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THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 


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All material herein is subject to change without prior notice 
Effective Date: September 4, 1973 


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CALIFORNIA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 


FULLERTON 



73-74 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 
FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA 92634 # (714)870-2011 

COMPLIMENTARY COPY 



4 


THIS CATALOG 

Within this catalog may be found general academic and administrative information as well as specific 
descriptions of the detriments, their majors and the courses offered in each. The first major part 
contains orienting information such as the calendar, materials on The California State University and 
Colleges, an overview of Cal State Fullerton and facts about student services and activities on the 
campus. 

The subsequent sections of the catalog are concerned with: admission, registration, records and 
regulations, academic advisement; and university courses. The next sections, organized by schools 
and divisions, describe the departments and the programs of study and courses they offer. The final 
part of the catalog contains directories: a listing of individuals and groups participating in the 
governance of the university and with inforn^tion on advisory councils, auxiliary organizations, and 
the faculty and administration. An irniex can be found at the end to help the reader locate specific 
items he needs or wishes to know about. 

Because this catalog must be prepared well ahead of the academic year it covers, changes in some 
programs and rules occur. The CUss Schedule (arxi subsequent errata sheets) are the final authority 
in regard to classes offered, instructors and revisions of regulations. This publication can be bought 
for a small fee from the Titan Bookstore. 

Through the assistance of the Department of Art, Tom Frost has done the graphic work on this 
catalog ar>d Susan Ragan has taken most of the photographs. The final organizing and editing was 
dor>e by Caroline Williams assisted by Wayr>e Untereiner in the Office of Academic Services ar>d 
Planning and Ruth Pecsok and lerry Keating in the Office of Public Affairs. 


5 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION— Cal State Fullerton Calendar 9. The California 
State University and Colleges 1 3, Cal State Fullerton: An Overview 1 5, Student 
Services 29 


ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, RECORDS AND REGULATIONS— Admis- 
sion to the University 41, Registration 55, Records and Regulations 59 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS— Bachelor's Degree 69, Master's Degrees 73 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT— 63 

UNIVERSITY CURRICULA— 93 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS— 103 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS— 145 
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS— 175 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION— 195 

DIVISION OF HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION AND ATHLETICS— 225 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES— 239 

DIVISION OF LIBRARY SCIENCE— 361 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING— 369 

DIRECTORIES — Trustees 427, Office of the Chancellor 429, Campuses 431, Cal 
State Fullerton 433, Auxiliary Organizations 449, Cooperating Teachers 453, 
Faculty 455, Index 481 


21—12 I 110 



GENERAL INFORMATION 


23-12 1 115 



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CAL STATE FULLERTON CALENDAR 
FOR 1973-74 


9 


1973 


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29 I JO 31 

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23 29 

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OECEMiEI 
$ M T W T F S 

16 17 16 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 26 29 

30 31 

lANUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

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6 7 6 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 16 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 

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I • I Classes 

□ 


1974 


Holidays 


23—12 1 115 



First summer session begins — registration and classes 


10 


SUMMER SESSION 1973 

June It, Monday 

...First summer session begins — registration and classes 

july 4, Wednesday 

...Independence Day holiday — all offices closed. No instruc- 
tion 

July 20, Friday 

...First summer session ends 

july 23, Monday 

...Second summer session begins — registration and classes 

August 1, Wednesday 

...Filing period opens for application to the spring semester 
1974 

August 31, Friday 

...SecofKJ summer session ends; effective date of graduation for 
those completing requirements 


FALL SEMESTER 1973 


November 1, 1972 

Initial period for filing applications for admission to the fall semester 1973 began for all 
students and former students not in attendance during the spring semester 1973. All 
applications received by November 30, 1972, received equal consideration for inclusion 
in enrollment quotas. Applications continued to be accepted after November 30, 1972, 
for consideration in unfilled categories within the policies of the statewide common 
admissions program. 


September 4, Tuesday 

...Academic year begins. See Class Schedule for details about 
advisement, orientation and registration 

September 7, Friday 

...Last day to register without late registration fee. Application 
deadline for baccalaureate degree candidates for graduation, 
June 1974 and September 1974, and for january 1974 mas- 
ter's degree candidates to request a graduation check 

September 10, Monday 

...Instruction begins 

November 1, Thursday 

...Filing period opens for application to the fall semester 1974 

November 22-23, Thursday- Friday.., 

...Thanksgiving recess — all offices closed 

December 15, Saturday 

...Last day of classes 

December 17, Morniay 

...Semester examinations begin 

December 22, Saturday 

...Semester examinations end 

December 24, Monday 

...Winter recess begins 

january 2, Wednesday 

...Semester ends; effective date of graduation for those 
completing requirements. 


12 


12S 


11 


SPRING SEMESTER 1974 


August 1, 1973 

Initial period for filing applications for the spring se^icster 1974 begins 
students and former students not in attendance during the fall sem«ter 1973. All applica- 
tions received by August 31, 1973, will have equal conside-rat^n fw irKlusiw jn wroll- 
ment quous. Applications will continue to be accepted after August 31, 1973, for 
consideration in any unfilled category within the policies of the statewide common 
admissions program. 


lanuarv 28, Monday Semwtef begins. See Oiss Schedule iw details about advise- 

ment. ofienution and registration 


February 1, Friday. 


.Last day to register without late registration fee. Application 
deadline for baccalaureate degree candidates for graduation 
january 1975, and for June 1974 and September 1974 mas- 
ter's degree candidates to request a graduation check 


February 4, Monday Instruction begins 

February 18, Monday Washington's birthday holiday— all offices closed. No in 

struction 


April 4, Thursday ‘-uther King, Jr., Memorial Observance 

April 8, Monday Spring recess begins 

Apnl 15, Monday Instruction resumes 

May 22, Wednesday day of cUsses 

May 23, Thursday Examination study day 

May 24, Friday Semester examinations begin 

May 27, Monday Memorial Day holiday — all offices closed. No instruction 

June 1, Saturday Sen^ester examinations end 

June 2, Sunday Commencement 

June 3, Monday Semester ends. Effective date of graduation for those com- 

pleting requiremenu 


SUMMER SESSION 1974 
June 10, Monday 

July 4, Thursday 

July 19, Friday 

July 22, Monday 

August 30, Friday — 


.First summer session begins — registration and classes 
Independence Day holiday— all offices closed 
.First summer session ends 

•Second summer session begins — registration and classes 

Second summer session ends; effective date of graduation for 
those completing requirements 


M— li 1 140 




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13 

THE CALIFORNIA 

STATE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 


The individual California Sute Colleger were brought together as a system by the Donahoe Higher 
Education Act of 1%0. In 1972 the system became The California State University and Colleges and 
14 ofthe 19 campuses received the title University. 

The oldest campus— California State University, San lose— was founded in 1857 and became the first 
institution of public higher education in California. The newest campus — California State College, 
Bakersfield — began instruction in 1970. 

Responsibility for The California State University and Colleges is vested in the Board of Trustees, 
whose members are appointed by the Governor. The Trustees appoint the Chancellor, who is the 
chief executive officer of the system, and the presidents, who are the chief executive officers on 
the respective campuses. 

The Trustees, the Chancellor and the presidents develop systemwide policy, with actual implementa- 
tion at the campus level taking place through broadly based consultative procedures. The Academic 
Senate of The California State University and Colleges, made up of elected representatives of the 
faculty from each campus, recommends academic policy to the Board of Trustees through the 
Chancellor. 

Academic excellence has been achieved by The California State University and Colleges through 
a distinguished faculty, whose primary responsibility is superior teaching. While each campus in the 
system has its own unique geographic and curricular character, all campuses, as multipurpose 
institutions, offer undergraduate and graduate instruction for professional and occupational goals as 
well as br^ liberal education. All of the campuses require for graduation a basic program of 
^'General Education— Breadth Requirements" regardless of the type of bachelor's degree or major 
field selected by the student. A limited number of doctoral degrees is offered jointly with the 
University of California. 

Presently, under the system's "New Approach to Higher Education," the campuses are implement- 
ing a wide variety of innovative programs to meet the changing needs of students and society. 
Among pilot programs under way are off-campus degree programs, weekend colleges, self-paced 
learning programs, and special testing programs to accelerate student progress toward a degree. 
Enrollments in fall 1972 totaled 278,000 students, who were Uught by a faculty of 15,500. Last year 
the system awarded over 55 percent of the bachelor's degrees and 35 percent of the master's degrees 
granted in California. Almost 380,000 persons have been graduated from the 1 9 campuses since 1 960. 





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15 


CAL STATE FULLERTON: AN OVERVIEW 


GOVERNANCE 

Governance on the campus level at California State University, Fullerton is the responsibility of the 
president and his administrative staff. Working closely with the president are a number of faculty 
and student groups which initiate, and review and recommend for approval university programs, 
policies and procedures. Although the president is vested with the final authority on all university 
activities, the traditions at Fullerton have been to erKOurage maximum faculty and staff participation 
in campus decision-making and governance. Increasingly, students are becoming involved and 
active, too, and student representatives are found on almost all university, school, and departmental 
committees and policy-making bodies. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

The California State University, Fullerton Advisory Board consists of community leaders interested 
in the development and welfare of the university. The board serves the president in an advisory 
capacity, particularly in maners which affect university and community relations. Members are 
nominated by the president and appointed by the Board of Trustees for terms of four years. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The main functions of an institution of higher learning are to disseminate and advance knowledge. 
The philosophy which guides an institution can limit or promote the successful achievement of these 
objectives. Therefore, from its inception. Cal State Fullerton has directed its educational program 
toward the fullest possible development of the individuals who participate in it. For both faculty and 
students this entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, a comprehensive rather than 
a narrow approach to major areas of study, and a corKem with research and other creative activity. 
The university holds to the belief that an enduring educational experience must be founded upon 
exploration of our cultural heritage, through basic studies in the liberal arts and sciences, and that 
it can and should at the same time prepare for success in a chosen occupation or profession. 
Accordingly, the required general education program has as its objective the development in each 
student of: 

1 . The effective use and interpretation of the written and spoken language. 

2. An undersunding of the wide range of human endeavor and accomplishments in liberal arts 
and scierKes, their interrelationships, and the various choices and values they represent. 

3. An understanding of information and prirKiples in some areas of the liberal arts and sciences 
in sufficient depth to encourage critical and creative thought and expression. 

4. A spint of inquiry into the past and into the future, in order to cope with corxfitions in the 
continually changing world. 

5. An understarxiing of the rights, privileges and responsibilities of citizenship in the community 
and nation, and of effective participation in today's world. 

In addition, the university requires of all students who are candidates for a degree — whatever their 
special purpose — the pursuit of a subject major. 

(For specific details, see page 69.) 

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT 

Cal State Fullerton was the 12th State College in California to be authorized by the Legislature. The 
following year, 1958, resulted in the designation of a site in northeast Fullerton, and 1959 saw the 
purchase ^ the site, the appointment of O. William B. Langsdorf as the founding president, the 
selection of the first staff, and the planning for the opening of the new college in the fall. Orange 
County State College started classes for 452 full-time and part-time students in September, 1959, 
using leased quarters for its administrative offices on the Fullerton Union High School campus and 
for its classrooms at Fullerton's Sunny Hills High School. In the fall of 1960, the college opened 
classes on its own campus where it occupied 1 2 temporary buildings. The name changed to Orange 


45—12 1 225 


16 Human and Natural Environment 


State College in july, 1%2, to California Slate College at Fullerton in july, 1964, to California State 
College, Fullerton in July, 1968 and to California State University, Fullerton, in June, 1972. The first 
permanent building, the six-story Letters and ScierKe Building, was occupied in l%3. 

Today, there are many dramatic evidences of additional, very rapid growth. Nine large arni modern 
permanent buildings have been completed, and enrollment has climbed to approximately 18,500. 
Since 1%3 the curriculum has expanded to include lower division work and many graduate pro- 
grams. More than $50 million already has been invested in larnJ, buildings and equipment — a sum 
expected to increase appreciably by the 1980's when the university is due to reach its projected peak 
enrollment of nearly 27,000. 

During this rapid growth, the university also has achieved a growing reputation for academic 
excellence. Cal State Fullerton began this spectacular development at a period when the citizens and 
government of California were revising arid greatly expanding their commitments to quality public 
higher education. The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960 established the California State 
Colleges as a system under an independent Board of Trustees, redefined the furKtions of the State 
Colleges, and related them to both the community colleges and to the University of California 
system. In this atmosphere of public support. Cal State Fullerton was the first of the Slate Colleges 
to submit and secure approval for a five-year master curricular plan and one of the first three to 
secure approval of a master building plan. It also was a university that was able to think in terms 
of its ultimate enrollment objectives from the beginning. During the same period. Orange County 
also was experiencing its own unprecedented growth. 

In l%9-70, it became apparent that colleges and universities statewide and nationally were entering 
a new period of development. Crowing financial problems on all levels of government, nrKXjnting 
criticisms of contemporary educational policies and practices, and a loss of much public support 
for education were symptomatic of much deeper and more widespread problems and changes in 
our society and its schools. In the context of what increasingly seenr>ed to be the emergeiKe of a 
new, and in many ways, different type of culture and world, the colleges and universities (like other 
major institutions) were acutely experiencing the confusions and conflicts such basic and rapid 
cultural transformations generate. 

Like other colleges and universities, Cal State Fullerton currently is reexamining and reevaluating 
even its most basic educational goals and assumptions and practices. It is becoming irKreasingly 
clear how higher education can more effectively assume its central responsibilities of teachir^g, 
developing knowledge, and providing public service in the future that lies ahead. Higher education 
must become nwe aware of, owe articulate about, and more scholarly regarding the learning 
experiences that occur on and outside campuses. It is clear, too, that vigorous and imaginative arxJ 
pluralistic educational experimentation needs to be rapidly and greatly irKreased arxJ that students 
as well as members of the larger community have vital and irKreasir^ roles to play in these processes. 
There are developing, loo, deepening and widening convictions that: educators may have under- 
estimated the potentialities ar>d learning capacities of people; and that new teaching strategies arxJ 
learning materials can result in higher, and an irKreasingly widespread attainment of, educational 
standards. 

On May 26, 1971, Dr. L. Donald Shields, who had served as acting president for seven months, was 
appointed the second president of Cal State Fullerton. Under his presiderKy five task forces subse- 
quently were established to plan for the formation of a school of applied arxJ professional studies; 
to explore opportunities for external degree, extension arxi continuing education programs; to study 
form ar>d furKtion for a learning resources center; to develop a long-range plan for the estaUishment 
of university priorities and the allocation of available resources; and to analyze the university's 
academic arxJ administrative organization in terms of its structure arxJ processes. President Shields 
also has vigorously pursued creating nyxe effective working relationships with the community. 
Cal State Fullerton is looking forward to irKreasirig the contribution it rruy make in the work ahead. 
This institution already is rethinking and improving the quality of its part in higher education so that 
people will have more freedom to shape and create the sort of future they value and that is possible 
with the resources and krwwledge that man now has. 

THE HUMAN AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Fullerton, a city of 88,606 inhabitants, is located in northern Oange County, about 30 miles southeast 
of central Los Angeles. It is in the center of the new Southern California population center arxJ within 
easy freeway access of all the diverse natural and cultural attractions of this region. 


31—11 1 290 






campus and Buildings 19 

Orange County, with an area of 782 square miles, is the 48th in size of California's 58 counties, but 
it is the secorxi largest county in population (1.5 million), and in total personal income. Orange 
County has experierKed during the last 20 years alnrK>st unprecedented growth of population, and 
ecorK>mic and other activities: it was the fastest growing area in the United States. This expansion 
came partly because of: the proximity of Orange County to rapidly expanding Los Angeles; the 
irKreasing access through the developing freeway system; and the natural attractiveness of the 
beaches, countryside and clinriate. 

In 20 years what had been a predominantly, slowly<hanging, agricultural and resort area, was 
transformed into a dynamic and predominantly industrial growth center for new types of manufac- 
turing and commercial and cultural enterprises. Much land in Orange County, however, still is 
available and comparatively untouched. Agriculture, and particularly orar>ge groves and cattle 
ranching, still are highly visible activities. But space-age industries and industrial parks, new schools 
and shops and housing developments, tourist facilities and imaginative cultural attractions, and 
large-scale planned communities continue to erKroach upon the diminishing expanses of habitable 
land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture of the old and new ecorK>mic and life styles in Orange 
County. Underneath the soil, archeologists and bulldozers uncover traces of the hunting and gather- 
ing lr>dian barnis which flourished at least as early as 4,(XX) years ago in what was a benign and 
bountiful region. More visible traces remain of the Spanish and Mexican periods and cultures: 
Mission San Juan Capistrano, which began the agricultural tradition in Orange County, and subse- 
quent adobes from the great land grants and ranches that followed. Additionally, both customs and 
many names persist from this period, and so does some ranching. The architectural and other 
evid^es of the subsequent pioneer period are still quite visible, farmsteads, old buildings from the 
new towns that then were esUWished in the late 18(X)'s, mining operations, and traces of early resort 
and other types of pronKgional activities. For about 1(X) years, farming was the main economic 
activity with products such as grapes, walnuts, vegetables, and increasingly oranges replacing the 
older wheat and canie ranches. Today, agriculture still is very important. Orange County ranks sixth 
among California's counties in mineral production with its oil, natural gas, sarKJ and gravel, and clay 
mining and processing activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 miles of beaches in Orange County and the development of 
such attractions as Disneyland. Knott's Berry Farm, the Laguna Festival of Arts and Pageant of 
Masters, and the Anaheim Stadium and Convention Center continue to make tourism an increasingly 
important activity. So does the Mediterranean-type climate with: rainfall averaging 14 inches per 
year; and ger>erally mild days (with either freezing or lOB-degree temperatures ufKomnKin) with 
frequent morning fogs during the summer Both downtown Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean can 
be reached by car in half an hour, and mountain and desert recreation areas are as close as an hour's 
drive from the campus. 

THE CAMPUS AND ITS BUILDINGS 

OfKe part of a vast orange grove. Cal State Fullerton's attractively landscaped campus now consists 
of 225 acres bounded on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the west by Sute College Boulevard, 
on the north by Yorba Linda Boulevard and on the east by the Orange Freeway. The portion of 
Orange County immediately surrounding the campus is predominantly suburban: it includes housing 
tracu, apartment complexes, shopping centers, space-age industrial firms aixi still remaining orange 
groves ar>d urxleveloped hilK and fields. Oher educational institutions also are part of the immediate 
environment The new campus of the Southern California College of Optometry, with its four 
modernistic buildir^, opened in the spring of 1973. Its seven-acre, $3,330,000 campus is just north 
of Cal State Fullerton. Tl^ College Park complex on the south will be occupied by Pacific Christian 
College, a liberal arts school with a Bible emphasis, where 250 students will surt classes in the fall 
of 1973. The Western Sute University College of Law will sUrt construction in the fall of 1973 on 
the west of Cal State Fullerton with a four-story building. The College of Law plans to start classes 
in the fall of 1974. 

The Cal Sute Fullerton campus itself has a high density urban layout of buildings and facilities 
developed to serve a predominantly commuting public. The university's modern buildings were 
planned so that no student should need nxxe than 10 minutes to go from or>e class to another. The 
campus is surrounded with well-lighted and landscaped parkirtg facilities. 

Even though nK>st of the campus has been converted into modem buildings, facilities for athletic 


60—12 1 aoo 


20 Faculty 

activities, parking lots, or attractively landscaped areas, there still remain over 20 acres of the original 
orange grove, land of which will become an arboretum within the next few years. Several older 
buildings also remain, including one which has been converted into the attractive University Club 
and another into the Foundation headquarters. 

The first permanent building, the Letters and Science Building, was occupied in 1%3. This imposing 
structure, master planned to serve ultimately as a facility for undergraduate and graduate science 
instruction and research, has been used to house other programs until they could warrant new 
facilities of their own. 

Since 1%3, growth has been rapid. The Music-Speech-Drama Building was completed in 1964, the 
Physical Education Building in 1%5, the Library-Audiovisual Center in 1966, the Commons cafeteria 
facility in 1%7, the Humanities-Social Sciences Building and Art Center in 1%9, and the Administra- 
tion-Business Administration Building and Engineering Building in 1971. 

The latter two reflect a commitment to programs with high community involvement. In addition to 
the many undergraduate students who will study and learn in these buildings, many professional 
engineers and local businessmen also will use these very advanced facilities to continue their 
educations. 

New buildings are being planned to keep pace with university enrollment increases. At least one new 
academic facility aixJ several building additions are contemplated for the 1970's. An ultramodern 
Student Health Center is due to be completed in late 1973, and about the same time construction 
will begin on the Education-Classroom Building and the University Center. 

The ample freeway aruJ surface street accommodations that approach the main entrance to the 
university's modern campus also provide comparatively easy access to the great ar>d diverse learning 
resources available in Southern California: many other colleges and universities; museums, libraries, 
art galleries; zoos; ar>d the wide variety of economic, governmental, social, and cultural activities 
and experiments that may be found in this dynamic and complex region of California and the United 
States. 

STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Much of the distinctive character and learning atmosphere of any campus comes from the nature 
and vitality of its students. Diversity, the synthesis of academic with work and family interests, strong 
high school records and relative nraturity are some of the predominant characteristics of the student 
body at Cal State Fullerton. The campus is both a large and a still rapidly growing one despite its 
comparative newness. Over 17,500 students were enrolled in 1972-73, and this year's total is 
expected to be 18,500. 

The university is a commuter institution: 3 percent of the students live on campus; 24 percent work 
35 hours a week or more; af>d yet 60 percent take 1 2 or nnore units of coursework each semester. 
Seventy-five percent coa>e from a radius of 15 miles from the campus, but many have lived 
elsewhere before coming to Orange County. 

Twenty-two percent are lower division students, 58 percent are university juniors arxi seniors, and 
another 20 percent are doing graduate work. Over seven-eights of the upper-division students are 
transfers from other ir>stitutions, prirKipally community colleges. Fifty-nine percent are rr>en, and the 
median age is 23. Forty-or>e percent are women, ar>d the median age is 22. Thirty-seven percent are 
married. One third of the students participate in both the day arnJ evening programs during the 
regular semesters, ar>d or>e tenth are involved only in the late afterrKXKi or evening program. 
Many already have clearly defined disciplinary, professional, and artistic interests. Some still are 
searching for a meaningful vocation ar>d are in the process of exploring different fields of knowledge 
ar>d the work that might develop from them. Most are trying to urnlerstand themselves and their 
world better so that they can beconrje nwre effective human beings ar>d citizens. 

THE FACULTY 

Central to the effectiveness of any institution of higher learning is the quality arxl dedication of its 
faculty. Cal State Fullerton is proud of the high caliber of its faculty and of the commitments of its 
individual faculty members to teaching and scholarship. 

In the fall of 1972, there were 604 full-time and 333 part-time faculty members teaching on the 
campus. For the full-time faculty niembers the median age was 37. arxi airTK>st all had had some 
previous college or university teaching experierKe before comir>g to Fullerton. Faculty members also 


65>-12 1 3SS 


Schedule of Classes 21 


have a wide variety of expenerKes and accomplishments in research, the arts, professional work, 
consulting, and other creative activities. Seventy-four percent of the full-tin>e faculty have earned 
their doctorate degrees, and these have come from nwe than 100 major colleges and universities. 
Criteria for selection to the faculty icKlude mastery of knowledge in an academic specialty, demon- 
strated skill and experience in teaching, ar>d continuing interest in scholarly study and research. 
Retention and promotion criteria also include service to the university arni to the community. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

The university offers a full four-year program of freshman through senior work as well as credential 
programs for teachers and graduate, master's level work in many disciplir^es and professional fields. 
The university provides a diversity of educational opportunities to satisfy the broad range of back- 
grounds arnJ interests of its students. Over 1,600 courses have been developed to provide learning 
from introductory to highly specialized, in-depth and advanced, work in a wide variety and growing 
number of fields of study. 

Fullerton currently awards the baccalaureate degree in 37 fields of knowledge More advanced work 
and the master's degree are awarded in 30 programs. Many of the baccalaureate and master's degree 
programs offer a choKe of specializations (or options or emphases). Additionally, at least a few 
courses are given in many fields or subject maner areas in which some other colleges and universi- 
ties offer full degree programs. Often these courses are given by a number of different departments. 
Such an interdisciplinary trend fits not only with broader, cultural integration of knowledge but also 
with the recent d^elopment of a growing number of interdisciplinary efforts, including some new 
degree programs, at Fullerton. 

Certain traditions have developed with the academic programs at Cal Slate Fullerton. One is that 
of relative balance in strength of the programs in the physical sciences, the social sciences, the 
humanities and the fine arts. Arx>ther is that of academic excellerKe in the various specializations 
offered by the university and the comparative freedom given to departments and professional 
schools to develop the d^h programs for their majors. Another pattern is the great freedom given 
to nK>st students in selecting courses to satisfy their general education or breadth requirements. Still 
other tenderKies icKlude the ertcouragement of: a diversity of approaches to teaching; experimenta- 
tion and inrtovation in courses and programs; and student participation in curricular planning and 
decision-makir>g. 

ACCREDITATION 

Cal State Fullerton is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Specific 
programs have been accredited by the California Stale Board of Education, the American Assembly 
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the National Association of Schools of Music, the American 
Chemical Society, the An>erican Speech and Hearing Association, the American Council on Educa- 
tion for Journalism and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Cal State Fullerton is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Specific 
programs have been accredited by the California State Board of Education, the American Assembly 
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the National Association of Schools of Musk, the Amerkan 
Chemkal Society, the Amerkan Speech and Hearing Association, the Amerkan Council on Educa- 
tion for Journalism, the National Council for Accrediution of Teacher Education, and the Engineers' 
CourKil for Professional Development- 

Cai State Fullerton is a member of the CourKil of Graduate Schools in the United States and the 
Western Association of Graduate Schools. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

The regular, educational program of the university is offered continuouly from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. The CUss Schedule, listing all classes meeting during these hours, is pre- 
pared for each semester and can be purchased at the Titan Bookstore. 

The classes held during the late aftertKion and evening hours have become an established part of 
the regular university program. Students enrolling in these classes must have met all admission 
requirements of the university, including the filing of an offKial appikation for admission, the filing 
of complete offKial transcripts from other schools, colleges and universities and in the case of 
lower-divtsion appikants, the completion of required tests for admission. 

The classes whkh are offered during the summer sessions and by means of Extension do not require 
admission to the university, but some courses do require specifK prerequisites. Special schedules 
are provided for the sumnr>er sessions and extension programs. 


71—12 1 355 


22 Extension 

CONTINUING EDUCATION— SUMMER SESSIONS 

The summer session is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in the enrichment 
of their educational background as well as completing requirements for a degree or credential. 
Summer session courses are the equivalent of university courses offered in the fall and spring 
semesters, and apply toward graduation and residence requirements as well as teaching credential 
requirements. Both day and evening classes are scheduled. Many courses have prerequisite require- 
ments which students must meet. Master's degree work is also offered. 

The university offers 12 weeks of instruction, usually divided into two six-week sessions which run 
consecutively. 

The dates for the 1973 summer session are june 11 through August 31, with the end of the first 
six-week session being July 20, and the beginning of the second six-week session being July 23. 
The dates for the 1974 summer session are june 10 through August 30, with the end of the first 
six-week session being July 19, and the beginning of the second six-week session being July 22. Also 
offered are wide varieties of course durations, with a number of two- and three-week workshops, 
intensified courses, and expar>ded eight-week courses. In addition to much of the regular curriculum, 
summer offerings include many unique and innovative programs for teachers and other professional 
groups. The Associated Students offers a program of recreational activities and a lecture series to 
serve a wide variety of interests. 

A summer sessions class schedule is usually available by February, and may be obtained by writing 
the dean of continuing education. This schedule contains information on matters such as costs and 
registration. 

Admission to the Summer Sessions 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the same as in the regular 
session, the university does not require an advance application or transcripts from students register- 
ing for credit courses in the summer session. However, students are expected to have satisfied the 
prerequisites for the courses in which they register. Admission to summer session does rK>t grant 
admission to the regular session. Admission to the summer sessions is completed at registration. 

Authorized Student Load 

Title 5 of the California State Administrative Code states, "Not nf>ore than one semester unit may 
be earned for each week of atter>dance in summer session, except that upon approval of appropriate 
college authorities, additional semester units may be earned at the rate of one-half unit for each three 
units of credit for which a student is registered. " 

This means that combinations can be arranged so that a student may earn up to seven units during 
either of the two six-week summer sessions when a total of not more than two courses is involved 
(i.e., a four-unit course and a three-unit course, or a five-unit course and a two-unit course). Any 
student who enrolls by error in nxxe than seven units during a six-week sumnner session will find 
that credit for excess units will not be counted toward a degree, credential or other objective. Any 
other exceptions must be petitioned through the Office of Admissions and Records. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION— EXTENSION 
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

The resources of Cal State Fullerton are made available through extension programs to those who 
are unable to take university work in residecKe but who wish to pursue university-level study for 
purposes of resuming an interrupted or irKompleted education, to enharKe professional or vocation- 
al abilities, or for personal growth and fulfillment. 

Extension offerings irKlude regularly established university courses as well as courses, workshops, 
and conferefKes designed to meet the needs of particular groups arxJ communities, and may be 
initiated at various tirr»es during the year. Any adult may enroll in an extension course provided he 
meets the prerequisites of the course; it is rK)t necessary that he also be enrolled in the university. 
The maximum extension credit which will be accepted toward baccalaureate degrees is 24 semester 
units. Six semester units of extension credit may be applied toward a master's degree with appropri- 
ate approvals. Extension credit may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirements for 
graduation. 


T7— It 1 3ffi 


Instruction^lly Related Services 23 

Veterans may use the educational benefits available to them under federal and state laws to enroll 
in university extension courses provided the classes are part of their prescribed and recognized 
objectives as approved by the Veterans Administration. 

For information about establishing an extension course, or for current offerings, write or telephone 
the Extension Office. 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

A Study abroad program of global scope is offered by The California State University and Colleges 
International Programs, urxJer which students may enroll for a full academic year simultaneously at 
their home campus, where they earn academic credit arid nuintain campus residency, and at a 
distinguished foreign university or a special program center. 

Cooperating universities abroad include the University of Province, France; the University of Heidel- 
berg, Germany; the University of Florence, Italy; the Universidad Ibero- Americana, Mexico; the 
University of Uppsala, Sweden, the University of Madrid and the University of Granada, Spain; Tel 
Aviv University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; and Waseda University, Japan. In 
the United Kir>gdom, cooperating universities, which may vary from year to year, include Dundee, 
Leicester, London, Oxford, and Sheffield. In addition, California State University and Colleges 
students may attend a special program in Taiwan, Republic of China, or an architectural program 
in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Eligibility is limited to students who will have upper division or graduate sunding during their year 
of participation, who have a B (3.0) average or better in at least 30 semester or 45 quarter units in 
any two previous consecutive years; show ability to adapt to a new environment; and, in the cases 
of France, Germany, Mexico and Spain, are proficient in the language of instruction at the foreign 
university. Selection is made by a faculty committee on the students' home campus and by a 
statewide faculty committee. 

The International Programs are supported by sUte funds to the extent that such funds would have 
been expended had the student concerned continued to study in California. Students assume costs 
for predeparture orientation, insurance, transportation, housing and meals. Home campus registra- 
tion fees, tuition on the home campus for out-of-state students (if the student is not a California 
resident) and persorwl incidenul expenses or vacation travel costs while abroad are also paid for 
by the student. The Office of International Programs collects and administers funds for those items 
which the program must arrange or can negotiate more effectively; typically, home campus fees, 
orienution costs, insurance, outbound transporution, and housing in some centers. Students accept- 
ed in the International Programs may apply for any financial aid available at their home campus. 
Application for the 1974-75 academic year must be submitted before February 4, 1974 (except for 
United Kingdom applicants who must submit applications by January 7, 1974). Applicants are 
notified of accepunce by April 1, 1974. DeUiled information may be obuined from the director of 
intemationai student education and exchange at Cal Sute Fullerton, or by writing to The California 
State University and Colleges International Programs, 5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles 90036. 

INSTRUCTIONALLY RELATED SERVICES 

The university provides an extensive program of instructionally related services for its students and 
faculty. These include the universitywide services of the university Library, the Instructional Media 
Center and the Computer Center described in the following sections. Four offices, Academic Serv- 
ices and Planning, Academic Administration, Academic Suffing Services and Institutional Research, 
make studies on university programs and assist in coordinating, planning educational operations and 
shanng information on educational trends and innovations on the Fullerton campus with those going 
on els^here. 

The Library 

The Library Building, completed in 1966, is shared by the Instructional Media Center, which has the 
lower level; the School of Education, %vhich is located on the second floor; and the Library, which 
utilizes the first and third through sixth floors. As Ks collection grows and the enrollment increases, 
the Library will occupy the second floor of the building. Designed presently to seat approximately 
1,150 persons and to house about 300,000 books as well as related nuterials, the building contains 
group study and seminar rooms, study carrels for graduate students and facilities for individual and 
group listening, for the reading of microform materials and for copying materials in book and 
microform. 


88—12 1 440 


24 Instructionally Related Services 

The main book collection will contain about 335,000 volumes at the beginning of the 1973-74 
academic year. During that year about 20,000 volumes will be added. Besides attempting to build 
a balanced collection of basic works, the Library has concentrated its efforts in several subject areas. 
As a result relatively strong collections are now available in such fields as World War II, international 
relations since 1870, Kant, Shakespeare, Melville, ichthyology, angling, historiography and historical 
bibliography, library science, mathematics and British and U.S. history. 

A selective depository for U.S. government documents since 1964, the Library will house about 
1 30,000 U.S. documents by the beginning of the 1973-74 academic year. The Library has, in addition, 
some 10,000 reels of microfilmed U.S. government documents, chiefly State Department archives, 
but also such items as the Congressional Record and the papers of various presidents as well as 
microfiche copies of the material in Project ERIC. The Library is a depository for California state 
documents and for California curriculum materials, ar>d includes current samples of state adopted 
texts, curriculum guides from all over the United States, and non-book instructional materials. 
The Library subscribes to over 4,000 periodicals. It has some 20,000 volumes of bound periodicals 
and has extensive microform holdings in backfiles of periodicals and of local, national, and interna- 
tional newspapers. 

Among its major holdings are the Human Relations Area Files, the British 19th Century Parliamentary 
Papers, the Parliamentary Debates, a microfilm edition of the Published Colonial Records of the 
Anoerican Colonies, 1619-1800, and in conjunction with the Patrons of the Library, the Langsdorf 
Anniversary Collection of Crabhorn Press and Book Club of California books. 

Library hours are posted in the lobby and listed, with other key information about the Library, in 
the Library Guide, which is available at the information desk in the lobby as well as at the circulation 
and reference desks. Assistance in the use of the card catalog and other library facilities may be 
obtained at the first floor information desk. Librarians with various subject backgrounds are on duty 
at the reference desk on the third floor to aid students arni faculty in further use of the library's 
resources. 

Instructional Media Center 

The Instructional Media Center, located in the lower level of the Library Building, includes both 
extensive audiovisual arKi instructiorul television services. 

Services to the faculty arxl students include encouragement and use of all types of audiovisual 
equipment and materials, rental of films from major rental libraries, and for faculty: production of 
transparencies, charts, graphs, diagrams, audiotapes and cassettes, tele-lectures plus all types of still 
and motion picture photography. Instructional television services include distribution of off-the-air 
or videotaped programs from master control to selected classrooms, videotaping facilities and 
playback both in the studio or classroom and off the campus. 

The center is responsible for the coordination arxi development of instructional applications of 
media, and the improvement of programs and materials designed for instructional use. Liaison and 
service relations are maintained with other media learning-oriented units on the campus. Personnel 
of the center are prepared to assist the faculty in their analysis of media needs as related to the 
procurement or production of materials pertinent to instructional developn>ent. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center, located on the secorid floor of the Administration-Business Administration 
Building, serves as the central computing facility for all of the university. As the central campus 
computing facility, it provides support for instruaion, research arnl administrative computing serv- 
ices. 

The computing system at Fullerton is integrated into the State Distributed Computer Network which 
provides a wide range of computing services. The local campus computer is a CDC 3150 with 32,000 
words (130,000 characters) of memory, card reader, card punch, printer, two tape drives arxl four 
disk drives. As a component of the network, the Computer Center can communicate with a large- 
scale CDC 3300 Computer located at the Division of Information Systems in Los Angeles. The 
Distributed Computer Network also provides time-sharing services on a CDC 3170 and access to 
an IBM 360/91 at UCLA, Keypunch, teletype terminals, a sorter and an interpreter for student use 
are available in an open shop area located in the Computer Center. 

A computer science degree is offered jointly by the Departments of C^iantiutive Methods and 


93^12 1 469 


Research Organizations 25 

Mathematics and the Division Engineering. Many other departments, including Sociology, Geog- 
raphy and Accounting, use the computer facility in their coursework. Students' jobs receive the 
high^t priority of all work batch-processed on the CDC 3150. The Computer Center maintains a 
library of application programs for general use. Such languages offered by the system include 
FORTRAN, COBOL, ALGOL. BASIC and COMPASS (the assembly language for CDC). 

Office of Academic Administration 

The Office of Academic Administration was established in 1971 to coordinate the following instruc- 
tionally related functions: Academic Staffing Services, Computer Services; Institutional Research, and 
Admissions and Records. The associate vice president for academic administration also provides 
supervisory direction for the Division of Health Education, Physical Education, Recreation and 
Athletics. 

Office of Academic Staffing Servket 

The Office of Academic Staffing Services is responsible for all activities related to the scheduling of 
classes during the academic year. In addition to the preparation of the Class Schedule, the office 
coordinates all changes and adiustments to rt, administers and prepares the staffing formula for the 
university, and has a prinwry responsibility for course-section and facilities utilization reporting 
during and after registration. 

Office of Institutional Research 

The Office of Institutional Research serves as an information center and a problem-solving agency 
which collects, interprets and disseminates information. These data include enrollment histories and 
projeaions, distributions of daU classes according to selected factors (e g. level, type of instruction, 
unit value), summaries of student characteristics, and other statistics related to student population, 
course offerings and resources. Most of the data collection and analysis is related to the reporting 
requirements of The California State University and Colleges and other agencies. However, the office 
evaulates daU, provides assistance in design of specialized studies and also conducts analytic studies 
to serve the decision-making and policy-formulating needs of Cal State. 

Office of Academic Services and Planning 

In 1%9 the Office of Academic Planning was created to coordinate the development of educational 
programs, to provide an all-university perspective on educational activities at the campus, and to 
stimulate academic inrxwations. A dean of academic planning was appointed to provide leadership 
for this office and to work closely with the vice presid^. academic affairs, the Curriculum Commit- 
tee, the Committee for Educational Development and Innovation and other individuals and groups 
concerned with changing and improving the educational programs of this institution. 

This office currently is responsible for preparing the caulog and for some of the university-level 
reviewing arxl approving of new courses and programs. It also makes studies of important education- 
al problems and activities on the campus. Additionally, it does the preliminary fact finding and staff 
work for some of the new plans, policies and procedures designed to improve the quality and vitality 
of the learning climate arid experierKes on the campus. 

The Office of Academic Planning was reorganized and expanded in 1971 to include coordination 
of the functions of the Library, the Instructional Media Center, the Office of Continuing Education 
and the Office of Academic Advisenwt. The associate vice president, academic services and 
planning also provides supervisory direction for the Division of Library ScierKe. 

RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICES 
AND SPECIAL STUDY CENTERS 

Much arid varied research is going on at Fullerton. Most of this is being done by individual faculty 
members and students as part of their scholarly and professional development aaivities. Research 
trainir^ is an important part of the education for more advanced work in most disciplines and 
professions, and many of our students are encouraged and assisted to learn and apply research skills 
in either indeperxient or team protects. 

The Research Committee of the Faculty Council and the Contracts and Grants Office provide 
stimulus, coordiriation and direction to the research efforts of the university. 

A Student Research Fellowship program and a Faculty Research Grant program award '"seed grants" 


98—12 1 490 


26 Research Organizations 

to promising research projects every year. Services supporting research are given by the Cal State 
Fullerton Foundation, the university Computer Center, and the university Library. Augmenting the 
on-campus aids to research are the great and diverse resources available for study in the Southern 
California area. 

A number of special centers with specific research objectives are operating at the university. These 
include the Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community (with its affiliated 
Center for Economic Education, the Real Estate Research Institute, the Center for Governmental 
Studies, the Urban Research Institute, the Institute for Molecular Biology, the Reading Center, the 
Laboratory for Phonetic Research, the Sp>ecial Education Clinic, the Speech and Hearing Clinic and 
the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community 

The Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community provides: 

1 . School of Business Administration and Economics and other faculty with additional opportu- 
nity to participate in research activities in order to improve and reinforce teaching and 
professional competence; 

2. Professional research and consultation services to the local area normally considered as being 
serviced by the university, irKluding private business, labor, agriculture, and local government 
agencies; 

3. Educational services, e.g., seminars and conferences, to improve the level of understarujing 
and competerKe of local decision-makers in specialized areas relating to busir>ess administra- 
tion and economics; and 

4. A focus, through research, for the education of students and citizens in the business and 
economic problems of the local community, and for the involvement of faculty in such 
educational programs. 

The operations of the center are carried out by constituent institutes, programs, and projects for 
which the center provides overall leadership and coordination. The institutes are long-term, continu- 
ing organizations designed to operate in selected major problem and functional areas of strategic 
significance and corKern to the school. Programs and projects within the center are organized to 
carry on work outside the institutes' area of interest, which are a smaller scale and for a shorter 
time-span. 

Currently included within the Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community are 
the affiliated Center for Economic Education and the Real Estate Research Institute. 

Center for Economic Education 

The Center for EcorK>mic Education is one of many such centers at colleges and universities in the 
United States working with the natior>al Joint Council on Economic Education to expand economic 
understanding. Center programs irKlude ( 1 ) services to schools and colleges, individual educators, 
and the community; (2) research and professional training; and (3) operation of an economic 
education information center. The center consists of a broadly based executive policy board; an 
administrative staff; and formally organized groups of participating users. Although operating autorK>- 
mously, the center is affiliated with the Center for Research in Business, Economics arxJ the Commu- 
nity. 

Real Estate Research Institute 

The Real Estate Research Institute conducts a continuing research program, with special emphasis 
on urban development in Orange County. Studies are undertaken in cooperation with various public 
and private agencies, but primary funding is from the California State Department of Real Estate. 
Opportunities exist for student involvement. 

Center for Governmental Studies 

The Center for Governmental Studies is part of the Department of Political Science's expanding 
research and teaching activities. Established in 1%5, the center has four major furKtions: first to 
collect and make available fugitive governmental and political materials; secorxi, to assist local 
government agencies and citizen groups in the study of local governmental problems; third, to 
provide students with instruction and experience in research techniques and methodology; and 
fourth, to provide facilities for community institute and seminars. 


lOi-12 1 S90 


Research Organizations 27 


Urban Research Institute 

The Urban Research Institute is a joint venture between local government arKi the university. The 
institute has an advisory board representing governments and academic institutions in the area. The 
research on local problems is done by teams consisting of practitioners, elected officials, community 
representatives arid academicians selected for their expertise in the areas under study. It is an attempt 
to fuse the experience and reality orientation of practitioners with the resources, knowledge and skills 
of the academic community in solving problems facing the residents and governments in Orange 
County. 

Institute for Molecular Biology 

The Institute for Molecular Biology was established for the purpose of promoting an atmosphere 
cor>genial to research and creative activity in the nrK>lecular biologicai sciences. It is an interdiscipli- 
nary organization comprised of certain facuKy from the Departments of Biological ScierKe, Chemis- 
try and Physics. The institute is dedicated to the pursuit of problems of human welfare, utilizing an 
approach at the cellular and nK>lecular level of irtquiry. Its purposes are ( 1 ) to foster and encourage 
communication of ideas and information among its membership for mutual professional improve- 
ment; (2) to erKOurage students to adopt affiliation with the membership and to adopt an interdisci- 
plinary understanding of their particular areas of emphasis; (3) to foster an active research program 
on the part of the nf>embership on problems best approached by the integration of chemistry, physics 
and biology; and (4) to seek ways of improving the individual teaching performance of its member- 
ship through interdisciplinary communication at all levels of instruction. 

It is interKled that the institute will function as a service to the departments that it represents. The 
institute sponsors a series of special seminars devoted to topics in the nx>lecular biological scierKes, 
featuring speakers from its own personnel and from other campuses 

Reading Center 

The Reading Center is located in the School of Education. Its primary purpose is to serve as a clinic 
and laboratory for graduate students in the reading option of the Master of ScierKe in Education. 
Children from the university community schools anend the Reading Center for diagnosis and 
remediation. The center houses materials and equipment relating to reading instruction. 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 

The Laboratory for PhorKtic Research is a major research and training facility in the Department 
of linguistics at Cal State Fullerton It is equipped with the necessary electromechanical facilities 
required for the acoustical, psychoacoustkal, and physK>logk:al study of human speech. 

Its objectives are threefold; 

/nsiructfon. To provide teaching, training and expenefKe for students who will serve during their 
professional lives to assist the language handicapped. 

Research. To provide advanced students and faculty with facilities for research on language 
function arni dysfurKtion. 

Community servtce. To provide qualitative diagnostic assistance to the university community 
to the extent possible. 

The courses which center about the laboratory are designed to prepare students as operators in the 
elearomechanKal aspects of dinkal arxf research work in the analysis of normal and disordered 
speech. 

Advanced students and faculty use the laboratory to carry out significant research projects in 
acoustical, artKulatory and experimenul phonetics. To date, a wide range of such projects have 
either been completed or are currently in progress. The laboratory publishes the Research Reports 
series, available internationally through the ERIC system. 

Special Education Clinic 

The primary purpose of the Special Education Oinic is to provide intensive experierKes for students 
with children referred by schools and other ageiKies in the community. The experierKes involve 
educational assessn>ent, instructional methodology arxl evaluation. All students participating in the 
dink aner>d dink seminars and prepare cases for presentation at the seminars. 


1 S40 


108—12 


28 


Titan Shops 
Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton Founda* 
tion agency. In addition it is an off-campus clinical program for graduate students that involves 
experiences within medical and paramedical settings. The primary purpose of the clinics both on 
campus and off campus is to provide opportunities for teaching, service and research. University 
students receive clinical experience and opportunity for observation. The on-campus clinic is ac- 
credited by the Board of Examiners of the American Speech and Hearing Association and the 
California State Department of Education. 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 

The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton Founda- 
tion agency. The sanctuary provides for a program of continuing educational service to the commu- 
nity; a research center for biological field studies; a facility for teacher education in nature 
interpretation and conservation education; and a center for training students planning to enter into 
the public service field of nature interpretation. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 

FULLERTON FOUNDATION 

The California State University, Fullerton Foundation was established and incorporated in October 
1959 to provide essential student, faculty, and staff services which canrK>t be provided from state 
appropriations; to supplement the program and activities of the university in appropriate ways; and 
to assist otherwise the university in fulfilling its purposes and in serving the people of the State of 
California — especially those of the area in which the university is located. 

Services provided by the foundation include administration of scholarship and student loan furxis; 
sponsored research programs; Tucker Wildlife SarKtuary; and certain institutes. 

The foundation's overall policies are administered by a board of trustees composed of members of 
the university faculty, administration and students as well as community leaders. 

TITAN SHOPS, INC. 

Titan Shops, Inc., is comprised of the Titan Bookstore and food services. Established July 1, 1971, 
it is administered by a board of trustees made up of members of the university faculty, administration, 
students and community business leaders. 

Titan Bookstore 

Students are able to purchase or order books arxi supplies as needed for classes from the on-campus 
bookstore, owned and operated by the Titan Shops, Inc. The Titan Bookstore is a nonprofit operation; 
its proceeds are used to further the educatiorval aims of the university. It is located directly east of 
the Letters and ScierKe Building and is closely adjacent to the Administration-Busir^ess Administra- 
tion Building. 

Food Services 

On the campus. Titan Shops, Inc., provides food in the Commons arxJ in a snack bar in the lower 
level of the Letters and ScierKe Building. Verxiing machines and mobile carts also are located at other 
locations. They are operated by R & R Food Services, Inc. A variety of resUurants and eating places 
also may be four>d within a short walking or driving distarKe from the university. 


134-12 2 30 


w 


STUDENT SERVICES 


While classroom activity is devoted to the academic development of the learner. Student Services 
offers programs which simultar>eously provide students with services and opportunities for personal 
growth. Some Student Services programs such as housing and finarKial aid emphasize their service 
arxi educationally supportive roles; others, like counseling, accentuate their developmental aspects. 
The opportunities offered by the university's Student Services program vary from the traditional 
"student activity" of fraternity and sorority "rush" to the establishment of a coffee house complete 
with weekly entertainment. More developmental in nature is the investigating of vocational and 
personal life styles through group arnl/or individual counseling ar>d testing. 

The Student Services program iiKludes: counseling and testing, student activities. Associated Stu- 
dents government, housing, health services, financial aid, programs for the handicapped, internation- 
al education, placement, alumni affairs, educational opportunity for the cuKurally different, and 
special projects. Given the scope of Student Services, a partial measurement of a university's breadth 
arxJ depth is the quality of its Student Services program. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

While each department within Student Services has its specific function and staff, the Dean of 
Student Services coordinates arxJ administers the university's Student Services program. Additional- 
ly, the Dean of Student Services is an advocate for students to the faculty and administration and 
as such develops and maintains procedures within Student Services and the university which will 
increase the ger^eral welfare of the students and enhance their educational success at the university. 
Information regarding any of the Student Services programs may be obtained in the Dean of Student 
Services office. 

COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES 

Counseling 

Students who need assistance with such concerns as choosing an academic major or vocational goal, 
with study skills, or with personal problems affecting their academic progress may obtain help 
through the Counseling Center. The staff of professionally trained counselors and psychologists has 
available a variety of resources including occupational information files, vocational and psychologi- 
cal tests, college and graduate school caulogs and directories of various kinds to assist the student. 
The Counseling Center also mainuins contact with agencies and professional persons in the commu- 
nity to whom students may be referred. 

Counseling services are available only to fully matriculated, registered students. 

Testing 

Universitywide testing programs are coordinated and administered by the Testing Center. These 
include university admissions tests and ger>eral tests for graduate school admission. In addition, the 
Testify Center provides advice and consulting services to instructional departments in the develop- 
ment and administration of admission, selection, and placement tests for use by a specific depart- 
merrt. 

The Testing Center also conducts ongoing research on the validity and appropriateness of tests used 
in university testing progranrs. 

Testing requirements for students seeking admission are listed in the admissions section of the 
catalog Studems seeking information about testing requiremems for specific instructional programs 
should inquire in the appropriate instructional division or the Counseling and Testing Center. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The university recognizes the important role of student activities. An extensive organization of clubs, 
interest groups, commissions, councils arxl communities has been created within the student body 
structure so that opportunities are available to every student according to his interest, ability and 


laa-ii 2 55 


30 Student Activities 


available time. In addition each academic department has a student association which provides 
contact with faculty and opportunities for activities related to a student's major or vocational interest. 

Student Activities Center 

The Student Activities Center provides a wide range of service. A professional staff provides aid and 
consultation to individuals and groups as well as assisting the Associated Students in planning and 
implementing programs, events and projects. The staff advises all student organizations concerning 
established policies and procedures, and aids students in arranging for use of university services and 
facilities. The commitment of the center is to aid students and faculty in the development of an 
enriched academic environment. 

Associated Students 

All students are members of the Associated Students and are represented by the Associated Students 
Senate and executive officers, who develop and maintain extracurricular programs of every type. 
Each year a budget is adopted in the spring which allocates anticipated activity fees and all other 
income to be derived from all programs during the following year. Senators are elected from various 
academic disciplines. One of the noteworthy developments in 1972-73 was the Departmental 
Association Council, which is assigned a certain portion of the budget by the Senate. The many 
departmental associations are established to promote closer relationships among students and 
faculty of their departments and bring programs to the departments that might not be possible 
without the funding provided by the Senate. Most departments have established very active associa- 
tions and participation by all students is solicited enthusiastically. 

Student Government 

All registered students are members of the Associated Students of Cal State Fullerton. The Associated 
Students is governed through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the Associated 
Students organization. The president and commissioners constitute the executive branch which has 
the responsibility for the developn^ent and administration of the program, including such activities 
as publications, intercollegiate athletics, intramural athletics, forensics, and musk. The Associated 
Students Senate has full responsibility for legislation by which this program is directed and for the 
allocation of student funds for the program. The judkial branch serves as the legal body for 
interpretation of the constitution and enforcement of Associated Student polkies. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are recognized as vital to the total educational process. They are chartered 
to encourage and facilitate use of university resources and integrate activities with a goal of sustaining 
a viable university community. Any group of students may become a chartered organization, 
provided the goals and activities are consistent with university rules and regulations, and applying 
through the Student Activities Office. Organizations are classified under the following headings: (1 ) 
CocurricvUtr (organizations whkh share learning goals with a specific department); (2) Political or 
Religious: (3) 5efvke/and (4) Social. More than 75 organizations are now recognized, including 
seven national social fraternities, five national social sororities, a number of departmental associa- 
tions and many special interest groups. 

Student Publications 

The university newspaper, the Daily Titan, is published as a product of the journalism classes and 
financed by the Associated Students. In addition, a handbook is available for use by organizations 
in the development and operation of their program. Two magazines. Focus and the Promethean, 
are also published by students. 

Men's Athletics 

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of teams in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, 
golf, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, water polo, ferKing and wrestling. A 
year-round program of intramural activities includes basketball, badminton, flag football, handball, 
softball, tennis and wrestling, swimming and weight lifting. 

The university is a member of the California Collegiate Athletk Association (CCAA). All athletk 
teams compete under rules of the National Collegiate Athletk Association (NCAA). 


145^12 2 89 


student Activities 31 


Intramural Activities 

The intramural program is conducted on a seasonal basis and involves a variety of athletic and 
recreational activities for both men and women. Rules and regulations which govern participation 
in the intramural program are available in the Office of the Director of the Intramural Program or 
in the Student Activities Center. 

Women's Athletics 

Participation by women in extramural volleyball, basketball, tennis, swimming, track, and golf is 
provided though membership in the Extramural Coordinatir>g Council of Southern California and the 
American Recreation ar>d Athletic Federation for University Women. 

Recreation Programs 

Individual recreation opportunities in weight training, swimmirig, handball, volleyball, basketball and 
badminton are available through membership in the University Recreation Programs to members 
of the student body, faculty and staff. 

Draft Advisement and Information Programs 

A professional staff provides information, guidance and referrals for students of the university on all 
questions and problems stemming from Selective Service requirements. This service, provided by 
the Associated Students, works closely with the Selective Service assistant in the Admissions and 
Records Office as well as all other areas of Student Services. 

Birth Control Information Services 

Birth control counseling at the Studerit Health Center has been supplemented by a Birth Control 
Information Service, financed ar>d operated by the Associated Students urxier the direction of the 
university medical director. A part-time coordinator is available in the University Union to make 
appointments with a Student Health Center physician. The physician advises the patient on the 
advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of birth control as well as giving the necessary 
physical examiriation. 

Campus wide Events 

Student boards, organized by the Associated Students, sponsor many campuswide events. The 
lecture series, pop corKerts, film senes and special events are part of the ongoing program. All 
recognized student organizatiorts frequently cosponsor events in the area of their interests. 

Child Care Center 

Sponsored by the Associated Students is the Children's Center which provides daytime nursery care 
for children of Cal Sute Fullerton students for a nominal fee. The professionally suffed center, 
located near the campus, is licensed by the State of California. 

Experimental College 

The Experinr>ental College is a program created and funded by the Associated Students. A student 
director and his staff coordinate, guide, plan and publicize the program to the university community. 
The Experimental College is recognized by the university community as a creative, positive cocur- 
ncular program that is a supplement to the regular instructional program of the university. 

Legal Information and Referral 

This unique office provides assisunce to students on matters pertaining to law and makes referrals 
in cooperation with the Orange County Bar Association and the Legal Aid Society. A full-time law 
student attending a recognized school of law maintains scheduled office hours in the University 
Union. 

Mutual Ticket Agency 

The Associated Students, through its business office, operates a ticket agency for the benefit of all 
students. Purchases for drama, music, sho%vs and sporting evems may be made during regular office 
hours. The agerKy is located in the University Union. 


149^12 2 96 


32 Finjincial Aid 


Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1 %0 to provide the outside press with news of student 
activities on the campus. It is financed by a budgeted allocation from Associated Students. 

University Union 

The University Union is leased by the Associated Students from the university. This facility houses 
the Associated Students government offices and business office, as well as the Student Activities 
Center, student organizations rooms and a snack bar. Facilities are available to all students for 
meeting rooms, pool, cards, films, and small discussion groups. The union is located in the lower 
level of the Letters and Science Building. 

STUDENT RESIDENCE CENTER 

The Student Residence Center has a professional staff of housing counselors whose primary concern 
is to insure that every student's housing needs are measured and every attempt is made to satisfy 
those needs. 

In order to meet these primary concerns, the center provides the following services; 

• Lists of off-campus housing, rooms and apartments. These listings are continuously updated by 
conventional and computerized procedures. 

• Summer orientations designed to find housing for students well In advance of the fall semester. 
The orientations generally bring together small groups of students who share similar interests 
because of their housing needs. 

• Model rental agreements or leases are available to all students. The model lease has been 
carefully reviewed by legal counselors and represents the university's best recommerxlations 
to students who want a lease which clearly states the rights and privileges of both tenant and 
landlord. 

• Information pamphlets are available to students with questions about tenant rights and respon- 
sibilities. Also, counseling services are available to help the student understand his/her tenant 
rights and responsibilities. 

• Bulletin boards are available for students requesting roommates or needing an apartment. 

• A free computerized car pool service is available to students with transportation difficulties and 
students attempting to improve the university's automobile ecology. 

THE HEALTH CENTER 

The Student Health Center is located in Suite 553 of the Letters and Science Building. The center 
is open from 8 a m. to 7 p.m., Morxiay through Thursday, arxJ 8 a m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

The doctors and nurses, lab techs, pharmacists and aides are there to care for patients' medical 
r>eeds, rwt to judge their morals. No one has access to a patient's medical records unless the patient 
tells the center to serxi them to another doctor. 

Most of the doctors are gef>eralists who have considerable experience and interest in the heahh 
needs of university people. In addition, there are psychiatrists, an orthopedist and gynecologists. The 
center has a limited pharmacy (not for outside prescriptions), a laboratory, an X-ray service and 
physiotherapy. 

The cost of care given in the Health Center, except for a few specific fees, already has been paid 
through student fees and by the State of California. Every registered student is eligible for care. 
However, the Health Center cannot meet all medical needs. So students are urged to obtain health 
insurance. A good, inexpensive policy is offered through the Associated Students Office. 
Sometime this academic year, probably around Christmas 1973, the new Health Center will open. 
When it does, all members of the university community are invited to come in for a personal tour. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Financial Aid Office provides guidance and assistance in financial matters to all students. 
Financial aid administers all scholarships, emergerKy loans, grants. National Direct Loans and the 
work-study programs. 


154—12 2 125 


Financial Aid 33 


Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships is available for outstanding students. Qualified students should 
obtain scholarship applications from the Financial Aid Office, arxJ return by April 15 for the fall 
semester. Scholarship applications are evaluated by the university Scholarship Committee. Awards 
are based on scholastic record, financial need and personal qualifications. Some scholarships are 
limited to students majoring in specified disciplir)es. Departmental recommendations weigh heavily 
in such cases. 

Scholarships offered by Cal State Fullerton are made possible by interested organizations, business 
firms and individuals. Recent contributors to the scholarship program include: 

American Association of University Women (Placentia-Yorba Linda Branch) 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc. 

California Retired Teachers Association 

Cal State Fullerton Computer Center Scholarship Fund 

California State Employees' Association (Cal State Fullerton Chapter) 

Delta Delta Delta East Orange County Alumnae Chapter 

Ebell Club of Fullerton 

Edward Mittleman Memorial Scholarship 

Fourth District, California Parents and Teachers Association 

Fullerton Rotary Club 

Gamma Phi Beta Sorority (Orange County Alumnae) 

Kappa Phi Sigma Sorority 

Los Amigos Club of Fullerton 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Coulson (President's Award) 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship Fund 

National Federation of the Blind of California, Inc. 

North American Rockwell 
Orange County Engineering Council Scholarship 
Robert King Maxwell MefTXKial Scholarship Fund 
Sadie Lar>don Memorial Music Scholarship Fund 
Sheryl Cummings Memorial Scholarship Furtd 

Loans 

The generosity of organizations arKi individuals enables the university to offer short-term loans to 
students who meet unexpected financial difficulties of a temporary nature. Loans from these funds 
are made for various periods of tin^ arxi to specified categories of students, according to university 
regulations arxf the wishes of the dorxxs. The prime purpose of these loans is to meet educationally 
related expenses, and thus loans canrK>t be made for the purposes which are normally financed by 
private lending institutions. Application for a short-term loan may be made at any time during the 
school year. 

The following is a listing of the loan funds available during the 1972-73 school year: 

Altrusa Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 

Associated Students Foreign Student Loan Fur>d 

Brea Rotary Club Loan Fund 

California Retired Teachers Association 

Carrie Lou Sutherland Memorial Furxi 

Cal State Fullerton Faculty Women's Oub Loan Fund 

Don Miller Menxxial Furxi 

Gamma Epsilon Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Loan Furxi 

James Merrick Memorial Fund 

Junior Ebell Club of Anaheim Loan Furxi 

Laguna Beach Pan-Hellenic Loan Fund 

Laura E. Imhoff Memorial Furxi 

Mary Virginia Lopez Memorial Fund 

Memorial Loan Furxi 

Newport Harbor Children's Theatre Loan Furxi 
Newport Harbor Pan-Hellenic Loan Furxi 
Pan-Hellenic Club of Northern Orartge County Loan Fund 
Pierre Guyette Memorial Fund 

2— 844S2 


156—12 2 145 


34 Financial Aid 


Robert E. Edwards Memorial Fund 

Rossmoor Women's Club Loan Fund 

Rotary Club of Fullerton, Foreign Students Loan Fund 

Soroptimist International Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 

Stan Chase Memorial Fund 

Student Emergency Loan Fund 

Trust-Oavis Meniorial Furxf 

Zonta Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 

National Direct Student Loans 

Cal State Fullerton joins with the federal government and the State of California in making long-term, 
low-interest loans available to students under the National Direct Education Act. Details and applica- 
tions are available at the Financial Aid Office. Deadlines for submissions of applications are Decem- 
ber 1 for the spring semester, April 1 for the summer sessions and june 1 for the fall semester. 

All unmarried applicants under age 25 are required to file a Parents' Confidential Statement or an 
Independent Student Certificate with the Financial Aid Office. The Parent Confidential Statement 
should be mailed to the College Scholarship Service, Box 1025, Berkeley 94701, designating Cal State 
Fullerton as orw of the recipients. The Parents' Confidential Statement assists the university to 
evaluate financial need, and, since it must be on hand before the loan application can be acted upon, 
early submission is advised. These forms can be obtained at nfH)st secondary schools or at the 
FinarKial Aid Office. 

Federal Insured Loan Program 

The university cooperates with the federal government and private lending institutions in making 
guaranteed loans available to full-time students. A loan recipient under this program must meet the 
following qualifications: 

a. have an adjusted family income of less than $15,000 per year 

b. be a full-time student 

c. be enrolled and in good standing at the university or accepted for enrollment. 

The interest on these loans is 7 percent per annum on the unpaid balance. The U.S. Office of 
Education will pay all interest while the student is enrolled as a full-time student. Repaynr>ent ranges 
from 5 to 10 years following graduation, according to arrangements made with the lerxler. Applica- 
tions and further information may be obtair>ed from the Financial Aid Office. 

University Work-Study Program 

The university cooperates with the federal government in providing work-study jobs. Students who 
can establish "need eligibility" may work up to an average of 1 5 hours a week during the school 
year and up to 40 hours in the sumn>er. Ur>der this program there are on-campus opportunities such 
as library and instructional aides, clerks, computer center aides, and laboratory and research assist- 
ants, Off<ampus jobs in nonprofit community agencies include teacher aides, recreation leaders, 
office trainees, and administrative interns. Interested students should consult the Financial Aid Office 
for eligibility requirements. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

Federal funds have been made available to the university to use in making grants to undergraduate 
students who display "exceptional finarKial need" arxl who would otherwise be unable to contirnje 
their education. These grants range from $200 to $1 ,000 per year and are non-repayable. These grants 
are always awarded in conjurKtion with other forms of aid, arxi thus a Parents' Confidential 
Statement is required. Deadlines are the same as for the National Direct Student Loans. 

Alan Pattee Scholarship (Children of Deceased Peace Officers or Firemen) 

Surviving children, natural or adopted, of California peace officers or firemen killed in the lir>e of 
duty are not charged fees or tuition of any kind while enrolled at any California State University or 
College, according to the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act arni Section 23762, California Education Code. 
Students qualifying for these benefits are known as Alan Panee scholars. 


163^12 2 170 


Educational Opportunity Program 35 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Foreign Students 

Special services for foreign students are coordinated by the Office of International Education and 
Exchange. These services include aid with problems corKerning visa status and employment; orien- 
tation to academic procedures and requirements; advisement related to finances and social customs; 
and to resources and opportunities offered by campus and community. 

International Programs ' 

Information concerning study opportunities for American students in foreign universities is available 
in the International Student Office. The director of international education and exchange coordinates 
the selection of students applying for admission to one of the international programs operated by 
The California State University and Colleges in FrarKe, Germany, Israel, Italy, japan, Spain, Sweden, 
Taiwan and the United Kingdom. (See also International Programs on page 23.) 

HANDICAPPED STUDENT PROGRAM 

A program to meet the special needs of physically handicapped students currently is being devel- 
oped. The goal of this program is to make the full educational, cultural, social, and physical facilities 
of the university available to students with orthopedic, visual, hearing, or other mobility or perceptual 
disabilities. A full range of services is being planned— a learning resource center, preregistration, 
orientation, attendant/reader/note-taker services, counseling, career planning, academic advise- 
ment, housing, transportation and job placement. The purpose is to provide necessary services and 
assistance that will eliminate or significantly reduce barriers resulting from the nK>bility problems 
erKOuntered by most handicapped students. The program will serve as a centralized source of 
information and individual attention to students by personnel experienced m the particular needs 
of the handicapped. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Student Services. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM 

The Educational Opportunity Program is an innovative educational program designed to provide 
comprehensive services for Vocationally disadvantaged and/or culturally different students. These 
services include the identification, selection, counseling and retention of students who would not 
normally acquire a university education because of academic, ethnic, financial or motivational 
barriers. 

EOP gives each of the students in its program individual attention. It also uses knowledge of the 
student's distirKtive patterns of social behavior, learning styles, motivations, and aspirations to assist 
students in realizir^g their full potentialities. Additionally, EOP strives to develop a sense of commu- 
nity among its students through a variety of creative and identity-seeking activities. 

Students are erKOuraged rK)t only to understand the background and strengths of their own particular 
ethnic groups, but also to work together in support of central, universal human values. EOP is keenly 
interested in advancing the understanding of different cultural groups on this campus and an 
awareness of their problems and potentialities. 

The services offered by the Educational Opportunity Program include: Project Upward Bound, 
recruiting, cour>selir^ Learning AssistarKe Center /Tutorial Center, direct intervention programs and 
supporting secretarial services. 

Project Upward Bound 

This program is direaed to high school students with good potential and who are therefore capable 
of college work, but who are underachieving. Upward Bound provides these students with supple- 
mental academic and counselir>g support to motivate them to complete high school and assist them 
in entering higher education. 

Recruiting 

EOP recruitnYent teams visit high schools ar>d colleges within a specified service area and advise 
students of the benefits of higher education at Cal State Fullerton. Utilizing Affirmative Action 
guidelines, a special attempt is made to recruit students with high academic potential. The support 
services of EOP are designed to ensure a high rate of student achievement arxl to provide them the 


16S— 12 2 195 


36 Placement Services 

opportunity to realize their full potential. 

Counseling Service 

The counseling component is the key to the effectiveness of the entire EOP. Peer counsel* 
ors, working under the direction of professional counselors, are the important liaisons between each 
individual EOP student and the university as a whole. Assistance and guidance is provided to help 
the student resolve academic, social, financial and personal problems. The EOP Counseling Center 
also acts as a referral center to direct students to the appropriate support services, e.g. financial aid, 
housing. Learning Assistance Center, tutorial service, etc. 

Learning Assistance Center and Tutorial Center 

The EOP Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is for students who need to bring about changes in their 
present learning skills, particularly in the areas of reading, writing, computation and study skills. The 
LAC also serves as a resource center, containing special study materials, collateral textbooks, and 
taped programs that supplement regular course offerings. 

Direct Intervention Programs 

These programs bridge the gap between a student's present achievement and university scholastic 
requirements. Currently, special programs are offered for academic credit in reading, mathematics, 
study skills and ethnic studies. The LAC is now preparing additional direct intervention programs in 
mathematics, and the sciences. Additional programs will be created and implemented relevant to 
student needs. 

Tutorial Services 

Individual tutoring is available to students through the LAC on request and through faculty or peer 
counselor referrals, and after their needs have been properly assessed. All tutors are first selected 
on their ability in their particular area of corKentration. Prior to tutoring, they are assigned to a series 
of education courses designed to give the prospective tutor a greater understanding and awareness 
of the nature of his role in the learning process. These classes are new this year and are not listed 
in this catalog. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

A centralized Placement Center is n^aintained with responsibilities for assisting students in career 
planning and in finding both part-tin^e and career employment. The university believes that it best 
serves both the student and employers only when its graduates have been placed in the professions 
for which they are prepared arxi trained. All registered students are welcome to use the services 
of the Placement Center without cost are also eligible for career counseling and placement 

Part- Time Placement 

All registered students wishir^ part-tin>e jobs either on or off campus are eligible to receive the 
assistance of the office. New students may receive service as soon as they have been officially 
admitted to the university. Secretarial skills are in great demand, but calls for dnvers, custodians, 
teacher aides, draftsmen, waiters, clerks, youth and recreation leaders, sitters, garderters, etc., are 
received. Entering freshmen who must augment their resources while going to school are en- 
couraged to limit their work hours to approximately 1 5 per week. 

Business, Industry and Government Placement 

Through personal interviews the career placement counselor assists graduating seniors, graduate 
students, and alumni seeking career employment in business, industry, or public service in defining 
occupational prefererKe, providing active job leads and writing r^m^. 

In addition, the Placement Center makes arrangements for the on-campus recruitment program 
which brings the employers to the students. Also available through this office is the Job Bank service. 
The center is a member of the Orange County Job Bank, and a computerized listing of more than 
1,000 job opportunities in Orange County is received daily. 


17^-12 2 290 


Alumni Relations 37 


Located in the Placement Center is the Career Library with an ever-expanding selection of resource 
materials on career opportunities. Federal, state, county, city and armed forces brochures and 
applications are also available for student access. One section of the Career Library is devoted to 
information on nontraditional or alternative vocations. 

The Placement Center serves as liaison office for the military and Action/ Peace Corps-VISTA offering 
counseling and information brochures to any interested student. 

Educational Placement 

Students in the teacher education, pupil personnel services, or administration curriculum of the 
university, who are in the final semester of a credential program, or who are in student teaching or 
directed held work, are eligible to register and receive the services of the Placement Center, chief 
of which is help in establishing a professional employment file. Such registrants are supplied informa- 
tion on openings and helped to establish their candidacies in the school districts and educational 
institutions. 

Students who are not in the student teaching program but who are completing their credential 
program at the university are also eligible for service. This includes those about to receive their 
master's degree in library science or academic areas, who plan to apply for a community college 
credential. 

Coordinator of Minority Relations 

The coordinator of minority relations has the responsibility for broadening awarer>ess in the entire 
community of placement services available to all minorities and for ecKOuraging minority students 
to register with the center for career courtseling and placement services. The coordinating officer 
works cooperatively with colleagues responsible for other specialized functions, e g. teaching, 
part-time jobs, busir>ess, industry and government, and does not serve as the whole placement 
counselor for all miruxity students. 

SPECIAL PROJECTS 

The Office of Special Projects is cofKerned with formulating and adjudicating student rights, griev- 
arKes and responsibilities. The office coordinates both the student grievance and the student discipli- 
nary procedures. Additionally, the office carries out special projects related to Student Services as 
assigned by the Dean of Student Services. 

ALUMNI RELATIONS 

The Alumni Association of Cal State Fullerton provides the opportunity for alumni to maintain 
contact with the university after graduation through various publications, information about continu- 
ing education programs as well as special social and service events at the university. The association 
is directed by a board which also advises the university president and administration. Further 
information regarding membership and the progranns can be obtained by calling the Office of Alumni 
Relations. 


—12 2 310 


191 - 



ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, 
RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 


19l~lt f 310 




41 


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 


OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS 

The Office of Admissions and Records is responsible for the administration of the admission, 
registration, and records programs and services for undergraduate and graduate students in the 
regular sessions of Cal State Fullerton. These programs and services irKlude; the admission and 
readmission of students within established enrollment categories, quotas and priorities; the evalua- 
tion of the applicability of undergraduate transfer credit toward all-university requirements of the 
curriculum, the registration of student programs of study, including enrollment into classes; the 
maintenance of academic records; the administration of academic probation and disqualification 
policies; the provision of enrollment certifications on student request, including transcripts of aca- 
demic records, certificates for Selective Service, Veterans Administration and other purposes; the 
certification of the completion of degree and credential requirements; the review of petitions for 
exceptions to academic regulations; and the provision of information about these programs and 
services. 

RELATIONS WITH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

The Office of Relations with Schools and Colleges administers a universitywide program to assist 
undergraduate students in the transition from school to college. This assistance is provided in the 
form of preadmission guidarKe to prospective students, counseling with parents, provision of current 
information about the university's curricula and requirements to school and college counselors, and 
research into the articulation problems of the transfer student. 

Requirements for Admission 

Requirements for admission to the California Slate University and Colleges are in accordance with 
Title 5, Chapter 5, Subchapter 2, of the California Administrative Code as amended by the Board 
of Trustees of the California State University and Colleges on November 24, 1970. A prospective 
applicant who is unsure of his status under the requirements is erKouraged to consult his school or 
college counselor or the university Admissions Office. 

Undergraduate Application Procedures for 1974-75 

All prospective undergraduate studems must file a completed application for admission within the 
appropriate filing period. A completed application includes an application, a residence question- 
naire, a data coding form, and the $20 nonrefundaWe application fee. Applicants seeking financial 
aid should also complete and submit with the application the Preliminary Financial Aid application. 
Each undergraduate applicant may file only one application for any one term with The California 
Slate University and Colleges. Applications may be obtained from any campus of the system or high 
school and community college counselors, and should be filed with the campus of first choice. 
Alternative choice campuses may be listed on the application. 

Graduate Application Procedures for 1974-75 

All applicants for post-baccalaureate status must file a completed application for admission to 
post-baccalaureate sutus with the appropriate filing period. A completed application for admission 
to post-baccalaureate sutus includes an application, a residence questionnaire, a supplemenul 
graduate admissions application, a dau coding form, and the $20 nonrefundable application fee. 
Post-baccalaureate ap^icants who were enrolled as undergraduate students at the campus in the 
term immediately preceding the term for which they now wish to apply are also required to complete 
and submit an application and submit the $20 nonrefundable application fee. Applicants seeking 
financial aid should also complete and submit with the application material specified above, the 
preliminary finarKial aid application. 

Post-baccalaureate applicants seeking second baccalaureates are considered undergraduate appli- 
cants for purposes of application and admission procedures, categories, and quoUs. 

Since applicants for post-baccalaureate programs will be limited to the choice of a single campus 
on each application, redirection to alternative campuses will be minimal. In the event that a post- 


196^12 2 335 


42 Admission to the University 

baccalaureate applicant wishes to be considered by nrK)re than one campus, it will be necessary to 
submit a separate and complete application to each. 

Application materials may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Graduate Studies Office 
of any campus within the system and must be filed with the campus of first choice. 


Admission Categories and Quotas 

Admission quotas are established at each college for student categories selected within policies 
established by the Trustees of The California State University and Colleges. At Fullerton, categories 
have been established for students who are; first-time freshmen; freshman and sophomore under- 
graduate transfer applicants; junior and senior undergraduate transfer applicants; special program 
applicants; hardship applicants; and foreign students. Also, there is a quota for each graduate level 
program. After admission to Fullerton, requests for change to a different (i.e., a new) academic 
objective involving established admission categories and quotas will be evaluated following policies 
and procedures parallel to those for new students. 


Application Filing Periods for 1974-75 


Term 

Summer quarter 1974 
Fall quarter 1974 
Fall semester 1974 
Winter quarter 1975 
Spring semester 1975 
Spring quarter 1975 


Initial Filing Period 
jan. 1-31, 1974 
Nov. 1-30, 1973 
Nov. 1-30, 1973 
june 1-30, 1974 
Aug. 1-31, 1974 
Aug. 1-31, 1974 


Extended Filing Period 
Begins (continues until 
quotas are reached) 
Feb. 1, 1974 
Dec. 1, 1973 
Dec. 1, 1973 
July 1, 1974 
Sept. 1, 1974 
Sept. 1, 1974 


Semester Calerfdar 


Chico 
Fresno 
Fullerton 
Long Beach 
Sacramento 


San Diego 
San Fernando 
San Francisco 
San lose 
SOfKMTia 


Quarter Caterniar 
Bakersfield Pomona 

Dominguez Hills San Bernardino 

Hayward San Luis Obispo 

Humboldt Stanislaus 

Los Angeles 


Initial Filing Period 

All applications received during the initial filing period will receive equal consideration within 
established enrollment categories, quotas, and prionties, irrespective of the time and date filed. 

Space Reservations 

Applicants who can be accomnnodated within category quotas will receive confirmation of space 
reservation. Although the space reservation is not a statement of admission, it is a commitnr>ent on 
the part of the university to admit a student once eligibility has been determir>ed. When the student 
receives notice of the space reservation, he should initiate action to have transcripts of all college 
and high school work sent to the campus where space has been reserved. The institution will inform 
him of the number of copies of transcripts requir^, dates for submittal, and where they should be 
sent. The student should not request that transcripts be sent until requested to do so by the campus 
where space has been reserved. 

Redirection 

Applications of undergraduate students who cannot be accommodated at their first choice campus 
will automatically be redirected to their secorxJ choice, arxJ, if they cannot be accomnxxiated there, 
to their third choice, and so on. 

Hardship Petitions 

Each college or university has established procedures to consider qualified applicants who would 
be faced with an extreme hardship if not admitted. Prospective hardship petitior>ers should contact 
the campus regarding specifK policies governing hardship admission. 


901—12 2 360 


Undergraduate Admission Requirements 43 


Extended Filing Period 

Campuses not filling enrollment quotas during the initial filing period will continue to accept applica- 
tions during the extended filing period until quotas are filled. Application priority within the extended 
period will be granted in chronological order of application receipt. 

How to Apply 

1 . Submit a completed application for admission within the anrKXjnced filing period accompanied 
by the required application fee to: 

Office of Admissions and Records 
California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, California 92634 

2. Request required transcripts of record of all previous scholastic work from each school or 
college attended when asked to do so by the campus where space has been reserved for you. 
The transcripts required at Fullerton are 

— (or undergraduates— 

(a) the high school transcript, and 

(b) a transcript from each college or university attended. Undergraduate applicants for a 
teaching credential must submit two copies of the transcript from each college or 
university attended; 

— for graduates— 

( a ) applicants for unclassified graduate standing with no degree or credential objective must 
submit a transcript from the college or university where the baccalaureate was earned. 

(b) applicants for a master's degree or teaching credential, or both, must submit two copies 
of the transcript from each college or university anernied. 

All students are advised that they should also have a complete set of college transcripts for their 
personal use at all times of advisement. 

All transcripts must be received directly from the issuing institution to be considered official 
and cannot be returned to the student. Foreign language transcripts must be accompanied by 
certified English translations 

3. If required, submit the scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the American College 
Test. Scores are required for all urxiergraduate applicants with fewer than 60 completed 
semester units of study (90 quarter units). Applicants to classified graduate curricula must 
submit the scores of any qualifying examinations required in their prospective program of study. 

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

First-time Freshmen 

Applicants who have completed no college work after high school graduation will be considered 
for admission as first-tin^e freshmen under one of the following provisions. Results of either the CEEB 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing program examination (ACT) are 
acceptable in establishing eligibility. 

Exceptions: College credit earf>ed concurrent with high school enrollment; college credit earned 
in summer session after high school and prior to regular matriculation in college; college credit 
granted for the CLEP or Advanced Placement programs, or military or USAFI courses; or college 
credit granted for some nontraditional learning experierKe, will not affect the applicant's status 
as a first-time freshman for application quota purposes as well as admission. Further, the accelerat- 
ed student, who completes his high school program mid-year, who has applied to The California 
State University and Colleges for the following fall term, but chooses to atterxf a local community 
college in the spring term will be cor>sidered a first-time freshman for application quota purposes 
as well as admission. All such college or advanced standing credit, if fully acceptable as transfer 
credit will be granted the student after admission. 

California high school graduates or legal residems for tuition purposes must have a grade-point 
average arxi total score on the SAT, or composite score on the ACT, which together provide an 
eligibility index placing them m the upper or>e-third of California high school graduates. For 1973-74 
the minimum eligibility index is 3,072 usir>g the SAT or 741 usir>g the ACT. 

High school graduates from other states or possessions who are nonresidents for tuition purposes 


a06— 12 2 38S 


44 Undergraduate Admission Requirements 

must present an eligibility index which places them in the upper one-sixth of California high school 
graduates. For 1973-74 the minimum eligibility index is 3,402 using the SAT or 826 using the ACT. 
The eligibility index is computed either by multiplying the grade-point average by 800 and adding 
it to the total SAT score, or multiplying the grade-point average by 200 and adding it to 10 times 
the composite ACT score. Grade-point averages are based on work completed in the last three years 
of high school, exclusive of physical education and military science. 

As an alternative, the following table may be used to determine the eligibility of graduates of 
California high schools (or California legal residents) for freshman admission to a California State 
University or College. This table is based on the eligibility index. Scores shown are the SAT Total 
and the ACT Composite. Students with a given CPA must present the correspK)nding test score. 
Conversely, students with a given ACT or SAT score must present the corresponding CPA in order 
to be eligible. 

ADMISSIONS TABLE FOR CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
OR CALIFORNIA LEGAL RESIDENTS 



ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 

CPA 

Score 

Score 

CPA 

Score 

Score 

CPA 

Score 

Score 

( )• 



2.80 

19 

832 

2.39 

27 

1160 

3.20 

11 

512 

2.79 

19 

840 

2.38 

27 

1168 

3.19 

11 

520 

2.78 

19 

848 

2.37 

27 

1176 

3.18 

11 

528 

2.77 

19 

856 

2.36 

27 

1184 

3.17 

11 

536 

2.76 

19 

864 

2.35 

28 

1192 

3.16 

11 

544 

2.75 

20 

872 

2.34 

28 

1200 

3.15 

12 

552 

2.74 

20 

880 

2.33 

28 

1208 

3.14 

12 

560 

2.73 

20 

888 

2.32 

28 

1216 

3.13 

12 

568 

2.72 

20 

8% 

2.31 

28 

1224 

3.12 

12 

576 

2.71 

20 

904 

2.30 

29 

1232 

3.11 

12 

584 

2.70 

21 

912 

2.29 

29 

1240 

3.10 

13 

592 

2.69 

21 

920 

2.28 

29 

1248 

3.09 

13 

600 

2.68 

21 

928 

2.27 

29 

1256 

3.08 

13 

606 

2.67 

21 

936 

2.26 

29 

1264 

3.07 

13 

616 

2.66 

21 

944 

2.25 

30 

1272 

3.06 

13 

624 

2.65 

22 

952 

2.24 

30 

1280 

3.05 

14 

632 

2.64 

22 

960 

2.23 

30 

1288 

3.04 

14 

640 

2.63 

22 

968 

2.22 

30 

12% 

3.03 

14 

648 

2.62 

22 

976 

2.21 

30 

1304 

3.02 

14 

656 

2.61 

22 

984 

2.20 

31 

1312 

3,01 

14 

664 

2.60 

23 

992 

2.19 

31 

1320 

3.00 

15 

672 

2,59 

23 

1000 

2.18 

31 

1328 

2.99 

15 

680 

2.58 

23 

1008 

2.17 

31 

1336 

2.98 

15 

688 

2.57 

23 

1016 

2.16 

31 

1344 

2.97 

15 

6% 

2.56 

23 

1024 

2.15 

32 

1352 

2.% 

15 

704 

2.55 

24 

1032 

2.14 

32 

1360 

2.95 

16 

712 

2.54 

24 

1040 

2.13 

32 

1368 

2,94 

16 

720 

2.53 

24 

1048 

2.12 

32 

1376 

2.93 

16 

728 

2.52 

24 

1056 

2.11 

32 

1384 

2.92 

16 

736 

2.51 

24 

1064 

2.10 

33 

1392 

2.91 

16 

744 

2.50 

25 

1072 

2.09 

33 

1400 

2.90 

17 

752 

2.49 

25 

1080 

2.06 

33 

1406 

2.89 

17 

760 

2.48 

25 

1088 

2.07 

33 

1416 

2.88 

17 

768 

2.47 

25 

10% 

2.06 

33 

1424 

2.87 

17 

776 

2.46 

25 

1104 

2.05 

34 

1432 

2.86 

17 

784 

2.45 

26 

1112 

2.04 

34 

1440 

2.85 

18 

792 

2.44 

26 

1120 

2.03 

34 

1448 

2.84 

18 

800 

2.43 

26 

1128 

2.02 

34 

1456 

2.83 

18 

806 

2.42 

26 

1136 

2.01 

34 

1464 

2.82 

18 

816 

2.41 

26 

1144 

2.00 

35 

1472 

2.81 

18 

824 

2.40 

27 

1152 

( )t 




* Students eanunf tr«de>potfX av«r«9es abow 3 JO are et#bie for adnusision 
t Students earning grade-pomi averages befow 2.0 are not e di ble for admnson. 


211—11 1 410 


Admission of Grjtduate Students 45 


Graduates of High Schools in a Foreign Country 

Applicants who are graduates of foreign high schools must have preparation equivalent to that 
required of eligible California high school graduates. The university will carefully review the previous 
record of all such applicants and only those with promise of academic success equivalent to that 
of eligible California high school graduates will be admitted. Such applicants are not required to take 
either the SAT or ACT except when specifically requested to do so. 

Non-High School Graduates 

Applicants who are over 18 years of age, but have not graduated from high school, will be considered 
for admission only when preparation in all other ways is such that the university believes promise 
of academic success is equivalent to that of eligible California high school graduates. 

High School Students 

Students still enrolled in high school will be considered for enrollment in certain special programs 
if recommended by their principal and if in the judgment of the university their preparation is 
equivalent to that required of eligible California high school graduates. Such admission is only for 
a given course or program. 

Recommended Preparation 

Overall excellefKe of performance in high school subjects and a test score giving evidence of 
academic potential provide the best bases for predicting success at Cal State Fullerton. While no 
specific course pattern is required, prospective students are strongly encouraged to include the 
following subjects in their preparation for work at Fullerton: college preparatory English; another 
language; mathematics; laboratory science; history or social science (or both); and study in speech, 
music, art and other subjects contributing to a well-rounded academic background. Students who 
anticipate intensive study in scierKe are urged to take four years of mathematics and three years 
of foreign language in high school. 

ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission as undergraduate transfers will be considered for admission under one of 
the following provisions: 

Applicants who have successfully completed 60 or more transferable semester units, or the 
equivalent, are eligible for admission if they have achieved a grade-point average of 2.0 (C) and 
were in good standing at the last college atternied. Nonresident applicants must have earned a 
grade-point average of at least 2.4 (C-t- ). 

Applicants who have successfully completed fewer than 60 transferable semester units, or the 
equivalent, are eligible for admission if they meet the above requirements andx\\e current first-time 
freshman requirements. Applicants for admission as transfer students who have been continuously 
enrolled at a college since graduation from high school are eligible if they meet the first-time 
freshman requirements in effect at the time of their high school graduation. Either SAT or ACT 
test results are required of transfer applicants with fewer than 60 semester units. 

Other Applicants 

Applicants not admissible under one of the above provisions should enroll in a community college 
or other appropriate institution. Only under the most unusual circumstances, and then only by 
special action, will such applicants be permined to enroll in the university. 

ADMISSION OF GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Unclassified Graduate Status 

For admission with graduate standing as an unclassified graduate student, a student: shall have 
completed a four-year college course and hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accred- 
ited institution; or shall have completed equivalent academic preparation as determined by the 
appropriate authorities; and additionally must satisfactorily meet the professional, personal, scholas- 
tic and other standards for graduate study (including qualifying examinations) that the appropriate 
authorities may prescribe. Such admission does not, however, constitute acceptance to specific 
graduate degree or credential curricula. 


21^11 2 435 


46 


Readmission of Former Students 


Classified Graduate Status 

A student who has been admitted to a California State University or College under the unclassified 
graduate requirement above may, upon application, be admitted to an authorized graduate degree 
or credential curriculum if he satisfactorily meets the professional, personal, scholastic, and other 
standards for admission to the graduate curriculum (including qualifying examinations) that the 
appropriate authorities nwy prescribe. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES 

Normally, the university accepts for consideration only two categories of applicants from other 
countries: 

1 Those who have completed, with a good academic record, a two-year program in an accredit- 
ed institution of higher education. 

2. Those who have completed a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, with a good academic record, 
in an accredited institution and wish to enroll as graduate students. 

Persons applying from their home countries are formally considered for admission to the fall 
semester only. Those transferring from U.S. institutions may apply to the fall or spring semesters. 
All applicants whose native language is other than English are required to present a satisfactory score 
on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The international administrations of this 
examination are scheduled for October 20, 1973, and January 5, March 23, and June 1, 1974. 
Applicants should obtain the TOEFL BuitHin of Information registration forms well in advance. 
Copies of this bulletin and registration forms are often available at American embassies and consu- 
lates, offices of the United States Information Service, United States educational commissions and 
foundations abroad, bi-national centers, arni several private organizations. Those who cannot obtain 
locally a TOEFL Bulletin of Information should write to; Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 
899, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08S40. 

Application procedures in other respects are the same as for other students, except that transcripts 
of educational documents in languages other than English must be accompanied by approved 
translations into English. 

SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the sanne as in the regular 
session, the university does rx>t require an advarKe application or transcripts from students register- 
ing for credit courses in the summer session. However, students must be high school graduates arxJ 
are expected to have satisfied the prerequisites for the courses in which they register. In addition, 
students are expected to file a request to register in the summer session. Admission to summer 
session does not grant admission to the regular session. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A Student previously enrolled in the university, planning to return after an absence of or^e or more 
senresters, must file a new application for admission in accordance with procedures set forth below. 
The application fee is required if the student was not enrolled in either of the two semesters prior 
to the semester to which he is seeking admission or if he was enrolled in arxMher institution during 
his absence from Cal State Fullerton. Unless a leave of abserKe was granted, catalog requirements 
at the time of readmission will apply. 

Former Students in Good Standing 

A student who left the university in good standing will be readmitted provided any academic work 
attempted elsewhere sifKe the last atterniarKe does not change his scholastic status. Transcripts of 
the record of any work attempted in the interim are required. 

Former Students Who Were on Probation 

A student on probation at the close of his last enrollment will be readmitted on probation provided 
he is otherwise eligible. The student must furnish transcripts of any college work taken during his 
absence. 


tao— 12 f 4» 


General Information About Admission 47 


Former Students Who Were Disqualified 

The readmission of a previously disqualified student is by special action only. Ordinarily the univer- 
sity will consider an application for reinstatement only after the student has remained absent for a 
minimum of one year following disqualification and has fulfilled all recommended conditions. In 
every instance, readmission action is based on evidence, irvcluding transcripts of study completed 
elsewhere subsequent to disqualification, which in the judgment of the university warrants such 
action. If readmitted, the student is placed on scholastic probation. 

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ADMISSION 

Determination of Residence 

The following statement of the rules regarding residency determination is not a complete discussion 
of the law, but a summary of the principal rules and their exceptions. The statutes governing 
residence determination for tuition purposes by The California State University ar>d Colleges are 
found in Education Code Sections 22800-23754.4, 23758.2, 23762, and in Title 5 of the California 
Administrative Code, Article 4 (commerKing with Section 41901 ) of Subchapter 5 of Chapter 1, Part 
V. These regulations have been amended to implement the uniform residerKe determination law 
enacted in Statutes 1972, Chapter 1100 (AB 666), and became operative on May 1, 1973, for all 
subsequent residence determination dates. A copy of the revised regulations is available for inspec- 
tion upon request being made to the Office of Admissions and Records. The determination of 
whether a student qualifies as a "resident " for admission and tuition purposes is made by the 
university after review of a "Residence Questionnaire" completed by each student upon entering 
the university. The residence questionnaire is designed to provide to the university information 
necessary for residency determination, irKluding the applicability of any exceptions. 

The general rule is that a student must have been a California resident for at least one vear 
immediately preceding the residence determination date in order to qualify as a "resident student" 
for admission and tuition purposes. A residence determination date is set for each academic term 
and is the date from which residerKe is determined for that term. 

Whether a student has acquired California residence usually depends on whether the student has 
attained majority; i.e., has become an adult. Majority is attained at 18 years of age. If the student 
is a minor, residence is derived from (and therefore is the same as) that of the student's father. If 
the father is not living, the student's residence is that of the mother while she remains unmarried. 
Upon attaining majority, the student may acquire a residence apart from that of the parents. The 
acquisition of California residence by an aduh requires both physical preserKe in the state, and at 
the same time, an intent to remain in California indefinitely, that is, an intent to regard California 
as one's permanent home. Although physical presence is easily proven, subjective intent is more 
difficult, requiring the student to present evidefKe of various objective manifestations of such intent. 
A woman may establish her own residence even though she be married. 

An alien is not eligible to acquire residerKe until admitted into the United States for permanent 
residerKe urxier an immigrant visa. 

There are several exceptions from nonresident tuition. These rules are limited in scope, and are quite 
deuiled. If it appears that any of them may be applicable, the student may wish to discuss the matter 
with the residence clerk of the campus. Some of the exceptions provide for: 

1 . Minors whose parents were residents of California but who have left the slate. When the minor 
reaches age 18, the exception continues for the year to enable the minor to qualify as a resident 
student. 

2. Minors who have been present in California for more than a year before the residence 
determination date, and entirely self-supporting for that period of time, are treated as adults 
for purposes of determining residerKe. 

3. Dependent children and spouses of persons in active military service stationed in California on 
the residence determination date. This exception applies only for the minimum tinse required 
for the student to obtain California residerKe and maintain that residerKe for a year. The 
exception is not affected by transfer of the military person directly to a post outside the 50 sutes 
and District of Columbia. 


227~li 2 «0 


48 General Information About Admission 

4. Military personnel in active service stationed in California on the residence determination date 
for purposes other than education at state-supported institutions of higher education. This 
exception applies only for the minimum time required for the student to obtain California 
residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

5. Certain credentialed, full-time employees of community college districts. 

6. Full-time State University and Colleges employees and their children and spouses. This excep- 
tion applies only for the minimum time required for the student to obtain California residence 
and maintain that residence for a year. 

7. Certain exchange students. 

8. Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employees, who were Califor- 
nia residents, and who were killed in the course of law enforcement or fire suppression duties. 

9. A person in continuous full-time attendance at an institution who had resident classification on 
the effective date of Statutes 1972, Chapter 1 100 ( AB 666) shall not lose such classification as 
a result of adoption of the uniform student residency law on which this catalog statenr^ent is 
based, until the attainment of the degree for which currently enrolled. ( Education Code Section 
22862). 

Students classified incorrectly as residents or incorrectly granted an exception from nonresident 
tuition are subject to reclassification as nonresidents and paynwnt of nonresident tuition in arrears. 
Resident students who become nonresidents, and nonresident students qualifying for exceptions 
whose basis for so qualifying changes, must immediately notify the Office of Admissions and 
Records. Applications for a change in classification with respect to a previous term are not accepted. 
The student is cautioned that this summation of rules regarding residence determination is by no 
means a complete explanation of their meaning. The student should also note that changes may have 
been made in the rate of nonresident tuition, in the statutes, and in the regulations between the time 
this catalog is published and the relevant residence determination date. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Admission to the university as a student does not constitute admission to the teaching credential 
program. Students who plan to work toward leaching credentials must apply to the School of 
Education following procedures available from the School of Education. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student who is admitted to the university for a given semester but who does not register in the 
specified semester will have his admission canceled. The student must file a new application form 
when he again seeks admission and must follow the complete application procedure and meet the 
then current admission requirerr>enis. 

Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshman and transfer students who have demonstrated 
outstanding achievement in past academic work. For first-time freshmen who have no previous 
college units earned, a grade point of 3.5 on a 5-point scale must be earned in the coorsework 
considered for admission to the university. Students who have completed fewer than 60 college 
semester units of credit must meet the grade-point average criteria for first-time freshmen and must 
also have earned a 3.5 grade-point average on all this past college work attempted. Students who 
have completed 60 or more semester college units are eligible if a grade-point average of 3.5 is 
earned in all college work completed. 

Undergraduate Entrance Testing Requirements 

All undergraduate students, who have completed fewer than 60 semester or 90 quarter units of 
college v^rk. are required to submit scores from either one of two national testing programs before 
eligibility for admission to the university can be determined. This requirement does not affea 
undergraduate students who have previously attended Cal Suie Fullerton and who have submitted 
ACT or SAT scores at the lime of their first admission. 




E valu^ tions of A cademic Records 5 1 


Registration forms for either test may be obtained from high school and community college counsel- 
ors, Cal State testing offices or directly from the testing service at the address below: 


SAT 
CEEB 
Box 1025 

Berkeley, Calif. 94770 
Dates Test Given: 
Oct. 13, 1973 
Nov. 3, 1973 
Dec. 1, 1973 
Feb. 2, 1974 
April 6, 1974 
June 22, 1974 


ACT 

Registration Unit 
P. O. Box 168 
Iowa City, Iowa 52240 

Dates Test Given: 

Oct. 20, 1973 
Dec. 8, 1973 
Feb. 23, 1974 
April 27, 1974 
June 15, 1974 


To take one of these tests: 

1 . Obtain a registration form and a Student Information Bulletin from your high school or commu- 
nity college counselor, from or>e of the addresses above, or from the university Testing Center. 
Select a test center near your home from the list printed in the Bulletin. 

2. Send the completed registration form and the appropriate test fee to the proper address. Do 
not send to the Fullerton campus. 

3. Have your ACT or SAT scores reported to the Testing Center, Cal State Fullerton. These scores 
should be received before the deadline for application. Use the appropriate code number for 
score reports. 

If you have already taken either the ACT or SAT serKJ $1 to the appropriate testing agency and 
request that your scores be reported to the Testing Center. Use appropriate code number when 
requesting such reports, and provide complete information concerning testing date, test center, name 
arKJ address changes, etc. These test scores when irKluded on high school or college transcripts are 
not acceptable. 


Health Requirements for Admission 

Undergraduate and graduate students must submit, upon admission, completed health history and 
physical evaluation forms. The physical evaluation (physical examination) must have been com- 
pleted within or>e year prior to registration. In addition, evidence of the resuKs of a test for tuberculo- 
sis obtained within 12 months prior to registration must be presented. (A tuberculin skin test is 
preferred.) 

The following services may be obtained at the Student Health Center for a charge of $1 each: 
urinalysis, hematocrit and tuberculin skin lest. In cases of need, students may contact the Student 
HeaKh Center relative to the physical examination. 

All health requirements must be satisfactorily completed before the student will be allowed to 
register. It is urged that the health clearance be obuined before the date of registration as this will 
conserve the student's registration time. 


EVALUATIONS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Evalu3tion of Transfer Credits 

The Office of Admissions will evaluate previous college work in ternris of its relationship to the 
requirements of Cal State Fullerton. All degree candidates will be issued a credit summary during 
the first semester of aiterKJance which serves as a basis for determining specific remaining require- 
ments for the student's specific objectives. 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as long as the student enrolls at the dale 
specified, pursues the objeaive specified, and remains in continuous atteridance. The student will 
not be held to additional graduation requirements unless such requirements become mandatory as 
a result of changes in the California Administrative Code or the California Education Code. If the 
student does not remain in contirHious attendance and has not applied for and been granted a formal 
leave of abserice, the evaluation issued upon readmission will specify the remaining requirements 
for the student's specific objectives. 


233—12 2 520 


52 Eviluitions of Academic Records 

«“den' notify the Office of Admissions immediately 
specified in his evaluation. While the evaluation for a student remains 

wh rh mV for complying with all changes in regulations and procedures 

which may appear in subsequent catalogs. ^ 

Acceptance of Credit 

V"* '^p!***^ accredited institutions, other than coursework identified by such 
in«itution$ as remedial or in other ways as being nontransferable, will be accepted toward the 

r^£em^t?a'^c^V‘^ crederitial requirements at the university within limitations of residence 
requirements and community college transfer maximums. 

Transfer of Credit From a Community College 

^ community college. Credential credit is 
V courses in professional education taken in a community college This does not 

invalidate cr^it for preprofwsional courses taken at a community college, suchas introduction ?o 
rtucation, art or design, arithmetic, or music for classroom teachers. After a student has completed 
acc^tHtor'^url^^^^'* * community college, no further community college units will be 

Credit for Military Service 

undt^'rlr.'l?AV!l!l !^" 'P" ‘'X “"'‘S Of 

eCal^^ti^n whrh^ 00 the basis of an 

^aluation which determines that they are of university level. Any credit for military experience will 

Emissions" te<»u«t. Records verifying such experience must be filed with the Office of 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

“"’V.'TT’ ffttoogh correspondence and extension courses which may be 

allowed toward the bachelor s degree is 24 units, if otherwise applicable. 

Credit by Advanced Placement 

successfully completed courses in the advanced placement program (defined 
fn tl^ n * ^ ,*P.P^ of 3, 4 or 5) shall be granted credit toward graduation, advanced placement 
in the university s sequence courses, and credit for curriculum requirements. 

Credit by Examination 

^ granted credit fw a course toward graduation and to meet curriculum requirements 
1 ^^™ 'I'n co^letion of a challenge examination in that course requirement The examina- 
\^l in administered by the department in which the course is offered. 

t^rK ^ examination the student will secure written approval of his major 

P^ the department in which the course is offered. Upon the successful 
on permanent record of the student will be made 
III « tor the cour^. CR is to indicate credit for the course with a passing grade. Upon failure 
f notation on the permanent record of the student will be made as 'No CR ' 

Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirements 

ran ‘^P*'^ ^ Only once. A maximum of 30 credits 

can be earned by challenge examination, including those achieved by advanced placement. 

College Level Examination Program 

Operating under an intenm policy. Cal Stale Fullerton may grant credit and advanced standing based 
upon examirwtion results from the Collet Level Examination Program of the College ^trance 
Exdmindtion Bodrd using as minimum standards: 

Genera/ Examinations 

\ !!!f P' college sophomore norms. 

2. That unit credit be granted for any test in the general examinations, but that six units of 
general education requirements be waived for each test completed with the appropriate score. 


2S2— 12 2 615 


Evaluations of Academic Records 53 


Subject Examinations 

1 . That the student submit a score at or above the 50th percentile of those in the norming group 
who earned a mark of C or better. 

2. That equivalency to Cal State Fullerton courses be determined by the appropriate academic 
department in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

3. That university credit shall have not been previously earned in the courses in question. 

In no case will credit so awarded count towards residence credit. 


N 


REGISTRATION 


55 


Orientation 

Various opportunities are provided for new students to obtain information relating to academic 
programs, student services and activities, and other aspects of university life. Information about 
specific programs will be published separately. 

Registration 

Class Schedule: A complete listing of courses offered will be found in the class schedule published 
prior to the start of each seniester. This publication, which may be purchased in the Titan Bookstore 
for a rK>minal charge, also states detailed information pertaining to the semester including class 
enrollment and fee payn^ent procedures. 

It is important that each student familiarize himself not only with the academic policies stated in the 
catalog but also with the requirements and procedures in the class schedule as both are used in the 
selection of classes for the semester. 

Course Selection: Cal State Fullerton believes its students have the intelligence and capability to plan 
their schedules each semester and to make a selection among available sections of a course. Such 
matters are the responsibility of the student and permit him to develop an individualized class 
schedule for each semester to meet the student's academic program requirements as well as his own 
unique personal requirements (study, work, etc.). 

Course selection should be based on an adviser-approved formal academic program, course descrip- 
tions in the current catalog (including course prerequisites), and courses offered as listed in the 
semester class schedule. With this information each student should be able to determine courses 
needed, courses available, and eligibility for enrolling in them. The study list resulting from such an 
appraisal forms the basis for completing the official program card which is used in registration. 
Registration. Registration is made up of two steps — class enrollment and fee payment. At registration, 
every student is required to file a program card with the Office of the Registrar. The filing of a 
program card by the student and its acceptance by the university obligates the student to perform 
the designated work to the best of his ability. All undergraduates are urged to declare a major at 
the earliest practicable time and not later than at the time they have completed bO units of college 
work. 

It is emphasized that registration does rxM become official until fees have been paid. 

Computerized Records System 

The student personr>el records system, irKluding the registration process, is computer based. This 
means that records and reports are produced from an information data file maintained in the 
university Computer Center. It is a fact of life in a large institution such as Fullerton that use of the 
computer is essential. Thus, there is a requirement for data cards, code numbers, student file numbers 
and for meeting precise criteria for data input ar>d stringent deadlines. All of this introduces an 
element of the impersonal in the student records system. Despite these corxJitions, every effort is 
made to provide courteous, efficient arxJ personalized service to students arxJ the entire university 
community. To assist in providing this service, students are urged to be extrenr>eiy careful and 
accurate in preparing data cards, especially the official program card and change of program card, 
for entry into the information file. Accurate input of information will assure each student of error-free 
records. 

"H" Classes 

Course code numbers followed by an "H" identify courses which require special departmental 
approval before a student can enroll in them. 

The "H" means a student must obtain special approval from the department prior to class enrollment 
(card pulling). Having such approval, in effect, "holds" a place for the student in the class. 
Approvals must be obtained from the specific department in which the course is offered. 


268^12 3 29 


56 Selective Service 


Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be annourKed in the Class Schedule. Late registrants 
will find themselves handicapped in arranging their programs and must pay a $5 late registration fee 
in addition to regular fees. 

Changes in Program 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses he lists when he registers. Changes may not 
be made thereafter without the filing of a change of program (add-drop) form in the Office of the 
Registrar following procedures announced in the CUss Schedule. 

Failure to file an official change of program request in the case of dropped classes may result in a 
penalty mark being recorded. Through the fourth week of instruction in the semester no record of 
enrollment is made of dropped classes. After four weeks students are expected to complete all 
courses in which they are enrolled. However, for reasons of ill health or reasons Involving other 
serious and unforeseen problems, the student may drop a class or classes and receive a W (With- 
drawal) or F (Failure) by obtaining the signature of the professor (s) involved ar>d filing the change 
with the registrar on the form provided. 

No classes nnay be dropped during the last three weeks of instruction, although complete withdrawal 
from the university is still possible (See page 62). 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the university may enroll concurrently for additional courses at ariother 
institution only with advarKe written approval from the student's academic adviser on official forms 
filed in the OffKe of the Registrar. Permission will not be granted when the study load in the 
proposed combined program exceeds the units authorized at this university. 

Auditors 

A properly qualified student may enroll in classes as an auditor. The student must meet the regular 
university admission requirements and must pay the same fees as other students. An auditor may 
not change his registration to obuin credit after the last date to add courses to the study list An 
auditor is not permined to take examinations in the course. 

Handicapped Students 

Students physically handicapped who require assistance should contact the Office of the Registrar 
prior to the anrxHJiKed semester registration period so that special arrangements for them can be 
made. 

VETERANS 

Cal State Fullerton is approved by the Bureau of Readjustnf>ent Education, State Department of 
Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking benefits under state arid federal le^slation. All 
students seeking veterans' benefits must have a degree or credential objective. 

Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in which the veteran plans 
to use these benefits in order to have the authorization at the time of registration. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

Male students requiring certification of their student status may request the Office of Admissions and 
Records to submit the appropriate forms to their draft board. 

Undergraduate students shall normally be enrolled for 12 units a semester to be considered full time. 
Graduate students enrolled for nine units of study may be considered full time provided at least three 
units are 5(X>-level courses. 

All students are advised that by enrolling each consecutive term at the minimum level to qualify for 
full-time certification they may not achieve the degree and credential programs within the time limit 
allowed by the Seleaive Service System. 


80-12 3 4S 


Fee Schedule 57 


RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

Cal Slate Fullerton does rwt have a Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. However, a two-year 
program is available to eligible students through cooperation with the University of Southern Califor- 
nia where an Air Force ROTC program is conducted. For complete information, write the Professor 
of Aerospace Studies, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90007. 

FEE SCHEDULE, 1973-74 

Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California. The following are the fees and expenses 
currently assessed. 

All Students 

Application fee (nonrefundable) 

Payable by check or money order at lime of applying $20 

Materials and Service fee: Semester 

Fewer than 4 units $39 

At least 4 but fewer than 8 units $44 

At least 8 but fewer than 1 2 units $49 

1 2 or more units $59 

Fewer than 8 units or 

8 units more 

Facilities fee $ 3 $ 3 

Associated Students fee $10 $10 

University Union fee $ 4 $ 8 

Nonresidents 

Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees required of resident students, except for enrollment in 
extension or summer session) 

15 Of more units, maximum $555 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit $37 

Per academic year $1,110 

Foreign-Visa Students 

Nonresident foreign-visa students (in addition to fees required of resident students) 

15 Of more units, maximum $555 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit $37 

Per academic year $1,110 

Summer Session 

Per summer seniester unit $27 

Associated Students fee $ 3 

University Union fee $ 4 

Extension Fees 

Per Unit or Fraction of Unit $24 to $48 

Other Fees or Charges 

Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above) $5 

Check returned from bank for any cause $2 

Transcript fee $1 

Failure to meet administrative required appointment or time limit $2 

Auditors pay the same fees as others. 

Fees are subjea to change by the Trustees of the California State University and Colleges without 
advance notice. 

Alan Pattee Scholars 

No fees of any kirxi shall be required of or coltected from those individuals %vho qualify for such 
exemption under the provisions of the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act. 


268—12 3 ss 


58 Fee Schedule 
Refund of Fees 

Upon withdrawal from the university, the materials and service fee may be refunded if written 
application for refund, on forms provided by the university, is submitted to the registrar not later 
than 14 days following the day of the term that instruction begins; provided that the anwunt of $10 
shall be retained to cover the cost of registration. Late registration fees, change of program fees and 
application fees are not refundable. 

The entire fee may be refunded if a student is unable to continue his registration because of a 
university regulation or because of compulsory military service. Application for refund under such 
circumstances may be made at any time before the date when the student received any academic 
credit for the courses for which he is registered. 

No refund of fees will be given if the unit load of the student is reduced to a lower material and 
service fee category. 


Parking Fees 

Semester pass (rwnreserved spaces): 

Regular and limited students $15.00 

Coin operated gate, per admission 25 

Summer session, each six-week period 5.00 


Typical Student Expenses 

Typical school year budgets for California residents living at home or making other housing arrange- 
ments will vary widely. It is estimated that, irKluding an $800 yearly aIbwarKe for room and board, 
the cost will approximate $1,600. Nonresident students must also allow for nonresident tuition. 


270-12 3 65 


59 

RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 


ENROLLMENT DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each semester unit represents three hours of university work per week for one semester. Courses 
are of three types: 

( 1 ) Lecture— one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory — three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. All required courses carry unit credit. 

Classification in the University 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0“29)< semester units of work are classified as fresh- 
men, 30-59>i semester units as sophomores, 60-89>i; semester units as juniors, and 90 or more as 
seniors. 

Maximum Number of Course Units 

Undergraduate students' requests to carry units beyond 18 (19 for engineering majors) must be 
approved by the student's adviser and the department chairman of the major. If such requests are 
denied, appeals may be made to the appropriate school dean. Undeclared majors must receive the 
approval the director of academic advisement to carry over 18 units of work. The minimum 
full-time load is 12 units. 

A student whose academic record justifies a study list in excess of the normal may request to be 
allowed to carry extra units. Request forms may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and 
are submitted during the first week of instruction. In ger^eral, only students with superior academic 
records are allowed to enroll for nx>re than the maximum unit load. In addition, the need to carry 
an overload must be esuWished. Factors such as time spent in employment or commuting, the nature 
of the academic program, extracurricular activities and the student's health should be considered 
in planning a stu^ load. Students who are employed or have outside responsibilities are advised 
to reduce their program of study. 

The minimum full-time program of study for graduate students is defined in the "Graduate Policies 
and Procedures" section of this catalog. 

Initial Class Meeting 

It is imporunt that students anerxi the first meeting of a class. In closed classes students who are 
absent from the first meeting without notification of the instructor or departmental office within 24 
hours may be denied admission to the class. Instructors are privileged to deny admission to absentees 
in order to admit any persons on waiting lists in their places. Students who are denied admission 
to class must file a drop request card with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Level Courses 

Graduate level (500) courses are organized primarily for graduate students. Undergraduate students 
may be permitted to enroll in a graduate level (500) course if: 

1 . Th^ are within nir« units of completion of graduation requirements, or 

2. They are exceptionally qualified seniors whose undergraduate work in the related field or fields 
has been of 3.5 grade-point average or better, and whose cumulative overall grade-point 
average is at least 3.25. 

5uch cases shall require specific approval by the instructor and also chairman of the department or 
dean of the school in whi^ the course is offered and by the chairman or dean of the student's major 
department or school. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under 1. above may be applied to a graduate program if 
approved urxier graduate studies policies. 

Graduate level (500) courses uken under 2. above may be applied to the undergraduate program 
only. 


275— is 3 90 


60 Records and Regulations 

GRADING POLICIES 

special Note: At the time this catalog was being prepared the university was considering a major 
revision of its grading policies to be effective fall, 1973. Therefore, all of the following material is 
subject to change. The revisions, if adopted, will be published in special announcements from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 

Grading System 

Every student of the university will have his coursework reported by the faculty in terms of letter 
grades or special administrative symbols. The grades and symbols used are listed in the following 
chart to illustrate the academic bookkeeping involved. 


Grade or Symbol 

Units 

Attempted 

Units 

Earned 

Grade-Point and 
Progress-Point Value 

Satisfactory Grade 

A 

Yes 

Yes 

4 

B 

Yes 

Yes 

3 

C 

Yes 

Yes 

2 

Unsatisfactory Grade 

D 

Yes 

Yes 

1 

F 

Yes 

No 

0 

Administrative Symbol 

1 (incomplete) 

No* 

No 

None* 

W (withdrawal) 

No 

No 

None 

SP (satisfactory progress) 


No 

Nor>e 

RD (report delayed) 


No 

None 

AU (audit) 

No 

No 

None 

• If not completed within one calendar year the "V 

will be counted as an 

"F" for grade-point and 

progress-point computations. 

Totals 

Used in GPA 

Counted 

Used in GPA 


and progress- 

towards 

arxJ progress- 


point computa 
tions 

objective 

point computations 


Incomplete Work 

A grade of I may be given only when, in the opinion of the instructor, a student cannot complete 
a course during the semester of enrollment for reasons beyorxihis control. Such reasons are assunned 
to include: illr>ess of the student or of members of his immediate family, extraordinary fmarKiai 
problems, loss of outside position, and other such exigencies. In assigning a grade of I, the imtructor 
will file with his department a statement of the specific requirements for completion of coursework. 
Such requirements will not include or necessitate retaking the course. This statement will also include 
a provisional grade indicating the quality of work completed at that time, and the ir>structor's 
designation of the time limit allowed for completion of course requirements. Upon later completion 
of the course requirements, or upon expiration of the time limits for conr>pletion of course require- 
ments, the instructor shall initiate a change to a grade of A, B, C, D or F. Instruaional departments 
will d^ermine procedures for completion of course requirements and assigning grades for such 
completed coursework. in those special circumstances where the instructor is no longer available. 
An incomplete must be made up within one calerxiar year immediately following the end of the term 
in which it was assigned. This limitation prevails whether or txA the student maintains continuous 
enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an irKomplete being counted as 
equivalent to an **F*' for grade-point and progress-point computations. 

Withdrawal 

The symbol "W" ir>dicates that the student was permitted to drop the course after the 20th day of 
instruction with the approval of the instructor arid the department chairman or dean. It carries rto 


878— IS 3 105 


Records and Regulations 61 

connotation of quality of performance and is not used in calculating progress points or grade-point 
averages. Withdrawal is permitted during the first 20 days of instruction without record of enroll- 
ment. 

Withdrawal is not permitted during the final three weeks of instruction except in cases such as 
accident or serious illr>ess beyond the student's control and the assignment of an incomplete is not 
practicable. Ordinarily, withdrawals in this category will Involve complete withdrawal from the 
university, except that an Incomplete may be assigned for courses in which sufficient work has been 
turned in to permit an evaluation to be made. 

Satisfactory Progress 

The symbol "SP" is used in connection with thesis, project, or similar courses that extend beyond 
one academic term. The symbol indicates that work in progress has been evaluated as satisfactory 
to date but that assignment of a final grade and credit must await the completion of additional 
coursework. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted may not exceed the total number applicable 
to the student's educational objective. All work is to be completed within a stipulated time period 
which may not exceed one year except for graduate degree theses for which the time may be up 
to two years, but nwy not exceed the overall time limit for completion of all master's degree 
requirenr>ents. Any extension of this time period must receive prior authorization of the dean of the 
school, or his or her designee, in which the course is offered. 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the end of each semester. 
Many students also leave self-addressed post cards for teachers of specific courses to send them 
slightly faster evaluations of their work. 

Examinations 

Final examinations, if required by the instructor, will be given at times scheduled by the university. 
Once esublished, the final examination schedule may not be changed unless approved by the dean 
of the school. No makeup final examination will be given except for reason of illness or other verified 
emergencies. 

Grade-Point Averages; Repetition of Courses 

Grade-point averages are calculated by dividing grade points earned by units attempted. Work 
attempted at all institutions, including Cal State Fullerton, is irKluded in all-college calculations. Work 
atten>pted at other institutions will not be included in Cal State Fullerton-only averages. 

When any course is repeated both grades are considered in computing grade-point averages. 
However, successful repetition of a course originally passed carries no additional unit credit towards 
a degree or credential. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of courses taken at the university are issued only with the written permission of 
the student concerned. Partial transcripts are not issued. A fee of SI for each transcript issued must 
be received before the record can be forwarded. 

Normally transcripts are available within three working days, except at the erxi of the semester when 
the student should allow about 10 days after the last day of the semester. 

Transcripts from other institutions, which have been presented for admission or evaluation, become 
a part of the student's permanent academic file and are not returned or copied for distribution. 
Students desiring transcripts covering work anempted elsewhere should request them from the 
institutions concerned. 

CONTINUOUS RESIDENCY REGULATIONS 

Good Standing 

"Good standing" indicates that a student is eligible to continue and is free from financial obligation 
to the university. A student urxier academic disqualification, disciplinary suspension or disciplinary 


300>-12 3 213 


62 Records snd Regulations 

expulsion is not eligible to receive a statement of "good standi' 3 " on transcripts issued by the 
university or on other documents. 

Choice of Catalog Regulations for Meeting Degree Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing on in the same 
curriculum in any California State University or College, in any of the California community colleges 
or in any combination of California community colleges arvd The California State University and 
Colleges, may, for purposes of n>eeting graduation requirements, elect to meet the graduation 
requirements of The California State University or College from which he will graduate in effect either 
at the time of his entering the curriculum or at the time of his graduation therefrom, except that 
substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the proper college authori- 
ties. 

Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Students 

A graduate student with a degree objective is expected to maintain continuous enrollment in the 
university (summer sessions and extension excluded) until completion of the degree. If a student 
pursuing an advanced degree finds it impossible to attend during a certain semester, and is not 
eligible for a leave of absence, as detailed elsewhere in this catalog, he may request permission to 
register in Graduate Studies 7(X), a course with no unit credit, which does not require class attend- 
ance. A student may not register in Graduate Studies 7(X) for more than two consecutive semesters. 
If a graduate student who has completed student teaching and is pursuing a standard elementary 
or secondary teaching credential finds that he cannot enroll In courses leading to the credential 
during a certain sennester, he nf>ay enroll in Credential Studies 701 . This course Is a course with no 
unit credit, which does not require class attendance. Students may not enroll In Credential Studies 
701 for a third consecutive semester. 

A graduate student who fails to register has severed his connection with the university. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may petition for a leave of abserKe and if approved may upon his return continue under 
the catalog requirements that applied to his enrollment prior to the abserKe. Except in the case of 
required military service a leave of abserKe nnay be granted for a maximum of one year. Illness and 
compulsory military service are the only routinely approved reasons for a leave of abserKe. Students 
should realize that an approved leave of absence does not reserve a place for them in the 
university. 

Complete Withdrawal from the University 

Students who wish to withdraw from the university must complete a change of program form. See 
section on refund of fees for possible refunds. No student may withdraw after the date shown on 
the university calerxlar as the last day of instruction. Complete withdrawal from the university is 
accomplished by followir>g the procedures for dropping classes (see Change of Program) irxiicating 
compile withdrawal in the appropriate place (box). 

STUDENT HONORS 

Dean's Honor List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list of undergraduate 
students whose grade-point average for the previous term has been 3.5 or better. Students are 
notified in writing when they have earned this distirKtion. Eligibility is based on a minimum of 12 
units of graded coursework. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation have been defined by the Faculty Council in three classifKatiorts: 


With honors CPA 3.5 

With high honors CPA 3.85 

With highest honors CPA 4.0 


304—12 3 23S 


Records ind Regulations 63 


PROBATION AND DISQUALIFICATION 

For purposes of determining a student's eligibility to remain in the university both quality of perform- 
ance and progress towards his educational objective will be considered. 

Academic Probation 

An undergraduate student shall be placed on academic probation if in any semester his cumulative 
grade-point average or his grade-point average at Cal State Fullerton falls below 2.0 (grade of C on 
five-point scale), and if he fails to earn twice as many progress points as all units attempted during 
that semester. The student shall be advised of probation status promptly and, except in unusual 
Instances, before the start of the next consecutive enrollment period. 

An undergraduate student shall be removed from academic probation and restored to clear standing 
when he earns a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 (C) In all academic work attempted, In all 
such work attempted at Cal Sute Fullerton, and is making satisfactory progress towards his educa- 
tional objective by achieving at least twice as many progress points as units attempted during each 
semester. 

Academic Disqualification 

An undergraduate student on academic probation shall be subject to academic disqualification if: 

1 . As a lower division student (fewer than bO semester hours of college work completed) he falls 
15 or nK>re grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or in all units 
attempted at this institution, or fails to earn during any semester twice as many progress points 
as all units attempted in that semester. 

2. As a junior (60 to 89% semester hours of college work completed) he falls nine or more grade 
points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or in all units attempted at this 
institution, or fails to earn during any semester twice as many progress points as all units 
attempted in that semester. 

3. As a senior (90 or more semester hours of college work completed) he falls six or more grade 
points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or in all units attempted at this 
institution, or fails to earn during any semester twice as many progress points as all units 
anempted in that semester. 

A graduate student (unclassified or classified) shall be disqualified if he falls below a 2.0 (C) average 
in all units attempted at this institution as a graduate student, or fails to earn during any semester 
twice as many progress points as all units attempted in that semester. 

Student Conduct 

The university properly assumes that all students are in atterxiance to secure a sound education and 
that they will corxiuct themselves as mature citizens of the campus community. Compliance with 
all regulations of the university is therefore expected. If, however, on any occasion a student or an 
organization is alleged to have compromised accepted university policies or standards, appropriate 
judiciary procedures shall be initiated through the established university judicial process. Every effort 
will be made to encourage and support the development of self-discipline and control by students 
and student organizations. The dean of studerx services, aided by all members of the faculty and 
advised by the Student Affairs Committee of the facuKy, is responsible to the president of the 
university for the behavior of students in their relationships to the university. The president in turn 
is responsible to the Chancellor and the Trustees of The California Sute University and Colleges who 
themselves are governed by specific laws of the Sute of California. 

A list of specifically prohibited behavior is available upon request from the dean of student services 
and also is posted on the administrative bulletin boards in the breezeway of the Letters and Science 
Building arid in the second-floor lobby of the Administration-Business Administration Building. 
Prohibited behavior includes hazing, now defined as acts likely to cause physical or emotional harm. 
Students have the right to appeal cerUin disciplinary actions Uken by appropriate university authori- 
ties. Regulations governing original hearings and appeal rights and procedures have been carefully 
deuiled to provide maximum protection to both the individual charged and the university commu- 
nity. Information about the operation of the judicial system involving student discipline may be 
obuined in the Office of Special Projects. 


309--12 3 200 


64 Records and Regulations 

Debts Owed to the University 

From lime to time the student may become indebted to the university. This could occur, for example, 
when the student fails to repay money borrowed from the university. Similarly, debts occur when 
the student fails to pay library fees, or when the student fails to pay for other services provided by 
the university at the request of the student. Should this occur. Sections 42380 and 42381 of Title 5 
of the California Administrative Code authorize the university to withhold ''permission to register, 
to use facilities for which a fee is authorized to be charged, to receive services, materials, food or 
merchandise or any combination of the above from any person owing a debt" until the debt is paid. 
For example, under these provisions the university may withhold permission to register, and may 
withhold other services such as grades and transcripts. If a student feels that he or she does not owe 
all or part of a particular fee or charge, the student should contact the business office. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students may petition for review of certain university academic regulations when unusual circum- 
stances exist. It should be noted, however, that academic regulations when they are contairied in 
Title 5, California Administrative Code, are not subject for petition. 

Petition forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records and must first be reviewed and 
signed by the student's adviser. Action will then be taken on the petition and the student will be 
notified of this decision. A copy of the action will also be placed in the student's folder in the Office 
of the Registrar 

RIGHT OF ACADEMIC APPEAL 

The student who believes he has been graded capriciously or treated with obvious prejudice by 
faculty or administrators may initiate steps for an academic appeal. In all cases the student should 
first make an effort to resolve the issue by consulting the faculty or administrator cofKerr^ed. If the 
issue canrxM be resolved the student should consult with the dean of student services or director 
of special projects. 


4_H4452 


311—12 3 270 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 


311— IS 3 270 



\ 


V 


; 




69 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 


A student is eligible for graduation if he is in good standing and fulfills the following requirements: 

/. Genera! Education 

To be eligible for a baccalaureate degree from Cal State Fullerton, the student shall have completed 
a minimum of 45 sen>ester units of general education courses selected In accordarKe with the pattern 
designated below. Such courses may be lower division courses or upper division courses for which 
the student qualifies. 

/. Natural Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of two courses, one from each of two fields which shall 
include the following: biological sciences, chemistry, earth sciences, physics and physical 
science. 

//. Social Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields which shall 
include the following; anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psy- 
chology and sociology. 

A/o/e. Of the courses taken to meet the requirements in U.S. history. Constitution, stale and local 
government (California Administrative Code, Section 40404), a maximum of three units may 
be applied for credit in Section II. 

///. Arts — Humanities Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields which shall 
irKlude the following: art, drama, lar>guage (English, intermediate or advanced courses in 
foreign languages), literature (American, comparative, English, foreign), music, philosophy and 
speech. 

IV. Basic Subjects Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields which shall 
include the following: computer science, elementary foreign languages, health education, 
mathematics, oral communication, physical education, reading, statistics arui writing, 

V. Genera! Education Electives 

The student may fulfill any remaining units required for general education by selecting any 
undergraduate course offered by the university for credit except courses which apply to the 
student's major or credential program. Transfer students certified under provisions of California 
Administrative Code, Title V, as havir>g met the 40>unit minimum general education require- 
nr>ents will be required to complete five additional units in ger>eral education selected from two 
or more sections, l-V above. 

2. Statutory Requirements in American Institutions and Values 

In addition to general education-breadth requirements California Administrative Code, Section 
40404. sutes that for graduation the student is required "to demonstrate competence in the Constitu- 
tion of the United Sutes, and in American history including the study of American institutions and 


315~li 3 290 


70 Bachelor's Degree 

ideals, and of the principles of state and local governn>ent established under the Constitution of this 
state/' To meet this requirement, the student may select the following alternatives: (1) pass a 
comprehensive examination in these fields, (2) pass Political Science 100 and a course in U. S. 
history or American Studies 201, (3) pass a combination of Political Science 300 and History 170A 
or 1708. 

Note: Coursework completed to satisfy Section 40404 may be a(>plied in the social sciences area 
of general education to a maximum of three units. 

3. Electives 

After fulfilling the requirements in general education, American institutions and values, and a specific 
major (and possibly a mirwr), each student is free to choose the rest of the courses needed to 
complete the 1 24 semester units required for graduation. Different majors vary considerably in both 
the number of units they require in their own and related fields. They also vary considerably in the 
amount of latitude or choice they permit in selecting courses to satisfy the major requirement. The 
general education requirement encourages great freedom of choice within the broad categories of 
the natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities, and basic subjects. Students at the univer- 
sity use their electives to broaden their general educations, deepen some aspect of their specialties, 
pursue work in related fields, and satisfy curiosities and enthusiasms for particular subjects or areas 
of interest. 

4. Units 

(a) Total units 

A minimum of 124 senr>estef units is required for graduation with a bachelor of arts degree. 
The Bachelor of ScierKe in Engir>eering requires a minimum of 132 semester units. 

(b) Upper division units 

Completion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Resident units 

Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units in residerKe is required. At least one-half of 
these units must be completed anrKMig the last 20 semester units counted toward the degree. 
Extension credit, or credit by examination, may not be used to fulfill the minimum residerKe 
requirement. 

5 . Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted, including those 
accepted by transfer from another institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted at California State 
University, Fullerton. 

6 . Major 

Completion of all requirements for a major as specified by appropriate university authority is 
required. 

7 . Multiple Majors and Second Baccalaureate Degrees 

Second majors 

Within the units required for the baccalaureate it is possible for a student to complete the 
requirements for more than one major within a degree program when the additional major is 
within the degree program for the first major. The student shall declare the additior^l major 
with the appropriate department not later than the beginning of the student's final year of study. 
The completion of additional majors will be noted at the time of graduation by appropriate 
entries on the academic record and on the comnr>erKement program. 

Second baccalaureate 

(a) First degree completed elsewhere, secor>d at Cal State Fullerton 

Students seeking a bachelor's degree from Cal State Fullerton after having received a 
baccalaureate from arKither institution may qualify for graduation with the approval arxf 
recommendation of the faculty upon completion of the following: 


319-12 3 310 


Bachelor's Degree 71 


( 1 ) general education requiremnients 

(2) all requirenients in the major field of study 

(3) residence and scholarship requirements 
(b) Two baccalaureates from Cal State Fullerton 

A student completing a baccalaureate program at Cal State Fullerton will have completed 
the general education, residence, and scholarship requirements. With the approval and 
recommendation of the faculty, he may qualify for a secor>d baccalaureate under the 
following circumstances: 

(1) The second field of study is offered in a different program (e.g. bachelor of arts to 
bachelor of science) 

(2) At least 24 units are earned in residence beyond the requirements for the first degree 

(3) All requirements of the major are fulfilled 

Units included in second baccalaureate programs may not apply to graduate degrees 
or credential programs. 

8. Minor 

Completion of a mirK>r field is not required for the baccalaureate degree at this time. 

9. Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation should file an application for a graduation requirement check in the 
Office of the Registrar during registration for the semester prior to the semester in which he expects 
to graduate (please refer to the current schedule of class for the deadlines applied to requesting and 
returning graduation checks). A senior should have completed at least 100 units (including the 
current work in progress) and a substantial portion of his major requiren>ents before requesting a 
graduation check. If the candidate does not complete the requirements in the semester indicated, 
he must file a change of graduation date in the Office of the Registrar. The original graduation check 
is valid as long as a student is in continuous atterxJance and is completing the major under which 
the graduation check was requested. 

W. Approval and Recommendation by the Faculty of the University 


ai— 12 3 330 


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73 


THE PROGRAM OF MASTER'S DECREES 


Master's degree programs offered at Cal State Fullerton are listed on page 93 and are described in 
the appropriate section of this catalog under "University Curricula." Program descriptions and 
additional information are contained in the Graduate Bulletin, copies of which are available in the 
Office of Admissions and the Graduate Office. 

Master's degrees in other areas are under consideration and will be annourKed when approved. 

STANDARDS FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate study deals with more complex ideas and demands nwe sophisticated techniques, search- 
ing analysis, and creative thinking than undergraduate study. The research required is extensive in 
both primary and secondary sources and the quality of writing expected is high. The student is 
advised to consider these factors when deciding upon the amount of coursework to be undertaken 
during any or>e semester 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General requirements for the master's degree include a study plan consisting of a minimum of 30 
semester units of approved upper division and graduate (500-level) coursework taken after the 
baccalaureate and completed with a 3.0 ( B ) minimum grade-point average. The coursework should 
normally be completed within five years (see "Time Limit for Completion"). For specific require- 
ments of particular programs, please see the descriptions elsewhere in this catalog. 

In the degree program: 

1 . Not less than 24 semester units shall be completed in residerKe. 

2. Not less than 15 semester units shall be in graduate (500-level) courses. 

3. Not more than six semester units shall be allowed for a thesis if a thesis is required. 

4. Six shall be in related fields outside the department or corKentration. 

Some type of final evaluation, near the erxl of the student's work toward his master's degree, is 
required. It may be a thesis, a protect, a compreher^sive examination, or any combination of these. 
Each student's program for a master's degree (including his eligibility, classified sUtus, candidacy, 
and award of the degree) must be approved by the graduate program adviser, the graduate commit- 
tee, and the dean of graduate studies. 

GRADUATE REGULATIONS 

The following are in addition to other policies and procedures applying to both undergraduates and 
graduates described elsewhere in this catalog and in the appropriate class schedule. Requirements 
of individual programs are shown in the appropriate sections of this catalog. Also, individual academ- 
ic areas may have established particular rules governing programs offered. 

Students are advised to consult the Graduate Bulletin for detailed instructions corKeming steps in 
the master's degree program. It is the student's responsibility to initiate the requests for classified 
status, advancement to candidacy, and for a graduation check at the appropriate times. The deadline 
for requesting the graduation check appears in the official calerxiar for each semester. 

Since all policies and procedures are subject to change, by appropriate authority, students should 
consult class schedules and ocher official anrxxjrKements for possible revision of policies and 
procedures stated herein. 

Admission With Graduate Standing: Unclassified 

For admission with graduate standing as an unclassified graduate student, a student shall have 
completed a four-year college course and hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accred- 
ited institution; or shall have completed equivalent academic preparation as determined by the 
appropriate authorities, and must satisfaaorily meet the professional, personal, scholastic, and other 
standards for graduate study, irnrluding qualifying examinations, as the appropriate authorities may 
prescribe. 


326—12 3 345 


74 Master's Degree 

Admission with unclassified graduate standing does not constitute admission to a graduate degree 
program. Duration of unclassified graduate standing may be determined by appropriate authority. 

Admission to Graduate Degree Curricula: Classified 

A student who has been admitted in unclassified graduate status may, upon application, be admitted 
to an authorized graduate degree curriculum as a classified graduate student. He must satisfactorily 
meet the professional, personal, scholastic, and other standards for admission to the graduate degree 
curriculum, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate authorities may prescribe. Only 
those applicants who show promise of success and fitness will be admitted to graduate degree 
curricula, and only those who continue to denwnstrate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence 
and fitness, as determined by the appropriate authorities, shall be eligible to continue in such 
curricula. Students whose performance in a graduate degree curriculum is judged to be unsatisfacto* 
ry may be required to withdraw from all graduate degree curricula offered. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

A student who has been classified (as above) may, upon application and with subsequent approvals, 
be advanced to candidacy, following the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 12 units of 
coursework on the approved study plan. A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 in all coursework 
on the study plan is required; other scholastic, professional and personal standards, the passing of 
examinations, and other qualifications, may be prescribed. 

Admission From Nonaccredited Schools 

A student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited school must apply for admission as an undergraduate 
to complete requirements for a bachelor's degree from this institution. However, oiKe admitted, a 
student in this category who gives eviderKe of unusual promise ar>d superior backgrourxi n>ay 
petition the school or department concerr>ed for reclassification as an unclassified graduate student, 
and if the petition is granted he may then proceed in the graduate program. 

Residence Requirement 

A student is considered to be in residence when registered during regular semesters at Cal State 
Fullerton. Of the minimum of 30 senr>ester units of approved coursework required for the nnaster's 
degree, not less than 24 shall be completed in residence at this institution. Approved units earned 
in summer sessions may be substituted for regular session unit requirements on a unit for unit basis. 
Extension credit and credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum resideiKe 
requirement and are not normally acceptable as part of the six units of approved transfer work 
permitted. See also "Continuous Enrollment," below. 

Election of Curriculum Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing in the same 
curriculum may elect to meet the degree requirements in effect either at the time of his classification 
or at the time of the completion of degree requirements, except that substitutions for discontinued 
courses may be authorized or required by the proper authorities. 

Continuous Enrollment 

A graduate student with a graduate degree objective is required to maimain cootirnious enrollment 
during regular semesters (summer sessions excluded) until award of the degree. Enrollment in 
extension classes does not satisfy this requirement. 

A graduate student who faiK to register has severed his conr>ection with this institution and with the 
academic unit offering the graduate degree program. If he wishes to resume his studies, he must 
reapply for admission to Cal State Fullerton and to the degree program. This policy is designed to 
eliminate the need for readmission to the university, provide opportunity for continuous use of 
facilities, including the Library, and assure the developnient of an integrated program, adequately 
supervised, ar>d effectively terminated within the time limitations allowed by regulatior^. 

Students who may have completed all coursework. but who may not have satisfactorily completed 
a comprehensive examir^ation or other requirement must maintain contiruious enrollment. 

If a graduate student pursuing an advanced degree finds it impossible to atterxl during a certain 
semester, he may request permission to register in Graduate Studies 700, a credit/no credit course 


331-12 3 370 


Master's Degree 75 

with no units of credit, which does not require class attendance. Registration in Graduate Studies 
700 will normally be restricted to graduate students who have been classified or who are in a 
prescribed prerequisite program for a specific graduate degree. A student may not register in 
Graduate Studies 700 for a third consecutive semester. 

For a student whose only objective is a credential, a similar course, Credential Studies 701, is 
available. Consult the School of Education for further details. 

Applicability of Courses Taken During Summer Sessions 

Cal State Fullerton rK>rmally corxiucts two six-week summer sessions. Appropriate courses taken 
during the summer sessions may be applied to a graduate degree program, providing the courses 
are approved in advance by the appropriate authorities^ SifKe the funding of graduate work during 
the summer nnonths does not include the necessary adyisement and supervision, appropriate advis- 
ers and committees may not be available. 

Title 5 of the California State Administrative Code states: "Not nwe than of>e semester unit may 
be earned for each week of atterxiarKe in summer sessions, except that upon approval of appropriate 
authorities, additional semester units may be earned at the rate of one-half unit for each three units 
of credit for which a student is registered." This means that combinations can be arranged so that 
a student may earn up to seven units during either of the two six-week summer sessions when a 
total of not nKxe than two courses is involved (i.e., a four-unit course and a three-unit course, or 
a five-unit course arxi a two-unit course) . Any student who enrolls by error in more than seven units 
during a six- week summer session will find that credit for excess units will not be counted toward 
a degree, credential or other obfective. Any other exceptions must be petitioned through the Office 
of Admissions and Records. 

It should be noted that enrolln>ent in a sumn^er session does not constitute admission to the 
university (matriculation). Any student desiring a master's degree must be admitted to a regular 
semester (fall or spring) and is expected to be enrolled continuously until award of the degree (see 
"Contiruious Enrollnr>ent"). 

Grade- Point Average Standards 

Minimal grade-point average requirements for admission with unclassified graduate standing are 
established by the schools and division offering graduate programs. See the section of this catalog 
on admission of graduates. In some programs additional screening procedures have been estab- 
lished. For further information, consult the appropriate graduate adviser, or the Office of Admissions. 
The required GPA for the granting of classified status (see "Admission to Graduate Degree Curricula: 
Classified ') varies, according to the particular program. Consult descriptions of programs elsewhere 
in this caulog and in the Graduate Bulletin. However, a student must have earned a 3.0 average 
in all post-baccalaureate coursework taken at this university plus such transfer courses as are applied 
to his study plan. Exception to this rule may be granted by the academic area in response to a student 
petition only if it is evident that courses whose grades are not to be computed in the CPA are 
inapplicable and inappropriate to the degree program. 

The 30 semester units of approved study plan coursework required for the degree must be completed 
with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average. If a student approaches the completion of the degree 
requirements with less than a 3.0 average, he may request a change in his study plan to add no nwre 
than six units of coursework in order to achieve at least a 3.0 average (see "Changes in Study Plan," 
as follows). If a student's average at any time falls below such a level that it cannot be raised to 
a 3.0 within the prescribed limits of coursework, he has in effect withdrawn himself from his master's 
program. 

Tests 

Students applying for admission with graduate sUnding as an unclassified graduate student and 
declaring the objective of a Master of Business Administration are required to submit the test scores 
from the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business (Educational Testing Service). 

Students declarir^ other graduate degree objectives will not be required to submit test scores for 
admission with uiKlassified graduate starxiing. However, test scores are required for admission to 
classified status in many of the master's degree programs. See program descriptions in this catalog 
for the types of tests required. 

The Graduate Record Examinatxxis are nationally administered arxl are given only a few times a 
year on specified dates. A current list of these dates is available at the Office of Counseling and 


337—11 3 400 


76 Master's Degree 

Testing, and the Graduate Office. The student must make written application for the tests on a form 
available at the above offices which must be submitted to the particular testing service office by the 
applicable deadline. Since test results are measured against those of students who normally take the 
tests in their senior year and sirKe they are required before the student can become a classified 
student, the taking of the tests should not be deferred. 

Limitation on Preclassification Coursework 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken at Cal State Fullerton prior to classified status 
may be applied to a student's master's degree study plan. Any acceptable transfer work is excluded 
from the nine units permitted. Students who receive postgraduate credit for courses taken during 
their final semester as a senior may accumulate as many as 1 2 units. 

Inapplicable Courses 

Courses numbered 100 to 299 and in the 700 series may not be included in a master's degree study 
plan. Courses numbered 300 to 399 do not give graduate credit unless included on an approved 
graduate study plan. 

Courses taken to meet baccalaureate degree requirements, or postgraduate coursework taken to 
satisfy quantitative or qualitative deficiencies may rwt be used on a master's degree study plan. Credit 
by examination and corresponderKe credit is not acceptable. 

Workshop, extension, and institute coursework offered either at this institution or by other colleges 
or universities is rH>t norn^ally acceptable as part of a master's degree study plan. A student who 
desires to utilize such coursework must obtain approval from the graduate adviser and committee, 
and from the dean of graduate studies. When such coursework has been taken elsewhere, the 
student should provide evidence that the college or university concerned would consider such 
coursework acceptable toward a comparable graduate degree. Any such courses offered by other 
institutions, but which are not acceptable for their own graduate degrees, may not be accepted by 
this university for a graduate degree. 

Also see the sections following on "CR, P or S Grades" and "Time Limit for Completion." 

CR, P or S Grades 

Any course taken at this university with a grade of CR, P, S or similar canrK>t be accepted on a 
master's degree study plan. 

A course taken at another college or university with a grade of CR, P, S or similar cannot be accepted 
on a master's degree study plan unless such a course with such a grade is acceptable at that college 
or university for a graduate degree. 

Declassification 

Graduate students in classified graduate status nnay be declassified upon the recommerxiation of the 
appropriate academic unit, reverting to unclassified status, when one or more of the following 
conditions exist: 

1 . The student's request for declassification is approved by his graduate committee. 

2. The student fails to maintain the grade-point average required in the master's degree program. 

3. The student's professional performance is judged to be unsatisfactory. 

4. The student fails to petition for an extension of the time limit. 

Tinw Limit for Completion 

All coursework on the master's degree study plan should normally be completed within five years, 
except that, upon petition to the Graduate Office, two additional years may be allowed. The 
university, at its option, nuy further extend the time for students who pass a comprehensive 
examination in the relevant course. Requests to take such comprehensive examinations should be 
made to appropriate graduate studies committees. 

When an examination is administered, a report of successful completion will be made to the dean 
of graduate studies. The grade received on the original course will be used on the master's degree 
study plan, rather than the CR grade used for challertge examinatior>s. 

The following shows the dates of expiration of courses according to the five-year limitation: 


341-.12 3 430 


Master's Degree 77 


Courses taken in 


Will expire in 


1%8 

1%9 

1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 


1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 


The five-year period is computed as being the time between the actual date of completion of the 
earliest course and the riKKith the degree is granted. 

Changes in Study Plan 

The student must complete the courses shown on his approved study plan on file in the Graduate 
Office and in the particular academic unit with at least a 3.0 (B) grade-point average. If a student 
wishes to make a change in his study plan, he should file the appropriate form (copies available 
in the Graduate Office, and graduate program offices) in the academic unit offering the master's 
degree prior to registration. The recommendation for a change must be signed by his adviser. No 
course for which a grade has been assigned may be removed from a study plan. 

Minimum Full-Time Course Load 

The minimum full-time unit load for a graduate student is either 12 units of coursework a semester 
or nine units of which six are in 500-level courses. Students for whom the unit count does not 
adequately reflect the study load may request a review. Consult the Graduate Office for further 
information. 

Maximum Course Unit Load 

Twelve units is considered to be a maximum course load for graduate students, but, on the approval 
of an adviser, in exceptional cases, a student may take rrxKe. 

Theses and Projects 

When a thesis is required, the approved original copy, in the approved binding, and a microfilm of 
it must be deposited in the Library. An abstract, of not more than 1 50 words, must accompany the 
thesis, and will be published in the loumal. Master's Abstracts. Arrangements for the binding, 
microfilming and publication of the abstract are made through the Titan Bookstore and include the 
execution of a puMication agreement. The current fee (subject to change) for microfilming, publica- 
tion of the abstract and the archival copy is $20, plus $1 for postage. The fee (subject to change) 
for binding is $8.50. 

When a project is required, it will be filed with the academic unit offering the degree program. Some 
record of the project, or the project itself, is preserved in the academic unit and, when appropriate, 
in the Library. When the appropriate authority recommerxis, a project or its written record may be 
treated as a thesis. 

The thesis and, where appropriate, the project, must conform in maners of style and format to the 
rules in 'Thesis Procedures and Regulations," duplicated instruaions available in graduate program 
offices, the Graduate Office, arxJ the Library RefererKe Room. Since adhererKe to these rules must 
be checked and approved, and valuable assistance can be given with problems associated with 
illustrations, etc., students are advised to consult the Library adviser (in the RefererKe Room) well 
in advance of the final typing of the thesis. In addition, schools, divisions, departments, and programs 
have adopted particular form books and/or style sheets, which are to be followed in matters of 
documenution and bibliography (see the chart in the Graduate Bulletin or consuh the Graduate 
Office, or appropriate academic area). 

It is the student's responsibility to become acquainted with the appropriate rules and regulations and 
to make all necessary arrangements for the typing of the thesis, including instruction of the typist, 
if other than himself. Adequate time should be allowed for reading and criticism by the adviser, the 
committee members, and the library clerk, for revisions, as needed, and for completion of the final 
edition of the thesis, including approvals. 

The deadline for submission of the completed thesis to the adviser and comminee is six weeks in 
advance of the last day of classes of the sen>esler in which the student hopes to be awarded the 


346-12 3 445 


78 Master's Degree 

degree, unless other arrangements are made with the school or department. The deadline for 
depositing the approved original copy of the thesis in the Titan Bookstore and making the 
arrangements for binding, microfilming and publication of the abstract, is the last day of 
classes of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. If a student's program requires 
a thesis, or if the project has been determined to be regarded as a thesis, the master's degree cannot 
be awarded unless the notification that the student has completed this final step is received by the 
dean of graduate studies. 

Graduate Assistantships, Fellowships, and Financial Aids 

There are a limited number of appointments as graduate assistants available to outstanding graduate 
students who are working in graduate degree programs. These may pay up to $1,340 per semester. 
If interested, consult the dean or chairman of the appropriate academic area. Teaching fellowships 
are not currently available. 

Each year the State of California may award a certain number of graduate fellowships (payment of 
fees only ) . Qualified students who are residents of California may make application for these through 
the Financial Aid Office. 

The Graduate Office maintains a file of scholarship and fellowship opportunities offered by other 
educational institutions and foundations. 

For information concerning other financial aids and part-time placement services, see pages 32 and 
36, respectively. 

International Study 

Cal State Fullerton participates in The California State University and Colleges' program of study 
abroad. Under this program, limited studies taken at designated foreign universities, when arranged 
in advance, may be applied toward the requirements of a graduate degree awarded by Cal State 
Fullerton. It is important that plans be completed several months before starting such a program. For 
details see page 23 and consult the director of international student education and exchange. 

Second Master's Degree 

A graduate student desiring to work for a second master's degree at Cal State Fullerton must request 
permission from the academic area offering the program and the Graduate CoufKil to apply for 
admission for a second master's degree program (in unclassified status). If the request is granted, 
the student must as a minimum satisfy all prerequisites and all requirements of the new degree 
program. Approval of classified status for the second degree will be given only after the first degree 
has been awarded. Please consult the Graduate Office for further details. 

Postgraduate Credit 

If a graduate student has not while an undergraduate, received permission to consider coursework 
which was rK>t required for the baccalaureate as postgraduate, he may petition for such credit to 
be granted retroactively Petitions for postgraduate credit are filed in the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 

if approval is given by the appropnate school or department graduate adviser arxl university commit- 
tees. such coursework may be included as a part of the student's study plan, within existing 
regulations concerning applicable coursework and requirements for the degree. See also "Inapplica- 
ble Courses." 

Enrollment in SOCFLeve! Courses by Seniors 

Under certain circumstances, a senior nf>ay take a 500-level course. If he ^ not within nine units of 
graduation, he may r>ot receive postgraduate credit for such courses. He must have a minimum 
grade-point average of 3.25 overall arxi of 3.5 in the field or fields of his interxied graduate program, 
and the specific approval of the dean or chairman of the academic area in which the course is offered 
and the chairman or dean of the student's major area. 

If he is within nine units of completion of graduation requirements and if he has the approval of the 
appropriate chairmen or deans, as above, he may petition for postgraduate credit for these units as 
provided under "Postgraduate Credit." 


350-12 3 465 



n 




ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


306^12 3 405 



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83 

ACADEMIC.ADVISEMENT 


In order to help students to make their study years a meaningful educational experience, the 
university established the Office of Academic Advisement. This office assists students in choosing 
an undergraduate major and in choosing ger>eral education courses and electives. It also provides 
a center for undeclared majors, i.e. for those students who have not yet decided upon a major. 
The Office of Academic Advisement is located in Room 112 in the Humanities-Social Sciences 
Building. No appointment is necessary to engage the assistance of an adviser about various aspects 
of the academic life at the university. For more specific information about the office, the student 
should consult the Ctdss Schedule. 

Choosing an Undergraduate Major 

Every student is expected to choose a major or field of cocKentration by the beginning of the junior 
year. The majors currently offered at this university are described in the next sections of this catalog. 
Most major requirements allow students the freedom to take a number of courses in fields other than 
in their majors or closely related fields. 

Lower division students who are uncertain about their primary vocational goals or educational 
interests may, and probably should, enroll as undeclared majors. Then, and during their freshman 
and sophomore years, such students should explore the possibilities open to them that will meet their 
interests and potentialities. To help students in their searching and selecting, the university has 
available a number of useful resources: an Office of Academic Advisement; orientation programs 
that are given every year; a variety of counseling and testing services provided by the Counseling 
and Testing Centers, and the different department and school offices for information and advice on 
particular fields, their programs of study and later work opportunities. There also is a collection of 
college and university caulogs available in the Library. Additionally, there are a growing number 
of student organizations on the campus that are organized in terms of disciplinary and professional 
interests. The Placement Center also has much useful information on vocations and specific work 
opportunities. 

Most students have general ideas about some subjects in which they might like to major, and almost 
all students are aware of the fields in which they do not wish to major. The Usk of selecting a major 
(and often a minor or other complementary specialization) then becomes one oi crystallizing these 
earlier ideas on the basis of experiences in specific courses, discussions with other students and 
faculty, etc. Before commitment to a specific major, students should be sure that they have not 
rejected a field of study because of some wrong precorKeptions or inaccurate information. Students 
also should not overlook interests and potentialities that they previously may not have discovered. 
The option of taking a limited number of courses on a Credit/ No Credit basis often will be helpful 
in these pursuits. 

Students, however, must be very careful to plan freshman or sophomore programs which will permit 
their entering or taking advanced courses in fields they think they may want to be their majors. Such 
students should check such major requirements as mathematics, chemistry, foreign language, etc. 
which must be taken before the junior year or perhaps even begun during the freshman year. 
Students anticipating graduate or professional study in a certain field should exercise special care 
in planning their undergraduate programs, and they should seek faculty counseling in the fields 
coricerned. Such choices do not have to be made during the first two years, and may or may not 
be made during the secorxl two. However, careful and advance examination of the possibilities of 
graduate or professional study often will be helpful to students who have fairly clear ideas of the 
educational and vocational objectives they would like to seek 

Students also should be careful about concentrating so heavily in a particular field that they cannot 
change majors to a different field should they wish to do so. Some of our students come to the 
campus with rw clear idea of the Md in which they would like to major. Such students, arxJ others 
whose goals and objectives have not yet firmly crystallized, will have opportunities to take courses 
in various fields ar>d make up their minds durir^g their lower division work. They should, however, 
take full advantage of the opportunities that exist on and outside the campus to learn more about 
available fields of study arxl occupational fields. 


361—12 3 S20 


84 Academic Advisement 


Planning a Major Program 

When students have selected a major field, they should study carefully all the requirements which 
are specified in this catalog under their chosen degree program. Then they should make a tentative 
semester by semester plan for completing the requirements, with careful regard for courses which 
are prerequisite to others. They should discuss this plan with their major advisers who will be able 
to help them with any problems. 

In addition to courses in the major department, related courses in other fields and supporting courses 
in basic skills also may be required. These, too, should be included in the tentative semester by 
semester plan. These auxiliary requirements are described in the degree program for each major. 
Some departments require placement tests prior to admission to classes. The time and place for such 
tests is given in the class schedule, often before registration. Students should purchase a copy of the 
class schedule at the Titan Bookstore well before registration for classes begins. 

Choosing Genera! Education Courses and Electives 

In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the university requires its graduates to have sampled a 
variety of disciplines as part of their general education. The broad categories of general education 
courses are presented in the catalog section on ‘"Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor's 
Degree". Through these requirements students are introduced to the worlds of values, ideas, and 
beauty, to mankind and his problems, to the natural world in which man lives, and to skills essential 
for scholarship. 

To many students the selection of general education courses and electives poses many difficult 
choices. With well over 2,700 classes to choose from and over 50 fields of specialization that can 
be sampled, some demarniing decisions must be made. Various aids or resources are available. 
Among these are: this catalog and the CUtss Schedule W\\h their descriptions of regular and new and 
experimental courses; infornnal consultations with other students and faculty members; and advisers 
in the Office of Academic Advisement. 

The reasons for selecting particular general education courses and electives include: 

• A meaningful and adequate preparation for a selected field of study for those students who 
have decided on their major. 

• The need to explore potential major or vocational interests. 

• Curiosity about or enthusiasm for a particular subject. 

• The desire to clarify thinking and values on problems and issues of personal and social 
significance. 

• The urge to broaden and synthesize work in a specialization with perspectives and skills from 
other fields. 

• The desire to deepen urnferstanding arxi improve skills for such central human activities as 
personal relationships, family and community life, citizenship activities ar>d leisure pursuits. 

• The interest in experierKing the various approaches and teaching nr>ethods of different, ulented 
teachers. 

• Sharir^g learning experiences with frierxis. 

Communication Skills 

Skills in written, oral, and gestural communication are important tools and nr>arks of well educated 
men and women. Great competencies in both articulation and advocacy are arts well-worth attain- 
ing for living effective, full and civic lives and for achieving excellecKe in vocational careers. 

A variety of experierKes at the university provides opportunities to practice arxl develop communi- 
cations skills. The acts of written and oral expression also serve to consolidate, synthesize, and 
develop thinking and personality. 

Students will be required to denwistrate, in all classes where written expression is appropriate, their 
ability to write clearly and correaly about the materials of the course. Ability of a student to 
denrK>nstrate writing proficierKy shall be used as a part of the final grade determination in any course. 

Change of Major, Degree or Credential Objective 

A student who wishes to change his major, degree, or credential objective must obtain the required 
form in the Office of Admissions and Records or the Office of Academic Advisen>ent. Such a change 


366— li 3 MS 




Preprofessional Programs 87 

is not official until the form has been signed and filed in the Registrar's Office. A student should be 
aware that he will be responsible for the requirements for the new choice of major, degree, or 
credential that are in the catalog in effect at the time he files a change. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

According to the established praaice at the university, each department follows the advisement 
system which it finds the nK>st appropriate for its majors. 

Each undergraduate student is assigr>ed or may request an adviser who will help the student plan 
an academic program. The adviser is a resource person who can provide valuable information and 
suggestions and who can assist the student to find the most desirable ways to meet the requirements 
for graduation and for his major or credential. Although the adviser is consulted, the final choice 
of courses and the responsibility for the program lies with the student himself. 

Academic program advisers are able to offer better advice when consulted if students come pre- 
pared with lists of courses they already have taken and their own copies of transcripts from colleges 
previously attended (if students are new to Cal State Fullerton). 

An undergraduate student who has declared a major may either request or will be assigned an 
adviser by the chairman of his major department. Those seeking a credential will also be assigned 
a professional adviser by the School of Education. Students who have not yet decided upon a major 
(undeclared majors) or who are rtot seeking a degree will be advised in the Office of Academic 
Advisement. 

Graduate students will be assigned a major adviser in their fields of specialization, except in educa- 
tion where all will have a professional adviser from the School of Education. Those stud^ts seeking 
a credential for teaching in secondary schools will be assigned both a professional and a major 
adviser. 

In the Division of Engineering, each student will be assigr>ed an adviser by the chairman of the 
division and is expected to meet with that adviser at least once a semester. He is required to file 
an adviser-approved program plan before the beginning of the secorni semester of the junior year. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

The academic programs of the university provide appropriate preparation for graduate work in a 
variety of fields. Students who have made tentative decisions about institutions in which they n^ay 
wish to pursue graduate work should consult the caulogs of those graduate schools as they plan 
their undergraduate programs. Students planning to undertake graduate work should supplement 
their undergraduate programs by anticipating language requirements at major graduate schools and 
by intensive work in areas of special relevance to their intended graduate work. Professional schools 
in many universities either require or recommerxi that applicants complete four-year programs for 
admission. Although the professional schools do not always require a bachelor's degree, they 
generally encourage basic preparation and a broad general education leading to that degree before 
beginning specialization. 

The university offers a number of professiorwl programs through the master's degree. These include 
programs in the fine arts, business administration, communications, education, er^gineering, health 
education ar>d physical education and recreation, library scierKe, public administration, and speech 
pathology-audiology Students interested in preparing for professional careers in these areas, either 
here or in other educational institutiorts, are encouraged to seek assistance and guidance from our 
faculty members in these fields. 

Paramedical Health Sciences 

(Oenul Technician, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Podiatry) 
Although no specific bachelor's or master's degree program is available in the professional areas of 
denul technician, nursing, occupational therapy, optometry, physical therapy, podiatry, academic 
preparatory courses for these professions are given in the science departments. Students should 
register their specific interest preference in either the Office of the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs or the department offices in biological science or chemistry. 


376—11 3 S66 


88 Rreprofessionjil Programs 
Prelegal Preparation 

Students planning to enter law school may elect any one of several majors. In general, the better 
law schools require that an applicant hold a baccalaureate degree. Although there is no uniform 
prelegal course of study or specific university major required, it is recommended that prospective 
law students prepare themselves in such fields as English, American history, economics, political 
scietKe (particularly the history and development of English and American political institutions) and 
such undergraduate courses as judicial process, administrative law, constitutional law and interna- 
tional law, philosophy (particularly ethics and logic), business administration, anthropology, psy- 
chology and sociology. 

The major chosen and many of the courses selected should demand a high level of perfornruince 
in reading difficuK material, understanding abstract and complex concepts, and speaking and writing 
clearly and persuasively. Prelegal students are advised to take the minimum program to nr>eet the 
requirements of their chosen major and courses beyocKl the introductory survey level In other 
selected fields. A distribution of course sequerKes among the social scieiKes, the natural scierKes 
and the humanities is desirable. Students with interests in becoming lawyers should contact the 
Prelaw Society. Some faculty members in the School of Business Administration and Economics and 
the Department of Political SciecKe also can provide advice and assistance. 

Premedical'Predental Committee 

Student counseling with respect to preprofessional programs in medicine, dentistry and other health 
scierKes as well as professional school admission problems are the concern of this committee. (See 
n>embership listing, page 440. ) All students wishing to prepare for dental or medical careers should 
register in the OffKe of the Academic Vice President for Academic Affairs or either the department 
offices in biological sciecKe or chemistry 

Premedica! Preparation 

Medical schools are currently seeking applicants with as broad and liberal an educational experience 
as possible. They recomnf>er>d that applicants pursue collegiate major programs which are of vital 
interest to the student. However, all medical schools require a basic minimal training in the natural 
scierKes arxi the Premedkal- Predental Committee upon review of these admission requirements 
recomnfKnds the following coursework which satisfies this minimum training: 

OfK year of English 

three semesters of biology (including embryology and genetics) 

one year of ger>eral chemistry 

one year or organic chemistry with laboratory 

ofte year of college physics with laboratory 

one year of calculus 

Most medical school applicants complete a baccalaureate degree program prior to beginning their 
medical training. However, applications to medical school are processed normally at the termination 
of the sixth semester (junior year) . The n>edical college admission tesl required of all n>edical school 
applicants, is taken normally during the spring of the sixth semester (junior year). The prospective 
n^kal school applicant should therefore normally plan to complete the above natural science 
minimal requirements by the end of the junior year. TIhis he should begin gerKral chemistry in his 
freshman year in order to satisfy the prerequisite requirements for the advanced courses in chemts- 
try. 

Since nr>edical school admissions are limited, the best prepared applicants are likely to have an 
advantage. Many n>edical schools recommerxi certain courses in the natural scierKes in addition 
to those listed above in the minimal requirements. 

The prospective applicant is advised to consuK the catalogs of those medical schools to which he 
anticipates applying for additional recommerxied preparatory subjects. He is further advised to 
consult a member of the Premedkal Committee for assistance in planning his total collegiate 
program and to obtain copies of optimal progranrs from the chairman of the Premedkal Committee. 

Medical Technology 

A coTKentration in medkal techrK>logy is available under the BA in Biologkal Science program. 
Students interested in pursuing this field of study should select appropriate paramedkal courses as 


380-12 3 615 


Preprofe$sional Programs 89 


electives in their study plan. 

A concentration in medical techr>ology is also available under the M.A. in Biology. Students electing 
this must take as part of their course requirenf>ents Biological ScierKe 514A-E (6 units) . These courses 
are open only to students who are M.A. candidates in the medical technology corKentration and 
they are given at an approved cooperating hospital laboratory school. For further details consult the 
coordinator of medical technology in the Department of Biological Science. 

Social Welfare 

Full preprofessiorul training usually consists of two years of graduate training leadir^g to the degree 
of Master of Social Welfare. Students who plan to seek employment in social work or social welfare 
should prepare themselves In the fields of human services, psychology (particularly child and 
adolescent psychology), sociology, anthropology, political science, ecofK)mics arxJ research meth- 
ods in social science. 

Students who intend to enter a professional school following undergraduate training should learn 
about the specific prerequisites for admission to the graduate school of their choice. Ordinarily a 
major in one of the social sciences, and some additional work in at least several other social sciences, 
is recommended. Students with interests in pursuing careers In the fields of social welfare should 
contact the Department of Sociology for advice arxl assistarKe. 

Pretheological 

Students who might be interested in pursuing careers in counseling, social work, the teaching of 
religion, and the ministry and associated fields should take some courses in religion, psychology, 
anthropology, sociology, philosophy, education, communications, history, English, speech com- 
munication and a foreign language. Students desiring assisunce and counseling regarding advanced 
work or professional careers may seek help from the faculty In the Department of Religious Studies. 


3S3— 11 3 630 



UNIVERSITY CURRICULA 


38S-12 3 630 



\ 


N 


93 


UNIVERSITY CURRICULA 


DEGREE PROGRAMS 

California Slate University, Fullerton offers the following baccalaureate degree programs which are 


described on the pages listed: 

Page 

B.A. Anr>erican Studies 243 

B.A. Anthropology 245 

B.A. Art 103 

B.A. Biological Science 369 

B.A. Business Administration 146 

B.A. Chemistry 380 

B.A. Communications 256 

B.A. Comparative Literature 266 

B.S. Computer Science 175 

B.A. Criminal justice 270 

B.A. Earth Science 388 

B.A. Economics 152 

B.S. Engineering 391 

B.A. English 270 

B.A. Ethnic Studies 239, 251 

B.A. FrerKh 276 

B.A. Geography 291 

B.A. German.. 279 

B.A. History 2% 


Page 


B.S. Human Services 179 

B.A. Latin American Studies 182 

B.A. Liberal Studies 184 

B.A. Linguistics 309 

B.A. Mathematics 407 

B.A. Music 120 

B M Music 122 

B.A. Philosophy 315 

B.S. Physical Education 225 

B.A. Physics 414 

B.A. Political ScietKe 321 

B.A. Psychology 330 

B.A Religious Studies 335 

B.A. Russian Area Studies 186 

B.A. Sociology 340 

B.A. Spanish 276 

B.A. Special Major 189 

B.A. Speech Communication 346 

B.A. Theatre Arts. 131 


The following master's degree programs are offered: 


Page 


M.A. Anthropology 245 

M.A. Art 106 

M.A. Biology 370 

M B A. Business Administration 150 

M.A. Chemistry 383 

M.A. Communications 259 

M.A. Comparative Literature 266 

M.A. Economics 153 

M.S. Education (with emphases in ele- 
mentary education, reading, school ad- 
ministratKXi. school counseling and 

special education) 195 

M.S. Engineering 395 

M.A. English 272 

M S. Environmental Studies 177 

M.A. FrerKh 277 

M.A. Geography 292 


Page 

M.A. German 277 

M.A. History 297 

M S. Library SciefKe 361 

M.A. Linguistics 310 

M.A. Mathematics 409 

M.A. Musk 123 

M S. Physkal Education 227 

M.A. Politkal SciefKe 322 

M.A. Psychology 331 

M.P.A. Pubik Administration 323 

M.A. Social SciefKes 187 

M.A. Sociology 341 

M.A. Spanish 277 

M.A. Special Major 189 

M.A. Speech ComrTHjnkation 348 

M.A. T>Katre Arts 133 


The university is accredited by the California State Board of Education and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education for programs leading to credemials and master's degrees. 


46—12 4 70 


94 Sub/ect Finder 

SUBJECT FINDER 

The listing of degree programs does not include all of the fields or subject matter areas in which 
some courses currently are being offered at Cal State Fullerton. Additionally, different colleges and 
universities differ in the names they assign to degrees, curricular programs, and the academic units 
offering courses. The following "subject finder" lists some of the most commonly used terms for 
fields with information on where courses or programs on these subjects can be located at Fullerton 
and in this catalog. 

Subject Page 

Accounting 1 54 

African Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, Geography, History, Political 
Science) 

Afro-American Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies) 239 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 239 

American Indian Studies 242 

American Studies 243 

Anthropology 244 

Art 103 

Art Education 115 

Art History 104 

Asian Studies (See Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Geography, History, Political 
Science) ’ 

Astronomy 369 

Behavioral Sciences in Education 1% 

Biological Science 369 

Busir>ess Administration 145 

Chemistry 379 

Chicano Studies 251 

Classics (See Comparative Literature. History and Latin) 

Communications 255 

Comparative Literature 265 

Computer Studies (See Engineering, Mathematics, Quantitative Methods) 175 

Criminal justice 270 

Dance 116 

Drama (See Theatre) 131 

Drama Education (See Theatre Education) 141 

Earth Science 368 

Economics 1 56 

Education 195 

Pupil Personnel Services 1% 

Reading 201 

School Administration — 203 

School Counseling 1% 

School Psychology 197 

School PsychoiTWtry 197 

Special Education 206 

Teacher Education — 213 

Engineering 391 

English 270 

English Education 276 

Environmental Studies 1 76 

Ethnic Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies and Chicarx) Studies) 239, 251 

Finance 159 

Folklore (See Anthropology and Comparative Literature) 

Foreign Languages ar>d Literatures 276 

Foreign Languages Education 278 

FrefKh 279 

Geography 291 

Geology 388 

German 283 


4»-l2 4 85 


Subject Finder 95 

Graduate Studies 96 

Health Education 228 

Hebrew 285 

History 2% 

Human Services 179 

Interdisciplinary Center 180 

International Relations (See Political ScierKe, EcorK>mics, History) 

International Study 98 

Italian 286 

Journalism (See Communications) 

Journalism Education 265 

Latin 286 

Latin American Studies 182 

Law (See Political ScierKe, Management) 321, 156 

Library ScierKe 361 

Liberal Studies 184 

Linguistics 309 

Management 161 

Marketing 164 

Mathematics 407 

Mathen>atics Education 423 

Meteorology 413 

Medical Biology Courses 376 

Mexican- American Studies (See Chicano Studies) 

Music 118 

Musk Education 130 

Mythology (See Anthropology and Comparative Literature) 

Native American Studies (See Amerkan Indian Studies) 242 

Nature Interpretation 420 

Oceanography 379 

Philosophy — - 315 

Photography (See Art and Communkations) 

Physkal Education - - 229 

Physkal ScierKe - - 414 

Physks - 414 

Politkal ScierKe — - 321 

Portuguese - - 286 

Psychology - 330 

PuWk Administration (See Politkal ScierKe) 

PuWk Relations (See Communkatiom) 

(^Quantitative Methods — 166 

Radio (See Theatre and CorrununKaiions) 

Reading 201 

Recreation - - 235 

Religious Studies — 335 

Russian — ... 287 

Russian Area Studies 186 

Sanskrit (See Linguistks) 

School Administration 203 

ScierKe Education 421 

Social Sciences 187 

Social Wetfare 89 

Social Work (See Social Welfare) 

Sociology 340 

Spanish — 288 

Special Major 189 

Speech (See Speech Communkation) 

Speech Communkation 346 

Speech Education 357 

Sports (See Physkal Education) 

90-.12 4 90 


96 Course Numbering 


Statistics (See Mathematics and (Quantitative Methods) 407, 166 

Student-to-Student Tutorial 98 

Swahili 291 

Teacher Education 213 

Technological Studies 190 

Television (See Theatre and Communications) 131, 255 

Theatre 131 

Theatre Education 141 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions briefly describe the content or subject matter to be covered arni provide 
additional information on units of credit, the level of instruction (general course numbering code), 
prerequisites, and the type of course (lecture, laboratory, activity, seminar, and individually super- 
vised work). Information on specific offerings of courses (times, rooms, instructors) will be fourul 
in the class schedule which is printed in advarKe of the fall and spring semesters. Information on 
additional (new, special, or experimental) courses for each semester also can be found in these class 
schedules. 

Some of the courses listed in the catalog are not taught every year. Many are taught once only every 
year. Others are taught every sen^ester, and often in many sections. Advance information regarding 
the plans for offering particular courses may be obtained from the offices of the departments teaching 
them. 

The forms and methods of teaching vary widely in specific classes, deper>ding on the subject matter 
and purposes and the particular instructor ar>d studwts. The nfK>re traditional methods of lecturing, 
discussion, laboratory work, arni individually supervised research or projects irKreasingly are being 
supplemented by such learning resources as group arid individual exercises, television, and films and 
records, videotaping, and the use of the computer. Modern specialized facilities and equipment are 
used in many courses in different fields. These irKlude: laboratories for teaching the sciecKes; studios 
for teaching the fine arts, a small museum and archaeology /physical anthropology laboratory; a 
variety of facilities for teaching communications; a language laboratory for teaching foreign lan- 
guages and linguistics courses; a speech and hearing clinic; af>d the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. 
Cal State erKourages experimentation and inrK)vation in teaching and welcomes a diversity of 
approaches. IrKreasingly, ar>d with growing help from students, efforts are being nriade on the 
campus to examine ar>d evaluate arxJ improve the learning experieiKes in some classroonns in more 
scholarly ways. Students also are being provided more opportunities to learn through teaching 
experierKes in activities such as tutoring and organizing and cor>ducting courses in the Experinriental 
College. 

SCHEDULES 

A new Cfdss Schedule ts published in advance of the fall and spring sefT>esters. This general, university 
schedule contains not only detailed information on times, places, and instructors for specifK courses 
but also materials on registration, new courses that are not in the catalog, the times for final 
examinations, and many other useful items for course and program plannir^. The Ctiss Scher^le 
may be purchased at the Titan Bookstore. Special schedules, which may be obuined from the office 
of continuing education, are provided for the summer sessions and the extension curriculum. The 
Experimental College of the Associated Students also distributes a schedule in advance of its pro- 
grams of course offerings. 

GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

100-299 Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open also to upper division 
students. 

300-399 Upper division courses of junior arxi senior level, which do nor give graduate credit unless 
irKluded on an approved graduate study plan (such as a credential or graduate degree 
program) for a specific graduate student. 

400-499 Upper division courses of junior and senior level which give graduate credit when taken 
by a graduate student. (Note limitations in specific graduate programs.) 


40^12 4 us 


Independent Study 97 


500-599 Graduate courses organized primarily for graduate students * 

700-799 Graduate professional courses in the postgraduate program, not applicable to graduate 
degrees. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

Because of the differerKes in the organization arxJ content of the various disciplines and professions, 
there is no uniform, reasonable way of numbering courses that would be equally useful for all fields 
of knowledge. Some of the departments explain the logic of their own course numbering system in 
this catalog. 

In general it may be assumed that increases in class (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, or 
graduate) and certainly division level (lower, upper, graduate) correlate with more difficult and 
challenging academic work. Sometimes, however, disciplines organize their course numbering partly 
in terms of criteria other than degree of difficulty: e.g. anthropology numbers its area courses in the 
300's and its theoretical or institutional courses in the 400 $. It should be noted, too, that some 
students find introductory courses to be more demanding than advanced, specialized courses: in 
such courses, a more comprehensive approach and the first exposure to new ways of thinking may 
be harder for some individuals than covering a smaller, more familiar area, in much greater detail. 

SPECIAL COURSE NUMBERS 

For uniformity, certain types of courses have been listed by all departments and schools with the 
same numbers: 499 and 599 are used for undergraduate and graduate "independent study"; 1% or 
4% for "student-to-student tutorials"; 597 for a graduate "project"; and 598 for a graduate "thesis." 
The course numbers for senior seminars are not so uniform but they ternf to be numbered 485, 490, 
491, or 495. 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NOTATIONS 

Certain notations are uniformly used in the course descriptions in the catalog. 

1 . The figure in parentheses following the course title indicates the number of semester units for the 
course. Courses offered for varying units are indicated as (1-3) or (3-b). 

2. A course description such as Anthropology 453 (3) (Same as Geography 453) indicates that: the 
same course is "cross-listed" by both departments, i.e. a student can choose to take the course 
and count it as either an anthropology or a geography course, the complete course description 
will be found with the geography courses, and probably the instructor will be a member of the 
Geography Department. For this same cross-listed course, the Geography Department will indi- 
cate after the course description "(Same as Anthropology 453)." 

3. A notation such as (Formerly 433) following the course title and the number of units irnlicates 
the same course previously was numbered 433. 

PREREQUISITES 

Students are expected to meet stated prerequisites for all courses. However, in exceptional cases, 
and at the discretion of the division in which the course is taught, students may be allowed to meet 
prerequisites by examination. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Under the independent study program, the upper division student can pursue topics or problems 
of special interest beyorKJ the scope of a regular course under the supervision of a faculty adviser. 
The work is of a research or creative nature, and normally culminates in a paper, projea, compre- 
hensive examination, or performance. Before registering, the student must get his topic approved 
by the professor who will be supervising indeperxient study. The catalog numbers for independent 
study in departments are 499 and 599. Independent study courses may be repeated. A student 
wishing to enroll in nwe than six units of independent study in any one semester must have the 
approval of his major adviser and of the chairman of the department ($) in which the independent 
study is to be corxiuaed. 

• Note emccDbom on S9 


4 — H44S? 


413—12 4 140 


98 Student-to-Student Tutorials 
INTERNATIONAL STUDY COURSES 

Cal State Fullerton students under The California State University and Colleges International Study 
Programs register concurrently at Cal State Fullerton and at the host institution abroad, with credits 
assigned to the student which are equivalent to courses offered at Cal State Fullerton. Undergraduate 
students who discover appropriate study opportunities at the host institution but no equivalent 
course at Cal State Fullerton may use Independent Study 499 and International Study 292 or 492. 
Graduate students may use Independent Graduate Research 599 and International Study 592. 

292 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-6 lower division units) 

Open to students enrolled In California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken In a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

492 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 upper division units) 

Open to students enrolled In California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

592 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 graduate units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 700 

A credit/rK> credit course with no (0) units of credit, which is designed to ensure continuous 
registration for those graduate students with an advanced degree objective who find that they are 
unable to enroll in regularly offered coursework. This course does not 'equire class atterniance. 
Permission to register in Graduate Studies 700 must be given by appropriate university authorities. 
A student may not register in Graduate Studies 700 for a third consecutive semester. 

Students are reminded that units in a 700-level course may not be applied toward fulfillment of 
requirennents for an advanced degree. 

STUDENT-TO-STUDENT TUTORIALS 

The university has begun a program of experimentation with and development of "student-to- 
student tutorials.'* One of the fastest and profoundest ways to learn is to teach. The "student-to- 
student tutorial" will provide a formal way to erKourage students to learn through teaching. It will 
expand significantly the opportunities for students to have meaningful experierKes as teachers. At 
the same time, it greatly will increase the amount of tutoring available and will extend tutoring to 
all of the kinds of students who need and want tutorial assistance. 

Students electing to be tutors not only will increase their mastery of particular subject matters but 
also will have practice in developing their communication, cooperation and interpersonal relation- 
ship skills. Most important adult roles and jobs also involve a teaching dimension ar>d the tutorial 
experience will provide opportunities to develop awarer>ess of teaching problems and competence 
in teaching techniques. 

Each department will decide whether or not it wishes to offer this course. Departments choosing 
to offer the student-to-student tutorial course will follow the rules listed in the following course 
description. 

The course number will be 1 % or 4%, and one to three units of credit can be given for each course. 
Prerequisites: A 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or consent of instructor and simultaneous 
enrollment in the course or previous enrolln>ent in a similar course or its equivalent. The tutor and 
his tutee or tutees will work in mutually advantageous ways by allowing all involved to delve more 
carefully and thoroughly into the materials presented in this specific course. One to three students 
may be tutored by the tutor unless the instructor decides that special circumsunces warrant increas- 
ing the usual maximum of three tutees. Three hours of work are expected for each unit of credit 
and this work may include, apart from contact hours with tutees, such other aaivities as: tutorial 
preparations; consulting with instructors; reporting, analysis and evaluation of the tutorial experi- 
ences; and participation in an all-university orientation and evaluation program for tutors. A max- 
imum of three units can be taken each semester and nine units of any con^bination of 196 arxJ 4% 
for an undergraduate program. This course must be taken as an eleaive and rK)t counted toward 


416-12 4 165 


StudenMo-Student Tutorials 99 


general education, major or minor requirements. The course can be taken on a credit /no credit basis 
by the tutor. Requests for tutors must be initiated by tutees and can be initiated up until the official 
university date for dropping a class with a W. Tutors electing to respornJ to such requests will receive 
credits at the ernl of the semester and can register In the course until the official university date for 
dropping a class with a W. Both tutors and tutees must submit written reports, analyses and 
evaluations of their shared tutorial experierKe, and both must participate in an all*university orienta- 
tion program as well as in any conferecKes or critiques that the instructor of the course may require. 
Further information can be obtained from the department in which the student is interested in 
"student-to-student tutorials." 


\ 


419—12 4 170 





THE ARTS 


420—12 4 175 



480—12 4 175 


103 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 

Dean: J. Justin Cray 


DEPARTMENT OF ART 

FACULTY 
Gerald Samuelson 
Department Chairman 

Alvin Ching, Darryl Curran, Naomi Dietz, Henry Evjenth, Robert Ewing, Dextra Frankel, Carmel 
Goode, Raynwrid Hein, Thomas Holste, George James, Claude Kent, G. Ray Kerciu, Ruth Kline, 
Donald Lagerberg, Michael Lee, Ronald Leighton, Clinton MacKenzie, John ^sen, Robert Partin, 
Albert Porter, Leo Robinson, Jerry Rothman, Victor Smith, Jon Stokesbary 
The Department of Art offers a program which irKludes the several fields of art history, theory and 
appreciation; drawing, painting, sculpture; design and crafts; and art education. The broadest objec- 
tive of the program is to contribute to the intellectual, social, and creative development of the student 
as he prepares for citizenship in a democratic society. More specifically, the art program provides 
opportunities for students: ( 1 ) to develop a knowledge and understanding of those general principles 
of visual organization and expression basic to all forms and fields of art; (2) to develop a critical 
appreciation and undersunding of historical and contemporary art forms through a study of these 
principles as they relate to the range of artistic production of mankind; (3) to use these general 
principles as a nr>eans to express more clearly th^r ideas, thoughts, and feelings in the creation of 
visual forms; (4) to develop those understandings and skills needed to pursue graduate studies in 
the field, to teach art in the schools, or to qualify for a position in business and industry as an art 
specialist. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the bachelor of arts degree have been designed to meet the 
specialized needs of the following groups: (1 ) students who wish to study art as an essential part 
of their personal and cuKural development; (2) students seeking preprofessional preparation in art; 
and (3) students planning to teach art in grades K-12. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have a C average in all 
courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major 
courses in which a grade of D is obtained. As is customary, the Art Department reserves the right 
to hold projects completed by a student for class credit for a period of three years. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

Three course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs ar>d interests of students 
working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art. 

In the development of specific course offerings which make up these programs, it has been the 
concern of the art faculty to see that each program contains: ( 1 ) basic courses in art history, theory, 
appreciation, and studio practice which have as their primary focus the study of those general 
prirKiples of visual organization and expression underlying all fields of art: (2) more specialized 
courses which provide for adequate preparation in depth in a single field of art. The teaching of art 
history, theory, and criticism is not confined to courses bearing that title. Rather, each studio course 
involves theo^ as well as the practice of art, includes as part of its content the study and reference 
to related historical art forms, and has as part of its purpose the development of those critical abilities 
which are necessary to a valid evaluation and appreciation of the art expressions of man. 

Plan I provides for an emphasis in the area of art history, theory, and appreciation and is particularly 
recommended for those students who wish to pursue graduate studies in art history or museology. 
Plan II is designed for those students who prefer a studio-type program with a preprofessional 
orientation and an area of specialization selected from the follo^ng: (1 ) drawing and painting; (2) 
phntmaking; (3) sculpture; (4) crafts; (5) ceramics; (6) graphic design; (7) illustration, (8) environ- 
mental design; or (9) creative photography. 

Plan III is for those students %vho wish to meet the requiremems for single subject instruction (Ryan 
Act) for teaching art in grades K-12. 

Plan I requires a minimum of 60 units in art or approved related courses with a minimum of 36 units 


4M— 12 4 19S 


104 Art 


of upper division in art. Plan II requires a minimum of 70 units in art with a minimum of 36 units 
of upper division in art. Plan III requires a minimum of 55 units of art including a minimum of 27 
units of upper division art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other university 
requirements for a bachelor of arts degree (see page 69). Students following Plan III also must meet 
any specific requirements for the desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for School of 
Education). 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY EMPHASIS Un/ts 

Preparation for the Major: Art history 201 A, B ( 6 units ); 6 units of studio courses; approved 
electives (12 units) in art, anthropology, drama, foreign languages, history, literature, 

music or philosophy 24 

The Major: Art history (36 units) including one course from each of the following six 
groups: 301-302; 411-412; 341-421-422, 431-432; 451-452; 461-462-471; six courses in 
not more than three of the above groupings and three courses (9 units) of approved 

electives 36 

Reading knowledge of or>e modern foreign language 

PLAN II: STUDIO EMPHASIS 

Drawing and Painting 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A,B; 102; 107 A,B; 103; 104; 1 17 (3 units); 207 A,B; and 

6 units of art electives 34 

The Major: 307 A, B; 317A,B, 4B7A,B or C (6 units); 9 units of upper division art history; 

and 9 units of art electives 36 

Printmaking 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A,B; 102; 107 A,B; 247; 117 (3 units); 103; 104; and 9 

units of art electives 34 

The Major: Art 347A,B; 4B7D (6 units); 307 A, 31 7A; 9 units of upper division art history; 

and 9 units of art electives 36 

Sculpture 

Preparation for the Major htX 201 A,B; 102, 107 A,B; 103; 104; 216A,B; 1 17 (3 units); 6 units 

of art electives 34 

The Major: Art 316A,B; 336A,B, 486 (6 units); 9 units of upper division art history and 

9 units of art electives 36 

Crafts 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B; 102; 123B; 107 A,B; 103; 104; 205A, and 9 units 

selected from Art 106A. 123B, 205B, 216B, or 117 (3 units) 34 

The Major — General Concentration: Art 305 A; 31 5A; 325A; 330 or 355A or 365A; 9 units 
of upper division art history and 15 units selected from Art 305B, 31 5B, 316A, 325B, 

338A, 485A. 485B, 485C. 485D or 485E 36 

The Major^ewelry/Metahmithing Concentration: Art 305 A; 315A,B; 325A.B; 9 units of 
upper division art history; 6 units selected from Art 305B, 330. 355A. 365A or 338A; 

and 6 units selected from 485A or 485C 36 

The Major— Textile Concentration: Art 355A.B, 365 A. B; 6 units selected from 330, 485 D 

or 385E; 9 units of upper division art history; and 9 units of art electives 36 

Ceramics 

Preparation hr the Major Art 201 A.B; 102; 107 A.B; 103; 104; 106A.B; 117 (3 units); and 

6 units of art electives 1 34 

The Major Art 306A,B; 326A.B. or 426A.B, 484 (6 units); 9 units of upper division art 

history and 9 units of art electives 36 

Graphic Design 

Preparation for the Major 102; 107 A.B; 103; 104; 223A.B, 117 (3 units); 6 units 

of art electives., 34 

The Major Art 323A.B; 483 A (6 units); 338A; 363A; 9 units of upper division art history; 

and 9 units of art electives 36 


428—12 4 215 


Art 105 


Illustration Units 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A,B; 102; 107 A,B; 103; 104; 123A; 117 (3 units); and 

9 units of art electives 34 

The Major: Art 363A,B; 4B3C (6 units); 317A.B, 323A; 9 units of upper division art history; 

and 6 units of art electives 36 

Environmental Design 

Preparation for the Major: 201A,B; 102; 107A,B, 103; 104; 123B; 216A; 205A and 6 units 

of art electives 34 

The Afa/or 313A,B; 333A,B; 483B (6 units); 453A; 9 units of upper division art history and 

7 units of art electives 36 

Creative Photography 

Preparation for the Major: 201 A,B; 102; 103; 104; 107 A.B; 117 (3 units); 247; and 9 

units of art electives 34 

The Major: 338A,B; 489 (6 units); 347A; 9 units of upper division art history, and 6 units 

selected from 323A, 363A, 307 A, 347B, or 443A; and 6 units of art electives 36 


PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 


Single Subject lnstructiorv->ltyan Act 
(Qualifies for teaching Art in grades K-12) 

Preparation for the Mafor: Art 102; 103; 104; 106A; 107 A,B; 2 units of 1 1 7 or 1 23A; 201 A,B; 

and 205A 27-28 

The Major: (Select or>e of the following) 

Drawing and Painting: 307 A,B; 316A. 317A; 338A or 443A, 347A, 41 1 or 412; and 441 A,B 27 

Crafts: 305A; 306A,B; 307A; 315A; 330, 411 or 412; and 441 A,B 27 

Graphic Design and Photography: 307 A, 323 A; 338A, 347A; 363 A, 41 1 or 412, 443 A, and 

441 A,B 27 

Professional Preparation. 

Art Ed 442 3 

Education coursework 9 

Student teaching (of>e semester full time) 12 

Program requirements: 


1 . Assignment by the Art Department chairman to a faculty adviser in art education. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in this caulog within the School of Education for the 
curriculum pertir>ent to the Ryan Act provisions. 

3. Meet the requirements listed urxier Plan III, Teaching Emphasis for the bachelor's degree in 
art. 

4. Completion of nujor arxj education course requirements prior to enrolling in student teaching. 

5. Admission to teacher education through the School of Education is required prior to enrollment 
in Art Ed 442 ar>d student teaching. 

6. AcceptarKe for student teachir>g is based on candidate quotas, a review of a candidate's 
portfolio of art work, and eviderKe of success in university coursework completed. 

7. Recommerxlation by the faculty adviser in art education. 

Upon completion of the above program ar>d the bachelor of arts degree, the student is eligible for 
a partial credential, which meets state requirements for teaching in grades K-12. Within a specified 
period of time from the beginning of a teaching assignment, 30 units of coursework must be 
completed at an accredited college or university to qualify for a full credential. Credentials are issued 
from the ir^stitution where this unit requirement has been completed. 

Fifth Year Credential Program. Units 

This program is designed to meet the 30 unit Ryan Act requirement for the full credential 
authonaing single subject ir>struction in grades K-12. Emphasis is placed on an in-depth 
program in one of three possible course options. 

Drawing and Painting (Option: Art 207 A,B, 307 A, B, 317A,B, 347A, 487 and 6 units of 

adviser-approved electives in art 30 


432—12 4 235 


106 Art 


Units 

Crafts and Genera! Art Option: Art 106A,B, 21 BA, 307 A, B, 31 5A, 330, 347A and 6 units 


of adviser-approved electives in art 30 

Photography and Genera! Art Option: An 307A,B, 317A, 330B, 443 A, B, 489 (6 units) and 

6 units of adviser-approved electives in art 30 


Multiple Subject lnftruction-4lyan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in the elementary 
schools in multiple subject classrooms: 

Units 


Art 380 3 

Music 333 3 

Theatre 402 3 


9 

The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any student who wishes 
to expand his knowledge in any or all of the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, 320, 330, 340, and 380 
Dance 101, 125A,B, 140, 210, 221A,B, 227A,B, 245A,B, 311A,B, 331A,B, 477 
Music 111A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281A,C,E,C, 283A, 381A,B, 435 
Theatre 100A,B, 211, 263A, 27BA, 277, 370A,B, 402, 403, 41 1C 

MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DECREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bachelor of arts degree of which a 
minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. Included in the program must be a basic 
course in each of the followir>g areas: (1) art history and appreciation; (2) design; (3) drawirtg and 
painting; and (4) crafts. Those students planning to qualify for a standard teaching credential with 
specialization in elementary or secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain approval from 
the Art Department for the courses selected to meet the upper division requirements for a minor 
in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts degree in art provides a balarKe of theory and 
practice for those who desire to teach art or wish to develop a sound basis for continued advanced 
work in this field. The program offers each student the opportunity to expand his intellectual and 
technical resources and to acquire greater richr>ess and depth in terms of creative understandir>g and 
achievenf>ent in or>e of the following areas of concentration: (1) drawing ar>d painting (including 
printmaking); (2) crafts (including ceramics); (3) design; and (4) sculpture. 

Prerequisites for the Program 
Prerequisites to the program include: 

1. An undergraduate major in art or 24 units of upper division art including at least 12 units of 
upper division study in the elected area of concentration with a CPA of 3.0 or better; 

2. Portfolio review— before any units may apply to the approved study program for the degree, 
the student must arrange for a faculty committee evaluation of the student's background, 
including a statement of purpose by the student and review of creative work. Portfolio review 
dates are May 1 for the following fall semester, and December 1 for the following spring 
semester of each year. Arrangements may be made through the Art Office to meet these 
deadlines prior to admission. 

Study Pian 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved by the student's graduate commit- 
tee of which 15 must be 500-level courses. The 30 units are distributed as follows: 


Units 

1. 5(X>-level courses in art 15-21 

A. Core courses in art history, philosophy, analysis and criticism (9) 

Art 500A, Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Art 500B, Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 


137— u 4 MO 


Art 107 


Units 

Art 481, Seminar in Art History, or substitute of a 400-level art history 
course or Philosophy 311, Aesthetics, on the recommendation of the 

major adviser 

B. Coursework in the area of coixentration selected from one of the follow- 
ing areas: drawing and painting; crafts; design; sculpture (6) 

C Project or thesis (3-6) 

2. Additional courses 2 

A. 500- and/or 400-level courses in art to extend the student's field in depth (6) 

B. 500-, 400- and/or 300-level courses, either in courses outside the Art 

Department and related to the student's special area of interest, or in 
courses within the Art Department but outside the area of concentra- 
tion, to expand the student's field in breadth (3-6) 


Toul 30 


All courses must be completed with a B average, and all courses in the area of concentration must 
be graded B or better. The Department of Art requires the candidate for the Master of Arts in Art 
degree to exhibit his or her project in the department upon completion of the Master of Arts in Art 
degree and the art faculty reserves the right to reuin an example from the student's master's exhibit 
for the university collection. 

For further information, consult the Department of Art. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees,'" page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ART COURSES 

100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Exploration and creative use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. Field trips 
required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of the Art Department. (6 hours 
activity) 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

A course for the general student designed to develop an undersunding of historical and contempo- 
rary art forms. Illustrated with examples of painting, sculpture, architecture, and design. Field trips 
required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of the Art Department. 

102 Art in Southern California (1) 

Discussion and field trip experiences to see art in the Los Angeles community. 

103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of plastic organization as related to a two- 
dimensional surface. (6 hours activity) 

104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tods, and elements of plastic organization as related to three- 
dimensional form. (6 hours activity) 

106A,B Beginning Ceramics (33) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A basic course in the study of form as related to ceramic materials, tods, 
processes, and concepts. (6 hours activity) 

107 A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (33) 

Beginning work in the creative use d the materials d drawing and painting with emphasis on visual 
concepts, use d medium, individual exploration, and growth, planning and craftsmanship. 107A 
emphasizes drawing; 107B emphasizes painting (9 hours laboratory) 

111 Furidamentals of Art (3) 

A comparative study d the elements d plastic organization in relation to personal and cultural 
aesthetic expression and concepts. Fundamental art ideas, problems d organization and struc- 
ture, and terminology. Field trips required. 

117 Life Drawirvg (1) 

Drawing from the live model. May be repeated to a maximum d 4 units. (3 hours laboratory for 
each unit) 

123A,B Descriptive Drawing (33) 

An intensive study d traditional and contemporary drawing techniques and theories. Emphasis in 
123A on representation d rwture forms arid in 123B on manmade arxi mechanical forms includ- 
ing linear perspective. (9 hours laboratory) 


441—12 4 280 


108 Art 


201A,B Art and Civilization (34) 

A comparative survey of the basic ideas, forms, and styles of the visual arts as they developed in 
various cultures from prehistoric time to the present day. 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and evaluation of craft 
concepts, processes and materials as they relate to the development of aesthetic forms based 
on function. (6 hours activity) 

205B Beginning Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and evaluation of 
woodworking concepts and processes as they relate to the development of wood into aesthetic 
form based on function. (6 hours activity) 

207A,B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and Materials) (34) 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 107 A,B or the equivalents. An intensive study of traditional and contemporary 
methods and materials as they relate to current approaches in drawing and painting. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

213A,B Beginning Interior Design (34) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104 or equivalents, and Art 123B. An introduction to design theory and 
communication skills related to the interior design field. A — Emphasis on architectural terminol- 
ogy, plans and elevations, and graphic symbols. B — Emphasis on material analysis and lighting. 
(6 hours activity) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (34) 

Prerequisite: Art 104. An introductory course in sculpture with emphasis on the creative use of wood 
and metal, power equipment and hand tools. (6 hours activity) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (34) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A study of the history, design and use of letter forms including techniques for 
rough arwi comprehensive layouts and the use of both hand-lettered forms arnl handset type. 
(6 hours activity) 

247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B. An introductory course of all printmaking forms to include litho, etchir^g, 
woodcut and serigraphy. (6 hours activity) 

286 Design for the Theatre (3) 

(Same as Theatre 286) 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the Paleolithic to the period of late antiquity. 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the period of late antiquity through the Gothic. 

305A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205A. Study ar»d evaluation of craft corKepts, processes, arxf materials as they relate 
to the development of utilitarian arnJ aesthetic form. (9 hours laboratory) 

305B Advanced Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205B. A study and evaluation of craft coiKepts and processes as they relate to the 
development of wood into utilitarian and aesthetic form. (9 hours laboratory) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (34) 

Prerequisite: Art 106A,B. Further experiences in the study and evaluation of form as related to the 
creative use of ceramic corKepts and nuterials including design, forming, glazing, and firing. (6 
hours activity) 

307 A,B Drawing and Painting (34) 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 107 A,B. 207 A,B or equivalents. The study, evaluation ar>d creative use of the 
corKepts arnJ materials of drawing and painting with emphasis on individual exploration, growth, 
planning and craftsmanship. (9 hours laboratory) 

310A,B Drawing and Painting: Techniques ar>d Approaches for the Classroom Teacher 
(34) 

Prerequisite: Art 100. The study and development of painting arxJ drawing materials and approaches 
as they relate to elementary and secondary education. (6 hours activity) 

313A Environmental Design: Unit CorKepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 102, 103, 104 and 213. Environmental projects related to a study of unit concepts. 
(6 hours activity) 


446—12 4 306 


Art 109 


313B Environmental Design: Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 3A. Environmental projects exploring systems concepts as related to interior 
space. (6 hours activity) 

315A3 lewelry (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. Design and creation of 
jewelry. (9 hours laboratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 21 6A. (9 hours laboratory) 

317A,B Advanced Life Drawing (33) 

Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from the live model. (9 
hours laboratory) 

320 Paper: Structural and Decorative Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. An exploration of the structural and decorative aspects of construc- 
tion with paper, emphasizing three-dimensional design. Such techniques as papier mache, paper 
sculpture, paper folding and paper applique will be considered through a variety of paper 
surfaces. (6 hours activity) 

323A,B Graphic Design (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 223 A. Development and projection of ideas in relation to the technical, 
aesthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. (6 hours activity) 

325A,B Metalsmithing (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken cofKurrently. A study and evaluation of 
fundamental metalsmithing concepts, processes and materials as they relate to the aesthetic 
development of utilitarian forms, raising, silversoldering, forging, casting, engraving, chasing and 
repousse. (9 hours laboratory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (33) 

Development of basic ceramic technology into individual sculptural forms and techniques. (6 hours 
activity) 

327A,B Supergraphics (33) 

The design and production of environmental paintings. Team and individual projects. A variety of 
advanced technical means are employed. Studio and lecture. A historical survey of environmen- 
tal painting, concepts and techniques is irKluded. (6 hours activity) 

329A,B Art and Techrsology (33) 

Creative activity in the context of modern technology. (9 hours laboratory) 

330 Textile Design: Threads ar>d Fibers, Non-woven Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A or B, or consent of instructor. Concepts and processes of design 
as they relate to norvloomed structures, to include macrame, crochet, stitchery and knitting. (6 
hours activity) 

333A Environmental Design: Space ar>d Structure (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 21 3. Architecturally oriented projects to develop concepts of exterior-interior design 
and planning. (6 hours activity) 

333B Environmental Design: Space and Structure (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 333A. Architecturally oriented projects to develop experimental spaces and struc- 
tures. (6 hours activity) 

33bA,B Casting Techniques ar>d Theories of Cast Sculpture (33) 

Prerequisite: Art 316A. Projects in various waxing molding and metal casting techniques. Media with 
ernphasis on aluminum and bronze and the lost wax process. (9 hours laboratory) 

33BA Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. Exploration of the photographic media as a means of personal 
expression. Historical attitudes arxi processes are discussed in relationship to new materials and 
contemporary aesthetic trends. Field trips required. (9 hours laboratory) 

33SB Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 33BA. Further exploration of the photographic medium as a means of personal 
expression. Historical arxl new processes introduced as a vehicle toward the individual student's 
personal goal. Field trips required. (9 hours laboratory) 


449—12 4 320 


110 Art 


340 Ceramicf: Techniques for the Classroom Teacher (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 100. Beginning work in the creative use of hand building processes, and glazing of 
ceramic ware. Related information on decorating processes, drying and firing kilns as they apply 
to appropriate teaching levels. Historical development of ceramics as it relates to various cultures. 

341 Art of India (3) 

A study of the art of India and its impact on the cultures of Southeast Asia, with an emphasis on 
Buddhist and Hindu monuments. Schools of miniature painting and the art of Muslim India 
included. 

347A Printmaking — Etching (3) 

Prerequisites; Art 107A,B, 247, and 117. Development of concepts and exploration of materials 
involved in printmaking including etching, and aquatint. (9 hours laboratory) 

347 B Printmaking — Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 247, and 117. Development of corKepts and exploration of materials and 
techniques involved in lithography printing. (9 hours laboratory) 

355A,B Textile Design and Construction: Fabric Printing and Dyeing (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or B or consent of instructor. Concepts and processes of design as they 
relate to fabric surfaces with emphasis on various printing and dyeing techniques. (6 hours 
activity) 

360 Elementary School Crafts (2) 

Studio activities and techniques of crafts appropriate to the elementary school. Strongly recommend- 
ed for elementary teaching credential candidates. (4 hours activity) 

363A,B Illustration (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A,B and 117. Development and projection of ideas relative to the needs 
of story, book, and magazine, and film illustration. (6 hours activity) 

365A,B Textile Design and Construction: Weaving (33) 

Prerequisites; Art 103, 104 or 205 A, B or consent of instructor. CorKepts and processes of design as 
they relate to fabric construction with emphasis on the use of the loom and various weaving 
techniques. (6 hours activity) 

380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisites; Art 100 or equivalent. The study and evaluation of art concepts, materials, and 
processes as they relate to and promote child development. (6 hours activity) 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. Develop- 
ment of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts through lectures, 
readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance atterxiance. Emphasis on descriptive and 
evaluative skills in musk, art, theatre, dance and cinema critkism. 

411 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting and sculpture of the Realism, Impressionism, Post Impressionism periods. 

412 Art of the 20th Century — 1900 to Present (3) 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphks and architecture. 

421 Oriental Art: China (3) 

A study of the historical development of the arts of China arxf their relation to Chinese philosophy 
and culture. 

422 Oriental Art: fapan (3) 

A study of the historkal development of the arts of Japan and their relation to Japanese philosophy 
and culture. 

423 Film Animation (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107 A,B and 117. Aesthetk and technkal considerations of animation 
applied in the production of film. 

426A,B Glass Forming (33) 

Prerequisites: Art 106A,B. 306A, and consent of instructor. A course in the chemistry, handling and 
manipulation of glass and its related tools arxJ equipment for the ceramk artist. (6 hours activity) 

431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the RenaissarKe period. Leaures, discus- 
sion and field trips. 

432 Baroque and Rococo Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Baroque and Rococo period. Lectures, 
discussion and field trips. 


4S6— 12 4 3» 


Art 111 


441A,B Media Exploration for Teaching Art (34) 

Prerequisites; Art 103, 104, 107A,B, 205A or consent of instructor. Provides a wide range of oppor- 
tunities for exploring the art media used in secondary school art programs today. Deals with 
materials appropriate for secondary art curriculum. Offers creative investigation of two and three 
dimensional media in a variety of subject matter applications. 

443A,B Film Making (34) 

Development of film as a visual art form. 

451 Oceanic Art (3) 

An introductory survey of the styles of the aboriginal people of the following regions: Australia, 
Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Indonesia. 

452 Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3) 

An introduction by region and tribal group to the art forms of West Coastal Africa and the Sudan, 
Niger River kingdoms, Yoruba kingdoms, Cameroon chieftainships. Congo tribes. Central Africa 
and East Coastal Africa. 

453A,B Display aruJ Exhibition Design (2,2) 

A course in the appropriate and creative use of materials, processes, and design concepts as they 
relate to the special problems involved in the planning and preparing of displays, exhibits, bulletin 
boards, wall cases, and art portfolios. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

441 Art of North American Indian (3) 

An introduction to the art forms and style groupings of the following American Indian groups: Eskimo, 
Pacific Northwest, California, Eastern Woodlands, Mound Builders, Southwestern and Northern 
Mexico. 

442 Art of Metoamerica (3) 

An introduction to the art and architectural forms of Mesoamerka from the early, formative stages 
to the Spanish Cor>quest. 

471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

An introduction to the art styles and cultural regions of Central America and South America. 

4B1 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. (Opportunities for intensive study and evaluation in or>e area of 
art history and appreciation. 

4B3 Special Studies in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite; consent of imtructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the design areas listed below. 
Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 1 2 units, but no more than 3 units of credit 
may be obtair>ed in any one area in a sir>g)e semester. 

4B3a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B3b Environmental Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B3c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B3d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

4B3f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B4 Special Studies in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite; a minimum of six upper division units in ceramics. Course may be repeated to a 
maximum of 12 units, but not more than three unrts of credit may be obtained in any one area 
in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B5 Special Studies in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite; a minimum of six upper division units in designated area or consent of instructor. 
Opportunity for intensive study in the craft areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated 
to a maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one 
area in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

4B5a Jewelry 
4B5b General Crafts 
4B5c Metalsmithing 

4a5d Textile Design— Weaving, Threads and Fibers 
4B5e Textile Desigr>— Fabric Printing 


450—12 4 370 


112 Art 


486 Special Studies in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the following 
sculptural processes. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units 
of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

486a Modeling and Fabrication 
486b Casting 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and Printmaking (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units and consent of instructor. Opportunity for 
intensive study in the drawing and painting areas listed below. Each area listed may be repeated 
to a maximum of 1 2 units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one 
area in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 


487a 

Painting 

487b 

Life Drawing 

487c 

Drawing 

487d 

Printmaking 

488A,B 

Advanced Scene Design (3^) 


(Same as Theatre 488A,B) 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A,B. Advanced projects in photography as a means of personal expression. May 
be repeated to a maximum of 1 2 units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained 
in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

499 Independent Research (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in art with consent of department chairman and written consent of 
instructor May be repeated for credit. 

500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Selected advanced problems and issues in art. Emphasis is on intellectual clarification and verbal 
articulation of individual intent as an artist. Each student will develop oral and written material 
in support of his master's project. 

500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 5(X)A. Directed research in the area of major emphasis. Each student will develop 
oral and written material on historical backgrounds and developments in art as they relate to his 
intent as an artist (stated in Art S(X)A) and in support of his master's project. 

502 Seminar in Contemporary Art (3) 

Selected advanced problems and directed research in relation to the contemporary art form. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, development, and 
evaluation of individual projects in the design areas listed below. May be repeated to a maximum 
of 1 2 units in each area, but rx) more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one area 
in a single semester. 

503a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503b Environmental Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

503f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, development and 
evaluation of individual projects in ceramics. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no 
more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each 
unit) 


462—12 4 385 







Art 115 


505 Graduate Problems in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor, intensive study with emphasis on planning, development, and 
evaluation of individual projects in the crafts areas listed below. May be repeated to a maximum 
of 12 units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours 
activity for each unit) 

505a Jewelry 
505b General Crafts 
505c Metalsmithing 

505d Textile Desigrs— Weaving-Threads and Fibers 
505e Textile Design— Fabric Printing 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, development, and 
evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. May be repeated to a maximum of 1 2 units but 
no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for 
each unit) 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (1-3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper division drawing and painting. Intensive study with emphasis on 
planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in the drawing and painting areas 
listed below. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of credit 
may be obtained in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

507a Painting 
507b Life Drawing 
507c Drawing 
507d Printmaking 

597 Project (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and recommendation of the student's gradu- 
ate committee. Art 5006 may be taken corKurrently with Art 597 on approval of instructor. 
Development and presentation of a creative project in the area of corKentration beyond regularly 
offered coursework. 

596 Thesis (3-4) 

Prerequisites: Art S00A,B, written consent of instructor and recommerxiation of the student's gradu- 
ate committee. Art 500B may be taken corKurrently with Art 598 on approval of instructor. 
Development and presentation of a thesis in the area of corKentration beyond regularly offered 
coursework. No more than three units may be taken in any one semester. 

599 Indepersdent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in art with consent of department chairman and written consent of 
instructor. May be repeated for credit. ^ 


ART EDUCATION COURSES 

332 Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 41 1 or consent of instructor. Creative selection, organization and use of materials 
and tools in construction activities. IrKludes correlation experiences with the social studies, 
sciecKe, and other units of work. (4 hours activity) 

370A,B Art Activity (24) 

(Opportunities to observe, analyze, and evaluate child growth in and through creative art experi- 
ences. (4 hours activity) 

429A,B Arts and Crafts for Teaching Exceptioiul Children (24) 

Methods of using a variety of art materials and processes with emphasis on those experiences which 
meet the needs of retarded or handkapp^ children. (4 hours activity) 


466—12 4 406 


116 Dance 


442 Teaching Art In the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovis* 
ual instruction for teaching art in secondary schoolu. Required before student teaching of stu- 
dents presenting majors in art for the standard teaching credential. 

749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 

FACULTY IN DANCE 

FACULTY 
Frank Hatch 
Chairman 

Masami Kuni, Araminta Little, Miriam Tait 
PART-TIME 

William Couser, John Dougherty, Al Gilbert, Linda Hatch, Robert Regger, Joyce Ward 
The program of studies in dance provides studies and training in four major tracks related to the 
broad spectrum of the dance arts. They are: n>odern dance, entertainment dance forms, ballet, and 
ethnic dance forms. Each area of study consists of courses ranging from beginning to advanced levels 
of technique, composition, and theory leading to performarKe and production in the dance form. 
Corollary courses In dance history, criticism, aesthetics, production, and choreography as well as 
philosophy ar>d rr>ethodology courses in dance education are offered in support of the prirKiple 
tracks of study. In recognition of the fact that dancing must be performed, the Dance Faculty 
sponsors curricular performing groups. They are: Dance Repertory, Contemporary Ballet Ensemble, 
and University Folk Dancers. Every dance concentration major is required to enroll for at least one 
unit of performance each semester. 

Additional opportunities for darKe performarKe are available through DarKe Faculty sponsored and 
cosponsored dance concerts, operas, and musicals. 

The curriculum is desigr^d in accordance with the following three objectives: to prepare the student 
who wishes to enter dance as a profession, either in teaching, choreography, or performarKe; to 
provide for the general university student the opportunity for a personal involvement in darKe as 
an art form arnJ as a basic nf>ovefT>ent experierKe; to offer curricular experierKe in darKe for the 
student who is majoring in fields of study that are closely related to dance such as art, musk, physkal 
education and theatre. 

Whereas, no major in dance is offered in The California State University and Colleges, the Depart- 
ment of Theatre offers B.A. and M.A. degrees in theatre arts with areas of corKentration in dance 
which are designed to meet the requirements of educational arxi professional careers in dance. 


DANCE COURSES 

Dance concert attendance required for all courses listed. 

101 Introduction to Dance (2) 

Historical and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form, to provide student with bask knowledge 
and aesthetk values in ballet nx)dem darKe, educational darKe, theatrkal darKe as well as 
ethnic dance. Field trips. 

105 Eurythmics for Teachers (1) 

Designed to teach and develop the rhythmk sense and ability of the students with the method of 
Eurythmics by Jaques Dakroze and the rhythm-training method of Rudolf Bode. Recommerxied 
for students of dance, musk, theatre and art as well as education. (2 hours activity) 

125A,B Improvisation (24) 

Prerequisite: DarKe 1 25A is prerequisite for 1 25B. Theory arxJ practice of improvisation in nxwe- 
ment. The student will be taught to overcome inhibitions, to nrx>ve freely arxJ naturally arxl to 
improvise imaginatively in movement. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


478—11 4 439 


Dance 117 


135A,B Movement and Rhythm (2^) 

Prerequisite; Dance 135A is prerequisite for 135B. Designed to equip the student with higher kines- 
thetic arKi kinetic ability. Basic movement experierKe for dance, drama, art, music as well as the 
general student. (4 hours activity) 

140 Dance Activities (1) 

A physical activity experierKe in dance activities with a student in an educational setting and under 
the direction of an instructor who directs the activity to nr>eet the needs ar»d interests of the 
student. May be repeated for credit. 

210 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B. Designed not only for the student who is going to teach children how 
to create dance, but also for the student who is going to be a dance creator. Basic dance subjects 
in relation to the growth of children from 5 to 1 7 years of age. How to make a dance motif and 
how to compose simple dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

221A,B Fundamentals of Classical Ballet (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Dance 140 or consent of instructor. Fundamental structure and technique of classic 
ballet, based on R.A.D. method. Designed for students who aim to be professional performers 
or choreographers on stage, film and television. (4 hours activity) 

227A,B Space Forming in Dance (34) 

Prerequisite. Dance 135A,B. 227A is prerequisite for 227B. Theory of space and principle of space 
forming to train students to understand spacial movement, so that they can master movement 
on stage, suge design and the basic skills of choreography. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 
245 A,B Mime and Pantomir>e (24) 

Prerequisite: 245A is prerequisite for 245B. Theory and practice of mime and pantomime for drama, 
dance and education (expression and gesture). Historical and contemporary knowledge and 
techniques with emphasis on individual development of creative skill in mime and pantomime. 
(4 hours activity) 

255 |azz Dance (2) 

Prerequisite; Dance 101 and 135A,B. Designed to the basic rhythm of jazz and to equip the students 
with the technique of classic and modern jazz dances. (4 hours activity) 

311A,B Elementf and Forms of Dance Composition (34) 

Prerequisites; Dance 135A,B and 227A,B. BasK forms and elements of dance composition. Dances 
in which these rules must be applied will be composed by the student. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

331A,B Character Dance for Theatre (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B or consent of instructor. Basic Character Dances such as Mazurka, 
Czardas, Friska, Polonaise, Fandango, Tarantella, along with the Court Dances such as Minuet 
and Calliard. Designed for students who aim to be professional performers or choreographers, 
as well as for actors and directors of theatre. (4 hours activity) 

335 Afro-American DarKe (3) 

Study of primitive ar>d tribal rhythm including jazz and other derivational dances of Africa. ( 1 hour 
lecture, 4 hours activity) (Same as PE 335 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 314) 

35B Philosophy and Methodology of Educational Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 125A,B and 31 1 A,B or cortsent of instructor. A short history of dance education; 
principles and objectives of modern educational dance and the methodology to meet these 
objectives; prirKi(^ and structure of curriculum for educational darKe. 

374A,B Dance Theatre and Production (34) 

Prerequisite: Dance 135A,B arxf 227 A,B or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of creative and 
expressive movement in relation to the theatre and dance production. 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or cor>sent of instructor. Develop- 
ment of criteria arxl vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts through lectures, 
readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance anendance. Emphasis on descriptive evalua- 
tive skills in musk, art, theatre, dance and cinema critkism. 

437 Musk for Dance (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 374 A, B or consent of instructor. Desigr>ed to give knowledge and technique 
of accompanying dance, (irKluding electronk musk) and to give knowledge and understanding 
of the structure arni rhythm of dance and its relation to musk for musk students who are 
interested in composing musk for dance. 


an— 12 4 460 


118 Music 


441 Seminar in Ethnic Dance as Culture Phenomena (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the mutual influence and relation between the religion, 
living form, habits and economical-political-geographical environment and dance form (includ- 
ing music and costume) of the major ethnic groups of the world. 

450 Creative Dance for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 135A,B and 358, or consent of instructor. Study and analysis of creative dance 
and its relation to dance education in elementary and secondary schools. Recommended for 
students of dance, theatre, musk and art as well as practicing teachers. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

474 Special Studies in Dance Theatre PerformarKe (Dance Repertory) (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 374A,B or equivalent and consent of instructor. Opportunity for intensive study 
in theory and practice in dance theatre and production. May be repeated to a maximum of eight 
units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (More than 
3 hours production per unit) 

476A,B History of Dance (3^) 

History of darKe from primitive times to the present. Covers development of dance in Europe, the 
Orient, Asia, America (irKluding American Indian) in its general relation to culture history. 

477 Dance Aesthetks (3) 

Prerequisites: Dance 101 and 374A,B and/or consent of instructor. Philosophkal as well as theoreti- 
cal knowledge of dance as an art form. A study of the processes of dance creation, movement 
and image; the problems of musk accompaniment in dance, artd dance as an art form of 
metaphysical beauty. 

482 Ethnic Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced preparation and/or experierKe in dance or consent of instructor. Theoretical 
and practical study of folk, square and social forms of dance in terms of cultural and environmen- 
tal influences (includes geography, music, costumes, customs. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 
(Same as PE 482) 

484 Contemporary Dance Technique (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 140, Dance USA or equivalent. Study of theories, approaches, and techniques of 
contemporary dancers. Emphasis Is on development of individual technique in dance. (6 hours 
activity) (Same as PE 484) 

486 Choreography (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 140, DarKe USA or equivalent. Theoretical and creative aspects of choreography. 
Application and analysis of elements of choreographk form. Composition of solo and group 
dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) (Same as PE 486) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Directed reading, reports, creation and performarKe according to predetermined arrangements with 
instructor and department chairman. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

FACULTY 

Leo Kreter 

Department Chairman 

David Berfield, Carole Chadwkk, Andrew Charlton, Eugene Corporon, M'lou Dielzer, John Farrer, 
Rita Fuszek, Kenneth Goldsmith, J. Justin Cray,* Burton Karson, Terry King, Joseph Landon, Cary 
Maas, Donal Mkhalsky, Benton Minor, Jane Paul, Lloyd Rodgers, Patrkia Roycroft, Robert Ste- 
wart, Howard Swan, David Thorsen, Rodger Vaughan 

PART-TIME 

Kalman Bloch (Clarinet), Lynwood Bronson (Piano), Dorothy Evinger (Musk Education), Bonnie 
Farrer (Theory/ Piano), Pamela Goldsmith (Viola /History), Jay Crauer (String Bass), Susan 
Greenberg (Flute). David Crimes (Guitar/Literature), Su Harmon (Vokc), Cornel Imry (Guitar), 
John Johnson (TuIm), Mkhael Kurkjian (Voke), Todd Miller (French Horn /Percussion), Frede- 
rkk Moritz (Bassoon), Donald Muggeridge (Oboe), William Nkholls (Trombone), JoAnne 
Ritacca (Accompanying), Leona Roberts (Voke), Charles Shaffer (Organ), James Sump (Trum- 
pet), Earle Voorhies (Piano), Paul Woltz (Bassoon), Brett Watson (Choral) 

* Univvnity oMiccr 


482^12 4 489 


Music 119 


The Department of Music offers courses in music for both majors ar>d non-majors. The fundamental 
purpose of the music major curriculum leading toward the baccalaureate degree is to provide the 
necessary training in each of the related aspects of music such as its history and literature, theoretical 
studies, and musical performance. Such a program of studies is based on the need to provide serious 
students with a core curriculum which will prepare the individual in such areas as (a) the knowledge 
of the history and relationships of music as an art form, (b) a comprehensive and analytical 
understanding of musical literature, (c) a working knowledge of music theory and structure, (d) 
a high degree of competence in a performing field, and (e) a specialization within the major. 

The music program is designed to educate; 

1 . Students in general, in terms of composite mifxxs, music minors, or broad offerings in the 
humanities or liberal arts. 

2. Students preparing to teach in the elementary or secondary schools, or at the college level, 
with a major emphasis in music. 

3. Students other than music majors preparing to teach as classroom teachers in the elementary 
schools. 

4. Students seeking undergraduate preparation for other vocations in music, normally requiring 
advanced training. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. Proficiency examinations in basic piano, voice, theory, literature and performance will be 
given to all musk majors at the time of entrarnie to the university. Demonstrable proficierKy 
in the piano and voke placement examinations will satisfy the requirement in piano and voice 
proficiency (see 5d and 7 following). Students defkient in any of the above areas will be 
advised to take additional work. 

2. Music majors will be expected to declare a principal performance area with the approval of 
the faculty adviser. It will be expected that each student will demonstrate satisfactory progress 
within this principal performance area, culminating in the successful presentation of a senior 
recital before he may be approved for graduation. In exceptional cases, ar>d with the written 
approval of the coordinator of the principal performance area, a student may petrtion to fulfill 
the recital requirement by conducting, composition, lecture, or any combination of these with 
performance. In the vocal area, the director of choral activities must also approve the petition. 

3. All musk majors are required to partkipate in a major performance group (band, orchestra, 
opera or chorus) each semester of the regular school year (minimum; B.A. six semesters, B.M. 
eight semesters). Students who declare wind or percussion as their principal performance 
area must register for band (and/or orchestra, if designated by the instrumental coordinator); 
string majors must register for orchestra; and voke majors must register for chorus (or opera 
if designated by the choral-vocal coordinator) . A musk major whose principal performance 
area is piano, organ, or guitar shall be assigned to an appropriate performance group by his 
faculty adviser. 

4. All musk majors whose principal performance area is an orchestral instrurT>ent or piano are 
expected to take part in small ensembles for a minimum of two semesters, except for students 
enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts degree— Musk Education (Dption. 

5. The principal performance area for the major in musk requires work in applied music, as 
follows; 

a. PiarK), voke arxi instrumental majors must conH>lete a minimum of eight semesters 
(six semesters BA.) of applied musk in the principal performance area. 

b. A student pursuing the B.M. (Composition) or the B.A (Musk History and Theory 
option) must conH>lete six units of applied musk in a principal performance area. 
If he attair>s the 300-level of competency before completing the maximum of six 
units allotted for this study, he may use the remainder of these units as music 
electives. A musk history and theory major may elect additional units in applied 
musk only upon the recommerxlation of his adviser and the coordinator in his area 
of performance, and with the approval of the coordinator of applied music. The 
composition major must also complete six units of applied composition culminating 
in the successful presentation of a senior recital of his own compositions. 

c. A student pursuing the B.M. (Instrun>ental, Piano or Voke Specializations) may not 
receive double lessons (two units) for more than three semesters at any given jury 


4flrr— 12 4 510 


120 Music 

level. Specific information about jury level criteria is available in the Music Depart- 
ment office. 

d. Ail music majors must pass the piano proficiency examination before being ap- 
proved for graduation. This requirement may also be satisfied by successful comple- 
tion of Mu 282B. 

e. In order to receive state-funded lessons in applied music, an undergraduate student 
must be enrolled for a minimum of six units, two of which must be in an academic 
area of music (any courses other than performing ensembles and applied music), 
and he must be making satisfactory progress toward a degree. If courses are dropped 
during the semester reducing his enrollment below the six-unit minimum, state- 
funded lessons will be withheld In a subsequent semester of enrollment. 

6. Senior transfer students entering Cal State Fullerton with a major in music, or graduate students 
in music entering to complete credential requirements are expected to complete a minimum 
of one semester of successful upper division work in musk before they may be approved for 
directed teaching. Required courses and competencies expected of all the university musk 
majors must be satisfied before endorsement by the faculty committee for acceptance In the 
credential program. 

7. All credential candidates are required to pass functional examinations in piano and voke (in 
addition to the piano proficiency described in 5d above) before being approved for admit- 
tance to teacher education. This requirement may also be satisfied by successful completion 
of Mu 282B and 283. 

8. All music majors will be expected to atter>d a weekly departmental recital hour in conjunction 
with their study of applied musk. 

9. A music major must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average in major field coursework at this 
institution in order to be approved for graduation. 

10. Any exception to a departmental requirement must be nwide by petition to the chairman. 

MUSIC DECREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Musk offers a variety of courses and programs leading to baccalaureate and 
graduate degrees in teaching and the professions. The baccalaureate degree may be earmed in two 
degree patterns. Within these patterns, a student will normally pursue an emphasis in applied musk, 
composition, music education, or musk history and theory. Options in piano pedagogy and elective 
studies have been prepared by the Department of Musk and the proposals for these optior>s are 
urxier consideration by the CharKellor's Office. Hopefully, these options will be approved for 
implementation by September, 1973. The piano pedagogy option is designed to prepare the student 
for a career as a private teacher of piano, and the elective studies option is designed to provide 
considerable latitude in the study of musk and is non>vocational in orientation. Specific information 
about these programs is available from the Musk Department office. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts in Musk shall consist of no fewer than 55 units, of whkh at least 29 shall be 
in the upper division. 

Bask Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Units 

Musk theory (Mu inA.B, 211) 9 

Musk literature (Mu 251) 3 

•Applied techniques (Ensemble 4 . Principal Performar>ce Area 4 ) _8 

20 


Musk History and Theory Option 

This is designed as a balanced program in musk history and theory providing suitable preparation 
for advarKed degrees in theory, literature or muskology and bask preparation for advanced study 
in other fields, such as muskal acoustks, musk therapy, ethnomuskology, library scierKe in musk 
and musk in irnfustry and recreation. 

* S«« Sb under Requwemenb of the Oepertment of Mueic. pofe 119. 


la—ia 4 530 


Music 


121 


Units 


Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 20 

Music theory (Mu 316, 321A,B, and 320A or 320B or 3210 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 A, 352A,B, 498, 499) 11 

•Applied techniques (Ensemble 2, PrirKipal PerformarKe Area 2) 4 

Corxlucting and composition (Mu 391 A or 392A and 391 B or 392B or 422A) 4 

Elective courses in music history, theory, and literature _7 

55 


Allied Requirenrients: 

1. An academic minor (20 units) with approval of the facuKy adviser 

2. Foreign language, preferably German, to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level, 

b. a pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 

or 

c. completion of the second semester of the beginning university course in foreign 

language. 

Music Education Option 

This is designed to provide in-depth preparation for teaching in the public schools under the 
provisions of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act). 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 

Music theory (Mu 320, 321 A) - - - 

Music history and literature (Mu 351A,B) - 

Applied techniques (Ensemble 3, Principal Performance 2) 

Specialization in the major - - 

Voice-Choral Specialization: 

Mu 281 (4), Mu 354 ( 2), Mu 390 (2), Mu 391 A,B (4), Mu 316 (2), Mu 361d (1), Mu 
457 (2), Mu 453 (2), Electives (2) 

Instrumental Specialization: 

Mu 362F (1), Mu 392A,B (3), Mu 281 (6), Mu 323A (2), Mu 422A (2), Mu 353 (2), 

Mu 316 (2), Mu 371 or 471 (1) 

General Music Specialization: 

Mu 281 (4), Mu 333 (3), Mu Ed 435 (3), Mu 391 A (2), Mu 392A (1), Mu 362F (1), 

Mu 381B (2), Mu Ed 441 (2), Electives (1) 

Total - 

(Mu 299 and 399— Clinical Practice— are recommended as a corollary to Mu 271, 281 
and/or Mu 391, 392) 

General Education.^ — — - — . 

Professional Education 

Mu Ed 442 (3)— professional education courses 

Student teaching, full-time 

Grand Total — 

CompetefKTy examinalKXis are required for the degree and credential: 

Prior to Junior Level: 

History and literature 
Theory 

Prior to Student Teaching: 

Keyboard furKtional 
Voice functional 
Senior reciul 


Units 

20 

5 

6 
5 

19 


55 

45 

12 

J2 

124 


122 Music 


Multiple Subfect Instruction — Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in the elementary 
schools in multiple subject classrooms: 

Units 


Art 380 3 

Mu 333 3 

Theatre 402 3 


9 

The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any student who wishes 
to expand his knowledge in any or all of the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, 320, 330, 340, and 380 
Dance 101, 125A,B, 140, 210, 221 A,B, 227A,B, 245A,B, 311A,B, 331 A,B, 477 
Mu 100, 101, 111A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281A,C,E,C, 283A, 381 B, Mu Ed 435 
Theatre 100A,B, 211, 263A, 278A, 277, 370A,B, 402, 403, 41 1C 


BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This degree program is for the development of persons specializing in performance and applied 
music techniques.* 

The music major, professional degree program, shall consist of no fewer than 70 semester units, of 
which at least 32 shall be in the upper division. 


Units 

13 

6 

2 

4 

_1 

26 


Composition Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 

Music theory (Mu 318, 320A,B, 321A and 321B or C, 323A) 

Music history and literature (Mu 352A,B) 

••Principal performance area 

Applied composition 

Major performance ensemble 

Electives in music 

70 


26 

7 

3-6 

11 

4 

4 

6 

6-9 

70 


Keyboard Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 26 

Music theory (Mu 320A or B, 321A) 5 


*Tht$ profTAm can prepare the student for a leachins career as a music specialist in the pubKc elementary or secondary schools of 
CaMomia. For cornplete prof essi o n al education requirements, see School of Education seeborv Students must complete Mu Ed 
442 before admission to student teiachint. 

**See 5b under Requirements of the Department of Music pape 119. 


Instrumental Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 

Musk theory (Mu 320A or B, 321A, 323A) 

Musk history and literature (351 B or 352A,B) 

Principal performance area .... ..... 

Major pedormance ensemble 

Conducting (392A,B, 362F) 

Chamber musk 

Electives in musk 


26 

13 

6 

4 

5 
4 

12 


Basic Requirements for the Bachelor of Music 

Music theory (Mu 111A,B, 211, 316, 422A) 

Music history and literature (Mu 251, 351 A) 

Principal performance area (Mu 171) 

Major performance ensemble 

Senior recital (Mu 498) 


is 4 575 


Music 1 23 


Units 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 454A,B) 7-10 

Principal performance area 11 

Chamber music 3 

Accompanying 1 

Pedajgogy (Mu 372 or 373, 467A,B) 5 

Electives in music 9-12 

70 

Voice Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 26 

Music theory (Mu 320A or B, 321 A) 5 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 456, 457A,B) 10-13 

Principal performance area 1 1 

Major performance ensemble (2 units minimum in Mu 361 d) 4 

Diction (Mu 390A,B,C) 3 

Conducting 2 

Pedagogy 2 

Electives in music 

70 


Allied requirement: 

Two foreign languages, each to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level, or 

b. A pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completion of the secorxJ semester of the beginning university course in foreign language. 

Minor in Music 

The minor in music may be used as an appropriate area of study by persons whose majors are in 
other fields, or may be used to satisfy minor field requirements for elementary or secortdary teaching 
credentials. A maximum of 12 units from the lower division may be included in work counted toward 
the music minor. The music minor requires a minimum preparation of 20 units. 

Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division Units 

Theory of nnjsic (selected from Mu 101, 1 1 1 A,B, 21 1 or any 300- or 400-level theory 

classes for which student is qualified) 6 

Music history and literature (Mu 100, 251, 350 or courses at the 400- or 500-level for 

which student is qualified) - 5-6 

Applied techniques (including ensemble, conducting, piano or voice, orchestral instru- 
ments, and principal instrument or voice) B-9 

Total - ^ 

Note: Students expecting to use the minor for teaching must complete four unrts of Mu 281 a-d 
and/or Mu 381 A.B Orchestral Instrumems, and a minimum of two unrts in an ensemble appropri- 
ate to their area of specialization. 

Master of Arts in Musk 

The program of studies leading to the Master of Aru in Musk provides advanced studies in breadth 
as well as in an area of graduate specialization. The program is further intended to provide advanced 
coursework with a suitable balance in such musk studies as theory, composition, history, literature 
and advanced applied techniques and musk education. There are suitable graduate specializations 
in the areas of history and literature and performance. 

The Master of Arts in Musk is especially designed for teachers and supervisors of musk; persons 
intef>ding to specialize in applied fields in the pursuit of occupatiorul goals; individuals preparing 
for college teaching; and persons internfing to pursue advanced degrees beyorxJ the master's level. 

Prerequisites 

The student nmist have a baccalaureate degree with a major in nnjsk (or the equivalent of a major, 
i.e., 24 upper division units in nrnisk). Opportunity is given the student to remove deficiencies by 


SOS-12 4 SOS 


124 


Music 


taking certain prescribed courses. Such courses cannot be applied to the master's degree program. 
The student must also take the aptitude and advanced music tests of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion and pass the graduate music placement-proficiency examinations. 

Study Plan 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study, no more than nine of which shall be outside 
the field of music, and at least 1 5 of which must be in 500-level courses in the major. The student 
will take Mu 500 (Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music, 2 units) within the first nine units 
included on the study plan in his program. The degree program offers two options: Option I in 
History and Literature, or Option II in Performance. A thesis or project is required in both options. 
In addition, in Option I the program will include at least six units of study outside the field of music, 
but supportive to the program. Each program is individually designed in conference with the adviser. 
For further information, consult the Department of Music. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


MUSIC COURSES 

100 Introduction to Music (3) 

A basic approach to listening to music with understanding and pleasure through a general survey 
of musical literature representative of various styles arnJ performance media. Music will be 
related to other arts through lectures, recordings, and concerts. Closed to music majors. 

101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Basic theory and practical applications to further understanding of basic music principles and to 
improve music performance and listening skills. Includes sightsinging and relationship to key- 
board and simple melodic instruments. Closed to music majors. 

111A,B Music Theory (34) 

A year course covering diatonic harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and intervals, triads and 
their inversions, harrrx>nizations, nonharmonic tones, modulation and dominant seventh chords. 
Practical applications, to include sightsinging, dictation and keyboard harnnonizations. (2 hours 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

171, 271, 371, 471 IruJividual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual study with approved instructor with emphasis on 
technique and repertoire. Musk majors must register for a minimum of one unit per semester. 
Performance majors approved by jury recommerxJation should register for two units per serr>es- 
ter. jury examination required. May be repeated for credit. 

172 Piano Class for Piano Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Group instruction in bask pianistic technique and repertoire. 
May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

173 Voice Class for Voice Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placerrtent by coordir^ator. Group instruction in bask vocal technique and repertoire. 
May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

182A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) 

Fundamentals of keyboard technique for students whose major performance instrument is not piano. 
(2 hours activity) 

1B3 Voice Class for Non-majors (1) 

Beginning and elementary techniques in singing for the non-musk major. May be repeated for credit. 
(2 hours activity) 

1B4A,B Piano Class for Non-Majors (1,1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101. Beginning and elementary instruction in bask piano techniques for the rK>n- 
music major. (2 hours activity) 

199 Clinical Practke in Major Performance (1) 

Observation, experimentation, clinkal practke of instrumental and/or choral musk in applied field 
situations, as in pubik and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 361 recommerxled. (2 hours 
activity) 


S2S-12 s 7S 


Music 125 


211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 1 1 1 B. Continuation of Mu 1 1 1 A,B with emphasis on the chromatic practice of the 
19th century. Includes secondary dominants; ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords; sequence, 
and chromatically altered chords. Practical applications to irKlude sightsinging, melodic and 
harmonic dictation, and keyboard practice. Required of all music majors. (2 hours lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

251 Survey of Musical Literature (3) 

An introductory course required of majors in the study of the literature of music in Western 
civilization. Open to minors and qualified students by consent of instructor. Students should be 
able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, design and style. (3 hours lecture) 

281a-g Orchestral Instruments (1) 

Mu 281a,c,e, and g are required of all music credential candidates. Instrumental music candidates 
are required to take two additional units selected from Mu 281b, d, or f. (2 hours activity) 

281a String Instruments (1) 

Specialization on violin and viola. Violin and viola majors substitute Mu 281b for this course. 

281b String Instruments (1) 

Specialization on cello and string bass. Cello and bass majors are exempt. 

281c 8rass Instruments (1) 

Specialization on trumpet and French horn. Trumpet and French horn majors substitute 281 d for 
this course. 

281d Brass Instruments (1) 

Specialization on trombone, baritone and tuba. Trombone and tuba majors are exempt. 

281e Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Specialization on clarinet and flute. Secondary emphasis on saxophone. Clarinet and flute majors 
substitute 281 f for this course. 

281f Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Specialization on oboe and bassoon. Oboe and bassoon majors are exempt. 

281g Percussion Instruments (1) 

Specialization on the snare drum and mallet-played instruments with related work on other 
standard percussion instruments. Special consideration given to typical problems encountered 
with percussion in the public schools. Percussion majors are exempt. 

282A,B Piano Class for Musk Majors (1,1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 182B or placement by instructor. Osigned to meet music major minimum piano 
proficiency requirements for degree. Fundamentals of keyboard technique for students whose 
major performance field is not piarK>. Not required for keyboard majors. (2 hours activity) 

283 Voice Class (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Recommended for credential candidates. Not required for 
voice majors. (2 hours activity) 

299 Clinical Practice in Instrumental and Vocal Techniques (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of instrumenul and vocal techniques classes, as in public and 
private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 271 or Mu 281 recommended. (2 hours activity) 

300 Music of Today (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or 101, or consent of instructor. CorKentration on the musical trends of the 
last two decades. The emphasis will be on western art musk, but recent developments in jazz, 
rock, and folk idioms will also be discussed. 

301 Advanced Theory for Non-Majors (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 . Further study in musk theory beyond Mu 101 . Study of traditional and current 
techniques with emphasis on original composition. Includes sightsinging and keyboard applica- 
tions. Not open to musk majors for credit. 

316 16th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 21 1 or consent of instructor. Sixteenth-century counterpoint in two, three and four 
parts, covering motet, carxKi, double counterpoint. Required of all musk majors pursuing the 
B.M. degree. 

318 18th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 316 or consem of instructor. Eighteenth-century counterpoint in two, three and four 
parts, covering invention, canon, double and triple counterpoint and fugue. 


53^-12 5 100 


126 Music 


320A,B 20th-Century Techniques (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 21 1 . A survey of the compositional practices of the 20th century with emphasis on 
written examples in the various styles. Practical applications to include sightsinging, keyboard 
practice, and dictation. A — Compositional techniques from 1890 to 1945. Required of all music 
majors. B — Compositional techniques since 1945, to include limited experience with the synthe- 
sis of sound. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

321A,B,C Form and Analysis (3,2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. A — Analysis of structural elements of music such as 
motive, phrase, and period; binary, ternary, rondo, sonato allegro and larger musical forms in 
representative musical works. Required of all music majors. B — Continuation of A, with emphasis 
on larger musical works. C — Continuation of A and B with emphasis on literature of the 20th 
century. 

323A,B Orchestration (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 320, 321 A or consent of instructor. Writing and analysis of orchestral music. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 or equivalent or successful completion of proficiency test. Study of the relation- 
ship of music to child growth and development, with emphasis on the child from 5 to 12. 

341 Survey of the Symphony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of the history and literature of symphonic 
music from the 18th through the 20th centuries, with special emphasis on the relationships 
between musical composition and the general artistic temper of historical periods. For non-music 
majors only. 

342 Survey of the Concerto (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 1(X) or consent of instructor. A study of the history and literature of the concerto 
from the 1 7th century to the present. The nature of the soloist and the social display of virtuosity 
will be considered. For non-music majors only. 

343 Survey of Choral Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of choral musk through the ages, from 
Gregorian Chant to contemporary forms, corKentrating on choral works of the great composers 
of the Baroque, Classical and Ron>antic eras. For non-musk majors only. 

350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 1(X) or consent of instructor. Designed to increase interest and an understanding 
of music in its relation to our ger>eral culture. A sociologkal approach whkh includes muskal 
critkism and journalism, concert life, audierKe psychology, and the political /religious /business 
aspects of the American muskal scene. 

351A,B History and Literature of Music (34) 

Prerequisite: Mu 251 . A— A study of the history and literature of musk from early Creek beginnings 
through the Renaissance. B — A study of the history and literature of musk covering the Baroque, 
Classic, Romantk period and the 2()th century. Required of all musk nujors. 

352A,B History and Literature of Musk from 1600 to the Present (34) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 and 251, or consent of instructor. A — Historical arxl stylistk study in the 
Baroque and Classk periods. B — Historkal and stylistk study in the Romantk period and 20lh 
century. May be used to replace 351 B. If used to fulfill musk history requirements, both A and 
B sections of Mu 352 must be completed. This course is recomn^ended to all musk majors who 
intend to continue musk study at the graduate level. 

353 Survey of Instrumental Musk Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392A. Through examination and analysis of multiple examples of the repertory, this 
course is designed to develop skills in the practkal use of instrumental literature for performance 
in secondary schools and community colleges. 

354 Survey of Public School Choral Musk Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391 A. Thorough examination and analysis of multiple examples of choral repertoire 
suitable for junior and senior high choruses. 

361a-g Major Performance Ensemble (1) 

The study arid performarKe of starxiard and contemporary musk literature. Pubik corKerts on 
campus and in the community are irKluded in the scheduled activities each semester and 
partkipation is required. A cofKert tour may be included by some groups. (More than 3 hours 
major production.) May be repeated for credit. 


537— la 5 i» 


Music 1 27 


361a Symphony Orchestra (1) 

Open to all university students and qualified adults in the community by audition or consent of 
instructor. 

361b University Choir (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. 

361c University Concert Band (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. 

361d Opera Theatre (1) 

Study of roles and representative excerpts from standard and contemporary operas and the basic 
musical, dramatic and language techniques of the musical theatre. Performance of operatic 
excerpts and complete operas. 

361e University Singers (1) 

Membership restricted to advanced voice students or those accepted by audition 

361f University Wind Ensemble (1) 

Membership restricted to advanced wind and percussion students or those accepted by audition. 

361g University Chorale (1) 

Open to upper division and graduate students with consent of instructor. Audition necessary. 
362A Wind EnsembleHazz Ensemble (1) 

Open to qualified students by audition or consent of instructor. Public performances on campus and 
in the community are scheduled each semester. 

362B Wind Ensemble — Varsity Band (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. Varsity Band provides music for Titan 
football and basketball home games. CorKurrent enrollment in Mu 361c is recommended. 
362C Vocal Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of choral literature of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Open only to 
students by audition. Public performance required. (2 hours activity) 

3620 Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Study and performarKe of music written for the Percussion Ensemble. Open to any qualified student 
with consent of instructor. (2 hours activity) 

362E Brass Ensemble (1) 

The study and performarKe of musk written for large brass choir/er>semble. Open to any qualified 
student with consent of irtstructor. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

362P CofKJucting Laboratory Ensemble — Instrumental (1) 

A non-performing ensemble composed of orchestral instruments (strings, woodwinds, brass, and 
percussion) whkh furKtior>s as a laboratory ensemble for instrumental conducting students. 
Literature covered is of limited diffKulty. Required of students enrolled in Mu 392A, open to all 
students. (2 hours activity) 

363 Chamber Music Ensembles (1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string, or keyboard students. Various ensembles will be formed to study, 
read, and to perform representative chamber literature of all periods. (2 hours activity) 

372 Harpsichord Class for Musk Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 3(X>-jury level in piano or organ or consent of instructor. The study of the harpischord 
as an instrument, the appikation of Baroque stylistk characteristks, and training in the rudiments 
of continuo playing in ensemble with vokes and instruments. (2 hours activity) 

373 Organ Class for Musk Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano. The study of the organ as an instrumem, the playing techniques, 
ar>d repertoire. Instruction will include the differerKes between piar>o and organ techniques. (2 
hours activity) 

3B1A Survey of Orchestral Instruments (2) 

A ger>eral survey of orchestral instrurnemal practkes. (4 hours activity) 

3S1B Survey of Recreational Instruments (2) 

A general survey of recreational instrument practkes for credential candidates. (4 hours activity) 
3B5 Keyboard Sight-reading (2) 

Prerequisite: 200-jury level in piano or organ or consent of instructor. Analysis of sight-reading skills 
and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read solo, ensemble, and scores without 
hesitation at first sight. (4 hours activity) 


Ml— 12 S 140 


128 Music 


386 Piano Accompanying (1) 

Prerequisite: by audition only. The study and performance of piano accompaniments for instrumen- 
talists, vocalists, and ensembles. Participation in rehearsals, recitals, and concerts required. (2 
hours activity) 

387 Church Service Playing (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. Transposition and improvisation of interludes and 
playing of hymns, chants and accompaniments. Includes characteristics of services of various 
denominations and a survey of suitable organ literature. Can be repeated for credit. 

390A,B,C Diction for Singers (1,1,1) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Study of proper singing diction; may not 
be considered a substitute for formal language study. Examples from standard vocal literature 
explained through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. A — Italian, English. B — Ger- 
man. C — French. 

3S1A,B Choral Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: one semester of voice class or consent of instructor. A — Principles, techniques, and 
methods of conducting choral groups. Required of all music education majors. (4 hours activity) 
B — Continuation of 391 A including laboratory work with class and vocal ensembles, using 
standard choral repertoire. (4 hours activity) 

392A,B Instrumental Conducting (1,2) 

Prerequisite: two courses from 281 a-g or consent of instructor. A— Principles, techniques, and 
methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. Required of all music education majors. (2 
hours activity) B — Continuation of 392A, including laboratory experience in conducting instru- 
mental groups, using standard instrumental literature. (4 hours activity) 

399 Clinical Practice in Conducting (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of concepts, materials, and procedures as applied to field 
situations, as in public and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 391 A or 392A recommef>ded. 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. Develop- 
ment of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts through lectures, 
readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. Emphasis on descriptive and 
evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, dance and cinema criticism. 

422A,B Composition (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 316, 320 and 321 A or consent of instructor. A — Ear-training analysis of smaller 
forms, simple composition of two- and three-part song form styles. B — Analysis and writing of 
nwe complex musical forms. 

450 History and Literature of Instrumental Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. The development of instruments and irtstrumental 
forms from the Middle Ages to the present, with emphasis on the analysis of compositiortal 
techniques and stylistic development. (3 hours lecture and discussion, 1 hour listening) 

451 History and Literature of Vocal Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. A study of solo and ensemble vocal literature, 
including opera, from the Middle Ages to the present, with emphasis on the analysis of composi- 
tional and vocal techniques and stylistic developnr>ent. (3 hours lecture and discussion, 1 hour 
listening) 

453A,B Choral Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 391 A or equivalent and 351 A,B. A — The study of choral literature from the 
M^ieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras analyzed in historical perspective. Appropriate per- 
formance practices will be examined. B — Continuation of A with representative examples from 
the Classic, Romantic and Contemporary eras. 

454A,B Piano Literature and Interpretation (24) 

Prerequisite: 351 A,B and junior level piano standing or consent of instructor. Study and performance 
of representative styles and schools of piano literature, with particular reference to solo arxi 
ensemble repertoire. A — CorKentration on contrapuntal forms, sonatas, and variations. •— 
Concentration on coocerti, character pieces, fantasies, suites, and etudes. 

455 Instrumental Chamber Literature ar>d Interpretation (3) 

Open to all music majors, or to nor>-majors by consent of instructor. Members of the class will be 
grouped into ensembles for defnonstration purposes. Emphasts will be placed on the stylistic 
differences required in performing works of all periods. 


547—12 5 170 


Music 1 29 


456 Opera Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Study of all periods and nationalities, including 
stylistic and historical connotations. 

457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390B or consent of instructor. Study and performance of German Lieder with 
representative examples of periods and styles. 

457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390A or consent of instructor. Study and performance of Italian, French, Russian, 
English and American art songs, with representative examples of periods and styles. 

458 Collegium Musicum Practicum (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. The study and performarKe of rare and old music, 
both instrumental and vocal. Techniques of musical research will be applied. Students should 
be competent performers. 

459 Guitar Literature, Interpretation and Pedagogy (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in guitar, or consent of instructor. A survey of the literature available to 
guitarists. Includes works for lute, vihuela, and Baroque guitar as well as the compositions and 
transcriptions for the nrxxiern guitar. An introduction to materials and methods essential for the 
guitar instructor. 

460. Interpretation of Early Music (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in principal performance area. A survey of the various stylistic interpreta- 
tions of vocal and instrumental literature from the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Designed for 
the senior or graduate student majoring in performance. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

467 A,B Piano Pedagogy (2,2) 

Prerequisite: junior piano standing or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of piano pedagogy, with 
reference to individual and group instruction. A— Survey of materials and methods for beginning 
and intermediate students. Supervised teaching. B— Survey of methods of teaching advanced 
technique and repertoire. Physiology and psychology of working with advanced pianist. Super- 
vised teaching and recital preparation. 

468A,B Vocal Pedagogy (2,2) 

Prerequisite: senior sunding or consent of instructor. A~Fundamentals of vocal pedagogy with 
reference to studio and public school teaching, with consideration of physiology and acoustics 
as they apply to singing. B— Practical appiKation of the fundanf>entals discussed in A. The student 
will participate in seminar discussions and be observed in an actual studio teaching situation. 
Emphasis will be on the diagnosis and cure of specific vocal problems. 

498 Senior Recital (1) 

Prerequisite: 371 -level (471 -level for performance majors) and consent of instructor. Intensive 
preparation and presenution of representative works in the principal performance area. 

499 Indeperwfent Study (1-3) 

Study of a special topic in music selected in consultation with the instructor ar>d carried out under 
his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Mufk (2) 

Required of all graduate music majors. Study of basic bibliography, literature, and research tech- 
niques and materials useful m graduate music study. 

522 Contemporary Techniques of Composition (2) 

Advanced techniques of conHx>sition, as applied to the student's area of graduate specialization. 

523 Advanced Orchestration (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 323B. Analysis and practice of traditional and contemporary orchestration tech- 
niques. Scoring of nnisic for large ensembles such as orchestra, band, chorus and orchestra, or 
band and orchestra 

551 Seminar in Musk of the Medieval Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A detailed study of the musk forms, structures and styles from 
5(X) to 1450. Detailed analysis of important representative works as well as the contributions of 
individual composers and theoretkal writers. 

552 Seminar in Musk of the Renaissance (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of ir^structor. A comprehensive study of the forms, styles, and developmental 
characteristics of musk between 1450 and 1600. Detailed analysis of selected works by repre- 
sentative composers and theoretkal writers. 

5—84452 


583—12 5 200 


1 30 Music 


553 Seminar in Music of the Baroque Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Muscat forms, styles, and performance practices 
of the Baroque period. Detailed analysis of significant representative works. 

554 Seminar in Music of the Classic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. A study of the history and literature of music from 
approximately 1750 to 1900. Detailed analysis of important representative works. 

555 Seminar in Music of the Romantic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An intensive study of the structure and development of music 
in the 19th century. Detailed analysis of important representative works. 

556 Seminar in 20th-Century Music (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. Developments in the music of western Europe and 
the western hemisphere since 1890. Intensive study of contemporary music and its structure. 

557 Seminar in Musicology (2) 

Prerequisite: at least two courses from Mu 551-556 and consent of Instructor. Detailed investigation 
and systematic analysis of specific developments in musicology including exercises in transcrip- 
tions from old notations and historical investigations prepared by members of the seminar. 

558 Collegium Musicum (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced studies in the performance of rare and old music. (See 
Mu 458 for general description.) May be repeated for credit. 

571 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual instruction with approved instructor with emphasis 
on performance techniques and repertory. Minimum of one unit must be taken per semester. 
Required of all graduate students whose terminal project is the graduate recital. 

591 Seminar in Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391 B, conducting experience, or consent of instructor. Advanced problems in 
choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on laboratory work with student groups and in 
concert conducting. 

592 Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392B, keyboard facility for score reading and consent of instructor. Advanced study 

of conducting techniques through assignments with the university symphony. Interpretive prob- 
lems of each period covered in lectures. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Systematic study and report of a significant undertaking in the area of musical composition, musical 
performarKe, or other related creative activity. A written critical evaluation of the work or activity 
will be required. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Individual investigations of specific problems in the area of corKentration by candidates for the M.A. 
degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in music and permission of instructor. Research and study projects 
in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and written reports required. 


MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES 

435 Music in the Modern Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of 20th-century materials and techniques, 
of recordings for creative movement to music, and of bask conducting techniques for song 
leading in the elennentary school. Adaptation of materials for use in classroom music. 

441 Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools (2) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, senior standing, or consent of instructor. (Dbjectives, 
methods, and materials for teaching ger>eral musk or allied arts-humanities classes in secorxiary 
schools, iiKluding their relationship to specialized instrumental and choral programs. Practkal 
problems and field work applications are included. 

442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. History, prirKiples of pubik education, grades K-12, 

with special emphasis on musk. Philosophy, methods, materials and procedures for organizing 
and teaching musk in elementary and secondary schools. 


558—12 5 225 


Theatre 131 


444 Administration, Materials and Arranging for the Marching Band (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 323A or consent of instructor. A study of techniques, materials, administration and 
arranging for marching band. Includes charting for the football field, parade activities, and 
practical experierKe in the scoring of music for marching band with particular emphasis on the 
needs of school bands. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

530 Practicum of Research in Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in musk; completion of Mu SOO. Research techniques and proce- 
dures in music education. Students will be required to complete a creative project or research 
paper. 

531 Fourulations of Music Education (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 500. Study of philosophkal and historkal bases which have influenced music 
education. Identification of philosophk frames of leading educators. Contemporary trends which 
affect the teaching of music in the schools. Prerequisite for all graduate musk education courses. 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) 

Studies in the trends and application of educational theory in relation to the teaching of music in 
the pubik schools. 

544 Curriculum Planning and Construction in Music (2) 

Principles and practices of currkulum planning in musk education, with special reference to the 
pubik elementary, junior and senior high school. Required of majors who intend to complete 
supervision credential. 

545 Supervision and Administration of Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Open to nujsk education majors with teaching experience Philosophy, prirKiples and practices of 
supervision of musk in the pubik elementary and seccmdary schools. Emphasis on modern 
principles of leadership, types of servkes, organization, management and evaluation of programs 
of instruction. Required of candidates for supervisory credential 
749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (B) 

See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 

FACULTY 
Alvin Keller 

Department Chairman 

Teri Allen, Ronald Dieb, Edwin Duerr, Donald Henry, Dean Hess, R. Kirk Mee, S. Todd Muffatti, 
Dwight Odie, lerry Pickering, William Raoul, Robert Renee, Darrell Winn, lames Young,* Allen 
Zellzer * 

The Department of Theatre program includes the several fields of playwriting, oral interpretation, 
acting-directing, technkal theatre, theatre history and theory, radio-tetevision-film and dance. Spe- 
cifically, the coursewofk is arranged to provide opportunities for studer>ts ( 1 ) to develop an ap- 
preciation for the theatre; (2) to become aware, as audiecKe or partkipants of the shaping force 
of the theatre in society; (3) to improve the understandings ar>d skills necessary for work in the 
theatre as a profession; (4) to prepare for teaching theatre; ar>d (5) to pursue graduate studies. 
Theatre majors must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average in their major for graduation. In addition 
to course requirements, all students will enroll for one unit of Theatre 478 each semester. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

Course programs have been planned to n>eet the individual needs and interests of students working 
for the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts. 

Plan I is for those who wish to study theatre as a <;ultural contribution or who wish to pursue graduate 
degrees in theatre with emphasis in theatre bistory arxf theory. It is strongly recommended that 
students electir^ this plan support the major with approved electives from art theatre, musk, foreign 
languages, literature, philosophy or speech. 

Plan II is desigf>ed to develop the necessary competerKy for pursuing theatre as a profession, or for 
pursuing graduate degrees in theatre with an emphasis in an area of concentration other than history 
of the theatre. Areas of concenuation are; playwriting; acting; directing; oral interpretation; radio- 
television-film; technkal theatre and dance. 

* Ufwcnilv admratranw oMccr 


563—12 5 250 


132 


Theatre 


Plan III meets the requirements of the teaching credential with specialization in secondary or 
community college teaching. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other university 
requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III also must meet any specific 
requirements for the desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for School of Education). 
Those students who plan to work on the M.A. degree as well as the credential should see the 
chairman of the Department of Theatre. 


PLAN I: THEATRE HISTORY AND THEORY EMPHASIS Units 

Lower Division: 1(X)A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 263A, Begin- 

ning Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamen- 
tals (3) or Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation 

(3) 20-21 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, 

World Theatre (12); Theatre 477 A, B, Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (6); 

Theatre 472, American Theatre (3); electives (3 units) 27 

PLAN II: PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN AN AREA OF CONCENTRATION Units 


Lower Division: Same as in Plan I, with exception of acting, radio-television-film, dance 
technical theatre and directing. 

Upper Division: In one of the following areas of concentration; 

Playwriting — Theatre 364, Seminar in Playwriting (6), or Theatre 364 (3) and Theatre 
383, Television Writing (3); Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); 

Theatre 468, Experimental Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); 

Theatre 477A,B, Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (6) 33 

Oral I nterpretatior>— Theatre 311, Oal Interpretation (3); Theatre 411A,B,C, Oral 
Interpretation of Prose, Poetry, Drama (9); Theatre 414A,B, Reading Theatre (6); 

Theatre 475A,B,C, or D, World Theatre (6); electives selected from the following 
courses: Theatre 386, Stage Lighting; Theatre 472, American Theatre; Theatre 
475A,B,C, or D, World Theatre; Theatre 477 A,B, Senior Seminar in Critical Tech- 
niques (6) 30 

The major in theatre with an emphasis in oral interpretation requires 25 units in 
supportive courses from related areas such as art, anthropology, comparative 
literature, English literature, linguistics, speech, philosophy to be selected in consul- 
tation with the student's adviser. 

Acting — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 241, 

Voice Production for the Performer (3); Theatre 251, Body Movement for the 
Actor (3); Theatre 263A,B. Beginning Acting (6); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft (6); 


Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2) 26 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 363A,B, Inter- 
mediate Acting (6); Theatre 463A,B, Advanced Acting (6); Theatre 475A.B,C,D, 

World Theatre (12); Theatre 480, Television Production and Direction (3) or 

Theatre 382, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); Dance electives (2) 35 

Radio-Television-Film 

Unit Croup f: Theatre 1(X)A,B, Introduction to Theatre (6); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft 
(6), Theatre 290A.B, History of Motion Pictures (6); Theatre 380, Introduction to 
Radio and Television (3); Theatre 382, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); 

Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 392A,B, Dramatic Film Production (6) 33 


Unit Croup //. Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 241, Voice Production for 
the Performer (3); Theatre 263A,B, Beginning Acting (6); Theatre 277, Costume 
Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 370A,B, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (6); adviser approved courses in Communications Depart- 
ment 6 


567—12 5 270 


Theatre 133 

Units 


Unit Croup III: Theatre 475A,B,CD. Wortd Theatre (12) 6 

Unit Croup / VC- Theatre 381, Radio and Television Announcing (3); Theatre 383, Televi- 
sion Writing (3); Theatre 480, Television Production and Direction (3); Theatre 
486, Advanced Lighting (6); Theatre 490A,B, Advanced Dramatic Film Production 

(6); Theatre 492, Film Aesthetics and Oiticism (3) 12 

Directing— Division: Theatre 1(X)A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 
263A, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, Costun>e 
Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 21 1 Oral Interpre- 
tation (3) 23 

Upper Division: Theatre 350, Organization for Production (1 ); Theatre 370A,B, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (6); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 470A,B, Direct- 
ing (8); Theatre 475A,B,CD, World Theatre (12); Theatre 480, Television 
Production and Direction (3) or Theatre 382, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); 
electives, 6 upper division units in technical theatre 39 


Technical Production/ Design Major— The technical theatre major does not divide 
into an upper division or lower division format. Majors will be expected to follow 
unit groupings for a total of 60 units. 

Unit Croup /. Basic technical class core to be taken by all ow/ors— Theatre 100A,B, 
Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 188, Historical Styles (3); Theatre 276A,B, 
Beginning Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, 
Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 288, Design for the Theatre (3); Theatre 350, 
Organization for Production (1); Theatre 370A, Fundamenuls of Directing (3); 

Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 387, Audio Techniques (3); Theatre 450, 

Theatre Management (3) 36 

Unit Croup //. Theatre 211, Introduction to Oal Interpreution (3); Theatre 263 A, 

Beginning Acting (3) 3 

Unit Croup III: Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12) 

Unit Croup IV: Theatre 376A,B, Advanced Stagecraft (6); Theatre 377 A, B, Stage Cos- 
tuming (6); Theatre 385, Advanced Theatrical Makeup (3); Theatre 388, Interme- 
diate Scene Design (3); Theatre 392A,B, Dramatic Film Production (6); Theatre 
480, Television Production and Direction (3); Theatre 486, Advanced Stage Light- 
ing (3); Theatre 488A,B, Advanced Scene Design (6); or any adviser-approved 

three unit compatible course (3) — 15 

Oancc — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B (6); Dance 101 (2); Dance 135A,B (4); 

Dance 227A.B (6); four units selected from; Dance 105; Dance 245 A, B; Dance 
140; Dance 125A,B; Dance 210; Dance 220; Dance 221A,B; Dance 255; five to six 

units selected from: Theatre 276A; Theatre 277, Theatre 285........... 27-28 

Upper Division: DarKe 311 A (3); Dance 374A,B (6); Dance 476A,B (6); DarKe 484 


(3); Dance 486 ( 3); six units by advisement selected from; Theatre 386, Theatre 
35o! Theatre 387, Theatre 450, Theatre 486; three units selected from; Theatre 
363A, Theatre 370A; three units selected from; Theatre 475A,B,C,D; three units 
selected from; Dance 331A.B; Dance 335; Dance 358; Dance 401 A,B; Dance 441; 

Dance 450; Dance 474; Dance 477; Dance 499 36 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS (SecofKiary or Community College) Units 

Lower Division: Theatre 100A.B, Introduction to Theatre (6); Theatre 211, Introduction 

to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 263A, Beginning Acting (3) 12 

Upper Division: Theatre 342A,B, Simplifed Technical Production (8); Theatre 370A,B, 
Fundamenuls of Directing (6); Theatre 403, Theatre for Children (3); Theatre 414, 

Reading Theatre (3); Theatre 470A. Directing (4); Theatre 475A,C,D, World 
Theatre (9) 33 


MASTER OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

The Master of Arts in Theatre Arts is designed to provide a program of coordinated graduate studies 
buiK on the framework of the undergraduate preparation; to provide added incentive for intellectual 
growth reflected m improvement in teaching and professional recognition; and to provide a sound 
basis for continued graduate study in the field of theatre. The student is expected to demonstrate 
a high degree of intellectual and creative competence and to demorntrate mastery of one of the areas 


47—12 S 290 


134 


Theatre 


of emphasis in theatre: (1) acting and directing, (2) dance, (3) dramatic literature and criticism, 
(4) oral interpretation, (5) playwriting, (6) radio and television, (7) theatre for children, (8) theatre 
history; (9) technical theatre. 

Prerequisites 

In addition to the university requirements for unclassified status, students subsequently admitted 
(classified) into this program must have an appropriate undergraduate major in theatre, with a 
grade-point average of 3.0 in all upper division work in the major, or at least 24 units of appropriate 
upper division work in theatre, with a CPA of 3.0, and have completed Theatre 477 A, Senior Seminar 
in Critical Techniques, or in the case of transfer students, its equivalent, before being classified. Upon 
recommendation of the student's graduate committee, additional prerequisites may be required prior 
to classification and the approval of the area of emphasis. Students will complete an oral interview 
before being admitted to a program of studies. 

Study Plan 

The degree study plan in theatre will irKlude at least 30 units of adviser-approved graduate studies, 
1 5 units of which must be in S(X>-level courses. Each program will have 24 units in theatre, including 
a core of six units (Theatre 5(X), Introduction to Graduate Study — which must be taken the first 
semester of graduate study after admission to graduate study; Theatre 597, Project; or Theatre 598, 
Thesis). Before the degree is granted each student will pass oral and written examinations. Students 
will be permitted to take the written examination twice. 

For further information, consult the Department of Theatre. See also ''The Program of Master's 
Degrees," page 73, and the Cr^u^te Bulhtin. 


THEATRE COURSES 

100A,B Introduction to the Theatre (34) 

A — A study of the production aspects of contemporary theatre through examination of audience/ 
performer relationships arxi the organization of support personnel. B — A study of current plays, 
nwtion pictures and television with special emphasis on dramatic analysis and cultural signifi- 
cance. Required of all theatre maiors in their freshman year. 

188 Hiftorical Styles for Theatrical Design (3) 

A visual survey through lecture, pictorial sources arKi field trips of artistic periods throughout the 
ancient and modern world as a cultural foundation for beginning and advarKed creative work 
in technical theatre. Consideration of representative artists and architects. 

211 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

Analysis of selections from prose and poetry, development of voice control, projection of idea and 
emotion studied as the basis for practical application of theories of oral interpretation of literature. 

241 Voice Production for the Performer (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fundamental techniques, methods, arxi training to give the actor 
maximum use of his voice in theatre. Correction of speech faults and regional accents. Introduc- 
tion to problems of stage dialects. Study of basic interpretative material. May be repeated for 
credit. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

251 Body Movement for the Actor (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Furxlamental work in developing the body as an expressive 
instrument; acquiring of strength, flexibility, relaxation, control. Establishment of an awareness 
of and coordination of relationship of the body to the creative project. May be repeated up to 
six units of credit. (6 hours activity) 

2h3A,B Beginning Acting (34) 

Prerequisite: 263A is prerequisite to B. or consent of instructor. Laboratory practice arxi discussions 
of the form and content of the art of acting. A — Improvisation, action, and motivation and 
behavior. B — Continuation of A arxi problems in characterization. (6 hours activity) 

272 Under$tandir>g Theatre (3) 

A nontechnical survey course for the general student leading to an appreciation and urxierstarxiing 
of the theatre as a medium of communication arxi entertainment arxi as an art form. Field trips 
to certain significant productions. Recommerxied for non>majors. 


579-12 5 330 


Theatre 135 


276A3 Beginning Stagecraft (3^) 

Prerequisite: 276A is prerequisite to B. Study and practice in planning and construction of stage and 
television scenery including use of tools, stage equipment and reading of technical drawings. 
Students will crew productions. Required by second year. (More than 6 hours activity) 

277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Study of the principles and procedures of costuming theatrical and television productions. Practical 
experience in basic construction techniques, organizing and executing duties of the costume 
crew. Designed primarily for non-technical majors within the department and as an introductory 
course for technical majors. (More than 6 hours activity) 

285 Theatrical Makeup (2) 

Theory and practice in makeup for stage ar>d television. Emphasis on development of individual skill 
in techniques of character analysis, application in pigment, plastic, hair makeup, and selection 
and use of makeup equipment. (4 hours activity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or Theatre 27bA, or consent of instructor. Study and practice in the basic 
principles of designing scer^ery for the stage and television. Work in the designing and planning 
of sets for theatre productions. (Same as Art 288) (6 hours activity) 

290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (34) 

History and development of the motion picture as an art form and social influence. A— The motion 
picture from its origins until 1945. B— The contemporary cinema, from 1945 to present, (Same 
as Communications 290A,B) 

311 Oral Interpretation (3) 

Analysis of various forms of literary material, program planning, culminating in advanced application 
of theories of control of voice and body, and projection of idea and emotion of these literary 
forms to an audience 

342A,B Simplified Technical Production (4,4) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. lr>struction in simplified, inexpensive methods of producing in 
following technical areas; managen>ent, design, stagecraft, painting, costume, makeup, lighting, 
and sound. Course includes handling of limited resources, untrained personnel, improper facili- 
ties and equipment. Participation on production crews. (More than 8 hours activity) 

350 Organization for Production (1) 

Prerequisites: completion of all beginning courses in technical theatre and directing. Theory and 
training in backstage management stressing interrelationship of production personnel. Students 
will serve as crew heads or stage managers for major productions. Theatre 478 not required 
during the semester this course is taken. 

363A,B Intermediate Acting and Characterization ( 34 ) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 241, 251, 263A,B. A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. Emphasis on 
exterxied arxi integrated speech and movement problems in characterization. Ensemble acting, 
extensive analysis arxi exploration and basic television techniques. (6 hours activity) 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: eviderKe of student's previous interest in creative writing and consent of instructor. 
Study of superior models, development of style, and group criticism and evaluation of each 
student's independent work, as it relates to playwriting. May be repeated for credit. (Same as 
English 364) 

370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (34) 

Prerequisite: A is prerequisite to B Consent of instructor. The study of prerehearsal problems and 
procedures, of the structural analysis of plays, and of composition, picturization, pantomimic 
dramatization, movement and rhythm on stage arid in television. Practice in directing scenes. 
(6 hours activity) 

376A,B Advanced Stagecraft (34) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 2768 or consent of instructor. Advanced problems in planning and executing 
scenery for stage and television. Students will also work in the scene shop for major productions. 
(More than 6 hours activity) 

377 A,B Stage Costuming (34) 

A — A chrorK)logicai study of fashions arxJ textiles of major historical periods, methods of research; 
interpreting historical costume for theatrical statement. B — Techniques of designing and con- 
structing costumes with emphasis on creative planning. Participation in major productions of the 
department. (More than 6 hours activity) 


S85— 12 5 360 


136 


Theatre 


380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

The history and development of the broadcasting industry and its impact and influence on our 
society. A study of the basic broadcasting practices, audiences, production and programming. 
(Same as Communications 380) 

381 Radio and Television Announcing (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of control room operation. 
Lectures and practice in microphone and camera techniques, commercial announcements; 
interviewing, sportscasting, narration, foreign pronunciation, and continuity. (6 hours activity) 

382 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. Television techniques and production, designed primarily for 
theatre majors to train the director, actor and designer in the elements of televised drama. (6 
hours activity) 

383 Television Writing (3) 

Study of the principles and practices and experience in the writing of scripts and other forms of 
continuity for television. May be repeated for credit. 

385 Advanced Theatre Makeup (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 285. Advanced problems in makeup including special techniques and material 
prosthetics, hairpieces, masks for television and film; practical application of study through design 
and supervision of makeup for departmental productions (4 hours activity) 

386 Stage Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A,B or equivalent. Theory and practice in stage lighting and television 
presentations. Emphasis is given to design and the technology for its illumination. (More than 
6 hours activity) 

387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 27bA,B or consent of instructor. Theory, procedures, and practice necessary 
to develop and to integrate live and recorded sourni into performing arts productions. Emphasis 
given to recording, reproduction and studio techniques. (6 hours activity) 

388 Intermediate Scene Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 288. Designing stage sets on paper and in model form for a variety of produc- 
tions and theatres. Work in preparing designs for practical execution as part of an actual produc- 
tion. (6 hours activity) 

392A,B Dramatic Film Production (33) 

Theory and practice of silent dramatic film production techniques to irKlude mechanical operation 
of super 8mm and 16mm equipment, preparation of shootir^g script, direction and production 
of several short films, criticism and ar^lysis of finished products. (6 hours activity) 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. Develop- 
ment of criteria arxi vocabulary for criticism of the visual arxi performing arts through lectures, 
readings, discussions, and exhibit and performarKe attendance. Emphasis on descriptive arxi 
evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, darKe arxi cir>ema criticism. 

402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

Theory and practice in the use of creative dramatics, storytelling, puppetry, assembly programs, 
role-playing, arxi other aspects of dramatics as tools for the teachw, group worker, recreation 
major, and others who work with children. (6 hours activity) 

403 Theatre for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theories and prirKiples of production in the formal theatre arts 
for children. DefTx>nstrations of appropriate theatrical forms with analysis arxi evaluation. (6 
hours activity) 

411 A Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature (3) 

Relevant critical techniques are developed and applied to the study of various types of prose 
literature and to the development of oral interpretation skills appropriate to these types. 

4118 Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Relevant critical techniques are developed and applied to the study of various types of poetry arxi 
to the development of oral interpretatxKi skills appropriate to these types. 

411C Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Relevant critical techniques are developed and applied to the study of various types of dramatic 
literature and to the development of oral interpretation skills appropriate to these types. 


960^12 5 385 







Theatre 1 39 


414A,B Reading Theatre (34) 

Prerequisite: con^nt of instructor. Croup and individual oral interpretation of literature in which 
emphasis is placed upon theatre of the mirKl. May be repeated for credit with consent of 
instructor. (6 hours activity) 

450 Theatre Management (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion and practice of the basic elements of public relations 
as applied to theatre with a detailed analysis of various advertising nr^ediums and experimentation 
in their use. A study of the various financial aspects of academic, community, and professional 
theatre operations including practical experience in front-of-the-house management and box 
office operation through the department's public presentations. (6 hours activity) 

463A,B Advanced Acting (34) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 363A,B. 463A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. A study of historical 
thwries and techniques of styles of acting as an art form. The first semester will include Creek 
through Renaissance periods and the secorxf semester will include the Neoclassic periods to 
contemporary styles. (6 hours activity) 

46B Experimental Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An activity course in which dramatic principles are applied 
through production of full length and one>act plays using various styles of acting and staging. May 
be repeated up to six units for credit. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 

470A,B Directing (4,4) 

Prerequisites; Theatre 370A,B or consent of instructor. Readings in theory, analysis of scripts and 
practice in directing plays for their oral and visual value as theatre. A — Each student directs public 
performances of a one-act play. B — Each student directs public performances of two one-act 
plays or equivalent. (8 hours activity) 

472 American Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The development of the art of theatre in the United States from colonial 
times to the present day; its place and potentialities as a force in a democratic society. 
475A,B,C,D World Theatre (3444) 

Examination of the historical and dramatic evolution of world theatre. A — AiKient Greece and 
Rome, Middle Ages; Italian Renaissance; B — England from 1558-1790; 16th- and 17th-century 
Spain ar>d PrarKe; C — 18th- arKi 19th-century Europe and Russia; 19th-century England; D— 18th- 
and 19th-century America; the Orient; the modern world. Studems registering for Theatre 475 
must have completed the requirements for upper division standing. 

477 A,B Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (34) 

Theatre 477A or consertt of instructor prerequisite to B. First semester presents an historical survey 
of major critical theories as they apply to theatre. Secor>d semester provides the opportunity to 
apply critical theories to local dramatic productions. 

478 Rehearsal ar>d Performance (1) 

Acting in stage productions, major technical assignments in stage productions, or piarticipation in 
television or theatre for children productions. One unit per semester required of aH theatre 
majors. Enrolment on a credit /rw credit basis only. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 
480 Television Production and Direction (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and practice in the production of television programs and 
annourKernems: the plannirtg, organizing, directing, rehearsing, performing, recording arid edit- 
ing of television programs ar>d anrKXjrKements. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

486 Advanced Theatrical Lighting (3) 

Prerequisite; Theatre 386 or consent of instructor. The design and technology of lighting. Student will 
be prepared to design for the stage, darKe, pageant, display, film and television. Student will do 
at least one major lightir^ project as part of the course. (6 hours activity) 

488A,B Seminar in Advanced Scene Design (34) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 288, 388, or equivalent beginning work in design. Lecture, discussion, and 
research in scerte design with emphasis on style, ornamemation arxi illusion leading to practical 
problems in designing for the stage arxi television. (Same as Art 488A,B) 

490A,B Advanced Dramatic Film Production (34) 

Prerequisites; Theatre 392A,B. Theory and practice of 16 mm sourxl film production with emphasis 
on the narrative film. Labs arxi lectures irKlude the development of scripts, uses of sound film, 
editing arxf directing the sour>d film and production of several short filn^s. (6 hours activity) 
491 Senior Seminar. Creek Tragedy (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 491 ) 


506-12 S 415 


140 


Theatre 


492 Film Aesthetics and Criticism (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 290A,B and/or consent of instructor. An exploration of the nature of film and 
the film experience through aesthetic and theoretical bases and establishment of a critical basis 
for film evaluation and understanding. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Undergraduate creative or research projects. Open to advanced students with the consent of 
instructor. Student must complete course application form by the end of the seventh week of 
the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be done. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Theatre (3) 

Introduction to methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source materials, includ- 
ing library and original data; research and project design and execution; interpretation of re- 
searches. Must be taken the first semester after admission to graduate study. 

501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory and Appreciation (3) 

Prerequisite; Theatre 500. Directed research with emphasis on the relationship between historical 
backgrounds and developments in the theatre and the student's area of concentration. 

503 Seminar: Theatre for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 403. Critical study of the historical development, philosophies, theories, tech- 
niques and trends of the art of theatre for children. Research and investigation of problems related 
to the use of materials in educational, community and professional children's theatres. 

511 Graduate Seminar in Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. The historical and philosophical backgrounds In the development 
of interpretation and its relationship to contemporary theory and practice. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research of instructor, this course will offer directed research and 
writing, group discussion, and lectures covering major figures. May be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. (Same as English 571) 

572 Graduate Seminar, Literary Genres (3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. As appropriate to the specialized research and publications of 
instructor, this course will offer directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures 
covering such major literary types as; tragedy, comedy and historical drama. With consent of 
adviser, may be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as English 572) 

576 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) 

History and philosophy of production problems in theatre arts. Organization of the university theatre 
as it relates to the total university program. Planning of the production within the limitations of 
budgets and physical facilities. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites; consent of instructor, student's graduate committee arxJ department executive com- 
mittee. Development and presentation of a creative project in the area of concentration beyond 
regularly offered coursework. May be repeated to a maximum of six units. Student must complete 
course application form by the end of the seventh week of the semester preceding the semester 
in which the work is to be done. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites; consent of student's graduate committee. Development and presentation of a thesis 
in the area of concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. Student must complete course 
application form by the end of the seventh week of the semester precedir^ the semester in which 
the work is to be done. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in theatre with consent of instructor and student's graduate committee. 
May be repeated for credit. Student must complete course application form by the erxi of the 
seventh week of the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be done. 


600—12 5 435 


Theatre 141 


THEATRE EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. See page 216 for description of secondary school 
teaching credential program. Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovisual instruc- 
tion for teaching in secondary schools. 

484 Educational Television Production (3) 

Theory and practice in the activities, methods of lesson preparation, and presentation of educational 
television productions. 

749 Student Teaching in Theatre in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 


\ 


600—12 5 435 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 


600->12 5 435 








! 



145 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Dean: Jack W. Coleman 


Department of Accounting: Robert Vanasse, Chairman 
Dale Bar>dy, Donald Barnett, james Cork, Eugene Corman, john Hinds, A. jay Hirsch, Robert 
Lamden, Glenn Lashbrook, Dorsey Wiseman, john Woo 
Department of Economics: john Lafky, Chairman 
Maryanna Boynton, Edwin Carr {Emeritus), Kwang-wen Chu, Franz Dolp, Kenneth Goldin, Levern 
Graves, Lionel Kalish, Sidney Klein, Robert Michaels, Gary Pickersgill, Joyce Pickersgill. jack 
Pontney, Guy Schick, Norman Townshend-Zellner, Edward R. Zilbert * 

Department of FinarKe: Dennis O'ConrxK, Chairman 
Kenneth Daane, Peter Mlynaryk, john Nichols, Radha Sharma. Frank Taylor, Marco Tonietti, B. 
E. Tsagris, Cary Tuchman 

Department of Management: Granville Hough, Chairman 
Fred Colgan, james Conant, Richard Gilman, Leo Guolo, William Hellwig, Leland McCloud, Kent 
McKee, Richard Mushegain^ Donald Shaul, Paul Siegrist, John Trego, Edgar Wiley 
Department of Marketing; William Bell, Acting Chairman 
john Foster, Irene Lange, Peter McClure, Robert Olsen, Frank Roberts, jack Wichert, Guthrie 
Worth 

Department of Quantitative Methods; David Stoller, Chairman 
Cora Bhaumik, Gary Bloom, Gerald Brown, Milton Chen, Wen Chow, Ronald Colman, Ben 
Edmorxlson, William Heitzman, james Hightower, Marshall McFie, Demetrios Michalopoulos, 
Frederick Mueller, Herbert Rutemiller, Sohan Sihota, LaVerne Stanton, Donnamaie White 

Academic Objectives of the School 

The faculty of the school believes that it can best optimize its effectiveness in achieving the broad 
educational objective of the university by corKentrating its energies on the exploration and teaching 
of relevant corKepts, principles and practices, including interrelationships. Additionally, the faculty 
recognizes the need for integrating and relating the various disciplines into a balanced and thought - 
provoking educational experierKe for the student. While considerable emphasis must be placed on 
the need for breadth of knowledge and creativity in thought and actions, there must also be emphasis 
on exploration arxi analysis in some depth of those disciplines most relevant to the business 
profession. These disciplines are recogniz^ to be interrelated and are to be integrated through the 
application of economics, behavioral and quantitative scierKes, systems theories and concepts, 
decision theories, computer sciences, logic, and theoretical and applied research methodology. 

In addition, the faculty of the school has set forth specific objectives for its curriculum and related 
programs. A summary statement of these objectives is as follows: 

1. EducMionat and Professional 

Through a study of the various theoretical and practical business and ecorKimic models, 
policies arxf procedures, each student is to be afforded and provided with technical expertise 
in a chosen discipline — accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, quantitative 
methods arxl business education— to a depth acceptable to prospective employers for begin- 
ning professional employment. 

2. Human and Ethical 

A major part of effective society and business leadership is related to organization and direction 
of human resources to achieve general arxi specific goals. Therefore, a knowledge of human 
values — the ethical, psychological and sociological foundation for human behavior — is essen- 
tial. This irKludes an awareness and understarxiing of the nature of human values, of individual 
goals and the forces which lead to their achievement; the fucKtion of leadership in relating 

* UwiWfViv officer 


626—12 5 565 


1 46 Business A dministration 


individual and enterprise goals; the impact of group dynamics, informal organizations, and 
interpersonal relationships on the administrative process; and the need for a personal code of 
ethics. 

3. Socioeconomic, Political and Cultural Environment 

Firms do not operate in a vacuum, and information about the external forces and constraints 
which bear on the enterprise comprises a necessary body of knowledge for competent business 
planners and administrators. In particular, development of economic literacy to support rational 
choice; recognition of economic implications resulting from economic policy decisions by 
various levels of government; and a conceptualization of the impact of the various Institutions 
on the enterprise and the impact of business leadership decisions on the social system as a 
whole are stressed. 

Student Organizations 

Chapters of the following national honor societies have been established on campus with member- 
ship open to qualified students: Alpha Delta Sigma (advertising). Beta Alpha Psi (accounting). Beta 
Gamma Sigma (business), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Phi Kappa Phi (all campus). In 
addition there are the following departmentally affiliated clubs which students are encouraged to 
join: the Accounting Society, Economics Association, Finance Association, Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management, Marketing Club, QM Club and Computer Club. 

Undergraduate Program in Business Administration and Economics 

In our ever-expanding, complex society, the managers of tomorrow must be men and women with 
breadth of understanding and vision. Students who concentrate In a special area are encouraged to 
elect courses in other divisions of the university, particularly in the area of the behavioral, social, 
and political sciences, and foreign languages. It is assumed that the first half of their university work 
toward a bachelor's degree represents a required basic education in communication, mathematics, 
a laboratory science, social science and the humanities. Since the understanding of mathematics is 
becoming increasingly Important in business and the social sciences, students who contemplate 
enrollment In either business administration or economics are encouraged to take four years of high 
school mathematics. College algebra, or three years of high school mathematics including a second 
course in algebra, will be a minimum prerequisite for entrance to the program. 

If credits for either or both elementary accounting and principles of economics have not been 
earned, it will be necessary to enroll in these courses the first semester of the junior year. 
Students enrolled in the school and working toward a university degree are subject to the general 
requirements of the university as to courses and credit hours required for graduation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree requirements are as follows: 

1 . Completion of a minimum of 50 semester credit hours in business administration and economics 
courses In the School of Business Administration and Economics, of which 35 semester credit 
hours must be upper division courses. A total of 124 units, of which 40 must be upper division, 
is required for graduation from the university. 

2. Completion of at least six of the 12 units of concentration and 15 of the last 24 units are required 
in residence in the School of Business Administration and Economics for the B.A. degree. 

3. Completion of the required core courses In the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

4. Completion of 12 semester credit hours of required courses in an area of concentration to be 
selected by the student. 

5. Completion of at least 62 semester credit hours in areas other than business administration. 
Students may elect to apply economics core courses outside the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics to fulfill this requirement. 

6. Students must attain at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all university work attempt- 
ed, In all courses taken in the School of Business Administration and Economics, and in their area 
of concentration. 

7. All business administration majors are required to take a mathematics proficiency examination 
upon entrance into the program. 


631—12 5 590 


Business Administration 147 

CORE: The business administration and economics courses listed below are required of all students 
majoring in business administration: 

Lower Division: Units 

Eco 100 The Economic Environment and 3 

Eco 200 Principles of Economics, or 

Eco 210 Principles of Economics (5) 3 

Acc 201 A, B Elementary Accounting 6 

QM 265 Computer Methods 3 

Upper Division: 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory or Eco 320 Intermediate Macroeco- 
nomic Theoryt 3 

Fin 330 Business Finance 3 

Man 341 Organization and Management Theory 3 

Man 346 Business Law 3 

Mar 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

QM 360 Mathematical Methods In Business and Economics or 

QM 363 Management Sciences* 3 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Man 449 Seminar in Business Policies** 3 


39 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR MAJORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student in business administration should select an area of concentration by the second semester 
of the junior year and take the required courses in the area. 

Accounting 

301 A, B Intermediate Accounting 

302 Cost Accounting 

And at least one of the following courses: 

308 Federal Income Tax 

401 Advanced Accounting 

402 Auditing 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems 
Economics 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 
320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 
Economics Elective, 400-level 
Management 446, Managerial Economics 

Finance 

331 Financial Analysis 

And at least three additional courses offered by the Finance Department other than Finance 333 

Management 

In consonance with university and school objectives, the major goals of the Management Depart- 
ment are to: 

1. Provide students with foundational competence In the utilization of the factors of production. 

2. Develop in each student an understanding of the theory and practices needed for successful 
performance in managerial and staff positions in business, government and the community. 

3. Provide students with a knowledge of human values — the ethical, psychological and sociologi- 
cal foundation for human behavior, and the impact of group dynamics. Informal organizations, 
and interpersonal relationships on the administrative process. 

Students with an area of concentration in management must choose one of the four following 
emphases: 

Administrative Management Emphasis: Designed for students Interested In all aspects of business or 
in general supervision of organized activity. 

342 Production Operations 

t Management and Quantitative Methods require Economics 310. All other departments require either Economics 310 or 320. 

* Students taking quantitative methods as their area of concentration will take QM 363, Management Science. 

•• Students taking business economics as their area of concentration will take Eco 410, Government and Business — in lieu of Man 
449, Business Policies. 


635—12 5 610 


148 


Business Administration 


343 Personnel Management 

444 Management of Systems 
446 Managerial Economics or 

447 Management Decision Games 

Operations Management Emphasis: Designed for students who have interest in and aptitude for 
managing new projects and production operations in both manufacturing and non-manufacturing. 
340 Behavioral Science for Management or 
343 Personnel Management 

342 Production Operations 

445 Advanced Production Operations 

446 Managerial Economics or 

447 Management Decision Games 

Industrial Relations Emphasis:* Designed for students interested In industrial relations or in managing 
labor unions as organized enterprises. 

343 Personnel Management 

441 Labor-Management Relations 

442 Labor Law 

444 Management of Systems 

Behavioral Science for Management Emphasis:* Designed for students Interested in interpersonal 
relations and group leadership opportunities in ail organizations but specifically found in manpower 
management small business, hospital and welfare administration, and organizations carrying out 
social change. 

340 Behavioral Science for Management 
343 Personnel Management 

443 Individual, Interpersonal, and Group Dynamics for Management 

444 Management of Systems 

Marketing 

The Marketing Department offers programs leading to careers in marketing management, marketing 
research, advertising, retailing, selling, product management and logistics. 

Required: 

The student must take 12 hours in marketing in addition to Marketing 351. This includes: 

459 Marketing Problems (3) 

One of the following courses (3) 

350 Buyer Behavior and Marketing Communications 
452 Marketing Research 

457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis 
One of the following courses (3) 

352 Principles of Retailing 

353 Marketing Administration 

354 Principles of Advertising 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing 

358 Physical Distribution 

455 Management of the Sales Force 

458 International Marketing 

An additional elective from the marketing offerings (3) 

Quantitative Methods 

The objective of the Quantitative Methods Department is to prepare the student to utilize quantita- 
tive information and methods effectively In evaluating alternatives and making decisions. Emphasis 
is placed on the theory and practice of quantitative methods, especially those topics contributed by 
the disciplines of computer science, operations research and statistics. 

• The student must complete two of the following collateral courses for this emphasis: Speech Communication 324, Dynamics of 
Small Croup Discussion; Speech Communication 333, Communication in Business and Industry; Psychology 351, Social Psy- 
chology; Sociology 473, Complex Organizations. 


68—12 5 625 


Business A dministration 1 49 


Students with a quantitative methods concentration are required to take Math 150A, Calculus,! Ql^ 
170, Introduction to Quantitative Methods, QM 461, Advanced Statistics, and at least three courses 
in a study plan approved by the student's adviser. These courses may Include any of the following, 
as well as approved courses In other disciplines. 

Computer Science 

364 Computer Logic and Programming 

382 Information Structures and Machine Language Programming 
446 Computer Programming Theory 

464 Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing 
480 Information Theory and Cybernetics 

482 Introduction to Discrete Structures 

484 Computer Assisted Instruction 

485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing 

486 Automata Theory 

487 Artificial Intelligence 

488 Introduction to Pattern Recognition 
Operations Research 

448 Digital Simulation 

465 Linear Programming 

466 Nonlinear Programming 

470 Conflict, Bargaining and Cooperation 
490 Stochastic Process Models in Business and Industry 
Statistics 

367 Statistics and Society 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications 

467 Statistical Quality Control 
469 Reliability Statistics 

475 Multivariate Analysis 

A student majoring In quantitative methods may also elect to minor in computer science. For details 
concerning the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and the minor in Computer science see 
page 175. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Students who wish to major in business administration in preparation for a career as a secondary 
school teacher In business subjects must meet the requirements of the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics and the secondary school teacher education program including the require- 
ments for the proper credential as outlined In the catalog. 

The requirements for a major in this area are as follows: 

1. The core requirements as set forth for all business administration majors, page 147. 

2. Twelve hours of advanced work In one of the six areas of concentration: 

a. Accounting 

b. Economics 

c. Finance 

d. Management 

e. Marketing 

f. Quantitative methods 

3. Meet the school's minimum requirement of 50 credit hours In business administration and 
economics courses. 

4. A maximum of 12 credit hours in the secretarial field. Including those applied as electives, may 
count toward the degree In business administration and economics.** 

5. Completion of at least 62 credit hours in areas other than business administration and econom- 
ics are required for the degree. 

t Quantitative methods concentration students shall substitute QM 363 for QM 360 in their business core. Math 150A may be taken 
with the credit/no credit option. 

•• The university does not offer work in secreurial training, typewriting, or business machines. Consult the dean of the School of 
Business Administration and Economics to arrange for transfer of approved courses to satisfy these requirements. 


7a-12 6 10 


150 Business Administration 


Education courses required for a credential will be detailed by the School of Education. 


The requirements for a minor in this area are as follows: 

Eco 100 The Economic Environment and^QO 200 Principles of Economics or Units 

210 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Acc 201 A, B Elementary Accounting 6 

QM 264 Computer Programming 1 

One of the following: 

Mar 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Fin 330 Business Finance 3 

Man 346 Business Law 3 

QM 265 Computer Methods 3 3 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in Secondary School 3 

t Electives ^ 


24-25 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Applicants, as well as continuing students, should read carefully "The Program of Master's Degrees," 
page 73, and consult the Graduate Bulletin, particularly the "Steps in the Master's Degree Program." 

Programs of Study 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers two plans for the M.B.A. degree. 
Plan I is a broad, integrated program designed primarily for students with an undergraduate degree 
in a field other than business administration. 

Plan II is an integrated program allowing some concentration in an area of specialization. Under this 
plan the student is required to complete 12 units in an area of concentration. It is designed primarily 
for students with baccalaureate degrees In business administration. 

The procedural steps for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Business Administration 
degree follow: 

Admission 

Admission Into the M.B.A. programs (classified status) of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics requires the following: 

1 . A bachelor's degree from a fully accredited college or university. 

2. At least a 2.75 CPA ( B — ) on the last 50 percent of coursework taken for the bachelor's degree, 
or at least a 3.0 CPA on the sequential 60 semester units Immediately preceding the application 
for classified standing, provided that the student has met all other entrance requirements. 
Furthermore, all work within any given quarter or semester must be included even though that 
will result in more than 60 semester units. The units to be included in the 60 semester units 
may come only from among the following: 

a. Work taken In postgraduate status within the last seven years.* ** 

(1) Graduate work taken at other institutions. 

(2) Upper division courses at this institution for which upper division or graduate credit has 
been given. 

(3) A prescribed remedial program agreed to by the associate dean, academic programs. 

b. Units earned prior to the bachelor's degree. 

3. A minimum score of 450 on the Admission Test for Graduate Study In Business (ATGSB). 

4. For Plan II, the equivalent to an undergraduate degree in business from Cal State Fullerton is 
required. 

The courses in the major are to be no more than seven years old and are to have at least a 
3.0 grade-point average. Courses with grades less than C must be repeated. In addition the Plan 
II student will be required to successfully complete the Foundation Examination which covers 
the core requirements in the school's undergraduate degree in business. 


t A maximum of six units of secretarial courses, including those applied as electives, may count toward the minor in business education. 
••• These courses may not be counted toward fulfilling M.B.A. coursework requirement. 


Business Administration 1 51 

5. Preparation and approval of a program (Study Plan) in consultation with an adviser. 

6. Completion of an application form for classified status. 

PLAN I 

CURRICULUM 

First-Year Program 
Acc 510 Financial Accounting 
Acc 511 Managerial Accounting 
Eco 514 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, A 
Eco 515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, B 
Fin 517 Managerial Finance 

Man 516 Organizational Theory and Management of Operations 
Man 518 Legal Environment of Business 
Mar 519 Marketing Management 
QM 512 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques, A 
QM 513 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques, B 
Second-Year Program 

Acc 521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 
Eco 522 Comparative Economics Seminar 
Fin 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management 
Man 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 
Mar 525 Seminar In Marketing Problems 
QM 526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis or 
QM 560 Operations Research 
BAE 596 M.B.A. Management Came 
Two electives at the 400- or 500-level 

PLAN II 
Prerequisites 

Plan II is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in business. As a prerequisite, the 
student is required to have the equivalent to an undergraduate major in business at California State 
University, Fullerton (See page 147 for the core and area of concentration requirements.) 

CURRICULUM 

(A minimum of 24 of the 30 units required for the degree must be at the 500 level.) 

Required Courses 

Acc 511 Managerial Accounting * or 

Acc 521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 
Eco 515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, B or 
Eco 522 Comparative Economics Seminar 
Fin 523 Seminar In Corporate Financial Management 
Man 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 
Mar 525 Seminar In Marketing Problems 
QM 526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis or 
QM 560 Operations Research 

Concentration 

Each student shall elect an area of concentration of at least 12 units to be approved by the 
department chairman concerned, or his designee within the department, and the associate dean, 
academic programs. 

Terminal Evaluation 

A terminal evaluation is required for the degree. Departmental requirements vary, however, and the 
student should check with his departmental chairman. In many cases students take BAE 596, M.B.A. 
Management Came, to satisfy this requirement, thus increasing the number of units offered for the 
degree from 30 to 33. The terminal evaluation may be repeated once during a two-year period. 

• Students who have credit in cost accounting may not receive credit for Accounting 511. 


81—12 6 50 


152 Business A dministration 


For further information, consult the School of Business, Administration and Economics Announce- 
ment and/or the associate dean, academic programs, in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The economics major is designed to prepare students for positions in business, education, and 
government, and for graduate work in economics and related disciplines. 

Advanced Placement Program in Economics 

An Advanced Placement Program in Economics has been established by the Department of Eco- 
nomics, the Center for Economic Education, and the Center's affiliated Leadership Group of High 
School Teachers of Economics. Three semester-units of university academic credit in principles of 
economics aA7c/ advanced placement are offered to students taking economics in high school who 
enroll In the program and pass the Advanced Placement Examination in Economics given at the 
university at the end of each fall and spring semester. To enroll in the program contact Dr. Norman 
Townshend-Zellner, director. Center for Economic Education. 

Requirements 

Required of all students for the degree: 

1. Completion of 41 semester credit hours of courses In economics and business administration 
of which 27 semester credit hours must be in upper division courses. At least 15 semester 
hours must be completed in residence In the School of Business Administration and Econom- 
ics. 

2. Completion of the major course requirements for economics majors as listed below. Students 
in economics are required to take Quantitative Methods 265 or equivalent as prerequisite to 
Quantitative Methods 361. 

3. Completion of at least 62 credit hours In areas other than economics and business administra- 
tion. Of these 62 semester credit hours the department suggests that special attention be 
placed on related social sciences, particularly political science, sociology, history and geogra- 
phy, as well as philosophy and the fields of quantitative methods and mathematics. A list of 
suggested courses Is available in the Economics Department office. 

4. Students must attain at least 2.0 grade-point average in all college or university work attempt- 
ed, and in all courses in the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

Business administration and economics courses required of all students majoring In economics are 


listed below: 

Lower Division Units 

Eco 100 and 200 o^2^0 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Acc 201 A,B Elementary Accounting or Mathematics 150A,B Analytic Geometry and 
Calculus (students who take Math 150A,B in substitution of Acc 201 A, B are re- 
quired to take QM 363 Management Science In lieu of QM 360) 6-8 

QM 265 Computer Methods 3 

Total 14-17 

Upper Division Units 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 420 Money and Banking 3 

QM 360 Mathematical Methods in Business and Economics or 

Mathematics 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3-4 

QM 361 Statistical Methods In Business and Economics 3 

Fifteen hours of upper division electives In economics approved by the student's 

adviser 1 5 

Total 30-31 


86—12 6 75 


Business Administration 153 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

A minor in economics may be achieved by taking the following courses: 

Eco 100 and 200 or 210 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Electives 9 

Total 20-21 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 


The Master of Arts In Economics is a part-time, evening (and late-afternoon) degree program, 
designed especially for candidates who will be employed full or part-time while working for the M.A. 
degree. 

The procedural steps for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Arts in Economics follow. 
Admission Requirements 

1 . Apply for admission to the university In unclassified graduate status and declare the objective 
to be a Master of Arts in Economics degree. This must be accomplished at the (Dffice of 
Admissions before the dates established in the university calendar. 

2. Apply for admission to the Master of Arts in Economics program. Please read carefully page 
73, and secure informal advisement from the academic programs office of the School of 
Business Administration and Economics. The informal advisement should occur at least three 
weeks prior to your first registration, but in any event during the first semester of work. Specific 
admission requirements include: 

a. An overall grade-point average In ail undergraduate work of not less than 2.7. 

b. Completion of QM 265, Computer Methods, and QM 360, Mathematical Methods in 
Business and Economics, orQM 264, Computer Programming, and one semester of calculus. 

c. Satisfactory level of performance on the Graduate Record Examination (verbal and quanti- 
tative), aptitude only. 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires the completion of the following prerequisite courses, or 
equivalent: 

1 . For students without an undergraduate major in economics (a grade-point average of not less 
than 3.0 in the following prerequisites is required): 


Principles of Economics 6 

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Statistics (analytical) 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Total 18 


2. For students with an undergraduate major in economics: 24 semester units of work In econom- 
ics or related courses (e.g., statistics), with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0. The 24 units 
must Include the following courses or their equivalent, with a minimum grade of 3.0 In each 
course: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis, Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis, Statis- 


tics (analytical). Money and Banking. 

Program of Study 

1. A core of 12 graduate units in economics is required: fj^ 

Eco 502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Eco 503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Eco 505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar 3 

Eco 506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic 

Applications (prcyecr required) 3 

Total 12 


90—12 6 95 


154 Accounting 

2. In addition to the core, 18 units of electives are required as follows: 

a. Eighteen units of electives at the 400 or 500 level, with a minimum of six and a maximum 
of 12 in a field outside of but related to economics. 

b. At least nine units of electives must be at the 500 level, six of which must be in economics. 

c. If nine or more units are taken in fields outside of economics, at least three units must be 
at the 500 level. 

For further information, consult the School of Business Administration and Economics Announce- 
ment and/or the associate dean, academic programs, in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. See also 'The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ACCOUNTING COURSES 

201A,B Elementary Accounting (33) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A must be taken before taking 201 B. Accounting concepts and tech- 
niques essential to the administration of a business enterprise; accounting as a process of measur- 
ing and communicating economic Information; analyzing and recording financial transactions; 
preparation of financial statements; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; introduc- 
tion to manufacturing accounts and reports; the Interaction of accounting with the areas of 
finance, quantitative methods, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data-information systems. 

301 A, B Intermediate Accounting (33) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. The quantification, recording, and presentation of balance sheet and 
income statement items with particular emphasis on the corporate type of organization; state- 
ment of application of funds; cash flow statement; basic concepts of accounting theory; interpre- 
tation of financial statements. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. The development of accounting information for management of 
manufacturing enterprises; cost records; cost behavior and allocation; standard costs; and an 
introduction to cost control. 

303 Governmental Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: one course in accounting. A consideration of the accounts and reports of nonprofit 
Institutions, municipalities, state and federal governments; organization, procedures, budgets. 

304 Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Intended for students whose area of concentration Is not accounting. 
Analysis, Interpretation, and application of accounting information for managerial decision mak- 
ing; budgets and budgetary control; special-purpose reports; differential cost analyses. 

305 Elements of Accounting (3) 

For students majoring In computer science. Accounting concepts essential to the administration of 
business enterprises and measuring and communicating economic Information. Emphasis on 
Interaction of accounting with computers. Not open to business administration or economics 
students. 

307 Distribution Costs (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B and Marketing 351. The development of quantitative measures for 
marketing activity; costs of distributing through different channels of distribution, advertising vs. 
personal selling, and movement activities; development of sales budgets, standard costs, and the 
analysis of actual perfomance in the light of budgets and standards. 

308 Federal Income Tax (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Basic consideration of the history, theory, and accounting aspects 
of federal Income taxation. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 301 B. A study of partnerships, statements for special purposes, receiver- 
ships, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting and foreign exchange. 

402 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B and 302. Nature of an audit, auditing standards and procedures, audit 
reports; professional ethics and responsibilities of the independent public accountant; introduc- 
tion to Internal auditing. 


93—17 5 10 


Accounting 155 


406 Cost Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. A study of current and persistent problems in cost accounting; theories 
of cost allocation and absorption; flexible budgeting; responsibility accounting; and distribution 
cost control. 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B and QM 264 or 265. Integrated systems for the collection, processing, 
and transmission of information; aspects of the information service function; feasibility studies; 
case studies of operating systems. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Research in problems of taxation with emphasis on Income taxes as 
they relate to corpK)ratlons, partnerships and fiduciaries. 

409 C.P.A. Problems and Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 401, or consent of Instructor. Selected problems and questions as found in 
the uniform C.P.A. examination; preparation, analysis and revision of financial statements; assets, 
liabilities and ownership equities; income determination; cost accounting; governmental and 
institutional accounting; accounting theory. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by department chairman. Open to qualified undergradu- 
ate students desiring to pursue directed indep)endent Inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B, classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. The concepts and 
theory of accounting; the effects of professional, governmental, business, and social forces on 
the evolution of accounting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Financial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 502 and classified M.B.A. status. A critical examination of the current 
problems and areas of controversy in financial accounting. 

504 Seminar in Contemporary Managerial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 51 1 or 302, classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. A critical 
examination of the current problems and areas of controversy in managerial accounting. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and classified M.B.A. status. Auditing theory and practices; profes- 
sional ethics; auditing standards; SEC and stock exchange regulations; auditor's legal liability; 
statement trends and techniques. 

507 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 407 or equivalent, and classified M.B.A. status. Case studies of large scale 
accounting systems used by organizations such as universities, banks, and industrial corporations. 
Applications of conceptual knowledge of system components and controls learned previously 
to actual operating systems. 

508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. A review of 
substantive provisions of federal tax law with an emphasis on tax planning from a corporate 
viewpoint; case studies of the effect of federal tax law on business decisions. 

510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. The basic fundamentals of accounting as they apply to the 
accumulation, organization, and interpretation of financial and quantitative data relevant to the 
activities of the corporate business enterprise. The interaction of accounting with the areas of 
finance, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data-Informatlon systems. 

511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B or 510, consent of Instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Accounting 
Information for management decision; elements of manufacturing, distribution, and service costs; 
cost systems; standard costs; cost reports; cost analysis. 

518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 A, B or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Comparative analysis 
of accounting principles and practices, current problems of international financial reporting, 
accounting planning and control for international operations with emphasis upon multinational 
companies. 


693—12 6 260 


156 Economics 


521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) (Formerly 501) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302, 304, or 500; classified M.B.A. status; and consent of instructor. 
Integrative aspects of accounting, financial, and quantitative data for managerial decision-mak- 
ing; long-term, short-term profit planning; budgetary control; cost analysis; financial analysis and 
planning; taxation; and transfer pricing. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent Inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. Student will select and have 
approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a 
defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor, and approval by department chairman. 
May be repeated for credit. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core, senior standing and consent of instructor. Application of 
research methods: selection and identification of a problem, determining a method of approach, 
collection and analysis of relevant data, eliciting conclusions and solutions. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of Instructor. The changing role of capitalism and 
Its control in the United States, European countries and Japan. The trends as to Government 
policy and action, relative to private ownership and coordinated economic planning. 

5% M.B.A. Management Game (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status and within six units of completion of the M.B.A. study plan. This 
course serves as the required terminal evaluation for M.B.A. candidates. An Integrated approach 
to policy decisions using the principles and practices of the several disciplines in the M.B.A. 
program. 


ECONOMICS COURSES 

100 The Economic Environment (3) (Formerly 200A) 

An Introduction to economic analysis with application to problems such as unemployment, poverty, 
discrimination, inflation, gold and foreign exchange, pollution, urban decay, defense, war, and 
industrialization. 

Ill Economics of Utopia (3) 

An economic analysis of utopian thought and attempts to create ideal economic systems. Emphasis 
is placed on the importance of economic structure and environment to the performance of 
utopian experiments. 

200 Principles of Economics (3) (Formerly 200B) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100. A survey of basic economic theory. Includes the central problem of 
allocating resources, the distribution of income, unemployment, inflation, and the role of markets 
and public policies solving these problems. 

210 Principles of Economics (5) 

Prerequisite: open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 100 and 200). An Introduction to the princi- 
ples of economic analysis and policy Including the central problem of scarcity, basic economic 
institutions of the United States, resource allocation and income distribution, economic stability 
and growth, and the role of public policy. 

301 Economic Principles (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B and QM 265 or equivalents. An introduction to economic principles for 
students who have a strong quantitative background, and who have a special interest In the 
technical areas of engineering and computer science. Not open to students majoring in business 
administration or economics. 


697—12 6 280 


Economics 157 


310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 and 200 or 210. An analysis and evaluation of (1) rational decision- 
making behavior of consumers and firms and (2) price and output determination in markets; with 
special emphasis placed on the use of cases and problems to illustrate the application of the 
analysis to the contemporary scene. 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 200 or 210. The explanation and evaluation of the determinants 
of the level and fluctuations of such economic aggregates as national income and employment, 
with stress placed on the use of problems involving the application of analytical tools to modern 
macroeconomic issues. 

324 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. A study of the structure and operation of commercial banks and 
financial institutions including a consideration of the impact of money and capital market devel- 
opments on economic activity. Not open to economics majors. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210 or 100 plus consent of Instructor. A study of alternative economic 
systems with regard to their theoretical foundations, actual economic institutions, and achieve- 
ments and failures. The contrast between socialist and capitalist systems will be emphasized. 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. An analytical evaluation of Soviet economic development 
Including the structure and performance of the Soviet economy and problems of planning and 
control. 

332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Analysis of the natural resources, population, agricultural, 
industrial, transportation, communications, monetary, banking, etc. problems of Asia i.e. China, 
japan, etc. and the Aslan subcontinent. The relations of non-economic problems to the economic 
are considered in detail. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. An examination of the processes of economic growth with 
special references to developing areas. Considers capital formation, resource allocation, relation 
to the world economy, economic planning and institutional factors, with appropriate case stud- 
ies. 

334 Economics of Poverty, Race and Discrimination (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. An economic analysis of the problems and policies dealing with 
poverty, race and discrimination. A field Investigation or project Is required of each student. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The development of American economic institutions with 
special emphasis on economic problems, economic growth, and economic welfare. 

351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The evolution of European economic Institutions and their 
relation to the development of Industry, commerce, transportation, and finance in the principal 
European countries. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Theory and analysis of the urban economy, urban economic 
problems and policy. 

365 Public Finance (3) ' 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. A study of government finance at the federal, state, and local 
levels with particular reference to the Impact of taxation and spending on resource allocation. 
Income distribution, stabilization and growth. 

370 Economics of Research, Development and Technological Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Examination of the Importance of R & D and technological 
change in the economy; concepts. Issues, and major figures in the study of economics of 
technology; analytical techniques for the assessment of technological change; and evaluation of 
the impacts of technological change. 

410 Government and Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An economic study of business organization, conduct and performance 
followed by an analysis of the rationale and Impact of public policy on various segments of 
business and business activities, including the regulated Industries, sick Industries and antitrust 
policy. 


702—12 6 305 


158 Economics 


411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An examination of the theory of international trade and the means and 
significance of balance of payments adjustments, with an analysis of past and present develop- 
ments in international commercial and monetary policy. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An analysis of the basic economic and institutional influences operating 
in labor markets. Considers relevant aspects of resource allocation, income distribution, econom- 
ic stability and growth. 

420 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the money supply process and the impact of monetary 
policy on economic activity. 

421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the techniques of monetary and fiscal policy and an appraisal 
of their relative roles in promoting economic stability and growth. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310, 320 and QM 360 or Math 150A. Development of advanced statistical 
methods and their application in economic research. Advanced concepts in model building; 
development of different types of economic models. The use and effect of economic models in 
public policy. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310, 320 and QM 360 or Math 150A. Selected topics in economic theory, 
drawn from microeconomics and macroeconomics. Content varying from year to year but with 
emphasis on constrained optimization problems and rational decision-making. 

450 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and 320. A study of the development of economic thought as reflected 
In the evolution of major schools of thought and of leading individual economists as they 
Influenced economic thought and policy. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: economics major or concentration, senior standing and approval by the department 
chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent 
Inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 and 2(X) or 210, and 310. An advanced theoretical formulation of the 
principles of the determination of prices and outputs of goods and productive services in a market 
system. Topics include: consumer choice, demand, production, cost, the equilibrium of the firm 
and the market and distribution. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 200 or 210, and 320. Advanced theory of the determination of 
employment, fluctuations of real and money Income and the forces underlying economic growth. 

505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar (3) 

Applications of statistical and econometric techniques in economic analysis. Emphasis Is on practical 
problems in empirical research. Topics include statistical analyses of demand functions, con- 
sumption functions, cost and production functions, and models of national income determina- 
tion. Practical problems involved in using multiple regression analysis are examined. 

506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic Applications (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503, and 505. Complements the study of methodology in economic 
research. Students select approved topics and via independent Investigation, seminar presenta- 
tion and critique develop their analytical and research abilities, culminating with an acceptable 
paper. 

511 Economic Problems and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514, 515 and classified M.B.A. status. Seminar devoted to an examination 
of the nature and implication of the major economic problems facing the economy and an 
evaluation of current and alternative policies for their solution. Problems considered will include 
price level stabilization, balance of payments equilibrium, economic growth, and cyclical and 
technological unemployment. (Not op)en to Economics M.A. candidates.) 


706—12 6 325 


Finance 159 


514 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy — Part A (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. An intensive study of micro- and macroeconomic theory and 
policy within the framework of a market system. (Not open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy — Part B (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 and classified M.B.A. status. An integration of modern microeconomic 
theory, optimization techniques, and microeconomic policy. Topics include: mathematical pro- 
gramming, consumer choice, production theory, firm and market equilibrium, and government 
regulation. (Not open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) (Formerly 512) 

Prerequisite: Economics 514 and 515 and classified M.B.A. status. A comparative study of various 
analytical and prescriptive approaches to economic problems of scarcity, development, fiscal 
and monetary policy, planning and poverty. (Not open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

528 Seminar in International Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 or equivalent, consent of Instructor and classified M.B.A. status. A 
systematic survey of international monetary and international trade theories and policies. In- 
cludes analyses of international monetary reform, barriers to trade, economic integration, eco- 
nomic development and international capital flows. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

5% Selected Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210, 310 and 320. Seminar: Selected topics in economic analysis 
and policy will be covered In depth, with special emphasis on contemporary research and 
materials. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Projects (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-^) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent Inquiry. Student will select and have 
approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a 
defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by department chairman. Open 
to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue Independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


FINANCE COURSES 

324 Money and Banking (3) 

(Same as Economics 324) 

330 Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Financing business enterprises; financial planning and control; analy- 
sis of alternative sources and uses of combinations of short-, intermediate- and long-term debt 
and equity. Cost of capital. Study of capital investment decisions; capital budget analysis and 
valuation; working capital and capital structure management. 

331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Development of techniques for internal financial control and their applica- 
tion to business situations. Capital costs and optimal capital investment decisions. Budgets and 
forecasts for projection of long-term profitable operations. Analysis of current financial models. 
Group problems and case studies. 

333 Personal Financial Management (3) 

Financial problems of the household in allocating resources and planning expenditures. Considera- 
tion of housing, insurance. Installment buying, medical care, savings and investments. (May not 
be used to fulfill the area of concentration requirement in finance.) 

334 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Principles of life, casualty and liability insurance, individual and group insurance programs; methods 
of establishing risks and rates. 


72^-12 6 420 


160 Finance 


335 Security Investments (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 330 and QM 265 or consent of instructor. Principles underlying the analysis, 
selection and management of securities; characteristics of securities, valuation, trading methods, 
role of mutual funds and other institutions; computerized statement analysis and portfolio selec- 
tion methods; a computer securities game is played by members of the class. 

336 Principles and Practices of Real Estate (3) 

Survey of urban real estate principles and practices; structure and growth of cities; economic 
implication to real estate markets. Trends and factors affecting real property values, real estate 
financing and real estate law. Integrative cases and projects. Study of current urban models used 
in urban development. Croup problems and case studies. 

401 Real Estate Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 336 and 437 or 438. Croup problems, laboratory work as determined by 
computer terminal availability. 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331. Application of analytical techniques to the solution of financial institution 
problems. Major financial intermediaries and the broad range of decision-making problems they 
face. Regulation and Its effect on management operations. Croup problems and case studies. 

431 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Role of capital and money markets In the American economy; markets for new corporate and 
government issues; secondary markets; Interrelation of financial Institutions; factors influencing 
yields and security prices. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331 . Comprehensive case studies including group problems of estimating funds 
requirements, long-term financial planning, controlling and evaluating cash flows, and financing 
acquisitions and mergers. Croup problems and case studies. 

435 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 335 or consent of instructor. Advanced securities analysis course utilizing 
computer applications for statement analysis, valuation models, and portfolio selection and 
management models. The data base utilizes Standard and Poor's "compustat tapes." A simulated 
portfolio management game Is played at the end of the course. 

436 Legal Aspects of Real Estate (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 346 or equivalent area; Finance 336. Law of real property; types of 
ownership; titles and estates; transfers of interests; encumbrances; casements; fixtures; land sale 
contracts; recording; zoning; leases; responsibilities of real estate brokers. 

437 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 336 or consent of instructor. Sources and uses of capital in financing real estate 
transactions. Financial Institutions and their effect on credit. Money and capital market conditions 
and their effect on credit availability and cost. Instruments of real estate finance. Real estate as 
an Investment medium. Group problems and case studies. 

43B Real Estate Valuation (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 336 or consent of instructor. Theory of real property value, historical develop- 
ment; methods used in urban and rural property appraisals; special purpose appraisals. Group 
problems, laboratory work as determined by computer terminal availability. 

439 Social Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Financial problems and policies in old age pensions, health insurance, 
unemployment Insurance, workman's compensation, and private pension plans. 

441 Business Conditions Analysis and Financial Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 330. Role of forecasting in financial management: effect of business fluctuations 
on financial planning; procedures for measuring changes in business activity; methods of fore- 
casting for the economy, the particular industry, and the individual firm. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chairman. Open to qualified under- 
graduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


729—12 6 440 


Management 161 


517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. The methodology of financial management Including the 
primary tools for financial analysis, long-term investment decisions, valuation and working capital 
management. 

523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) (Formerly 532) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 and classified M.B.A. status. Emphasis in this course is on the analysis of 
the financial decision-making process through case studies and seminar presentations. Current 
financial theory and models are utilized. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 523 and classified M.B.A. status. Optimal financing and asset administration; 
advanced techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical methods to the administration 
of the finance function of the business firm. 

534 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 431 or consent of the instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Structure and 
operation of major financial institutions; portfolio composition, price-cost problems, and market 
behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and interrelation of financial institutions and mar- 
kets. 

535 Seminar in Investment Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 435 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of Invest- 
ment and portfolio management; concepts of risk evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of 
interest rate movements; Investment valuation and timing; regulation and administrative prob- 
lems of the industry. 

536 Seminar in Risk Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 334 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques of risk management, structure of 
risk management, insurance planning and control, risk management programs. 

537 Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 330, 336 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of real estate 
Investment; concepts of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of real property values; real 
estate development and financing. 

538 Seminar in International Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or consent of Instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Focus on the financial 
problems of the multinational business. Included are balance of International payments, financing 
international movement of goods and services, foreign exchange and international monetary 
problems. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. Student will select and have 
approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a 
defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of the instructor and approval by the department 
chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


MANAGEMENT COURSES 

340 Behavioral Science for Management (3) 

Prerequisites: general education requirements for social sciences. An analysis of Interpersonal behav- 
ior of individuals and groups In organizations. Attention Is given to: social environment of 
business; systematic development of knowledge about human behavior; and behavioral implica- 
tions for organizational design and management practice. Open to non-business majors. 


6 — 84452 


734—12 6 465 


1 62 Management 

341 Organization and Management Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210, or consent of instructor. Administrative processes, organization 
theories, applications in utility-creating business operations. Planning, control, communication 
and information systems, measuring effectiveness, and interpersonal relationships. Business rela- 
tionships to society and politics. Leadership in creating utility. Open to non-business majors. 

342 Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341 and QM 265. Fundamentals of production systems which combine 
materials, labor, and capital resources to produce goods or services. Analysis of systems, models 
and methods for management of production operations. Product and process development. Case 
studies stress utilization of computer decision models. 

343 Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of instructor. A study of the personnel function, its 
activities, and Its opportunities. Emphasis upon management's responsibilities for selection, de- 
velopment and effective utilization of personnel. Open to non-business majors. 

346 Business Law (3) 

Philosophy, institutions and role of law in business and society, with emphasis on functions of courts 
and attorneys, case studies in areas of contracts, and on the law relating to sale of goods. 

347 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 346 or equivalent. Philosophy, Institutions and role of law in business 
relationships, with emphasis on case studies in areas of agency, partnerships, corporations, 
bankruptcy, unfair competition and trade regulation. 

348 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 346 or equivalent. The philosophy, institutions and role of law in commer- 
cial and personal transactions, with emphasis upon case studies In the areas of personal property, 
bailments, commercial paper, secured transactions, real property, mortgages, trusts, community 
property, wills, estate administration and insurance. 

441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341 . Impact of labor-management relations upon labor, management, and 
the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining, and settlement of disputes are 
among subjects examined. 

442 Labor Law (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341 and 346. Study of labor law and its effects upon American society. 
Federal and state legislation, and actions of regulatory bodies are explored by means of case 
studies. 

443 Individual, Interpersonal and Group Dynamics for Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 340, 341 or consent of Instructor. Case studies and current literature on 
human problems of work situations. Focuses on developing self-knowledge; manager motivation; 
communicator strengths; improving interaction skills; and improving interaction processes In 
groups. Laboratory work offers practical approach. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

444 Management of Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: QM core. Technology for managing business and other enterprises as cybernetic 
systems. The course investigates the design and control of systems appropriate for product, 
project and program levels of analysis. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

445 Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 342 and QM core. Planning and control methodologies for production 
op)eratlons. Quantitative approaches which integrate cost, schedule and technical performance 
criteria. Collection, evaluation and use of real-time Information. Individual and group projects 
synthesize control systems for actual cases. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM core. Economics 310 and Management 341. A study of relationships of manage- 
ment tools to applied economics and statistics in decision-making process; use of cases and group 
problems to study the true economic meaning of cost, demand, supply, price, product and 
competition. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core less Management 449, or consent of instructor. A simula- 
tion of an oligopolistic industry to provide the student with an opportunity, through group 
problems, to use statistics and other analytical tools to make managerial decisions in the function- 
al areas of management. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 


7»-12 6 490 


Management 1 63 


449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: ail other SBAE core courses and departmental approval. Through analyzing integrative 
cases from top management viewpoint, students use business and liberal arts training, especially 
knowledge of business operations, administrative processes, organization theory, and policy 
formulation. Individual and team efforts. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, and approval by faculty sponsor and 
department chairman of proposed statement of work. Open to qualified undergraduate students 
desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

516 Organizational Theory and Management of Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status. Modern organization theory and application in utility creating 
operations. Planning, control, organizing, directing, communication and information systems, 
and measures of effectiveness are explored. Business ethics and relationships to society and 
politics are examined. Graduate discussion and research reports. 

518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and either concurrent or prior enrollment in Accounting 510. 
Philosophy, institutions and role of law In business with emphasis upon legal implications Inher- 
ent in business decisions, and upon casie studies In areas of contracts, sale of goods, agency, 
partnerships and corporations. 

524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration (3) (Formerly 544) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. Analysis of human behavior in 
organization, studies in organizational theories, and administrative action. 

541 Seminar in Project Operations Problem Solving (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of Instructor. A seminar designed to focus atten- 
tion on application of system analysis and other dynamic techniques to current operations 
problems. Special projects are used to demonstrate application of concepts. 

542 Seminar in Labor Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of Instructor. Theories and philosophies of union- 
management relations In modern industrial society with attention to trends in nonindustrial 
organizations. Issues In collective bargaining, contract administration, labor law, and government 
regulation. Discussion and analysis of literature. 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. Provides graduate students with 
opportunities to study cases, problems, and significant personnel administration literature in 
order to develop a comprehensive understanding of personnel administration and human rela- 
tions. 

545 Seminar in Research and Development Project Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. Management of R&D projects. 
Techniques of preparing project proposals and assessing their economic worth. Project selection 
and review procedures based on performance, cost and marketing projections. Project program- 
ming and control. Establishing a creative environment. 

548 Seminar in International Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of Instructor. Problems in managerial qualifications 
and training, political structure within and without the operations, foreign receptivity to United 
States business, organizing and controlling the international firm. Management in selected coun- 
tries is examined. 

549 Seminar in Policy Planning and Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. Planning, implementing, and control- 
ling policy strategies to achieve objectives are considered. Executive's role In overall enterprise 
operations and the firm's resource use are examined and supported by cases, literature and 
training techniques. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent project. Student will select and have 
approved a project proposal, conduct the project, and prepare a formal analysis and report. 


744—12 6 515 


164 Marketing 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. Student will select and have 
approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a 
defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor and approval by faculty sponsor and 
department chairman of proposed statement of work. May be repeated for credit. 


MARKETING COURSES 

350 Buyer Behavior and Marketing Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Analysis of interactions between buyer decision-making processes and 
communication processes based on concepts of economics, sociology, psychology, and mass 
and informal communications. 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 2(X) or 210. Analysis of how management markets output of the 
enterprise — and obtains revenue. Covers product management, pricing, promotion, distribution 
channels. Marketing's role in socioeconomic system Is examined from viewpoints of consumer, 
management and government. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Covers problems retailers face such as store location, store design and 
layout, what goods should be purchased, how to: obtain sales volume, plan operations, control 
the enterprise, and react to competitors. Current problems in retailing will be examined. 

353 Marketing Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351 . Major problems facing the marketing executive, including marketing 
organization, planning and forecasting, market analysis, budgeting, product policy, pricing, ad- 
vertising and sales promotion, administration of the sales force. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the advertising function. Including the role of 
advertising in marketing strategy, budgetary considerations, allocation among media, measure- 
ment of effectiveness, administration and control, and its economic and social implications. 

355 Credit and Credit Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The general nature and functions of credit, credit instruments; the 
management of the credit department; sources of credit information; acceptance of credit risk- 
establishment of credit limits; and the problem of collections. 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Salesmanship, In the very broad context, is persuading people to do 
what you want them to do. A fundamental managerial skill. Relevant principles of behavior are 
applied to the persuasion process. 

357 Industrial Purchasing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The principles and practices of purchasing for industrial organizations. 
Major buying policies, sources of materials, quantity and quality considerations, and the relation 
to production cost. 

358 Physical Distribution (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, QM 265, 360. Investigation of the practices and problems of logistics 
and physical distribution. Analysis and evaluation of the system and Its elements — packaging, 
transportation, warehousing, inventory control — leading to improved system design and man- 
agement. 

452 Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and QM 361. Presents marketing research as the systematic and 
objective search for and analysis of information relevant to: identification and solution of any 
problem in the marketing field; and, decision-making process in marketing management. (2 hours 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

453 Marketing to the Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and nondefense products to the government. 
The nature and administration of contractual agreements with government agencies. 


762—12 6 605 


Marketing 165 


455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Examines the job of the sales manager in such areas as organization; 
recruiting and selecting salesmen; sales training; formulating compensation and expense plans; 
supervising and stimulating sales activities; morale; sales planning, evaluating salesmen; and 
distribution cost analysis. 

457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and QM 265. Management orientation of tools and techniques for 
planning and making decisions in marketing. Emphasis on understanding use of models in 
analyzing marketing processes and systems. Application of various objective analytical tools to 
analyze specific marketing problems. 

458 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and senior standing. Presents analytical framework for studying devel- 
opment of domestic marketing systems. Marketing problems arising across national boundaries 
and within national markets will be analyzed. Emphasis is given U.S. firms involved in Internation- 
al marketing operations. 

459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, two advanced marketing courses one of which must be marketing 350, 
452 or 457. Analysis and evaluation of marketing problems of both the firm and society. Emphasis 
placed upon Intergrative interactions between marketing activities and the interfaces of marketing 
with finance and production. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: marketing concentration, senior standing, and approval by the department chairman. 
Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May 
be repeated for credit. 

519 Marketing Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510, 511, Economics 514, 515, QM 512, 513, Management 516, 518 (may 
be taken concurrently) and classified M.B.A. status. The role of marketing within the context of 
society and the business firm is explored. A contemporary analysis of concepts, principles and 
techniques used by marketing management in the administration of the marketing variables. 

525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) (Formerly Marketing 551 ) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 and classified M.B.A. status. A managerial approach to major marketing 
problems facing Industry: definition of and organization for marketing task; demand analysis; 
decisions concerning product, price, promotion, and trade channels. A firm's adjustment to 
marketing environment with emphasis on competitive strategy. 

552 Seminar in Pricing and Price Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Critical analysis of pricing problems. Pricing 
function examined from standpoints of economic theory, management science, business prac- 
tices, legal constraints, ethical considerations. Relationship of pricing objectives, policies, strate- 
gies, methods market behavior, goals of firm. 

553 Seminar in Product Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Designed to assist marketing management 
in the formulation and execution of marketing plans for new and existing products. Examination 
of the management decision areas and procedures search, preliminary evaluation, development, 
testing, commercialization products. 

554 Seminar in Promotion (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525, 452, and classified M.B.A. status. Critical analysis of the promotion mix 
as employed by businesses to optimize profitable operations. Particular emphasis given to: 
determination of promotional goals, planning, budgeting, controlling promotional programs; and 
measuring promotional effectiveness. 

555 Seminar in Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 452, 525, consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. The application 
of scientific method to marketing decisions; research methodology and models; decision-making 
applications. 

556 Seminar in Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Design and evaluation of marketing com- 
munications programs In consumer and industrial settings based on the critical analysis of buyer 
decision-making and communications models. Discussion, cases, and projects. 


767—12 6 630 


166 Quantitative Methods 

558 Seminar in International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Includes: comparative inter- 
national marketing systems; managerial techniques and strategies as they apply to multinational 
and domestic firms engaged in export; and the impact of political, legal, social, economic and 
cultural forces upon the decision-making process. 

559 Seminar in Marketing Thought and Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Application of theoretical concepts in the 
behavioral sciences, managerial sciences and quantitative methods to the^ development of theo- 
ries and models In marketing. The emphasis is on the Interdisciplinary exchange of Ideas relating 
to marketing. Evolving concepts and theories in marketing are appraised. May be repeated for 
credit. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. Student will select and have 
approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present himself for a 
defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of Instructor and approval by department chairman. 
May be repeated for credit. 


QUANTITATIVE METHODS COURSES 

170 Introduction to Quantitative Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 150A or equivalent. For those business majors concentrating in quantitative 
methods. Emphasizes application of the mathematical tools which the student learns in a first 
course in calculus and analytic geometry. 

210 Logic (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 210) 

264 Computer Programming (1) 

Introduction to problem-oriented languages of computers. The solving of problems using computer 
programming. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

265 Computer Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: college algebra or three years of high school mathematics including a second course 
In algebra and a passing score In the SBAE Mathematics Proficiency Examination. Introduction 
to sets, logic, counting, frequency distributions, and probability. Solving problems on a digital 
computer with a compiler language. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 

280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 264, 265, or equivalent. A study of selected computer languages. Introduction to 
formal language theory, numerical data processing, string and list processing, formal structure 
manipulating, recursive routines. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

289 Computer Methods in Social Science (3) 

An introduction to the history and application of digital computers to problems in the social sciences. 
Student written programs In a problem-oriented computer language. Discussion of computers, 
law and society; artificial Intelligence; and other topics of current interest. (2 hours lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

360 Mathematical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 265 or equivalent and a passing score in the SBAE Mathematics Proficiency 
Examination. Concepts of mathematical methods and their application to business and economic 
problems. Elementary mathematical optimization models. Students with a quantitative methods 
concentration must take QM 363 In lieu of this course. 

361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite. QM 265 or equivalent and a passing score in the SBAE Mathematics Proficiency 
Examination. Collection, analysis, and presentation of statistical data. Random sampling, estima- 
tion, and hypothesis testing, introduction to regression and correlation. 


35—12 7 10 






Quantitative Methods 169 


363 Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A and QM 170. Introduction to the basic concepts of Management Science 
and its relationship to economics and decision theory. Topics surveyed include optimization in 
continuous models, linear programming, queueing and inventory models, dynamic programming 
and decision-making in the business environment. 

364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 264, 265, or equivalent. An Introductory survey of assembler language, hardware 
organization, design, logic, and system software of modern digital computers. (2 hours lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

367 Statistics and Society (3) 

A descriptive, non-mathematical survey of the impact of statistical concepts and techniques on 
social, political, biological, and environmental life of mankind. 

368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 368) 

369 Second Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 369) 

382 Information Structures and Machine Language Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364. A formal discussion of information structures, the types of processes for which 
they are appropriate, and their relative computational efficiencies. Assignments implemented in 
a variety of machine languages. 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361 and Economics 310 or 320. Statistical methods applied to problems In business 
and industry; fundamentals of index-number constructions; practical multiple regression models 
with computer solutions; basic techniques in time-series analysis of trend, cyclical and seasonal 
components; correlation of time-series and forecasting with the computer. 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361. Principles for designing business and economic surveys. Applications in 
accounting, marketing research, economic statistics and the social sciences. Basic methods of 
sampling: simple random, stratified and multistage design; construction of sampling frames; 
detecting and controlling non-sampling errors. 

446 Computer Programming Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. A study of techniques for establishing the correctness of algorithms, estimating 
time and storage requirements of algorithms, and selecting the operational environment and 
linguistic media appropriate for algorithms. 

448 Digital Simulation (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 280, and Math 435 or QM 461. A study of techniques of generating stochastic 
variates and their use In solving numerical problems and studying operational problems in 
queueing, communication, economic, inventory, scheduling and other models. 

461 Advanced Statistics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 1 70, 361 and Math 1 50A or equivalent. An advanced treatment of the theory and 
application of the topics covered In QM 361, using the methods of the calculus. Moments, 
generating functions, point and interval estimation, Neyman-Pearson and Likelihood Ratio Hy- 
pothesis Tests. 

464 Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364 or consent of instructor. An examination of modern computer hardware, the 
techniques of programming it, and the languages in which such programs are written. Includes 
discussion of memory protection. Interrupt systems, recursive programming, list-structured-lan- 
guages and user-oriented languages. 

465 Linear Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 1 50A and QM 1 70 or consent of instructor. The theory and applications of linear 
programming. Topics include: linear programming and the simplex algorithm; starting proce- 
dures; the dual and economic Interpretation; parametric programming and sensitivity analysis; 
and transportation and assignment problems. 

466 Nonlinear Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 465, Math 281, or consent of Instructor. A unified study of nonlinear programming 
theory with emphasis on computational algorithms and industrial applications. Topics will in- 
clude: Kuhn-Tucker theorem, duality, quadratic programming. Integer programming, dynamic 
programming, search techniques, and post-optimality analysis. 


40—12 7 35 


1 70 Quantitative Methods 

467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361. Shewhart Control Charts for variables, percent defective, and defects. Toler- 
ances, process capacity, special control charts, acceptance sampling, and batch processing 
problems. Bayesian aspects of process control. 

468 Seminar in Symbolic Logic (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 468) 

469 Reliability Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461 or equivalent. Statistical principles of reliability; hazard functions; point and 
Interval estimation of reliability; reliability demonstration; growth models. 

470 Conflict, Bargaining and Cooperation (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 265, Math 120, or consent of Instructor. Analysis of the structure of two-, three- 
and many-sided conflict, bargaining, and cooperation by means of the theory of games of 
strategy. The structure of strategy and utility, domination, negotiability and non-negotiability, 
cooperation and equilibrium. 

475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461, or equivalent. The least squares principle; estimation and hypothesis testing 
in linear regression; multiple and curvilinear regression models; discriminant analysis; principal 
components analysis; application of multivariate analysis In business and industry. 

480 Information Theory and Cybernetics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 265, 361, and Math 250. Study of complex systems In their static aspects; informa- 
tion contents and communications and their dynamic aspects; change, control and stability. 

482 Introduction to Discrete Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B and either QM 382 or consent of instructor. Combinatorial and graph 
theory techniques applied to study of known and unknown structures, to counting, approximate 
counting and enumeration of structural configurations, and to resolution of discrete optimization 
problems. 

484 Computer Assisted Instruction (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 264 and consent of instructor, knowledge of computer organization, terminology, 
and experience in programming. A survey of computer-assisted and computer-based instruction 
consisting of a review of present research activities and Including: methodology of educational 
approaches, implementations, and present achievements. 

485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. A study of monitor, assembler, and compiler systems and the hardware, 
firmware, and software characteristics required in a real-time. Interactive environment. 

486 Automata Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382 and Math 250, or consent of instructor. A formal introduction to the theory 
of computation and its relation to modern computing techniques. Includes development of 
Turing machines, recursive functions, equivalence theorems, and the algebraic theory of recog- 
nizers. 

487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. Selected topics of current interest from heuristic programming, pattern recog- 
nition, learning systems, problem solving systems, and formal symbol manipulating systems. 

488 Introduction to Pattern Recognition (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382 and 461, or consent of Instructor. Classification techniques, discriminant 
. functions, training algorithms, potential function theory, supervised and unsupervised learning, 
feature selection, clustering techniques, multidimensional rotations and rank ordering relations. 

490 Stochastic Process Models in Business and Industry (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 461, Math 281, or consent of instructor. Models of industrial waiting line and 
storage systems. Markov chains, single and multiple server models, discrete and continuous 
processes, and homogeneous birth and death processes. 

495 Symposium in Applied Mathematics (1) 

Prerequisites: a major In engineering, mathematics, or business administration (quantitative meth- 
ods) and at least junior standing. A series of weekly lectures to be given on varied topics in 
applied mathematics by invited experts in areas of current research and applications. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 


44—12 7 55 


Quantitative Methods 171 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: quantitative methods concentration, senior standing, and approval by the department 
chairman. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent 
inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

512^ 513 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques (3^) 

Prerequisites: QM 512 must be taken before QM 513 as must Accounting 510 and Economics 514; 
classified M.B.A. status. The development and application of mathematical and statistical meth- 
ods, including mathematical models, computer programming and simulation, used in business 
decision-making. 

526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis (3) (Formerly 563) 

Prerequisites: QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques from probability, statistical decision 
theory, and computer simulation applied to problems of management. 

560 Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A, QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques of operations research, 
with emphasis on model construction. Topics include optimization in continuous models, linear 
programming, queueing and scheduling models, Inventory models, dynamic programming. (Not 
open to students with QM 363) 

561 Seminar in Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 560 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. A particular topic in 
operations research, such as simulation, inventory theory, waiting line theory, or synthesis of 
large scale systems will be covered in depth with special emphasis on research methods. 

565 File Management and Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 464 or consent of instructor. An examination of innovative real-time computer 
based information systems in industry and government. 

566 Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. A survey of the fundamentals of experimental 
design, including analysis of variance, factorial experiments, nested designs, confounding, and 
fractional replication. 

571 Seminar in Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 363 or 560 and classified M.B.A. status. The synthesis, analysis and evaluation of 
policy alternatives through the use of quantitative methods. The analyst's role in evaluating 
operations of an enterprise is demonstrated by individual and team efforts in the design, develop- 
ment, performance and communication of results of operations research projects. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Student will select and have approved a thesis topic, show 
evidence of original research and must present himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty 
committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and approval by the department chairman. May be repeated 
for credit. 


48—12 7 75 



CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY 

PROGRAMS 

785—12 7 80 








1 ^' 



175 

CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY 
PROGRAMS 


COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Ronald Miller 
Chairman 

Gary Bloom, Wen Chow, Ronald Colman, Robert Curry, Richard Gilbert, Walter Hudetz, Eugene 
Hunt, Marshall McFie, Demetrios Michalopoulos, Sam Pierce, Chennareddy Reddy, Herbert 
Rutemiller, Jesus Tuazon, Donnamaie White 

COUNCIL MEMBERS 

Wen Chow, Ronald Colman, Richard Gilbert, Walter Hudetz, Eugene Hunt, Sam Pierce, Herbert 
Rutemiller, Jesus Tuazon 

Computer science degree programs are administered by the Computer Science Council, an interdis- 
ciplinary group representing the Department of Mathematics, the Department of Quantitative Meth- 
ods and the Division of Engineering. 

The Association for Computing Machinery has given the following discipline description of computer 
science: 

"'Computer science is not simply concerned with the design of computing devices — nor is it the 
design of computing devices — nor is it just the art of numerical calculation, as important as these 
topics are. Computer science is concerned with information in much the same sense that physics 
is concerned with energy; computer science is devoted to the representation, storage, manipula- 
tion and presentation of information in an environment permitting automatic information systems. 

... All forms of Information — numeric, alphabetic, pictorial, verbal, tactile, olfactory, etc. — are 
of interest to computer science." 

The computer scientist Is interested in effective ways to present information, algorithms to transform 
information, languages in which to express algorithms, effective means to monitor the process and 
display transformed Information, and effective ways to accomplish these goals at reasonable cost. 

B.S. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The degree requires completion of 54 units of basic courses which include courses In mathematics 
and statistics as well as in computer languages, information structures and computer logic design. 
Fifteen additional units are required beyond the basic courses. Considerable flexibility Is provided 
to the student In that he may elect a 15-unit concentration in mathematics, engineering or quantita- 
tive methods. The student's grade-point average must be at least 2.0 for the 69 units required for 
the major, and none of these may be taken on a credit-no credit basis. 

Required courses are as follows: 

Lower Division 

Mathematics 150A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (8) 

Mathematics 250 Intermediate Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 281 Linear Alegebra with Differential Equations (3) 

Quantitative Methods 265 Computer Methods {Z) or 
Engineering 205 Digital Computation (3) 

Quantitative Methods 280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Upper Division 33 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Quantitative Methods 382 Information Structures (3) 

Quantitative Methods 485 Programming Systems (3) 

Engineering 402 DIgiUl Logic (3) 


Units 

21 


98—12 7 100 


176 Environmental Studies 


Engineering 405 Digital Computer Design and Organization (3) 

Mathematics 340 Numerical Analysis (3) 

Mathematics 335 Mathematical Probability (3) or 
Engineering 423 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

Mathematics 435 Mathematical Statistics (3) or 
Quantitative Methods 461 Advanced Statistics (3) or 
Mathematics 440 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 

Quantitative Methods 448 Digital Simulation (3) 

Quantitative Methods 363 Introduction to Management Science (3) 

Economics 301 Economic Principles (3) 

Units 

Electives: 1 5 

A minimum of 1 5 units of upper division electives, selected to comprise a concentration 
in one of the three areas: Engineering, quantitative methods or mathematics. The 15 units 
may include courses in other areas besides the concentration, but all electives must be 
approved by the student's adviser. 

Total 69 

All courses within the computer science program originate in other departments within the 
university. Students should refer to the department originating the course for description. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Students majoring in other fields, including those without an extensive mathematics background, 
may earn a minor in computer science. A minimum of 21 units of computer science are required 
for a minor. These shall include Quantitative Methods 265, Quantitative Methods 289 or Engineering 
205 in addition to Quantitative Methods 280 and either Quantitative Methods 364 or Engineering 
402, and a minimum of four courses (at most two from the same area) selected from the following 
upper division courses in the indicated areas: 

Engineering: 317, 402, 403*, 405, 424, 445, 458 
Mathematics: 335, 340*, 435*, 440 

Quantitative Methods: 364, 382, 446, 448, 461*, 464, 480, 482, 485, 487, 488, 495 

Students must have a 2.0 grade-point average or better in the minor. These courses may not be taken 

on a credit/ no credit basis. 

Student Advisement 

A student majoring in computer science may select a faculty adviser from a list of advisers from the 
faculties of engineering, mathematics and quantitative methods; otherwise an adviser will be as- 
signed. Students are strongly urged to consult with their advisers each semester, or as frequently as 
needed. 

Group advisement sessions are sponsored each semester by the Computer Science Council in 
conjunction with the Computer Club. Entering students are especially urged to attend these sessions. 
Contact the Department of Mathematics, the Department of Quantitative Methods, or the School 
of Engineering for details. 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Joel Weintraub 
Program Director 

COUNCIL OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Arthur Earick (Urban Studies), Barry Gerber (Technological Studies), Barry Thomas (Environmental 
Education), William Langworthy (Human Ecology), Pat Kramer (Student), Michael Lee (Art), 
Frank St. Clair (Student), Floyd Thomas (Engineering). 

* Not both Mathematics 43S and Quantitative Methods 461 nor both Mathematics 340 vtd Engineerinf 403 may be used to fulfill 
minor requirements. 


101—6 1 5 


Environmental Studies 1 77 


Environmental studies is an interdisciplinary program of courses dealing with man and his interac- 
tions with his environments — cultural as well as natural. The courses, both pre-existing in various 
departments and specially developed, attempt to integrate knowledge and methods from several 
disciplines, all of which independently study special aspects of this area. The program will deal with 
man and his social and cultural aspect, as he exploits, modifies and attempts to achieve balance with 
his environment. The student will have the opportunity to cope with problems involving ecological 
changes, pollution, technological solutions, economics, balanced land use, and politics. 

The program is intended to provide the widest possible variety of students with an opportunity to 
become acquainted with and acquire a common vocabulary in this vital area. A basic element will 
be an introductory seminar in environmental studies, which will bring together students and staff 
from various disciplines to delineate environmental problems and explore fundamental methods. 
This seminar may be taken either on the undergraduate or graduate level and will be prerequisite 
to all further work in the projected graduate program. Additional graduate-level interdisciplinary 
courses serve as foundations for graduate curricula in the program options. 

No degree objective in environmental studies is planned for undergraduates; however, participation 
by such students in the program is encouraged. Individuals interested in environmental problems, 
irrespective of their majors, and those planning to enter job-related areas should consider supple- 
menting their regular course schedules with elements of this program. 

A Master of Science in Environmental Studies is offered. The student may elect emphases in human 
. ecology, urban studies or environmental education; a technological studies emphasis is under 
I development. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 
Prerequisites 

Prerequisites to classification in the M.S. in environmental studies program are as follows: 

1 . A bachelor's degree with an overall CPA of at least 3.0 for the last 60 units. If the student has 
a grade deficiency, he will be eligible for classification if he achieves a CPA of 3.0 in nine units 
of adviser-approved coursework. 

2. Completion of Environmental Studies 440. 

3. Completion of no more than nine semester units of adviser-approved coursework. 

Study Plan 

The M.S. in Environmental Studies requires a minimum of 36 units of adviser-approved coursework 
with a CPA of 3.0 or better. 

I. Interdisciplinary Core, Environmental Studies 
440 Introduaion to Environmental Studies (3) 

501 Environmental Analysis: Natural and Urban Environment (3) 

502 Environmental Analysis: Technology, Culture, and Change (3) 

595 Environmental Problems: Seminar (3) 

II. Project, Internship, Thesis 

Every student will either prepare a research project or participate in an internship at an 
institutional or private agency. A thesis is required on the results of these experiences. Projects 
will be interdisciplinary In nature. (6-9) 

III. Individualized Coursework 

Craduate level courses in the field of the undergraduate major or appropriate discipline (6) 
and additional courses outside of the Individual's major (9-12) will be chosen with the 
student's background in mind. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Craduate Bulletin. 

Related Departmental Courses 

Listed below are a number of departmental courses which either bring up environmental Issues or 
deal with concepts bearing on such issues. Few have extensive prerequisites; they are therefore 
suitable for undergraduates interested in learning more about man and his environment. 

This list is not complete; consult this catalog for additional courses. 

Anthropology 204 Man's Many Faces (3) 

Anthropology 460 Culture Change (3) 

Anthropology 465 Alternative Futures (3) 


8—6 1 35 


178 Environmental Studies 


Art 333AB Environmental Design (3,3) 

Biological Science 102 Crisis Biology (3) 

Biological Science 267 Man and Insects (3) 

Biological Science 316 Principles of Ecology (3) 

Chemistry 411 instrumental Analysis (4) 

Communications 427 Current Issues In Mass Communications (3) 
Earth Sciences 370 Earth Resources and Environmental Planning (3) 
Engineering 207 Pollution and Politics (3) 

Engineering 425A,B Environmental Engineering (3,3) 

Environmental Education 350 Field Biology and Conservation (3) 
Environmental Education 460 Applied Conservation (4) 

Geography 150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

Geography 350 Conservation of the American Environment (3) 
Geography 370 Urban Geography (3) 

Geography 453 Cultural Ecology (Also Anthropology 453) (3) 

History 479 Emergence of Urban America (3) 

Physical Science 100 Man and His Physical Environment (4) 
Political Science 424 Urban Planning and Development (3) 

Political Science 524 Seminar In Environmental Planning (3) 
Sociology 361 Population Problems (3) 

Sociology 371 Urban Sociology (3) 

Technological Studies 100 Introduction to Technological Studies (3) 
Technological Studies 410 Society and Technology (3) 
Technological Studies 430 Technology and Ideology (3) 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES 

431 Ecology of the Santa Ana Mountains (3) 

Seminars, field investigation, and laboratory compilation of environmental factors of a wild region 
within urbanizing Southern California. Team-taught intensive field investigations utilizing tech- 
niques of aerial photography, remote sensing, geologic and vegetation mapping, instrumentation 
of environmental factors and taxonomy. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents. 

440 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced standing in an academic major. Principles, fundamentals and current prob- 
lems involving man and his physical, biological and man-made environment. Human ecology, 
urban studies, environmental education and technological studies are Introduced to the student. 
Seminars, field trips and simulations. 

501 Environmental Analysis: Natural and Urban Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 440 or consent of Instructor. A look at the factors influencing 
our views and planning approaches in natural and urban situations. Environmental planning 
Including use of environmental Impact reports is included. Seminars, possible field trips and 
simulations. 

502 Environmental Analysis: Technology, Culture, and Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 501 or consent of instructor. A look at current and alternative 
choices for structuring rural and urban environments. Seminars and possible field trips. 

568 Law and Environment (3) 

An interdisciplinary seminar In the role of law in the allocation, management, and administration of 
resources and the environment. Relevant studies relate to conservation law, land tenure, water 
rights, environmental health and other topics. 

595 Environmental Problems (3) 

An interdisciplinary seminar discussing specific problems in environmental management. 

5% Internship (3) 

An opportunity for the student to gain field experience In governmental or private agencies. Only 
open to degree candidates In environmental studies. May be repeated for a maximum of six units 
of credit. 


13--6 1 60 


Human Services 1 79 


597 Project (3) 

Open to graduate students only by consent of instructor with whom the student wishes to pursue 
independent study in environmental studies. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of 
credit. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: an officially appointed thesis committee and advancement to candidacy. Guidance in 
the preparation of a project or thesis for the master's degree. 

HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

George Watson (Psychology) 

Coordinator 
ADVISORY BOARD 

Marilyn Bates (Special Education), Gerald Corey (Interdisciplinary Center), Ernest Dondis (Psy- 
chology), Anthony Hybl (Counseling), David Keirsey (Special Education), Paul Obler (Interdisci- 
plinary Center), Edsel Stiel (Mathematics) 

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services is a program designed to prepare the student with a 
specified set of clearly defined competencies which will qualify a person to work In community 
service agencies, such as institutions dealing with exceptionality, child care, geriatrics, correction and 
detention, community change, minority relations, and career development. 

To complete the degree, students must satisfactorily complete 57 units as indicated below. An- 
adviser approved study plan is required. 

Units 

A. Core requirements 39 

Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Interdisciplinary Center 318 Character and Conflict (3) 

Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality (3) 

Psychology 341 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3) or 
Education 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Human Services 445A,B,C,D Practicum In Human Services (12) 

Psychology 471 Behavior Modification (3) 

Human Services 488 Research Analysis (3) 

Human Services 489 Assessment Seminar (3) 

Human Services 490 Theories and Techniques of Counseling 


B. Electives — Minority Studies 3 

Three units selected from minority studies — e.g., Afro-ethnic, women, Chicano 
studies, native American studies, sociology. 

C. Electives 15 

Fifteen units of coursework, planned with an adviser, relevant to the student's career 
goals. __ 

Total 57 


HUMAN SERVICES COURSES 

445A,B,C,D Practicum in Human Services (3^,3,3) (Formerly Interdisciplinary Center 

445A,B,C,D) 

Practical experience in campus and community settings. Seminar and field placement. 

488 Research Analysis (3) 

The design and interpretation of experiments along humanistic lines. The student will be required 
to design and conduct an experiment as part of the course requirement. 

489 Assessment Seminar (3) 

The candidate for the degree must demonstrate for the Faculty Assessment Team a required number 
of competencies appropriate to his program at a required level of mastery. Course may be 
repeated for credit with approval of the Faculty Assessment Team. 


18-6 1 85 


180 Interdisciplinary Center 

490 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3) 

An introduction to the various approaches to counseling with emphasis upon the applications of 
theories to individual and group counseling situations. Techniques and methods of counseling, 
the counseling relationship, ethics, and problems in counseling. Course should be taken prior to 
or concurrently with the first practicum. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER 

FACULTY 
Paul Obler 
Director 

Gerald Corey, William Lyon 

The Interdisciplinary Center was created out of the conviction that much of the real excitement 
happening in the intellectual world today (and probably other times as well) is at the boundary lines 
where traditional disciplines converge. The concrete reality of the human situation raises problems 
amenable to no facile descriptions or easy solutions — certainly none that any one discipline can 
yield. We are coming more and more to recognize the need for diverse perspectives — that whether 
we are confronting the immense complexity of the modern city or the subtle dimensions of love 
or anxiety, no single frame of reference or specialized knowledge can be sufficient. 

Many of the courses now offered or planned by the center lie outside the province of any single 
department or academic discipline. They challenge students and professors alike to utilize their 
specialized knowledges and yet to go beyond them. A subject like love may be approached from 
historical, psychological, aesthetic or philosophical perspectives. Several courses utilize the comple- 
mentary methodologies of the physical sciences, social sciences, or humanities. It follows that 
interdisciplinary courses frequently involve two or more professors and feature guests from outside 
the academic community. 


INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER COURSES 

301 Psychological Approaches to Literature (3) 

Development of the work of I. A. Richards begun in his Practical Criticism. Psychological experimen- 
tation relevant to understanding errors of interpretation of literary texts. Several experimental 
approaches to understanding errors in interpretation will be described and illustrated. Current 
therapeutic techniques for the development of attitude change. 

303 Yoga (3) 

A study of Yoga: its theories, literature and practices; some methods of meditation taughf Its 
relevance for today's world. 

310 Seminar in Human Sexuality (3) 

The concept of sexuality as it relates to man. Including data regarding sexual practices, their biologi- 
cal and social implications, and their relationship to population and the survival of the species. 

315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

jazz — Its primitive and European roots; cross-cultural description of improvisation. Lectures, demon- 
strations, some concerts. 

318 Character and Conflict: The Struggle for Autonomy (3) 

An exploration — via lectures, discussion and group encounter — into the problems and techniques 
of resolving the conflicts created by the individual's struggle to achieve and maintain personal 
autonomy while living successfully in an automated world. Topics Include: autonomy, masculini- 
ty-feminity, love, sex, marriage, meaning, and encountering others. 

351 Poverty in America (3) 

A study of the extent, causes, consequences and possible cures of poverty in modern America. 
Poverty will be treated as, among other things, a political Issue, and spokesmen from various 
political groups will lecture on their organization's approach to the poverty question. Lectures, 
discussion, some documentary films. 


22--6 1 109 


Interdisciplinary Center 181 

402 Art, Literature and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

An application of theories of consciousness, particularly existential and Jungian, to poems, paintings 
and musical compositions. Intensive encounters between the individual and the art work; oppor- 
tunities at checking one's own responses against those of others and exploring the significance 
of the differences. (Same as Comparative Literature 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

A comparative study of quest narratives which exemplify the Eastern and Western man's search for 
self-identity and fulfillment. Religious, psychological and literary texts will be used to help 
illuminate the comparison. (Same as Comparative Literature 403 and Anthropology 416) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

An examination of the various dimensions of love as found in notable philosophical, psychological 
and literary works. (Same as Comparative Literature 404) 

405 Psychoanalysis and Drama (3) 

A detailed study of Freud's topographic and structural theories and their recent elaborations; the 
application of theory to selected readings in dramatic literature mainly, but also to some fiction, 
poetry and films. (Same as Comparative Literature 405) 

410 Self-Actualization Croup: Experiences in Human Growth (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive small group experiences will assist each individual in 
unleashing his own growth potential and accelerating his own developmental processes. Self- 
actualization and related existential and humanistic concepts will be explored In depth, using 
recently developed methods. Lectures, Individual assignments supplement the class experience. 

411 Croup Process and Leadership (3) 

The impact of the individual on other persons in a group and what takes place in a group, the 
structure and process of a group; the influence of leadership. Theories and concepts of those 
forces operating in a group situation, as well as a first-hand experience in of one's own self in 
a group; feedback on how others see one in a group relation; and involvement in group dynamics. 

412 Special Croup Experiences (3) 

Intensive group experience familiarizing the student with a practical encounter approach and its 
theoretical basis. Sections may be repeated for credit including: transactional analysis group; 
Gestalt group; open couple; guided fantasies; residential marathon group; search for identity; 
therapeutic community; existential group; and other experimental group approaches. 

421 Great 19th-Century Revolutionaries: Darwin, Marx, Freud (3) 

Consideration of the three great 19th-century revolutionaries, Darwin, Marx and Freud, with a 
purpose of discovering the force of their impact on 20th-century society. Their major literary 
works will be discussed and their biographies studied to determine why they became revolutio- 
naries. 

422 Jewish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

A description and analysis of Jewish mysticism, and its comparison with other systems of mysticism 
from different cultures. (Same as Anthropology 422) 

450 The Way (3) 

An exploration of sensory awareness, interpersonal relations, dreams, body language through study 
and through laboratory sessions in Gestalt theory. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and philosophers as Freud, Spen- 
gler, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. (Same as English 451) 

452 Student Protest (3) 

The dynamics of student protest with major attention given to contemporary activities In the United 
States. (Same as Political Science 417) 

470 Seminar Interdisciplinary Issues (3) 

Concentrated study each year of a different key issue approached from an interdisciplinary view and 
frequently combined with two or three courses in other departments to form a nine-hour block. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with consent of instructor and program coordinator. May 
be repeated for credit. 


27—6 1 130 


182 Latin American Studies 


799 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with consent of instructor and program coordinator. May 
be repeated for credit. 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Thomas Flickema 
Director 

Oswaldo Arana (Foreign Languages), Nancy Baden (Foreign Languages), David Feldman (Linguis- 
tics), Frank Hatch (Dance), Paul Kane (Education), William Ketteringham (Geography), Martin 
Klein (Communications), John Lafky (Economics), Leroy joesink-Mandeville (Anthropology), 
Neil Maloney (Earth Science), Ivan Richardson ‘(Political Science), Edgar Wiley (Management), 
Jon Yinger (Political Science) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The B.A. in Latin American Studies is an interdisciplinary program organized and taught by faculty 
from numerous fields with special training and fieldwork in Latin America. 

The program is designed for students desiring a general education with specific knowledge about 
Latin America. It is designed for students planning careers which will necessitate residence in or 
knowledge of Latin America, such as teaching, business, scientific research, engineering, journalism 
or government service. It Is also designed for students who are planning to teach Spanish or social 
studies In the secondary schools. The program serves as a sound base for students preparing for 
graduate work In Latin American studies or In specific disciplines with a specialization in the region 
of Latin America. 

Foundation Courses: 

Language: All students in the program should develop a proficiency level in language measured 
by Spanish 204 and Portuguese 102. (This need may be met by completion of the above courses, 
their equivalents, or by passing requirements as stated by the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures). 

Required Core Courses: 

Language: Spanlsh.317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 
or Portuguese 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Literature: Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature from Modernismo to the Present (3) 
or Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

History and Culture: Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) 
or Portuguese 325 Introduction to Luzo-Brazillan Culture and Civilization (3) 

History 350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

History 350B Republican Latin America (3) 

Recommended Selected Concentrations: IS units selected from three or more of the following 
groupings: 

Culture: 

Portuguese 315 Introduction to Luzo-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Portuguese 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 
or Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Portuguese 325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 
or Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish- American Civilization (3) 

Anthropology 322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

• University administrative officer 


30-6 


145 


Latin American Studies 183 


Fine Arts and Literature: 

Art 462 Art of Mesoamerica (3) 

Art 471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3) 
or Spanish 441 Spanish>American Literature (3) 

Spanish 440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

History and Politics: 

History 450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

History 453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

History 453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

History 454 Argentina, Brazil, Chile (3) 

Political Science 438 Latin American Interest Croups (3) 

Geography and Economics: 

Geography 333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Geography 433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 
Economics 330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

Senior Seminar: 

Latin American Studies 401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

For courses within the Latin American studies program which originate In other departments, the 
students should refer to the department originating the course for the description. 

Anthropology 

322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Art 

462 Art of Mesoamerica (3) 

471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

411 International Trade (3) 

Geography 

333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

History 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

350B Republican Latin America (3) 

450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

454 Argentina, Brazil, Chile (3) 

Latin American Studies 

100 Introduction to Latin America (3) 

A team-taught Introductory course on topics relevant to Latin America which uses an Interdiscipli- 
nary approach. Core areas include man, environment, society, institutions and culture. 


33—6 1 160 


1 84 Liben! Studies 


401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary team-taught senior seminar on topics relevant 
to contemporary Latin America. The exact content of the course will vary depending upon the 
faculty and present conditions within Latin America. May be repeated for credit. 

Political Science 

438 Latin American Interest Croups (3) 

Portuguese 

315 Introduction to Luzo>Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Spanish 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Michael Tang 
Director 
PART-TIME 

Francis Collea (Science Education), Sandra Sutphen (Political Science), David Pivar (American 
Studies), Norman Townshend-Zellner (Economics), Ann Untereiner (American Studies), Wayne 
Untereiner (Anthropology) 

BOARD MEMBERS 

Marvin Rosen, Chairman (Communications), John Farrington (Liberal Studies Student), Dagoberto 
Fuentes (Chicano Studies), Bernard Kravitz (Education), Pat Lackey (Sociology), Joseph Landon 
(Music), Miles McCarthy (Biology),* David Pivar (American Studies), Otto Sadovszky (An- 
thropology),* Donald Sears (English), Geoffrey St. John (Liberal Studies Student), Norman Town- 
shend-Zellner (Economics), Elena Tumas (English), Wayne Untereiner (Anthropology) 

Policy for the liberal studies program is determined by an interdisciplinary board of liberal studies. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES 

The degree program in liberal studies is Interdisciplinary, involving the interactions of two or more 
different disciplines. These Interactions may range from simple communication of Ideas among 
disciplines to the mutual Integration of organizing concepts, methodology, procedures, epistemolo- 
gy, terminology and data. 

The liberal studies program affirms that specialized higher education is not appropriate for every 
individual student or for every social purpose; and that a liberal or generalist type of education has 
great value for both individuals and society. Emergent technologies, the complexities of urban life, 
the challenges to and reformulations of our values, the new modes of thinking and experierKing 
required of modern man — all demand a reconceptualization and resynthesis Into a truly contempo- 
rary liberal education. The liberal studies program is designed to explore and evolve the appropriate 
ideas and Ideals for "'educated'" man in his current and future circumstances. 

The program in liberal studies is considerably more than the simple absence of specialization — it has 
its own purposefully structured form and contents. For Its primary goals, the program stresses 
problem-formulation and problem-solving, using the most appropriate methodologies and theories 
available. The program emphasizes and focuses upon the student's own foundational synthesis of 
experiences and knowledge to achieve new and more effective levels of awareness, skills, multidi- 
mensional perspectives, and useful action attitudes and techniques. To achieve these goals, the 
program develops the following competencies in its majors: 


• University adn^inistrative officer 


37—6 1 180 


Liberal Studies 1 85 


1 . The capacities to inventory, evaluate and integrate knowledge; 

2. The capacities to describe, explain and evaluate within a framework of interdisciplinary ideas and 
information; 

3. The competencies to see the common denominators and recurrent dilemmas as well as the 
distinctive differences and unique contributions in each of the great institutional or specialized 
areas of knowledge and creative endeavor; 

4. The capacities to combine breadth of perspective with depth of understanding so that the nature 
and boundaries of new experiences and problems can be expressed, specified and delineated; 

5. The capacities to transform such perceptions and diagnoses into either effective forms of artistic 
expression or social and individual actions; and 

6. The capacities to be effective in communication for different modes of inquiry, purposes and 
types of audiences — competencies to speak, write and persuade with authenticity, clarity, preci- 
sion and style and effectively to strengthen such communication through nonverbal and artistic 
means. 

As the primary organizing framework in the liberal studies program, each student focuses on a broad, 
complex problem, issue, or theme of his own choosing and pursues it through an individualized study 
plan in consultation with faculty advisers. In addition to providing a valuable experience, perse, in 
higher education, the liberal studies degree program can help the student prepare for a career or 
profession. It may, for example, provide a diversified degree appropriate for students seeking an 
elementary teaching credential. The student's choice of an appropriate theme, problem or issue can 
make the program a valuable background experience to other careers or professions as well, (for 
example, a prelaw student might choose as his area of inquiry In liberal studies, "Equality and 
Inequality In Society".) 

The total liberal studies major requires 48 units of coursework consisting of: (1) required liberal 
studies courses (21 units); and (2) an individualized program of approved and coordinated courses 
drawn, universitywide, from other disciplines (27 units). 

1. Liberal studies courses listed in the approved degree program: 

Units 


101 Introduction to Liberal Studies 3 

• 201 Liberal Studies in Humanities and Arts 3 

• 202 Liberal Studies in Science and Mathematics 3 

• 203 Liberal Studies in Social Sciences 3 

301 Proseminar in Liberal Studies 3 

480 Practicum in Liberal Studies 3 

490 Seminar in Liberal Studies _3 

21 

2. Individualized program of approved, coordinated courses drawn from other disciplines 

to develop a study plan based on an integrating problem, issue or theme.** .... ^ 

Total required 48 


(Since the liberal studies program was initiated in fall 1972, students are urged to consult the Liberal 
Studies Program Office and the current Class Schedule for a full listing and description of liberal 
studies courses.) 

* Each department or program may offer a course with interdtscipHrtary focus to fulfill this requirement The course wiH be cross-listed 
with liberal studies by mutual agreement. 

** Of the 27 program units, at least six upper division ur>its must be elected in each of the three broad areas: humanities and the 
arts; scieiKre and mathematics; and social scierKes. In at least one of these areas, 12 upper division units must be taken. The 
Board of Liberal Studies must approve of the study plan under the individualized program. 


41-6 1 200 


186 Russian Area Studies 

LIBERAL STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Liberal Studies (3) 

Focus on the concept of liberal studies. Definition of interdisciplinarity and its relation to disciplines 
in natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. Consideration of knowledge that gener- 
ates new knowledge. Preparation of student for an integrated general education program. 

301 Proseminar in Liberal Studies (3) 

Facilitates the integration of knowledge by focusing upon a common subject, problem, or phe- 
nomenon from various perspectives. The course's practical outcome will be a study proposal to 
be submitted to the Board of Liberal Studies for approval. 

324 World Literature to IbSO (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 324) 

325 World Literature 1650 to Present (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 325) 

RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Robert Feldman 
Director 

Charles Frazee (History), Ronald Helin (Geography), Karl Kahrs (Political Science), Peter Koep- 
ping (Anthropology), Harvey Mayer (Foreign Languages), Joyce PIckersglll (Economics), John 
Shippee (Political Science), Ted Smythe (Communications), Elena Tumas (Comparative Litera- 
ture), Bruce Wright (Political Science), Michael Yessis (Physical Education) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES 

The Russian area studies major is an interdisciplinary program designed for students interested in 
the language, literature, politics, history, economics, ideology, customs and geography of the Soviet 
Union. In addition to fulfilling the various cultural objectives common to any liberal arts program, 
the Russian area studies major provides a foundation for teaching the Russian language and social 
studies on the elementary and secondary levels. This major serves especially the needs of students 
intending to pursue graduate studies and those who foresee employment in government and profes- 
sions that demand a regional as well as traditional orientation. 

To qualify for this major, a student must complete (1) 16 units of Russian language or their 
equivalent, (2) 24 units of upper division Russian area courses from at least four of the following 
fields: comparative literature, economics, geography, political science, history, foreign language, (3) 
1 5 units of upper division coursework in a related discipline to be determined in consultation with 
a Russian area counselor. Students are encouraged to have these units apply toward a second major 
in a traditional discipline. 


RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES COURSES 

All courses within the Russian area studies program originate in other departments within the 
university. Students should refer to the department originating the course for description. 

Anthropology 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


51 ^ 1 290 


Social Sciences 


187 


Communications 
499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Comparative Literature 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

374 Contemporary Russian Literature (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Foreign Language: Russian 
315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition 3) 

375 Introduction to Literary Form (3) 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

431 Early Russian Literature (3) 

441 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature, (3) 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Geography 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

History 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

434B Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime (3) 

437 East Europe Since 1815 (3) 

491 Proseminar (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Political Science 

430 Government and Politics of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

431 Government and Politics of Authoritarian Systems (3). 

443 Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

PROGRAM IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

FACULTY 

Lawrence de Craaf (History) 

Graduate Program Adviser 
ADVISORY BOARD 

Giles Brown (Graduate Studies), Marlene de Rios (Anthropology), Franz Dolp (Economics), Nor- 
ma Fimbres (Chicano Studies), Barry Gerber (Political Science), Wacira Gethaiga (Afro-Ethnic 
Studies), William Puzo (Geography), Joseph Thomas (Psychology), Clarence Tygart (Sociology), 
James Weaver (American Studies), James Young (School of Humanities and Social Sciences) 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

This degree encompasses a series of coordinated programs of graduate studies, which emphasize 
the examination of human behavior and its relation to social institutions. These programs have the 
common purpose of exposing students to diverse methodologies, establishing the relationship be- 
tween disciplines, and providing the student with the opportunity to explore a selected area from 
a variety of intellectual perspectives. 


55—6 1 270 


1 88 Social Sciences 


The social sciences include the following related fields: Afro-ethnic studies, American studies, 
Anthropology, Chicano studies, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and 
sociology. 

This degree Is designed to provide interdisciplinary insights and tools for those students who are 
interested In (a) pursuing careers In government and business; (b) elementary or secondary teach- 
ing In the area of social studies; (c) a graduate program to complement their undergraduate degree 
in social science, liberal studies, area studies or other similar interdisciplinary programs; or (d) a 
custom tailored-program of advanced study In the liberal arts. 

Prerequisites 

It is recommended that an incoming student should have an undergraduate major or the equivalent 
in one of the social sciences and substantial work in other social science fields.* The graduate 
program adviser will determine equivalence to major. 

An Incoming student must have a grade-point average of 3.0 in upper division (undergraduate) 


social sciences courses. 

Study Plan 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: Units 

1 . Social Sciences Core 6 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Theories (3) 

501 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Methods (3) 

2. Multidisciplinary Core 21 

Minimum 5(X)-level units (9) 

Maximum undergraduate units (12) 


The 21 units must be taken in at least two and generally three social science fields. At least nine 
of these units must be 500-level or graduate courses. At least two fields should be represented 
in the graduate units. 

3. Project 3 

597 Project (3) 

Every student will prepare a project, particulars of which will be defined by the committee for 
the student. The norm for a project Is a written essay, but equivalent work in other forms or 
media may be accepted. Projects will be tailored to reflect the focus of the student's Interdisci- 
plinary effort. 

Total 30 

The social sciences include the following related fields: anthropology, economics, geography, his- 
tory, political science, psychology and sociology. 

For further Information, consult the graduate program adviser. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSES 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Theories (3) 

A seminar providing a philosophical and theoretical basis for graduate work in the area of social 
science. It will focus on the Interrelationships which exist among the various social sciences as 
they relate to man In his social, physical and political environment. 

501 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Methods (3) 

Analytical comparison of the historical, humanistic and scientific methodologies in the social 
sciences. This seminar will also deal with the contemporary trends in the social sciences methods. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

• The prerequisite for “subsUntial work” will vary among departments and according to the specific courses within some depart- 
ments. Lack of substantial work in one or more fields will not ordmarily bar a student from admission b(X will result in one or 
more additional courses being required before the student may be classified. 


63—6 1 310 


Special Major 189 


599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Open to graduate students in social science with the consent of program adviser or coordinator. May 
be repeated for credit. 

SPECIAL MAJOR PROGRAM 

From the total curriculum of the university, students may wish to plan a specially designed program 
of study that does not duplicate significantly any existing major or concentration at Cal State 
Fullerton. The special major (B.A. or M.A.) provides opportunities for selected students to pursue 
individualized programs of study leading to a degree when: legitimate academic and professional 
goals can be satisfied by a judicious selection of courses from two or more fields; and these alms 
cannot be satisfied by the authorized, standard degree majors that are available on the campus. This 
major, designed for exceptional cases of individual students only, provides an opportunity to develop 
concentrations or specializations outside the framework of existing majors, dt is not intended as a 
means of bypassing normal graduation requirements or as a means by which students may graduate 
who fait to complete the degree major in which they are enrolled.) 

The following guidelines will govern the special major B.A.: 

1 . Initial counseling, record-keeping and faculty referrals for the program will be the responsibility 
of the Office of Academic Advisement. 

2. A faculty, special major adviser will work informally with the student who desires a special 
major to develop a suitable plan of coursework for subsequent approval. 

3. A special major faculty advisory committee, appointed by the Curriculum Committee, will 
review the requests for admission and make recommendations regarding each proposed pro- 
gram to the Office of the Vice President, Academic Affairs. The formal request for admission 
to the special major pogram should include: the academic and professional reasons for wanting 
the program; a list of specific courses, which may include alternatives and electives, that has 
been developed with and approved by the faculty adviser (the relevance of each course to 
the special major should be explained); and justification that the program of courses being 
proposed does not significantly duplicate any existing degree programs. 

Programs which give indication of a jurisdictional conflict, whether by virtue of their title or 
course content, shall require consultation of concerned departments. Evidence of such ap- 
proval shall be attached to the proposal. In case of disagreement, the dispute will be resolved 
in accordance with University Policy Statement (UPS) 411.102. 

4. Final approval for a student to be admitted to the special major will rest with the Office of the 
Vice President, Academic Affairs. 

5. Following approval of the special major plan, the faculty adviser will be responsible for 
subsequent counseling and graduation certification. 

6. Entrance to the special major is normally at the beginning of the junior year (60 units remaining 
for graduation). Under no conditions may a student enter the special major with less than 30 
units remaining for graduation. 

7. The minimum requirements for a special major degree should be a program of at least 24 
semester units of upper division work recommended by the student's faculty adviser. 

8. Neither lower division nor upper division courses applied to general education-breadth require- 
ments will be applicable toward the minimum, special major degree requirements. 

The following guidelines will govern the special major, M.A.: 

1 . A graduate student desiring to work for a master's degree with a special major will prepare a 
proposal in writing including justification for the request. 

2. This proposal, accompanied by statements from three professors who agree to serve on the 
student's graduate advisement committee, will be submitted for approval to the Special Major 
Advisory Committee, to the appropriate academic officers in the areas where coursework will 
be taken and to the dean of graduate studies (representing the vice president, academic 
affairs). 

Programs which give indication of a jurisdictional conflict, whether by virtue of their title or 
course content, shall require consultation of concerned departments. Evidence of such ap- 
proval shall be attached to the proposal. In case of disagreement, the dispute will be resolved 
in accordance with UPS 411.102. 


68-6 1 339 


190 Technological Studies 

3. Upon approval of the general plan, the student and the committee will develop a formal and 
detailed program of study, which may include prerequisites. The study plan must conform to 
all university regulations governing graduate work. 

4. The dean of graduate studies then will approve the program of study and grant classified status 
in accordance with existing policies. 

5. After admission (classified status), the student will follow all university policies and procedures 
for graduate work as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin and this catalog. 

6. Upon completion of requirements for the master's degree (including a thesis, project or 
comprehensive examination), the master's degree with a special major may be awarded in 
conformity with university policy. 

TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Barry Gerber 
Acting Director 

Roger Dittman (Physics), Christopher Hulse (Anthropology), Michael Lee (Art), Marvin Rosen 
(Communications), Edward Sowell (Engineering), Imre Sutton (Geography), Michael Tang 
(Liberal Studies), James Woodward (History) 

The technological studies program was established to conduct special programs of studies and to 
provide course offerings which cut across related disciplines. Activities of the technological studies 
program are interdisciplinary and include a reference center and curriculum In technological studies 
as well as special activities such as the construction of the technological studies geodesic dome. 
This program brings together courses from several disciplines on the nature and impacts of technol- 
ogy and methods of analysis. The general focus of the program is on study of interdisciplinary 
methods and techniques for analyzing technological change; technology transfer and applications; 
and analysis of the impacts of technological change on society. 

The program provides an area for special study within recognized major fields of studies. Students 
may take separate courses or develop an individualized program of studies based on courses, 
directed readings and research participation. Wherever possible courses are conducted as seminars 
and bring together lecturers from relevant disciplines included in the sciences and humanities. 
Through Independent studies students are encouraged to pursue topics or problems of special 
Interest beyond the scope of regular courses under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The techno- 
logical studies program is directly coordinated with the activities of departments and other programs 
of the university. 

The Man and Technology Program 

Man and Technology, a program developed jointly between the technological studies program and 
the Division of Engineering, directed to the study of man In the man-made world, the relationship 
between technology and the human condition. The program (1) enables engineering students to 
meet social science and general education requirements of the Division of Engineering by engaging 
In studies closely akin to their major studies; (2) provides a general course of study for students of 
other technologically oriented disciplines of the university; (3) makes available to nonengineering 
students a set of general education courses in the analysis and solution of engineering problems; and 
(4) provides a meeting ground for faculty and students concentrating in different fields of study 
through participation in Interdisciplinary studies of technology. 


TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES COURSES 

100 Introduction to Technological Studies (3) 

An examination. In survey form, of questions about the development of human technologies. 
Examination of the various theories and methodologies which can be applied to the study of the 
role of technology in the process of cultural and social development. 


73—6 1 360 


Technological Studies 1 91 


211 Technology for Man (3) 

An assessment of the special requirements of human beings in relation to technological develop- 
ment. Explores, in various ways, the natural and cultural human needs which a technologist might 
consider when he creates a piece of technology. 

300 Culture and Technology (3) 

A survey of the impacts of technology on culture In general and of culture in general on technology. 
410 Society and Technology (3) 

The analysis of the relationship between technological development and various aspects of social 
reality. 

420 Theories of Technological Change (3) 

An examination of normative and fact-oriented theories concerning technological development. 
430 Ideology and Technology (3) 

An examination of the development and meaning of contemporary technological society: technoc- 
racy, technostructure, cybernetics and cyberculture, and associated changes in ideology. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Students can pursue topics of special interest beyond the scope of regular courses under the 
supervision of a faculty adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, and normally 
culminates in a paper, project, comprehensive examination or performance. May be repeated, 
however consent of supervising professor is required. 

(Sponsored by the Technological Studies Program) 

Economics 

370 Economics of Research and Development and Technological Change (3) 
Engineering 

417 Engineering Economy (2) 

423 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

History 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) 

Topic: The American Response to Technological Development. Examination of the historical 
consequences of technological change for American society including the reception of techno- 
logical images, symbols, and myths Into the culture; the adaptation of institutions to imperative 
needs for technological Innovation; and the changing status of technologists. 

Management 

545 Research and Development Project Management (3) 

Science Education 

461 Development of Science and Technology (3) 

Science and Mathematics Education 
470 Evolution of Scientific Ideas (3) 


77—6 


380 



H44S2 


EDUCATION 


92r-6 1 380 





\ 


\ 










195 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Dean: Robert T. Stout 


DIVISION OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Chairman: Ernest Lake 

PROGRAMS IN PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

FACULTY 
Marilyn Bates 
Program Coordinator 
Clarence Johnson, David Keirsey 

PART-TIME 

Edwin Carrigan, LeRoy Cordrey, Lang Dana, Vicki Dendinger, Barbara Griffin, Donald Hays, Eleanor 
Hicks, William Long, Bailey McCune, Walter Retzlaff, Donald Ridge, John Seeland 

PROGRAMS IN READING 

FACULTY 
Hazel Croy 
Program Coordinator 

Adelina Gutweiler, Ruth May, Deborah Osen, George Schick, Richard Windmiller 
PART-TIME 

Clayton Credell, Helen Herold, Dorothy Klausner, Joseph Lucero 

PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRA TION 
FACULTY 
Ernest Lake 
Program Coordinator 

Walter Beckman, Kenneth Preble, Stanley Rothstein 
PART-TIME 

Spencer Covert, Robert Jenkins, Donald Jordan, Charles Kenney, Ernest Norton, David Paynter, 
Walter Pray, John Rajcic, Robert Stout 

PROGRAMS IN SPECIAL EDUCA TION 
FACULTY 
Calvin Nelson 
Program Coordinator 

Robert Lemmon, Lester March, Leo Schmidt, Shirl Stark 

The courses, programs, and services of the Division of Special Programs are directed toward the 
following objectives of students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with a concentration in reading, school counseling, school 
administration or special education. 

2. Preservice education leading to the standard designated services credentials with specializa- 
tions in pupil personnel services. 

3. Preservice teacher education for teachers of the educationally handicapped and the mentally 
retarded. 

4. Professional training for staff serving in pupil personnel, reading, school administration and 
special education positions. 

5. In-service programs for special services personnel. 


95-6 1 395 


196 Education 


PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION 

1. Graduate Programs in Pupil Personnel Services 

2. Graduate Programs In Special Education 

3. Master of Science In Education, Reading 

4. Master of Science in Education, School Administration 

5. Preparation of Teachers of the Mentally Retarded Children Programs 

6. Special Education Newsletter 

PROGRAMS IN PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The pupil personnel services program is focused on the competencies which students acquire. 
Students who exit from the program as graduates will be certified by the faculty as having demon- 
strated to a specified degree, a specified set of competencies. Curricula are offered leading to 1 ) 
the degree of Master of Science In Education, School Counseling, 2) credentials in counseling, 
psychometry and school psychology, and 3) academic preparation for the examinations toward 
licensure as a marriage, child and family counselor and an educational psychologist. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

School Counseling 

Prerequisites 

1 . Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution 

2. Teaching experience or other approved experience 

3. An approved major 

4. A grade-point average of 2.5 overall 

5. Specified course prerequisites completed or In progress: 

Educ 452 (3 units); Educ 550 (3 units) 

6. Satisfactory Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test scores 

7. Satisfactory Interview, references and autobiography 

Study Plan 

The following information is provided to assist students in planning programs and in seeking admis- 
sion to classified graduate status. Students should consult the Graduate Bulletin for information 
concerning standards for graduate study, steps in the master's degree program, and graduate policies 
and procedures. Thirty semester units of graduate work, specified on a formal study plan approved 
by the graduate adviser, must be completed within five years. The units are to be distributed as 
follows: 

Units 


Master's degree studies, supporting courses 9 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Adviser-approved courses (6) 

Courses for the concentration in school counseling 21 


Educ 551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) 

Educ 552 Croup Processes in Counseling and Guidance (3) 

Educ 553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs (3) 

Educ 555 Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study (3) 

Educ 559A Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (3) 

Educ 559B Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (3) 

Educ 598 Thesis, or Educ 597 Project, or Educ 595 Advanced Studies (Includes 
Comprehensive) (3) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further information, consult the program graduate adviser 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

The program of pupil personnel services in education offers work toward the basic pupil personnel 
credentials with authorization for counseling, psychometry and psychology. Students are asked to 
check with an adviser to plan a program of study. 

The program offers work under the Standard Designated Services Credential of 1964 and the 1970 


100-« 1 420 


Education 197 


''Approved Program" revision of the Standard Designated Services Credential. The Standard Desig- 
nated Services Credential of 1964 requires a master's degree and 60 units of postgraduate work. The 
1970 State Board of Education revision requires a postgraduate program of work as follows: 

School Counseling 

Required professional background for Standard Designated Services Credential: Pupil Counseling • 
(1970 Revision of Fisher Act) 

1. Educ 452 Principles of Guidance (3) 

2. Educ 550 Counseling Theories and Processes (3) 

3. Educ 551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) 

4. Educ 552 Group Processes in Counseling and Guidance (3) 

5. Educ 553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs (3) 

6. Educ 555 Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study (3) 

7. Educ 559A,B Fieldwork In Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (3,3)* 

8. Educ 596 Graduate Educational Practicum (6) 

9. Certification of competency as pupil counselor (signature obtained from at least two pupil 
personnel faculty) 

School Psychometry 

To become a candidate for the school psychometry credential, the following are prerequisites: 

1. Completion of the counseling credential training program (outlined previously) or Issuance of 
a pupil personnel services credential In counseling, on a clear basis, by the California State 
Department of Education. 

2. Completion of prescribed coursework Including supervised fieldwork in psychometry and 
certification of competency as a psychometrist by pupil personnel faculty. 

School Psychology 

Candidates for the school psychology authorization must hold a pupil personnel services credential 
authorizing counseling and psychometry, must have an acceptable master's degree, must complete 
prescribed coursework including supervised fieldwork In school psychology, and must be certified 
competent as a school psychologist by pupil personnel faculty. 


PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES COURSES 

452 Principles of Guidance (3) 

A didactic and experiential approach to intervention work in the helping professions. This screening 
course Is designed to give class members opportunity to "sample" the field of counseling before 
making further career commitment. 

500 Survey of Collegiate Student Personnel Services (3) 

History, philosophy, objectives, organization and administration of collegiate student personnel 
services (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

550 Counseling Theories and Processes (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 452 or consent of instructors. Team-taught seminar In the dynamics of 16 coun- 
selor-client relationships, addressing competencies in both theory and practice of counseling, 
therapy and consulting. Large and small group instructional formats Include lectures, demonstra- 
tions, coaching, discussions, experiential, multimedia and autoinstructional modules. 

551 Educational and Career Orientation (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 550 or consent of Instructors. Team-taught seminar In the theory and practice of 
career and educational development, with emphasis on a systems and self-study approach. 
Curriculum implications of group test data, development of educational and occupational re- 
sources, and educational and career counseling competencies are emphasized. 

• Admission to fieldwork should be requested on appropriate form at least one semester before a student expects to enroll. Students 
must have completed a minimum of six pupil personnel related units at Cal State Fullerton and obtain adviser's approval. 


106-6 1 445 


198 Education 


552 Croup Processes in Counseling and Guidance (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 550 or consent of instructors. Team-taught seminar in intensive study of groups 
emphasizing clinical group leadership training. Lecture, demonstration, coaching and experiential 
learning opportunities are offered toward competencies in interactive and didactic group proc- 
esses originating from a variety of theoretical orientations appropriate to child and family coun- 
seling. 

553 Administration and Organization of Pupil Personnel Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 551 or consent of instructor. Seminar in the management of pupil personnel 
human and information systems. Consideration of supervision, organization and administration 
of pupil services units, leading to competencies in research, development and maintenance of 
pupil services. Includes laws relating to family, children, and child welfare. 

555 Dynamics of Individual Behavior and Case Study (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 452 or consent of Instructor. Seminar in clinical study of techniques of diagnosis 
and detection of abnormal and normal traits, types, interpersonal dyads and membership groups. 
Psychodiagnostic work with tests. Inventories, observations and Interviews appropriate to child 
and family counseling. 

556 Advanced Individual and Croup Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 550, 552 or consent of instructor. An advanced team-taught seminar in Individual 
and group intervention techniques stemming from a variety of theoretical orientations. Members 
will acquire high level competencies appropriate for therapy (counseling and consulting) with 
children, marriages, and families. 

557 Seminar in School Psychology: A Contemporary Overview of Professional Aspects and 
Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced seminar In school psychology Including professional 
ethics, issues, and problems, school and community service, legislation, supervision in Individual 
treatment services. Initiating and developing district level research, counseling and consultation 
functions of a school psychologist will be stressed. 

558A School Psychology: Seminar in Problems in Personality Diagnosis (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar in personality assessment. Advanced experience in the 
clinical case study, application of the structures and dynamics of individuals and groups to 
symptomatic behavior. 

558B School Psychology: Seminar in Problems of Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar In problems of learning and metalearning. Advanced 
work in diagnostic testing, clinical Interview and interpretation of data, diagnosis and remediation 
of learning, effort. Interpersonal and personal problems, advanced work in dysfunctional com- 
munication. 

559A,B Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Counseling (2-6) 

Prerequisites: Educ 551, 552, 555 and consent of Instructor. Student will work in his local school 
and/or other institutional setting under supervision of a local coordinator and university staff. 
Assignments are on an Individual basis. Students will also meet in weekly seminar. May be 
repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 units. 

559C Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: Psychometry (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 559A,B and consent of instructor. Students will participate In psychometry 
activities in their local setting under the supervision of a local coordinator and university staff. 
Work assignments are made on an Individual ba^sis. May be repeated for credit. 

559D Fieldwork in Pupil Personnel Services: School Psychology (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Educ 559A,B,C and consent of Instructor. Fieldwork in psychological services In the 
school and/or other institutional settings under the supervision of a local coordinator and 
university staff. Assignments are made on an Individual basis. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas as behavior, 
teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, communication theory and 
Interpersonal relations. May be repieated for credit. 

5% Graduate Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conduct at a graduate level an educational practicum experience 
with an individual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units. 


120--6 1 520 





Education 201 


597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue 
independent inquiry. 

PROGRAMS IN READING 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
Reading 

A program of graduate studies leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education, Reading, 
is authorized by The California State University and Colleges Board of Trustees. The program is 
designed to help qualified individuals gain the technical knowledge and scholarship requisite to 
becoming reading specialists. This professional program Is based on and combined with sound 
preparation in the liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum proposes an interdisciplinary approach 
to the preparation of the professional specialist in the area of reading. Thus, those who qualify for 
the degree must complete a specified amount of their coursework In such fields as linguistics, English, 
sociology, speech communication, theatre or psychology. 

Prerequisites 

Once the student has been notified of his acceptance into the university master's degree program, 
he must complete an application for admission to the reading program. He must then confer with 
the program graduate adviser to discuss the following prerequisites which should be fulfilled for 
classified status in the program: 

1 . A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university 

2. Successful teaching experience or other approved experience 

3. An approved major 

4. A grade-point average of 2.5 or better In academic and related work 

5. Sufficient background In reading 

6. Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test 

7. Four references from school administrators, school supervisors, or professors 

8. A satisfactory interview 

Study Plan 

The final adviser-approved program of coursework for the degree must include: 


Units 

Master's degree studies, supporting courses 6-9 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Adviser-approved courses in supporting disciplines (3-6) 

Courses for the concentration in reading 22-25 

Educ 506 Curriculum and Research in Reading (3) 

Educ 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Educ 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (3) 


Educ 582 Analysis of Corrective Reading Practices (3) or 
Educ 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Educ 583 A Remedial Reading Casework (3) 

Educ 583B Remedial Reading Casework (3) 

Educ 595 Advanced Studies (includes comprehensive) (1) or 
Educ 597 Project ( 1 ) or 
Educ 598 Thesis (1) 


One of the following 

Educ 507 Current Trends In Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) 


3 


202 Education 


Units 


Educ 508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School O) 

Educ 517 Educational Testing (3) 

Educ 518 Behavioral Problems In Teaching (3) 

Educ 519 The Principal's Role in the Effective School Reading Program (3) 

Educ 582 Analysis of Corrective Reading Practices (3) 

Educ 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Educ 585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 

Total 31 

For advisement and further Information, consult the program graduate adviser. 

Lower division courses In reading (Education 101, 201 and 202) and an upper division course 
(Education 320) are designed to assist students in developing the critical and creative reading skills 
required for efficient university learning. Education 480 presents an overview of reading education 
(K-adult) and prepares teachers to assess reading skills and build a curriculum based on the results 
of continuing assessment. 


READING COURSES 

101 Reading Development (1) 

An elective course for students who wish to Improve their reading efficiency. May be repeated for 
a maximum of three units of credit. 

201 Critical Reading Skills (3) 

Development of study-skills including textbook analysis, note-taking and study techniques, prepara- 
tion for examinations and written reports. Close critical reading of selected writings for thorough 
understanding of general meaning. 

202 Vocabulary Building (3) 

Development of individual vocabulary through study of characteristics of the language usage, word 
formation exercises, dictionary practice. Selected reading. 

320 Power Reading (3) 

Intensive approach to reading improvement intended for the upper division student, with particular 
emphasis on improvement of rate and comprehension, study skills and critical analysis. Not 
intended for student who has taken Educ 201 or has more than one unit of credit for Educ 101. 

480 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

Curriculum and methods in the teaching of reading in the elementary and secondary schools. 
Examination and analysis of the approaches to reading in teachers' manuals and guides. Practical 
experience in preparing lessons in classroom teaching of reading. 

506 Curriculum and Research in Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of curriculum and research In reading, including materials, 
organization and methods of instruction. 

507 Current Trends in Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Recent research findings on the learner, the teacher, approaches, 
materials and facilities in the teaching of reading at secondary and college levels. 

508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division or graduate status. Current trends in the teaching of elementary reading, 
focusing on the teacher as diagnostician and the reading process as continuous and developmen- 
tal for all learners. 

516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisites: teaching experience, Educ 506 or consent of Instructor. Studies of the factors underly- 
ing learning disabilities In reading in children, adolescents and young adults. 

517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Survey of Individual and group Intelligence, 
achievement, interest, aptitude, vocational and personality tests. Theory and practical application 
of Individual and group tests used with students having learning problems. 

518 Behavioral Problems in Teaching Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of Instructor. Practical application of psychological princi- 
ples to the diagnosis and management of behavioral problems In elementary and secondary 
reading classrooms. 


129—6 1 555 


Education 203 


519 The Principal's Role in the Effective School Reading Program (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing — preservice or inservice principal. Includes techniques for develop- 
ing the philosophy, goals and objectives of the school reading program consistent with the PPBS 
format procedures for assessing and developing students' reading ability and methods for provid- 
ing faculty inservice experiences in reading. 

581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor's degree, teaching experience. Standard Teaching Credential, Educ 506 or 
consent of instructor. Analysis and diagnosis of reading difficulties. Techniques and methods of 
prevention and treatment. Individual remediation of student. Primary through secondary. 

582 Analysis of Corrective Reading Practices (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 516, 581 and consent of instructor. Critical evaluation of reading and remedial 
reading practices. Short-term project In a school situation. 

583A,B Remedial Reading Casework (3;i) 

Prerequisites: Educ 582 and consent of instructor. Fieldwork in diagnosis and remediation in reading 
through casework technique. Conferences with teachers, parents, consultants, and administra- 
tors. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

A study of linguistics and Its Influence on reading materials and instruction. An analysis of trends 
in reading and changes affected by the science of linguistics. 

585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 

Study of word perception skills in the process of learning to read. A developmental hygiene of child 
vision. Visual anomalies and their applications to reading disorders. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies In such areas as behavior, 
teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, communication theory and 
interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the Instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue Independ- 
ent inquiry. 

PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
School Administration 

A program of graduate studies leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education with a 
concentration in school administration has been authorized by the California State University and 
Colleges Board of Trustees. The principal objective of the curriculum is to prepare carefully selected 
Individuals for certain leadership positions in school administration. 

The program is designed to help these Individuals gain the technical knowledge and scholarship 
requisite to high achievement In these positions. This professional program is based on and com- 
bined with sound preparation in the liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum proposes an Interdisci- 
plinary approach to the preparation of the professional specialist In public education. Thus, those 
who qualify for the degree should have completed coursework in such fields as philosophy, public 
administration, psychology, political science, biology, English, sociology, economics, anthropology 
or history. 

Prerequisites 

A student desiring to enter the program should complete the following requirements: 

1 . A baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution. 

2. A successful teaching experience in an elementary or secondary school, or community college. 
Is desirable. If such experience Is not available, other experience In related fields is a recom- 


133—6 1 575 


204 Education 


mended alternative, which must be approved by a graduate adviser before starting the pro- 
gram. 

3. Generally, students will have completed as a requirement of their teaching certificate 30 units 
of postbaccalaureate study. These must be of upper division or graduate level (300 level or 
above) and be approved by the graduate adviser. Students should make an appointment with 
a graduate adviser as soon as the objective in school administration Is selected. 

4. An approved undergraduate major. 

5. A minimum of 12 postgraduate units in academic subjects, completed either prior to or during 
the program. 

6. At least 2.5 grade-point average in previous academic and related work. 

7. Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination Test. 

Programs of Study 

The degree study plan must Include 30 units of committee-approved coursework, of which 21 must 
be at the 5(X) level. A minimum of 21 units must be in school administration; six units may be assigned 
on an interdisciplinary basis from courses related to the needs of individual students. Course require- 
ments include field experience and a project. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken prior to classified status may be applied to a 
student's master's degree program. 

Students concentrating in school administration will take Education 503, Foundations for Administra- 
tive Leadership, as soon as they Identify their interest In this M.S. degree. To continue In the program 
beyond this course, the student must be granted a "letter of admission to the program" and possess 
an official Cal State Fullerton program evaluation. Students who desire only isolated courses from 
the program are normally denied admission to such courses. The adviser-approved 30 units (mini- 
mum) on the study plan will include: 

Units 


Master's degree studies, supporting courses 9 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Adviser-approved courses (6) 

Courses for the concentration in school administration 21 

(No grade below C) 

All of the following: 

Educ 505 Supervision of Curriculum (4) 

Educ 561 Organization of School Systems (3) 


Educ 563 Principles of School Personnel Administration (2) 

Educ 564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Educ 565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration, and Buildings (3) 

Educ 567A Fieldwork and Seminar in School Administration (includes Project or 
Thesis) (2) 

Educ 567B Fieldwork and Seminar In School Administration (Includes Project or 
Thesis) (2) 

One of the following: 

Educ 566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor (3) 

Educ 586 The Secondary School Principal, Community College Administrator, and 
Supervisor (3) 

For advisement and further information, consult the Division of Special Programs. See also "The 
Program of Master's Degrees," in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

A selected number of teachers will be offered the opportunity to study and to practice school 
administration as school interns in administration. A candidate must obtain admission to the pro- 
gram, and agreement must be reached with a sponsoring school or college district to employ the 
candidate as a full-time administrator during the school year. The concept of the internship in 
educational administration is similar to that found in other professional fields. Its basic function is 
to enable the intern to gain the necessary experience In the performance of the critical tasks of his 
profession while under the close supervision of a fully-trained and experienced practitioner. It Is an 
opportunity for the college and local school and college systems to work together in training 
well-qualified school administrators. The internship in educational administration is but one phase 


137 -^ 1 595 


Education 205 


of the program for preparing supervisory and administrative personnel for community college, high 
school, intermediate school, and elementary school positions of leadership. It is an investment in 
training supervisory leadership from which the cooperating school district, the university and the 
intern will derive benefit and in which all three have responsibilities. Cooperation among all three 
is essential to the success of the program. 

Internships are for a full academic year and require of ail students the completion of a minimum 
of 19 graduate credits. During the period of the internship the student Is required to be a registered 
graduate student at Cal State Fullerton. 

All candidates will be given a temporary credential for supervision and administration according to 
the regulations of the California Administrative Code, Title V, Section 6555. Such candidates should 
register in two courses: Education 561, Organization of School Systems, Education 563, Principles 
of School Personnel Administration. 

Both courses must be completed in the summer session if the student Is to do his internship beginning 
in the fall semester. Applications for admission to the program should be sent to the chairman. 
Internship Program in School Administration, by June 1. Careful planning of electives will enable 
candidates to receive the Master of Science In Education with a concentration In school administra- 
tion upon further study, after completing the requirements for the internship. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 

School Administration 

Candidates In administration, upon completion of the degree requirements for a Master of Science 
in Education, should qualify for certification as a school administrator at any level providing they 
have taught three years. As certification requirements change yearly, candidates are urged to have 
their adviser check their study program against current requirements. 

Candidates in administration accepted in the Administrator Internship Program will be issued the 
Standard Supervision Credential conditionally upon partial fulfillment of requirements according to 
the California Administrative Code, Title V, Section 6555. 

OTHER STUDENTS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Experienced school administrators, holding a California administrative credential or a supervision 
credential and exempt from degree requirements, may register for any course in the school adminis- 
tration concentration. Teachers wishing to take courses in school administration directed at helping 
them to understand administration problems are welcome to take selected courses. 


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

481 Issues in Higher Education (3) (Formerly Behavioral Science 480) 

Seminar In structure, governance, administration and challenges of American higher education. 

485 Introduction to Educational Administration (3) 

Introduction to educational administration. Course directed toward better understanding of adminis- 
trative tasks, processes, and skills involved in the various roles of school personnel in administra- 
tion. Special attention to the role of the teacher in school administration. 

503 Foundations for Administrative Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar on cultures and values to which schools must contribute. 
Introduction to community sociology, tax systems, and public administration; the literature of 
leadership. Screening for admission to program. Course required of ail students during their first 
registration In School Administration. 

505 The Supervision of Curriculum (4) 

Prerequisite: Educ 566 or 586. Seminar on development of a quality program of instruction In both 
elementary and secondary schools; appraisal of programs of instruction; advanced principles of 
curricular review and modification. Evaluation of subject matter competence in area of supervi- 
sory specialization. 

560 Contemporary Problems in School Administration (3) 

Seminar on contemporary problems in school organization and administration with particular em- 
phasis on collective bargaining, the computer as a business and educational tool and the needs 
of urban schooling including the problem of racial Isolation. 


149-6 2 15 


206 Education 


561 Organization of School Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 503 or concurrent enrollment. Structure, functions, trends, fiscal responsibilities 
and issues In respect to the government of education at federal, state, county, and local school 
district levels. Basic principles in school organization and administration. Special emphasis on 
intergovernmental relations and impact at local level. 

563 Principles of School Personnel Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 503 or concurrent enrollment. Seminar on principles of organizational behavior, 
social processes Inherent In effective leadership, and techniques of school personnel manage- 
ment. 

564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School law as a reflection of public policy. California Education 
Code and the California Administrative Code, Title 5, and county counsel opinions as they affect 
administration, instruction, and financial management of public schools. Legal basis for public 
education In California. 

565 Seminar in School Finance^ Business Administration, and Buildings (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Emphasis on school finance, business administration, and build- 
ings as they implement an effective educational program. A study of financial principles. School 
revenues and expenditures, budgetary procedures and processes, cost analysis, business man- 
agement, and salary policies. 

566 The Elementary School Principal and Supervisor (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of elementary school principal and 
supervisor. Pupil personnel and instructional program in elementary school; working relations 
and morale among staff, community and pupils; parent education; relations with central district 
staff; management and recordkeeping functions; teacher evaluation. 

567 A,B Fieldwork and Seminar in School Administration (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 566 or 586 or concurrent registration, and consent of Instructor. Two-semester 
terminal sequence required for the M.S. in Education with a concentration In school administra- 
tion. Includes directed fieldwork in selected public schools and district offices. Supervised project 
or thesis required for degree. (4 hours fieldwork, 2 hours conference) 

568 Seminar for Administrative Trainees (3) 

Provides a behavioral analysis approach In the establishment of a sound foundation for educational 
administrators. The culminating offering of the administrator internship program. Objectives 
include (1 ) study of the behavior of human beings and (2) understanding how theory contrib- 
utes to effective administrative practice. 

586 The Secondary School Principal, Community College Administrator and Supervisor 
(3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of the secondary school principal and 
supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in secondary schools; development and 
administration of vocational education; morale among staff, community and pupils; relations with 
central district staff; management functions; teacher evaluation. 

587 Seminar in Financial Resource Allocation (PPBS) (3) 

Advanced finance, program budgeting, quality controls, expenditure progams, state-county-local- 
federal financing. Decision making In assigning financial resources. Financial accountability. 

588 Organization Management Systems in Education (3) 

Seminar in advanced management and decision systems, such as systems analysis, decision tree 
analysis, net work analysis and including an analysis of the structures of contemporary organiza- 
tions. 

589 Staff Evaluation — Supervision (3) 

Seminar In group work supervision techniques as they apply to improvement of teaching process; 
analyzing and focusing role relationships between supervisors, students, teachers, parents; class- 
room dynamics and role of supervisor in planning and developing educational programs. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified students desiring to pursue Independent Inquiry. 

PROGRAMS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The courses and programs in special education are designed to fulfill the following objectives of 

students: 

1 . Master of Science in Education with a concentration in special education; 


153>-6 2 30 


Education 207 

2. Preservice teacher training for teachers of the educationally handicapped and the mentally 
retarded. 

Instruction is centered about the scientific treatment of behavior change in educational settings. The 
objective of the program is to develop student competencies In the selection, development, applica- 
tion and evaluation of materials and procedures necessary for the modification and optimum 
development of human behavior. Though there is a primary commitment to the public school as 
a behavior change agency in our culture, the department's program is viewed as having application 
to educational decision-making situations outside the schools. 

PRESERVICE EDUCATION 

Cal State Fullerton is accredited by the California State Board of Education for programs leading to 
the following credentials offered by the special education program: 

1 . Restricted teaching credential for services as a speech and hearing specialist; 

2. Restricted teaching credential to teach the educable mentally retarded. 

PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a credential under the special education program. 
During registration, the student should consult an adviser in the area in which he expects to major, 
as well as an adviser in special education, for assistance in selecting courses in his program. A student 
from another institution should bring transcripts of previous work and a tentative selection of 
courses. Transferred education courses must be of upper-division level and taken within the past 15 
years to be applicable to upper division credential requirements. 

ADMISSION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION CREDENTIAL 

To become a candidate for a teaching credential, the student must be enrolled, in good standing, 
and must be admitted to "teacher education" In the Office of Admission to Teacher Education of 
the School of Education. Application for admission to teacher education should be filed during the 
first semester of the junior year or the first semester of attendance at the university If the student 
enters with advanced standing. 

Admission to teacher education is required of each student before he files the application for student 
teaching.! 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant's Intellectual resources and 
mastery of Important concepts in the common curricular areas of higher education, command of 
fundamental skills of communication, scholarship, personality and character. Interest in teaching, 
and health. Data related to these criteria are gathered from transcripts and records from other 
schools and universities. Students should normally qualify for admission and be advised of their 
status during the second semester of the junior year of their first semester of attendance if they enter 
with advanced standing with degrees from accredited colleges or universities. 

If the applicant has serious deficiencies In communication skills or does not meet the standards of 
mastery in the common curricular areas, personality and character, scholarship. Interest In teaching, 
or health, the faculty committee will deny admission to teacher education. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The following information is provided to assist students in planning programs and in seeking admis- 
sion to classified graduate status. Students should consult the Graduate Bulletin for Information 
concerning standards for graduate study, steps In the master's degree program, and.graduate policies 
and procedures. This publication is available from the Office of Graduate Studies. 

The degree program Is designed: 

1. To help Individuals interpret and Implement research related to exceptional children, conduct 
appropriate research In the classroom and/or clinical setting, become skilled In their abilities 
to diagnose with educational instruments and observation techniques, Interpret the results of 
diagnostic procedures, prescribe and Implement educational strategies. 

2. To provide teachers with competencies to enable them to fulfill the role of supervising teachers 
and demonstration teachers in special classes. 

3. To prepare individuals for positions of leadership In the field of sp>ecial education. 

t Exceptions will be made in the case of new transfer students. 


158-« 2 40 


208 Education 

4. To prepare individuals to pursue graduate work toward the doctoral degree. 


Prerequisites for Admission to the Program 

1 . A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution 

2. At least 2.5 grade-point average in previous academic and related work 

3. An acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination — Aptitude Test 

4. An approved major 

5. Satisfactory completion of Educ 471, Exceptional Children (3) 

6. Satisfactory interview, references and autobiography 


Steps in the Master's Degree Program (see Graduate Bulletin): 

Courses required for the Degree: 

Units 

1 . Nine semester hours of adviser-approved courses outside the area of special educa- 
tion 9 


(Met by Educ 510 (3) or 
Educ 509 (3) 

(Met by 6 units of adviser- 
approved courses 


A. 3 hours In basic research 

and 

B. Administration 

or 

Clinic orientation 
or 

Teaching strategies 
or 

Communication and 
Interpersonal relations 
or 

Educational technology 
or 

Inter- and intracultural 
studies 

Twenty-one semester hours of adviser-approved courses selected from the area of 
special education 


21 


A. 4-6 units of research activity * 

B. 2-5 units of practicum 

C. 10-15 units of special education 
specialization 


(Met by Educ 514 (3) 
and 

Educ 597 or 598 (1-3) 

(Met by Educ 572 (2^) 
and/or 

Educ 596 (1-3) 

(Met by adviser-approved 
special education courses 
at the 400- and 50()-level) 


For further information, consult the program graduate adviser. See also 'The Program of Master's 
Degrees" in this catalog. 


STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching In special education are included in the 
curricula descriptions. Upon the completion of the requirements, the student will submit an applica- 
tion for a credential to the State Department of Education In Sacramento. On these applications the 
student is asked about his citizenship status, his professional conduct, and he is asked to sign an oath 
of allegiance. He must also submit a health examination form signed by a qualified physician, two 
fingerprint-identification cards and the legal fee, which is currently $20. The forms are available In 
the credentials office of the university. 


• Student may elect to substitute the Program Comprehensive Examination for Educ 597/598. Students electing this option must 
complete Educ 514. 


161—6 2 55 


Education 209 


Curricula in Preparation of Special Education Teachers 

Two credential and one non-credential program are offered. The credential programs include the 
regular mental retardation credential and the restricted credential to teach the educable mentally 
retarded. The non-credential program is one leading to teaching the educationally handicapped (as 
of December 1, 1972). 

Requirements for the Credential to Teach the Mentally Retarded 

Students who complete the requirements for this credential are qualified to teach both the trainable 
and educable mentally retarded. In addition to completing the requirements in special education, 
the student must also complete the curriculum in either elementary or secondary education as 
described in pages 215 and 216. When the major is in an academic area commonly taught in the 
elementary or secondary schools (as appropriate), the 22 units of specialized preparation described 
below (not Including student teaching) may be substituted for the minor. Upon successful comple- 
tion of the program, the student will be recommended for the standard teaching credential with a 
specialization in elementary or secondary teaching with specialized preparation to serve as a teacher 
of exceptional children, area of the mentally retarded. Upon receipt of the credential, the student 
will be authorized to teach in special classes as well as In regular classes at the appropriate level. 
Students desiring to prepare as teachers of the mentally retarded should proceed as follows: 

1. Apply for admission to special education (forms are available in the program office). 

2. Arrange for a personal interview with a member of the special education faculty. 

3. Apply for admission to teacher education as described on page 214. 

4. Upon completion of the necessary prerequisite courses, apply for admission to student teach- 
ing. Since students completing this program divide their student teaching experience between 
special education and regular education, they should apply for admission to student teaching 
as described on page 214. In addition, they must apply for student teaching In special education 
by completing the application form necessary the semester before taking the course. 

Students seeking recommendations for this special credential to teach the mentally retarded should 
complete the courses listed below in lieu of the minor required for the Standard Teaching Credential. 

Units 


Educ 471 Exceptional Children 3 

Educ 473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury 3 

Educ 474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the Mentally Retarded 3 

Educ 475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the Mentally Retarded 3 

Educ 779 Student Teaching with Mentally Retarded Pupils 4 

Educ 452 Principles of Guidance 3 

Speech Comm 403 Speech Development 3 

Electives from courses related to teaching the mentally retarded (4 units); electives must 
be approved by the adviser. 

Total number of units in special education not including student teaching 22 


Requirements for a Restricted Credential to Teach the Educable Mentally Retarded * 

Upon completion of the requirements for this credential, an individual is qualified for service at all 
grade levels with service restricted to teaching the mentally retarded. Students seeking this credential 
must: 

1 . Obtain the baccalaureate degree 

2. Complete a fifth year of university work 

3. Complete 22 hours of coursework in special education and related fields 

4. Complete student teaching with educable mentally retarded children 

These programs are subject to change pending the initiation of programs consistent with the Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970. Students should maintain contact with program offices in 
the event of change. 


• Students who cannot complete the program before September 1974 should not enroll. 


165—6 2 75 


210 Education 


Program Leading to the California Credential — Speech and Hearing Specialist 

Students wishing to pursue the major in speech and hearing and to complete a fifth year for the 
"'Restricted Teaching Credential for Services as a Speech and Hearing Specialist" (1967) should 
follow the major for speech for the B.A. degree with emphasis in speech pathology and audiology 
to be followed by a fifth year of adviser-approved specialized preparation. 

Required in the undergraduate and graduate years will be the completion of 65 semester units 
constituting a well-integrated program that includes 18 semester units in courses that provide 
fundamental Information applicable to the normal development and use of speech, hearing, and 
language, and their relationship to the educative process, and 42 semester units in courses that 
provide information about and training in the management of speech, hearing, and language disor- 
ders and that provide Information supplementary to these fields. 

Details of this program are found on page 348. The program is administered by the Department of 
Speech Communication in consultation with the School of Education. 

Standard Teaching Credential with Specialization in Speech and Hearing in Lieu of Minor 

A major other than speech and hearing is required for the clinical speech and hearing program taken 
In lieu of a minor. See an adviser in the Department of Speech Communication for details of this 
program. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Each candidate for a credential to teach the mentally retarded, the restricted credential to teach the 
educable mentally retarded, or the restricted credential to teach the trainable mentally retarded will 
do his student teaching during the last semester of his senior year or during his postgraduate year 
In the university. Persons seeking the credential to teach the mentally retarded will divide their 
student teaching experience with elementary or secondary student teaching. Details about student 
teaching may be obtained from the program office. Student teaching assignments are made In 
elementary and secondary schools geographically accessible to the university. Students will be 
assigned to work under the supervision of carefully selected supervising teachers. A university 
supervisor will regularly visit the student teacher and the supervising teacher. Student teachers will 
be expected to meet In a weekly seminar with the university supervisor. 

Permission to Substitute Teaching Experience for Student Teaching 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had two years of successful, regular teaching experi- 
ence must petition the School of Education, through his professional adviser, for permission to 
substitute such experience for the student teaching requirement. Substitution of teaching experience 
for student teaching will be considered only if the applicant: 

1 . Has been admitted to teacher education at the university. 

2. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, or superintendent 
to the School of Education certifying at least two years of successful, regular teaching experi- 
ence at the appropriate level. A form for this verification is available In the Office of the School 
of Education. 


SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSES 

295 The Personal Quest (3) 

An experience-based course exploring the factors contributing to personality. Consideration will be 
made concerning individual needs, how they are met by the individual, other individuals, society 
and society's institutions. One objective will be to explore the demands of a rapidly changing 
technology. 

471 Exceptional Children (3) 

The study of children who deviate from the average in the elementary and the secondary schools; 
physically handicapped, mentally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, emotionally disturbed, 
and delinquent. Special educational services, curriculum, procedures, and materials necessary 
to promote their maximum development. 


170—6 2 100 


Education 211 


472 Gifted Children (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471. Identification, principles of Instruction, grouping, individualized Instruction, 
classroom enrichment. Problem solving and research experiences in science, social studies, and 
mathematics, reading programs and literature, creative writing, oral language. 

473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471. Organic and cultural basis of mental retardation and brain injury, including 
social, psychological, and vocational problems. Child growth, sensory development, learning 
characteristics of mentally retarded and brain injured children, and techniques of working with 
parents will be considered. 

474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 473. Curriculum development, methods, and materials for teaching the educable 
and trainable mentally retarded at the elementary and secondary levels. 

475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 474. Supervised observation and participation with the educable and the trainable 

mentally retarded at both the elementary and secondary levels of education. (4 hours activity, 
1 hour lecture and discussion) 

477 The Educationally Handicapped Child (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 . Behavioral characteristics of the educationally handicapped child, the child 
with a neurological handicap or a behavioral disorder as defined by the California Education 
Code. Educational procedures, perceptual and motor training, evaluation, parent guidance. 

478 Innovations in Special Education (3-6) 

Acquaints teachers and administrators with recent, dynamic and innovative methodologies and 
concepts related to the atypical child. Emphasis on assisting participants to update their present 
knowledge and skills through implementing new thought as it relates to special education. 

479 Seminar and Practicum in Education of the Trainable Mentally Retarded (6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Curriculum, methods, and materials for children having severe 

intellectual, motor, sensory and language Impairment. Emphasis will be placed on the educational 
management of children exhibiting handicapping conditions. (3 hours seminar and 9 hours 
practicum in special school facilities) 

489 Fieldwork in Exceptional Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Direct supervised experience with educationally 
handicapped children. 

4% Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with educationally handicapped 
children. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing and consent of Instructor. Student will complete individual 
studies under the direction of faculty member. Studies include experimental, library, or creative 
projects. Only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be approved. 

514 Graduate Seminar: Behavioral Research on Children with Learning Disorders (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 510 or 511. Critical analysis of behavioral research on children with learning 
disorders. Resources, criteria for evaluation of studies with exceptional children, historical view 
of research. Research relating to learning, handicapping conditions, and efficacy of special 
methods. 

521 Group Processes in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Exploration of group interaction, teacher sensitivity, 
and their relevance to educational planning and management. Emphasis: emotionally disturbed, 
educationally handicapped. 

522 Behavior Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Identification and mangagement of social and 
affective disturbances related to school performance. Emphasis: early detection, behavioral 
modification techniques, parent counseling. Interagency cooperation. 

523 Learning Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 471 or consent of instructor. Identification and educational management of 
learning problems. Emphasis: developmental sequences, related prescriptive teaching and 
remediation techniques. 


180-6 2 ISO 


212 Education 


570 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Developmental 
Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory and practice in the physical-motor develop- 
ment, cognitive-intellectual growth and affective-personality organization of children and adoles- 
cents. Focus is given to educational interventions as a means of problem solving. 

571 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Psychology of Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory and practice In the psychology of learning and 

motivation: motoric, cognitive and affective. Focus on problem-solving situations In which edu- 
cational Intervention Is designed to facllitlate learning in each domain. 

572 Psycho-Educational Clinic (2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 475 or 477, 523, 570, 571 concurrently with 572, and consent of Instructor. 
Clinical practicum to develop teaching skills In dealing with learning problems of exceptional 
children, practice in working with formal and informal information-gathering devices, special 
teaching instruments, teaching systems, teaching strategies. May be repeated once with consent 
of Instructor. (6 hours laboratory) 

577 Seminar in Program Trends in Special Education (3) 

Prerequisites: recommendation of adviser and consent of Instructor. A seminar designed for the 
study of historical development of educational programs for exceptional children. A critical 
analysis of Issues and trends in special education. 

578 Administration and Supervision of Special Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 577 or consent of instructor. Problems of organization, administration, and super- 
vision of special education programs: finance and attendance, physical facilities, budgeting, 
needed equipment, community agencies and curriculum development. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies In such areas as behavior, 
teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, communication theory and 
interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

5% Graduate Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conduct at a graduate level an educational practicum experience 
with an individual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue Independ- 
ent inquiry. 

779 Student Teaching with Exceptional Children (4-8) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Participation In a class for exceptional children for greater part 
of every school day. Includes a two-hour seminar each week In problems and procedures for 
teaching exceptional children. The student will enroll for either four or eight units credit depend- 
ent upon the problems and procedures for teaching exceptional children. 


SPECIAL PROGRAMS COURSES 

510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor's degree. Teacher Education 509 or equivalent. Elements of design, in- 
strumentation, treatment of data, hypothesis testing and Inference and analysis of educational 
data. Develop a research proposal. Practice In analyzing and evaluating research reports. 


185-6 2 175 


Education 213 


DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

Chairman: Paul Kane 

FACULTY 

Betty Barnes, Edwin Carr (Emeritus), Ida Coppolino, James Cusick (coordinator of secondary 
education), Kenneth Doane,* Mildred Donoghue, Gerhard Ehmann, James Gilmore, Barbara 
Hartsig, Shirley Hill, Emma Holmes, Bernard Kravitz (coordinator of elementary education), Edith 
McCullough, Eugene McCarry,* Robert McLaren, Bryan Moffet, Donald Pease, Fraser Powlison, 
Nancy Reckinger, Morris Sica, Robert Simpson 

SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHING METHODS FACULTY 

James Alexander (Journalism Education), Jean Barrett (Physical Education), Carol Chadwick (Music 
Education), Francis Collea (Science Education), Naomi Dietz (Art Education), Kaye Good 
(Speech Education), Donald Henry (Theatre Education), Elmer Johnson (Physical Education), 
Jacqueline Kiraithe (Foreign Language Education), Joseph Landon (Music Education), L. Clark Lay 
(Mathematics Education), William Leonard (Mathematics Education), Benton Minor (Music 
Education), Irene Nims (English Education), David PagnI (Mathematics Education), Albert Porter 
(Art Education), Virginia Scheel (Physical Education), H. Eric Streitberger (Science Education), 
Howard Warner (Art Education), John White (English Education), Charles Williams (Science 
Education), Jon ZImmermann (Foreign Language Education) 

PART-TIME 

Susan Bedell,. Marlita Bellot, James Bremer, Margot Coons, Emmanuel Dellglannis, James Dunne, 
Margaret Eadie, Alfred Frank, Patricia Giamarino, Margerle Hunt, Lois Jeffrey, Clarence Lee, Lois 
Lytle, Roberta Pantle, Russell Parks, Ann Pease, Max Rauch, Jay Rowen, Harriet Schultz, Penelope 
Swenson, Terry Swenson, Michael Trapp, Thomas Wilson 

The courses, programs and services of the division are directed toward the following objectives of 
students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration In elementary curriculum and instruction. 

2. Preservice teacher education (elementary school, secondary school, community college). 

3. In-service teacher education. 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of the school as a basic institution of our culture, 
the methods and materials associated with effective teaching, and the current and persistent prob- 
lems that confront teachers, and other professional workers In educational institutions. In addition 
to using published source materials and attending class sessions for presentations and discussions, 
many courses require fieldwork in schools, laboratories, clinics and other educational agencies. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

1. Master of Science in Education, Elementary Curriculum and Instruction 

2. Admission to Teacher Education: Standards, Instructions, Application 

3. Admission to Student Teaching: Standards, Instructions, Application 

4. Standard Teaching Credential with a Specialization in Elementary Teaching 

5. Standard Teaching Credential with a Specialization In Secondary Teaching 

PRESERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION 
INTERIM TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 

During the 1973-74 academic year teacher education curriculum will be based upon programs 
accredited by the State Board of Education under California certification requirements effective in 
1964 (Fisher Act). Other programs will be submitted to the Commission for Teacher Preparation 
and Licensing for approval under the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 effective in 
September 1974 (Ryan Act) and can be in operation during the 1973-74 academic year. Information 
concerning those programs will be published in supplementary bulletins. 


* University administrative officer 


189-6 2 195 


214 Education 


PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement concerning interim teacher education curricula is available In the Division of Teacher 
Education office. Students should consult with the coordinators of elementary or secondary teacher 
education and other faculty in selecting courses and building their programs. Transfer students 
should bring transcripts of previous work. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Before being permitted to enroll in a credential program the student must have made formal 
application, been screened and been formally admitted to teacher education through the School of 
Education. The student will be permitted to apply for admission to teacher education in the semester 
previous to that in which he will have completed all but six units of his major (usually no earlier 
than the second semester of the junior year). 

A faculty committee will review information concerning the applicant's intellectual resources, com- 
mand of fundamental skills of communication, scholarship, personality and character, interest in 
teaching and health. When more qualified students apply for admission to teacher education than 
can be accommodated during a given semester, applicants will be ranked and those with highest 
rank selected. Qualified candidates who are not admitted may reapply during subsequent semesters. 
Information concerning the criteria and the procedures for admission to teacher education may be 
obtained in the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

The credential candidate must submit his application for student teaching by October 1 5 or March 
1 of the semester preceding the semester in which the student expects a student teaching assignment. 
The application for admission is submitted to either the coordinator of elementary or secondary 
teacher education. 

The application for student teaching is part of the continuous process of evaluating credential 
candidates on their suitability for elementary and secondary school teaching. Information concern- 
ing the criteria and procedures for admission to student teaching, along with the application, may 
be obtained from the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

STUDY LIMITS OF STUDENT TEACHERS 

Students who enroll in Education 439A,B, Student Teaching in the Elementary School, will be limited 
to one additional course for that semester. Students who enroll In Education 749, Student Teaching 
in the Secondary School, will be limited to two additional courses for that semester. It is expected 
that students will not carry out-of-universIty work responsibilities during the semester of the student 
teaching assignment. 

If a student is under hardship because of these limitations, he may submit a petition to the coordina- 
tor of elementary education or to the coordinator of secondary education, as appropriate, requesting 
permission to carry not more than 13 units, including student teaching. The petition must set forth, 
in full, the circumstances necessitating the petition. 

PERMISSION TO SUBSTITUTE TEACHING EXPERIENCE FOR STUDENT TEACHING 

A candidate for a teaching credential who has had two years of successful, regular teaching experi- 
ence must petition the School of Education, through his professional adviser, for permission to 
substitute such experience for the student teaching requirement. Substitution of teaching experience 
for student teaching will be considered only if the applicant: 

1 . Has been admitted to teacher education at the university. 

2. Has submitted an official verification from his former supervisor, principal, or superintendent 
certifying at least two years of successful, regular teaching experience at the appropriate level. 
The letter of verification must be submitted to the Division of Teacher Education. 

APPLICATION FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The curricular requirements for credentials for teaching In California elementary and secondary 
schools are included in the curricula descriptions. Upon the completion of the requirements, the 
student will submit an application for a credential to the Commission for Teacher Preparation and 
Licensing In Sacramento. On these applications the student is asked about his citizenship status, his 
professional conduct, and he Is asked to sign an oath of allegiance. He must also submit a health 
examination form signed by a qualified physician, one fingerprint-identification card and the legal 


19i--6 2 220 


Education 215 


fee, which is currently $20. The forms are available in the credentials office of the university. 

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION • 

The program leading to the recommendation for the standard teaching credential with specialization 
in elemenary school teaching includes the following: 

1. A bachelor's degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper division or 
graduate level. (If the student does not complete all requirements, the credential may be 
awarded on the basis of partial fulfillment at the end of four or more years of work If he has 
a bachelor's degree from an approved institution and has completed the student teaching 
requirement.) 

3. A minimum of 45 semester hours In five of the following six areas: (1) social sciences, (2) 
natural sciences, (3) humanities (excluding foreign languages), (4) fine arts, (5) mathematics 
and (6) foreign languages. The humanities requirement must include a year of English and a 
course in advanced composition. (To prepare himself to meet professional responsibilities, an 
elementary school teacher education candidate should include in his program Art 100, Music 
101, and Speech Communication 1(X) or 102). These 45 semester hours of coursework for the 
credential can be met through the university general education requirements for the bachelor's 
degree with the proper selection of courses. (Not more than six hours of coursework taken 
to satisfy these requirements shall apply toward the fulfillment of the requirements for either 
a major or a minor.) 

4. Three semester hours of coursework in the theory of the structure, arithmetic and algebra of 
the real number system or three semester hours of coursework In calculus. (Math Ed 103A 
meets this requirement.) 

5. One of the following: 

A. A major consisting of at least 24 semester hours of upper division or graduate level courses 
in an academic subject matter area commonly taught In the public elementary schools. 
These majors are currently available for this specialization at the university: American 
studies, anthropology, art, biological science, chemistry, communications with a journalism 
emphasis, comparative literature, drama, economics, English, French, geography, German, 
history, linguistics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, 
sociology, Spanish, speech. (Note: the specifications above are state minima, and do not 
necessarily satisfy requirements for a major for graduation from the university.) 

B. A major and a minor, each of which is in a subject matter area commonly taught in the 
public elementary schools, and one of which is in an academic subject matter area. The 
academic major shall consist of at least 24 semester hours of upper division or graduate 
coursework. If the major is not an academic one. It shall consist of 28 semester hours of 
upper division of graduate coursework. (With a nonacademic major, i.e., business adminis- 
tration or physical education, only the major and minor subjects may be taught In kindergar- 
ten and grades 1 through 9.) This minor shall consist of a minimum of 20 semester hours 
of coursework. When the major is in an academic subject matter area specialized prepara- 
tion in such areas as mentally retarded or speech and hearing handicapped may be substitut- 
ed. 

C. Two minors In subject matter areas commonly taught In the public elementary schools and 
a major, other than education and educational methodology, not commonly taught therein. 
If the major is not in an academic subject matter area, each minor shall be in an academic 
matter area. (With a nonacademic major only the major and minor subjects may be taught 
in kindergarten and grades 1 through 9.) If the major Is in an academic subject matter area, 
one of the minors shall be In an academic subject matter area. These minors shall consist 
of a minimum of 12 semester hours coursework. Specialized preparation in such areas as 
mentally retarded or speech and hearing handicapped may be substituted for one of the 
minors. 

6. Courses selected from the following are offered by academic departments as part of the basic 
preparation for elementary teachers. A minimum of three courses, selected with the approval 
of a professional adviser, must be completed before student teaching. 

* Regulations for the credential are subject to change by the state; any curricular changes will be available in later university 
publications. 


200--6 2 250 


216 Education 


Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

English 433 Children's Literature (3) 

Math Ed 103B Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

PE 333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Sci Ed 310 Elementary Experimental Science (3) 

7. Professional education requirements which are currently met by the following program: 

Educ 401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Educ 430A Foundations In Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Educ 430B Curriculum and Methods In Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Educ 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (3) 

Educ 433 Reading Instruction in Public Schools (3) 

Educ 439A,B Student Teaching in the Elementary School (12) 

Note: Admission to the university does not include admission to the elementary teacher education 
program. Procedures for admission to teacher education are outlined on page 214. It Is the 
responsibility of each student to file an application for admission to teacher education in his 
junior year and to complete the requirements for admission to teacher education before 
enrolling in Educ 430A,B,C and 433. 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. Each student 
Is responsible for meeting the requirements and following the procedures for admission to 
student teaching given on page 214. 

INTERIM CURRICULA IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION 

During the 1973-74 academic year curricula In secondary school teacher education programs will 
meet 1964 California credential requirements (Fisher Act) for the candidates who can complete 
student teaching during or . before spring semester, 1974, and will be operative under the Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act) when approved by the commission for Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing. This approval is pending. 

Students completing secondary credential programs under Fisher Act regulations will do student 
teaching after the completion of the baccalaureate degree. 

Secondary Cooperative Teacher Education Program 

For information regarding courses for the secondary teacher education program report to the Office 
of Admission to Teacher Education. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

This degree Is reserved for professionally qualified graduate students who desire to prepare for or 
advance their careers in elementary curriculum and instruction. 

Prerequisites 

To be admitted to the program, students must have a basic teaching credential or equivalent 
experiences, an approved major (minimum of 24 units upper division or graduate), acceptable 
scores on the Graduate Record Examination (aptitude test), a 2.5 grade-point average on previous 
academic and related work, satisfactory interview, references and autobiography. Credit will be 
given for previous postbaccalaureate studies when possible. (Dtherwise well-qualified students may 
be admitted with limited subject or grade deficlences, but these deficlences must be removed. 
Grade-point average deficlences may be removed by a demonstration of comp)etency in the gradu- 
ate program. 

Programs of Study 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will include the following: Units 

Coursework outside elementary education 9 

Two of the following: 

Educ 402 Comparative Education (3) 

Educ 403 History of Education (3) 

Educ 406 Educational Sociology (3) 


212-6 2 310 


Education 217 


Educ 452 Principles of Guidance (3) 

Educ 501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Educ 509 Theory and Practice in Educational Measurement (3) 

Educ 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Educ 511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Other adviser-approved courses (3) 

Coursework In elementary education 

Educ 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Three of the following: 

Educ 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Foreign Languages (3) 
Educ 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Educ 532 Graduate Studies In Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Educ 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Educ 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Educ 535 Graduate Studies In Elementary Education: Reading (3) 

Educ 537 Seminar for Elementary Education (3) 

One of the following: 

Educ 597 Graduate Project (1-3; total of 3) 

Educ 598 Thesis (1-3; total of 3) 

Electives selected with approval of the adviser 

For further information, consult the chairman. 

See also 'The Program of Master's Degrees/' page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


15 


6 


TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES 

210 The Teaching Experience: Exploration (3) 

Exploration of one's self in relation to other people in the schools and an encounter with the teaching 
experience, through fieldwork. Accompanying seminar to help students extend their observa- 
tions and explore relevant issues. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

301 The Educated Man (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Various conceptions of the nature, concerns 
and activities of a truly educated person are studied: the humanitarian Ideal; aspects of human 
freedom; and the relation of science to culture. 

302 The Campus in Transition (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Study of the history and development of 
American higher education. The roots of change and campus unrest are examined. 

303 Education and Its Critics (3) 

Examination of the criticisms of contemporary education and of proposals for reform. Includes visits 
to a variety of schools. Designed for all students. Not a part of the credential program. 

304 Contemporary Educational Change (3) 

Emphasis on the changing educational scene in elementary and secondary levels. The quest for 
greater flexibility, better methods of teaching. Improved staffing patterns and accountability serve 
as the course foundation. 

305 School and Society (3) 

Stability and change in contemporary society viewed In terms of the decline of traditional values 
and culture and the rise of legal-rational institutions. Urban life, social class, race relations and 
family organization will be examined. 

308 Education of Various Cultural Groups: Early Childhood (3) 

Designed for Head Start personnel and others engaged in the early education of culturally different 
children. Focus will be on development of learning, curriculum content, and methodology. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

309 Fieldwork in the Education of Various Cultural Groups (3) 

Observation and participation in classes for various cultural groups. Integrated with coursework In 
Education of Various Cultural Croups. Must be taken concurrently with Educ 308. (9 hours 
laboratory) 


216—6 2 330 


218 Education 


310 The Teaching Experience: Participation (3) 

Active participation in school classrooms and analysis of the experience. Accompanying seminar 
will help students to analyze their fieldwork experiences. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

340 Principles and Curriculum of Secondary Education (3) 

Principles of secondary education In the Unlt^ States: organization, curriculum, and teaching 
practices. Two hours of observation per week in selected junior and senior high school classes. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours fieldwork) 

385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

The physical growth and social and personality development of the human through the sixth year 
of life. 

386 Adolescence (3) 

A study of the physical, social and cultural development of human adolescence and youth. Particular 
attention is given to contemporary factors producing change. 

401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Seminar in philosophical, historical and sociological foundations of education, considered in the light 
of their Influence on contemporary educational theory and practice in the United States. 

402 Comparative Education (3) 

A seminar centered in study of the various countries' education patterns, as part of the cultural setting 
in which found; designed to deepen Insight Into our own culture's educational program and offer 
bases for comparative evaluation with other systems. 

403 History of Education (3) 

The main streams of educational history In Europe and America, with particular emphasis on the 
ways these main streams have affected the current scene in the United States. 

406 Educational Sociology (3) 

The school In the social order; the school as a social system; analysis of cultural factors affecting 
the school; the special culture of the school; roles and role conflicts In the school; policy 
questions flowing from social issues and school-cultural relationships. 

408 Ghetto Schools (3) 

A study of the schools in the Inner city, including educational Issues related to or stemming from 
poverty, cultural differences, often inappropriate curricula, limited communication between 
parents and the system, and other problems. 

411 Psychological Foundations of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, concurrent enrollment in upper division practicum or fieldwork, and 
previous admission to teacher education program. Learning theory, thinking processes, and 
human growth and development. Students who have completed Psych 311 must have consent 
of instructor to enroll. 

430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. A study of children's learning styles, and their overall 
growth and development with the aim of helping future elementary teachers acquire the behav- 
iors necessary for effective teaching. To be taken concurrently with Education 430B,C and 433. 

430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. A study of elementary school curricula, instructional 
materials, and teaching techniques with the aim of helping future elementary teachers acquire 
the behaviors necessary for effective teaching. To be taken concurrently with Education 430A,C, 
and 433. 

430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Students will serve as teacher aides in an assigned 
elementary school classroom to apply information learned in the following courses which must 
be taken concurrently: Educ 430A,B and 433. 

431 Principles and Curricula of the Elementary School (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. An introductory course In elementary education. Stress on major 
principles and basic curricular considerations. Importance of the elementary school system to 
society. 

433 Reading Instruction in Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Experience in the teaching of reading which students 
will demonstrate the behavior necessary to work with children In public school 


221-6 2 355 


Education 219 


436 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques the classroom teacher may use in understanding 
indvidual children within his classroom who do not respond to the teacher and his peers in 
typical ways. 

437 Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of current literature and recent research in the area of 
education of young children through individual and group study. Emphasis will be placed on 
problems centered In cognitive processes, content, structure and instruction at this level. 

439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (10) 

Prerequisites: Educ 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Participation In a regular 
elementary school teaching program for the full school day. Concurrent enrollment In Educ 439B 
is required. 

439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (2) 

Prerequisites: Educ 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Seminar In problems and 
procedures of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enrollment in Educ 439A is required. 

442 Teaching — in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Required before student teaching of students present- 
ing major in following areas or subjects. 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (3) 

Educ 442 Teaching Social Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Engl Ed 442 Teaching English in the Seconary School (3) 

For Lang Ed 442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Journ Ed 442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (3) 

Mu Ed 442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Speech Ed 442 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (3) 

Theatre Ed 442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

445 Junior High School Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 442 or 331. Seminar on principles of junior high education. Purposes, curriculum, 
and organization of the junior high school including examination of recent innovations and 
proposals. For students with elementary or secondary backgrounds Interested in this level. 

446 Secondary School Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: student teaching or teaching experience or consent of Instructor. Fundamentals of 
curriculum development. Seminar on current Issues within secondary education. Curricular 
organization and current practices. Survey and evaluation of newer curricular programs. 

448 Social Studies Simulation Games (2) 

A discussion-laboratory course in which students will study simulations, get acquainted with and play 
a number of commercially available simulations, and design and play their own. For teachers 
and prospective teachers of the social studies elementary and secondary schools. 

449 A,B Student Teaching in the Secondary School and Seminar (12) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Full-time student teaching. 

451 Principles of Educational Measurement (3) 

Development, validation, and application of the principles of educational measurement. Construc- 
tion and use of informal and standardized achievement tests. Summary and interpretation of 
results of measurement. 

491 Audiovisual Education (2) 

Media in communication, psychological bases, development, curricular function, evaluation. Survey 
of equipment and materials available, preparation of instructional materials for classroom use. 
(1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

492 Television in the Classroom (2) 

Television as a vehicle for instruction, information and enrichment. General theory of media in 
classroom, psychological bases, curricular capabilities and limitations of equipment. Responsibili- 
ty of the classroom teacher, practice in utilization process. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


239—6 2 445 


220 Education 


493 Production of Audiovisual Materials (2) 

Exploration and development of audiovisual materials. Students will participate In scriptwriting, 
story-board, photography and tape production. Experience will be provided in producing graph- 
ics, charts and bulletin boards. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

4% Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with an individual under the 
direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing, consent of Instructor and division prior to registration. 
Individual Investigation under supervision of a faculty member. Only students of demonstrated 
capacity and maturity will be approved; adequate prerequisite study necessary. May be repeated 
for credit. 

501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: postgraduate standing and Educ 339 or 439A, B or 749, or consent of Instructor. Uses 
of theories of knowledge, value and reality in dealing with educational problems; application of 
contemporary systems of thought to education. 

509 Theory and Practice in Educational Measurement (3) 

Introduction to concepts, theory, and procedures for construction of informal and standardized tests. 
Application of measurement theory and statistical techniques toward problems of analysis, 
scaling, norming, and interpretation. Practice in item writing for tests and analysis of commercial 
standardized tests. 

511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Educ 509, teaching experience. Review of descriptive statistics and stalstical inference 
as applied to educational problems. Analysis of representative research papers. Principles of 
research design. Prepare a research proposal. 

530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Foreign Language (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of pertinent Investigations and their applica- 
tion in the classroom together with significant curriculum developments and organization In the 
area of second language learning in the elementary school, including English as a foreign lan- 
guage. 

531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Seminar for advanced study of trends and problems in teaching 
the fundamental skills of communication In the elementary school. Analysis of research in the 
language arts and related disciplines as background for curriculum development. 

532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math Ed 103A, Educ 439A, B, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of 
significant research, curricular developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving 
mathematics programs and Instruction. 

533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 439A, B or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of significant research in 
elementary school science. Criteria for planning and Improving science programs and the devel- 
opment of materials. 

534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339 or 439A, B, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of significant 
research developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving social studies programs 
and current techniques of teaching. 

535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 339 or 439A, B, or consent of instructor. Seminar In advanced study of trends and 
Issues in teaching reading In elementary schools. Analysis of research or background for cur- 
riculum development and Instructional procedures. 

536 Curriculum Theory and Development in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 439A, B or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of the elementary school 
curriculum including the forces operating on the curriculum and the participants involved in 
curriculum building. Emphasis also placed on the process of curriculum building. 

537 Seminar for Elementary Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 439A, B or consent of instructor. A study of problems and issues in elementary 
education, their causes and possible solutions. 


244—6 2 470 


Education 221 


547 Seminar for Secondary Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Educ 749 or consent of instructor. Persistent problems in secondary education and 
survey of related literature; causes of and solutions for these problems. Application of scientific 
method to educational problems, sources of educational research, and to techniques of coopera- 
tive thinking. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas as behavior, 
teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, communication theory, and 
interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue Independ- 
ent inquiry. 

701 Credential Studies (0) 

A course for students admitted to teacher education who find It impossible to maintain continuous 
enrollment while they are completing the 30 units beyond the baccalaureate. A student may not 
register In this course for a third consecutive semester. See page 62. 

709 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: possession of a teaching credential and one year of teaching experience. Designed for 
teachers who supervise student teachers. Emphasis on principles and procedures of effective 
supervision and research. 

721 Philosophy and Objectives of Community College Education (2) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing. College movement in higher education in the United States. 
Socioeconomic forces creating needs for different post-high school education; community col- 
lege education objectives, relationships to secondary and higher education; curriculum develop- 
ment and organization. 

744 Principles of Community College Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing. Psychological foundations of community college teaching, 
measurement and evaluation of learning. Educational and philosophical bases for instructional 
procedures In the community college. Instructional procedures Including audiovisual materials, 
community college classs observations. (2 hours seminar, 3 hours fieldwork) 

749 Student Teaching in — in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. Student teaching for the standard teaching credential 
with specialization In secondary school teaching. Student teaching program for half-days for a 
full semester. Includes a 2 hour seminar each week. (Minimum of 15 hours a week) 

Art Ed 749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Educ 749 Student Teaching in Business in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Educ 749 Student Teaching in Social Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Engl Ed 749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

For Lang Ed 749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

Journ Ed 749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Math Ed 749 Student Teaching in Mathematics in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Mu Ed 749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

PE 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Speech Ed 749 Student Teaching in Speech in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Theatre Ed 749 Student Teaching in Theatre in Secondary School and Seminar (6) 


248—6 2 490 



HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, RECREATION AND ATHLETICS 


248—6 2 490 







■ I- 


• 0 ‘ 



\ 


225 


DIVISION OF HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, RECREATION AND ATHLETICS 

Chairman: Paul Pastor 


ATHLETICS 

Neale Stoner, Director 

FACULTY 

August Garrido, David Gibbs, John Godden, William Griffin, Jerry Lloyd, Donald Matson, Edward 
Musolff, Melvin Sims, V. Richard Wolfe, Peter Yoder 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Eula Stovall, Chair 

I 

FACULTY 

C. Ian Bailey, Jean Barrett, Paul Fardy, M. William Fulton, Eric Hanauer, Elmer Johnson, Billie Moore, 
Alexander Omalev, Roberta RIkli, Virginia Scheel, Carol Weinmann, Ronald Witchey, Michael 
Yessis 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Physical Education offers the Bachelor of Science In Physical Education for 
students preparing to teach, for those preparing to pursue graduate work In physical education and 
for those preparing for careers In business, industry and government service. The degree consists 
of 124 units with a maximum of 12 lower division units and a minimum of 28 upper division units 
in physical education. 

Transfer students must request transcripts of records of all previous scholastic work from each 
university or college attended. These transcripts are in addition to those required for admission to 
the university and must be sent by the Issuing institution directly to the chair. Department of Physical 
Education. 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

It is strongly recommended that students take one or more of the following courses to fulfill their 
general education requirements: 

Chemistry 100 Introductory Chemistry (4) 

Physics 211 A Elementary Physics (4) 

Physical Science 201 Modern Physical Science (4) 

Biological Science 201 Elements of Biology (5) 

Biological Science 361 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology (4) 


Lower Division (maximum of 12 units) Units 

PE 201 Introduction to Physical Education 3 

A minimum of six classes elected from the following 6 t 


PE 110, 120, 130, 140, 170 and 180. (Although course number may be repeated to 
meet this requirement, a specific class may count only once.) 


Upper Division (minimum of 28 units) 

Theoretical and practical bases: Units 

Minimum of two courses from the following 6-7 


PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

PE 360 Movement Anatomy (3) 

t A minimum of three units for students who transfer from institutions granting one-half unit credit for physical education activity 
classes. 

8 — 84452 


253—6 2 515 


226 


HEPERA 


Units 


PE 361 Biomechanics of Sport (3) 

PE 370 Physiology of Exercise (4) 

PE 418 Adapted and Corrective Activities (3) 

Contemporary Understandings: 

Minimum of two courses from the following 6 

PE 350 History of Physical Education (3) 

PE 356 Cultural Perspectives of Physical Activity (3) 

PE 436 Sport Psychology (3) 

PE 437 Sport Sociology (3) 

Analysis: 

Three courses as follows ^7 

One course from the PE 340 series, Analysis of Individual Sports (2) 

One course from the PE 341 series, Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

One course from the following: 

PE 340 Analysis of Individual Sports (2) 

PE 341 Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

PE 342 Analysis of Team Sports (2) 

PE 482 Ethnic Dance (3) 

PE 484 Contemporary Dance Technique (3) 

PE 486 Choreography (3) 

Upper division physical education courses to complete the required 40 units for the major 

Total 40 

Proficiency Requirements for Major and Minor Students 

Activity courses should be taken to meet the prerequisite requirements for any analysis series courses 
the student plans to take. Proficiency screening tests are administered in the analysis classes at the 
beginning of the semester. 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A physical education minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework in physical education with a 
minimum of 1 2 upper division units which must include work from each of the following areas: 
Theoretical and Practical Bases, Contemporary Understandings and Analysis series. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS SEEKING A 
TEACHING CREDENTIAL 

Important note: Due to changes in the legal requirements for teaching credentials mandated by 
the California State Legislature, the program and requirements indicated here are subject to change. 
Students interested in obtaining a teaching credential at this institution will be subject to requirements 
in existence at the time of application for the various phases of the teacher preparation program for 
physical education. Information on these requirements will be published in supplementary bulletins 
available from the Department of Physical Education. 

The university program for meeting the /?a5/c requirements for the standard teaching credential with 
a specialization In secondary school teaching can be found elsewhere in this catalog (see School 
of Education, Division of Teacher Education) . Additional requirements of the Department of Physical 
Education are as follows: 

1. Required Coursework 

In addition to, or as part of, the requirements for a major in physical education ail candidates 
for the credential must complete the following with a minimum of a grade: 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 

PE 360 Biomechanics of Sport 

PE 420 Tests and Measurements In Physical Education 

2. Competency in Subject Matter of Physical Education 

All candidates for the credential must adequately demonstrate their competency In subject matter 
scope and content of physical education. The major areas of emphasis identified by the Physical 
Educahon Advisory Panel of the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing Include: (1 ) 
biological foundations, (2) sociological foundations, (3) psychological foundations, (4) histori- 
cal— philosophical foundations, (5) curriculum— organization, (6) evaluation and measurement, 
(7) health and safety concepts relating to physical activity and (8) Instructional subject matter. 

258—6 2 540 


HEPERA 227 


3. Instructional Subject Matter of Physical Education 

Students seeking a credential with a specialization in physical education from this institution must 
be able to demonstrate their competency in instructional subject matter which is a part of the 
physical education program of the public schools. The Department of Physical Education 
specifically requires the following: 

a. Ability to perform and analyze basic movement skills common to a large number of Instruction- 
al physical activities. 

b. Adequate background and preparation to demonstrate breadth of understanding of the scope 
and content of physical education. 

c. Adequate background and preparation in a minimum of three designated areas of physical 
education* to demonstrate "'in-depth" understanding and ability to apply understandings to 
the teaching learning situation. At present the areas Identified by the Teacher Education 
Advisory Council of the Physical Education Department include: (1 ) team sports, (2) Individ- 
ual sports, (3) dual sports, (4) dance, (5) aquatics, (6) recreational (must be instructional 
in nature), (7) environmental, (8) developmental, (9) special programs, and (10) coaching. 

4. Admission to Teacher Education 

In addition to the requirements set forth elsewhere in this catalog, the Department of Physical 
Education requires candidates to submit to an extensive review of qualifications for teaching. This 
review includes additional written documentation, interviews and may Include a written examina- 
tion. 

5. Admission to Student Teaching 

Admission to teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. In addition to 
the requirements set forth by the Division of Teacher Education, all candidates who are physical 
education majors must meet standards established by the department. Information on these 
standards is available in a supplemental publication from the Department of Physical Education. 
Note: The present credential law calls for physical education majors to complete an academic 
minor. In general, the Teacher Education Advisory Council for the Department of Physical Education 
holds the position that prospective student teachers must have a satisfactory CPA In the minor and 
must be able to demonstrate that a minimum of 15 units of minor coursework (including at least 
six units but preferably nine units of upper division minor units) will be completed by the time the 
student teaching phase of the program is completed. Exceptions to this position may be made by 
submitting a petition which must be approved by the council. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies is designed: (1) to prepare master teachers at the college level; (2) to 
Improve the professional background and competence of those in the field; (3) to prepare scholars 
who wish to pursue a doctoral program in physical education; and (4) to prepare students for sports 
related careers in fields other than teaching. 

Prerequisites 

Prerequisites to the program include: 

(1) completion of 24 approved upper division units in physical education; 

(2) a grade-point average of 3.0 or better, for all upper division work taken in physical education 
and a 2.5 CPA for all previous college and/or university work. (Contingency provisions: 
grade-point deficiencies in Individual courses In physical education may be met by taking 6-12 
hours of approved courses at Cal State Fullerton, and earning a 3.0 CPA In these courses. Such 
courses, while counted toward the prerequisites for the master of science program, may not 
be used to fulfill the program requirements.) 

Study Plan: 

The degree study plan normally consists of 30 units of graduate coursework with a CPA of 3.0 or 
better. Coursework shall include a minimum of 18 units of 500-level courses of which 5-7 units are 
required. Further work includes 11 to 13 units of 500-level physical education courses and a 
maximum of 12 units of optional electives. A thesis or a project and an oral examination at the 
conclusion of the program are required; a written examination may also be required. 

• Students are urged to consult with the teacher education adviser of the department before submitting documents required for 
establishing subject matter competency. 


264—6 2 570 


228 HEPERA 


Units 

W 


Required 

PE 510 Research in HEPER (3) 

PE 598 Thesis or PE 597 Project (2-4) 

Study plans shall be developed from the following list of approved courses with adviser's 
approval. 

Approved 500-level Physical Education 11-13 

PE 515 Seminar in Physical Education (3) 

PE 516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education (3) 

PE 520 International Physical Education (3) 

PE 530 Administration and Supervision of HEPER (3) 

PE 532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

PE 533 Facilities Development and Planning (3) 

PE 540 Seminar in Problems in Adapted Physical Education (3) 

PE 545 Seminar in Evaluation in Physical Education (3) 

PE 551 Seminar: Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

PE 552 Human Bio-Kinetics (3) 

PE 555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

PE 560A Advanced Studies (Tennis-Badminton) (2) 

PE 560B Advanced Studies (Gymnastics) (2) 

PE 560C Advanced Studies (Track and Field) (2) 

•PE 596 Advanced Studies in Physical Education (1-3) 

•PE 599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Optional Electives 12 

Twelve units of coursework are selected with adviser's approval which would be support- 
ive of the individual student's stated goals for graduate study. Coursework may be select- 
ed from the following categories In any combination: 

1 . 5(X)-level coursework in physical education. 

2. 400-level coursework In physical education approved by the department's Graduate 
Studies Committee for graduate students. 

3. Graduate or upper division coursework approved for graduate students from other 
departments within the university. 

Total 30 

For further details, consult the graduate studies adviser, Division of Health Education, Physical 
Education, Recreation and Athletics. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

101 Personal and Community Health (2) 

Meaning and significance of physical, mental and social health as related to the individual and to 
society; alcohol and narcotics education; fire prevention; public safety and accident prevention. 

102 Prevention and First Aid (2) 

Study of the hazards In man's environment and the common accidents related thereto. Emphasis 
Is placed upon both the care and prevention of accidents. Students will be certified In standard 
and advanced American Red Cross first aid procedures. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

321 Stimulants and Depressants (3) 

Critical study of habit-forming substances such as alcohol, tobacco, narcotics and related drugs. 
Social and legal aspects of the drug problem are also considered. 

322 Man, Exercise and Leisure (2) 

A study of the effect of man s nutrition in relation to exercise. The interrelationships of activity and 
leisure In modern society and the problems that are associated with them will also be investigat- 
ed. 

• PE 5% and 599 may be applied to the major area of concentration and/or the secondary area of optional electives. 


275—6 2 625 


HEPERA 229 


419 The School Health Program (3) 

Prerequisite: HE 101 or equivalent. Consideration of the three classical divisions of the school health 
program: Instruction, services and environment. Study will Include standards, problems, and 
relationships pertaining to these areas as well as a field project. 

421 Public Health (2) 

A study of the structure, policies and practices of public health agencies in the United States. 
Emphasis on factors affecting environmental health. 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

General Education Requirements: 

Health and Physical Education Electives 

There are no specific health and physical education requirements. Each student, however, must take 
a minimum of three courses (9 units) with one from each of three fields included in Category IV, 
Basic Subjects: computer science, elementary foreign languages, health education, mathematics, oral 
communications, physical education, reading, statistics or writing. See page 69. 

110 Aquatics (1) 

A physical activity experience In aquatics activities with a student In an educational setting and under 
the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs and interests of the 
student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

120 Group Activities (1) 

A physical activity experience in group activities with a student In an educational setting and under 
the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs and interests of the 
student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

130 Individual Activities (1) 

A physical activity experience in Individual activities with a student in an educational setting and 
under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs and interests 
of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

140 Dance Activities (1) 

(Same as Dance 140) 

170 Intercollegiate Sports (W) (2) 

An Intercollegiate activity experience In individual or team sports for women In an educational 
setting under the direction of a coach who directs the activity to meet the needs and interests 
of the student. Consent of coach required for enrollment. 

180 Intercollegiate Sports (M) (2) 

An Intercollegiate activity experience in individual and team sports for men in an educational setting 
under the direction of a coach who directs the activity to meet the needs and interests of the 
student. Consent of the coach required for enrollment. 

190 Team Management (2) 

Field experience in the management of an intercollegiate sport. May be repeated for credit. 

Professional Theory Courses 

201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Introduction to physical education programs in public and private agencies, personal, social and 
professional requirements of the physical education teacher and recreation leader, includes the 
origin and development of the professions of health education, physical education and recreation 
with emphasis upon their significance and function in contemporary American culture. 

206 Techniques of Officiating Team Sports (2) 

Analysis of officiating techniques and rules necessary for officiating team sports. May be repeated 
for various sports or combinations of sports. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

210 Water Safety Instructor (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 1 10 (Life Saving) or equivalent and consent of instructor. This course prepares the 
student to teach swimming and life saving and to supervise aquatic programs. Successful comple- 
tion of this course will qualify the student for certification as an ARC Water Safety Instructor. 
(1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


279—6 3 5 


230 HEPERA 


214 Skin and Scuba Diving (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 1 10 (Skin Diving), or ability to swim 400 yards, tread water one minute, and swim 
25 yards underwater and consent of instructor. The techniques of skin and scuba diving, theory 
of diving, safety procedures and applications of diving will be covered. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

301 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, successful completion of HE 102 (or equivalent) and consent 
of instructor. Designed to assist trainers, coaches, physical education instructors, health educa- 
tors, YMCA and playground personnel, and athletes In the prevention and care of athletic Injuries. 
Emphasis will be on practical applications as well as theory. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

303 Conditioning for Athletes (3) 

Fundamentals of conditioning for those who plan to coach. Includes specific programs such as circuit 
training, nutrition, motivation, weight control and kinesiologic factors for women's and men's 
athletics. 

320 Theory of Coaching: Sports (2) 

A physical education experience designed to help prepare the student to coach specific individual 
and team sports. Emphasis will include coaching techniques, conditioning of athletes, budget 
preparation, purchase and care of equipment, scheduling and design and care of facilities. May 
be repeated for credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

An analysis of current theories of motor learning as related to human performance. Philosophical 
bases are developed from which basic principles are evolved. 

325 Organization and Administration of Physical Education (3) 

Case studies involving human physical performance. Sequence of activities, individual needs. Institu- 
tional patterns of organization and programming. 

333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Emphasis is placed upon characteristics of the child, particularly as these relate to physical growth 
and development; basic mechanical principles underlying efficient movement; and programs for 
physical needs of children In the elementary school. Consent of instructor or department chair- 
man required for physical education majors. 

335 Afro-American Dance (2) 

(Same as Dance 335) 

340 Analysis of individual Sports (2) 

Prerequisites: prior experience In the specific sport (s) offered. Must demonstrate adequate profi- 
ciency in each sport (s) offered. Analysis of a specific sport (s) including game play and skill 
performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May be repeated for 
credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

341 Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

Prerequisites: prior experience In the specific sport (s) offered. Must demonstrate adequate profi- 
ciency In each sport(s) offered. Analysis of a specific sport (s) including game play and skill 
performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May be repeated for 
credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

342 Analysis of Team Sports (2) 

Prerequisites: prior experience In the specific spo^(s) offered. Must demonstrate adequate profi- 
ciency in each sport (s) offered. Analysis of a<sp^ific sp)ort(s) including game play and skill 
performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May be repeated for 
credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

350 History of Physical Education (3) 

Historical development of thought and practice In athletics and physical education in American 
education. 

356 Cultural Perspectives of Physical Activity (3) 

An Interdisciplinary approach to the examination of physical activity in the cultural milieu. Study will 
cover historical and contemporary Interpretations of the role of play, games and sports, dance 
and recreation In human life. 

360 Movement Anatomy (3) 

Description of human movement especially as witnessed In sports. Comprehension of muscle action 
and function in various sports. 






HEPEKA 233 


361 Biochemics of Sport (3) 

Sports technique analysis. General techniques of motion study and application of mechanical princi- 
ples to sport. 

370 Physiology of Exercise (4) 

The study of physiological processes in physical activities and the effects of training upon perform- 
ance. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

3% Tutorial (1) 

Student aide In general education activity classes. May be repeated for credit. 

418 Adapted and Corrective Activities (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 360. The study and selection of activities and programs for students physically unable 
to participate In the regular physical education program. 

420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3) 

A study of the development and use of tests and measurements In physical education in the 
evaluation of objectives, programs and student achievement. 

425 Special Programs: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Croup investigation of selected topics determined by profes- 
sionals In the field. Will be offered as a one-, two- or three-unit course. May be repeated for 
credit. 

436 Sport Psychology (3) 

Discussion and analysis of literature, research and Issues dealing with psychological aspects of play, 
games and sport. (Same as Psychology 436) 

437 Sport Sociology (3) 

A critical examination of the interrelationships of sport and athletics with other aspects of the culture; 
special emphasis on 20th-century America. 

442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Deals with objectives, methods and materials of 
teaching physical education at the secondary school level. Required before student teaching. 
Course is part of the 1 2-unit education block and may not be taken separately. 

482 Ethnic Dance (3) 

(Same as Dance 482) 

484 Contemporary Dance Technique (3) 

(Same as Dance 484) 

486 Choreography (3) 

(Same as Dance 486) 

4% Physical Education Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department chair and instructor. Participation as an assistant in planning, 
preparing, coaching, teaching in public school, college, or community physical education or 
recreation programs. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. Credit/ no credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of instructor supervising the study and department 
chair. Independent inquiry into problems of topics of special interest beyond the scope of regular 
coursework. May be repeated for credit up to six units. 

510 Research in Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. The role and functions of research in health, physical education, and 
recreation; included are the different types of research with tools of and equipment for the 
respective research. Selection and development of research problems and critique of completed 
studies are stressed. 

515 Seminar in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major or minor in physical education. A study of current 
problems and issues in physical education through a critical analysis of the literature In the field 
and research findings. 

516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education, identification of philosophical 
schools of thought as related to physical education including the role of the philosophical 
process. Examination and application of the philosophical process in physical education. 


234 HEPERA 


520 International Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. An in-depth study of the theory and 
practice of physical education and sports in selected foreign countries. Evaluation of foreign 
physical education programs in relation to programs witnessed in the United States. 

530 Administration and Supervision of Health Education, Physical Education and 
Recreation (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with major in physical education. An in-depth study and critical analysis 
of existing programs In health education, physical education, and recreation In terms of estab- 
lished evaluative criteria and norms of practice. 

532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major In physical education. Study In desirable practices, proce- 
dures, and factors influencing curricular development in the field of physical education. Especial- 
ly designed for the practicing teacher, supervisor of physical education, and the school 
administrator concerned with physical education in the total school program. 

533 Facilities Development and Planning (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and a major in physical education. Analysis of new trends and research 
in the development of indoor and outdoor facilities in planning programs In health education, 
physical education and recreation with special emphasis upon design, safety, features, site 
selection, building construction and equipment needs. 

540 Seminar in Problems in Adapted Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 418. Identification and solutions of problems in planning, organization, administra- 
tion, and evaluation of adapted physical education programs at local, state and national levels. 

545 Seminar in Evaluation in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. The study and application of 
advanced evaluation procedures and scientific instrumentation used in the solution of current 
problems and projects in physical education. 

551 Seminar: Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 370 or equivalent. A study of advanced theories of exercise and physiological 
function. 

552 Human Bio-Kinetics (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 361 or equivalent background In kinesiology. A study of advanced theories and a 
detailed analysis of human movement. 

555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, coursework In kinesiology, physiology of exercise, blo-kinetics and 
consent of instructor. Detailed study of contempx)rary training with specific attention to the 
development of those qualities involved in various sports. Experience in evaluation of the effects 
of training. 

560A Advanced Study in Performance: Badminton and Tennis (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or experience in badminton and tennis or 
consent of instructor. Theory and analysis of top level performance. Includes in-depth study of 
skills, techniques and strategy involved in badminton and tennis and the factors pertinent to 
outstanding athletic performance. 

560B Advanced Study in Performance: Gymnastics (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or work in gymnastics or consent of 
instructor. Theory and analysis of top level performance. Includes in-depth study of the skills and 
techniques Involved in gymnastics and the factors pertinent to outstanding athletic performance. 

560C Advanced Study in Performance: Track and Field (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, advanced preparation and/or work in track and field or consent of 
Instructor. Theory and analysis of top level performance. Includes in-depth study of the skills, 
techniques, and strategy involved in track and field and the factors pertinent to outstanding 
athletic performance. 

5% Advanced Studies: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Graduate seminars designed to develop competencies in such areas 
as: historical, philosophical, sociological, psychological, scientific bases of sport and dance. 
Opportunities are provided for the individualization of instruction with appropriate experiences. 
May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 510 and consent of Instructor. Individual work on an empirical problem. Confer- 
ences with project chairman and committee, culminating in a project. 


292—6 3 70 


HEPERA 235 


598 Thesis (4) 

Prerequisites: PE 510 and consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical problem. Confer- 
ences with thesis chairman and committee, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of the faculty adviser and department chair. Research for 
qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 
749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 


RECREATION COURSES 

203 Recreation Programs and Activities (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and activity course, leadership in recreation programs, 
activities in recreation agencies. Laboratory experiences and practice included. ( 1 hour lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

204 Camping and Camp Leadership (3) 

A study of camping designed to make a person become a more skillful camper, to understand better 
the values of camping and to prepare students to organize and discuss camping activities and 
the role of the counselor. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

208 Recreational Film>Making (2) 

The theory and practice of the art of creative film-making as it pertains to the field of recreation. 
(1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 


3 105 




HUMANITIES AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 











239 

SCHOOL OF 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Dean: Hazel J. Jones 


The curricula of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences are designed to provide opportunities 
for the student to expand his general knowledge, to develop a beginning specialization, to investigate 
areas of intellectual interest, and, if he chooses, to prepare himself for specialized professional 
studies. 

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences is presently comprised of 1 6 departments and several 
interdisciplinary programs offering undergraduate majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science degree and master's programs leading to the Master of Arts, Master of Science or Master 
of Public Administration. 

DEPARTMENT OF AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Wacira Cethaiga 
Chairman 

Cheryl Armstrong, Michael Finnie, Jim Hancock, Boaz Namasaka 

The required minimum for the major is 36 units: Afro-Ethnic Studies 103,* 107 and 240 plus six 
additional units from lower division offerings and a minimum of 24 units in upper division courses. 
The purpose of the program is to provide a specialization in Afro-American studies within the 
framework of a more generalized and comprehensive ethnic studies perspective; to acquaint stu- 
dents with the problems, successes and failures of America's largest minority group; to help students 
understand the nature of contemporary ethnic and social turmoil and guide them Into constructive 
modes of thought about current issues; to enable students to see the black experience In America 
in a world setting; and to enable students to lead more effective lives in a culturally pluralistic and 
rapidly changing society. 

To accomplish this, it Is important that prospective majors and others interested in a minor consult 
with the Afro-Ethnic faculty for advice. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 

This degree program is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a variety of needs in 
contemporary higher education: extending opportunities for university education to students who 
have long been under-represented due to cultural differences between their experiences and the 
cultural emphasis of higher education; providing for personal consultation between faculty and 
students of diverse cultural backgrounds; and revising curriculum and promoting research to give 
ail students and faculty an understanding of the interaction of ethnic groups in past and contempo- 
rary civilizations. 

Required 

*103 Effective Communication (3) 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

240 Afro-American History (3) 

Lower division electives: (6 units required) 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

104 Swahili (4) 

105 Swahili (4) 

230 The Native American (3) 

245 Black Political History (3) 

• Students can be exempted from Afro-Ethnic Studies 103 by an examination and/or consent of department. 


302r-6 3 120 


240 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 


250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Black (3) 

270 The Amer-Asian (3) 

Upper division electives: (24 units required including at least 9 units from 309, 335, 346, 385, 
and 410) 

300 Black Man/ Black Woman (3) 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

303 Ancient and Modern African Culture (3) 

304 African Religion and Philosophy (3) 

305 Community Organizations (3) 

309 The Black Family (3) 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

335 History of Racism (3) 

346 The African Experience (3) 

385 Schools and Minority Croups (3) 

400 The Black Man and Reconstruction (3) 

401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

402 Africa and Self-Determination (3) 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

411 Black Writers' Workshop (3) 

420 Philosophy of Black Radical Thought (3) 

460 Afro-American Music (3) 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

A survey of the basic concepts and problems involved In an examination of the perspective through 
which black and brown people have come to see themselves in terms of their own heroes, 
culture, and contributions to societies in which they live and world society In general. 

103 Effective Communication (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic skills, emphasizing writing and communication skills, stressing 
the use of idioms, proper pronunciation. Intonation, and correct English patterns. 

104 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

(Same as Swahili 101 ) 

105 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

(Same as Swahili 102) 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Introduction to the aims and objectives of the Afro-American studies program. The course will define 
and explore the basic terms and references that give substance to Afro-American studies, it will 
provide uniform purpose and direction for students who seek an education in Afro-American 
studies. 

230 The Native American (3) 

A study of the American Indian experience In the United States as seen from the Indian's point of 
view In comparison with that of the white man. Special attention will be focused on the problems 
of American Indians today. 

240 Afro-American History (3) 

A survey of the social, political, and economic history of black people In the United States from 
slavery to the present. 

245 Black Political History (3) 

Background in the political development of the United States and the influence of slavery there on 
to the present date. Included Is a survey and analysis of the U. S. Constitution showing separate 
political development of white and black. 


305—6 3 135 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 241 


250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

An examination of the process of socialization of the black man In America and Its imprints upon 
his psyche. 

260 Cultural Identity of the Contemporary Black Man (3) 

An examination and study of the "identity crisis" or lack of It in young black individuals in the United 
States. An in-depth analysis of the changing points of view of the black toward acculturation. 

270 The Amer- Asian (3) 

A survey of the Aslan-American experience from the early 19th century. Includes: analysis of the 
discriminatory legislation as reflected in immigration quotas; investigation of the fallacies sur- 
rounding the Asian-American experience; and study of present day attitudes In the Aslan commu- 
nity. 

300 Black Man/Black Woman (3) 

A study of black value systems, double standards, machismo figure, communication barriers caused 
by predefined roles, stereotype expectations according to the traditional class status, and how 
they affect Individual abilities and self-esteem. 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

A survey of African cultural characteristics In the New World, as they relate to contemporary events, 
including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

303 Ancient and Modern African Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced sophomore or upper division standing. A survey of the African cultures 
(specifically West African contrasted with East African) before the period of exploration and 
after colonization. A look at the present-day American black culture and an estimation of the 
carry-over cultures. 

304 African Religion and Philosophy (3) 

An analysis of African life, the relationship between man. Cod and nature, the systems of African 
philosophical thought in terms of Cod, man, ethics, justice, morals, good and evil, life and death, 
and their interrelationships. 

305 Community Organizations (3) 

A study of organization agencies, such as Partners for Progress, Fair Housing, SER, Urban League 
and the local welfare systems and their relevancy to the minority community. Students will be 
involved In field research and assess the goals and accomplishments of an organization selected 
for study. 

309 The Black Family (3) 

A study of the American social conditions that shaped the black family from the African cultural 
patterns that were destroyed during slavery to the family that exists today. Special attention will 
be given to the roles of poverty, racism and discrimination. 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

Theory and practice of movement of African and Haitian peoples. An investigation of how move- 
ment (dance) acts as quasi-language in perpetuating the life style of African cultures and cultures 
of African descent. 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

A study of African and Afro-American art from prehistoric to contemporary times. Including African 
Influences in other art forms and a stylistic analysis of drawings, sculpture and paintings. 

335 History of Racism (3) 

An examination of the current dynamics of racism in terms of the historical roots of that racial 
phenomenon both In American society and the world setting. 

346 The African Experience (3) 

A survey of major themes of African history from the origin of the black man and traditional African 
civilization through the African diaspora to the Institutional realities of Africa today. 

385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) (Formerly 285) 

A study of the prevailing educational practices in regard to minority groups In elementary school 
through college, including minority students' failure patterns, what Is being done to change 
failures, and the outcomes of these practices. 

400 The Black Man and Reconstruction (3) 

An examination of the first attempt to bring about the realization of an Interracial democratic 
American society. Special attention will be given to the conduct, achievements and contributions 
of those Afro-Americans who participated In that short lived experiment. 


311—6 3 165 


242 American Indian Studies 


401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting black Americans, 
with an emphasis on problem solving. Particular focus will be placed on the effects American 
social attitudes and institutions have had on the black community. Research will focus on these 
areas. 

402 Africa and Self-Determination (3) 

Prerequisite: Afro-Ethnic Studies 303. A study of the national characters of African nations, how they 
shed labels like "tribes" and united to demand the Independence they had lost. 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

A study of the literary endeavors of Afro-Americans and their cultural impact, especially in relation- 
ship to the social and psychological evolution of the Afro-American. 

411 Black Writers' Workshop (3) 

Practice in writing prose, fiction, drama, short stories, book reviews, poetry and essays from the 
perspective of the black experience. 

420 Philosophy of Black Radical Thought (3) 

The philosophy of black radical thought as it emerged from the black experience In America through 
slavery. Reconstruction, post- Reconstruction, pre- World War II and contemporary times and as 
it Is expressed through music, sermons, literature, social movements, drama and political action. 

460 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of black music In America; the sociological conditions that help produce various forms of 
black music; and influential black music In America. 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: junior status or consent of instructor. Special seminar in selected topics In Afro- 
American studies. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and acceptance of the subject by department chairman and the faculty 
member directing the study. 

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Faculty 

Lawrence Christensen (Anthropology), Wacira Gethalga (Afro-Ethnic Studies), Fred Katz (An- 
thropology), Robert Renee (Theatre), Gerald Rosen (Sociology), Otto Sadovszky (Anthropolo- 
gy), Priscilla Shames (English), Gary Shumway (History), Alexander Stupple (English), Imre 
Sutton (Geography), Norman Townshend-Zellner (Economics) 

PART-TIME 
Jack Allen 

COUNSELORS 

William Coffer, Richard Hernasy, Beth Voien 

The American Indian studies program, now in development, anticipates bringing together interested 
students — Indian and non-Indian — and faculty In a mutual effort to provide instruction In and 
dialogue on the status, condition and destiny of Indians In contemporary America. As now envi- 
sioned, the program would include Indian-oriented courses dedicated to an Indian Interpretation of 
tribal experience in America as well as related courses on Indian themes, including several already 
being offered, as developed by interested faculty in other academic departments. 

The intent is to create an academic environment that would stimulate students and faculty alike to 
exchange Ideas and knowledge about native Americans and to establish. In a sense, a center for 
interaction on campus, which, in turn, would be guided by Indian counselors. Another objective of 
the program is to provide special kinds of instruction to reinforce the Indian student's comprehension 
of tribal problems and to define areas of solutions students might pursue allied to their degree 
objectives on campus. Indian students should be apprised of the fact that Educational Opportunity 
Program and Bureau of Indian Affairs funding may be available to them through the university 
Financial Aid Office. It Is expected within a year or two that this program will be expanded by the 
addition of several new "core" as well as "related" courses. 


315—6 3 185 


American Studies 243 


Core Course: 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 230 The Native American (3) 

Related Courses: 

Anthropology 321 The American Indian (3) 

Anthropology 460 Culture Change (3) 

Art 461 Art of North American Indian (3) 

Dance 476A,B History of Dance (3^) 

Economics 334 Economics of Poverty, Race and Discrimination (3) 

English 320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

English 421 Minority Images in American Literature (3) 

Sociology 431 Minority Group Relations (3) 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN STUDIES 

FACULTY 
David Pivar 
Department Chairman 

John Ibson, Robert Porfirio, Ann Untereiner, E. James Weaver 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The degree in American studies is an interdisciplinary program within the School of Humanities and 
Social Sciences. The program is designed for students with a special interest in the American 
experience, including the overseas experience. It permits, through intensive study of the United 
States, greater perception of American society, both contemporary and historical. By providing 
students with an opportunity to discover the larger relationships among disciplines, the student may 
receive a better sense of the whole. 

The American studies degree prepares students for teaching either on the elementary or secondary 
level. Credentlaling, usually handled during the fifth year of study, may be obtained for students 
enrolled in this interdisciplinary program. American studies Is useful for any career In which an 
understanding of American culture is important. Specialized careers in American studies, leading to 
the Ph.D., are also available. 

Since two alternative programs are available, the student Interested In becoming a major must 
consult with an American studies counselor to develop a course of study mutually satisfactory. 
The major consists of 36 units distributed as follows between the core program and either plan a 
or b: 

I. Core program (12 units) required of all majors. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

301 The American Character (3) 

350 Seminar In Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

401 Prosemlnar in American Studies (3) 

II. Alternative plans (24 upper division units in either plan — electives in American Studies may 
be used in conjunction with courses in other departments) 

a. The student may choose to work In two but not more than three disciplines related to the 
American experience; i.e.: history and literature or sociology, anthropology and political 
science. 

b. The student may choose to pursue a specialized theme or subject; i.e., mass culture, 
women in America, urbanization or ethnic groups In Amercian society, or the student may 
choose to concentrate on 20th-century American problems. 

Students interested In the American studies major must consult with the chairman of the department 
before establishing an individual course of study. 


320—6 3 210 


244 Anthropology 

AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

With the concept of culture as a unifying principle, this course will focus on four separate time 
periods in order to provide the framework for an understanding of American civilization. Several 
different kinds of documents will be used to illustrate the nature and advantages of an Interdisci- 
plinary approach. 

301 The American Character (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or History 170A or B or consent of instructor. Studies the 
changing national character. Reading reflects an interdisciplinary approach; from poetry to 
sociology. Some attention is paid to the American Negro and Indian in addition to the transplant- 
ed European. 

333 Visual Arts in Contemporary America (3) 

Visual phenomena in America as they reveal changes in recent American culture. Areas covered 
include the ''high" arts (painting, sculpture) as contrasted with the "low" arts (advertising, 
television); the artist as Innovator, alienation, the business world, and American values In art. 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301 ; or History 1 70A or B; or consent of instructor. Designed 
to provide the American studies major with an understanding and appreciation of methodology, 
theories of society and images of man as they effect American studies contributions to scholar- 
ship. 

401 Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of instructor. Designed 
to permit students to examine the relationship between theory and application. Emphasis on 
analytic readings and research. Topics will be announced each semester. Xheck the Class 
Sch^ule for topics being considered each semester. 

402 Religion in the Development of American Society (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of Instructor. An 
intensive study of the changing role of religion in shaping, reflecting, and challenging dominant 
American values and Institutions. Focus is on the 19th and 20th centuries, although some 
attention will be paid to the colonial period. 

410 Irish-Americans and the Cult of Success (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of instructor. Irish- 
American subculture from the Potato Famine Emigration to the present. Focuses on the quality 
and extent of the "Americanization" process. Including the retention, repression, and loss of Irish 
ethnicity. 

415 The Hero in American Popular Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 1 70A or B, or consent of Instructor. Nineteenth 
and 20th-century materials including dime novels, pulps, detective fiction, comic strips, and films, 
will be utilized to examine the role of the hero in American Imagination. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

(Same as English 425) 

450 Women in American Society (3) 

An effort to explain the rise and decline of feminism in America. The first half of the course will be 
lecture. The second half will be devoted to discussion aimed at comparing and contrasting the 
contemporary woman's movement with Its predecessors. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects In American studies to be taken with the consent of instructor and 
program coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Hans Leder 
Department Chairman 

Alleen Baron, Lawrence Christensen, Marlene Dobkin de Rios, David Evans, Christopher Hulse, E. 
T. jacob-Pandlan, LeRoy joesink-Mandevllle, Fred Katz, Peter Koepping, NgaPare Mills, Otto 
Sadovszky,* Richard See, Judy Suchey, Wayne Untereiner, Wayne Wanke, Jack Zahniser 

• University administrative officer 


a25— 6 3 235 


Anthropology 245 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The major in anthropology is designed for students desiring a broad generalist background, students 
preparing to become teachers of social sciences, and students preparing for graduate work in 
anthropology and in advanced specializations on particular areas (Africa, Asia, etc.) or with cross- 
cultural and international emphasis. 

The required minimum for the major is 45 units, in addition to those taken for the general education 
requirement, distributed as follows: 

Thirty-three units must be taken in anthropology, 24 in upper division courses. Anthropology 201, 
202, 203, 380, 401, 406 or 409, and 480 are required. One course Is required from areal offerings 
in the field: Anthropology 204, t 303, 321, 322, 324, 325, 328, 340, 341, 345, 347, 350, 351, 352, 360, 
and 361. Two courses are required from theoretical /Institutional courses in the field: Anthropology 
t 313, t 315, 403, 404, J 407, t 408, t 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, t 416, 420, 421, X 422, 423, 424, 
425, 428, 429, 430, 440, 441, 450, 455, 460, 465, 470 and 490. 

(The courses marked with X are cross-listed with other departments and programs. They may be 
used to satisfy the major requirement for: either the courses In anthropology; or related courses.) 

Minimum units 33 

Twelve upper division units are to be taken In the related social science fields of economics, 
geography, history, political science, sociology and psychology, to be approved by the major 
adviser. Advanced work In biological science, the fine and applied arts, and the humanities may be 
substituted for these units by students with specialized interests with the approval of their adviser^. 
Students interested in specializing in anthropological linguistics are urged to take courses from the 
university's program in linguistics. Students interested in specializing in physical anthropology are 
urged to take some of the following biological science courses: 101, Elements of Biology; 312, 
Genetics; 361, Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology; 404, Evolution; 463, Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy; 465, Animal Ecology; and 471, Natural History of the Vertebrates. Students interested In 
specializing in primitive art are urged to take many of these art courses: 451, Oceanic Art; 452, Art 
of Sub-Saharan Africa; 461, Art of North American Indians; 462, Art of Mesoamerica; 471, Art of 


Central and South America. 

Minimum units 1_2 

Minimum total units for the major 45 


Students considering advanced professional careers in research, teaching, or applications of an- 
thropology are urged to explore and sample widely from course offerings In the other social sciences, 
the biological and natural sciences and the humanities and arts. Through a judicious selection of 
these courses it Is hoped that anthropology majors will broaden their Interests and diversify and 
develop their skills in working towards a variety of individualized career objectives. 

TEACHING MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The minor in anthropology is Intended as a second field for persons completing a major in another 
discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. Twenty-one units must be taken In anthropology; 
15 of these in upper division courses. Anthropology 201 or 203, 202 and 380 are required. Two 
additional courses must be selected from areal offerings In the field: Anthropology 303, 321, 322, 
324, 325, 328, 340, 341, 345, 347, 350, 351, 352, 360 and 361. Another course must be selected from 
theoretical /institutional courses in the field: Anthropology 313, 315, 403, 404, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 
411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 428, 429, 430, 440, 441, 450, 455, 460, 465, 
470 and 490. A final course must be either Anthropology 401 or 480. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The program for this degree provides advanced study of general anthropology as well as research 
and other learning experiences for students with specialized areas of Interest or competence. This 
program has its main emphasis on cultural anthropology. (The comparatively great number of 
linguistic offerings is due only to the purpose of cross-listing courses.) After consultation with his 
adviser, a student may, however, decide to concentrate in archaeological, linguistic or physical 
anthropology. 


339—6 3 305 


246 Anthropology 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the program requires: 

1. A bachelor's degree with a minimum of 27 units in anthropology, including the following 
courses or their equivalents. 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

380 Ethnological Theory (3) 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) or 
409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

One areal course (e.g. Anthropology 328, Peoples of Africa) 

One theoretical or topical course (e.g. Anthropology 415, Culture and Personality: Psycho- 
logical Anthropology) 

Reading courses and special examinations may be substituted for some of these prerequisites 
by the department. 

2. A CPA of 3.0 (B) for all work taken in anthropology. 

3. Evaluation and acceptance by the graduate study committee. The applicant must submit a letter 
of Intent and at least two letters of recommendation and may be required to attend a personal 
Interview at the discretion of the graduate study committee. 

Students with limited subject or grade defi<;:iencies may be considered for admission to the 
program upon completion of additional courses, selected by the graduate study committee, 
with at least a 3.0 (B) average. 


Study Plan 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: Units 

1 . Anthropology 501 Methodology of Anthropological Research 3 

2. Anthropology 502 Contemporary Theory In Cultural Anthropology 3 

3. Anthropology 598 Thesis 6 

4. Two additional graduate seminars In anthropology 6 

5. Upper division or graduate work In anthropology 6 

6. Upper division or graduate work in related fields _6 

30 


Any adviser-approved 300- or 4(X)-level course taken as a graduate student may be used for 
requirements 5 and 6. Anthropology 599, Independent Graduate Research, may be used for require- 
ment 5. 

For continuation in the program an average of 3.0 (B) for all work in the study plan must be 
maintained. A thesis must be completed for the degree. Normally a student will register for thesis 
two times, for three units each semester. Students must demonstrate reading knowledge of an 
appropriate foreign language prior to completion of the degree. 

For further information, consult the Department of Anthropology. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

Man as a biological organism and In evolutionary perspective. Concepts, methods, findings and 
Issues In the study of the order primates, including the relationships between fossil monkeys, apes 
and man, and the significance of genetic diversity between modern populations. 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

The nature of culture and its significance for man. Uniformities and variations in human cultures. 
Cultural analyses of major Institutional forms such as the family, economy, government, religion 
and art with an emphasis on preliterate peoples. A consideration of central problems of cultural 
comparison and interpretation. 


343—6 3 325 


Anthropology 247 


203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

Relationship of archaeology, culture history, and culture process, including some discussion of field 
methods and analysis of archaeological data; the uses and abuses of archaeology. A survey of 
world culture history from Pleistocene beginnings to the threshold of civilization. 

204 Man's Many Faces (3) 

The study and analysis of a broad selection of human societies, which will provide a perspective 
on how human problems have been solved and the possibilities for new solutions to our own 
problems. 

303 Woman in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. A description, analysis and survey of the Influence of biological 
determinants as they are shaped by cultural factors such as beliefs, values, expectations and 
socially defined roles for women. The changing role of women in industrial society will form an 
Important analytical segment. 

313 Human Genetics (3) 

(Same as Biological Science 313) 

315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 315) 

321 The American Indian (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. A cultural survey of North American Indians 
north of Mexico; origins, languages, culture areas, cultural history; the impact of European 
contacts. 

322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. General survey of the ethnology of the 
Mesoamerican culture-area, with treatment of each of the principal subareas In depth. Analysis 
of present-day ethnological societies, emphasizing sociopolitical organization, economic systems 
and religion. 

324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A culture history survey of the principal 
cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica from the dawn of incipient agriculture to the Spanish 
conquest. 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of Central and South 
America. Description of selected cultures representative of different cultural areas before and 
after contacts with Western countries. 

328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. A cultural survey of Africa. Description of 
selected cultures representative of different cultural areas before and after contacts with Western 
and Asian countries. 

340 Aboriginal Peoples of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural areas outside the centers 
of high civilizations of China and japan. Emphasis on steppe-nomadism, Siberia, and ethnic 
splinter groups between India and the Philippines, with focus upon their influence on the cultural 
centers and vice versa. 

341 Peoples of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Description and analysis of the religious, 
social and technological systems of the civilizations of Japan and China, as well as the Impact 
of nomadic herders of North and Central Asia upon those centers. Also, a comparison of 
community studies on these regions. 

345 Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of the Middle East with 
descriptions of selected cultures (Arab urban, nomadic, Jewish, Turk, Berber, Kurd). 

347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A survey of the native peoples and cultures 
of the Pacific Islands, including Australia; the social and cultural patterns of representative 
cultures of various areas; special ethnological and theoretical problems. 


347-6 3 345 


248 Anthropology 

350 Peoples of Western Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Representative groups considered in mod- 
ern and historical perspective, stressing especially rural-urban relationships and the dynamics of 
change. 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Peasant cultures of Russia, Southeast Europe, 
Poland, Czechoslovakia and the Baltic area, their traditional way of life and the Impact of 
industrialization and Communist ideology. 

352 Peoples of Ancient Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. A survey of the cultural and social Institu- 
tions of the peoples of Pre-Christian Europe. Particular attention will be paid to the Creek, Italic, 
Germanic and Celtic peoples, and readings will be drawn largely from original ancient writers. 

360 Contemporary American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Application of anthropological methods, 
categories of analysis, and types of interpretation to American culture. Survey and critique of 
selected community studies and other kinds of relevant research. 

361 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. An introduction to African culture. A survey 
of African cultural characteristics in the New World, as they relate to contemporary events, 
including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

380 Ethnological Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A survey on the theories about the position 
of man as a social and cultural being as described and thought about by philosophers in Greece, 
during the Renaissance, and particularly In the 19th century up to modern times in the Western 
World. 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 6 additional units of anthropology or consent of instructor. 
Anthropological field research by students on various problems using participant observation 
techniques. 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or 203 and consent of instructor. Excavation of a local archaeologi- 
cal site. Archaeological mapping, photography and recording. Laboratory methods of cataloging, 
preservation, description and interpretation of archaeological materials. Saturday field sessions, 
six fieldwork hours per week. May be repeated once for credit as an elective. 

404 Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 203 and 403. The employment of various physical data collecting 
techniques (e.g., photographic, palaeo-magnetic, etc.) in the field and the analysis of artifact 
collections and data from previous field operations In the laboratory. May be repeated once for 
credit as an elective. 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 406) 

407 California Indian Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 406. Survey of the Indian languages of California; descriptive analysis of 
their grammatical structure and their linguistic Interrelationship. 

408 The Uralic Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 406. The grammatical structure of the Uralic languages in Eastern Europe 
and Siberia and their interrelationship. 

409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Nature and functions of language; language structure and change; classification of languages; use of 
linguistic evidence in anthropology. (Same as Linguistics 409) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instruaor. The study of language as a factor in culture. 
Trends In the study of language and culture. (Same as Linguistics 410) 

411 Folklore (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. An Introduction to the study of folktales, 
myths, legends, proverbs, riddles and other forms of the verbal traditions of peoples. Major 
concepts and theories and research methods In the study of folklore. 


352—6 3 370 


Anthropology 249 


412 Comparative Oral Literature (3) 

A comparative survey of oral literature and its role in society. The types of oral narratives, their 
themes, meanings, and functions will be analyzed. 

413 Ethnological Music (3) 

Music, music making and musicians in various nonliterate societies. 

415 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and Psychology 331 or 351 or Sociology 341 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Comparative study of the relationship between the individual and his culture. Child training 
in nonwestern cultures. Survey of important concepts, studies, and research techniques. 

416 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

420 Primitive Value Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Study of what properly is considered 
"common sense" in the everyday life of people living within differing sociocultural environ- 
ments. 

421 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Examination of beliefs and practices in the 
full human variation of religious phenomena, but with an emphasis on primitive religions. The 
forms, functions, structures, symbolism, and history and evolution of man's religious systems. 

422 Jewish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 422) 

423 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

An analysis of the metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the "grammars" of the art, poetry, 
languages, myths, music, and rituals of various nonliterate and literate peoples and their develop- 
ment into creative experiences. 

424 Hallucinogens and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. A cross-cultural survey of mind-altering drugs, especially hallucino- 
gens, as they have been utilized in religion, healing, divination, witchcraft and magic. 

425 Anthropology of Law and Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. Sources of law-government in primitive 
societies; the cultural background of law; the functions and development of law and government 
in primitive politics; transitions to and comparisons with classical and modern legal and political 
systems. 

428 Social Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A study of the social organization of 
preindustrial societies; religious, political and economic institutions; status and value systems; 
conditions and theories of change. 

429 Kinship and Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 428 or consent of Instructor. Kinship systems in primitive society 
and their significance in the organization of social life. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, 
and kinship role patterns. 

430 Economic Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. Analysis of anthropological concepts of 
economy, ecology, and technology; relationship between habitat, economy, and culture. A 
survey of the different types of economic systems found throughout the world; outline of the 
economic development of mankind. 

440 Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Biological Science 404 is suggested. Advanced primate evolution 
with emphasis on the origin of Homo sapiens as evidenced in the fossil record and through 
biochemical and molecular studies. Evolutionary theory and problems in human evolution. 

441 Human Variation (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Biological Science 313 and 412 are suggested. A survey of the 
processes underlying and the theories for the existence of the present variation between and 
within human populations. The genetics of human populations and the study of the significance 
of racial classifications. 


356—6 3 390 


250 Anthropology 

450 Culture and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or Education 301 or consent of intructor. The transmission of valu^, 
implicit cultural assumptions, and the patterning of education in cross-cultural perspective, with 
special attention to American culture and development problems. 

455 Ethno-ecology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and consent of instructor. A comparative study of culture determin- 
ing man's impact on his environment. Our factual knowledge, different major approaches, 
important research issues, and methods of study will be the subject of this survey. 

460 Culture Change (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 301 or consent of instructor. Interrelations between cultural, 
social and psychological processes In the dynamics of culture growth and change. Impact of 
western technology on tribal and peasant societies. Anthropological contributions to the planning 
of directed sociocultural change in selected areas. 

465. Alternative Futures (3) 

A study of the growing literature on the future and a consideration of Its implications for anthropolo- 
gy and the other social sciences and humanities. 

470 Philosophical and Behavioral Foundations of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 and open to lower division students with the consent of instructor. 
Consideration of basic assumptions and contexts of anthropological work. The synthesis of Ideas 
and methods into professional skills and careers. 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: at least 12 units of anthropology or consent of Instructor. Historical antecedents of 
modern anthropology. A systematic survey of the development of anthropology as a scientific 
field; and examination of the principal contributions of leading anthropologists, past and present. 
Reinterpretations and emerging trends. 

490 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics In anthropology selected by the faculty and students 
participating in the course. May be repeated for credit. (Juniors may enroll.) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of adviser. Student selection of an 
individual research project involving either library or fieldwork. There are conferences with the 
adviser as necessary, and the work results In one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202, 401 and consent of instructor. Examination, analysis and evaluation 
of the contemporary methodological spectrum in anthropology and of new trends in research 
planning and Implementation. Consideration and critique of specific cases Involving differing 
research designs. 

502 Contemporary Theory in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 480 or consent of instructor. Critique of the basic assumptions and 
theoretical positions of leading contemporary anthropologists. 

504 Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing or 
consent of instructor. The topic chosen and a general outline of the seminar is circulated prior 
to registration. May be repeated. 

505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 505) 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 507) 

508 Modern Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 507 or Foreign Languages 507 or Linguistics 507 or consent of instructor. 
Speech 404 and Anthropology 410 recommended. Study of contemporary theories of grammar, 
with special emphasis on transformational, generative, logical and electromechanical bases and 
techniques of utterance analysis. (Same as Linguistics 508) 

550 Seminar in Problems in the Teaching of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Discussion of a variety of methods and materials for the teaching 
of anthropology at primary, secondary, and undergraduate college levels. 


367—6 3 445 


Chicano Studies 251 


592 Field Methods in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 505 and 507 or consent of instructor. Methods of analysis and descrip- 
tion of language structures. Data elicited from informants will be analyzed and described. 
Controlled study of a live informant's language. (Same as Linguistics 592) 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The writing of a thesis based on original 
field or laboratory research, library study or an educational project, and its analysis and evalua- 
tion. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Individual research on a field, laboratory, or library study, with 
conferences with a project adviser as necessary, and resulting in one or more papers. May be 
repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHICANO STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Norma Fimbres 
Department Chair 

Dagoberto Fuentes, Joseph Platt, Robert Serros 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE CHICANO STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 

The degree program in Chicano studies is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a 
variety of pressing needs in contemporary higher education. Among these needs are educating 
students to the culture, language, history and socioeconomic background of the Chicano population 
in California and the Southwest. This program is also designed to extend the opportunity of a higher 
education to Chicano and minority students. 

CHICANO STUDIES OPTION 

The department provides academic programs which include: Chicano studies minor and Chicano 
Studies Option of the Bachelor of Arts In Ethnic Studies. The program is adaptable for a dual major 
in ethnic studies (Chicano studies option) and other university degree programs, for joint programs 
In teacher preparation, and for the preparation of professionals and paraprofesslonals in government 
and private agencies. Through the multidisciplinary nature of the department, service classes In 
Chicano studies can be offered to students in the areas of: anthropology, economics, communica- 
tions, English, foreign languages, human services, history, music, political science, psychology, 
religious studies, speech, etc. 

The required minimum for the option is 36 units, 12 lower and 24 upper division. 

Units 

Lower Division 12 

Required: 

*102 Communication Skills (3) 

*103 Communication Skills (3) 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Electives: 

120 Bilingual Oral Expression (3) 

200 Chicano Movement (3) 

213 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

214 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3) 

218A Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

21 8B Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

237 Mexican and Chicano Literature in Translation (3) 

Upper Division 24 

Required: (6 units to be selected from the following) 

430 Cancidn de la Raza (3) 

* Instructor's approval required prior to enrollment. 


12-6 3 465 


252 Chicano Studies 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

453 Mexico since 1906 (3) 

Electives: 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

340 Sociology of the Chicano (3) 

403 Cultural Differences In Mexico and Aztl^n (3) 

411 Mexican Arts and Mexican Society (3) 

415 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher In the Barrio (3) 

421 Economics of the Chicano (3) 

430 Cancl6n de la Raza (3) 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

434 Counseling Chicano Students (3) 

435 Directed Research and Studies In Chicano Schools (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

441 Religion In the Chicano Society (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

452 The Chicano and Nativism (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Total 36 

MINOR IN CHICANO STUDIES 

The minor in Chicano studies consists of 24 units in the following areas: 

Required lower division courses (6 units) 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Required upper division courses (6 units) 

430 Cancidn de la Raza (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Approved electives 

Twelve units of approved coursework in lower and upper division classes that are selected by the 
adviser. 

TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Chicano Studies offers a Chicano Studies Option of the Bachelor of Arts In Ethnic 
Studies and a minor that are being accepted by the State Board of Education as concentrations in 
the bilingual-bicultural credential. Due to changes In teacher preparation and credentlaling (as 
established by the Ryan Act and Assembly Bill 1117), students should consult a departmental adviser 
in order to select the proper courses. 


379—6 3 505 


Chicano Studies 253 


CHICANO STUDIES COURSES 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing writing and communica- 
tion skills stressing the use of Idioms, proper pronunciation, intonation and correct English 
patterns of thought. 

103 Communication Skills (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 102 or consent of department. A methodical presentation of the basic 
communication skills emphasizing writing and communication skills stressing the use of Idioms, 
proper pronunciation, intonation and correct English patterns of thought. 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

A study of the role of the Chicano in the United States. Special emphasis on the Chicano's cultural 
values, social organization, urbanization patterns, and the problems In the area of education, 
politics and legislation. 

120 Bilingual Oral Expression (3) 

Recommended: Chicano Studies 102 and/or 103. Designed to train the bilingual Chicano In the 
process of oral expression in English and barrio Spanish. Pertinent topics will be selected in the 
areas of education, law enforcement and contemporary issues for bilingual oral expression. 

200 The Chicano Movement (3) 

A survey of the history of the Chicano movement, Its present activists and their Intellectual philoso- 
phies. 

213 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

The Spanish language as it Is spoken In the United States today. Designed to improve the basic 
communication skills in Spanish for students from Spanish-speaking backgrounds; emphasis on 
vocabularly building, syntactical analysis and conversation. Designed for Chicano students but 
not restricted to them. 

214 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 213. Designed to enhance further the communication skills in Spanish 
of the Spanish-speaking student. The second part of the course will emphasize written expression. 
Designed for Chicano students but not restricted to them. 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3^) 

Chicano creative writing utilizing the barrio's trilingual expressions. Student work as well as the work 
of contemporary Chicano writers will be analyzed. 

218A,B Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

A survey of the Chicano's cultural heritage from the pre-Cortesian period to the present. A historical 
analysis of the music, literature, art and dance of the Chicano. A — Literature and art. B — History, 
music and dance. 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Introduction to the basic characteristics of the Mexican, especially the Chicano society and culture 
and its ramifications in the United States today. Covers the period of 1519 to the present day. 
Emphasis is placed on the arts, literature, and history of Mexico and the Chicano in the United 
States. 

237 Mexican and Chicano Literature in Translation (3) 

A survey course in Mexican and Chicano literature in English. Special emphasis will be given to 
presenting the point of view of the Chicano. Panel discussions will emphasize the exposure of 
students to the Ideas of Mexican and Chicano literature as seen through the eyes of the Chicano. 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

Analysis of the Cal6 language of the southwestern states of the United States. Students will study 
the bicultural language of the Chicanos, origin, development, and contemporary use in the 
barrios. 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

A historical and cultural survey of the principal pre-Columbian cultures of Mexico and their signifi- 
cance for Mexican society. 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

The Chicano family development as an American social institution. Historical and cross-cultural 
perspectives. The socio- and psychodynamics of the Chicano family. 


384—6 3 530 


254 Chicano Studies 


306 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 200 or 220 or consent of instructor. Classroom instruction covering the 
major characteristics of the barrio. Supervised fieldwork in the barrio is required. Analysis of the 
barrio or agency will be made after fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 306. Classroom Instruction covering the major characteristics of the 
barrio and supervised fieldwork in the local barrios. An analysis of the barrio or agency will be 
made after fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

An overview of Mexican art forms from pre-Cortesian epochs to the contemporary artists, with 
emphasis on the use of oil painting techniques as employed by modern Mexican and Chicano 
artists. 

336 Main Trends in Spanish American Literature (3) 

An Introduction to the main currents of Spanish American literature emphasizing contemporary 
works. Close attention will be given to the relation between the artistic expression and the 
Ideological values of the period. 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 101 or 106, or 220, or 237, or consent of instructor. A study of the 
modern Chicano writers In the United States. Special emphasis will be given to Allurlsta, Corky 
Gonzales, Octavio Romano, El teatro campesino and the major Chicano magazines and newspa- 
pers. 

340 Sociology of the Chicano (3) 

Prerequisites: Chicano Studies 101 or 106, 220, or consent of instructor. A general survey of the field. 
Sociological perspectives of Chicano culture and social structure, including background, present 
nature, and changing patterns. 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and Aztl6n (3) 

A study of the cultural conflicts In Mexico as seen by the contemporary thinkers of Mexico and the 
United States. Special emphasis will be given to the urban and rural problems. 

411 Mexican Arts and Mexican Society (3) 

Study of the ways In which Mexican artists, architects and designers have reacted to the political, 
social and artistic developments In Mexico and the world. 

415 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of Mexican music ranging from the pre-Cortesian period to the present in Mexico and in 
the southwestern states of the United States. The history and music are presented by lectures 
and recordings. 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

Designed to improve the oral expression of teachers in the barrio elementary schools. Special 
emphasis will be given to the language patterns of the Chicano students and their parents. 

421 Economics of the Chicano (3) 

A study of the Chicano and his socioeconomic situations. Special emphasis will be placed on 
contemporary economic problems in immigration, agriculture, business, Industry, and crafts. 

430 Canci6n de la Raza (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish. Survey and analysis of the Nahuatl, Mexican and 
Chicano literature from the pre-Columbian period to the present. The latter part of the course 
will focus on contemporary Chicano writers. 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

Study of the Chicano child from preschool through grade six. The course will emphasize motor, 
physical, social. Intellectual and emotional growth and development and their effect on school 
adjustment and achievement. Observation of preschool and grade school children will be 
arranged. 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

A survey of the Chicano adolescents' social. Intellectual, and emotional growth and development. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the bicultural pressures from the barrio, family structure, 
school and achievement values. 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

An in-depth study and analysis of the literature of Mexico since 1940. Emphasis will be placed on 
the works of Carlos Puentes, Luis Spota, Rodolfo Usigll, Xavier Villaurrutia, Juan Jose Arreola, 
Octavio Paz, Roberto Blanco Moheno and Luis C. Basurto. 


388-4 3 550 


Communications 255 


434 Counseling the Chicano Student (3) 

Definition of problems of the Chicano student. Review of proposed methods of motivational coun- 
seling and analysis relevant curriculum. 

435 Directed Research and Studies in Chicano Schools (3) 

Superivised research and study of Chicano schools. Special emphasis will be placed on curriculum, 
library materials, and teaching techniques of the schools of the barrio and of classes with a high 
percentage of Chicano students. 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish and Chicano Studies 237 and 302 recommended. Study 
and discussion of the emergence of the Chicano movement dealing with political, economic, and 
sociological facets. Analyzes the writings of the Nahuatl, Spanish, Spanish-American and Chica- 
no writers with special attention on the contemporary writers. 

441 Religion in the Chicano Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 220, or consent of Instructor. A comparative study of American 
Protestant and Mexican Catholic thought and their influence on the values held by Anglos and 
Chicanos. Special emphasis will be placed on the contemporary issues. 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

History of the Chicano from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Special emphasis on the 
Chicano's changing role in the United States, his cultural identity crisis, and his achievements. 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting the Chicano, with 
emphasis on proposed solutions. Particular focus will be placed on the effect that social institu-^ 
tions have had on the Chicano community. Study and research will be made in these areas. 

452 The Chicano and Nativism (3) 

A study of nativism and the Chicano. Special emphasis is placed on Anglo-Chicano relationships as 
well as immigration law and practices. 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division class standing. A study of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 stressing the 
political, economic, and social features of this period. Special emphasis will be given to the 
Revolution and its contributions in the fields of art, literature and social reforms. 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

Theory of urban politics and evaluation of issues that affect the Chicanos and American society. 
Evaluations and surveys will be made on political organizations in the Hispanic-surnamed com- 
munities. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and approval by the department chairman and the professor (s) in charge 
of directing the study. An opportunity to do independent study under the guidance of the 
department, of a subject of special interest to the student. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

FACULTY 
James Alexander 

Acting Department Chairman 

William Berg, Fenton Calhoun, Carolyn Johnson, Raynolds Johnson, Martin Klein, Mary Koehler,* 
George Mastroianni, J. William Maxwell, Albert Ralston, Marvin Rosen, Ted Smythe 
The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Communications emphasizes study of broad princi- 
ples of communications, functions of the mass media in a democratic society, and theories relevant 
to Informing, instructing, and persuading through communications media. It may serve as prepara- 
tion for careers In mass media, business, industry, government and education; and as a preparation 
for graduate and professional schools. 

The department offers a major in communications with emphases in advertising, journalism, photo- 
communications, public relations, technical communication, and telecommunication. A special 
emphasis designed to meet the needs and Interests of Individual students rpay also be arranged. 

• University administrative officer 


34—6 3 575 


256 Communications 

A master of arts program in communications provides advanced study in communications and 
related disciplines for those seeking professional careers in teaching, research and development, and 
mass media. 

Programs in the department are designed to provide both theory and practice in the use of print, 
broadcast and film media of communication to inform, instruct and persuade. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

Every student must take 21 units of core courses and a minimum of 15 units in one of the emphases 
offered by the department. Additionally, the student must complete 12 units of collateral courses 
specified for the emphasis selected, although some flexibility may be permitted upon advisement. 
The major totals 48 units. 

COMMUNICATIONS CORE ^nits 

Com 101 Communications Writing 3 

Com 102 Communications Writing 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication in Modern Society 3 

Com 407 Communication and the Law 3 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 

andWNO of the following: 

Com 410 Principles of Communication Research 3 

Com 426 World Communication Systems 3 

Com 427 Current Issues In Mass Communication 3 

EMPHASES FOR COMMUNICATIONS MA)ORS 

Every communications major must select an area of emphasis and complete the courses in It. 

ADVERTISING 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 217A,B or 218 Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 353 Advertising Copy and Layout 3 

Com 354 Retail Advertising 3 

Com 356 Advertising Production (1,1 ) 2 

Com 439 Mass Media Intership 2 

Com 439 Mass Media Intership 2 

Com 451 National Advertising Campaigns 3 

Collateral Requirements Units 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

Engl 303 The Structure of Modern English 3 

Phil 310 Ethics 3 

Mktg 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

JOURNALISM 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 217A,B or 218 introduction to Photography 2 

Com 219 Communications Photography 2 

Com 332 Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Com 335 Reporting of Public Affairs 3 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Collateral Requirements 

Soc 341 Social Interaction 3 

Engl 462 Modern British and American Novels 3 

Hist 476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 3 

and one of the following: 

Pol Sci 3(X) Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics 3 

Pol Sci 41 3 Pressure Croups and Public Opinion 3 


36—6 3 585 


Communications 257 


• PHOTOCOMMUNICATIONS 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 217A,B or 218 Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 219 Communications Photography 2 

Com 220 Basic Color Photography 3 

Com 221 Advanced Color Photography 2 

Com 306 Photographic Production 2 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

and or\e of the following: 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 358 Graphic Communications 3 

Com 359 Publications Production 2 

Collateral Requirements 

Pol Scl 300 Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics 3 

Amer Stu 301 The American Character 3 

Art 338A Creative Photography 3 

Geo 365 Conservation of the American Environment 3 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 217A,B or 218 Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 361 Theory and Principles of Public Relations 3 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 2 

Com 463 Public Relations Methods 3 

Com 465 International Public Relations 3 

one of the following: 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 358 Graphic Communications 3 

Com 359 Publications Production 2 

Collateral Requirements 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

Engl 334 Shakespeare 3 

Spch 334 Persuasive Speaking 3 

Pol Scl 413 Pressure Croups and Public Opinion 3 

t TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION 

Emphasis Requirements units 

Com 332 Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Com 334 Feature Article Writing 3 

Com 401 Report Writing 3 

Com 403 Technical Writing 3 

Com 404 Advanced Specialized Writing and Editing Techniques 3 

Collateral Requirements 

Phys 211 A Elementary Physics 4 

Phys 21 IB Elementary Physics 4 

QM 361 Business and Economic Statistics 3 

QM 364 Computer Logic and Programming 3 

• Photocommunications students who wish to emphasize film should take Com 218, 311, 375, 411, 439 and 485. 

t Required collateral units may exceed 12 for this emphasis to include additional mathematics and science. In such cases, variations 
in the core requirements will be arranged through advisement so that the nwjor will not exceed 48 units. 

9—84452 


36-6 3 566 


258 Communications 


t TELECOMMUNICATION 
Emphasis Requirements 

Com 371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs 

Com 380 Introduction to Radio and Television 

Com 390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production . 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship 

Com 475 Telecommunications Programming 

Collateral Requirements 

Engl 322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns 

Soc 341 Social Interaction 

Pol Sci 410 Political Parties 

Hist 476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 


Units 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 


Special Emphasis 

Students whose interests involve more than one emphasis may seek approval of a special emphasis. 
Minimum requirements for the special emphasis are the same as for other emphases: 15 units of 
coursework in communications, at least 12 of which will be in upper division courses; 12 additional 
units of collateral coursework In other departments; and approval of the special emphasis plan in 
advance by the Department of Communications. 


MINOR IN COMMUNICATIONS 

Twenty-one units approved by the department are required for a minor In communications. The 
following is a recommended minor sequence emphasizing writing and publication courses. 


Lower Division (maximum of 7 units) Units 

Com 101 or 102 Communications Writing 3 

Com 217A,B or 218 Introduction to Photography 2 

Com 219 Communications Photography 2 

Upper Division (minimum of 14 units) 

Com 331 Analyzing News Communication 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication In Modern Society 3 

Com 338 Newspaper Production 3 

Com 358 Graphic Communications 3 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 


TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Communications offers major and minor programs approved as academic by 
the State Board of Education for those seeking an elementary or secondary teaching credential. For 
advisement, consult the Department of Communications. Because of anticipated changes in creden- 
tial requirements due to the Ryan Act, students should consult an adviser In the department regarding 
the specific steps involved in completing credential requirements. 

SECONDARY 

Communications majors who are secondary teacher candidates should complete the communica- 
tions core and journalism emphasis, including Communications 358A,B; have a minor approved by 
the Communications Department chairman; and fulfill professional education course requirements 
beyond those of the major and minor. (See ''Journalism Education," page 265) 

Elementary and Intermediate 

The program of courses for elementary and Intermediate teachers follows. 


Emphasis Requirements Units 

Com 331 Analyzing News Communication 3 

Com 333 Mass Communication in Modern Society 3 

Com 361 Theory and Practice of Public Relations 3 

Com 375 The CX)cumentary Film 3 

Com 380 Introduction to Radio and Television 3 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication 3 

Com 426 World Communication Systems 3 


t Telecommunication students who wish to emphasize film in broadcasting should take Com 290A or 2908, 311, 375, 41 1 and 439. 


42--6 3 615 


Communications 259 

Units 

Elect 15 units from appropriate communications courses in consultation with adviser 
(may include a project, Com 499, for three units). 

Collateral Requirements 

Engl 303 Structure of Modern English 3 

Elect nine additional units from appropriate courses in consultation with adviser. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

The Master of Arts in Communications is designed to provide advanced study in communications 
and related disciplines and to develop a research emphasis or option related to the processes and 
effects of communications. These options are: advertising, journalism education, news, photocom- 
munication, public relations, technical communication, or telecommunication. 

Students completing the Master of Arts in Communications with an emphasis in journalism education 
research are eligible for journalism teaching positions in high school or community college. 

Prerequisites 

Students must possess a baccalaureate degree and have completed a basic core of courses in 
communications as prerequisites to the M.A. program. Before admission to classified graduate status, 
students must achieve satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. 

Study Plan 

Students are required to complete 30 units of approved study, including 18 units in graduate level 
communications courses and six units In related studies. Six of the 18 units of graduate level courses 
are applicable to the thesis or project requirement. In addition, students must satisfy a ''collateral 
field requirement" in a related discipline. 

For further information, consult the Department of Communications. See also "The Program of 
Master's Degrees," page 73 and the Graduate Bulletin. 


COMMUNICATIONS COURSES 

100 Introduction to Communications (3) 

A survey of the mass media and their relationship to society today. 

101 Communications Writing (3) 

An introductory course covering principles of reporting and writing, with emphasis on content 
organization, conciseness, and clarity. Typing ability required. 

102 Communications Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 101 or consent of instructor. Concentration on reporting and writing 
of more advanced material. Typing ability required. 

103 Applied Writing (3) 

Principles and practice in organizing and preparing letters, reports, documents, and proposals 
required In most occupations. Designed especially for non-communications majors. 

217A,B,C Introduction to Photography (1,1,1) 

Black and white still photography. Self-directional course; times to be arranged. A — Cameras, lenses 
and accessories; processing and printing; composition. (Not open to students with credit in 
Communications 218.) B — Prerequisite: Communications 21 7A or concurrent enrollment. Artifi- 
cial light, filters, subject treatment and composition. (Not open to students with credit in Com- 
munications 218.) C — Prerequisite: Communications 217A,B or 218, or concurrent enrollment. 
Special photographic techniques and applications. 

218 Introduction to Photography (2) (Formerly 218A) 

Black and white still photography: cameras, lenses, accessories, processing*, printing, artificial light, 
filters, subject treatment, and composition. (Not open to students with credit In Communications 
217A or B.) (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

219 Communications Photography (2) (Formerly 218B) 

Prerequisite: Communications 217A,B or 218, or consent of Instructor. Creative aspects and tech- 
niques of making photographs for publication: newspaper and magazine news, advertising, 
feature, sports and women's pages. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 


47—6 3 640 


260 Communications 


220 Basic Color Photography (3) 

Color still photography: additive and subtractive color, film, exposure, color balance, lighting, color 
harmony, subject treatment and composition. All assignments executed using commercially 
process^, color slide film. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

221 Advanced Color Photography (2) (Formerly 220A) 

Prerequisite: Communications 217A,B or 218, and 220. Positive and negative color film processing, 
sensitometry, and color printing. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3,3) 

History and development of the motion picture as an art form and social force. A — the motion 
picture from Its origins until 1945. B— the contemporary cinema from 1945 to present. (Same 
as Theatre 290A,B) 

301 Writing for Telecommunication (3) 

An Introduction to theory and principles of writing employed in the broadcast and film media. 

303 Business Communications (3) 

Design and implementation of communications systems for various business enterprises. Utilizes 
graphic analysis and analytical techniques. Includes practice in producing messages and channel- 
ing them to avoid ambiguities. 

304 Communication in Information Systems (3) 

Generalized systems approach to the complete cycle of data flow within an Information system: 
origination, recording, representation, communications, organization, storage, processing, and 
Information displays. 

306 Photographic Production (2) 

Prerequisites: Communications 217A,B or 218, and 219, or consent of instructor. Production of 
photographs for the mass media, business, education, government, industry, and science. In- 
dividualized projects. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of six units. (4 hours activity 
for each 2 units) 

311 Introduction to Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 21 8A or equivalent or consent of instructor. Introduction to theory 
and practice of motion picture photography and film production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

331 Analyzing News Communications (3) 

Analyzing news and other informational materials to assess their influence on the public, especially 
children. Oriented to teachers and teacher candidates, particularly those at the intermediate or 
elementary level. 

332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 102, or consent of Instructor. Practice and theory of editing 
informational materials for publication in newspapers and magazines. (6 hours activity) 

333 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Basic structure and Interrelationships of newspapers, magazines, films, radio, and television, in terms 
of their significance as social Instruments and economic entities in modern society. 

334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines, including study of sources, methods and markets. 
Open to non-majors. 

335 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Coverage in depth of significant 
events pertinent to operations of governmental units and related organizations. 

338 Newspaper Production (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. A lecture/activity course In which members of the class constitute 
the editorial staff of the university newspaper. The group meets four hours per week for critiques 
in news reporting, writing, editing and makeup, followed by production. With consent of Instruc- 
tor, the course may be repeated for a maximum of nine units of credit. (More than 9 hours 
laboratory) 

350 Advertising in Western Society (3) 

Emphasis on environmental, consumer, and regulatory influences from the industrial revolution to 
the present. 

353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales appeals, attention factors and 
illustrations. (6 hours activity) 


419—6 4 60 


Communications 261 


354 Retail Advertising (3) 

Principles and procedures of retail advertising; utilization of mass media; supervised field assign- 
ments In the analysis of specific advertising needs. 

356 Advertising Production (3) 

Preparation of advertisements for the university newspaper and magazine. Advertising accounts 
assigned to each student. Weekly critique sessions. Individual consultation with Instructor. (5 
hours laboratory) 

358 Graphic Communications (3) 

A lecture /activity class covering basic principles of graphic communication. Areas studied include 
printing processes, publication formats, copy preparation, copy-fitting techniques, layout princi- 
ples, paper selection and distribution methods. (1 hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

359 Magazine Production (2) 

Prerequisite: Communications 358 or consent of instructor. A production class for development of 
student publications, including the university magazine, authorized by appropriate university 
authorities. Activities include writing articles, editing copy, taking photographs and preparing 
layouts. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

361 Theory and Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Examination of the social, psychological, philosophical, economic and political foundations of public 
relations, as well as the theories and principles of public relations as a communications discipline. 

362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Analysis and preparation of news releases, newsletters, annual reports, public service announce- 
ments and other forms of public relations materials. 

371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 380 (or concurrent enrollment). Theory and practice of 
covering news events and public affairs for radio and television. (6 hours activity) 

375 The Documentary Film (3) 

Purpose, development, current trends, critical analysis and production requirements of the docu- 
mentary film. Future of the medium in business, government, education and television. 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

(Same as Theatre 380) 

381 Broadcast Advertising (3) 

Study of television and radio as advertising media. Planning advertising campaigns, costs and 
coverage. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Basic theory and practice of radio and television program pro- 
duction. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

401 Report Writing (3) 

Planning, organizing, and writing of reports for business, education and government. Practice will 
be given in use of graphic aids and preparation of copy for reports that are to be printed. 
Recommended for non-majors. 

403 Technical Writing (3) 

Study of uses of technical writing in Industry, science and engineering and completion of written 
assignments designed to test understanding of, and provide experience with, various forms. 

404 Advanced Specialized Writing and Editing Techniques (3) 

Writing and editing of material for reports, proposals, special publications and journals. 

407 Communication and the Law (3) 

The Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and press; statutes and administrative regulations 
affecting freedom of information and publishing, advertising and telecommunication. Libel and 
slander, rights In news and advertising, contempt, copyright and Invasion of privacy. 

410 Principles of Communication Research (3) 

Survey of research methods used to assess the effects of print, broadcast and film communications 
on audience attitudes, opinions, knowledge and behavior. Basic concepts of research design and 
data analysis In communications research. 

411 Advanced Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 21 7A or 218, 311, 301 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of 
Instructor. Advanced theory, procedures and practice in film production: motion picture (silent 
and sound), script-writing, transfer and mixes, production, distribution and financing. 


423—6 4 80 


262 Communications 


425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

American mass communication, beginning with newspap)ers and periodicals and continuing through 
radio and television. Includes Ideological, political, social and economic aspects. 

426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Major mass communication systems, both democratic and totalitarian, and the means by which 
news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 

427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Mass media regulation by the government, "objective" versus "interpretive" news reporting and 
ethical and legal questions of particular cases. 

428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Study of how Innovations — ideas, products, and practices perceived as new — are communicated 
to members of a social system. Examines the roles of adopters, opinion leaders, change agente, 
and communications as they relate to the diffusion of innovations and consequent changes in 
social systems. 

431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Mass media in Communist societies, particularly the U.S.S.R., the People's Republic of China, Poland 
and Yugoslavia. Emphasis on the interrelationships of the mass media, people and party. 

439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

According to his emphasis, the student serves a supervised internship with organizations such as a 
newspaper or magazine publisher, radio or television station, press association, public relations 
firm or an advertising agency. Application for Internships must be made through the department 
coordinator one semester prior to entering the Internship program. 

451 National Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Advanced study of advertising campaigns and utilization of mass media — such as television, newspa- 
pers, and magazines — in national advertising programs. Design of complete campaign. 

463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 361 or consent of instructor. Techniques used for effective public 
relations in both personal and mass communications. 

465 International Public Relations (3) 

Public relations principles applied to international operations, both private and public. 

467 Public Relations for Educational Institutions (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 361 or consent of Instructor. Theory and practice of public relations 
applied to public and private schools. Methods, policies, programs and problems inherent In 
educational public relations. 

473 Telecomnr^ications Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Self-regulation, governmental regulation and international regula- 
tion of broadcast programming. 

475 Telecommunications Programming 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Theory and practice of programming for television and radio. 

477 Telecommunications Station Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380. Management functions and policies of broadcasting stations and 
networks. Effects of government, public opinion, employee groups and ownership. Technical, 
legal, financial and other obligations. 

479 Advanced Telecommunication Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 380 or concurrent enrollment in 390 or consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced techniques in producing television-radio programs. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Processes In persuasive communications applied to the mass media: the communicator, the content 
and structure of messages, and context of communications. 

485 Film Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 311, 375 and 411 or consent of Instructor. Fundamentals of docu- 
mentary film production planning and execution. Students prepare complete films in teams. (2 
hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

489 Practicum in Television Production (3) 

Prerequisite: six units of television courses or equivalent and/or consent of instructor. Honors couse. 
Students develop, write, produce and direct regular programs of Information, instruction or 
diversion for distribution on the campus-wide closed-circuit television system and area cable 
systems. 


68—6 4 100 









Comparative Literature 265 


490 Film Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 290A and/or 290B or equivalent or consent of instructor. Analytical 
and comparative study of theories relating to film-making; nature of the film medium. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised mass media projects and 
research on campus and in the community. May involve newspaper and magazine publishers, 
radio and television stations and public relations agencies. May be repeated. 

500 Theories of Communication (3) 

Theoretical study of communication processes In terms of source, media, message, audience and 
context variables. Review of research on the effects of communications on audience attitudes, 
opinions, knowledge and behavior. 

501 Literature of Communications (3) 

Types, sources and uses of communications literature; application to Individual graduate studies. 

502 Theories of Instructional Communication (3) 

Theories of learning, persuasion, and instruction applied to the design of instructional communica- 
tions. Study of human factors in the design, development and evaluation of such media as 
textbooks, programmed workbooks, training films and videotapes, recordings, and audio-tutorial 
and interactive training systems. 

503 Practicum in Instructional Communication (3) 

Principles of programmed instruction applied to achieve training objectives through the use of the 
media communication. Includes development and empirical tryout of short programs In print, 
film, and/or broadcast media utilizing behavioral analysis of typical audiences to assess program 
effects. 

508 Humanistic Study of Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 410 and 500. Seminar In humanistic methods of study In communica- 
tions: historical research and critical analysis applied to problems. Issues, and creative works. 

509 Seminar in Communication Research (3) (Formerly 510A) 

Prerequisites: Communications 410 or equivalent, 500 and 501, 503 or 512 (or concurrent enroll- 
ment). Principles of research design and analysis applied to the study of communication proc- 
esses and effects. 

510 Advanced Seminar in Communication Research (3) (Formerly 510B) 

Prerequisite: Communications 508 or 509. Problems in theoretical, applied and evaluative research 
in communication. 

512 Graduate Seminar in Journalism Education (3) 

Study of selected problems In journalism education with emphasis on individual research. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Completion of a creative project In the area of concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Completion of a thesis in the area of concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. Individually supervised mass media projects or 
research for graduate students. May be repeated. 


JOURNALISM EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Theory and technique of advising school newspaper 
and yearbook staffs and teaching journalism. Relation of classroom instruction to staff assign- 
ments. 

749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PROGRAM 

The program in comparative literature is an Interdisciplinary program directed by the Committee on 
the Program in Comparative Literature. The committee is responsible for formulating curricular 
policies, approving courses, and advising studies. The chairman of the English Department admlnis- 


7a-6 4 125 


266 Comparative Literature 

ters the program, and the courses are taught by faculty from the English Department and other 
departments whose courses are approved by the committee. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The major in comparative literature provides professional competence and personal enrichment for 
students with an exceptional concern and appreciation for the study of the interrelationships be- 
tween the languages and literatures of various civilizations. The program offers courses in literary 
form and content, theory and philosophy, genres and movements, providing insight into the back- 
grounds of mankind's worldwide culture and literature. The comparative literature courses are 
conducted in English and required reading is available in English. 

Upper Division Requirements 

1 . Eighteen units selected from courses listed under comparative literature. 

2. Reading competence in a foreign language, demonstrated by successfully completing an adviser- 
approved 400-level course offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
provided it is not taught in translation. This requirement can be met through examination. 
Information on the examination is available in the Department of English office. 

3. Six units selected from literature courses listed under English and numbered 300 or above. 

4. Six units of anthropology, history, art history, music history or philosophy approved by the adviser 
and aimed at enlarging total perspective. 

5. The remainder of required units selected from any 300- or 400-level literature course in compara- 
tive literature, English, French, German, Italian, Russian, or Spanish. 

Total 42 units 

Distribution 

1. Of these 42 units, 15 must span the chronological range of the literary continuum, one in each 
of the following literary periods: Classical or Medieval; Renaissance; Neoclassical or Baroque; 
Romantic; Contemporary (1850- ). 

2. One course in a literary genre. 

3. One course in a major figure. 

It should be noted that (2.) and (3.) can perform the dual function of also satisfying (1.) (i.e., 
a senior seminar in IHugo would satisfy both the major figure and the Romantic Period require- 
ments). 

More detailed information on the comparative literature major can be obtained from the brochure 
available in the Department of English office. The importance of close consultation with an adviser 
cannot be stressed enough for comparative literature, since the diversity of language specialties and 
other factors may necessitate individual tailoring in any given case. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The objectives of the master's degree program In comparative literature are to promote the under- 
standing of other literatures, peoples, and cultures in various historical periods, including the present, 
and to prepare the student for more advanced work In comparative literature, leading to the Ph.D. 
degree. The program also prepares teachers of world literature in the high schools and community 
colleges and provides a liberal arts background preparation for library studies. In addition to fulfilling 
all general prerequisites for graduate work established at Cal State Fullerton, the applicant, in order 
to gain admission to the program, must meet the following criteria: 

1. Possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

2. An undergraduate major in comparative literature, English or foreign language with a CPA of 3.0 
or better in the major courses and a CPA of 2.5 In all other college and/or university work. If 
the student's degree is in another field, he must have completed a total of 24 units of upper 
division work in comparative literature, English or foreign language, with a CPA of 3.0. 

If the student lacks the prerequisite number of courses, he must make them up before he can begin 
work in the master's degree program, and he must earn at least a 3.0 in such makeup coursework. 
In the event that the student's CPA In these probationary courses is 3.0 or better, he may be 
admitted (classified). Courses taken to remove qualitative and quantitative deficiencies may not 
be applied to the M.A. program. 

3. Satisfactory completion of a written examination In an approved foreign language, or satisfactory 


436—6 4 145 


Comparative Literature 267 

completion of an upper division course taught in an approved foreign language. 

Study Plan 

Required are 30 units of coursework completed with a minimum GPA of 3.0 to be distributed as 


follows: 

1. A minimum of 18 units In 500-series courses: Units 

Courses at the 500-level in comparative literature (one adviser-approved 5(X)-level 

course in English may help satisfy this requirement) 15 

A course at the 500 level In a related area 3 

Total 18 

2. Upper division courses: 

Comparative Literature 410 3 

Adviser-approved courses In comparative literature 6 

Adviser-approved courses In a related area 6 

(At least 3 units of related coursework must be in foreign literature, read in the 

original language.) 

Total 15 


At the conclusion of his coursework, the student will take a written comprehensive examination for 
the master's degree. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

(Offered by the Department of English) 

202 Short Story (3) 

(Same as English 202) 

305 The Hebrew Prophets (3) 

(Same as Religious Studies 333) 

312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

A comprehensive survey of Biblical literature emphasizing intrinsic literary qualities as well as the 
influence of major themes of both Old and New Testament writings upon Western literary 
traditions. 

314 The Oral Tradition in Literature (3) 

A study of storytelling as an art, particularly as developed through the media of the folktale. 

315 Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) 

A basic study of those Creek and Roman myths which have been of continuing significance In 
Western world literature. 

316 Celtic Mythology and Early Irish Literature (3) 

A survey of early Irish literature and of Irish and Welsh mythological literature, with discussion of 
comparative and archeological relationships. 

317 Indie Mythology (3) 

A survey of the mythologies embodied in the Mahabharata, the Ramayana, the Vedas and the 
Sathapatha Brahamana of India, and in the Abast, Avesta, and Shah Namah of Persia, and their 
relation to the principal mythologies of Europe. 

318 Baltic and Slavic Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of the Balts and Slavs and their relationship to the Indo-European 
Inheritance. 

319 African Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of sub-Saharan Africa, together with their reflections In African art 
and custom. 

320 Greek and Roman Literature (3) 

Readings In English translation from the literature of classical Greece and Rome. 


81—6 4 165 


268 Comparative Literature 

321 Germanic Mythology and Saga Literature (3) 

A study of Germanic mythology, including comparative myth and archeological relationships, and 
an introduction to Icelandic saga. 

324 World Literature to 1650 (3) (Formerly 324A) 

Selected readings in Oriental and Western literature from the beginning to 1650. 

325 World Literature 1650 to Present (3) (Formerly 324B) 

Selected readings in Oriental and Western literature from 1650 to the present. 

332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) 

Selected readings in modern English translation from the medieval literature of England and the 
continent from St. Augustine to Sir Thomas Malory. 

333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 

Major phases of the Renaissance as a literary movement, from Erasmus to Montaigne and Cervantes. 

343 The Literature of the Romantic Period (3) 

Backgrounds in Romanticism and study of major figures of European and American Romanticism, 
such as Pushkin, Rousseau, Leopardi, Goethe, Thoreau, Schiller, Byron, and Emily Bronte. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352) 

360 Irish Literature (3) 

Selected writings representative of Irish literature from the early Middle Ages to the present. 

371 A, B The French Tradition (3) 

A comprehensive survey of French literature from the Renaissance to present times. The first 
semester will Include the novel, short story and essay; the second semester will cover drama and 
poetry. 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of selected works by Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chek- 
hov, Pasternak, and others, and their relationship to Western literature. 

374 Modern Russian Literature (3) 

A study of literary trends and representative works of Russian writers from Maxim Corky to the 
present times. Special consideration of the Soviet literary theory and its impact upon their 
literature. Lectures and readings In English. 

375 Hispanic Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations from Hispanic literature and their relations to world literature. 
Readings in the picaresque novel, Cervantes, Golden Age drama, Galdos, Unamuno, Lorca. 

376 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

An Introduction to the main currents of Spanish-American literature, emphasizing contemporary 
writers, such as Alegria, Asturias, Borges, Fuentes, Neruda. Close attention will be given to the 
relation between the artistic expression and the ideological values of the same period. 

402 Art, Literature, and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 404) 

405 Psychoanalysis and Drama (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 405) 

410 Theory and Method of Comparative Literature (3) (Formerly 510) 

Introduction to the theories and methods of comparative literature and the problems of translation. 

425 Indian Literature (3) 

A study of selected works of Indian literature. 

426 Chinese and Japanese Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations of Chinese and Japanese literature. 

427 Modern Japanese Fiction (3) 

A study of major writers and literary movements In 20th-century Japanese fiction. 

430 Persian and Arabian Literature (3) 

A survey course on the nature and distribution of the classics of western Asia in English translation, 
with lectures, readings and discussion. 


444--6 4 185 


Comparative Literature 269 

445 Literature of the Americas: Contemporary Novelists (3) 

A study of the interdependency of the contemporary fiction of North and South America. It focuses 
on direct influences, such as Hemingway's and Faulkner's on Latin American writers, and Borges' 
influence on North American writers. It also examines several parallels in techniques and themes 
as they reflect relationships In and between the Northern and Southern cultures. 

450 The Naturalists (3) 

A study of naturalism In the works of Turgenev, Balzac, the brothers Concourt, Maupassant, Zola, 
Huysmans, Ibsen, Verga; and also the works of GIssing, Moore, Hardy, Garland, Crane, Norris, 
Dreiser, London and O'Neill. 

453 The Novel in France and Germany (3) 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding novels in translation with a view toward 
determining some principles of the narrative arts. Emphasis on Goethe, Stendhal, Flaubert, Mann, 
Kafka, Proust and others. 

454 Contemporary Movements in European Literature (3) 

A study of modern literary movements, including naturalism, realism, symbolism, expressionism and 
surrealism, with reading and discussion of selected examples. 

457 The Experimental Novel (3) 

A study of contemporary novels, including examples of surrealism and the nouveau roman, as well 
as other novels not readily classified. 

458 The Spanish Novel (3) 

A study of major Spanish novels In translation. 

473A,B World Drama (3;i) 

Reading, discussion and interpretation of great plays of the world In translation, emphasizing them 
as literature for performance. A — From ancient Greece through the mld-19th century. B — From 
Ibsen to the present. 

482 Senior Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures Involving intensive study of major 
writers. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the sections 
available. This course number may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

483 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) (Formerly 491) 

Fifth century Greek tragedy through the extant works of Aeschylus and Sophocles, and 10 plays of 
Euripides. (Same as Theatre 492) 

491 Senior Seminar: Special Studies in Comparative Literature (3) (Formerly 483) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures devoted to significant periods, move- 
ments, and themes in world literature. This course number may be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 

492 Literature of Action in 20th-Century France (3) 

(Same as French 492) 

492 German Literature in Translation (3) 

(Same as German 492) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

550 Graduate Seminar: Medieval Literature (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures, concerning special problems such as 
the development of medieval narrative, the growth and development of the Arthurian legend, 
lyric poetry, allegory and devotional literature. 

551 Graduate Seminar: The Renaissance and Baroque (3) 

Comparative investigation of a theme, genre, or major figures in western literature for the Renais- 
sance and Baroque Period. Directed research and writing, group discussions, independent study. 
Since the topic each year will vary, depending upon the specialized interests and publications 
of the instructor, this course may be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

552 Graduate Seminar: Neoclassicism (3) 

553 Graduate Seminar: Romanticism (3) 

554 Graduate Seminar: Studies in the Modern Period (3) 

571 Graduate Seminar: The Novel (3) 

Offers directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures concerning the genre of the 
novel. An ability to read the novels in the original language will be helpful. May be repeated with 
different content for additional credit. 


9i— 6 A 230 


270 English 

572 Graduate Seminar: Poetry (3) 

573 Graduate Seminar. Drama (3) 

580 Graduate Seminar: Major Figures in World Literature (3) 

Directed study and research on a major figure in world literature. Students will write reports and 
a long paper on approved topics. 

582 Graduate Seminar: Dante (3) 

591 Seminar in Comparative Literary Criticism (3) 

598 Thesis (3) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM 

FACULPi' 

W. Garrett Capune (Sociology) 

Coordinator 

For information concerning this new bachelor's degree program^ contact the coordinator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

FACULTY 
Howard Seller 
Department Chairman 

Don Austin, Rosemary Boston, John Brugaletta, Miriam Cox, Sherwood Cummings, Dorothea de 
France, George Friend, Cynthia Fuller, Stephen Garber, Joseph Glide, Joan Greenwood, Annabelle 
Haaker, Jean Hall, Mary Hayden, Joseph Hayes, Dennis Hengeveld, Jane HIpollto, Robert Hodges, 
Michael Holland, Wayne Huebner, Charlotte Hughes, Helen JaskoskI, Hazel Jones *, Dorothy 
Kllker, Thomas Klammer, William Koon, Joanne Lynn, Willis McNelly, Russell Miller, Keith Neil- 
son, Irene Nims, Paul Obler, Rita Oleyar, Urania Petalas, June Salz Poliak, Orrington Ramsay, Sally 
Romotsky, William Rubinstein, Joseph Sawicki, Clarence Schneider, John Schwarz, Sari Scott, 
Alice Scoufos, Donald Sears, Priscilla Shames, Som Sharma, George Spangler, Alexander Stupple, 
Elena Tumas, Martha Vogeler, M. John Wagner, John White, Helen Yanko 
The English Department offers courses designed to acquaint the student with the nature and develop- 
ment of our language, with the literatures of England and America, and with the disciplines involv^ 
in the various kinds of writing. Except for freshmen English offerings, courses in world literature In 
English translation are listed separately, under Comparative Literature. In addition the Department 
of English offers some specialized professional courses for the preparation of teachers. On the senior 
and graduate levels, various opportunities are provided for seminar work and independent study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: A total of 42 units beyond English 1(X) and 103, or their equivalents, including 201 
which should be completed before upper division courses are taken. 

Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

May include survey courses in British, American or world literature. 

Basic Course (3 units) 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms 

Upper Division (minimum of 33 units) 

Language courses (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

302 Introduction to the English Language 

303 The Structure of Modern English 
305 American Dialects 

490 History of the English Language 

• University administrative officer 


99--6 4 255 


English 271 


American literature (6 units): 

321 American Literature to Whitman 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns 
Major author courses (9 units) 

333 Chaucer 

334 Shakespeare 
341 Milton 

Period courses (minimum of 6 units, at least 3 in a period preceding the Romantic Movement) 
selected from the following: 

332 Medieval Literature 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose 

337 1 7th Century Poetry and Prose 

338 Drama of the Restoration and the 1 8th Century 

339 Restoration Literature (1 660-1 7(X)) 

340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose 

343 The Romantic Movement In English Literature 

344 Victorian Literature 

345 The Development of the English Novel through jane Austen 

346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel 

462 Modern British and American Novels 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels 

464 Modern British and American Drama 
466 Modern British and American Poetry 

Transfer students should consult with their advisers who may recommend the granting of further 
credit for lower division work completed at other institutions. 

Electives to complete a minimum of 42 units selected from additional courses In language and 
composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars, and comparative literature. Com- 
parative literature offerings are listed separately, but count toward an English major. 

A program of literary studies gains in perspective through the study of history, sociology, philosophy, 
and psychology. Students of literature are strongly advised to include such courses in their program. 
English majors seeking a secondary teaching credential must either complete or be exempted from 
English 301, and complete either English 302 or English 303 before student teaching. 

English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire proficiency in at least one 
foreign language. Note: Freshmen intending to major in English should complete two years of course 
work in a foreign language, or demonstrate equivalent accomplishment by transfer or by examina- 
tion. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: a total of 21 units 

Lower Division (maximum of 9 units) 

201 or any lower division course beyond English 100 and 103 or the equivalent. 

Lower division electives (3 units) 

Upper Division (minimum of 12 units), including: 

American Literature (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

321 American Literature to Whitman 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns 
Language courses (minimum of 3 units), selected from the following: 

302 Introduction to the English Language 

303 The Structure of Modern English 
305 American Dialects 

490 History of the English Language 
Major author courses (minimum of 6 units) 

334 Shakespeare 
333 Chaucer or 

341 Milton 


116-6 4 340 


272 English 


MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

To qualify for admission to the program for the M.A. in English (classified graduate status), a student 
must hold a bachelor's degree In English from an accredited institution at which he has maintained 
at least a 3.0 grade-point average In the major courses provided that he has a minimum of 24 units 
of upper-division coursework; or if he holds a bachelor's degree in another major, he must have 
completed 24 units of upper-division coursework In English with at least a 3.0 grade-point average. 
If the student lacks the prerequisite number of English courses, he must make them up before he 
may begin work in the master's degree program, earning at least a 3.0 in such makeup coursework. 
In the event that the student's CPA in prerequisite English courses Is less than 3.0, he may be allowed 
to take from six to nine units of probationary, adviser-approved coursework. If his CPA in these 
probationary courses Is 3.0 or better, he may be admitted (classified). Courses taken to remove 
qualitative and quantitative deficiencies may not be applied to the M.A. program. 

A student Is required to have two years of one foreign language at the college or university level 
or six units of study in comparative literature. If taken as graduate work, these six units may be 
applied to the master's degree under "units in subjects related to English." 


Study Plan: Units 

Minimum units in English courses restricted to graduate students (500 series) 18 

(with the permission of the graduate adviser, 3 of these 18 units may be taken in a 
comparative literature graduate seminar) 

Maximum units in specified upper-division courses in English 6 

Units in subjects related to English _6 

Total 30 


At the conclusion of his program he will take the written comprehensive examination for the master's 
degree. A student who fails the examination may retake the failed part only once. 

Note: The student is strongly advised to take the steps necessary for admission to the program before 
registering for his first graduate courses. Part of the admission process is to confer with the graduate 
adviser, who will analyze prerequisites and designate those courses which will apply to the degree 
program. Courses taken by an unclassified student do not necessarily apply toward a degree. At the 
time the student achieves classified status, no more than nine units of postgraduate coursework may 
be applied to the master's degree program. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ENGLISH COURSES 

For world literature in English translation see courses under comparative literature. 

100 Composition (3) 

A basic course In composition. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

103 Seminars in Writing (3) 

A course for the student with some proficiency In composition. Readings on a relevant topic are 
meant to motivate the student to express his thoughts In a meaningful, disciplined manner. 

105 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

An exploratory creative writing course in which the student Is given the opportunity to write in 
various genres. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through Medieval Times (3) 

The study of representative writers and works from the ancient through the medieval world. 

111 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance through the 19th Century (3) 
The study of representative writers and works from the Renaissance through the 19th century. 

112 Modern Literature of the Western World (3) 

The study of representative writers and works of modern literature. 

201 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

The main literary forms— prose fiction, poetry, and drama— are studied and analyzed. Various 
critical methods are applied to representative works mainly from English and American literature. 
English majors should schedule this basic course as early in their programs as possible. 


122—6 4 370 


English 273 


202 The Short Story (3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to the study of the structure and technique of the short 
story. Emphasis on critical analysis of selected American and European short stories. (Same as 
Comparative Literature 202) 

205 Introduction to Drama (3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to the study of dramatic literature. Emphasis on close 
analysis of individual plays. 

206 Introduction to Poetry (3) 

A course designed to increase students' understanding and appreciation of the art of poetry. The 
primary activity will be close reading of poems written In English. 

301 Advanced Composition (3) 

Prerequisites: English 1(X), 103, or their equivalents. Exercises in creativity, analysis, and rhetoric as 
applied In expository writing. Requir^ of English majors seeking the secondary credential. 

302 Introduction to the English Language (3) 

A basic course in language emphasizing the history, structure, and dialects of American English in 
Its social, cultural, and educational contexts. This course or English 303 required of English majors 
seeking a secondary credential and must be taken before student teaching. 

303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary English. Modern English usage. This 
course or English 302 required of English majors seeking a secondary credential and must be 
taken before student teaching. 

305 American Dialects (3) 

An examination of the principles of dialectology. Emphasis will be on the description of modern 
American dialects and their role in social, cultural and educational Issues of today. (Same as 
Linguistics 305) 

311 Masters of British Literature (3) (Formerly 211) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of Instructor. An introduction to major periods and 
movements, major authors and major forms through 1760. 

312 Masters of British Literature (3) (Formerly 212) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to major periods and 
movements, major authors and major forms from 1 760 through modern times. 

320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

A study of the prose and poetry of the American Indian, focusing on the literatures of the North 
American tribes. 

321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

Emphasis on major writers: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman and others. 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Emphasis on Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

A survey of Anglo-American balladry and folksong, with attention to historical development, ethnic 
background and poetical values. 

332 Medieval English Literature (3) 

An introduction to the literature of medieval England exclusive of Chaucer. Readings in modern 
English versions of representative major works and genres from Beowulf \o Malory. 

333 Chaucer (3) 

A study of The Canterbury Tales and of Chaucer's language, with particular emphasis upon the 
understanding of the vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and syntax of the East Midland dialect 
of Middle English, as indispensable to literary appreciation. 

334 Shakespeare (3) 

An introduction to Shakespeare's art through a detailed study of the more famous plays. 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

Studies of representative English dramatists of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Emphasis on 
the development of the dramatic traditon in the plays of Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont 
and Fletcher, and others. 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

A study of the nondramatic literature of the English Renaissance from More to Campion. Emphasis 
on Renaissance thought and the works of Spenser. 


126—6 4 390 


274 English 

337 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

A survey of the major writers of the period from 1603 to 1660 exclusive of Milton. 

338 The Drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century (3) 

A study of representative plays of the Restoration and the 18th century. Emphasis will be placed on 
the development of such dramatic movements as the heroic play, Restoration comedy and 
sentimental drama. 

339 Restoration Literature (1660-1700) (3) 

Butler, Rochester, Dryden, Pepys, and selected minor writers. 

340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Swift, Addison and Steele, Pope, Boswell, Johnson, and selected minor writers. 

341 Milton (3) 

An Intensive study of the poetry and prose in the light of Milton's intellectual development. 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

Burns, Blake; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The reaction against rationalism, 
the rise of revolutionary and liberal thought, humanitarlanism, and emphasis on individual 
creativity. 

344 Victorian Literature (3) 

A study of literature in its relationship to the problems which emerge from the social, cultural, 
scientific and industrial revolutions of the Victorian period. 

345 The Development of the English Novel through Jane Austen (3) 

A study of the English novel from Its beginnings to the 19th century considering such novelists as 
Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Austen. 

346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel (3) 

A study of such novelists as the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy. 

351 Science Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. The study of science fiction as a genre, including future-scene fiction, the 
utopian novel, the superman novel, and short fantasy stories. 

352 African Literature (3) 

African literature written in the English language, with special emphasis on the fiction, poetry and 
drama of the new nations. (Same as Comparative Literature 352) 

353 Black Writers in America (3) 

A study of black American writers from Frederick Douglass to the present. Concentration on 
important figures such as Wright, Ellison and Baldwin. 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: evidence of student's previous Interest in creative writing and consent of Instructor. 
Study of superior models, development of style, and group criticism and evaluation of each 
student's independent work. May be repeated for credit. (Same as Theatre 364) 

391 Survey of English Literary Criticism (3) 

A study of the major English critics from the Renaissance to the modern. Emphasis on Sidney, 
Dryden, Johnson, Coleridge, Arnold and Eliot. 

421 Minority Images in American Literature (3) 

An examination of 19th- and 20th-century literature written by and about racial groups In America. 
Includes Unde Tom's Cabin, Soul on /ceand Laughing Boy. 

423 Early American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: English 321 or consent of Instructor. The literature of colonial and revolutionary Ameri- 
ca, including the Puritans, 18th-century deism and rationalism, and the literary antecedents of 
American democratic thought. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. An examination of selected writings of 
Darwin and of such Darwinians as Spencer and Huxley; then a study of the literary adaptations 
and assimilations of Darwinism. (Same as American Studies 425) 

433 Children's Literature (3) 

Reading and discussion of works from world literature designed primarily for children, including 
material from the oral tradition, realistic fiction, fantasy and poetry. Designed for the general 
student as well as for elementary credential candidates. 

435 Studies in Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of instructor. An intensive study of selected plays with primary 
emphasis upon problems of dramatic structure and artistic meanings. 


131_6 4 415 


English 275 


445 The American Tradition in Poetry (3) 

A study of selected American poems from the 17th century to 1914. Emphasis on the close reading 
of individual poems. 

446 The American Novel to 1914 (3) 

A study of selected novelists from C. B. Brown, through Melville and Twain, to Dreiser. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 451 ) 

452 Modern Literary Criticism (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of Instructor. A study of the major movements in 
20th-century British and American criticism. 

462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of instructor. Development of modern British and American novels from 19(X) to 1950. 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) 

The novel In English since World War II. 

464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of Instructor. The development of British and American drama from 19(X) to 1950. 

465 Contemporary British and American Drama (3) 

British and American drama from 1950 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of Instructor. The development of British and American poetry from 19(X) to 1950. 

467 Contemporary British and American Poetry (3) 

British and American poetry from 1950 to the present. 

490 History of the English Language (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English vocabulary, 
phonology, morphology and syntax from Indo-European to modern American English. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in the area to be studied, a B average or better In English 
courses, or consent of instructor. Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures 
covering selected topics from language studies. Intensive studies of major writers, criticism, and 
literary types, periods, and ideological trends. 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Open to advanced students In English with the consent of department chairman. May be repeated 
for credit. 

570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering philology, historical develop- 
ment, and structure of English. Individual offerings under this course number may deal with only 
one aspect of language studies. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialize research and publication of instructor, this course will offer directed 
research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering major figures such as: Shakespeare, 
Milton, Chaucer, Melville, Twain, Hawthorne, Joyce and Coleridge. May be repeated with 
different content for additional credit. (Same as Theatre 571 ) 

572 Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of Instructor, this course will offer directed 
research and writing, group discussion and lectures, covering such major literary types as: the 
epic, the novel, the short story, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy and historical drama. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as Theatre 572) 

573 Graduate Seminar Cultural Periods (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of Instructor, this course will offer directed 
research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering the literature of a particular cultural 
period from the Anglo-Saxon to modern times. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 


136-4 4 440 


276 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

574 Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this course will offer 
directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures covering special problems such as: 
the detailed critical study of varying Influences on literature, including philosophical, religious, 
scientific, geographic and other ecological viewpoints. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 

579 Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering historical development and 
schools of criticism. Individual offerings within this course number may deal with only one aspect 
of critical problems. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and written 
reports. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 


ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Principles, methods and materials of teaching English 
in the secondary school. 

749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

FACULTY 

Samuel Cartledge 
Department Chairman 

Linda Andersen-Bensimon, Oswaldo Arana, Nancy Baden, Robert Bertalot, Gerald Boarino, Daniel 
Brondi, Modesto Diaz, Leon Gilbert, Jacqueline Kiralthe, Walter Kline, G. Bording Mathieu, 
Harvey Mayer, Doris Merrifleld, Monique Miller, Ervie Pena, Charles Shapley, Curtis Swanson, 
Marjorie Tussing, Eva Van Ginneken, Stephen Vasari, Jon Zimmermann 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

Several options are offered: 

1. French major. Requirements: French 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents; plus a 
minimum of 27 units of upper division courses including 305, 315, 317, 325, 415, 425 and six units 
of 475A,B,C,D. 

2. German major. Requirements: German 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents; plus 24 
units of upper division coursework, which must include 315, 317, 375 and three of the following 
literature courses: 430, 440, 450, 460. 

3. Spanish major. Requirements: Spanish 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents, 315, 316, 
317 or 318, 375, plus 15 units of upper division courses in Spanish which must include Spanish 
430, 441 and 461. 

Those Spanish majors who wish to prepare themselves to teach in bilingual programs would 
pursue the following 27-unit upper division sequence: Spanish 315 or 316, 317 or 318, 375, 400 
(or its equivalent), 466, 467, 4^, at least one 4()0-level Spanish literature course, plus an elective, 
chosen in consultation with the adviser, from the areas of Spanish literature, Chicano studies, 
education or social sciences. 

MINOR IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents, completed satisfactorily; 

plus nine units In upper division courses selected in consultation with the adviser. Minor concentra- 
tions are offered In French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. 


499—6 4 460 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 277 

PROGRAMMED COURSES IN UNCOMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES 

The department has available a number of programmed courses in languages which cannot be 
regularly taught such as Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, etc. For details see Foreign Languages 198. 

STANDARD TEACHING CREDENTIAL, SPECIALIZATION IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

All prospective teachers, before being admitted to a credential program, must pass a proficiency 
examination in which their skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and knowledge of linguistic 
principles will be tested. The examination is administered twice yearly, in September and February. 
Students should make arrangements with the department to take the test during their senior year 
or during the first semester of their fifth year. 

The credential program is the same as for the liberal arts major, with the following additional 
requirements: Foreign Languages Education 442; French or German or Spanish Applied Linguistics 
466; plus six units in the major language selected with the approval of the adviser and taken in the 
senior year or thereafter at the 400 and 500 level. 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

In accordance with recommendations made by the Modern Language Association of America, the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures encourages all majors Interested in a teaching 
career to participate In a study-abroad program. This will enable a student to perfect his mastery 
of the language and afford him additional Insights Into the foreign culture. To this end The California 
State University and Colleges' International Programs offer a wide variety of study opportunities on 
the junior, senior and graduate level. Language majors are, however, required to complete a mini- 
mum of three literature courses at the 400 level on the Fullerton campus. For further information, 
see page 23. 

THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required. In addition to the regular class periods, 
to practice for the minimum of prescribed time In the language laboratory. The 30-statlon laboratory 
operates like a library; students may use it at a time most convenient to them preferably every day 
In sessions of 15 to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced by each Instructor and by the 
supervisor of the language laboratory. 

Students are invited to make use of the collection of literary and cultural recordings in French, 
German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish available in the language laboratory. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

The degrees of Master of Arts in French, German and Spanish require a minimum of 30 semester 
units beyond the bachelor's degree including a minimum of 1 5 units in 500-level courses. A candidate 
presenting a B.A. which has fewer than 24 upper division units in the major language, or Is otherwise 
inadequate, normally will be required to take additional courses to build a full undergraduate major 
before beginning the graduate program. The student must also demonstrate proficiency in English, 
either by examination or a three-unit upper division course in English grammar. 

The basic study plans are as follows: 

French 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

French 500 or substitute 
French 510, 520 or 530 

B. Graduate seminars In literature (9 units) 

C. Other electives (15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level French courses. Up to six units may be taken, 
with approval of the adviser, in a related field. 

A biblio project is to be completed prior to classification; a reading project Is to be completed prior 
to advancement to candidacy. 

German 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

German 466 or 530 
German 500 


504--6 4 485 


278 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

B. Graduate seminars in literature (9-12 units) 

C Other electives (12-15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level German courses. Up to six units may be taken, 
with approval of the student's graduate committee, in a related field. 

Spanish 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

Spanish 500 or substitute 
Spanish 530 

B. Graduate seminars in literature (9 units) 

C. Other electives (15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level Spanish courses. Up to six units may be taken, 
with approval of the adviser, in a related field. 

In all the programs a student, with the approval of his graduate committee, may opt to substitute 
a thesis for a part of the units required in section C. 

A reading list must be covered by all students in all programs. 

In all languages the final evaluation is by a comprehensive examination, both written and oral, 
including fluency in the language. 

The candidate for the M.A. degree must consult a graduate adviser before beginning his program. 
Before being advanced to candidacy for the degree, he must demonstrate proficiency in the language 
to a faculty committee appointed for that purpose. The terminal evaluation is by comprehensive 
written and oral examination, including fluency in the specified language. 

For further information, consult the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

See also 'The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES COURSES 

1% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See page 98. 

198 Programmed Courses in Uncommonly Taught Languages (1-3) 

Intensive individualized programmed instruction in specific languages other than those regularly 
offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, such as Arabic, Chinese and 
Japanese. Designed to develop the skills of auditory comprehension and speaking in the language 
to form a basis for later development of the reading and writing skills. A minimum of 3 hours 
per week In the learning laboratory as well as regular sessions with native informants, are required 
for each unit of credit. May be repeated for credit. 

4% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See page 98. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisites: French, German or Spanish 466; and admission to teacher education or consent of 
Instructor. The theory and practice of language learning and language teaching with special 
emphasis on the audiolingual method. Conducted in English, with practice by students in the 
language they plan to teach. Required before student teaching. (2 hours lecture, plus fieldwork) 

542 Problems in Language Acquisition (2) 

Seminar focusing on current research into language learning. Recent developments and innovations 
in the structural approach to language behavior. 


508-6 4 506 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 279 

545G German Culture in the Language Classroom (2) 

Prerequisite: German 315 or consent of instructor. A thorough review of the geography, social 
organization, political structure, contemporary patterns of culture and value systems of German 
speaking lands. Emphasis on the resources and techniques available to the teacher of German. 
749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
See page 221 for description and prerequisites. 


FRENCH COURSES 

101 Fundamenfal French (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in French. 

102 Fundamental French (5) 

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. 
Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared In the language 
laboratory. Conducted in French. 

203 Intermediate French (3) 

Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice In speaking, understanding, reading, and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in French. 

204 Intermediate French (3) 

Prerequisite: French 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in French. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with French 203. Conducted in French. 

214 Intermediate Diction and Phonetics (2) 

Practice in oral delivery of cultural and literary materials. Detailed analysis of individual problems 
In pronunciation followed by intensive work in class and the language laboratory. May be taken 
concurrently with French 204. Conducted In French. 

300 French Conversation (3) 

Prerequisites: French 204 and 214 or equivalent. Designed to enable the student to develop further 
his oral control of the language in the context of his own or contemporary concerns rather than 
In the context of the subject matter of a French major. Conducted In French. 

305 Introduction to Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Examination of what is known about the nature of human 
language, the literary use of language, literary creation, reading, and what critics are able to say 
about literary works. Reading and discussion of some typical, mainly contemporary, texts. 
Conducted in French. 

315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. The social, intellectual and artistic origins of French civiliza- 
tion: feudal society becoming the anclen r^lme; the medieval world-view transformed by the 
Renaissance. For direct contact with medieval and Renaissance sensibility, selections from 
typical works of literature will be read in modern French translation. Conducted in French. 

317 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in 
French. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or equivalent. Designed to give the student special competence in the 
control of French as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted In French. 


513—6 4 530 


280 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

325 Contemporary French Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Reading and discussion to develop understanding of the social and intellectual problems, trends, 
and contributions of pr6sent-day France, while at the same time strengthening facility with the 
language. Conducted in French. 

400 French for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or consent of Instructor. Intensive review of spoken French, while develop- 
ing the student's powers of self-expression In the spoken and written language. Conducted In 
French. 

415 French Classicism (3) (Formerly 451) 

Prerequisite: French 305 and 317. The decisive moment in French experience. Focus on literature 
of the Classic period (1660-1685), but open to both ends to include the formation and perennial- 
ity of French Classicism. Conducted in French. 

425 French Romanticism (3) (Formerly 441) 

Prerequisite: French 305 and 317. The revolution In feeling and Intellect which transformed France 
in the 19th century and opened the way to the 20th century. Focus on literature of the Romantic 
period (1820-1850) but open on both ends to include the formation and perennially of French 
Romanticism. Conducted In French. 

466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to French, with special attention to 
structural contrasts between French and English. Emphasis on the application of linguistic analysis 
to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

475A,B,C,D Seminar in 20th-Century French Literature (3^^^) 

Prerequisite: French 305 and 317. Organizes the study of 20th-century French literature around four 
major themes. Conducted in French. 

475 A Exploration of the Self (3) 

Search for identity and the quest for personal authenticity. The role of the conscious and unconscious 
mind and of artistic creativity. Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Valery, etc. 

475B In Search of the Real (3) 

The surrealist revolt against bourgeois logic, mores and literature. From Dada to automatic writing 
to Revolution to I'amour fou. Includes precursors and kindred spirits (e.g. Lautr^amont, Jarry). 

475C The Individual and Society (3) 

Attitudes toward personal freedom; the existential sense of responsibility toward one's fellow man. 
Salnt-Exup4ry, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, etc. 

475D Beyond Despair (3) 

Writers after World War II seeking tough-minded visions of man to replace the naive humanism of 
the '30's, new kinds of hope "beyond despair": Sartre's "la vrale vie commence au-del^ de 
d^sespolr." 

485 Senior Seminar in French Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: French 305, 317 and senior standing. Exploration of a literary current, period, author, 
genre or problem. Subject will change each time course is given and may be repeated for credit. 
Conducted In French. 

492 Literature of Action in 20th-Century France (3) 

Selected works read, discussed and analyzed In the light of current philosophical trends as well as 
historical and political developments. Readings and lectures in English. May not be counted 
toward fulfillment of the requirements for the major In French. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in French language or literature to be taken with the consent of the Instructor 
and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in French. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of Instructor. Conducted in French. 

520 Graduate Seminar: Old French (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Readings in the medieval literature of northern France represent- 
ing a wide variety of dialects and centuries. Conducted In French. 


518—6 4 555 






Foreign Languages and Literatures 283 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of instructor. Some previous study of Latin is highly recommend- 
ed. Studies in the phonetic, morphological, syntactic and semantic changes that characterize the 
development of Latin into the French of today. Conducted in French. 

557 Graduate Seminar: French Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

571 Graduate Seminar: French Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

575 Graduate Seminar: French Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in French. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in French and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in French 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


GERMAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental German (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic forms and structures of German. Audiolingual assignments are an 
integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted In 
German. 

102 Fundamental German (5) 

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of 
German. Audiolingual assignments are an Integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. Conducted In German. 

Ill German for the Music Major (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 390B. Intensive work in the structure of German with special emphasis on oral 
and written problems related to the language of music. 

203 Intermediate German (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in German. 

204 Intermediate German (3) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted In German. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with German 203. Conducted in German. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with German 204. Conducted in German. 

301 Readings in German for the Non-Major (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Readings reflecting a broad spectrum of writing in the 
sciences and humanities. Special attention given to rapid reading and recognition of structure and 
vocabulary. 

315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Readings and discussions in German literature, arts and institutions to develop insights into 
German culture, while strengthening facility with the language. Conducted in German. 


523-4 4 580 


284 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in German. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: German 31 7 or consent of instructor. Designed to give the student special competence 
In the control of German as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted in 
German. 

325 Modern German Thought in Science and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of Instructor. 
Readings and discussion of modern German thought In science, literature, philosophy and art, 
designed to acquaint the student with a broad range of German contributions to present-day 
civilization while strengthening facility with German language. Conducted In German. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of Instructor. Introduction to the principal literary forms, prose 
fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major concepts of literary techniques and 
criticism. Close analysis and interpretation of various texts to increase the student's abilities in 
reading, language and literary criticism. Conducted in German. 

390 Group Reading and Oral Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: German through fourth semester or consent of instructor. Oral reading of Horspiele, 
dramatic literature and poetry in group session. Emphasis on the practice of reading aloud from 
the printed page with proper pronunciation and intonation with simultaneous discussion of 
surface, inner and personal meaning of the literary work. Conducted In German. 

399 German Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. Detailed analysis of individual problems in 
pronunciation followed by Intensive work In class and the language laboratory. May be repeated 
for credit. Conducted in German. 

400 German for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisites: German 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of German while developing 
the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. Conducted in 
German. 

430 German Literature to the Baroque (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375 or consent of instructor. Masterpieces of German literature 
from the HHdebrandsHedXo Der AbenteuerHche SimpHcissimus axyd their relationship to cultural, 
historical and Intellectual developments between ca. 800-1670 A.D. Conducted In German. 

440 18th-Century German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of Instructor. The principal authors and move- 
ments (Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, early Romanticism) of the 18th century. 
Conducted in German. 

450 19th-Century German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. Significant impulses in 19th-century 
German literature from Romanticism to Naturalism, mcluding examination of decisive philosoph- 
ic, political, and economic influences. Conducted In German. 

460 20th-Century German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. Major German prose, drama and 
poetry of the 20th century. Conducted In German. 

466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to German, with special attention to 
structural contrasts between German and English. Emphasis on the application of linguistic 
analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

482 German Literature in Film (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced standing in literature or consent of instructor. A critical study of literary works 
and their film adaptations. Significant works of German literature will be analyzed and compared 
in both art forms. 

485 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing in German and consent of Instructor. Research and discussion In depth 
of a literary movement, a genre or an author. Subject will vary and will be announced in the 
Class Schedule. Topics offered in past years have included the Baroque, the Novelle, Brecht, 
Modern Drama, Keller, Poetic Realism, Romantic Period. May be repeated for credit with a 
different ^opic. Conducted in German. 


528-6 4 605 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 285 

490 Oral Interpretation of Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Group and individual reading of various types of literature to 
develop oral and interpretative skills. Conducted In German. 

492 German Literature in Translation (3) 

Open to all students. Reading, discussion and interpretation of relevant German literature. Authors 
may include Goethe, Schiller, Kafka, Hesse, Mann, Brecht, Grass, Hauptmann. Readings and 
discussions in English. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the major 
in German. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in German Language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of Instructor. Conducted in German. 

550A3fC Interpretation of Literature (2,2,2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Interpretation of literary works In advanced language classes. 
Conducted In German. A — the narrative, B — the drama, C — poetry. 

557 Graduate Seminar: German Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted In 
German. 

571 Graduate Seminar: German Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

575 Graduate Seminar: German Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted In German. 

598 Thesis (3-^) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency In German and consent of Instructor. Supervised research projects in German 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


HEBREW COURSES 

101 Fundamental Hebrew (3) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

102 Fundamental Hebrew (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 101. Intensive practice In listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

203 Intermediate Hebrew (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to 
sentence. Conducted In Hebrew. 

204 Intermediate Hebrew (3) \ 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 203 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to 
sentence. Conducted in Hebrew. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Hebrew language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor and 
department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


531—6 4 620 


286 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

ITALIAN COURSES 


101 Fundamenal Italian (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic structure of Italian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and 
are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in Italian. 

102 Fundamental Italian (4) 

Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of sounds and the basic forms and structure of Italian. 
Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the language 
laboratory. Conducted in Italian. 

203 Intermediate Italian (3) 

Prerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in Italian 

204 Intermediate Italian (3) 

Prerequisite: Italian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in Italian. 


LATIN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Latin (3) 

Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading knowledge and a fundamental writing ability 
in Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will be applied. 

102 Fundamental Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading knowl- 
edge and a fundamental writing ability in Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will 
be applied. 

203 Intermediate Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 102 or equivalent (two years of high school Latin). Intensive reading and writing. 
Selected prose and poetry from the Golden Age. Audiolingual techniques of language learning 
are used when applicable. 

204 Intermediate Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 203 or equivalent (three years of high school Latin) . Intensive reading and writing. 
Selected prose from the Silver and Middle Ages. Audiolingual techniques of language learning 
are used when applicable. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects In Latin language and Roman literature. To be taken with consent of department 
chairman as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Subject matter will vary. May be 
repeated for credit. 


PORTUGUESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing to develop control of the 
sounds and the basic forms and structures of Portuguese. Enrollment restricted to students with 
previous study of a Romance language. Conducted in Portuguese. 

102 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 101 or equivalent. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehen- 
sion, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of Portu- 
guese. Enrollment restricted to students with previous study of a Romance language. Conducted 
in Portuguese. 


537—6 5 10 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 287 

315 Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Prerequisites: Portuguese 102 or equivalent, reading knowledge of Portuguese or consent of Instruc- 
tor. Readings and discussions to develop Insights into the main currents of Portuguese culture 
and civilization, their expansion to the New World, and the intellectual and artistic development 
of Brazil from its discovery to the end of the Second Empire. Conducted In Portuguese. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instruc- 
tor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Portuguese. 

318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed to give the student special competence in the control of Portuguese as an instru- 
ment for free oral and written expression. Conducted In Portuguese. 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of Instructor. Readings and discussion toward developing 
an understanding of the social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions to Brazil from 
the advent of the Republic. Major emphasis on present day Brazil. Conducted In Portuguese. 

431 Portuguese Literature of the Golden Age (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The literature of Portugal's golden age (1500-1700). The major 
works of the Cancloneiros, Gil Vicente, Luis de Camoens and other writers will be examined from 
the point of view of their artistic structure as well as within the context of Portuguese culture 
and civilization. Conducted in Portuguese. 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The literature of Brazil from the Colonial period to the present. 
Conducted in Portuguese. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Portuguese language or literature to be taken with the consent of the instructor 
and the department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


RUSSIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Russian (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Russian. Audiolingual assignments are an Integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in Russian. 

102 Fundamental Russian (5) 

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of 
Russian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in 
the language laboratory. Conducted in Russian. 

203 Intermediate Russian (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice In speaking, understanding, reading, and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in Russian. 

204 Intermediate Russian (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in Russian. 

213 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice In written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with Russian 203. Conducted In Russian. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with Russian 204. Conducted in Russian. 


541-6 5 30 


288 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Reading and discussion to develop a view of the Russian tradition (its social, intellectual and 
literary evolution) while at the same time strengthening facility with the language. Conducted 
in Russian. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Russian. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the principal literary forms, 
prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major concepts of literary techniques and 
criticisms. Close analysis and interpretation of various texts to increase the student's abilities in 
reading, language and literary criticisms. Conducted in Russian. 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 31 7 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken Russian, while develop- 
ing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written languge. Conducted in 
Russian. 

431 Early Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Evolution of Russian literature from the medieval 
ecclesiastic traditions and transition to Baroque and Classicism. French and German influence 
on the 18th century. Transition to Romanticism and the beginnings of Realism. Conducted in 
Russian. 

441 The Works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Major works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky In their 
intellectual and historical setting and their impact on Russian and world literature. Conducted 
in Russian. 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of Intructor. A study of major literary works of the first half of 
the 19th century which exemplify cultural and intellectual movements In Russia. Conducted In 
Russian. 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of Instructor. Representative works of outstanding modern 
Russian writers with an emphasis on The Nobel Prize winners (M. Sholokhov and B. Pasternak). 
Analysis and discussion of their prose and poetry in the light of the social problems of present-day 
Russia. Conducted in Russian. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Russian language or literature to be taken with the consent of the Instructor 
and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 


SPANISH COURSES 

101 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Intensive practice In listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Spanish. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted In Spanish. 

102 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice In listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Spanish. 
Audiolingual assignments are an Integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the language 
laboratory. Conducted in Spanish. 

203 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted in Spanish. 


545-4 5 50 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 289 


204 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, reading and 
writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. 
Conducted In Spanish. 

213 Intermediate Composition and Conversation (2) 

Practice in written and oral expression based on a variety of materials. May be taken concurrently 
with Spanish 203. Conducted in Spanish. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with Spanish 204. Conducted in Spanish. 

315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of Instructor. 
Readings and discussions in Spanish literature, arts and Institutions to develop insights into 
Spanish culture, while strengthening facility with the language. Conducted in Spanish. 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of Instructor. 
Reading and discussion in Spanish-American literature, arts and institutions to develop insights 
into Spanish-American literature and culture while strengthening facility with the language. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of Instructor. 
Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

318 Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition (3) 

Emphasis on linguistic problems encountered by the Spanish/ English bilingual student in connection 
with his written expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the principal literary forms, 
prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major concepts of the literary techniques 
and criticism. Close analysis and Interpretation of various texts to increase the student's abilities 
in reading, language and literary criticism. Conducted in Spanish. 

399 Spanish Phonetics (1) 

Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of Instructor. Detailed analysis of students' specific prob- 
lems In pronunciation followed by intensive work in class and the language laboratory until 
articulatory proficiency is achieved. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

400 Spanish for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of Instructor. Intensive study of spoken Spanish, while develop- 
ing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. Conducted In 
Spanish. 

415 Contemporary Spanish Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. An analysis and study of the cultural — social, 
economical, political — characteristics of contemporary Spanish life. Conducted in Spanish. 

430 Spanish Literature to Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 and 375. Spanish literature from its beginnings to 1700, with special 
emphasis on the outstanding representative works of each genre. Conducted in Spanish. 

440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites; Spanish 316 and 375 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature from The 
Conquest to 1888. Conducted In Spanish. 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 316 and 375 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature from 
modernismo to the present. Conducted In Spanish. 

461 Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 315 and 375 or consent of instructor. Representative works of 19th- and 
20th-century Spain. Conducted in Spanish. 

466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to Spanish, with special attention to 
structural contrasts between Spanish and English. Emphasis on the application of linguistic 
analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

10 — 84452 


549—6 5 70 


290 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 317 or 318; 400 or equivalent; and 466, the latter of which may be taken 
concurrently. Focuses on the differences in phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon found 
in the linguistic patterns of all Spanish-speaking regions. Includes the Influence and contribution 
of cultural and historical features, as well as the continuing interactions of Spanish and English. 
(3 hours lecture) 

468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 317 or 318; 400 or equivalent; and 466, the latter of which may be taken 
concurrently. Theory and techniques of contrasting phonological grammatical and lexical struc- 
tures of Spanish and English, with special emphasis on comparison of the two languages as related 
to the speaker of both languages. Development of specific professional means to deal with 
problems of linguistic interference encountered In multilingual classroom situations. (3 hours 
lecture) 

472 Senior Seminar: Cervantes and the Age of Humanism (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 430 or consent of instructor. Cervantes' artistic creation and its relation to the 
culture of the 16th century. Special emphasis on Oon Quixote and the Novelas ejemplares. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

475 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Spanish. The Generation of '98 and 20th-century theatre, poetry and 
novel. Conducted in Spanish. 

485 Senior Seminar: Spanish Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing In Spanish. Exploration of a literary current period, author, genre or 
problem in the literature of Spain and Spanish America. Subject will change each time the course 
is given. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in Spanish language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

510 Graduate Seminar. Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

530 Graduate Seminar Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of Instructor. Conducted In Spanish. 

556 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted In Spanish. 

557 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

567 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Novel (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in Spanish and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects In Spanish 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


152-4 5 90 


SWAHILI COURSES 


Geography 291 


101 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to master the basic structure of 
Swahili and the requisite skills for both oral and written communication. Conducted in Swahili. 
(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 104) 

102 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Prerequisite: Swahili 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and 
writing to master the basic structure of Swahili and the requisite skills for both oral and written 
communication. Conducted in Swahili. (Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 105) 


DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 


FACULTY 


William Ketteringham 
Department Chairman 


George Britton, Robert Brown, Arthur Earick, Wayne Engstrom, Glenn George, Gary Hannes, Ronald 
Helin, Tso-Hwa Lee, Bill Puzo, Gertrude Reith, Imre Sutton, Barbara Weightman 
The major in geography provides knowledge concerning variety and change In the earth's physical 
foundation and In man's economic, cultural and political relationship to that foundation. In doing 
so It contributes to a broad, liberal education and furnishes sound preparation for employment in 
business, planning, and government service. The field also provides a foundation for teaching on the 
elementary and secondary levels and for advanced geographic study on the graduate level leading 
to university and university teaching and research. 

Students and counselors are advised that departmental offerings are numbered according to instruc- 


tiona! level and course content. These criteria are applied in the following ways: 

Instructional level 

survey courses designed primarily for non-majors 100-199 

survey courses designed primarily for majors 200-299 

courses designed for students with general needs and not normally applicable to 

graduate programs In geography 300-399 

courses designed for students with special needs; prerequisites cited are strictly inter- 
preted 400-499 

courses for graduate students and qualified undergraduate students 500-599 


Course content 
general courses: 
physical courses: 
regional courses: 
human courses: 
technical courses: 
special studies: 


00-09 (e.g.. Geography 100 or 500) 
10-29 (e.g.. Geography 211 or 323) 
30-49 (e.g.. Geography 342 or 433) 
50-79 (e.g.. Geography 250 or 367) 
80-69 (e.g.. Geography 280 or 381 ) 
90-99 (e.g.. Geography 499 or 599) 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 




The major consists of at least 36 units of geography, including no more than 1 3 units of lower division 
work and excluding all work applied toward the general education requirement. To fulfill the major 
a student must complete the geography core (Geography 100, 211, 250 and 280) and a 24 unit 
concentration in upper division geography; including at least one course from each of the following 
groups: Physical, Regional, Human, Technical. 

No unit credit toward the major will be allowed for geography courses in which a grade of D Is 
received. Content credit for such courses may be allowed by the student's adviser. 


TEACHING MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography is intended as a second field for persons completing a major in another 
discipline in preparation for a teaching credential. It is designed to give a basic understanding of earth 
science and geographic relationships helpful to the classroom teacher. The program provides a 
balance between the physical and social sciences. 


155—6 5 105 


292 Geography 

The minor consists of at least 21 units of work in geography, including a minimum of nine units from 
the geography core (100, 211, 250 and 280) and a minimum of nine upper division units selected 
from at least three of the following groups: Physical, Regional, Human, Technical. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

This program provides advanced study in geographic concepts, techniques and methods. Through 
seminars and research it develops the analytical and interpretive abilities of the student, and provides 
requisite background for employment in teaching, government and business. 

Prerequisites 

Admission to the program (classified status) requires the equivalent of 27 semester units of study 
in geography, including the following: (1) nine units in introductory geography; (2) nine units in 
upper division physical and human geography, including at least three units in physical and three 
units in human geography; (3) 3 units in upper division techniques; and (4) three units in upper 
division regional geography. A 3.0 (B) average in all geography courses is required prior to classifica- 
tion in the program. Course or grade deficiencies may be made up with consent of the departmental 
graduate committee. After completion of all prerequisites and removal of deficiencies, if any, the 
student is reviewed for classification into the program by the departmental graduate committee, 
which then supervises the student in the formulation of an official study plan. 

Study Plan 

Requirements for the completion of the degree program include: 

a) A technical requirement equivalent to nine units. Technical courses passed as an undergradu- 
ate or graduate. Including the course used to gain admittance to the program, may be used 
to satisfy this requirement, as may technical courses passed by means of a proficiency exami- 
nation. 

b) A minimum of 30 units of approved upper division or graduate-level work distributed as 
follows: 

Units 


Geography seminars (minimum of) 9 

Geography 597 (Project) or Geography 598 (Thesis) 6 

Elective upper division or graduate work in geography (for which up to 6 units 

may be taken In related field) 15 

Total 30 


Candidacy Is attained on the satisfactory completion of the technical requirement and attainment 
of a grade of B or better In all of 1 2 approved units of work, including at least three units in a 500-level 
geography seminar. A written or oral examination may be required for advancement to candidacy. 
Each candidate will prepare either two three-unit projects or a six-unit thesis. Students interested 
in foreign area studies are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in a suitable foreign language. 
All graduate students are to confer with the departmental graduate adviser sometime during the first 
two weeks of each semester; for further information, consult this adviser. 

See also 'The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

100 Man and the Land (3) 

An introduction to world geography, with emphasis on. the world's major regions and on their use 
and modification by man. 

150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

A geographic analysis and approach to the problems of man and his environment, dealing with man's 
interpretation of the environment and his use and misuse thereof. Factors of discussion will 
include population, nutrition, health, settlement, pollution, resource utilization and local environ- 
mental problems. Not acceptable on the geography major. 


199—6 9 129 


Geography 293 


211 Physical Geography (4) 

A study of the basic elements of the physical environment (e.g., weather, climate, landforms, oceans, 
vegetation and soils) and an analysis of their world distribution and interrelationships. (3 hours 
lecture, 2 hours activity) 

250 Human Geography (3) 

Systematic study of the elements of the man-made environment as correlated with their physical 
and cultural foundations (e.g., population distributions, sociocultural groupings, health and nutri- 
tion, land utilization, transportation and trade, allocation of land and territory, and rural and urban 
settlement). 

280 Introduction to Geographical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. Designed to help students Interpret physical 
and human features and activities of the landscape. An understanding will be gained by first-hand 
field experience together with the utilization of graphics and written material. (1 hour lecture, 
4 hours activity. Including two Saturday field trips) 

312 Geomorphology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 21 1 or Earth Science 101 . A study of the development of landforms through 
an analysis of the processes that construct and modify them. 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 21 1 or consent of instructor. A study of atmospheric elements and controls, 
and climatic classification systems. 

330 Geography of California (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. Description and analysis of the geographic 
regions of California — their environmental diversity, occupance patterns, and current problems. 

332 Geography of Anglo-America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of the United States and 
Canada emphasizing the interrelated physical and cultural features that give geographic personal- 
ity both to the Individual regions as well as the individual countries. 

333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A systematic and regional survey of Middle 
and South America with particular emphasis on the Interrelationships of the physical and social 
factors of the area. 

336 Geography of Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. A survey of the basic physical and human 
lineaments of Europe and of the elements that distinguish and give character to Its major regional 
divisions. 

338 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. Character of and bases for the regional 
diversity of man and land In the Soviet Union. 

340A Geography of East Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of Instructor. A regional study of China, Japan and Korea 
In terms of Internal and external economic, social and political activities and interrelationships. 

340B Geography of Southeast Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of the diversity so characteris- 
tic of man and land In southeastern Asia, with special emphasis on the growing significance — in 
economic, social and political terms — of the region's newly emergent nations. 

344 Geography of Subsaharan Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of Instructor. The physical, human and regional geography 
of Africa south of the Sahara. 

346 Australia and the Pacific Islands (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. The physical, cultural, and regional geography 
of Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. 

350 Conservation and Ecology in Contemporary America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A survey of resource-use problems and the principles of 
conservation and ecology with discussions of philosophy, ethics, public policy and environmen- 
tal law. 


163—6 5 140 


294 Geography 

355 Population Perspectives (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A systematic approach to the geography of population within 
a regional framework. Investigation of historical and contemporary demographic patterns and 
processes in terms of cultural, economic and environmental factors of population growth, mobil- 
ity and distribution. 

360 Economic Geography (3) 

A systematic inquiry into the world distribution of economic activities: agriculture, extractive and 
manufacturing industries, and tertiary services. 

367 Political Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 250 or consent of instructor. A systematic inquiry into the geographic bases 
of political territories, from the municipal to the international level with an emphasis on sovereign 
states. Special consideration will be given to perception of political units and to relationships 
among political territories. 

370 Urban Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The city as a geographic unit; urban settlements as regional 
centers; city-region relationships; the structure of villages, towns and cities, and their historical 
developments; case studies. 

381 Cartography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Compilation and construction of maps and 
graphs as geographic tools, with emphasis on the principles of effective cartographic representa- 
tion. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

386 Data Processing for Geographic Information (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 280 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the use of a digital computer 
in solving geographical problems. Includes the acquisition of basic computer programming skills 
and the investigation of spatially-oriented problems. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

412 Regional Geomorphology of the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 312. A seminar examining the major physiographic provinces of the United 
States. Special emphasis is placed on the record that present and past geomorphic processes have 
left on the landscape. 

423 Physical Climatology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 323 or consent of instructor. A study of selected topics in atmospheric 
science, including heat-transfer, atmospheric motion, synoptic and climatic analysis of weather 
data, and the effects of urban environment on the atmosphere. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

430 Problems of California Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 330 or consent of Instructor. A seminar analyzing selected geographic 
problems of California, such as urbanization, transportation, water supply and pollution. 

431 Man's Impact on the California Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 330 or upper division standing. Studies of selected geographic problems 
which have resulted from man's Impact on the land and its resources, with particular emphasis 
on southern California. 

432 Geography of Eastern America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or equivalent and upper division standing. An intensive study of the 
geography of Eastern America eastward from the Great Plains. Emphasis will be on the natural 
setting, patterns of movement and settlement, population characteristics, economic develop- 
ment, and urbanization. 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 333 or consent of instructor. A seminar for advanced students in Latin 
American studies or geography. Studies of contemporary Interest dealing with man and his 
development in the area of Latin America. Specific content of the course will vary from year to 
year, but major stress will be placed upon the larger countries of the region. 

451 Geographical Change in the American West (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100, or upper division standing, or consent of Instructor. Geographical 
interpretations of historic and ethnic influences, public and private ownership of resources, and 
the rise of urbanization in the evolution of the American West. 


171-6 5 180 


Geography 295 


453 Cultural Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A seminar for students in geography, related disciplines and 
in environmental studies. A topical treatment (e.g., nutrition, health, land tenure, technology) 
of the ecological approach to man-land relationships. 

457 Social Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 250. An investigation of man's social milieu from a spatial perspective. 
Emphasis will be placed on the subjective spatial constructs of various social groups In order to 
illuminate extant similarities and differences in the design of earth occupance. 

464 Transportation Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 360 or 370 or consent of instructor. An Inquiry into spatial patterns of both 
regional and urban transportation networks; use of elementary graph theory In geographic 
research; transportation planning and methodology. 

472 Urban Growth and Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 370 or consent of Instructor. A seminar on urban development with an 
emphasis on the decentralizing forces operating In contemporary urban space; Identification of 
trends In the planning process. 

482 Advanced Cartography — Thematic Mapping (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 381 and consent of instructor. Application of photographic techniques and 
cartographic analysis to advanced problems in map compilation and design. (1 hour lecture, 6 
hours laboratory) 

484 Airphoto and Image Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisites: junior, senior or graduate standing and consent of Instructor. Use of aerial photogra- 
phy, space photography and other remote sensors as tools and research sources. Emphasis on 
interpretation of physical and cultural elements of the landscape. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

485 Quantitative Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. An Introduction to spatial analysis and geo- 
graphic application of basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics. Includes some use 
of the electronic computer. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

488 Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 280 and consent of instructor. Analysis and Interpretation of urban and 
rural land use and settlement with specific references to geographic field problems. Application 
of geographic techniques and tools to local field studies. Saturday field sessions. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students. Student must have consent of Instructor under whom study will be 
undertaken before enrolling. May be repeated for credit. 

5(X) Seminar in the Evolution of Geographic Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. An inquiry into the nature, scope, and 
development of the geographic discipline. 

510 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of Instructor. A seminar on selected topics pertaining to 
physical geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

530 Seminar in Regional Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected regions or selected 
topics within a regional setting. May be repeated once for credit. 

550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected topics pertaining to 
cultural, political or social geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

560 Seminar in Resource Geography (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected problems in resource 
utilization, land use planning and economic geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

571 Seminar in Urban Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. An in-depth study of selected urban 
problems. Topics will vary from semester to semester and will allow for concerns of the partici- 
pants. 


176-6 5 205 


2 % History 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and consent of adviser. May be repeated once for a 
maximum of six units of credit. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and consent of adviser. May be repeated up to a maximum 
of six units of credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

FACULTY 

George Ciacumakis , 

Department Chairman 

Cordon Bakken, W$rren Beck, Leland Bellot, Lauren Breese, Giles Brown,* Lawrence de Craaf, Jack 
Elenbaas, George Etue, Robert Feldman, Thomas Flickema, Charles Frazee, Arthur Hansen, B. 
Carmon Hardy, Harry Jeffrey, James Jordan, Frederic Miller, Michael Onorato, David PIvar, 
Charles Povlovich, Jackson Putnam, Ronald Rietveld, Danton Sailor, Seymour Scheinberg, Gary 
Shumway, Cameron Stewart, Ernest Toy,* David Van Deventer, Nelson Woodard, James Wood- 
ward, KinjI Ken Yada, Ceclle Zinberg 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in history is designed to provide cultural enrichment, a sense of alternative, 
and perspectives especially relevant to a society confronted with widespread Institutional change. 
The department offers an extensive number of courses which expose the student to man's rich and 
diverse experience. In addition to subject matter, the department gives particular emphasis to various 
methodologies and ways of thinking about mankind's past. The major may be pursued to fulfill 
various professional and cultural objectives common to a liberal arts program. It serves, especially, 
as a preparation for teaching, law, government, and other services, and as the foundation for 
advanced study at the graduate level. 

The undergraduate program for the history major contains three well defined levels of study: 
Introductory, interm^iate and advanced. At the introductory level, the student has the opportunity 
to enroll in topical or survey courses in various fields. At the intermediate level, the student builds 
on the foundations he has established in early study, extending his understanding and moving toward 
greater sophistication in the use of historical materials. At the advanced level, he will devote himself 
to seminar work and Independent study in his area or areas of specialization, at which time he will 
be required to apply his knowledge and training in original and challenging ways. 

The undergraduate major requires a total of 40 units: 1 3 In introductory classes and 27 in intermediate 
and advanced courses. At the primary level, each student is to enroll in History 100, Introduction 
to History. He must also complete four topical or survey offerings. At the intermediate level. History 
399, Historical Methodology, must be taken along with 18 units, six each in the three fields of United 
States history; European history; and Latin American, Asian or African history. At the advanced level 
the student will be required to enroll in a research seminar and any other elective, at the upper 
division level, which he may choose. 

Except for History 100, all courses offered in the department may be counted toward fulfillment of 
the general education and social science requirement for the bachelor's degree at this university. 
Beyond this, any American history class will satisfy the California State requirements In U.S. history. 
Students majoring in history are encouraged to take work In other of the social sciences and 
humanities. Those intending to do graduate work in history should commence the study of at least 
one foreign language appropriate to the pursuit of advanced study In their particular specialty. 

Program of Study for the Major 

1. Introductory requirements: 13 units 

A. History 100 (prerequisite for Intermediate and advanced courses)** 

• University administrative officer 

•• Students transferring from accredited institutions who have completed nine or more semester units of work in introductory or 
survey history courses are exempt from this requirement. 


180-6 5 225 


History 297 

B. Four courses (100-200 level) from three of the following four fields. These may be survey 
and/or topical courses: 

1. U.S. history (170A,B and/or 270 topic course) 

2. European and ancient Mediterranean (110 A,B and/or 220, 230 topic courses) 

3. Latin America, Asian and African (240, 250, 260 topic courses) 

4. World or comparative history (101A,B and/or 210 topic courses) 

2. Intermediate requirements: 21 units 

A. History 399 

B. At least six units of U.S. history 

C. At least six units of European history 

D. At least six units in Latin America, Asian or African history 

3. Advanced Requirements: 6 units 

A. History 490 

B. Three units of elective, upper division level 

TEACHING MINOR IN HISTORY 

The teaching minor in history is composed of units in history exclusive of the general education 


requirements: 

Recommended teaching minor: Units 

Introductory courses 9 

Electives at the intermediate and advanced levels 22 

Total 21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The Master of Arts In History Is designed to Improve the student's academic and professional 
competence for educational services at the elementary, secondary and community university levels 
as preparation for advanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree in history. It is relevant to 
various other specialties In public or private enterprise and general cultural or community service. 
The program aims to deepen the students understanding of man's condition through a careful study 
of human experience. 

Prerequisite 

Prerequisite to classification In this master's degree Is an undergraduate major in history with at least 
a GPA of 3.0 in the upper division history courses. Each student's background and record are 
evaluated by the department graduate program adviser. Satisfactory scores on the aptitude test and 
the advanced test in history of the Graduate Record Examination are required. 

Students with limited subject, grade, or breadth deficiencies may be considered for classified status 
In the program upon completing courses approved by the graduate program adviser in history in 
addition to those required for the degree, with at least a B average. 

Study Plan 

Of the 30 units of adviser-approved graduate courses on the study plan for the degree, 18 must be 
in appropriate work at the 500-level, and six must be in other supportive social sciences or related 
fields. The required courses for both Plan I and Plan II are: 

History 501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) 

History 590 History and Historians (3) 

Plan I: 

A primary focus in one area In which a field is intensively developed. This results in a specific topic 
of research with a written thesis as the final product (History 598, Thesis: 3-6 units). 

An oral examination on the thesis and the coursework will be required upon completion of the 
coursework but prior to the final draft of the thesis. 


585—6 5 245 


298 History 

Plan II: 

The focus in this plan is in two fields not found in the same general area. There Is a minimum 
requirement of one graduate research seminar besides History 501 and 590. There Is also a minimum 
requirement of one graduate reading seminar In the recent interpretations of history in the particular 
fields of interest. 

A written comprehensive in each of the two fields will be required upon completion of the program. 
Students in the History Department's graduate program must demonstrate a broad cultural under- 
standing of one or more foreign countries relevant to the student's area of specialization. This 
requirement may be met by a reading knowledge of an appropriate foreign language or an approved 
selection of comparative studies (12 units post-B.A.), but the method must be approved by the 
student's adviser. In certain programs, an examination in statistics may be substituted for the 
language requirement. 

For further Information, consult the Department of History. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

HISTORY MAJOR CATEGORIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY COURSES (for undergraduate students) 

A. Survey Courses (Lower division) 

100 Introduction to History (1) 

101 A World History to 1500 
101 B World History Since 1500 

110A Western Civilization to the 17th Century 
11 OB Western Civilization from 1648 
170A United States to 1877 
170B United States Since 1877 

B. Topical Courses {Lov/ev dms\OT\) 

210 Topics In World or Comparative History 

220 Topics In European History 

230 Topics in the History of Science and Technology 

240 Topics In Latin American History 

250 Topics in African History 

260 Topics in Asian History 

270 Topics in American History 

II. INTERMEDIATE COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

A. Historical Methodology (Upper division) 

399 Historical Methodology 

B. Subject Area Courses (Upper division) 

The Ancient World 

41 2 A Ancient Near East — Mesopotamia 

41 2B Ancient Near East — East Mediterranean 

41 5A Classical Greece 

41 5B Hellenistic Civilization 

41 7A Roman Republic 

41 7B Roman Empire 

Europe 

340 Ancient and Medieval Britain 

341 Tudor-Stuart England 

342 History of England and Great Britain 

400 European Social and Intellectual History to 1500 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present 
405 History of the Jews 

419 The Byzantine Empire 

421 A History of the Christian Church to 1025 

421 B History of the Christian Church from 1025 to the Present 

423 A Medieval Europe, 300-1000 

423B Medieval Europe, 1000-1400 


588—6 5 260 


History 


299 


425A The Renaissance 
425B The Reformation 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1 648-1 763 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon 

428 l^h Century Europe 

429 Eitrbpe Since 1 648 
432 Germany Since 1648 
434A Russia to 1890 

434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime 
437 East Europe Since 1851 
439 History of Spain 
Latin America 

350A Colonial Latin America 

350B Republican Latin America 

450 Change in Contemporary Latin America 

453A Mexico to 1910 

453B Mexico Since 1910 

454 Argentina, Brazil, Chile 

Africa 

456 Tropical Africa to 1900 

457 Tropical Africa in the 20th Century 

458A Southern Africa from Earliest Times to the 20th Century 
458B Southern Africa in the 20th Century 
East Asia 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East 

462A History of China 

462B History of China 

462C China Since 1949 

463 A History of Japan 

463B History of Japan 

464A History of Southeast Asia to 1850 

464B History of Southeast Asia, 1850-1945 

464C History of Contemporary Asia 

465A History of India 

465B History of India 

465C History of India 

Middle East 

466A Arab Islamic Age 
466B The Turkish World 

467 The Past and the Present in the Middle East 

468 Contemporary Middle East 
The United States 

383 History of California 

470 American Colonial Civilization 

471 The United States From Colony to Nation 

472 Jeffersonian Themes In American Society, 1800-1861 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 

474 America In the Age of the Industrial Revolution (1876-1914) 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 

476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 
479 The Emergence of Urban America 

481 Westward Movement in the United States 
482A Socioeconomic History of the United States 
482B Socioeconomic History of the United States 
484A American Constitutional History to 1865 
484B American Constitutional History from 1865 
485A United States Foreign Relations to 19(X) 

485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 
486A Social and Intellectual History of the United States 


591-6 5 275 


300 History 

486B Social and Intellectual History of the United States 
487A History of Politics in American Society 
487B History of Politics in Amercian Society 
488A American Negro From Slavery to Jim Crow 
488B American Negro Since 1890 

489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest 
Science and Technology 

430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance 
430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present 

III. ADVANCED COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

A. Seminars (Upper division) 

490 Senior Research Seminar 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics 

492 Community History 

493 Oral History (2) 

494 Special Research Techniques 

495 Colloquium In History 

B. Individualized Study (Upper division) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

IV. GRADUATE COURSES (for graduate students) 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History 

505 Seminar in Recent Interpretations in History 

520 Seminar in European History 

550 Seminar In Latin American History 

560 Seminar In Afro-Asian History 

570 Seminar in American History 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations 
590 History and Historians 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-2) 


HISTORY COURSES 

100 Introduction to History (1) 

Designed to introduce the new history major to his academic discipline through exposure to the 
following topics: the uses and significance of history; the nature of history; areas and fields of 
history; the language and vocabulary of history; and methods of studying history. Required of 
all lower division majors. 

101A World History to 1500 (3) 

The history of mankind from earliest times to 1500 A.D. Special attention is given to the definition, 
evolution, and interaction of the major civilizations. 

101 B World History Since 1500 (3) 

Global history during the past four centuries, with special emphasis on the interaction between the 
expanding West and the non-Western areas of the world. 

110A Western Civilization to the 17th Century (3) 

The study of man and Western Institutions from their beginnings until the middle of the 1 7th century. 

110B Western Civilizations from 1648 (3) 

The study of man and the modernization of Western institutions from 1648 to the present. 

170A United States to 1877 (3) 

A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States to 1877. 
Attention is given to Old World background, rise of the new nation, sectional problems, the Civil 
War and Reconstruction. Satisfies the state requirement in U.S. history. 

170B United States Since 1877 (3) 

A survey of U.S. history from the late 19th century to the present. Attention Is given to economic 
transformation, political reform movements, social, cultural, and Intellectual changes, and the 
role of the United States in world affairs. Satisfies the state requirement in U.S. history. 


601 ^ 5 325 


History 


301 


210 Topics in World or Comparative History (3) (Formerly 260) 

Introductory world or comparative history courses. 

220 Topics in European History (3) 

Introductory European history courses. 

230 Topics in the History of Science and Technology (3) 

Introductory science and technology history courses. 

240 Topics in Latin American History (3) (Formerly 230) 

Introductory Latin American history courses. 

250 Topics in African History (3) (Formerly 240) 

Introductory African history courses. 

260 Topics in Asian History (3) (Formerly 250) 

Introductory Asian history courses. 

270 Topics in American History (3) (Formerly 210) 

Introductory American history courses. 

340 Ancient and Medieval Britain (3) 

The history of Britain from 55 B.C. to 1485. Emphasis on the constitutional, institutional and cultural 
aspects of Roman, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Plantagenet Britain. 

341 Tudor-Stuart England (3) 

The history of England from the accession of Henry VII to the Glorious Revolution. Emphasis on the 
political, institutional, ecclesiastical and cultural aspects of the period of the Tudors and Stuarts. 

342 History of England and Great Britain (3) 

A study of the political, economic and social history of Great Britain from the later Stuarts to the 
present. Particular stress on the modification of the parliamentary system and the growth of 
economic and social democracy within Britain and upon the development of responsible political 
systems in the dependent territories. 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

A survey of the pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portugal and the European 
background of these countries; the development of the socioeconomic, cultural, and governmen- 
tal institutions In colonial life; the background of revolutions and the wars for Independence. 

350B Republican Latin America (3) 

A survey of the Latin American republic since 1826, emphasizing the struggle for responsible 
government, socioeconomic, and cultural changes, and the role of U.S. foreign policy. 

383 History of California (3) 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of California from the aboriginal inhabitants 
to the present, tracing the development of contemporary Institutions and the historical back- 
ground of current issues. 

399 Historical Methodology (3) 

A study of historical knowledge in relation to general knowledge; an introduction to the plurality of 
approaches in the analysis of history through the social sciences and humanities. Special empha- 
sis will be placed upon the application of theory in historical investigations and upon forms of 
historical communication. Required of all majors. 

400 European Social and Intellectual History to 1500 (3) 

A survey of the history of ideas from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Particular attention is given to 
the development of western thought. Its foundations In Graeco-Roman and judao-Christian 
tradition and its impact on the shaping of European society and culture. 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present (3) 

The history of the competing Ideas in European history from 1 500 to the present which have entered 
into the formation of modern European institutions. 

405 History of the Jews (3) 

History of the Jewish people from the 1st century until the present. The emphasis will be on the 
literature of each period as well as the relationships which exist between the Jewish communities 
and the societies In which they exist. 

41 2A Ancient Near East — Mesopotamia (3) 

A study of the political, socioeconomic, religious, and literary history of Mesopotamian culture from 
the rise of the Sumerian city-states to Alexander the Great, a period of over three millennia. This 
will include discussion of the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Hurrians and Persians. 


606—6 5 350 


302 History 

412B Ancient Near East — East Mediterraneans (3) 

A study of ancient Egypt from early dynastic times in the third millennium B.C. to the conquest of 
Alexander the Great. The history of the Syro-Palestinian region will be studied in light of its 
migrations and international culture. A careful study of the Hebrews and their contributions to 
modern civilization will be included. 

415A Classical Greece (3) 

A study of the civilization of ancient Greece. This course traces the rise and flourishing of the classical 
city-states; considerable attention is devoted to the literary and philosophic contributions to our 
modern civilization. 

415B Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

A study of the Hellenistic synthesis and the new patterns in government, the arts and sciences, 
philosophy and literature that appeared between the Macedonian conquest and the intervention 
of Rome. 

417A Roman Republic (3) 

A study of the development of Roman social and political institutions under the republic. 

417B Roman Empire (3) 

A study of Roman imperial institutions and culture. Attention is also given to the rise of Christianity. 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

A historical survey of the East Roman Empire from Constantine to the Ottoman conquest of 1453. 
Special attention to institutional aspects of Byzantine society: church, state, the economy, law 
and culture. 

421A History of the Christian Church to 1025 (3) 

This course traces the Christian Church from Its origins in the apostolic preaching through the Middle 
Ages in both the East and West. 

421 B History of the Christian Church from 1025 to the Present (3) 

This course studies the western church as an institution from 1025 to the present. Orthodoxy, 
Catholicism and Protestantism are presented In historical perspective. 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1000 (3) 

The genesis of European society from the decline of Rome to the age of the Vikings. Particular 
attention is given to the transmission of classical elements Into Christian thought and culture; to 
the barbarian migrations which culminated in the Carolingian Empire; and to the impact of the 
Vikings on Northern Europe. 

423B Medieval Europe, 1000-1400 (3) 

A topical approach Is employed with particular attention given to Normandy and the Norman 
Conquest, technology and social change, Romanesque and Gothic art and Scholasticism. 

425A the Renaissance (3) 

The history of Europe from 1400 to 1525 with emphasis upon the beginnings of capitalism, the 
beginnings of the modern state, humanism, the pre- Reformation and the church on the eve of 
the Reformation. 

425B The Reformation (3) 

The history of Europe from 1525 to 1648, deals with the Protestants and Catholic Reformations; the 
religious wars; the price rise; royal absolution; the rise of science. 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1763 (3) 

Prerequisite: History HOB. European diplomatic history and the balance of power from 1648 to 1763. 
Attention is given to the social and philosophical developments of the period. 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 

A survey of European history from 1763 to 1815. Emphasis Is placed on the politics, society, and 
culture of the Old Regime, the Influence of the Enlightenment, the Impact of the French Revolu- 
tion on Europe, and the establishment of French hegemony by Napoleon. 

428 19th-Century Europe (3) 

Europe from 1815 to 1914. An examination of the political, economic, social, and cultural trends In 
European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. Special attention 
is given to the emerging forces of nationalism, liberalism, socialism, and secularism. 

429 Europe Since 1914 (3) 

Survey of events from the beginning of World War I to the present. Special emphasis given to the 
economic, political, social, diplomatic, and Intellectual trends of 20th-century Europe. 


610—6 5 370 


History 303 


430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance (3) 

An examination of the origin and development of western science and its role in culture from the 
third millenium B.C. through the beginnings of the Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th 
centuries. The hellenic, hellenistic and later medieval periods will receive special attention. 

430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present (3) 

A study of the development of science from the 16th century to the present. Particular emphasis 
will be placed on the scientific revolutions of the 17th and 20th centuries. The Interaction 
between science, technology and culture will be discussed in some detail. 

432 Germany Since 1648 (3) 

The evolution of Germany from the Peace of Westphalia to the present. Emphasis Is placed on 
political, social, economic, diplomatic and cultural trends in the 19th and 20th centuries. 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

An analysis of the historical developments from the establishment of the Russian state at Kiev through 
the great reforms, the revolutionary movement and reaction of the 19th century. Emphasis is 
placed upon the shaping of contemporary Russia. 

4348 The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3) 

An evaluation of the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the subsequent consolidation of power under 
the Communist regime. Chief emphasis is placed upon the continuity and change In Russian 
social, political, cultural institutions and foreign policy effected by the impact of Marxist-Leninist- 
Stalinist ideology. 

437 East Europe Since 1815 (3) 

The political and social history of the east European peoples from the Congress of Vienna to the 
present. 

439 History of Spain (3) 

Development of Hispanic civilization from the earliest times to the present. 

450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

An analysis of political, social and economic change in present-day Latin America. 

453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

A history of Mexico from the pre-Columbian period to 1910. The course stresses the Indian heritage, 
the impact upon the native civilizations of the Spanish Conquest and the blending of Hispanic 
institutions with those of the first Mexicans. 

4538 Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

A study of the background of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the revolution itself from 1910 
to 1921 stressing the political, economic, and social features; special attention will be paid to the 
Revolution as the first of the great upheavals of the 20th century. 

454 Argentina, Brazil, Chile (3) 

A history of Argentina, Brazil and Chile, with special attention to Chile. 

456 Tropical Africa to 1900 (3) 

The history of tropical Africa from earliest times to the colonial era. 

457 Tropical Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the impact of the colonial period upon the p>eoples of tropical Africa including a 
comparative analysis of the various systems of colonial administration; the factors contributing 
to the rise of African nationalism and the achievement of independence; and the problems 
encountered by these new nations. 

458A Southern Africa from Earliest Times to the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the culture and history of the indigenous peoples of southern Africa; and the development 
and Impact of European Interests in this area with particular emphasis on the history of South 
Africa to the Union of 1910. 

4588 Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

A survey of 20th-century developments in the Union (Republic) of South Africa, Central Africa (the 
Rhodesias and Nyasaland) and the Portuguese colonies with emphasis on the political, economic 
and social ramifications of race relations. 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East (3) 

A topics course dealing with events in the major Far Eastern nations since World War II, with 
emphasis upon problems of nationalism, communism and economic development in China, 
japan, Korea and Southeast Asia. 


614—6 5 390 


304 History 

462A History of China (3) 

Chinese history from ancient times to the middle of the 1 7th century, with special attention to the 
development of society, thought, economy and political Institutions. 

462B History of China (3) 

Chinese history from the middle of the 17th century to the 1950s. A study of China's internal 
developments and foreign intrusion, with special attention to the rise of modern Chinese national- 
ism and intellectual developments in the Republican period, as well as the attempts at moderniza- 
tion and the triumph of communism. 

462C China Since 1949 (3) 

History of China from 1949 to the present. A study of the Communist Party, political institutions, 
ideology, economic modernization and foreign relations of China. 

463A History of Japan (3) 

A study of the social, political, and economic history of Japan until 1868, with emphasis upon the 
Tokugawa era. 

463B History of Japan (3) 

A study emphasizing the rise of the modern Japanese state, Japanese Imperialism and the postwar 
era. 

464A History of Southeast Asia to 1850 (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia since early historical times to the establishment of the colonial empires 
of the West in the mid-19th century. 

464B History of Southeast Asia, 1850-1945 (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia under the impact of the Imperialism and the effects of the Pacific War 
on the European empires. 

464C History of Contemporary Asia (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia since the Pacific War to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the 
problems of the area and American Involvement in Southeast Asia. 

465A History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from ancient times to the fall of the first Islamic 
empire In India, 1526. In addition to political developments, the course Includes an examination 
of evolving religious and social institutions: Hinduism, Buddhism, class and caste. 

465B History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from the beginning of the Mughul Empire, 1526 
to the Indian Mutiny of 1857. The course Includes an examlnalon of European intrusions and the 
crystallization of British supremacy in India. 

465C History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of India from 1857 to 1947 emphasizing India's struggle for independence. 

466A Arab Islamic Age (3) 

The study of the events transpiring in the Middle East from the Roman world to the period of the 
Crusades. This will include the impact of the Islamic civilization upon the Middle East society. 

466B The Turkish World (3) 

The development of the countries of the Middle East following the Crusades to the present. This will 
Include the Ottoman Empire, European colonialism In the Middle East, and the modern Middle 
East. 

467 The Past and Present in the Middle East (3) 

This course Is a study tour to various areas In the Middle East and a study of the history of these 
areas. 

468 Contemporary Middle East (3) 

A study of the social, political and economic changes taking place in the Middle East primarily since 
World War I. Where possible, the Middle East will be treated as a whole and viewed through 
a topic-oriented approach. 

470 American Colonial Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. This course analyzes the creation of societies 
in English North America from 1607-1754, stressing the emergence of economic, social and 
political patterns and structures in a maturing Anglo-American culture. 


618—6 5 410 






History 307 


471 The United States from Colony to Nation (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. This course analyzes and describes the social, 
economic, political and Intellectual developments in 18th century America, stressing the Anglo- 
American Imperial problems leading to the revolution, the origins of American nationalism, the 
social structure of the new nation, the formation of the Constitution and the rise of a party system. 

472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. Analyzes Jeffersonian values and their impact 
upon the social, political and cultural life of the nation during the era of their greatest relevance. 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of Instructor. The study of America's "great national crisis" 
and the Impact of slavery, civil war and national reconstruction upon the democratic process 
of the republic. 

474 America in the Age of the Industrial Revolution (1876-1914) (3) 

A study of the maturation of the American industrial economy and its transforming impact upon class 
structure, politics, intellectual and cultural life, and diplomacy. Special consideration is given to 
the attempts made in the Progressive years to cope with the changes wrought by the Industrial 
Revolution. 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 (3) 

A multi-topic analysis of major trends in U.S. domestic policy, foreign policy, economy and society 
from World War I through World War II. Course will concentrate on conflicting values and ideals 
of domestic policy and U.S. role in world affairs. 

476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 (3) 

Multi-topic analysis of U.S. History from 1945 to the present stressing the interrelationship of foreign 
policy, economic prosperity, domestic tensions and protest movements. 

479 The Emergence of Urban America (3) 

A study of the historical development of urban life In America with special emphasis on the process 
of urbanization and the development of urban and suburban cultures. 

481 Westward Movement in the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: History 1 70A,B or equivalent. A survey of the expansion of the United States population 
and sovereignty from the eastern seaboard to the Pacific, colonial times to 1900, and a history 
of regional development during the frontier period. 

482A Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) 

The course explores the interaction of social and economic factors upon each other In the develop- 
ment of American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and labor in economic 
change. The first semester covers the development of a colonial economy and the early national 
economy. 

482B Socioeconomic History of the United States (3) 

The course continues to explore the interaction of social and economic factors upon each other In 
the development of American society beginning with the "takeoff stage of economic develop- 
ment" and ending with contemporary America. Special attention is given to the role of business 
and labor in economic change. 

484A American Constitutional History to 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A, English and colonial origins, the growth of democracy, the slavery 
controversy, and the sectional conflict as they reflect constitutional development. 

484B American Constitutional History from 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170B. Constitutional problems Involved In the post-Civil War era, the expansion 
of business. World War I, the New Deal, World War II, and civil rights In the postwar era. 

485A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) 

A comprehensive survey of the foreign relations of the United States from the beginning of the nation 
until 19(X). Particular attention is given to bases of policy, critical evaluation of major policies and 
relationships between domestic affairs and foreign policy. ^ 

485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 (3) ^ 

Relations from 19(X) to the present. An analysis of the rise of the United States as a world power 
in the 20th century with special emphasis on the search for world order and the diplomacy of 
the atomic age. 

486A Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the Puritans to the Civil 
War. 


221-4 5 430 


308 History 

486B Social and Intellectual History of the United States (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the Civil War to the 
present. 

4B7A History of Politics in American Society (3) 

This course traces political developments from the Colonial Period to the end of the Civil War. Its 
primary focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional development and the response 
of the American political system to changing societal demands and needs. 

487B History of Politics in American Society (3) 

This course traces political developments from Reconstruction to Lyndon Baines Johnson. Its primary 
focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional development and the response of the 
political system to changing societal demands and needs. 

488A American Negro From Slavery to Jim Crow (3) 

A history of black Americans from African backgrounds through the era of slavery and the Civil War 
to the post-Reconstructlon era. 

488B American Negro Since 1890 (3) 

History of black Americans from Booker T. Washington to present, stressing both their culture and 
role In American life and the issues involved In their relations with other segments of the 
population in various regions. 

489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest (3) 

Historical role of the Mexican-American in the Southwest stressing the cultural uniqueness, contribu- 
tions, with special emphasis upon migration, education, and economic changes since 1945. 

490 Senior Research Seminar (3) 

Directed research seminar with class discussions applied to specific topics and areas as schedule 
and staff allow. Designed to give students experience in original research and writing. Required 
of all history majors. 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) 

Intensive study of trends, phenomena, themes or periods of history involving occasional lecture, 
discussion, directed reading, and student research. 

492 Community History (3) (Formerly 480A) 

A study of the historical development of communities in general, and of the Orange County area 
in particular. Special emphasis on techniques of gathering and processing local historical data. 
Including oral Interviews and other archival materials. 

493 Oral History (2) (Formerly 480B) 

Utilization of tape recorded interviews to document significant events in 20th-century history. 
Training will be given In interviewing techniques, tape recording interviews and historical editing 
of the typed transcripts of interviews. May be repeated for a total of six units If student wishes 
to pursue a different emphasis. 

494 Special Research Techniques (3) 

Introduces student to specialized techniques applicable to a particular field of historical research, 
such as the use of nonliterary resources, quantitative methods, etc. Designed to provide experi- 
ence in unusual kinds of original historical research. 

495 Colloquium in History (3) 

Interpretation and analysis of significant documents and works of history aimed at broad synthesis 
and mastery of major interpretations in an area. Involves extensive directed reading and dlcus- 
slon. Themes will vary according to instructor. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students In history with consent of department chairman. May be repeated for 
credit. 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. 

505 Seminar in Recent Interpretations in History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the Instructor. 

520 Seminar in European History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the Instructor. 

550 Seminar in Latin American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the Instructor. 

560 Seminar in Afro-Asian History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 


232—6 5 489 


Linguistics 309 


570 Seminar in American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the Instructor. 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

590 History and Historians (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. A study of the writings, personalities, and philosophies of repre- 
sentative historians from Herodotus to the present. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in history with consent of department chairman. May be repeated for 
credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 

FACULTY 
David Feldman 
Department Chairman 

Joseph Kalir, Alan Kaye, James Santucci, Peter Solon 

Linguistics is the scientific study of language — its nature and development. Its universal properties. 
Its diversified structures and their dialectal variants, its systems of writing and transcription, its cultural 
role in the speech community, and Its application to other areas of human knowledge. As such. It 
Is concerned with the multiple aspects of human communicative behavior which encompass 
thought, symbolization, language, meaning, acoustics, perception and the physiological processes 
of utterance and audition. 

The interdisciplinary aspects of this study are reflected In the organization of the program which 
offers a core of general linguistics courses and draws upon linguistically-related courses in other 
departments. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

This program is designed for students with an exceptional Interest In and aptitude for the study of 
the systems of human communication. It enables the undergraduate student to understand the 
essential relationships between language and thought and language and culture; to gain familiarity 
with the structure of foreign languages as well as English; to observe several types of linguistic 
structures; and to become conversant with the historical study of language and formal techniques 
and theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis. The program will enable the student with linguistic 
and philological interests to grasp the scope of the field and to determine more accurately the most 
meaningful concentrations in graduate study. 

Lower Division Requirements 

Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 

One year of Latin, Greek, Hebrew or Sanskrit (6) 

Anthropology 202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Upper Division Requirements (minimum of 30 units) 

317 Course in a modern foreign language (3) 

Linguistics 341 Introduction to Phonetics (3) 

Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

Linguistics 491 Linguistics in Relation to Other Disciplines (1) 

Three electives (or more) from the following: 

Education 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Education 380 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

English 302 Introduction to English Language (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modern English (3) 


640-6 5 520 


310 Linguistics 

French, German, Russian or Spanish 400 course (3) i 

French, German, or Spanish 466 course (3) 

Linguistics, any undergraduate courses other than those listed as required above 
Mathematics 304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Philosophy 368 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Philosophy 450 Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3) 

Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Psychology 415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Speech Communication 304 Message Reception and Analysis (3) 

Speech Communication 340 Speech Science (3) 

Students must consult with an adviser In linguistics before establishing their individual programs of 
study. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

The M.A. In Linguistics is designed for students who have exceptional interest in and aptitude for 
the study of the systems of human communication, reinforced by undergraduate study In linguistics 
and allied areas, such as foreign languages, English language, anthropology, speech communication 
and related areas in psychology and philosophy. It enables the graduate student to study In depth 
the position and function of human communication systems In the development of civilization; to 
understand more fully the essential relationships between thought, language and culture; to deepen 
mastery of the structure of foreign languages as well as English; to work intensively with several types 
of linguistic structures with special attention to non-Indo-European languages; and to increase 
expertise in the historical study of language and formal techniques and theoretical foundations of 
linguistic analysis. 

The core courses of the program are devoted to an in-depth consideration of descriptive, historical 
and applied linguistics. The remainder of the program combines advanced work in the theory of 
phonemic; morphological and syntactical analysis; articulatory and experimental phonetics; seman- 
tics; lexicology; dialectology; language typology; and field methods, in which the procedures of the 
linguist working under field conditions are demonstrated by the analysis of several languages elicited 
from informants. A variety of approaches to descriptive analysis and several theoretical points of 
view including generative grammar, transformational analysis and prosodies are presented. A series 
of courses on the structure of Individual languages, both ancient and modern, provides opportunities 
for applying the general principles of structural analysis and for establishing linguistic data by 
elicitation from informants and analysis of written records. General courses in comparative linguistics 
and comparison within individual language families review methods of establishing genetic relation- 
ships among languages. The geographical diffusion of linguistic features and problems of language 
contact are studied by examining areal groupings of genetically unrelated languages. The relationship 
between linguistics and other disciplines and the application of the techniques, findings, and insights 
of that science to such activities as language teaching are treated in interdisciplinary courses and 
seminars. 

The aim of the graduate program in linguistics Is to provide thorough and well-balanced training for 
practice and research in the several areas of linguistic studies and to prepare qualified students for 
careers in the communication sciences and allied disciplines. 


Course requirements 

Coursework in descriptive, historical and structural linguistics 

Linguistics 501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Linguistics 505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

Linguistics 507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

Linguistics 508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Linguistics 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Coursework selected from any one of the following six areas of subspecialization, includ- 
ing other courses in the department with the approval of the adviser 


Units 

13 


Applied Linguistics 

English 302 Introduction to English Language (3) 
English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 
English 570 Graduate Seminar; Language Studies (3) 


645—6 5 545 


Linguistics 

Foreign Languages Ed 520 Advanced Seminar in Applied Linguistics (3) 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 305 American Dialects (3) 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 529 Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Linguistics 565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) 

Spanish 468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


Anthropological Linguistics 

Anthropology 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 
Linguistics 409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

Linguistics 411 Bilingualism (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families 
Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues In Linguistics 
Linguistics 592 Field Methods (3) 

Linguistics 593 Language Typology (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


(3) 

(3) 


Analysis of Specific Language Structures 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

French 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 
German 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 
Spanish 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 
French 510 Phonology (3) 

German 510 Phonology (3) 

Spanish 510 Phonology (3) 

French 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

German 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

French 520 Old French (3) 

English 570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

English 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 
Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues In Linguistics (3) 
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Experimental Phonetics 

Linguistics 402 Phonetic Analysis of Speech (3) 

Linguistics 540 Seminar in Experimental Phonetics (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


311 


649—6 9 969 


312 Linguistics 


Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Speech Communication 543 Major Problems in Speech Pathology and Audiology (3) 
Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


Communication and Semantics 

Anthropology 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 


(3) 


Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Bilingualism (3) 

Sociolinguistics (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Semantics (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Psycholinguistics 
Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Current Issues In Linguistics 
Linguistics and Reading (3) 

Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 
Seminar: Philosophy of Language (3) 


Linguistics 409 
Linguistics 411 
Linguistics 412 
Linguistics 504 
Linguistics 515 
Linguistics 529 
Linguistics 575 
Linguistics 584 
Linguistics 599 
Philosophy 450 

Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research 


(3) 

(1-3) 


Disorders of Communication 

Linguistics 403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

Linguistics 515 Graduate Seminar: Psycholinguistics (3) 

Linguistics 529 Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Linguistics 540 Seminar in Experimental Phonetics (3) 

Linguistics 575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues In Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Speech Communication 441 Speech Pathology: Nonorganic Disorders (3) 

Speech Communication 443 Speech Pathology: Organic Disorders (3) 

Speech Communication 463 Audiology (3) 

Speech Communication 543 Seminar: Major Problems in Speech Pathology and Audi- 
ology (3) 

Speech Communication 563 Seminar In Audiology (3) 

Speech Communication 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Coursework In a related field 6 

Linguistics 597 Project (2) _2 

Total 30 


A minimum of 15 units in 500-level courses is required. Also, satisfactory completion of written and 
oral comprehensive examinations will be required at the conclusion of the program. 


Admission to the Graduate Program 

In addition to fulfilling all general prerequisites for graduate work established by the university, an 
applicant, in order to gain admission to this program, must hold a bachelor's or equivalent degree 
with a major In linguistics consisting of 24 upper division semester credit hours, or equivalent, in the 
field, with grades testifying to above-average scholarship from an accredited institution. Those 
having degrees with other related majors may be admitted if they have completed the following 
courses or their equivalents. These prerequisites may be fulfilled concurrently with graduate course- 
work In the program. 

Linguistics 406 (3) 

English 490 (3) 

Linguistics 410 (3) 

Linguistics 491 (1) 

Knowledge of one foreign language is required. Students without coursework In a foreign language 
may demonstrate proficiency by a score of "average" or better on the MLA-ETS Proficiency 
Examination for Advanced Students. Work toward fulfillment of this requirement may be taken 
concurrently with graduate coursework in linguistics. 

For further Information, consult the graduate coordinator of the Department of Linguistics. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


652-« 5 580 


Linguistics 313 


LABORATORY FOR PHONETIC RESEARCH 

See description appearing on page 27. 

For further information, consult the chairman of the Department of Linguistics. 

See also 'The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


LINGUISTIC COURSES 

106 Language and Linguistics (3) 

A general introduction to the field of human communication. Specific topics include the nature of 
language. Its origin and development; language In culture; the system of language; and language 
and thought. 

301 Sanskrit (3) 

An introduction to the Sanskrit language, emphasizing the acquisition of reading fluency. The 
devanagari script, phonology, morphology and syntax will be examined along with relevant 
points on Hindu culture and on the place of Sanskrit In the development of the Indo-European 
language family. 

302 Sanskrit (3) 

Prerequisite; Linguistics 301 or equivalent. Continuation of 301, concentrating on the intensive and 
extensive reading of Sanskrit texts. Special attention will be given to paleographic techniques and 
graphemics. 

303 Sanskrit: Intensive Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 302, its equivalent or consent of instructor. Designed to offer intensive 
training and experience in the reading and interpretation of classical Sanskrit and to further 
acquaint the student with the linguistic structure of the language. 

304 Sanskrit: Intensive Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 303, Its equivalent or consent of instructor. Continuation of 303, concentrat- 
ing on the following readings: Upanisads, Bhagavad Gita, the MSnava Dharma SSstra and 
Nalopakhy^nam. 

305 American Dialects (3) 

(Same as English 305) 

341 Phonetics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 341, Theatre 341) 

365 Introduction to Major Language Families (3) 

A general introduction to the linguistic history and present structure of the world's major language 
families. Each semester a different language family will be studied and analyzed in terms of its 
synchronic and diachronic phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. 

375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 375) 

402 Phonetic Analysis of Speech (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 402) 

403 Speech and Language Development (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 403) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Introduction to the nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morphological, and syntactic 
structures of languages are examined through the use of techniques developed for the description 
of such structures. 

409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 409) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 410) 

411 Bilingualism (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or equivalent. The study of the personal and social development of 
bilingual communities as reflected in the conflict between the language of the home and the 
language of the community. 


255—6 5 600 


314 Linguistics 

412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or equivalent. The study of social dialects In relation to the surrounding 
communities. Topics include social stratification, acculturation, language maintenance, standard- 
ization, language planning and language change. 

417 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3) 

(Same as Psychology 417) 

475 Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 and 410, their equivalents, or consent of Instructor. An intensive 
exploration of the latest research and development in linguistic theory, technique and me- 
thodology. 

491 Linguistics in Relation to Other Disciplines (1) 

Open to all upper division students. The mutually contributing relationships between linguistics and 
the social and natural sciences, literature, music, psychology, philosophy, mathematics and 
language pedagogy. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in linguistics to be taken with consent of department chairman as a means of 
meeting special curricular problems. Selection of topic to be studied varies with needs of the 
students enrolled. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and Linguistics 406, or equivalent. Introduction to principal books, 
periodicals, and collections in general linguistics, specific languages and related fields; techniques 
of preparing research papers and field reports in linguistics. 

504 Graduate Seminar: Semantics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 504) 

505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. Study of various kinds of phonological systems 
that occur in languages. Emphasis on practical problems in the phonetic and phonemic analysis 
of selected language data. (Same as Anthropology 505) 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. The study of word formation and sentence 
construction in a variety of languages. Application of Immediate constituent, tagmemic, and 
transformational analysis to selected linguistic data. (Same as Anthropology 507) 

508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 507 or consent of instructor, intensive and practical study of contemporary 
theories of grammar, with special emphasis on transformational, generative, logical and elec- 
tromechanical bases and techniques of utterance analysis. (Same as Anthropology 508) 

515 Graduate Seminar: Psycholinguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 and 41 7 or equivalents. An examination of the behavioral, conceptual, 
motivational and social aspects of language, emphasizing recent developments in information 
theory, behavioral theory and linguistic theory as applied to human communication. (Same as 
Psychology 515) 

529 Graduate Seminar: Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. An intensive examination of the development 
of language and linguistic systems in the human species and in the individual from the viewpoint 
of contemporary linguistic analysis and theory. 

530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406, its equivalent, or consent of Instructor. The history of language, also 
Including principles and techniques for the historical study and classification of individual lan- 
guages and language families, writing systems, lexicostatistical methods, and linguistic geography. 

532 Indo European Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 and 530, their equivalents, or consent of Instructor. Lingulstical analysis 
of Proto-Indo-European. Attention will be given to the later development and spread of the 
Proto-Indo-European language and the culture of the Indo-European language family. 

540 Graduate Seminar: Experimental Phonetics (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 540) 


661-4 5 625 


Philosophy 315 


565 Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406, its equivalent, or consent of instructor. The linguistic history and present 
structure of one of the world's major language families with collateral attention given to the 
relationships between the language family and the cultures with which It Is associated. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing In the Department of Linguistics or consent of Instructor. An intensive 
exploration of the latest research and development in linguistic theory, technique and me- 
thodology. May be repeated for credit. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (3) 

(Same as Education 584) 

592 Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 505 and 507 or consent of instructor. Methods of analysis and description 
of language structures. Data elicited from Informants will be analyzed and described. Controlled 
study of a live Informant's language. (Same as Anthropology 592) 

593 Graduate Seminar. Linguistic Typology (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 and 530, their equivalents, or consent of instructor. Techniques, meth- 
ods and criteria of comparing languages, dialects, or historical stages of languages and classifying 
them in terms of the basic elements of linguistic form which they represent. 

597 Project (2) 

Preparation and completion of an approved project. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

METEOROLOGY 

(Offered by the Department of Earth Science and the Department of Geography) 

See departmental descriptions for the following courses: 

Earth Science 

330 Hydrometeorology and Oceanography (4) 

430 Advanced Studies in Hydrometeorology and Oceanography (2) 

Geo^phy 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

423 Physical Climatology (3) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

FACULTY 
J. Michael Russell 
Department Chairman 

William Alamshah, Ernest Becker,* John Cronquist, Craig lhara, Gloria Rock, Stephen Simon, Richard 
Smith, Frank Verges 

PART-TIME 

Harry Bear, Alfred Painter, Betty Safford, E. Diane Smith, William Wingfield 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

The major In philosophy is designed to provide the undergraduate student with (1) information 
about the achievements of the world's outstanding philosophers in the analysis and resolution of 
philosophic issues, and (2) some measure of skill In analyzing and resolving such issues as they arise 
In his own areas of interest. Courses In philosophy are selected to provide both breadth and depth 
in exploring and analyzing philosophic concerns. 

Requirements for the Major 

1. A minimum of 36 units in philosophy. 

* University administrative officer 


66S-6 6 5 


316 Philosophy 

2. Lower Division (Maximum of six units beyond general education requirements) 

Philosophy 290 (3) 

Philosophy 291 (3) 

Note: Students who have taken lower-division work elsewhere may be given credit for up to six 
units of such coursework at the discretion of the department. 

3. Upper Division (Minimum of 24 units to be counted toward the major) 

A. AREA REQUIREMENTS: nine units from areas I, II and III (to Include courses in at least two 
of these areas); nine units from Area IV; total, 18 units. 

Area I— Ethics, Aesthetics, Value Theory: 310, 311, 345, 365, 373, 444, 445 
Area II — Metaphysics, Epistemology: 420, 425, 430, 440 
Area III— Logic, Philosophy of Science: 368, 369, 375, 384, 385, 435, 468, 475 
Area IV — History of Philosophy: nine units, to include 300 and 301, and three units from 
among the following courses: 305, 323, 380, 497, 498 

B. SEMINAR REQUIREMENT: three units to be met by any senior seminar not used to fulfill 
requirements under A. (Senior seminars are those courses with numbers from 444 to 498.) 

C. INDEPENDENT STUDY REQUIREMENT: three units of Philosophy 499. 

4. Electives (6 units) 

May Include lower-division courses other than 290 and 291, and upper-division courses not 
counted under 3 above. In no case, however, can more than six units of lower-division work taken 
at another institution count toward the major requirement of 36 units. 

A program in philosophy profits greatly through the study of literature, psychology and the social 
sciences. Students of philosophy are advised to supplement their studies In philosophy with course- 
work offered in these fields. Philosophy majors are urged to acquire proficiency in a foreign 
language. 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 
Requirements for the Minor 

1. A minimum of 21 units in philosophy. 

2. Lower Division (Maximum of nine units beyond general education requirements) 

Philosophy 290 (3) 

Philosophy 291 (3) 

3. Upper Division (Minimum of 12 units) 

Philosophy 300 (3) 

Philosophy 301 (3) 


PHILOSOPHY COURSES 

For more detailed course descriptions, consult the course guide which is available each semester 

at registration time In the Philosophy Department office. 

100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

An introduction to the nature, methods and some of the main problems of philosophy. Designed 
for freshmen and sophomores. 

110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) 

A study of man's religious impulse as viewed from the philosophical standpoint. An attempt will be 
made to analyze and to compare religious experience as expressed In Christianity, Islam, Bud- 
dhism, Hinduism, etc. 

210 Logic (3) 

Analysis of the various forms given to propositions and the basic requirements necessary for valid 
inference. Designed primarily for humanities and social science majors. 

250 Philosophy of Ideas (3) 

Analysis of basic Ideas which have shaped modern thought. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 


670—6 6 30 





■WLL 



Philosophy 319 


290 History of Philosophy: Greek Philosophy (3) 

The origins of philosophy in Greece, and its development to the time of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. 

291 History of -Philosophy: Medieval Philosophy (3) 

Scholastic philosophy and its precursors in ancient thought. 

300 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) 

The rationalism of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, and the empiricism of Locke, Berkeley, and 
Hume. 

301 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) 

The empiricistic and rationalistic influences on Kant, followed by a study of the major trends in 
19th-century philosophy. 

305 Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

A survey and analysis of the main trends of 20th-century philosophy. Emphasis will be placed on 
such trends as pragmatism, linguistic analysis, and existentialism. 

310 Ethics (3) 

An analysis of the problems of human conduct: motivation, valuing, norms, social demands and 
personal commitments. 

311 Aesthetics (3) 

An investigation into the conditions and the alms of art and aesthetic experience. 

323 Contemporary Existentialism (3) 

An analysis of the meaning of existentialism In modern philosophy. 

345 Political Philosophy (3) 

Selected problems In political philosophy. 

347 Selected Problems in Philosophy (3) 

An Investigation Into the significant contributions made to human culture through philosophic 
analysis. May be repeated with a different content for additional credit. 

350 Oriental Philosophy (3) 

A critical survey of major philosophical systems of India, China and Japan, including various schools 
of Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. 

360 Philosophy of History (3) 

A study of the metaphysical and the logical problems of history. 

365 Social Philosophy (3) 

An analysis and appraisal of theories about the nature of various social, political and legal institutions, 
and of arguments about what these Institutions ought to be. 

368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

The recognition and construction of correct deductions in the sentential logic and the first-order 
predicate calculus with identity. 

369 Second Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 368 or equivalent. Continuation of the study of the recognition and con- 
struction of correct deductions in the full first-order predicate calculus with Identity and the 
calculus of descriptions. Detailed examination of axiomatized deductive systems of propositional 
calculus. 

370 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

An examination of the role of philosophy in shaping theological doctrine. In critically evaluating 
religious experience. In proving the existence of God, and in considering the Issues of atheism 
and the existence of evil. 

373 Philosophy in Literature (3) 

Exploration of philosophical themes In literature. Emphasis on recent American novels, although 
British and continental authors will also be read and discussed. 

375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) 

An Introduction to the major issues in semantical theory: truth, meaning, analytic-synthetic, semiot- 
ics. (Same as Linguistics 375) 

380 Analytic Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: six units In philosophy or consent of instructor. A detailed Investigation of the works 
of some of the many figures of the 20th-century movement In analytic philosophy. The works 
of Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Strawson, Ryle will be read. 


676—6 6 60 


■HBl 


320 Philosophy 

384 Philosophy of the Natural Sciences (3) 

Space, time and relativity; quantum mechanics, causality and real existence; laws, theories and 
models; topics in the history of science. Some facility in either mathematics or philosophy is 
presupposed. (Same as Physics 384) 

385 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3) 

Problems posed by methodological developments in psychology, sociology, anthropology, econom- 
ics, political science and history. Topics such as objectivity and value judgments in social science, 
Verstehen, emergence, explanation, models and theories will be studied. Concepts of reduction- 
ism and functionalism will be examined. Some acquaintance with the social sciences is presup- 
posed. 

420 Metaphysics (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of Instructor. An examination of the philosophical 
problems of freedom and determinism, mind and body, time and becoming, causation, deity, 
substratum, personal identity. 

425 Introduction to Phenomenology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units In philosophy or consent of Instructor. An investigation into the historical 
background and basic viewpoints which have provided a framework for philosophical research 
and study in the writings of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. 

430 Epistemology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units In philosophy or consent of Instructor. An investigation of the concepts of 
knowledge, belief and certainty, and a study of representative theories concerning man's knowl- 
edge of the external world, the past, and other minds. 

435 Philosophy of Science (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. An investigation of some logical features 
of scientific procedure, such as the problem of induction. 

440 Philosophy of Mind (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. Basic problems relating to the analysis 
of the concept of mind and such related Issues as behavior, consciousness, and voluntary action. 

444 Seminar in Ethical Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or upper division standing; Philosophy 310 recommended. 
Examination of some prominent theories regarding the analysis of such concepts as right action, 
goodness, duty, and the justification of ethical beliefs. May be repeated with a different content 
for additional credit. 

445 Seminar in Value Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 310 or consent of instructor. An Investigation Into the conditions, modes, 
levels, and criteria relevant to any systematic view of valuing. 

457 Seminar in Ancient Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 290 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of the works of some 
major ancient philosopher, such as Plato or Aristotle, or of some school of ancient philosophy, 
such as stoicism. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

460 Seminar in Oriental Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 350 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of some major figure 
or school In Indian, Chinese or Japanese thought. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

467 Seminar in Continental Rationalism (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 300 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of the works of some 
major rationalist, such as Descartes, Spinoza or Leibniz, or some school or phase of continental 
rationalism. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

468 Seminar in Advanced Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 369 or equivalent. Detailed examination of axiomatized systems of deduc- 
tion covering such areas as the propositional and predicate calculi and alternative systems of 
logic. Topics in philosophical logic and free logic. May be repeated with a different content for 
additional credit. 

475 Seminar in the Philosophy of Language (3) (Formerly 450) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of the problems 
In the theory of meaning and formal semantics. 


681-« 6 85 


Political Science 321 


477 Seminar in British Empiricism (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 300 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of the works of some 
major British empiricist, such as Locke, Berkeley, or Hume, or of some school or phase of British 
empiricism. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

487 Seminar in Modern Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 301 or consent of instructor. A detailed examination of the works of some 
major modern philosopher, such as Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche or j. S. Mill, or of some school or 
phase of modern philosophy to around the end of the 19th century. May be repeated with 
different content for additional credit. 

497 Seminar in Contemporary Analytic Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 305 or consent of instructor. Emphasis on the analytic movement in philoso- 
phy as it developed during the 20th century. The works of such philosophers as C. I. Lewis, Quine, 
Goodman, Russell and Wittgenstein will be read. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

498 Seminar in Existentialism and Phenomenology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units of philosophy, Including Philosophy 323 or 425, or consent of Instructor. A 
detailed examination of the work of some major contemporary continental philosophers, such 
as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre or Merleau-Ponty. May be repeated with a different content for 
additional credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: minimum of 12 units in philosophy and approval of the department. Such study Is 
designed to develop greater competency In research. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY 
Barbara Stone 
Department Chair 

Sidney Baldwin, Charles Bell, Michael Brown, Keith Boyum, Robert Dworak, Ann Feraru, Joel Fisher, 
Julian Foster, Barry Gerber, Philip Gianos, Harvey Grody, Bernard Hyink, Karl Kahrs,John Mason, 
William Petak, John Purcell, Ivan Richardson, * John Shippee, Vera Simone, Sandra Sutphen, 
Bruce Wright, Jon YInger 

ADVISEMENT 

Undergraduates 

Students are strongly urged to see one of the department's undergraduate advisers during their first 
semester at Cal State Fullerton. This is particularly important for community college transfers. Failure 
to do so may delay graduation. 

Graduates 

Students must see either their political science or public administration adviser during their first 
semester of study. (See section on graduate programs.) 

Prelaw 

Students who plan to go to law school should see the department's prelaw adviser, information is 
available about various kinds of law schools, law school entrance requirements (CPA & LSAT), the 
Legal Clinic, prelaw internship and prelaw curriculum. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The undergraduate major in political science prepares students for teaching, government employ- 
ment on the local, state and national level, foreign service, graduate work in political science, law 
school, or leadership in civic and political activities. Political science is also of value to prospective 
special librarians and journalists. 

Students interested in public administration, and In preparing for careers in the public service, may 
concentrate in that area. In consultation with members of the public administration faculty, they may 
design study plans which include opportunities for cooperative (work-study) arrangements. 

• University administrative officer 
11—84452 


685—6 6 106 


322 Political Science 


The prelaw student may work out an individual program in consultation with his adviser to meet 
the specific requirements for admission to the law school of his choice. Generally speaking, however, 
there are no such specific requirements. 

Unit and Course Requirements 

The major consists of 30 units of political science of which at least 24 units must be in the upper 
division, plus 12 upper division units in related departments taken with the approval of the adviser. 
These 42 units are in addition to those meeting the general education requirements. Majors are 
required to take appropriate upper division courses in other disciplines usually in the social sciences 
(e.g., anthropology, economics, geography, history, psychology, sociology, statistics and philoso- 
phy). Related credit may be given only when specifically approved in writing by a department 
adviser. 

All majors are required to take Political Science 100, American Government, or Its equivalent. This 
course does not apply toward the 30 units required of the major, but It may apply toward the 
student's general education requirements. In addition to Political Science 100, there are other 
prerequisites for many of the 400-level courses offered by the department; therefore, the student 
should plan in advance to meet course requirements, (e.g. public administration courses require 
Political Science 320, Politics, Public Administration and Policy, as a prerequisite In addition to 
Political Science 100). 

For current information regarding the Department of Political Science, the student is advised to 
consult the departmental bulletin (PS), which is issued each semester. 

INTERNSHIPS 

The department offers several internships designed to give the student experience in applying 
political science knowledge to specific problems. At present these are in international relations 
(Political Science 495); prelaw (Political Science 497) for students Interested In public administra- 
tion; and politics (Political Science 498). 

For details, see page 26 of this catalog. 

INTENSIVES (RESEARCH PROSEMINARS) 

Students who want to concentrate their study on a special topic or problem are urged to take at 
least one of the six-unit Intensive classes. Combining lectures /discussion with applied research, these 
courses enable the interested student to beconw involved In a specific subject. See catalog descrip- 
tion of Political Science 311, 316, 321, 331, 336, 341, 346 and 351. 

TEACHING MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The teaching minor is composed of 21 units of political science, in addition to those meeting the 
general education requirements. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

This degree is planned for students interested In advanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree 
in political science, for the professional improvement of high school and community college teach- 
ers, government employees, personnel in the military services, and for Individuals Interested In civic 
and political leadership. 

Prerequisites 

A student desiring to be classified as candidate for the M.A. in Political Science: 

1 . Must have taken the verbal and quantitative test of the Graduate Record Examination. The GRE 
Advanced Test in Political Science may also be required. 

2. Must have completed an undergraduate degree with a grade-point average of 3.0 or more in 
courses in the major field. If the major field was not political science or another social science, 
the student must have a G PA of 3.0 both In the major and In any upper division social science 
courses taken. 

A student whose GPA is less than 3.0 may appeal to the departmental graduate committee for 
waiver of this requirement. If his combined score on the GRE aptitude test is 1,000 or more. 


689—6 6 125 


Political Science 323 


Study Plan 

A student must design a study plan of 30 units of coursework, subject to the approval of his M.A. 
committee (as part of the requirements for admission to classified status). At least 18 of these units 
must be in political science, of which 1 5 units must be 5(X)“level courses (one of which must be 506) . 
Three to six units may be a thesis or project. Students writing a thesis must take a final oral 
examination, too. All other students shall take a comprehensive final written examination and an oral 
examination. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken prior to classified status may be applied to a 
student's master's degree program. 

Thesis 

A chairman and two other members of a student's thesis committee shall be selected by the student 
In consultation with the graduate advisory committee. 

A thesis shall include an oral examination which covers the subject matter of the thesis as well as 
a general knowledge of the discipline, particularly the student's major and minor fields. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Comprehensive examinations shall include written and oral tests in a student's major area of 
concentration, minor area, and the scope and theory of the discipline. All three sections must 
successfully be passed or the entire examination must be retaken. 

A student who does not pass the written portion Is Ineligible to take the oral test. 

A student Is entitled to retake the examinations only once if he fails in the initial effort. 

For advisement and further information, consult the M.A. in Political Science adviser. See also "The 
Program of Master's Degrees," page 73 and the Graduate Bulletin. 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

As a major gateway to a professional career in government and public affairs, the M.P.A. degree 
is designed to serve the following purposes: 

1. To prepare students who wish to enter a "generalist career" in public administration, leading 
to such positions as city manager, county administrator, and general administrative officer in 
city, county, state, and national governments; 

2. To increase the professional competence of those who are already embarked on careers In 
general or in specialized areas of public administration, such as budgeting and finance, person- 
nel, and systems analysis; 

3. To assist functional specialists, such as those in urban planning, public works, public welfare, 
law enforcement, education, community action, and other fields, who believe that they need 
a broader education in public administration; 

4. To provide academic study for more experienced or mature persons who wish to prepare 
themselves for second careers In public administration; and 

5. To provide academic preparation for those Interested in proceeding to the doctoral degree in 
public administration. 

Prerequisites: 

A student desiring to be considered for classified status in the M.P.A. degree program must have 
satisfied the following requirements: 

1 . Possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution; 

2. Completion of a minimum of 12 semester units of undergraduate coursework in the social 
sciences, six semester units of which must have been upper division; and 

3. Attainment of a grade-point average of 3.0 in upper-division courses in the major field, or 
completed nine units of adviser-approved coursework with a CPA of at least 3.0. 

4. Completion of no more than nine semester units of adviser-approved coursework In public 
administration. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination. 

6. Successful passage of an upper-division course In social science statistics. 

Students with grade-point deficiencies, but who have had extensive experience in an administrative 
capacity, may be classified In the program after they have demonstrated their ability for advanced 


693—6 6 145 


324 Political Science 


academic work by successfully completing nine semester units of approved public administration 
coursework with a grade-point average of at least 3.0. 

Study Plan 

The degree study plan must include a minimum oi 30 semester units of adviser-approved coursework 
which meets the following requirements: 

1. Twelve units of required core coursework in public administration as follows: 

Units 


Political Science 426 Administrative Research and Analysis 3 

Political Science 521 Seminar in Public Administration Theory 3 

Political Science 526 Seminar In Administrative Behavior 3 

Political Science 597 Project or 

Political Science 598 Thesis _3 

Total 12 


2. At least six units of coursework must be In related fields outside of public administra- 

tion, and at the 400- or 500-level. 

3. At least 15 units must be at the 500 level. 

4. No more than six units from other institutions may be accepted for transfer credit. 

5. A final oral defense of the project or thesis is required of every candidate for the 

M.P.A. degree. 

6. Normally, no more than nine units of postgraduate coursework taken prior to classi- 

fied status may be applied to the master's degree program. 

For further Information, consult the M.P.A. Adviser. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES * 

Political Science 100 or Its equivalent is the prerequisite for ail upper division political science 

courses; 300-level courses beginning with 310 may require concurrent enrollment in a research 

prosemlnar (See discussion of Intensives on page 322.) . See the departmental bulletin for details not 

provided in the course descriptions below. 

100 American Government (3) 

Explores people, their politics, and power focusing on contemporary issues, changing political styles 
and processes, as well as Institutions and underlying values contributing to the stability of the 
American political system. Satisfies state requirements in U.S. Constitution and California state 
and local government. 

300 Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics (3) 

Analysis of contemporary issues in California government and politics. Including regional, county, 
and community subdivisions. Emphasis on decision-making and costs of democracy; crisis in the 
cities, flight to the suburbs, and race relations. Comparisons will be made with other states and 
their subdivisions. Satisfies state requirement in California state and local government. 

310 American Political Behavior (3) 

Stresses American culture, social patterns, behavior as they relate to political interaction. To be taken 
In conjunction with Political Science 311 when offered by same instructor. 

311 Research Proseminar in American Political Behavior (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project In American political behavior. 
Offered only as companion course to Political Science 310. 

315 American Political Process (3) 

Stresses theoretical and analytic approaches to the study of structures, processes, and institutions 
in the American political system. To be taken in conjunction with Political Science 316 when 
offered by same instructor. 

* Prerequisites may be waived only with consent of instructor. 


697—6 6 165 


Political Science 325 


316 Research Proseminar in American Political Process (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project in American political process. 
Offered only as companion course to Political Science 315. 

320 Politics, Policy and Administration (3) 

Public administration and the roles played by administrators In the formulation and execution of 
public policy. To be taken In conjunction with Political Science 321 when offered by same 
instructor. 

321 Research Proseminar in Politics, Policy and Administration (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project in public administration and 
policy analysis. Offered only as companion course to Political Science 320. 

330 Comparative Political Analysis (3) 

Compares patterns of political behavior and interaction In various political systems. Also analyzes 
the basis for making such comparisons. To be taken In conjunction with Political Science 331 
when offered by same Instructor. 

331 Research Proseminar in Comparative Political Analysis (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an Individual project in comparative political analysis. 
Offered only as companion course to Political Science 330. 

335 Comparative Political Change (3) 

A comparative study of sources and patterns of political change. To be taken in conjunction with 
Political Science 336 when offered by same instructor. 

336 Research Proseminar in Comparative Political Change (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an Individual project in comparative political change. 
Offered only as companion course to Political Science 335. 

340 Political Philosophy (3) 

Problems of evidence and validation in political studies. The distinction between empirical state- 
ments, value judgments and tautologies. The relationship of fact and value. Systematic ap- 
proaches to the political philosophies of selected thinkers. To be taken In conjunction with 
Political Science 341 when offered by same instructor. 

341 Research Proseminar in Political Philosophy (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project in Political Philosophy. Offered 
only as companion course to Political Science 340. 

345 Political Culture and Political Value (3) 

Political values as they relate to aspects of political culture such as perceptions, attitudes and 
participation. To be taken In conjunction with Political Science 346 when offered by same 
Instructor. 

346 Research Proseminar in Political Culture and Political Values (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project in political culture and political 
value. Offered only as companion course to Political Science 345. 

350 International Politics (3) 

A study of the diplomatic, political, economic, and cultural relations of states; basic factors of power, 
sovereignty, nationalism. Imperialism, colonialism, the rise to Influence of the developing nations, 
the settlement of disputes. To be taken in conjunction with Political Science 351 when offered 
by same instructor. 

351 Research Proseminar in International Politics (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project In international relations. Offered 
only as a companion course to Political Science 350. 

375 Public Law (3) 

Nature and function of public law particularly within the Anglo-American political tradition. To be 
taken in conjunction with Political Science 376 when offered by same instructor. 

376 Research Proseminar in Public Law (3) 

Research concepts and techniques applied to an individual project In public law. Offered only as 
a companion course to Political Science 375. 

400 Problems in American Government (3) 

An examination of such problems as the role of the federal government In regard to pollution, drugs 
and narcotics (research, education, law enforcement, international agreements), the seniority 
system in Congress; the role of lobbies, etc., using government reports. Congressional hearings, 
newspapers and journals of opinion. May be repeated for credit. 


711—6 6 235 


326 Political Science 


405 Politics of Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A senior research proseminar stressing the theory and application 
of simulation models, Including decision-making, game theory and group encounter techniques 
with respect to politics. Individual and group research encounter techniques will be utilized. 

406 Scope and Theory of Political Science (3) 

A senior prosemlnar in |X)litical science. The nature of the discipline: approaches, tools, concepts 
and theories. Highly recommended for all political science majors planning to do graduate work. 

407 Quantitative Methods in Political Science (3) 

A course in statistics which are relevant to the analyzing of political data. It will be presumed that 
students have only high school mathematics. Designed mainly for seniors who are thinking about 
going to graduate school or are graduate students. 

410 Political Parties (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The structure and methods by which the political parties operate 
in the American political system with some comparisons to their structure and operation in other 
democratic societies. 

411 Art of Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An examination of public administration as "art" rather than 
"science." Features the reading of administrative novels and other fictional literature, and the 
review of films and other audiovisual media. 

412 The Art of Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An examination of politics as it is practiced and understood by 
practitioners of the art. A seminar which features guest lecturers. 

413 Pressure Groups and Public Opinion (3) 

The power and growth of farm, labor, business, and noneconomic pressure groups; Interest group 
activity In Congress; administration and courts; public opinion and propaganda. 

414 The Legislative Process (3) 

The nature of the legislative process In Congress, state legislatures, city councils and county boards 
of supervisors. Stress is placed on process, policy and reform; the executive as chief legislator; 
interest groups; judicial and bureaucratic law making; and representation. 

415 Political Behavior (3) 

A behavioral approach to understanding how and why people behave politically. Topics include: 
the U.S. power elite, voting behavior, how children learn politics, an examination of the nature 
or nurture aspects of political behavior, and the role of ideology and personality. 

416 The American Presidency (3) 

A study of the growth of the office and power of the President, of his relationship to his advisers 
and the executive departments. Congress and the courts, state governments and the public. The 
role of the President as chief policy-maker and administrator, party and public opinion leader, 
with particular attention to developments during International and domestic crises. 

418 Public Policy Process (3) 

Analysis of various public policy-making models and evaluation of their applicability to selected 
contemporary policy issues. 

419 Administrative Organization and Process (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Designed for students planning to enroll In graduate-level public 
administration courses, but who have not had an Introductory course In public administration. 
Topics as organizational theory and practice, decision making, systems analysis, performance 
evaluation and administrative improvement. 

420 Municipal Politics and Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320. Structure and function of urban government, with emphasis upon 
community decision-making and group influence. 

421 Public Finance Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 419. Role of finance administration and budgeting in determina- 
tion of public policy, and in planning and management of governmental operation in United 
States. Relationship of assessment administration to governmental revenues and expenditures, 
principles and practices of cost accounting, treasury management, and capital budgeting. 


716—6 6 260 


Political Science 327 


422 Public Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 419. The growth and development of the civil service and the 
merit system; an evaluation of recruitment procedures and examinations; an analysis of such 
topics as position classification, salary structures, retirement plans, in-service training, employees 
organizations, and personnel supervision. 

423 Regional Planning and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of instructor. A study of governmental policies, proce- 
dures, and agencies involved in planning and development of regions. Concept of regions, survey 
of regional problems, and objectives, developmental prospects of regions, emerging views of 
regional planning, and investment allocation during development process. 

424 Urban Planning and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of Instructor. The origins and development of city 
planning; the legal bases and fundamental concepts of planning are defined; and the organization 
and administration of the planning activity are examined. The major elements of the general plan, 
zoning laws and administration, urban renewal, and capital programming are considered. 

425 Comparative Public Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Political Science 320 or 419. Cross cultural comparison of public administration sys- 
tems; application of different models of analysis to administrative institutions; bureaucracy; 
ecology of public administration in modernized and developing societies; and role of public 
administration in nation-building. 

426 Administrative Research and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 419. Concepts and methods employed In administrative re- 
search and analysis, with emphasis on organization and procedure surveys, performance evalua- 
tion techniques, administrative data sources and their uses, and report writing. 

427 Metropolitan Politics and Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The politics and administration of metropolitan area Institutions 
of government, with emphasis upon their problems and alternative solutions. 

428 Administrative Systems and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 419. Administrative systems and analysis in contemporary 
government, with emphasis upon systems planning and design, data processing, work flow, 
control systems, operations research, cost-benefit analysis and forms design. 

430 Government and Politics of a Selected Nation-State (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 330 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the political institutions and 
processes of a selected nation-state. May be repeated for credit. 

431 Government and Politics of a Selected Area (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 330 or consent of instructor. A comparative analysis of the structures 
and functions of the national political systems in a selected geographic area, such as Western 
Europe, Eastern Europe, Africa, South and Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Far East. 

438 Latin American Interest Groups (3) 

Consideration of the role of church, military, business, peasant and bureaucratic groups in Latin 
American society with particular interest in their Impact on the quest for governmental stability 
and economic development. 

440 Political Ideologies and Attitudes (3) 

Content and appeals of contemporary Ideologies. Social, economic and psychological bases of 
political attitudes and preferences. 

442 Problems of Democratic Political Thought (3) 

Problems relevant to philosophies and theories of democratic political systems, with emphasis on 
American political thought. 

443 The Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 340. An analytical study of Marxist theory and philosophy from its 
pre-Hegelian roots to the present. 

450 Conduct of American Foreign Relations (3) 

Formulation and execution of foreign policy. Powers of the President, Senate, and House. Functions 
of the State Department, U.S. Information Agency, role of the Pentagon; public opinion. Separa- 
tion of powers, checks and balances, and cooperation In the conduct of American foreign policy. 


721—6 6 285 


328 Political Science 


451 Problems in International Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350. Examination of selected problems in various countries and geo- 
graphic areas with a definite impact on international relations, such as nationalism, colonialism, 
anticolonialism, neutralism, racism, ethnic and linguistic minorities, border disputes, governmen- 
tal instability, economic poverty, disease, illiteracy and overpopulation. 

452 Foreign Policy of a Selected Country or Group of Countries (3) 

Objectives, capabilities, policy-making processes, and implementation of the foreign policies of a 
particular country or group of countries. Focus may be on United States, Soviet Union, Latin 
America or other countries or areas. May be repeated for credit. 

461 The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations (2) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350. Structure and functions of United Nations and various specialized 
and regional international organizations. 

470 Judicial Process (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 or consent of Instructor. The nature, function and role of courts 
in the Anglo-American legal system particularly as the legal system affects and is affected by the 
political system. 

473 Seminar in Constitutional Law and Governmental Power (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 or consent of Instructor. Case studies, selected problems in the 
exercise of governmental authority, especially involving social and economic regulation; federal- 
ism; and the relationships among legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. 

474 Seminar in Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 or consent of instructor. Case studies in selected constitutional 
rights and liberties. 

475 Administrative Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 375 or consent of instructor. The study of law as it affects public 
officials and agencies in their relations with private citizens and the business community. Atten- 
tion is given to appropriate case materials and regulatory practices. 

476 International Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350 or 375 or consent of Instructor. The sources and nature of 
international law; its role In a world of sovereign states; the law of war and peace; the rights and 
duties of nations in their international relationships. The World Court; purpose, problems, and 
prospects. 

481 Politics Through Literature (3) 

Uses the novel as a means of explicating political behavior In various nation-states. 

485 Politics of Change (3) 

Focuses on a specific interest group, cultural, religious, or ethnic in character, or the Impact of a 
particular Ideology, movement or Individual on political processes and behavior. Topics vary 
from semester to semester and may include, for example, women's liberation and black politics. 
May be repeated for credit. 

490 Seminar in Selected Topics (3) 

Seminar in selected topics to be announced on a semester basis. May be repeated for credit. 

495 International Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Students work 10 hours per week with officials of foreign govern- 
ments located in the Los Angeles-Orange County area. Usually these will be consular officials. 
Individual supervision is provided by the faculty and cooperating officials. Interns meet with 
Instructor by arrangement. 

4% Prelaw Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Designed to acquaint students with the legal profession as it is 
practiced from a variety of frames of reference but primarily In the public rather than the private 
spheres. There is a supervised working commitment of 10 hours weekly with an assigned 
Individual or organization associated or concerned with the practice of law. 

497 Government Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: public administration concentration and consent of Instructor. Students work 15-20 
hours per week as supervised interns in a public agency or related organization. Supervision is 
provided by the faculty and cooperating agency. In addition to the job experience. Interns meet 
in a weekly three-hour seminar. 


726—6 6 310 


Political Science 329 


498 Political Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: political science concentration and consent of instructor. Students work 8-1 2 hours 
per week with elected officials or candidates for elective office. Individual supervision is provided 
by the faculty and cooperating individuals. Interns meet with the instructor by arrangement. May 
be repeated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in political science by permission of the department chairman. 

501 Readings in Political Science (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A seminar surveying the major works in the discipline of political 
science; strongly recommended for all students seeking an M.A. in Political Science or an M.P.A. 

506 Seminar in the Scope and Theory of Political Science (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The nature of the discipline, approaches, tools, concepts and 
theories. 

511 Seminar in American Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A comprehensive examination of the political process in the 
United States. 

515 Seminar in Political Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An intensive analysis of selected topics In political behavior. 

520 Seminar in Public Finance Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Study of selected topics In public finance administration. 

521 Seminar in Public Administration Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Study of the concepts, models and ideologies of public adminis- 
tration within the larger political system. 

522 Seminar in Public Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Study of selected topics in public personnel administration. 

524 Seminar in Environmental Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Specialized study of problems and issues in the physical and 
human environment of the urban community. 

525 Seminar in Metropolitan Area Government (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of the different approaches to metropolitan areawide 
government, with special emphasis on interjurisdicitional conflict and cooperation and the roles 
of state and national governments. 

526 Seminar in Administrative Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Concepts, functions and techniques of administrative leadership; 
group dynamics; decision-making; the organization and the individual. 

527 Seminar in Comparative Public Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in comparative public administration. 

528 Seminar in Public Administration and Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of the interplay between public policy development and 
program administration. 

529 Seminar in Administrative Management Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of selected topics In organization and management theory. 

531 Seminar in Comparative Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A comparative study of political systems. 

535 Comparative Political Parties (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Comparative analysis of the structure, behavior, and roles of 
political parties and party systems. An attempt to construct a theory of parties, based on the 
evidence of a number of national political parties. 

541 Seminar in Political Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A comprehensive examination of ideologies, concepts, methods 
and trends In political theory. 

550 Seminar on Foreign Policy Formulation (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor, A study of various models of the foreign policy-making process. 
Emphasis will be on the interaction between domestic and international sources for policy 
formulation. 


730-6 6 330 


330 Psychology 

551 Seminar in International Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of selected problems in international relations with empha- 
sis on individual research and contributions within the framework of a seminar. May be repeated 
for credit. 

571 Seminar in Public Law (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in public law. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

FACULTY 
David Perkins 
Department Chairman 

Robert Abbott, Christopher Cozby, Ernest Dondis, Peter Ebersole, Margaret Fitch, Jara Krivanek, 
Richard Lindley, William Lindner, Richard McFarland, Russell Revlis, Michael Scavio, Louis 
Schmidt, Don Schweitzer, William Smith, Edward Stearns, Joseph Thomas, Loh Seng Tsai (Emeri- 
tus), George Watson, Stanley Woll 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The major in psychology consists of 36 units of lower and upper division work designed for students 

(1 ) who want a sound background In psychology as a science, (2) who want a basic understanding 
of human behavior as a supplement to some other major course of study, and (3) who wish to 
acquire a thorough undergraduate training in psychology in anticipation of graduate study. 

Requirements for the Major 

Lower Division 

Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Psychology 161 Elementary Statistics (3) 

Psychology 202 Principles of Psychology (3) 

Upper Division 

A minimum of 27 units of upper division work is required for a major in psychology. Fifteen units 
are required as follows: 

Psychology 302 Experimental Psychology: Learning and Motivation (3) 

Psychology 303 Experimental Psychology: Sensation Perception or 
Psychology 321 Physiological Psychology (3) 

Psychlogy 351 Social Psychology or 
Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality (3) 

Psychology 461 Croup Psychological Testing (3) 

Psychology 408 History of Psychology (3) 

A minimum of 12 additional units In psychology courses will be selected in consultation with the 
academic adviser. Not more than three units of Psychology 499, Independent Study, may be counted 
toward the major. 

Each course counted toward the major must be completed with a grade of C or higher. 

Recommended Related Courses 

Courses from each of the following areas according to the student's interests: (1 ) social sciences; 

(2) physical sciences; (3) biological sciences; (4) mathematics; (5) humanities. 

Students planing to do graduate work in psychology are advised to plan additional work In biological, 
physical, and computer sciences and to Include at least a one-semester course in college mathemat- 
ics. Undergraduate work In foreign languages is also recommended. 


739—6 6 375 


Psychology 331 


MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The Master of Arts in Psychology is designed to broaden the student's knowledge in the major 
content areas of psychology and to develop skills In analyzing and carrying out research. The degree 
Is useful for those intending to do advanced graduate work in psychology or to teach In a community 
college and for those seeking careers In a variety of community positions. 

Prerequisites 

Students to be admitted to the program must: (1 ) meet the general prerequisites for graduate work 
formulated and recommended by the university;* (2) have completed a bachelor's degree with 
a major In psychology or 24 units In upper division psychology including a course In statistics, a 
course in the history of psychology, an upper division laboratory course in psychology, at least two 
of the following courses: physiological psychology, learning, sensation and perception, motivation, 
and at least one of the following courses: social psychology, personality, developmental psychology, 
psychological testing; (3) have completed a course in college mathematics, a course In the biological 
sciences, and a course In sociology or anthropology; (4) have completed a baccalaureate degree 
with a 2.5 general average and a 3.0 average in psychology; (5) show satisfactory performance on 
the aptitude test and the advanced test In psychology, which are parts of the Graduate Record 
Examination. 

Study Plan 

The Master of Arts in Psychology requires a minimum of 30 units of approved graduate work in the 
major field, including the completion and acceptance by the Psychology Department Graduate 
Studies Committee of a written thesis. 

The student, in consultation with an adviser on the staff of the Psychology Department, shall develop 
a program of studies which will be submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department 


of Psychology for approval. 

Course requirements for the M.A. in Psychology: Units 

Psychology 501 A,B Prosemlnar 6 

Psychology 510 Experimental Design 3 

Psychology 520 Seminar: Experimental Psychology 3 

Psychology 521 Seminar: Personality or 

Psychology 551 Seminar: Social Psychology 3 

Psychology 598 Thesis 3 

Related courses outside psychology optional 0-6 

Elective courses in psychology 6-12 

Total 30 


Students are required to receive a grade of B or better in Psychology 501 A,B, to pass a comprehen- 
sive examination in psychology, and to complete 12 units of the study plan before being advanced 
to candidacy. No more than three attempts to pass the comprehensive examinations will be allowed. 
An oral defense of the thesis is required at the completion of the student's program. 

For further information and a copy of the departmental questionnaire, consult the graduate office 
of the Department of Psychology. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


PSYCHOLOGY COURSES 

101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

General introduction to basic concepts and problems in psychology as a behavioral discipline. 
Emphasis on the human organism as an adapting system, with attention to genetic origins; normal 
development capacities; problem-solving and adjustment to stress. 

161 Elementary Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 120. Descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation. 

• Application to the program is not completed until a questionnaire (obtainable by nwii from the graduate office of the Psychology 
OepartnrYent) is completed and returned to that office. 


743—6 6 395 


332 Psychology 

202 Principals of Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. A course for psychology majors stressing the fundamentals of research 
methods as they apply to basic areas in psychology. Emphasis on student participation in 
conducting experiments and analyzing data. 

302 Experimental Psychology: Learning and Motivation (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 161 or consent of instructor. Selected experimental investigations in 
human and animal learning, memory, thinking, problem solving, and motivation with appropriate 
lecture and discussion. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

303 Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 161 or consent of Instructor. Selected experimental investigation with 
appropriate lecture and discussion. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

304 Experimental Psychology: Comparative (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 161 or consent of Instructor. Comparison of species with respect to 
position on the phylogenetic scale; the relation of changes In motivation, emotionality, and 
adaptiveness of behavior to changes In sensory, motor, endocrine and neural structures as well 
as genetic and environmental factors. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

311 Educational Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in psychology. Application of psychological research and theory to the educa- 
tive process. Major attention given to the problems of learning, individual differences, child 
capacities, and behavior. 

321 Physiological Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 202 and Bio Sci 101 or equivalent. Relation between behavioral and biological 
processes. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, role of neural and humoral agents 
in complex behavior and psychosomatic disorders, behavioral effects of brain lesions and drugs. 

331 Psychology of Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 202. Concepts of personality development, structure, and dynamics, with empha- 
sis upon problems, methods, and findings In the study of personality. 

341 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 231 or 331. Dynamics, symptoms, causes, treatment, and prevention of neuroses, 
psychoses, alcohol and drug addiction, psychosomatic Illnesses, and character disorders. 

342 Mental Health (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. An analysis of the concepts of mental health with emphasis upon positive 
factors in the Individual, group, and community which are conducive to Improving mental health. 
Credit not given as part of psychology major. 

351 Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101 . Study of phenomena of social interaction and the nature of group processes 
and Influences. Attention paid to the intrapsychic effects of group influences on the individual's 
behavior. 

361 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101 . Concepts and processes involved in the understanding of the psychological 
development of the person from infancy through adulthood. Attention is given to stages in the 
development of cognition, emotion, perception, motivation, and to the interaction of these 
processes. 

391 Industrial Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 161 or 202. Study of psychological principles and techniques in industrial and 
business settings. Includes selection, placement, training, human factors, environmental Influ- 
ences, problems of people at work, and consumer behavior. 

404 Advanced Topics in Animal Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 304, Anthro 201 or Bio Sci 466 and upper division standing, or consent of 
instructor. Advanced topics in animal behavior and comparative psychology. Emphasis on social 
behavior, organizations, and communication. Population dynamics, aggressive behavior, evolu- 
tion of behavior patterns and intelligence will be covered. Library and field work required. 

408 History of Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 302, and 303 or 321 . Survey of the development of psychology from early times 
to the present. 


748—6 6 420 


Psychology 333 


411 Human Learning and Memory (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the acquisition, retention, and 
transfer of verbal and motor responses. Consideration of single vs. multiple memory storage 
systems and of the role of reward, information, and motivation in human learning. 

412 Psychology of Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or consent of instructor. Principles of learning according to the major 
theoretical systems. Critical evaluation of the theories and systems. 

413 Perception (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 303 or consent of instructor. Psychological problems in perception. 

415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302, 303 or 304. Consideration of theory and research with respect to problem 
solving, thinking, concept learning, language, decision making and judgment, cognitive structure, 
cognitive development. 

416 Motivation (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or consent of instructor. Concepts and evidence concerning the activation 
and direction of behavior. Including consideration of needs, wishes, drives, incentives and 
preferences. 

417 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: six hours of upp>er division work in psychology or linguistics, or consent of instructor. 
Survey and analysis of psychological and linguistic approaches to the study of language. Innate 
and learned aspects of language development, motivational and social aspects of language, 
symbolism, language disorders and universals. (Same as Linguistics 417) 

431 Theories of Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 331 or consent of Instructor. Personality structure, development, and dynamics 
according to major theories. Research methods as they apply to personality theory. 

436 Sport Psychology (3) 

Discussion and analysis of literature, research and issues dealing with psychological aspects of play, 
games and sport. Credit not given as part of psychology major. (Same as Physical Education 436) 

440 Laboratory Instrumentation in Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 302 and 303 or 321 . A laboratory course In basic instrumentation in psychology. 
Major attention given to sensory, analog, digital, and electromechanical instrumentation. (2 
hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) 

441 Experimentation in Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 331. Laboratory experience in personality structure and dynamics. Conducting 
an experiment and willingness to serve as an experimental subject are required. Subjects cov- 
ered, e.g., projective tests as personality measures, creativity, personality structure, vary accord- 
ing to desire of Instructor and students. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

451 Experimental Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 161 or equivalent, 202 and 351. Study of selected topics In social interaction, 
group processes and influences. Laboratory experiments in attitude formation and change; group 
processes such as communication, problem solving, and norm formation; interpersonal influence 
and perception. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

453 Attitude Formation and Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 351 or consent of instructor. An intensive study of the theories of attitude 
development, stressing research methodologies in this area. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

455 Small Group Process (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 351 . A survey of the theories and methods of research used in the study of small 
groups with laboratory application In a small ongoing group In which the student will participate. 
(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

461 Group Psychological Testing (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 161 or equivalent. Intelligence, aptitude, interest, and personality testing. Theory, 
construction, evaluation, interpretation, and uses of psychological tests. 

463 Experimental Child Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 161 or equivalent, 202 and 361, plus junior-senior standing. Study In depth of 
selected methodological techniques and tactics for investigating and Interpreting child and 
developmental psychological phenomena. Laboratory experience In experimental investigation 
of physiological, cognitive, social and personality development. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours labora- 
tory) 


752—6 6 440 


334 Psychology 

465 Advanced Psychological Statistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 161 and Math 120 or equivalent. Statistical inference. Quantitative methods in 
psychology with particular emphasis on correlation, small sample theory nonparametrics and 
some complex analysis of variance procedures. 

471 B^liavior Modification (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 and senior standing. An exposition and evaluation of the theory, research, 
and techniques for modifying human behavior. Emphasis an operant conditioning as applied to 
retarded and psychotic behavior. 

475 Psychopharmacology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 321 or 1 5 units of biological science. Basic principles underlying the use of drugs 
and related substances to modify experience and behavior. Historical and cultural variations in 
drug usage. Psychological, medical and social potentialities and limitations of these techniques. 

476 Drug Therapy of Mental Illness (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 341 and either 475 or 321 or six units or biological science or consent of 
Instructor. General effects, toxicity and therapeutic use of drugs in the treatment of schizophre- 
nia, neuroses and psycho-affective disorders; relation of drug therapy to other forms of psychiat- 
ric treatment; development and screening of new drugs. 

481 Survey of Clinical Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 331, 341 and 461. Development and contemporary aspects of the field. Meth- 
ods, diagnosis, therapeutic techniques, research, and problems. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of at least one upper division laboratory course and consent of instructor. 
Individual library study or experimental investigation under direction of a staff member. May be 
repeated for credit. 

501A Proseminar (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A course to prepare beginning graduate 
students for more advanced courses. Areas stressed are sensation and perception, physiological 
psychology and learning. 

501 B Proseminar (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A course to prepare beginning graduate 
students for more advanced courses. Areas stressed are operant conditioning, personality, social 
psychology, and abnormal psychology. 

510 Experimental Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 1 61 and 465. Principles and methods of planning and carrying out systematic 
investigations on the behavior of complex organisms, interdependence of experimental design 
and statistical evaluation of results, and the opportunity for practice in formulation of testable 
hypotheses. 

511 Seminar in Psychological Measurement (3) 

Logic and methodology of measurement in the areas of intelligence, personality, judgment, and 
attitudes: problems of test construction and validation. May be repeated for credit. 

515 Psycholinguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 515) 

520 Seminar: Experimental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing. Psych 465 and 501 A. Study in depth of the data, methods, problems 
and current developments in sensation-perception; animal learning; human motor and verbal 
learning; thinking and problem solving; and motivation. May be repeated for credit. 

521 Seminar: Personality (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and Psych 501 B. An intensive study of central problems in personal- 
ity. Intensive study of current problems and theories in these areas. May be repeated for credit. 

523 Seminar: Comparative Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of Instructor. A study in depth of some aspect of animal 
behavior. Comparisons between species and biological determinants of behavior will be empha- 
sized. May be repeated for credit. 

531 Individual Mental Testing (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 461 . Study of the major tests of intelligence. Emphasis on practical experience 
in administration, scoring and interpretation of these instruments. 


757—6 6 465 


Religious Studies 335 


551 Semmar: Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and Psych 501 B, and either 351 or consent of instructor. An intensive 
study of central problems and major theories in the field of social psychology. May be repeated 
for credit. 

598 Thesis 

Prerequisites: formal admission to candidacy and consent of instructor. The writing of a thesis based 
on a major study or experiment in psychology. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Individual library study or experimental 
investigation under direction of a staff member. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Donald Card 
Department Chairman 

Haim Asa, Daniel Brown, Morton Flerman, Joseph Kallr, Robert McLaren (Education), James San- 
tucci 

8ACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

This program leads to the B.A. In Religious Studies and Is designed to encourage students to acquire 
the intellectual tools and scholarly background required for a critical understanding of the forms and 
traditions of religion that have appeared in human culture. 

Students in fields other than religion are encouraged to ask the questions which pertain to the real 
excitement at the boundary lines where the usual studies converge. The aim of each course is an 
open and nontraditional examination of ultimate questions as they apply to contemporary situations. 
The relevance of belief in both Eastern and Western civilizations for the cultural development of man 
is examined. Guest lecturers from fields other than religion present their understanding of the art of 
living and of loving. An understanding of prejudice, war and other dimensions of religious value 
systems may thus be gained. 

Major in Religion 

Six hours of introduction to world religions and six hours of a senior seminar in two semesters on 
contemporary religious issues are required. 

In addition to the required lower division Introduction to World Religions (6) plus the required senior 
seminar. Contemporary Religious Issues (6), the student will be asked to choose at least six hours 
of courses in lower or upper division studies from each of the following categories of courses: 

1. The History and Sociology of Religion: religion studied as a cultural phenomenon with the 
historical context; its development and controversies; religion and science; religion and eco- 
nomics; the sociology of religion. 

Courses to be selected from: 

Art: 201 A, B 

History: 412A,B, 417A,B, 425B, 466B 
Sociology: 458 
Anthropology: 421 

Religious Studies: 330, 331, 333, 334, 345A,B, 405, 406, 415, 416, 430, 445, 476, 480, 485, 486 

2. The Phenomenology of Religion: religion as a human phenomenon; the psychology of religion; 
the philosophy of religion; linguistic analysis of religious language; religion and poetry, the arts. 
Courses to be selected from: 

Philosophy: 312, 323, 370 
Interdisciplinary Center: 402,403, 404, 451 

Religious Studies: 343, 375, 376, 377, 431, 433, 434, 450, 475, 480, 481, 485, 486 

3. Comparative Religion: a study of religious traditions and practices in Western and non-Western 
cultures: religious scriptures; comparative theology; major religious figures. 


5—6 6 480 


336 Religious Studies 

Courses to be selected from: 

Philosophy; 110 

Interdisciplinary Center: 303, 422 

Religious Studies: 111, 200, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 376, 415, 416, 430, 432 
Courses in other schools and departments may be acceptable upon consultation with the chairman 
of the Department of Religious Studies. 

Minor in Religion 

The minor In religious studies is composed of at least 20 units In religious studies exclusive of the 
general education requirements. For further Information, contact the department chairman. 
Courses in other schools and departments may be acceptable upon consultation with the chairman 
of the Department of Religious Studies. 


RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES 

111 Problems in the History of Religious Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110 or consent of department chairman. An examination of some of the 
perennial problems that have appeared In the religious traditions of both East and West. 

200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 

An examination of the Christian scriptures and their background In the light of modern exegesis with 
special emphasis on the Synoptic Gospels. The second half of the course will examine written 
creeds and liturgical formulae associated with the Orthodox, Roman, and Protestant commun- 
ions. 

330 Judaism: From the Beginning to the Middle Ages (3) 

The historical role of the religion of the Jews including the Genesis and the development of Judaism. 

331 Judaism: From the Middle Ages to the Present (3) 

The history and contemporary social significance of the religion of the Jews from the Middle Ages 
to the present, with emphasis upon contemporary Judaism. Special emphasis will be devoted to 
the distinctive characteristics of Orthodox, Conservative and Reform Judaism. 

332 The Land of the Bible: Everyday Life in Old Testament Times (3) 

How people lived in the Mediterranean world in the first century of the Christian era. To deepen 
the understanding and kindle the imagination of the readers of the Old Testament in the light 
of the staggering progress which has been made in Biblical archaeology during the course of the 
present century. 

333 Hebrew Prophets (3) 

Lectures and seminar discussions dealing with the cultural, historical, values of and contemporary 
application of Isaiah, Second Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and the minor prophets. (Same as Com- 
parative Literature 305) 

334 Wisdom Literature (3) 

The Interpretation of values in Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Ecclesiasticus, the Wisdom of Solomon, 
Egyptian and Mesopotamian Wisdom writers as applied to the modern world. 

343 The Bible and Its Ethics (3) 

The principal features of the ethics of the Bible, its significance, its problems, and its meaning for 
our modern times. The ideals of the ethics of the Bible and its approach to the problems in our 
society. 

345A History and Development of Christian Thought: The Beginning to 1274 (3) 

The development of Christian thought from apostolic times to the death of Thomas Aquinas against 
the background of Old and New Rome, the Great Councils, the Middle Ages, and the marriage 
of faith and reason. 

345B History and Development of Christian Thought: 1275 to the Present (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 345A or consent of Instructor. The development of Christian thought 
from the death of Thomas Aquinas to the present, against the cultural and philosophical back- 
ground of the successive ages of scholasticism, the renaissance, baroque, reason and revolution, 
and the modern world. 


16—6 6 535 






Religious Studies 339 


375 Religion and the Cultural Crisis (3) 

The role of religion in contemporary cultural crises and in history with such topics as the develop- 
ment of the family unit, sexual relationships and forms of worship. 

376 Dimensions of Religion (3) 

The great themes of religious thought viewed objectively and subjectively in history and in the 
present day are studied as a basis for understanding religious relevance and application. Seminar 
and discussion presentation. 

377 Religious Symbolism and Mysticism (3) 

Discussion of symbols and ideas inherent in religious thought. Use of Jungian theory. Topics covered 
are myth, centering, grounding, mandala, internal religious space, life and death, spiritual energy, 
mother god, father god, child, etc. Theoretical and practical applications. 

405 Indian Religions (3) 

Discussion of all the major religions of ancient India, special emphasis will be placed upon the 
Upanisads, Buddhism and Veddnta. 

406 Indian Religions (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 405 or consent of instructor. Discussion of all the major religions of 
ancient India. Special emphasis will be placed upon the Upanisads, Buddhism and VedSnta. 

415 Religions of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 111 or Philosophy 110 or consent of instructor. The major religions 
of China and japan will be discussed with special emphasis upon Taoism, Buddhism, and 
Confucianism. Chinese influence on Japan and the Japanese reaction to this influence, also will 
be discussed. 

416 Religions of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 111 or Phllosphy 110, Religious Studies 415 or consent of instructor. 
The major religions of China and Japan will be discussed with special emphasis upon Taoism, 
Buddhism, and Confucianism. Chinese influence on Japan and the Japanese reaction to this 
influence, also will be discussed. 

430 Rabbinic Literature: The Writings of Law and Lore (3) 

The historical, sociological and cultural background of the beginnings of the Talmud. The Talmud 
as one basis of modern ethics. Special stress will be laid on: man as a moral being, free will, labor, 
justice, truth and truthfulness, peace, charity, parents and children, country and community. 

431 Jewish Mythology, Religion and Mysticism (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 331 or consent of instructor. The principal features of Jewish mysti- 
cism, its Inner significance, problems and meaning. An analysis of some of its most Important 
phases. A new illustration of the function which Jewish mysticism has had at varying periods, 
of Its ideals and of its approach to the various problems. 

432 The Worlds of Martin Buber, ''The Philosophy and Theology of Martin Buber'' (3) 

A detailed and critical study of Buber's views concerning relationship of man to God and man to 

man. 

433 Myth and Legend in Ancient Israel (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 330 or consent of Instructor. Comparative folklore and mythology of 
the Old Testament. The myths and stories of the Old Testament. 

434 The Psalms (3) 

Major concepts In the Psalm Literature; structure, authorship and style of Individual Psalms; histori- 
cal, theological, intellectual and political backgrounds of the Books of Psalms; the significance 
of the Psalms for our time. 

445 Religion in Western Culture (3) 

An examination of groups and Individuals whose writings and ideas have been formative in the 
development of Western culture from classic times to the present. 

450 Ritual and Symbol (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, Religious Studies 111, or consent of Instructor. A study of the nature 
of ritual and symbol in our culture, taking into account the contributions of psychology. 

475 Anxiety, Guilt and Freedom (3) 

The distinction between psychiatry and religious methods of understanding basic human emotions 
will be examined together with an analysis of terms such as "authority", "God", "faith", 
"forgiveness", "sin", "error", "repentance", "sex", and "absolution". 


21—6 6 560 


340 Sociology 

476 The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry 1933-1945 (3) 

The ordeal of European Jewry during the Second World War as reflected in art, music, drama, fiction, 
poetry, historical, psychological, and religious writing. 

480 Theology and Contemporary Life (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 345 or consent of the instructor. An exploration of major theological 
Issues, and their relevance for contemporary social problems: Cod, nature, man, sin, revelation, 
reconciliation; culture and creativity, marriage and divorce, poverty, war, race. International 
relations, political and economic authorltarianisms. 

481 Zoroastrianism (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 110. The course will present a detailed account of the life and teachings 
of Zoroaster as presented in the Avesta, with a discussion of its relationship to Judaism, Christian- 
ity, and the Creek philosophers Heraclitus, Pythagoras, Plato. 

485 Major Contemporary Religious Thinkers (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, Religious Studies 111, or the equivalent. A detailed and critical study 
of religious thinkers contemporary to the modern world. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 

486 Major Contemporary Religious Topics (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, Religious Studies 111, or the equivalent. An In-depth Inquiry into 
modern topics of a religious nature related to social, political, psychological trends. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in religious studies to be taken with the consent of the instructor and 
the program coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

FACULTY 

John Bedell 

Department Chairman 

Donald Baker, Dennis Berg, Jonathan Brower, W. Carrett Capune, Carol Copp, Helalne Feingold, 
Ronald Hughes, Perry Jacobson, Hllla Kuttenplan, Pat Lackey, Michael Mend, C. Nanjundappa, 
Rae Newton, Bartolomeo Pallsi, Houshang Poorkaj, Lorraine Prinsky, Gerald Rosen, Libby Ruch, 
J. Rex Smith, C. Michael Stuart, J. Morgan Thomas, Clarence Tygart, Mary Lindenstein Walshok, 
Ernest Works, Troy Zimmer 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The major in sociology provides knowledge about how groups, social positions and social ideologies 
affect people's behavior. This type of knowledge provides a good background for occupations in 
which people either supervise or help others, such as social work, government services business 
careers, and teaching. A B.A. In sociology prepares the student to do graduate work in sociology 
and related fields of study. 

The major in sociology requires 36 units made up of 21 required units and 15 elective units. 
Twenty-seven units must be in upper division courses, nine In lower division. 

Units 

Required courses: 21 

Sociology 201 Introductory Sociology (3) 

Sociology 203 Introduction to Sociological Analysis (3) 

This course Is a prerequisite for ail sociology courses except Sociology 201 and 
should be taken prior to completion of the sophomore year. 

Sociology 331 A,B Social Research Methods (3,3) 

This course must be taken In sequence or as Sociology 331 X (6 units) and should 
be completed before the student becomes a senior. 

Sociology 481 Sociological Theory (3) 

Applied Research Analysis: 

Select one of the following courses to fulfill this requirement: Soc 342, 360, 361, 362, 

442, 452, 455, 456 or 483 
One of the following: 

Sociology 494 Directed Readings in Sociology (3) 

Sociology 495 Senior Seminar (3) 

Sociology 496 Project Seminar (3) 


26—6 6 585 


Sociology 341 


TEACHING MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

For teaching credential purposes a minor consists of 21 units in sociology, distributed as follows: 

Sociology 201 (3) Units 

Sociology 202 or 411 or 413 or 431 (3) 

Sociology 341 or 451 (3) 

Sociology 477 or 480 or 481 (3) 

Electives in sociology (9) — 

Total 21 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The program for this degree provides advanced study in general sociology. It offers an opportunity 
to broaden one's knowledge of society, to strengthen skills or sociological analysis, and to do 
research in dept in an area of particular interest. It may be used as preparation for study toward the 
doctorate in sociology, for community college teaching, participation In research, or for a variety 
of positions in business and industry, corrections, the community, or government. 

Prerequisites 

Admission (classified status) requires a minimum of 18 upper division units in sociology, including 
the following courses or their equivalents: 

Sociology 331 A Social Research Methods (3) (design, collecting data, etc.) and 

Sociology 331 B Social Research Methods (3) (elementary statistics) or 

Sociology 331 X Social Research Methods (6) (combines materials covered in 
331A,B) 

Sociology 481 Sociological Theory (3) 

Also required is a CPA of 3.0 (B) for all work In sociology and a 2.5 average for all previous college 
work. 

Study Plan 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: 

I. Core requirements 

Sociology 502 Research Process (3) 

Sociology 530 Advanced Statistical Analysis (3) 

Sociology 581 Analysis of Contemporary Social Theory (3) 

Two graduate-level (500) sociology courses in content areas (6) 

II. Related field, independent study /research or graduate sociology 

Three upper division or graduate courses in sociology or related fields. These may 
be Independent studies courses. 

III. Qualifying alternatives 

Sociology 596 Community College Symposium (6) 

Sociology 597 Project: Agency Placement (6) 

Sociology 598 Thesis (3) 

Must be taken two semesters for a total of six units. Expected of all Ph.D. 
oriented students. 

Any two of the above may be selected with the extra alternative replacing six units 
of Part II. 

Total 30 

Courses chosen are to be consistent with the student's goals and with the consent of his adviser. 
Prior to advancement to candidacy, and no later than one year after completion of the core 
requirements, a four-hour basic screening examination in the core areas of methods, statistics and 
theory should be taken. The examination can result In (1) disqualification, (2) qualification with 
extra required coursework in deficient areas, or (3) qualification. The graduate adviser must be 
informed at least three months In advance of intention to take the screening examination. 

For further Information, consult the graduate program adviser for the Department of Sociology. 
See also "The Program of Master's Degrees," page 73, and the Graduate Bulletin. 


Units 

15 


30 -^ 6 606 


342 Sociology 

SOCIOLOGY COURSES 


201 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

A general introduction to the basic concepts of sociology, and the scientific study of human society. 
Among topics included are social interaction, culture, personality, social processes, population, 
social class, the community, social Institutions and sociocultural change. 

202 Social Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 . Study of the extent, causes and consequences of a number of social 
problems, with emphasis on 20th-century America. Problems are viewed in the context of the 
changing society. 

203 Introduction to Sociological Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. A comprehensive introduction to the logical, conceptual, and empirical 
foundations of a scientific analysis of human behavior. Emphasis on how the theoretical, empiri- 
cal, and statistical aspects of sociology are interrelated. These interrelationships will be applied 
to a few content areas In sociology. 

331 A Social Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of department. Research design and methods of 
gathering data, especially by interview and questionnaire, are emphasized. Among other topics 
are the role of theory In research, and sampling methods and problems. In addition, the student 
will be introduced to the techniques and equipment essential to data processing and analysis. 

331 B Social Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201, 203 and 331 A, or consent of department. Elementary statistical analysis 
of social data is emphasized, with some consideration of problems of measurement and of the 
writing of research reports. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

331 X Social Research Methods (6) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203, and consent of Instructor. The content of Sociology 331 A,B 
will be integrated. Students may take the course as a six-unit, one-semester course or as two 
consecutive courses of three units each. The content of this course is the same as Sociology 
331A,B. 

341 Social Interaction (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 and three units of psychology. Inquiry Into the social and 
sociopsychological dimensions of group behavior and the socialization of the Individual. Social 
interaction and Its Impact on the individual and personality formation. 

342 Methods in Experimental Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 203 and 341 . Designed for sociology majors who are unfamiliar with the 
experimental method. Focus will be on substantive sociological topics that are amenable to 
laboratory and field experimentation, and the design of such experiments. Special stress will be 
given to the theoretical integration of basic psychological and sociological principles. 

345 Sociology of Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 and upper division standing. A study of linguistic, symbolic, 
kinesic and social interactional and organizational aspects of communicative systems. Special 
attention devoted to attitude and belief systems as influenced by direct Interpersonal contact, 
and by printed media, television and motion pictures. 

348 Collective Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Characteristics of crowds, mobs, publics. Analysis of social 
movements and revolutions, their relation to social unrest and their role in developing and 
changing social organization. 

361 Population Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Population composition, growth and movement. Social factors 
affecting birth rates, death rates, and migration. Attention is given to the population of the United 
States and to selected areas of the world. 

362 Introduction to Population Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201, 203 and 361. The demographic measures and concepts of the three 
basic factors of the population growth, viz., fertility, mortality, and migration will be discussed 
as far as it is feasible without assuming from the students the knowledge of mathematics beyond 
high school algebra. 


790-4 6 630 


Sociology 343 


371 Urban Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. The population and ecology, patterns of growth, institutions, 
characteristic social Interaction, values and problems of the urban community. 

411 Criminology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. The extent, causes and control of criminal behavior. Includes 
study of the criminal law, casual factors and theories, correctional Institutions, probation and 
parole, and preventive efforts. 

413 Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Juvenile delinquency as a social problem. Sociological study 
of the causes of delinquent behavior, and programs of control, treatment and prevention. 

415 Sociology of Corrections (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 411 or 413 or consent of Instructor. The application of basic sociological 
theory to analyze current problems and programs in probation, parole and correctional institu- 
tions. Intended to provide a conceptual framework for students planning careers in the field of 
corrections. 

425 Comparative Social Change (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Comparative analysis of changing community. Institutional, 
technological, and social class patterns in selected societies, with emphasis on differences 
between '"developed" and developing areas. 

430 Social Psychology of Prejudice (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of instructor. The social psychology of intergroup 
prejudice. An analysis of research and theory on the dimensions, causes, consequences and 
reductions of intergroup prejudice. 

431 Minority Croup Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: Wlology 201 and 203. Study of racial, national and religious minorities, especially in 
the United States. Includes study of discrimination, prejudice, different patterns of intergroup 
adjustment, and attempts to change group status. 

432 Afro-Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201, 203, or consent of instructor. To Identify and analyze the sociological 
factors which have greatly influenced the Afro-American society; and to explore the sociological 
factors which have conditioned the black psyches, consciousness and rage. 

436 Social Stratification (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Social class structures and their functions. Different styles of 
life; determinants of class status; vertical social mobility; change in class systems. 

442 Small Groups (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 341, 342, or consent of instructor. Theories, methodology, and studies In the 
area of small group research. Covers such topics as communication channels, coalition forma- 
tion, group cohesion, leadership, and conformity In groups. 

451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. The family as a social institution. Historical and cross-cultural 
perspectives; social change affecting marriage and the family; analysis of American courtship and 
marriage patterns; the psychodynamics of family life. 

452 The Sociology of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201, 203, 331 A,B, or consent of instructor. The examination of education 
as a social process and a social institution. Topics will include the relationship between education 
and sociology, the social functions of education with emphasis on the socialization process, the 
school and the community, and the school as a social Institution. 

454 Sociology of Aging (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Analysis of aging as a social process, with emphasis on 
sociological theories of aging, problems of adjustment, demographic changes and policy Issues. 

455 Medical Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of instructor, and upper division standing. Designed 
to provide the student with a comprehensive sociological perspective for interpreting medicine 
and medical behavior. 

456 Mental Illness (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Sociological analysis of the process of production, recognition, 
and treatment of those behaviors commonly defined as mental illness. Mental Illness, its diagno- 
sis, definition, and treatment are viewed and analyzed as social processes. 


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344 Sociology 

458 Sociology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Theoretical analysis of religion as a social institution In complex 
societies. The structure and functioning of religious organizations; roles and role relationships; 
types of religious organizations and leadership; the relationships of religion to other social 
institutions; religion and social change. 

461 Issues in Comparative Sociology: The Family (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 451 or consent of Instructor. Concerned with the major variations in the 
organization of the human family; what they are, what causes them, and what difference they 
make; deals with the comparative study of families, both within a culture and across cultures. 

463 Political Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Theoretical perspectives; nature of power and authority; social 
structure and political institutions; elites and decision making; social influences on political 
behavior; political movements. 

464 Contemporary Social Issues (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of intructor. Application of social conflict theory 
to the analysis of controversial social Issues and contemporary revolutionary movements in the 
world today; Including the conditions leading to the development of social protest; the Ideologies, 
goals, strategies, and outcomes of revolutionary and reform movements. 

465 Law and Society (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. The law and lawyers in the context of human society. Law 
as formal social control, variations in legal systems, social change and selected areas of law, the 
legal profession. 

466 Deviant Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. An advanced course In which the wide range of behaviors 
socially defined as deviant are dealt with from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Behaviors 
covered include drug addiction, sexual deviance, delinquency, alcoholism and mental illness. 

467 Sociology of Sport (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Examines the nature, position, functions, and growing impor- 
tance of sport in contemporary industrial society. Particular emphasis given to the relationships 
between structure, variety, and extent of sport activity and other Institutional sectors in society. 

470 Sociology of Occupations (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Sociological analysis of work roles In technologically advanced 
societies. Career patterns, occupational recruitment, job mobility, organizational demands. The 
nature and development of the professions, their Ideologies and images. 

471 Industrial Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of instructor. The study of human relations In 
industry; characteristics and assumptions of modern industrial societies; social roles of workers, 
technicians, management, and owners; formal and informal work groups; the social organization 
of work and Industry; Industrial communities and Incentives. 

473 Complex Organizations (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Sociological analysis of formal organizations (industrial, gov- 
ernmental, welfare, military, medical, educational, correctional, etc.) as systems of social Interac- 
tion. Includes such topics as blueprinted vs. informal structure, authority, decision making, role 
conflicts, communication and morale. 

477 Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. Theories of social organization and the structure of various 
social groups are analyzed, with a comparative analysis of social structures and systems. The 
various levels of groups are discussed and interrelated. 

478 The Sociology of Voluntary Organizations (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology .201 and 203. Views of the reality and nature of voluntary action will be 
examined. The assumptions which various schools of sociology make about behaviorism, hu- 
manism, reductionism, free will and determinism and the consequences of such assumptions will 
be discussed. 

480 Analysis of Social Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203. The analysis of pre-20th century explanations of man's behav- 
ior. Considerable attention is given to the comparison of the early philosophy of man and the 
modern sociological view of man. 


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Sociology 345 


481 Sociological Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 203 or consent of department. A comprehensive survey of the main 
school of sociological thought, both European and American, with emphasis on systems of 
theory, methodology of theorists, cultural change and social Institutions. 

482 Sociology of Knowledge (3) 

The analysis and study of frames of reference and beliefs systems In everyday life, and their 
relationship to social structure, decision processes and social change. 

483 Theories and Research Techniques in Modern Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 481 or 331 A, or equivalent. Open to non-majors with consent of instructor. 
The objective of the course Is the integration of theory and research techniques In the study of 
such things as socialization role behavior, alienation and power. Not a survey course but rather 
an Intensive study of one or a few social events. 

494 Directed Readings in Sociology (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and 15 units of sociology completed. Readings In a specialized 
area are directed and supervised by a faculty member. Examination and Individual conferences 
are required. 

495 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: senior classification. Open to sociology majors who have had the upper division 
coursework in the area of the seminar. Emphasis in the seminar will depend upon the particular 
specialty and training of Instructor. 

4% Project Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: senior status. Sociology 481; 331 A, B or 331 X. Open to sociology majors who have 
had upper division coursework In the seminar area. Students will designate, plan, and carry out 
their own research project, and report and discuss it with other students in the seminar. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 12 hours of sociology and consent of adviser. Student selects an individual 
research project, either library or field. The student must take appropriate undergraduate 
prerequisites and enroll with an instructor whose recognized Interests are in the area of the 
planned independent study. Conferences with the adviser as necessary, and the work culminates 
In one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Seminar: Selected Topics in Societal Structure and Process (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of a specialization within the study of society such as: 
socialization and personality; deviance; social change; institutional structure and process. May 
be repeated. 

502 Research Process (3) 

Requires the completion of a research project including such elements as theory construction, 
hypotheses formation, sampling, survey construction, data collection and data analysis. 

511 Seminar in Crime and Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 41 1 or 41 3, or consent of department. Analysis of selected problems In the 
field of crime and delinquency with major emphasis upon independent investigation into the 
theoretical and research contributions on the causes, prevention and treatment of criminal and 
delinquent behavior. 

530 Advanced Statistical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 331 A,B or consent of instructor. Techniques most commonly utilized by 
sociologists but not covered in Sociology 331 A,B are studied. The techniques deal primarily with 
multivariate analysis such as tests of significance, tests for interaction, measures of association, 
regression analysis and factor analysis. 

533 Seminar in Intergroup Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 431 or consent of department. Analysis of relations among ethnic, racial and 
religious groups throughout the world. Analysis of processes leading to, sustaining, and associated 
with changes in relations among such groups. 

536 Seminar in Social Stratification (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 436 or consent of department. Analysis of stratification in industrial societies. 
Emphasis on theory and methods, and on international comparisons. Analysis of factors leading 
to social class, the persistence of class divisions, class conflict and social change, and the effects 
of class on behavior. 


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346 Speech Communication 

541 Seminar in Social Interaction (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 341 or consent of department. Advanced social-psychological study of social 
interaction, Including sociological factors in personality development and analysis of primary 
group behavior. 

542 Practicum in Sociological Experimentation (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 342, 331 A,B, or consent of instructor. Designed to meet needs of students 
who desire practical training in experimental sociology. Students in the seminar will design and 
conduct an experiment in all its phases, including selecting a testable hypothesis, designing the 
appropriate equipment, producing the data, analyzing the results, and preparing the final report. 

573 Seminar in Large Organizations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 473 or consent of department. The analysis of large organizations, their 
structural and operating characteristics and the relationships between the organization and its 
members. 

577 Seminar in Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 477 or its equivalent and consent of department. A critical treatment of 
various theoretical approaches to the analysis of social organization. Specific areas of social 
organization. 

581 Analysis of Contemporary Social Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 481 or equivalent and consent of department. Examination of the basic 
elements and key problems In constructing a systematic sociological theory. A detailed, compre- 
hensive and critical analysis of selected theoretical works. 

5% Community College Symposium (6) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Introductory sociology, social problems and marriage and the family 
with emphasis upon teaching preparation. Includes an oral exam. 

597 Project: Agency Placement (6) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Twenty hours