standing and consent of the 
instructor. A critical examination of the current problems and areas of contro- 
versy in managerial accounting. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and graduate standing. Auditing theory and prac- 
tices; professional ethics; auditing standards; SEC and stock exchange regulations; 
auditor's legal liability; statement trends and techniques. 

397 Project (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

59« Thesis (3-4) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

399 Indepandent Graduate Research (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, the consent of the instructor, and approval by 
the department chairman. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue 
independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core, senior standing and consent of in- 
structor. For advanced students who wish to investigate business and economic 
problems in specialized areas. Application of research methods: selection and iden- 
tification of a problem, determining a method of approach, collection and analysis 
of relevant data, eliciting conclusions and solutions. 

395 Modern Capitalism (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The changing role of 
capitalism and its control in the United States, European countries and Japan. The 
trends as to Government policy and action, relative to private ownership and co- 
ordinated economic planning. 


155 


Economies 


ECONOMICS COURSES 


100A Principles of Economics (3) 

The first half of a two-semester sequence. An introduction to the principles and 
analysis of economic policy. Emphasizes economic stability and growth and the 
role of public policy. 

100B Principles of Economics (3) 

The second half of a two-semester sequence. Continuation of an introduction to 
the principles of economic analysis and policy including the central problem of 
scarcity. Emphasizes resource allocation and income distribution, international 
economics, comparative economic systems, and the role of public policy. 

200 Principles of Economics (5) 

Prerequisite: open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 100AJB). An introduction 
to the principles of economic analysis and policy including the central problem of 
scarcity, basic economic institutions of the United States, resource allocation and 
income distribution, economic stability and growth, and the role of public policy. 

201 The American Economy (3) 

A survey of the basic economic concepts and processes of a private enterprise 
economy. Included is a consideration of such topics as resource allocation, income 
distribution, problems of economic stability and growth and the appropriate role 
of government in a private enterprise society. Not open to students majoring in 
business administration and economics. 

300 Basic Economics (3) 

Open only to graduate students. A concentrated study of the principles of 
economic analysis and policy and the basic economic institutions of the United 
States. 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B or 200 or equivalent. An analysis and evaluation 
of (1) rational decisionmaking behavior of consumers and firms and (2) price 
and output determination in markets; with special emphasis placed on the use of 
cases and problems to illustrate the application of the analysis to the contemporary 
scene. 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B or 200 or equivalent. The explanation and 
evaluation of the determinants of the level and fluctuations of such economic 
aggregates as national income and employment, with stress placed on the use of 
problems involving the application of analytical tools to modem macroeconomic 
issues. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. An analytical comparison 
of unplanned and planned systems of economic organization as to their theoretical 
foundations, existing economic institutions, and achievements and failures; capital- 
ism, socialism, communism, and fascism will be examined as exemplified by the 
United States, England, Russia and prewar Germany. 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. An analytical evaluation of 
Soviet economic development including the structure and performance of the 
Soviet economy and problems of planning and control. 


156 


Economies 


332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. Analysis of the natural 
resources, population, agricultural, industrial, transportation, communications, mone- 
tary, banking, etc. problems of Asia, i.e. China, Japan, etc. and the Asian subconti- 
nent. The relations of non-economic problems to the economic is considered in 
detail. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. An examination of the 
processes of economic growth with special references to developing areas. Con- 
siders capital formation, resource allocation, relation to the world economy, eco- 
nomic planning and institutional factors, with appropriate case studies. 

334 Economics of Poverty# Race and Discrimination (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B or 200 or equivalent; Economics 201 will be 
accepted as the prerequisite with permission of the instructor. An economic 
analysis of the problems and policies dealing with poverty, race and discrimina- 
tion. A field investigation or project is required of each student. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. The development of 
American economic institutions with special emphasis on economic problems, eco- 
nomic growth, and economic welfare. 

351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. The evolution of European 
economic institutions and their relation to the development of industry, commerce, 
transportation, and finance in the principal European countries. 

360 Economics of Location (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. The theory and principles 
underlying the location of economic activity. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. Theory and analysis of the 
urban economy, urban economic problems and policy. 

365 Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. A study of government 
finance at the federal, state, and local levels with particular reference to adminis- 
trative problems of public finance, the ethical aspects of taxation, and the impact 
of taxation and spending on resource allocation and income distribution. 

370 Economics of Research# Development and Technological Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100A,B, or 200 or equivalent. Examination of the im- 
portance of R & D and technological change in the economy; concepts, issues, and 
major figures in the study of economics of technology'; analytical techniques for the 
assessment of technological change; and evaluation of the impacts of technological 
change. 

410 Government and Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An economic study of business organization, con- 
duct and performance followed by an analysis of the rationale and impact of 
public policy on various segments of business and business activities, including the 
regulated industries, sick industries, and antitrust policy. 


157 


economics 


411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An examination of the theory or international 
trade and the means and significance of balance of payments adjustments, with 
an analysis of past and present developments in international commercial and 
monetary policy. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An analysis of the basic economic and institutional 
influences operating in labor markets. Considers relevant aspects of resource allo- 
cation, income distribution, economic stability, and growth. 

420 Money and banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the structure and operation of com- 
mercial banks and financial institutions including a consideration of the impact 
of money and capital market developments on economic activity. (Same as 
Finance 324.) 

421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the techniques of monetary and fiscal 
policy and an appraisal of their relative roles in promoting economic stability and 
growth. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310, 320 and Q\1 360 or Math 150A. Development of 
advanced statistical methods and their application in economic research. Advanced 
concepts in model building; development of different types of economic models. 
The use and effect of economic models in public policy. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310, 320 and QM 360 or Math 150A. Selected topics in 
economic theory, drawn from microeconomics and macroeconomics. Content vary- 
ing from year to year but with emphasis on constrained optimization problems 
and rational decision making. 

450 History of Economics Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and 320. A study of the development of economic 
thought as reflected in the evolution of major schools of thought and of leading 
individual economists as they influenced economic thought and policy. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Prerequisites: economics major or concentration, senior standing and approval 
by the department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring 
to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 100A,B, and 310. An advanced theoretical for- 
mulation of the principles of the determination of prices and outputs of goods 
and productive services in a market system. Topics include: consumer choice, de- 
mand, production, cost, the equilibrium of the firm and the market, and distribu- 
tion. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 100A,B, and 320. Advanced theory' of the de- 
termination of the level and fluctuations of real and money income, and the 
forces underlying economic growth. 


158 


Economies 


505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502 or 503 and concurrent enrollment in Economics 
503 or 502. A systematic examination of the philosophy and methodology of eco- 
nomic analysis and research. Topics include theory construction, verification and 
measurement, and the problems associated with policy formulation. 

506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic Applications (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503, and 505. Complements the study of methodol- 
ogy in economic research. Students select approved topics and via independent 
investigation and seminar presentation and critique develop their analytical and 
research abilities, culminating with an acceptable paper. 

510 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 300 or equivalent. Seminar devoted to an examination 
of the economic implications of various forms of market structure and business 
conduct and considers the application of public policy to various segments of 
business and business activities, including antitrust policy and regulation of busi- 
ness. (Not open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

511 Economic Problems and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 300 or equivalent. Seminar devoted to an examination 
of the nature and implication of the major economic problems facing the economy 
and an evaluation of current and alternative policies for their solution. Problems 
considered will include price level stabilization, balance of payments equilibrium, 
economic growth, and cyclical and technological unemployment. (Not open to 
Economics M.A. candidates.) 

512 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 300 or equivalent. A comparative study of various 
analytical and prescriptive approaches to economic problems of scarcity, develop- 
ment, fiscal and monetary policy, planning and poverty. (Not open to Economics 
M.A. candidates.) 

596 Selected Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 100A,B, 310 and 320. Seminar: Selected topics 
in economic analysis and policy will be covered in depth, with special emphasis 
on contemporary research and materials. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Projects (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by depart- 
ment chairman. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independ- 
ent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


159 


Finance 


FINANCE COURSES 

324 Money and Banking (3) 

(Same as Economics 420) 

330 Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B or 200. Financing business enterprises; financial 
planning and control; analysis of alternative sources and uses of combinations of 
short-, intermediate- and long-term debt and equity. Cost of capital. Study of 
capital investment decisions; capital budget analysis and valuation; working capital 
and capital structure management. Group problems, laboratory work as determined 
by computer terminal availability. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Prcrcqusitc: Finance 330. Development of techniques for internal financial con- 
trol and their application to business situations. Capital costs and optimal capital 
investment decisions. Budgets and forecasts for projection of long-term profitable 
operations. Analysis of current financial models. Group problems, laboratory work 
as determined by computer terminal availability. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours labo- 
ratory) 

333 Personal Financial Management (3) 

Financial problems of the household in allocating resources and planning ex- 
penditures. Consideration of housing, insurance, installment buying, medical care, 
savings and investments. 

334 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Principles of life, casualty and liability insurance, individual and group insurance 
programs; methods of establishing risks and rates. 

335 Security Investments (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Principles underlying the selection and management 
of portfolios, analysis of different types of securities; the role of mutual funds, 
investment trusts and other investment institutions. Group problems, laboratory 
work as determined by computer terminal availability. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
laboratory) 

336 Principles and Practices of Real Estate (3) 

Survey of urban real estate principles and practices; structure and growth of 
cities; economic implication to real estate markets. Trends and factors affecting 
real property values, real estate financing and real estate law. Integrative cases 
and projects. Study of current urban models used in urban development. Group 
problems and case studies. 

401 Real Estate Research (2) 

Prerequisites: Finance 336 and 437 or 438 and concurrent enrollment for 1 unit 
of Finance 499. Group problems, laboratory work as determined by computer 
terminal availability. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 330 and 331. Application of analytical techniques to the 
solution of financial institution problems. Major financial intermediaries and the 
broad range of decision-making problems they face: function, management opera- 
tions, loan analysis, investment policies, and liquidity problems. Regulation and its 
effect on management operations. Group problems, laboratory work as determined 
by computer terminal availability. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 


160 


Finance 


431 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Role of capital and money markets in the American economy; markets for 
new corporate and government issues; secondary markets; interrelation of financial 
institutions; factors influencing yields and security prices. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331. Comprehensive case studies including group problems 
of estimating funds requirements, long-term financial planning, controlling and 
evaluating cash flows, and financing acquisitions and mergers. (2 hours lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

435 Security Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 335, or consent of instructor. An advanced securities analy- 
sis course (with computer applications) developing various models of security 
valuation. A simulated portfolio management game is played during the latter 
part of the course. 

437 Real Estate Finance (3) (Formerly 337) 

Prerequisite: Finance 336 or consent of instructor. Sources and uses of capital 
in financing real estate transactions. Financial institutions and their effect on credit. 
Money and capital market conditions and their effect on credit availability and cost. 
Instruments of real estate finance. Real estate as an investment medium. Group 
problems and case studies. 

438 Real Estate Valuation (3) (Formerly 338) 

Prerequisite: Finance 336 or consent of instructor. Theory of real property value, 
historical development; methods used in urban and rural property appraisals; special 
purpose appraisals. Group problems, laboratory work as determined by computer 
terminal availability'. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

439 Social Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Financial problems and policies in old age pensions, 
health insurance, unemployment insurance, workman’s compensation, and private 
pension plans. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chairman. Open 
to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent in- 
quiry. May be repeated for credit. 

532 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 433 or consent of instructor. Emphasis in this course is 
on the analy'sis of the financial decision-making process. Areas of emphasis include: 
management and control of current assets; evaluation of cash flows; financial fore- 
casting and fund requirements; capital budgeting; cost of capital; dividend poli- 
cies; and merger, acquisition, and valuation problems. Current financial theory 
and models. Case studies and seminar presentations. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 532. Optimal financing and asset administration; advanced 
techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical methods to the adminis- 
tration of the finance function of the business firm. 


6—81593 


161 


Management 


534 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 431 or consent of the instructor. Structure and operation 
of major financial institutions; portfolio composition, price-cost problems, and 
market behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and interrelation of financial 
institutions and markets. 

535 Seminar in Investment Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 435 or consent of instructor. Problems of investment and 
portfolio managment; concepts of risk evaluation and investment criteria; analysis 
of interest rate movements; investment timing; valuation of securities; regulation 
of securities markets. 

536 Seminar in Risk Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 334 and graduate standing. Techniques of risk manage- 
ment, structure of risk management, insurance planning and control, risk man- 
agement programs. 

537 Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 330, 336 or equivalent and graduate standing. Problems of 
real estate investment; concepts of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of 
real property values; real estate development and financing. 

597 Prefect (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of the instructor and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue inde- 
pendent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


MANAGEMENT COURSES 

340 Fundamentals of Behavioral Science for Management (3) 

Prerequisites: general education requirements for social sciences. An analysis of 
interpersonal behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Attention is given 
to the social environment of business and to the systematic development of knowl- 
edge about human behavior, and its implications for organizational design and 
management practice. 

341 Organization and Management Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200, or 100A.B, or consent of instructor. Administra- 
tive processes and theories of organization; their applications in utility-creating 
business functions and operations. Concepts of planning and control, communica- 
tion and information systems, measures of effectiveness, and interpersonal relation- 
ships. Relationship of business to the social and political environments. Management 
role of leadership in the creation of utility. 


162 


Management 


342 Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341 and QM 265. Fundamentals of production systems 
which combine materials, labor, and capital resources to produce a good or serv- 
ice. Analysis of systems, models and methods for management of production opera- 
tions. Product and process development. Case studies stress utilization of computer 
decision models. 

343 Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of the instructor. A study of the per- 
sonnel function, its activities, and its problems. Emphasis upon management’s re- 
sponsibilities for selection, development, and effective utilization of personnel. 

346 Business Law (3) 

The philosophy, institutions and role of the law in business and society, with 
emphasis upon the functions of courts and attorneys, and upon case studies in the 
areas of contracts and corporation law. 

347 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 346. The philosophy, institutions and role of the law 
in commercial transactions, with emphasis upon the uniform commercial code and 
case studies in the areas of sales, security devices, personal property, bailment and 
negotiable instruments. 

34B Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 346. The philosophy, institutions and role of the law 
in business relationships, with emphasis upon case studies in the areas of agency, 
partnership, real property, mortgages, trusts, wills, community property, insurance, 
suretyship and bankruptcy. 

349 Real Estate Law (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 346 or equivalent area; Finance 336. Law of real prop- 
erty; types of ownership; titles and estates; transfers of interests; encumbrances; 
casements; fixtures; land sale contracts; recording; zoning; leases; responsibilities of 
real estate brokers. 

441 Labor- Management Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of instructor. The course provides 
an understanding of the impact of labor-management relations upon labor, manage- 
ment, and the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining, and the 
settlement of disputes are among the subjects that are examined. 

442 Labor Law (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341, 346 or consent of instructor. The study of 
labor law and its effects upon American society. Federal and state legislation, and 
actions of regulatory bodies are explored by means of case studies. 

443 Dynamics of Individual, Interpersonal and Group Behavior for 
Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 340, 341 or consent of instructor. Case studies and 
current literature in the human problems of work situations. Special emphasis is 
focused on each participant gaining knowledge about himself: his motivation as a 
manager, his strengths as a communicator, areas where he can improve his inter- 
action skills, and ways he can improve the interaction processes in groups where 
he serves as a leader. Laboratory work offers a practical approach to these areas. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.) 


163 


Management 

444 Management of Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: QM core. The technology for managing programs, enterprises, 
and organizations as cybernetic systems. The course investigates the design and 
control of systems appropriate for product, project and program levels of analysis. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

445 Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 342 and QM core. Planning and control methodologies 
for production operations. Quantitative approaches which integrate cost, schedule 
and technical performance criteria. Collection, evaluation and use of real-time 
information. Individual and group projects synthesize control systems for actual 
cases. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM core, Economics 310 and Management 341, or consent of 
instructor. A study of the relationship of management tools to applied economics 
and statistics in the decision-making process; the use of cases and group problems 
to study the true economic meaning of cost, demand, supply, price, product and 
competition. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) 

Prercquisitics: business administration core less Management 449, or consent of 
instructor. A simulation of an oligopolistic industry' to provide the student with 
an opportunity, through group problems, to use statistics and other analytical 
tools to make managerial decisions in the functional areas of management. (2 hours 
lecture; 2 hours activity) 

449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: three elective units from among Anthropology' 202, Psychology 
101, and Sociology' 201 or 471; Accounting 201A3; Finance 330; Management 
341, Marketing 351; QM core, senior or graduate standing, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Through an analysis of integrative cases and problems from the viewpoint of 
top management, the student is encouraged to use his business and liberal arts 
training, especially' his knowledge of business functions and operations, administra- 
tive processes, organization theory, and policy formulation and administration. 
Individual and team efforts resolve decisionmaking policies and actions. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry- May be repeated for credit. 

541 Seminar in Project Operations Problem Solving (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. A seminar designed 
to focus attention on application of sy'stem analysis and other dymamic techniques 
to current operations problems. Special projects are used to demonstrate applica- 
tion of concepts. 

542 Seminar in Labor Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Theories and philoso- 
phies of union-management relations in modem industrial society with attention 
to trends in nonindustrial organizations. Issues in collective bargaining contract 
administration, labor law, and government regulation. Discussion and analysis of 
literature. 


164 


Management 




543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and the consent of instructor. The seminar 
provides the graduate student with an opportunity to study cases, problems, and 
significant literature in the field in order to develop a comprehensive understanding 
of personnel administration and human relations. 

544 Sominar in Organizational Behavior and Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The analysis of 
human behavior in organization, studies in organizational theories, and administra- 
tive action. 

545 Seminar in Research and Development Project Management (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Management of R&D 
projects. Techniques of preparing project proposals and assessing their economic 
worth. Project selection and review procedures based on performance, cost and 
marketing projections. Project programming and control. Establishing a creative 
environment. 

543 Sominar in International Management (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Problems in man- 
agerial qualifications and training, political structure within and without the opera- 
tions, foreign receptivity to United States business, organizing and controlling the 
international firm. Management in selected countries is examined. 

549 Sominar in Policy Planning and Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Planning, imple- 
menting, and controlling policy strategies to achieve objectives are considered. 
The executive’s role in the overall operations of the enterprise and its resources are 
examined, and supported by cases, literature and training techniques in practice. 

597 Projoct (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

593 Thesis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor and approval by department 
chairman. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent 
inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 





165 


Marketing 


MARKETING COURSES 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. Marketing organization and methods for the indi- 
vidual business with serious consideration of the social and economic aspects of 
the distribution task. Topics include the consumer, his place and his problems in 
the marketing area; marketing functions, institutions, and policies; legal and 
political environment for marketing activity; and an evaluation of the present 
marketing system. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Retail problems of location; organization; buying; 
selling media and methods; pricing; and merchandising. Emphasis will be placed 
upon operating procedures and control, planning, budgeting, and costs. 

353 Marketing Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Major problems facing the marketing executive, 
including product planning, pricing, market and analysis, sales potentials, market- 
ing organization, and administration of the sales force. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the advertising function, in- 
cluding the role of advertising in marketing strategy, budgetary considerations, 
allocation among media, measurement of effectiveness, administration and control, 
and its economic and social implications. 

355 Credit and Credit Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The general nature and functions of credit, credit 
instruments; the operation of the credit department; sources of credit information; 
acceptance of credit risk; establishment of credit limits; and the problem of col- 
lections. 

356 Crootive Motivation in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Personal salesmanship and the application of the 
findings of the behavioral sciences to selling and group dynamics as they relate to 
the creative and promotional aspects of the business. 

357 Industrial Purchasing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The principles and practices of purchasing for 
industrial organizations. Major buying policies, sources of materials, quantity and 
quality considerations, and the relation to production cost. 

35S Physical Distribution (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Consideration of the logistics problems of physically 
distributing products and the principles and practices of solving them. An evalua- 
tion of the transportation and storage of products based on considerations of cost, 
time, and service. 

452 Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and QM 361. The application of scientific methodol- 
ogy as an aid in solving problems of product planning, pricing, promotion, and 
distribution. Practical application is emphasized through class projects and case 
problems. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 


166 


Marketing 


453 Marketing to the Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and nondefense products 
to the government. The nature and administration of contractual agreements with 
government agencies. 

454 Advertising Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 354 or consent of instructor, plus senior standing. 
Management of the advertising function in the marketing program. A study of the 
formulation of advertising policies, involving primarily an analysis of cases dealing 
with the role of advertising in marketing, the definition and choice of advertising 
objectives, strategy, appropriation policy, media selection, evaluation of advertising 
results, and the organization and implementation of the advertising program. Cases, 
simulations, and readings. 

457 Sales Analysis and Control (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B and Marketing 351. The development of quanta- 
tive measures for marketing activity; costs of distributing through different 
channels of distribution, advertising versus personal selling, and movement activi- 
ties; development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual per- 
formance in the light of budgets and standards. (Same as Accounting 307) 

453 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and Marketing Administration 353; or consent of 
instructor. Presents an analytical framework for studying the development of 
domestic marketing systems in the context of overall economic growth. Emphasis 
is given to U. S. firms involved in international marketing operations. 

459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351, 353 and 452; or consent of instructor. Case studies 
of problems facing the marketing executive; identification and analysis of the 
problems; selection and evaluation of alternative solutions; and implementation of 
recommended solutions. 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Prerequisites: marketing concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

551 Saminar in Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and graduate standing. A managerial approach to 
the major marketing problems faced by industry: e.g., definition of and organiza- 
tion for the marketing task; demand analysis; decisions concerning product, price, 
promotion, and trade channels. A firm’s adjustment to its marketing environment 
with emphasis on competitive strategy. The case approach supplemented with 
simulations and topical readings. 

552 So minor in Pricing and Prico Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. A critical analysis of the pricing problems of a firm 
with alternative choices and diverse objectives. The pricing function will be 
examined from the standpoints of economic theory, management science, business 
practices, legal constraints, and ethical considerations. Relationship of pricing objec- 
tives, policies, strategies, and methods to market behavior and the goals of the firm. 
Pricing policies among businesses and their economic and social implications. 


167 


Marketing 


553 Seminar in Product Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. A course designed to assist marketing management 
in the formulation and execution of marketing plans for new and existing products. 
An examination of the management decision areas and procedures required for 
search, preliminary evaluation, development and testing, and commercialization of 
products. Particular emphasis on solving problems arising from product programs 
developed to assure corporate growth. 

554 Seminar in Promotion (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551 or instructor’s approval. A critical analysis of the 
promotion mix as employed by small, medium and large business organizations 
in their efforts to optimize profitable operations. Particular emphasis will be given 
to: determination of promotional goals, planning, budgeting, and controlling pro- 
motional programs; and measuring the effectiveness of the promotional effort. 

555 Seminar in Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 452 and 551 or consent of instructor. The application 
of scientific method to marketing decisions; research methodology and models; 
decision-making applications. 

556 Seminar in Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. A critical analysis of theories underlying consumer 
behavior. The orientation is on understanding and predicting consumer behavior. 

559 Seminar in Marketing Thought and Concepts (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 551. Application of theoretical concepts in the behav- 
ioral sciences, managerial sciences and quantitative methods to the development of 
theories and models in marketing. The emphasis is on the interdisciplinary ex- 
change of ideas relating to marketing. Evolving concepts and theories in marketing 
are appraised. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Projoct (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. Student will 
select and have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and 
must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by depart- 
ment chairman. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent 
inquiry'. May be repeated for credit. 


168 


Quantitative Methods 


QUANTITATIVE METHODS COURSES 

100 Introduction to Analyst* (4) 

(Preparation for Calculus — same as Engineering 100) 

264 Computer Programming (1) 

Introduction to problem-oriented languages of computers. The solving of prob- 
lems using computer programming. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

265 Computer Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: college algebra or three years of high school mathematics including 
a second course in algebra. Introduction to sets, logic, counting, frequency distri- 
butions, and probability. Solving problems on a digital computer with a compiler 
language. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 264 or equivalent. A study of selected computer languages 
and the types of problems for which they are suited. Introduction to formal 
language theory. Student written programs in languages typical of the major 
categories: numerical, data processing, string and list processing, formal structure 
manipulating, multipurpose and specific task oriented. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours 
activity) 

360 Mathematical Methods in Business and Economics (3) (Formerly 462) 

Prerequisite: QM 265 or equivalent. Concepts of mathematical methods and 
their application to business and economic problems. Elementary mathematical 
optimization models. 

361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 265 or equivalent. Collection, analysis, and presentation of 
statistical data. Random sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Introduction 
to regression and correlation. 

362 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100A, B, QM 361 and Economics 310 (may be taken 
concurrently). An introduction to basic mathematical tools and their application 
to economic theory. The nature of econometric models and the concept of identifi- 
cation. Estimation and evaluation of simple single equation linear models and an 
introduction to such problems as autocorrelation and multicollinearity. Not open 
to students who have taken QM 360. 

364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 264 or equivalent. An introductory survey of assembler lan- 
guage, hardware organization, design, logic, and system software of modem digital 
computers. 

382 Machine Language Programming and Information Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364. A formal discussion of information structures, the types 
of processes for which they are appropriate, and their relative computational 
efficiencies. Assignments implemented in a variety of machine languages. 

446 Computer Programming Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 264 and Math 150 A or equivalent. Selected topics of concern 
to the computer programmer from the fields of numerical analysis and simulation 
theory with FORTRAN applications. 


169 


Quantitative Methods 


448 Digital Simulation (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 280, and Math 336 or QM 461. A study of techniques of gen- 
erating stochastic variates and their use in solving numerical problems and studying 
operational problems in queueing, communication, economic, inventory, scheduling, 
and other models. 

461 Advanced Statistics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361 and Math 150A,B, or equivalent. An advanced treatment 
of the theory and application of the topics covered in QM 361, using the methods 
of the calculus. Moments, generating functions, point and interval estimation, 
Neyman-Pearson and Likelihood Ratio Hypothesis Tests. 

463 Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B, QM 360. Introduction to the basic concepts of 
Management Science and its relationship to economics and decision theory. 
Topics surveyed include optimization in continuous models, linear programming, 
queueing and inventory models, dynamic programming and decision making in 
the business environment. 

464 Information Structures, Information Storage and Retrieval (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364 or consent of instructor. An examination of modern 
computer hardware, the techniques of programming it, and the languages in 
which such programs are written. Includes discussion of memory protection, 
interrupt systems, recursive programming, list-structured-languages and userori- 
ented languages. 

465 Linear Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361 (may be taken concurrently). The theory and applica- 
tions of linear programming. Topics include: Linear programming and the Simplex 
Algorithm; starting procedures; the dual and economic interpretation; parametric 
programming and sensitivity analysis; and transportation and assignment problems. 

466 Nonlinear Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 465, Math 281, or consent of instructor. A unified study of 
nonlinear programming theory with emphasis on computational algorithms and 
industrial applications. Topics will include: Kuhn-Tucker Theoreum, duality, 
quadratic programming, integer programming, dynamic programming, search tech- 
niques, and post optimality analysis. 

467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361. Shewhart Control Charts for variables, percent defective, 
and defects. Tolerances, process capacity, specized control charts, acceptance 
sampling, and batch processing problems. Bayesian aspects of process control. 

469 Reliability Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461 or equivalent. Statistical principles of reliability; hazard 
functions; point and interval estimation of reliability; reliability demonstration; 
growth models. 

475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461, or equivalent. The least squares principle; estimation and 
hypothesis testing in linear regression; multiple and curvilinear regression models; 
discriminant analysis; principal components analysis; application of multivariate 
analysis in business and industry. 


170 


Quantitative Methods 


485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. A study of monitor, assembler, and compiler systems and 
the hardware, firmware, and software characteristics required in a real-time, inter- 
active environment. 

486 Automata Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382 and Math 250, or consent of instructor. A formal intro- 
duction to the theory of computation and its relation to modem computing tech- 
niques. Includes development of Turing machines, recursive functions, equivalence 
theorems, and the algebraic theory of recognizers. 

487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. Selected topics of current interest from heuristic pro- 
gramming, pattern recognition, learning systems, problem solving systems, and 
formal symbol manipulating systems. 

490 Stochastic Process Models in Business and Industry (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 461, Math 281, or consent of instructor. Models of industrial 
waiting line and storage systems. Markov chains, single and multiple server models, 
discrete and continuous processes, and homogeneous birth and death processes. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: quantitative concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

560 Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A and QM 361. An examination of the nature and scope 
of Operations Research, with emphasis on the techniques of model construction. 
Topics surveyed include optimization in continuous models, linear programming, 
queueing and scheduling models, inventory models, dynamic programming, and 
decision making under uncertainty. (Not open to students with QM 463) 

\ 

561 Seminar in Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 560, or consent of instructor. A particular topic in Operations 
Research, such as simulation, inventory theory, waiting line theory, or synthesis of 
large scale systems will be covered in depth with special emphasis on research 
methods. 

563 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361. Techniques from probability, statistical decision theory, 
and computer simulation applied to problems of management. 

565 Seminar on Computers in Industry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An examination of developments and innova- 
tions concerning computers in industry* Artificial intelligence, information retrieval, 
and time sharing. 

566 Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361 and graduate standing. A survey of the fundamentals of 
experimental design, including analysis of variance, factorial experiments, nested 
designs, confounding, and fractional replication. 

597 Project (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 


171 


Quantitative Methods 


598 Thetis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Student will select and have approved a thesis 
topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a defense 
of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, and approval by the department chairman. Open 
to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent inquiry. May be re- 
peated for credit. 


172 


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* 




EDUCATION 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 


Dean: Eugene L. McGarry 


DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES IN EDUCATION 

FACULTY 
Calvin C. Nelson 
Department Chairman 

Marilyn Bates, James Bennett, Louis Brockmann, Ida Coppolino, James Gilmore, 
Betty Gould, Frederick Kingdon, Doyle Knirk, Anne Langstaff, Robert Lemmon, 
Lester March, Fraser Powlison, Leo Schmidt, Shirl Stark 

The courses and programs of the department are designed to fulfill the following 
objectives of students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with a concentration in Counseling. 

2. Master of Science in Education with a concentration in Special Education. 

3. Preservice teacher training for teachers of the Educationally Handicapped and 
the Mentally Retarded. 

4. Professional training for Pupil Personnel Services in the public schools. 

5. Psychological Foundations requirements for the preservice training of elemen- 
tary, secondary, and special education teachers. 

Instruction is centered about the scientific treatment of behavior change in educa- 
tional settings. The objective of the program is to develop student competencies in 
the selection, development, application and evaluation of materials and procedures 
necessary' for the modification and optimum development of human behavior. 
Though there is a primary' commitment to the public school as a behavior change 
agency in our culture, the department’s program is viewed as having application 
to educational decision-making situations outside the schools. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL 
SCIENCES IN EDUCATION 

1. Master of Science in Education, School Counseling. 

2. Master of Science in Education, Special Education. 

3. Preparation of Teachers of the Mentally’ Retarded Children Programs. 

4. Special Education Newsletter. 

PRESERVICE EDUCATION 

California State College, Fullerton is accredited by the California State Board of 
Education for programs leading to the following credentials offered by the Depart- 
ment of Behavioral Sciences in Education: 

1. Restricted teaching credential for services as a speech and hearing specialist. 

2. Restricted teaching credential to teach the trainable mentally retarded. 

3. Restricted teaching credential to teach the educable mentally retarded. 

4. Standard designated services credential with a specialization in pupil personnel 
services. 

Details of the programs are provided in special brochures available from the De- 
partment of Behavioral Sciences in Education. Information about the professional 
services authorized by’ the above credentials will be provided by professional ad- 
visers. 


174 


Education 


PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a credential offered by the de- 
partment and a bachelor of arts degree at this college. During registration, the 
student should consult an adviser in the department in which he expects to major 
and an adviser in the Department of Behavioral Sciences in Education who will 
help him select courses and build his program. A student from another institution 
should bring transcripts of previous work and a tentative selection of courses. 
Transferred education courses must be of upper division level and taken within 
the past 15 years to be applicable to upper division credential requirements. 

ADMISSION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION CREDENTIAL 

To become a candidate for a teaching credential the student must be enrolled, 
in good standing, and must be admitted to “teacher education” in the Office of 
Admission to Teacher Education of the School of Education. Application for 
admission to teacher education should be filed during the first semester of the 
junior year or the first semester of attendance at the college, if the student enters 
with advanced standing. 

Admission to teacher education is required of each student before he files the 
application for student teaching.! 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant's intel- 
lectual resources and mastery of important concepts in the common curricular 
areas of higher education, command of fundamental skills of communication 
(English language usage, written composition, speech, hearing, reading compre- 
hension, handwriting, mathematical skills), scholarship, personality and character, 
interest in teaching, and health. Data related to these criteria are gathered from 
transcripts and records from other schools and colleges, group and individual 
tests, personality inventories, estimates of the potential of the applicant, and from 
the Student Health Center. Students should normally qualify for admission and 
be advised of their status during the second semester of the junior year or their 
first semester of attendance if they enter with advanced standing with degrees from 
accredited colleges. 

Students who show weaknesses in any of the fundamental skills of communication 
are advised of their standing. If there are weaknesses in only one or two of the 
areas noted above, the student will be advised of refresher courses and given a 
specified time to meet the standard. 

If the applicant has serious deficiencies in communication skills or does not meet 
the standards of mastery in the common curricular areas, personality and character, 
scholarship, interest in teaching, or health, the faculty committee will deny ad- 
mission to teacher education. 

The student must arrange to take the required battery of group and individual 
tests and inventories necessary to provide information needed by the faculty 
committee. The tests of breadth of understanding, reading, English usage, number 
skills, composition, handwriting, and personality are given by the School of Educa- 
tion for admission to teacher education; consult the Office of Admission to Teacher 
Education of the School of Education for dates. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Each candidate for a credential to teach the mentally retarded, the restricted 
credential to teach the educable mentally retarded, or the restricted credential 
to teach the trainable mentally retarded (REX Program) will do his student teach- 
ing during the last semester of his senior year or during his postgraduate year in 
the college. Persons seeking the credential to teach the mentally retarded will 
divide their student teaching experience with elementary or secondary student 
teaching. Details about student teaching may be obtained from the departmental 
office. Student teaching assignments are made in elementary and secondary schools 

t Exceptions will be made in the case of new transfer students. 


175 


Education 


geographically accessible to the college. Students will be assigned to work under 
the supervision of carefully selected supervising teachers. A college supervisor will 
regularly visit the student teacher and the supervising teacher. Student teachers will 
be expected to meet in a weekly seminar with the college supervisor. 

Permission to Substitute Teaching Experience for Student Teaching 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had two years of successful, 
regular teaching experience must petition the School of Education, through his 
professional adviser, for permission to substitute such experience for the student 
teaching requirement. Substitution of teaching experience for student teaching will 
be considered only if the applicant: 

1. Has been admitted to teacher education at the college. 

2. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, 
or superintendent to the School of Education certifying at least two years of 
successful, regular teaching experience at the appropriate level. A form for 
this verification is available in the Office of the School of Education. 

STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching in special education are 
included in the curricula descriptions. Upon the completion of the requirements, 
the student will submit an application for a credential to the State Department 
of Education in Sacramento. On these applications the student is asked about his 
citizenship status, his professional conduct, and he is asked to sign an oath of 
allegiance. He must also submit a health examination form signed by a qualified 
physician, two fingerprint-identification cards and the legal fee, which is currently 
$20. The forms arc available in the Credentials Office of the college. 

Curricula in Preparation of Special Education Teachers 

There are three credential programs and one non-credential program offered by 
the department. The credential programs include the regular mental retardation 
credential, the restricted credential to teach the cducable mentally retarded, and 
the restricted credential to teach the trainable mentally retarded. The non-creden- 
tial program is one leading to teaching the educationally handicapped. 

Requirements for the Credential to Teach the Mentally Retarded 

Students who complete the requirements for this credential are qualified to teach 
both the trainable and educable mentally retarded. In addition to completing the 
requirements in special education, the student must also complete the curriculum 
in cither elementary’ or secondary education as described in pages 212 and 213. 
When the major is in an academic area commonly taught in the elementary or sec- 
ondary schools (as appropriate), the 22 units of specialized preparation described 
below (not including student teaching) may be substituted for the minor. Upon 
successful completion of the program, the student will be recommended for the 
standard teaching credential with a specialization in elementary or secondary teach- 
ing with specialized preparation to serve as a teacher of exceptional children, area 
of the mentally retarded. Upon receipt of the credential, the student will be 
authorized to teach in special classes as well as in regular classes at the appropriate 
level. 

Students desiring to prepare as teachers of the mentally retarded should proceed 
as follows: 

1. Apply for admission to special education (forms are available in the depart- 
ment office). 

2. Arrange for a personal interview with a member of the special education 
faculty. 

3. Apply for admission to teacher education as described on page 206. 


176 


Education 


4. Upon completion of the necessary prerequisite courses, apply for admission 
to student teaching. Since students completing this program divide their 
student teaching experience between special education and regular education, 
they should apply for admission to student teaching as described on page 207. 
In addition, they must apply for student teaching in special education by 
completing the application form necessary the semester before taking the 
course. 


Students seeking recommendations for this special credential to teach the men- 
tally retarded should complete the courses listed below in lieu of the minor 
required for the Standard Teaching Credential. 

Units 

Educ 471 Exceptional Children 3 

Educ 473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury 3 

Educ 474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the 
Mentally Retarded . 3 

Educ 475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the 

Mentally Retarded 3 

Educ 779 Student Teaching with Mentally Retarded Pupils 4 

Educ 452 Principles of Guidance 3 

Speech Comm 403 Speech Development . 


Electives from courses related to teaching the mentally retarded (4 units); 
electives must be approved by the adviser 

Total number of units in special education not 
including student teaching 


22 


Recommended Sequence of Courses in Professional Education for Students 
Preparing as Teachers of the Mentally Retarded 


Junior year, first semester. 


Elementary 

Educ 411 (3) 
Educ 496 (1) 


Secondary 

Educ 411 (3) 
Educ 496 (1) 


Junior year, second semester Educ 471 (3) 


Educ 471 (3) 
Educ 340 (3) 


Senior year, first semester- Educ 331 (8) 

Educ 473 (3) 

Senior year, second semester _£duc 474 (3) 

Fifth year, first semester .Educ 475 (3) 

Speech Comm 403 (3) 
Electives in special 
education (4) 

Educ 401 (4) 

Fifth year, second semester Educ 779 (4) 

Educ 739 (4) 

Educ 452 (3) 


Educ 442 (3) 

Educ 473 (3) 

Educ 474 (3) 

Educ 401 (4) 

Educ 475 (3) 

Speech Comm 403 (3) 
Electives in special 
education (4) 


Educ 779 (4) 
Educ 749 (2) 
Educ 452 (3) 


Requirements for a Restricted Credential to Teach the 
Educabte Mentally Retarded 

Upon completion of the requirements for this credential, an individual is qualified 
for service at all grade levels with service restricted to teaching the mentally 
retarded. Students seeking this credential must: 

1. Obtain the baccalaureate degree. 

2. Complete a fifth year of college work. 

3. Complete 22 hours of course work in special education and related fields. 

4. Complete student teaching with educable mentally retarded children. 

Educ 312 is prerequisite to this credential program. 


177 


Education 


Requirements for a Restricted Credential to Teach the 
Trainable Mentally Retarded 

Successful completion of this program qualifies the student for a credential 
restricted to the teaching of the trainable mentally retarded. A fifth year of study 
is not required; courses may be completed either as an undergraduate or a graduate 
student. The student does not need to complete requirements for the Standard 
Elementary or Standard Secondary Teaching Credential. 

In addition to the completion of the requirements for the baccalaureate degree 
at California State College, Fullerton or other accredited institutions, the student 
must follow Plan I or Plan II listed below. 

Recommended Sequence of Courses in Professional Education for Students 
Preparing as Teachers of the Trainable Mentally Retarded 

Plan I: Recommended for students selecting program in the junior year 

(credential will be issued with bachelor’s degree upon completion of program) . 
Major: Recommend Psychology, Sociology, or Speech, but others are accept- 
able. 


Junior year, first semester Educ 411 (3) 

Junior year, second semester Educ 471 (3) 

Senior year, first semester Educ 473 (3) 

Educ 479 (6) 

Senior year, second semester Speech Comm 403 (3) 

Educ 779 (4) 

Plan II: For graduate students 

Units 

Educ 411 Psychological Foundations of Education 3 

Educ 496 Senior Practicum 1 

Educ 471 Exceptional Children (optional) 3 

Educ 473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury 3 

Speech Comm 403 Speech Development (optional) 3 

Educ 479 Seminar and Practicum in Education of the TMR 6 

Educ 779 Student Teaching with the Mentally Retarded 4 


The program for preparing teachers of the educationally handicapped is a gradu- 
ate program. Since it leads to no credential, the student must possess either a 
standard elementary or standard secondary credential in order to teach the edu- 
cationally handicapped. Students interested in working with these children should 
consult with a member of the departmental faculty in order to plan their pro- 
grams. Since the curriculum is restricted to graduate students, it should appeal to 
persons interested in specializing in special education at the master’s degree level. 
(See page 180 for the Master of Science in Education — Special Education) 

Program Leading to the California Credential— Speech and Hearing Specialist 

Students wishing to pursue the major in Speech and Hearing and to complete a 
fifth year for the “Restricted Teaching Credential for Services as a Speech and 
Hearing Specialist” (1967) should follow the major for speech for the B.A. degree 
with emphasis in speech pathology and audiology to be followed by a fifth year 
of adviser-approved specialized preparation. 

Required in the undergraduate and graduate years will be the completion of 
65 semester units constituting a well-integrated program that includes 18 semester 
units in courses that provide fundamental information applicable to the normal 
development and use of speech, hearing, and language, and their relationship to the 
educative process, and 42 semester units in courses that provide information about 
and training in the management of speech, hearing, and language disorders and that 
provide information supplementary to these fields. 


178 


Education 


Details of this teacher education program are found on page 426. The program 
is administered by the Department of Speech Communication in consultation with 
the School of Education. 

Standard Teaching Credential with Specialization in Speech and Hearing in Lieu 
of Minor 

A major other than speech and hearing is required for the clinical speech and 
hearing program taken in lieu of a minor. See an adviser in the Department of 
Speech Communication for details of this program. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Pupil Personnel Services offers work toward the credentials for school counseling, 
school psychometrists and school psychologists. (The Standard Designated Services 
Credential with Specialization in Pupil Personnel Services.) Students must check 
with an appropriate adviser to plan a program of study. 

Counseling 

Students begin work for the credential by taking Educ 452, Principles of Guid- 
ance. Other courses in this credential program include: Educ 550, Counseling 
Theories and Processes; 555, Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study; 
596, Graduate Educational Practicum; Individual Counseling Relationships; 551, 
Educational and Career Orientation; 552, Group Processes in Counseling and Guid- 
ance; 596, Graduate Educational Practicum: Group Leadership and Membership; 
553, Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs; 559A,B, Field- 
work in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling. 



179 


Education 


Psychometry 

Students preparing for the psychometry credential complete the work in coun- 
seling and, in addition, include Psychology 461, Group Psychological Testing; 
Psychology 531, Individual Mental Testing; Educ 559 CD, Fieldwork in Pupil 
Personnel Services: Psychometry, and coursework in learning or behavior disorders 
depending on the needs of individual students. 

School Psychology 

Students preparing to be school psychologists add to the work in counseling 
and psychometry: Educ 556, Advanced Individual and Group Processes; 557, 
Seminar in School Psychology: A Contemporary Overview (of Professional 
Aspects and Problems in School Psychology); 558A,B, Fieldwork in Pupil Person- 
nel Services: Counseling. In addition, students will be employed full time as psy- 
chometrists or do a minimum of 20 hours per week in fieldwork in school psy- 
chology. 


GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
School Counseling 

Students concentrating in school counseling will take Educ 452, Principles of 
Guidance, as soon as they identify their interest in this concentration in the M.S. 
Education: School Counseling degree. At or near the end of this course students 
are normally admitted to this program by a screening process. Students who trans- 
fer this course from other institutions must see an adviser for approval of the 
next course before continuing in the program. This second course becomes the 
screening course for transfer students. 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the master’s degree in School 
Counseling study plan will include the following: 

Units 

A. Nine units outside the area of specialization 9 

1. Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

2. Six units selected with the approval of an adviser (6) 

B. Twenty -one units in the concentration in counseling 21 

1. Educ 551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) 

2. Educ 552 Group Processes in Counseling and Guidance (3) 

3. Educ 553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel 
Programs (3) 

4. Educ 555 Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study (3) 

5. Educ 559A,B Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (3-3) 

6. Educ 597 or 598 Graduate Project or Thesis (1-3; total of 3) 

For further information , consult the chainfian. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

Special Education 

The following information is provided to assist students in planning programs 
and in seeking admission to classified graduate status. Students should consult the 
Graduate Bulletin for information concerning standards for graduate study, steps 
in the master’s degree program, and graduate policies and procedures. This pub- 
lication is available from the Office of Graduate Studies. 


180 


Education 


Objectives of the Degree Program: 

The program is designed: 

1. To help individuals interpret and implement research related to exceptional 
children, conduct appropriate research in the classroom and/or clinical set- 
ting, become skilled in their abilities to diagnose with educational instruments 
and observation techniques, interpret the results of diagnostic procedures, 
prescribe and implement educational strategies. 

2. To provide teachers with competencies to enable them to fulfill the role of 
supervising teachers and demonstration teachers in special classes. 

3. To prepare individuals for positions of leadership in the field of special 
education. 

4. To prepare individuals to pursue graduate work toward the doctoral degree. 


Prerequisites for Admission to the Program: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

2. At least 2.5 grade-point average in previous academic and related work. 

3. An acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination— Aptitude Test. 


Steps in the Master's Degree Program (see Graduate Bulletin ): 

Courses Required for the Degree: 

Units 

A. Nine semester hours of adviser-approved courses outside the area of 
special education 9 

1. 3 hours in basic research (Met by Educ 510 (3) or 

and Educ 509 (3)) 

2. Administration (Met by 6 units of adviscr- 

or approved courses) 

Clinic orientation 
or 

Teaching strategies 
or 

Communication and 
Interpersonal relations 
or 

Educational technology 
or 

Inter- and intracultural 
studies 


B. Twenty-one semester hours of adviser-approved courses selected from 
the area of special education — — 


1. 4 -6 units of thesis or project 


2. 2-5 units of practicum 


3. 10-15 units of special education 
specialization 


(Met by Educ 514 (3) 
and 

Educ 597 or 598 (1-3)) 
(Met by Educ 572 (2-4) 
and/or 

Educ 496 (1-3)) 

(Met by adviser-approved special 
education courses at the 
400 and 500 level) 


For further information , consult the chairman. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


181 


Education 


BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES IN EDUCATION 
PRESERVICE COURSES 


296 Educational Practicum (1—3) 

Conduct an individual educationally oriented experience with a child, youth, or 
young adult in an educational practicum location under the direction of a faculty 
member. Available to students who want or need public service experience with 
children, youth, or adults. Does not give credit toward any teaching credential. 
May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. Open to freshman and 
sophomore students. (3 hours laboratory per hour of credit) 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. A comprehensive study of human growth and develop- 
ment with emphasis on childhood, adolescence, and middle and old age. Includes 
mental, social, emotional, and physical development. 

411 Psychological Foundations of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101 and concurrent enrollment in upper division practicum 
or fieldwork. Prerequisite to other courses in the professional education sequence. 
Learning theory, thinking processes, and human growth and development. Students 
who have completed Psych 311 must have permission of instructor to enroll. 

452 Principles of Guidance (3) 

An introduction to pupil personnel services in the public school setting. The 
relationship of historical, sociological, psychological and philosophical foundations 
to principles of counseling and guidance will be explored. The course is designed 
to give students an opportunity to examine their interest in pupil personnel work. 
Students will participate in small groups and will conduct interviews. Students 
seeking the special education credentials will emphasize the counseling and guid- 
ance of the exceptional student. The course serves as a vehicle to screen students 
into the pupil personnel services program. 

471 Exceptional Children (3) 

Corequisite: Educ 411 (or Educ 312 for students working toward the Re- 
stricted EMR Credential). Seminar on the study of children who deviate from the 
average in the elementary and the secondary schools; physically handicapped, men- 
tally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, emotionally disturbed, and delinquent. 
Special educational services, curriculum, procedures, and materials necessary to 
promote their maximum development. 

472 Gifted Children (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411. Identification, principles of instruction, grouping, indi- 
vidualized instruction, classroom enrichment. Problem solving and research expe- 
riences in science, social studies, and mathematics, reading programs and literature, 
creative writing, oral language. 

473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471. Organic and cultural basis of mental retardation and 
brain injury, including social, psychological, and vocational problems. Child 
growth, sensory development, learning characteristics of mentally retarded and 
brain injured children, and techniques of working with parents will be consid- 
ered. 

474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 473. Curriculum development, methods, and materials for 
teaching the educable and trainable mentally retarded at the elementary and sec- 
ondary levels. 

182 


Education 


475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 474. Supervised observation and participation with the educa- 
ble and the trainable mentally retarded at both the elementary and secondary 
levels of education. (4 hours activity, 1 hour lecture and discussion.) 

477 The Educationally Handicapped Child (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471. Behavioral characteristics of the educationally handi- 
capped child, the child with a neurological handicap or a behavioral disorder as 
defined by the California Education Code. Educational procedures, perceptual and 
motor training, evaluation, parent guidance. 

479 Seminar and Practicum in Education of the Trainable Mentally Retarded (6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Curriculum, methods, and materials for 
children having severe intellectual, motor, sensory and language impairment. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the educational management of children exhibiting handi- 
capping conditions. (3 hours seminar and 9 hours practicum in special school fa- 
cilities.) 

480 Issues in Higher Education (3) 

Seminar in structure, governance, administration and challenges of American 
higher education. 

489 Fieldwork in Exceptional Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Direct supervised experience 
with educationally handicapped children. 

496 Senior Educational Practicum (1—3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with an in- 
dividual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing, consent of instructor and department 
prior to registration. Conduct of an individual investigation under supervision of 
a faculty member; investigation might be an experiment, a library study, or a 
creative project; only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be 
approved; adequate prerequisite study necessary. May be repeated for credit. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

500 Survey of Collegiate Student Personnel Services (3) 

History, philosophy, objectives, organization and administration of collegiate 
student personnel services. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity.) 

514 Graduate Seminar: Behavorial Research on Children with Learning Disorders 

(3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 510 or 511, consent of instructor, and teaching ex- 
perience with exceptional children. Critical analysis of behavioral research on 
children with learning disorders. Resources, criteria for evaluation of studies with 
exceptional children, historical view of research in special education. Research 
relating to learning and handicapping conditions, and efficacy of special methods 
and materials will be reviewed. 

521 Group Processes in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Exploration of group interaction, 
teacher sensitivity, and their relevance to educational planning and management. 
Emphasis: emotionally disturbed, educationally handicapped. 


183 


Education 


522 Behavior Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Identification and management 
of social and affective disturbances related to school performance. Emphasis: early 
detection, behavioral modification techniques, parent counseling, interagency coop- 
eration. 

523 Learning Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Identification and educational 
management of learning problems. Emphasis: developmental sequences, related 
prescriptive teaching and remediation techniques. 

550 Counseling Theories and Processes (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 452. Seminar in the dynamics of counselor and client relation- 
ships, exploration of various theories of counseling, application of theory to tech- 
niques and processes, and a study of the counseling theory in relation to personality 
theory. Major project and supervised practice required. 

551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to the Pupil Personnel Program, Educ 550 or consent 
of instructor. Seminar in the principles of evaluating, classifying, and disseminating 
occupational and educational information in the guidance program; sources of oc- 
cupational literature, occupational research, vocational surveys, and methods of 
studying the individual as a unique whole to help him develop his greatest career 
potential. Emphasis on the psychological, sociological, economic, and clinical im- 
plications of career and educational choice. A major project in career information 
is developed under supervision. 

552 Group Processes in Counseling and Guidance (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to the Pupil Personnel Program, Educ 550 or consent 
of instructor. Seminar in the intensive study of the dynamics of group processes 
including the function of leadership, effective membership and techniques of group 
problem solving. Special emphasis on clinical group counseling including a semes- 
ter project in a school setting. 

553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the Pupil Personnel Program, Educ 551 or consent 
of instructor. Seminar in the development, organization, supervision, and administra- 
tion of the pupil personnel services. Seminar on analysis and evaluation of pupil 
personnel services by the case study method, curriculum, counselor competencies, 
staffing; includes laws relating to children and child welfare. 

555 Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the Pupil Personnel Program, Educ 451, 550, or consent 
of instructor. Seminar in case conference techniques; clinical study of the tech- 
niques of individual diagnosis including the synthesis and interpretation of informa- 
tion. Use of the life or developmental record, self-ratings, behavior ratings and 
tests as they relate to counseling with the normal and abnormal pupil. Identification 
and remediation of learning difficulties emphasized. 

556 Advanced Individual and Group Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to school psychology program, Educ 452, 550, 552, 
and concurrent enrollment in Educ 558A. An advanced course in individual coun- 
seling and advanced group process to be offered as part of the training require- 
ments for school psychologists. Includes experience in working with faculty inter- 
action groups in a leadership capacity. Attention will be given to the translation 
of theory into practice in public school and clinical settings. Lecture and prac- 
dcum including school and clinical experiences. 


184 


Education 


557 Seminar in School Psychology: A Contemporary Overview of Professional 
Aspects and Problems in School Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Educ 588B. An advanced course in school 
psychology covering professional aspects in a contemporary setting including 
ethics, issues and problems, membership in professional organizations, pyschological 
services relationship to other school and community service, supervision of psy- 
chometrists and other specialized personnel, legislation and current and future 
trends in public education. Initiating and developing district level research and 
consultation functions of a school psychologist will be stressed. 

55SA School Psychology: Seminar in Problems in Personality Diagnosis (4) 

Prerequisites: a clear California credential in school psychometry or psychology 
intern credential and admission by screening committee of Pupil Personnel Services. 
Seminar and internship and/or fieldwork in problems of personality assessment in 
the school setting, effecting changes in behavior among school pupils and per- 
sonnel. Emphasizes role and function of the school psychologist in pupil personnel 
services. Advanced experience in the clinical case study, application of understand- 
ings of the dynamics of individual counseling and group counseling to human be- 
havior in the school setting. 

558B School Psychology: Seminar in Problems of Learning (4) 

Prerequisite: Educ 558A. Seminar and internship and/or fieldwork in problems 
of learning and their remediation. Arvanced work in diagnostic testing, clinical 
interpretation of data, remediation of identified problems. Advanced work in com- 
munication including reporting, individual counseling, group counseling and case 
conference. 

559A,B Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (2-6) 

Prerequisites: Educ 551, 552, 555 and consent of instructor. Student will partici- 
pate in guidance and counseling activities in his local school setting under the 
supervision of a local coordinator and the college staff. Work assignments are 
made on an individual basis. In addition to work in the field, students will meet 
in weekly seminar. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 units. 

559C,D Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Psychometry (2—6) 

Prerequisites: Educ 559A,B, admission to Psychometry Program and consent 
of instructor. Students will participate in psychometry activities in their local 
school setting under the supervision of a local coordinator and college staff. Work 
assignments are made on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit up to a 
maximum of 12 units 

570 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Developmental 
Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory and practice in the field of 
child and adolescent development. 

571 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Psychology of 
Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory' and practice in the field of 
the psychology of learning with special attention to classroom learning. 

572 Psycho-Educational Clinic (2) 

Prerequisites: prerequisite sequence or equivalent and consent of instructor. 
(Prerequisite sequence is Educ 475 or 477, 523, 570, and 571 concurrently' with 572.) 
A clinical practicum for the purpose of developing clinical teaching skills in dealing 
with the learning problems of exceptional children, practice in working with 
formal and informal information-gathering devices, special teaching instruments, 
teaching systems, and teaching strategies. Students may, upon the recommendation 
of the instructor, repeat the course for credit one time. (6 hours laboratory) 


185 


Education 


577 Seminar In Program Trends in Special Education (3) 

Prerequisites: recommendation of adviser and consent of instructor. A seminar 
designed for the study of historical development of educational programs for 
exceptional children. A critical analysis of issues and trends in special education. 

57ft Administration and Supervision of Special Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 577 or consent of instructor. Problems of organization, admin- 
istration, and supervision of special education programs: finance and attendance, 
physical facilities, budgeting, needed equipment, community agencies and curricu- 
lum development. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas 
as behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, 
communication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

596 Graduate Educational Practicum (1—3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conduct at a graduate level an educational 
practicum experience with an individual under the direction of a faculty member. 
May be repeated for a maximum of six units. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, 
with conferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

59ft Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with 
the instructor, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Open to qualified graduate students 
desiring to pursue independent inquiry. 


PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

702 Guidance of the College Round Student (3) 

The study of admission to college: backgrounds, current issues and research, 
the admission process, scope and diversity of institutions of higher education in 
the United States. 

77 ft Fieldwork in Administration of Special Education (12) 

Prerequisites: Educ 577, and registration in Educ 578. Directed fieldwork in 
the administration of special education programs. An assignment will be made 
in public or private schools. 

779 Student Teaching With Mentally Retarded Pupils (4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 475 and concurrent enrollment in Educ 339 or 739 (for four 
units) or Educ / 49 (for two units) . Student teaching in a special class program for 
the educable or trainable mentally retarded at either the elementary or secondary 
level. (Elementary level: minimum of 30 hours a week in an elementary school; 
2 hours per week in seminar. Secondary level: minimum of 15 hours a week in 
a secondary school; 2 hours per week in seminar.) 

Students working for a Restricted EMR or Restricted TMR credential need 
onl> enroll in Educ 779 (4 units). Enrollment in Educ 339 or 739 is not required. 


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

FACULTY 
Paul J. Pastor 
Department Chairman 

Jean Barrett, John Caine, Richard Coury, Paul Fardy, M. William Fulton, Eric 
Hanauer, Elmer Johnson, David Jordan, Araminta Little, Jerry Lloyd, Donald 
Matson, Dallas Moon, Billie Moore, Joseph O’Hara, Alexandar Omalev, Virginia 
Scheel, Eula Stovall, Carol Weinmann, Ronald Witchey, V. Richard Wolfe, 
Michael Yessis 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The department offers a bachelor of science in physical education for students 
preparing to teach, for those preparing to pursue graduate work in physical edu- 
cation and for those preparing for careers in business, industry and government 
service. 

The major consists of 40 units in health education, physical education and recre- 
ation, and six units of electives in upper division in supporting and related fields. 
Electives are to be approved by the students* departmental adviser. Requirements 
for the major, including proficiency requirements, prerequisite and lower division 
courses, are indicated below. 

Proficiency Requirements for Major Students 

All physical education majors must demonstrate proficiency in at least five skill 
areas selected from: aquatics; combatives (men); folk, social and square dance; 
gymnastics; individual sports; modem dance; and team sports. Activity courses 
should be taken to meet the prerequisite requirements for the analysis series 
courses. Proficiency screening tests are administered in the analysis classes at the 
beginning of the semester. 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Prerequisites 

Chemistry 100 Introductory Chemistry 

or 

Physics 211 A Elementary Physics 

or 

Physical Sci 201* Modem Physical Science 

Biological Sci 101 Elements of Biology 

Biological Sci 361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology 


Total _ 13 

Electives: Interdisciplinary 

Upper division units outside the School of Education 6 

Total 6 

Courses in Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Lower Division (all required ) 

HE 101 Personal and Community Health 2 

HE 102 Prevention and First Aid — 7 2 

PE 201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation 3 

Rec 203 Recreation Programs and Activities 2 

Total 9 

* As taught at California State College, Fullerton. 

187 


Units 

4 

4 

5 

4 


Physical Education 


Upper Division (all required) Units 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 3 

PE 325 Case Studies in Human Motor Learning 3 

PE 416 Kinesiology - — 3 

PE 417 Physiology of Exercise 3 

PE 418 Adapted and Corrective Activities 3 

HE 419 The School Health Program 3 

PE 420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education 3 

Total 21 

Upper Division ( any five courses) 

PE 311 Analysis of Aquatics 2 

PE 312 Analysis of Combatives 2 

PE 313 Analysis of Folk, Square and Social Dance 2 

PE 314 Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports 2 

PE 315 Analysis of Modem Dance 2 

PE 3 17 A3 Analysis of Team Sports (W) 4 

PE 318 Analysis of Team Sports (M) . 2 

PE 319 Analysis of Gymnastics and Tumbling 2 

Total 10 

Total in health, physical education and recreation 40 


MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A minor conssirs of 22 units of work as listed below: 

Lower Division: HE 102, PE 201, Rec. 203. 

Upper Division: PE 324, 416 or 417, 419 or 420 and select any three courses 
(6 units) from the analysis series: 

PE 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317A,B, 318, 319. 

Proficiency Requirements for Minor Students 

Physical education minors must demonstrate proficiency in at least three skill 
areas selected from: aquatics, combatives (men); folk, social and square dance; 
gymnastics; individual sports; modem dance; and team sports. Activity courses 
should be taken to meet the prerequisite requirements for the analysis series 
courses. Proficiency screening tests are administered in the analysis classes at the 
beginning of the semester. 



188 


Physical Education 


CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

The college program for meeting the requirements for the Standard Teaching 
Credential with a Specialization in Secondary School Teaching is as follows: 

1. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university education taken at the upper division 
or graduate level, at least six semester hours of which must be taken at the 
graduate level. 

3. Forty-five semester hours of coursework selected from four of the 
following six areas: humanities (except foreign languages); social sciences; 
natural sciences; mathematics;* fine arts; and foreign languages. The appli- 
cant must have at least a year of English and shall demonstrate competence 
in composition by passing a course in advanced composition or by passing 
an examination/^ (The general education requirement for the bachelor’s degree 
will satisfy this requirement if courses are selected properly. Not more than 
six hours of general education coursework shall apply toward the major or 
the minor for the credential.) 

4. A major and a minor in subject matter areas commonly taught in the public 
secondary school. The following minors are available for physical education 
majors: an, biology, chemistry, communications with a journalism emphasis, 
drama, economics, English, French, geography, German, history, mathe- 
matics, music, physics, political science, Spanish and speech. 

5. Credential requirements for preservice professional education are met through 
the following program in professional education: 

Units 


Educ 340 Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education 3 

Educ 411 Psychological Foundations of Education 3 

Educ 496 Practicum (concurrent enrollment with Educ 411) _ — 1 

Educ 401 Social Foundations of Education — 3 

tPE 442 Teaching Physical Education in Secondary Schools 2 

Educ 449 Fieldwork in Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools (con- 
current enrollment with PE 442) — — — 1 

♦PE 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School 

and Seminar 6 


Admission to Teacher Education 

The application for admission to teacher education should be completed by the 
end of the semester in which Educ 340 is completed. Information about admission 
to teacher education is available at the Credentials Office. The instructions for ad- 
mission indicate all the procedures to be followed. Each applicant should take the 
test batteries at the earliest date listed in the admission to teacher education mate- 
rials. 

Admission to Student Teaching 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. 
Information about admission to student teaching is available at the Secondary Edu- 
cation Office. Applications for student teaching for fall semester must be submitted 
by March 1 and for spring semester by October IS. 

Study Limits of Student Teachers 

Students enrolled in PE 749 will be limited to two additional courses for that 
semester. It is expected that students will not carry out-of-college work responsi- 
bilities during the semester of the student teaching assignment. 

* Mathematics requiring as a prerequisite an understanding and knowledge of high school algebra 

and geometry. 

t The English requirement including composition is met at this College by English 100 or 103, 
English 110, 111 or 112 (or equivalents) and English 301. 

♦ See course description for prerequisites. 


189 


Physical Education 


GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
General Characteristic! 

The program of studies leading to this degree is designed to prepare carefully 
selected individuals as master teachers of physical education by providing the 
technical knowledge and scholarship necessary to interpret to others through 
modern methods of education: (1) the basic subject matter of physical education; 
(2) the conduct and application of experimental research pertinent to physical 
education; (3) the ability to evaluate critically the basic issues affecting physical 
education; and (4) the application of concepts from related fields having signifi- 
cance for physical education. 

The program is also designed to prepare teachers of physical education at the 
college level as well as to provide the background for continued study in a doctoral 
program in physical education. 

Prerequisites 

Prerequisites to the program include: 

(1) completion of 24 approved upper division units in physical education; 

(2) a grade-point average of 3.0 or better, for all upper division work taken in 
physical education and a 2.5 GPA for all previous college work. (Contin- 
gency provisions: grade-point deficiencies in individual courses in physical 
education may be met by taking 6-12 hours of approved courses at California 
State College, Fullerton, and earning a 3.0 GPA in these courses. Such 
courses, while counted toward the prerequisites for the master of science 
program, may not be used to fulfill the program requirements.) 

(3) completion of the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination. 

Program of Study 

The degree study plan normally consists of 30 units of graduate coursework 
with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Coursework shall include 21 units of 500-level courses 
of which 10 units shall be in the core studies. Further work includes 12-17 units in 
physical education electives with eight of these units concentrated in one special 
area. Six units of work must be in disciplines other than physical education. A 
thesis and an oral examination at the conclusion of the program are required; a 
written examination may also be required. 

I. Core Studies (minimum 10 units) Urdu 

PE 510 Research Design in HEPER 3 

PE 598 Thesis 4 

At least one of the following: 

PE 515 Seminar in Physical Education 3 

PE 516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education 3 

PE 520 International Physical Education 3 

II. Electives (12-17 units) in physical education, including a minimum of eight 
units in one of the following concentrations: 

(PE 596, Advanced Studies in Physical Education, 1-3 units, may be applied to 
core, concentration or elective area as improved. PE 599, Independent Re- 
search, 1-3 units, may be applied to any of the concentrations which follow.) 


A. Administrative: Urdu 

PE 532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education 3 

PE 530 Administration and Supervision of HELPER 3 

PE 533 Facilities Development and Planning 2 

PE 545 Seminar in Evaluation in Physical Education 3 


190 


Physical Education 


B. Scientific: Units 

PE 552 Human Bio-Kinetics 3 

PE 555 Scientific Bases of Training 3 

PE 551 Seminar: Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise 3 

PE 545 Seminar in Evaluation in Physical Education 3 

PE 540 Seminar in Problems in Adapted Physical Education 3 


C. Scientific Sports: 

Must include two courses from the scientific area above: 
PE 560 Advanced Study in Performance: 


(a) Tennis-Badminton 2 

(b) Gymnastics 2 

(c) Track and Field 2 

III. Supporting courses from other disciplines 6 


For further details, consult the coordinator of graduate studies, Department of 
Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

101 Personal and Community Health (2) 

Meaning and significance of physical, mental and social health as related to the 
individual and to society; alcohol and narcotics education; fire prevention; public 
safety and accident prevention. 

102 Prevention and First Aid (2) 

Study of the hazards in man’s environment and the common accidents related 
thereto. Emphasis is placed upon both the care and prevention of accidents. Stu- 
dents will be certified in standard and advanced American Red Cross first aid 
procedures. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

321 Stimulants and Depressants (2) 

Critical study of habit forming substances such as alcohol, tobacco, narcotics and 
related drugs. Social and legal aspects of the drug problem are also considered. 

322 Man, Exercise and Leisure (2) 

A study of the effect of man’s nutrition in relation to exercise. The interrelation- 
ships of activity and leisure in modem society and the problems that are associated 
with them will also be investigated. 

419 The School Health Program (3) 

Prerequisite: HE 101 or equivalent. Consideration of the three classical divisions 
of the school health program: instruction, services and environment. Study will 
include standards, problems, and relationships pertaining to these areas as well as a 
field project. 

421 Public Health (2) 

A study of the structure, policies and practices of public health agencies in the 
United States. Emphasis on factors affecting environmental health. 


191 


Physical education 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

General Education Requirements: 

Health and Physical Education Electives 

There are no specific health and phyisical education requirements. Each student, 
however, must take a minimum of three courses (9 units) with one from each of 
three fields included in Category IV, Basic Subjects: computer science, elementary 
foreign languages, health education, mathematics, oral communications, physical 
education, reading, statistics or writing. See page 74. 

110 Aquatics (1) 

A physical activity experience in aquatics activities with a student in an educa- 
tional setting and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity 
to meet the needs and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

120 Group Activities (1) 

A physical activity experience in group activities with a student in an educational 
setting and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to 
meet the needs and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated 
for credit. 

130 Individual Activities (t) 

A physical activity experience in individual activities with a student in an edu- 
cational setting and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the ac- 
tivity to meet the needs and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be 
repeated for credit. 

140 Dance Activities (1) 

A physical activity* experience in dance activities with a student in an educa- 
tional setting and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity 
to meet the needs and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated 
for credit. 

170 Intercollegiate Sports (W) (1) 

An intercollegiate activity experience in individual or team sports for women in 
an educational setting under the direction of a coach who directs the activity to 
meet the needs and interests of the student. Consent of coach required for en- 
rollment. 

180 Intercollegiate Sports (M) (1) 

An intercollegiate activity experience in individual and team sports for men 
in an educational setting under the direction of a coach who directs the activity 
to meet the needs and interests of the student. Consent of the coach required for 
enrollment. 

Professional Theory Courses 

201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Introduction to physical education programs in public and private agencies, per- 
sonal, social and professional requirements of the physical education teacher and 
recreation leader, includes the origin and development of the professions of health 
education, physical education and recreation with emphasis upon their significance 
and function in contemporary* American culture. 

206 Techniques of Officiating Team Sports (2) 

Analysis of officiating techniques and rules necessary for officiating team sports. 
May be repeated for various sports or combinations of sports. (1 hour lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

192 


Physical Education 


210 Water Safely Instructor (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 110 (Life Saving) or equivalent and consent of instructor. 
This course prepares the student to teach swimming and life saving and to supervise 
aquatic programs. Successful completion of this course will qualify the student for 
certification as an ARC Water Safety Instructor. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

214 Skin and Scuba Diving (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 110 (Life Saving) or equivalent and the consent of in- 
structor. The techniques of skin and scuba diving. Theory of diving, safety proce- 
dures and applications of diving will be covered. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

301 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (2) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, successful completion of HE 102 (or equiv- 
alent) and consent of instructor. Designed to assist trainers, coaches, physical 
education instructors, health educators, YMCA and playground personnel, and 
athletes in the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Emphasis will be on prac- 
tical applications as well as theory. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

311 Analysis of Aquatics (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 110 (Life Saving) or equivalent and consent of instructor. 
Analysis of springboard diving, instructional and competitive swimming, watcrpolo, 
and skin and scuba diving. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

312 Analysis of Combatives (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 130 (Combatives — Men) or equivalent. Analysis of judo (jui- 
jitsu), wrestling and self-defense. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

313 Analysis of Folk, Square and Social Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: basic skills in folk, square and social dance. Analysis of basic dance 
skills, international folk, square, round and social dancing. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 



7—81593 


193 


Physical Education 


314 Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports (2) 

Prerequisites: proficiency in skills covered and consent of instructor. Analysis 
of archery, badminton, golf and tennis. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

315 Analysis of Modern Dance (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 140 (Beginning Modern Dance and Intermediate Modern 
Dance) or equivalent and consent of instructor. Analysis of modem dance in- 
cluding choreography, program planning and dance accompaniment. (1 hour 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

317A Analysis of Team Sports (W) ( 2 ) 

Prerequisites: proficiency' in the skills covered and consent of instrucor. Analysis 
of basketball, softball, soccer, specdball, and speed-a-way (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity). 

317B Analysis of Team Sports (W) (2) 

Prerequisites: proficiency in the skills of the sports covered and consent of in- 
structor. Analysis of volleyball, field hockey, track and field (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity). 

311 Analysis of Team Sports (M) (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 120 (Team Sports — Men) or equivalent and consent of instruc- 
tor. Analysis of soccer, softball, specdball, and volleyball. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

319 Analysis of Gymnastics and Tumbling (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 130 (Beginning Gymnastics and Tumbling) or equivalent and 
consent of instructor. Analy sis of apparatus gymnastics and tumbling. (1 hour lec- 
ture, 2 hours activity) 

320 Theory of Coaching: Sports (2) (Formerly 321, 322, 323) 

A physical education experience designed to help prepare the student to coach 
specific individual and team sports. Emphasis will include coaching techniques, 
conditioning of athletes, budget preparation, purchase and care of equipment, 
scheduling and design and care of facilities. May be repeated for credit with em- 
phasis on a different sport. 

324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

An analysis of current theories of motor learning as related to human perform- 
ance. Philosophical bases are developed from which basic principles are evolved. 

325 Case Studies in Human Motor Learning (3) 

Case studies involving human physical performance. Sequence of activities, indi- 
vidual needs, institutional patterns of organization and programming. 

333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Emphasis is placed upon characteristics of the child, particularly as these relate to 
physical growth and development; basic mechanical principles underlying efficient 
movement; and programs for physical needs of children in the elementary school. 

335 Afro-American Dance (2) 

Study of primitive and tribal rhy'thms including jazz and other derivational 
dances of Africa. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

416 Kinesiology (3) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 361 or equivalent. The study of human motion. 


194 


Physical Education 


417 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 361 or equivalent. The study of physiological processes in 
physical activities and the effects of training upon performance. 

413 Adapted and Corrective Activities (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 416. The study and selection of activities and programs for 
students physically unable to participate in the regular physical education program. 

420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3) 

A study of the development and use of tests and measurements in physical 
education in the evaluation of objectives, programs, and student achievement. 

425 Special Programs: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Group investigation of selected topics de- 
termined by professionals in the field. Will be offered as a one-, two- or three- 
unit course. May be repeated for credit. 

431 Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics in the 
Community Colleges (3) 

This course is designed to prepare students for junior college teaching and for 
administrative positions. It will investigate the role of health, physical education, 
recreation and athletics in the junior college curriculum. Fieldwork and campus 
visitations required. 

435 Physical Activity in Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. An interdisciplinary approach to the 
examination of physical activity in the cultural milieu. Study will cover historical 
and contemporary interpretations of the role of play, games and sports, dance and 
recreation in human life. 

442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisite: Education 340, Education 411, admission to teacher education, 
senior standing or consent of instructor. The student who has not had teaching 
experience must register concurrently in Education 449. See page 212 under Sec- 
ondary Education for description of Standard Teaching Credential Program. 
Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruction for teaching 
physical education in secondary schools. 

484 Contemporary Dance Technique (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 140 (Intermediate Modern Dance) or equivalent. Study of 
theories, approaches, and techniques of contemporary dancers. Emphasis is on 
development of individual technique in dance. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

486 Choreography (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 140 (Intermediate Modern Dance) or equivalent. Theoretical 
and creative aspects of choreography. Application and analysis of elements of 
choreographic form. Composition of solo and group dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

496 Physical Education Practicum (1—3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department chairman and instructor. Participation 
as an assistant in planning, preparing, coaching, teaching in public school, college, 
or community physical education or recreation programs. May be repeated for a 
maximum of six units of credit. Credit/no credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of instructor supervising the 
study and department chairman. Independent inquiry into problems of topics of 
special interest beyond the scope of regular coursework. May be repeated for 
credit up to six units. 


195 


Physical Education 

510 Research in Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. The role and functions of research in health, phys- 
ical education, and recreation; included are the different types of research with 
tools of and equipment for the respective research. Selection and development of 
research problems and critique of completed studies are stressed. 

515 Seminar in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major or minor in physical education. A 
study of current problems and issues in physical education through a critical 
analysis of the literature in the held and research findings. 

516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. Identification 
of philosophical schools of thought as related to physical education including the 
role of the philosophical process. Examination and application of the philosophical 
process in physical education. 

520 International Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. An in depth 
study of the theory and practice of physical education and sports in selected 
foreign countries. Evaluation of foreign physical education programs in relation 
to programs witnessed in the United States. 

530 Administration and Supervision of Health Education, Physical Education and 
Recreation (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with major in physical education. An in depth 
study and critical analysis of existing programs in health education, physical educa- 
tion, and recreation in terms of established evaluative criteria and norms of practice. 

532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in phyiscai education. Study in desir- 
able practices, procedures, and factors influencing curricular development in the 
field of phy sical education. Especially' designed for the practicing teacher, super- 
visor of physical education, and the school administrator concerned with physical 
education in the total school program. 

533 Facilities Development and Planning (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and a major in physical education. Analysis of new 
trends and research in the development of indoor and outdoor facilities in planning 
programs in health education, physical education and recreation with special em- 
phasis upon design, safety, features, site selection, building construction and equip- 
ment needs. 

540 Seminar in Problems in Adapted Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 418. Identification and solutions of problems in planning, organi- 
zation, administration, and evaluation of adapted physical education programs at 
local, state, and national levels. 

545 Seminar in Evaluation in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. The study and 
application of advanced evaluation procedures and scientific instrumentation used 
in the solution of current problems and projects in phy r sical education. 

551 Seminar: Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 417 or equivalent. A study of advanced theories of exercise and 
phy'siological function. 


196 


Physical Education 


552 Human Bio-Kinetics (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 416 or equivalent background in kinesiology and physiology. 
A study of advanced theories and a detailed analysis of human movement. 

555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, coursework in kinesiology, physiology of exercise, 
bio-kinetics, and consent of instructor. Detailed study of contempoary training 
with specific attention to the development of those qualities involved in various 
sports. Experience in evaluation of the effects of training. 

5 60 A Advanced Study in Performance: Badminton and Tennis (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or experience in bad- 
minton and tennis or consent of instructor. Theory and analysis of top level per- 
formance. Includes in depth study of skills, techniques and strategy involved in 
badminton and tennis and the factors pertinent to outstanding athletic performance. 

560B Advanced Study in Performance: Gymnastics (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or work in gymnastics 
or consent of instructor. Theory and analysis of top level performance. Includes 
in depth study of the skills and techniques involved in gy mnastics and the factors 
pertinent to outstanding athletic performance. 

560C Advanced Study in Performance: Track and Field (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or work in track and 
field or consent of instructor. Theory and analysis of top level performance. 
Includes in depth study of the skills, techniques, and strategy involved in track 
and field and the factors pertinent to outstanding athletic performance. 



197 


Physical Education 


596 Advanced Studies: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Graduate seminars designed to develop competen- 
cies in such areas as: historical, philosophical, sociological, psychological, scientific 
bases of sport and dance. Opportunities are provided for the individualization of 
instruction with appropriate experiences. May be repeated for credit. 

598 Thesis (4) 

Prerequisites: PE 510 and consent of instructor. Individual research on an 
empirical problem. Conferences with thesis chairman and committee, culminating 
in a thesis. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of the faculty adviser and department 
chairman. Research for qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent 
inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and Seminar 

(4) 

See pages 223-224 for description and prerequisites. 


RECREATION COURSES 

303 Recreation Programs and Activities (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and activity course, leadership 
in recreation programs, activities in recreation agencies. Laboratory experiences 
and practice included. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


198 


Education 


DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
AND SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS 

FACULTY 
Ernest G. Lake 
Department Chairman 

Hollis Allen (Emeritus), Edwin Carr, Stuart McComb (Emeritus), Robert Mc- 
Laren, Kenneth Preble 

PART-TIME 

Walter Beckman, Ragnar Engcbretsen, Robert Jenkins, Donald Jordan, Donald 
Kennedy, Charles Kenney, Ernest Norton, David Paynter, Walter Pray 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS 

Courses in the Social Foundations of Education are designed to help prospective 
teachers understand how the school has been shaped, and is being shaped, by 
a myriad of forces. These forces are intellectual, historic, economic, political, social, 
legal; together they influence the outcomes of formal education at least as much 
as does any educational methodology. For this reason work in the Social Founda- 
tions of Education is one of the requirements for teaching credentials. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
School Administration 

A program of graduate studies leading to the degree of Master of Science in 
Education with a concentration in school administration has been authorized by 
the California State Colleges Board of Trustees. The principal objective of the 
curriculum is to prepare carefully selected individuals for certain leadership posi- 
tions in school administration. 

The program is designed to help these individuals gain the technical knowledge 
and scholarship requisite to high achievement in these positions. This professional 
program is based on and combined with sound preparation in the liberal arts and 
sciences. The curriculum proposes an interdisciplinary approach to the preparation 
of the professional specialist in public education. Thus, those who qualify for the 
degree should have completed coursework in such fields as philosophy, public ad- 
ministration, psychology, political science, biology, English, sociology, economics, 
anthropology, or history. 

Prerequisites 

A student desiring to enter the program should complete the following require- 
ments: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

2. A successful teaching experience in an elementary’ or secondary school, or 
community college, is desirable. If such experience is not available, other ex- 
perience in related fields is a recommended alternative, which must be approved 
by a graduate adviser before starting the program. 

3. Generally, students will have completed as a requirement of their teaching 
certificate 30 units of postbaccalaureate study. These must be of upper division 
or graduate level (300- level or above) and be approved by the graduate ad- 
viser. Students should make an appointment with a graduate adviser as soon 
as the objective in school administration is selected. 

4. An approved undergraduate major. 

5. A minimum of 12 postgraduate units in academic subjects, completed either 
prior to or during the program. 

6. At least 2.5 grade-point average in previous academic and related work. 

7. An acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination — either the Area 
Test or the Aptitude Test. 


199 


Education 


Programs of Study 

The degree study plan must include 30 units of committee-approved coursework, 
of which 21 must be at the 500-level. A minimum of 21 units must be in school 
administration; 6 units may be assigned on an interdisciplinary basis from courses 
related to the needs of individual students. Course requirements include field expe- 
rience and a project. 

No more than 9 units of postgraduate work taken prior to classified status may 
be applied to a student’s master’s degree program. 

Students concentrating in school administration will take Education 503, Founda- 
tions for Administrative Leadership, as soon as they identify their interest in this 
M.S. degree. To continue in the program beyond this course, the student must 
be granted a “letter of admission to the program” and possess an official California 
State College, Fullerton program evaluation. Students who desire only isolated 
courses from the program arc normally denied admission to such courses. The 
adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will include: 


Units 

Master’s degree studies, supporting courses 9 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Adviser-approved courses (outside the student’s area of specialization and 
outside the Department of School Administration and Social Founda- 
tions (6) 

Courses for the Concentration in School Administration 18 

All of the following: 

Educ 505 Supervision of Curriculum (4) 

Educ 561 Organization of School Systems (3) 

Educ 563 Principles of School Personnel Administration (2) 

Educ 564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Educ 565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration, and Build- 
ings (3) 

Educ 56 7 A F ieldwork and Seminar in School Administration 
(Includes Project or Thesis) (2) 

Educ 567B Fieldwork and Seminar in School Administration 
(Includes Project or Thesis) (2) 

One of the following 3 

Educ 566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor (3) 

Educ 586 The Secondary School Principal, Community College 
Administrator, and Supervisor (3) 

For advisement and further information, consult the Department of School 
Administration and Social Foundations. See also “The Program of Master’s De- 
grees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

A selected number of teachers will be offered the opportunity to study and to 
practice school administration as school interns in administration. A candidate must 
obtain admission to the program, and agreement must be reached with a sponsor- 
ing school or college district to employ the candidate as a full-time administrator 
during the school year. The concept of the internship in educational administration 
is similar to that found in other professional fields. Its basic function is to enable 
the intern to gain the necessary' experience in the performance of the critical 
tasks of his profession while under the close supervision of a fully-trained and 
experienced practitioner. It is an opportunity' for the college and local school 
and college systems to work together in training well-qualified school administra- 
tors. The internship in educational administration is but one phase of the program 
for preparing supervisory' and administrative personnel for community college, high 
school, intermediate school, and elementary school positions of leadership. It is 

200 


Education 


an investment in training supervisory leadership from which the cooperating school 
district, the college, and the intern will derive benefit and in which all three 
have responsibilities. Cooperation among all three is essential to the success of the 
program. 

Internships are for a full academic year and require of all students the comple- 
tion of a minimum of 19 graduate credits. During the period of the internship 
the student is required to be a registered graduate student at California State 
College, Fullerton. 

All candidates will be given a temporary credential for supervision and adminis- 
tration according to the regulations of the California Administrative Code, Title 
V, Section 6555. Such candidates should register in two courses: Education 561, 
Organization of School Systems, Education 563, Principles of School Personnel 
Administration. 

Both courses must be completed in the summer session if the student is to do 
his internship beginning in the fall semester. Applications for admission to the 
program should be sent to the chairman, Internship Program in School Administra- 
tion, by June 1. Careful planning of electives will enable candidates to receive the 
Master of Science in Education with a concentration in school administration upon 
further study, after completing the requirements for the internship. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 
School Administration 

Candidates in administration, upon completion of the degree requirements for 
a Master of Science in Education, should qualify for certification as a school 
administrator at any level providing they have taught three years. As certification 
requirements change yearly, candidates are urged to have their adviser check 
their study program against current requirements. 

Candidates in administration accepted in the Administrator Internship Program 
will be issued the Standard Supervision Credential conditionally upon partial ful- 
fillment of requirements according to the California Administrative Code, I itlc V, 
Section 6555. 

OTHER STUDENTS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Experienced school administrators, holding a California Administrative Creden- 
tial or a Supervision Credential and exempt from degree requirements, may register 
for any course in the school administration concentration. Teachers wishing to 
take courses in school administration directed at helping them to understand 
administration problems are welcome to take selected courses. 


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 411, admission to teacher education or consent of instructor. 
Seminar in philosophical, historical, and sociological foundations of education, con- 
sidered in the light of their influence on contemporary educational theory and 
practice in the United States. 

402 Comparative Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 401, 403, or consent of instructor. A seminar centered in 
study of the various countries’ and areas’ education patterns, problems and trends 
as part of the cultural setting in which found; designed to deepen insights into our 
own culture’s educational program and offer bases for comparative evaluation 
with other systems. 


201 


Education 


403 History of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: history of world civilization and Educ 331 or 442 or consent 
of instructor. The main streams of educational history in Europe and Amer- 
ica, with particular emphasis on the ways these main streams have affected the 
current scene in the United States. 

406 Educational Sociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 331 or 442, or consent of instructor. The school in the 
social order; the school as a social system; analysis of cultural factors affecting the 
school; the special culture of the school; roles and role conflicts in the school; 
policy questions flowing from social issues and school-cultural relationships. 

496 Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with an in- 
dividual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing, consent of instructor and department 
prior to registration. Conduct of an individual investigation under supervision of 
a faculty member; investigation might be an experiment, a library study, or a 
creative project; only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be 
approved; adequate prerequisite study necessary. May be repeated for credit. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: postgraduate standing and Educ 339 or 739 or Educ 749, or con- 
sent of instructor. Uses of theories of knowledge, value and reality in dealing 
with educational problems; application of contemporary systems of thought to 
education. 

503 Foundations for Administrative Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar on cultures and values to which 
schools must contribute: introduction to community sociology, tax systems and 
public administration; the literature of leadership. Screening for admission to pro- 
gram. Occasional special meetings. Required of all students during first registra- 
tion in school administration and supervision at this college. 

505 The Supervision of Curriculum (4) 

Prerequisite: Educ 566 or 586. Seminar on development of a quality program of 
instruction in both elementary and secondary schools; appraisal of programs of 
instruction; advanced principles of curricular review and modification. Evaluation 
of subject matter competence in area of supervisory specialization. Meets creden- 
tial requirements in principles of curriculum construction and evaluation; super- 
vision of instruction and curriculum in both elementary and secondary schools. 

560 Contemporary Problems in School Administration (3) 

A seminar on contemporary problems in school organization and administration 
with particular emphasis on collective bargaining, the computer as a business and 
educational tool, and the needs of urban schooling including the problems of 
racial isolation. 

561 Organization of School Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 503 or concurrent enrollment. Seminar on structure, functions, 
trends, fiscal responsibilities and issues in respect to the government of education at 
federal, state, county, and local school district levels. Basic principles in school or- 
ganization and administration. Special emphasis on intergovernmental relations and 
impact at local level. 

202 


Education 


563 Principles of School Personnel Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 503 or concurrent enrollment. Seminar on principles of organi- 
zational behavior, social processes inherent in effective leadership, and techniques 
of school personnel management. 

564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School law as a reflection of public policy; 
the California Education Code and the California Administrative Code, Title 5, 
and county counsel opinions as they affect administration, instruction, and finan- 
cial management of public schools. Court attorney general decisions in interpreting 
school law. Legal basis for public education in California. An elective course in 
school administration. 

565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration, and Buildings (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Emphasis on school finance, business admin- 
istration, and buildings as they implement an effective educational program. A 
study of financial principles. School revenues and expenditures, budgetary pro- 
cedures and processes, cost analysis; business management, and salary policies. An 
elective course in school administration. 

566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of elementary school 
principal and supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in elementary 
school; working relations and morale among staff, community and pupils; parent 
education; relations with central district staff; management and recordkeeping 
functions; teacher evaluation. 

567A,B Fieldwork and Seminar in School Administration (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 566 or 586 or concurrent registration, and consent of in- 
structor. Two-semester terminal sequence required for the M.S. in Education with 
a concentration in school administration. Includes directed field work in selected 
public schools and district offices. Supervised project or thesis required for degree. 
(4 hours fieldwork, 2 hours conference) 

568 Seminar for Administrative Trainees (3) 

Provides a behavioral analysis approach in the establishment of a sound foun- 
dation for educational administrators who have just completed a year of practice 
in administration. The seminar is the culminating offering of the Administrator 
Internship Program The objectives of the seminar include (1) developing further 
insights into the complex behavior of human beings in social groups, (2) increas- 
ing understanding of how certain theory and research contribute to effective ad- 
ministrative practice, (3) evaluating further self-behavior in administration. Ex- 
perienced school administrators who wish to relate their administrative experiences 
to the theory of behavioral analysis are welcome to register in the seminar. Be- 
havioral environment will be examined as it shapes process, organization, and 
function in school administration. 

586 The Secondary School Principal, Community College 
Administrator, and Supervisor (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of the secondary 
school principal and supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in the 
secondary school; the development and administration of vocational and adult edu- 
cation; working relations and morale among staff, community and pupils, relations 
with central district staff; the management and record-keeping functions; teacher 
evaluation. 


203 


Education 


595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas 
as behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, 
communication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, 
with conferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with 
the instructor, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring 
to pursue independent inquiry. 


204 


Teacher Education 


DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 


FACULTY 
Hazel M. Croy 
Department Chairman 

James Alexander (Journalism Education), Jean Barrett (Physical Education), 
Carol Chadwick (Music Education), Francis Collca (Science Education), Miriam 
Cox (English Education), James Cusick, Raymond Denno*, Naomi Dietz (Art 
Education), Kenneth Doanc*, Mildred Donoghuc, Gerhard Ehmann*, Hugh 
Ellison (Music Education), Richard Gerfen, Kaye Good (Speech Education), 
Barbara Hartsig, Donald Henry (Theatre Education), Emma Holmes, Elmer 
Johnson (Physical Education), Paul Kane, Bernard Kravitz, Joseph Landon 
(Music Education), L. Clark Lay (Mathematics Education), Michael Lyon 
(Art Education), Edith McCullough, Benton Minor (Music Education), Bryan 
Moffet, Irene Nims (English Education), Deborah Osen, David Pagni (Mathe- 
matics Education), Donald Pease, Virginia Schcel (Physical Education), George 
Schick, Clarence Schneider (English Education), Morris Sica, Robert Simpson, 
Eula Stovall (Physical Education), H. Eric Streitbcrger (Science Education), 
John White (English Education), Charles Williams (Science Education), Jon 
Zimmermann (Foreign Language Education) 

PART-TIME 

Leona Baumgardner, Margot Coons, Dorothy Klausner, Helen Levy, Marjorie Og- 
den, D. Russell Parks, Harriet Schultz, Roberta Seaman 

The courses, programs, and services of the department are directed toward the 
following objectives of students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration in an elementary curriculum 
and instruction, or reading. 

2. Preservice teacher education (elementary school, secondary school, community 
college). 

3. In-service teacher education. 

4. Program for the preparation of reading specialists. 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of the school as a basic 
institution of our culture, the methods and materials associated with effective 
teaching, and the current and persistent problems that confront teachers, and 
other professional workers in educational institutions. In addition to using published 
source materials and attending class sessions for presentations and discussions, many 
courses require fieldwork in schools, laboratories, clinics, and other educational 
agencies. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

1. Master of Science in Education, Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 

2. Master of Science in Education, Reading. 

3. Admission to Teacher Education: Standards, Instructions, Application. 

4. Admission to Student Teaching: Standards, Instructions, Application. 

5. Standard Teaching Credential with a Specialization in Elementary Teaching. 

6. Standard Teaching Credential with a Specialization in Secondary Teaching. 

7. Standard Teaching Credential with a Specialization in Community College 
Teaching. 

8. Program for Elementary Internship. 


College administrative officer. 


205 


Teacher Education 


PRESERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION 

TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 

California State College, Fullerton is accredited by the California State Board 
of Education for programs leading to the following credentials offered by the De- 
partment of Teacher Education: 

1. Standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary school teaching 

2. Standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching 

3. Standard teaching credential with specialization in community college teaching 

The School of Education has administrative responsibility for teacher education. 
All curricula provide for completing the requirements for graduation with the 
bachelor of arts degree at the end of the usual four collegiate years and an addi- 
tional year of work to satisfy requirements for a teaching credential. Preparation 
for teaching in a community college requires the master’s degree. Details of the 
programs are provided in special brochures available from the Department of 
Teacher Education. Information about the professional services authorized by the 
above credentials will be provided by professional advisers. 

PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a public school credential and a 
bachelor of arts degree at this college. During registration, the student should 
consult an adviser in the department in which he expects to major and an adviser 
in the School of Education who will help him select courses and build his program. 
A student from another institution should bring transcripts of previous work and 
a tentative selection of courses. Transferred education courses must be of upper 
division level and taken within the past 15 years to be applicable to upper division 
credential requirements. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

To become a candidate for a teaching credential the student must be enrolled, 
in good standing, and must be admitted to “teacher education’’ in the Office of 
Admission to Teacher Education of the School of Education. Application for 
admission to teacher education should be filed during the first semester of the 
junior year or the first semester of attendance at the college, if the student enters 
with advanced standing. 

Admission to teacher education is required of each student before he files the 
application for student teaching.t 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant’s intel- 
lectual resources and mastery of important concepts in the common curricular 
areas of higher education, command of fundamental skills of communication 
(English language usage, written composition, speech, hearing, reading compre- 
hension, handwriting, mathematical skills), scholarship, personality and character, 
interest in teaching, and health. Data related to these criteria are gathered from 
transcripts and records from other schools and colleges, group and individual 
tests, personality inventories, estimates of the potential of the applicant, and from 
the Student Health Center. Students should normally qualify for admission and 
be advised of their status during the second semester of the junior year or their 
first semester of attendance if they enter with advanced standing with degrees from 
accredited colleges. 

Students who show weaknesses in any of the fundamental skills of communication 
are advised of their standing. If there are weaknesses in only one or two of the 
areas noted above, the student will be advised of refresher courses and given a 
specified time to meet the standard. 


t Exceptions will be made in the case of new transfer students. 

206 


Teacher Education 


If the applicant has serious deficiencies in communication skills or does not meet 
the standards of mastery in the common curricular areas, personality and character, 
scholarship, interest in teaching, or health, the faculty committee will deny ad- 
mission to teacher education. 

The student must arrange to take the required battery of group and individual 
tests and inventories necessary to provide information needed by the faculty 
committee. The tests of breadth of understanding, reading, English usage, number 
skills, composition, handwriting, and personality arc given by the School of Edu- 
cation for admission to teacher education; consult the Office of Admission to 
Teacher Education of the School of Education for dates. 

The student who comes to CSCF to work toward a credential for teaching in a 
secondary school and who already has a bachelor’s degree must, before he is ad- 
mitted to teacher education, consult with an adviser in the major and must submit 
a statement, signed by the adviser, which indicates the following: 

1. That the student’s undergraduate preparation in his major is considered to be 
adequate for the credential sought, or 

2. Specific courses which the student must complete to have a major adequate 
for the credential sought, and which he must complete before he will be 
admitted to student teaching. These may be in addition to the minimum of the 
six upper division or graduate units required in the major in the postgraduate 
year, or may, in part or in whole, satisfy this six unit minimum requirement. 

Full details on standards and procedures for admission to teacher education arc 
described in “Instructions and Standards for Admission to Teacher Education,” 
which is available from the Office of Admission to Teacher Education and the 
Department of Teacher Education. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Each candidate for the standard teaching credential with specialization in elemen- 
tary school teaching will do his student teaching in the last semester of his senior 
year or in his postgraduate year at the college. Each candidate for the standard 
teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching, or for the 
specialization in community college teaching will do his student teaching during 
a postgraduate year. Details about student teaching in special education classes 
are available in the Department of Behavioral Sciences. Student teaching assign- 
ments are made in the elementary" and secondary schools of districts geographi- 
cally accessible to the college. Community college student teaching assignments 
are made in nearby' community colleges. Students will be assigned to work 
under the supervision of carefully selected supervising teachers; a college super- 
visor makes frequent visits to the student teacher and the supervising teacher. Stu- 
dent teachers meet in a weekly' seminar under the leadership of the college super- 
visor to discuss performance and problems. 

Application for Student Teaching 

Admission to teacher education as described above is the first step in a cumulative 
and continuing evaluation of a candidate’s fitness to teach. The applicant for 
admission to student teaching must have a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the 
major, 2.5 in the minor, and 2.5 in professional education. Marks of C, or better, are 
required in all professional education courses. Applicants for admission to elemen- 
tary school student teaching must be classified as postgraduate students or be within 
15 units of the baccalaureate degree. Applicants for admission to secondary school 
student teaching or to community college student teaching must be classified as 
postgraduate students. All applicants must have completed at least 12 units at Cali- 
fornia State College, Fullerton. The applicant must present a favorable report on 
health status and history. He must present evidence of readiness for student teach- 
ing responsibility as testified by the major adviser, the professional adviser, and other 
college faculty. This evidence relates to scholarship, breadth of understanding, 


207 


Teacher Education 


command of the subjects to be taught, fundamental skills of communication, person- 
ality and character, interest and potential for teaching, and health. 

Competence is required in all subjects and skills for which the candidate is seeking 
a credential. For the elementary school teacher education student, this includes all 
subjects and skills commonly taught in the first eight grades of the public schools. 
Secondary school and junior college teacher education students must meet the 
requirements for major and minor (s) as specified by the academic divisions. 

All instructors of the college are asked to participate in the continuing evaluation 
of students in relation to those aptitude, personality and character traits which are 
considered essential to admission to the teaching profession. Dependability in 
fulfilling assignments, class attendance, ability to get along with people, industry, 
and emotional stability are representative criteria. In addition to the evaluations 
by instructors, the applicants may be interviewed by a faculty committee, and 
attention will be directed to general appearance, dress, vitality, poise, temperament, 
integrity, and social attitudes. 

The application for admission to student teaching is submitted to the coordinator 
of admissions to teacher education and student teaching. The application must be 
submitted by October 15 or March 1 of the semester preceding the semester in 
which the student teaching assignment is expected. A faculty committee will 
gather the information described above and report to the student in time to do plan- 
ning for the following semester. 

Except for graduate students who are in their first semester of study at CSCF, 
applications will be accepted only frorti those who have completed all requirements 
for admission to teacher education. 

Full details on standards and procedures arc described in “Instructions and 
Standards for Admission to Student Teaching,” available in the Department of 
Teacher Education. 

Study Limits of Student Teachers 

Students who enroll in Educ 339 or 739, Student Teaching in the Elemen- 
tary School, will be limited to one additional course for that semester. Students 
who enroll in Educ 749, Student Teaching in the Secondary School, will be 
limited to two additional courses for that semester. It is expected that students 
will not carry out-of-college work responsibilities during the semester of the student 
teaching assignment. 

If a student is under hardship because of these limitations, he may submit a 
petition to the coordinator of elementary education or to the coordinator of 
secondary education, as appropriate, requesting permission to carry not more than 
13 units, including student teaching. The petition must set forth, in full, the 
circumstances necessitating the petition. 


Permission to Substitute Teaching ixperience for Student Teaching 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had two years of successful, 
regular teaching experience must petition the School of Education, through his 
professional adviser, for permission to substitute such experience for the student 
teaching requirement. Substitution of teaching experience for student teaching will 
be considered only if the applicant: 

1. Has been admitted to teacher education at the college. 

2. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, 
or superintendent to the School of Education certifying at least two years of 
successful, regular teaching experience at the appropriate level. A letter of 
verification must be submitted to the Department of Teacher Education. 


208 


Teacher Education 


STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching in California elemen- 
tary schools, secondary schools and community colleges are included in the curric- 
ula descriptions. Upon the completion of the requirements, the student will submit 
an application for a credential to the State Department of Education in Sacramento. 
On these applications the student is asked about his citizenship status, his profes- 
sional conduct, and he is asked to sign an oath of allegiance. He must also submit 
a health examination form signed by a qualified physician, two fingerprint-identi- 
fication cards and the legal fee, which is currently $20. The forms are available in 
the Credentials Office of the college. 

Curriculum in Elementary School Teacher Education * 

The program leading to the recommendation for the standard teaching creden- 
tial with specialization in elementary school teaching includes the following: 

1. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper 
division or graduate level. (If the student does not complete all requirements, 
the credential may be awarded on the basis of partial fulfillment at the end 
of four or more years of work if he has a bachelor’s degree from an approved 
institution and has completed the student teaching requirement.) 

3. A minimum of 45 semester hours in five of the following six areas: (1) social 
sciences, (2) natural sciences, (3) humanities (excluding foreign languages), 
(4) fine arts, (5) mathematics, and (6) foreign languages. The humanities 
requirement must include a year of English and a course in advanced com- 
position. (To prepare himself to meet professional responsibilities, an ele- 
mentary school teacher education candidate should include in his program 
Art 100, Music 101, PE 123, PE 149, and Speech Communication 100 or Speech 
Communication 102.) These 45 semester hours of coursework for the credential 
can be met through the college general education requirements for the bach- 
elor’s degree with the proper selection of courses. (Not more than six hours 
of coursework taken to satisfy these requirements shall apply toward the fulfill- 
ment of the requirements for either a major or a minor.) 

4. Three semester hours of coursework in the theory of the structure, arithmetic 
and algebra of the real number system or three semester hours of coursework 
in calculus. (Math Ed 103A meets this requirement.) 

5. One of the following: 

a. A major consisting of at least 24 semester hours of upper division or gradu- 
ate level courses in an academic subject matter area commonly taught in the 
public elementary schools. These majors are currently available for this 
specialization at the college: American studies, anthropology, art, biological 
science, chemistry, communications with a journalism emphasis, compara- 
tive literature, drama, economics, English, French, geography, German, his- 
tory, linguistics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political science, 
psychology, sociology, Spanish, speech. (Note: the specifications above are 
state minima, and do not necessarily satisfy requirements for a major for 
graduation from the college.) 

b. A major and a minor, each of which is in a subject matter area commonly 
taught in the public elementary schools, and one of which is in an aca- 
demic subject matter area. The academic major shall consist of at least 
24 semester hours of upper division or graduate coursework. If the major 
is not an academic one, it shall consist of 28 semester hours of upper division 
or graduate coursework. (With a nonacademic major, i.e., business admin- 
istration or physical education, only the major and minor subjects may 
be taught in kindergarten and grades 1 through 9.) This minor shall consist 
of a minimum of 20 semester hours of coursework. When the major is in an 

* Regulations for the credential are subject to change by the State Board of Education; any cur- 
ricular changes will be available in later college publications. 

209 


Teacher Education 


academic subject matter area specialized preparation in such areas as men- 
tally retarded or speech and hearing handicapped may be substituted, 
c. Two minors in subject matter areas commonly taught in the public ele- 
mentary schools and a major, other than education and educational method- 
ology, not commonly taught therein. If the major is not in an academic 
subject matter area, each minor shall be in an academic matter area. (With 
a nonacademic major only the major and minor subjects may be taught in 
kindergarten and grades 1 through 9.) If the major is in an academic subject 
matter area, one of the minors shall be in an academic subject matter area. 
These minors shall consist of a minimum of 12 semester hours coursework. 
Specialized preparation in such areas as mentally retarded or speech and 
hearing handicapped may be substituted for one of the minors. 

6. Courses selected from the following ones offered by academic departments 
as part of the basic preparation for elementary teachers. A minimum of 
three courses, selected with the approval of a professional adviser, must be 
completed before student teaching. 

An 380 An and Child Development (3) 

English 433 Children’s Literature (3) 

Math Ed 103B Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

PE 333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Sci Ed 310 Elementary Experimental Science (3) 

7. Professional education requirements which are currently met by the following 
program: 

Educ 331 A Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods: Mathe- 
matics, Science, and Social Studies (4) 

Educ 33 IB Elementary School Principles, Curricula, and Methods: Language 
Arts and Reading (4) 

Educ 339 or 739 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (8) 

Educ 401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Educ 411 Psychological Foundations of Education (3) 

Educ 496 Senior Educational Practicum, Elementary (1) 

Note: Admission to the college does not include admission to the elementary 
teacher education program. Procedures for admission to teacher education are out- 
lined on page 206. It is the responsibility of each student to file an application for 
admission to teacher education in his junior year and to complete the requirements 
for admission to teacher education before enrolling in Educ 331. 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. 
Each student is responsible for meeting the requirements and following the pro- 
cedures for admission to student teaching given on page 207. 

Composite Lower Division , Upper Division, and Fifth Year Work 

A student seeking recommendation for the standard teaching credential with 
specialization in elementary school teaching after five years of preservice teacher 
education should complete — 

In the lower and upper division: 

a. Coursework listed in 3, 4, and 5 above. 

b. A minimum of three courses from item 6 above. These courses are to be 
selected in consultation with and with the approval of his professional 
adviser. 

c. Courses in professional education 
Junior year, Educ 411 (3) and 496 (1) 

Senior year, second semester, 331 A (4) and 33 IB (4) 

d. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser. 

210 


Teacher Education 


In the fifth year: 

a. Courses in professional education 
First semester, Educ 739 (8) 

Second semester, Educ 401 (4) 

b. Additional courses from item 6 above as needed and other courses selected 
in consultation with his professional adviser. 

(The applicant for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
elementary school teaching must complete 30 units of upper division and/or 
graduate work after he has completed all requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree.) 

A student seeking the standard teaching credential with specialization in elemen- 
tary school teaching on partial fulfillment of requirements should complete — 

In the lower and upper division: 

a. Course work listed in 3, 4, and 5 above. 

b. A minimum of three courses from item 6 above. These courses are to 
be selected in consultation with and with the approval of his professional 
adviser. 

c. Courses in professional education 
Junior year, Educ 411 (3) and 496 (1) 

Senior year, first semester, 331 A (4) and 33 lB (4) 

Senior year, second semester, Education 339 (8) 

d. Additional courses selected in consultation with his professional adviser 

In the fifth year (to be completed during the first seven years of teaching) : 

a. Courses in professional education 
Educ 401 (4) 

b. Additional courses from item 6 above as needed and other courses selected 
in consultation with his professional adviser. 

(The applicant for the standard teaching credential with specialization in 
elementary school teaching must complete 30 units of upper division and/or 
graduate work after he has completed all requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree.) 

Alternate Program, Iniornship 

An alternate program (internship teaching) leading to the recommendation for 
the standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary school teaching 
is available for those who meet the requirements. 

This program fulfills the fifth year (30 units beyond the bachelor’s degree) re- 
quirement and qualifies the candidate for the Standard Teaching Credential with 
an Elementary Specialization. 

This program extends over two summers and two semesters. A student must 
begin the internship program in the summer preceding his internship teaching. 
Standards for admissions to the internship program: 

a. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution with a major consisting of 
at least 24 semester hours of upper division or graduate level courses in an 
academic subject matter area commonly taught in the public elementary 
schools. 

b. A minimum of 45 semester hours in five of the six areas outlined in No. 3 
on page 209.* 

c. Three semester hours of coursework in mathematics outlined in No. 4 on 
page 209.* 

d. No teaching experience. 

e. A grade-point average of 2.5 in the major. 

• For those who do not meet this requirement, but otherwise qualify for the internship, a 
program will be planned so that the individual can enter the internship program and 
meet the requirements of the Curriculum in Elementary School Teacher Education. 

211 


Teacher Education 


f. Minimum achievement requirements on the Graduate Record Examination for 
admission to graduate study. 

g. Screening by faculty in Elementary Teacher Education and by cooperating 
school districts. 

h. Sponsorship by a school district as an intern in elementary school teaching. 


Courses in the program include selection from No. 6 on page 210, the courses in 
No. 7 on page 210, Educ 496, 537, '595, and one or more electives from the follow- 
ing: 


Educ 503 
Educ 531 
Educ 532 
Educ 533 
Educ 534 


Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Foreign Languages (3) 
Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 
Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 
Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 


Curriculum in Preparation of Reading and Remedial Reading Specialists 

Teachers who wish to enter the program for the preparation of specialists in 
reading and remedial reading, including both primary and secondary school levels, 
may enroll in the following 18-unit specialty: 


Sequence of Courses in Reading 


Units 

Educ 506 Curriculum and Research: Reading 3 

Educ 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties 3 

Educ 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties 3 

Educ 582 Analysis of Reading Practices 3 

or 

Educ 584 Linguistics and Reading 3 

or 

Educ 585 Word Perception Skills in Reading 3 

Educ 583A Remedial Reading: Casework 3 

Educ 583B Remedial Reading: Casework 3 


Completion of the reading sequence will entitle the student to a statement of 
completion of the reading specialty. 


Curriculum in Secondary School Teacher Education * 

Credential requirements and the program leading to the recommendation for 
the standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary school teaching 
includes the following: 

1. A bachelor’s degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper 
division or graduate level. (The postgraduate year is defined by California 
State College, Fullerton as 30 semester units of upper division or graduate 
level courscwork completed after the bachelor’s degree. Coursework taken 
through extension at this college and summer workshops offered at this college 
may be used as coursework applying towards the fifth-year requirement.) 

3. Forty-five semester hours of coursework, including the English and the com- 
petency described below, and including jour of the following six areas: (1) 
humanities (excluding foreign languages), (2) social sciences, (3) natural 
sciences, (4) mathematics requiring as a prerequisite an understanding and 
knowledge of high school algebra and geometry, (5) fine arts, and (6) foreign 
languages. The humanities requirement must include a year of English, and 
in addition, the applicant for the credential shall demonstrate competence in 
composition either by passing a course in advanced composition or by passing 
an examination in lieu thereof. 


• This is the curriculum for the standard teaching credential with specialization in secondary 
school teaching. Credential requirements are subject to regulatory changes. Any such changes 
will be described in later college publications. 

212 


Teacher Education 


(Note: This 45 semester hours of course work for the credential can be met 
through the college general education requirement for the bachelor’s degree 
with proper selection of courses. Not more than six hours of coursework 
taken to satisfy these requirements shall apply toward the major or minor for 
the credential.) 

4. Preparation in subject matter areas commonly taught in the public secondary 
schools for the purpose of credential requirements for majors and minors. 

a. One of the following: 

Option 1. A major in an academic subject matter area commonly taught 
in the public secondary schools. 

Option 2. A major and a minor, each of which is in a subject matter area 
commonly taught in the public high schools, and one of which 
is in an academic subject matter area. 

b. Major requirements for the credential must include at least 24 upper divi- 
sion and graduate level units. At least six units in the major must be taken 
at the graduate level. Six postgraduate units in the minor may be taken in 
lieu of this requirement for the major. See the general course numbering 
code on page 96 for the description of graduate level courses for the cre- 
dential. Also see the appropriate sections of this catalog for descriptions of 
requirements in specific majors. The college will recognize single subject 
areas as satisfying Option 1 provided the student supplies additional upper 
division or graduate units in supporting areas structured by the department 
in which the baccalaureate degree is taken and in consultation with the 
other departments involved. This option should be considered carefully, 
since it may not be practical in terms of job placement. Some departments 
of the college will require that the student must present a minor. Stu- 
dents must consult with academic and professional advisers concerning 
Option 1. 

c. Minor requirements vary, but must include 20 units in a single subject in 
this credential program at CSCF. (Note: A minor is not required for 
graduation from the college but is required for the recommendation of the 
college for Option 2.) 

Each student will complete a major planned with and approved by his 
major adviser. Majors presently available are: American studies, art, biology, 
business administration, chemistry, communications with journalism em- 
phasis, drama, economics, English, French, geography, German, history, 
mathematics, music, physical education, physics, political science, Spanish, 
and speech. 

Each student will complete a minor planned with and approved by his 
professional adviser. Minors presently available are: American studies, art, 
biology, business education, chemistry, communications with journalism 
emphasis, drama, economics, English, French, geography, German, history, 
mathematics, music, physical education, physics, political science, Spanish 
and speech. Students may also present specialized preparation to serve as a 
teacher of exceptional children in the area of the mentally retarded or 
speech and hearing handicapped in lieu of the minor. 

Students majoring in business administration and physical education must 
have an academic minor with a minimum of 20 units in subjects commonly 
taught in the public secondary schools. Students with these majors must 
complete 12 units of upper division or graduate level work in the minor 
area. 

5. Credential requirements in courses for preservice professional education are 
met in the following program in professional education: 


213 


Teacher Education 


Courses in Professional Education 

Units 

Educ 340 Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education 3 

Educ 401 Social Foundations of Education _ 4 

Educ 411 Psychological Foundations of Education 3 

Educ 496 Senior Educational Practicum, Secondary 1 

Educ 442 Teaching (art, English, etc.) in the Secondary Schools (also 

listed in respective departments) 2 

Educ 449 Fieldwork in Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools 1 

Educ 749 Student Teaching (art, English, etc.) in the Secondary School 
and Seminar (also listed in respective departments) 6 

Students normally will begin their work in professional education in the junior 
year, and it is expected that, except for Educ 401, the courses above will be taken 
in the indicated sequence. Students who begin their work in professional education 
as seniors or as graduate students will follow a somewhat different sequence, and 
should consult professional advisers when planning their programs. Graduate 
students without professional education backgrounds may be required to extend 
their program beyond a single academic year to complete the college secondary 
school teacher education program. Coursework taken in extension at other insti- 
tutions is not acceptable in substitution for any of the above courses. In all cases, 
students are required to take Educ 340 the first semester they are enrolled in 
professional education. 

Note: Admission to the college does not include admission to the secondary 
school teacher education program. See the description on page 206 for the 
procedures for admission to teacher education which does include admission to this 
credential program. It is the responsibility of each student to file his application 
for admission to teacher education by the end of the semester in which he com- 
pletes Educ 340. It is also the responsibility of each student to arrange to 
complete his requirements for admission to teacher education early in his work 
in professional education. Students must be admitted to teacher education prior 
to taking Educ 442 and 449. 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. 
See the description of the procedures for admission to student teaching on page 
207. The student must observe the deadline and must meet other requirements for 
admission to student teaching . 

Curriculum in Community Coll- ge Teacher Education 

The program requirements leading to the college-recommended standard teach- 
ing credential with a specialization in community college teaching are: 

1. A masters or higher degree from CSCF or other accredited institution. 

2. Preparation in subject matter areas commonly taught in community colleges 
in either of the following: 

a. An academic major in a single subject commonly taught in community 
colleges. (Tlie subject in which a master’s degree has been granted consti- 
tutes a major in that subject for these purposes.) 

b. If the major is nonacademic (the candidate holds a master’s degree in a 
subject such as business administration or physical education), the can- 
didate must have an academic minor of a minimum of 20 semester hours 
in a single subject commonly taught in the community college. Twelve 
of the units in the minor must be of upper division or graduate level. 

3. Professional education requirements in CSCF recommended program: 

Units 

Educ 744 Principles of Community College Teaching 3 

Educ 799 Community College Student Teaching and Seminar 4 


214 


Teacher Education 


Admission to Community College Teacher Education Program 

Admission to the college does not constitute admission to community college 
teacher education. 

The candidate must: 

Have a master’s or higher degree from a fully accredited institution in a field 
in which the college offers a major 
or 

have classified graduate status (master’s degree candidacy) at CSCF and 
possess a baccalaureate degree. 

Admission to community college teacher education follows in general the pro- 
cedure described on page 215. For exact procedures see Office of Admissions to 
Teacher Education. 

The student is responsible for filing his application for admission as early as 
possible and is also responsible for admission to teacher education. 

Application for community college student teaching and seminar is not included 
in admission to the program. The student is responsible for following the pro- 
cedures listed on page 207 under “Application for Student Teaching.” 

The courses in professional education listed above will be taken in sequence. 
The student must have postgraduate standing before he enrolls in these courses. 
Student teaching may be taken in either the last semester in which the master’s 
degree will be completed or after the degree has been granted. 

N.B.: The above is a description of the program leading to the recommenda- 
tion of the college for the credential. This program includes student teaching 
and work in professional education not required by the state. The college pro- 
gram is designed to meet the job placement needs of candidates for positions 
in community colleges. 


GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

General Characteristics 

This degree is reserved for professionally qualified graduate students who desire 
to prepare for or advance their careers in reading or elementary curriculum and 
instruction. 


Prerequisites 

Most programs have as prerequisites a teaching credential, successful teaching 
experience, an approved major, acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion (area tests or aptitude test), a 2.5 grade-point average on previous academic 
and related work, and screening into the program on the basis of the prerequisites 
and professional leadership criteria. Credit will be given for previous postbacca- 
laureate studies when possible. Otherwise well-qualified students may be admitted 
to the college with limited subject or grade deficiences, but these deficiences must 
be removed. Grade-point average deficiencies may be removed by a demonstration 
of competency in the graduate program. 


Programs of Study 

Elementary Curriculum and Instruction 


The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will include the 
following: 


Units 

Coursework outside elementary education- 9 

Two of the following: 

Educ 402 Comparative Education (3) 

Educ 403 History of Education (3) 

Educ 406 Educational Sociology (3) 


215 


Teacher Education 


Educ 452 Principles of Guidance (3) 

Educ 501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Educ 509 Theory and Practice in Measurement (3) 
Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Other adviser-approved courses (3) 


Coursework in elementary education 

Educ 537 Seminar for Elementary Education (3) 


Three of the following: 

Educ 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 
Foreign Languages (3) 

Educ 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 
Language Arts (3) 

Educ 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 
Mathematics (3) 


Educ 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 
Science (3) 

Educ 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 

Social Studies (3) 

One of the following: 

Educ 597 Graduate Project (1-3) (total of 3) 

Educ 598 Thesis (1-3) (total of 3) 


Units 

15 


Electives selected with approval of the adviser 6 

For further information , consult the chairman. 

Sec also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


Reading 

The adviser-approved 31-33 units on the study plan will include the following 


Studies: 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis 3 

Supporting courses from other disciplines. _ 9 

Courses for the concentration in reading 18 


Educ 506 Curriculum and Research: Reading (3) 
Educ 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 
Educ 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (3) 
Educ 582 Analysis of Reading Practices (3) 
or 

Educ 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 
or 

Educ 585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 
Educ 583 A Remedial Reading: Casework (3) 

Educ 583B Remedial Reading: Casework (3) 

Educ 597 Graduate Project (1-3) 
or 

Educ 598 Graduate Thesis (1-3) 


or 

A comprehensive examination 


For further information , consult the chairman. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


216 


Teacher Education 


TEACHER EDUCATION 
PRESERVICE COURSES 

101 Reading Development (1) 

An elective course for students enrolled at CSCF who wish to improve their 
reading efficiency. May be repeated for a maximum of three units of credit. 

308 Education of Various Cultural Groups: Early Childhood (3) 

A course designed for Head Start personnel and others engaged in the early 
education of culturally different children. Focus will be on the development of 
learning, curriculum content, and methodology related to various cultural groups. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

309 Fieldwork in the Education of Various Cultural Groups (3) 

Observation and participation in classes for various cultural groups. Integrated 
with coursework in Education of Various Cultural Groups. Must be taken con- 
currently with Educ 308. (9 hours laboratory) 

329 Fieldwork in Methods of Teaching in Elementary School (1) 

Prerequisites: Educ 411 and admission to teacher education. Observation and 
participation in elementary school classrooms. 

331 A Elementary School Principles, Curricula and Methods (4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 411, 496, Math Ed 103A and admission to teacher education. 
Must be taken concurrently with 33 IB. Principles, curricula, methods and materials 
of elementary school instruction with major emphasis on arithmetic, social studies 
and science. Includes audiovisual instruction, methods and techniques. Required of 
all candidates for the standard teaching credential with specialization in elementary 
school teaching. Includes screening for admission to student teaching. (2 Vi hours 
lecture, 1 l A hour activity) 

331 B Elementary School Principles, Curricula and Methods (4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 411, 496 and admission to teacher education. Must be taken 
concurrently with Educ 329 and 331 A. Principles, curricula, methods and materials 
of elementary school instruction with major emphasis on language arts and read- 
ing. Two semester hours devoted to methods of reading instruction, including 
phonics. Required of all candidates for the standard teaching credential with 
specialization in elementary' school teaching. Includes screening for admission to 
student teaching. (2 Vi hours lecture, 1 54 hour activity) 

339 Student Teaching in the Elementary School and Student 
Teaching Seminar (8 or 4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 331, three academic related courses, and admission to student 
teaching. Participation in a regular elementary school teaching program for the 
greater part of every school day. Includes a two-hour seminar each week in 
problems and procedures of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enrollment in 
other courses is discouraged. (Minimum of 30 hours a week in an elementary 
school, 2 hours per week seminar.) 

340 Principles and Curricula of Secondary Education (3) 

Required first course in the professional sequence for the standard teaching 
credential with specialization in secondary teaching Principles of secondary edu- 
cation in the United States: organization, curriculum, and teaching practices. Cor- 
related with methods and materials courses in the major. Two hours of observa- 
tion per week in selected junior and senior high school classes. Application for 
admission to teacher education is included. Each student is expected to complete 
all requirements for admission during Educ 340. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours field- 
work) 


217 


Teacher Education 


380 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

Curriculum and methods in the teaching of reading in the elementary and 
secondary schools. Examination and analysis of the approaches to reading in 
teachers’ manuals and guides. Practical experience in preparing lessons in class- 
room teaching of reading. 

431 Principles and Curricula of the Elementary School (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or consent of instructor. An introductory course in 
elementary education. Stress on major principles and basic curricular considera- 
tions. Importance of the elementary school system to society. 

432 Teaching— in the Elementary School 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or consent of instructor. Courses, listed dually in the 
School of Education and in the other appropriate departments dealing with 
objectives, methods, and materials of teaching the various subjects and areas 
in the elementary schools. The courses are professional education courses and 
applicable toward credential requirements. Detailed descriptions of the courses are 
to be found in the materials of other departments within this catalog. 

For Lang Ed 432 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School (2) 

436 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 331 or consent of instructor. Techniques the classroom 
teacher may' use in understanding individual children within his classroom who do 
not respond to the teacher and his peers in typical ways. 

437 Problems In Early Elementary Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 339 and consent of instructor. Study of current litera- 
ture and recent research in the area of education of young children through 
individual and group study. Emphasis will be placed on problems centered in 
cognitive processes, content, structure, and instruction at the early elementary 
education level. 

442 Teaching — in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: 20 units in the major, Educ 411, 496, 340, admission to teacher edu- 
cation, and senior standing; or consent of instructor. A series of courses, with the 
exception of business and social science methods, listed dually in the School of 
Education and in the other appropriate departments, dealing with objectives, 
methods, and materials of teaching, including audiovisual instruction, the various 
subjects and areas in secondary schools. Required, before student teaching, of stu- 
dents presenting major in these areas or subjects for the standard teaching cre- 
dential with specialization in secondary school teaching. Students without teaching 
experience must register concurrently in Educ 449 to complete a teacher aide 
assignment in high schools. 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (2) 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (2) 

Educ 442 Teaching Social Science in the Secondary School (2) 

Engl Ed 442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (2) 

For Lang Ed 442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2) 

Journ Ed 442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (2) 

Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (2) 


218 


Teacher Education 


Mu Ed 441 Teaching Music Theory and Appreciation in the Public Schools (2) 
Mu Ed 442 Teaching Vocal Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Mu Ed 443 Teaching Instrumental Music in the Public Schools (2) 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (2) 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (2) 

Speech Ed 442 Teaching Speech In the Secondary School (2) 

Theatre Ed 442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (2) 

443 Principles of Core Curriculum (2) 

Prerequisite: teaching experience or consent of instructor. Unity and inter- 
relationships of human learning and behavior and the curricular processes and 
arrangements by which this may be achieved. Seminar on development, principles, 
and application of core curricula; guidance functions; evaluation; and roles of the 
teacher. 

445 Junior High School Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 442 or 331 or consent of instructor. Seminar on prin- 
ciples and procedures for developing the junior high school program. Purposes, 
curriculum, and organization of the junior high school arc stressed including 
examination of recent innovations and proposals. Designed for students with ele- 
mentary or secondary backgrounds who plan to teach in the junior high school. 

446 Secondary School Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: student teaching or teaching experience or consent of instructor. 
Fundamentals of curriculum development. Seminar on current issues within sec- 
ondary education. Curricular organization and current practices. Survey and evalu- 
ation of newer curricular programs. 

449 Fieldwork in Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools (1) 

Prerequisite: Educ 340, 411, admission to teacher education or consent of 
instructor. Participation in the instruction of a secondary school class as a teacher 
aide. Integrated with coursework in the teaching of the major. Must be taken 
concurrently with Educ 442 and students must allow sufficient time in their 
schedules, at the same hour each day, to serve as a teacher aide. 

4S1 Principles of Educational Measurement (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or Psych 311. Development, validation, and application 
of the principles of educational measurement. Construction and use of informal 
and standardized achievement tests. Summary and interpretation of results of 
measurement. 

491 Audiovisual Education (2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 411, 442, or consent of instructor. Media in communica- 
tion, psychological bases, development, curricular function, evaluation. Survey of 
equipment and materials available, preparation of instructional materials for class- 
room use. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

492 Television in the Classroom (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or consent of instructor. Television as a vehicle for 
instruction, information, and enrichment. General theory of media in classroom, 
psychological bases, curricular capabilities and limitations of equipment. Responsi- 
bility of the classroom teacher. Practice in utilization process. (1 hour lecture, 2 
hours activity) 


219 


Teacher Education 


493 Production of Audiovisual Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Fduc 491 or consent of instructor. Exploration and develop- 
ment of audiovisual materials. Students will participate in script writing, story 
board, photography and tape production. Experience will be provided in produc- 
ing graphics, charts and bulletin boards. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

496 Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with an in- 
dividual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing, consent of instructor and department 
prior to registration. Conduct of an individual investigation under supervision of 
a faculty member; investigation might be an experiment, a library study, or a 
creative project; only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be 
approved; adequate prerequisite study necessary. May be repeated for credit. 



220 


Teacher Education 


GRADUATE COURSES 

506 Curriculum and Research in Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of curriculum and research in reading, 
including materials, organization, and methods of instruction. 

509 Theory and Practice in Educational Measurement (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or Psych 311. Introduction to basic concepts, theory, and 
procedures for construction of informal and standardized tests. Application of meas- 
urement theory and statistical techniques toward problems of analysis, scaling, 
norming, and interpretation of test results. Practice in item writing for short class- 
room tests and intensive analysis of selected commercial standardized tests. 

510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor’s degree, Educ 509 or the equivalent. Elements of design, 
instrumentation, treatment of data, hypothesis testing and inference, and analysis 
of educational data. Develop a research proposal. Practice in analyzing and evalu- 
ating research reports. 

511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 509, teaching experience. Review of descriptive statistics 
and statistical inference as applied to educational problems. Analysis of repre- 
sentative research papers. Principles of research design. Prepare a research pro- 
posal. 

516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching experience, Educ 506 or consent of instructor. Studies 
of the factors underlying learning disabilities in reading in children, adolescents 
and young adults. 

530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Foreign Language (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339, 739, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study 
of pertinent investigations and their application in the classroom together with 
significant curriculum developments and organization in the newest area facing 
the elementary' school educator. Criteria for appraising programs, personnel, and 
materials also will be discussed. 

531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 510 or consent of instructor. Seminar for advanced study 
of trends and problems in teaching the fundamental skills of communication in the 
elementary’ school. Analysis of research in the language arts and related disciplines 
as background for curriculum development. 

532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math Ed 103 A, Educ 339 or 739, or consent of instructor. 
Seminar for the study of significant research, curricular developments and ma- 
terials, criteria for planning and improving mathematics programs and instruction. 

533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339 or 739 or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study 
of significant research in elementary' school science. Criteria for planning and im- 
proving science programs and the development of materials. 

534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339 or 739, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of 
significant research developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving 
social studies programs and current techniques of teaching. 


221 


Teacher Education 


537 Seminar for Elementary Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339 or 739 or consent of instructor. A study of problems 
and issues in elementary education, their causes and possible solutions. 

547 Seminar for Secondary Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 749 or consent of instructor. Persistent problems in sec- 
ondary education and survey of related literature; causes of and solutions for these 
problems. Application of scientific method to educational problems, sources of 
educational research, and to techniques of cooperative thinking. 

581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor’s degree, teaching experience, Standard Teaching Creden- 
tial, Educ 506 or consent of instructor. Analysis and diagnosis of reading dif- 
ficulties. Techniques and methods or prevention and treatment. Individual re- 
mediation of student. Primary through secondary. 

582 Analysis of Corrective Reading Practices (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 516, 581, and consent of instructor. Critical evaluation of 
reading and remedial reading practices. Short-term project in a school situation. 

583A,B Remedial Reading Casework (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 582, and consent of instructor. Fieldwork in diagnosis and 
remediation in reading through casework technique. Conferences with teachers, 
parents, consultants, and administrators. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

A study of linguistics and its influence on reading materials and instruction. An 
analysis of trends in reading and changes affected by the science of linguistics. 

585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 

Study of word perception skills in the process of learning to read. A develop- 
mental hygiene of child vision. Visual anomalies and their applications to reading 
disorders. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas 
as behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, 
communication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, 
with conferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with 
the instructor, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring 
to pursue independent inquiry. 


222 


Teacher Education 


PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN THE POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

709 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: possession of a teaching credential and one year of teaching ex- 
perience. Designed for teachers who supervise student teachers. Emphasis on prin- 
ciples and procedures of effective supervision and research. 

721 Philosophy and Objectives of Community College Education (2) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing or consent of instructor. Origins of the 
junior college movement in higher education in the United States; economic, tech- 
nological, and social forces creating needs for new and different post-high school 
education; objectives of community college education; relationships to secondary 
and higher education; functions of the community college; curriculum develop- 
ment and organization. 

739 Student Teaching in the Elementary School and Student Teaching 
Seminar (8 or 4) 

Prerequisites: Educ 331, three academic related courses, admission to student 
teaching, and postgraduate status. Participation in a regular elementary school 
teaching program for the greater part of every school day. Includes a two-hour 
seminar each week in problems and procedures of elementary school teaching. 
Concurrent enrollment in other courses is discouraged. (Minimum of 30 hours a 
week in an elementary school, 2 hours per week seminar.) 

744 Principles of Community College Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing or consent of instructor. Psychological foun- 
dations of community college teaching, measurement and evaluation of learning. 
Educational and philosophical bases for instructional procedures in the community 
college. Instructional procedures including audiovisual materials, community college 
class observations. (2 hours seminar, 3 hours fieldwork) 

749 Student Teaching In — in the Secondary School and Seminar (6 or 2) 

A series of courses in student teaching and seminars listed dually in the School 
of Education and in the other appropriate departments. 

Prerequisites: Educ 442, 449, and admission to student teaching. Student teaching 
for the general secondary credential or the standard teaching credential with spe- 
cialization in secondary school teaching. Participation in a regular secondary school 
teaching program for half-days for a full semester. Includes a seminar each w'eek in 
problems and procedures of secondary school teaching, under the direction of the 
respective college supervisor. (Minimum of 15 hours a week in a secondary school; 
2 hours per week in seminar) 

Art Ed 749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Educ 749 Student Teaching in Business in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Educ 749 Student Teaching in Social Science in the Secondary School and Semi- 
nar (6) 

Engl Ed 749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

For Lang Ed 749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary 
School and Seminar (6) 

Journ Ed 749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

Math Ed 749 Student Teaching in Mathematics in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 


223 


Teacher Education 


Mu Ed 749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Pi 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Speech Ed 749 Student Teaching in Speech in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

Theatre Ed 749 Student Teaching in Theatre in Secondary School and Sem- 
inar (6) 

799 Community College Student Teaching and Seminar (4) 

Prerequisite: Educ 744. Student teaching in the student’s major field in a coop- 
erating community college for one semester. Weekly seminar on curriculum devel- 
opment and organization in the community college, instructional procedures and 
materials, and instructional problems of the community college student teacher. 
(Minimum of 9 hours a week in a community college; 2 hours per week in 
seminar) 


224 



8—81593 


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 


Dean: Robert G. Valpey 


FACULTY 
George C. Chiang 

Chairman, Civil Engineering & Engineering Mechanics 
Eugene B. Hunt 

Chairman, Electrical Engineering 
Floyd W. Thomas, Jr. 

Chairman, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering 

George Cohn, Munir El-Saden, Euyen Gott, Walter Hudetz, Jack Kemmerly, Jesa 

Krcincr, Sundaram Krishnamurthy, Young Duck Kvvon, Wai Kok Lim, Charles 

Medler, Peter Othmer, George Raczkowski, James Rizza, Jesus Tuazon, Mahadeva 

Vcnkatesan 

The School of Engineering offers programs at the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. The individual courses are described in the section of this catalog on 
announcement of courses. At the undergraduate level the school prescribes certain 
patterns of courses combined with those of other academic departments and schools 
of the college, as a program of 132 semester units leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Engineering. At the graduate level the school offers a sequence of 
courses as a program of 30 semester units leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in Engineering. In the graduate program specific options in major fields 
are offered. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING 

The objective of the undergraduate engineering program is to form a broad 
base of science, mathematics, social science, humanities and engineering science — 
coupled with enough specialization in an area of concentration to initiate a success- 
ful engineering career. Students are prepared to enter directly into engineering 
practice or to continue further education at the graduate level. 

The heart of the engineering program is a core curriculum somewhat broader 
than that of the traditional engineering program. This core includes courses in 
mathematics, physics, chemistry', basic engineering sciences, social sciences and the 
humanities and provides a firm basis for more specialized knowledge at an advanced 
level. Beyond the basic core curriculum a student chooses a minimum of 30 units 
of technical electives to complete his program with enough specialization in an 
area of emphasis to initiate a successful engineering career. During the first 
2 Vi years of study all students in engineering take the same program emphasizing 
the inter-relationship of the primary’ engineering subjects which form the broad 
background required of modern-day engineers. 

The program of 132 semester units presumes that the entering student brings a 
high school preparation which includes geometry’, trigonometry and two years of 
algebra. Physics and chemistry are highly desirable. A course in mechanical drawing 
will be helpful. Students deficient in mathematics must take a special preparatory’ 
course. Engineering 100, Introduction to Analysis, or equivalent, which will not 
carry’ credit for graduation. 


TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A smooth transition from a community’ college into upper-division engineering is 
assured when the following program, as a minimum, has been completed. Students 
deficient in any of these areas may look to our summer catalog for offerings that 
may make up any deficiencies: 


226 


Engineering 


Minimum Nwnber of 
Semester Units 


Analytic geometry and calculus 14 

Chemistry (for engineering and science majors) 8 

Physics (for engineering and science majors)— 12 

Engineering graphics 2 

Properties of engineering materials 2 

Computer programming (FORTRAN) 3 

Electric circuits 4 

Analytical mechanics (statics) | 


The School of Engineering subscribes to the following statement approved by the 
Engineering Liaison Committee of the State of California: 

Based on the 1970-71 requirements, any student of a California community 
college, with a stated major in engineering, who presents a transcript showing 
satisfactory completion of the following proposed core program in lower divi- 
sion, will be able to enroll in this institution w'ith regular junior standing; and 
further, assuming normal progress, said student can complete an engineering 
program in four additional semesters with a regular bachelor’s degree, presuming, 
upon transfer, that he has completed at least 50 percent of the graduation unit 
requirements in that program. Completion of a specific program of his choice 
will be dependent upon his proper selection of elective courses. 

Semester Quarter 


Subject Area Units Units 

Mathematics (beginning with Analytical Geometry and 
Calculus and completing a course in ordinary differential 

equations) 16 24 

Chemistry (for engineers and scientists). — 8 12 

Physics (for engineers and scientists) 12 18 

Statics 3 4 

Graphics and Descriptive Geometry 3 4 

Computers (digital) 2 3 

Orientation and Motivation 1 1 

Properties of Materials — 3 4 

Electric Circuits 3 4 

Electives 11-15 17-23 


TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

During the junior year the student shall submit a proposed study plan to his 
faculty adviser covering the sequence of upper-division level courses totaling not 
less than 30 units in engineering and closely related fields. His study plan shall in- 
clude a sufficient number of courses to provide continuity and depth of under- 
standing in a given area of specialization. Such plan must be approved by his ad- 
viser before taking any technical electives. A student shall include at least two 
senior-level engineering laboratories and one design course within his area of 
emphasis in the 30 units of technical electives. Examples of areas of emphasis cur- 
rently available arc: electronics, communications, control systems, digital systems, 
aeronautics, heat and mass transfer, thermal sciences, mechanical design, structural 
systems and design, applied mechanics, environmental studies, etc. In lieu of these 
areas of emphasis a student may request the engineering science program. The pro- 
gram in engineering science is to be selected by the student and his adviser and 
submitted for approval to a committee of the School of Engineering (supplemented, 
if appropriate, by members of the science and mathematics faculty). The courses 
are to be selected from upper-division electives in engineering, physics, chemistry, 
mathematics and biology (additional prerequisites for science courses may be re- 
quired), to meet a special and specific engineering science objective of the student 

227 


Engineering 


such as engineering physics, computer science, premcdical, etc. Note that specific 
engineering courses, in addition to the two senior-level engineering laboratories and 
one design course, may be required by the adviser or the committee. 

Work taken at another college or university on which a grade of D was earned 
may not be substituted for upper-division courses. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE 
Lower Division Science and Mathematics (All required for B.S.) 

•Math 150A, B Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Math 250 Intermediate Calculus 

Math 281 Linear Algebra with Differential Equations 

Chem 101 A General Chemistry 

Chem 105 General Chemistry for Engineers 

Physics 225A, B, C Fundamental Physics 

Physics 226A, B, C Fundamental Physics Laboratory 


Units 

8 

4 
3 

5 
3 
9 
3 


35 

Non-engineering General Education 28 

The engineering student will take at least 24 units from Areas II and III of 
the general education requirements for the bachelor’s degree (see page 74), 
six units of which may meet the U.S. history and government requirements. 

He will follow, as a minimum, the college wide requirements, adding courses 
at his discretion to make 24 units. An additional four units, for a total of 28 
must be specifically approved by his adviser and will be recommended to 
assure the best balance for the student’s education. A student shall be limited 
to a maximum of six units of activity courses. 


Lowor Division Engineering (All required for B.S.) 

Egr 101 Introduction to Engineering 1 

Egr 102 Graphical Analysis _ 2 

Egr 201 Mechanics 3 

Egr 202 Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Egr 205 Digital Computation 3 

12 

Upper Division Engineering (All required for B.S.) 

Egr 300 Electric Circuits 3 

Egr 300L Electric Circuits Laboratory 1 

Egr 302 Dynamics 3 

Egr 303 Electronics 3 

Egr 303 L Electronics Laboratory 2 

Egr 304 Thermodynamics 3 

Egr 305 Transport Processes 3 

Egr 306A Unified Laboratory 1 

Egr 306B Unified Laboratory 2 

Egr 308 Engineering Analysis 3 

Egr 370 Seminar in Engineering 1 

Egr 417 Engineering Economy 2 


Technical Electives 


27 

30 


Total 132 


* Students with inadequate preparation for Mathematics 150A will take Engineering 100, 
Introduction to Analysis. 

228 


Engineering 


DETAILED OUTLINE OF TYPICAL * EIGHT-SEMESTER PROGRAM 
FOR B.S. IN ENGINEERING 
(132 Units) 

Semester 1 Freshman Units 

General Education Elective 4 

Math 150A Calculus 4 

Chem 101A General Chemistry 5 

Egr 101 Introduction to Engineering 1 

Egr 102 Graphical Analysis 2 

16 

Semester 2 Freshman 

Math 150B Calculus 4 

Physics 225A Fundamental Physics (Mechanics) .. 3 

Physics 226A Fundamental Physics Laboratory . .. 1 

Chem 105 Chemistry (for engineers) 3 

Egr 205 Digital Computation 3 

General Education Elective 3 

17 

Semester 3 Sophomore 

General Education Electives ^ 

Math 250 Intermediate Calculus 4 

Physics 225B Fundamental Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 3 

Physics 226B Fundamental Physics Laboratory 1 

Egr 201 Mechanics 3 

17 

Semester 4 Sophomore 

General Education Electives 6 

Math 281 Linear Algebra with Differential Equations 3 

Egr 202 Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Physics 225C Fundamental Physics (Modem Physics) 3 

Physics 226C Fundamental Physics Laboratory 1 

16 

Semester 5 Junior 

Egr 300 Electric Circuits 3 

Egr 300L Electric Circuits Laboratory 1 

Egr 304 Thermodynamics ■ 

Egr 305 Transport Processes — 3 

Egr 3 06 A Unified Laboratory 1 

Egr 302 Dynamics 3 

Egr 308 Engineering Analysis 3 

17 

Semester 6 Junior 

Egr 303 Electronics 

Egr 303L Electronics Laboratory 2 

Egr 306B Unified Laboratory 2 

Engineering Technical Electives 9 

16 


semester to meet his needs. 

229 


Engineering 


3 
2 

12 

17 

6 
9 
1 

16 

7btd L~ 132 

Note: A student may be required to take the engineering mathematics review course, 
701 A, B. This course is open to all who may feel the need for such a refresher course. No credit. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING 

Applicants, as well as continuing students, should read carefully the college re- 
quirements for master's degree programs, page 77. 

The procedural steps for admission to and the completion of the Master of 
Science in Engineering arc as follows: 

Admission Procedure 

1. Apply for admission to the college in unclassified graduate status and declare 
the objective to be a master of science in engineering. Proof of a degree from 
an accredited college or university must be supplied. This must be taken care 
of at the Office of Admissions before the dates established in the college calendar. 

2. Apply for admission to the School of Engineering master of science program. 
This must be taken care of at the office of the School of Engineering after admis- 
sion to the college but before registration. 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the engineering program requires a 2.5 undergraduate grade 
point average; however, students may be considered with grade deficiencies. 
Any dcficiences must be made up, and will require six or more units of adviser- 
approved courses with at least a 3.0 average in addition to those required for the 
degree. A committee of the engineering faculty will evaluate each student’s record 
for specific course dcficiences in the engineering field. Making suitable allowance 
for actual engineering experience, the committee will require each student, prior to 
admission to the program, to make up such dcficiences as the committee determines. 

Note: A student may be reouired to take the engineering mathematics review courses, 701 A, 
B. These courses are open to all who may feel the need for such refresher courses. They are to 
be taken in addition to those required for the degree. 

Admission to Classified Graduate Status 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Meeting the prerequisites of the previous paragraph. 

2. Before completing nine units at CSCF toward a MS. degree, a student shall 
fill out an application card for classified status and make an appointment with 
the adviser at the office of the School of Engineering. 

3. Preparing, in consultation with his adviser, an approved graduate study plan. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Having been granted classified status in the Master of Science in Engineering 
program. 

2. Having completed 12 units of coursework on his master’s degree study plan, 
including six units of 500-level courses with a GPA of not less than 3.0. 

3. Filing an advancement to candidacy card in the Graduate Office. 

230 


Semester 7 Senior 1 

General Education Electives 

Egr 417 Engineering Economy 

Engineering Technical Electives 


Semester 8 Senior 

General Education Electives — 

Engineering Technical Electives . 

Egr 370 Seminar in Engineering 


Engineering 


Graduation 

Final achievement of the Master of Science in Engineering requires: 

1. Having been admitted to candidacy status. 

2. Filing a request for check on completion of requirements in the Graduate 
Office prior to the appropriate deadline. 

3. Having completed 30 units of approved work with an overall GPA of not 
less than 3.0. 

4. Completing satisfactorily a final comprehensive examination. 

5. Receiving approval of the faculty of the School of Engineering and the Dean 
of Graduate Studies. 

The Program for the Master of Science in Engineering 

Qualification for the Master of Science in Engineering requires the following: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 30 units of approved upper division or graduate- 
level work including: 

(a) a minimum of six units of approved upper division or graduate mathe- 
matics (certain engineering courses may fulfill this requirement). 

(b) a minimum of 15 units of approved 500 level courses. 

2. An overall GPA of 3.0. 

3. Satisfactory completion of a final comprehensive examination. 

A candidate for the Master of Science in Engineering may pursue one of five 
options currently offered by the School of Engineering: 

Electrical engineering 

Mechanical and aerospace engineering 

Structural engineering and engineering mechanics 

Systems engineering 

Engineering science 

A student is normally required to select a minimum of 15 units within these 
options. These 15 units may be 400-level and 500-level courses. The 500-level 
courses are listed below: 

Electrical Engineering Units 

Egr 501 A t B Microwaves 3,3 

Egr 503 Information Theory and Coding 3 

Egr 504 Linear Network Synthesis 3 

Egr 505 Nonlinear Control Systems 3 

Egr 506 Advanced Digital Computer Systems — 3 

Egr 507 Statistical Communication Theory 3 

Egr 513 Optimal Control Systems 3 

Egr 514A, B Software Systems Design — 3,3 

Egr 515A,B Quantum Electronics 3,3 

Egr 521 A, B Antenna Theory - 3,3 

Egr 523 Solid State Devices and Integrated Circuits 3 

Egr 553A, B Plasma Dynamics — 3,3 

Egr 554 Hybrid Computation 3 

Egr 555 Electromagnetic Field Theory 3 

Egr 556 Radar Systems 3 

Egr 557 Sampled-Data Systems — ; 3 

Egr 559 Active Network Synthesis 3 

Egr 570 Seminar in Electrical Engineering 1-3 

Egr 5 96 A, B, C, D Special Topics in Engineering 1-3 

231 


Engineering 


Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Units 

Egr 508 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics. 3 

Egr 511 Advanced Dynamics : 3 

Egr 512 Gyrodynamics 3 

Egr 516 Advanced Principles of Heat Transfer 3 

Egr 518 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 

Egr 520 Incompressible Boundary Layer Theory 3 

Egr 522 Theory of Hydrodynamic Lubrication 3 

Egr 524 Advanced Thermodynamics 3 

Egr 525 Compressible Boundary Layer Theory 3 

Egr 530 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 

Egr 569 Orbital Mechanics 3 

Egr 573 Aerospace Guidance Systems 3 

Egr 575 Kinetic Theory and Statistical Thermodynamics 3 

Egr 596A, B, C, D Special Topics in Engineering 1-3 


Structural Engineering and Engineering Mechanics 

Egr 509 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 

Egr 510 Numerical and Approx Meth. in Structural Mech. 3 

Egr 511 Advanced Dynamics 3 

Egr 517 Theory of Inelasticity 3 

Egr 518 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 

Egr 519 Advanced Structural Mechanics 3 

Egr 530 Advanced Strength of Materials 3 

Egr 545 Advanced Structural Design 3 

Egr 547 Advanced Dynamics of Structures _ 3 

Egr 549 Theory of Elastic Stability 3 

Egr 577 Reliability Analysis of Structures 3 

Egr 596A, B, C, D Special Topics in Engineering 1-3 


Systems Engineering 

Egr 581 Linear Systems Engineering 


Estimation Theory in Systems Engineering 

Optimization Techniques in Systems Engineering 

Operational Analysis Techniques in Systems Engineering . 
Advanced Engineering Analysis 


Egr 582 
Egr 585 
Egr 587 
Egr 592 

Egr 596A, B, C, D Special Topics in Engineering 


(Up to nine units in systems engineering may be selected from approved subjects 
offered in the School of Business Administration and Economics.) 


Engineering Science 

The program in engineering science is to be selected by the student and his 
adviser and submitted for approval to a committee of the School of Engineering 
(supplemented, if appropriate, by members of the science and mathematics fac- 
ulty). The courses selected are to meet a special and specific engineering science 
objective of the student, such as engineering physics. 

In addition to those courses offered in the specific options, the following three 


courses apply to any option, though they are not necessarily required. 

Units 

Egr 597 Project 1-6 

Egr 598 Thesis 1-6 

Egr 599 Independent Graduate Research 1-3 

For further information, consult the School of Engineering. 


See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin . 


232 


Engineering 


ENGINEERING COURSES 

100 Introduction to Analysis (4) 

Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra, one year of high school geome- 
try. Algebraic, exponential and trigonometric functions and relations. Coordinate 
geometry and vectors. Real and complex numbers. Designed to prepare students 
better for a first course in calculus. Docs not carry major or related area credit 
for engineering, mathematics, quantitative methods or science majors. 

101 Introduction to Engineering (1) 

An introduction designed to familiarize the student with the nature, responsibili- 
ties and opportunities of the profession. 

102 Graphical Analysis (2) 

Graphics as fundamental means of communication in engineering analysis and 
design; development of spatial visualization; freehand sketching; descriptive geome- 
try and modern engineering drawing practice. Methods of engineering design and 
design project. Graphical computation; nomography, representation and analysis 
of empirical data. (6 hours lecture-laboratory) 

1 1 0A,B The Man-Made World (3,3) 

Prerequisite: must be non-science, non-mathematics, non-engineering major; co- 
requisite: Egr 111A,B (laboratory). The methodology of the technological age. 
The use of models of the real world to arrive at rational decision making. Control, 
amplification, and feedback. 

Ill A,B The Man-Made World (1,1) 

Corequisite: Egr 110A,B. Laboratory to accompany Egr 110A,B. Simulation of 
real situations with models. 

201 Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150B and Physics 225 A. An introductory development of 
the fundamentals of statics with emphasis on application to strength of materials. 

202 Properties of Engineering Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Chem 101 and Egr 201. Scientific and engineering principles im- 
portant in the selection and design of engineering materials, variables influencing 
material properties, concepts of stress and strain, Hooke’s law'. Equilibrium of 
rigid bodies, introduction to metallurgy; material models; dislocations and other 
defects in solids, strengthening mechanisms, modes of failure. 

205 Digital Computation (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 101; corcquisitc: Math 150A. Introduction to computers and 
their application in engineering. Elementary FORTRAN programming language, 
numerical methods for the solution of algebraic and transcendental equations and 
systems of linear algebraic equations; numerical integration. 

300 Electric Circuits (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 225B and Math 250; corequisite: Egr 300L. Ohm and 
Kirchhoff law's; mesh-current and nodal analyses methods; basic network theorems; 
transients in RL, RC and RLC circuits, phasors, sinusoidal analysis, current, voltage 
and pow r er relationships in single phase circuits; complex frequency and S-plane 
plots; frequency response and resonance; and magnetically coupled circuits. 


233 


Engineering 


300L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 300. Electrical measurement techniques; experimental investi- 
gation of the behavior of simple resistive circuits; transient response RLC circuits; 
frequency response and resonance; and magnetically coupled circuits. (3 hours 
laboratory) 

301 Strength of Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and Egr 202. States of stress and strain. Analysis and de- 
sign of structural elements (pressure vessels, beams, torsion bars, springs), fracture 
criteria, statically indeterminate problems, energy methods, buckling of columns. 

303 Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and Egr 201. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and 
rigid bodies, Newton’s laws, work and energy, impulse and momentum. Solution 
of problems by using vector approach is emphasized. 

303 Electronics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 300 and 300L; corequisite: 303L. Characteristics and applica- 
tions of the ideal diode, semiconductor materials and the p-n junction, field-effect 
transistors, bipolar-junction transistors, vacuum tubes; applications of electronic 
devices (rectifiers, clippers, clampers, amplifiers). 

303L Electronics Laboratory (2) 

Corequisite: Egr 303. Experimental study of semiconductor diodes and transistors; 
electronic circuits, including rectifiers, limiters, clampers, amplifiers and other ap- 
plications. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

304 Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Chem 105 and Egr 201. The study of energy' and its transformation 
which encompasses heat and work and the conservation of energy, the concept of 
entropy and its relation to other system properties. The ideas are conveyed through 
the detailed study of ideal gases, heat engines and refrigeration (both ideal and 
actual). 

305 Transport Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and Egr 201. The study of one-dimensional steady heat 
conduction, radiation heat transfer, fluid statics, ideal and real fluid flows, free 
and forced heat convection. 

306A Unified Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Egr 202 or equivalent; corequisite: Egr 305. Observations and 
measurements in the laboratory’ as art introduction to the experimental method. 
Static and dynamic measurements are made on simple engineering sy r stems (beams, 
columns, pendulum, gy roscopes) using mechanical and electrical transducers. Re- 
port writing is emphasized. (3 hours laboratory) 

3063 Unified Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 305 and 306A. A continuation of Egr 306A. More complex en- 
gineering systems are considered with fluid flow and thermal measurements em- 
phasized in the laboratory'. Lecture deals with instrumentation theories and the 
design of engineering experiments. The students’ ability' to express theoretical con- 
cepts and experimental efforts via the technical report is further enhanced. (1 hour 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory') 

308 Engineering Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 281 or consent of instructor. Fourier series, Fourier transforms, 
Laplace transforms, complex analysis (residues and contour integration), vector 
analysis; engineering applications. 


234 


Engineering 


309 Networks and Transmission Lines (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 300 and 300L. Continuation of Egr 300. Two-port network 
theory, network topology, polyphase circuits, transmission line theory. 

310 Electronic Circuits (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 303, 303L and 308. Continuation of 303, multistage amplifiers 
and feedback, frequency characteristics of amplifiers, tuned amplifiers, frequency 
characteristics and stability of feedback amplifiers, oscillators and power amplifiers. 

31 04. Electronics and Circuits Laboratory (2) (Formerly 315) 

Corequisite: Egr. 310. Experimental study of discrete elements and integrated 
circuits such as emitter and source followers, differential amplifiers, tuned amplifiers, 
power amplifiers, feedback amplifiers and oscillators. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

311 Field Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 225B and Math 281. Fundamental concepts and experi- 
mental background underlying the formulation of electric, magnetic and electro- 
magnetic field theory. Electric and magnetic fields produced by charge and cur- 
rent distributions. Effect of magnetic, dielectric and conducting materials. Forces 
produced on charges, currents and material media. Electromagnetic and magneto- 
electric induction. Capacitance, inductance and resistance. 

312 Linear System Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 300, 302 and 308. Engineering analogies (models); system 
concepts (block diagrams; signal graphs; transient and frequency response; Bode 
plots; stability; transfer functions; feedback; and Nyquist polar diagrams); non- 
dimensionalization of functions and analysis of distributed parameter systems — with 
engineering applications. 

316 Applied Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Chem 105, Egr 205 and 304. Continuation of Egr 304, additional 
coverage of power and refrigeration cycles. Maxwell’s relations, mixtures of real 
and ideal fluids, chemical reactions (emphasis on combustion), phase and chemical 
equilibrium. 

320 Metallurgy (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 202. Structure and properties of metals and alloys, influences 
of mechanical and thermal treatments, plastic deformation, work hardening and 
recrystallization, grain growth, alloy diagrams, solution hardening, diffusion harden- 
ing, precipitation hardening, the iron-carbon system, composite materials, brittle, 
creep and fatigue failures. 

324 Soil Mechanics and Foundations (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 201 and 301. Soil properties and soil action as related to 
problems encountered in engineering structures; compression shear strength, stabil- 
ity and lateral earth pressures. 

324L Soil Mechanics and Foundations Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 324. Laboratory exercises supporting Egr 324. (3 hours lab- 
oratory) 

326 Structural Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 301. Elements of the design of steel, timber members. Con- 
nection details. Design of complete structures for both vertical and lateral loads. 

331 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 202. Plastic deformation mechanisms, treatment of plastic de- 
formation, fatigue, creep and fracture. Case studies. 


235 


Engineering 

333 Introduction to Aerodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 305. Kinematics of fluid flow, classification of flow fields, Euler 
and Navier-Stokes equations, the Bernoulli equation, flow measurement, wind tun- 
nel testing laminar and turbulent flow through ducts of varying cross-section- 
aerodynamic forces, effect of Reynolds number and Mach number. 

335 Mechanical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 202 and 302; corequisite: Egr 335L. Kinematics and dynamics 
of mechanisms, analysis of linkages, gears, cams, etc. using analytical and graphical 
techniques, balancing. 

335L Mechanical Analysis Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 335. Analytical and graphical techniques will be used in solving 
engineering type problems in mechanical design. (3 hours laboratory) 

360 Electrical Engineering Design Projects Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309 and 310L, within 20 units of graduation. The application of 
fundamental engineering principles to typical design problems in the field of 
electrical engineering. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

361 Mechanical and Aerospace Design Projects Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: within 20 units of graduation. The application of fundamental engi- 
neering principles to typical design problems in the mechanical/aerospace engineer- 
ing field. (6 hours laboratory) 

370 Seminar in Engineering (1) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering. The engineering profession, profes- 
sional ethics, and related topics. 

371 Technical Seminar in Engineering (1) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering. Recent developments in engineering. 
Oral and written reports. 

375A Electrical Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309, 310 and 310L. Bridge measurements of circuit parameters 
at audio and radio frequencies; slottcd-line measurements; experimental studies 
of feedback, regulator and other electronic circuits; spectrum measurements; time- 
domain reflectomctry. (6 hours laboratory) 

3753 Electrical Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: Egr 375A. Laboratory study of calibration methods and instru- 
ments; microwave measurements. (6 hours laboratory) 

376A Mechanical Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 306B and 308. Experimental studies of dynamic systems, error 
analysis, simulation and solution of dynamic problems on the analog computer. 
(6 hours laboratory) 

376B Mechanical Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 306B and 316. A laboratory investigation of mass transfer, heat 
transfer, and thermodynamic phenomena and their interaction with mechanical 
systems. (6 hours laboratory) 

377 Structural Engineering Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering. Experimental studies of structural 
mechanics; plastic deformation of steel beams and frames, stress and deformation 
studies of concrete structures. Dynamic response of structures. (6 hours laboratory') 


236 


Engineering 


401 Dynamics of Machines (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 335. The study of masses, motions and forces in machines. 
Static forces, inertia forces, balancing of machines and the principles of the gyro- 
scope, mechanical vibrations, critical speeds are some of the topics covered. 

402 Digital Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 205 or equivalent. Introduction to digital computers, Boolean 
algebra, number representations. Analysis, simplification and synthesis of combina- 
tional and sequential networks. 

402L Digital Techniques Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 402. Experimental study of digital logic and switching circuits. 
(3 hours laboratory) 

403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205 and 308 or equivalent. The use of numerical methods and 
digital computers in the solution of algebraic, transcendental, simultaneous, ordi- 
nary and partial differential equations. 

405 Digital Computer Design and Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 303 and 402. Digital computer organization; arithmetic opera- 
tions: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division; control unit: instruction format, 
types, acquisition, execution; memory unit: organization, types, hierarchies; input- 
output unit: methods, data organization. 

406 Dynamic Response (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 312 and Math 281. Natural and forced motions of linear lumped 
and distributed parameter systems; matrix and iterative methods in vibration 
analysis. 

406L Dynamic Response Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Egr 376A; corequisite: Egr 406. Steady and transient response of 
dynamic and control systems, linear and nonlinear systems, analog and digital 
simulation and computation. (3 hours laboratory) 

407 Transfer and Rate Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205, 305 and 308. Analysis of two- and three-dimensional 
steady and unsteady heat conduction, radiation heat transfer, forced and free con- 
vection for interior and exterior surfaces, heat transfer with a change in phase and 
heat transfer in high-speed flow. 

408 Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 326. Theory of reinforced concrete. Design of rein- 
forced concrete slabs, beams, columns, buildings and bridges. Introduction to pre- 
stressed concrete, ultimate strength theory. 

409 Intermediate Structural Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 326 and 408. Analysis of structural systems, such as build- 
ings, bridges. Various considerations leading to the final selection of a structural 
design scheme. Design philosophy, code interpretation. Design projects. 

410 Space Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 302. Gravitational field, impulsive transfer and rendezvous 
between two-body orbits; dynamics of two or more interconnected rigid bodies; 
spin stability, orientation by gravity-gradient and solar-radiation pressure, damping 
of spacecraft’s rotational motion. 


237 


Engineering 

411 Dynamics of Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 308, or equivalent. Free and forced vibrations of 
discrete systems, response of structures to impulse loads and earthquakes. Matrix 
formulation and normal coordinates analysis. Vibration of beams. 

412 Theory of Elasticity (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 308. The differential equations which govern the 
behavior of an elastic solid, and their applications to a variety of problems in two 
and three dimensions using various coordinate systems. 

413 Electromechanical Energy Conversion (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309 and 312. Basic principles of electromechanical energy con- 
version machinery and transducers. Magnetic circuits and transformers. Perform- 
ance and control of synchronous, induction and direct-current machines. 

413L Electromechanical Energy Conversion Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 413. Experimental study of electromechanical machinery and 
transducers. (3 hours laboratory) 

414 Matrix Analysis of Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205, 301 and 308 or equivalent. Introduction to matrix algebra; 
use of matrix formulation in the analysis of structures; flexibility and stiffness 
methods; use of the matrix method on a digital computer. 

415 Gas Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 304 and 305. Thermodynamics of compressible fluid flow, 
normal and oblique shocks, flow through converging-diverging passages, flow in 
ducts with heating or cooling, interaction of shocks and expansion waves. 

416 Feedback Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 312. Basic se nomechanism characteristics; classification of 
feedback systems; static error coefficients; application of root-locus and frequency 
response methods to feedback control systems; introduction to state-space system 
description; forward path and feedback compensation methods. 

416LA Control Systems Laboratory (2) 

Corequisite: Egr 416. Experimental study of simulated and actual control system 
components; determination of transfer characteristics; compensation methods. (1 
hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

416LB Control Systems Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: Egr 416 or consent of instructor. Experimental study of mechanical, 
hydraulic and pneumatic control system components; open loop and closed loop 
control systems responses. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

417 Engineering Economy (2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering. Development, evaluation and pres- 
entation of alternatives for engineering systems and projects using principles of 
engineering economy and cost benefit analysis. Examination of the relationships 
between the engineer and other members of the enterprise environment. Exami- 
nation of the engineers ethics, value systems and nonquantifiable inputs from the 
enterprise environment. 

418 Foundation Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301, 326 and 408. Design loads for foundation structures. 
Design of footings, retaining walls, piled foundations, bulkheads, other waterfront 
structures. 


238 


Engineering 


419 Electromagnetic Field Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 311. Continuation of Egr 311 to provide a greater depth and 
extension of coverage, energy in fields. Maxwell’s equations, boundary value prob- 
lems, propagation, guided waves. 

420 Limit Analysis of Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 427. General theory of elastic-plastic state of materials; 
concept of yield hinges and yield lines; analysis of continuous beams, frames, plates. 

421 Mechanical Design (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 335; corequisite: Egr 421L. The application of the 
principles learned in mechanics of rigid and deformable bodies to the proportioning 
of machine elements to engineering problems. 

421L Mechanical Design Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 421. Analysis, formulation and solution of engineering type 
problems encountered in mechanical design. (3 hours laboratory) 

422 Introduction to Analog Computation (2) 

Prerequisites: Egr 302, 303 and 308. Introduction to electronic analog computers, 
programming, solution of engineering problems using analog computers. (1 hour 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

423 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 308, or consent of instructor. Engineering problems involving 
discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution and density 
functions, introduction to stochastic processes, correlation functions and power 
spectral densities. 

424 Computer Applications (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205, 312 and 422. Advanced analog computer methods, opti- 
mization techniques, digital differential analyzers, engineering system simulation 
languages. 

425A,B Environmental Engineering (3/3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering or equivalent. Fundamentals of en- 
vironmental engineering. Planning, analysis and design of systems for water and air 
pollution control; domestic and industrial waste treatment and disposal. 

426 Ocean and Coastal Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering or equivalent. Characteristics of ocean 
basis, marine soils. Fundamentals of ocean waves, currents, tides, tsunamis and 
storm surges. Effect of waves on structures, floating platforms, offshore towers. 
Engineering problems of beach erosion, harbor design and coastal problems. 

427 Structural Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 301. The analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures, 
such as continuous beams, frames, grids, arches, trusses, curved beams, using slope 
and deflection method, moment distribution method, elastic energy approach. Tem- 
perature effect, foundation settlement, secondary stresses. Nonprismatic members. 

428 Engineering Hydraulics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 305. Hydraulic forces, theory and analysis of open channel 
flow and pipe flow. Critical flow, uniform and non-uniform flow. Design of chan- 
nels, spillways, gravity pipelines. Hydraulic analogies. 


239 


Engineering 


429 Transportation and Traffic Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering or equivalent. Introduction to trans- 
portation systems. Engineering aspects of air, highways, rails, waterways and 
other modes of transportation. Planning, design and regulation of highway traffic. 
Elements of highway and freeway layout. Planning and design of rapid transit 
systems. Transportation facilities. Application of computers. 

430 Design of Steel Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 301. Design of steel structures: design of built-up girders, 
moment connections, light gage metal members. Torsion and unsymmetrical bend- 
ing of beams, buckling of beams and columns. Design for wind and earthquake 
forces. The use of the latest A1SC design code. 

431 Experimental Stress and Model Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 306A or equivalent. Lectures and laboratory in the 
principal experimental methods of stress and model analysis. Principles of similitude, 
mechanical and electrical strain gaging, analogy methods, photoelasticity, photo- 
stress and Moire methods. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

432 Aerospace Vehicle Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205 and 301. Stress analysis of vehicle components, combined 
torsion, bending and shear; stability and strength of thin sheet members, com- 
pressive strength of sheet stringer panels, interaction curves. 

433 Aerodynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 308 and 333. Theory of lift and drag. Thin airfoil theory, 
lifting lines and lifting surfaces, supersonic airfoils, similarity laws, slender-body 
theory. 

434 Direct Energy Conversion (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 300, 304 and 305. The direct conversion of heat to electrical 
energy, thermoelectric, thermionic and magnetohydrodynamic devices, solar and 
fuel cells. 

437 Propulsion (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 305 and 316. Theoretical analysis of flight vehicle propulsion 
systems. Includes review of pertinent thermodynamic, fluid mechanic, and dynamic 
fundamentals; air breathing engines (ramjet, turbojet, turboprop); chemical rockets. 

440 Flight Vehicle Performance (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 305 and 333. Drag estimation of components of aircraft, air- 
craft performance, flight testing and performance reduction, introduction to the 
performance analysis of hovercraft and helicopters. 

441 Stability and Control of Flight Vehicles (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 308 and 333. The equations of motion of a rigid flight vehicle, 
flight path and orientation equations, small disturbance theory, static and dynamic 
stability, transient response and frequency response. 

443 Electronic Communication Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 310. Principles of amplitude, angular and pulse modulation, 
study of representative communication systems, consideration of the effects of 
noise on system performance. 

443L Electronic Communication Systems Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Egr 310L; corequisite: Egr 443. Experimental study of detection, 
modulation and signal generation; Y r HF and UHF component and system studies. 
(3 hours laboratory) 

240 


Engineering 


445 Pulse and Digital Circuits (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 310. Analysis and design of active and passive circuits for the 
generation and processing of pulse, digital and switching waveforms. 

445L Pulse and Digital Circuits Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: Egr 445 (may be taken concurrently). Laboratory study of logic 
circuits, switching circuits, gates, timing circuits and special waveform generating 
circuits. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

455A / B Solid-State Electronics (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 303 and 311. Quantum mechanical principle, atomic structure, 
quantum statistics, crystal structure, energy level in solids, band theory, transport 
phenomena, conductivity and super conductivity, theory of intrinsic and extrinsic 
semiconductors, generation and recombination processes. Dielectric theory and 
materials, magnetization density, diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, 
antiferromagnetism. Ferrimagnetism theory and materials. Para and ferromagnetic 
resonance. Illustrative applications to devices. 

458 Programming Languages (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205 and 403. Basic method of non-numeric programming: 
machine languages, arrays, lists, stacks, trees, searching, sorting, recursion, as- 
semblers, supervisors, loaders, and macros. Structures of program oriented language: 
Fortran, Algol and PL/1. 

460 Failure of Engineering Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 202. The study of initiation and propagation of cracks, stress 
concentration, dislocation, fatigue, creep, stress corrosion, cracking, hydrogen 
embrittlement and fracture testing. 

461 Theory of Dislocations (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 202 and 308 or senior standing in physics or chemistry. Nature 
of dislocations and their influence in plastic deformation and fracture of materials, 
straight dislocations, curved dislocations, interaction of dislocations. 

462L Engineering Metallurgy Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Egr 320. Study of microstructure of materials, cold work and heat 
treatment, use of microscope and sample preparation, fatigue testing and failure 
analysis. (3 hours laboratory) 

473 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in engineering. A review of atomic 
physics and nuclear fission followed by elementary reactor theory and reactor 
design considerations. 

475 Engineering Acoustics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 308. Mathematical analysis of the transmission and absorption 
of acoustic waves; sound generation and detection devices; applications in loud- 
speaker design; architectural and underwater acoustics. 

491 Analytical Methods in Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 308 or consent of instructor. Differential equations with con- 
stant and variable coefficients; orthogonal functions; conformal mapping; potential 
theory; tensor analysis; engineering applications. 

497 Senior Projects (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser and instructor. Directed independent design 
project. 


241 


Engineering 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval of study plan by adviser. Study of specialized topics in 
engineering selected in consultation with the instructor and carried out under his 
supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

501 A,B Microwaves (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309, 403 and 419. Review of concepts underlying Maxwell’s 
equations, propagation through passive, active, linear, nonlinear, isotropic, aniso- 
tropic, homogeneous and inhomogeneous media with and without wave guiding 
structures. Orthogonal modes in waveguide and cavity resonators, microwave cir- 
cuit theory, micowave devices. Generation and transmission of microwave energy. 

503 Information Theory and Coding (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 423. Information measures, probabilistic studies of the trans- 
mission and encoding of information, Shannon’s fundamental theorems, coding 
for noisy channels. 

504 Linear Network Synthesis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309 and 312. Generalized analysis methods of passive net- 
works, modem synthesis procedures for realizing driving-point and transfer-func- 
tions of approximation methods in filter design. 

505 Nonlinear Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 416. Analysis of nonlinear control systems using linearization 
and perturbation techniques; describing function and phase plane techniques; 
Lyapunov’s stability criterion. 

506 Advanced Digital Computer Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 405. High speed arithmetic design, fault tolerance and fault 
defection, time-sharing, real-time and multi-processor computer systems. 

507 Statistical Communication Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 423 and 443. Transmission of random signals through linear sys- 
tems, noise considerations, detection theory, optimum receivers. 

508 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 308 and 333. An investigation of potential flow theory in- 
cluding the study of complex potentials, the Joukowski transformation, sources 
and sinks, and the theorem of Schwarz and Christoffel. 

509 Theory of Plates and Shells (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 491 or equivalent. Theory of plates bent by transverse 
loads; applications to circular, rectangular, other shapes. General theory of thin 
shells; shells of revolution; shells of translation. 

510 Numerical and Approximate Methods in Structural Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 205, 308 and 414 or equivalent. Use of finite-difference and 
finite-element methods for solution of problems in structural engineering. Coding 
on a digital computer and numerical solutions using direct and iterative techniques. 

511 Advanced Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 312. The dynamics of particles and rigid bodies by the use of 
the formulations of the laws of mechanics due to Newton, Euler, Lagrange and 
Hamilton; applications. 

512 Gyrodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 312. Frames of reference, Eulerian angles, spinning disks and 
rotors, gravity effects, gyroscopes, control of forced and free vibrations. 


242 


Engineering 


51 3 Optimal Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 416 and 581. Formulation of optimal control problems; the 
calculus of variations; the maximum principle; studies of minimum-time and 
minimum-energy problems; dynamic programming. 

514A,B Software Systems Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 402 and 458 or equivalent. A brief review of programming 
languages (syntax and semantics); organization of system components for assembly, 
compilation and interpretation; organization and design of operating systems for 
batch processing, multiprocessing, and time sharing; memory allocation in a 
dynamic environment. 

515A,B Quantum Electronics (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 403 and 419. Electroluminescence, interaction of radiation and 
matter, gas lasers, solid state laser, injection lasers, holography, electro-optic effects, 
non-linear optics, laser systems, noise and applications. 

316 Advanced Principles of Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 407. A study of advanced principles in convective and radiation 
heat transfer. Exact and approximate solutions of thermal boundary layer problems. 
A study of energy transfer in absorbing and emitting media. 

517 Theory of Inelasticity (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 412 and 491 or equivalent. General equations of inelastic con- 
tinua; theory of plasticity; three dimensional yield conditions and flow laws; theory 
of linear viscoelasticity; applications. 

51S Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 508. A study of the foundations of stability theory and the 
general properties of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation, investigation of turbulent 
boundary layers, turbulent flow through pipes and free turbulent flows (jet and 
wakes). 

519 Advanced Structural Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301, 427 and 491 or equivalent. Use of potential energy prin- 
ciple in structural analysis; direct and indirect method of calculus of variations; 
nonlinear problems of large deformation; beam on elastic foundations; special topics 
in structural mechanics. 

320 Incompressible Boundary Layer Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 333 and 407. A study of the fundamental equation of motion 
and continuity applied to viscous fluids (Navier-Stokes equations). The develop- 
ment of the boundary layer equations and the study of viscous drag, investigation 
of boundary layer control theory to reduce viscous drag. 

S21A,B Antenna Theory (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 309, 403 and 419. Polarization; radiation patterns; impedance 
characteristics; plane, cylindrical and spherical waves, electric and magnetic dipoles; 
wire antennas, traveling wave antennas; broad band antennas; analysis and synthesis 
of arrays; parabolas; lenses; radomes; feed systems; scattering; multiple beam 
antennas, synthetic antennas; phased arrays; diffraction; solution by superposition, 
orthogonal expansion, integral equation and variational techniques; antenna meas- 
urements. 

522 Theory of Hydrodynamic Lubrication (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 333 and 407. The analysis and design of compressible and in- 
compressible journal and thrust bearings. 


243 


Engineering 


523 Solid State Devices and Integrated Circuits (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 455 A. Diodes, bipolar transistors, junction and insulated-gate 
field effect transistors. Integrated circuit design principles. Bipolar and MOS inte- 
grated circuits, monolithic and hybrid integrated circuits. 

524 Advanced Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 316. Equilibrium and stability criteria, chemical thermody- 
namics, multiple reaction systems, ionization, equilibrium composition. 

525 Compressible Boundary Layer Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 520. The study of compressible viscous flow analysis. The two- 
dimensional and axi-symmetric compressible steady boundary layer equations, 
momentum integral and transformation techniques of solution. 

530 Advanced Strength of Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301 and 308. Energy methods, principle of virtual work, appli- 
cations to structures, cylinders, shrink fits, curved beams, elastic and inelastic 
buckling of columns. 

545 Advanced Structural Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 408 and 491 or equivalent. Analysis and design of thin shell 
structures; folded plates structures; suspended cable structures. 

547 Advanced Dynamics of Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 411 and 491 or equivalent. Vibration of beams, plates and 
shells. Dynamic response of continuous systems in general. Introduction to random 
vibrations. Topics in nonlinear vibrations. 

549 Theory of Elastic Stability (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 301, 530 and 491 or equivalent. Critical loads of columns, beam 
columns, plates, shells; lateral stability of beams, torsional buckling of open sections, 
stability of the frames; dynamic stability of elastic systems. 

553A,B Plasma Dynamics (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 403 and 419. Orbit theory, collision theory, transport prop- 
erties, equilibrium, oscillations, fluctuations, thermionic energy conversion, plasma 
containment, instabilities, fusion power, plasma propulsion, hypersonics, plasma 
sheaths and wakes, scattering from plasmas, wave propagation through plasmas, 
energy conversion. 

554 Hybrid Computation (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 403 and 424. Hybrid analog-digital computer systems, A/D 
and D/A converters and other linkage equipment, application of hybrid com- 
puters to solving partial differential equations and modeling, error analysis. 

555 Electromagnetic Field Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 419. Relativistic electrodynamics, retarded potentials, radiation 
from arbitrarily moving charges, Cerenkov radiation, cyclotron radiation, propa- 
gation in dispersive media, space charge dynamics, advanced boundary value 
problems. 

556 Radar Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 423 and 443. The theory of radar measurements, modulation 
methods, detection of signals in noise, extraction of information from radar signals, 
radar systems engineering. 


244 


Engineering 


557 Sampled-Data Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 416. Analysis and design of sampled-data and digital control 
systems, using Z-transforms and state-variable methods; consideration of stability. 

559 Active Network Synthesis (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 504. Active devices as network elements, analysis of active net- 
works with controlled sources, scattering parameters, sensitivity, realizability con- 
ditions. 

569 Orbital Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 410. Potential field, the n body problem; determination of orbits, 
perturbation and numerical methods; orbits of near earth satellite and inter- 
planetary probes. 

570 Seminar in Electrical Engineering (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and 12 units of graduate coursework. Special 
topics and current developments of primary interest in the field of electrical 
engineering. This course, with different content, may be retaken for additional 
credit. 

573 Aerospace Guidance Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 410 and 423. Guidance equations for powered and impulsive 
orbit injection and mid-course correction; analysis of navigation fix; estimation 
from measurements and error analysis; recursive navigation theory. 

575 Kinetic Theory and Statistical Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 316. Statistical study of ideal gases, kinetic theory, statistical 
mechanics, electron gas, thermionic emission, photon and phonon gases. 

577 Reliability Analysis of Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 423 and 427. Application of statistics and theory of probabil- 
ity to the problems of safety of structures. 

531 Linear Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 312 and graduate standing. Classification of systems, principles 
of time domain analysis, matrices, linear spaces, analog simulation, state space, 
matrix representation of state equations, systems with random signals, stability of 
systems. 

582 Estimation Theory in Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 423 and 581. Linear estimation theory, Gauss-Markoff, least 
squares, Kalman, maximum likelihood; Kalman estimation for discrete dynamic sys- 
tems, smoothing, filtering, and prediction, Kalman estimation for continuous dy- 
namic systems. 

585 Optimization Techniques in Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: Egr 403. Optimization of functions of several variables, Lagrange 
multipliers, gradient techniques, linear programming, and the simplex method, non- 
linear and dynamic programming. 

587 Operational Analysis Techniques in Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 423 and 585. Operational research models; applications of 
probability theory to reliability', quality control, waiting line theory, Markov 
chains; Monte Carlo methods. 

592 Advanced Engineering Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Egr 403 and 491 or equivalent. Partial differential equations in engi- 
neering; calculus of variations; numerical techniques; integral equations; engi- 
neering applications. 


245 


Engineering 


596A,B/C,D Special Topics in Engineering (1—3) 

Prerequisite: corresponding general courses in same subject area. Selected topics 
in specialized areas of engineering covering recent developments. 

597 Graduate Projects (1-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. 

598 Thesis (1-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: classified graduate status. Open to graduate students only by consent 
of Engineering School Graduate Committee. May be repeated for credit only upon 
approval of this committee. 

701 A,B Review of Applied Mathematics for Engineers (3,3) 

Review of elementary calculus, ordinary differential equations, Laplace trans- 
forms, vector analysis, Fourier series, matrices, and partial differential equations. 



246 





ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAMS 


DEPARTMENT OF AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

FACULTY 

Michael A. Finnie 

Department Chairman 

Wacira Gethaiga, Sonia Tilden 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES 

This degree program is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a 
variety of needs in contemporary higher education. These are: extending op- 
portunities for college education to students who have long been under-repre- 
sented due to cultural differences between their experiences and the cultural em- 
phasis of higher education; providing for personal consultation between faculty 
and students of diverse cultural backgrounds; revising curriculum and promoting 
research to give all students and faculty an understanding of the interaction of 
ethnic groups in past and contemporary civilizations; and conducting continuous 
research in innovative teaching methods and courses to create more effective means 
of teaching students in culturally pluralistic environment. 

Afro-American Studies Option 

The required minimum for the major is 36 units: Ethnic Studies 107, and 102 * 
or 103 • and nine additional units from lower division offerings and a minimum of 
24 units in upper division courses. 

The purposes of the Afro-American studies option are: to provide a specializa- 
tion in Afro-American studies within the framework of a more generalized and 
comprehensive, ethnic studies perspective; to provide greater flexibility and more 
electives within the ethnic studies program to meet the variety of needs and in- 
terests of the diverse group of students selecting this option; to acquaint students 
with the problems, successes and failures of America’s largest minority group; to 
help students understand the nature of contemporary ethnic and social turmoil 
and guide them into constructive modes of thought about current issues; to enable 
students to see the black experience in America in a world setting; and to enable 
students to lead more effective lives in a culturally pluralistic and rapidly changing 


society. 

Required: Units 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies 3 

•102 Communication Skills 3 

*103 Communication Skills 3 

Lower Division Electives: (9 units required) 9 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 


104 Introduction to Swahili (4) ) e 0 «•!• • i * j • • 

105 Introduction to Swahili (4) } ** Sv}ahlh m catal °* for descr >P aon 
230 The American Indian (3) 

240 Afro-American History (3) 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Mexican and Black Man (3) 

270 The Amer-Asian (3) 

* Students can be exempted from Ethnic Studies 102 and/or 103 by an examination and/or 
the consent of the department. 


248 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 


Upper Division Electives: (24 units required) 24 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

303 Ancient and Modem African Culture (3) 

309 The Black Family (3) 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

345 Europe, Africa and America in Modern Western Civilization 

346 The African Experience (3) 

401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

402 Africa and Self Determination (3) 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

460 Afro-American Music (3) 

496 Selected Topics (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

A survey of the basic concepts and problems involved in an examination of the 
perspective through which black and brown people have come to see themselves 
in terms of their own heroes, culture and contributions to societies in which they 
live and world society in general. 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing writing 
and communication skills stressing the use of idioms, proper pronunciation, intona- 
tion and correct English patterns of thought. 

103 Communication Skills (3) 

Prerequisite: Ethnic Studies 102 or consent of the department. A methodical 
presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing writing and communi- 
cation skills stressing the use of idioms, proper pronunciation, intonation, and 
correct English patterns of thought. 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Introduction to the aims and objectives of the Afro-American Studies program. 
It will define and explore the basic terms and references that give substance to 
Afro-American Studies. It will provide uniform purpose and direction for students 
who seek an education in Afro-American Studies. 

230 The American Indian (3) 

A study of the American Indian experience in the United States as seen from 
the Indian’s point of view in comparison with that of the white man. Special 
attention will be focussed on the problems of American Indians today. 

240 Afro-American History (3) 

A survey of the social, political, and economic history of black people in the 
United States from slavery to the present. 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

An examination of the process of socialization of the black and brown man in 
America and its imprints upon his psyche. 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Mexican and Black Man (3) 

An examination and study of the “identity crisis” or lack of it in young Mexican 
and black individuals in the United States. An in depth analysis of the changing 
points of view of the Mexican toward acculturation. 


249 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 


270 The Amer-Asian (3) 

A surv T ey of the Asian-American experience beginning from the early 19th cen- 
tury. Also analysis of the discriminatory legislation as reflected in immigration quo- 
tas; investigation of the fallacies surrounding the Asian-American experience and 
study of present day attitudes in the Asian community. 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

A survey of African cultural characteristics in the New World, as they relate to 
contemporary events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

303 Ancient and Modern African Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: limited to advanced sophomores and upper division students. This 
course will attempt a survey of the African cultures (specifically West African 
contrasted with East African) before the period of exploration and after coloniza- 
tion. A look at the present-day American black culture will try to estimate the 
carry-over of cultures. 

309 The Black Family (3) 

A study of the American social conditions that shaped the black family from the 
African cultural patterns that were destroyed during slavery to the family that 
exists today. Special attention will be given to the roles of poverty, racism and 
discrimination. 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

Theory and practice of movement of African and Haitian peoples. Also an 
investigation of how movement (dance) acts as quasi-language in perpetuating the 
life style of African cultures and cultures of African descent. 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

A study of African and Afro-American art, from prehistoric to contemporary 
times, including African influences in other art forms and a stylistic analysis of 
drawings, sculpture, and paintings. 

345 Europe, Africa and America in Modern Western Civilization (3) 

A historical examination of the interrelationships and interactions of European, 
African and American cultures. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the mutual 
effects of slavery, colonization and self-determination upon various cultures. 

346 The African Experience (3) 

A survey of major themes of African history from the origin of the black man 
and traditional African civilization through the African diaspora to the institu- 
tional realities of Africa today. 

401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting 
black Americans, with an emphasis on problem solving. Particular focus will be 
placed on the effects American social attitudes and institutions have had on the 
black community. Study and research will be made in these areas. 

402 Africa and Self-Determination (3) 

Prerequisite: Ethnic Studies 303. A look into the national characters of African 
nations as to how they shed labels like “tribes” and united to demand the inde- 
pendence they had lost. 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) (Formerly 231) 

A study of the literary endeavors of Afro-Americans and their cultural impact, 
especially in relationship to the social and psychological evolution of the Afro- 
American. 


250 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 


460 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of black music in America; the sociological conditions that help 
produce various forms of black music; influential *black musicians and com- 
posers, and analysis of the cultural impact of black music in America. 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: at least junior status or consent of the instructor. Special seminar in 
selected topics in Afro-American studies. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level or acceptance of the subject by the department chair- 
man and the professor (s) in charge of directing the study. An opportunity to do 
independent study under the guidance of the department, of a subject of special 
interest to the student. 


251 


Chicano Studies 


DEPARTMENT OF CHICANO STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Robert Serros 

Department Chairman 

Dagobcrto Fuentes, Ricardo Organista, Anthony Vega 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES 

This degree program is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a 
variety of needs in contemporary higher education. These are: extending op- 
portunities for college education to students who have long been under-repre- 
sented due to cultural differences between their experiences and the cultural em- 
phasis of higher education; providing for personal consultation between faculty 
and students of diverse cultural backgrounds; revising curriculum and promoting 
research to give all students and faculty an understanding of the interaction of 
ethnic groups in past and contemporary civilizations; and conducting continuous 
research in innovative teaching methods and courses to create more effective means 
of teaching students in culturally pluralistic environment. 

MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES OPTION 

The required minimum for the major is 36 units: Ethnic Studies 106, 102 • or 
103 * and 120* and 12 additional units from the lower division offerings and a 
minimum of 24 units in upper division courses. 

The purposes of the Mexican- American studies option are: to provide a special- 
ization in Mexican-American studies within the framework of a more generalized 
and comprehensive, ethnic studies perspective; to provide greater flexibility and 
more electives within the ethnic studies program to meet the variety of needs and 
interests of the diverse group of students selecting this major; to acquaint students 
with the problems, successes and failures of Orange County’s largest minority 
group; to help students understand the nature of contemporary ethnic and social 
turmoil and guide them into constructive modes of thought about current issues; 
to enable students to see the brown experience in America in a world setting; 
to enable students to lead more effective lives in a culturally pluralistic and rapidly 
changing society; and to prepare students to work more effectively in Spanish- 


speaking areas. 

Required: Units 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies 3 

*102 Communication Skills 3 

*103 Communication Skills 3 

*120 Bilingual Oral Expression 3 

Core Courses: (9 units required) 9 


213 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

214 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

232 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Mexican and Black Man (3) 

Lower Division Electives: 3 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

237 Mexican and Mexican-American Literature in Translation (3) 

* Students can be exempted from Ethnic Studies 102 and/or 103 and 120 by an examination 
and/or the consent of the department. 

252 


Chicano Studies 


Units 

Upper Division Electives : (a minimum of 25 upper division units from the 
following courses) 25 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

340 Sociology of the Chicano (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

430 Cancion de la Raza (3) 

433 Mexican Literature since 1940 ( 3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

441 Religion in the Mexican- American Society (3) 

450 The Mexican-American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

453 Mexico since 1910 (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


CHICANO STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

A survey of the basic concepts and problems involved in an examination of the 
perspective through which black and brown people have come to sec themselves 
in terms of their own heroes, culture and contributions to societies in which they 
live and world society in general. 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing writing 
and communication skills stressing the use of idioms, proper pronunciation, intona- 
tion and correct English patterns of thought. 

103 Communciation Skills (3) 

Prerequisite: Ethnic Studies 102 or consent of the department. A methodical 
presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing writing and communi- 
cation skills stressing the use of idioms, proper pronunciation, intonation, and 
correct English patterns of thought. 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

A study of the role of the Chicano in the United States. Special emphasis will 
be placed on the Chicano’s cultural values, social organization, urbanization pat- 
terns, and the problems in the area of education, politics, and legislation. 

120 Bilingual Oral Expression (3) 

Prerequisites: none, but it is recommended that Ethnic Studies 102 and/or 103 
be taken prior to taking this course. A course designed to train the bilingual 
Chicano in the process of oral expression in English and Barrio Spanish. Perti- 
nent topics will be selected in the areas of education, law enforcement, and con- 
temporary issues for bilingual oral expression. 


253 


Chicano Studies 


213 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

A methodical presentation of the Spanish language as it is spoken in the United 
States today. The first part of the course is designed to improve the basic com- 
munication skills of Spanish to students who are from Spanish speaking back- 
grounds; emphasis will be placed on vocabulary building, syntactical analysis and 
conversation. Designed for Mexican-American students but not restricted to them. 

214 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Ethnic Studies 213. A course designed to further enhance the com- 
munication skills of Spanish of the Spanish-speaking student. The second part will 
emphasize written expression. Designed for Mexican-American students but not 
restricted to them. 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Introduction to the basic characteristics of the Mexican and especially the 
Mexican-American society and culture and its ramifications in the United States 
today. The survey course covers the period of 1519 to the present day. A special 
emphasis is placed on the arts, literature and history of Mexico and the Mexican- 
American in the United States. 

232 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of the Mexican music ranging from the pre-Cortesian period to present 
musical renditions in Mexico and in the southwestern states of the United States. 
The history" and music are presented by lectures and recordings. 

237 Mexican and Mexican-American Literature in Translation (3) 

A survey course in Mexican and Mexican-American literature in English. Special 
emphasis will be given to presenting the point of view of the Mexican-American. 
Panel discussions will emphasize the exposure of our students to the ideas of the 
Mexican and Mexican-American literature as seen by the artistic eyes of the 
Mexican-American. 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

An examination of the process of socialization of the black and brown man in 
America and its imprints upon his psyche. 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Mexican and Black Man (3) 

An examination and study of the “identity" crisis” or lack of it in young Mexican 
and black individuals in the United States. An in depth analysis of the changing 
points of view of the Mexican toward acculturation. 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

A historical and cultural survey of the principal pre-Columbian cultures of 
Mexico and their significance for Mexican society. 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

The Chicano family development as an American social institution. Historical 
and cross-cultural perspectives. The socio and psycho dynamics of the Chicano 
family. 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: Ethnic Studies 101 and/or 220 or consent of instructor. Students 
are given classroom instruction covering the major characteristics of the barrio and 
are then supervised in their fieldwork in the local barrios. An analysis of the barrio 
or agency will be made after fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
fieldwork) 


254 


Chicano Studies 


307 Barrio Studios (3) 

Prerequisite: Ethnic Studies 306. Students are given classroom instruction cover- 
ing the major characteristics of the barrio and are then supervised in their field- 
work in the local barrios. An analysis of the barrio or agency will be made after 
fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

A brief overview of Mexican art forms from pre-Cortesian epochs to the con- 
temporary artists, with emphasis upon the use of oil painting techniques as em- 
ployed by modem Mexican and Chicano artists. 

336 Main Trends in Spanish American Literature (3) 

An introduction to the main currents of Spanish American literature emphasizing 
contemporary works. Close attention will be given to the relation between the 
artistic expression and the ideological values of the same period. 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: any of the following: Ethnic Studies 101, 106, 220, 250, 260, 237 or 
232 or the permission of the instructor. A study of the modern Chicano writers 
in the United States. Special emphasis will be given to Allurista, Corky Gonzales, 
Octavio Romano, El teatro campesino and the major Chicano magazines and 
newspapers. 

340 Sociology of the Chicano (3) 

Prerequisites: Ethnic Studies 101 or 106, and any one of the following: Ethnic 
Studies 220, 250, or 260, or the instructor’s approval. A general survey of the 
field. Sociological perspectives of Mexican- American culture and social structure 
including background, present nature, and changing patterns. 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

Designed to improve the oral expression of teachers in the barrio elementary 
schools. Special emphasis will be given to the language patterns of the Mexican- 
American students and their parents. 

430 Cancion de la Raza (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish. Survey and analysis of the Nahuatl, 
Mexican and Mexican-American literature from the pre-Columbian period to the 
present. The latter part of the course will focus on contemporary Mexican- 
American writers. 

433 Mexican Literature since 1940 (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish. An in-depth study and analysis of 
the literature of Mexico since 1940. Emphasis will be placed on the works of 
Carlos Fuentes, Luis Spota, Rodolfo Usigli, Xavier Villaurrutia, Juan Jose Arreola, 
Octavio Paz, Roberto Blanco Moheno and Luis G. Basurto. 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

Recommended that students have a reading knowledge of Spanish and that 
they take Ethnic Studies 237, and 302. A study and discussion of the emergence 
of the Mexican-American movement dealing with political, economical, and 
sociological facets. This course analyzes the writings of the Nahuatl, Spanish, 
Spanish-American and Mexican-American writers. Special attention will be focused 
on the contemporary writers. 

441 Religion in the Mexican-American Society (3) 

Prerequisites: Ethnic Studies 220, and/or 250 or 260, or consent of instructor. 
A comparative study of American Protestant and Mexican Catholic thought and 
their influence on the values held by Anglo and Mexican-Americans. Special 
emphasis will be placed on the contemporary issues. 


255 


Chicano Studies 


450 The Mexican-American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting 
the Mexican-American, with emphasis on the proposed solution. Particular focus 
will be placed on the effects the social institutions have had on the Mexican- 
American community. Study and research will be made in these areas. 

453 Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division class standing. A study of the Mexican Revolution 
of 1910 stressing the political economic and social features of this period. Special 
emphasis will be given to the Revolution and its contributions in the fields of an, 
music, literature and social reforms. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level or acceptance of the subject by the department chair- 
man and the professor (s) in charge of directing the study. An opportunity to do 
independent study under the guidance of the department, of a subject of special 
interest to the student. 



256 




9—81593 



DIVISION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY 
AND SPECIAL STUDIES 

Chairman: Paul C. Obler 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

William C. Langworthy 
Program Director 

Gordon Bakken (History), Bayard Brattstrom (Biological Science), George Chiang 
(Engineering), James Do (student), Margaret Fitch (Psychology), Christopher 
Hulse (Anthropology), William Ketteringham (Geography), Robert Laidlaw 
(student), Imre Sutton (Geography), Joel Weintraub (Biological Science). 

Environmental studies is an interdisciplinary program of courses dealing with 
man and his environment. The courses, both pre-existing in various departments 
and specially developed, attempt to integrate knowledge and methods from several 
disciplines, all of which independently study special aspects of this area. The pro- 
gram will deal with man in his social and cultural aspect, as he exploits, modifies 
and attempts to achieve balance with his environment. The student will have the 
opportunity to cope with problems involving ecological changes, pollution, tech- 
nological solutions, economics, balance land use, and politics. 

The program is intended to provide the widest possible variety of students with 
an opportunity to become acquainted with and acquire a common vocabulary in 
this vital area. A basic element will be an introductory seminar in environmental 
studies, which will bring together students and staff from various disciplines to 
delineate environmental problems and explore fundamental methods. This seminar 
may be taken either on the undergraduate or graduate level and will be prerequisite 
to all further work in the projected graduate program. 

No degree objective in environmental studies is planned for undergraduates; 
however, participation by such students in the program is encouraged. Individuals 
interested in environmental problems, irrespective of their majors, and those plan- 
ning to enter job-related areas should consider supplementing their regular course 
schedules with elements of this program. A master’s degree in environmental 
studies has been proposed and is under development. 

Courses in Environmental Studies 

Environmental Studies 431 Ecology of the Santa Ana Mountains (also listed as 
Interdisciplinary Center 431) (3) 

Environmental Studies 440A,B Introduction to Environmental Studies (3-3) 

Related Departmental Courses 

Listed below are a number of departmental courses which either bring up 
environmental issues or deal with concepts bearing on such issues. Few have ex- 
tensive prerequisites; they are therefore suitable for undergraduates interested in 
learning more about man and his environment. 

Anthropology 204 Man’s Many Faces (3) 

Anthropology' 460 Culture Change (3) 

Biological Science 102 Crisis Biology’ (3) 

Biological Science 267 Man and Insects (3) 

Biological Science 316 Principles of Ecology' (4) 

Engineering 425 A, B Environmental Engineering (3,3) 


258 


Environmental Studies 


Geography 150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

Geography 350 Conservation of the American Environment (3) 
Geography 453 Cultural Ecology (Also Anthropology 453) (3) 
Nature Interpretation 350 Field Biology and Conservation (3) 

Nature Interpretation 460 Applied Conservation (4) 

Physical Science 100 Man and His Physical Environment (4) 
Sociology 361 Population Problems (3) 

Technological Studies 100 Introduction to Technological Studies (3) 
Technological Studies 110A,B Man-Made World (3,3) 

Technological Studies 201 Society and Technology (3) 
Technological Studies 464 Technology and Ideology (3) 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES 

431 Ecology of the Santa Ana Mountains (3) 

An interdisciplinary course composed of seminars, field investigation, and labora- 
tory compilation of environmental factors of a wild region within the urbanizing 
areas of Southern California. Instructed and supervised by specialists in earth 
science, geography, and biological science. Intensive field investigation of factors 
of significance in the location and distribution of plants and animals, utilizing 
techniques of aerial photography, remote sensing, geologic and vegetation mapping, 
instrumentation of environmental factors and taxonomy. Open to advanced under- 
graduate and graduate students. 

440A,B Introduction to Environmental Studies (3,3) 

Prerequisites: advanced standing in an academic major and permission of the 
director. 440A is prerequisite to 440B. Principles, fundamentals, and current prob- 
lems involving man and his physical, biological, and man-made environment. 
Seminars and field trips (weekend trips may be required). 


259 


Interdisciplinary Center 


INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER PROGRAM 


FACULTY 
Paul Obler 

Director 

William Lyon 

The Interdisciplinary Center was created out of the conviction that much of the 
real excitement happening in the intellectual world today (and probably other 
times as well) is at the boundary lines where traditional disciplines converge. The 
concrete reality of the human situation raises problems amenable to no facile 
descriptions or easy solutions — certainly none that any one discipline can yield. 
We are coming more and more to recognize the need for diverse perspectives — 
that whether we are confronting the immense complexity of the modern city or 
the subtle dimensions of love or anxiety, no single frame of reference or specialized 
knowledge can be sufficient. 

Many of the courses now offered or planned by the center lie outside the 
province of any single department or academic discipline. They challenge students 
and professors alike to utilize their specialized knowledges and yet to go beyond 
them. A subject like love may be approached from historical, psychological, 
aesthetic or philosophical perspectives Several courses ( Psychology and Literary 
Criticism, Social Sciences and Humanities : A Critical Analysis) utilize the comple- 
mentary methodologies of the physical sciences, social sciences, or humanities. It 
follows that interdisciplinary courses frequently involve two or more professors 
and feature guests from outside the academic community. Many courses are of a 
frankly experimental nature, often one-time journeys into strange seas, perhaps 
ill-fated. Many can be used as credits toward upper-level general ^education or are 
cross-listed with several majors. The center is interested in new courses or innova- 
tive programs; it originally sponsored the Religious Studies Program; it shortly 
hopes to introduce a B.A. in Human Interaction. It welcomes suggestions from stu- 
dents or all other members of the academic community. 


INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER COURSES 

301 Psychological Approaches to Literature (3) 

A development of the work of I. A. Richards begun in his Practical Criticism. 
The course’s primary focus is on the psychological experimentation relevant to 
understanding errors of interpretation, particularly interpretation of literary texts. 
Several experimental approaches to understanding errors in interpretation will be 
described and illustrated, including those of Piaget (errors of the child), Asch 
(structural factors of personality), and Adorno. Current therapeutic techniques 
for the development of attitude change will be discussed. 

303 Yoga (3) 

A study of Yoga; its theories, literature, and practices; some methods of medita- 
tion taught; its relevance for today’s world. 

310 Seminar in Human Sexuality (3) 

The concept of sexuality will be explored as it relates to man, including data 
regarding sexual practices, their biological and social implications, and their rela- 
tionship to population and the survival of the species. 


260 


Interdisciplinary Center 


315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

Jazz — its primitive and European roots; cross-cultural description of improvisa- 
tion. Lectures, demonstrations, some concerts. 

31ft Character and Conflict: The Struggle for Autonomy (3) 

An exploration — via lectures, discussion and group encounter— into the problems 
and techniques of resolving the conflicts created by the individual’s struggle to 
achieve and maintain personal autonomy while living successfully in an automated 
world. Topics for exploration include the changing concepts of masculinity and 
femininity, love, marriage, sexual morality, encountering others. 

351 Povorty in Amorica (3) 

A study of the extent, causes, consequences and possible cures of poverty in 
modem America. Poverty will be treated as, among other things, a political issue, 
and spokesmen from various political groups will lecture on their organization’s 
approach to the poverty question. Lectures, discussion, some documentary Aims. 

402 Art/ Literature and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

An application of theories of consciousness, particularly existential and Jungian, 
to poems, paintings and musical compositions. Intensive encounters between the 
individual and the art work; opportunities at checking one’s own responses against 
those of others and exploring the significance of the differences. (Same as Com- 
parative Literature 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: last and West (3) 

A comparative study of quest narratives which exemplify the Eastern and West- 
ern man’s search for self-identity and fulfillment. Religious, psychological and 
literary texts will be used to help illuminate the comparison. (Same as Comparative 
Literature 403 and Anthropology 416) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

An examination of the various dimensions of love as found in notable philo- 
sophical, psychological, and literary works. (Same as Comparative Literature 404) 

405 Psychoanalysis and Drama (3) 

A detailed study of Freud’s topographic and structural theories and their recent 
elaborations; the application of theory* to selected readings in dramatic literature 
mainly, but also to some fiction, poetry, and films. (Same as Comparative Litera- 
ture 405) 

410 Solf-Actualization Group: Experiences in Human Growth (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive small group experiences will assist 
each individual in unleashing his own growth potential and accelerating his own 
developmental processes. Self-actualization and related existential and humanistic 
concepts will be explored in depth, using recently developed methods. Lectures, 
individual assignments supplement the class experience. 

411 Group Process and Leadership (3) 

The impact of the individual personality on other persons in a group and what 
takes place in a group of people; the structure and process of a group; the influ- 
ence of leadership. The course will provide learning experiences involving theories 
and concepts of those forces operating in a group situation, as well as a first-hand 
experiencing of one’s own self in a group; feedback on how others see one in a 
group relation; and involvement in group dynamics. 


261 


Interdisciplinary Center 


412 Special Group Experiences (3) 

Intensive group experience familiarizing the student with a practical encounter 
approach and its theoretical basis. Sections may be repeated for credit. Open 
Couple : An exploration of openness, intimacy and personal growth as aspects of 
the man-woman relationship. Ongoing concerns of enrolled couples are spring- 
boards for intensive experiences. Open to married and unmarried couples. Trans- 
actional Group : Self-actualization using Transactional Analysis. Selected readings to 
enhance personal growth and development. Ongoing group experience using Trans- 
actional Analysis, Gestalt techniques, poetry and other approaches to new self- 
awareness and personal decisions. Special Social Group. 

418 Practicum and Research in Group Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Center 318. Practical experience in developing the 
ability to effectively lead other persons in their efforts to further both their own 
individual self-understanding and their ability to interact productively within a 
peer group. 

419 Individual Personality (3) 

Major theories of personality development, with emphasis upon the dynamics 
and modification of the autonomous individual personality. 

421 Great 19th-Century Revolutionaries: Darwin, Marx, Freud (3) 

The course will consider the three great 19th-century revolutionaries, Darwin, 
Marx and Freud, with a purpose of discovering the force of their impact on 20th- 
century society. Their major literary works will be discussed and the students will 
study their biographies to determine why they became revolutionaries. 

422 Jewish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

A description and analysis of Jewish mysticism, and its comparison with other 
systems of mysticism from different cultures. (Same as Anthropology 422) 

450 The Way (3) 

An exploration of sensory awareness, interpersonal relations, dreams, body lan- 
guage through study and through laboratory sessions in Gestalt theory. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and philoso- 
phers as Freud, Spengler, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Kierkegaard. (Same as 
English 451 and Philosophy 451) 

452 Student Protest (3) 

The dynamics of student protest with major attention given to contemporary 
activities in the United States. 

470 Seminar: Interdisciplinary Issues (3) 

Concentrated study each year of a different key issue approached from an 
interdisciplinary view and frequently combined with two or three courses in other 
departments to form a nine-hour block. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with the consent of the instructor and 
the program coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 

799 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with the consent of the instructor and 
the program coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 


262 


Latin American Studies 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 


FACULTY 

William J. Ketteringham 
Director 

Oswaldo Arana (Foreign Languages), Nancy Baden (Foreign Languages), George 
Baker (History), Warren Beck (History), Lawrence Christensen (Anthropol- 
ogy), David Feldman (Linguistics), Thomas Flickema (History), Michael Mend 
(Sociology), Ivan Richardson (Political Science), John Yinger (Political Science) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The B.A. in Latin American Studies is an interdisciplinary' program organized 
and taught by faculty from numerous fields with special training and fieldwork 
in Latin America. 

The program is designed for students desiring a general education with specific 
knowledge about Latin America. It is designed for students planning careers which 
will necessitate residence in or knowledge of Latin America, such as teaching, 
business, scientific research, engineering, journalism or government service. It is also 
designed for students who are planning to teach Spanish or social studies in the 
secondary schools. The program serves as a sound base for students preparing for 
graduate work in Latin American studies or in specific disciplines with a speciali- 
zation in the region of Latin America. 

Foundation Courses: 

Language: All students in the program should develop a proficiency level in 
language measured by Spanish 204 and Portuguese 102. (This need may be met 
by completion of the above courses, their equivalents, or by passing require- 
ments as stated by the Department of Foreign Languages.) 

Rocommendod Coro Coursos: 

Language: Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Literature: Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature from Modemismo to the 

Present 

History and Culture: Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civiliza- 
tion (3) 

History 350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

History' 350B Republican Latin America (3) 

Recommended Selected Concentration!: 15 units selected from three or more of 
the following groupings: 

Culture: 

Portuguese 315 Introduction to Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Portuguese 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Portuguese 325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

Anthropology 322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Sociology 460 Comparative Institutions: Latin America (3) 

Line Arts and Literature: 

Art 462 Art of Mesoamerica (3) 

Art 471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3) t . 

Spanish 440 Spanish American Literature from * he Conquest to 1888 (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 


Latin American Studies 


History and Politics: 

History 450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

History 453 History of Mexico (3) 

History 454 Argentina, Brazil, Chile (3) 

Political Science 437 Government and Politics of Developing Systems: Latin 
America (3) 

Political Science 438 Latin American Interest Groups (3) 

Political Science 463 International Relations and Problems of Latin America (3) 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

For courses within the Latin American studies program which originate in other 
departments, the students should refer to the department originating the course 
for the description. 

Anthropology 

322 Peoples of Mesoomerica (3) 

324 Ancient Mesoomerica (3) 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Art 

462 Art of Mesoomerica (3) 

471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

411 International Trade (3) 

Geography 

333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 


History 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

3 SOB Republican Latin America (3) 

4S0 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

453 History of Mexico (3) 

454 Argentina/ Brazil/ Chile (3) 

Latin American Studies 

401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary team-taught senior 
seminar on topics relevant to contemporary' Latin America. The exact content of 
the course will vary' depending upon the faculty and present conditions within 
Latin America. May be repeated for credit. 


264 


Latin American Studies 


Political Science 

437 Government and Politics of Developing Systems: Latin America (3) 

438 Latin American Interest Groups (3) 

463 International Relations and Problems of Latin America (3) 
Portuguese 

315 Introduction to Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Sociology 

460 Comparative Institutions: Latin America (3) 

Spanish 

316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) 

440 Spanish American Literature from The Conquest to 1888 (3) 

441 Spanish American Literature from Modernismo to the Present (3) 
466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Geography and Economics: 

Geography 333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Geography 433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 
Economics 330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 


Senior Seminar: 

Latin American Studies 401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 



265 



Russian Area Studies 


RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Robert S. Feldman 
Coordinator 

Ronald Helin (Geography), Lee Kerschner (Political Science), Harvey Mayer 
(Foreign Languages), Gary Pickersgill (Economics), John Shippee (Political 
Science), Elena Tumas (English), Michael Yessis (Physical Education) 

PART-TIME 

Tatiana Erohina (Foreign Languages) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES 

The Russian area studies major is an interdisciplinary program designed for 
students interested in the language, literature, politics, history, economics, ideology, 
customs and geography of the Soviet Union. In addition to fulfilling the various 
cultural objectives common to any liberal arts program, the Russian area studies 
major provides a foundation for teaching the Russian language and social studies 
on the elementary and secondary levels. This major serves especially the needs 
of students intending to pursue graduate studies and those who foresee employment 
in professions that demand a regional as well as traditional orientation. 

To qualify for this major a student must complete (1) 16 units of Russian 
language or their equivalent, (2) 24 units of upper division Russian area courses 
from at least four of the following fields: comparative literature, economics, geog- 
raphy, political science, history, foreign language, (3) 15 units of upper division 
coursework in a related discipline to be determined in consultation with a Rus- 
sian area counselor. 


RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES COURSES 

All courses within the Russian area studies program originate in other depart- 
ments within the college. Students should refer to the department originating the 
course for description. 

Comparative Literature 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

374 Contemporary Russian Literature (3) 

499 Independent Study Cl — 3) 

Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Geography 

366 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


266 


Russian Area Studies 


History 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

434B Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime (3) 

491 Proseminar (3) 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Political Science 

430 Government and Politics of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

433 Government and Politics of Authoritarian Systems (3) 
443 Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

454 Soviet Union and World Affairs (3) 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Foreign Language: Russian 

303 Readings in Scientific Russian (3) 

315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

375 Introduction to Literary Form (3) 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

431 Early Russian Literature (3) 

441 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


267 


Social Sciences 


PROGRAM IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

FACULTY 

George Giacumakis, Jr. 

Coordinator 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The Master of Arts in Social Sciences is designed with three possible objectives 
in view: to provide a broader and more integrated disciplinary background for 
students later interested in working toward the doctorate in any one of the specific 
fields of social sciences or in the general area of social sciences; to prepare sec- 
ondary and elementary school teachers to introduce the social sciences in a more 
modern and sophisticated way so that the social studies curriculum can be up- 
graded; and to provide opportunities for students with strong interests in inter- 
disciplinary programs to work out custom-tailored programs which will serve their 
interests. 

Prerequisites 

An incoming student must have an undergraduate major or the equivalent in 
one of the social sciences and a minor in another. The coordinator will determine 
equivalence to major and minors. 

An incoming student must have a grade-point average of 3.0 in upper division 
(undergraduate) social sciences courses. 

Program of Study 

I. Social Sciences Core 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modem World: Major Findings, 

Concepts and Theories (3) 

501 The Social Sciences in the Modem World: Basic Skills 
and Human Dimensions (3) 

II. Multidisciplinary Core 

This part of the program is to be made up of 21 units in at least three social 
science fields. Twelve of these units must be 500-level or graduate courses. 
The same three fields should be represented in the 12 graduate units. 

III. Project 

Every student will prepare a project, the norm of which will be a written 
research essay, but particulars of which will be defined by the committee for 
the student. Projects will be tailored to reflect the interdisciplinary effort. 

The social sciences include the following related fields: anthropology, economics, 
geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. 

For further information, consult the coordinator. 

See also ‘The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSES 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Theories (3) 

A seminar providing a philosophical and theoretical basis for graduate work in 
the area of social science. It will focus on the interrelationships which exist among 
the various social sciences as they relate to man in his social, physical, and politi- 
cal environment. 


268 


Social Sciences 


501 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Methods (3) 

Analytical comparison of the historical, humanistic, and scientific methodologies 
in the history of the social sciences. This seminar will also deal with the contem- 
porary trends in the social sciences methods. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Open to graduate students in social science with the consent of the program 
adviser or coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 


269 


Technological Studies 


TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES PROGRAM 


FACULTY 
Barry E. Gerber 

Acting Director 

The technological studies program was established to conduct special programs 
of studies and to provide course offerings which cut across related disciplines. 
Activities of the technological studies program are interdisciplinary and include a 
reference center and curriculum in technological studies as well as special activities 
such as Directions: Man and Technology , a periodical devoted to the field. 

This program brings together courses from several disciplines on the nature and 
impacts of technology and methods of analysis. The general focus of the program 
is on study of interdisciplinary methods and techniques for analyzing technological 
change; technology transfer and applications; and analysis of the impacts of tech- 
nological change on society. 

The program provides an area for special study within recognized major fields 
of studies. Students may take separate courses or develop an individualized program 
of studies based on courses, directed readings and research participation. Wherever 
possible courses are conducted as seminars and bring together lecturers from 
relevant disciplines included in the sciences and humanities. Through independent 
studies students are encouraged to pursue topics or problems of special interest 
beyond the scope of regular courses under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The 
technological studies program is directly coordinated with the activities of depart- 
ments and other programs of the college. 

The Mon and Technology Program 

Man and Technology , a program developed jointly between the technological 
studies program and the School of Engineering, directed to the study of man in 
the man-made world, the relationship between technology and the human condi- 
tion. The program (1) enables engineering students to meet social science and 
general education requirements of the School of Engineering by engaging in studies 
closely akin to their major studies; (2) provides a general course of study for 
students of other technologically oriented disciplines of the college; (3) makes 
available to nonengineering students a set of general education courses in the 
analysis and solution of engineering problems; and (4) provides a meeting ground 
for faculty and students concentrating in different fields of study through par- 
ticipation in interdisciplinary studies of technology. 


TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES COURSES 

100 Introduction to Technological Studios (3) 

An examination, in survey form, of questions about the development of human 
technologies. Examination of the various theories and methodologies which can 
be applied to the study of the role of technology' in the process of cultural and 
social development. 

110A Man-made World (3) 

(Same as Engineering 110A) 

II OB Man-made World (3) 

(Same as Engineering 110B) 

III A Laboratory: Man-made World (1) 

(Same as Engineering 111 A) 


270 


Technological Studies 


11 IB Laboratory: Man-made World (1) 

(Same as Engineering 111B) 

201 Society and Technology (3) 

The analysis of the relationship between technological development and various 
aspects of social reality. 

211 Technology for Man (3) 

An assessment of the special requirements of human beings in relation to tech- 
nological development. Explores, in various ways, the natural and cultural human 
needs which a technologist might consider when he creates a piece of technology. 

300 Technology and Culture (3) 

A survey of the impacts of technology on culture in general and of culture in 
general on technology. 

301 Theories of Technological Change (3) 

An examination of normative and fact-oriented theories concerning technological 
development. 

464 Technology and Ideology (3) 

An examination of the development and meaning of contemporary technological 
society: technocracy, technostructure, cybernetics and cyberculture, and associated 
changes in ideology. 

(Sponsored by the Technological Studies Program) 

Economics 

370 Economics of Research and Development and Technological Change (3) 
Engineering 

100A,B Introduction to Analysis (3) 

101 Introduction to Engineering (1) 

417 Engineering Economy (3) 

423 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

History 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) 

Topic: The American Response to Technological Development 
Examination of the historical consequences of technological change and de- 
velopment for American society including the reception of technological images, 
symbols, and myths into the culture; the adaptation of institutions to imperative 
needs for technological innovation; and the changing status of technologists in 
American society with primary focus on the late 19th and 20th centuries. 

Int«rdis<iplinary Center 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Through independent study students can pursue topics or problems of special 
interest beyond the scope of regular courses under the supervision of a faculty 
adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, and normally culminates 
in a paper, project, comprehensive examination or performance. Before register- 
ing, the student must get his topic approved by the professor who will be sup- 
ervising independent study. Independent study courses may be repeated. A stu- 
dent wishing to enroll in more than six units of independent study in any one 
semester must have the approval of his major adviser and of the chairman of the 
department (s) in which the independent study is to be conducted. 


271 


Technological Studies 


799 Independent Study (1-3) 

A survey of the problems and prospects for technology and impacts of tech- 
nology on society. The course brings together lecturers from several disciplines 
included in the sciences and humanities. The seminar approach is used where 
possible. The course will include lectures on such topics as the impact of tech- 
nology on urban life and development; education in the technological society; 
technology, society, and central planning; the military-industrial-research com- 
plex and the new industrial state; the American challenge in international eco- 
nomic affairs; the “new economics,” technology, economic growth, and the 
social order; technology and ideology; the American response to technological 
change; development of science and technology and cultural change; evolution 
of scientific ideas; and economics of research and development and technological 
change. 

Management 

545 Research and Development Project Management (3) 

Science Education 

461 Development of Science and Technology (3) 

Science and Mathematics Education 

470 Evolution of Scientific Ideas (3) 



272 



LETTERS, 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 


SCHOOL OF 
LETTERS, ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Dean: Hazel J. Jones 


The curricula of the School of Letters, Arts and Sciences are designed to pro- 
vide opportunities for the student to expand his general knowledge, to develop a 
beginning specialization, to investigate areas of intellectual interest, and, if he 
chooses, to prepare himself for specialized professional studies. 

The School of Letters, Arts and Sciences is presently comprised of 19 depart- 
ments offering 22 undergraduate majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science degree and 18 master’s programs leading to the Master of Arts or 
Master of Public Administration degree. 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN STUDIES 

FACULTY 
David J. Pivar 
Department Chairman 
E. James Weaver 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The degree in American studies is an interdisciplinary program within the 
School of Letters, Arts and Sciences. The program is designed for students with 
a special interest in the American experience, including the overseas experience. 
It permits, through intensive study of the United States, greater perception of 
American society, both contemporary and historical. By providing students with 
an opportunity to discover the larger relationships among disciplines, the student 
may receive a better sense of the whole. 

The American studies degree prepares students for teaching either on the ele- 
mentary or secondary level. Credentialing, usually handled during the fifth year 
of study, may be obtained for students enrolled in this interdisciplinary program. 
American studies is useful for any career in which an understanding of American 
culture is important. Specialized careers in American studies, leading to the PhD., 
are also available. 

Since two alternative programs are available, the student interested in becoming 
a major must consult with an American studies counselor to develop a course of 
study mutually satisfactory. 

American Studies Program 

The major consists of 36 units distributed as follows: 

I. Core program (12 units) required of all majors. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

301 The American Character (3) 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

401 Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

II. Alternative plan (24 upper division units in either plan) 

a. The student may choose to work in two but not more than three 
disciplines related to the American experience; i.e.: history and literature 
or sociology, anthropology and political science. 

b. The student may choose to pursue a specialized theme or subject; i.e.: 
mass culture, urbanization or ethnic groups in American society. 

1. The student may choose to concentrate on 20th century American 
society. 

Students interested in the American studies major must consult with the chairman 
of the department before establishing an individual course of study. 

274 


American Studies 


AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

With the concept of culture as a unifying principle, this course will focus on 
four separate time periods in order to provide the framework for an understanding 
of American civilization. Several different kinds of documents will be used to 
illustrate the nature and advantages of an interdisciplinary approach. 

301 Tho American Character (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or History 170A or B or consent of instruc- 
tor. An intensive examination of the changing national character. Reading assign- 
ments will reflect an interdisciplinary approach, ranging from poetry to sociology. 
Some attention will be paid to the American Negro and Indian in addition to the 
transplanted European, and foreign perspectives on the American will be considered. 

350 Sominar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent 
of instructor. This course is designed to provide the American studies major 
with an understanding and appreciation of methodology, theories of society and 
images of man as they effect American studies contributions to scholarship. 

401 Pro seminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent 
of instructor. The proseminar is designed to permit students to examine the 
relationship between theory and application. An emphasis will be placed on 
analytic readings and research. Topics will be announced each semester. Some 
examples might be: The novelist as historian or the concept of postindustrial society. 

402 Roligion in tho Development of American Society (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of 
instructor. An intensive study of the changing role of religion in shaping, re- 
flecting, and challenging dominant American values and institutions. The course 
will focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, although some attention will be paid 
to the colonial period. 

450 Women in American Society (3) 

An effort to explain the rise and decline of feminism in America. The first 
half of the course will be lecture. The second half will be devoted to discussion 
aimed at comparing and contrasting the contemporary woman’s movement with 
its predecessors. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in American studies to be taken with the consent 
of instructor and program coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 


275 


Anthropology 


DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

FACULTY 
Hans H. Leder 
Department Chairman 

Lawrence Christensen, Marlene de Rios, David Evans, Nga Pare Kaihina Hopa, 
Christopher Hulse, Leroy Joesink-Mandeville, Roger Joseph, Fred Katz, Peter 
Koepping, Otto Sadovsky, Richard See, Judy Suchey, Wayne Untereiner * 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The major in anthropology is designed for students desiring a broad generalist 
background, students preparing to become teachers of social sciences, and students 
preparing for graduate work in anthropology and in advanced areal and inter- 
national specializations. 

The required minimum for the major is 45 units, in addition to those taken for 
the general education requirement, distributed as follows: 

Thirty-three units must be taken in anthropology, 24 in upper division courses. 
Anthropology' 201, 202, 203, 380, 401, 406, and 480 are required. One course is 
required from areal offerings in the field: Anthropology' 204, 303, 321, 322, 324, 
325, 328, 340, 341, 345, 347, 350, 351, 352, 360, and 361. Two courses are required 
from theoretical/institutional courses in the field: Anthropology *313, *315, 403, 
410, 411, 412, 413, 415, *416, 420, 421, *422, 423, 424, 425, 428, 429, 430, 440, 441, 
450, *453, 460, and 470. (The courses marked * are cross-listed with other depart- 
ments and programs. They may be used to satisfy the major requirement for: 
either the courses in anthropology; or related courses.) 

Minimum units 33 

Twelve upper division units are to be taken in the related social science fields 
of economics, geography', history, political science, sociology, and psychology, to 
be approved by the major adviser. Advanced work in biological science, the fine 
and applied arts, and the humanities may be substituted for these units by stu- 
dents with specialized interests with the approval of their advisers. Students inter- 
ested in specializing in anthropological linguistics are urged to take courses from 
the college’s program in linguistics. Students interested in specializing in physical 
anthropology are urged to take some of the following biological science courses: 
161 Principles of Zoology*; 312 Genetics; 361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology*; 
404 Evolution; 463 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy; 465 Animal Ecology; and 
471 Natural History* of the Vertebrates. Students interested in specializing in primi- 
tive art are urged to take many of these art courses: 451 Oceanic Art; 452 Art 
of Sub-Saharan Africa; 461 Art of North American Indians; 462 Art of Meso- 


america; 471 Art of Central and South America. 

Minimum units 12 

Minimum total units for the major 45 


Students considering advanced professional careers in research, teaching, or 
applications of anthropology' are urged to explore and sample widely from course 
offerings in the other social sciences, the biological and natural sciences and the hu- 
manities and arts. Through a judicious selection of these courses it is hoped that 
Anthropology' majors will broaden their interests and diversify and develop their 
skills in working towards a variety of individualized career objectives. 

TEACHING MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The minor in anthropology* is intended as a second field for persons completing 
a major in another discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. Twenty-one 
units must be taken in anthropology*; 15 of these in upper division courses. Anthro- 
pology* 201 or 203, 202, and 380 are required. Two additional courses must be 

* College administrative officer. 

276 


Anthropology 


selected from areal offerings in the field: Anthropology 303, 321, 322, 324, 325, 328, 
340, 341, 345, 347, 350, 351, 352, 360, and 361. Another course must be selected 
from theoretical/institutional courses in the field: 313, 315, 403, 406, 410, 411, 412, 
413, 415 , 416, 420, 421, 422, 423 , 424, 425, 428, 429, 430, 440, 441, 450, 453, 460, and 
470. A final course must be either Anthropology 401 or 480. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The program for this degree provides advanced study of general anthropology 
as well as research and other learning experiences for students with specialized 
areas of interest or competence. 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the program requires: 

a) A B.A. degree with a minimum of 24 units in anthropology including the 
following courses or their equivalents: 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology or 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

203 Introduction to Archaeology 

380 Ethnological Theory 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods 

406 Descriptive Linguistics 

480 History of Anthropology 

One areal course (e.g. Ant 328, Peoples of Africa) 

One theoretical or topical course (e.g. Ant 415, Culture and Personality: Psy- 
chological Anthropology) 

Reading courses and special examinations may be substituted for some of these 
prerequisites by the department. 

b) A GPA of 3.0 (B) for all work taken in anthropology. 

c) Evaluation and acceptance by the graduate study committee. The applicant 
must submit at least two letters of recommendation and may be required to attend 
a personal interview at the discretion of the graduate study committee. 

Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for ad- 
mission to the program upon completion of additional courses, selected by the 
graduate study committee, with at least a 3.0 (B) average. 

Program of Study 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: 

Units 


1. Ant 501 Methodology of Anthropological Research 3 

2. Ant 502 Contemporary' Theory in Cultural Anthropology 3 

3. Ant 598 Thesis 6 

4. Two additional graduate seminars in anthropology 6 

5. Upper division or graduate work in anthropology 6 

6. Upper division or graduate work in related fields 6 


30 

Any adviser-approved 300- or 400-level course taken as a graduate student may 
be used for requirements 5 and 6. Ant 599 Independent Graduate Research may 
be used for requirement 5. 

For continuation in the program an average of 3.0 (B) for all work in the study 
plan must be maintained. A thesis must be completed for the degree. Normally 
a student will register for thesis two times, for 3 units each semester. Students 
must demonstrate reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign language prior 
to completion of the degree. 

For further information, consult the Department of Anthropology'. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

277 


Anthropology 


ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

Man in biological and evolutionary perspective. Methods, findings, concepts, and 
issues in the study of primates, fossil men, and races. 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

The nature of culture and its significance for man. Uniformities and variations 
in human cultures. Cultural analyses of major institutional forms such as the family, 
economy, government, religion and art with an emphasis on preliterate peoples. 
A consideration of central problems of cultural comparison and interpretation. 

203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

Relationship of archaeology, prehistory, and culture history; field methods and 
analysis of archaeological data. A survey of world culture history, from Pleistocene 
beginnings to the threshold of civilization; and introduction to the world’s early 
centers of civilization. 

204 Man's Many Faces (3) 

The study and analysis of a broad selection of human societies, which will pro- 
vide a perspective on how human problems have been solved and the possibilities 
for new solutions to our own problems. (Replaces Anthropology 301, World 
Ethnography) 

303 Woman in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. A description, analysis and survey of the social 
position of women in cultures of the world. Attention is given to the influence of 
biological determinants as they are shaped by cultural factors such as beliefs, 
values, expectations and socially defined roles for women. The changing role of 
women in industrial society will form an important analytical segment. 

313 Human Genetics (3) 

(Same as Biological Science 313) 

315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 315) 

321 The American Indian (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of 
North American Indians north of Mexico; origins, languages, culture areas, cultural 
history; the impact of European contacts. 

322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. General survey of the 
culture history and ethnology’ of the Mesoamerican culture-area, with treatment 
of each of the principal subareas in depth. Analy’sis of both the native civilizations 
of Mesoamerica and the present-day ethnological societies, emphasizing sociopolit- 
ical organization, economic sy'stems and religious systems. 

324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A culture history survey 
of the principal cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica from the dawn of incipient 
agriculture to the Spanish conquest. 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology’ 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of 
Central and South America. Description of selected cultures representative of dif- 
ferent cultural areas before and after contacts with Western countries. 

278 


Anthropology 


328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of 
Africa. Description of selected cultures representative of different cultural areas 
before and after contacts with Western and Aslan countries. 

340 Aboriginal Peoples of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural areas 
outside the centers of high civilizations of China and Japan. Emphasis on steppe- 
nomadism, Siberia, and ethnic splinter groups between India and the Philippines, 
with focus upon their influence on the cultural centers and vice versa. Ecology, 
migration routes, social organization, religious systems. 

341 Peoples of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Description and analy- 
sis of the religious, social and technological systems of the civilizations of Japan 
and China, as well as the impact of nomadic herders of North and Central Asia 
upon those centers, from an anthropological point of view. Also, a comparison of 
community studies on these regions. 

345 Peoples of the Middle last (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of the 
Middle East with descriptions of selected cultures (Arab urban, nomadic, Jewish, 
Turk, Berber, Kurd). 

347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A survey of the native 
peoples and cultures of the Pacific Islands, including Australia; the social and 
cultural patterns of representative cultures of various areas; special ethnological 
and theoretical problems. 

350 Peoples of Western Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Representative groups 
considered in modem and historical perspective, stressing especially rural-urban 
relationships and the dynamics of change. (Formerly Peoples of Europe) 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Peasant cultures of Rus- 
sia, Southeast Europe, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the Baltic area, their traditional 
way of life and the impact of industrialization and Communist ideology. 

360 Contemporary American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Application of an- 
thropological methods, categories of analysis, and types of interpretation to 
American culture. Survey and critique of selected community studies and other 
kinds of relevant research. 

361 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. An introduction to 
African culture. A survey of African cultural characteristics in the New World, 
as they relate to contemporary events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

380 Ethnological Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A survey on the 
theories about the position of man as a social and cultural being in the network 
of biological and environmental as well as intrapersonal factors, as described and 
thought about by philosophers in Greece, during the Renaissance, and particularly 
in the 19th century up to modem times in the Western World. 


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401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 6 additional units of anthropology or con- 
sent of instructor. Anthropological field research by students on various problems 
using participant observation techniques. 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or 203 and consent of instructor. Participation 
in the excavation of a local archaeological site. Archaeological mapping, photog- 
raphy and recording. Laboratory methods of cataloging, preservation, description 
and interpretation of archaeological materials. Saturday field sessions. (6 hours 
fieldwork per week). 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 406) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The study of language 
as a factor in culture. Introduction to anthropological linguistics. Trends in the 
study of language and culture. (Same as Linguistics 410) 

411 Folklore (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the 
study of folktales, myths, legends, proverbs, riddles and other forms of the verbal 
traditions of peoples. Major concepts and theories and research methods in the 
study of folklore. 

412 Comparative Oral Literature (3) 

A comparative survey of oral literature and its role in society. The types of 
oral narratives, their themes, meanings, and functions will be analyzed. 



280 


Anthropology 


413 Ethnological Music (3) 

Music, musicmaking, and musicians in various nonliterate societies. 

415 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and Psychology 331 or 351 or Sociology 341 or 
consent of instructor. Comparative study of the relationship between the individual 
and his culture. Child training in nonwestem cultures. Survey of important con- 
cepts, studies, and research techniques. Changing viewpoints and new directions in 
culture-personality studies. 

416 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

420 Primitive Value Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Study of what properly 
is considered “common sense” in the everyday life of people living within differing 
sociocultural environments. 

421 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Examination of beliefs 
and practices in the full human variation of religious phenomena, but with an 
emphasis on primitive religions. The forms, functions, structures, symbolism, and 
history and evolution of man’s religious systems. Analysis of major categories, 
concepts, and theoretical models used by anthropologists in the study of religion. 

422 Jowish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 422) 

423 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

An analysis of the metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the “gram- 
mars” of the art, poetry, languages, myths, music, and rituals of various nonliterate 
and literate peoples and their development into creative experiences. 

424 Psychedelic Anthropology (3) 

A study of states expanded consciousness. It is a synthesis of anthropology, 
sociology, philosophy, psychology, psychoanalysis, mythology', mysticism, esoteric 
systems and the religious traditions of East and West, including Yoga and the 
Vedanta, Zen Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, ancient and primitive religions, Judaism 
and Christianity. 

425 Anthropology of Law and Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Sources of law- 
government in primitive societies; the cultural background of law; the functions 
and development of law and government in primitive politics; transitions to and 
comparisons with classical and modem legal and political systems. 

428 Social Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A study of the social 
organization of preindustrial societies; religious, political and economic institutions; 
status and value systems; conditions and theories of change. 

429 Kinship and Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 428 or consent of instructor. Kinship sys- 
tems in primitive society and their significance in the organization of social life. 
Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, and kinship role patterns. Analysis of the 
formal properties of diversely structured kinship systems and techniques of kinship 
and structural analysis. 


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430 Economic Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Analysis of anthro- 
pological concepts of economy, ecology, and technology; relationship between 
habitat, economy, and culture. A survey of the different types of economic 
systems found throughout the world; outline of the economic development of 
mankind. 

440 Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Advanced human evolution; human physiological 
and related cultural evolution as displayed in the fossil record, adaptations, problems 
in human evolution. 

441 Human Races (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. An historical study of racial classifications; 
analysis of processes of race formation; analysis of the concept of race and racism; 
study of variation in modem populations. 

450 Culture and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or Education 301 or consent of instructor. The 
transmission of values, implicit cultural assumptions, and the patterning of educa- 
tion in cross-cultural perspective, with special attention to American culture and 
development problems. 

453 Cultural Ecology (3) 

(Same as Geography 453) 

460 Culture Change (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 301 or consent of instructor. Interrelations 
between cultural, social and psychological processes in the dynamics of culture 
growth and change. Impact of western technology on tribal and peasant societies. 
Anthropological contributions to the planning of directed sociocultural change in 
selected areas. 

470 Philosophical and Behavioral Foundations of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 and open to lower division students with the 
consent of the instructor. Consideration of basic assumptions and contexts of an- 
thropological work. The synthesis of ideas and methods into professional skills 
and careers. 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: at least 12 units of anthropology or consent of instructor. His- 
torical antecedents of modem anthropology. A systematic survey of the develop- 
ment of anthropology as a scientific field; an examination of the principal contribu- 
tions of leading anthropologists, past and present. Reinterpretations and emerging 
trends. 

490 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in anthropology selected by the 
faculty and students participating in the course. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology' and consent of the adviser. Stu- 
dent selection of an individual research project involving either library or field- 
work. There are conferences with the adviser as necessary, and the work results 
in one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 


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501 Seminar Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202, 401, and consent of instructor. Examination, 
analysis and evaluation of the contemporary methodological spectrum in anthro- 
pology and of new trends in research planning and implementation. Consideration 
and critique of specific cases involving differing research designs. 

502 Contemporary Theory in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 480 or consent of instructor. Critique of the basic 
assumptions and theoretical positions of leading contemporary anthropologists. 

504 Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or gradu- 
ate standing or consent of instructor. The topic chosen and a general outline of 
the seminar will be announced by the Department of Anthropology to graduate 
students in Anthropology and circulated to other potentially interested depart- 
ments. May be repeated. 

505 Seminar: Phonetics and Phonemics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 505) 

507 Seminar: Marpho-syntax (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 507) 

508 Modern Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 507 or Foreign Languages 507 or Linguistics 507 or 
consent of instructor. Speech 404 and Anthropology 410 recommended but not 
required. Intensive and practical study of contemporary theories of grammar, with 
special emphasis on transformational, generative, logical, and electromechanical 
bases and techniques of utterance analysis. (Same as Linguistics 508) 

550 Seminar in Problems in the Teaching of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion of a variety of methods and mate- 
rials for the teaching of anthropology at primary, secondary, and undergraduate 
college levels. 

592 Field Methods in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 505 and 507 or consent of instructor. Methods of 
analysis and description of language structures. Data elicited from informants will 
be analyzed and described. Controlled study of a live informant’s language. (Same 
as Linguistics 592) 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The writing of a 
thesis based on original field research, library study or an educational project and 
its analysis and evaluation. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department. Individual research on either a field or 
a library study, with conferences with a project adviser as necessary, and resulting 
in one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 


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DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


FACULTY 
Donald B. Bright 
Department Chairman 

Phillip Adams, Natalie Barish, LuBelle Boice, L. Jack Bradshaw, Bayard Brattstrom, 
Calvin Davenport, Ted Hanes, Michael Horn, Claris Jones, Charles Lambert, 
Miles McCarthy,® Lonnie McClanahan, Kenneth McWilliams, Marvin Rosen- 
berg, Alvin Rothman, James Smith, Donald Sutton, George Turner, David 
Walkington, Joel Weintraub, Melbourne Whiteside, Jerome Wilson 

The Department of Biological Science offers a program leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts in Biological Science for students preparing to enter graduate and profes- 
sional schools, for those preparing to teach, and for those preparing for careers in 
industry and government service. 

It is the conviction of the faculty in biological science that the purposes of all 
these students can best be served by building their curricula on a core of courses 
fundamental to the science of biology. This core curriculum includes biological 
principles, ecology, genetics, microbiology, and physiology. 

In considering the curricula beyond this core of subjects, the faculty has agreed 
that the interest and goals of individual students can best be satisfied through indi- 
vidual counseling rather than through prescribed programs. After discussion with 
their advisers, students will elect those upper division courses which will satisfy 
their individual interests and professional goals. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in biological sciences, students must have 
a C average in all required related courses. No credit toward the major will be 
allowed for biological science courses in which a grade D is obtained. A profi- 
ciency in one modern foreign language (Russian, Spanish, German, French, others 
by petition) is required. This requirement is normally met by completing the 203 
or 303 level course in the language (e.g. German 101, 102, 303). Upon approval of 
the adviser, nine units of any combination of courses in quantitative methods, 
statistics, or advanced mathematics (above Math 150A) may be substituted for the 
language requirement. 

Advanced students will be permitted to enroll in Biological Science 499, Inde- 
pendent Study. All full-time upper division students are expected to attend the 
departmental seminars. 

The Department of Biological Science also offers a curriculum for students major- 
ing in other fields who wish to minor in biology. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

One hundred twenty-four units including general education (see page 74), 
foreign language, 36 units in biology courses, and supporting courses in physical 
sciences and mathematics. The supporting courses must include one year of inor- 
ganic college chemistry including qualitative analysis with laboratory, two semesters 
of organic chemistry with laboratory, one semester of college mathematics, and 
one year of college physics with laboratory .+ 

* College administrative officer. 

t Those students seeking careers in biology at the Ph.D. level and careers in medicine should 
take a full year of organic chemistry, a year of analytical geometry and calculus, and 
quantitative chemistry with laboratory. 


284 


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Minimum Course Requirements for the Major f 

Lower Division 

Units Units 


141 Principles of Botany 4 

161 Principles of Zoology 4 


8 8 


4 

3 

3 

4 

14 

28 28 
36 


Minimum Requirements for Biological Science Minor f 

Biological science 

141, 161 Principles 8 

404 Evolution or 

312 Genetics or 313 Human Genetics 3 

320 General Microbiology 4 

361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology 4 

Electives 4 


23 


Upper Division 

Biological Science 

305 Molecular Biology 

312 Genetics Lecture 

316 Principles of Ecology 

320 General Microbiology 

Electives — 14 units, of which 4 must be 
outside area of emphasis 


MASTER OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY 

The program for this degree is based on the assumption that modern science 
necessitates broad preparation through the master’s level of training. It permits 
breadth of preparation and at the same time concentration in an area such as 
botany, microbiology or zoology. In design it offers sufficient breadth and depth 
to strengthen the student’s academic understanding and improve his competence 
for (a) advanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree in biological science, 
(b) teaching at all levels — elementary, secondary, and community college, (c) 
participating in research programs, (d) participating in various field service and 
conservation positions with both the state and national governments, (e) entering 
the field of public health service, and (f) technological work in the health sciences. 
An M.A. in Biology is available to students who are planning technological work 
in a clinical laboratory through the medical biology concentration. 

Prerequisites 

Prerequisites to classification in the M.A. program in Biology are as follows: 
(1) B.A. in Biological Science at CSCF or other accredited institution with a grade- 
Point average of 3.0 in biological science and a GPA of 2.5 in the related sciences 
°f mathematics, chemistry and physics; (2) Study plan prepared in conference with 
the adviser and submitted to the departmental Graduate Committee. Students with 
limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for admission to the pro- 
gram upon completion of 12 units of postgraduate studies in biology, mathematics, 
chemistry or physics, with a GPA of 3.0. These courses will be selected in con- 

t Substitutions in the program may be made for transfer students and others upon the recommen- 
dation of the adviser and the approval of the department chairman. 


285 


Biological Science 


ference with the adviser. Supervising the work of graduate students requires the 
personal attention of advisers. To insqre that advisers are available for newly 
classified students, it is highly recommended that a graduate student complete his 
work within three years after classification. 

Advancement to candidacy for the M.A. in Biology will be granted after complet- 
ing 15 units of coursework on the study plan with a GPA of 3.0. In addition, the 
student must pass the departmental qualification examination which will be offered 
at the beginning of each semester. Two attempts will be allowed to successfully 
complete this exam. The first attempt must be made no later than the semester fol- 
lowing classification. 

Program of Study 

A student who meets the prerequisites may apply for classified graduate status. 
He must file a study plan including 30 units of adviser-approved graduate work, 
at least 15 of which must be at the 500 level. All study plans must include Bio Sci 
599, Independent Graduate Research, and Bio Sci 598, Thesis, and at least one 
departmental seminar. Six units must be outside the principal area. Further elec- 
tives may be possible. Required is a thesis or a published paper, or a paper accepted 
for publication, acceptable to the adviser and committee, covering a field or lab- 
oratory research problem. A final oral examination on his research is also required. 

The program of study for the medical biology concentration will include the 
general requirements as shown above, with the following variations: (1) the study 
plan must include adequate coursework in the paramedical sciences, and (2) Bio 
Sci 514A,B,C,D,E (taken at an affiliated hospital laboratory school). 

For more detailed information or advisement, students should consult the chair- 
man of the Biological Science Department, or the graduate coordinator of the 
Biological Science Department. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE COURSES 

101 Elements of Biology (5) 

An introduction to basic concepts in the study of living organisms and to the 
characteristics of the natural environment. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

102 Crisis Biology (3) 

Presents to the student basic biological knowledge necessary for understanding 
our current environmental problems. With this information the ecology of man 
and his ecosystem is analyzed and crisis areas discussed. 

141 Principles of Botany (4) 

Emphasis will be placed on the dynamic aspects of botany although the tra- 
ditional areas of morphology and classification will not be neglected. Required of 
all biology majors. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

161 Principles of Zoology (4) 

An introduction to the principles of animal biology with special reference to 
the structure, classification, phylogeny, physiology, behavior and ecology of animals. 
Required of all biology' majors. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

267 Insects and Man (3) 

Insect biology 7 and ecology; the effects of insects upon civilization past and 
present; control of insects and effects upon the environment; and the superiority 
of insects. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 


286 


Biological Science 


305 Molecular Biology (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology, prior completion or concurrent en- 
rollment in the second semester of organic chemistry. An introduction to the 
physical and chemical aspects of biological science including macromolecular 
synthesis and function as well as the biochemistry of subcellular activities. Topics 
include studies of modem data-gathering methods, organelle structure and function, 
bioenergetics, protein biosynthesis, and gene function at the molecular level. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

312 Genetics Lecture (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or permission of the instructor. The 
general principles and modem developments in the study of heredity. Course de- 
signed for biology majors: nonmajors see Bio Sci 313. 

312L Genetics Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 312. The use of a variety of organisms and methods for 
exploring basic principles of genetics. (3 hours laboratory) 

313 Human Genetics (3) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 101 or equivalent. Principles of heredity with emphasis on 
methods of analysis, on interaction of genes and environment, and on gene popu- 
lations in humans. (Same as Anthropology 313) 

316 Principles of Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or consent of instructor. A com- 
munity approach to plant and animal systems. Environmental factors, biological 
cycles, community types and contemporary environmental problems are discussed. 
Students are provided with background for the advanced ecology courses. (3 hours 
lecture) 

316L Principles of Ecology Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 316 (can be enrolled concurrently). Laboratory and field 
techniques used in ecological studies are taught. Student projects and one or more 
field trips required. (3 hours laboratory) 

318 Marine Biology (4) 

Prerequisite: one semester of college biology or equivalent, or consent of in- 
structor. Physical and chemical aspects of the ocean as a background for the 
study of marine organisms and habitats, including food cycles, communities, iden- 
tification, ecology, methods of collecting and preserving local marine algae, in- 
vertebrates, and fish. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory or fieldwork) 

320 General Microbiology (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology and one semester of organic chemistry, 
°t consent of the instructor. An introduction to the study of the morphology, 
growth, physiology and genetics of bacteria and other microorganisms. A con- 
sideration of the role of microorganisms as agents of change in natural processes. 
*2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

^*2 Plant Anatomy (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 141 or one year of college biology or equivalent. The 
°rigin, development, and maturation of leaves, stems, roots, and flowers of vascular 
Plants. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

344 Plant Morphology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 141 or consent of instructor. A study of the modem con- 
cepts of plant morphology, including biochemical and morphogenetic considera- 
tions. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


287 


Biological Science 

361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology (4) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or consent of instructor. Study of the 
structure and function of the human organism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

362 Histological Technique (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or consent of instructor. Theory and 
practice of the preparation of cells and tissues for microscopic study. 1 hour lec- 
ture, 6 hours laboratory) 

394 Readings in Biological Sciences (1) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 101 or equivalent. Directed readings of classical and con- 
temporary biological literature with periodic group discussions concerning the 
methods and principles studied. This course is designed for the nonmajor and is 
open to seniors only. (3 hours laboratory) 

401 Biogeography (3) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology and Bio Sci 316 or 404 or consent of 
instructor. A study of the present day distribution of plants and animals based 
upon classification, fossil records, morphology, geography and consideration of cur- 
rent theories. (3 hours lecture) 

403 Biosystematics (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology, and Bio Sci 316 or 404 and consent 
of instructor. An introduction to the principles and techniques of bio- 
systematics, including evolutionary mechanisms, the species concept, taxonomic 
procedures and nomenclature. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

404 Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or consent of instructor. A study 
of evolution, including the history of evolutionary thought; origin of universe, 
earth and life; geological and paleontological history of the earth; evidences for 
evolution derived from comparative anatomy, embryology, genetics, zoogeography; 
mechanisms of evolution. 

404L Evolution Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 404 (may be taken concurrently). (3 hours laboratory) 

406 Biometry (4) 

Prerequisite: Math 120 or 150A; upper division standing in biology. Intro- 
duction to experimental design, interpretation, and practical application of statistics 
to biological problems. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

410 General Cell Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology and one semester of organic chemistry 
or consent of the instructor. Characteristics of life at the cellular level; processes 
by which the cell obtains energy and material and forms new cell substances; con- 
trol of these processes by the cell; organization of structures and enzyme systems 
within the cell. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

412 Population Genetics (3) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 312 or 313. Theory and literature of genetic change in 
populations, primarily one-locus: maintenance of genetic variability, inbreeding* 
drift, migration and selection treated singly and in combination. Estimation of 
genetic parameters. (3 hours lecture) 

416 Limnology-Fresh Water Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 141, 161, 316 and Chem 101B. Comparative physical, chemi- 
cal and biological characteristics of inland waters and estuaries. (2 hours lecture, 6 
hours laboratory) 

288 


Biological Science 


417 General Oceanography (3) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 141 and 161, and Chem 101 A,B (may be concurrent), 
Physics 211. Introduction to oceanography including the study of the extent of 
the oceans; the chemical nature of the sea; marine geology; causes and effects of 
currents and tides; and interrelationships of plants and animal life. 

418 Biological Oceanography (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 417. Biological factors of the marine environment; physi- 
ological and ecological relationships; methods of sampling, identification and 
analysis. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

419 Marine Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: upper division or graduate standing in biological sciences, and suc- 
cessful completion of Bio Sci 316 and 418 or 461 or 446. A course in the funda- 
mentals of ecology embracing the aspects of the interrelations of organisms and their 
environment with emphasis on productivity, population dynamics, behavior and 
biological associations. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

423 Pathogenic Microbiology (4) 

Prerequisite: one semester of microbiology or bacteriology. Study of the biology 
of infectious disease: mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity; host defenses; mode 
of action of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents; characteristics of specific 
pathogenic bacteria, fungi and viruses. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

424 Immunology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 305, 320 and Chem 301A, or consent of the instructor. A 
study of the cellular and molecular nature of the immune process. Emphasis is 
placed on the nature of antibodies and antigens, their role in immunity and the 
specificity of their reactions. Other topics, such as transplantation, immuno-chem- 
istry and the immunology of neoplastic disease are discussed. The laboratory is 
designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the techniques of modern im- 
munology. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

426 General Virology (2) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 305, 312 and 320. A comparison of bacterial, animal and 
plant viruses. A detailed study of viral structure and host-virus interaction in the 
viral replication process. 

426L General Virology Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: prior completion or concurrent enrollment in Bio Sci 426. Experi- 
mental methods for studying bacterial and animal viruses, including techniques for 
growth and titration of infectious viral units and physical characterization of virus 
structures. (6 hours laboratory) 

432 Microbial Genetics (2) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 305, 312 and 320. An advanced course on genetic mecha- 
nisms in microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria and bacterial viruses. 

432L Microbial Genetics Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: prior completion or concurrent enrollment in Bio Sci 432. Expe- 
rimental techniques used in research on the genetics of bacteria and bacterial 
viruses. (6 hours laboratory) 

436 Microbial Growth and Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: one semester courses in microbiology and organic chemistry. An 
advanced treatment of the growth, physiology and structures of the microorgan- 
isms, with emphasis on study of the free-living bacteria, yeasts and molds. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


10—81593 


289 


Biological Science 

439 Microbial Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 316 and one semester of microbiology or bacteriology. The 
interaction of microbes and their environment; the influence of physical and 
chemical factors on the distribution and activities of microbial populations; the 
effects of microbes on the living and nonliving environment. Basic principles of 
microbial enrichment, selection and succession. On completion of the basic exper- 
iments each student will select and perform a field and laboratory study in micro- 
bial ecology. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

441 Plant Taxonomy (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 141 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the study 
of classification and evolution of vascular plants with an emphasis on the flowering 
plants. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

443 Plant Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 316, 441 and 444. Advanced study of plants in relation to 
their environment. Topics include: environmental factors and their measurement; 
plant community structure, their description and analysis; physiology; succession; 
and man-related problems. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory; student projects 
and one or more field trips required) 

444 Plant Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 141 or equivalent and one semester of organic chemistry 
or consent of instructor. A study of plant growth, nutrition, food synthesis, and 
metabolism. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

445 Mycology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 141. A study of the comparative morphology and taxonomy 
of the fungi with an emphasis on morphological, physiological and reproductive 
characteristics demonstrating evolutionary relationships. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

446 Algology (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 141 and consent of instructor. A study of the comparative 
morphology and taxonomy of the algae including a consideration of the physio- 
logical and chemical characteristics demonstrating evolutionary relationships. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

452 Economic Botany (3) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 141 or consent of the instructor. An examination of man’s 
dependence upon and economic interest in plants throughout the world. Includes 
a discussion of the domestication of plants and the origin of agriculture. (2 hours 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

461 Invertebrate Zoology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 161, or a year of college biology or consent of instructor. 
Evolution, classification, physiological adaptations, and biology of invertebrate 
animals. Includes dissection, identification and observation of living animals. (2 
hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, or fieldwork) 

462 Parasitology (4) 

Prerequisite: one year of general biology or consent of instructor. A consider- 
ation of the symbiotic relationships existing at all levels of animal organization. 
Emphasis on the natural history, biology, physiology, ecology and laboratory 
recognition of symbiotic organisms. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


290 


Biological Science 


463 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4) 

Prerequisite: a year course in general zoology or biology or consent of instruc- 
tor. A comparative study of the chordates, with emphasis on morphology and 
evolution of various organ systems from fish through mammals. Includes compara- 
tive dissection of numerous vertebrates. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

464 Embryology (4) 

Prerequisite: a year course in general zoology or biology or consent of instruc- 
tor. Study of development from gametogenesis through organogenesis. Laboratory 
work includes a study of selected vertebrate and invertebrate embryos. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

465 Animal Ecology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 316. A study of the factors that affect the distribution and 
abundance of animals. Emphasis on field techniques, statistical applications, and 
theoretical approaches. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory; one or more weekend 
trips per semester required) 

466 Animal Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology or consent of instructor. An intro- 
duction to the current problems in animal behavior including sensory capaci- 
ties, orientation, innate and learned patterns, and social behavior of invertebrates 
and vertebrates. 

467 Entomology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 161, or a year of college biology or consent of instructor. 
Anatomy, physiology, evolution, and biology of insects and other terrestrial arthro- 
pods. Laboratory includes detailed dissection, collection, identification, and obser- 
vation of living arthropods. (2 hours lecture, and 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork) 

468 Comparative Animal Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: principles of zoology, Chem 101 A, 101B, and organic chemistry. 
A comparative survey of organ systems and physiological processes among inver- 
tebrate and vertebrate animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

670 Arthropod Morphology (4) 

Prerequisite: Bio Sci 461 or 467. Survey of evolution, form and function of 
exoskeleton and organ systems of terrestrial arthropods, with emphasis on insects. 
(2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

674 Natural History of the Vertebrates (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology; comparative vertebrate anatomy, or 
evolution or consent of instructor. Natural history and ecology of the vertebrates 
including behavior, temperature and water regulation, migration and homing, 
echolocation, diving adaptations, venoms, color and coloration. Laboratory and 
field emphasis on observation, identification, behavior, ecology and distribution 
of the vertebrates of California. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; 
one or more weekend trips per semester required) 

675 Ichthyology (4) 

Prerequisites: a year of college biology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, and 
natural history of the vertebrates, or consent of instructor. The biology, struc- 
ture, physiology, ecology, evolution and economic importance of fishes. Lab- 
oratory and field work in identification, collection, and natural history of fishes. 
(2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork per week; one or more weekend 
trips per semester required) 


291 


Biological Science 

476 Herpetology (4) 

Prerequisites: a year of college biology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, and 
natural history of the vertebrates; or consent of instructor. The biology, struc- 
ture, physiology, ecology, distribution, evolution, and behavior of amphibians 
and reptiles. Laboratory and fieldwork in identification, collection, study of 
amphibians and reptiles including studies on reptile and amphibian behavior and 
physiology. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork per week; one or 
more weekend trips per semester required) 

478 Mammalogy (4) 

Prerequisites: one year of college biology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, 
and natural history of the vertebrates; or consent of instructor. The biology, 
structure, physiology, ecology, distribution, evolution and behavior of mammals. 
Laboratory and fieldwork in identification collection, and natural history of mam- 
mals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork per week; one or more 
weekend trips per semester required) 

491 Senior Seminar (1) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in one of the sciences with a GPA of 2.8, or consent 
of instructor. Topics in the biological sciences and related fields, selected by the 
faculty and students participating in the course. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Open to qualified undergraduate students by consent of instructor with whom 
the student wishes to pursue independent study in biology. May be repeated for 
credit. 

502 Seminar in Biology (3) 

Open to graduate students only by consent of instructor. May be repeated for 
credit. 



292 


Biological Science 


503 Seminar in Modern Concepts in Biology (3) 

Investigation of major integrative themes in biological sciences and explore the 
ways in which these permeate all levels of biological thought. May be repeated. 

505 Seminar in Molecular Biology (3) 

Selected advanced topics in molecular biology, such as macromolecular structure, 
thermodynamics in biological systems and molecular regulation of cellular activi- 
ties. Open to graduate students and other qualified students by consent of instruc- 
tor. May be repeated. 

510 Seminar in Physiology (3) 

Selected topics within the area of physiology. Open to graduate students and 
other qualified students by consent of instructor. May be repeated. 

512 Seminar in Genetics (3) 

Selected advanced topics within the general area of genetics. Open to graduate 
students and to other qualified students only by consent of instructor. May be 
repeated. 

513 Molecular Genetics (4) 

Prerequisites: Bio Sci 312, 305 and Chem 301 A, B. The organization, replication and 
function of the genetic material and informational macromolecules in organisms 
from the viruses to the higher plants and animals. Topics include: chromosomal 
structure and function, recombination, mutagenesis, genetic coding, protein syn- 
thesis and genetic aspects of development. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

S14A Medical Hematology (1) 

The study of normal and diseased cells. Includes theory and practice in hema- 
tological methods, (lecture/laboratory) 

514B Medical Biochemistry (2) 

The chemistry of the body and body fluids in health and in disease. Includes 
basic and advanced techniques of biochemical and microscopic analyses, (lec- 
ture/laboratory) 

514C Blood Bank and Immunology (1) 

Blood bank and pretransfusion procedures and problems; serological diagnosis, 
(lecture/laboratory) 

514D Medical Bacteriology (1) 

The pathogenesis, diagnosis, and control of bacterial diseases. Includes the isola- 
tion and identification of pathogenic bacteria, (lecture/laboratory) 

5 1 4E Medical Mycology and Parasitology (1) 

The pathogenesis and control of fungus and parasitic diseases. Includes procedures 
for the identification of fungi and parasites, (lecture/laboratory) 

*17 Seminar in Ecology (3) 

Selected advanced topics within the general area of ecology. Open to graduate 
students and to other qualified students only by consent of instructor. May be 
repeated. 

518 Seminar in Marine Science (3) 

Selected advanced topics within the general area of marine science.. Open to 
graduate students and to other qualified students only by consent of instructor. 
May be repeated. 


293 


Biological Science 

520 Seminar in Microbiology (3) 

Selected topics in the area of microbiology. Open to graduate students and other 
qualified students by consent of instructor. May be repeated. 

524 Seminar in Immunology (3) 

Selected topics in immunochemistry, immunobiology and medical immunology. 
Open to graduate students and other qualified students by consent of instructor. 
May be repeated. 

540 Seminar in Botany (3) 

Selected advanced topics within the general area of botany. Open to graduate 
students and to other qualified students by consent of the instructor. May be 
repeated. 

560 Seminar in Zoology (3) 

Selected advanced topics within the general area of zoology. Open to graduate 
students and to other qualified students by consent of the instructor. May be 
repeated. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units of credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students only by consent of the instructor with whom the 
student wishes to pursue independent study in biology. May be repeated for credit. 


MEDICAL BIOLOGY COURSES 

(See departmental course descriptions for the courses listed below) 

Biological Science 

423 Pathogenic Microbiology (4) 

424 Immunology (4) 

426 General Virology (2) 

426L General Virology Laboratory (2) 

445 Mycology (4) 

462 Parasitology (4) 

468 Comparative Animal Physiology (4) 

514A / B / C / D / E Medical Biology (6) 

560 Seminar in Zoology (Hematology) (3) 

598 Thesis (3) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Chemistry 

312 Quantitative Chemistry (4) 

421A,B General Biochemistry (3/3) 

422A/B General Biochemistry Laboratory (2,2) 


294 


Biological Science 


OCEANOGRAPHY COURSES 

(See departmental course descriptions for the courses listed below) 

Biological Science 

325 Marine Biology (4) 

420 General Oceanography (3) 

421 Biological Oceanography (4) 

426 Marine Ecology (4) 

520 Seminar in Marine Science (3) 

Earth Science 

110 Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3) 

401 Studies in Geoscience, Geofluids (2-6) 


Chemistry 


DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 
Andrew F. Montana 
Department Chairman 

David Bailey, James Baur, Robert Belloli, John Bryden, Fred Dorer, J. Milton 
Harris, Gene Hiegel, Harvey Janota, William Langworthy*, Frances Mathews, 
Carl Prenzlow, L. Donald Shields*, Robert Spenger, Carl Wamser, Bruce Weber, 
Patrick Wegner, W. Van Willis, Dorothy Pan Wong 

The Department of Chemistry is on the approved list of the American Chemical 
Society. 

The curriculum is planned to provide thorough instruction in the basic principles 
and concepts of chemistry for students who will (1) advance to graduate work 
in chemistry or biochemistry; (2) teach in the science programs of secondary 
schools; (3) seek employment in industry or government; (4) advance to medical 
or dental training or (5) pursue a chemistry minor in support of other science 
majors such as physics or biology. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, students must have a C 
average in all courses required for the majors including those in the related sci- 
ences. A reading proficiency in one modem foreign language (Russian, German, 
French) is required. This requirement may be met by taking either four semesters 
of college foreign language or a course in scientific French, German, or Russian. 
Under unusual circumstances the requirement may be met by examination upon 
approval by the department chairman. Examinations will be given in October and 
March of each academic year. For details of examination procedure, apply at the 
department office. A reading comprehension of a second modern foreign language 
is recommended for students planning graduate study leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade D is obtained. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

The basic chemistry curriculum contains the minimum requirements for a B.A. 
in Chemistry and is suitable for those students who are candidates for professional 
schools as medicine, dentistry, etc. and secondary education. Chemistry majors in- 
tending to work in chemical industry or continue with graduate work in chemistry 
would generally take 6-10 additional units of upper division chemistry electives. 
Students may elect a curriculum based upon the recommendations of the Committee 
for Professional Training of Chemists of the American Chemical Society and upon 
completion of this program receive a Certificate of the American Chemical Society. 
This curriculum is the basic curriculum plus Instrumental Analysis (Chem 411) and 
at least one upper division chemistry elective. 

Chemistry students interested in biochemistry may elect the biochemistry em- 
phasis. This program differs from the basic chemistry curriculum and may be the 
chemistry program selected by those students who are candidates for professional 
schools in medicine, dentistry, etc. and graduate school in biochemistry or molecu- 
lar biology. 

The chemistry curricula have been designed to give the student a full under- 
standing of the fundamental areas of chemistry and still allow him to tailor his 
program to his interests and goals. The student is urged to consult regularly •with 
the chemistry faculty about his program. 

* College administrative officer. 


296 


Chemistry 


Basic Chemistry Curriculum 1 

Required Courses in Chemistry Units Units 

General Chemistry (101A,B) 10 

Organic Chemistry (305A,B) 10 

Quantitative Chemistry (312) 4 

Physical Chemistry (371A,B) 6 

Inorganic Chemistry (425 ) a 3 

Physical Chemistry Lab (441)* 3 

Senior Research (495 or 499)* 4 

Total Units 40 

Related areas 

Physics (225 A3, C, 226B,C) f 11 

Mathematics (150A,B, 250) 12 

Biology — — 4 

Total Units 27 

Total units in science and mathematics - 67 

General education units, not including 13 units of physical science, 

mathematics (see general education requirements, page 74) 32 

Elective Units* 

Total units for the B.A. in Chemistry 124 


Chemistry Curriculum with a Biochemistry Emphasis 1 


Required Courses in Chemistry 

General Chemistry (101AJB) 

Organic Chemistry (305 A3) 4 — 

Quantitative Chemistry (312) 

Physical Chemistry (371A3)- 
Biochemistry (421A,B, 422 A, B) — 
Senior Research (495 or 499) 

Total units 


10 

10 

4 

6 

10 

2 

~42 


Related areas ( satisfies the general education requirement in natural 
science and mathematics) 

Physics (225 A,B, C, 226B,C) 5 

Mathematics (150A3* 250) — 

Biology * 

Total units 

Total units in science and mathematics 

General education units, not including 13 units of science and mathe- 
matics • — — — — 

Elective units — — 

Total units for the B.A. in Chemistry with biochemistry emphasis 


11 

12 

12 

17 


77 

32 

J5 

124 


Notes: .11 

1 Under unusual circumstances and with the approval of the department chairman, particularly when 
a student decides to become a chemistry major in his sophomore or junior year, the minimum 
requirements for a chemistry degree can differ from the above. 

* Requirements differ for the biochemistry emphasis. ^ ^ , 

Generally includes 6—10 units of upper division chemistry units. In some cases, a student may sub- 
stitute biology, mathematics, or physics courses from an approved list for these upper 

4 Students who^are candidates for professional schools as medicine, dentistry, etc., or graduate 
school in biology may substitute Chemistry 301A,B, 302A,B (8 unite). This substitution is 
not preferable for students who are candidates for graduate school m chemistry or bio- 

* Studente^who are candidates for professional schools such as medicine, dentistry, etc., or graduate 

school in biology may substitute Physics 211A,B, 212A,B (8 units). This substitution is not 
. preferable for students who are candidates for graduate school in chemistry or biochemistry. 

* Includes 4 units of lower division biology and 8 units of upper division biology or related areas 

as approved by adviser. 


297 


Chemistry 


MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

A minimum of 24 acceptable units of chemistry, including 14 units of upper 
division chemistry courses, excluding Independent Study, are required for a chem- 
istry minor. 


Suggested Eight Semester Program for a Major in Chemistry 


First Semester (Freshman) 

Units 


Chem 101 A Gen Chem 5 

Math 150A Anal Geo and Calc._ 4 

Eng 101 Composition and Lit 3 

Gen education courses 4 

16 

Third Semester (Sophomore) 

Chem 305A Org Chem 5 

Math 250 Inter Calc 4 

Physics 225B, 226B Fund Physics.. 4 

Gen education courses 3 

16 

Fifth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 371 A Physical Chem 3 

Chem 312 Quant Chem 4 

General education courses 9 


16 


Seventh Semester (Senior) 

Chem (495 or 499) 2 

Chem 425 Inorg Chem 3 

Electives 11 


16 


Second Semester (Freshman) 

Urdu 

Chem 101B Gen Chem 5 

Math 150B Anal Geo and Calc„„ 4 

Physics 22 5 A Fund Physics 4 

Eng 102 Lit and Composition 3 

15 

Fourth Semester (Sophomore) 

Chem 305B Org Chem 5 

Math 281 Lin Alg Dif Eq 3 

Physics 225C, 226C Fund Physics 4 
Bio Sci 4 

16 

Sixth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 37 IB Physical Chem 3 

Chem 441 Phys Chem Lab 3 

General education courses 6 

Electives 3 

15 

Eighth Semester (Senior) 

Chem 411 Instr Anal 4 

Chem 495 (or 499) 2 

Electives 8-10 

14-16 


Listed below are possible electives which would be available to the upper di- 
vision student: 

Chem 403 Anal of Org Cmpds 
Chem 421 A, B Gen Biochem 
Chem 42 2 A, B Gen Biochem Lab 
Chem 427 Prep Techniques 
Chem 43 1 Ad v Org 
Chem 451 Quantum Chem 


Graduate chemistry courses 
Approved biology courses 
Approved mathematics courses 
Approved physics courses 


298 


Chemistry 


Suggested Eight Semester Program for a Major In Chemistry 
with a Biochemistry Emphasis 


First Semester (Freshman) 

Units 

Chem 101A Gen Chem 5 

Math 150A Anal Geo and Calc.. 4 

Eng 101 Composition and Lit 3 

Biology 4-5 


16-17 

Third Semester (Sophomore) 

Chem 305A Org Chem 5 

Math 250 Inter Calc 4 

Physics 225B, 226B Fund Physics 4 
General education courses 3 

16 

Fifth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 371 A Physical Chem 3 

Chem 312 Quant Chem 4 

General education courses 9 

16 

Seventh Semester (Senior) 

Chem 421 A, 422 A Gen Biochem.... 5 

General education courses 4 

Electives 6 

15 


Second Semester (Freshman) 

Units 

Chem 101 B Gen Chem 5 

Math 150B Anal Geo and Calc._. 4 

Physics 225 A Fund Physics 4 

Eng 102 Lit and Composition. — 3 

15 

Fourth Semester (Sophomore) 

Chem 305B Org Chem 5 

Physics 225C, 226C Fund Physics 4 

Bio Sci 3-4 

General education courses 3 


15-16 

Sixth Semester (Junior) 

Chem 37 IB Physical Chem 3 

Biology 3 

General education courses 9 

15 

Eighth Semester (Senior) 

Chem 42 IB, 422B Gen Biochem ... 5 

Chem 495 (or Chem 499) 2 

General education courses 9 

16 


MASTER OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

The Master of Arts in Chemistry is designed to qualify students for more ad- 
vanced work in chemistry, to provide preparation which will lead to responsible 
positions in industrial or government research and development laboratories, and 
to provide preparation for the effective teaching of chemistry in the high schools 
and junior colleges. 

The program provides fundamental courses at a level and depth commensurate 
with those taken during the first year of a doctoral program and provides an in- 
troduction to research and research methods. 

Prerequisites 

Students to be admitted to the program must: 

1. Meet the general prerequisites for graduate work formulated and recom- 
mended by the college. 

2. Have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

3. Have an undergraduate major in chemistry with a grade-point average of 3.0 
or better in chemistry courses taken, and a 2.5 GPA in all other previous col- 
lege work. 

4. Have had enough specialized elective courses in chemistry to give a minimum 
of 24 units of upper division chemistry, including at least one course which 
has three years of chemistry as a prerequisite. 

The major in chemistry should have included in the undergraduate program a 
year-course in each of the following fields: general chemistry, analytical chemistry, 
organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. The course in physical chemistry should 
have included laboratory work. 


299 


Chemistry 


Orientation examinations, administered by the department, are required of all 
students entering the program. The results of these examinations will be used to 
advise the student in developing his study plan. A student may be classified with 
certain subject deficiencies, but such deficiencies must be removed by completion 
of committee-approved courses with at least a B average before the student may 
be advanced to candidacy. Proficiency in reading chemical literature in one ap- 
proved foreign language (e.g., German, French or Russian) must be demonstrated 
before advancement to candidacy. 

Program of Study 

The degree program consists of 30 units of committee-approved course work 
completed with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0, including at least 15 units 
of 500-level chemistry courses. 

The following courses are required of all students in the program: 


Units 

Chem550 Advanced Physical Chemistry 4 

Chem505 Seminar in Chemistry 2 

Chem599 Independent Graduate Research 3 (minimum) 

Chem 598 Thesis 1-2 


Elective courses, to be taken with the approval of the adviser, must include a 
minimum of six units outside the student’s area of specialization and a minimum 
of nine units (in addition to the minimum of three units of Chem 599, as above) 
in one of the following areas of specialization, including related areas as approved 
by the committee. 

1. Analytical chemistry 

2. Biochemistry 

3. Inorganic chemistry 

4. Organic chemistry 

5. Physical chemistry 

For further details or advisement, please refer to the Graduate Coordinator of 
the Chemistry Department. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


CHEMISTRY COURSES 

100 Introductory Chemistry (4) 

Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra. Fundamental principles of 
chemistry with emphasis placed on the chemistry of inorganic compounds. Does 
not apply as credit for majors in the physical or biological sciences or for minors 
in the physical sciences. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

101A,B General Chemistry (5,5) 

Prerequisites: high school algebra and either high school chemistry or high 
school physics or Chemistry 100. High school physics and trigonometry strongly 
recommended. Intended for majors and minors in the physical and biological 
sciences. 


300 


Chemistry 


A — The fundamental principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, gas laws, 
solid and liquid states, changes of state, modern atom concepts, chemical bonding 
and chemical equilibrium with emphasis on quantitative acid-base chemistry. Labo- 
ratory: experiments applying elementary physical chemistry and volumetric 
quantitative analysis. (3 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

B — Oxidation-reduction chemistry, introduction to chemical thermodynamics 
and chemical kinetics, discussions of the chemistry of representative and transition 
elements, and introductions to biochemistry, organic and nuclear chemistry. Labo- 
ratory: Experiments concerning gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis, 
selected topics in qualitative analysis and inorganic preparations. (3 hours lecture 
discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

105 General Chemistry for Engineers (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 A. Description the same as Chemistry 101 B. Open 
only to engineering majors. Not open to students with credit in Chemistry 101 B. 

201 Modern Physical Science (4) 

(See course description under Physical Science) 

205 Glassblowing (1) 

Elementary training in the manipulation of glass leading to the construction of 
scientific glass apparatus. Enrollment limited with preference given to junior and 
senior physical science majors. (4 hours laboratory) 

301 A,B Organic Chemistry (3/3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101B or equivalent. Chemistry 301B must involve con- 
current enrollment in Chemistry 302B. A course in organic chemistry designed for 
the non-chemistry major. Emphasis is placed on modern theories of structure and 
reaction mechanism. Recommended for biology majors and students planning to 
enter a paramedical profession. 

302A/B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1/1 or 2) 

Chemistry 302 A may be taken concurrently with Chemistry 301 B and 302B. 
Chemistry 302B must be taken concurrently with Chemistry 301 B. A course de- 
signed to give training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, 
including synthesis of typical aliphatic and aromatic compounds. (3 hours labora- 
tory) Chemistry 302A, B may be taken concurrently (6 hours laboratory) with 
301B. 

305A,B Organic Chemistry (5,5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 101B or equivalent. A comprehensive course in organic 
chemistry designed for the chemistry major. Emphasis in lecture and laboratory 
is placed upon modem theories of structure and reaction mechanism with applica- 
tions of modern instrumental and spectroscopic methods. (3 hours lecture discus- 
sion, 6 hours laboratory) 

312 Quantitative Chemistry (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101AJB (grade C or better) and at least one semester of 
organic chemistry lecture and lab. Physics 21lA,B or Physics 221A,B strongly 
recommended. Modem analytical chemistry including contemporary separation 
methods, nonaqueous quantitative chemistry, and introductions to instrumental 
methods of analysis in electrochemistry, absorption spectroscopy, and radiochem- 
istry. (2 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

351 Introduction to Biochemistry (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 301B and five units of biology. A survey of the 
chemistry and metabolism or proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, hormones, in plants, 
animals, and microorganisms. (3 hours lecture discussion, 3 hours laboratory) 

301 


Chemistry 


371 A/B Physical Chemistry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 250, one year of Physics and Chemistry 101B. Chem- 
istry 312 recommended. Equivalent courses may be substituted. A study of the 
fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Thermodynamics, solutions, chemical 
and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, transport phenomena, introduction to atomic 
and molecular structure, rotation and vibration spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, 
kinetics are the major topics discussed. Discussions with emphasis on the use of 
fundamental principles to solve problems. 

403 Analysis of Organic Compounds (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 305A,B and 312 or equivalents. Isolation and identifica- 
tion of organic compounds using chemical and instrumental techniques. (2 hours 
lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

411 Instrumental Analysis (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 312, 301 A, B, 371A,B and one year of college physics. 
Advanced topics in absorption and emission spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic reso- 
nance, electron spin resonance, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, X-ray 
methods, electrochemistry and radiochemistry. (2 hours lecture discussion, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

421A,B General Biochemistry (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 IB or equivalent. Survey of major areas of biochemis- 
try, including chemistry and functions of compounds of biochemical interest. 

422A,B General Biochemistry Laboratory (2,2) 

Prerequisites: concurrent or prior enrollment in Chemistry 421A,B. Laboratory 
designed to illustrate the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and 
proteins, and to introduce the student to research methods. (6 hours laboratory) 

425 Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 A, B or equivalent and Chemistry 301 A, B and 
371A,B. A comprehensive inorganic chemistry course with an introduction to 
modern theories of chemical bonding and structure. Theoretical treatments include 
molecular orbital and ligand field theory with their extensions, coordination and 
transition metal chemistry, various aspects of nonmetal chemistry and a discussion 
of hydride properties. 

427 Preparative Techniques (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 312, 301 A, B and 425 (concurrent enrollment accept- 
able) or equivalents. Laboratory exercises using advanced techniques and modem 
methods for the preparation and identification of chemical compounds. Readings 
in the current literature required. 

431 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 301A,B, 371A and 37 IB. Theoretical aspects of organic 
chemistry wtih emphasis on the modem concepts of structure and chemical re- 
activity. 

441 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B. Laboratory exercises illustrating the physical 
principles of chemistry. (1 hour lecture discussion, 6 hours laboratory) 

451 Quantum Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B. An introduction to the application of quantum 
mechanics. Postulates and theories approximation methods, the electronic structure 
of atoms and periodic system, molecules and the chemical bond, and introduction 
to group theory. 


302 


Chemistry 


495 Senior Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: three one-year courses in chemistry and senior standing. Must have 
consent of supervising instructor before enrollment. Open only to students with a 
3.0 grade point average in chemistry. An introduction to the methods of chemical 
research through a research project carried out under the supervision of one of 
the Chemistry Department faculty. May be repeated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and completion of two one-year courses in 
chemistry. Study of some special topic in chemistry, selected in consultation with 
the instructor and carried out under his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Research in Chemistry (1-6) 

Prerequisites: admission to graduate standing and consent of supervising instruc- 
tor before enrollment. Research in one of the fields of chemistry on an individual 
basis under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. 

505 Seminar (1-2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of department. Student presenta- 
tions of recent contributions to the chemical literature. May be repeated for credit. 

511 Theory of Separations (2) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 312, 301 A,B, 37lA,B. The theory, application, and limi- 
tations of physical and chemical separation techniques. 

512 Electroanalytical Chemistry (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 312, 301 A, B and 371A,B. Advanced topics in potenti- 
ometry, amperometry, electroanalysis, coulometry, conductometry, polarography, 
single and multiple sweep voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamper- 
ometry. 

525 Radiochemistry (4) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371AJB. Introduction to the theory of nuclear properties 
and phenomena; their detection and measurement; application of their technology 
to chemical experimentation. 




W? V 




303 


Chemistry 


528 Coordination Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 425 or equivalent. A concise treatment of the structure 
and bonding in coordination compounds according to crystal field, molecular 
orbital, and ligand field theories is included, as well as preparative methods and a 
survey of ligand substitution kinetics. The theoretical models will be related to 
spectral, thermodynamic, kinetic and redox properties. Biochemical and industrial 
uses of coordination compounds will be discussed. 

531 Theoretical Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 550. The application of theoretical concepts to 
current topics of physical organic chemistry research. 

535 Organic Synthesis (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 301A,B or 305A,B and 371A3 (concurrent enrollment 
acceptable). Methods of synthetic organic chemistry and their application to con- 
struction of organic molecules. Recent developments covered. 

539 Chemistry of Natural Products (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 B. Selected topics from the chemistry of the alka- 
loids, terpenes, steroids and a variety of other natural products of plant and animal 
origin. Discussions included on the classification, structure elucidation, synthesis, 
biosynthesis and physiological activity of these compounds. 

541 Enzyme Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 42 IB or consent of instructor. Discussion of the struc- 
ture and chemical modification of enzymes and mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme 
catalyzed reactions. 

542 Intermediary Metabolism (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 42 IB or consent of instructor. A discussion of metabolic 
and biosynthetic pathways and physiological control mechanisms. 

550 Advanced Physical Chemistry (4) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 371A,B or equivalent. An advanced study of classical 
thermodynamics followed by an introductory study of statistical mechanics and 
chemical kinetics. 

551 Quantum Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 451. Elementary applications. Perturbation theory, colli- 
sion problems, relativistic theory of the electron, theories of valence, complex 
compounds and complex crystals. 

555 Chemical Kinetics (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 550 or consent of instructor. Analysis of reacting systems; 
theories of chemical kinetics; discussion of gas phase, liquid phase and surface 
reactions including recent developments. 

561 Statistical Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 550 or equivalent. A study of statistical mechanics and 
its application to chemical problems. 

572 X-Ray Crystallography (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 221A,B, Mathematics 250, and Chemistry 301 A,B, or equiva- 
lent courses. Morphological crystallography, crystal symmetry and crystallographic 
groups, X-rays and X-ray diffraction, the recording and interpretation of diffrac- 
tion phenomena, and the analysis of crystal structures, including computer appli- 
cations. 


304 


Chemistry 


575 Theory of Spectroscopy (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 451 or equivalent. Group theory, symmetry mode, in- 
tensities and selection rules, selected topics from electronic spectra of atoms and 
molecules, UV, IR, NMR, ESR and Raman spectroscopy. 

580 Topics in Advanced Chemistry (1-0) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemistry. Selected areas of current research 
interest in chemistry will be discussed. May be repeated for credit. 

598 Thesis (1-2) 

Prerequisites: an officially appointed thesis committee and advancement to candi- 
dacy. Guidance in the preparation of a project or thesis for the master’s degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemistry. May be repeated for credit. 


PHYSICAL SCIENCE COURSES 

(Offered by the Departments of Chemistry and Physics) 

100 Man and His Physical Environment (4) 

A course specifically designed to meet the needs of non-science majors. It traces 
some of man’s scientific and technological activities which have resulted in major 
modification of his environment. Key elements will be examined with a view 
towards predicting trends and suggesting alternatives which may improve the 
environment. Treated will be topics such as: transportation; energy conversion; 
food production; population; resources, renewable and nonrenewable; waste dis- 
posal; pollution. Particular emphasis will be given to those problems which threaten 
man’s survival. Credit will not be given to students who have had a college course 
in chemistry or physics. 

201 Modern Physical Science (4) 

Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra or equivalent, or consent of 
instructor. Taught jointly by the Departments of Chemistry and Physics, this 
course presents the essential unifying features of the basic physical sciences, chem- 
istry, chemistry and physics; the modem concepts of the physical and chemical 
theory of atomic and molecular structure form the unifying course material. 
Selected physical and chemical theory (from the fields of mechanics, electricity 
and magnetism, light, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, quantum theory, and inor- 
ganic and organic chemistry) are included to provide the necessary background 
material. Credit will not be given to students who have had a college course in 
chemistry or physics. 


305 


Communications 


DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

FACULTY 
J. William Maxwell 

Department Chairman 

James Alexander, Fenton Calhoun, Raynolds Johnson, Martin Klein, Mary Koehler, 

John Lawrence, George Mastroianni, Wayne Overbeck, Marvin Rosen, Ted 

Smythe 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Communications emphasizes 
study of broad principles of communications, functions of the mass media in a 
democratic society, and theories relevant to informing, instructing, and persuading 
through communications media. It may serve as preparation for graduate and 
professional schools, careers in business, industry, government, education, and mass 
media. 

The department offers a major in communications with emphases in advertising, 
journalism, photocommunication, public relations, technical communication, and 
telecommunication. A combined emphasis designed to meet the needs and interests 
of individual students may also be arranged. 

A Master of Arts program in Communications provides advanced study in com- 
munications and related disciplines for those seeking professional careers in teach- 
ing, research and development, and mass media. 

Programs in the department are designed to provide both theory and practice 
in the use of print, broadcast and film media of communication to inform, instruct, 
and persuade. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

Every student must take 21 units of core courses and a minimum of 15 units in 
one of the emphases offered by the department. Additionally, the student must 
complete 12 units of collateral courses specified for the emphasis selected, although 
some flexibility may be permitted upon advisement. The major totals 48 units. 


COMMUNICATIONS CORE Units 

Com 101 Communications Writing 3 

Com 102 Communications Writing 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication in Modem Society 3 

Com 407 Communication and the Law 3 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 

and two of the following: 

Com 410 Principles of Communication Research™ 3 

Com 426 World Communication Systems 3 

Com 427 Current Issues in Mass Communication 3 


EMPHASES FOR COMMUNICATIONS MAJORS 

Every communications major must select an area of emphasis and complete the 


courses in it. 

Advertising 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 353 Advertising Copy and Layout 3 

Com 354 Retail Advertising 3 

Com 356 Advertising Production (1,1) 2 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Com 451 National Advertising Campaigns 3 

Collateral Requirements 

Art 103 Two-dimensional Design 3 

Engl 303 The Structure of Modern English 3 

Phil 310 Ethics 3 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

306 


Communications 


Journalism 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 218B Communications Photography 2 

Com 332 Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Com 335 Reporting of Public Affairs 3 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Requirements 

Soc 341 Social Interaction 3 

Engl 462 Modern British and American Novels 3 

Hist 476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 3 

and one of the following: 

Pol Sci 300 Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics — 3 
Pol Sci 413 Pressure Groups and Public Opinion 3 

Photocommunication 

Emphasis Requirements 

Com 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 218B Communications Photography 2 

Com 306 Photographic Production 2 

Com 311 Introduction to Motion Picture Production 3 

Com 358A Publications Production * 2 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Com 485 Film Production 3 

Collateral Requirements 

Pol Sci 300 Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics.— 3 

Amer Stu 301 The American Character 3 

Art 338A Creative Photography 3 

Geo 365 Conservation of the American Environment 3 

Public Relations 

Emphasis Requirements 

Com 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 361 Theory and Principles of Public Relations 3 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Com 463 Public Relations Methods 3 

Com 465 International Public Relations 3 

and one of the following: 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 3 58 A Publications Production 2 

Collateral Requirements 

Art 103 Two-dimensional Design 3 

Engl 334 Shakespeare 3 

Spch 334 Persuasive Speaking 3 

Pol Sci 413 Pressure Groups and Public Opinion - 3 


307 


Communications 


* Technical Communication 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 332 Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Com 334 Feature Article Writing 3 

Com 401 Report Writing 3 

Com 403 Technical Writing 3 

Com 404 Advanced Specialized Writing and Editing Techniques 3 

Collateral Requirements 

Phys 211 A Elementary Physics 4 

Phys 21 lB Elementary Physics 4 

QM 361 Business and Economic Statistics 3 

QM 364 Computer Logic and Programming 3 


f Telecommunication 


Emphasis Requirements 

Com 371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs 3 

Com 380 Introduction to Radio and Television 3 

Com 390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production 3 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Com 475 Telecommunications Programming 3 

Collateral Requirements 

Engl 322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns 3 

Soc 341 Social Interaction 3 

Pol Sci 410 Political Parties 3 

Hist 476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 3 


Combined Emphasis 

Students whose interests involve more than one emphasis may seek approval of 
a combined emphasis. Minimum requirements for the combined emphasis are the 
same as for other emphases: 15 units of coursework in communications, at least 
12 of which will be in upper division courses; 12 additional units of collateral 
course work in other departments; and approval of the combined emphasis plan 
in advance by the Department of Communications. 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATIONS 

Twenty-one units approved by the department are required for a minor in 
communications. The following is a recommended minor sequence emphasizing 


writing and publication courses. 

Lower Division (maximum of 7 units) Units 

Com 101 or 102 Communications Writing 3 

Com 218A Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 218B Communications Photography 2 

Upper Division (minimum of 14 units) 

Com 331 Analyzing News Communication 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication in Modem Society 3 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 358 A Publications Production 2 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 


* Required collateral units may exceed 12 for this emphasis to include additional mathematics and 
science. In such cases, variations in the core requirements will be arranged through advisement 
so that the major will not exceed 48 units. 

t Telecommunication students who wish to emphasize film in broadcasting should take Com 290, 
311, 375,411 and 439. 


308 


Communications 


TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Communications offers major and minor programs approved 
as academic by the State Board of Education for those seeking an elementary or 
secondary teaching credential. For advisement, consult the Department of Com- 
munications. 

Secondary 

Communications majors who are secondary teacher candidates should complete 
the communications core and journalism emphasis, including Communications 
358A,B; have a minor approved by the Communications Department chairman; and 
fulfill professional education course requirements beyond those of the major and 
minor. (See “Journalism Education,” page 315) 

Elementary and Intermediate 

The program of courses for elementary and intermediate teachers follows. 


Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 331 Analyzing News Communication — ~ 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication in Modern Society 3 

Com 361 Theory and Practice of Public Relations 3 

Com 375 The Documentary Film 3 

Com 380 Introduction to Radio and Television 3 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 

Com 426 World Communication Systems 3 

Elect 15 units from appropriate communications courses in consultation 
with adviser (may include a project, Com 499, for three units). 


Collateral Requirements 

Engl 303 Structure of Modem English 3 

Elect nine additional units from appropriate courses in consultation with adviser. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

The Master of Am in Communications is designed to provide advanced study 
in communications and related disciplines and to develop a research emphasis or 
option related to the processes and effects of communications. These options are: 
advertising, journalism education, news, photocommunication, public relations, 
technical communication, or telecommunication. 

Students completing the Master of Arts in Communications with an emphasis 
in journalism education research are eligible for journalism teaching positions in 
high school or community college. 

Prerequisites 

Students must possess a baccalaureate degree and have completed a basic core 
of courses in communications as prerequisites to the M.A. program. Before admis- 
sion to classified graduate status, students must achieve satisfactory scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. 

Program of Study 

Students are required to complete 30 units of approved study, including 18 
units in graduate level communications courses and six units in related studies. 
Six of the 18 units of graduate-level courses are applicable to the thesis or project 
requirement. In addition, students must satisfy a “collateral field requirement” in a 
related discipline. 

For further information, consult the Department of Communications. See also 
“The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77 and the Graduate Bulletin. 


309 


Communications 


COMMUNICATIONS COURSES 

101 Communications Writing (3) 

An introductory course covering principles of reporting and writing, with 
emphasis on content organization, conciseness, and clarity. Typing ability re- 
quired. 

102 Communications Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 101 or consent of instructor. Concentration on re- 
porting and writing of more advanced material. Typing ability required. 

103 Applied Writing (3) 

Principles and practice in organizing and preparing letters, reports, documents, 
and proposals required in most occupations. Designed especially for non-com- 
munications majors. 

218A Introduction to Photography (2) 

Introduction to photographic theory and the application of photographic prin- 
ciples. Students are encouraged to provide their own adjustable cameras. (1 hour 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

21 8B Communications Photography (2) 

Prerequisite: Communications 2 18 A or consent of instructor. Application of 
photographic principles to the requirements of mass communications. Students are 
encouraged to provide their own adjustable cameras. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

290 History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3) 

(Same as Theatre 290) 

301 Writing for Telecommunication (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 380 (or concurrent enrollment) and Communica- 
tions 101. An introduction to theory and principles of writing employed in the 
broadcast and film media. 

303 Business Communications (3) 

Design and implementation of communications systems for various business 
enterprises. Utilizes graphic analysis and analytical techniques. Includes practice in 
producing messages and channeling them to avoid ambiguities. 

306 Photographic Production (2) 

Prerequisites: Communications 2 18 A and 218B, or consent of instructor. Pro- 
duction of photographs for college publications and television programs. Applica- 
tion of photocommunication principles to media problems under deadline condi- 
tions. ( 1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

311 Introduction to Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 2 18 A. Introduction to theory and practice of mo- 
tion picture photography and film production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

331 Analyzing News Communications (3) 

Analyzing news and other informational materials to assess their influence on 
the public, especially children. Oriented to teachers and teacher candidates, par- 
ticularly those at the intermediate or elementary level. 

332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Practice and 
theory of editing informational materials for publication in newspapers and mag- 
azines. (6 hours activity) 


310 


Communications 


333 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Basic structure and interrelationships of newspapers, magazines, films, radio, and 
television, in terms of their significance as social instruments and economic entities 
in modem society. 

334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines, including study of sources, 
methods and markets. Open to non-majors. 

335 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Coverage in 
depth of significant events pertinent to operations of governmental units and 
related organizations. 

338 Newspaper Production (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A lecture and activity course in which mem- 
bers of the class constitute the editorial staff of the college newspaper. The group 
meets four hours per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing, and 
makeup, followed by production. With consent of instructor, the course may be 
repeated for a maximum of nine units of credit. (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales appeals, 
attention factors and illustrations. (6 hours activity) 

354 Retail Advertising (3) 

Principles and procedures of retail advertising; utilization of mass media; su- 
pervised field assignments in the analysis of specific advertising needs. 

356 Advertising Production (1) 

Preparation of advertisements for the college newspaper and magazine. Adver- 
tising accounts assigned to each student. Weekly critique sessions. Individual con- 
sultation with instructor. (5 hours laboratory) 



311 



Communications 


358A Publications Production (2) 

A production class for development of student publications, including the college 
magazine, authorized by appropriate college authorities. Activities include writing 
articles, editing copy, taking photographs and preparing layouts, supplemented 
by explanatory lectures. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

358B Publications Production (2) 

Prerequisite: Communications 3 58 A, taken during or following the 1970-71 
academic year, or consent of the instructor. A production class for advanced 
students meeting concurrently with Communications 3 58 A for preparation of the 
college magazine and other publications authorized by appropriate college au- 
thorities. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

361 Theory and Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Examination of the social, psychological, philosophical, economic and political 
foundations of public relations, as well as the theories and principles of public 
relations as a communications discipline. 

371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101, Communications 102 (or concurrent enroll- 
ment), and Communications 380 (or concurrent enrollment). Theory and practice 
of covering news events and public affairs for radio and television. Student ma- 
terial will be prepared for local broadcast. (6 hours activity) 

375 The Documentary Film (3) 

Purpose, development, current trends, critical analysis and production require- 
ments of the documentary film. Future of the medium in business, government, 
education and television. Student material will be prepared for production in 
laboratory sessions. 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

(Same as Theatre 380) 

381 Broadcast Advertising (3) 

Study of television and radio as advertising media. Planning advertising campaigns, 
costs, and coverage. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Basic theory and practice of radio and tele- 
vision program production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

401 Report Writing (3) 

Planning, organizing, and writing of reports for business, education and govern- 
ment. Practice will be given in use of graphic aids and preparation of copy for 
reports that are to be printed. Recommended for non-majors. 

403 Technical Writing (3) 

Study of uses of technical writing in industry, science and engineering and 
completion of written assignments designed to test understanding of, and provide 
experience with, various forms. 

404 Advanced Specialized Writing and Editing Techniques (3) 

Writing and editing of material for reports, proposals, special publications and 
journals. 

407 Communication and the Law (3) 

The Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and press; statutes and 
administrative regulations affecting freedom of information and of publishing, ad- 
vertising and telecommunication. Libel and slander, rights in news and advertising, 
contempt, copyright and invasion of privacy. 

312 


Communications 


410 Principles of Communication Research (3) 

Survey of research methods used to assess the effects of print, broadcast and 
film communications on audience attitudes, opinions and knowledge. Techniques 
for developing, using and interpreting various instruments to measure and analyze 
behavioral responses of audiences. 

411 Advanced Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 311. Advanced theory, procedures and practice in 
film production. Motion picture (silent and sound) shooting and editing; sound 
transfer and mixes; production, distribution, and financing. 

425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

American mass communication, beginning with newspapers and periodicals and 
continuing through radio and television. Includes ideological, political, social and 
economic aspects. 

426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Major mass communication systems, both democratic and totalitarian, and the 
means by which news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 

427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Mass media regulation by the government, “objective” versus “interpretive” news 
reporting and ethical and legal questions of particular cases. 

428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

The impact upon contemporary society of American mass media and mass com- 
munications. 

439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

According to his emphasis, the student serves a supervised internship with 
organizations such as a newspaper or magazine publisher, radio or television station, 
press association, public relations firm or an advertising agency. Application for 
internships must be made through the department coordinator one semester prior 
to entering the internship program. 

451 National Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Advanced study of advertising campaigns and utilization of mass media — such as 
television, newspapers, and magazines — in national advertising programs. Design of 
complete campaign. 

463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 361 or consent of instructor. Techniques used for 
effective public relations in both personal and mass communications. 

465 International Public Relations (3) 

Public relations principles applied to international operations, both private and 
public. 

467 Public Relations for Educational Institutions (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 361 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice 
of public relations applied to public and private schools. Methods, policies, pro- 
grams and problems inherent in educational public relations. 

473 Telecommunications Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Self-regulation, governmental regulation and 
international regulation of broadcast programming. 

475 Telecommunications Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Theory and practice of programming for 
television and radio. 


313 


Communications 

477 Telecommunications Station Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Management functions and policies of broad- 
casting stations and networks. Effects of government, public opinion, employee 
groups and ownership. Technical, legal, financial and other obligations. 

479 Advanced Telecommunications Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 390 or consent of instructor. Advanced techniques 
in producing television-radio programs. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

485 Film Production (3) (Formerly 319) 

Prerequisites: Communictions 311, 375, and 411 or consent of instructor. Funda- 
mentals of film script writing, production planning and execution. (2 hours lecture, 
3 hours laboratory) 

490 Film Theory (3) 

Analytical and comparative study of theories relating to film-making; nature 
of the film medium. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised mass media 
projects and research on campus and in the community. May involve newspaper 
and magazine publishers, radio and television stations and public relations agencies. 
May be repeated. 

500 Theories of Communication (3) 

Study of communication processes in terms of source, media, message and audi- 
ence variables. Effects of communications on audience attitudes, opinions, knowl- 
edge and behavior. 

501 Literature of Communications (3) 

Types, sources and uses of communications literature and application to in- 
dividual graduate studies. 

502 Theories of Instructional Communications (3) 

Implications of learning, persuasion and instruction theories for the design of in- 
structional communications. Considers role of human factors in the design of such 
media as textbooks, programed workbooks, training films and videotapes, record- 
ings, multimedia instructional programs and interactive training systems. 

503 Fundamentals of Programed Instructional Communications (3) 

Principles of programed instruction applied to achieve training objectives through 
the use of the media of communication. Includes development and empirical tryout 
of short programs In print, film, and/or broadcast media utilizing behavioral anal- 
ysis of typical audiences to assess program effects. 

510A Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 410 or equivalent, Communications 500, and Com- 
munications 501 (or concurrent enrollment). Principles of research design and 
analysis applied to the processes and effects of communications. Considers problems 
of casual inference, correlation, and measurement in experiments and surveys in- 
volving communication variables. Practice in evaluating research reports and in 
developing small-scale designs. 

510B Advanced Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 510A. Problems in theoretical and applied research 
in communication. Theory and practice of sampling, measurement, variance con- 
trol and data analysis in communication experiments and surveys. Application to 
student research projects. 


314 


Communications 


512 Graduate Seminar in Journalism Education (3) 

Study of selected problems in journalism education with emphasis on individual 
research. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Completion of a creative project in the area of concentration beyond regularly 
offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Completion of a thesis in the area of concentration beyond regularly offered 
coursfework. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised mass media 
projects or research for graduate students. May be repeated. 


JOURNALISM EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: Education 411, 340, admission to teacher education, or consent of 
instructor. The student without teaching experience must register concurrently in 
Education 449. Theory and technique of advising school newspaper and yearbook 
staffs and teaching journalism. Relation of classroom instruction to staff assign- 
ments. See page 212 under Secondary Education for description of Standard Teach- 
ing Credential program. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised projects 
relating to journalism education. 

749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 223 for description and prerequisites. 


315 


Comparative Literature 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(An Interdisciplinary Program) 

The program in comparative literature is an interdisciplinary program directed 
by the Committee on the Program in Comparative Literature. The committee is 
responsible for formulating curricular policies, approving courses, and advising stu- 
dents. The chairman of the English Department administers the program, and the 
courses are taught by faculty from the English Department and other departments 
whose courses are approved by the committee. The major in comparative literature 
provides professional competence and personal enrichment for students with an 
exceptional concern and appreciation for the study of the interrelationships between 
the languages and literatures of various civilizations. The program offers courses 
in literary form and content, theory and philosophy, genres and movements, pro- 
viding insight into the backgrounds of mankind’s worldwide culture and literatures. 
The comparative literature courses are conducted in English and required reading 
is available in English. 

Upper Division Requirements 

(A) 18 units selected from courses listed under comparative literature. 

(B) 3 units from any adviser-approved 400 level course offered by the Foreign 
Language Department providing it is not taught in translation. This require- 
ment can be met through examination. 

(C) 6 units selected from literature courses listed under English and numbered 
300 or above. 

(D) 6 units of anthropology, history, art history, music history, or philosophy 
approved by the adviser and aimed at enlarging total perspective. 

(E) The remainder of required units selected from any 300 or 400 level litera- 
ture course in comparative literature, English, French, German, Italian, Rus- 
sian, or Spanish. 

T otal: 42 units 

Distribution 

(A) of these 42 units 15 must span the chronological range of the literary con- 
tinuum, one in each of the following literary periods: 

(1) Classical or Medieval 

(2) Renaissance 

(3) Neoclassical or Baroque 

(4) Romantic 

(5) Contemporary" (1850- ) 

(B) One course in a literary genre 

(C) One course in a major figure 

It should be noted that (B) and (C) can perform the dual function of also 
satisfying (A) (i.e., a senior seminar in Hugo would satisfy both the major 
figure and the Romantic Period requirements). 

More detailed information on the comparative literature major can be obtained 
from the brochure available in the Department of English office. The importance 
of close consultation with an adviser cannot be stressed enough for comparative 
literature, since the diversity of language specialties and other factors may necessi- 
tate individual tailoring in any given case. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The objectives of the master’s degree program in comparative literature are to 
promote the understanding of other literatures, peoples, and cultures in various 
historical periods, including the present, and to prepare the student for more 


316 


Comparative Literature 


advanced work in comparative literature, leading to the Ph.D. degree. The program 
also prepares teachers of world literature in the high schools and community 
colleges and provides a liberal arts background preparation for library" studies. In 
addition to fulfilling all general prerequisites for graduate work established at 
California State College, Fullerton, the applicant, in order to gain admission to 
the program, must meet the following criteria: 

1. Possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

2. An undergraduate major in comparative literature, English, or foreign lan- 
guage, with a GPA of 3.0 or better in the major courses and a GPA of 2.5 
in all other college work. If the student’s degree is in another field, he must 
have completed a total of 24 units of upper division work in comparative 
literature, English, or foreign language, with a GPA of 3.0. 

3. Satisfactory completion of a written examination in an approved foreign 
language, or satisfactory completion of an upper division course taught in an 
approved foreign language. 

Requirements 

30 units of coursework completed with a minimum GPA of 3.0, to be distributed 
as follows: 

1) A minimum of 18 units in 500-series courses: Urdu 

Comparative Literature 510 Graduate Seminar: Theory and Method of 
Comparative Literature 3 

Courses at the 500 level in comparative literature (six of these units may 

be in Comparative Literature 598, Thesis) 12 

A course at the 500 level in a related area 3 

Total 18 

2) Upper division courses: 

Adviser-approved courses in comparative literature 6 

Adviser-approved courses in a related area 6 

(At least 3 units of related course work must be in foreign literature, 
read in the original language.) 

Total 12 

At the conclusion of his coursework, the student will take a written compre- 
hensive examination for the master’s degree. The examination may be waived if the 
student completes a thesis. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bul- 
letin. 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

(Offered by the Department of English) 

202 Short Story (3) 

(Same as English 202) 

205 The Hebrew Prophets (3) 

(Same as Religious Studies 305) 

212 The Bible as Literature (3) 

A comprehensive survey of Biblical literature emphasizing intrinsic literary 
qualities as well as the influence of major themes of both Old and New Testa- 
ment writings upon western literary traditions. 


317 


Comparative Literature 

314 The Oral Tradition in Literature (3) 

A study of storytelling as an art, particularly as developed through the media 
of the folktale. 

315 Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) 

The origins, elements, forms and functions of classical mythology in works from 
the earliest times to the present. 

316 Celtic and Germanic Mythology (3) 

A basic study of the principal Celtic and Germanic myths with some discussion 
of literary and archeological relationships. 

317 Indie Mythology (3) 

A survey of the mythologies embodied in the Mahabharata , the Ramayana , the 
Vedas and the Sathapatha Brahmana of India, and in the A bast, Avesta , and Shah 
Nainah of Persia, and their relation to the principal mythologies of Europe. 

318 Baltic and Slavic Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of the Balts and Slavs and their relation to the 
Indo-European inheritance. 

319 African Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of sub-Saharan Africa, together with their 
reflections in African art and custom. 

320 Greek and Roman Literature (3) 

Readings in English translation from the literature of classical Greece and Rome. 

324A Advanced World Literature (3) 

Selected readings in Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern and European 
literature from the beginning to 1650. 

324B Advanced World Literature (3) 

Selected readings from Oriental and Western literature from 1650 to the present. 

332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) 

Selected readings in modern English translation from the medieval literature 
of England and the continent from St. Augustine to Sir Thomas Malory. 

333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 

Major phases of the Renaissance as a literary movement, from Erasmus to Mon- 
taigne and Cervantes. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352) 

360 Irish Literature (3) 

Selected writings representative of Irish literature from the early Middle Ages 
to the present. 

371 A,B The French Tradition (3) 

A comprehensive survey of French Literature from the Renaissance to present 
times. The first semester will include the novel, short story and essay; the second 
semester will cover drama and poetry. 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of selected works by Pushkin, Dostoyev- 
sky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, and others, and their relationship to Western 
literature. 


318 


Comparative Literature 


374 Modern Russian Literature (3) 

A study of literary trends and representative works of Russian writers from 
Maxim Gorky to the present times. Special consideration of the Soviet literary 
theory and its impact upon their literature. Lectures and readings in English. 

375 Hispanic Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations from Hispanic literature and their relations to 
world literature. Readings in the picaresque novel, Cervantes, Golden Age drama, 
Galdos, Unamuno, Lorca. 

376 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

An introduction to the main currents of Spanish-American literature, emphasiz- 
ing contemporary writers such as Alegria, Asturias, Borges, Fuentes, Neruda. Close 
attention will be given to the relation between the artistic expression and the 
ideological values of the same period. 

402 Art, Literature, and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 404) 

405 Psychoanalysis and Drama (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 405) 

425 Indian Literature (3) 

A study of selected works of Indian literature. 

426 Chinese and Japanese Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations of Chinese and Japanese literature. 

427 Modern Japanese Fiction (3) 

A study of major writers and literary movements in 20th-century Japanese 
fiction. 

430 Persian and Arabian Literature (3) 

A survey course on the nature and distribution of the classics of western Asia 
in English translation, with lectures, readings and discussion. 

445 Literature of the Americas: Contemporary Novelists (3) 

A study of the interdependency of the contemporary fiction of North and South 
America. It focuses on direct influences, such as Hemingway’s and Faulkners on 
Latin American writers, and Borges* influence on North American writers. It also 
examines several parallels in techniques and themes as they reflect relationships 
in and between the Northern and Southern cultures. 

450 The Naturalists (3) 

A study of naturalism in the works of Turgenev, Balzac, the brothers Goncourt, 
Maupassant, Zola, Huysmans, Ibsen, Verga; and also the works of Gissing, Moore, 
Hardy, Garland, Crane, Norris, Dreiser, London, and O’Neill. 

453 The Novel in France and Germany (3) 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding novels in translation with 
a view toward determining some principles of the narrative arts. Emphasis on 
Goethe, Stendhal, Flaubert, Mann, Kafka, Proust, and others. 


319 


Comparative Literature 

454 Contemporary Movements in European Literature (3) 

A study of modern literary movements, including naturalism, realism, symbol- 
ism, expressionism and surrealism, with reading and discussion of selected exam- 
ples. 

457 The Experimental Novel (3) 

A study of contemporary novels, including examples of surrealism and the 
nouveau rovian , as well as other novels not readily classified. 

473A # B World Drama (3,3) 

Reading, discussion and interpretation of great plays of the world in translation, 
emphasizing them as literature for performance. First semester from ancient Greece 
through the mid-19th century; second semester, from Ibsen to the present. 

482 Senior Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures involving intensive 
study of major writers. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule 
of classes for the sections available. This course number may be repeated with 
different content for additional credit. 

483 Senior Seminar: Special Studies in Comparative Literature (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures devoted to signifi- 
cant periods, movements, and themes in world literature. The student should con- 
sult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the sections available. This course 
number may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

491 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) 

Fifth century Greek tragedy through the extent works of Aeschylus and 
Sophocles, and 10 plays of Euripides. (Same as Theatre 491) 

491 Senior Seminar: Realism (3) 

The theory, the origins, and the development of realism. 

492 Literature of Action in 20th-Century France (3) 

(Same as French 492) 

492 German Literature in Translation (3) 

(Same as German 492) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

510 Graduate Seminar: Theory and Method of Comparative Literature (3) 

Introduction to the theories and methods of comparative literature and the 
problems of translation. 

550 Graduate Seminar: Medieval Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course offers directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures, con- 
cerning the literature of Western Europe during the Middle Ages. Special problems 
as the development of medieval narrative, the growth and development of the 
Arthurian legend, lyric poetry, allegory and devotional literature. 

551 Graduate Seminar: The Renaissance and Baroque (3) 

Comparative investigation of a theme, genre, or major figures in western litera- 
ture for the Renaissance and Baroque Period. Directed research and writing, 
group discussions, independent study. Since the topic each year will vary, depending 
upon the specialized interests and publications of the instructor, this course num- 
ber may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 


320 


Comparative Literature 


552 Graduate Seminar: Neoclassicism (3) 

553 Graduate Seminar: Romanticism (3) 

554 Graduate Seminar: Studies in the Modern Period (3) 

571 Graduate Seminar: The Novel (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized interests and publication of the instructor, 
this course offers directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures 
concerning the genre of the novel. An ability to read the novels in the original 
language will be helpful. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule 
of classes for sections appropriate to his graduate program. This course number 
may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

572 Graduate Seminar: Poetry (3) 

573 Graduate Seminar: Drama (3) 

580 Graduate Seminar: Major Figures in World Literature (3) 

Directed study and research on a major figure in world literature. Students 
will write reports and a long paper on approved topics. 

582 Graduate Seminar: Dante (3) 

591 Seminar in Comparative Literary Criticism (3) 

598 Thesis (3) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 



11—81593 


321 



English 


DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

FACULTY 
Joan V. Greenwood 
Department Chairman 

Don Austin, Rosemary Boston, John Brugaletta, Miriam Cox, Sherwood Cummings, 
Dorothea de France, George Friend, Cynthia Fuller, Stephen Garber, Joseph 
Gilde, Annabelle Haaker, Jean Hall, Mary Hayden, Joseph Hayes, Dennis Henge- 
vcld, Jane Hipolito, Robert Hodges, Michael Holland, Wayne Huebner, Char- 
lotte Hughes, Helen Jaskoski, Hazel Jones*, Dorothy Kilker, William Koon, A. 
David Law, Arthur Lynn, Willis McNelly, Russell Miller, Keith Neilson, 
Irene Nims, Paul Obler, Rita Oleyar, Urania Petalas, June Salz Poliak, Cliff 
Probst, Orrington Ramsay, Michael Riley, Sally Romotsky, William Rubin- 
stein, Joseph Sawicki, Clarence Schneider, John Schwarz, Sari Scott, Alice 
Scoufos, Donald Sears, Howard Seller, Priscilla Shames, Som Sharma, George 
Spangler, Alexander Stupple, Elena Tumas, Martha Vogeler, M. John Wagner, 
John White, Helen Yanko 

The English Department offers courses designed to acquaint the student with 
the nature and development of our language, with the literatures of England and 
America, and with the disciplines involved in the various kinds of writing. Except 
for freshman English offerings, courses in world literature in English translation 
are listed separately, under Comparative Literature. In addition the Department of 
English offers some specialized professional courses for the preparation of teachers. 
On the senior and graduate levels, various opportunities are provided for seminar 
work and independent study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: A total of 42 units beyond English 100 and 103 or their equiva- 
lents, with the following distribution: 

Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

May include survey courses in British, American, or World Literature. 

Basic Course (3 units) 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms 
Upper Division (minimum of 33 units) 

Language courses (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

303 The Structure of Modern English 
305 American Dialects 
490 History of the English Language 
American Literature (6 units) : 

321 American Literature to Whitman 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Modems 
Major Author Courses (9 units) 

333 Chaucer 

334 Shakespeare 
341 Milton 

Period courses (minimum of 6 units, at least 3 in a period preceding the Roman- 
tic Movement) selected from the following: 

332 Medieval Literature 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose 

337 17th Century Poetry and Prose 

338 Drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century 


* College administrative officer. 

322 


English 


339 Restoration Literature (1660-1700) 

340 18th Century Poetry and Prose 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature 

344 Victorian Literature 

345 The Development of the English Novel through Jane Austen 

346 The Development of the 19th Century English Novel 

462 Modem British and American Novels 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels 

464 Modern British and American Drama 

466 Modern British and American Poetry 

Transfer students should consult with their advisers who may recommend the 
granting of further credit for lower division work completed at other institutions. 

Electives to complete a minimum of 42 units selected from additional courses 
in language and composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars, and 
comparative literature. Comparative literature offerings are listed separately, but 
count toward an English major. 

A program of literary studies gains in perspective through the study of history, 
sociology, philosophy, and psychology. These fields offer vital lifelines which 
nourish and deepen understanding of literature. Students of literature are strongly 
advised to include such courses in their program, particularly in the areas of 
philosophy and psychology. 

English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire pro- 
ficiency in at least one foreign language. Note: Freshmen intending to major in 
English should complete two years of course work in a foreign language, or dem- 
onstrate equivalent accomplishment by transfer or by examination. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: a total of 21 units. 

Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

201, 211, 212, or any lower division course beyond English 100 and 103 or the 
equivalent. 

Lower Division electives (3 units) 

Upper Division (minimum of 12 units), including: 

American Literature (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

321 American Literature to Whitman 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Modems 

Language courses (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

303 The Structure of Modem English 

305 American Dialects 

490 History of the English Language 

Major Author Courses (minimum of 6 units) 

334 Shakespeare 

333 Chaucer or 

341 Milton 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

To qualify for admission to the program for the M.A. in English (classified 
graduate status) a student must hold a bachelor’s degree in English from an ac- 
credited institution at which he has maintained at least a 3.0 grade-point average 
in the major courses provided that he has a vnnhmim of 24 units of upper-division 
courseworky or if he holds a bachelor’s degree in another major, he must 
have completed 24 units of upper-division course work in English with at least 
a 3.0 grade point average. If the student lacks the prerequisite number of English 

323 


English 


courses, he must make them up before he may begin work in the master’s degree 
program, earning at least a 3.0 in such make-up coursework. In the event that the 
student’s G.P.A. in prerequisite English courses is less than 3.0, he may be allowed 
to take from 6 to 9 units of probationary, adviser-approved coursework. If his 
GPA in these probationary courses is 3.0 or better, he may be admitted (classified). 
Courses taken to remove qualitative and quantitative deficiencies may not be applied 
to the M.A. program. 

A student is required to have two years of one foreign language at the college 
level or 6 units of study in comparative literature. If taken as graduate work, these 
6 units may be applied to the master’s degree under “units in subjects related to 


English.” 

Program: Units 

Minimum units in courses restricted to graduate students (500 series) 18 

Maximum units in specified upper-division courses in English 6 

Units in subjects related to English 6 

Total 30 


At the conclusion of his program he will take the written comprehensive exam- 
ination for the master’s degree. 

Note: The student is strongly advised to take the steps necessary for admission 
to the program before registering for his first graduate courses. Part of the admis- 
sion process is to confer with the graduate adviser, who will analyze prerequisites 
and designate those courses which will apply to the degree program. Courses taken 
by an unclassified student do not necessarily apply toward a degree. At the time 
the student achieves classified status, no more than 9 units of postgraduate course- 
work may be applied to the master’s degree program. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ENGLISH COURSES 

For world literature in English translation see courses under comparative liter- 
ture. 

100 Composition (3) 

A basic course in composition. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

103 Seminars in Writing (3) 

A course to develop the ability to give effective written shape to ideas. Readings 
on a topic of current relevance are meant to generate interest and enthusiasm, to 
motivate the student to express his thoughts in a meaningful, disciplined manner. 

105 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

An exploratory creative writing course in which the student is given the oppor- 
tunity to write in various genres. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through Medieval Times (3) 

The study of representative writers and works from the ancient through the 
medieval world. 

111 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance through the 
19th Century (3) 

The study of representative writers and works from the Renaissance through the 
19th century. 


324 


English 


112 Modern Literature of the Western World (3) 

The study of representative writers and works of modern literature. 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

The main literary forms — prose fiction, poetry, and drama — are studied and ana- 
lyzed. Various critical methods are applied to representative works mainly from 
English and American literature. Especially recommended for prospective teachers 
of literature. 

202 The Short Story (3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to the study of the structure and 
technique of the short story. Emphasis on critical analysis of selected American 
and European short stories. (Same as Comparative Literature 202) 

205 Introduction to Drama (3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to the study of dramatic literature. 
Emphasis on close analysis of individual plays. 

206 Introduction to Poetry (3) 

A course designed to increase students’ understanding and appreciation of the art 
of poetry. The primary activity will be close reading of poems written in English. 

211 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: limited to students who are of sophomore standing or who have 
obtained the consent of the instructor. An introduction to major periods and move- 
ments, major authors, and major forms through 1760. 

212 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: limited to students who are of sophomore standing or who have 
obtained the consent of the instructor. An introduction to major periods and 
movements, major authors, and major forms from 1760 through modern times. 

301 Advanced Composition (3) 

Prerequisites: English 100, 103, or their equivalents. Exercises in creativity, analy- 
sis, and rhetoric as applied in expository writing. Required of English majors seek- 
ing the secondary credential. 

303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary English. Modern 
English usage. Required of English majors seeking the secondary credential. 

305 American Dialects (3) 

An examination of the principles of dialectology. Emphasis will be on the descrip- 
tion of modern American dialects and their role in social, cultural and educational 
issues of today. 

320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

A study of the prose and poetry of the American Indian, focusing on the 
literatures of the North American tribes. 

321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

Emphasis on major writers: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whit- 
man, and others. 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Emphasis on Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

A survey of Anglo-American balladry and folksong, with atention to historical 
development, ethnic background, and poetical values. 


325 


English 


332 Medieval English Literature (3) 

An introduction to the literature of medieval England, exclusive of Chaucer. 
Readings in modern English versions of representative major works and genres 
from Beowulf to Malory. 

333 Chaucer (3) 

A study of The Canterbury Tales and of Chaucer’s language, with particular 
emphasis upon the understanding of the vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and 
syntax of the East Midland dialect of Middle English, as indispensable to literary 
appreciation. 

334 Shakespeare (3) 

An introduction to Shakespeare’s art through a detailed study of the more 
famous plays. 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

Studies of representative English dramatists of the late 16th and early 17th 
centuries. Emphasis on the development of the dramatic tradition in the plays of 
Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

A study of the nondramatic literature of the English Renaissance from More to 
Campion. Emphasis on Renaissance thought and the works of Spenser. 

337 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

A survey of the major writers of the period from 1603 to 1660 exclusive of Milton. 

338 The Drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century (3) 

A study of representative plays of the Restoration and the 18th century. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the development of such dramatic movements as the heroic 
play, Restoration comedy, and sentimental drama. 

339 Restoration Literature (1660-1700) (3) 

Butler, Rochester, Dryden, Pepys, and selected minor writers. 

340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Swift, Addison and Steele, Pope, Boswell, Johnson, and selected minor writers. 

341 Milton (3) 

An intensive study of the poetry and prose in the light of Milton’s intellectual 
development. 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

Bums, Blake; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The reaction 
against rationalism, the rise of revolutionary and liberal thought, humanitarianism, 
and emphasis on individual creativity. 

344 Victorian Literature (3) 

A study of literature in its relationship to the problems which emerge from the 
social, cultural, scientific, and industrial revolutions of the Victorian period. 

345 The Development of the English Novel through Jane Austen (3) 

A study of the English novel from its beginnings to the 19th century considering 
such novelists as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen. 

346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel (3) 

A study of such novelists as the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. 


326 


English 


351 Science Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. The study of science fiction as a genre, including fu- 
ture-scene fiction, the utopian novel, the superman novel, and short fantasy 
stories. 

352 African Literature (3) 

African literature written in the English language, with special emphasis on the 
fiction, poetry, and drama of the new nations. (Same as Comparative Literature 
352) 

353 Black Writers in America (3) 

A study of black American writers from Frederick Douglass to the present. 
Concentration on important figures such as Wright, Ellison and Baldwin. 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: evidence of student’s previous interest in creative writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group 
criticism and evaluation of each student’s independent work. Depending on the 
specialized writing field of the instructor, the various sections will concentrate on 
fiction, plays, or poetry. May be repeated for credit. 

391 Survey of English Literary Criticism (3) 

A study of the major English critics from the Renaissance to the modem. 
Emphasis on Sidney, Dryden, Johnson, Coleridge, Arnold and Eliot. 

421 Minority Images in American Literature (3) 

An examination of 19th- and 20th-century literature written by and about racial 
groups in America. Includes Uncle Tom's Cabin , Soul on Ice and Laughing Boy. 

423 Early American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: English 321 or consent of instructor. The literature of colonial and 
revolutionary America, including the Puritans, 18th-century deism and rationalism, 
and the literary antecedents of American democratic thought. 

433 Children's Literature (3) 

A study of masterpieces of the world’s literature for children. Illustrates literary 
qualities appealing to children and demonstrates the ways in which children’s 
literature reflects the particular cultural differences of the various Oriental, classi- 
cal and modem cultures. 

435 Studies in Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of instructor. An intensive study of selected 
plays with primary emphasis upon problems of dramatic structure and artistic 
meanings. 

445 The American Tradition in Poetry (3) 

A study of selected American poets from the 17th century to 1914. Emphasis 
on the close reading of individual poems. 

446 The American Novel to 1914 (3) 

A study of selected novelists from C. B. Brown, through Melville and Twain, to 
Dreiser. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 451) 

452 Modern Literary Criticism (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of the instructor. A study of 
the major movements in 20th-century British and American criticism. 


327 


English 


462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American, or world literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of the instructor. The development of modern 
British and American novels from 1900 to 1950. 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) 

The novel in English since World War II. 

464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American, or world literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of instructor. The development of British and 
American drama from 1900 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper divi- 
sion literature course; or consent of instructor. The development of British 
and American poetry from 1900 to the present. 

490 History of the English Language (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English 
vocabulary, phonology, morphology, and syntax from Indo-European to modem 
American English. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in the area to be studied, a B average or 
better in English courses, or consent of instructor. Directed research and writing, 
group discussion, and lectures covering selected topics from language studies, in- 
tensive studies of major writers, criticism, and literary types, periods, and ideological 
trends. 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Open to advanced students in English with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering philology, 
historical development, and structure of English. Individual offerings under this 
course number may deal with only one aspect of language studies. The student 
should consult his advisor and the schedule of classes for the sections appropriate 
to his graduate program. This course number may be repeated with different con- 
tent for additional credit. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures cov- 
ering major figures such as: Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Melville, Twain, Haw- 
thorne, Joyce, and Coleridge. The student should consult his adviser and the sched- 
ule of classes for the sections appropriate to his graduate program. This course 
number may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

572 Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures, 
covering such major literary types as: the epic, the novel, the short story, lyric 
poetry, tragedy, comedy, and historical drama. The student should consult his 
adviser and the schedule of classes for sections appropriate to his graduate pro- 
gram. This course number may be repeated with different content for additional 
credit. (Same as Theatre 573) 


328 


English 


573 Graduate Seminar: Cultural Periods (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures 
covering the literature of a particular cultural period from the Anglo-Saxon to 
modern times. The student should consult his adviser and his schedule of classes 
for the sections appropriate to his graduate program. This course number may 
be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

574 Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this 
course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures 
covering special problems such as: the detailed critical study of varying in- 
fluences on literature, including philosophical, religious, scientific, geographic, 
and other ecological viewpoints. The student should consult his adviser and his 
schedule of classes for the sections appropriate to his graduate program. This 
course number may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

579 Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering historical 
development and schools of criticism. Individual offerings within this course 
number may deal with only one aspect of critical problems. The student should 
consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the sections appropriate to his 
graduate program. This course number may be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered course work. 
Oral and written reports. This course number may be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 


ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: Education 411, admission to teacher education. Principles, methods, 
and materials of teaching English in the secondary school. The student who has 
not had teaching experience must register concurrently in Education 449. 

749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 223 for description and prerequisites. 


329 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

FACULTY 
Walter D. Kline 

Department Chairman 

Linda Andersen, Oswaldo Arana, Nancy Baden, Robert Bertalot, Gerald Boarino, 

Samuel Cartledge, Modesto Diaz, Leon Gilbert, G. Bording Mathieu, Harvey 

Mayer, Doris Merrifield, Ervie Pena, Charles Shapley, Gisela Studebaker, Curtis 

Swanson, Marjorie Tussing, Eva Van Ginneken, Stephen Vasari, Jon Zimmermann 

The program of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures is de- 
signed to meet the needs of several types of students, including those who seek 
a liberal arts education with an emphasis on a foreign language and its literature; 
those who intend to teach at the elementary, secondary, or college level; those 
who plan to use foreign languages in professional careers; or those who desire 
to pursue graduate studies. The program emphasizes high standards of achievement 
in the practical use of the language, in the study of its literature and its culture, 
in the mastery of applied linguistics, and in methodology of teaching, the latter 
acquired in part through apprenticeship. 

A student may enroll at any point in the sequence of courses for which his pre- 
vious study has prepared him. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 
MAJOR IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Three options are offered: French, German or Spanish. Requirements: Courses 
101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents completed satisfactorily; plus a 
minimum of 24 units of upper division courses, including 315, 317, 375, 431, 441, 
451, 461. 

Attention is directed to the courses in foreign literatures in translation listed else- 
where in this catalog under comparative literature. These courses may not be 
counted toward a major in a foreign language. , 

MINOR IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Requirevtents : Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents, completed 
satisfactorily; plus nine units in upper division courses selected in consultation with 
the adviser. Minor concentrations are offered in French, German, Portuguese, Rus- 
sian and Spanish. 

PROGRAMMED COURSES IN UNCOMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES 

The department has available a number of programmed courses in languages 
which cannot be regularly taught such as Arabic, Hindi, Japanese, etc. For details 
see Foreign Languages 198. 


CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

All prospective teachers, before being admitted to a credential program, must 
pass a proficiency examination in which their skills of listening, speaking, reading, 
writing and knowledge of linguistic principles will be tested. The examination is 
administered twice yearly, in September and February. Students should make 
arrangements with the department to take the test during their senior year or 
during the first semester of their fifth year. 

STANDARD TEACHING CREDENTIAL WITH A SPECIALIZATION 
IN ELEMENTARY TEACHING 

Students who are candidates for the standard teaching credential with a speciali- 
zation in elementary teaching are encouraged to enroll in Foreign Languages 
Education 432 and 433. 


330 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 


STANDARD TEACHING CREDENTIAL WITH A SPECIALIZATION 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The credential program is the same as for the liberal arts major, with the fol- 
lowing additional requirements: 

Foreign Languages Education 442; 

French or German or Spanish Applied Linguistics 466; 
plus six units in the major language selected with the approval of the adviser and 
taken in the senior year or thereafter at the 400 and 500 level. 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

In accordance with recommendations made by the Modem Language Association 
of America, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures encourages all 
majors interested in a teaching career to participate in a study-abroad program. 
This will enable a student to perfect his mastery of the language and afford him 
additional insights into the foreign culture. To this end, the California State Col- 
leges International Programs offer a wide variety of study opportunities on the 
junior, senior and graduate level. Language majors are, however, required to com- 
plete a minimum of three literature courses at the 400 level on the Fullerton 
campus. For further information, see page 33. 

THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required, in addition to the 
regular class periods, to practice for the minimum of prescribed time in the lan- 
guage laboratory. The 30-station laboratory operates like a library; students may 
use it at a time most convenient to them, preferably every day in sessions of 15 
to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced by each instructor and by the 
supervisor of the language laboratory. 

Students are invited to make use of the collection of literary and cultural record- 
ings in French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish available in the language 
laboratory. 

MASTER IN ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

The degrees of Master of Arts in French, German and Spanish require a mini- 
mum of 30 semester units beyond the bachelor’s degree. A candidate presenting a 
B.A. which has fewer than 24 upper division units in the major language, or is 
otherwise inadequate, normally will be required to take additional courses to build 
a full undergraduate major before beginning the graduate program. The student 
must also demonstrate proficiency in English, either by examination or a three-unit 
upper division course in English grammar. The 30 units in the graduate program are 

distributed as follows: __ . 

Units 

Language and linguistics courses (minimum of 9 on 500 level) 12 

Literature courses (minimum of 6 on 500 level) 12 

Subjects in an approved related field — ^ 

Minimum total ■■■ — — — — 

A part of the 30 units may be assigned to a thesis. 

The candidate for the M.A. degree must consult a graduate adviser before be- 
ginning his program. Before being advanced to candidacy for the degree, he must 
demonstrate proficiency in the language to a faculty committee appointed for that 
purpose. The terminal evaluation is by comprehensive written and oral examination, 
including fluency in the specified language. # 

For further information, consult the Department of Foreign Languages and Lit- 
atures. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

331 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES COURSES 


198 Programmed Courses in Uncommonly Taught Languages (1-3) 

Intensive individualized programmed instruction in specific languages other than 
those regularly offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
such as Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, etc. Designed to develop the skills of 
auditory comprehension and speaking in the language to form a basis for later 
development of the reading and writing skills. A minimum of 3 hours per week 
in the learning laboratory as well as regular sessions with native informants, are 
required for each unit of credit. May be repeated for credit. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION COURSES 

432 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Elementary School (2) 

Methods of teaching FLES: foreign languages in elementary schools. Critical 
review of materials, audiolingual-visual aids, and current research. Conducted in 
English, with practice by students in the language they plan to teach. 

433 Electromechanical Aids in the Foreign Language Classroom (1) 

Principles and techniques of advanced electromechanical, auditory, visual and 
programmed learning devices in foreign language instruction. Special emphasis on 
instructional television and the language laboratory. 

442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (2) 

Prerequisites: Education 340 and 411; French, German, or Spanish 466; and 
admission to teacher education. Open also to experienced teachers. The student 
who has not had teaching experience must register concurrently in Education 449. 
See page 218 under Secondary Education for description of Standard Teaching 
Credential program. The theory and practice of language learning and language 
teaching with special emphasis on the audiolingual method in combination with 
electromechanical aids. Conducted in English, with practice by students in the 
language they plan to teach. Required, before student teaching, of students pre- 
senting majors in foreign languages for the standard teaching credential with a 
specialization in secondary education. 

749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the 
Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 223 for description and prerequisites. 

FRENCH COURSES 

French 315 and 375 are prerequisites for all French literature courses at the 400 
level. 

101 Fundamental French (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. Conducted in French. 

102 Fundamental French (5) 

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structure of French. Audiolingual assignments are an integral part 
of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in 
French. 


332 


French 


203 Intermediate French (3) 

Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in French. 

204 Intermediate French (3) 

Prerequisite: French 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in French. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with French 203. Conducted in French. 

214 Intermediate Composition and Phonetics (2) 

Practice in written expression and oral delivery of cultural and literary ma- 
terials. Detailed analysis of individual problems in pronunciation followed by in- 
tensive work in class and the language laboratory. May be taken concurrently with 
French 204. Conducted in French. 

300 French Conversation (3) 

Prerequisites: French 204 and 214 or equivalent. Designed to enable the 
student to develop further his oral control of the language in the context of his 
own or contemporary concerns rather than in the context of the subject matter 
of a French major. Conducted in French. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

303 Readings in Scientific French (3) 

Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. Readings reflecting a broad spectrum of 
writing in the physical and natural sciences and mathematics. Special attention 
given to the development of rapid reading for comprehension. Open only to 
science and mathematics majors. 



333 


French 


315 Introduction to French Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussions to develop a 
view of the French tradition (its social, intellectual and literary evolution) while 
at the same time strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division 
students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in French. 

317 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Emphasis on free oral and written 
expression. Conducted in French. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or equivalent. Designed to give the student special 
competence in the control of French as an instrument for free oral and written 
expression. Conducted in French. 

325 Contemporary French Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion to develop under- 
standing of the social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions of pres- 
ent-day France, while at the same time strengthening facility with the language. 
Open to lower division students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in 
French. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the prin- 
cipal literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major 
concepts of the literary techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpretation 
of various texts to increase the student’s abilities in reading, language, and literary 
criticism. Conducted in French. 

400 French for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
French, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken and 
written language. ‘Conducted in French. 

431 French Literature in the Middle Ages and Renaissance (3) 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The development of French 
literature from the 12th through the 16th centuries, through analysis of representa- 
tive works. Conducted in French. 

441 French Literature in the Century of Revolution (3) 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The principal authors and 
movements (romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism) of the 19th century. 
Conducted in French. 

451 French: Literature in the Baroque and Classic Age (3) 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The essence and evolution of 
17th-century classicism, studied principally in the major authors (Corneille, 
Moliere, Racine, La Fayette) and in the dominant genre (the theater). Conducted 
in French. 

461 French Literature in the Age of Enlightenment (3) 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. Two complementary aspects 
of the 18th century: reason and feeling, the philosophes and the current of sensibil- 
ity. Emphasis on major authors (Marivaux, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Laclos). 
Conducted in French. 


334 


French 


466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to French, with spe- 
cial attention to structural contrasts between French and English. Emphasis on 
the application of linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

471 Senior Seminar: Contemporary French Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: French 315 or consent of instructor. The major figures of the 20th 
century, including the generations of Proust, Apollinaire, Malraux, Sartre and 
Robbe-Grillet. Conducted in French. 

485 Senior Seminar in French Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: French 431, 441, 451, 461, or senior status. Exploration of a literary 
current, period, author, genre or problem. The subject will change each time the 
course is given and may be repeated for credit. Conducted in French. 

492 Literature of Action in 20th-Century France (3) 

Selected works read, discussed and analyzed in the light of current philosophical 
trends as well as historical and political developments. The works studied might 
include such titles as: The Counterfeiters (Gide); Man's Fate and The Temptation 
of the West (Malraux); The Wall and What is Literature (Sartre); The Plague 
and Resistance , Rebellion and Death (Camus); Wind , Sand and Stars and A Sense 
of Life (Saint-Exupery) . Readings and lectures in English. This course may not 
be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the major in French. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in French language or literature to be taken with the consent 
of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phenology (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

520 Old French (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Readings in the medieval literature of northern 
France representing a wide variety of dialects and centuries. Conducted in French. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of the instructor. It is highly recommended 
that the student have had some previous study of Latin. Studies in the phonetic, 
morphological, syntactic and semantic changes that characterize the development 
of Latin into the French of today. Conducted in French. 

557 Graduate Seminar: French Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

571 Graduate Seminar French Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

575 Graduate Seminar: French Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in 

French. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student’s graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in French and consent of instructor. Supervised research 
projects in French language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


335 


German 


GERMAN COURSES 

German 315 and 375 are prerequisites for all German literature courses 
at the 400 level. 


101 Fundamental German (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of German. 
Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared 
in the language laboratory. Conducted in German. 

102 Fundamental German (5) 

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structure of German. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted 
in German. 

203 Intermediate German (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in German. 

204 Intermediate German (3) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in German. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with German 203. Conducted in German. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with German 204. Conducted in German. 

303 Readings in Scientific German (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Readings reflecting a broad spectrum of 
writing in the physical and natural sciences and mathematics. Special attention 
given to the development of rapid reading for comprehension. Open only to 
science and mathematics majors. 

315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussions in German 
literature, arts and institutions to develop insights into German culture, while 
strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Conducted in German. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in German. 

325 Modern German Thought in Science and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussion of modern 
German thought in science, literature, philosophy and art, designed to acquaint 
the student with a broad range of German contributions to present-day civilization 
while strengthening facility with German language. Open to lower division stu- 
dents with consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 


336 


German 


375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the 
principal literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the 
major concepts of literary techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpre- 
tation of various texts to increase the student’s abilities in reading, language, and 
literary criticism. Conducted in German. 

399 German Phonetics (1) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. Detailed analysis of 
individual problems in pronunciation followed by intensive work in class and the 
language laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in German. 

400 German for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisites: German 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of German 
while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken and written 
language. Conducted in German. 

431 The Works of Lessing and Schiller (3) 

The major works of Lessing and Schiller illustrating their thought and art. Con- 
ducted in German. 

441 The Works of Goethe (3) 

Selected works of Goethe illustrating his thought and art. Conducted in German. 

451 German Literature to the Baroque (3) 

Important works from the Hildebrand sited to Smiplicissmms in the setting ol 
their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in German. 

461 German Literature Since Goethe (3) 

Important works illustrating the development from romanticism to expressionism 
in the setting of their intellectual and historical climate. Conducted in German. 

466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to German, with 
special attention to structural contrasts between German and English. Emphasis 
on the application of linguistic analysis to the teaching of modem foreign lan- 
guages. 

485 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing in German and consent of instructor. Research and 
discussion in depth of a literary movement, a genre or an author. Subject will vary 
and will be announced in the class schedule. Topics offered in past years have in- 
cluded the Baroque, the Novelle , Brecht, Modern Drama, Keller,. Poetic Realism, 
Romantic Period. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in 
German. 

492 German Literature in Translation (3) 

Open to all students. Reading, discussion and interpretation of relevant German 
literature with emphasis on determining the specific contribution these works have 
made to world literature and the shaping of global philosophies. Authors include 
Goethe, Schiller, Kafka, Hesse, Mann, Brecht, Grass, Hauptmann. Readings and 
lectures in English. This course may not be counted toward fulfillment of the 
requirements for the major in German 

*99 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in German language or literature to be taken with 
the consent of the instructor and the department chairman. May be repeated for 

credit. 


337 


Hebrew 


500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

S10 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

557 Graduate Seminar: German Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with a different 
topic. Conducted in German. 

571 Graduate Seminar: German Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in 
the class schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted 
in German. 

575 Graduate Seminar: German Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in 

the class schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in 

German. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in 

the class schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in 

German. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in German and consent of instructor. Supervised research 
projects in German language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 

HEBREW COURSES 

101 Fundamental Hebrew (3) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

102 Fundamental Hebrew (3) 

Prerequisite 101. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, read- 
ing and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

203 Intermediate Hebrew (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speaking, 
understanding, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguis- 
tic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Hebrew. 

204 Intermediate Hebrew (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 203 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speak- 
ing, understanding, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. 
Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Hebrew. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Hebrew language or literature to be taken with the con- 
sent of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


338 


Italian 


ITALIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Italian (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic structure of Italian. Audiolingual assignments 
are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the language labora- 
tory. Conducted in Italian. 

102 Fundamental Italian (4) 

Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of sounds and the 
basic forms and structure of Italian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted 
in Italian. 


LATIN COURSES 


101 Fundamental Latin (3) 

Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading knowledge and a funda- 
mental writing ability in Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will be 
applied. 

102 Fundamental Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice to develop a compre- 
hensive reading knowledge and a fundamental writing ability in Latin. Modem 
techniques of language instruction will be applied. 

203 Intermediate Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 102 or equivalent (2 years of high school Latin). Intensive 
reading and writing. Selected prose and poetry from the Golden Age. Audio- 
lingual techniques of language learning are used when applicable. 

204 Intermediate Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 203 or equivalent (3 years of high school Latin). Intensive 
reading and writing. Selected prose from the Silver and Middle Ages. Audio- 
lingual techniques of language learning are used when applicable. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Latin language and Roman literature. To be taken with 
consent of the Department Chairman as a means of meeting special curricular 
problems. Subject matter will vary. May be repeated for credit. 


PORTUGUESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing to de- 
velop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of Portuguese. 
Enrollment restricted to students with previous study of a Romance language. 
Conducted in Portuguese. 

/ 

102 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 101 or equivalent. Listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading comprehension, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structures of Portuguese. Enrollment restricted to students with 
previous study of a Romance language. Conducted in Portuguese. 


339 


Russian 


315 Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Prerequisites: Portuguese 102 or equivalent, reading knowledge of Portuguese 
or consent of instructor. Readings and discussions to develop insights into the main 
currents of Portuguese culture and civilization, their expansion to the New World, 
and the intellectual and artistic development of Brazil from its discovery to the 
end of the Second Empire. Conducted in Portuguese. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in Portuguese. 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. Readings and discussion 
toward developing an understanding of the social and intellectual problems, trends, 
and contributions to Brazil from the advent of the Republic. Major emphasis on 
present day Brazil. Conducted in Portuguese. 

431 Portuguese Literature of the Golden Age (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. The literature of Portugal’s 
golden age (1500-1700). The major works of the Cancioneiros, Gil Vicente, Luis 
de Camoes and other writers will be examined from the point of view of their 
artistic structure as well as within the context of Portuguese culture and civiliza- 
tion. Conducted in Portuguese. 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. The literature of Brazil 
from the Colonial period to the present. Conducted in Portuguese. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Portuguese language or literature to be taken with the 
consent of the instructor and the department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


RUSSIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Russian (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Russian. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the 
language laboratory. Conducted in Russian. 

102 Fundamental Russian (5) 

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the 
basic forms and structures of Russian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted 
in Russian. 

203 Intermediate Russian (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 


340 


Russian 


204 Intermediate Russian (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Russian 203. Conducted in Russian. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Russian 204. Conducted in Russian. 

303 Readings in Scientific Russian (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Readings reflecting a broad spectrum of 
writing in the physical and natural sciences and mathematics. Special attention given 
to the development of rapid reading for comprehension. Open only to Science and 
Mathematics majors. 

315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion to develop a view 
of the Russian tradition (its social, intellectual and literary evolution) while at the 
same time strengthening facility with the language. Open to lower division 
students with consent of instructor. Conducted in Russian. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with 
the consent of the instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in Russian. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the princi- 
pal literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major con- 
cepts of literary techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpretation of various 
texts to increase the student’s abilities in reading, language, and literary criticism. 
Conducted in Russian. 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken 
Russian, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken 
and written language. Conducted in Russian. 

431 Early Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Evolution of Russian litera- 
ture from the medieval ecclesiastic traditions and transition to Baroque and 
Classicism. French and German influence on the 18th century. Transition to 
Romanticism and the beginnings of Realism. Conducted in Russian. 

441 The Works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Major works 
of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky in their intellectual and historical setting and their 
impact on Russian and world literature. Conducted in Russian. 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of major literary works of the first 
half of the 19th century which exemplify cultural and intellectual movements in 
Russia. Conducted in Russian. 


341 


Spanish 


461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Representative 
works of outstanding modem Russian writers with an emphasis on The Nobel Prize 
winners (M. Sholokhov and B. Pasternak). Analysis and discussion of their prose 
and poetry in the light of the social problems of present-day Russia. Conducted in 
Russian. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Supervised projects in Russian language or literature to be taken with the con- 
sent of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

SPANISH COURSES 

Spanish 315, 316 and 375 are prerequisites for all Spanish literature courses 
at the 400 level. 


101 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to 
develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Spanish. Audio- 
lingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. Conducted in Spanish. 

102 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehen- 
sion, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic 
forms and structure of Spanish. Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of 
the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

203 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Spanish. 

204 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, under- 
standing, reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic 
analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Spanish. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Spanish 203. Conducted in Spanish. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be 
taken concurrently with Spanish 204. Conducted in Spanish. 

315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussions in Spanish lit- 
erature, arts and institutions to develop insights into Spanish culture, while strength- 
ening facility with the language. Open to lower division students with the consent 
of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion in Spanish-Amer- 
ican literature, arts and institutions to develop insights into Spanish-American 
literature and culture while strengthening facility with the language. Open to 
lower division students with the consent of the instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 


342 


Spanish 


317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with the 
consent of the instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the principal 
literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major concepts 
of the literary techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpretation of various 
texts to increase the student’s abilities in reading, language, and literary criticism. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

399 Spanish Phonetics (1) 

Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of instructor. Detailed analysis of 
students’ specific problems in pronunciation followed by intensive work in class 
and the language laboratory until articulatory proficiency is achieved. May be 
repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

400 Spanish for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive study of spoken 
Spanish, while developing the student’s powers of self-expression in the spoken 
and written language. Conducted in Spanish. 

431 The Golden Age (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. Major works including Mys- 
ticism, the Picaresque and Pastoral Novels, the theater of Lope de Vega and his 
contemporaries. Conducted in Spanish. 

440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 316 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature 
from The Conquest to 1888. Conducted in Spanish. 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 316 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature 
from modemismo to the present. Conducted in Spanish. 

451 Spanish Literature to the Golden Age (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. Cantar de Mio Cid and other 
epic poetry, the early ballads and lyric literature, the prose of Juan Manuel, the 
Renaissance lyrics of Garcilaso de la Vega, El libro de buen amor and La Celes- 
tina. Conducted in Spanish. 

461 Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) 

Representative works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Analysis of romanticism, 
eclecticism, naturalism and realism. Conducted in Spanish. 

466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to Spanish, with 
special attention to structural contrasts between Spanish and English. Emphasis 
on the application of linguistic analysis to the teaching of modem foreign lan- 
guages. 

472 Senior Seminar: Cervantes and the Age of Humanism (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 431 or consent of instructor. Cervantes’ artistic creation and 
its relation to the culture of the 16th century. Special emphasis on Don Quixote and 
the Novelas ejemplares. Conducted in Spanish. 

475 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) 

The Generation of ’98 and 20th-century theater, poetry and novel. Conducted 
in Spanish. 


343 


Swahili 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in Spanish language or literature to be taken with 
the consent of the instructor and department chairman. May be repeated for 
credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

556 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

557 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

567 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Novel (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student’s graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in Spanish and consent of instructor. Supervised research 
projects in Spanish language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 

SWAHILI COURSES 

101 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to master 
the basic structure of Swahili and the requisite skills for both oral and written 
communication. Conducted in Swahili. 

102 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Prerequisite: Swahili 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening compre- 
hension, speaking and writing to master the basic structure of Swahili and the 
requisite skills for both oral and written communication. Conducted in Swahili. 


344 


Geography 


DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 


FACULTY 
Gertrude M. Reith 
Department Chairman 

Arthur Earick, Ronald Helin, William Ketteringham, Tso-Hwa Lee, Crane Miller, 
Leonard Pettyjohn, William Puzo, Robert Sager, Imre Sutton 

The major in geography provides knowledge concerning variety and change in 
the earth’s physical foundation and in man’s economic, cultural and political rela- 
tionship to that foundation. In doing so it contributes to a broad, liberal education 
and furnishes sound preparation for employment in business, planning, and govern- 
ment service. The field also provides a foundation for teaching on the elementary 
and secondary levels and for advanced geographic study on the graduate level 
leading to university and college teaching and research. 

When planning his program, the student should know that departmental offerings 
are numbered according to both the instructional level and course content in the 


following specific ways: 

Instructional level 

survey courses designed primarily for non-majors 100-199 

survey courses designed primarily for majors 200-299 

courses designed for students with general needs and not normally 

applicable to graduate programs in geography 300-399 

courses designed for students with special needs; prerequisites 

cited are strictly interpreted 400-499 

courses for graduate students and qualified undergraduate students 500-599 


Course content 

general courses: 00-09 (e.g., Geog 100) 
physical courses: 10-29 (e.g., Geog 211 or 323) 
regional courses: 30-49 (e.g., Geog 342 or 433) 
lncman courses: 50-79 (e.g., Geog 150, 260. 367, or 477) 
technical courses: 80-89 (e.g., Geog 381 or 484) 
special studies: 90-99 (e.g., Geog 499) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

Program of Study 

The major consists of at least 36 units of geography, including no more than 13 
units of lower division work and excluding all work applied toward the general 
education requirement. To fulfill the major a student must complete the geog- 
raphy core (Geography 100, 211, 250 and 260) and a 24 unit concentration in upper 
division geography, including at least one course from each of the following groups: 
Physical , Regional , Human , Technical. 

No unit credit toward the major will be allowed for geography courses in which 
a grade of D is received. Content credit for such courses may be allowed by the 
student’s adviser. 

TEACHING MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography is intended as a second field for persons completing a 
major in another discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. It is designed 
to give a basic understanding of earth science and geographic relationships helpful 
to the classroom teacher. The program provides a balance between the physical 
and social sciences. 


345 


Geography 


Recommended Program of Study 

At least 2 1 units of work in geography, including 

(1) a minimum of 9 units from the geography core (Geog 100, 211, 250, 
260). 

(2) a minimum of 9 upper division units, including work from at least three 
of the following: Physical, Regional, Human, Technical. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

This program provides advanced study in geographic concepts, techniques and 
methods. Through seminars and research it develops the analytical and interpretive 
abilities of the student, and provides requisite background for employment in 
teaching, government and business. 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the program requires the equivalent of 27 semester units of geog- 
raphy distributed as follows: (1) nine units in introductory geography; (2) three 
units in upper division physical geography; (3) six units in upper division human 
geography; (4) six units in upper division techniques including three units in 
cartography and (5) three units in upper division regional geography. A 3.0 (B) 
average in all geography courses is required prior to classification in the program. 
Course or grade deficiencies may be made up with consent of the departmental 
graduate committee. After completion of all prerequisites and removal of deficien- 
cies, if any, the student is reviewed for classification by the departmental graduate 
committee, which then supervises the student in the formulation of an official study 
plan. 


Program of Study Units 

Geography Seminars 9-12 

Geography 597 (Project) or Geography 598 (Thesis) 6 

Elective upper division or graduate geography, including three units of 

technique 9-6 

Upper division or graduate work in related fields 6 

Total 30 


Candidacy is attained on the satisfactory completion, i.e., B or better in all, of 
12 approved units of work, including at least three units in a 500-level geography 
seminar. A written or oral examination may be required for advancement to 
candidacy. Each candidate normally prepares two three-unit research projects, but, 
if recommended by the student's graduate committee, he may substitute a six-unit 
thesis. Students interested in foreign area studies are expected to demonstrate a 
proficiency in a suitable foreign language. 

For further information, consult the Department of Geography. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

100 Man and the Land (3) 

An introductory geography of the world, with emphasis on the world’s major 
physical regions and their occupational development by man. 

150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

A geographic analysis and approach to the problems of man and his environment, 
dealing with man’s interpretation of the environment and his use and misuse 
thereof. Factors of discussion will include population, nutrition, health, settlement, 
pollution, resource utilization and local environmental problems. Not acceptable on 
the geography major. 

346 


Geography 


211 Physical Geography (4) (Formerly 206) 

A study of the basic elements of the physical environment (e.g., weather, 
climate, landforms, oceans, vegetation and soils) and an analysis of their world 
distribution and interrelationships. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

250 Cultural Geography (3) (Formerly 210) 

A topical examination of the evolutionary role of culture in the human occu- 
pancy of the earth, focusing on changing technological and organizational patterns 
in livelihood and settlement. 

260 Economic Geography (3) (Formerly 233) 

A systematic inquiry into the world distribution of economic activities: agri- 
culture, extractive and manufacturing industries, transportation and tertiary serv- 
ices. 

312 Geomorphology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 211 or Earth Science 1Q1. A study of the development of 
landforms and the processes which alter them. 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 211 or consent of instructor. A study of atmospheric 
elements and controls, climatic classification systems, and world climatic distribu- 
tions. 

330 Geography of California (3) (Formerly 431) 

Description and analysis of the geographic regions of California — their environ- 
mental diversity, population distribution, economic development and current prob- 
lems. 

332 Geography of Anglo-America (3) (Formerly 432) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of the 
United States and Canada emphasizing the interrelated physical and cultural fea- 
tures that give geographic personality both to the individual regions as well as the 
individual countries. 

333 Geography of Latin America (3) (Formerly 434) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A systematic and regional 
survey of Middle and South America with particular emphasis on the interrela- 
tionships of the physical and social factors of the area. 

336 Geography of Europe (3) (Formerly 365) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Description and analysis of physical en- 
vironments and human occupance patterns in Europe west of the Soviet Union. 

338 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) (Formerly 366) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Character of and bases for the regional di- 
versity of man and land in the Soviet Union. 

340 Geography of Asia (3) (Formerly 435) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of Asiatic 
nations, exclusive of the Soviet Union and Southwest Asia, showing the interrela- 
tionships of physical and cultural characteristics with special emphasis on the grow- 
ing significance, in economic, social, and political terms, of such countries as China, 
India and Japan. 


347 


Geography 

342 Geography of the Middle East (3) (Formerly 439) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. The physical foun- 
dations and cultural landscapes of civilization in the Middle East, with emphasis 
on contemporary political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes. 

344 Geography of Subsaharan Africa (3) (Formerly 436) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. The physical, human, and 
regional geography of Africa south of the Sahara. 

346 Australia and the Pacific Islands (3) (Formerly 445) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. The physical, cultural, 
and regional geography of Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia and 
Polynesia. 

350 Conservation of the American Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A survey of resource-use problems and the 
principles of conservation, with discussions of philosophy, ethics, public policy, 
and environmental law. 

355 Population Perspectives (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. An introduction to spatial analysis of demo- 
graphic variables with an emphasis on the economic and social factors influencing 
population distribution and mobility. World patterns will be discussed with an 
emphasis on the United States. 

367 Political Geography (3) (Formerly 481) 

Prerequisite: Geography 210 or consent of instructor. The political map of the 
world with special reference to the geopolitical structure of states, dependencies, 
and other politically organized areas. 

370 Urban Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The city as a geographic unit; urban settle- 
ments as regional centers; city-region relationships; the structure of villages, towns 
and cities, and their historical development; case studies. 

380 Maps and Map Interpretation (3) (Formerly 343) 

Interpretation, evaluation, uses, and sources of various types of maps and 
graphic aids for teaching and research. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

381 Cartography (3) (Formerly 478) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Compilation and con- 
struction of maps and graphs as geographic tools, with emphasis on the principles 
of effective cartographic representation. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

430 Problems of California Geography (3) (Formerly 463) 

Prerequisite: Geography 330 or consent of instructor. A seminar analyzing 
selected geographic problems of California, such as urbanization, transportation, 
water supply and pollution. 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) (Formerly 464) 

Prerequisite: Geography 333 or consent of instructor. A seminar for advanced 
students in Latin American Studies or Geography. Studies of contemporary inter- 
est dealing with man and his development in the area of Latin America. Specific 
content of the course will vary from year to year, but major stress will be placed 
upon the larger countries of the region. 


348 


Geography 


453 Cultural Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 250 or Anthropology 202, or consent of instructor. A 
senior seminar in the ecological approach to man in nature. (Same as Anthro- 
pology 453) 

472 Urban Growth and Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 370 or consent of instructor. A senior seminar on urban 
development with an emphasis on the decentralizing forces operating in contem- 
porary urban space; identification of trends in the planning process. 

477 Historical Geography (3) (Formerly 483) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. A seminar analyzing signifi- 
cant geographic influences on selected aspects of American history. 

482 Problems of Map Compilation and Design (3) (Formerly 480) 

Prerequisite: Geography 381 and consent of the instructor. Application of photo- 
graphic techniques and cartographic analysis to advanced problems in map com- 
pilation and design. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

484 Airphoto and Image Interpretation (3) (Formerly 479) 

Prerequisite: junior, senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Use 
of aerial photography, space photography and other remote sensors as tools and 
research sources. Emphasis on interpretation of physical and cultural elements of 
the landscape. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

485 Quantitative Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. An introduction to spatial 
analysis and geographic application of basic concepts of descriptive and inferential 
statistics. Includes some use of the electronic computer. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

488 Field Methods (3) (Formerly 475) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing and completion of the geography 
core. Consent of the instructor is required. Analysis and interpretation of urban 
and rural land use and settlement with specific references to geographic field 
problems. The course involves application of geographic techniques and tools 
to local field studies. Saturday field sessions. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Open to advanced students. Student must have permission of instructor under 
whom study will be undertaken before enrolling. May be repeated once for credit. 

500 Seminar in the Evolution of Geographic Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. An inquiry into the 
nature, scope, and development of the geographic discipline. 

530 Seminar in Regional Geography (3) (Formerly 513) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected 
regions or selected topics within a regional setting. May be repeated once for 
credit. 

550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) (Formerly 523) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected 
topics pertaining to cultural, political or social geography. May be repeated once 
for credit. 


349 


Geography 

560 Seminar in Resource Geography (3) (Formerly 533) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected 
problems in resource utilization, land use planning and economic geography. May 
be repeated once for credit. 

587 Geographic Research and Presentation (3) (Formerly 490) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar workshop 
in research methods, writing, editing, manuscript preparation, and presentation. 
Recommended that students take Geography 597 or 598 concurrently. 

597 Project (3) 

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units of credit. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. May be 
repeated for a maximum of 6 units of credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 


350 


History 


DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

FACULTY 
B. Carmon Hardy 
Department Chairman 

George Baker, Gordon Bakken, Warren Beck, Leland Bellot, Lauren Breese, Giles 
Brown,* Lawrence de Graaf, Jack Elenbaas, George Etue, Robert Feldman, 
Thomas Flickema, Charles Frazie, George Giacumakis, Arthur Hansen, Harry 
Jeffrey, James Jordan, Frederic Miller, Michael Onorato, David Pivar, Charles 
Povlovich,* Jackson Putnam, Ronald Rietveld, Danton Sailor, Seymour Schein- 
bcrg, Gary Shumway, Cameron Stewart, Ernest Toy,* David Van Deventer, 
Shirley Weleba, Nelson Woodard, Kinji Ken Yada, Ka-Che Yip, Cecile Zinberg 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in history is designed to provide cultural enrichment, 
a sense of alternative, and perspective on both the present and the future. The 
department offers a wide variety of offerings which expose the student to man’s 
rich and diverse experience. This major may be pursued to fulfill various profes- 
sional and cultural objectives common to a liberal arts program. It serves, especially, 
as a preparation for teaching, law, government, and other public services, and as 
the foundation for advanced study at the graduate level. 

The major is composed of a minimum of 24 units in the upper division, plus 
the basic courses in world civilizations (History 110A-110B) and United States 
History (History 170A-170B). The basic courses may also be used to meet general 
education requirements. Students majoring in history are encouraged to include in 
their lower division programs some work in such fields as anthropology, eco- 
nomics, geography, literature, philosophy, political science and sociology. 

Students intending to do graduate work in history should acquire a reading 
knowledge of at least one foreign language appropriate to the pursuit of advanced 
research in a field of history. 

The 24 units of upper division courses required for the major must include: 
History 399 Historiography (3 units) 

Six units in United States history 

Six units in European history (from ancient Greece to modern times) 

Six units in the history of Asia, Africa, or Latin America 

TEACHING MINOR IN HISTORY 

The teaching minor in history is composed of at least 20 units in history exclu- 
sive of the general education requirements: 


Recommended teaching minor: Units 

World civilization (or equivalent) 6 

Upper division work in history 15 

Total 21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The Master of Arts in History is designed to improve the student’s academic and 
professional competence for educational services at the elementary, secondary and 
junior college levels as preparation for advanced graduate work toward the 
doctoral degree in history. It is relevant to various other specialties in public or 
private enterprise and general cultural or community service. The program aims 
to deepen the students understanding of the human condition through a careful 
study of human experience. 


College administrative officer. 


351 


History 


Prerequisites 

Prerequisite to this master’s degree is an undergraduate major in history with at 
least a GPA of 3.0 in the upper division history courses. Each student’s background 
and record are evaluated by the coordinator. Satisfactory scores on the aptitude 
test and the advanced test in history of the Graduate Record Examination are 
required. 

Students with limited subject, grade, or breadth deficiencies may be considered 
for admission to the program upon completing courses approved by the Graduate 
Coordinator in History in addition to those required for the degree, with at least 
a B average. 

Program of Study 

Of the 30 units of adviser-approved graduate courses on the study plan for 
the degree, 18 must be in appropriate work at the 500-level, and six must be in 
other supportive social sciences or related fields. The required courses are: 

Hist 501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3 units) 

Hist 590 History and Historians (3 units) 

A. Plan I: 

A primary focus in one area in which a field is intensively developed. This 
results in a specific topic of research with a written thesis as the final product 
(History 598, Thesis, 3 to 6 units). 

An oral examination on the thesis and the cour^ework will be required upon 
completion of the coursework but prior to the final draft of the thesis. 

B. Plan II: 

The focus in this plan is in two fields not found in the same general area. 
There is a minimum requirement of one graduate research seminar besides History 
501 and 590. There is also a minimum requirement of one graduate reading seminar 
in the recent interpretations of history in the particular fields of interest. 

A written comprehensive in each of the two fields will be required upon com- 
pletion of the program. 



352 


History 


Students in this program must demonstrate a broad cultural understanding of 
one or more foreign countries of import to the master’s degree study program. 
This requirement may be met by a reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign 
language or an approved selection of comparative studies (12 units post B.A.), 
but the method must be approved by the student’s adviser. In certain programs an 
examination in statistics may be substituted for the language requirement. 

For further information, consult the Department of History. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


HISTORY COURSES 

110A World Civilizations to the 17th Century (3) 

The story of man from the beginning of civilizations and historical records until 
the middle of the 17th century. 

110B World Civilizations from 1648 (3) 

The story of man from the end of the religious wars to the present. Deals with 
the rise of science, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and the rise of 
the ideologies of the 20th century. 

170A United States to 1877 (3) 

A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the 
United States from the discovery to 1877. Attention is given to the Old World 
background, the rise of the new nation, sectional problems, and the Civil War 
and Reconstruction. Satisfies the state requirement in U.S. History. 

170B United States Since 1877 (3) 

A survey of United States history from the late 19th century to the present. 
Attention is given to economic transformation, political reform movements, social, 
cultural, and intellectual changes, and the role of the United States in world 
wars. Satisfies the state requirement in U.S. History. 

340A History of England and Great Britain (3) 

A study of the political, economic, and social history of medieval and Tudor- 
Stuart England. Particular stress is placed on institutional and cultural changes 
from the Conquest to the Glorious Revolution. 

340B History of England and Great Britain (3) 

A study of the political, economic, and social history of Great Britain from the 
later Stuarts to the present. Particular stress is placed upon the modification of the 
parliamentary system and the growth of economic and social democracy within 
Britain and upon the development of responsible political systems in the dependent 
territories. 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

A survey of the pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portugal 
and the European background of these countries; the development of the socio- 
economic, cultural, and governmental institutions in colonial life; the background of 
revolutions and the wars for independence. 

350B Republican Latin America (3) 

A survey of the Latin American republic since 1826, emphasizing the struggle 
for responsible government, socioeconomic, and cultural changes, and the role of 
United States foreign policy. 


12—81593 


353 


History 


383 History of California (3) 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of California from the 
aboriginal inhabitants to the present, tracing the development of contemporary 
institutions and the historical background of current issues. 

399 Historiography (3) 

Introduction to nature and discipline of history. A study of methods of historical 
research and writing, of bibliography, and of major problems of historical in- 
terpretation. Required of history majors. 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The history of the competing ideas in 
European history from 1500 to the present which have entered into the formation 
of modern European institutions. 

412A Ancient Near East— Mesopotamia (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A. A study of the political, socioeconomic, religious, 
and literary history of Mespotamian culture from the rise of the Sumerian city- 
states to Alexander the Great, a period of over three millenia. This will include 
discussion of the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Hurrians, and Persians. 

412B Ancient Near East— East Mediterranean (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A. A study of ancient Egypt from early dynastic times 
in the third millennium B.C. to the conquest of Alexander the Great. The history 
of the Syro-Palestinian region will be studied in light of its migrations and inter- 
national culture. A careful study of the Hebrews and their contributions to modern 
civilization will be included. 

415A Classical Greece (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A or consent of instructor. A study of the civilization 
of ancient Greece. This course traces the rise and flourishing of the classical city- 
states; considerable attention is devoted to the literary and philosophic contribu- 
tions to our modem civilization. 

415B Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A or consent of instructor. A study of the Hellenistic 
synthesis and the new patterns in government, the arts and sciences, philosophy 
and literature that appeared between the Macedonian conquest and the interven- 
tion of Rome. 

417A Roman Republic (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A or consent of instructor. A study of the development 
of Roman social and political institutions under the republic. 

417B Roman Empire (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A or consent of instructor. A study of Roman imperial 
institutions and culture. Attention is also given to the rise of Christianity. 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

The rise and fall of Byzantium from the 4th century A.D. until the 15th century 
A.D. This will include a study of Byzantine society and its contribution to the 
world. 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1050 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A. The genesis of European society and culture from 
the decline of Rome to the mid-llth century: the medieval church, the Barbarian 
migrations, the Byzantine and Islamic cultures and the establishment of feudalism 
in western Europe. 


354 


History 


423B Medieval Europe, 1050-1400 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A. A continuation of History 423 A. The struggle be- 
tween church and state, the rise of feudal monarchies and $he intellectual, scientific 
and artistic expressions of European civilization in the later Middle Ages. 

425A The Renaissance (3) 

The history of Europe from 1400 to 1525 with emphasis upon the beginnings of 
capitalism, the beginnings of the modern state, humanism, the pre-Reformation and 
the church on the eve of the Reformation. 

425B The Reformation (3) 

The history of Europe from 1525 to 1648; deals with the Protestant and Catholic 
Reformations; the religious wars; the price rise; royal absolution; the rise of science. 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648—1763 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110B. European diplomatic history and the balance of 
power from 1648 to 1763. Attention is given to the social and philosophical devel- 
opments of the period. 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 

A survey of European history from 1763 to 1815. Emphasis is placed on the 
politics, society, and culture of the Old Regime, the influence of the Enlighten- 
ment, the impact of the French Revolution on Europe, and the establishment of 
French hegemony by Napoleon. 

428 19th-Century Europe (3) 

Europe from 1815 to 1914. An examination of the political, economic, social, and 
cultural trends in European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak 
of World War I. Special attention is given to the emerging forces of nationalism, 
liberalism, socialism, and secularism. 

429 Europe Since 1914 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110B. Survey of events from the beginning of World War 
I to the present. Special emphasis given to the economic, political, social, diplo- 
matic, and intellectual trends of 20th century Europe. 

432 Germany Since 1648 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A,B. The evolution of Germany from the Peace of 
Westphalia to the present. Emphasis is placed on political, social, economic, diplo- 
matic and cultural trends in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

Prerequisite: History HOB. An analysis of the historical developments from the 
establishment of the Russian state at Kiev through the great reforms, the revolu- 
tionary movement and reaction of the 19th century. Emphasis is placed upon the 
shaping of contemporary Russia. 

434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An evaluation of the 1905 and 1917 revolu- 
tions and the subsequent consolidation of power under the Communist regime. 
Chief emphasis is placed upon the continuity and change in Russian social, political, 
cultural institutions and foreign policy effected by the impact of Marxist-Leninist- 
Stalinist ideology. 

437 East Europe Since 1500 (3) 

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the peoples of East Central 
Europe from 1500 to the present. 

439 History of Spain (3) 

Development of Hispanic civilization from the earliest times to the present. 


355 


History 


450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

An analysis of political, social and economic change in present-day Latin Amer- 
ica. 

453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

A history of Mexico from the pre-Columbian period to 1910. The course stresses 
the Indian heritage, the impact upon the native civilizations of the Spanish Conquest 
and the blending of Hispanic Institutions with those of the first Mexicans. The 
uniqueness of Mexican culture in the world as expressed in its art, literature, 
religion and philosophy will be examined in detail. 

453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

A study of the background of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the revolution 
itself from 1910 to 1921 stressing the political, economic, and social features; special 
attention will be paid to the Revolution as the first of the great upheavals of the 
20th century and the relationship of the United States to Mexico during these 
turbulent years. The quest for political stability in the 1920s and 1930s along 
economic and social changes will be studied but stress will also be placed on cul- 
tural renaissance of modem Mexico. 

454 Argentina/ Brazil/ Chile (3) 

A history of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, with special attention to Chile. 

456 Tropical Africa to 1900 (3) 

The history of tropical Africa from earliest times to the colonial era. 

457 Tropical Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the impact of the colonial period upon the peoples of tropical Africa 
including a comparative analysis of the various systems of colonial administration; 
the factors contributing to the rise of African nationalism and the achievement of 
independence; and the problems encountered by these new nations. 

458A Southern Africa from Earliest Times to the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the culture and history of the indigenous peoples of southern Africa; 
and the development and impact of European interests in this area with particular 
emphasis on the history of South Africa to the Union of 1910. 

458B Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

A survey of 20th-century developments in the Union (Republic) of South 
Africa., Central Africa (the Rhodesias and Nyasaland) and the Portuguese colonies 
with emphasis on the political, economic and social ramifications of race relations. 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East (3) 

A topics course dealing with events in the major Far Eastern nations since 
World War II, with emphasis upon problems of nationalism, communism and 
economic development in China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia. 

461 A The Far East (3) 

An introductory' examination of Chinese and Japanese history from ancient times 
to the middle of the 19th century, with particular emphasis on social, intellectual 
and economic developments. 

461 B The Far East (3) 

An introductory' examination of Chinese and Japanese history from the middle 
of the 19th century to the 1950s, concentrating especially on the Western intrusion 
and the rise of nationalism and communism. 


356 


History 


462A History of China (3) 

Chinese history from ancient times to the middle of the 17th century, with 
special attention to the development of society, thought, economy and political 
institutions. 

462B History of China (3) 

Chinese history from the middle of the 17th century to the 1950s. A study of 
China’s internal developments and foreign intrusion, with special attention to the 
rise of modem Chinese nationalism and intellectual developments in the Republi- 
can period, as well as the attempts at modernization and the triumph of com- 
munism. 

463A History of Japan (3) 

A study of the social, political, and economic history of Japan until 1868, with 
emphasis upon the Tokugawa era. 

463B History of Japan (3) 

A study emphasizing the rise of the modem Japanese state, Japanese imperialism 
and the postwar era. 

464A Southeast Asia in the Modern World (3) 

A study of the social, political, and economic development in Southeast Asia 
from 1500 to the establishment of the colonial empires of the West in the 19th 
century. 

464B Southeast Asia in the Modern World (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia under the impact of imperialism and the effects of 
decolonization. 

465A History of India from the Beginning Through the Delhi Sultanate 1526 (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from the earliest times to 
the fall of the Delhi Sultanate 1526. 

465B History of India from the Mughal Through the British Period, 

1 526-1857 (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from the fall of the Delhi 
Sultanate up to the Indian Mutiny of 1857. 

466A Arab Islamic Age (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110A. The study of the events transpiring in the Middle 
East from the Roman world to the period of the Crusades. This will include the 
impact of the Islamic civilization upon the Middle East society. 

466B The Turkish World (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110B. The development of the countries of the Middle East 
following the Crusades to the present. This will include the Ottoman Empire, 
European colonialism in the Middle East, and the modem Middle East. 

467 The Past and the Present in the Middle East (3) (Offered 
during some summer sessions only) 

This course is a study tour to one of three geographical areas in the Middle 
East. The three areas which will be visited during three different summer periods 
of 22 days each, are: North Africa consisting of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya 
and Egypt; the East Mediterranean consisting of Greece, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel 
and Egypt; and Turkey, Iraq and Iran. The objective of these study tours goes 
well beyond a visitation of important historical and archaeological sites, and 
stresses continuities and relationships of the past to the contemporary scene. 


357 


History 


468 Contemporary Middle East (3) 

A study of the social, political and economic changes taking place in the Middle 
East primarily since World War I. Where possible the Middle East will be treated 
as a whole and viewed through a topic-oriented approach. 

470 American Colonial Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170 A or consent of instructor. This course surveys the 
settlement of North America and the growth of Anglo-American civilization to 
the mid- 18th century stressing the creation of political, economic, and social insti- 
tutions and a distinctive American culture. 

471 United States from Colony to Nation (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170 A or consent of instructor. This course surveys the 
political, economic, and intellectual developments of 18th-century America with 
special emphasis upon Anglo-American imperial problems leading to the Revolu- 
tion, the origins of American nationalism, the creation of a constitutional republic, 
and the rise of a party system. 

472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. Analyzes Jeffersonian values 
and their impact upon the social, political and cultural life of the nation during the 
era of their greatest relevance. 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. The study of America’s 
“great national crisis” and the impact of slavery', civil war and national reconstruc- 
tion upon the democratic process of the republic. 

474 America in the Age of the Industrial Revolution (1876—1914) (3) 

A study of the maturation of the American industrial economy and its trans- 
forming impact upon class structure, politics, intellectual and cultural life, and 
diplomacy. Special consideration is given to the attempts made in the Progressive 
years to cope with the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution. 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 (3) 

A multi-topic analysis of major trends in U. S. domestic policy, foreign policy, 
economy and society from World War I through World War II. Course will 
concentrate on conflicting values and ideals of domestic policy and U.S. role in 
world affairs. 

476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 (3) 

Multi-topic analysis of U. S. history from 1945 to the present stressing the 
interrelationship of foreign policy, economic prosperity, domestic tensions and 
protest movements. 

479 The Emergence of Urban America (3) 

A study of the historical development of urban life in America with special 
emphasis on the process of urbanization and the development of urban and sub- 
urban cultures. 

481 Westward Movement in the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A,B or equivalent. A survey of the expansion of the 
United States population and sovereignty from the eastern seaboard to the Pacific, 
colonial times to 1900, and a history of regional development during the frontier 
period. 


358 


History 


482A Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170 A or consent of instructor. The course explores the 
interaction of social and economic factors upon each other in the development of 
American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and labor in 
economic change. The first semester covers the development of a colonial economy 
and the early national economy. 

482B Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170B or consent of instructor. The course continues to 
explore the interaction of social and economic factors upon each other in the devel- 
opment of American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and 
labor in economic change. The second semester begins with the “takeoff stage of 
economic development” and ends with contemporary America. 

484A American Constitutional History to 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A. English and colonial origins, the growth of democ- 
racy, the slavery controversy, and the sectional conflict as they reflect constitu- 
tional development. 

484B American Constitutional History from 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170B. Constitutional problems involved in the post-Civil 
War era, the expansion of business, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, 
and civil rights in the postwar era. 

485A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) 

A comprehensive survey of the foreign relations of the United States from the 
beginning of the nation until 1900. Particular attention is given to bases of policy, 
critical evaluation of major policies and relationships between domestic affairs and 
foreign policy. 

485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 (3) 

Relations from 1900 to the present. An analysis of the rise of the United States 
as a world power in the 20th century with special emphasis on the search for world 
order and the diplomacy of the atomic age. 

486A Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the 
Puritans to the Civil War. 

486B Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the 
Civil War to the present. 

487 A History of Politics in American Society (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A,B or consent of instructor. The first semester of 
this course traces political developments from the Colonial Period to the end of 
the Civil War. Its primary focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional 
development and the response of the American political system to changing societal 
demands and needs. 

487B History of Politics in American Society (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A,B or consent of instructor. The second semester of 
the course traces political developments from Reconstruction to Lyndon Baines 
Johnson. Its primary focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional 
development and the response of the political system to changing societal demands 
and needs. 

488A American Negro From Slavery to Jim Crow (3) 

A history of black Americans from African backgrounds through the era of 
slavery and the Civil War to the post-Reconstruction era. 


359 


History 


488B American Negro Since 1890 (3) 

History of black Americans from Booker T. Washington to present, stressing 
both their culture and role in American life and the issues involved in their rela- 
tions with other segments of the population in various regions. 

489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest (3) 

Historical role of the Mexican-American in the Southwest stressing the cultural 
uniqueness, contributions, with special emphasis upon migration, education, and 
economic changes since 1945. 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) 

Intensive study of trends, phenomena, themes or periods of history involving 
occasional lecture, discussion, directed reading, and student research. 

492A Community History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the historical development of 
communities in general, and of the Orange County area in particular. Special 
emphasis on the techniques of gathering and processing local historical data includ- 
ing oral interviews and other archival materials. 

492B Community History (3) 

Prerequisite: History 492A. Community history studies continued. Special em- 
phasis is on the gathering, editing and utilization of local community history 
documents. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in history with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

505 Seminar in Analysis of Recent Interpretations in History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

520 Seminar in European History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

550 Seminar in Latin American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

560 Seminar in Afro-Asian History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

570 Seminar in American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

590 History and Historians (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the writings, personalities, and 
philosophies of representative historians from Herodotus to the present. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1—3) 

Open to graduate students in history with the consent of the department chair- 
man. May be repeated for credit. 

360 


Linguistics 


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 

FACULTY 
David M. Feldman 
Department Chairman 

Ralph Beckett (Speech Communication), Samuel Cartledge (Foreign Languages), 
Lawrence Christensen (Anthropology), Seth Fessenden (Speech Communica- 
tion), Barbara Harris (Speech Communication), Joseph Kalir, Donald Kaplan 
(Speech Communication), Mary Key, Harvey Mayer (Foreign Languages), Max 
Nelson (Speech Communication), Otto Sadovszky (Anthropology), James San- 
tucci, Clarence Schneider (English), Donald Sears (English), Richard See 
(Anthropology), Frank Verges (Philosophy), Jon Zimmermann (Foreign 
Languages) 

Linguistics is the scientific study of language — its nature and development, its 
universal properties, its diversified structures and their dialectal variants, its ac- 
quisition by children and non-native speakers, its systems of writing and transcrip- 
tion, its cultural role in the speech community, and its application to other areas of 
human knowledge. As such, it is concerned with the multiple aspects of human 
communicative behavior which encompass thought, symbolization, language, mean- 
ing, acoustics, perception and the physiological processes of utterance and audition. 

The interdisciplinary aspects of this study are reflected in the organization of 
the program which not only offers its own core of general linguistics courses but 
draws widely upon linguistically-related courses in other departments of the 
college. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

This program is designed for students with an exceptional interest in and aptitude 
for the study of the systems of human communication. It enables the undergraduate 
student to perceive the function of language in the development of civilization; to 
understand the essential relationships between language and thought and language 
and culture; to gain substantial familiarity with the structure of foreign languages 
as well as English; to observe several types of linguistic structures; and to become 
conversant with the historical study of language and formal techniques and 
theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis. The program will enable the student 
with linguistic and philological interests to grasp the scope of the entire field and, 
in addition, to determine more accurately the most meaningful concentrations 
in graduate study. 


Lower Division Requirements 

One year of Latin, Greek, Hebrew or Sanskrit (6) 
Anthropology 202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 
Philosophy 210 Logic (3) 


Upper Division Requirements (minimum of 30 units) 

317 course in a modem foreign language (3) 

Linguistics 341 Introduction to Phonetics <3) 

Linguistics 404 General Semantics (2) 

Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

Linguistics 490 Linguistics in Relation to Other Disciplines ( 1-4) 
Linguistics 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 


361 


Linguistics 


Two electives (or more) from the following: 

Communications 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass 
Communication (3) 

Education 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Education 380 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modem English (3) 

English 305 American Dialects (3) 

French, German, Russian or Spanish Course 400 (3) 

French, German, or Spanish 466 Course (3) 

Linguistics 375 The Philosophy of Language (3) 

Linguistics 402 Phonetic Analysis of Speech (3) 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Mathematics 304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Philosophy 450 Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3) 

Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Psycholgy 415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Speech Communication 304 Message Reception and Analysis (3) 

Speech Communication 340 Speech Science (3) 

Students must consult with an adviser in linguistics before establishing their in- 
dividual programs of study. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

The M.A in Linguistics is designed for students who have exceptional interest in 
and aptitude for the study of the systems of human communication, reinforced by 
undergraduate study in linguistics and allied areas, such as foreign languages, 
English language, anthropology, speech communication and related areas in psy- 
chology and philosophy. It enables the graduate student to study in depth the 
position and function of human communication systems in the development of 
civilization; to understand more fully the essential relationships between thought, 
language and culture; to deepen mastery of the structure of foreign languages as 
w’ell as English; to work intensively with several types of linguistic structures w ith 
special attention to non-Indo-European languages; and to increase expertise in the 
historical study of language and formal techniques and theoretical foundations of 
linguistic analysis. 

The core courses of the program are devoted to an in-depth consideration of 
descriptive, historical and applied linguistics. The remainder of the program com- 
bines advanced work in: the theory of phonemic; morphological and syntactical 
analysis; articulatory and experimental phonetics; semantics; lexicology"; dialec- 
tology; language typology; and field methods, in which the procedures of the 
linguist working under field conditions are demonstrated by the analysis of 
several languages elicited from informants. A variety of approaches to descriptive 
analysis and several theoretical points of view, both American and European, in- 
cluding generative grammar, transformational analysis and prosodies are presented. 
A series of courses on the structure of individual languages, both ancient and 
modern, provides opportunities for applying the general principles of structural 
analysis and for establishing linguistic data by elicitation from informants and 
analysis of written records. The languages examined will be drawn from a wide 
variety of language families including the more familiar members of the Indo- 
European group. General courses in comparative linguistics and comparison within 
individual language families review methods of establishing genetic relationships 
among languages. The geographical diffusion of linguistic features and problems of 
language contact are studied by examining areal groupings of genetically unre- 
lated languages. The relationship between linguistics and other disciplines and 

362 


Linguistics 


the application of the techniques, findings, and insights of that science to such 
activities as language teaching are treated in interdisciplinary courses and seminars. 

The aim of the graduate program in linguistics, as reflected in the course 
offerings, is to provide thorough and well-balanced training for practice and re- 
search in the several areas of linguistic studies and to prepare qualified students 
for careers in the communication sciences and allied disciplines. 

Course requirements Units 

Coursework in descriptive, historical and structural linguistics 13 

Linguistics 501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Linguistics 505 Phonetics and Phonemics (3) 

Linguistics 507 Seminar: Morphosyntax (3) 

Linguistics 508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Linguistics 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Coursework selected from any one of the following six areas of subspe- 
cialization, including other courses in the department with the approval 
of the adviser 9 

Applied Linguistics 

English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

English 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 520 Advanced Seminar in Applied Linguistics (3) 
French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 529 Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Anthropological Linguistics 

Anthropology 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 565 Graduate Major Language Families (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 592 Field Methods (3) 

Linguistics 593 Language Typology (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Analysis of Specific Language Structures 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

French 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

German 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Spanish 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

French 510 Phonology (3) 

German 510 Phonology (3) 

Spanish 510 Phonology (3) 


363 


Linguistics 

French 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

German 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

French 520 Old French (3) 

English 570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

English 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Experimental Phonetics 

Linguistics 402 Phonetic Analysis of Speech (3) 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 540 Seminar in Experimental Phonetics (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Speech Communication 543 Major Problems in Speech Pathology and Audiol- 
ogy (3) 

Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Communication and Semantics 

Anthropology 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 504 Graduate Seminar: Semantics (3) 

Linguistics 515 Psycholinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 529 Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Philosophy 450 Seminar: Philosophy of Language (3) 

Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Disorders of Communication 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 515 Psycholinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 529 Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Linguistics 540 Seminar in Experimental Phonetics (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Speech Communication 441 Speech Pathology: Nonorganic Disorders (3) 
Speech Communication 443 Speech Pathology: Organic Disorders (3) 

Speech Communication 451 Diagnostic Methods in Speech and Hearing (3) 
Speech Communication 452 Therapeutic Procedures in Speech and Hear- 
ing (3) 

Speech Communication 463 Audiology (3) 

Speech Communication 464 Audiometry (3) 

Speech Communication 557 A -I Seminar in Speech Pathology (3) 

Speech Communication 563 Seminar in Audiology (3) 

Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


Coursework in a related field 6 

Linguistics 597 Project (2) 2 

Total 30 


364 


Linguistics 


A minimum of 15 units in 500-level courses is required. Also, satisfactory com- 
pletion of written and oral comprehensive examinations will be required at the con- 
clusion of the program. 

Admission to the Graduate Program 

In addition to fulfilling all general prerequisites for graduate work established 
at California State College, Fullerton, an applicant, in order to gain admission 
to this program, must hold a bachelor’s or equivalent degree with a major in 
linguistics consisting of 24 upper division semester credit hours, or equivalent, in 
the field, with grades testifying to above-average scholarship from an accredited 
institution. Those having degrees with other related majors may be admitted if 
they have completed the following courses or their equivalents. These prerequisites 
may be fulfilled concurrently with graduate coursework in the program. 

Linguistics 406 (3) 

English 490 (3) 

Linguistics 410 (3) 

Linguistics 490 (1) 

Knowledge of one foreign language is required. Students without coursework in 
a foreign language may demonstrate proficiency by a score of “average” or better 
on the MLA-ETS Proficiency Examination for Advanced Students. Work toward 
fulfillment of this requirement may be taken concurrently with graduate course- 
work in linguistics. 

For further information, consult the graduate coordinator of the Department of 
Linguistics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

LABORATORY FOR PHONETIC RESEARCH 

See description appearing on page 38. 

For further information, consult the chairman of the Department of Linguistics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


LINGUISTICS COURSES 


301 Sanskrit (3) 

An introduction to the Sanskrit language, emphasizing the acquisition of reading 
fluency. The devanagari script, phonology, morphology and syntax will be exam- 
ined in depth, along with relevant points on Hindu culture and on the place of 
Sanskrit in the development of the Indo-European language family. 

302 Sanskrit (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 301 or equivalent. Continuation of 301, concentrating on 
the intensive and extensive reading of Sanskrit texts. Further development of the 
relationship between the Sanskrit language and Hindu culture will be comple- 
mented by an in-depth treatment of the genetic and typological relationships be- 
tween Sanskrit and other languages of the Indo-European family. Special attention 
will be given to paleographic techniques and graphemics. 

341 Phonetics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 341, Theatre 341) 

375 Philosophy of Language (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 375) 

402 Phonetic Analysis of Speech (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 402) 


365 


Linguistics 


403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 403) 

404 General Semantics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 404) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Introduction to the nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morpho- 
logical, and syntactic structures of languages are examined through the use of 
techniques developed for the description of such structures. 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 410) 

411 Bilingualism (3) 

The study of the personal and social development of non-English speaking com- 
munities as reflected in the conflict between the language of the home and the 
language of the community. Special emphasis is placed on the Spanish-speaking 
communities of California and on the need for and means of achieving bilingual 
educational programs for the maintenance of the Hispanic cultural heritage in the 
American environment. 

412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

The study of social dialects in relation to the surrounding communities, with 
special attention to black dialects in America. Topics include social stratification, 
acculturation, language maintenance, standardization, language planning and lan- 
guage change. 

490 Linguistics in Relation to Other Disciplines (1—4) 

The mutually contributing relationships between linguistics and the social and 
natural sciences, literature, music, psychology, philosophy, mathematics, and lan- 
guage pedagogy. To be taken for one unit of credit for four semesters by majors 
in linguistics. Open to all upper division students. 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Supervised projects in linguistics to be taken with consent of department 
chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Selection of topic to 
be studied varies with needs of the students enrolled. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and Linguistics 406, or equivalent. Introduction 
to principal books, periodicals, and collections in general linguistics, specific lan- 
guages and related fields; techniques of preparing research papers and field reports 
in linguistics. 

504 Graduate Seminar: General Semantics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 504) 

505 Seminar Phonetics and Phonemics (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology or Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. Study 
of various kinds of phonological systems that occur in languages. Emphasis on 
practical problems in the phonetic and phonemic analysis of selected language 
data. (Same as Anthropology 505) 

507 Seminar: Morphosyntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology or Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. The 
study of word formation and sentence construction in a variety of languages. 
Application of immediate constituent, tagmemic, and tranformational analysis to 
selected linguistic data. (Same as Anthropology 507) 

366 


Linguistics 


508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 507 or consent of instructor. Intensive and practical 
study of contemporary theories of grammar, with special emphasis on transforma- 
tional, generative, logical and electromechanical bases and techniques of utterance 
analysis. 

515 Psycholinguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or equivalent. An examination of the behavioral, 
conceptual, motivational and social aspects of language, emphasizing recent develop- 
ments in information theory, behavioral theory, and linguistic theory as applied to 
human communication. Linguistic ontogeny, non-verbal communication, and com- 
municative failure will also be discussed. 

529 Graduate Seminar: Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 403 and 406, their equivalent, or consent of instructor. 
An intensive examination of the development of language and linguistic systems 
in the human species and in the individual from the viewpoint of contemporary 
linguistic analysis and theory. Special attention will also be given to non-verbal 
communication systems, paralanguage, and kinesics as language-relevant communi- 
cation media. Work with informants and experimental subjects in the Laboratory 
for Phonetic Research will complement the theoretical material. 

530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406, its equivalent, or consent of instructor. The his- 
tory of language, also including principles and techniques for the historical study 
and classification of individual languages and language families, writing systems, 
lexicostatistical methods, and linguistic geography. 

540 Graduate Seminar: Experimental Phonetics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 540) 

565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406, its equivalent, or consent of instructor. The lin- 
guistic history and present structure of the world’s major language families. Each 
semester a different language family will be studied and analyzed in terms of its 
synchronic and diachronic phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, with 
collateral attention given to the relationships between the language family and 
the cultures with which it is associated. May be repeated for credit. 



367 


Linguistics 

575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in the Department of Linguistics or consent of 
instructor. An intensive exploration of the latest research and development in 
linguistic theory, technique and methodology. May be repeated for credit. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

(Same as Education 584) 

592 Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 505 and 507 or consent of instructor. Methods of analysis 
and description of language structures. Data elicited from informants will be 
analyzed and described. Controlled study of a live informant’s language. 

597 Project (2) 

The preparation and completion of an approved project. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-*3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of department chairman. May be 
repeated for credit. 


368 


Mathematics 


DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

FACULTY 
Dennis B. Ames 
Department Chairman 

Russell Benson, Edwin Buchman, Joseph Bucuzzo, Michael Clapp, Russell Egbert, 
Robert Gauntt, Richard Gilbert, Vuryl Klassen, Vyron Klassen, Gerald Marley, 
John Mathews, Ronald Miller, Sam Pierce, Rollin Sandberg, Harris Shultz, Edsel 
Stiel, Yun-Cheng Zee 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS 

The program of studies in mathematics offers courses stressing the understanding 
of mathematical concepts and the axiomatic approach. A sufficient variety of 
courses is given to satisfy the needs of: 

(1) The proficient aiming toward graduate study, 

(2) The student planning to use mathematics in a career in industry and gov- 
ernment service, 

(3) Preprofessional students in other science areas, 

(4) The prospective elementary and secondary teacher. 

The major program is designed to provide a student with both depth and 
breadth in mathematics. It also prepares a student for subsequent graduate work 
in mathematics. 

The Applied Option is designed to prepare a student for industrial employment 
in applied mathematics. 

The Teaching Option is designed to prepare a student for the teaching of mathe- 
matics (credentialed) in high school or lower. 

The science-language requirements for all mathematics majors are: 


Units 

Physics 225A and 226A 4 

and either 

Thirteen units (or their equivalent) of a modem foreign language, German, 
French or Russian. (Note: for the Teaching Option— German, French, 
Russian and Spanish) 13 

or 

Twelve units from one or several of the following categories 12 


1. Additional courses from Physics 225B,C,D, and 226B,C and/or upper 
division physics 

2. Chemistry 101 A, B and/or upper division chemistry 

3. Philosophy 368, Symbolic Logic, or Mathematics 304 * but not both 

4. Quantitative Methods 264, Programming. 

Any mathematics major may, if he desires, satisfy his science-language require- 
ments with the above courses rather than the courses prescribed in a previous 
catalog. 

Each of these courses must be passed with a grade of at least C, hence none 
may be taken on a credit/no credit basis. 

To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics, students must have at least 
a C in all mathematics courses required for the major. 

The basic courses in mathematics may also be used to meet the general education 
requirements. 

* The student in the Teaching Option may not use Math 304 for credit in both the science- 
language requirements and as a major elective in mathematics. 


369 


Mathematics 


Mathematics majors should take the lower division mathematics courses (150A, 
B, 250, 291) during the first two years. Furthermore, majors requiring Advanced 
Calculus (350A, B) should complete these courses before the senior year. 


Major Program in Mathematics 

Required courses: 

Math 150A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Math 250 Intermediate Calculus 

Linear Algebra 


Vector and Tensor Analysis 
Elementary Differential Geometry 
Modem Algebra 


(choice)- 


Math 291 
Math 306 
Math 307 
Math 302 

Math 350A,B Advanced Calculus 
Math 407 Abstract Algebra 
Math 412 Complex Analysis 
Math 414 Topology 
Math 450 Real Analysis 

Any other 400-level course in mathematics 


(choice of three ). 


Units 
_ 8 
_ 4 
_ 3 


Required courses: 
Math 150A, B 
Math 250 
Math 291 
Math 306 
Math 307 
Math 310 
Math 350A, B 
Math 302 
Math 335 
Math 336 
Math 340 
Math 430 
Math 431 
Math 440 
Math 450 
Math 412 


Option in Applied Mathematics 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Intermediate Calculus 

Linear Algebra 


Vector and Tensor Analysis 
Elementary and Differential Geometry 

Ordinary Differential Equations 

Advanced Calculus 

Modern Algebra 
Mathematical Probability 
Mathematical Statistics 
Numerical Analysis 
Partial Differential Equations 
Methods of Applied Mathematics 
Advanced Numerical Analysis 
Real Analysis 

Complex Analysis 


(choice) 


39 

Units 
- 8 
^ 4 
_ 3 


(choice of four, 

at least two of 
which must be 400- 
level) 


12 


Option in Mathematics for Teacher Education 
for Elementary or Secondary Education 

Required courses : 


42 


Math 150A, B Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

Math 250 Intermediate Calculus 

Math 291 Linear Algebra 

Math 302 Modem Algebra 1 / h : x 

Math 330 Number Theory J ^ ' * 

Math Ed 311 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Algebra 

Math Ed 312 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics — Geometry 

Math 315 Euclidean Geometry } . , . . 

Math 320 Projective Geometry $ ' c 01ce ' 

Math 335 Mathematical Probability } , . 

Math 336 Mathematical Statistics ] c olce 

Elective courses from Mathematics Department only, 300-level or higher 


8 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

9 


370 


39 


Mathematics 


Minor Program in Mathematics 

A mathematics minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework selected from the 
courses offered by the Mathematics Department. They must include Mathematics 
291 and at least six upper division units from the Mathematics Department. Each 
course must be completed with a grade C or better. 

Minor Program in Mathematics for Teacher Education 

A. For elementary education the minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework 
selected from the course listings in mathematics and mathematics education. These 
courses must include Mathematics 150B and Mathematics Education 103 A, B. 

B. For secondary education the minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework 
selected from the course listings in mathematics and mathematics education. These 
courses must include Mathematics 291 and six units of upper division courses in 
mathematics or mathematics education. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS 

The M.A. in Mathematics is designed to provide advanced study for students 
interested in continuing studies for a Ph.D. in mathematics, high school and junior 
college teaching, and mathematical analysis in industry. 

Prerequisites 

Prerequisites to the program include: 

(1) possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution; 

(2) an undergraduate major in mathematics or a combination of courses and 
work experience which the student’s graduate committee evaluates as satis- 
factory preparation. 

Students with limited preparation or grade deficiencies may be considered for 
admission to the program, upon completion of committee-approved courses with at 
least a B average. 

Program of Study (for all except high school mathematics teachers) 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved by the stu- 
dent’s graduate committee. Sixteen of these units must be 500-level mathematics 
courses. Each student will be required to take electives to insure competence in 
algebra, analysis, topology and geometry. Nine units will be required outside the 
student’s specialization, which may be taken in the Mathematics Department. 

Proficiency in reading mathematics literature in an adviser-approved foreign 
language will be required before advancement to candidacy and before the depart- 
ment will recommend the awarding of the degree, the candidate must pass exami- 
nations (written and/or oral) designed to test his competence in the coursework 
he has taken. 

For more detailed information or advisement, students should communicate with 
the chairman of the Department of Mathematics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

Program of Study for Option in Mathematics for Secondary Schools 

This option, designed for high school mathematics teachers, requires 30 units of 
graduate study approved by the student’s graduate committee. The following 15 
units of coursework must be included: Math 581, 582, 583, 590 and one unit of 597. 
Each student will be required to take electives to insure competence in algebra, 
geometry and analysis. 

There is no foreign language requirement for this option. Before the department 
will recommend the awarding of the degree, the candidate must pass examinations 
designed to test his competence in the coursework he has taken. 


371 


Mathematics 


Most of the courses required for this option will be offered during the summer 
only. Courses will be scheduled so that a student may complete the degree re- 
quirements by attending classes during three successive summers. It should be noted 
that the student must be admitted to the college for a regular semester and must 
be enrolled at the time of receiving the degree. 

For more detailed information or advisement, students should communicate with 
the chairman of the Department of Mathematics. 

See also “The Program of Master’s Degrees,” page 77, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


MATHEMATICS COURSES* 

110 Methods and Concepts of Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisites: 2Vi years of high school mathematics, including one year of algebra 
and one year of geometry. Selected topics in algebra, number theory, geometry, 
set theory, probability and analysis with special emphasis on the ideas and methods 
involved. Not open for credit to mathematics majors. 

120 Elementary Probability (3) 

Prerequisites: three years of high school mathematics or its equivalent. Topics 
include set algebra, finite probability models, sampling, binomial trials, conditional 
probability and expectation. It is particularly suited to students of economics, the 
biological and social sciences. 

150A/B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4,4) 

Prerequisites: four years of high school mathematics inclusive of trigonometry. 
An introduction to analysis including vector algebra, analytic geometry, functions, 
limits, differentiation, the definite integral, techniques of integration, first order 
differential equations, applications. 

250 Intermediate Calculus (4) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A.B or equivalent. A continuation of Math 150. Topics 
include functions of several variables, partial differentiation, curvilinear integrals, 
multiple integration, infinite series, Taylor’s theorem, linear differential equations. 

281 Linear Alegbra with Differential Equations (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250. An introduction to linear algebra with particular appli- 
cation to the theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: vector 
functions, vector spaces, linear transformations, systems of linear algebraic and 
differential equations, matrices, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, applica- 
tions to physical systems, series solutions of differential equations. Intended for 
students in the physical sciences and engineering. (Credit cannot be taken for 
Math 291 if Math 281 is taken.) 

291 Linear Algebra (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 150B. The study of matrices, determinants, vector spaces, 
linear transformations. (Credit cannot be taken for Math 281 if Math 291 is taken.) 

302 Modern Algebra (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 291. The integers, rational numbers, real and complex num- 
bers, polynominal domains, introduction to groups, rings, integral domains and 
fields. 

304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Math DOB. An introductory course in the elements of mathematical 
logic. 


* Prerequisites may be waived in any mathematics course by the consent of instructor. 

372 


Mathematics 


305 Elements of Set Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and 291. Operations on sets; functions; cardinals and 
ordinals; ordering, well ordering; axiom of choice; transfinite numbers. 

306 Vector and Tensor Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and either 281 or 291. Analysis of vector fields; Green’s, 
Gauss’ and Stokes theorems. Introduction to tensor analysis. Applications to geom- 
etry, mechanics and electromagnetism. 

307 Elementary Differential Geometry (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and 291. The differential geometry of curves and sur- 
faces in Euclidean 3-space. Differential forms in 3-space. Cartan’s equations of 
structure. Gauss-Weingarten-Codazzi equations. 

310 Ordinary Differential Equations (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and either 281 or 291. An introduction to existence theo- 
rems and the theory of ordinary differential equations. 

315 Euclidean Geometry (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250. Selected topics in advanced Euclidean geometry such as 
convexity, transformation theory and 72-dimensional Euclidean space. 

320 Projective Geometry (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 291. Homogeneous coordinates, projective group, cross-ratio, 
duality, point and line conics. 

330 Number Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250 or 291. Divisibility, congruences, prime number theory, 
Diophantine problems. 

335 Mathematical Probability (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250. An introductory course in probability theory and its 
applications, based on use of the calculus. 

336 Mathematical Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250. An introductory course in statistical theory and its 
applications, based on use of the calculus. 

340 Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250, either 281 or 291, and a knowledge of computer coding. 
Solution of systems of nonlinear equations. Approximation and interpolation. Nu- 
merical differentiation, integration, and solution of ordinary differential equations. 
Difference equations. Error analysis. Computer coding of numerical methods. 

350A,B Advanced Calculus (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250 and either 281 or 291. Designed to introduce the student 
to rigorous proofs in analysis. Topics include continuity, differentiation and inte- 
gration of functions of several variables, improper integrals, sequences and in- 
finite series. 

407 Abstract Algebra (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 302. Sets, mappings, groups, rings, modules, fields, homo- 
morphisms, advanced topics in vector spaces and theory of linear transformations, 
matrices, algebras, ideals, field theory, Galois theory. 

412 Complex Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 350A. Complex differentiation and integration, Cauchy’s 
theorem and integral formulas, maximum modulus theorem, harmonic functions, 
Laurent series, analytic continuation, entire and meromorphic functions, conformal 
transformations and special functions. 


373 


Mathematics 


414 Topology (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 350A. An introductory course in point set and algebraic topol 
ogy. 


430 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 350B or consent of instructor. Cauchy-Kowalewsky and other 
existence theorems, theory of first order equations, classification of equations of 
higher order, detailed study of elliptic, hyperbolic and parabolic equations, appli- 
cations of functional analysis to partial differential equations. 

431 Methods of Applied Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 350A or consent of instructor. Calculus of variation, partial 
differential equations of physics, Fourier series and orthogonal functions, integral 
transforms. 

440 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 340 and 350A. Numerical solution of systems of linear equa- 
tions, matrix inversion, computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and solution of 
partial differential equations. Error analysis. Computer coding of numerical meth- 
ods. 

450 Real Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 3 SOB. An introduction to Lebesgue measure and integration 
and selected topics from the following: metric spaces, compact and perfect sets. 
Cantor’s ternary set, limes inferior and superior, discontinuities, functions of 
bounded variation, Riemann-Stieltjes integral, families of continuous functions, 
equi-continuity, Stone- Weierstrass theorem, convergence of Fouries series, inverse 
and implicit function theorems, functional dependence. 

499 Independent Study (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of some special topic in mathematics, 
selected in consultation with the instructor and carried out under his supervisions. 

506 Seminar in Number Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 302, 330, 350B or consent of instructor. Selected topics in 
analytic and algebraic number theory. 

507 Topics in Abstract Algebra (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 407. Modules, algebras, ideal theory, field theory, Galois 
theory, categories, functors, homology. 

508 Seminar in Algebra (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 407 or consent of instructor. Structure theory of rings, 
algebras, field and Galois theory. Homological algebra. Research topics in algebra. 
May be repeated for credit. 

512 Complex Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 412. Special topics in complex analysis including analytic 
functions of several variables, special functions, conformal mapping and Riemann 
surfaces. 

514 Topology (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 414. Advanced point set and algebraic topology. 

515 Seminar in Advanced Topology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced areas in topology in preparation 
for research work. May be repeated for credit. 


374 


Mathematics 


520 Lebesgue Measure and Integration (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 350B. Lebesgue measure and integration on the line and in 
77 -space. Topics include the dominated convergence theorem, absolute continuity, 
convergence in measure and in mean, differentiation and Fubini’s theorem. 

525 Differential Geometry (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 414. Differentiable manifolds, connections, curvature, torsions, 
covariant differentiation, topics in Riemannian geometry. 

526 Seminar in Geometry (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. May be repeated for 
credit. 

530 Topics in Applied Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Topics will be selected from mechanics 
of continua, integral equations, partial differential equations, probability, statistics, 
ordinary differential equations, Riemann surfaces and approximation theory. May 
be repeated for credit. 

531 Seminar in Applied Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced topics in applied mathematics. 
May be repeated for credit. 

550 Topics in Real Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 450. General theory of measure and integration, set functions, 
theorems of Radon-Nikodym and Fubini. 

551 Seminar in Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. A semester graduate course in analysis. 
Advanced topics in real and complex analysis. May be repeated for credit. 

560 Functional Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 291 and 450; corequisite: Math 414. Topics in modem func- 
tional analysis including Hilbert and Banach spaces, linear transformations and 
spectral theory. 

580 Junior High School Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in junior or 
senior high school mathematics. The content and methods of mathematics related 
to the junior high school mathematics curriculum correlated with a seminar on 
current junior high school mathematics programs. 

581 High School Geometry from an Advanced Standpoint (4) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in junior 
or senior high school mathematics. The content and methods of mathematics 
related to the high school geometry curriculum, correlated with a seminar on 
current high school geometry programs. 

582 High School Algebra from an Advanced Standpoint (4) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in junior 
or senior high school mathematics. The content and methods of mathematics 
related to the high school algebra curriculum, correlated with a seminar on cur- 
rent high school algebra programs. 


375 


Mathematics 


583 Precalculus High School Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint (4) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in junior 
or senior high school mathematics. The content and methods of mathematics 
related to the high school precalculus curriculum (primarily trigonometry and 
analytic geometry), correlated with a seminar on current high school precalculus 
programs. 

584 Elementary Analysis from an Advanced Standpoint (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in high 
school mathematics. The content and methods of mathematics related to the high 
school curriculum in analysis, correlated with a seminar on current high school 
programs in analysis. 

590 Seminar in Secondary Mathematics ( 2 ) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus one year of full-time teaching in junior 
or senior high school mathematics. An analysis of current issues, programs and 
proposals within secondary mathematics. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. One unit of independent study required of each 
student for each regular graduate course. Also offered without being attached to 
any course. May be repeated for credit. 


376 


Philosophy 


DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 


FACULTY 
Paul C. Hayner 
Department Chairman 

William Alamshah, Ernest Becker # , John Cronquist, Leonard Hitchcock, Gloria 
Rock, J. Michael Russell, Frank Verges 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

The major in philosophy is designed to provide the undergraduate student with 
(1) information about the achievements of the world’s outstanding philosophers 
in the analysis and resolution of philosophic issues, and (2) some measure of skill 
in analyzing and resolving such issues as they arise in his own areas of interest. 
Courses in philosophy are selected to provide both breadth and depth in exploring 
and analyzing philosophic concerns. 

Requirements for the Major 

A. A minimum of 30 units in philosophy. 

B. Lower Division (Maximum of 6 units beyond general education require- 
ments). 

1. Philosophy 290 (3) 

2. Philosophy 291 (3) 

Note: Students who have taken their lower division work elsewhere will be 
given credit for equivalent coursework. Up to 6 units of such coursework may 
be allowed for credit at the discretion of the department. 

C. Upper Division (Minimum of 24 units) 

1. Philosophy 300 (3) 

2. Philosophy 301 (3) 

3. At least 9 units at the 400 level, to include: 

a. At least one seminar, (3) 

b. Philosophy 499, and (3) 

c. A 400 level elective other than a seminar. (3) 

A program in philosophy profits greatly through the study of literature, 
psychology, and the social sciences. Students of philosophy are advised to supple- 
ment their studies in philosophy with coursework offered in these fields. Philosophy 
majors are urged to acquire proficiency in a foreign language. 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 

Requirements for the Minor are: 

A. A minimum of 21 units in Philosophy. 

B. Lower Division (Maximum of 9 units beyond general education require- 
ments) . 

1. Philosophy 290 (3) 

2. Philosophy 291 (3) 

C. Upper Division (Minimum of 12 units) 

1. Philosophy 300 (3) 

2. Philosophy 301 (3) 

* College administrative officer. 


377 


Philosophy 


PHILOSOPHY COURSES 

100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to the nature, methods and some of the main problems of 
philosophy. 

110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) 

A study of man’s religious impulse as viewed from the philosophical standpoint. 
An attempt will be made to analyze and to compare religious experience as ex- 
pressed in Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc. 

210 Logic (3) 

Analysis of the various forms given to propositions and the basic requirements 
necessary for valid inference. 

250 Philosophy of Ideas (3) 

Analysis of basic ideas which have shaped modern thought. 

290 History of Philosophy: Greek Philosophy (3) 

The origins of Philosophy in Greece, and its development to the time of 
Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. 

291 History of Philosophy: Medieval Philosophy (3) 

Scholastic philosophy and its precursors in ancient thought. 

300 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) 

The rationalism of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and the empiricism of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. 

301 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) 

The empiricistic and rationalistic influences on Kant, followed by a study of the 
major trends in 19th-century philosophy. 

305 Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

A survey and analysis of the main trends of 20th-century philosophy. Emphasis 
will be placed on such trends as pragmatism, linguistic analysis, and existen- 
tialism. 

310 Ethics (3) 

An analysis of the problems of human conduct: motivation, valuing, norms, so- 
cial demands, and personal commitments. 

311 Aesthetics (3) 

An investigation into the conditions and the aims of art and aesthetic experience. 

323 Contemporary Existentialism (3) 

An analysis of the meaning of existentialism in modem philosophy. 

345 Political Philosophy (3) 

Selected problems in political philosophy. 

347 Selected Problems in Philosophy (3) 

An investigation into the significant contributions made to human culture through 
philosophic analysis. 

360 Philosophy of History (3) 

A study of the metaphysical and the logical problems of history. 


378 


Philosophy 


365 Social Philosophy (3) 

Philosophical (logical) analysis of theories of social organization and rigorous 
investigation of the various types of social, economic and cultural institutions 
which make up western society. 

368 Symbolic Logic (3) 

The recognition and construction of correct deductions in the sentential logic 
and the first-order predicate calculus with identity. 

369 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 368 or equivalent. Continuation of the study of the 
recognition and construction of correct deductions in the full first-order predicate 
calculus with identity and the calculus of descriptions. Detailed examination of 
axiomatized deductive systems of propositional calculus. 

370 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

An examination of the role of philosophy in shaping theological doctrine, in 
critically evaluating religious experience, in proving the existence of God, and 
in considering the issues of atheism and the existence of evil. 

375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) 

An introduction to the major issues in semantical theory: truth, meaning, ana- 
lytic-synthetic, semiotics. (Same as Linguistics 375) 

380 Analytic Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. A detailed investi- 
gation of the works of some of the many figures of the 20th-century movement 
in analytic philosophy. The works of Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Strawson, Ryle 
will be read. 

385 Philosophy of the Behavioral Sciences (3) 

Problem posed by methodological developments in psychology, sociology, 
anthropology, economics, political science and history. Topics such as objectivity 
and value judgments in social science, Virstehen, emergence explanation, models 
and theories will be studied. The concepts of reductionism and functionalism ex- 
amined. Some acquaintance with the behavioral sciences is presupposed. 

420 Metaphysics (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. An examination 
of the philosophical problems of freedom and determinism, mind and body, time 
and becoming, causation, deity, substratum, personal identity. 

425 Introduction to Phenomenology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. An investigation 
into the historical background and basic viewpoints which have provided a frame- 
work for philosophical research and study in the writings of Husserl, Heidegger, 
Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. 

430 Epistomology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. An investigation 
of the concepts of knowledge, belief and certainty, and a study of representative 
theories concerning man’s knowledge of the external world, the past, and other 
minds. 

435 Philosophy of Science (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. An investigation 
into the methodologies of the deductive and inductive sciences. 


379 


Philosophy 


440 Philosophy of Mind (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. Basic problems 
relating to the analysis of the concept of mind and such related issues as behavior, 
consciousness, and voluntary action. 

444 Seminar in Ethical Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or upper division standing; Philosophy 310 
recommended. Examination of some prominent theories regarding the analysis 
of such concepts as right action, goodness, duty, and the justification of ethical 
beliefs. 

445 Seminar in Value Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 310 or consent of instructor. An investigation into 
the conditions, modes, levels, and criteria relevant to any systematic view of valuing. 

450 Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. A detailed ex- 
amination of the problems in the theory of meaning and formal semantics. 

457 Seminar in Ancient Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 290 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination 
of the works of some major Ancient Philosopher, such as Plato or Aristotle, or 
of some School of Ancient Philosophy, such as Stoicism. This course number 
may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

467 Seminar in Continental Rationalism (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 300 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination 
of the works of some major Rationalist, such as Descartes, Spinoza or Leibniz, or 
some school or phase of Continental Rationalism. This course number may be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

468 Seminar in Advanced Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 369 or equivalent. Detailed examination of axiomatized 
systems of deduction covering such areas as the propositional and predicate calculi 
and alternative systems of logic. Topics in philosophical logic and free logic. 

477 Seminar in British Empiricism (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 300 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination 
of the works of some major British Empiricist, such as Locke, Berkeley, or Hume, 
or of some school or phase of British Empiricism. This course number may be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

487 Seminar in Modern Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 301 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination 
of the works of some major Modern Philosopher, such as Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche 
or J. S. Mill, or of some school or phase of Modern Philosophy to around the 
end of the 19th century. This course may be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

497 Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 305 or consent of instructor. Emphasis will be placed 
on the Analytic Movement in Philosophy as it developed during the 20th century. 
The works in such philosophers as C. I. Lewis, Quine, Goodman, Russell and 
Wittgenstein will be read. The course may be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: minimum of 12 units in philosophy and approval of the depart- 
ment. Such study is designed to develop greater competency in research. May be 
repeated for credit. 

380 


Physics 


DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

FACULTY 
Fred M. Johnson 
Department Chairman 

Raymond Adams, Kurt Bengston, Harvey Blend, Edward Cooperman, Ronald 
Crowley, Roger Dittman, Stuart Dubin, David Johnston, Mark Shapiro, Thomas 
Stark 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICS 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Physics provides funda- 
m