Skip to main content

Full text of "CSUF Course Catalogs 1959-2007"

See other formats



FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA 92634 • (714) 870-2011 



THIS CATALOG 


Within this catalog may be found general academic and administrative information as well as 
specific descriptions of the departments, their majors and the courses offered in each. The 
first major part contains orienting Information such as the calendar, materials on The Califor- 
nia State University and Colleges, an overview of Cal State Fullerton and facts about student 
services and activities on the campus. 

The subsequent sections of the catalog are concerned with: admission, registration, records 
and regulations; academic advisement; and university courses. The next sections, organized 
by schools and divisions, describe the departments and the programs of study and courses 
they offer. The final part of the catalog contains directories: a listing of individuals and 
groups participating in the governance of the university and with information on advisory 
councils, auxiliary organizations, and the faculty and administration. An index can be found 
at the end to help the reader locate specific Items he needs or wishes to know about. 

Because this catalog must be prepared well ahead of the academic year it covers, changes in 
some programs and rules occur. The Class Schedule and subsequent errata sheets are the 
final authority In regard to classes offered, instructors and revisions of regulations. This 
publication can be bought for a small fee from the Titan Bookstore. 

Through the assistance of the Department of Art, William Hartshorn has done the graphic 
work on this catalog. Mark Boster has taken the photographs. The final organizing and 
editing was done by Kay Adams, In the Office of Academic Administration, and Ruth Pecsok 
and Jerry Keating in the Office of Public Affairs. 

NOTICE 


The Board of Trustees of The California State University and Colleges, in Section 43800 of Ti- 
tle 5 of the California Administrative Code, has reserved the right to add, amend or repeal 
any of its regulations, rules, resolutions, standing orders, and rules of procedures, in whole 
or in part, at such time as it may choose. None shall be construed, operate as or have the 
effect of an abridgement or limitation of any rights, powers or privileges of the Trustees. The 
chancellor reserves the right to add, amend or repeal any of his executive orders, at such 
time as he may choose, and the president of California State University, Fullerton reserves 
the right to add, amend or repeal provisions of this catalog and rules of the university. In- 
cluding handbooks, at such time as he may choose. No executive order shall be construed, 
operate as or have the effect of an abridgement or limitation of any rights, powers or 
privileges of the president. 



All material herein is subject to change without prior notice 
Effective Date: September 2, 1975 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


GENERAL INFORMATION— Cal State Fullerton Calendar 6, The California 
State University and Colleges 9, Cal State Fullerton: An Overview 10, 
Student Services 23. 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, RECORDS AND REGULATIONS— 

Admission to the University 34, Registration 45, Records and 
Regulations 49. 


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS — Bachelor's Degree 60, Master's Degrees 63. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT— 72. 

UNIVERSITY CURRICULA— 80. 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS— 88. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS— 126. 
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS— 156. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION— 176. 

DIVISION OF HEALTH EDUCATION, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION AND ATHLETICS— 208. 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES— 218. 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING- 344. 

DIRECTORIES— Trustees 408, Office of the Chancellor 409, Campuses 410, 
Cal State Fullerton 412, Auxiliary Organizations 426, Cooperating 
Teachers 431, Faculty and Administration 433, Index 467. 





©ENECAL 

iNE€l3MATICf 




CAL STATE FULLERTON CALENDAR 
FOR 1975-76 


1975 


June 

July 

August 

September 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

1 2 3 LlJS 

1 2 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

8 91011 121314 

6 7 8 91011 12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

7 8 91011 1213 

1516171819 20 21 

13141516171819 

1011 121314 1516 

141516171819 20 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

17 1819 20 21 22 23 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

29 30 

27 28 29 30 31 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

28 29 30 

October 

November 

December 

January 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S. 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

1 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 91011 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

7 8 91011 1213 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

12131415161718 

91011 12131415 

141516171819 20 

11 121314151617 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

1819 20 21 22 23 24 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

23 24 25 26(2728)29 
30 

28 29 30 31 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

February 

March 

April 

May 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

1 2 3 

1 

8 91011 121314 

7 8 91011 1213 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

15[ip71819 20 21 
22W24 25 26 27 28 

14 1516171819 20 

111121314 1516117 

91011 12131415 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

1617 1819 20 21 22 

29 

28 29 30 31 

25 26 27 28 29 30 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

June 

July 

August 


S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 

S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 4 5 

1 2 3 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


6 7 8 91011 12 

4in6 7 8 910 

8 91011 121314 


13 141516171819 

11 121314151617 

1516171819 20 21 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

1819 20 21 22 23 24 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


27 28 29 30 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

29 30 31 



[ I CLASSES 
I I HOLIDAYS 


1976 


7 


SUMMER SESSION 1975 


June 9, Monday Twelve weeks of instruction begins. Registration and 

classes 

July 4, Friday Independence Day holiday— campus closed 

August 1, Friday Filing period opens for application to the spring 

semester 1976 

August 29, Friday Summer session instruction ends; effective date of 

graduation for those completing recjuirements 


FALL SEMESTER 1975 


November 1, 1975 

Initial period for filing applications for admission to the fall semester 1975 began 
for all students and former students not in attendance during the spring semester 
1975. 


September 1, Monday Labor Day holiday — campus closed 

September 2, Tuesday Academic year begins. Advisement, orientation and 

registration begin. See C/ass Schedule for details 

September 6, Saturday Last day to register without late registration fee. 


Application deadline for baccalaureate degree can- 
didates for graduation, June 1976 and August 1976, and 
for January 1976 master's degree candidates to reejuest a 
graduation check 

September 6, Saturday Rosh Flashanah 

September 8, Monday Instruction begins. Admission Day— campus open 

September 15, Monday Yom Kippur — campus open 

October 13, Monday Columbus Day— campus open 

November 1, Saturday Filing period opens for applications to the fall semester 

1976 

November 4, Tuesday Election Day — campus open 

November 11, Tuesday Veterans' Day — campus open 

November 27-28, Thursday-Friday.. Thanksgiving recess — campus closed 

December 16, Tuesday Last day of classes 

December 17-20, Wednesday- 
Saturday Semester examinations 

December 22, Monday Winter recess begins 

January 5, Monday Winter recess ends. Grade reporting 

January 6, Tuesday Semester ends; effective date of graduation for those 

completing requirements. All grade reports due 


8 


SPRING SEMESTER 1976 


August “I, 1975 

Initial period for filing applications for the spring semester 1976 begins for all new 
students and former students not In attendance during the fall semester 1975. 


January 22, Thursday Semester begins. Departmental and faculty meetings 

through Friday, January 23 

January 26, Monday Advisement, orientation and registration begin. See 

Class Schedule for details 

January 31, Saturday Last day to register without late registration fee. 

Application deadline for baccalaureate degree can- 


didates for graduation January 1977, and for June 1976 
and August 1976 master's degree candidates to request a 
graduation check. 

February 2, Monday Instruction begins 

February 12, Thursday Lincoln's Birthday — campus open 

February 16, Monday Washington's Birthday holiday— campus closed 

April 5, Monday Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Observance Day — 

campus open 

April 12, Monday Spring recess begins 

April 19, Monday Instruction resumes 

May 22, Saturday Last day of classes 

May 25-28, Tuesday-Friday Semester examinations 

May 30, Sunday Commencement 

May 31, Monday Memorial Day holiday — campus closed 

June 1, Tuesday Grade reporting 

June 2, Wednesday Semester ends. Effective date of graduation for those 

completing requirements. End of academic year. All 
grade reports due 

SUMMER SESSION 1976 


June 7, Monday Twelve weeks of Instruction begins. Registration and 

classes 

July 5, Monday Independence Day holiday — campus closed 

August 27, Friday Summer session Instruction ends; effective date of 

graduation for those completing requirements 


THE CALIFORNIA 

STATE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 


The individual California State Colleges were brought together as a system by the Donahoe 
Higher Education Act of 1960. In 1972 the system became The California State University and 
Colleges and 14 of the 19 campuses received the title University. 

The oldest campus— San Jose State University — was founded in 1857 and became the first In- 
stitution of public higher education In California. The newest campus— California State 
College, Bakersfield— began instruction in 1970. 

Responsibility for The California State University and Colleges is vested In the Board of 
Trustees, whose members are appointed by the Governor. The Trustees appoint the 
Chancellor, who Is the chief executive officer of the system, and the presidents, who are the 
chief executive officers on the respective campuses. 

The Trustees, the Chancellor and the presidents develop systemwide policy, with actual im- 
plementation at the campus level taking place through broadly based consultative 
procedures. The Academic Senate of The California State University and Colleges, made up 
of elected representatives of the faculty from each campus, recommends academic policy to 
the Board of Trustees through the Chancellor. 

Academic excellence has been achieved by The California State University and Colleges 
through a distinguished faculty, whose primary responsibility is superior teaching. While 
each campus In the system has its own unique geographic and curricular character, all cam- 
puses, as multipurpose institutions, offer undergraduate and graduate instruction for 
professional and occupational goals as well as broad liberal education. All of the campuses 
require for graduation a basic program of ''General Education — Breadth Requirements" 
regardless of the type of bachelor's degree or major field selected by the student. A limited 
number of doctoral degrees is offered jointly with the University of California. 

Presently, under the system's "New Approaches to Higher Education," the campuses are Im- 
plementing a wide variety of innovative programs to meet the changing needs of students 
and society. Among pilot programs under way are instructional television projects, self- 
paced learning plans, minicourses and credit-by-examinatlon alternatives. The Consortium 
of The California State University and Colleges fosters and sponsors local, regional and 
statewide external degree and certificate programs to meet the needs of individuals who find 
it difficult or impossible to attend classes on campus. 

Enrollments in fall 1974 totaled 292,000 students, who were taught by a faculty of 16,000. Last 
year the system awarded over 57 percent of the bachelor's degrees and 35 percent of the 
master's degrees granted In California. Over 465,000 persons have been graduated from the 
19 campuses since 1960. 


10 


CAL STATE FULLERTON: AN OVERVIEW 


GOVERNANCE 

Governance on the campus level at California State University, Fullerton is the responsibility 
of the president and his administrative staff. Working closely with the president are a 
number of faculty and student groups which initiate, and review and recommend for 
approval university programs, policies and procedures. Although the president is vested with 
the final authority on all university activities, maximum faculty and staff participation in cam- 
pus decision-making and governance have become traditional. Increasingly, students are 
becoming actively involved and student representatives are found on almost all university, 
school, and departmental committees and policy-making bodies. 

ADVISORY BOARD 

The California State University, Fullerton Advisory Board consists of community leaders in- 
terested in the development and welfare of the university. The board serves the president in 
an advisory capacity, particularly In matters which affect university and community relations. 
Members are nominated by the president and appointed by the Board of Trustees for terms 
of four years. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The main functions of an institution of higher learning are to disseminate and advance 
knowledge. The philosophy which guides an institution can limit or promote the successful 
achievement of these objectives. Therefore, from its Inception, Cal State Fullerton has 
directed its educational program toward the fullest possible development of the individuals 
who participate in It. For both faculty and students this entails a commitment to high stan- 
dards of scholarship, a comprehensive rather than a narrow approach to major areas of 
study, and a concern with research and other creative activity. 

The university believes that an enduring educational experience must be founded upon ex- 
ploration of one's cultural heritage, through basic studies in the liberal arts and sciences, and 
that it can and should at the same time prepare for success in a chosen occupation or 
profession. Accordingly, the required general education program has as its objective the 
development in each student of: 

1. The effective use and Interpretation of the written and spoken language. 

2. An understanding of the wide range of human endeavor and accomplishments In 
liberal arts and sciences, their interrelationships, and the various choices and values 
they represent. 

3. An understanding of Information and principles in some areas of the liberal arts and 
sciences in sufficient depth to encourage critical and creative thought and expression. 

4. A spirit of inquiry Into the past and into the future, in order to cope with conditions in 
the continually changing world. 

5. An understanding of the rights, privileges and responsibilities of citzenship in the com- 
munity and nation, and of effective participation in today's world. 

In addition, the university requires of all students who are candidates for a degree— 
whatever their special purpose — the pursuit of a subject major. 

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT 

Cal State Fullerton was the 12th State College in California to be authorized by the 
Legislature. The following year, 1958, resulted in the designation of a site in northeast Fuller- 
ton. This site was purchased In 1959, when Dr. William B. Langsdorf was appointed as 
founding president, the first staff was selected and plans for opening the new college were 


The Human and Natural Environment of the University 


11 


made. Orange County State College started classes for 452 full-time and part-time students in 
September, 1959, using leased quarters for its administrative offices on the Fullerton Union 
Fligh School campus and for its classrooms at Fullerton's Sunny Hills High School. In the fall 
of 1960, the college opened classes on its own campus where it occupied 12 temporary 
buildings. The name changed to Orange State College in july, 1962, to California State 
College at Fullerton in july, 1964, to California State College, Fullerton in july, 1968 and to 
California State University, Fullerton, in june, 1972. The first permanent building, the six- 
story Letters and Science Building, was occupied in 1963. 

Today, there are many dramatic evidences of additional, rapid growth. Ten large and 
modern permanent buildings have been completed, and enrollment has climbed to approx- 
imately 20,000. Since 1963 the curriculum has expanded to include lower division work 
and many graduate programs. More than $60 million already has been invested in land, 
buildings and equipment — a sum expected to increase appreciably by the 1980's when the 
university is due to reach its projected peak enrollment of nearly 27,000. 

During this rapid growth, the university also has achieved a growing reputation for academic 
excellence. Cal State Fullerton began this spectacular development at a period when the 
citizens and government of California were revising and greatly expanding their com- 
mitments to quality public higher education. The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960 es- 
tablished the California State Colleges as a system under an independent Board of Trustees, 
redefined the functions of the State Colleges, and related them to both the community 
colleges and to the University of California system. In this atmosphere of public support. Cal 
State Fullerton was the first of the State Colleges to submit and secure approval for a five- 
year master curricular plan and one of the first three to secure approval of a master building 
plan. It also was a university that was able to think in terms of its ultimate enrollment objec- 
tives from the beginning. During the same period. Orange County also was experiencing its 
own unprecedented growth. 

In 1969-70, it became apparent that colleges and universities statewide and nationally were 
entering a new period of development. Growing financial problems on all levels of 
government, mounting criticisms of contemporary educational policies and practices, and a 
loss of much public support for education were symptomatic of much deeper and more 
widespread problems and changes in American society and schools. In the context of what 
increasingly seemed to be the emergence of a new, and in many ways, different type of 
culture and world, the colleges and universities (like other major institutions) were acutely 
experiencing the confusions and conflicts such basic and rapid cultural transformations 
generate. 

On May 26, 1971, Dr. L. Donald Shields, who had served as acting president for seven 
months, was appointed the second president of Cal State Fullerton. Under his leadership, the 
university is rethinking and improving the functions it serves in higher education even as it 
also is pursuing more effective working relationships with the community. 

THE HUMAN AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Fullerton, a city of approximately 90,000 inhabitants, is located in northern Orange County, 
about 30 miles southeast of central Los Angeles. It is in the center of the new Southern 
California population center and within easy freeway access of all the diverse natural and 
cultural attractions of this region. 

Orange County, with an area of 782 square miles, is the 48th in size of California's 58 coun- 
ties, but it is the second largest county in population (1.6 million), and in total personal in- 
come. Orange County has experienced during the last 20 years almost unprecedented 
growth as communities continue to occupy the diminishing expanses of open land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture of the old and new economic and life styles in 
Orange County. Underneath the soil, archeologists and bulldozers uncover traces of the 
hunting and gathering Indian bands which flourished at least as early as 4,000 years ago in 
what was a benign and bountiful region. More visible traces remain of the Spanish and Mex- 
ican periods and cultures: Mission San juan Capistrano, which began the agricultural 
tradition in Orange County, and subsequent adobes from the great land grants and ranches 


12 Campus and Buildings 

that followed. Additionally, both customs and many names persist from this period, and so 
does some ranching. The architectural and other evidences of the subsequent pioneer 
period are still quite visible: farmsteads, old buildings from the new towns that then were es- 
tablished in the late 1800's, mining operations, and traces of early resort and other types of 
promotional activities. For about 100 years, farming was the main economic activity with 
products such as grapes, walnuts, vegetables, and increasingly oranges, replacing the older 
wheat and cattle ranches. Today, agriculture still is very important. Orange County ranks 
high among California's counties in mineral production with its oil, natural gas, sand and 
gravel, and clay mining and processing activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 miles of beaches in Orange County and the 
development of such attractions as Disneyland, Knott's Berry Farm, the Laguna Festival of 
Arts and Pageant of Masters, and the Anaheim Stadium and Convention Center continue to 
make tourism an increasingly important activity. So does the Mediterranean-type climate 
with: rainfall averaging 14 inches per year; and generally mild days (with either freezing or 
100-degree temperatures uncommon) with frequent morning fogs during the summer. Both 
downtown Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean can be reached by car in half an hour, and 
mountain and desert recreation areas are as close as an hour's drive from the campus. 


THE CAMPUS AND ITS BUILDINGS 

Once part of a vast orange grove. Cal State Fullerton's attractively landscaped campus now 
consists of 225 acres bounded on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the west by State 
College Boulevard, on the north by Yorba Linda Boulevard and on the east by the Orange 
Freeway. 

The portion of Orange County immediately surrounding the campus is predominantly sub- 
urban: it includes housing tracts, apartment complexes, shopping centers, space-age in- 
dustrial firms and still remaining orange groves and undeveloped hills and fields. 

Other educational institutions also are part of the immediate environment. The new campus 
of the Southern California College of Optometry, with its four modernistic buildings, open- 
ed in the spring of 1973. It is just north of Cal State Fullerton. To Cal State's immediate south 
is Pacific Christian College, a liberal arts school with a Bible emphasis, where students started 
classes in the fall of 1973. The Western State University College of Law, California's largest law 
school, occupied its new campus to the immediate west of Cal State in January, 1975. 

The Cal State Fullerton campus itself has a high density urban layout of buildings and 
facilities developed to serve a predominantly commuting public. The university's modern 
buildings were planned so that no student should need more than 10 minutes to go from one 
class to another. The campus Is surrounded with landscaped parking facilities. 

Even though most of the campus has been devoted to modern buildings, facilities for athletic 
activities, parking lots or attractively landscaped areas, there still remain over 20 acres of the 
original orange grove, land of which will become an arboretum within the next few years. 
Several older buildings also remain, including one which has been converted into the attrac- 
tive University Club and another Into the Foundation headquarters. 

The first permanent building, the Letters and Science Building, was occupied in 1963. This 
imposing structure, master planned to serve ultimately as a facility for undergraduate and 
graduate science instruction and research, has been used to house other programs until they 
could warrant new facilities of their own. 

Since 1963, growth has been rapid. The Music-Speech-Drama Building was completed in 
1964, the Physical Education Building in 1965, the Library Building in 1966, the Commons 
cafeteria facility in 1967, the Humanities-Social Sciences Building and Art Center In 1969, and 
William B. Langsdorf Flail (Administration-Business Administration) and the Engineering 
Building in 1971, and the Student FJealth Center in 1974. Langsdorf Hall and the Engineering 
Building reflect a commitment to programs with high community involvement. In addition 
to the many undergraduate students who study and learn in these buildings, many 
professional engineers and local businessmen also use these very advanced facilities to con- 
tinue their educations. 


Faculty 13 

New buildings are being planned to keep pace with university enrollment increases. The 
Education-Classroom Building and the University Center (Student Union) presently are be- 
ing constructed and will be available for use in 1976. Next on the construction schedule is an 
addition to the Art Center. 

Planned for the northeast corner of the campus is a 25-acre Arboretum. It will Include a 17- 
acre contoured botanical garden, a four-acre organic garden and a four-acre experimental 
plot. The ecologically arranged floras will depict habitat from the desert to the tropics. Upon 
completion, the Arboretum will Include Heritage House, a 19th-century dwelling currently 
being restored, as well as an outdoor amphitheater. Plans call for Heritage House to serve as 
a cultural museum for North Orange County as well as an Arboretum office, while the 
amphitheater will seat 400 persons and feature Shakespearean and children's summer 
theater productions. 

The ample freeway and surface street accommodations that approach the main entrance to 
the university's modern campus also provide comparatively easy access to the great and 
diverse learning resources available in Southern California: many other colleges and univer- 
sities; museums, libraries, art galleries; zoos; and the wide variety of economic, governmen- 
tal, social, and cultural activities and experiments that may be found in this dynamic and 
complex region of California and the United States. 

STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Much of the distinctive character and learning atmosphere of any campus comes from the 
nature and vitality of its students. Diversity, the synthesis of academic with work and family 
interests, strong high school records and relative maturity are some of the predominant 
characteristics of the student body at Cal State Fullerton. The campus is both a large and a 
still rapidly growing one despite its comparative newness. Over 20,000 students were enroll- 
ed in 1974-75, and this year's total is expected to be 21,000. 

The university is a commuter institution. Less than 1 percent of the students live in university 
affiliated housing, 24 percent work 35 hours a week or more; and yet nearly 53 percent take 
12 or more units of coursework each semester. Seventy-five percent come from a radius of 15 
miles from the campus, but many have lived elsewhere before coming to Orange County. 

Twenty-five percent are lower division students, 52 percent are university juniors and 
seniors, and another 23 percent are doing baccalaureate or graduate work. Over seven- 
eighths of the upper-division students are transfers from other institutions, principally com- 
munity colleges. Fifty-seven percent are men, and the median age is 24. Forty-three percent 
are women, and the median age Is 22. Thirty-seven percent are married. One third of the 
students participate in both the day and evening programs during the regular semesters, and 
one tenth are Involved only in the late afternoon or evening program. 

Many already have clearly defined disciplinary, professional, and artistic interests. Some still 
are searching for a meaningful vocation and are in the process of exploring different fields of 
knowledge and the work that might develop from them. Most are trying to understand 
themselves and their world better so that they can become more effective human beings and 
citizens. 


THE FACULTY 

Central to the effectiveness of any institution of higher learning is the quality and dedication 
of Its faculty. Cal State Fullerton is proud of the high caliber of its faculty and of the com- 
mitments of its individual faculty members to teaching and scholarship. 

In the fall of 1974, there were 705 full-time and 400 part-time faculty members teaching on 
the campus. For the full-time faculty members the median age was 38, and almost all had had 
some previous college or university teaching experience before coming to Fullerton. Faculty 
members also have a wide variety of experiences and accomplishments in research, the arts, 
professional work, consulting, and other creative activities. Seventy-three percent of the full- 
time faculty have earned their doctorate degrees, and these have come from more than 100 
major colleges and universities. 


14 


Schedule of Classes 


Criteria for selection to the faculty include mastery of knowledge in an academic specialty, 
demonstrated skill and experience in teaching, and continuing interest in scholarly study 
and research. Retention and promotion criteria also include service to the university and to 
the community. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

The university offers a full four-year program of freshman through senior work as well as 
credential programs for teachers and graduate, master's level work in many disciplines and 
professional fields. The university provides a diversity of educational opportunities to satisfy 
the broad range of backgrounds and interests of its students. Over 1,600 courses have been 
developed to provide learning from introductory to highly specialized, in-depth and ad- 
vanced, work in a wide variety and growing number of fields of study. 

Fullerton currently awards the baccalaureate degree In 40 fields of knowledge. More ad- 
vanced work and the master's degree are awarded in 33 programs. Many of the bac- 
calaureate and master's degree programs offer a choice of specializations {or options or 
emphases). Additionally, at least a few courses are given in many fields or subject matter 
areas in which some other colleges and universities offer full degree programs. Often these 
courses are given by a number of different departments. Such an interdisciplinary trend fits 
not only with broader, cultural integration of knowledge but also with the recent 
development of a growing number of interdisciplinary efforts, including some new degree 
programs, at Fullerton. 

Certain traditions have developed with the academic programs at Cal State Fullerton. One is 
that of relative balance in strength of the programs in the physical sciences, the social 
sciences, the humanities and the fine arts. Another is that of academic excellence in the 
various specializations offered by the university and the comparative freedom given to 
departments and professional schools to develop the depth programs for their majors. 
Another pattern is the great freedom given to most students in selecting courses to satisfy 
their general education or breadth requirements. Still other tendencies Include the en- 
couragement of: a diversity of approaches to teaching; experimentation and innovation In 
courses and programs; and student participation in curricular planning and decision- 
making. 

ACCREDITATION 

Cal State Fullerton is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. 
Specific programs have been accredited by the California State Board of Education, the 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Chemical Society, the 
American Council on Education for journalism, the American Speech and Hearing 
Association, the Engineers' Council for Professional Development, the National Association 
of Schools of Art, the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Association of 
Schools of Theater and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Cal State Fullerton Is a member of the Council of Graduate Schools In the United States and 
the Western Association of Graduate Schools. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

The regular, educational program of the university Is offered continuously from 8 a.m. until 
10 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Class Schedule, listing all classes meeting during these 
hours. Is prepared for each semester and can be purchased at the Titan Bookstore. 

The classes held during the late afternoon and evening hours are part of the regular univer- 
sity program. Students enrolling in these classes must have met all admission requirements of 
the university, including the filing of an official application for admission, the filing of com- 
plete official transcripts from other schools, colleges and universities and in the case of 
lower-division applicants, the completion of required tests for admission. 

The classes which are offered during the summer sessions and by means of extension do not 
require admission to the university, but some courses do require specific prerequisites. 
Special schedules are provided for the summer sessions and extension programs. 


Extension Programs 15 

CONTINUING EDUCATION— SUMMER SESSION 

The summer session is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in the 
enrichment of their educational background as well as completing requirements for a 
degree or credential. Summer session courses are the equivalent of university courses 
offered in the fall and spring semesters, and apply toward graduation and residence re- 
quirements as well as teaching credential requirements. Both day and evening classes are 
scheduled. Some courses have prerequisite requirements which students must meet. 
Master's degree work is also offered. 

The dates for the 1976 summer session are June 7 through August 27. Also offered are wide 
varieties of course durations; with a number of two- and three-week workshops, intensified 
courses, and expanded eight-week courses. In addition to much of the regular curriculum, 
summer offerings include many unique and innovative programs for teachers and other 
professional groups. 

A summer session class schedule is usually available by February, and may be obtained by 
writing the Office of Continuing Education. This schedule contains information on matters 
such as costs and registration. 

Admission to the Summer Session 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the same as in the 
regular session, the university does not require an advance application or transcripts from 
students registering for credit courses In the summer session. However, students are ex- 
pected to have satisfied the prerequisites for the course in which they register. Admission to 
summer session does not grant admission to the regular session. Admission to the summer 
sessions is completed at registration. 

Authorized Student Load 

A normal full-time program of study in the summer session is units of coursework per 
week of instruction. Any student who enrolls by error in more than 18 units during a 12-week 
summer session will find that credit for excess units will not be counted toward a degree, 
credential or other objective. Any other exceptions must be petitioned through the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 


CONTINUING EDUCATION— EXTENSION 
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

The resources of Cal State Fullerton are made available through extension programs to those 
who are unable to take university work in residence but who wish to pursue university-level 
study for purposes of resuming an Interrupted or incompleted education, to enhance 
professional or vocational abilities, or for personal growth and fulfillment. 

Extension offerings include regularly established university courses as well as courses, 
workshops, and conferences designed to meet the needs of particular groups and com- 
munities, and may be initiated at various times during the year. Any adult may enroll in an 
extension course; it is not necessary to be enrolled in the university. 

The maximum extension credit which will be accepted toward baccalaureate degrees is 24 
semester units. Nine semester units of extension credit may be applied toward a master's 
degree with appropriate approvals. Extension credit may not be used to fulfill the minimum 
residence requirements for graduation. 

Veterans may use the educational benefits available to them under federal and state laws to 
enroll in university extension courses provided the classes are part of their prescribed and 
recognized objectives as aprpoved by the Veterans Administration. 

For information about establishing an extension course, or for current offerings, write or 
telephone the Extension Office. 


16 Instructionally Related Services 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

An overseas study program is offered by The California State University and Colleges Inter- 
national Programs, under which students may enroll for a full academic year simullanc'ously 
at their home campus, where they earn ac ademic credit and maintain c am[)us rc’sidcMU y, and 
at a distinguished foreign university or a special program center. 

Cooperating universities abroad include the University of Provence, France; the University 
of Heidelberg, Germany; the University of Florence, Italy; the Universidad Ibero-Americana, 
Mexico; the University of Granada and the University of Madrid, Spain; the University of 
Uppsala, Sweden; and Waseda University, Japan. In the United Kingdom, cooperating un- 
iversities, which may vary from year to year, include Dundee, Leicester, London, Oxford, 
Liverpool, Lampeter and Sheffield. In addition, California State University and Colleges 
students may attend a special program In Taiwan, Republic of China, an architectural 
program In Copenhagen, Denmark, and an agricultural program in New Zealand. 

Eligibility is limited to students who will have upper division or graduate standing during 
their year of participation, who have a (^.5) overall grade-point average, who show ability to 
adapt to a new environment, and, who in the cases of France, Germany, Mexico and Spain, 
are proficient in the language of instruction at the foreign university. Selec tion is made by a 
faculty committee on the students' home campus and by a statewide faculty committee. 

The International Programs are supported by state funds to the extent that sue h funds would 
have been expended had the student concerned continued to study in California. Students 
assume costs for predeparture orientation, insurance, transportation, housing and meals. 
Home campus registration fees, tuition on the home campus for out-of-state students (if the 
student is not a California resident) and personal incidental expenses or vacation travel costs 
while abroad are also paid by the student. The Office of International Programs collec is and 
administers funds for those items which the program must arrange or can negotiate more 
effectively, such as home campus fees, orientaiion costs, insurance, outbound transpor- 
tation, and, in some centers, housing. Students accepted in the International Programs may 
apply for any financial aid available in their home campus, except work-study. 

Application for the 1976-77 academic year must be submitted before February 13, 1976 (ex- 
cept for New Zealand and United Kingdom applicants who must submit applications by May 
16, 1975 and January 9, 1976, respectively). Applicants are notified of acceptance by April 1, 
1976 (New Zealand by June 1, 1975). Detailed information may be obtained from the director 
of international education and exchange at Cal State Fullerton, or by writing to The Califor- 
nia State University and Colleges International Programs, 5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Los 
Angeles 90036. 

INSTRUCTIONALLY RELATED SERVICES 

The university provides an extensive program of instructionally related service’s for its 
students and faculty. These include the universitywide services of the university Library, the 
Instructional Media Center and the Computer Center described in the following sec lions. 
Five offices. Academic Programs, Academic Administration, Academic Services, Ad- 
ministrative Planning and Institutional Research, make studies on university programs and 
assist in coordinating, planning educational operations and sharing information on 
educational trends and innovations on the Fullerton campus with those going on elsc’where. 

The Library 

The Library Building, completed in 1966, is shared by the Instructional Media Center, which 
has the lower level; the School of Education, which Is located on the second floor; and the 
Library, which utilizes the first floor and third through sixth floors. As its collection grows and 
the enrollment increases, the Library will occupy the second floor of the building. Designed 
presently to seat approximately 1,150 persons and to house about 300,000 books as well as 
related materials, the building contains group study and seminar rooms, study carrels for 
graduate students and facilities for individual and group listening, for the reading of 
microform materials and for copying materials in book and microform. 

The main book collection will contain about 360,000 volumes at the beginning of the 1975-76 
academic year. During that year about 15,000 volumes will be added. Besides attempting to 


17 


Instructionally Related Services 

build a balanced collection of basic works, the Library has concentrated its efforts in several 
subject areas. As a result relatively strong collections are now available in such fields as 
World War II, international relations since 1870, Kant, Shakespeare, Melville, ichthyology, 
angling, historiography and historical bibliography, library science, mathematics and British, 
United States, California history, and the history of cartography. A selective depository for 
U.S. government documents since 1963, the Library will house about 142,000 U.S. documents 
by the beginning of the 1975-76 academic year. The Library has. In addition, some 20,000 
reels of microfilmed U.S. government documents, chiefly State Department Archives, but 
also such items as the Congressional Record and the papers of various presidents as well as 
microfiche copies of the material in Project ERIC. The Library Is a depository for California 
state documents and for California curriculum materials, and includes current samples of 
state adopted texts, curriculum guides from all over the United States, and non-book Instruc- 
tional materials. 

The Library subscribes to about 4,400 periodicals. It has some 25,000 volumes of bound 
periodicals and has extensive microform holdings in backflles of periodicals and of local, 
national, and International newspapers. Titles held exceed 6,200. 

Among its major holdings are the Human Relations Area Files, the British 19th-Century 
Parliamentary Papers, the Parliamentary Debates, a microfilm edition of the Published 
Colonial Records of the American Colonies, 1619-1800, and in conjunction with the Patrons 
of the Library, the Langsdorf Anniversary Collection of Grabhorn Press and Book Club of 
California books. 

Library hours are posted In the lobby and listed, with other key information about the 
Library, in the Library Guide, which is available at the information desk In the lobby as well as 
at the circulation and reference desks. Assistance in the use of the card catalog and other 
Library facilities may be obtained at the first floor information desk. Librarians with various 
subject backgrounds are on duty at the reference desk on the third floor to aid students and 
faculty in further use of the Library's resources. Library tours are available at the beginning of 
each semester, and a course in bibliographic research is conducted each semester. 

Instructional Media Center 

The Instructional Media Center, located in the lower level of the Library Building, Includes 
both extensive audiovisual and instructional television services. 

Services to the faculty and students Include encouragement and use of all types of 
audiovisual equipment and materials, rental of films from major rental libraries, and for 
faculty: production of transparencies, charts, graphs, diagrams, audiotapes and cassettes, 
tele-lectures plus all types of still and motion picture photography. Instructional television 
services include distribution of off-the-air or videotaped programs from master control to 
selected classrooms, videotaping facilities and playback both In the studio or classroom and 
off the campus. 

The center is responsible for the coordination and development of instructional applications 
of media, and the improvement of programs and materials designed for instructional use. 
Liaison and service relations are maintained with other media learning-oriented units on the 
campus. Personnel of the center are prepared to assist the faculty In their analysis of media 
needs as related to the procurement or production of materials pertinent to Instructional 
development. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center, located on the second floor of Langsdorf Hall, serves as the central 
computing facility for all of the university. As the central campus computing facility, it 
provides support for instruction, research and administrative computing services. 

The computing system at Fullerton is integrated into the State Distributed Computer 
Network which provides a wide range of computing services. The local campus computer is a 
CDC 3150 with 48,000 words of memory, card reader, card punch, printer tape drives and 
disk drives. As a component of the network, the Computer Center can communicate with a 
large-scale CDC 3300 Computer located at the Division of Information Systems in Los 
Angeles. The Distributed Computer Network also provides time-sharing services on a CDC 
3170 and access to an IBM 360/91 at UCLA. Keypunch, teletype terminals, a sorter and an In- 


18 


Academic Administration 


terpreter for student use are available in an open shop area located in the Computer Center. 

A computer science degree is offered jointly by the Departments of Quantitative Methods 
and Mathematics and the Division of Engineering. Many other departments, including 
Sociology, Geography and Accounting, use the computer facility in their coursework. 
Students' jobs receive the highest priority of all work bath-processed on the CDC 3150. The 
Computer Center maintains a library of application programs for general use. Such 
languages offered by the system include FORTRAN, COBOL, ALGOL, BASIC and COMPASS 
(the assembly language for CDC). 

Office of Academic Administration 

The Office of Academic Administration coordinates the following instructionally related ac- 
tivities: Academic Services; Administrative Planning; Admissions and Records; Computer 
Services; and Institutional Research. 

Office of Academic Services 

The Office of Academic Services is responsible for the preparation of the Class Schedule and 
the Faculty Handbook. The office coordinates all changes and adjustments to these 
documents, administers and prepares the staffing formula for the university, and has a 
primary responsibility for course section and facilities utilization reporting during and after 
registration. 

Office of Administrative Planning 

The Office of Administrative Planning has responsibility for the development of Improved 
administrative structures and resource allocation techniques. Pursuant to Senate Bill 1239, 
Cal State Fullerton is committed to the design and implementation of a decentralized system 
based on program goals and objectives. In addition, the Office of Administrative Planning 
has responsibility for the coordination of the activities of the Office of Institutional Research 
and the Computer Center. The Office of Administrative Planning also provides analytic sup- 
port to the Office of Academic Administration. 

Office of Institutional Research 

The Office of Institutional Research serves as an information center and a problem-solving 
agency which collects, interprets and disseminates information. These data include 
enrollment histories and projections, distributions of data according to selected factors (e.g., 
level, type of Instruction, unit value), summaries of student characteristics, and other 
statistics related to student population, course offerings and resources. Most of the data 
collection and analysis is related to the reporting requirements of The California State 
University and Colleges and other agencies. However, the office evaluates data, provides 
assistance in design of specialized studies and also conducts analytic studies to serve the 
decision-making and policy-formulating needs of Cal State Fullerton. 

Office of Academic Programs 

The Office of Academic Programs is responsible for coordinating the development of 
educational programs; providing an all-university perspective on educational activities at the 
campus; and stimulating academic innovations. The office also is responsible for providing 
leadership for the cross-school programs (Computer Science, Environmental Studies, 
Human Services, Interdisciplinary Center, Latin American Studies, Liberal Studies, Russian 
Area Studies, Social Sciences, Special Major, Technological Studies). The office provides ad- 
ministrative assistance and coordination with all-university pilot proposals for special 
funding by the Chancellor's Office and for minigrants to support innovative projects. 

The office provides administrative assistance and coordination with directors of academic 
advisement, the university Library and the Instructional Media Center. Particular respon- 
sibilities include leadership with the Curriculum Committee, the General Education Com- 
mittee, the Committee for Educational Development and Innovation, and other individuals 
and groups concerned with changing and improving the educational programs of this in- 
stitution. Responsibilities relating to the Chancellor's Office include regular review and up- 
dating of the Academic Master Plan; Cal State Fullerton coordination of program perfor- 
mance review; and staff reports for the Chancellor's Office relating to academic planning. 


Research Organizations 19 

Careful liaison is maintained with the Office of Academic Administration for university-level 
approval of all new courses in the programs and preparation of the university catalog. 

RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICES 
AND SPECIAL STUDY CENTERS 

Much and varied research is going on at Cal State Fullerton. Most of this is being done by in- 
dividual faculty members and students as part of their scholarly and professional 
development activities. Research training is an important part of the education for more ad- 
vanced work in most disciplines and professions, and many of our students are encouraged 
and assisted to learn and apply research skills in either Independent or team projects. 

The Research Committee of the Faculty Council and the Contracts and Grants Office provide 
stimulus, coordination and direction to the research efforts of the university. 

A Student Research Fellowship program and a Faculty Research Grant program award "seed 
grants" to promising research projects every year. Services supporting research are given by 
the Cal State Fullerton Foundation, the university Computer Center, and the university 
Library. Augmenting the on-campus aids to research are the great and diverse resources 
available for study in the Southern California area. 

A number of special centers with specific research objectives are operating at the university. 
These include the Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community (with Its 
affiliated Center for Economic Education and the Real Estate Research Institute), the Center 
for Governmental Studies, the Urban Research Institute, the Institute for Molecular Biology, 
the Institute for Reading, the Laboratory for Phonetic Research, the Special Education Clinic, 
the Speech and Hearing Clinic and the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community 

The Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community provides: 

1. School of Business Administration and Economics and other faculty with additional op- 
portunity to participate in research activities in order to improve and reinforce teaching 
and professional competence; 

2. Professional research and consultation services to the local area normally considered as 
being serviced by the university, including private business, labor, agriculture, and local 
government agencies; 

3. Educational services, e.g., seminars and conferences, to Improve the level of under- 
standing and competence of local decision-makers in specialized areas relating to 
business administration and economics; and 

4. A focus, through research, for the education of students and citizens in the business 
and economic problems of the local community, and for the Involvement of faculty in 
such educational programs. 

The operations of the center are carried out by constituent institutes, programs, and projects 
for which the center provides overall leadership and coordination. The institutes are long- 
term, continuing organizations designed to operate in selected major problem and func- 
tional areas of strategic significance and concern to the school. Programs and projects within 
the center are organized to carry on work outside the institute's area of interest, which are a 
smaller scale and for a shorter time-span. 

Currently included within the Center for Research In Business, Economics and the Com- 
munity are the affiliated Center for Economic Education and the Real Estate Research In- 
stitute. 

Center for Economic Education 

The Center for Economic Education Is one of many such centers at colleges and universities 
in the United States working with the national joint Council on Economics Education to ex- 
pand economic understanding. Center programs include (1) services to schools and colleges, 
individual educators, and the community; (2) research and professional training; and (3) 
operation of an economic, education information center. The center consists of a broadly 


20 Research Organizations 

based executive policy board; an administrative staff; and formally organized groups of par- 
ticipating users. Although operating autonomously, the center is affiliated with the Center 
for Research in Business, Economics and the Community. 

Real Estate Research Institute 

The Real Estate Research Institute conducts a continuing research program, with special 
emphasis on urban development in Orange County. Studies are undertaken in cooperation 
with various public and private agencies, but primary funding is from the California State 
Department of Real Estate. Opportunities exist for student involvement. 

Center for Governmental Studies 

The Center for Governmental Studies was established and organized in 1965 under the 
direction of the Department of Political Science. Its purpose is to promote research and 
scholarship among both faculty and students, and to assist academic, governmental, 
professional and civic groups in the goals and programs. This is accomplished by offering 
assistance in the study of local governmental problems, providing instruction and ex- 
perience in research techniques and methodology, and sponsoring community institutes 
and seminars. 

Urban Research Institute 

The Urban Research Institute is a joint venture between local government and the university. 
The Institute has an advisory board representing governments and academic institutions in 
the area. The research on local problems Is done by teams consisting of practitioners, elected 
officials, community representatives and academicians selected for their expertise in the 
areas under study. It is an attempt to fuse the experience and reality orientation of prac- 
titioners with the resources, knowledge and skills of the academic community In solving 
problems facing the residents and governments in Orange County. 

Institute for Molecular Biology 

The Institute for Molecular Biology was established for the purpose of promoting an at- 
mosphere congenial to research and creative activity In the molecular biological sciences. It 
is an Interdisciplinary organization comprised of certain faculty from the Departments of 
Biological Science, Chemistry and Physics. The institute is dedicated to the pursuit of 
problems of human welfare, utilizing an approach at the cellular and molecular level of in- 
quiry. Its purposes are: (1) to foster and encourage communication of ideas and information 
among its membership for mutual professional improvement; (2) to encourage students to 
adopt affiliation with the membership and to adopt an Interdisciplinary understanding of 
their particular areas of emphasis; (3) to foster an active research program on the part of the 
membership on problems best approached by the integration of chemistry, physics and 
biology; and (4) to seek ways of Improving the individual teaching performance of Its 
membership through interdisciplinary communication at all levels of Instruction. 

It is intended that the institute will function as a service to the departments that it represents. 
The Institute sponsors a series of special seminars devoted to topics in the molecular 
biological sciences, featuring speakers from Its own personnel and from other campuses. 

Institute for Reading 

In 1971, the Institute for Reading was established for the purpose of promoting an at- 
mosphere congenial to research and creative activity for development of reading and related 
programs. In the fulfillment of this purpose, the institute Is dedicated to the pursuit of issues 
encountered in teaching of reading to children and adults, using an interdisciplinary 
approach whenever feasible. 

It (1) fosters and encourages communication of ideas and information among its 
membership for mutual professional Improvement; (2) encourages students to adopt af- 
filiation with members and to adopt an interdisciplinary understanding of their particular 
areas of emphasis; (3) seeks ways of improving the teaching performance of its membership 
through interdisciplinary communication at all levels of instruction; and (4) fosters research 
activities on the part of the membership. 


Internships and Cooperative Education 21 

The Reading Center is located in the School of Education. Its primary purpose is to serve as a 
clinic and laboratory for graduate students in the reading option of the Master of Science in 
Education. Children from the university community schools attend the Reading Center for 
diagnosis and remediation. The center houses materials and equipment relating to reading 
instruction. 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 

The Laboratory for Phonetic Research is a research and training facility in the Department of 
Linguistics. It is equipped with electromechanical facilities for the acoustical, psy- 
choacoustical, and physiological study of human speech. 

Its objectives are twofold: 

Instruction. To provide teaching, training and experience for students who will serve dur- 
ing their professional lives to assist the language handicapped. 

Research. To provide advanced students and faculty with facilities for research on 
language function and dysfunction. 

Special Education Clinic 

The primary purpose of the Special Education Clinic is to provide intensive experiences for 
students with children referred by schools and other agencies in the community. The ex- 
periences involve educational assessment, instructional methodology and evaluation. All 
students participating in the clinic attend clinic seminars and prepare cases for presentation 
at the seminars. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton 
Foundation agency. In addition it is an off-campus clinical program for graduate students 
that involves experiences within medical and paramedical settings. The primary purpose of 
the clinics both on campus and off campus is to provide opportunities for teaching, service 
and research. University students receive clinical experience and opportunity for obser- 
vation. The on-campus clinic is accredited by the Board of Examiners of the American 
Speech and Hearing Association and the California State Department of Education. 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 

The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton 
Foundation agency. The sanctuary provides for a program of continuing educational service 
to the community; a research center for biological field studies; a facility for teacher 
education in nature interpretation and conservation education; and a center for training 
students planning to enter into the public service field of nature interpretation. 

CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education was established to offer students the 
opportunity to combine their academic experience with periods of professional 
employment directly related to their academic major. The student, the university and the 
employer all benefit from the involvement in cooperative education. 

Students gain a clearer understanding of their career objectives through the application of 
their academic studies In the ''world of work." Learning while working outside the 
classroom, students obtain a broader perspective of themselves. Some of the internships are 
salaried and consequently assist students in meeting the costs of living. 

The employing agency receives the services of individuals who are highly motivated, eager 
to learn and aware of theoretical developments in their field. The employer also finds par- 
ticipation in cooperative education to be one of the most reliable means of recruiting per- 
sonnel for full-time employment upon graduation. 


22 


Titan Shops 

The university, through the establishment of the Center for Cooperative Education has 
provided a means for students to enhance their academic program. The center also serves as 
a feedback mechanism to keep the curriculum current and bring the campus and the com- 
munity closer together. 

Cooperative education is a program which offers innovative and expanded dimensions to 
the total education receiveci by students at the university. The center provides services to 
students, faculty and employers to better implement this program. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 

FULLERTON FOUNDATION 

The California State University, Fullerton Foundation was established and incorporated in 
October 1959 to provide essential student, faculty and staff services which cannot be provid- 
ed from state appropriations; to supplement the program and activities of the university in 
appropriate ways; and to assist otherwise the university in fulfilling its purposes and in serv- 
ing the people of the State of California— especially those of the area in whic h the university 
is located. 

Services provided by the foundation include administration of scholarship and student loan 
funds; sponsored research programs; Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary; and certain institutes. 

The foundation's overall policies are administered by a board of trustees composed of 
members of the university faculty, administration and students as well as c ommunity leaders. 

TITAN SHOPS, INC. 

Titan Shops, Inc., is comprised of the Titan Bookstore and food services. Established in July 
1971, it is administered by a board of trustees made up of members of the university faculty, 
administration, students and community business leaders. 

Titan Bookstore 

Students are able to purchase or order books and supplies as needed for c lasses from the on- 
campus bookstore, owned and operated by the Titan Shops, Inc. The litan Bookstore is a 
nonprofit operation: its proceeds are used to further the educational aims of the' univc*rsity. 
It Is located directly east of the Letters and Science Building and Is closely adjacent to 
Langsdorf Flail. 

Food Services 

On the campus. Titan Shops, Inc., provides food in the Commons and in a snack bar in the 
lower level of the Letters and Science Building. Vending machines and mobile carts also are 
located at other locations. A variety of restaurants and eating places also may b6 found 
within a short walking or driving distance from the university. 


STUDENT SERVICES 


23 


While classroom activity is devoted to the academic development of the learner. Student 
Services offers programs which simultaneously provide students with services and oppor- 
tunities for personal growth. Some Student Services programs such as housing and financial 
aid emphasize their service and educationally supportive roles; others, like counseling, 
accentuate their developmental aspects. The opportunities offered by the university's 
Student Services program vary from the traditional "student activity" of fraternity and 
sorority "rush" to the establishment of a coffee house complete with weekly entertainment. 
More developmental in nature is the investigating of vocational and personal life styles 
through group and/or individual counseling and testing. 

The Student Services program includes: counseling and testing, student activities. Associated 
Students government, housing, health services, financial aid, programs for the handicapped, 
international education, placement, alumni affairs, educational opportunity for the cultural- 
ly different, special projects, and services for women, minorities and veterans. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

While each department within Student Services has its specific function and staff, the Dean 
of Student Services coordinates and administers the university's Student Services program. 
Additionally, the dean is an advocate for students to the faculty and administration and as 
such develops and maintains procedures within Student Services and the university which 
will increase the general welfare of the students and enhance their educational success at the 
university. Information regarding any of the Student Services programs may be obtained in 
the Dean of Student Services Office. 

COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES 

Counseling 

Students who need assistance with such concerns as choosing an academic major or 
vocational goal, with study skills, or with personal problems affecting their academic 
progress may obtain help through the Counseling Center. The staff of professionally trained 
counselors and psychologists has available a variety of resources including occupational in- 
formation files, vocational and psychological tests, college and graduate school catalogs and 
directories of various kinds to assist the student. 

The Counseling Center also maintains contact with agencies and professional persons in the 
community to whom students may be referred. 

Counseling services are available only to fully matriculated, registered students. 

Testing and Student Research 

Universitywide testing programs are coordinated and administered by the Testing Center. 
These include university admissions tests and general tests for graduate school admission. In 
addition, the Testing Center provides advice and consulting services to instructional 
departments in the development and administration of admission, selection, and placement 
tests for use by a specific department or program. 

The Testing Center conducts ongoing research on the validity and appropriateness of tests 
used In university testing programs. It also designs and conducts surveys of student needs, at- 
titudes, and other characteristics. 

Testing requirements for students seeking admission are listed in the admissions section of 
this catalog. Students seeking information about testing requirements for specific instruc- 
tional programs should inquire in the appropriate instructional division or the Counseling 
and Testing Center. 


24 


Student Activities 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The university recognizes the important role of student activities. An extensive organization 
of clubs, interest groups, commissions, councils and communities has been created within 
the student body structure so that opportunities are available to every student according to 
his interest, ability and available time. In addition each academic department has a student 
association which provides contact with faculty and opportunities for activities related to a 
student's major or vocational interest. 

Student Activities Center 

The Student Activities Center provides a wide range of service. A professional staff provides 
aid and consultation to individuals and groups as well as assisting the Associated Students in 
planning and implementing programs, events and projects. The staff advises all student 
organizations concerning established policies and procedures, and aids students in arrang- 
ing for use of university services and facilities. The commitment of the center is to aid 
students and faculty in the development of an enriched academic environment. 

Associated Students 

All students are members of the Associated Students and are represented by the Associated 
Students Senate and executive officers, who develop and maintain extracurricular programs 
of every type. Each year a budget is adopted in the spring which allocates anticipated activity 
fees and all other income to be derived from all programs during the following year. 
Senators are elected from various academic disciplines. One recent development Is the 
Departmental Association Council, which is assigned a certain portion of the budget by the 
Senate. The many departmental associations are established to promote closer relationships 
among students and faculty of their departments and bring programs to the departments 
that might not be possible without the funding provided by the Senate. Most departments 
have established very active associations and participation by all students is solicited 
enthusiastically. 

Student Government 

All registered students are members of the Associated Students of Cal State Fullerton. The 
Associated Students is governed through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of 
the Associated Students organization. The president and commissioners constitute the ex- 
ecutive branch which has the responsibility for the development and administration of the 
program, including such activities as publications, intercollegiate athletics, intramural 
athletics, forensics, and music. The Associated Students Senate has full responsibility for 
legislation by which this program is directed and for the allocation of student funds for the 
program. The judicial branch serves as the legal body for interpretation of the constitution 
and enforcement of Associated Student policies. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are recognized as vital to the total educational process. They arc 
chartered to encourage and facilitate use of university resources and integrate activities with 
a goal of sustaining a viable university community. Any group of students may become a 
chartered organization, provided the goals and activities are consistent with university rules 
and regulations by applying through the Student Activities Office. Organizations are 
classified under the following headings: (1) Cocurricular (organizations which share learning 
goals with a specific department); (2) Political or Religious; (3) Service; and (4) Social. More 
than 100 organizations are now recognized including six national social fraternities, five 
national social sororities, a number of departmental associations and many special interest 
groups. 

Student Publications 

The university newspaper, the Daily Titan, is published as a product of communications 
classes and financed by the Associated Students. In addition, a handbook is available for use 
by organizations In the development and operation of their program. Two magazines. Focus 
and the Promethean, are also published by students. 


Student Activities 


25 


Men's Athletics 

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of teams in baseball, basketball, cross country, 
football, golf, gymnastics, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, water polo, fencing and 
wrestling. A year-round program of intramural activities includes basketball, badminton, flag 
football, handball, softball, tennis and wrestling, swimming and weight lifting. 

The university Is a member of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association (PCAA). All athletic 
teams compete under rules of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 

Intramural Activities 

The University Recreation Program offers a wide variety of team, dual and individual In- 
tramural activities designed to meet the competitive and recreational needs of students, 
faculty and staff members. Rules and regulations governing participation in the intramural 
program are available In the Recreation Office, located in the Physical Education Building. 

Women's Athletics 

Participation by women in intercollegiate volleyball, basketball, tennis, gymnastics, track and 
golf is provided through membership in the Southern California Women's Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference, the Western Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, and 
the American Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. 

Recreational Activities 

A recreational activities program is offered to students, faculty, staff, affiliated, and com- 
munity members, and their families who wish to use the recreational facilities on an unstruc- 
tured, noncompetitive basis. Such activities as swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
tennis, table tennis, racquetball, jogging, handball and weight training are provided. Special 
instructional programs and club sports are also available In various activities. 

Birth Control Information Services 

Birth control counseling at the Student Health Center has been supplemented by a birth 
control information service, financed and operated by the Associated Students under the 
direction of the university medical director. A part-time coordinator is available in the 
Student Health Center to make appointments with a Student Health Center physician. The 
physician advises the patient on the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of 
birth control as well as giving the necessary physical examination. 

Campuswide Events 

Student boards, organized by the Associated Students, sponsor many campuswide events. 
The lecture series, pop concerts, film series and special events are part of the ongoing 
program. All recognized student organizations frequently cosponsor events in the area of 
their interests. 

Child Care Center 

Sponsored by the Associated Students is the Children's Center which provides daytime 
nursery care for children of Cal State Fullerton students for a nominal fee. The professionally 
staffed center, located near the campus, is licensed by the State of California. 

Legal Information and Referral 

This unique office provides assistance to students on matters pertaining to law and makes 
referrals in cooperation with the Orange County Bar Association and the Legal Aid Society. A 
full-time law student attending a recognized school of law maintains scheduled office hours 
In the University Union. 

Mutual Ticket Agency 

The Associated Students, through Its business office, operates a ticket agency for the benefit 


26 


Health Center 


of all students. Purchases for drama, music, shows and sporting events may be made during 
regular office hours. The agency is located in the University Union. 

Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1960 to provide the outside press with news of 
student activities on the campus. It is financed by a budgeted allocation from Associated 
Students. 

University Union 

The University Union is leased by the Associated Students from the university. This facility 
houses the Associated Students government offices and business office, as well as the 
Student Activities Center, student organizations rooms and a snack bar. Facilities are 
available to all students for meeting rooms, pool, cards, films, and small discussion groups. 
The union is located in the lower level of the Letters and Science Building. 

HOUSING OFFICE 

The Housing Office has a staff whose primary concern is to insure that every student's hous- 
ing needs are measured and every attempt is made to satisfy these needs. 

In order to meet these primary concerns, the office provides the following: 

• List of off-campus housing, rooms and apartments. These listings are continuously up- 
dated. 

• Summer orientations designed to find housing for students well in advance of the fall 
semester. The orientations generally bring together groups of students who share similar 
interests because of their housing needs. 

• Model rental agreements are available to all students. This agreement has been carefully 
reviewed by legal counselors and represents the university's best recommendations to 
students. 

• Information is available for students with questions about the rights and responsibilities 
of being a tenant. 

• Bulletin boards are available for students requesting roommates or needing an 
apartment. 

• A free computerized car pool service is available to students with transportation dif- 
ficulties and students attempting to improve our ecology. 

THE HEALTH CENTER 

The Student Health Center is located on Gymnasium Campus Drive between the Physical 
Education Building on the west and the Engineering Building and the Geodesic Dome on the 
east. The center is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Friday. 

The doctors and nurses, laboratory and x-ray technologists, pharmacists and aides are there 
to care for patients felt medical needs. No one has access to a patient's medical records un- 
less the patient gives permission for the transfer of records, or in the rare case, by court's 
subpoena. 

Most of the doctors are generalists who have wide experience and interest in the health 
needs of students. In addition, there are psychiatrists, an orthopedist and gynecologists. The 
center has a pharmacy (not for outside prescriptions), a laboratory, an x-ray service and 
physical therapy. 

The cost of care given in the Health Center, except for a few specific fees, already has been 
paid through student fees and by the State of California. Every registered student is eligible 
for care. However, the Health Center cannot meet all medical needs. So students are urged 
to obtain health insurance If they do not already have adequate private insurance. A good. 
Inexpensive policy is offered through the Associated Students Office. 


Financial Aid 


27 


FINANCIAL AID 

The Financial Aid Office provides guidance and assistance in financial matters to all students. 
Financial aid administers all scholarships, emergency loans, grants. National Direct loans and 
the work-study programs. 

One application for aid covers all programs for which a student may be eligible. Deadlines 
for applications are as follows: December 1 for the spring semester; April 1 for summer 
sessions and for the fall semester. 

Dependent students, defined as those who are dependent upon their parents for support, 
must submit the following documents: (1) application; (2) Parent's Confidential Statement of 
the College Scholarship Service; and (3) copy of parents form 1040. 

Independent students, defined as those who are not dependent upon their parents for sup- 
port, must provide the following documents: (1) application; (2) Student's Financial 
Statement of the College Scholarship Service; (3) copy of their own form 1040 and spouse's, 
when applicable; and (4) Indepentdent Student Certificate. 

Early submission of documents Is advised, as funds are limited and demand Is great. 


Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships is available for outstanding students. Qualified students 
should obtain scholarship applications from the Financial Aid Office, and return by April 15 
for the fall semester. Scholarship applications are evaluated by the university Scholarship 
Committee. Awards are based on scholastic record, financial need and personal 
qualifications. Some scholarships are limited to students majoring in specified disciplines. 
Departmental recommendations weigh heavily in such cases. 

Scholarships offered by Cal State Fullerton are made possible by interested organizations, 
business firms and individuals. Recent contributors to the scholarship program include: 

American Association of University Women (Placentla-Yorba Linda Branch) 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc. 

California Retired Teachers Association 

Delta Delta Delta East Orange County Alumnae Chapter 

Ebell Club of Fullerton 

Fourth District, California Parents and Teachers Association 
Fullerton Rotary Club 

Gamma Phi Beta Sorority (Orange County Alumnae) 

Kappa Phi Sigma Sorority 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Coulson (President's Award) 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship Fund 
Orange County Engineering Council Scholarship 
Roberta King Maxwell Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Sadie Landon Memorial Music Scholarship Fund 
Sheryl Cummings Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Loans 

The generosity of organizations and individuals enables the university to offer short-term 
loans to students who meet unexpected financial difficulties of a temporary nature. Loans 
from these funds are made for various periods of time and to specified categoric's of 
students, according to university regulations and the wishes of the donors. The prime pur- 
pose of these loans is to meet educationally related expenses, and thus loans cannot be made 
for the purposes which are normally financed by private lending institutions. Application for 
a short-term loan may be made at any time during the school year. 

The following is a listing of the loan funds available during the 1975-76 school year: 

Altrusa Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 
Brea Rotary Club Loan Fund 
California Retired Teachers Association 


28 Handicapped Students Program 

Carrie Lou Sutherland Memorial Fund 

Cal State Fullerton Faculty Women's Club Loan Fund 

Don Miller Memorial Fund 

Gamma Epsilon Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Loan Fund 

James Merrick Memorial Fund 

junior Ebell Club of Anaheim Loan Fund 

Laguna Beach Pan-Hellenic Loan Fund 

Laura E. Imhoff Memorial Fund 

Mary Virginia Lopez Memorial Fund 

Memorial Loan Fund 

Newport Harbor Children's Theatre Loan Fund 
Newport Harbor Pan-Hellenic Loan Fund 
Pierre Guyette Memorial Fund 

Alan Pattee Scholarship (Children of Deceased Peace Officers or Firemen) 

Surviving children, natural or adopted, of California peace officers or firemen killed In the 
line of duty are not charged fees or tuition of any kind while enrolled at any California State 
University or College, according to the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act and Section 23762, 
California Educational Code. Students qualifying for these benefits are known as Alan Pattee 
scholars. 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Foreign Students 

Special services for foreign students are coordinated by the Office of International Education 
and Exchange. These services include aid with problems concerning visa status and 
employment; orientation to academic procedures and requirements; advisement related to 
finances and social customs; and to resources and opportunities offered by campus and 
community. 

International Programs 

Information concerning study opportunities for American students In foreign universities is 
available in the International Student Office. The director of international education and ex- 
change coordinates the selection of students applying for admission to one of the inter- 
national programs operated by The California State University and Colleges. (See also Inter- 
national Programs on page 16.) 

HANDICAPPED STUDENTS PROGRAM 

Located In the Library Building, this office offers services and assistance to handicapped 
students. The goal of this program is to make the full educational, cultural, social and 
physical facilities of the university available to students with orthopedic, visual, hearing or 
other mobility or perceptual disabilities. 

A full range of services is available In cooperation with other university departments — a 
learning resource center, priority registration, orientation, attendant/reader/note-taker ser- 
vices, counseling, career planning, academic advisement, housing, transportation and job 
placement. The purpose is to provide necessary services and assistance that will eliminate or 
significantly reduce barriers resulting from the mobility and perceptual problems en- 
countered by most handicapped disabled students. The program serves as a centralized 
source of information and provides individual attention to students. It is staffed by personnel 
experienced in the particular needs of the handicapped, and disabled. 

It should be further noted that this program has been operating on a part-time basis for the 
past three years and although attempts are being made to expand and operate full-time, 
some of the services herein listed are very limited, presently, even though they appear quite 
comprehensive. Help and suggestions from handicapped/disabled students are solicited in 
an attempt to upgrade the quality of services. The director for this program may be con- 
tacted in the Handicapped Student Center. 


Educational Opportunity Program 


29 


EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM 

The Educational Opportunity Program is an innovative educational program designed to 
provide comprehensive services for educationally, disadvantaged and/or culturally different 
students. These services include the identification, selection, counseling and retention of 
students who would not normally acquire a university education because of academic, 
ethnic, financial or motivational barriers. 

EOP gives each of the students In its program individual attention. It also uses knowledge of 
the student's distinctive patterns of soical behavior, learning styles, motivations, and 
aspirations to assist students in realizing their full potentialities. Additionally, EOP strives to 
develop a sense of community among its students through a variety of creative and identity- 
seeking activities. 

Students are encouraged not only to understand the background and strengths of their own 
particular ethnic groups, but also to work together in support of central, universal human 
values. EOP is keenly interested In advancing the understanding of different cultural groups 
on this campus by promoting an awareness of their concerns and potentialities. 

The services offered by the Educational Opportunity Program Include: Project Upward 
Bound, recruiting, counseling. Learning Assistance Center, direct intervention programs and 
supporting secretarial services. These support services of EOP are designed to ensure a 
progressive rate of student achievement and to provide the opportunity of realizing a full 
capacity success. 

Project Upward Bound 

This program is directed to high school students with good possibility and who are therefore 
capable of college work, but who are underachieving. Upward Bound provides these 
students with supplemental academic and counseling support to motivate them to complete 
high school and assist them in entering higher education. 

Recruiting 

EOP recruiting teams visit high schools and colleges within a specified service area and ad- 
vise students of the benefits of higher education at Cal State Fullerton. Utilizing Affirmative 
Action guidelines, a special attempt Is made to recruit students with high academic potential. 
Assistance with admissions and financial aid procedures Is an important service of this com- 
ponent. 

Counseling Service 

The counseling component is the key to the effectiveness of the entire EOP. Peer counselors, 
working under the direction of professional counselors, are the important liaisons between 
each Individual EOP student and the university as a whole. Assistance and guidance is 
provided to help the student resolve academic, social, financial and personal problems. The 
EOP Counseling Center also acts as a referral point to direct students to the appropriate sup- 
port services, e.g., financial aid, housing. Learning Assistance Center, with tutorial services, 
health services, etc. 

Learning Assistance Center and Tutorial Center 

The Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is for all university students who need to bring about 
changes in their present learning skills, particularly in the areas of reading, writing, com- 
putation and study skills. The LAC also serves as a resource center, containing special study 
materials, collateral textbooks, and taped programs that supplement regular course 
offerings. Individual tutoring Is available to students after their needs have been properly 
assessed through the LAC on request and through faculty or peer counselor referrals. All 
tutors are first selected on the basis of ability in their particular area of concentration. Prior to 
tutoring, they are assigned to a series of education courses designed to give the prospective 
tutor a greater understanding and awareness of the nature of his role in the learning process. 

Direct Intervention Programs 

These programs bridge the gap between a student's present achievement and university 


30 


Placement Services 


scholastic requirements. Currently, special programs are offered for academic credit in 
reading, mathematics, study skills and ethnic studies. The LAC Is now preparing additional 
direct intervention programs in mathematics, and the sciences. Additional programs will be 
created and implemented relevant to student needs. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

A centralized Career Planning and Placement Center Is maintained with responsibilities for 
assisting students In career planning and in finding both part-time and career employment. 
The university believes that It best serves both the student and employers only when Its 
graduates have been placed in the professions for which they are prepared and trained. All 
registered students are welcome to use the services of the Placement Center without cost 
and are also eligible for career counseling and placement. 

Part-Time Placement 

All registered students wishing part-time jobs either on or off campus are eligible to receive 
the assistance of the office. New students may receive service after August 1 for the fall 
semester or after January 1 for the spring semester. Secretarial skills are in great demand, but 
calls for drivers, custodians, teacher aides, draftsmen, waiters, clerks, youth and ret reation 
leaders, sitters, gardeners, etc., are received. Entering freshmen who must augmt'nl their 
resources while going to school are encouraged to limit their work hours to approximately 
15 per week. 

Business, Industry and Government Placement 

Through personal interviews the career placement counselor assists graduating seniors, 
graduate students, and alumni seeking career employment in business, industry, or public 
service in defining occupational preference, providing active job leads and writing resumes. 

In addition, the Placement Center makes arrangements for the on-campus recruitment 
program which brings the employers to the students. Also available through this office is the 
job Bank service. The center is a member of the Orange County job Bank, and a computeriz- 
ed listing of more than 1,000 job opportunities in Orange County is received daily. 

Located in the Placement Center is the Career Library with an ever-expanding selection of 
resource materials on career opportunities. Federal, state, county, city and armed forces 
brochures and applications arc also available for student access. One sec tion of the* Career 
Library is devoted to information on nontraditional or alternative vocations. 

The Placement Center serves as liaison offic e for the military and Ac tion/Pc'ac e Corps-VIST A 
offering counseling and information brochures to any interested student. 

Educational Placement 

Students In the teacher education, pupil personnel services, or administration c urric ulum of 
the university, who are in the final semester of a credential program, or who are in student 
teaching or directed field work, are eligible to register and receive the services of the 
Placement Center, chief of which is help in establishing a professional employment file. Suc h 
registrants are supplied information on openings and helped to establish their candiclac ic's in 
the school districts and educational Institutions. 

Students who are not in the student teaching program but who are completing their c reclen- 
tial program at the university are also eligible for service. This includes those about to receive 
their master's degree in library science or academic areas, who plan to apply for a com- 
munity college credential. Certain specified services are available to alumni as well. 

Coordinator of Minority Relations 

The coordinator of minority relations has the responsibility for broadening awareness in the 
entire community of placement services available to all minorities and for encouraging 
minority students to register with the center for career counseling and placement service's. 
T he coordinating officer works cooperatively with colleagues responsible for other specializ- 
ed functions, e.g., teaching, part-time jobs, business, industry and government, and does not 
serve as the sole placement counselor for all minority stueJents. 


Veterans' Services 


31 


SPECIAL PROJECTS 

The Office of Special Projects is concerned with formulating and adjudicating student rights, 
grievances and responsibilities. The office coordinates both the student grievance and the 
student disciplinary procedures. Additionally, the office carries out special projects related 
to Student Services as assigned by the dean. 

ALUMNI RELATIONS 

The Alumni Association of Cal State Fullerton provides the opportunity for alumni to 
maintain contact with the university after graduation through various publications, infor- 
mation about continuing education programs as well as special social, recreational, travel 
and service events at the university. The association Is directed by a board which also advises 
the university president and administration. Further information regarding membership and 
the programs can be obtained by calling the Office of Alumni Relations. 

OFFICE OF MINORITY SERVICES 

The Office of Minority Services offers information regarding the opportunities available to 
the minority student for graduate studies. This resource encompasses financial aid, 
application filing, recruitment sessions and personal contact with those involved in minority 
programs on other campuses. 

Maintaining student awareness of deadline dates, requirements, etc., hopefully will increase 
enrollment of minorities into programs of higher education. 

Another step in increasing the number of minorities in graduate school is to give attention to 
the needs of the undergraduate, through study-related work, tutoring and referrals to other 
agencies which would be useful to the student. 

OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

The Office of Veterans' Services was established to aid and assist all veterans, especially 
Vietnam-era veterans, who are not now participating in a postsecondary educational ex- 
perience. Functioning under an institutional award from the U.S. Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, the office is charged with the responsibilities of (T) outreach, (2) 
recruitment, (3) special programs and (4) counseling. In addition, it assists and aids veterans 
in: registration, tutoring, benefit advisement, educational opportunities, housing and job 
placement (both on and off campus). 

The program director of veterans' services may be contacted in the Veterans' Services Office. 


' "■ ■ '. ' ' •: ' ’ *' •■ ,.. '■ ' 

; ;W'». V.v, • -* ; 

O'; .{^1:;. o./' ' ■'■ ■ 


■ ' y ■ 


. ' , H \ ■• : :• -i-' ■ 

. .. ...;' , or . -r-. .; ^ .. 




• t'' ■• 

. ;v 

'^'if ji'!.'. ■>- ' : ' r ' "■'■ ‘r 

.V. t. ; .(<-•■ ,. 

V>r . 





.f’ O' ' ; V-r .. .--oV. •> . . -' ' -'V...* 

. ; • ■■", y ' -.. ;'■■'■■•!•' • •■'r' r.'.'u-:/ , 

. •., ' ■ - : , • ', rr.i-’.O' - :,, . .' ■'< ; I i ; r ' l> '3 ;'vi 

'Vi .••,io ‘ ' 'r'’ ’ J 


u O';: ■-■or, ' ■■■■.‘■' - ■■■' '■■"■" ' ■•' ■■';o 

•.; :,i ' c. ''1*..' ’■■ 'i/.- ii-i'.o,* ' 




-'-t r. J' • 

<‘1 . ' , ^ I V> 


' ■ - •'(1 r . “ • ■ , £ U ’ '• I- •, ■ 

r . . . . ’ .I..,, f . J • ' 


'•iO 




.v< '• '. 'r':) ■;.■ i.; -o-r o' ‘ ' ■ 

, . , . o'-. ■ 'V ‘ ' 

■ ■ . , ■ .0-.. ':o'. ' ■ 

. ; ;. • ; ■■ v' ; • ' 

' ' . ■ , o " o- .v't. ^ ;'■' 1 •'•i': ‘ . 


’ , ,\ •^. ■■ ■ d' • ;■ ■'■ ■ >' 

^ ' i ’ t ' * - ■ ' . ■ 




34 


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 


OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS 

The Office of Admissions and Records is responsible for the administration of the admission, 
registration, and records programs and services for undergraduate and graduate students in 
the regular sessions of Cal State Fullerton. These programs and services include: the ad- 
mission and readmission of students within established enrollment categories, quotas and 
priorities; the evaluation of the applicability of undergraduate transfer credit toward all- 
university requirements of the curriculum; the registration of student programs of study, in- 
cluding enrollment into classes; the maintenance of academic records; the administration of 
academic probation and disqualification policies; the provision of enrollment certifications 
on student request, including transcripts of academic records, certificates for Selective Ser- 
vice, Veterans Administration and other purposes; the certification of the completion of 
degree and credential requirements; the review of petitions for exceptions to academic 
regulations; and the provision of information about these programs and services. 

RELATIONS WITH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

The Office of Relations with Schools and Colleges administers a universitywide program to 
assist undergraduate students in the transition from school to college. This assistance is 
provided in the form of preadmission guidance to prospective students, counseling with 
parents, provision of current information about the university's curricula and requirements 
to school and college counselors, and research into the articulation problems of the transfer 
student. 

Requirements for Admission 

Requirements for admission to Cal State Fullerton are in accordance with Title 5, Chapter 1, 
Subchapter 3, of the California Administrative Code. A prospective applicant who is unsure 
of his status under these requirements is encouraged to consult a high school or college 
counselor or the Admissions Office. Applications may be obtained from the Admissions Of- 
fice at any of the campuses of The California State University and Colleges or at any Califor- 
nia high school or community college. 

Undergraduate Application Procedures for 1976-77 

Prospective undergraduates, whether applying for part-time or full-time programs of study, 
in day or evening classes, must file within the appropriate filing period, a complete 
application including all the required forms and fees as described in the application booklet. 
The $20 nonrefundable application fee should be in the form of a check or money order 
payable to The California State University and Colleges. Undergraduate applicants may file 
only at their first choice campus. Alternate choice campuses and majors may be indicated on 
the application, but an applicant should list as alternate campuses only those campuses of 
The California State University and Colleges that he will attend if his first choice campus can- 
not accommodate him. Generally, alternate degree majors will be considered at the first 
choice campus before an application is redirected to an alternate choice campus. Applicants 
will be considered automatically at the alternate choice campus if the first choice campus 
cannot accommodate them. Transcripts and other supporting documents should not be sub- 
mitted until requested by the campus. 

Post-Baccalaureate and Graduate Application Procedures for 1976-76 
All applicants for any type of post-baccalaureate status (e.g., master's degree applicants, 
those seeking credentials, and those interested in taking courses for professional growth, 
etc.) must file, within the appropriate filing period, a complete application including all of 
the required forms and fees described in the application booklet. Post-baccalaureate 
applicants who completed undergraduate degree requirements and graduated the 
preceding term are also required to complete and submit an application and the $20 non- 
refundable fee. Since applicants for post-baccalaureate programs may be limited to the 
choice of a single campus on each application, redirection to alternative campuses or later 
changes of campus choice will be minimal. In the event that a post-baccalaureate applicant 
wishes to be assured of initial consideration by more than one campus, it will be necessary to 
submit a separate application (including fee) to each. 


35 


Admission to the University 


Post-baccalaureate applicants seeking second baccalaureates are considered undergraduate 
applicants for purposes of application and admission procedures, categories, and quotas. 
Application materials may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Graduate 
Studies Office of any campus within the system and must be filed with the campus of first 
choice. 


Admission Categories and Quotas 

Admission quotas have been established by some campuses, in some majors, where the 
number of applicants is expected to exceed campus resources. At Cal State Fullerton, 
categories have been established for students who are: first-time freshmen; freshman and 
sophomore undergraduate transfer applicants; junior and senior undergraduate transfer 
applicants; special program applicants; hardship applicants; and foreign students. Also, 
there is a quota for most graduate level programs. 

All applications received In the initial filing period will receive equal consideration for such 
categories. A few undergraduate programs are impacted throughout the 19-campus system, 
and applicants to such programs are expected to meet supplementary admission criteria for 
admission to these programs. Applicants to these major programs will be sent further infor- 
mation by the campuses about the supplementary criteria to be used, and how and when 
applicants must meet them. Impacted programs are Identified and announced each fall. 
Applicants to impacted programs must apply during Initial filing periods. 

After admission to Cal State Fullerton, requests for change to a different (i.e., a new) 
academic objective involving established admission categories and quotas will be evaluated 
following policies and procedures parallel to those for new students. 

Application Filing Periods 


Term 

Summer 

Fall 

Winter 

Spring 


Initial Filing Period 
the previous February 
the previous November 
the previous June 
the previous August 


Extended Filing Period 
March until filled 
December until filled 
July until filled 
September until filled 


All applications postmarked or received during the initial filing period will be given equal 
consideration within established enrollment categories and quotas. There is no advantage in 
filing before the initial filing period. Applications received before the initial filing period 
may be returned, causing a delay in processing. With the exception of the impacted un- 
dergraduate program areas, most campuses will be accepting applications well into the ex- 
tended filing periods until quotas are filled. 


Space Reservations 

Applicants who apply during the initial filing period and who can be accommodated will 
receive a space reservation. A space reservation is not a statement of admission but is a com- 
mitment by Cal State Fullerton to admit the student once eligibility has been determined. 
The space reservation directs the applicant to arrange to have appropriate records forwarded 
promptly to the Admissions Office. Applicants should not request that any records be 
forwarded until they have received a space reservation notice. 


hiardship Petitions 

Each college or university has established procedures to consider qualified af3plicants who 
would be faced with an extreme hardship if not admitted. Prospective hardship petitioners 
should contact the campus regarding specific policies governing hardship admission. 

Fiow to Apply 

1. Submit a completed application for admission within the announced filing period ac- 
companied by the required application fee to: 

Office of Admissions and Records 
California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, California 92634 


2. Request required transcripts of record of ail previous scholastic work from each school or 
college attended when asked to do so by the campus where space has been reserved for 
you. The transcrips required at Fullerton are: 


36 Admission of Undergraduate Students 

— for undergraduates — 

(a) the high school transcript, and 

(b) a transcript from each college or university attended. Undergraduate applicants 
for a teaching credential must submit two copies of the transcript from each 
college or university attended. 

— for graduates — 

la) applicants for unclassified post-baccalaureate standing with no degree or creden- 
tial objective must submit a transcript from the college or university where the 
baccalaureate was earned. Further, one transcript from other institutions attended 
are required as necessary so that the university has a complete record of the last 60 
semester units attempted prior to enrollment at Cal State Fullerton. 

(b) applicants for a master's degree or teaching credential, or both, must submit two 
copies of the transcript from each college or university attended. 

All students are advised that they should also have a complete set of college transcripts 
for their personal use at all times of advisement. 

All transcripts must be received directly from the issuing institution to be considered of- 
ficial and cannot be returned to the student. Foreign language transcripts must be ac- 
companied by certified English translations. 

3. If required, submit the scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the American 
College Test. Scores are required for all undergraduate applicants with fewer than 56 
completed transferable semester units of study (84 quarter units). Applicants to 
classified graduate curricula must submit the scores of any qualifying examinations re- 
quired In their prospective program of study. 

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

First-time Freshmen 

Applicants who have completed no college work after high school graduation will be con- 
sidered for admission as first-time freshmen under one of the following provisions. Results of 
either the CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing program ex- 
amination (ACT) are acceptable In establishing eligibility. 

Exceptions: College credit earned concurrent with high school enrollment; college 
credit earned In summer session after high school and prior to regular matriculation in 
college; college credit granted for the CLEP or advanced placement programs, or military 
or USAFI courses; or college credit granted for some nontraditional learning experience, 
will not affect the applicant's status as a first-time freshman for application quota pur- 
poses as well as admission. Further, the accelerated student, who completes his high 
school program mid-year, who has applied to The California State University and 
Colleges for the following fall term, but chooses to attend a local community college in 
the spring term, will be considered a first-time freshman for application quota purposes 
as well as admission. All such college or advanced standing credit. If fully acceptable as 
transfer credit, will be granted the student after admission. 

California high school graduates or legal residents for tuition purposes must have a grade- 
point average and total score on the SAT, or composite score on the ACT, which together 
provide an eligibility index placing them in the upper one-third of California high school 
graduates. For 1975-76 the minimum eligibility Index is 3,072 using the SAT or 741 using the 
ACT. 

High school graduates from other states or possessions who are nonresidents for tuition pur- 
poses must present an eligibility index which places them in the upper one-sixth of Califor- 
nia high school graduates. For 1975-76 the minimum eligibility index Is 3,402 using the SAT or 
826 using the ACT. 

The eligibility index Is computed either by multiplying the grade-point average by 800 and 
adding it to the total SAT score, or multiplying the grade-point average by 200 and adding it 
to 10 times the composite ACT score. Grade-point averages are based on work completed In 
the last three years of high school, exclusive of physical education and military science. 
As an alternative, the following table may be used to determine the eligibility of graduates of 
California high schools (or California legal residents) for freshman admission to a California 
State University or College. This table is based on the eligibility index. Scores shown are the 
SAT Total and the ACT Composite. Students with a given GPA must present the cor- 
responding test score. Conversely, students with a given ACT or SAT score must present the 
corresponding GPA in order to be eligible. 


Admission of Undergraduate Students 


37 


CPA 

(-)* 

3.20 

3.19 

3.18 

3.17 

3.16 

3.15 

3.14 

3.13 

3.12 

3.11 

3.10 

3.09 

3.08 

3.07 

3.06 

3.05 

3.04 

3.03 

3.02 

3.01 

3.00 

2.99 

2.98 

2.97 

2.96 

2.95 

2.94 

2.93 

2.92 

2.91 

2.90 

2.89 

2.88 

2.87 

2.86 

2.85 

2.84 

2.83 

2.82 

2.81 


ADMISSIONS TABLE FOR CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
OR CALIFORNIA LEGAL RESIDENTS 

SAT ACT SAT 


ACT 

Score 


11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

14 
14 
14 
14 

14 

15 
15 
15 
15 

15 

16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
17 
17 
17 
17 

17 

18 
18 
18 
18 
18 


Score 


512 

520 

528 

536 

544 

552 

560 

568 

576 

584 

592 

600 

608 

616 

624 

632 

640 

648 

656 

664 

672 

680 

688 

696 

704 

712 

720 

728 

736 

744 

752 

760 

768 

776 

784 

792 

800 

808 

816 

824 


CPA 

2.80 

2.79 

2.78 

2.77 

2.76 

2.75 

2.74 

2.73 

2.72 

2.71 

2.70 

2.69 

2.68 

2.67 

2.66 

2.65 

2.64 

2.63 

2.62 

2.61 

2.60 

2.59 

2.58 

2.57 

2.56 

2.55 

2.54 

2.53 

2.52 

2.51 

2.50 

2.49 

2.48 

2.47 

2.46 

2.45 

2.44 

2.43 

2.42 

2.41 

2.40 


Score 

19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 

23 

24 
24 
24 
24 

24 

25 
25 
25 
25 

25 

26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
27 


Score 

832 

840 

848 

856 

864 

872 

880 

888 

896 

904 

912 

920 

928 

936 

944 

952 

960 

968 

976 

984 

992 

1000 

1008 

1016 

1024 

1032 

1040 

1048 

1056 

1064 

1072 

1080 

1088 

1096 

1104 

1112 

1120 

1128 

1136 

1144 

1152 


CPA 

2.39 
2.38 
2.37 
2.36 
2.35 
2.34 
2.33 
2.32 
2.31 
2.30 
2.29 
2.28 
2.27 
2.26 
2.25 
2.24 
2.23 
2.22 
2.21 
2.20 
2.19 
2.18 
2.17 
2.16 
2.15 
2.14 
2.13 
2.12 
2.11 
2.10 
2.09 
2.08 
2.07 
2.06 
2.05 
2.04 
2.03 
2.02 
2.01 
2.00 
{-) + 


ACT 

Score 

27 

27 

27 

27 

28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
29 

29 

30 
30 
30 
30 

30 

31 
31 
31 
31 

31 

32 
32 
32 
32 

32 

33 
33 
33 
33 

33 

34 
34 
34 
34 

34 

35 


SAT 

Score 

1160 

1168 

1176 

1184 

1192 

1200 

1208 

1216 

1224 

1232 

1240 

1248 

1256 

1264 

1272 

1280 

1288 

1296 

1304 

1312 

1320 

1328 

1336 

1344 

1352 

1360 

1368 

1376 

1384 

1392 

1400 

1408 

1416 

1424 

1432 

1440 

1448 

1456 

1464 

1472 


Graduates of Secondary Schools in a Foreign Country 

Applicants who are graduates of foreign secondary schools must have preparation 
equivalent to that required of eligible California high school graduates. The university will 
carefully review the previous record of all such applicants and only those with promise of 
academic success equivalent to that of eligible California high school graduates will be ad- 
mitted. Such applicants are not required to take either the SAT or ACT except when 
specifically requested to do so. 


•Students earning grade-point averages above 3.20 are eligible for admission. 

-I- Students earning grade-point averages below 2.0 are not eligible for admission. 


38 


Admission of Post-Baccalaureate and Graduate Students 


Non-High School Graduates 

Applicants over 18 years of age, but who have not graduated from high school, will be con- 
sidered for admission as first-time freshmen only when preparation in all other ways Is such 
that the university believes promise of academic success is equivalent to that of eligible 
California high school graduates*. 

High School Students 

Students still enrolled in high school will be considered for enrollment In certain special 
programs, including summer session. If recommended by their principal and if in the 
judgment of the university their preparation is equivalent to that required of eligible Califor- 
nia high school graduates. Such admission Is only for a given course or program. 

Recommended Preparation 

Overall excellence of performance in high school subjects and a test score giving evidence 
of academic potential provide the best bases for predicting success at Cal State Fullerton. 
While no specific course pattern is required, prospective students are strongly encouraged 
to include the following subjects in their preparation for work at Cal State Fullerton: college 
preparatory English; another language; mathematics; laboratory science; history or social 
science (or both); and study in speech, music, art and other subjects contributing to a well- 
rounded academic background. Students who anticipate Intensive study in science are urg- 
ed to take four years of mathematics and three years of foreign language In high school. 

ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission as undergraduate transfers In good standing at the last institution 
attended will be considered for admission under one of the following provisions: 

1. He is eligible for admission in freshman standing (see First-Time Freshman re- 
quirements) and has earned an average grade of "C" (2.0 on a scale where A equals 4.0) 
or better in ail transferable college units attempted. 

2. He has completed at least 56 transferable semester units or 84 transferable quarter units 
with an average grade of "C' (2.0 on a scale where A equals 4.0) or better If a California 
resident. Nonresidents must have a grade-point average of 2.4 or better. 

The California community college transfer student should consult the community college 
counseling office for information on transferability of courses. 

Other Applicants 

Applicants not admissible under one of the above provisions should enroll in a community 
college or other appropriate institution. Only under the most unusual circumstances, and 
then only by special action, will such applicants be permitted to enroll in the university. 

ADMISSION OF POST-BACCALAUREATE AND 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Post-Baccalaureate Standing. Unclassified. 

For admission to unclassified post-baccalaureate standing, a student must: hold an accep- 
table baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting 
association or have completed equivalent academic preparation as determined by an 
appropriate campus authority; have attained a grade point of at least 2.5 (on a five-point 
scale) in the last 60 semester (90 quarter) units attempted; and have been in good standing at 
the last college attended. 

An applicant ineligible for admission under these provisions may be admitted by special 
action if on the basis of acceptable evidence he Is judged by appropriate university authority 
to possess sufficient academic, professional or other potential pertinent to his educational 
objectives to merit such action. 


Summer Sessiott Students 


39 


Admission to a California State University or College with post-baccalaureate unclassified 
standing does not constitute admission to graduate degree curricula. 

Post-Baccalaureate Standing. Classified. 

A student who is eligible for admission to a California State University or College in un- 
classified standing may be admitted to classified post-baccalaureate standing for the purpose 
of enrolling in a particular post-baccalaureate credential or certificate program; provided, 
that such additional professional, personal, scholastic, and other standards, including 
qualifying examinations, as may be prescribed for the particular program by the appropriate 
campus authority are satisfied. 

Graduate Standing. Conditionally Classified. 

A student who is eligible for admission to a California State University or College under un- 
classified post-baccalaureate standard above, but who has deficiencies in prerequisite 
preparation which in the opinion of the appropriate campus authority can be met by 
specified additional preparation, including qualifying examinations, may be admitted to an 
authorized graduate degree curriculum with conditionally classified graduate standing. 

Graduate Standing. Classified. 

A student who is eligible for admission to a California State University or College in un- 
classified or conditionally classified standing may be admitted to an authorized graduate 
degree curriculum of the campus as a classified graduate student if he satisfactorily meets the 
professional, personal, scholastic or other standards for admission to the graduate degree 
curriculum, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate campus authority may 
prescribe. Only those applicants who show promise of success and fitness will be admitted to 
graduate degree curricula, and only those who continue to demonstrate a satisfactory level 
of scholastic competence and fitness shall be eligible to proceed in such curricula. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES 

Normally, the university accepts for consideration only two categories of applicants from 
other countries: 

1. Those who have completed, with a good academic record, a two-year program in an 
accredited institution of higher education. 

2. Those who have completed a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, with a good academic 
record, in an accredited Institution and wish to enroll as graduate students. 

Persons applying from their home countries are normally considered for admission to the fall 
semester only. Those transferring from U.S. institutions may apply to the fall or spring 
semesters. 

All applicants whose native language is other than English are required to present a satisfac- 
tory score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The international ad- 
ministrations of this examination are scheduled for September 22 and November 24, 1975, 
and February 25 and May 17, 1976. Applicants should obtain the TOEFL Bulletin of Infor- 
mation and registration forms well In advance. Copies of this bulletin and registration forms 
are often available at American embassies and consulates, offices of the United States Infor- 
mation Service, United States educational commissions and foundations abroad, bi-national 
centers, and several private organizations. Those who cannot obtain locally a TOEFL Bulletin 
of Information should write to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 899, Princeton, 
New jersey, U.S.A. 08540. 

Application procedures in other respects are the same as for other students, except that 
transcripts of educational documents in languages other than English must be accompanied 
by approved translations into English. 

SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the same as in the 
regular session, the university does not require an advance application or transcripts from 


40 


General Information About Admission 


students registering for credit courses in the summer session. However, students normally 
must be high school graduates and are expected to have satisfied the prerequisites for the 
courses in which they register. In addition, students are expected to file a request to register 
in the summer session. Admission to summer session does not grant admission to the regular 
session. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student previously enrolled in the university, planning to return after an absence of one or 
more semesters, must file a new application for admission in accordance with procedures set 
forth below. The application fee is required if the student was not enrolled in either of the 
two semesters prior to the semester to which he Is seeking admission or if he was enrolled in 
another institution during his absence from Cal State Fullerton. Unless a leave of absence 
was granted, catalog requirements at the time of readmission will apply. 

Former Students in Good Standing 

A student who left the university in good standing will be readmitted provided any academic 
work attempted elsewhere since the last attendance does not change his scholastic status. 
Transcripts of the record of any work attempted in the interim are required. 

Former Students Who Were on Probation 

A student on probation at the' close of his last enrollment will be readmitted on probation 
provided he is otherwise eligible. The student must furnish transcripts of any college work 
taken during his absence. 

Former Students Who Were Disqualified 

The readmIssion of a previously disqualified student is by special action only. Ordinarily the 
university will consider an application for reinstatement only after the student has remained 
absent for a minimum of one year following disqualification and has fulfilled all recommend- 
ed conditions. In every instance, readmisslon action Is based on evidence, including 
transcripts of study completed elsewhere subsequent to disqualification, which in the 
judgment of the university warrants such action. If readmitted, the student is placed on 
scholastic probation. 

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ADMISSION 

Determination of Residence 

New and returning students of The California State University and Colleges are classified for 
the purpose of determining the residence of each student for nonresident tuition purposes. 
The residence questionnaire and, if necessary, other evidence furnished by the student is 
used in making these determinations. A student may not register and enroll in classes until 
his residence questionnaire has been received by the Admissions Office. 

The following statement of the rules regarding residency determination for nonresident 
tuition purposes is not a complete discussion of the law, but a summary of the principal rules 
and their exceptions. The law governing residence determination for tuition purposes by 
The California State University and Colleges are found in Education Code Sections 22800- 
22865, 23753.1, 23754-23754.4, 23758.2, 23752, and in Title 5 of the California Administrative 
Code, Article 4 (commencing with Section 41901) of Subchapter 5 of Chapter 1, Part V. A 
copy of the statutes and regulations is available for inspection at the campus Admissions Of- 
fice. 

Legal residence may be established by an adult who Is physically present in the state while, at 
the same time, intending to make California his permanent home. Steps must be taken at 
least one year prior to residence determination date to evidence the intent to make Califor- 
nia the permanent home with concurrent relinquishment of the prior legal residence. Some 
of the relevant indicia of an Intention to establish and maintain California residence may be 
established by registering to vote and voting in elections in California; satisfying resident 
California state Income tax obligations on total income, ownership of residential property or 


General Information About Admission 


41 


continuous occupancy or letting of an apartment on a lease basis where one's permanent 
belongings are kept; maintaining active resident memberships in California professional or 
social organizations; maintaining California vehicle plates and operator's license; maintain- 
ing active savings and checking accounts in California banks; and maintaining permanent 
military address and home of record in California if one is in the military service. 

The student who is within the state for educational purposes only does not gain the status of 
resident regardless of the length of his stay in California. 

In general, the unmarried minor (a person under 18 years of age) derives legal residence 
from his parents, or, in the case of permanent separation of the parents, from the parent with 
whom the minor maintains his place of abode. The residence of a minor cannot be changed 
by act of the minor or that of the minor's guardian, so long as the minor's parents are living. 

A man or a woman may establish his or her residence; marriage is not a governing factor. 

The general rule is that a student must have been a California resident for at least one year 
immediately preceding the residence determination date in order to qualify as a "resident 
student" for tuition purposes. At the Fullerton campus, the residence determination date for 
fall terms is September 20, and for spring terms is January 25. 

There are several exceptions for nonresident tuition. Some of the exceptions provided for: 

1. Persons below the age of 19 whose parents were residents of California but who left the 
state while the student was still a minor. When the minor reaches age 18, the exception 
continues for one year to enable the student to qualify as a resident student. 

2. Persons below the age of 19 who have been present in California for more than a year 
before the residence determination date, and entirely self-supporting for that period of 
time. 

3. Persons below the age of 19 who have lived with and been under the continuous direct 
care and control of an adult, not a parent, for the two years immediately preceding the 
residence determination date. Such adult must have been a California resident for the 
most recent year. 

4. Dependent children and spouses of persons in active military service stationed in 
California on the residence determination date. This exception applies only for the 
minimum time required for the student to obtain California residence and maintain 
that residence for a year. The exception, once attained, is not affected by transfer of the 
military person directly to a post outside the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 

5. Military personnel in active service stationed in California on the residence deter- 
mination date for purposes other than education at state-supported Institutions of 
higher education. This exception applies only for the minimum time required for the 
student to obtain California residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

6. A student who Is an adult alien is entitled to residence classification If the student has 
been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence in accordance 
with all applicable provisions of the laws of the United States; provided, however, that 
the student has had residence in California for more than one year after such admission 
prior to the residence determination date. A student who Is a minor alien shall be entitl- 
ed to residence classification if both the student and the parent from whom residence is 
derived have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence in 
accordance with all applicable laws of the United States, provided that the parent has 
had residence in California for more than one year after acquiring such permanent 
residence prior to the residence determination date of the term for which the student 
proposes to attend the university. 

7. Certain credentialed, full-time employees of school districts. 

8. Full-time California State University and Colleges employees and their children and 
spouses. This exception applies only for the minimum time required for the student to 
obtain California residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

9. Certain exchange students. 


42 


General Information About Admission 


10. Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employees, who were 
California residents, and who were killed in the course of law enforcement or fire 
suppression duties. 

11. A person in continuous full-time attendance at an institution who had resident 
classification on May 1, 1973, shall not lose such classification as a result of adoption of 
the uniform student residency law on which this statement Is based, until the at- 
tainment of the degree for which currently enrolled. 

Any student, following a final decision on campus on his residence classification, may 
make written appeal to: Office of General Counsel, 5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1260, 
Los Angeles 90036, within 120 calendar days of notification of the final decision on cam- 
pus of his classification. The Office of General Counsel may make a decision on the 
issue, or it may send the matter back to. the institution with instructions for a further 
review on campus. Students classified incorrectly as residents or incorrectly granted an 
exception from nonresident tuition are subject to reclassification as nonresidents and 
payment of nonresident tuition in arrears. If incorrect classification results from false or 
concealed facts, the student is subject to discipline pursuant to Section 41301 of Title 5 
of the California Administrative Code. Resident students who become nonresidents, 
and nonresident students qualifying for exceptions whose basis for so qualifying 
changes, must immediately notify the Admissions Office. Applications for a change in 
classification with respect to a previous term are not accepted. 

The student Is cautioned that this summation of rules regarding residency deter- 
mination Is by no means a complete explanation of their meaning. The student should 
also note that changes may have been made in the rate of nonresident tuition, in the 
statutes, and In the regulations between the time this catalog is published and the 
relevant residence determination date. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Admission to the university as a student does not constitute admission to the teaching 
credential program. Students who plan to work toward teaching credentials must apply to 
the School of Education following procedures available from the School of Education. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student who is admitted to the university for a given semester but who does not register in 
the specified semester will have his admission canceled. The student must file a new 
application form when he again seeks admission and must follow the complete application 
procedure and meet the then current admission requirements. 

Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshman and transfer students who have 
demonstrated outstanding achievement in past academic work. For first-time freshmen who 
have no previous college units earned, a grade point of 3.5 on a five-point scale must be 
earned In the coursework considered for admission to the university. Students who have 
completed fewer than 56 transferable semester units of credit must meet the grade-point 
average criteria for first-time freshmen and must also have earned a 3.5 grade-point average 
on all college work attempted. Students who have attempted 56 or more transferable 
semester units are eligible if a grade-point average of 3.5 Is earned in all college work com- 
pleted. 

Undergraduate Entrance Testing Requirements 

All undergraduate students, who have completed fewer than 56 semester or 84 quarter units 
of transferable work, are required to submit scores from either one of two national testing 
programs before eligibility for admission to the university can be determined. This re- 
quirement does not affect undergraduate students who have previously attended Cal State 
Fullerton and who have submitted ACT or SAT scores at the time of their first admission. 

Registration forms and test dates for either test may be obtained from school or college 
counselors, from the addresses below, or from the campus testing offices. For either test, 
submit the registration form and fee at least one month prior to the test date. 


Evaluations of Academic Records 43 


ACT Address 


SAT Address 


American College Testing Program, Inc. 
Registration Unit, P.O. Box 168 
Iowa City, Iowa 52240 


College Entrance Examination Board 


P.O. Box 1025 
Berkeley, California 94770 


To take one of these tests: 

1. After obtaining the test registration form and a Student Information Bulletin, select a 
test center near your home from the list printed in the Bulletin. 

2. Send the completed registration form and the appropriate test fee to the proper 
address. Do not send to the Fullerton campus. 

3. Have your ACT or SAT scores reported to the Testing Center, Cal State Fullerton. Use 
the appropriate code number for score reports. 

If you have already taken either the ACT or SAT, send $2 to the appropriate testing agency 
and request that your scores be reported to the Testing Center. Use appropriate code 
number when requesting such reports, and provide complete information concerning 
testing date, test center, name and address changes, etc. 


EVALUATIONS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Evaluation of Transfer Credits 


The Office of Admissions will evaluate previous college work in terms of its relationship to 
the requirements of Cal State Fullerton. All degree candidates will be Issued a credit sum- 
mary during the first semester of attendance which serves as a basis for determining specific 
remaining requirements for the student's specific objectives. 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as long as the student enrolls at the 
date specified, pursues the objective specified, and remains in continuous attendance. The 
student will not be held to additional graduation requirements unless such requirements 
become mandatory as a result of changes in the California Administrative Code or the 
California Education Code. If the student does not remain In continuous attendance and has 
not applied for and been granted a formal leave of absence, the evaluation issued upon 
readmIssion will specify the remaining requirements for the student's specific objectives. 

In view of the foregoing regulations, the student should notify the Office of Admissions Im- 
mediately if he changes the objective specified In his evaluation. While the evaluation for a 
student remains valid, the student is held responsible for complying with all changes In 
regulations and procedures which may appear in subsequent catalogs. 

Acceptance of Credit 

Credit for work completed at accredited institutions, other than coursework identified by 
such institutions as remedial or in other ways as being nontransferable, will be accepted 
toward the satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at the university within 
limitations of residence requirements and community college transfer maximums. 

Transfer of Credit From a Community College 

Upper division credit Is not allowed for courses taken in a community college. Credential 
credit is not allowed for courses In professional education taken in a community college. 
This does not Invalidate credit for preprofessional courses taken at a community college, 
such as Introduction to education, art or design, arithmetic, or music for classroom teachers. 
After a student has completed 70 units of college credit at a community college, no further 
community college units will be accepted for unit credit. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in active military service for at least a year may be granted six units 
of undergraduate credit. Courses taken in service schools may be given credit on the basis of 
an evaluation which determines that they are of university level. Any credit for military ex- 


44 


Evaluations of Academic Records 


perience will be given only upon request. Records verifying such experience must be filed 
with the Office of Admissions. 


Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence and extension courses which may 
be allowed toward the bachelor's degree is 24 units, if otherwise applicable. 

Credit by Advanced Placement 

Students who have successfully completed courses in the advanced placement program of 
the College Entrance Examination Board (defined as receiving a score of 3, 4 or 5) shall be 
granted six units of credit for each advanced placement course toward graduation, advanced 
placement in the university's sequence courses, and credit for curriculum requirements. 


Credit by Examination 

Students may be granted credit for a course toward graduation and to meet curriculum re- 
quirements by the satisfactory completion of a challenge examination in that course re- 
quirment. The examinations are to be comprehensive and administered by the department 
in which the course is offered. Well in advance of the challenge examination the student will 
secure written approval of his major adviser and the chair of the department in which the 
course is offered. Upon the successful completion of the examination, the notation on the 
permanent record of the student will be made as "CR" for the course. "CR " is to indicate 
credit for the course with a passing grade. Upon failure of the examination, the notation on 
the permanent record of the student will be made as "No CR" for the course. Credit by ex- 
amination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirements. The challenge 
examination for any course may be attempted only once. A maximum of 30 credits can be 
earned by challenge examination, including those achieved by advanced placement. 


College Level Examination Program 


The university shall accept three semester units of credit for each of the following College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations, subject to achievement of the scores in- 
dicated, provided the examination was not taken previously within one calendar year and 
that degree credit has not been granted for previous coursework at the equivalent or at a 
more advanced level than for the examination in question. 


Examination 

Mathematics General Exam (1973 edition) 


Passing score 

50 (on both parts of 
the examination) 


College Algebra - Trigonometry 49 

Introductory Calculus (including essay) 48 

Statistics (including essay) 49 

Operating under an interim policy. Cal State Fullerton may grant additional credit and ad- 
vanced standing based upon CLEP examination results using as minimum standards: 


General Examinations 

1. That the student achieve a score at or above the 50th percentile, college sophomore 
norms. 

2. That no unit credit be granted for any test in the general examinations, but that six units 
of general education requirements be waived for each test completed with the 
appropriate score. 

Subject Examinations 

1. That the student submit a score at or above the 50th percentile of those in the norming 
group who earned a mark of C or better. 

2. That equivalency to Cal State Fullerton courses be determined by the appropriate 
academic department in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

3. That university credit shall have not been previously earned in the courses in (juestion. 

In no case will credit so awarded count towards residence credit. 


English Equivalency Examination 

Students passing the California State University and Colleges English Equivalency Ex- 
amination shall be awarded six semester units of credit provided credit has not been granted 
previously at the equivalent or at a more advanced level. 


REGISTRATION 


45 


Orientation 

Various opportunities are provided for new students to obtain information relating to 
academic programs, student services and activities, and other aspects of university life. Infor- 
mation about specific programs will be published separately. 

Registration 

Class Schedule: A complete listing of courses offered will be found in the Class Schedule 
published prior to the start of each semester. This publication, which may be purchased in 
the Titan Bookstore, also states detailed information pertaining to the semester including 
class enrollment and fee payment procedures. 

It is important that each student familiarize himself not only with the academic policies 
stated in this catalog but also with the requirements and procedures in the Class Schedule as 
both are used in the selection of classes for the semester. 

Registration: Registration is made up of two steps — class enrollment and fee payment. At 
registration, every student is required to file a study program with the Office of the Registrar. 
The filing of a program by the student and its acceptance by the university obligates the 
student to perform the designated work to the best of his ability. It is emphasized that 
registration does not become official until fees have been paid. 

Computerized Records System 

The student records system, including the registration process, is computer based. This 
means that records and reports are produced from files maintained in the university Com- 
puter Center. It is a fact of life in a large institution such as Cal State Fullerton that use of the 
computer is essential. Thus, there is a requirement for data cards, code numbers, student file 
numbers and for meeting precise criteria for data input, which introduces an element of the 
impersonal in the student records system. Despite these conditions, every effort is made to 
provide courteous, efficient and personalized service to students and the entire university 
community. To assist in providing this service, students are urged to be extremely careful and 
accurate in preparing forms, especially the official program and change of program forms. 
Accurate input of information will assure each student of error-free records. 


Controlled Entry Classes 

In general, all courses listed in the semester Class Schedule shall be available to all 
matriculated students except for appropriate academic restrictions as stated in the General 
Catalog. These restrictions, Including special qualifications and other academic limitations, 
on class entry shall be published in the Class Schedule as appropriate footnotes to the 
designated class or class section and shall be consistent with the General Catalog. 

Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be announced in the Class Schedule. Late 
registrants will find themselves handicapped in arranging their programs and must pay a $5 
late registration fee In addition to regular fees. 


Changes in Program 

Each student Is responsible for the program of courses he lists when he registers. Changes 
may not be made thereafter without the filing of a change of program (add-drop) form in the 
Office of the Registrar following procedures announced In the Class Schedule. 


46 


Fee Schedule 


Failure to file an official change of program request In the case of dropped classes may result 
in a penalty mark being recorded. Through the fourth week of instruction in the semester no 
record of enrollment is made of dropped classes. After four weeks students are expected to 
complete all courses In which they are enrolled. However, for reasons of ill health or reasons 
Involving other serious and unforeseen problems, the student may drop a class or classes and 
receive a W (Withdrawal) by obtaining the approval and signature(s) involved and filing the 
change with the registrar on the form provided. 

No classes may be dropped during the last three weeks of instruction, although complete 
withdrawal from the university is still possible. 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the university may enroll concurrently for additional courses at 
another institution only with advance written approval from the student's academic adviser 
on official forms filed In the Office of the Registrar. Permission will not be granted when the 
study load in the proposed combined program exceeds the units authorized at this univer- 
sity. 

Auditors 

A properly qualified student may enroll in classes as an auditor. The student must meet the 
regular university admission requirements and must pay the same fees as other students. An 
auditor may not change his registration to obtain credit after the last date to add courses to 
the study list. An auditor Is not permitted to take examinations in the course. 

Handicapped Students 

Students physically handicapped who require assistance should get in touch with the Han- 
dicapped Student Services Center prior to the announced semester registration period so, 
that special arrangements for them can'be made. 

VETERANS 

Cal State Fullerton is approved by the Bureau of Readjustment Education, State Department 
of Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking benefits under state and federal 
legislation. All students seeking veterans' benefits must have a degree or credential objec- 
tive. 

Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in which the 
veteran plans to use these benefits in order to have the authorization at the time of 
registration. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

Male students requiring certification of their student status may request the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records to submit the appropriate forms to their draft board. 

Undergraduate students shall normally be enrolled for 12 units a semester to be considered 
full time. Graduate students enrolled for nine units of study may be considered full time 
provided at least three units are 500-level courses. 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

Cal State Fullerton does not have a Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. However, 
through arrangements with the University of Southern California, two-, three- and four-year 
Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) programs are available to all qualified 
undergraduate students for the university. Further, in cooperation with the University of 
California, Los Angeles and the Claremont Colleges, Army ROTC programs are available to 
Fullerton students. Academic units earned In these programs are counted as elective credit 
towards the baccalaureate. Additional Information may be obtained from the Office of Ad- 
mission and Records. 

FEE SCHEDULE, 1975-76 

Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California. The following are the fees and ex- 
penses currently assessed. 


Fee Schedule 


47 


All Students 

Application fee (nonrefundable) 

Payable by check or money order at time of applying $20 

Student services fee Semester 

Fewer than 4 units $51 

At least 4 but fewer than 8 units $57 

At least 8 but fewer than 12 units $63 

12 or more units $72 

Facilities fee $3 

Associated Students fee $10 

University Union fee $10 

Nonresident and Foreign Visa Students 

Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees required of all students, except for enrollment in 
extension or summer session) 

15 or more units, maximum $650 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit $43 

Per academic year $1,300 

Summer Session 

Standard course fee per unit $30 

Associated Students fee $3 

University Union fee $5 

Facilities fee $3 

Extension Fees 

Per unit or fraction of unit $28 to $56 

Other Fees or Charges 

Campus service card $1 

Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above) $5 

Check returned from bank for any cause $5 

Transcript fee $1 

Failure to meet administrative required appointment or time limit $2 

Auditors pay the same fees as others. 

Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of The California State University and Colleges 
without advance notice. 

Alan Pattee Scholars 

No fees of any kind shall be required of or collected from those individuals who qualify for 
such exemption under the provisions of the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act. 

Refund of Fees 

Upon withdrawal from the university, the student services fee may be refunded If written 
application for refund, on forms provided by the university. Is submitted to the registrar not 
later than 14 days following the day of the term that Instruction begins; provided that the 
amount of $10 shall be retained to cover the cost of registration. Late registration and 
application fees are not refundable. 

The entire fee may be refunded if a student is unable to continue his registration because of 
a university regulation. Application for refund under such circumstances may be made at any 
time before the date when the student received any academic credit for the courses for 
which he is registered. 

No refund of fees will be given if the unit load of the student Is reduced to a lower student 
services fee category. 

Parking Fees 

Semester pass (nonreserved spaces); 

Regular and limited students 

Coin operated gate, per admission... 

Summer session, each six-week period 


$15 

..25 

..$6 


48 


Average Annual Costs and Sources of Funds 


Typical Student Expenses 

Typical school year budgets for California residents living at home or making other housing 
arrangements will vary widely. It is estimated that, including a $1,000 yearly allowance for 
room and board, the cost will approximate $2,000. Nonresident students must also allow for 
nonresident tuition. 

AVERAGE ANNUAL COSTS AND SOURCES OF FUNDS 

The 19 campuses of The California State University and Colleges are financed primarily 
through funding provided by the taxpayers of California. For the 1974-75 year, the total cost 
of operation Is $603 million, which provides continuing support for 231,295 full-time 
equivalent (FTE*) students. This results In an average cost per FTE student of $2,608 per year. 
Of this amount, the average student pays $254. Included in this average student payment is 
the amount paid by nonresident students. The remaining $2,354 in costs are funded by state 
and federal taxes. 


Averages do not fit all students alike or even any specific student. To arrive at an average 
figure that is meaningful, the costs outlined above exclude ''user fees" for living expenses, 
housing, and parking, as well as costs for extension and summer session work. Computations 
are based on full-time equivalent students, not individuals, and costs are prorated by system 
totals, not by campus. The average costs for a full-time equivalent student in the system are 
depicted in the following chart: 


1974-75 PROJECTION OF TOTAL COSTS OF CAMPUS OPERATION (Including Building 
Amortization) 

Enrollment: 231,295 FTE 


Average Cost Per 



Amount 

Student (FTE)* 

Percenttige 

State appropriation (support) 

$488,163,528 

$2,111 

81.0 

State funding (capital outlay)** 

28,615,000 

124 

4.8 

Student charges 

58,806,800 

254*** 

9.7 

Federal (financial aids) 

27,456,316 

119 

4.5 

Total 

$603,041,644 

$2,608 

100.0 


* For budgetary purposes, full-time equivalent (FTE) translates total head count into total academic student load. The 
term assumes that a full-time student in The California State University and Colleges is enrolled for 15 units of academic 
credit. Some students enroll for more than 15 units; some students enroll for fewer than 15 units. 

•• The system's more than 14,000 acres of land and the wide range of fac ilities and ecjuipment on the 19 campuses are 
currently valued at approximately $1.2 billion. Amortized over a 40-year period, they are valued at $125 per I 1 1 student. 

*** The average costs paid by a student include the student services fee (formerly called the materials and service* fee), 
health facilities fee, college union fee, student body fee and the nonresident tuition. This amount is derived by taking 
the total of all student fees and dividing by the total full-time equivalent student enrollment. Individual students may 
pay more or less than $254 depending on whether they are part-time, full-time, resident or nonresident studc*nts. 


49 


RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 

ENROLLMENT DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each semester unit represents three hours of university work per week for one semester. 
Courses are of three types: 

(1) Lecture — one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory — three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. All required courses carry unit 
credit. 

Classification in the University 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29V2 semester units of work are c lassified as 
freshmen, 30-59V2 semester units as sophomores, 60-89V2 semester units as juniors, and 90 or 
more as seniors. 

Maximum Number of Course Units 

Undergraduate students' requests to carry units beyond 18 (19 for engineering majors) must 
be approved by the student's adviser and the department chair of the major. If such requests 
are denied, appeals may be made to the appropriate school dean. Undec lared majors must 
receive the approval of the director of academic advisement to carry over 18 units of work. 
The minimum full-time load is 12 units. 

A student whose academic record justifies a study list in excess of the normal may rec|uest to 
be allowed to carry extra units. Request forms may be obtained from the Office of the 
Registrar and are submitted during the first week of instruction. In general, only students 
with superior academic records are allowed to enroll for more than the maximum unit load. 
In addition, the need to carry an overload must be established. Factors such as time spent in 
employment or commuting, the nature of the academic program, extracurricular activities 
and the student's health should be considered in planning a study load. Students who are 
employed or have outside responsibilities are advised to reduce their program of study. 

The minimum full-time program of study for graduate students Is defined in the "Graduate 
Policies and Procedures" section of this catalog. 

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Level Courses 

Graduate level (500) courses are organized primarily for graduate students. Undergraduate 
students may be permitted to enroll in a graduate level (500) course If: 

1. They are within nine units of completion of graduation requirements, or 

2. They are exceptionally qualified seniors whose undergraduate work In the related field 
or fields has been of 3.5 grade-point average or better, and whose cumulative overall 
grade-point average is at least 3.25. 

Such cases shall require specific approval by the instructor and also the chair of the 
department or dean of the school in which the course is offered and by the chair or dean of 
the student's major department or school. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under 1. above may be applied to a graduate program if 
approved under graduate studies policies. 

Graduate level (500) courses taken under 2. above may be applied to the undergraduate 
program only. 

Class Attendance 

While class attendance is not recorded officially by the university, regular attendance in class 
is often essential to success in a course. The policy on class attendance is. within the dis- 
cretion of the Individual faculty member and shall be announced by the faculty member at 
the first class meeting of the semester. 

Initial Class Meeting 

It is especially Important that students attend the first meeting of a class. Students who are 
absent from the first meeting and fail to notify the instructor or departmental office no later 


50 Grading Policies 


than 24 hours after the class meeting may be denied admission to the class. Instructors may 
deny admission to absentees in order to admit any persons on waiting lists in their places. 

Instructor-Initiated Drops 

A student who registers for a class and whose name appears on the first-day-of-class list 
should attend all class meetings in the first week or the first two class meetings, whichever 
alternative covers the longer time span. If the student Is absent without notifying the Instruc- 
tor or departmental office within 24 hours after any meeting missed, the student may then be 
dropped administratively from the class by the Instructor. This administrative withdrawal 
shall be without penalty and must be filed by the instructor with the registrar no later than 
the 20th day of Instruction. 

GRADING POLICIES 

Grading System 

Every student of the university will have his coursework reported by the faculty in terms of 
letter grades or administrative symbols. 

When, because of circumstances, a student does not complete a particular course, or 
withdraws, certain administrative symbols may be assigned by the faculty. Grades and sym- 
bols are listed in the chart below together with grade-point values. The chart also illustrates 
the academic bookkeeping Involved for all grades and symbols used. 

The university utilizes a combination of traditional and nontraditional grading options as 
follows: 

Traditional 

Option 1. Letter Grades: A, B, C, D, F 
Nontraditional 

Option 2. Letter Grades: A, B, C and NC (No Credit) for undergraduate courses; A, 
B, and NC for graduate level courses. 

Option 3. CR (Credit) for satisfactory and NC (No Credit) for less than satisfactory 

Grade Progress 

Units Units Point Point Full 

Grade or Symbol Attempted Earned Value Value Credit 


Option 1 Option 2 
Satisfactory Grade 


A A 

Yes 

Yes 

4 

4 

Yes 

B B 

Yes 

Yes 

3 

3 

Yes 

C 

Yes 

Yes 

2 

2 

Yes 

Unsatisfactory Grade 






D 

Yes 

Yes 

1 

1 

No 

NC 

* 

No 

None 

0 

No 

F 

Yes 

No 

0 

0 

No 

Option 3 






CR 

* 

Yes 

0 

2 

Yes 

NC 

* 

No 

0 

0 

No 

Administrative Symbols 






1 (Incomplete) 

♦ ♦ 

No 

None 

None 

No 

W (Withdrawal) 

No 

No 

0 

0 

No 

AU (Audit) 

No 

No 

0 

0 

No 

SP (Satisfactory Progress) ... 

No 

No 

0 

0 

No 

RD (Report Delayed) 

No 

No 

0 

0 

No 

TOTALS 

Used 

Counted 

Used 

Counted 



in 

Toward 

in 

Toward 



CPA 

Objective 

CPA 

Progress 



* Credit/No Credit course units are not included in grade-point computations; however Credit/No Credit course units 
attempted are included in progress-point computations. 

*• If not completed within one calendar year the "1" will be counted as an "F” (or "NC”) for grade-point and progress- 
point calculation. 

0 Undergraduate courses only. 


Grading Policies 51 

Selection of a grading option, with certain exceptions, is the responsibility of the student. 
Graduate students must use Option 1 for courses that are on study plans leading to master's 
degrees. 

Exceptions are those courses designated by the faculty to be graded solely on either an 
Option 2 or Option 3 basis. These courses will be so designated in the Class Schedule (and 
shall not be changed by the faculty after publication of the Class Schedule) for each semester 
and may be included in major, core, or special program requirements. 

The Instructor shall grade all students using the traditional A, B, C, D, or F grades except in 
Credit/No Credit courses, and the registrar shall make the necessary changes from A, B, C, D 
or F. converting A, B, C to Credit and D, F to No Credit In undergraduate courses; and A, B to 
Credit and C, D, F to No Credit in graduate level courses. In those courses offered only on a 
CredIt/No Credit basis, the instructor shall assign grades of "Credit" or "No Credit" or 
appropriate administrative symbols, i.e., "I" (Incomplete), "SP" (Satisfactory Progress). 


NONTRADITIONAL GRADE OPTIONS 

Nontraditional grading options are available to undergraduate students, nonobjective 
graduate students, and to classified graduate students for courses not included In the 
approved study plan. Any student attempting a course using either of the nontraditional 
grading options must meet the prerequisites for that course. Each student shall be permitted 
to select courses in subjects outside of the major requirements for enrollment on a 
Credit/No Credit basis (grading Option 3). The phrase "major requirements" shall be taken 
to Include core plus concentration (or option) requirements in departments using such 
terms, and professional course requirements in teacher education curricula. A student in any 
one term may take a maximum of two courses under Option 2, or one course from Option 2 
and one course from Option 3 (but not two courses under Option 3). In addition, he may 
enroll in a required course offered only under Option 3; however, a maximum of 36 units of 
Credit/No Credit (or pass/fail) courses including those transferred from other institutions 
may be counted toward the baccalaureate. 

Students shall Inform the registrar up to the end of the fourth week of classes regarding the 
selection of grading options in designated courses. If a student does not do so, he shall be 
graded under Option 1. 


A, B, Q No Credit (Option 2) 

There is no difference In grade-point values or other essentials between letter grades in this 
option and the traditional letter grades. The principal differences are that NC (No Credit) 
replaces both the D and F as an "unsatisfactory grade" and has "O" progress-point value in 
undergraduate courses, and replaces C, D and F in graduate courses. No Credit grades are 
included in progress computations. 

Credit/ No Credit (Option 3) 

Under Option 3 the term "Credit" signifies that the student's academic performance was 
such that he was awarded full credit in undergraduate courses with a quality level of 
achievement equivalent to a "C" grade or better. In all graduate level courses "Credit 
signifies academic performance equivalent to "B" or "A" grades. "No Credit" signifies that 
the student attempted the course but that his performance did not warrant credit toward his 
objective. As In Option 2, No Credit (NC) grades are included in progress point com- 
putations. 

Ordinarily, a student shall be limited to one non-major course per term using this option, ex- 
clusive of courses offered only on a Credit/No Credit basis. 


When an undergraduate student changes his major field of study to one where he has com- 
pleted courses on a Credit basis, such lower division courses shall be included in his major 


52 Administrative Symbols 

requirements. Upper division courses may be included at the option of the de[:)artment 
upon petition by the student. 


ADVISORY CAUTION: Undergraduate students who plan to pursue graduate or 
professional studies later are advised to be selective in opting for courses on a 
Credit/No Credit basis. As a general rule (advisory only), coursework that is 
preparatory or prerequisite to advanced specialized study should be completed 
and evaluated on a letter grade basis and not Credit/No Credit. 


ADMINISTRATIVE SYMBOLS 

Incomplete (I) 

A grade of Incomplete (I) may be given only when, in the opinion of the instructor, a student 
cannot complete a course during the semester of enrollment for reasons beyond his control. 
Such reasons are assumed to include: illness of the student or of members of his immediate 
family; extraordinary financial problems; loss of outside position; and other exigencies. In 
assigning a grade of "I", the instructor will file with his eJepartment, a statement of the 
specific requirements for completion of coursework. Such rectuirements will not inc lude or 
necessitate retaking the course. This statement will also inclucfe a provisional grade in- 
dicating the quality of work completed at that time, and the instructor's designation of the 
time limit, allowed for completion of course reejuirements. Upon later completion of the 
course requirements, the Instructor shall initiate a change to a grade of A, B, C, D or F, or CR 
(Credit), NC (No Credit) If the course was offered only for such grades. When the instructor 
is no longer available, instructional departments will determine procedures for completion 
of course requirements and assigning grades for such completed coursework. 

An Incomplete (I) signifies that a portion of required coursework has not been completed 
and evaluated in the prescribed time period and that there is still possibility of earning c reclit. 
It is the responsibility of the student to bring pertinent information to the instruc tor and to 
reach agreement on the means by which the remaining course requirements will be 
satisfied. A final grade is assigned when the work agreed upon has been completed and 
evaluated. 

An "Incomplete" must be made up within one calendar year immediately following the end 
of the term in which it was assigned. This limitation prevails whether or not the student main- 
tains continuous enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an "In- 
complete" being counted as equivalent to an "F" (or an "NC") for grade-point average and 
progress-point computations. 

Withdrawal (W) 

The symbol "W" indicates that the student was permitted to drop the course after the 20th 
day of Instruction (university census date) with the approval of the instructor and 
department chair. It carries no connotation of quality of performance and is not used in 
calculating grade point averages or progress points. Withdrawal is permitted during the first 
20 days of classes without record of enrollment. 

After the first 20 days of classes, students are expected to complete all courses in which they 
are enrolled. FHowever, for serious and compelling reasons, such as ilinc'ss, the student may, 
by obtaining appropriate authorizations, withdraw from a class or classc's and receive the 
symbol of "W" (withdrawal). Authorization to withdraw after the census date aiicl [)ric)r to 
the last three weeks of Instruction, shall be granted only with the approval of the* instruc tor 
and the department chair or school dean. All requests for permission to withdraw under 
these circumstances and all approvals shall be made in writing on the "Change of Program" 
form and shall briefly state the reason for the withdrawal. The completed c hange of program 
form shall be filed at the Registrar's Office by the student or his proxy. 

Withdrawals shall not be permitted during the final three weeks of instruc tioti except In 
cases such as accident or serious illness where the assignment of an "Incomplete" is not 
practicable. Ordinarily, withdrawals in this category will involve total withdrawal from the 


Administrative Symbols 53 

campus, except that Credit, or an Incomplete may be assigned loi courses in whic h sullic icMii 
work has been completed to permit an evaluation to be* made'. Recjuc'sis for permission to 
withdraw from all classes under these circumstances, with authorizations ^rs dc'sc r ibed .ibove, 
shall be made on the change of program form and shall be* filed by the studcMit, or his proxy, 
with the registrar. 

Audit (AU) 

The symbol "AU'' is used by the registrar in those instances where a studc'nt has c'nrolleil in a 
course either for information or other purposes not related to the student's lotmal .rc ademic 
objective. An auditor may not change his registration to obtain credit altcM the* kist dtite to 
add courses to the study list. An auditor is not permitted to take examinations In the* c oursc*; 
therefore, there Is no basis for evaluation and a formal grade report. 


Satisfactory Progress (SP) 

The "SP" symbol is used in connection with thesis, project or similar courses that extend 
beyond one academic term. It indicates that work Is in progress, and has been evaluated and 
found to be satisfactory to date, but that assignment of a final grade must await completion 
of additional coursework. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted may not exceed the 
total number applicable to the student's educational objective. Work is to be completed 
within a stipulated time period which may not exceed one year except for graduate degree 
thesis or project for which the time may be up to two years, but may not exceed the overall 
time limit for completion of all master's degree requirements. Any extension of time limit 
must receive prior authorization by the dean of the school (or the dean's designee) In which 
the course Is offered. 

Report Delayed (RD) 

The "RD" symbol is used in those cases where a delay in the reporting of a final grade is due 
to circumstances beyond the control of the student. The symbol is assigned by the registrar 
and should be replaced by a more appropriate grading symbol as soon as possible. An "RD" 
shall not be included in calculations of a grade-point average or in determination of progress 
points. 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the end of each 
semester. Many students also \eaye self-addressed post cards for instructors of specific 
courses to send them earlier reports. 

Examinations 

Final examinations, if required by the instructor, will be given at times scheduled by the un- 
iversity. Once established, the final examination schedule may not be changed unless 
approved by the dean of the school. No makeup final examination will be given except for 
reason of illness or other verified emergencies. 

Grade-Point Averages: Repetition of Courses 

Each undergraduate student shall complete with a grade-point average of 2.0: 

A. All units accepted toward a degree, including those accepted by transfer from another 
institution, 

B. All units in the major, 

C. All units attempted at the university. 

The numerical grade-point values in the grading system chart are intended to give an exact 
determination of a student's scholarship. To compute the grade-point average for 
coursework at Cal State Fullerton, the point value of each grade with the exception noted 
below is multiplied first by the unit value of the course to obtain a total of all grade points 
earned. The total is then divided by the total units attempted in all courses in which grades of 
A, B, C, D or F were received. The resulting figure is the grade-point average (GPA). 


54 Continuous Residency Regulations 

The exception in grade-point computations is as follows: Undergraduate students may 
repeat, using the traditional grading system (A, B, C, D, F), those courses for which grades of 
D or F were earned. In computing the grade-point average of a student who repeats courses 
in which he received D or F, only the most recently earned grades and grade points shall be 
used for the first 16 units repeated. Nevertheless, the original grade on the academic record 
shall not be changed or eradicated. 

In the case of any additional repetition (beyond the 16 unit limitation), both grades are con- 
sidered in computing grade-point averages. Flowever, successful repetition of a course 
originally passed carries no additional unit credit toward a degree or credential except for 
certain courses such as independent study or practicum (specified in this catalog as ''may be 
repeated for credit"). 

Grade Changes 

All grades except Incomplete (I) are final when filed by the instructor in his end-of-terrn 
course grade report. Each student is notified by mall of the grades earned during the term. 
These grades become a part of the official record and may be changed only upon official 
authorization by the instructor and department chair. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of courses taken at the university are issued only with the written per- 
mission of the student concerned. Partial transcripts are not issued. A fee of $1 for each 
transcript issued must be received before the record can be forwarded. 

Normally transcripts are available within three working days, except at the end of the 
semester vyhen the student should allow about 10 days after the last day of the semester. 

Transcripts from other institutions, which have been presented for admission or evaluation, 
become a part of the student's permanent academic file and are not returned or copied for 
distribution. Students desiring transcripts covering work attempted elsewhere should re- 
quest them from the institutions concerned. 

CONTINUOUS RESIDENCY REGULATIONS 

Good Standing 

"Good standing" indicates that a student is eligible to continue and is free from financial 
obligation to the university. A student under academic disqualification, disciplinary 
suspension or disciplinary expulsion is not eligible to receive a statement of "good standing" 
on transcripts issued by the university or on other documents. 

Choice of Catalog Regulations for Meeting Degree Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing on in the 
same curriculum in any California State University or College, in any of the California com- 
munity colleges or in any combination of California community colleges and The California 
State University and Colleges may, for purposes of meeting graduation requirements, elect 
to meet the graduation requirements of The California State University or College from 
which he will graduate in effect either at the time of his entering the curriculum or at the 
time of his graduation therefrom, except that substitutions for discontinued courses may be 
authorized or required by the proper college authorities. 

Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Students 

A graduate student with a degree objective is expected to maintain continuous enrollment 
in the university (summer sessions and extension excluded) until completion of the degree, 
If a student pursuing an advanced degree finds it impossible to attend during a certain 
semester, and Is not eligible for a leave of absence, as detailed elsewhere in this catalog, he 
may request permission to register in Graduate Studies 700, a course with no unit credit, 
which does not require class attendance. 

If a graduate student who has completed student teaching and is pursuing a standard 
elementary or secondary teaching credential finds that he cannot enroll in courses leading to 


Academic Progress, Probation and Disqualification 55 

the credential during a certain semester, he may enroll in Credential Studies 701. This course 
is a course with no unit credit, which does not require class attendance. Students may not 
enroll in Credential Studies 701 for a third consecutive semester. 

A graduate student who fails to register has discontinued enrollment in the university. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may petition for a leave of absence and if approved may upon his return continue 
under the catalog requirements that applied to his enrollment prior to the absence. A leave 
of absence may be granted for a maximum of one year. Illness is the only routinely approved 
reason for a leave of absence. Students should realize that an approved leave of absence 
does not reserve a place for them in the university; they must reapply. 

Complete Withdrawal from the University 

Students who wish to withdraw from the university must complete a change of program 
form. See section on refund of fees for possible refunds. No student may withdraw after the 
date shown on the university calendar as the last day of instruction. Complete withdrawal 
from the university is accomplished by following the procedures for dropping classes. 

STUDENT HONORS 

Dean's Honor List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list of un- 
dergraduate students whose grade-point average for the previous term has been 3.5 or 
better. Students are notified in writing when they have earned this distinction. Eligibility Is 
based on a minimum of 12 units of graded coursework. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation have been defined by the Faculty Council in three classifications: 


With honors GPA 3.5 

With high honors GPA 3.85 

With highest honors GPA 4.0 


ACADEMIC PROGRESS, PROBATION AND 
DISQUALIFICATION 


For purposes of determining a student's ability to remain in the university both quality of 
performance and progress towards his educational objective will be considered. 

Academic Probation 

An undergraduate student shall be placed on academic probation if in any semester his 
cumulative grade-point average or his grade-point average at Cal State Fullerton falls below 
2.0 (grade of C on a five-point scale), or if he fails to earn twice as many progress points as all 
units attempted during that semester. The student shall be advised of probation status 
promptly and, except in unusual instances, before the start of the next consecutive 
enrollment period. 

An undergraduate student shall be removed from academic probation and restored to 
standing when he earns a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 (C) in all academic work 
attempted, in all such work attempted at Cal State Fullerton, and is making satisfactory 
progress towards his educational objective by achieving at least twice as many progress 
points as units attempted during each semester. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program in either conditionally classified 
or classified standing shall be subject to academic probation if he fails to maintain a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (grade of B on a five-point scale) in all units 
attempted after admission to the program. 


56 Academic Progress, Probation and Disqualification 

Academic Disqualification 

An undergraduate student on academic probation shall be subject to academic dis- 
qualification if: 

1. As a lower division student (fewer than 60 semester hours of college work completed) 
he falls 15 or more grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or 
In all units attempted at this institution, or fails to earn during any semester twice as 
many progress points as all units attempted in that semester. 

2. As a junior (60 to 89 V 2 semester hours of college work completed) he falls nine or more 
grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or in all units 
attempted at this institution, or falls to earn during any semester twice as many progress 
points as all units attempted in that semester. 

3. As a senior (90 or more semester hours of college work completed) he falls six or more 
grade points below a 2.0 (C) average on all college units attempted or in all units 
attempted at this institution, or fails to earn during any semester twice as many progress 
points as all units attempted in that semester. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program shall be subject to dis- 
qualification If while on probation he fails to earn sufficient grade points to remove himself 
from probationary status. Disqualification may be either from further registration in a par- 
ticular program or from further enrollment in the university, as determined by appropriate 
campus authority. 

A post-baccalaureate student (unclassified or classified) shall be disqualified if he falls below 
a 2.0 (C) average in all units attempted at this institution as a post-baccalaureate student, or 
fails to earn during any semester twice as many progress points as all units attempted in that 
semester. 

Student Conduct 

The university properly assumes that all students are in attendance to secure a sound 
education and that they will conduct themselves as mature citizens of the campus com- 
munity. Compliance with all regulations of the university is therefore expected. If, however, 
on any occasion a student or an organization is alleged to have compromised accepted un- 
iversity policies or standards, appropriate judiciary procedures shall be initiated through the 
established university judicial process. Every effort will be made to encourage and support 
the development of self-discipline and control by students and student organizations. The 
dean of student services, aided by all members of the faculty and advised by the Student Af- 
fairs Committee of the faculty, is responsible to the president of the university for the 
behavior of students in their relationships to the university. The president in turn is responsi- 
ble to the Chancellor and the Trustees of The California State University and Colleges who 
themselves are governed by specific laws of the State of California. 

A list of specifically prohibited behavior Is available upon request from the dean of student 
services and also is posted on the administrative bulletin boards in the breezeway of the 
Letters and Science Building and in the second-floor lobby of Langsdorf Hall. Prohibited 
behavior includes hazing, now defined as acts likely to cause physical or emotional harm. 

Students have the right to appeal certain disciplinary actions taken by appropriate university 
authorities. Regulations governing original hearings and appeal rights and procedures have 
been carefully detailed to provide maximum protection to both the individual charged and 
the university community. Information about the operation of the judicial system involving 
student discipline may be obtained in the Office of Special Projects. 

Debts Owed to the University 

From time to time the student may become indebted to the university. This could occur, for 
example, when the student fails to repay money borrowed from the university. Similarly, 
debts occur when the student fails to pay library fees, or when the student fails to pay for 
other services provided by the university at the request of the student. Should this occur. 
Sections 42380 and 42381 of Title 5 of the California Administrative Code authorize the un- 
iversity to withhold ''permission to register, or use facilities for which a fee is authorized to 


57 


Right of Academic Appeal 

be charged, to receive services, materials, food or merchandise or any combination of the 
above from any person owing a debt" until the debt is paid. For example, under these 
provisions the university may withhold permission to register, and may withhold other ser- 
vices such as grades and transcripts. If a student feels that he or she does not owe all or part 
of a particular fee or charge, the student should contact the business office. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students may petition for review of certain university academic regulations when unusual 
circumstances exist. It should be noted, however, that academic regulations whcm they are 
contained in Title 5, California Administrative Code, are not subject for petition. 

Petition forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records and must first be 
reviewed and signed by the student's advisor. Action will then be taken on the [)etition atul 
the student will be notified of this decision. A copy of the action will also be placed in the 
student's folder in the Office of the Registrar. 

RIGHT OF NONCOMPLIANCE, RISK ACTIVITIES 

Certain university activities either within or outside of the classroom may involve varying 
degrees of risk to the participants. It Is university policy that the instructor direc ting such ac- 
tivities divulge fully to all potential participants the specific nature of such risks and obtain 
from them their expressed or Implied consent prior to undertaking activities. 

The student who at any time comes to believe that the risks to himself, whether physical or 
psychological, are excessive has the responsibility to withdraw from participation at that time 
and to inquire of the instructor if there are alternative means of fulfilling the requirements 
without penalty. If there is none, the student may petition for withdrawal from the course 
without penalty or appeal for an appropriate modification of the activity. The appeal may be 
made either to the chair of the department concerned, or to the chair of the Committee on 
Activities Involving Human Subjects, or both. 

RIGHT OF ACADEMIC APPEAL 

The student who believes he has been graded capriciously or treated with obvious prejudice 
by faculty members or administrators may initiate steps for an academic appeal. In all cases 
the student should first make an effort to resolve the issue by consulting the faculty member 
or administrator concerned. If the Issue cannot be resolved, the student should consult with 
the dean of student services or director of special projects. 




► . C;. >;v - w' . , 7 ' .‘ 

K-* . tj ^ ‘ ? V' ' V ‘ 

- ^■. r': .Vr 'I ” .]'-.>■' -f , - ' 

/V . , ,'■ ' - 1 | . ■ * / 

, • . • - - / ' ■ ' ■’ ’ 


, , ... -',: - ^k:; ■ .!,.•> '.' -.I'' 

- ■ ; , ■. .^- , , ,: . • . -.:-;. 4 ,;,'' 

,. -. . . . - , ■ ■ • V’"^ ■■: ^' r ■ iV;' ;:v/ - 

.' ' ■ 1 -., ■ ■ . ' ‘ ■■•'-’I ^ • ' ^ ■•"';• -Tj^. ‘ ny-'* '^j - 


DIE6IPE1E 





60 


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 


A student is eligible for graduation if he is in good standing and fulfills the following 
requirements: 

7 . General Education 

To be eligible for a baccalaureate degree from Cal State Fullerton, the student shall have 
completed a minimum of 45 semester units of general education courses selected in accor- 
dance with the pattern designated below. Such courses may be lower division courses or up- 
per division courses for which the student qualifies. 

/. Natural Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of two courses, one from each of two fields 
which shall Include the following: biological sciences, chemistry, earth sciences, 
physics and physical science. 

//. Social Sciences Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields 
which shall include the following: anthropology, economics, geography, history, 
political science, psychology and sociology. 

Note: Of the courses taken to meet the requirements in U.S. history, Constitution, 
state and local government (California Administrative Code, Section 40404), a max- 
imum of three units may be applied for credit in Section II. 

Ill Arts — Humanities Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields 
which shall include the following: art, drama, language (English, intermediate or ad- 
vanced courses in foreign languages), literature (American, comparative, English, 
foreign), music, philosophy and speech. 

IV. Basic Subjects Minimum: nine units 

The student shall select a minimum of three courses, one from each of three fields 
which shall Include the following: computer science, elementary foreign languages, 
health education, mathematics, oral communication, physical education, reading, 
statistics and writing. 

V. General Education Electives 

The student may fulfill any remaining units required for general education by 
selecting any undergraduate course offered by the university for credit except 
courses which apply to the student's major or credential program. Transfer students 
certified under provisions of California Administrative Code, Title V, as having met 
the 40-unit minimum general education requirements will be required to complete 
five additional units In general education selected from two or more sections, l-V 
above. 

2 . Statutory Requirements in American Institutions and Values 

In addition to general education-breadth requirements California Administrative Code, 
Section 40404, states that for graduation the student is required "to demonstrate com- 
petence In the Constitution of the United States, and in American history including the study 
of American Institutions and ideals, and of the principles of state and local government es- 
tablished under the Constitution of this state." To meet this requirement, the student may 
select the following alternatives: (1) pass a comprehensive examination in these fields, (2) 
pass Political Science 100 and a course in U. S. history or American Studies 201, (3) pass a 
combination of Political Science 300 and History 170A or 170B. 


Bachelor's Degree 61 

Note: Coursework completed to satisfy Section 40404 may be applied in the social sciences 
area of general education to a maximum of three units. 


3 . Electives 

After fulfilling the requirements in general education, American institutions and values, and 
a specific major (and possibly a minor), each student Is free to choose the rest of the courses 
needed to complete the 124 semester units required for graduation. Different majors vary 
considerably In both the number of units they require in their own and related fields. They 
also vary considerably in the amount of latitude or choice they permit In selecting courses to 
satisfy the major requirement. The general education requirement encourages great 
freedom of choice within the broad categories of the natural sciences, social sciences, arts 
and humanities, and basic subjects. Students at the university use their electives to broaden 
their general educations, deepen some aspect of their specialties, pursue work In related 
fields, and satisfy curiosities and enthusiasms for particular subjects or areas of interest. 


4. Units 

(a) Total units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for graduation with a bachelor of arts 
degree. The Bachelor of Science in Engineering requires a minimum of 132 semester 
units. 

(b) Upper division units 

Completion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Resident units 

Completion of a minimum of 24 semester units In residence is required. At least one- 
half of these units must be completed among the last 20 semester units counted toward 
the degree. Extension credit, or credit by examination, may not be used to fulfill the 
minimum residence requirement. 


5 . Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on ail units attempted, including 
those accepted by transfer from another Institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted at Cal State 
Fullerton. 


6 . Major 

Completion of ail requirements for a major as specified by appropriate university authority is 
required. At least 24 units, Including 12 at the upper division level, must be applied ex- 
clusively to the major requirements and may not be used to meet the requirements of 
general education. 


7. Multiple Majors and Second Baccalaureate Degrees 

Within the units required for the baccalaureate It is possible for a student to complete the 
requirements for more than one major within a degree program when the additional major 
is within the degree of the first major. At least 24 units, including 12 at the upper division 
level. In each major must be applied exclusively to the respective major and may not be used 
to meet requirements in other majors or in general education. The student shall declare the 
additional major with the appropriate department not later than the beginning of the 
student's final year of study. The completion of additional majors will be noted at the time of 
graduation by appropriate entries on the academic record and in the commencement 
program. 


62 


Bachelor's Degree 


Second baccalaureate 

(a) First degree completed elsewhere, second at Cal State Fullerton 

Students seeking a bachelor's degree from Cal State Fullerton after having received a 
baccalaureate from another Institution may qualify for graduation with the approval 
and recommendation of the faculty upon completion of the following: 


(1) general education requirements 

(2) ail requirements in the major field of study 

(3) residence and scholarship requirements 

(b) Two baccalaureates from Cal State Fullerton 

With the approval and recommendation of the faculty, a student may qualify for a 
second baccalaureate under the following circumstances: 

(1) The second field of study is offered in a different degree (e.g., bachelor of arts to 
bachelor of science) 

(2) At least 24 units are earned In residence after the conferral of the first degree 

(3) All requirements of the major are fulfilled 

Units included in second baccalaureate programs may not apply to graduate degrees or 
credential programs. 

8. Minor 

Completion of a minor field Is not required for the baccalaureate degree at this time. 

9 . Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation should file an application for a graduation requirement check in 
the Office of the Registrar during registration for the semester prior to the semester in which 
he expects to graduate (please refer to the current schedule of class for the deadlines applied 
to requesting and returning graduation checks). A senior should have completed at least 100 
units (including the current work in progress) and a substantial portion of his major re- 
quirements before requesting a graduation check. If the candidate does not complete the 
requirements In the semester indicated, he must file a change of graduation date in the Of- 
fice of the Registrar. The original graduation check is valid as long as a student is In con- 
tinuous attendance and is completing the major under which the graduation check was re- 
quested. 

70 . Approval and Recommendation by the Faculty of the University 


63 


THE PROGRAM OF MASTER'S DEGREES 


Master's degree programs offered at Cal State Fullerton are listed on page 80 and described 
in the appropriate section of this catalog under "University Curricula." Program descriptions 
and additional information are contained In the Craduafe Bulletin, copies of which are 
available in the Office of Admissions and the Graduate Office. 

Master's degrees in other areas are under consideration and will be announced when 
approved. 


STANDARDS FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Graduate study deals with more complex ideas and demands more sophisticated techniques, 
searching analysis, and creative thinking than undergraduate study. The research required is 
extensive in both primary and secondary sources and the quality of writing expected is high. 
The student is advised to consider these factors when deciding upon the amount of 
coursework to be undertaken during any one semester. 


GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

General requirements for the master's degree include a study plan consisting of a minimum 
of 30 semester units of approved upper division and graduate (500-level) coursework taken 
after the baccalaureate and completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average. The 
coursework should normally be completed within five years (see "Time Limit for 
Completion"). For specific requirements of particular programs, please see the descriptions 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

In the degree program: 

1. Not less than 24 semester units shall be completed in residence. 

2. Not less than one-half of the units required for the degree shall be in graduate 
(500-level) courses. 

3. Not more than six semester units shall be allowed for a thesis if a thesis is required. 
Some type of final evaluation, near the end of the student's work toward the master's 
degree. Is required. It may be a thesis, a project, a comprehensive examination, or any com- 
bination of these. 

Each student's program for a master's degree (including eligibility, classified standing, can- 
didacy, and award of the degree) must be approved by the graduate program adviser, the 
graduate committee, and the dean of graduate studies. 


GRADUATE REGULATIONS 

The following are in addition to other policies and procedures applying to both un- 
dergraduates and graduates described elsewhere In this catalog and in the appropriate Class 
Schedule. Requirements of individual programs are shown in the appropriate sections of this 
catalog. Also, individual academic areas may have established particular rules governing 
programs offered. 

Students are advised to consult the Graduate Bulletin for detailed instructions concerning 
steps in the master's degree program. It Is the student's responsibility to initiate the requests 
for classified standing, advancement to candidacy, and for a graduation check at the 
appropriate times. The deadline for requesting the graduation check appears in the official 
calendar for each semester. 

Since all policies and procedures are subject to change, by appropriate authority, students 
should consult class schedules and other official announcements for possible revision of 
policies and procedures stated herein. 


64 


Master's Degrees 

Post-Baccalaureate and Graduate Application Procedures 

All applicants for any type of post-baccalaureate or graduate standing (e.g., master's degree 
applicants; those seeking credentials, and those interested in taking courses for professional 
growth) must file a complete application within the appropriate filing period. Second bac- 
calaureate degree aspirants should apply as undergraduate degree applicants. A complete 
application for post-baccalaureate or graduate standing includes all of the materials required 
for undergraduate applicants plus the supplementary graduate admissions application. 
Applicants who completed undergraduate degree requirements and graduated the 
preceding term are also required to complete and submit an application and the $20 non- 
refundable application fee. Since applicants for post-baccalaureate and graduate programs 
may be limited to the choice of a single campus on each application, redirection to alter- 
native campuses or later changes of campus choice will be minimal. In the event that an 
applicant wishes to be assured of initial consideration by more than one campus, it will be 
necessary to submit a separate application (including fee) to each. Applications may be ob- 
tained from the graduate studies office of any California State University or College campus 
in addition to the sources noted for undergraduate applicants. 

Applicants should consult the section of this catalog, "Admission to the University," for In- 
formation concerning "Category Quotas and Systemwide Impacted Programs," 
"Application Filing Periods," "Space Reservations" and "Hardship Petitions." 


Admission of Post-Baccalaureate and Graduate Students 

Post-Baccalaureate Standing: Unclassified 

For admission to unclassified post-baccalaureate standing, an applicant must: (a) hold an 
acceptable baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting 
association (e.g.. Western Association of Schools and Colleges for California) or have com- 
pleted equivalent academic preparation as determined by an appropriate campus authority; 
(b) have attained a grade-point average of at least 2.5 (on a five-point scale) in the last 60 
semester (90 quarter) units attempted; and, (c) have been in good standing at the last college- 
attended. Admission to a California State University or College with post-baccalaureate un- 
classified standing does not constitute admission to graduate degree curricula. 

An applicant who does not qualify for admission under the provisions of (a) or (b), or both, as 
In the preceding, may be admitted by special action if on the basis of acceptable evidence it 
Is determined by appropriate campus authority that the applicant possesses sufficient 
academic, professional and other potential pertinent to the educational objectives to merit 
such action. 


Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

An applicant who is eligible for admission to a California State University or College under 
unclassified post-baccalaureate standards as above, but who has deficiencies in prerequisite 
preparation which in the opinion of the appropriate campus authority can be met by 
specified additional preparation, including qualifying examinations, may be admitted to an 
authorized graduate degree curriculum with conditionally classified graduate standing. 
There may be additional requirements for admission with conditionally classified standing in 
particular programs. Consult the program descriptions. 


Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who is eligible for admission to a California State University or College in un- 
classified or conditionally classified standing may be admitted to an authorized graduate 
degree curriculum of the campus as classified if the graduate student satisfactorily meets the 
professional, personal, scholastic or other standards for admission to the graduate degree 
curriculum, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate campus authority may 
prescribe. Consult the program descriptions. Only those applicants who show promise of 
success and fitness will be admitted to graduate degree curricula, and only those who con- 
tinue to demonstrate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and fitness shall be eligible 
to proceed in such curricula. 


Master's Degrees 


65 


Advancement to Candidacy 

A student who has been classified (as above) may, upon application and with subsequent 
approvals, be advanced to candidacy, following the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 
12 units of coursework on the approved study plan. A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 
(B) in all coursework on the study plan is required; other scholastic, professional and per- 
sonal standards, the passing of examinations, and other qualifications, may be prescribed. 

Admission From Nonaccredited Schools 

An applicant who is a graduate of a nonaccredited school must apply for admission as an un- 
dergraduate to complete requirements for a bachelor's degree from this Institution. 
However, once admitted, a student in this category who gives evidence of unusual promise 
and superior background may petition the school or department concerned for conditional- 
ly classified graduate standing. If the petition Is granted, the student may then proceed in the 
graduate program. 

Residence Requirement 

A student Is considered to be in residence when registered during regular semesters at Cal 
State Fullerton. Of the minimum of 30 semester units of approved coursework required for 
the master's degree, not less than 24 shall be completed in residence at this institution. 
Approved units earned in summer sessions may be substituted for regular semester unit re- 
quirements on a unit for unit basis. Extension credit and credit by examination may not be 
used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement and are not normally acceptable as part 
of the six units of approved transfer work permitted. See also "Continuous Enrollment," 
below. 

For a modification of this requirement, see the Master of Public Administration external 
degree program. 

Election of Curriculum Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular semesters and continuing in the 
same curriculum may elect to meet the degree requirements In effect either when entering 
the curriculum or at the time of completion of degree requirements, except that sub- 
stitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the proper authorities. 

Continuous Enrollment 

A graduate student with a graduate degree objective should maintain continuous 
enrollment during regular semesters (summer sessions and extension excluded) until award 
of the degree. 

A graduate student who falls to register has discontinued enrollment in this institution and in 
the graduate degree program. If the student wishes to resume studies, it will be necessary to 
reapply for admission to Cal State Fullerton and to the degree program. This policy is design- 
ed to eliminate the need for readmisslon to the university, provide opportunity for con- 
tinuous use of facilities, including the Library, and assure the development of an integrated 
program, adequately supervised, and effectively terminated within the time limitations 
allowed by regulations. 

Students who may have completed all coursework, but who may not have satistactorily com- 
pleted a comprehensive examination or other requirement, are expected to maintain con- 
tinuous enrollment. 

Students admitted to the external degree program in public administration are not subject to 
this requirement. 

If a graduate student pursuing an advanced degree finds It impossible to attend during a 
certain semester, permission may be requested from the academic area sponsoring the 
graduate degree sought to register in Graduate Studies 700, a credit/no credit course with no 
units of credit, which does not require class attendance. Registration in Graduate Studies 700 
will normally be restricted to graduate students who have been classified or who are in a 
prescribed prerequisite program for a specific graduate degree (conditionally classified). 

for a student whose only objective is a credential, a similar course. Credential Studies 701, is 
available. Consult the School of Education for further details. 


66 


Master's Degrees 

Applicability of Courses Taken During Summer Sessions 

Cal State Fullerton normally conducts a 12-week summer session. Appropriate courses taken 
during the summer session may be applied to a graduate degree program, providing the 
courses are approved in advance by the appropriate authorities. Since the funding of 
graduate work during the summer months does not include the necessary advisement and 
supervision, appropriate advisers and committees may not be available. 

A normal full-time program of study in the summer session is up to 1 Vs units of coursework 
per week of instruction. Any student who enrolls by error in more than 16 units during a 12- 
week summer session will find that credit for excess units will not be counted toward a 
degree, credential or other objective. Any exceptions must be petitioned through the Office 
of Admissions and Records. 

It should be noted that enrollment in a summer session does not constitute admission to the 
university (matriculation). Any student desiring a master's degree must be admitted to a 
regular semester (fall or spring) and is expected to be enrolled continuously until award of 
the degree (see "Continuous Enrollment"). 

Grade-Point Average Standards 

A minimum grade-point average of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted is required for 
admission of all students for enrollment beyond the baccalaureate level, except that, under 
certain conditions, an applicant who does not meet this requirement may be admitted by 
special action. See "Post-Baccalaureate Standing: Unclassified," under "Admission of Post- 
Baccalaureate and Graduate Students." 

Minimal grade-point average requirements for admission to graduate degree programs with 
conditionally classified graduate standing are shown in the descriptions of graduate 
programs elsewhere in this catalog. For further Information, consult the appropriate 
graduate adviser, the Office of Admissions or the Graduate Office. 

The required GPA for the granting of classified graduate standing varies, according to the 
particular program. Consult descriptions of programs in this catalog and in the Graduate 
Bulletin. However, a student is expected to have earned a 3.0 grade-point average in ail post- 
baccalaureate coursework taken at this university plus such transfer courses as are applied to 
the study plan. 

Students In conditionally classified and classified graduate standing are subject to academic 
probation and, subsequently, disqualification if they do not maintain a cumulative grade- 
point average of at least 3.0 In all units attempted subsequent to admission to the program. 
Progress points are not computed for students In graduate standing. 

Advancement to candidacy requires the completion of a minimum of 12 units on the study 
plan with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0, and whatever additional requirements 
there may be in a particular program. 

The 30 semester units of approved study plan coursework required for the degree must be 
completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade-point average. If a student approaches the com- 
pletion of the degree requirements with less than a 3.0 average, a request may be made to 
change the study plan to add no more than six units of coursework in order to achieve at 
least a 3.0 average (see "Changes in Study Plan," as follows). If a student's average at any time 
falls below such a level that it cannot be raised to a 3.0 within the prescribed limits of 
coursework, the student has in effect withdrawn from the master's program. 

Tests 

An applicant for admission with graduate standing in conditionally classified or classified 
graduate standing and declaring the objective of a Master of Business Administration is re- 
quired to submit the test scores from the Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business 
(Educational Testing Service). 

Similarly, an applicant for admission to the Master of Arts in Biology must submit test scores 
from the GRE Aptitude test and the Advanced test in biology. 


67 


Master's Degrees 

Other applicants may be admitted in conditionally classified graduate standing without test 
scores. However, test scores are required for admission to classified standing in many of the 
master's degree programs. See program descriptions in this catalog for the appropriate re- 
quirements and types of tests required. 

The Graduate Record Examinations are nationally administered and are given only a few 
times a year on specified dates. A current list of these dates is available at the Office of 
Counseling and Testing, and the Graduate Office. The student must make written 
application for the tests on a form available at the above offices which must be submitted to 
the particular testing service office by the applicable deadline. Since test results are 
measured against those of students who normally take the tests In their senior year and since 
they are required before the student can become a classified student, the taking of the tests 
should not be deferred. 

Limitation on Preclassification Coursework 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken at Cal State Fullerton prior to classified 
standing may be applied to a student's master's degree study plan. Any acceptable transfer 
work is excluded from the nine units permitted. Students who receive postgraduate credit 
for courses taken during their final semester as a senior may accumulate as many as 12 units. 

Inapplicable Courses 

Courses numbered 100 to 299 and in the 700 series may not be included in a master's degree 
study plan. Courses numbered 300 to 399 do not give graduate credit unless included on an 
approved graduate study plan. 

Courses taken to meet baccalaureate degree requirements, or postgraduate coursework 
taken to satisfy quantitative or qualitative deficiencies, may not be used on a master's degree 
study plan. Credit by examination and correspondence credit are not acceptable. 

Workshop, extension, and Institute coursework offered either at this institution or by other 
colleges or universities is not normally acceptable as part of a master's degree study plan. A 
student who desires to utilize such coursework should obtain approval from the graduate 
adviser and committee, and from the dean of graduate studies. When such coursework has 
been taken elsewhere, the student should provide evidence that the college or university 
concerned would consider such coursework acceptable toward a comparable graduate 
degree. Any such courses offered by other institutions, but which are not acceptable for 
their own graduate degrees, may not be accepted by this university for a graduate degree. 

Also see the sections following on "CR, P or S Grades" and "Time Limit for Completion." 

CR, P or S Grades 

Any course taken at this university with a grade of CR, P, S or similar cannot be accepted on a 
master's degree study plan. 

A course taken at another college or university with a grade of CR, P, S or similar cannot be 
accepted on a master's degree study plan unless such a course with such a grade is accep- 
table at that college or university for a graduate degree. 

Declassification 

Graduate students in classified standing may be declassified upon the recommendation of 
the appropriate academic unit, with a change to post-baccalaureate standing (unclassified), 
when one or more of the following conditions exist: 

1. The student's request for declassification is approved by the graduate committee. 

2. The student fails to maintain the grade-point average required in the master's degree 
program. 

3. The student's professional performance is judged to be unsatisfactory. 

4. The student fails to petition for an extension of the time limit. 


68 


Master's Degrees 


Time Limit for Completion 

All coursework on the master's degree study plan should normally be completed within five 
years. The university, at its option, may further extend the time if warranted by individual cir- 
cumstances and if the outdated work is validated by comprehensive examination, in the 
relevant additional course or subject field work or such other demonstration of competence 
as may be prescribed. Requests to take such comprehensive examinations, or accomplish 
updating by alternative means, should be made to appropriate graduate studies committees. 

When an examination is administered or the alternative completed, a report of successful 
completion will be made to the dean of graduate studies. The grade received on the original 
course will be used on the master's degree study plan, rather than the CR grade used for 
challenge examinations. 

The following shows the dates of expiration of courses according to the five-year limitation: 


Will exf^ire ii) 


Courses taken in 


1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

1979 

1980 

1981 


1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 


The five-year period is computed as the time between the actual date of completion of the 
earliest course and the month and year the degree is granted. 

Changes in Study Plan 

The student must complete the courses shown on the approved study plan on file in the 
Graduate Office and in the particular academic unit with at least a 3.0 (B) grade-point 
average. If a student wishes to make a change in the study plan, a request may be made on 
the appropriate form (copies available in the Graduate Office, and graduate program offices) 
in the academic unit offering the master's degree prior to registration for the coursework to 
be substituted or added. The recommendation for a change must be signed by the adviser. 
No course for which a grade has been assigned may be removed from a study plan. 

Minimum Full-Time Course Unit Load 

The minimum full-time unit load for a graduate student is either 12 units of coursework a 
semester or nine units of which six are in 500-level courses. Students for whom the unit 
count does not adequately reflect the study load may request a review. Consult the Graduate 
Office for further information. 

Maximum Course Unit Load 

Twelve units is considered to be a maximum course load for graduate students, but, on the 
approval of an adviser, in exceptional cases, a student may take more. 

Theses and Projects 

According to the definition approved by the university, a thesis is a systematic study of a 
significant problem. The problem, its major assumptions. Its significance, the methods and 
sources for gathering data, the analysis of data, and the conclusions and recommendations, 
should be clearly stated. A project is defined as either (1) the systematic development of a 
plan for, or the critical evaluation of a significant undertaking, or (2) a creative work such as a 
novel, a musical composition or a group of paintings. Quality of work accomplished is a ma- 
jor consideration in judging the acceptability of any thesis or project. The finished product 
must evidence originality, appropriate organization, clarity of purpose, critical analysis, and 
accuracy and completeness of documentation where needed. Mere description, cataloging, 
compilation or other superficial procedures are not adequate. Critical thinking and in- 
dependent thinking should characterize every thesis and every project. 


69 


Master^s Degrees 

Of the minimum of 30 semester units of approved coursework required for the master's 
degree, no more than six are allowed for a thesis. 

When a thesis is required the Library must be provided with the approved original copy, or a 
fully acceptable duplicated copy, in the approved binding, and a microfilm of it. An abstract, 
of not more than 150 words, must accompany the thesis, and will be published in the journal. 
Master's Abstracts. Arrangements for the binding, microfilming and publication of the 
abstract are made through the Titan Bookstore and include the execution of a publication 
agreement. The current fee (subject to change) for microfilming, publication of the abstract, 
and the archival copy is $21 (plus tax), plus $1 for postage. The fee (subject to change) for 
binding is $8.50 (plus tax). 

When a project is required, it will be filed with the academic unit offering the degree 
program. Some record of the project, or the project itself. Is preserved in the academic unit 
and, when appropriate, in the Library. When the appropriate authority recommends, a pro- 
ject or Its written record may be treated as a thesis. 

The thesis and, where appropriate, the project, must conform in matters of style and format 
to the rules in the section on "Theses and Projects" In the Graduate Bulletin. Since 
adherence to these rules must be checked and approved, and valuable assistance can be 
given with problems associated with illustrations, etc., students are advised to consult the 
Library adviser (in the reference area) well in advance of the final typing of the thesis. In ad- 
dition, schools, divisions, departments, and programs have adopted particular style manuals 
which are to be followed in matters of documentation and bibliography (see the chart in the 
Graduate Bulletin or consult the Graduate Office, or appropriate academic area). Some 
graduate programs use style manuals or guides designed for journal articles. Although these 
are helpful for abbreviations, tables, figures and footnoting, as well as other purposes, 
students should be aware of the difference between a thesis and an article and make 
appropriate adaptations, approved by the graduate program adviser. Theses from the Library 
shelves should not be used as examples of correct format. 

It is the student's responsibility to become acquainted with the appropriate rules and 
regulations and to make all necessary arrangements for the typing of the thesis, Including in- 
struction of the typist, if other than the student. An experienced typist Is strongly 
advised, although the university does not endorse or recommend typists. Adequate 
time should be allowed for reading and criticism by the adviser, the committee members, 
and the library clerk, for revisions, as needed, and for completion of the final edition of the 
thesis, including approvals. No changes or additions will be allowed after the final signatures 
have been obtained. 

The deadline for submission of the completed thesis to the adviser and committee is six 
weeks In advance of the last day of classes of the semester in which the student hopes to be 
awarded the degree, unless other arrangements are made with the school or department. 
The deadline for submission to the Library adviser is the last day of classes. The deadline for 
depositing the approved copy of the thesis in the Titan Bookstore and making the 
arrangements for binding, microfilming and publication of the abstract, is the last day of final 
examinations for the semester or session in which the degree is to be awarded. If a student s 
program requires a thesis, or If the project has been determined to be regarded as a thesis, 
the master's degree cannot be awarded unless the notification that the student has com- 
pleted this final step is received by the dean of graduate studies. 

Graduate Assistantships, Fellowships and Financial Aids 

A limited number of appointments as graduate assistants are available to outstanding 
graduate students who are working in graduate degree programs. These may pay up to $1,- 
540 per semester. If interested, consult the dean or chair of the appropriate academic area. 
Teaching fellowships are not currently available. 

Each year the State of California may award a certain number of graduate fellowships 
(payment of fees only) to qualified students who are residents of California. Applications 
may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office or the Graduate Office. 

The Graduate Office maintains a file of scholarship and fellowship opportunities offered by 
other educational Institutions and foundations. 


70 


Master^s Degrees 

For information concerning other financial aids and part-time placement services, see the 
appropriate sections of this catalog. 

International Study 

Cal State Fullerton participates in The California State University and Colleges' program of 
study abroad. Under this program, limited studies taken at designated foreign universities, 
when arranged in advance, may be applied toward the requirements of a graduate degree 
awarded by Cal State Fullerton. It is important that plans be completed several months 
before starting such a program. For details see elsewhere in this catalog and consult the 
director of international education and exchange. 

Second Master's Degree 

A graduate student desiring to work for a second master's degree at Cal State Fullerton must 
request permission to apply for admission for a second master's degree program. A letter 
should be sent to the dean of graduate studies requesting approval and giving justification 
for the request. If the request Is granted, the student must as a minimum satisfy all prere- 
quisites and all requirements of the new degree program. Approval of classified standing for 
the second degree will be given only after the first degree has been awarded. Please consult 
the Graduate Office for further details. 

Postgraduate Credit 

Petitions for postgraduate credit for coursework taken In excess of baccalaureate degree re- 
quirements at Cal State Fullerton are obtained and filed in the Office of Admissions and 
Records. If approved, the appropriate notations will be entered upon the permanent record 
of the student. 

If a graduate student has not, while an undergraduate, received permission to consider 
coursework which was not required for the baccalaureate as postgraduate, a petition may be 
filed for such credit to be granted retroactively. 

If, subsequently, approval is given by the appropriate graduate program adviser, the com- 
mittee and the dean of graduate studies, such coursework may be included as a part of the 
student's study plan, within existing regulations concerning applicable coursework and re- 
quirements for the degree. See also "Inapplicable Courses." 

Enrollment in 500-Level Courses by Seniors 

Under certain circumstances, a senior may take a 500-level course. If the student is not within 
nine units of graduation, postgraduate credit is not given for such courses. The senior must 
have a minimum grade-point average of 3.25 overall and of 3.5 in the field or fields of the In- 
tended graduate program, and the specific approval of the dean or chair of the academic 
area In which the course is offered and the chair or dean of the student's major area. 

If the senior is within nine units of completion of graduation requirements and has been 
given approval, as above, the student may petition for postgraduate credit for these units as 
provided under "Postgraduate Credit." 




72 


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


OFFICE OF ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

In order to help students make their study years a meaningful educational experience, the 
university established the Office of Academic Advisement. This office assists students in 
choosing an undergraduate major and In choosing general education courses and electives. 
It also provides initial interviews for special majors and is a center for undeclared majors, I.e., 
for those students who have not yet decided upon a major. 

The Office of Academic Advisement is located in Room 112 of the Humanities-Social 
Sciences Building. No appointment is necessary to engage the assistance of an adviser about 
various aspects of the academic life at the university. For more specific information about the 
office, the student should consult the Class Schedule. 

Choosing an Undergraduate Major 

Every student is expected to choose a major or field of concentration by the beginning of the 
junior year. The majors currently offered at this university are described in the next sections 
of this catalog. Most major requirements allow students the freedom to take a number of 
courses in fields other than in their majors or closely related fields. 

Lower division students who are uncertain about their primary vocational goals or 
educational interests may, and probably should, enroll as undeclared majors. Then, and dur- 
ing their freshman and sophomore years, such students should explore the possibilities open 
to them that will meet their interests and potentialities. To help students in their searching 
and selecting, the university has available a number of useful resources: the Office of 
Academic Advisement; summer advisement sessions and orientation programs that are 
given every year; a variety of counseling and testing services provided by the Counseling and 
Testing Centers; and the different department and school offices for information and advice 
on particular fields, their programs of study and later work opportunities. There also is a 
collection of college and university catalogs available in the Library. Additionally, there is a 
growing number of student organizations organized in terms of disciplinary and professional 
interests. The Career Planning and Placement Center also has much useful Information on 
vocations and specific work opportunities. 

Most students have general ideas about some subjects in which they might like to major, and 
almost all students are aware of the fields in which they do not wish to major. The task of 
selecting a major (and often a minor or other complementary specialization) then becomes 
one of crystallizing these earlier ideas on the basis of experiences in specific courses, dis- 
cussions with other students and faculty, etc. Before commitment to a specific major, 
students should be sure that they have not rejected a field of study because of some wrong 
preconceptions or inaccurate Information. Students also should not overlook interests and 
potentialities that they previously may not have discovered. The option of taking a limited 
number of courses on a Credit/No Credit basis often will be helpful in these pursuits. 
"Minicourses" also provide an excellent opportunity to explore the multiple areas of 
knowledge. 

Students, however, must be very careful to plan freshman or sophomore programs which 
will permit their entering or taking advanced courses in fields they think they may want to be 
their majors. Such students should check such major requirements as mathematics, 
chemistry and foreign language which must be taken before the junior year or perhaps even 
begun during the freshman year. Students anticipating graduate or professional study in a 
certain field should exercise special care in planning their undergraduate programs, and 
they should seek faculty counseling in the fields concerned. Such choices do not have to be 
made during the first two years, and may or may not be made during the second two. 
However, careful and advance examination of the possibilities of graduate or professional 
study often will be helpful to students who have fairly clear Ideas of the educational and 
vocational objectives they would like to seek. 


Academic Advisement 


73 


Students also should be careful about concentrating so heavily in a particular field that they 
cannot change majors to a different field should they wish to do so. Some students come to 
the campus with no clear Idea of the field in which they would like to major. Such students, 
and others whose goals and objectives have not yet firmly crystallized, will have oppor- 
tunities to take courses in various fields and make up their minds during their lower division 
work. They should, however, take full advantage of the opportunities that exist on and out- 
side the campus to learn more about available fields of study and occupational fields. 

Planning a Major Program 

When students have selected a major field, they should study carefully all the requirements 
which are specified in this catalog under their chosen degree program. Then they should 
make a tentative semester by semester plan for completing the requirements, with careful 
regard for courses which are prerequisite to others. They should discuss this plan with their 
major advisers who will be able to help them with any problems. 

In addition to courses In the major department, related courses in other fields and sup- 
porting courses in basic skills also may be required. These, too, should be included in the 
tentative semester by semester plan. These auxiliary requirements are described in the 
degree program for each major. 

Some departments require placement tests prior to admission to classes. The time and place 
for such tests is given in the class schedule, often before registration. Students should 
purchase a copy of the Class Schedule at the Titan Bookstore well before registration for 
classes begins. 

Choosing General Education Courses and Electives 

In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the university requires its graduates to have sampl- 
ed a variety of disciplines as part of their general education. The broad categories of general 
education courses are presented in the catalog section on "Graduation Requirements for the 
Bachelor's Degree." Through these requirements students are introduced to the worlds of 
values, ideas, and beauty, to mankind and his problems, to the natural world in which man 
lives, and to skills essential for scholarship. 

To many students the selection of general education courses and electives poses many dif- 
ficult choices. With well over 2,700 classes to choose from and over 50 fields of specialization 
that can be sampled, some demanding decisions must be made. Various aids or resources are 
available. Among these are: this catalog and the Class Schedule with their descriptions of 
regular and new and experimental courses; Informal consultations with other students and 
faculty members; and advisers in the Office of Academic Advisement. 

The reasons for selecting particular general education courses and electives include: 

• A meaningful and adequate preparation for a selected field of study for those students 
who have decided on their major. 

• The need to explore potential major or vocational interests. 

• Curiosity about or enthusiasm for a particular subject. 

• The desire to clarify thinking and values on problems and issues of personal and social 
significance. 

• The urge to broaden and synthesize work in a specialization with perspectives and skil Is 
from other fields. 

• The desire to deepen understanding and improve skills for such central human activities 
as personal relationships, family and community life, citizenship activities and leisure 
pursuits. 

• The interest in experiencing the various approaches and teaching methods of different, 
talented teachers. 

• Sharing learning experiences with friends. 

Communication Skills 

Skills in written, oral and gestural communication are important tools and marks of well 
educated men and women. Great competencies In both articulation and advocacy are arts 
well-worth attaining for living effective, full and civic lives and for achieving excellence In 
vocational careers. 

A variety of experiences at the university provides opportunities to practice and develop 


74 Preprofessional Programs 

communications skills. The acts of written and oral expression also serve to consolidate, syn- 
thesize, and develop thinking and personality. 

Students will be required to demonstrate, in all classes where written expression is 
appropriate, their ability to write clearly and correctly about the materials of the course. 
Ability of a student to demonstrate writing proficiency shall be used as a part of the final 
grade determination in any course. 


Change of Major, Degree or Credential Objective 

A student who wishes to change his major, degree, or credential objective must obtain the 
required form in the Office of Admissions and Records or the Office of Academic Ad- 
visement. Such a change is not official until the form has been signed and filed in the 
Registrar's Office. A student should be aware that he will be responsible for the re- 
quirements for the new choice of major, degree, or credential that are in the catalog in effect 
at the time he files a change. 

DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

According to the established practice at the university, each department follows the ad- 
visement system which it finds the most appropriate for Its majors. 

Each undergraduate student is assigned or may request an adviser who will help the student 
plan an academic program. The adviser is a resource person who can provide valuable infor- 
mation and suggestions and who can assist the student to find the most desirable ways to 
meet the requirements for graduation and for his major or credential. Although the adviser 
Is consulted, the final choice of courses and the responsibility for the program lies with the 
student himself. 

Academic program advisers are able to offer better advice when consulted if students come 
prepared with lists of courses they already have taken and their own copies of transcripts 
from colleges previously attended (if students are new to Cal State Fullerton). 

Those seeking a credential will also be assigned a professional adviser by the School of 
Education. Students who have not yet decided upon a major (undeclared majors) or who are 
not seeking a degree will be advised in the Office of Academic Advisement. 

Graduate students will be assigned a major adviser in their fields of specialization, except In 
education where all will have a professional adviser from the School of Education. Those 
students seeking a credential for teaching in secondary schools will be assigned both a 
professional and a major adviser. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

The academic programs of the university provide appropriate preparation for graduate work 
in a variety of fields. Students who have made tentative decisions about institutions in which 
they may wish to pursue graduate work should consult the catalogs of thoise graduate 
schools as they plan their undergraduate programs. Students planning to undertake 
graduate work should supplement their undergraduate programs by ancicipating language 
requirements at major graduate schools and by intensive work In areas of special relevanc e 
to their intended graduate work. Professional schools in many universities either retjuire or 
recommend that applicants complete four-year programs for admission. Although the 
professional schools do not always require a bachelor's degree, they generally encourage 
basic preparation and a broad general education leading to that degree before beginning 
specialization. 

The university offers a number of professional programs through the master's degrc*e. These 
include programs In the fine arts, business administration, communications, education, 
engineering, health education and physical education and recreation, library scienc e, public 
administration, and speech pathology-audiology. Students interested in preparing fc3r 
professional careers in these areas, either here or in other educational institutions, are en- 
couraged to seek assistance and guidance from our faculty members in these fields. 


Health Professions 


75 


Pre legal Preparation 

Students planning to enter law school may elect any one of several majors. In general, the 
better law schools require that an applicant hold a baccalaureate degree. Although there is 
no uniform prelegal course of study or specific university major required, it is recommended 
that prospective law students prepare themselves in such fields as English, American history, 
economics, political science (particularly the history and development of English and 
American political institutions) and such undergraduate courses as judicial process, ad- 
ministrative law, constitutional law and international law, philosophy (particularly ethics and 
logic), business administration, anthropology, psychology and sociology. 

The major chosen and many of the courses selected should demand a high level of perfor- 
mance in reading difficult material, understanding abstract and complex concepts, and 
speaking and writing clearly and persuasively. Prelegal students are advised to take the 
minimum program to meet the requirements of their chosen major and courses beyond the 
introductory survey level in other selected fields. A distribution of course sequences among 
the social sciences, the natural sciences and the humanities is desirable. Students with in- 
terests in becoming lawyers should contact the Prelaw Society. Some faculty members in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics and the Department of Political Science 
also can provide advice and assistance. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Health Professions Committee 

Student counseling with respect to preprofessional programs in medicine, dentistry and 
other health sciences as well as professional school admission problems are the concern of 
this committee. (See membership listing, page All students wishing to prepare for den- 
tal or medical careers should register in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Predental Preparation 

Dental schools are seeking applicants with broad preparation. Although admission is possi- 
ble following 60 or 90 units of college work including basic science requirements, most 
successful applicants in California complete their baccalaureate degree prior to admission to 
dental school. Dental schools vary with respect to their requirements, thus the student is ad- 
vised to consult the admission requirements of the individual schools to which he anticipates 
making application. The basic program listed below under premedical preparation, although 
more extensive than required for many individual dental schoosi, would meet the re- 
quirements for all of the California dental schools and the majority of the others in the 
United States. The prospective dental student should take the Dental College Admission Test 
(DAT) one year prior to the date at which he plans to enter dental school. Application blanks 
for the test may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Premedical Preparation 

Medical schools are currently seeking applicants with as broad and liberal an educational ex- 
perience as possible. They recommend that applicants pursue collegiate major programs 
which are of vital interest to the student. However, all medical schools require a basic 
minimal training in the natural sciences and English. The Health Professions Committee, 
upon review of the medical school admission requirements, recommends the following 
coursework which satisfies this minimum training: 

one year of English 

four semesters of biology (including embryology and genetics) 

one year of general chemistry 

one year of organic chemistry with laboratory 

at least one semester of biochemistry 

one year of college physics with laboratory 

one year of calculus 


76 


Health Professions 


Most medical school applicants complete a baccalaureate degree program prior to beginn- 
ing their medical training. However, applications to medical school are processed normally 
at the termination of the sixth semester (junior year). The Medical College Admission Test 
(MCAT), required of all medical school applicants, is taken normally during the spring of the 
sixth semester (junior year). The prospective medical school applicant should therefore nor- 
mally plan to complete the above natural science minimal requirements by the end of the 
junior year. Thus he should begin general chemistry in his freshman year in order to satisfy 
the prerequisite requirements for the advanced courses in chemistry. 

Since medical school admissions are limited, the best prepared applicants are likely to have 
an advantage. Many medical schools recommend certain courses in the natural sciences in 
addition to those listed above In the minimal requirements. 

The prospective applicant is advised to consult the catalogs of those medical schools to 
which he anticipates applying for additional recommended preparatory subjects. He is 
further advised to consult the chair or any member of the Health Professions Committee for 
assistance in planning his total collegiate program. Application forms for the MCAT can be 
obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 

Preoptometry 

The study and practice of optometry requires a high degree of responsibility, devotion, in- 
tellectual curiosity and social commitment. The individual's education prior to optometry 
school should demonstrate and strengthen these qualities. 

Academic requirements for admission to colleges of optometry are based on standards 
provided by the California Optometry Law, the accrediting bodies and the judgment of 
College Admissions Committee. 

At the college level, completion of a minimum of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units Is re- 
quired for admission; however, the accumulation of more units or attainment of any un- 
dergraduate degree Is suggested. The ratio of applicants to available places is dispropor- 
tionate; therefore, a student without a degree must demonstrate exceptionally high 
scholastic achievement, intellectual capacity and motivation in order to gain admission. 

The following courses must be completed prior to enrollment and are the minimum re- 
quirements for most colleges of optometry: 

Analytical geometry or calculus (3 semester units or 4 quarter units) 

General biology or zoology to include laboratory (8 semester units or 12 quarter units) 

Microbiology or bacteriology to Include laboratory (no substitutions are allowed) (3 
semester units or 4 quarter units) 

General physics to Include laboratory (8 semester units or 12 quarter units) 

General chemistry to include laboratory (8 semester units or 12 quarter units) 
Psychology (Statistics will not meet this requirement) (6 semester units or 8 quarter units) 
English — composition or literature (6 semester units or 8 quarter units). 


Other Health Professions 

Preprofessional preparation for osteopathy, pharmacy, pharmacology, podiatry and 
veterinary medicine should be arranged in consultation with the chair of the Health 
Professions Committee. 

No specific bachelor's degree programs are available at Cal State Fullerton in professional 
areas such as dental technician, occupational therapy, physical therapy. Preparatory work for 
such programs is available. Students should register their specific interest preference In 
3ither the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs or the department offices in 
biological science or chemistry. 


Health Professions 


77 


Medical Technology 

A concentration in medical technology Is available under the B.A. in Biological Science 
program. Students interested in pursuing this field of study should select appropriate 
paramedical courses as electives In their study plan. A concentration in medical technology 
Is also available under the M.A. in Biology. For further details, consult the coordinator of 
medical technology in the Department of Biological Science. 

Social Welfare 

Full preprofessional training usually consists of two years of graduate training leading to the 
degree of Master of Social Welfare. Students who plan to seek employment in social work or 
social welfare should prepare themselves in the fields of human services, psychology (par- 
ticularly child and adolescent psychology), sociology, anthropology, political science, 
economics and research methods in social science. 

Students who intend to enter a professional school following undergraduate training should 
learn about the specific prerequisites for admission to the graduate school of their choice. 
Ordinarily a major in one of the social sciences, and some additional work in at least several 
other social sciences, is recommended. Students with Interests in pursuing careers in the 
fields of social welfare should contact the Department of Sociolgoy for advice and assistance. 

Pretheological 

Students who might be interested in pursuing careers in counseling, social work, the 
teaching of religion, and the ministry and associated fields should take some courses in 
religion, psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, education, communications, 
history, English, speech communication and a foreign language. Students desiring assistance 
and counseling regarding advanced work or professional careers may seek help from the 
faculty in the Department of Religious Studies. 



■ f :> s,' 







80 


UNIVERSITY CURRICULA 


DEGREE PROGRAMS 

California State University, Fullerton offers 
which are described on the pages listed: 


Page 

B.A. American Studies 222 

B.A. Anthropology 224 

B.A. Art 88 

B.A. Biological Science 345 

B.A. Business Administration 126 

B.A. Chemistry 357 

B.S. Chemistry 355 

B.A. Communications 236 

B.A. Comparative Literature 244 

B.S. Computer Science 156 

B.A. Criminal justice 248 

B.A. Earth Science 365 

B.A. Economics 135 

B.S. Engineering 370 

B.A. English 251 

B.A. Ethnic Studies 218, 231 

B.A. French 257 

B.A. Geography 271 

B.A. German 257 

B.A. History 276 


following baccalaureate degree programs 

Page 


B.S. Human Services 162 

B.A. Latin American Studies 166 

B.A. Liberal Studies 168 

B.A. Linguistics 293 

B.A. Mathematics 389 

B.A. Music 103 

B.M. Music 105 

B.A. Philosophy 300 

B.S. Physical Education 208 

B.A. Physics 397 

B.A. Political Science 304 

B.A. Psychology 314 

B.A. Religious Studies 322 

B.A. Russian Area Studies 169 

B.A. Sociology 326 

B.A. Spanish 257 

B.A. Special Major 172 

B.A. Speech Communication 333 

B.A. Theatre Arts 116 


the 


The following master's degree programs are offered: 


Page 

M.A. Anthropology 225 

M.A. Art 91 

M.A. Biology 346 

M.B.A. Business Administration (Includ- 
ing a concentration in international 

business) 133 

M.A. Chemistry 359 

M.A. Communications 238 

M.A. Comparative Literature 244 

M.S. Computer Science 158 

M.S. Counseling 177 

M.A. Economics 135 

M.S. Education (with emphases in 
elementary education, reading, school 
administration, and special 

education) 180, 186, 189, 200 

M.S. Engineering 373 

M.A. English 252 

M.S. Environmental Studies 161 


Page 


M.A. French 258 

M.A. Geography 271 

M.A. German 258 

M.A. History 278 

M.S. Library Science 289 

M.A. Linguistics 293 

M.A. Mathematics 391 

M.A. Music 107 

M.S. Physical Education 210 

M.A. Political Science 305 

M.A. Psychology 315 

M.S. Psychology (concentration 

in Clinical/Community) 316 

M.P.A. Public Administration 306 

M.A. Social Sciences 170 

M.A. Sociology 326 

M.A. Spanish 258 

M.A. Special Major 173 

M.A. Speech Communication 334 

M.A. Theatre Arts 118 


The university is accredited by the California State Board of Education and the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for programs leading to credentials and 
master's degrees. 


Subject Finder 


81 


SUBJECT FINDER 

The listing of degree programs does not include all of the fields or subject matter areas in 
which some courses currently are being offered at Cal State Fullerton. Additionally, different 
colleges and universities differ in the names they assign to degrees, curricular programs, and 
the academic units offering courses. The following ''subject finder" lists some of the most 
commonly used terms for fields with information on where courses or programs on these 
subjects can be located at Fullerton and In this catalog. 

Subject Page 

Accounting 128 

African Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, Geography, 

History, Political Science) 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 218 

American Indian Studies 222 

American Studies 222 

Anthropology 224 

Art 88 

Art Education 98 

Art History 89 

Asian Studies (See Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Geography, 

History, Political Science) 

Astronomy 344 

Behavioral Sciences in Education 177 

Biological Science 344 

Business Administration 126 

Chemistry 355 

Chicano Studies 231 

Chinese 260 

Classics (See Comparative Literature, History and Latin) 

Communications 235 

Comparative Literature 244 

Computer Science 156 

Counseling 177 

Criminal Justice 248 

Dance 98 

Drama (See Theatre) 116 

Drama Education (See Theatre Education) 124 

Earth Science 356 

Economics 135 

Education 176 

Reading 180 

School Administration 186 

School Counseling 176 

School Psychology 176 

School Psychometry 176 

Special Education 189 

Teacher Education 194 

Engineering ^69 

English 750 

English Education 757 

Environmental Education 404 

Environmental Studies 160 

Ethnic Studies (See Afro-Ethnic Studies and Chicano Studies) 

Finance ^79 

Folklore (See Anthropology and Comparative Literature) 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 257 

Foreign Languages Education 260 

French 257 

Geography 270 

Geology (See Earth Science) 


82 Subject Finder 


German 

Graduate Studies 

Health Education 

Hebrew 

History 

Human Services 

Interdisciplinary Center 

International Relations (See Political Science, Economics, History) 

International Study 

Italian 

Japanese 

Journalism (See Communications) 

Journalism Education 

Latin 

Latin American Studies 

Law (See Political Science, Management) 

Library Science 

Liberal Studies 

Linguistics 

Management 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Mathematics Education 

Meteorology 299, 

Medical Biology Courses 

Mexican-American Studies (See Chicano Studies) 

Music 

Music Education 

Mythology (See Anthropology and Comparative Literature) 

Native American Studies (See American Indian Studies) 

Nature Interpretation 

Oceanography 354, 

Philosophy 

Photography (See Art and Communications) 

Physical Education 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Public Administration (See Political Science) 

Public Relations (See Communications) 

Quantitative Methods 

Radio (See Theatre and Communications) 

Reading 

Recreation 

Religious Studies 

Russian 

Russian Area Studies 

Sanskrit (See Linguistics) 

School Administration 

Science Education 

Social Sciences 

Social Welfare 

Social Work (See Social Welfare) 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Major 

Speech (See Speech Communication) 

Speech Communication 


257 

85 

211 

265 

276 

162 

164 

85 

265 

266 

243 

266 

166 

289 

167 

292 

130 

130 

389 

396 

3% 

355 

101 

115 

404 

396 

300 

208 

397 

397 

304 

266 

314 

131 

180 

216 

322 

267 

168 

186 

403 

170 

77 

325 

257 

172 

333 


General Course Numbering Code 


83 


Speech Communication Education 341 

Sports (See Physical Education) 

Statistics (See Mathematics and Quantitative Methods) 

Student-to-Student Tutorial 85 

Swahili 270 

Teacher Education 194 

Technological Studies 173 

Television (See Theatre and Communications) 

Theatre 116 

Theatre Education 124 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions briefly describe the content or subject matter to be covered and provide 
additional information on units of credit, the level of instruction (general course numbering 
code), prerequisites, and the type of course (lecture, laboratory, activity, seminar, and in- 
dividually supervised work). Information on specific offerings of courses (times, rooms, in- 
structors) will be found in the class schedule which is printed in advance of the fall and 
spring semesters. Information on additional (new, special or experimental) courses for each 
semester also can be found in these class schedules. 

Some of the courses listed in the catalog are not taught every year. Many are taught once 
only every year. Others are taught every semester, and often in many sections. Advance in- 
formation regarding the plans for offering particular courses may be obtained from the of- 
fices of the departments teaching them. 

The forms and methods of teaching vary widely in specific classes, depending on the subject 
matter and purposes and the particular instructor and students. The more traditional 
methods of lecturing, discussion, laboratory work, and individually supervised research or 
projects increasingly are being supplemented by such learning resources as group and in- 
dividual exercises, television, and films and records, videotaping, and the use of the com- 
puter. Modern specialized facilities and equipment are used in many courses in different 
fields. These include: laboratories for teaching the sciences; studios for teaching the fine 
arts; a small museum and archaeology/physical anthropology laboratory; a variety of 
facilities for teaching communications; a language laboratory for teaching foreign languages 
and linguistics courses; a speech and hearing clinic; and the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Cal State encourages experimentation and innovation In teaching and welcomes a diversity 
of approaches. Increasingly, and with growing help from students, efforts are being made on 
the campus to examine and evaluate and improve the learning experiences in some 
classrooms in more scholarly ways. Students also are being provided more opportunities to 
learn through teaching experiences in activities such as tutoring. 


SCHEDULES 

A new Class Schedule is published in advance of the fall and spring semesters. This general, 
university schedule contains not only detailed information on times, places, and instructors 
fpr specific courses but also materials on registration, new courses that are not in the catalog, 
the times for final examinations, and many other useful items for course and program plan- 
ning. The Class Schedule may be purchased at the Titan Bookstore. Special schedules, which 
may be obtained from the Office of Continuing Education, are provided for the summer 
sessions and the extension curriculum. 


GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

100-299 Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open also to upper 
division students. 

300-399 Upper division courses of junior and senior level, which do not give graduate credit 


84 Independent Study 

unless included on an approved graduate study plan (such as a credential or 
graduate degree program) for a specific graduate student. 

400-499 Upper division courses of junior and senior level which give graduate credit when taken 
by a graduate student. (Note limitations In specific graduate programs.) 

500-599 Graduate courses organized primarily for graduating students.* 

700-799 Graduate professional courses in the postgraduate program, not applicable to 
graduate degrees. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

Because of the differences in the organization and content of the various disciplines and 
professions, there is no uniform, reasonable way of numbering courses that would be equal- 
ly useful for all fields of knowledge. Some of the departments explain the logic of their own 
course numbering system in this catalog. 

In general it may be assumed that increases in class (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, or 
graduate) and certainly division level (lower, upper, graduate) correlate with more difficult 
and challenging academic work. Sometimes, however, disciplines organize their course 
numbering partly in terms of criteria other than degree of difficulty: e.g., anthropology 
numbers its area courses in the 300's and its theoretical or institutional courses in the 400's. It 
should be noted, too, that some students find introductory courses to be more demanding 
than advanced, specialized courses: in such courses, a more comprehensive approach and 
the first exposure to new ways of thinking may be harder for some Individuals than covering 
a smaller, more familiar area, in much greater detail. 

SPECIAL COURSE NUMBERS 

For uniformity, certain types of courses have been listed by all departments and schools with 
the same numbers: 499 and 599 are used for undergraduate and graduate ''Independent 
study"; 196 or 496 for "student-to-student tutorials"; 597 for a graduate "project"; and 598 
for a graduate "thesis." The course numbers for senior seminars are not so uniform but they 
tend to be numbered 485, 490, 491 or 495. 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NOTATIONS 

Certain notations are uniformly used in the course descriptions in this catalog. 

1. The figure in parentheses following the course title indicates the number of semester un- 
its for the course. Courses offered for varying units are indicated as (1-3) or (3-6). 

2. A course listing such as Anthropology 416 (3) (Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) in- 
dicates that the course Is "cross-listed" by both departments, i.e. a student can choose to 
take the course and count it as either an anthropology or an Interdisciplinary Center 
course; if the complete course description is found with the Interdisciplinary Center 
courses. It should be followed by "(Same as Anthropology 416)." 

3. A notation such as (Formerly 433) following the course title and the number of units in- 
dicates the same course previously was numbered 433. 

PREREQUISITES 

Students are expected to meet stated prerequisites for all courses. However, in exceptional 
cases, and at the discretion of the division In which the course is taught, students may be 
allowed to meet prerequisites by examination. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Under the independent study program, the upper division student can pursue topics or 
problems of special interest beyond the scope of a regular course under the supervision of a 
faculty advisor. The work Is of a research or creative nature, and normally culminates in a 


*Note exceptions on page 49. 


Student-to-Student Tutorials 


85 


paper, project, comprehensive examination, or performance. Before registering, the student 
must get his topic approved by the instructor who will be supervising independent study. 
The catalog numbers for independent study in departments are 499 and 599. Independent 
study courses may be repeated. A student wishing to enroll in more than six units of in- 
dependent study in any one semester must have the approval of his major advisor and of the 
chair of the department(s) in which the Independent study Is to be conducted. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDY COURSES 

Cal State Fullerton students under The California State University and Colleges International 
Study Programs register concurrently at Cal State Fullerton and at the host institution abroad, 
with credits assigned to the student which are equivalent to courses offered at Cal State 
Fullerton. Undergraduate students who discover appropriate study opportunities at the host 
Institution but no equivalent course at Cal State Fullerton may use Independent Study 499 
and International Study 292 or 492. Graduate students may use Independent Gra(luate 
Research 599 and International Study 592. 

292 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-6 lower division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International 
Programs. Study undertaken In a university abroad under the auspices of The California 
State University and Colleges. 

492 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 upper division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International 
Programs. Study undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California 
State University and Colleges. 

592 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 graduate units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International 
Programs. Study undertaken In a university abroad under the auspices of The California 
State University and Colleges. 


LIBRARY COURSE 

300 Elements of Bibliographic Investigation (3) 

An Investigation of the elements of bibliographic research which will enable students to 
become sophisticated library users. Will discuss such topics as: the organization of 
knowledge in libraries, a survey of Important research materials in various fields found in 
American libraries; how to prepare bibliographies and assemble information for term 
papers; and style manuals. 

GRADUATE STUDIES 700 

A credIt/no credit course with no (0) units of credit, which Is designed to ensure continuous 
registration for those graduate students with an advanced degree objective who find that 
they are unable to enroll in regularly scheduled coursework. This course does not require 
class attendance. Permission to register in Graduate Studies 700 may be requested from the 
academic area sponsoring the graduate degree sought. 

Registration in Graduate Studies 700 normally will be restricted to graduate students who 
have been classified or who are in a prescribed prerequisite program for a specific graduate 
degree (conditionally classified). 

STUDENT-TO-STUDENT TUTORIALS 

The university has begun a program of experimentation with and development of student- 
to-student tutorials. One of the fastest and profoundest ways to learn is to teach. The 
''student-to-student tutorial" will provide a formal way to encourage students to learn 
through teaching. It will expand significantly the opportunities for students to have 
meaningful experiences as teachers. At the same time, it greatly will increase the amount of 
tutoring available and will extend tutoring to all of the kinds of students who need and want 
tutorial assistance. 


86 


Student-to-Student Tutorials 


Students electing to be tutors not only will increase their mastery of particular subjc'ct 
matters but also will have practice in developing their communication, cooperation and in- 
terpersonal relationship skills. Most important adult roles and jobs also involve a tc'aching 
dimension and the tutorial experience will provide opportunities to devedop aw'arcmess of 
teaching problems and competence in teaching techniques. 

Each department will decide whether or not it wishes to offer this course. Departments 
choosing to offer the student-to-student tutorial course will follow the rules listed in the 
following course description. 

The course numbers will be 196 or 496, and one to three units of credit can be given for each 
cou/se. 

Prerequisites: A 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or consent of instructor and 
simultaneous enrollment in the course or previous enrollment in a similar course or its 
equivalent. The tutor and his tutee or tutees will work in mutually advantageous ways by 
allowing all involved to delve more carefully and thoroughly into the materials presented in 
this specific course. One to three students may be tutored by the tutor unless the instructor 
decides that special circumstances warrant increasing the usual maximum of three tutees. 
Three hours of work are expected for each unit of credit, and this work may include, apart 
from contact hours with tutees, such other activities as: tutorial preparations; consulting 
with instructors; reporting, analysis and evaluation of the tutorial experiences; and par- 
ticipation in an all-university orientation and evaluation program for tutors. A maximum of 
three units can be taken each semester and nine units of any combination of 196 and 496 for 
an undergraduate program. This course must be taken as an elective and not counted toward 
general education, major or minor requirements. The course can be taken on a credit/no 
credit basis by the tutor. Requests for tutors must be initiated by tutees and can be initiated 
up until the official university date for dropping a class with a W. Tutors electing to respond 
to such requests will receive credits at the end of the semester and can register in the course 
until the official university date for dropping a class with a W. Both tutors and tutees must 
submit written reports, analyses and evaluations of their shared tutorial experience, and both 
must participate in an all-university orientation program as well as in any conference or criti- 
ques that the instructor of the course may require. 

Further information can be obtained from the department in which the student is interested 
in ''student-to-student tutorials." 




88 


SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 

Acting Dean; Jerry Samuelson 
Associate Dean; Donald R. Henry 


DEPARTMENT OF ART 

FACULTY 

G. Ray Kerciu 

Acting Department Chair 

Robert Baron, Alvin Ching, Darryl Curran, Naomi Dietz, Henry Evjenth, Robert Ewing, Dex- 
tra Frankel, Carmel Goode, Ray Hein, Thomas Holste, George James, Claude Kent, Ruth 
Kline, Donald Lagerberg, Michael Lee, Clinton MacKenzie, Robert MacLean, Robert Par- 
tin, Albert Porter, Leo Robinson, jerry Rothman, Jerry Samuelson,* Victor Smith, Jon 
Stokesbary, Vincent Suez, George Williams. 

The Department of Art offers a program which includes the several fields of art history, 
theory and appreciation; drawing, painting, sculpture; design and crafts; and art education. 
The broadest objective of the program is to contribute to the intellectual, social, and creative 
development of the student as he prepares for citizenship in a democratic society. More 
specifically, the art program provides opportunities for students: (1) to develop a knowledge 
and understanding of those general principles of visual organization and expression basic to 
all forms and fields of art; (2) to develop a critical appreciation and understanding of 
historical and contemporary art forms through a study of these principles as they relate to 
the range of artistic production of mankind; (3) to use these general principles as a means to 
express more clearly their ideas, thoughts, and feelings in the creation of visual forms; (4) to 
develop those understandings and skills needed to pursue graduate studies in the field, to 
teach art in the schools, or to qualify for a position in business and industry as an art 
specialist. 

Undergraduate curricula leading to the bachelor of arts degree have been designed to meet 
the specialized needs of the following groups: (1) students who wish to study art as an essen- 
tial part of their personal and cultural development; (2) students seeking prcprofessional 
preparation in art; and (3) students planning to teach art in grades K-12. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have a C or better in 
ail courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific 
major courses in which a grade of D is obtained. As Is customary, the Art Department 
reserves the right to hold projects completed by a student for class credit for a period of 
three years. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

Three course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and interests of 
students working for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in art. In the development of 
specific course offerings which make up these programs, it has been the concern of the art 
faculty to see that each program contains: (1) basic courses in art history, theory, 
appreciation, and studio practice which have as their primary focus the study of those 
general principles of visual organization and expression underlying all fields of art: (2) more 
specialized courses which provide for adequate preparation in depth in a single field of art. 
The teaching of art history, theory, and criticism is not confined to courses bearing that title. 
Rather, each studio course involves theory as well as the practice of art, includes as part of its 
content the study and reference to related historical art forms, and has as part of its purpose 
the development of those critical abilities which are necessary to a valid evaluation and 
appreciation of the art expressions of man. 

Plan I provides for an emphasis In the area of art history, theory, and appreciation and is par- 
ticularly recommended for those students who wish to pursue graduate studies In art history 
or museology. 


♦University administrative officer. 


Art 


89 


Plan II is designed for those students who prefer a studio-type program with a 
preprofessional orientation and an area of specialization selected from the following: (T) 
drawing and painting; (2) printmaking; (3) sculpture; (4) crafts; (5) ceramics; (6) graphic 
design; (7) illustration; (8) environmental design; or (9) creative photography. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements for single subject instruction 
(Ryan Act) for teaching art in grades K-12. 

Plan I requires a minimum of 60 units in art or approved related courses with a minimum of 
36 units of upper division in art. Plan II requires a minimum of 60 units in art with a minimum 
of 33 units of upper division In art. Plan III requires a minimum of 54 units of art including a 
minimum of 27 units of upper division art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other un- 
iversity requirements for a bachelor of arts degree (see page 56). Students following Plan III 
also must meet any specific requirements for the desired teaching credential (see section in 
catalog for School of Education). 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY EMPHASIS Units 

Preparation for the Major: Art history 201A,B (6 units); 6 units of studio courses; 
approved electives (12 units) in art, anthropology, drama, foreign languages, 

history, literature, music or philosophy 24 

The Major: Art history (18 units) including one course from each of the following six 
groups: 301-302; 411-412; 341-421-422; 431-432; 451-452; 461; an additional three 
courses (9 units) to add depth in three of the above groups; and three courses (9 

units) of approved electives 36 

Reading knowledge of one modern foreign language 

PLAN II: STUDIO EMPHASIS 
Drawing and Painting 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 117 (3 units) and 207A,B 27 

The Major: Art 307A,B; 317A,B; 487A,B or C (6 units); 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 9 units of art electives 33 

Printmaking 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B; 107A,B; 247; 117 (3 units); 103; 104; and 3 un- 
its of art electives 27 

The Major: Art 347A,B; 487D (6 units); 307A, 317A; 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 9 units of art electives 33 

Sculpture 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 216A,B; 117 (3 units).... 27 
The Major: Art 316A,B; 336A,B; 486 (6 units); 6 units of upper division art history and 

9 units of art electives 33 

Crafts 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 205A; and 6 units selected 

from Art 106A, 123B, 205B, 216A, or 117 (3 units) 27 

The Major — General Concentration: Art 305A; 31 5A; 325A; 330 or 355A or 365A; 6 
units of upper division art history and 15 units selected from Art 305B, 315B, 316A, 

325B, 338A, 485A, 485B, 485C, 485D or 485E 33 

The Major — jewelry/Metalsmithing Concentration: Art 305A; 315A,B; 325A,B; 6 un- 
its of upper division art history; 6 units selected from Art 305B, 330, 355A, 365A or 

338A; and 6 units selected from 485A or 485C 33 

The Major — Fibers Concentration: Art 355A,B; 365A,B; 6 units selected from 330, 

485D or 385E; 6 units of upper division art history; and 9 units of art ek'ctives 33 

Ceramics 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 106A,B; 117 (3 units).... 27 
The Major: Art 306A,B; 326A,B, or 426A,B; 484 (6 units); 6 units of upper division art 

history and 9 units of art electives 33 

Graphic Design 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201 A, B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 223A,B; 117 (3 units).... 27 

The Major: Art 323A,B; 483A (6 units); 338A; 363A; 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 9 units of art electives 33 


Art 90 


Illustration Units 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 123A; 117 (3 units); and 3 

units of art electives 27 

The Major: Art 363A,B; 483C (6 units); 317A,B; 323A; 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 6 units of art electives 33 

Environmental Design 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B; 107A,B; 103; 104; 123B; and 6 units of art 

electives 27 

The Major: 313A,B; 333A,B; 483B (6 units); 453A; 6 units of upper division art history 

and 6 units of art electives 33 

Creative Photography 

Preparation for the Major: Art 201A,B; 103; 104; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); 247; and 3 un- 
its of art electives 27 

The Major: 338A,B; 489 (6 units); 347A; 6 units of upper division art history; and 6 

units selected from 323A, 363A, 307A, 347B, or 443A; and 6 units of art electives 33 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS 
Single Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 
(Qualifies for teaching Art in grades K-12) 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 106A; 107A,B; 3 units of 117 or 123A; 

201A,B; and 205A 27 

The Major: (Select one of the following) 

Drawing and Painting: 307A,B; 316A; 317A; 338A or 443A; 347A; 411 or 412; and 

441A,B 27 

Crafts: 305A; 306A,B; 307A; 315A; 330; 411 or 412; and 441 A, B 27 

Graphic Design and Photography: 307A; 323A; 338A; 347A; 363A; 411 or 412; 443A; 

and 441A,B 27 

Professional Preparation: 

Art Ed 442 3 

Education coursework 9 

Student teaching (one semester full time) 12 

Program Requirements: 

1. Assignment by the Art Department chair to a faculty adviser in art education. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in this catalog within the School of Education for 
the curriculum pertinent to the Ryan Act provisions. 

3. Meet the requirements listed under Plan III, Teaching Emphasis for the bachelor's 
degree in art. 

4. Completion of major and education course requirements prior to enrolling in student 
teaching. 

5. Admission to teacher education through the School of Education is required prior to 
enrollment in Art Ed 442 and student teaching. 

6. Acceptance for student teaching Is based on candidate quotas, a review of a candidate's 
portfolio of art work, and evidence of success in university coursework completed. 

7. Recommendation by the faculty adviser in art education. 

Upon completion of the above program and the bachelor of arts degree, the student is eligi- 
ble for a partial credential, which meets state requirements for teaching In grades K-12. 
Within a specified period of time from the beginning of a teaching assignment, 30 units of 
coursework must be completed at an accredited college or university to qualify for a full 
credential. Credentials are issued from the institution where this unit requirement has been 
completed. 

Multiple Subject Instruction— Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in the 
elementary schools in multiple subject classrooms: 

Units 
3 
3 
3 


Art 380 

Music 333 .. 
Theatre 402 


9 


Art 


91 


The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any student 
who wishes to expand his knowledge in any or all of the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, 330, 380, and 441A,B 

Dance 100, 112, 122, 125A,B, 132, 142, 152, 162, 206A,B, 311A,B, 331A,B, 484 

Music 111A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281A,C,E,G, 283A, 381B, 435 

Theatre 100A,B, 211, 263A, 276A, 277, 370A,B, 402, 403, 411C 

MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bachelor of arts degree of which 
a minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. Included in the program must be a 
basic course in each of the following areas: (1) art history and appreciation; (2) design; (3) 
drawing and painting; and (4) crafts. Those students planning to qualify for a standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary or secondary teaching and art for a 
minor must obtain approval from the Art Department for the courses selected to meet the 
upper division requirements for a minor in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

The program of studies leading to the master of arts degree in art provides a balance of 
theory and practice for those who desire to teach art or wish to develop a sound basis for 
continued advanced work in this field. The program offers each student the opportunity to 
expand his Intellectual and technical resources and to acquire greater richness and depth in 
terms of creative understanding and achievement in one of the following areas of con- 
centration: (1) drawing and painting (including printmaking); (2) crafts (including ceramics); 
(3) design; (4) sculpture; and (5) art history. 

Prerequisites 

1. Conditionally classified standing 

A. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

B. GPA of minimum 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted. 

C. Special requirements: 

(1) Studio emphasis: review of preliminary portfolio by department chair. 

(2) Art history emphasis: satisfactory score on the Educational Testing Service 
Undergraduate Record Exam— Area Tests and preliminary interview by art 
history coordinator. 

2. Classified standing 

A. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

B. GPA of minimum 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted. 

C. Special requirements: 

(1) An undergraduate major In art or 24 units of upper division art including at least 
12 units of upper division study in the elected area of concentration with a GPA 
of 3.0 or better. In the art history emphasis a satisfactory score on the Educational 
Testing Service Undergraduate Record Exam— Area Tests Is also required. 

(2) Portfolio review— before any units may apply to the approved study program for 
the degree, the student must arrange for a faculty committee evaluation of the 
student's background, including a statement of purpose by the student and 
review of creative work, or, for art history applicants, a submission of an assigned 
research topic. Portfolio review dates are April 1 for the following fall semester, 
and November 1 for the following spring semester of each year. Arrangements 
may be made through the Art Department office to meet these deadlines prior 
to admission. 

D. Development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved by the student's graduate 
committee of which 15 must be 500-level courses. The 30 units are distributed as follows: 


92 Art 

Units 
9 


12 


3-6 
3-6 

30 

All courses must be completed with a B average, and all courses in the area of concentration 

must be graded B or better. The Department of Art requires the candidate for the Master of 

Arts in Art degree to exhibit his or her project in the department upon completion of the 

Master of Arts in Art degree and the art faculty reserves the right to retain an example from 

the student's master's exhibit for the university collection. 

For further information, consult the Department of Art. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

ART COURSES 

100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Exploration and creative use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. Field trips 
required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of Art Department. (6 
hours activity) 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

A course for the general student designed to develop an understanding of historical and 
contemporary art forms. Illustrated with examples of painting, sculpture, architecture, 
and design. Field trips required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of 
Art Department. 

103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tools and elements of plastic organization as related to a two- 
dimensional surface. (6 hours activity) 

104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

The inventive use of materials, tools and elements of plastic organization as related to three- 
dimensional form. (6 hours activity) 

106A,B Beginning Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A basic course in the study of form as related to ceramic materials, 
tools, processes and concepts. (6 hours activity) 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Beginning work In the creative use of the materials of drawing and painting with emphasis 
on visual concepts, use of medium, individual exploration, and growth, planning and 
craftsmanship. 107A emphasizes drawing; 107B emphasizes painting. (9 hours laboratory) 

117 Life Drawing (1) 

Drawing from the live model. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units. (3 hours laboratory 
for each unit) 

123A,B Descriptive Drawing (3,3) 

An intensive study of traditional and contemporary drawing techniques and theories. 
Emphasis In 123A on representation of nature forms and in 123B on manmade and 
mechanical forms including linear perspective. (9 hours laboratory) 


1. Core courses in art history, philosophy, analysis and criticism 

A. Art 500A Graduate Seminar In Major Field (3 units) 

(admission for students with classified status only) 

B. Art 500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3 units) 

(admission for students with classified status only) 

C. Art 481 Seminar in Art History (3 units), or substitute of a 400-level art history 
course, or Philosophy 311, Aesthetics, on the recommendation of the major 
adviser 

2. 500- and/or 400 level courses in the area of concentration selected from one of 

the following areas 

A. Drawing and painting 

B. Crafts 

C. Design 

D. Sculpture 

E. Art history 

3. Additional coursework in area of concentration or approved electives 

4. Project or thesis 


Art 


93 


201 A, B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

A comparative survey of the basic ideas, forms and styles of the visual arts as they developed 
in various cultures from prehistoric time to the present day. 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and evaluation of 
craft concepts, processes and materials as they relate to the development of aesthetic 
forms based on function. (6 hours activity) 

205B Beginning Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. A study and evaluation of 
woodworking concepts and processes as they relate to the development of wood into 
aesthetic form based on function. (6 hours activity) 

207A,B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and Materials) (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 107A,B or equivalents. An intensive study of traditional and contem- 
porary methods and materials as they relate to current approaches in drawing and paint- 
ing. (9 hours laboratory) 

213A,B Beginning Environmental Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104 or equivalents, and Art 123B. An introduction to design theory 
and communication skills related to the design field. A— Emphasis on architectural ter- 
minology, plans and elevations, and graphic symbols. B — Emphasis on material analysis, 
finishes and lighting concepts. (6 hours activity) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 104. An introductory course In sculpture with emphasis on the creative use 
of wood and metal, power equipment and hand tools. (6 hours activity) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. A study of the history, design and use of letter forms Including tech- 
niques for rough and comprehensive layouts and the use of both hand-lettered forms 
and handset type. (6 hours activity) 

247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B. An introductory course of all printmaking forms to Include litho, 
etching, woodcut and serigraphy. (6 hours activity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

(Same as Theatre 288) 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the Paleolithic to the period of late antiquity. 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

A study of the developments in art from the period of late antiquity through the Gothic. 

305A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205A. Study and evaluation of craft concepts, processes, and materials as 
they relate to the development of aesthetic forms based on function. (9 hours laboratory) 

305B Advanced Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205B. A study and evaluation of craft concepts and processes as they relate 
to the development of wood into utilitarian and aesthetic form. (9 hours laboratory) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 106A,B. Further experiences in the study and evaluation of forms as related 
to the creative use of ceramic concepts and materials including design, forming, glazing 
and firing. (6 hours activity) 

307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 107A,B,207A,B or equivalents. The study, evaluation and creative use 
of the concepts and materials of drawing and painting with emphasis on individual ex- 
ploration, growth, planning and craftsmanship. (9 hours laboratory) 

310A,B Drawing and Painting: Techniques and Approaches for the Classroom 

Teacher (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 100. The study and development of painting and drawing materials and 
approaches as they relate to elementary and secondary education. (6 hours activity) 

311 Art and the Modern Mind (3) 

The visual arts in the context of modern thought. A general approach for the non-art major. 
A slide lecture and discussion approach to art and the ideas and Influences of McLuhan, 
Freud, jung, Wittgenstein, Levi-Straus, Skinner, etc. 


94 


Art 


312 History of Architecture (3) 

Architecture from antiquity to the present. Buildings will be studied in terms of their 
relationship to the societies which produced them, their symbolic content and their con- 
tributions to the evolution of western architectural tradition. 

313A Environmental Design: Unit Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 213. Environmental design projects related to the study of unit 
concepts. (6 hours activity) 

313B Environmental Design: Systems Concepts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 313A. Environmental design projects related to the study of systems con- 
cepts. (6 hours activity) 

315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. Design and creation 
of jewelry. (9 hours laboratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 216A. (9 hours laboratory) 

317A,B Advanced Life Drawing (3,3) 

Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from the live 
model. (9 hours laboratory) 

323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 223A. Development and projection of ideas In relation to the 
technical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. (6 hours activity) 

325A,B Metalsmithing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. A study and 
evaluation of fundamental metalsmithing concepts, processes and materials as they relate 
to the aesthetic development of utilitarian forms, raising, silversoldering, forging, casting, 
engraving, chasing and repousse. (9 hours laboratory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Development of basic ceramic technology Into individual sculptural forms and techniques. 
(6 hours activity) 

327A,B Supergraphics (3,3) 

The design and production of environmental paintings. Team and individual projects. A 
variety of advanced technical means are employed. Studio and lecture. A historical survey 
of environmental painting, concepts and techniques is included. (6 hours activity) 

329A,B Art and Technology (3,3) 

Creative activity In the context of modern technology. (9 hours laboratory) 

330 Fibers and Fabrics, Non-woven Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A or B, or consent of instructor. Exploration of concepts of 
design using knotting, crochet, fabric manipulation, basketry, stitchery and applique as 
techniques applied to the creation of art works. 

333A Environmental Design: Space and Structure (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 213. Architecturally oriented projects to develop concepts of exterior- 
interior design and planning. (6 hours activity) 

333B Environmental Design: Space and Structure (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 333A. Architecturally oriented projects to develop experimental spaces and 
structures. (6 hours activity) 

336A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 316A. Projects in various waxing, molding and metal casting techniques. 
Media with emphasis on aluminum and bronze and the lost wax process. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

338A Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. Exploration of the photographic media as a means of 
personal expression. Historical attitudes and processes are discussed in relationship to 
new materials and contemporary aesthetic trends. Field trips required. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

338B Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A. Further exploration of the photographic medium as a means of per- 
sonal expression. Historical and new processes Introduced as a vehicle toward the In- 
dividual student's personal goal. Field trips required. (9 hours laboratory) 


Art 


95 


341 Art of India (3) 

A survey of the art and architecture of India which includes Hindu, Buddhist and Muslim in- 
fluences from the pre-Indus Valley civilization to the decline of Muslim rule. 

347A Printmaking^Etching (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 247, and 117. Development of concepts and exploration of 
materials involved in printmaking including etching and aquatint. (9 hours laboratory) 

347B Printmaking— Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 247, and 117. Development of concepts and exploration of 
materials and techniques involved in lithography printing. (9 hours laboratory) 

355A,B Fibers: Fabric Printing and Dyeing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or B or consent of instructor. Exploration of concepts of design 
as they relate to fabric surfaces with emphasis on various printing techniques and dyeing 
techniques applied to the creation of art works. (6 hours activity) 

360 Elementary School Crafts (2) 

Studio activities and techniques of crafts appropriate to the elementary school. Strongly 
recommended for elementary teaching credential candidates. (4 hours activity) 

363A,B Illustration (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A,B and 117. Development and projection of ideas relative to the 
needs of story, book, magazine, and film illustration. (6 hours activity) 

365A,B Fibers: Weaving (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 or 205A,B or consent of instructor. Exploration of concepts of 
design using various weaving techniques and learning the uses of a loom applied to the 
creation of art works. (6 hours activity) 

380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 100 or equivalent. The study and evaluation of art concepts, materials, and 
processes as they relate to and promote child development. (6 hours activity) 

381 Early Childhood Development in Art (3) 

A variety of studio activities as they relate to early child art based on research of the 
behavioral sciences having relevance for the understanding of the child's artistic 
development. (6 hours activity) 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. 
Development of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts 
through lectures, readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. 
Emphasis on descriptive and evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, dance and cinema 
criticism. 

411 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting and sculpture of the realism, impressionism, post-impressionism 
periods. 

412 Art of the 20th Century— 1900 to Present (3) 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphics and architecture. 

421 Oriental Art: China (3) 

A study of the historical development of the arts of China and their relation to Chinese 
philosophy and culture. 

422 Oriental Art: Japan (3) 

A study of the historical development of the arts of japan and their relation to Japanese 
philosophy and culture. 

423 Film Animation (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B and 117. Aesthetic and technical considerations of 
« animation applied in the production of film. 

426A,B Glass Forming (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 106A,B, 306A, and consent of instructor. A course in the chemistry, handl- 
ing and manipulation of glass and its related tools and equipment for the ceramic artist. (6 
hours activity) 

431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance period. Lectures, 
discussion and field trips. 

432 Baroque and Rococo Art (3) 

Basic problems of painting, sculpture and architecture of the Baroque and Rococo period. 
Lectures, discussion and field trips. 


96 


Art 


441A,B Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B, 205A or consent of instructor. Provides a wide range of 
opportunities for exploring the art media used in secondary school art programs today. 
Deals with materials appropriate for secondary art curriculum. Offers creative in- 
vestigation of two and three dimensional media in a variety of subject matter 
applications. 

443A,B Film Making (3,3) 

Development of film as a visual art form. 

451 Oceanic Art (3) 

An introductory survey of the styles of the aboriginal people of the following regions: 
Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Indonesia. 

452 Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3) 

An introduction by region and tribal group to the art forms of West Coastal Africa and the 
Sudan, Niger River kingdoms, Yoruba kingdoms, Cameroon chieftainships, Congo tribes. 
Central Africa and East Coastal Africa. 

453A,B Display and Exhibition Design (3,3) 

A course in the appropriate and creative use of materials, processes, and design concepts as 
they relate to the special problems involved in the planning and preparing of displays, ex- 
hibits, bulletin boards, wall cases and art portfolios. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

461 Art of North American Indian (3) 

An introduction to the art forms and style groupings of the following American Indian 
groups: Eskimo, Pacific Northwest, California, Eastern Woodlands, Mound Builders, 
Southwestern and Northern Mexico. 

481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Opportunities for Intensive study and evaluation in one 
area of art history and appreciation. 

483 Special Studies in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the design areas listed 
below. Each area listed may be repeated to a maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 
units of credit may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. 

483a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483b Environmental Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

483d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

483f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 

484 Special Studies in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units in ceramics. Course may be repeated to a 
maximum of 12 units, but not more than three units of credit may be obtained in any one 
area in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units in designated area or consent of instruc- 
tor. Opportunity for intensive study in the craft areas listed below. Each area listed may be 
repeated to a maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtain- 
ed in any one area in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

485a Jewelry 

485b General Crafts 

485c Metalsmithing 

485d Fibers— Weaving 

485e Fibers— Fabric Printing and Dyeing 

485f Fibers and Fabrics 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of Instructor. Opportunity for intensive study in the 
following sculptural processes. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more 
than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each 
unit) 

486a Modeling and Fabrication 
486b Casting 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and Printmaking (1-3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper division units and consent of Instructor. Opportunity 
for intensive study in the drawing and painting areas listed below. Each area listed may be 


Art 97 

repeated to a maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units of credit may be obtain- 
ed in any one area in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

487a Painting 
487b Life Drawing 
487c Drawing 
487d Printmaking 

488A;B Seminar in Advanced Scene Design (3,3) 

(Same as Theatre 488A,B) 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A,B. Advanced projects In photography as a means of personal ex- 
pression. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of 
credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

498 Internship in Art (1-3) 

Practical work experience in a specific art field in business or industry. Must be senior stan- 
ding. 

499 Independent Research (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in art with consent of department chair and written consent of 
instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: classified standing. Selected advanced problems and issues in art. Emphasis is 
on intellectual clarification and verbal articulation of Individual intent as an artist. Each 
student will develop oral and written material in support of his master's project. 

500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 500A. Directed research in the area of major emphasis. Each student will 
develop oral and written material on historical backgrounds and developments In art as 
they relate to his intent as an artist (stated in Art 500A) and in support of his master's pro- 
ject. 

502 Seminar in Contemporary Art (3) 

Selected advanced problems and directed research in relation to the contemporary art form. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the design areas listed below. May 
be repeated to a maximum of 12 units in each area, but no more than three units of credit 
may be obtained in any one area in a single semester. 

503a Graphic Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503b Environmental Design (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503c Design and Composition (2 hours activity for each unit) 

503d Display Design (More than 3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

503f Film Making (2 hours activity for each unit) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, development 
and evaluation of individual projects in ceramics. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 
units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (2 
hours activity for each unit) 

505 Graduate Problems in Crafts (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of individual projects in the crafts areas listed below. May 
be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of credit may be ob- 
tained in a single semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 

505a Jewelry 
505b General Crafts 
505c Metalsmithing 

505d Fibers— Weaving, Fibers and Fabrics 
505e Fibers — Fabric Printing and Dyeing 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study with emphasis on planning, 
development, and evaluation of Individual projects In sculpture. May be repeated to a 
maximum of 12 units but no more than three units of credit may be obtained in a single 
semester. (2 hours activity for each unit) 


98 


Dance 


507 Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (1-3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper division drawing and painting. Intensive study with emphasis 
on planning, development arid evaluation of individual projects in the drawing and 
painting areas listed below. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units but no more than 
three units of credit may be obtained in a single semester. (3 hours laboratory for each 
unit) 

507a Painting 
507b Life Drawing 
507c Drawing 
507d Printmaking 

597 Project (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and recommendation of the 
student's graduate committee. Art 500B may be taken concurrently with Art 597 on 
approval of instructor. Development and presentation of a creative project in the area of 
concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and recommendation of the 
student's graduate committee. Art 500B may be taken concurrently with Art 598 on 
approval of Instructor. Development and presentation of a thesis in the area of con- 
centration beyond regularly offered coursework. No more than three units may be taken 
in any one semester. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in art with consent of department chair and written consent of in- 
structor. May be repeated for credit. 


ART EDUCATION COURSES 

332 Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers (2) 

Prerequisite: Educ 411 or consent of Instructor. Creative selection, organization and use of 
materials and tools in construction activities. Includes correlation experiences with the 
social studies, science, and other units of work. (4 hours activity) 

370A,B Art Activity (2,2) 

Opportunities to observe, analyze, and evaluate child growth in and through creative art ex- 
periences. (4 hours activity) 

429A,B Arts and Crafts for Teaching Exceptional Children (2,2) 

Methods of using a variety of art materials and processes with emphasis on those experiences 
which meet the needs of retarded or handicapped children. (4 hours activity) 

442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods, and materials including 
audiovisual Instruction for teaching art in secondary school. Required before student 
teaching of students presenting majors In art for the standard teaching credential. 

749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See description and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 


FACULTY IN DANCE 

FACULTY 
Araminta Little 
Faculty Chair, 

Wilson Barrilleaux, M. E. Daenecke Lawlor, Sue Smyle, Miriam Tait 
PART-TIME 

John Dougherty, Richard Duree, Al Gilbert, Art MIkaellan, Robert Regger, Bruce Terry, 
Sylvia Turner 

The program of studies in dance provides training in each of the related aspects of dance 
such as history, theory, composition and the techniques of movement leading to dance per- 
formances and productions. The curriculum Is designed in accordance with the following 


Dance 


99 


three objectives: (1) to prepare the student who wishes to enter dance as a profession, either 
in teaching, choreography or performance; (2) to provide for the general university student 
the opportunity for a personal Involvement In dance as an art form and as a basic movement 
experience; and (3) to offer curricular experiences in dance for the student who is majoring 
in fields of study that are closely related to dance such as art, music and theatre. 
Opportunities for dance performance are available through dance faculty sponsored and co- 
sponsored dance concerts, operas and musicals. 

A major In dance Is not yet offered by the Faculty in Dance; however, the Department of 
Theatre offers B.A. and M.A. degrees In theatre arts with areas of concentration in dance 
which are designed to meet the requirements of educational and professional careers in 
dance. 


DANCE COURSES 

Dance concert attendance required for all courses listed. 

100 Introduction to Dance (3) (Formerly 101) 

Historical and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form, to provide student with basic 
knowledge and aesthetic values in ballet, modern dance, educational dance, theatrical 
dance as well as ethnic dance. Field trips. 

102A,B Movement and Rhythm (2,2) (Formerly 135A,B) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A is prerequisite for 102B. Designed to equip the student with higher 
kinesthetic and kinetic ability. Basic movement experience for dance, drama, art, music as 
well as the general student. (4 hours activity) 

112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) (Formerly 140) 

A study of the fundamental structure and technique of classical ballet. (4 hours activitiy) 

122 Beginning Modern Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Development of proficiency in modern dance technique, and development of under- 
standing and appreciation for modern dance as an art form. (2 hours activity) 

126A,B Improvisation (2,2) (Formerly 125A,B) 

Prerequisite: Dance 126A is prerequisite for 126B. Theory and practice of improvisation in 
movement. The student will be taught to overcome inhibitions, to move freely and 
naturally and to improvise imaginatively in movement. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

132 Beginning Jazz Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Designed to introduce the student to the beginning technique of modern jazz dance and 
basic choreography. (2 hours activity) 

142 Beginning Tap Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Fundamental structure and technique of tap dance. Designed to equip students with the 
technique of tap and tap choreography. (2 hours activity) 

152 Ballroom Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Development of fundamental skills in ballroom dance with specific attention to basic steps 
and variations of dances In the major categories: fox-trot, waltz, swing, Latin-American 
and novelty dances. (2 hours activity) 

156 Soul Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Development of fundamental knowledges and skills in current fad and discotheque dances. 
(2 hours activity) 

162 Beginning Folk Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Designed to include both traditional and contemporary forms of folk dance. Dances of 
various countries are studied, with emphasis on the development of proficiency In folk 
dance skills and stylization. (2 hours activity) 

206A,B Mime and Pantomime (2,2) (Formerly 245A,B) 

Prerequisite: Dance 206A is prerequisite for 206B. Theory and practice of mime and pan- 
tomime for drama, dance and education (expression and gesture). Historical and contem- 
porary knowledge and techniques with emphasis on individual development of creative 
skill In mime and pantomime. (4 hours activity) 

212 Intermediate Classical Ballet (2) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 112 or consent of instructor. A study of the Intermediate level technique 
of classical ballet (4 hours activity) 

222 Intermediate Modern Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 122 or consent of instructor. Development of intermediate level modern 
dance technique and movement vocabulary in terms of composition and com- 
munication. (2 hours activity) 


100 Dance 


223A,B Space Forming in Dance (3^) (Formerly 227 A, B) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B. 223A is prerequisite for 223B. Theory of space and principle of 
space forming to train students to understand spacial movement, so that they can 
master movement on stage. Stage design and the basic skills of choreography. (1 hour 
lecture, 4 hours activity) 

226 Rhythmic Analysis (3) (Formerly 437) 

Knowledge and understanding of musical form and structure; practice In musically notating 
dance rhythms and in percussion accompaniment for dance. 

232 Intermediate Jazz Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 132 or consent of instructor. The development of intermediate level 
skills in jazz technique and choreography. (2 hours activity) 

242 Intermediate Tap Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 142 or consent of instructor. Designed to equip students with in- 
termediate skills in tap technique and tap choreography. (2 hours activity) 

262 Intermediate Folk Dance (1) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 162 or consent of instructor. An in-depth study of both traditional and 
contemporary forms of folk dance. Emphasis is on stylization and performance. (2 hours 
activity) 

271 Creative Dance for Children (3) (Formerly 210) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B. Designed not only for the student who is going to teach 
children how to create dance, but also for the student who is going to be a dance c reator. 
Basic dance subjects in relation to the growth of children from 5 to 17 years of age. How 
to make a dance motif and how to compose simple dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours ac- 
tivity) 

300 Dance Aesthetics (3) (Formerly 477) 

Prerequisites: Dance 10() or consent of instructor. Philosophical as well as theoretical 
knowledge of dance as an art form. A study of the processes of dance creation, 
movement and image; the problems of music accompaniment in dance, and dance as an 
art form of metaphysical beauty. 

312 Advanced Classical Ballet (2) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 212, audition, or consent of instructor. Advanced study in the techni- 
que, stylization and performance of classical ballet. (4 hours activity) 

316A,B Character Dance for Theatre (2,2) (Formerly 331 A, B) 

Prerequisite: 102A,B or consent of instructor. Basic character dances such as Mazurka, Czar- 
das, Friska, Polonaise, Fandango, Tarantella, along with the Court Dances such as Minuet 
and Galliard. Designed for students who aim to be professional performers or 
choreographers, as well as for actors and directors of theatre. (4 hours activity) 

323A,B Elements and Forms of Dance Composition (3,3) (Formerly 311A,B) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B. 323A is prerequisite for 323B. Basic forms and elements of dance 
composition. Dances in which these rules must be applied will be composed by the 
student. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

332 Advanced jazz Dance (2) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 232 or consent of instructor. The development of advanced jazz techni- 
ques through grade three of professional jazz dance. The relation of jazz to other forms 
of dance. History of jazz dance. Choreography of jazz dance. (4 hours activity) 

336A,B Dance for Musical Theatre (2,2) (Formerly 255) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B or consent of instructor. 336A is prerequisite to 336B. Theories, 
approaches and techniques of dance utilized In the musical comedy. A — Emphasis on the 
ensemble and individual approaches to the style. B— Introduced is the concept of basic 
choreography in the style of musical comedy. (4 hours activity) 

342 Advanced Tap Dance (2) (Formerly 140) 

Prerequisite: Dance 242 or consent of Instructor. Advanced structure and technique of tap 
dance. Designed for students aimed to be professional performers or choreographers on 
stage, film or television. (4 hours activity) 

366 Afro-American Dance (2) (Formerly 355) 

Study of primitive and tribal rhythm including jazz and other derivational dances of Africa. (1 
hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

372 Kinesthetics (3) 

Theory and application of kinesthetics as it relates to human performance capacity. Includes 
study of the principles of motion and human movement. 


Music 101 


375 Dance in Cultural Perspective (3) (Formerly 476A) 

History of dance from primitive times to the present. Covers development of dance in 
Europe, the Orient, Asia, America in its general relation to culture. 

376 Philosophy and Methodology of Educational Dance (3) (Formerly 358) 

Prerequisite: Dance 126 and 323A,B or consent of instructor. A short history of dance 

education; principles and objectives of modern educational dance and the methodology 
to meet these objectives; principle and structure of curriculum for educational dance. (1 
hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

383A,B Dance Theatre Production (3,3) (Formerly 375A,B) 

Prerequisites: Dance 102A,B and 223A,B or consent of instructor. A — The theory and prac- 
tice of the technical aspects of dance production. B — Students direct the technical 
aspects of dance performance. 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing In the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. 
Development of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts 
through lectures, readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. 
Emphasis on descriptive evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, dance and cinema 
criticism. 

422 Contemporary Dance Technique (3) (Formerly 484) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B or consent of instructor. Study of theories, approaches, and 
techniques of contemporary dancers. Emphasis is on development of individual tech- 
nique In dance. (6 hours activity) 

423 Choreography (3) (Formerly 486) 

Prerequisite: Dance 102A,B or equivalent. Theoretical and creative aspects of choreography. 
Application and analysis of elements of choreographic form. Composition of solo and 
group dances. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

426 Experimental Dance Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: Dance 222 or consent of instructor. Environmental and sensorial experiences in 
dance. Includes studies in creativity, sensitivity, and perception. Experiments in com- 
position using improvisation, happenings, geographic design, and special effects. Field 
trips. Final production. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

462 Ethnic Dance (3) (Formerly 482) 

Prerequisite: advanced preparation and/or experience in dance or consent of instructor. 
Theoretical and practical study of folk, square and social forms of dance in terms of 
cultural and environmental influences (includes geography, music, costumes, customs) 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

471 Creative Dance for Teachers (3) (Formerly 450) 

Prerequisites: Dance 102A,B and 376 or consent of instructor. Study and analysis of creative 
dance and its relation to dance education in elementary and secondary schools. 
Recommended for students of dance, theatre, music and art as well as practicing 
teachers. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

475 Forces and Figures in 20th Century Dance (3) (Formerly 476B) 

Intensive study of contemporary dance and trends influencing Its development. 

483 Dance Repertory (1-3) (Formerly 470) 

The production and performance of major dance repertory. A minimum of one unit per 
semester, excepting the freshman year, required for all dance emphasis theatre majors. 

4% Special Studies in Dance (1-3) (Formerly 474) 

Opportunity for intensive study In theory and practice In dance theatre and production. May 
be repeated to a maximum of eight units but no more than three units of credit may be 
obtained in a single semester. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Directed reading, reports, creation and performance according to predetermined 
arrangements with instructor and faculty chair. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

FACULTY 

Leo Kreter 
Department Chair 

Roger Ardrey, David Berfield, Carole Chadwick, Andrew Charlton, John Cooksey, M'lou 


102 Music 


Dietzer, John Farrer, Rita Fuszek, Kenneth Goldsmith, J. Justin Gray;Su Harmon, Burton 
Karson, Terry King, Joseph Landon, John Lueck, Gary Maas, Donal Michalsky, Benton 
Minor, Williams Nicholls, Jane Paul, Lloyd Rodgers, Patricia Roycroft, Robert Stewart, 
Howard Swan, David Thorsen, Rodger Vaughan. 

PART-TIME 

Donald Ambroson (viola), Kalman Bloch (clarinet), Kay Brightman (bassoon), William Cole 
(brass methods), Allen Davis (jazz ensemble), Bonnie Farrer (piano). Jay Grauer (double 
bass), Gary Gray (clarinet), David Grimes (guitar), Ann Hand (music education), John Jensen 
(music literature), Michael Kurkjian (voice), Jenifer McKenzie (flute), Karen McKinney 
(organ), Todd Miller (French horn and percussion), Michael Mitacek (theory), Donald 
Muggeridge (oboe), Harvey Pittel (saxophone), JoAnne Ritacca (accompanying), Leona 
Roberts (voice), Clarence Sawhill (conducting, band), Gary Scudder (saxophone ensemble), 
James Stamp (trumpet), Thomas Steele (guitar), Susan Stockhammer (flute), Susan Talevich 
(class piano), Leigh Unger (piano), Earle Voorhies (piano), Scott Zeidel (guitar) 

The Department of Music offers courses for both majors and non-majors. The fundamental 
purpose of the music curriculum is threefold: (1) to promote excellence in all aspects of 
music and academic coursework; (2) to provide basic preparation for careers in music; and 
(3) to promote interest in all musical and artistic endeavors In the university and the sur- 
rounding community. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. All entering music majors must register for the Bachelor of Arts degree program for the 
first semester of residence. Students may change their degree objective to the Bachelor 
of Music program upon completion of at least one semester of coursework at the uni- 
versity, successful completion of an examination In applied music and recommendation 
of the coordinator in the appropriate area of concentration. 

2. A placement audition In the principal performance area (student's voice or instrument), 
and proficiency examinations in theory and basic piano will be given to all music majors 
at the time of entrance to the university. Each student must pass the proficiency ex- 
aminations in theory and basic piano before being approved for graduation. The basic 
piano requirement may also be satisfied by successful completion of Mu 282B. Students 
deficient in any of the above areas will be advised to take additional coursework. 

3. Each music major must declare a single principal performance area with the approval of 
a faculty adviser who will be assigned upon completion of the placement audition at the 
time of entrance. Before being approved for graduation, each student must achieve at 
least the 300 level of performance proficiency in his area of principal performance. 

4. Each music major is required to present a senior recital appropriate to his degree 
program before being approved for graduation. In the music history and theory, con- 
ducting, composition, accompanying and musical theatre programs, this requirement 
may be met by some means other than a conventional recital. Consult the appropriate 
coordinator for more specific information. 

5. All undergraduate music majors are required to participate in a major performance 
ensemble (band, orchestra, opera or chorus) every semester. Students who declare 
wind or percussion as their principal performance area must register for band (or 
orchestra. If designated by the Instrumental coordinator); string majors must register 
for orchestra; and voice majors must register for chorus (or opera, if designated by the 
choral-vocal coordinator). A music major whose principal performance area is piano, 
organ or guitar shall be assigned to an appropriate performance group by his faculty ad- 
viser. Exceptions to this requirement must be directed by petition to the department 
chair (see also 6d below). 

6. The principal performance area for the major in music requires work in applied music, as 
follows: 


a. All music majors must complete a minimum of six semesters (eight semesters for 
the Bachelor of Music) of applied music in the principal performance area. 

b. A student pursuing the Bachelor of Music (Composition) or the Bachelor of Arts 
(Music History and Theory) may reach the 300 level in applied music before using 
all of the units designated in his degree requirements for that purpose. If the 300 
level is reached before the required units in applied music (principal perfor- 


Music 103 


mance area) are expended, the remainder of these units may be used as music 
major electives. A music history and theory major may elect additional units in 
applied music only upon the recommendation of his adviser and the coordinator 
in his area of performance, and with the approval of the coordinator of applied 
music. The composition major must also complete six units of composition 
beyond Mu 422A culminating in the successful presentation of a senior recital of 
his own compositions. 

c. A student pursuing the Bachelor of Music (instrumental, keyboard, voice or ac- 
companying specializations) must achieve the 300 level of performance 
proficiency before giving the junior recital, and must achieve the 400 level before 
giving the senior recital, and may not receive double lessons (two units) for more 
than three semesters at any given jury level. Specific information about jury level 
criteria is available in the Music Department Office. 

d. In order to receive state-funded lessons in applied music, an undergraduate 
student must be enrolled for a minimum of six units, two of which must be in an 
academic area of music (any courses other than performing ensembles and 
applied music), and must be making satisfactory progress toward a degree. If 
courses are dropped during the semester reducing his enrollment below the six- 
unit minimum, state-funded lessons will be withheld in a subsequent semester of 
enrollment. In order to receive state-funded lessons, the student also must be 
enrolled in an approved major performance ensemble or be excused from that 
requirement by means of a petition signed by the department chair. 

7. Senior transfer students entering Cal State Fullerton with a major in music, or graduate 
students In music entering to complete credential requirements are expected to com- 
plete a minimum of one semester of successful upper division work in music before they 
may be approved for admittance to teacher education. Required courses and competen- 
cies must be satisfied before endorsement by the faculty committee for acceptance in 
the credential program. 

8. All credential candidates are required to pass functional examinations in piano and voice 
(in addition to the piano proficiency described in 2 above) before being approved for 
admittance to teacher education. This requirement may also be satisfied by successful 
completion of Mu 282B and 283. 

9. A music major must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average in major field coursework at this 
institution In order to be approved for graduation. 

10. All exceptions to departmental or curricular requirements should be directed by petition 
to the department chair. 

MUSIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Music offers a variety of courses and programs leading to baccalaureate 
and graduate degrees in teaching and the professions. The baccalaureate degree may be 
earned in either of two degree programs (Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music). Within 
these patterns, a student will normally pursue an emphasis in music history and theory, music 
education, performance, composition, accompanying, or musical theatre, 
musical theatre. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts in Music shall consist of no fewer than 50 units, of which at least 29 shall 
be in the upper division. All Bachelor of Arts students must complete the basic requirements 
in lower and upper division and in addition select and complete the requirements listed in 
one of two options: Music History-Theory Option or Music Education Option. 


Basic Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts In Music 

Lower Division Units 

Music theory (Mu 111A,B, 211) 9 

Music literature (Mu 251) 3 

Applied techniques (Ensemble 4, Principal Performance Area 4) 8 

Upper Division 

Music theory (Mu 320A, 321A)* 5 

Music history (Mu 351A) _3 

* In the Music, History and Theory Option, Mu 320B or 321C may be substituted for Mu 320A. 8 


104 Music 


Music History and Theory Option 

This is designed as a balanced program in music history and theory and provides suitable 
preparation for advanced degrees in theory, literature or musicology and basic preparation 
for advanced study in other fields, such as musical acoustics, music therapy, 
ethnomusicology, library science in music, and music in industry and recreation. 

Units 


Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music theory (Mu 316, 321B) 4 

Music history and literature (Mu 352A,B, 498, 499) 8 

Conducting and composition (Mu 391 A or 392A or 422A) 2 

Ensemble (Mu 361) 2 

Electives in music (conducting, history^ or theory) _6 


50 

Allied requirements for Music History and Theory Option 

1. An academic minor (20 units) with written approval of the history or theory coordinator. 

2. Foreign language, preferably German, to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level. 

b. Pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completion of the second semester of the beginning university course in foreign 
language. 

Music Education Option 

This is designed to provide in-depth preparation for teaching in the California public schools 
under the provisions of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act). 


Instrumental Emphasis: Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281) 6 

Music theory (Mu 323A and 320B or 323B) 4 

Conducting (Mu 391A, 392A,B, 362F) 6 

Ensemble (Mu 361) _3 

50 

Vocal-Choral Emphasis: 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Diction for singers (Mu 390) 1 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281a,c,e,g) 4 

Conducting (Mu 391A,B, 392A, 362F) 6 

Literature and interpretation (Mu 453, 457) 4 

Opera theatre (Mu 361d) 1 

Ensemble (Mu 361) ^ 

50 

General Music Emphasis: 

Basic requirements for Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music and child development (Mu 333) 3 

Conducting (Mu 391 A, B) 4 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281A,C,E,G) 4 

Recreational instruments (Mu 381B) 1 

Music in the classroom (Mu 435) 3 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Ensemble (Mu 361) 3 

Electives in music _1 

50 

TEACHING CREDENTIAL PREPARATION 


Students desiring a California teaching credential in music must complete the following 
courses prior to enrolling in the professional education program as required by the School of 

Education. . , . 

Units 


Instrumental emphasis: Mu 342B, 353, 399 5 

Choral-vocal emphasis: Mu 342A, 354, 399 5 

General music emphasis: Mu 342A, Mu Ed 441, 399 5 


Music 105 

Students who wish to earn a teaching credential in addition to a Bachelor of Arts with a music 
education option must complete the following: 

Units 

MuEd 442 (3) — professional education courses 9-12 

Student teaching, full-time 12^ 


21-24 

The following competency examinations must be passed prior to admission to teacher 
education: 

Theory 

Keyboard functional 
Voice functional 

Multiple Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in the 
elementary schools In multiple subject classrooms: 

Units 


Art 380 3 

Mu 333 3 

Theatre 402 3 


9 

The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any student 
who wishes to expand his knowledge in the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, 320, 330, 340, and 380 
Dance 100, 112, 122, 125A,B, 132, 142, 152, 162, 206A,B, 311A,B, 331A,B, 484 
Mu 100, 101, 111A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281A,C,E,G, 283A, 381B, MuEd 435 
Theatre 100A,B, 211, 263A, 276A, 277, 370A,B, 402, 403, 411C 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This degree program is designed to provide training for the highly gifted students who show 
promise and capability of becoming professional performers and composers. 

This degree shall consist of no fewer than 70 semester units, of which at least 32 shall be in 
the upper division. 


Basic Requirements for the Bachelor of Music Units 

Music theory (Mu 111A,B, 211) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 251, 351A) 6 

Principal performance area (Mu 171) 2 

Major performance ensemble 4 

Senior recital (Mu 498) 1 

22 

Composition Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 318, 320A,B, 321 A and 321 B or C, 323A, 422A) 17 

Music history and literature (Mu 352A,B) 6 

♦Principal performance area 4 

Applied composition 5 

Major performance ensemble 4 

Electives in music 12 

70 

Instrumental Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 321 A, 323A, 422A) 11 

Music history and literature (351 B or 352A,B) 3-6 

Principal performance area 11 

Major performance ensemble 4 

Conducting (392A,B, 362F) 4 

Chamber music 6 

Electives in music 6-9 

~70 

♦See 6b under Requirements of the Department of Music. 


106 Music 


Keyboard Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 321A, 422A) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 454A,B) 7-10 

Principal performance area 11 

Chamber music 3 

Accompanying 1 

Pedagogy (Mu 372 or 373, 467A,B) 5 

Electives in music 9-12 

70 

Voice Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 321A, 422A) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 351B or 352A,B, 456, 457A,B) 10-13 

Principal performance area 11 

Major performance ensemble (2 units minimum in Mu 361d) 4 

Diction (Mu 390A,B,C) 3 

Conducting 2 

Pedagogy 2 

Electives in music 4-7 

70 

Allied requirement for voice specialization: 


Two foreign languages, each to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level, or 

b. A pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completion of the second semester of the beginning university course in foreign 
language. 


Accompanying Specialization 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 318, 320A or B, 321A, 422A) 11 

Music history and literature (Mu 351B or 352A,B, 455, 457A) 8-11 

Principal performance area 9 

Sight reading (Mu 385) 2 

Accompanying (Mu 386) 2 

Chamber music (Mu 363) 2 

Harpsichord class (Mu 372) 1 

Conducting (Mu 391A) 2 

Diction (Mu 390A,B,C,D) 4 

Organ class (Mu 373) 1 

Electives in music 3-6 

1(5 

Musical Theatre Specialization 

■^Baslc requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 321A or 323A) 2-3 

Music history and literature (Mu 351B, 456) 6 

Principal performance area 5-6 

Major performance ensemble/workshop 4 

Diction (Mu 390D) 1 

Conducting (Mu 391A or 392A) 2 

Music/Theatre workshop (465A, 465C) 6 

Music/Theatre history (473) 3 

Theatre (Theatre 263A, 263B, 342A, 342B) 14 

Dance (Dance 102A,B or 206A,B) 

70 


•Studoni may receive 498 credit for a leading role in a major production upon approval of insirur lor and area ( oordinalor. 


Music 107 


Minor in Music 

The minor in music may be used as an appropriate area of study by persons whose majors are 
in other fields, or may be used to satisfy minor field requirements for elementary or secon- 
dary teaching credentials. A maximum of 12 units from the lower division may be included in 
work counted toward the music minor. The music minor requires a minimum preparation of 
20 units. 


Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division Units 

Theory of music (selected from Mu 101, 111A,B, 211 or any 300- or 400-level theory 

classes for which student is qualified) 6 

Music history and literature (Mu 100, 251, 350 or courses at the 400- or 500-level for 

which student is qualified) 5-6 

Applied techniques (selected from Mu 183, 184A,B, 281a-g, 283 or any course in 
ensemble, conducting, piano, voice and orchestral instruments at the 300 or 400 

level for which student is qualified 8-9 

“20 


Note: Students expecting to use the minor for teaching must complete four units of Mu 
281a-g and/or Mu 381A,B Orchestral Instruments, and a minimum of two units in an 
ensemble appropriate to their area of specialization. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The program of studies leading to the Master of Arts in Music provides advanced studies in 
breadth as well as in an area of graduate specialization. The program is further Intended to 
provide advanced coursework with a suitable balance in such music studies as theory, com- 
position, history, literature, advanced applied techniques and music education. There are 
suitable graduate specializations in the areas of history and literature and performance. 

The Master of Arts in Music is designed for teachers and supervisors of music; persons in- 
tending to specialize in applied fields In the pursuit of occupational goals; individuals 
preparing for college teaching; and persons Intending to pursue advanced degrees beyond 
the master's level. 

PREREQUISITES 

An applicant must meet the university and school requirements for admission in classified 
graduate standing with the declared objective of this degree. These include: (a) possession 
of an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution; (b) a major in music 
(or the equivalent of a major; i.e., 29 upper division units In music), with a minimum grade- 
point average of 3.0 in the major and 2.75 overall; (c) completion of a satisfactory audition or 
conference and a written essay In his area of specialization; and (d) the completion of Music 
500 (Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music, 2 units). One objective of Music 500 is the 
selection of a Departmental Advisory Committee which aids the student in the preparation 
of a study plan listing all courses required for completion of the degree. This study plan must 
receive the approval of the Departmental Advisory Committee and the dean of graduate 
studies. Opportunity is given the student to remove deficiencies by taking certain prescribed 
courses, but such courses cannot be applied to the master's degree program. 

For admission In conditionally classified graduate standing with the declared objective of this 
degree, an applicant must meet the university and school requirements: possession of an 
acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and attainment of a grade- 
point average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted. In addition, each 
applicant will be required to audition In his area of specialization and to submit a written es- 
say. 


Study Plan 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study, no more than nine of which shall be 
outside the field of music, and at least 15 of which must be in 500-level courses In music. The 
student must include Mu 500, Introduction to Graduate Studies In Music, within the first 
nine units taken as a graduate student. The degree program offers two options: Option I in 


108 Music 


History and Literature, or Option II in Performance. A thesis is required in Option I; a thesis 
or project in Option II. In addition, in Option I the program will include at least six units of 
study outside the field of music, but supportive to the program. 

A written comprehensive examination will be required of all students prior to advancement 
to candidacy. In addition, for Option I only, the student must demonstrate reading ability in 
at least one foreign language, preferably German or French, prior to advancement to can- 
didacy. 

For further information, consult the Department of Music. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degree" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


MUSIC COURSES 

100 Introduction to Music (3) 

A basic approach to musical enjoyment and understanding through a general survey of 
musical literature representative of various styles and performance media. Music will be 
related to other arts through lectures, recordings and concerts. Closed to music majors. 

101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Basic theory and practical applications to further understanding of basic music principles and 
to improve music performance and listening skills. Includes sightsinging and 
relationship to keyboard and simple melodic instruments. Closed to music majors. 

102 History of Jazz (3) 

Historical study of jazz music in America, with emphasis on chronological development and 
stylistic evolution with consideration of peripheral trends. Emphasis on listening. 
Designed for the non-music major. 

111A,B Diatonic Harmony (3,3) ' 

A year course covering diatonic harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and Intervals, 
triads and their Inversions, harmonizations, nonharmonic tones, modulation and 
dominant seventh chords. Practical applications, to include sightsinging, dictation and 
keyboard harmonizations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

171, 271, 371, 471 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual study with approved instructor with emphasis 
on technique and repertoire. Music majors must register for a minimum of one unit per 
semester. Performance majors approved by jury recommendation should register for 
two units per semester, jury examination required. May be repeated for credit. 

172 Piano Class for Piano Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Group instruction in basic pianistic technique and 
repertoire. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

173 Voice Class for Voice Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Group instruction in basic vocal technique and 
repertoire. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

182A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) 

Fundamentals of keyboard technique for students whose major performance instrument is 
not piano. (2 hours activity) 

183 Voice Class for Non-majors (1) 

Beginning and elementary techniques in singing for the non-music major. May be repeated 
for credit. (2 hours activity) 

184A,B Piano Class for Non-Majors (1,1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101. Beginning and elementary instruction in basic piano techniques for 
the non-music major. (2 hours activity) 

211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 111B. Continuation of Mu 111A,B with emphasis on the chromatic practice 
of the 19th century. Includes secondary dominants; ninth, eleventh and thirteenth 
chords; sequence, and chromatically altered chords. Practical applications to include 
sightsinging, melodic and harmonic dictation, and keyboard practice. Required of all 
music majors. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 


Music 109 


251 Survey of Musical Literature (3) 

An introductory course required of majors in the study of the literature of music in Western 
civilization. Open to minors and qualified students by consent of instructor. Students 
should be able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, design and style. (3 hours 
lecture) 

267 Observation in Applied Music (1) 

Prerequisites: piano major, sophomore standing. Observation of specialists in private music 
teaching, teaching techniques, materials, development of student and preparation for 
beginners, adult beginners. Intermediate and early advanced students under the 
specialist in these areas. Requires written reports of activity in these areas. 

281a-g Orchestral Instruments (1) 

Mu 281a, c,e, and g are required of all music credential candidates. Instrumental music can- 
didates are required to take two additional units selected from Mu 281b, d, or f. (2 hours 
activity) 

281a String Instruments (1) 

Specialization on violin and viola. Violin and viola majors substitute Mu 281b for this 
course. 

281b String Instruments (1) 

Specialization on cello and string bass. Cello and bass majors are exempt. 

281c Brass Instruments (1) 

Specialization on trumpet and French horn. Trumpet and French horn majors substitute 
281d for this course. 

281d Brass Instruments (1) 

Specialization on trombone, baritone and tuba. Trombone and tuba majors are exempt. 

281e Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Specialization on clarinet and flute. Secondary emphasis on saxophone. Clarinet and 
flute majors substitute 281f for this course. 

281f Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Specialization on oboe and bassoon. Oboe and bassoon majors are exempt. 

281g Percussion Instruments (1) 

Specialization on the snare drum and mallet-played Instruments with related work on 
other standard percussion instruments. Special consideration given to typical 
problems encountered with percussion In the public schools. Percussion majors are 
exempt. 

282A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (1,1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 182B or placement by Instructor. Designed to meet music major minimum 
piano proficiency requirements for degree. Fundamentals of keyboard technique for 
students whose major performance field is not piano. Not required for keyboard ma- 
jors. (2 hours activity) 

283 Voice Class (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Recommended for credential candidates. Not re- 
quired for voice majors. (2 hours activity) 

299 Clinical Practice in Instrumental and Vocal Techniques (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of instrumental and vocal techniques classes, as in 
public and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 271 or Mu 281 recommended. (2 
hours activity) 

300 Music of Today (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or 101, or consent of instructor. Concentration on the musical trends of 
the last two decades. The emphasis will be on western art music, but recent 
developments in jazz, rock and folk idioms will also be discussed. 

316 16th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. Sixteenth-century counterpoint in two, three 
and four parts, covering motet, canon, double counterpoint. 

318 18th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 316 or consent of Instructor. Eighteenth-century counterpoint in two, three 
and four parts, covering invention, canon, double and triple counterpoint and fugue. 

320A,B 20th-Century Techniques (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211. A survey of the compositional practices of the 20th century with 
emphasis on written examples in the various styles. Practical applications to Include 


110 Music 


sightsinging, keyboard practice and dictation. A — Compositional techniques from 1890 
to 1945. Required of all music majors. B— Compositional techniques since 1945, to in- 
clude limited experience with the synthesis of sound. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

321A,B,C Form and Analysis (3^2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 or consent of instructor. A — Analysis of structural elements of music 
such as motive, phrase and period; binary, tenary, rondo, sonato allegro and larger 
musical forms in representative musical works. Required of all music majors. B — 
Continuation of A, with emphasis on larger musical works. C — Continuation of A and B 
with emphasis on literature of the 20th century. 

323A,B Orchestration (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 320, 321A or consent of instructor. Writing and analysis of orchestral music. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 or equivalent or successful completion of proficiency test. Study of the 
relationship of music to child growth and development, with emphasis on the child 
from 5 to 12. 

341 Survey of the Symphony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. A study of the history and literature of 
symphonic music from the 18th through the 20th centuries, with special emphasis on 
the relationships between musical composition and the general artistic temper of 
historical periods. For non-music majors only. 

350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of Instructor. Designed to increase interest and an under- 
standing of music In its relation to our general culture. A sociological approach which 
includes musical criticism and journalism, concert life, audience psychology and the 
polltical/religlous/business aspects of the American musical scene. 

351A,B History and Literature of Music (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 and 251 or consent of instructor. A — A study of the history and 
literature of music from early Greek beginnings through the Renaissance. B— A study of 
the history and literature of music covering the baroque, classic, romantic period and 
the 20th century. Required of all music majors. 

352A,B History and Literature of Music from 1600 to the Present (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 and 251, or consent of instructor. A — Historical and stylistic study in the 
baroque and classic periods. B — Historical and stylistic study in the romantic period and 
20th century. May be used to replace 351B. If used to fulfill music history requirements, 
both A and B sections of Mu 352 must be completed. This course is recommended to all 
music majors who intend to continue music study at the graduate level. 

353 Survey of Instrumental Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392A. Through examination and analysis of multiple examples of the reper- 
tory, this course is designed to develop skills in the practical use of instrumental 
literature for performance In secondary schools and community colleges. 

354 Survey of Public School Choral Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391A. Thorough examination and analysis of multiple examples of choral 
repertoire suitable for junior and senior high choruses. 

361a-g Major Performance Ensemble (1) 

The study and performance of standard and contemporary music literature. Public concerts 
on campus and in the community are included in the scheduled activities each semester 
and participation is required. A concert tour may be included by some groups. (More 
than 3 hours major production.) May be repeated for credit. 

361a Symphony Orchestra (1) 

Open to all university students and qualified adults in the community by audition or con- 
sent of instructor. 

361b University Choir (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. 

361c University Concert Band (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. 

361d Opera Theatre (1) 

Study of roles and representative excerpts from standard and contemporary operas and 
the basic musical, dramatic and language techniques of the musical theatre. Perfor- 
mance of operatic excerpts and complete operas. 


Music 111 


361e University Singers (1) 

Membership restricted to advanced voice students or those accepted by audition. 

361f University Wind Ensemble (1) 

Membership restricted to advanced wind and percussion students or those accepted by 
audition. 

361g University Chorale (1) 

Open to upper division and graduate students with consent of instructor. Audition 
necessary. 

361h Symphonic Band (1) 

Open to aii university students by audition or consent of instructor. 

362A Wind Ensemble— Jazz Ensemble (1) 

Open to qualified students by audition or consent of instructor. Public performances on 
campus and in the community are scheduled each semester. 

362B Wind Ensemble— Varsity Band (1) 

Open to all university students with consent of instructor. Varsity Band provides music for 
Titan football and basketball home games. Concurrent enrollment in Mu 361c is 
recommended. 

362C Vocal Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of choral literature of the Renaissance and baroque periods. Open 
only to students by audition. Public performance required. (2 hours activity) 

362D Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of music written for the Percussion Ensemble. Open to any qualified 
student with consent of instructor. (2 hours activity) 

362E Brass Ensemble (1) 

The study and performance of music written for large brass choir/ensemble. Open to any 
qualified student with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours ac- 
tivity) 

362F Conducting Laboratory Ensemble — Instrumental (1) 

A non-performing ensemble composed of orchestral instruments (strings, woodwinds, brass 
and percussion) which functions as a laboratory ensemble for instrumental conducting 
students. Literature covered is of limited difficulty. Required of students enrolled in Mu 
392A; open to all students. (2 hours activity) 

362G String Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of string orchestra literature covering ail periods of musical style. 
Open to students by audition or consent of instructor. 

362H Chamber Orchestra (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance of representative chamber 
orchestra literature. Open to university students and qualified adults in the community. 

362K Keyboard Workshop (1) 

Weekly workshop performances by students, faculty and guests. Open to all students. 

362V Vocal Workshop (1) 

Application of vocal technique to performance practices through lecture— demonstrations, 
master classes and ancillary recitals. 

363 Chamber Music Ensembles (1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string or keyboard students. Various ensembles will be formed to 
study, read and perform representative chamber literature of ail periods. (2 hours ac- 
tivity) 

367 Pedagogy Internship (1) 

Prerequisites: Mu 267 and 467A. Supervised internship in private piano teaching. 

372 Harpsichord Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level In piano or organ or consent of instructor. The study of the harp- 
sichord as an Instrument, the application of baroque stylistic characteristics, and train- 
ing in the rudiments as an instrument, the application of baroque stylistic 
characteristics, and training in the rudiments of continuo playing in ensemble with 
voices and instruments. (2 hours activity) 

373 Organ Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano. The study of the organ as an instrument, the playing 
techniques, and repertoire. Instruction will include the differences between piano and 
organ techniques. (2 hours activity) 


112 Music 


374 Keyboard Improvisation (2) 

Prerequisite: 200 level in keyboard applied music or consent of instructor. Emphasis on 
development of ability to modulate, transpose, read scores, and improvise at a 
moderately advanced level. 

381 B Survey of Recreational Instruments (1) 

A general survey of recreational instrument practices for credential candidates. (2 hours ac- 
tivity) 

385 Keyboard Sight-reading (2) 

Prerequisite: 200-jury level in piano or organ or consent of instructor. Analysis of sight- 
reading skills and procedures. Emphasis on development of ability to read solo, ensem- 
ble and scores without hesitation at first sight. (4 hours activity) 

386 Piano Accompanying (1) 

Prerequisite: by audition only. The study and performance of piano accompaniments for in- 
strumentalists, vocalists and ensembles. Participation in rehearsals, recitals and concerts 
required. (2 hours activity) 

390A,B,C,D Diction for Singers (1,1, 1,1) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Study of proper singing diction; 
may not be considered a substitute for formal language study. Examples from standard 
vocal literature explained through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. A — 
Italian. B — German. C — French. D — English. 

391A,B Choral Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: one semester of voice class or consent of instructor. A — Principles, techniques 
and methods of conducting choral groups. Required of all music education majors. (4 
hours activity) B — Continuation of 391A including laboratory work with class and vocal 
ensembles, using standard choral repertoire. (4 hours activity) 

392A,B Instrumental Conducting (1,2) 

Prerequisite: two courses from 281a-g or consent of instructor. A— Principles, techniques 
and methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. Required of all music 
education majors. (2 hours activity) B — Continuation of 392A, including laboratory ex- 
perience in conducting Instrumental groups, using standard instrumental literature. (4 
hours activity) 

3% Internship: Professional Experience (1-3) 

Fieldwork experience in music under supervision of resident faculty and professionals in the 
field. Requires minimum six hours fieldwork for each unit credit. May be repeated for 
credit to a maximum of six units. Open to all music students by consent of Instructor. 

397 Proseminar in Music (3) 

Prerequisites: Mu 211 and 351A or 352A or B, or consent of instructor. Study of the aesthetic 
and Intellectual nature of music and its relationship to other arts and society through 
both structured and independent investigations, leading to the selection of an area of 
special Interest for further investigation in the senior project. 

399 Clinical Practice in Conducting (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of concepts, materials and procedures as applied to 
field situations, as In public and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 391A or 392A 
recommended. 

400 Concert Music (1) 

Weekly performances by university students, faculty and performing organizations, with lec- 
tures and discussions relative to the performing arts. Attendance required at additional 
concerts during the semester. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. 
Development of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts 
through lectures, readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. 
Emphasis on descriptive and evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, dance and cinema 
criticism. 

422A,B Composition (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 316, 320 and 321A or consent of instructor. A— Ear-training analysis of 
smaller forms, simple composition of two- and three-part song form styles. B — Analysis 
and writing of more complex musical forms. 

453A,B Choral Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 391A or equivalent and 351A,B. A— The study of choral literature from the 


Music 113 


medieval, renaissance and baroque eras analyzed in historical perspective. Appropriate 
performance practices will be examined. B — Continuation of A with representative ex- 
amples from the classic, romantic and contemporary eras. 

454A,B Piano Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisite: 351A,B and junior level piano standing or consent of Instructor. Study and per- 
formance of representative styles and schools of piano literature, with particular 
reference to solo and ensemble repertoire. A — Concentration on contrapuntal forms, 
sonatas and variations. B— Concentration on concert!, character pieces, fantasies, suites 
and etudes. 

455 Instrumental Chamber Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Open to all music majors, or to non-majors by consent of instructor. Members of the class 
will be grouped into ensembles for demonstration purposes. Emphasis on the stylistic 
differences required in performing works of all periods. 

456 Opera Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Study of all periods and nationalities, in- 
cluding stylistic and historical connotations. 

457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390B or consent of instructor. Study and performance of German lieder 
with representative examples of periods and styles. 

457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390A or consent of instructor. Study and performance of Italian, French, 
Russian, English and American art songs, with representative examples of periods and 
styles. 

458 Collegium Musicum Practicum (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. The study and performance of rare and old 
music, both instrumental and vocal. Techniques of musical research will be applied. 
Students should be competent performers. 

459 Guitar Literature, Interpretation and Pedagogy (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in guitar or consent of instructor. A survey of the literature 
available to guitarists. Includes works for lute, vihuela and baroque guitar as well as the 
compositions and transcriptions for the modern guitar. An introduction to materials 
and methods essential for the guitar instructor. 

460 Interpretation of Early Music (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level In principal performance area. A survey of the various stylistic in- 
terpretations of vocal and instrumental literature from the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. 
Designed for the senior or graduate student majoring In performance. (2 hours lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

467A,B,C Piano Pedagogy (2,2,1) 

Prerequisite: junior piano standing or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of piano 
pedagogy, with reference to individual and group instruction. A — Survey of materials 
and methods for beginning and elementary students. Supervised teaching. B— Survey 
of materials and methods for intermediate and early advanced students. Physiology and 
psychology for studio teachers. Supervised teaching. C— Prerequisite: 467A or consent 
of instructor. Observation and practice teaching while learning organizational 
procedures, teaching techniques and course literature for class piano. 

468A,B Vocal Pedagogy (2,2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of Instructor. A— Fundamentals of vocal pedagogy 
with reference to studio and public school teaching, with consideration of physiology 
and acoustics as they apply to singing. B— Practical application of the fundamentals dis- 
cussed In A. The student will participate in seminar discussions and be observed in an 
actual studio teaching situation. Emphasis will be on the diagnosis and cure of specific 
vocal problems. 

497 Senior Project (1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 397. Intensive independent investigation of an area of special interest In 
music, culminating in a public performance, lecture, lecture-recital or other suitable 
demonstration. 

498 Senior Recital (1) 

Prerequisites: 371-level (471-level for performance majors) and consent of instructor. Inten- 
sive preparation and presentation of representative works in the principal performance 
area. 


114 Music 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Study of a special topic in music selected in consultation with the instructor and carried out 
under his supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (2) 

Required of all graduate music majors. Study of basic bibliography, literature, and research 
techniques and materials useful In graduate music study. 

522 Contemporary Techniques of Composition (2) 

Advanced techniques of composition, as applied to the student's area of graduate 
specialization. 

523 Advanced Orchestration (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 323B. Analysis and practice of traditional and contemporary orchestration 
techniques. Scoring of music for large ensembles such as orchestra, band, chorus and 
orchestra, or chorus and band. 

551 Seminar in Music of the Medieval Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. A detailed study of the music forms, structures and styles 
from 500 to 1450. Detailed analysis of important representative works as well as the con- 
tributions of individual composers and theoretical writers. 

552 Seminar in Music of the Renaissance (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. A comprehensive study of the forms, styles, and 
developmental characteristics of music between 1450 and 1600. Detailed analysis of 
selected works by representative composers and theoretical writers. 

553 Seminar in Music of the Baroque Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Musical forms, styles, and performance 
practices of the baroque period. Detailed analysis of significant representative works. 

554 Seminar in Music of the Classic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. A study of the history and literature of 
music from approximately 1750 to 1825. Detailed analysis of important representative 
works. 

555 Seminar in Music of the Romantic Period (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An intensive study of the structure and development of 
music in the 19th century. Detailed analysis of important representative works. 

556 Seminar in 20th-Century Music (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351A,B or consent of instructor. Developments In the music of western 
Europe and the western hemisphere since 1890. Intensive study of contemporary music 
and Its structure. 

557 Seminar in Musicology (2) 

Prerequisites: at least two courses from Mu 551-556 and consent of instructor. Detailed in- 
vestigation and systematic analysis of specific developments in musicology including 
exercises in transcriptions from old notations and historical investigations prepared by 
members of the seminar. 

558 Collegium Musicum (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced studies in the performance of rare and old 
music. (See Mu 458 for general description.) May be repeated for credit. 

571 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual instruction with approved Instructor with 
emphasis on performance techniques and repertory. Required of all graduate students 
whose terminal project is the graduate recital. 

591 Seminar in Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391 B, conducting experience or consent of instructor. Advanced problems 
in choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on laboratory work with student 
groups and in concert conducting. 

592 Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 392B, keyboard facility for score reading and consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced study of conducting techniques through assignments with the university 
symphony. Interpretive problems of each period covered in lectures. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Systematic study and report of a significant undertaking in the area of musical composition, 
musical performance, or other related creative activity. A written critical evaluation of 
the work or activity will be required. 


Music 115 


598 Thesis (3) 

Individual Investigations of specific problems In the area of concentration by candidates for 
the M.A. degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music and consent of instructor. Research and study pro- 
jects In areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and written 
reports required. 

MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES 

342A;B Practicum in School Materials and Techniques (2,2) 

Designed for the music education major. Experience in the use of musical materials, conduc- 
ting, organization and management. Observation and application of rehearsal and 
classroom techniques. Must be taken concurrently with Mu 399. A — Choral. Prere- 
quisite: Mu 391A,B. B— Instrumental. Prerequisite: Mu 392A,B. 

435 Music in the Modern Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of 20th-century materials and tech- 
niques of recordings for creative movement to music, and of choral materials and tech- 
niques appropriate for the elementary school choir. Adaptation of materials for use 
in classroom music. 

441 Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools (2) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, senior standing or consent of instructor. Ob- 
jectives, methods and materials for teaching general music or allied arts-humanitles 
classes in secondary schools. Including their relationship to specialized instrumental 
and choral programs. Practical problems and field work applications are Included. 

442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. History, principles of public education, grades 

K-12, with special emphasis on music. Philosophy, methods, materials and procedures 
for organizing and teaching music in elementary and secondary schools. 

444 Administration, Materials for the Marching Band (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 323A or consent of Instructor. A study of techniques, materials, ad- 
ministration for marching band. Includes charting for the football field and parade ac- 
tivities, with particular emphasis on the needs of school bands. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 

449A Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School (10) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act credential. See description and prere- 
quites under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

Must be taken concurrently with MuEd 449A. For candidates who have declared for the Ryan 
Act credential. See description and prerequisites under Division of Teacher Education. 

530 Practicum of Research in Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music and completion of Mu 500. Research techniques 
and procedures in music education. Students will be required to complete a creative 
project or research paper. 

531 Foundations of Music Education (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 500. Study of philosophical and historical bases which have influenced 
music education. Identification of philosophic frames of leading educators. Contem- 
porary trends which affect the teaching of music in the schools. Prerequisite for all 
graduate music education courses. 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) 

Studies in the trends and application of educational theory in relation to the teaching of 
music in the public schools. 

544 Curriculum Planning and Construction in Music (2) 

Principles and practices of curriculum planning in music education, with special reference to 
the public elementary, junior and senior high school. Required of majors who intend to 
complete supervision credential. 

545 Supervision and Administration of Music in the Public Schools (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. Philosophy, principles and prac- 
tices of supervision of music In the public elementary and secondary schools. Emphasis 


116 Theatre 


on modern principles of leadership, types of services, organization, management and 
evaluation of programs of instruction. Required of candidates for supervisory creden- 
tial. 

749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

For candidates who have declared for the Fisher Act credential. See description and prere- 
quisite under Division of Teacher Education. 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 

FACULTY 
Alvin Keller 
Department Chair 

Joseph Arnold, John Boyd, Ronald Dieb, Marjorie Farmer, Donald Henry,* Dean Hess, 
Michael McPherson, R. Kirk Mee, S. Todd Muffatti, Dwight Odie, jerry Pickering, William 
Raoul, Robert Renee, Darrell Winn, James Young,* Allen Zeltzer* 

The Department of Theatre program includes the several fields of playwriting, oral in- 
terpretation, acting-directing, technical theatre, theatre history and theory, radio-television- 
film and dance. Specifically, the coursework is arranged to provide opportunities for 
students (1) to develop an appreciation for the theatre; (2) to become aware, as audience or 
participants of the shaping force of the theatre in society; (3) to improve the understandings 
and skills necessary for work in the theatre as a profession; (4) to prepare for teaching 
theatre; and (5) to pursue graduate studies. 

Theatre majors must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average In their major for graduation. In ad- 
dition to course requirements, all students will enroll for one unit of Theatre 478 each 
semester. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

Course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and interests of students 
working for the Bachelor of Arts In Theatre Arts. 

Plan I Is for those who wish to study theatre as a cultural contribution or who wish to pursue 
graduate degrees in theatre with emphasis in theatre history and theory. It is strongly 
recommended that students electing this plan support the major with approved electives 
from art, music, foreign languages, literature, philosophy or speech. 

Plan II is designed to develop the necessary competency for pursuing theatre as a profession, 
or for pursuing graduate degrees in theatre with an emphasis in an area of concentration 
other than history of the theatre. Areas of concentration are: playwriting; acting; directing; 
oral Interpretation; radio-television-film; technical theatre and dance. 

Plan III meets the requirements of the teaching credential with specialization in secondary- 
teaching. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other un- 
iversity requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III also must meet 
any specific requirements for the desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for 
School of Education). Those students who plan to work on the M.A. degree as well as the 
credential should see the chair of the Department of Theatre. 


PLAN I: THEATRE HISTORY AND THEORY EMPHASIS Units 

Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 263A, 
Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, Costume Fun- 
damentals (3) or Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 211, Introduction 

to Interpretation (3) 20-21 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, 

World Theatre (12); Theatre 477A,B, Senior Seminar In Critical Techniques (6); 

Theatre 472, American Theatre (3); electives (3 units) 27 


*University administrative officer 


Theatre 117 


PLAN II; PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN AN AREA OF CONCENTRATION Units 

Lower Division: Same as in Plan I, with exception of acting, radio-television-film, 
dance, technical theatre and directing. 

Upper Division: In one of the following areas of concentration: 

Playwriting — Theatre 364, Seminar in Playwriting (6), or Theatre 364 (3) and Theatre 
383, Television Writing (3); Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); 

Theatre 468, Experimental Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); 

Theatre 477A,B, Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (6) 33 

Oral Interpretation-Theatre 311, Advanced Interpretation (3); Theatre 411A,B,C, 
Interpretation of Prose, Poetry and Drama (9); Theatre 414, Readers Theatre (3); 

Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 477A, Senior Seminar in 

Critical Techniques (3) 30 

The major in theatre with an emphasis in interpretation requires 25 units in suppor- 
tive courses from related areas such as stage lighting, art, literature, com- 
position, linguistics, speech, philosophy to be selected in consultation with the 
student's adviser. 

Acting — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 
241, Voice Production for the Performer (3); Theatre 251, Body Movement for 
the Actor (3); Theatre 263A,B, Beginning Acting (6); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft 

(6); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2) 26 

Upper Division: Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 363A,B, 
Intermediate Acting (6); Theatre 463A,B, Advanced Acting (6); Theatre 
475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 480, Television Production and 
Direction (3) or Theatre 382, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); dance elec- 
tives (2) 35 

Radio-Television-Film 

Unit Group I: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to Theatre (6); Theatre 276A,B, 
Stagecraft (6); Theatre 282, Video Basics (3); Theatre 290A,B, History of Motion 
Pictures (6); Theatre 380, Introduction to Radio and Television (3); Theatre 382, 
Television Dramatic Techniques (3); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 


392A,B, Dramatic Film Production (6), 6 units of adviser-approved courses in 
Communications Department 42 

Unit Group II: Theatre 211, Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 241, Voice Production 
for the Performer (3); Theatre 263A,B, Beginning Acting (6); Theatre 277, 
Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 
370A,B, Fundamentals of Directing (6) 6 

Unit Group III: Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12) 6 


Unit Group IV: Theatre 282, Video Basics (3); Theatre 381, Radio and Television An- 
nouncing (3) and Theatre 480, Television Production and Direction (3) or 
Theatre 490A,B, Advanced Dramatic Film Production (6); Theatre 383, 
Television Writing (3); Theatre 486, Advanced Lighting (6); Theatre 492, 


Television/Film Aesthetics and Criticism (3) 9 

Directing — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 
263A, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, 
Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 211 

Introduction to Interpretation (3) 23 

Upper Division: Theatre 350, Organization for Production (1); Theatre 370A,B, Fun- 
damentals of Directing (6); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 470A,B, Ad- 
vanced Directing (8); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 480, 


Television Production and Direction (3) or Theatre 382, Television Dramatic 
Techniques (3); electives, 6 upper division units in technical theatre 39 

Technical Production/Design Major— The technical theatre major does not divide 
Into an upper division or lower division format. Majors will be expected to 
follow unit groupings for a total of 57 units. 

Unit Group I: Basic technical class core to be taken by all mayors— Theatre 100A,B, 
Introduction to the Theatre (6); Theatre 188, Historical Styles (3); Theatre 263A, 
Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, 
Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (2); Theatre 288, 


118 Theatre 


Design for the Theatre (3); Theatre 350, Organization for Production (1); Units 
Theatre 370A, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); 


Theatre 387, Audio Techniques (3); Theatre 450, Theatre Management (3) ... 39 

Unit Group II: Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre(12) 6 


Unit Group III: Theatre 370B, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 376A,B, Ad- 
vanced Stagecraft (6); Theatre 377A,B, Stage Costuming (6); Theatre 385, Ad- 
vanced Theatrical Makeup (3); Theatre 388, Intermediate Scene Design (3); 
Theatre 392A,B, Dramatic Film Production (6); Theatre 480, Television 


Production and Direction (3); Theatre 486, Advanced Stage Lighting (3); 
Theatre 488, Advanced Scene Design (3); or any adviser-approved three unit 
compatible course (3) 12 

Dance — Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B (6); Dance 100 (3); Dance 102A,B (4); nine 
units selected from Dance 112, 122, 126A,B, 132, 142, 152, 162, 206A,B, 212, 222, 

232, 242, 262; five to six units selected from: Theatre 276A, 277, 285 27-28 

Upper Division: Dance 323A (3); Dance 375 (3); Dance 383A,B (6); Dance 422 (3); 

Dance 423 (3); Dance 475 (3); six units by advisement selected from Theatre 350, 

386, 387, 450, 486; three units selected from Theatre 363A, 370A; three units 
selected from Theatre 475A,B,C,D; three units selected from Dance 316A,B, 

462, 483, 496, 499 36 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS (Single Subject) 

Lower Division: Theatre 100A,B, Introduction to Theatre (6); Theatre 211, 
Introduction to Interpreation (3); Theatre 263A, Beginning Acting (3); Theatre 

276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft (6) 18 

Upper Division: Theatre 342, Simplified Technical Production (3); Theatre 370A,B, 
Fundamentals of Directing (6); Theatre 386, Stage Lighting (3); Theatre 402, 
Dramatic Activities for Children (3); Theatre 403, Theatre for Children (3); 

Theatre 414, Readers Theatre (3); Theatre 450, Theatre Management (3); 
Theatre 470A, Advanced Directing (4); Theatre 475A,D,E, World Theatre (9). 37 


MASTER OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

The Master of Arts In Theatre Arts is designed to provide a program of coordinated graduate 
studies built on the framework of the undergraduate preparation; to provide added incen- 
tive for intellectual growth reflected In improvement in teaching and professional 
recognition; and to provide a sound basis for continued graduate study in the field of 
theatre. The student is expected to demonstrate a high degree of intellectual and creative 
competence and to demonstrate mastery of one of the areas of emphasis in theatre: (1) 
acting and directing, (2) dance, (3) dramatic literature and criticism, (4) oral interpretation, (5) 
playwriting, (6) radio and television, (7) theatre for chilren, (8) theatre history; (9) technical 
theatre. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: an appropriate undergraduate major in theatre, 
with a grade-point average of 3.0 in all upper division work in the major, or at least 24 units of 
appropriate upper division work in theatre, with a GPA of 3.0; Theatre 477A, Senior Seminar 
in Critical Techniques, or in the case of transfer students, its equivalent. Upon recommen- 
dation of the student's graduate committee, additional prerequisites may be required prior 
to classification and the approval of the area of emphasis. Students will complete an oral in- 
terview as early as possible before becoming classified. 

Study Plan 

The degree study plan in theatre will include at least 30 units of adviser-approved graduate 
studies, 15 units of which must be In 500-level courses. Each program will have 24 units In 
theatre, including a core of six units (Theatre 500, Introduction to Graduate Study — which 


Theatre 119 


must be taken the first semester of graduate study; Theatre 597, Project; or Theatre 598, 
Thesis) and six units of adviser-approved supporting courses in related fields either in other 
departments or within the Theatre Department. Before the degree is granted each student 
will pass oral and written examinations. Students will be permitted to take the written ex- 
amination twice. 

For further information, consult the Department of Theatre. See also "The Program of 
Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


THEATRE COURSES 

lOOA^B Introduction to the Theatre (3,3) 

A— Considers theatre as an entertainment medium, as well as a force for social change, by 
way of slides, films, demonstrations, attendance at play productions, and lectures. B— A 
study of current plays, motion pictures and television with special emphasis on dramatic 
analysis and cultural significance. 

101 Theatre Hour (1) 

Various aspects of the theatrical arts through guest lectures and artists, as well as presen- 
tations from the different areas of emphasis within the department's curricula. 
Enrollment on a credit/no credit basis only. 

188 Historical Styles for Theatrical Design (3) 

Visual survey through lecture and slides of architecture, interior design and furniture from 
ancient to modern times. Provides a necessary foundation for scene design and 
technical courses. 

211 Introduction to Interpretation (3) 

An introduction to the basic techniques for the analysis and performance of literature by the 
interpreter. 

241 Voice Production for the Performer (3) 

Fundamental techniques, methods and training to give the actor maximum use of his voice 
in theatre. Correction of speech faults and regional accents. Introduction to problems 
of stage dialects. Study of basic Interpretive material. May be repeated for credit. (1 
hour lecture, 4 hours activity) 

251 Body Movement for the Actor (3) 

Fundamental work in developing the body as an expressive instrument; acquiring of 
strength, flexibility, relaxation, control. Establishment of an awareness of and coor- 
dination of relationship of the body to the creative project. May be repeated up to six 
units of credit. (6 hours activity) 

263A,B Beginning Acting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 263A is prerequisite to B. Laboratory practice and discussions of the form and 
content of the art of acting. A — Improvisation, action and motivation and behavior. B— 
Continuation of A and problems in characterization. (6 hours activity) 

272 Understanding Theatre (3) 

A nontechnical survey course for the general student leading to an appreciation and under- 
standing of the theatre as a medium of communication and as an art form. Field trips to 
certain significant productions. Recommended for non-majors. 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (3,3) 

Prjerequisite: 276A is prerequisite to B. Study and practice in planning and construction of 
stage and television scenery Including use of tools, stage equipment and reading of 
technical drawings. Students will crew productions. Required by second year. (More 
than 6 hours activity) 

277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Study of the principles and procedures of costuming theatrical and television productions. 
Practical experience In basic construction techniques, organizing and executing duties 
of the costume crew. Designed primarily for non-technical majors within the 
department and as an introductory course for technical majors. (More than 6 hours ac- 
tivity) 

280 History of Radio and Television Programming (3) 

Analysis of selected aural and visual programming presented by major networks. From 1926 
to the present. (Same as Communications 280) 


120 Theatre 


282 Video Basics (3) 

Theory and practice in the fundamentals of production for television. (6 hours activity) 

285 Theatrical Makeup (2) 

Theory and practice in makeup for stage and television. Emphasis on development of in- 
dividual skill in techniques of character analysis^ application in pigment, plastic, hair 
makeup, and selection and use of makeup equipment. (4 hours activity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 188. Fundamental exposure to all aspects of scene design: aesthetics, 
practical considerations and technical skills, such as drawing and model building. (Same 
as Art 288) (6 hours activity) 

290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3,3) 

History and development of the motion picture as an art form and social influence. A — The 
motion picture from its origins until 1945. B— The contemporary cinema, from 1945 to 
present. (Same as Communications 290A,B) 

311 Advanced Interpretation (3) 

The application of advanced techniques for the analysis and performance of literature. May 
be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. 

342 Simplified Technical Production (3) 

Open to theatre education majors only. Simplified Inexpensive methods of producing in: 
design, costume, makeup, production organization and technical problem solving. 
Includes handling of limited resources, untrained personnel, improper facilities and 
equipment. Participation on production crews. Supplements the theatre education 
program in technical theatre. (More than 6 hours activity) 

350 Organization for Production (1) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 370A. Theory and training in backstage management, stressing in- 
terrelationships of production personnel. Students will serve as crew heads or stage 
managers. Sophisticated production abilities are mandatory. 

363, A, B Intermediate Acting and Characterization (3,) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 241, 251, 263A,B. 363A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. 
Emphasis on extended and Integrated speech and movement problems in 
characterization. Ensemble acting, extensive analysis and exploration and basic 
television techniques. (6 hours activity) 

364 Seminar in Playwriting (3) 

Prerequisite: evidence of student's previous interest In creative writing and consent of in- 
structor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group criticism and 
evaluation of each student's independent work, as It relates to playwriting. May be 
repeated for credit. (Same as English 364) 

370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: 370A is prerequisite to B; Theatre 263A, or consent of instructor. The study of 
prerehearsal problems and procedures, of the structural analysis of plays, and of com- 
position, picturization, pantomimic dramatization, movement and rhythm on stage and 
in television. Practice in directing scenes. (6 hours activity) 

376A,B Advanced Stagecraft (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 276B or consent of instructor. Advanced problems In planning and ex- 
ecuting scenery for stage and television. Students will also work In the scene shop for 
major productions. (More than 6 hours activitv) 

377 A, B Stage Costuming (3,3) 

A— A chronological study of fashions and textiles of major historical periods, methods of 
research; Interpreting historical costume for theatrical statement. B — Techniques of 
designing and constructing costumes with emphasis on creative planning. Participation 
in major productions of the department. (More than 6 hours activity) 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

The history and development of the broadcasting Industry and its impact and influence on 
our society. A study of the basic broadcasting practices, audiences, production and 
programming. (Same as Communications 380) 

381 Radio and Television Announcing (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 211 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of control room 
operation. Lectures and practice in microphone and camera techniques, commercial 


Theatre 121 


announcements, interviewing, sportscasting, narration, foreign pronunciation, and 
continuity. (6 hours activity) 

382 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 282. Television techniques and production, designed primarily for 
theatre majors to train the director, actor and designer in the elements of televised 
drama. (6 hours activity) 

383 Television Writing (3) 

Study of the principles and practices and experience in the writing of scripts and other forms 
of continuity for television. May be repeated for credit. 

385 Advanced Theatre Makeup (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 285. Advanced problems in makeup including special techniques and 
material prosthetics, hairpieces, masks for television and film; practical application of 
study through design and supervision of makeup for departmental productions (4 hours 
activity) 

386 Stage Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A,B or equivalent. Theory and practice in stage lighting and 
television presentations. Emphasis is given to design and the technology for its il- 
lumination. (More than 6 hours activity) 

387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A,B or equivalent. Theory, procedures and practice necessary to 
develop and to integrate live and recorded sound into performing arts productions. 
Emphasis given to recording, reproduction and studio techniques. (6 hours activity) 

388 Intermediate Scene Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 288. Designing stage sets on paper and in model form for a variety of 
productions and theatres. Work in preparing designs for practical execution as part of 
an actual production. (6 hours activity) 

392A,B Dramatic Film Productions (3,3) 

Theory and practice of silent dramatic film production techniques to include mechanical 
operation of super 8mm and 16mm equipment, preparation of shooting script, 
direction and production of several short films, criticism and analysis of finished 
products. (6 hours activity) 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. 
Development of criteria and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts 
through lectures, readings, discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. 
Emphasis on descriptive and evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, dance and cinema 
criticism. 

402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

Theory and practice in the use of creative dramatics, storytelling, puppetry, assembly 
programs, role-playing and other aspects of dramatics as tools for the teacher, group 
worker, recreation major and others who work with children. (6 hours activity) 

403 Theatre for Children (3) 

Theories and principles of production in the formal theatre arts for children. Demonstrations 
of appropriate theatrical forms with analysis and evaluation. (6 hours activity) 

411 A Interpretation of Prose Literature (3) 

The study of the techniques of criticism and performance used in the interpretation of prose 
literature. 

41 IB Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

The study of the techniques of criticism and performance used in the interpretation of 
poetry. 

41 1C Interpretation of Drama (3) 

The study of the techniques of criticism and performance used in the interpretation of 
drama. 

414 Readers Theatre (3) 

The theory, principles and techniques of the interpretation of literature In the medium of 
readers theatre. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (6 hours activity) 

450 Theatre Management (3) 

Discussion and practice of the basic elements of public relations as applied to theatre with a 


122 Theatre 


detailed analysis of various advertising mediums and experimentation in their use. A 
study of the various financial aspects of academic, community and professional theatre 
operations including practical experience in front-of-the-house management and box 
office operation through the department's public presentations. (6 hours activity) 

463A;B Advanced Acting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 363A,B. 463A is prerequisite to B, or consent of instructor. A study of 
historical theories and techniques of styles of acting as an art form. The first semester 
will include Greek through renaissance periods and the second semester will include 
the neoclassic periods to contemporary styles. (6 hours activity) 

468 Experimental Theatre (3) 

An activity course in which dramatic principles are applied through production of full length 
and one-act plays using various styles of acting and staging. May be repeated up to six 
units for credit. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 

470A,B Advanced Directing (4,4) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 350, 370A,B and 475B,D, or consent of instructor. Readings in theory, 
analysis of scripts and practice in directing plays for their oral and visual value as theatre. 
A — Each student directs public performances of a one-act play. B — Each student directs 
public performances of two one-act plays or equivalent. (8 hours activity) 

472 American Theatre (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The development of the art of theatre In the United States 
from colonial times to the present day; Its place and potentialities as a force In a 
democratic society. 

475A,B,C,D,E World Theatre (3,3,3,3,3) 

Examination of the historical and dramatic evolution of world theatre. A— Ancient Greece 
and Rome, Middle Ages; Italian renaissance; B— England from 1558-1790; 16th- and 
17th-century Spain and France; C— 18th- and 19th-century Europe and Russia; 19th- 
century England; D— 18th- and 19th-century America; the Orient; the modern world. 
E— Historical background and contemporary view of the musical theatre. Students 
registering for Theatre 475 must have completed the requirements for upper division 
standing. 

477A,B Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (3,3) 

Theatre 477A or consent of instructor prerequisite to B. First semester presents a historical 
survey of major critical theories as they apply to theatre. Second semester provides the 
opportunity to apply critical theories to local dramatic productions. 

478A,B Rehearsal and Performance (1,1) 

A — Acting in stage or television performances. B — Technical crew work on stage and 
television performances. One unit per semester required of all theatre majors. 
Enrollment on a credit/no credit basis only. (More than 3 hours production per unit) 

480 Television Production and Direction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 282. Theory and practice in the production of television programs and 
announcements: the planning, organizing, directing, rehearsing, performing, 
recording and editing of television programs and announcements. (1 hour lecture, 4 
hours activity) 

486 Advanced Theatrical Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 386 or consent of Instructor. The design and technology of lighting. 
Student will be prepared to design for the stage, dance pageant, display, film and 
television. Student will do at least one major lighting project as part of the course. (6 
hours activity) 

488 Seminar in Advanced Scene Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 288 and 388. In-depth study and practice in design styles for various 
types of theatres and for TV and film. Emphasis on building a portfolio. (Same as Art 
488) 

489 Television Production Activities (3) 

(Same as Communications 489) 

490A,B Advanced Dramatic Film Production (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 392A,B. Theory and practice of 16mm sound film production with 
emphasis on the narrative film. Labs and lectures include the development of scripts, 
uses of sound film, editing and directing the sound film and production of several short 
films. (6 hours activity) 


Theatre 123 


491 Senior Seminar: Greek Tragedy (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 491) 

492 Television/Film Aesthetics and Criticism (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 290A,B, 480 or consent of instructor. An exploration of the nature of 
film and television through aesthetic and theoretical bases and the establishment of a 
critical basis for film and television evaluation and understanding. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Undergraduate creative or research projects. Open to advanced students with the consent of 
instructor. Student must complete course application form by the end of the seventh 
week of the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be done. May be 
repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Theatre (3) 

Introduction to methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source materials, 
including library and original data; research and project design and execution; in- 
terpretation of researches. Must be taken the first semester after admission to graduate 
study. 

501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory (3)- 

Prerequisite: Theatre 500. Directed research with emphasis on the relationship between 
historical backgrounds and developments in the theatre and the student's area of con- 
centration. 

503 Seminar: Theatre for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 403. Critical study of the historical development, philosophies, 
theories, techniques and trends of the art of theatre for children. Research and in- 
vestigation of problems related to the use of materials in educational, community and 
professional children's theatres. 

511 Graduate Seminar in Interpretation (3) 

The historical and philosophical backgrounds In the development of interpretation and its 
relationship to contemporary theory and practice. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research of instructor, this course will offer directed 
research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering major figures. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as English 571) 

572 Graduate Seminar, Literary Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publications of instructor, this course will 
offer directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures covering such major 
literary types as: tragedy, comedy and historical drama. With consent of adviser, may be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as English 572) 

576 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) 

History and philosophy of production problems In theatre arts. Organization of the univer- 
sity theatre as it relates to the total university program. Planning of the production 
within the limitations of budgets and physical facilities. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, student's graduate committee and department ex- 
ecutive committee. Development and presentation of a creative project In the area of 
concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. May be repeated to a maximum of 
six units. Student must complete course application form by the end of the seventh 
week of the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be done. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of student's graduate committee. Development and presentation of a 
thesis in the area of concentration beyond regularly offered coursework. Student must 
complete course application form by the end of the seventh week of the semester 
preceding the semester in which the work is to be done. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in theatre with consent of instructor and student's graduate com- 
mittee. May be repeated for credit. Student must complete course application form by 
the end of the seventh week of the semester preceding the semester in which the work 
is to be done. 


124 Theatre 


THEATRE EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods and materials, including 
audiovisual instruction for teaching in secondary schools. See description of secondary 
school teaching credential program under Division of Teacher Education. 

449A Student Teaching in Theatre in the Secondary School (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

484 Educational Television Production (3) 

Theory and practice in the activities, methods of lesson preparation, and presentation of 
educational television productions. 

749 Student Teaching in Theatre in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

For candidates seeking the Fisher standard credential In secondary teaching. See description 
and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 




126 


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Dean: Jack W. Coleman 
Associate Dean: Edward R. Zilbert 


Department of Accounting: Henry Anderson, Chair 

Dale Bandy, James Cork, Eugene Corman, Mary Fleming, Clyde Hardman, John Hinds, A. 
jay Hirsch, Robert Lamden, Maria Melcher, Robert Miller, Robert Vanasse, Herbert 
Watkin, John Williams, Dorsey Wiseman, John Woo, Arnold Wright 

Department of Economics: John Lafky, Chair 

Maryanna Boynton, Kwang-wen Chu, James Dietz, Franz Dolp, Alan Fisher, Kenneth 
Goldin, Levern Graves, Lionel Kalish, Sidney Klein, Stewart Long, Robert Michaels, Gary 
Pickersgill, Joyce Pickersgill, Jack Pontney, Guy Schick, Norman Townshend-Zellner 

Department of Finance: Dennis O'Connor, Chair 

Dick Bednar, Albert Bueso, Peter Mlynaryk, John Nichols, Radha Sharma, Peter Sibbald, 
Frank Taylor, Marco Tonietti, B. E. Tsagris 

Department of Management: Geoffrey King, Chair 

Farouk Abdelwahed, Robert Allan, Thomas Apke, John Bayless, Mei Liang Bickner, 
Robert Chapman, Fred Colgan, James Conant, Richard Gilman, Leo Guolo, Granville 
Hough, Leland McCloud, Kent McKee, Tal Oh, Donald Shaul, John Trego, Edgar Wiley 

Department of Marketing: Irene Lange, Chair 

Robert Barath, William Bell, Paul Hugstad, Robert Olsen, Frank Roberts, James Taylor, 
Jack Wichert, Guthrie Worth 

Department of Quantitative Methods: 

Gora Bhaumik, Gary Bloom, Milton Chen, Wen Chow, Ronald Colman, Ben Edmondson, 
Basil Gala, William Heltzman, James Hightower, John Lawrence, Marshal McFie, 
Demetrios Michalopoulos, Fred Mueller, Herbert Rutemiller, Sohan Sibota, Ram 
SInghania, Eric Solberg, David Stoller, LaVerne Stanton 

Academic Objectives of the School 

The faculty of the school believes that it can best optimize its effectiveness in achieving the 
broad educational objective of the university by concentrating its energies on the ex- 
ploration and teaching of relevant concepts, principles and practices, including in- 
terrelationships. Additionally, the faculty recognizes the need for integrating and relating 
the various disciplines into a balanced and thought-provoking educational experience for 
the student. While considerable emphasis must be placed on the need for breadth of 
knowledge and creativity in thought and actions, there must also be emphasis on exploration 
and analysis in some depth of those disciplines most relevant to the business profession. 
These disciplines are recognized to be interrelated and are to be integrated through the 
application of economics, behavioral and quantitative sciences, systems theories and con- 
cepts, decision theories, computer sciences, logic, and theoretical and applied research 
methodology. In addition, the faculty of the school has set forth specific objectives for its 
curriculum and related programs. A summary statement of these objectives is as follows: 

1. Educational and Professional 

Through a study of the various theoretical and practical business and economic models, 
policies and procedures, each student is to be afforded and provided with technical ex- 
pertise in a chosen discipline — accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, 
quantitative methods and business education — to a depth acceptable to prospective 
employers for beginning professional employment. 

2. Human and Ethical 

A major part of effective society and business leadership Is related to organization and 
direction of human resources to achieve general and specific goals. Therefore, a 
knowledge of human values — the ethical, psychological and sociological foundation for 
human behavior — is essential. This Includes an awareness and understanding of the 


Business Administration 127 


nature of human values, of individual goals and the forces which lead to their 
achievement; the function of leadership in relating individual and enterprise goals; the 
Impact of group dynamics, Informal organizations, and interpersonal relationships on the 
administrative process; and the need for a personal code of ethics. 

3. Socioeconomic, Political and Cultural Environment 

Firms do not operate in a vacuum, and Information about the external forces and con- 
straints which bear on the enterprise comprises a necessary body of knowledge for com- 
petent business planners and administrators. In particular, development of economic 
literacy to support rational choice; recognition of economic Implications resulting from 
economic policy decisions by various levels of government; and a conceptualization of 
the impact of the various institutions on the enterprise and the impact of business 
leadership decisions on the social system as a whole are stressed. 

Student Organizations 

Chapters of the following national honor societies have been established on campus with 
membership open to qualified students: Alpha Delta Sigma (advertising). Beta Alpha Psi (ac- 
counting), Beta Gamma Sigma (business). Financial Management Association Honor Society 
(Finance), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics). Phi Kappa Phi (all campus). Pi Sigma Epsilon 
(Marketing). In addition there are the following departmentally affiliated clubs which 
students are encouraged to join: the Accounting Society, Computer Club, Data Processing 
Management Association, Economics Association, Finance Association, Marketing Club, Per- 
sonnel and Industrial Relations Association, QM Club, Rho Epsilon (Real Estate-Finance) and 
Society for the Advancement of Management. 

Internship and Cooperative Education Program 

The School of Business Administration and Economics is offering a limited number of In- 
ternship positions In business, industry and public agencies for qualified business students. 
Students interested In this program should be of junior standing academically qualified, and 
have received consent of the internship adviser. Opportunities exist In such areas as: ac- 
counting and auditing; cost/benefit analysis and econometrics; finance and real estate; In- 
surance and banking; management and industrial relations; marketing, sales, and adver- 
tising; computer programming and business data systems; and other specialized areas fitting 
the need of the student and the business community. In return for the student's participation 
In the School of Business Administration and Economics Internship program, the student in- 
tern will receive academic credit through Business Administration 495 (on a credit/no credit 
basis), plus first hand experience and financial remuneration from their employers. 

For further information and/or applications on this program, please contact the Academic 
Programs Office, School of Business Administration and Economics. 

Undergraduate Program in Business Administration and Economics 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers two undergraduate degree 
programs: the B.A. in Business Administration and the B.A. in Economics. Students majoring 
In the school are encouraged to elect courses in other divisions of the university, particularly 
in the area of behavioral, social, and political sciences, and foreign languages. It is assumed 
that the first half of their university work toward a bachelor's degree represents a required 
basic education in communication, mathematics, natural science, social sciences and the 
humanities. Since quantitative and written communication skills are increasingly emphasized 
in business and the social sciences, students who contemplate enrollment In either business 
administration or economics are encouraged to take college preparatory English and four 
years of high school mathematics. College algebra, or three years of high school 
mathematics including a second course in algebra, will be a minimum mathematical prere- 
quisite for entrance to the program. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to the required coursework In business administration, students must complete 
Math 130 or Its equivalent and demonstrate proficiency in written communication (See No. 8 
below). If credits for elementary accounting, economics, calculus and the English re- 
quirements have not been met, it will be necessary to complete these requirements before 
or during the first semester of the junior year . 


128 Business Administration 


In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other un- 
iversity requirements for a B.A. degree (see page 60). The degree requirements are as 
follows: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credit hours in the School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics, of which 42 semester credit hours must be upper division. 

2. Completion of the required core courses in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. 

3. Completion of 18 semester credit hours of required courses in an area of concentration to 
be selected by the student. (Refer to specific departmental requirements.) 

4. Completion of at least 50 percent of the required units in the concentration and 15 of the 
last 24 units are required in residence in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. 

5. Completion of at least 50 semester credit hours In areas other than business ad- 
ministration. 

6. Attainment of at least a 2.0 grade point average (C average) in all university work 
attempted. In all courses taken in the School of Business Administration and Economics, 
and in the area of concentration. 

7. Completion of Math 130, A Short Course in Calculus, or its equivalent. <> 

8. Demonstration of proficiency In written communication skills. Students must either pass 
the College Board Achievement Test in English composition or the College Level Ex- 
amination Program (CLEP) Subject Examination In English Composition or complete one 
of the following courses at Cal State Fullerton: English 100, Composition; English 103, 
Seminars In Writing; or Communications 103, Applied Writing. (Information on the dates 
offered and the costs of these tests may be obtained from the university Counseling and 
Testing Center.) 

Academic Advisement for Business Administration Students 

The School of Business Administration and Economics provides an advisement service for its 
students. New students are particularly encouraged to consult an adviser in the school's 
Academic Programs Office to review program and course requirements. 

CORE: The business administration and economics courses listed below are required of all 


students majoring in business administration: 

Lower Division Units 

Eco 100 The Economic Environment and T 

Eco 200 Principles of Economics, or 

Eco 210 Principles of Economics (5) 3 

Acc 201A,B Elementary Accounting 6 

Man 246 Business Law 3 

QM 265 Computer Methods In Business and Economics 3 

Upper Division: 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory or Eco 320 Intermediate 

Macroeconomic Theory* 3 

Fin 320 Business Finance 3 

Man 340 Behavioral Science for Business 3 

Man 341 Organization and Management Theory 3 

Mar 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 3 

QM 362 Management Sciences Methods in Business and Economics or 3 

QM 363 Management Sciences** 3 

Man 449 Seminar in Business Policies*** __3_ 

42 


AREAS OF CONCENTRATION FOR MAJORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

A student in business administration should select an area of concentration as soon as 
possible, but not later than the second semester of the junior year and take the required 
courses in the area. 

0 Students who concentrate in quantitative methods must take Math 150A in lieu of Math 130. 

* Management and Quantitative Methods require Economics 310. All other departments require either Economics 310 or 
320. 

** Students taking quantitative methods as their area of concentration will take QM 363, Management Science. 
Students taking business economics as their area of concentration will take Economics 410, Government and Business — 
in lieu of Management 449, Business Policies. 


Business Administration 


129 


Accounting 

301A,B Intermediate Accounting 

302 Cost Accounting 

308 Federal Income Tax 

And at least two of the following courses: 

401 Advanced Accounting 

402 Auditing 

406 Cost Control 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems 

408 Problems in Taxation 

Economics 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 
320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 
6 units economics electives, 3 units of which must be 400-level 
Management 446, Managerial Economics 

Finance 

The department offers four primary areas of emphasis: financial management, real estate, 
securitles-investments and insurance. Courses are also offered in personal finance. A finance 
concentration requires Finance 331, Financial Analysis, plus 15 additional credit hours 
offered by the Finance Department. The student may choose all courses from one area or 
may elect to sample several areas. Finance 310, Personal Financial Management, will not 
count toward the area of concentration. 

Financial Management Emphasis: Designed for students Interested in the financial 
organization and operation of financial and business enterprises. Students interested in this 
area of emphasis are encouraged to include the following courses In their plan of study: 
332 Financial Administration 

425 Commerical Bank and Institution Management 

432 Financial Forecasting and Capital Budgeting 

433 Problems in Business Finance: 

440 Capital and Money Markets 

Real Estate Emphasis: Designed for students interested in a broad range of careers in real es- 
tate and urban development. Students Interested In this option are advised to include the 
following courses in their plan of study: 

350 Principles and Practices of Real Estate* 

451 Legal Aspects of Real Estate* 

452 Real Estate Finance* 

453 Real Estate Valuation* 

454 Real Estate and Urban Development* 

459 Real Estate Research 

Securities-Investments Emphasis: Designed for students interested in securities and in- 
vestment analysis, money and capital markets, and portfolio management. Students in- 
terested in this area of emphasis are encouraged to include the following courses in their 
plan of study: 

340 Security Investments 

440 Capital and Money Markets 

442 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management 

Insurance Emphasis: Designed for students Interested in careers In Insurance or in applying 
correct insurance procedures to business and personal affairs. Students interested in this 
emphasis should include the following courses in their plan of study: 

* 360 Principles of Insurance 

460 Social Insurance 

461 Risk Management 


These courses satisfy the California State Real Estate Brokers License Examination requirements. Please contact the Finance 
Department for futher details. 


130 Business Administration 


Management 

In consonance with university and school objectives, the major goals of the Management 
Department are to: 

1. Provide students with foundational competence in the utilization of the factors of 
production. 

2. Develop in each student an understanding of the theory and practices needed for 
successful performance in managerial and staff positions in business, government and 
the community. 

3. Provide students with a knowledge of human values — the ethical, psychological and 
sociological foundation for human behavior, and the impact of group dynamics, infor- 
mal organizations, and interpersonal relationships on the administrative process. 

Students with an area of concentration in management must choose one of the three follow- 
ing emphases: 

Administrative Management Emphasis: Designed for students interested in all aspects of 
business or In general supervision of organized activity. 

342 Production Operations 

343 Personnel Management 

444 Management of Systems 

446 Managerial Economics or 

447 Management Decision Games 

Two other concentration courses to be arranged 

Operations Management Emphasis: Designed for students who have interest In and aptitude 
for managing new projects and production operations in both manufacturing and non- 
manufacturing. 

342 Production Operations 

343 Personnel Management 

445 Advanced Production Operations 

446 Managerial Economics or 
Management Decision Games 

Two other concentration courses to be arranged. 

Human Resources Management Emphasis: Designed for students Interested In Interpersonal 
relations and group leadership opportunities in all organizations but specifically found in 
manpower management, small business, industrial relations, hospital and welfare ad- 
ministration, and organizations carrying out social change. 

343 Personnel Management 
441 Labor-Management Relations 

443 Individual, Interpersonal, and Group Dynamics for Management 

444 Management of Systems 

Two other concentration courses to be arranged. 

Marketing 

Students with an area of concentration in marketing choose a career path from the following 
areas: marketing management, marketing research, advertising, sales management, retailing, 
international marketing or physical distribution. 

Brochures and advising on career path selection are available in the department office. In 
addition to Marketing 351, all students will take 18 hours in marketing. 

Advertising Management 

354 Principles of Advertising 
379 Marketing Research Methods 
454 Advertising Management 
459 Marketing Problems 
470 Consumer Behavior 
One elective 

Marketing Management * 

354 Principles of Advertising or 
356 Creative Motivation in Marketing or 
470 Consumer Behavior 
357 Industrial Marketing or 


Business Administration 131 


457 Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 
459 Marketing Problems 
Two electives 
Marketing Research 

379 Marketing Research Methods 
470 Consumer Behavior 
479 Research Problems In Marketing 
459 Marketing Problems 
Two electives 

Physical Distribution 

354 Principles of Advertising or 
356 Creative Motivation in Marketing or 
470 Consumer Behavior 
358 Physical Distribution 

451 Management of Physical Distribution Operations 

457 Quantitative Techniques In Marketing 

459 Marketing Problems 

One elective 

Retailing 

352 Principles of Retailing 

354 Principles of Advertising 

379 Marketing Research Methods 

456 Marketing Problems In Retail Sector 

459 Marketing Problems 

470 Consumer Behavior 

No electives 

Sales Management 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing 
379 Marketing Research Methods 
455 Management of the Sales Force 
459 Marketing Problems 
470 Consumer Behavior 
One elective 

International Marketing 

354 Principles of Advertising or 
356 Creative Motivation in Marketing or 
470 Consumer Behavior 
379 Marketing Research Methods 

458 International Marketing 

459 Marketing Problems 
Two electives 

Quantitative Methods 

The objective of the Quantitative Methods Department Is to prepare the student to utilize 
quantitative information and methods effectively In evaluating alternatives and making 
decisions. Emphasis Is placed on the theory and practice of quantitative methods, especially 
those topics contributed by the disciplines of computer science, operations research and 
statistics. 

Students with a quantitative methods concentration are required to take Math ;150A, 
Calculus,* QM 170, Introduction to Quantitative Methods, In lieu of Math 150B, QM 461, 
Advanced Statistics, and at least 15 units in a study plan approved by the student's adviser. 
These courses may include any of the following, as well as approved courses In other dis- 
ciplines. 

Computer Science 

364 Computer Logic and Programming 

382 Information Structures and Machine Language Programming 
446 Computer Programming Theory 

•Quantitative methods concentration students shall substitute QM 363 for QM 360 in their business core. Math 150A may 
be taken with the credit/no credit option. 


132 Business Administration 

464 Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing 
480 Information Theory and Cybernetics 

482 Introduction to Discrete Structures 

484 Computer Assisted Instruction 

485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing 

486 Automata Theory 

487 Artificial Intelligence 

488 Introduction to Pattern Recognition 

Operations Research 

448 Digital Simulation in Business and Economics 

465 Linear Programming 

466 Nonlinear Programming 

470 Conflict, Bargaining and Cooperation 

490 Stochastic Process Models in Business and Industry 

Statistics 

367 Statistics and Society 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications 

467 Statistical Quality Control 
469 Reliability Statistics 

475 Multivariate Analysis 

A student majoring in quantitative methods may also elect to minor in computer science. For 
details concerning the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and the minor in computer 
science, see "Cross-disciplinary University Programs" elsewhere in this catalog. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Students who wish to major in business administration in preparation for a career as a secon- 
dary school teacher in business subjects must meet the requirements of the School of 
Business Administration and Economics and the secondary school teacher education 
program including the requirements for the proper credential as outlined in this catalog. 

The requirements for a major in this area are as follows; 

1. The core requirements as set forth for all business administration majors. 

2. Completion of 18 hours of required coursework in one of the six areas of con- 
centration: 

a. Accounting 

b. Economics 

c. Finance 

d. Management 

e. Marketing 

f. Quantitative methods 

3. Meet the school's minimum requirement of 60 credit hours in business administration 
and economic courses. 

4. A maximum of 12 credit hours in the secretarial field, including those applied as elec- 
tives, may count toward the degree in business administration and economics.** 

5. Completion of at least 50 credit hours in areas outside business administration and 
economics. 

Education courses reauired for a credential will be detailed bv the School of Education. 
The requirements for a minor in this area are as follows: 

Eco 100 The Economic Environment and Eco 200 Principles of Economics 

or Units 


Eco 210 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Acc 201A,B Elementary Accounting 6 

QM 264 Computer Programming 2 

One of the following: 

Man 246 Business Law 3 


••The university does not offer work in secretariat training, typewriting, or business machines, but will accept some transfer 
work in these areas taken at other institutions. 


Business Administration 133 


QM 265 Computer Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Fin 320 Business Finance 3 

Mar 351 Principles of Marketing 3 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in Secondary School 3 

0 Electives 6 

2 ^ 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Applicants, as well as continuing students, should read carefully "The Program of Master's 
Degrees" in this catalog and consult the Graduate Bulletin, particularly the "Steps in the 
Master's Degree Program." 

Programs of Study 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers two plans for the M.B.A. 
degree. 

Plan I is a broad. Integrated program designed primarily for students with an undergraduate 
degree in a field other than business administration. 

Plan II is an integrated program allowing some concentration in an area of specialization. 
Under this plan the student is required to complete 12 units in an area of concentration. It is 
designed primarily for students with baccalaureate degrees in business administration. 

The procedural steps for admission to, and completion of, the Master of Business Ad- 
ministration degree follow: 

Admission 

A. Regular admission into the M.B.A. program (i.e., classified standing) of the School of 
Business Administration and Economics, requires development of an approved study 
plan and the following: 

1. A bachelor's degree from a fully accredited college or university. 

2. A combination of grade-point average (GPA) and test score on the Admission Test 

for Graduate Study in Business (ATGSB) according to the following rules: 

a. An overall undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 plus a minimum ATGSB score of 450 
or a combination of GPA and ATGSB scores according to the formula: 200 times 
overall undergraduate GPA plus ATGSB score equals 1000 or over or 

b. At least a 2.75 GPA on the last 50 percent of coursework taken for the bachelor's 
degree plus a minimum ATGSB score of 450 or a combination of GPA and 
ATGSB score according to the formula: 200 times GPA on the last 50 percent of 
coursework taken* plus ATGSB score equals 1025 or over, or 

c. At least a 3.0 GPA on the last 60 sequential semester units of coursework plus a 
minimum ATGSB score of 450** or a combination of GPA and ATGSB scores ac- 
cording to the formula: 200 times GPA on the last 60 sequential semester units of 
coursework** plus ATGSB score equals 1050 or over. 

B. Admission Into the M.B.A. program (conditionally classified standing) of the School of 
Business Administration and Economics: 

An applicant who does not meet the entrance requirements for Classified standing, 
and/or who has deficiencies In a prerequisite preparation which In the opinion of the 
appropriate school authority can be met by additional preparation, including qualifying 
examinations, may be considered for admission into the M.B.A. degree program with 
conditionally classified graduate standing. Such students, at a minimum, must meet the 
general university admission requirements for graduate standing. Interested students 
should contact the associate dean, academic programs, School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics, for additional information. 

C. For Plan II, the equivalent to an undergraduate degree in business from Cal State 
Fullerton is required In addition to other requirements listed in A and B above. 

0 A maximum of six units of secretarial courses, including those applied as electives, may count toward the minor in business 
education. 

• All work within any given quarter or semester must be included even though that will result in more :..an 50 percent. 

•• All work within any given quarter or semester must be included even though that will result in more than 60 semester un- 
its. The units to be included in the last 60 semester units may come only from the following: (1) Work taken in post- 
baccalaureate status during the last seven years towards fulfilling M.B.A. coursework requirements; (2) units taken 
under a prescribed remedial program agreed to by the associate dean, academic programs. School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics; (3) units earned prior to the bachelor's degree. 


134 Business Administration 


The courses in the major are to be no more than seven years old and are to have at 
least a 3.0 grade-point average. Courses with grades less than C must be repeated. In 
addition the Plan II student will be required to successfully complete the Business 
Foundation Examination which covers the core requirements In the school's un- 
dergraduate degree in business. 

PLAN I 

CURRICULUM 
First-Year Program 

Acc 510 Financial Accounting 
Acc 511 Managerial Accounting 

Eco 514 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, A 
Eco 515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, B 
Fin 517 Managerial Finance 

Man 516 Organizational Theory and Management of Operations 

Man 518 Legal Environment of Business 

Mar 519 Marketing Management 

QM 512 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques, A 

QM 513 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques, B 

Note: Upon completion of the first year curriculum. Plan I students are required to 
successfully complete the Business Foundation Examination. 

Second-Year Program 

Acc 521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 
Eco 522 Comparative Economics Seminar 
Fin 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management 
Man 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 
Mar 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems 
QM 526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis or 
QM 560 Operations Research 
BAE 596 M.B.A. Management Game 
Two electives at the 400- or 500-level 
PLAN II 
CURRICULUM 

(A minimum of 24 of the 30 units required for the degree must be at the 500 level.) 

Required Courses 

Acc 511 Managerial Accounting* or 
Acc 521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting 
Eco 515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy, B or 
Eco 522 Comparative Economics Seminar 
Fin 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management 
Man 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration 
Mar 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems 
QM 526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis or 
QM 560 Operations Research 
Concentration 

Each student shall elect an area of concentration of at least 12 units to be approved by the 
department chair concerned, or his designee within the department, and the associate dean, 
academic programs. Concentrations offered in Plan II are: accounting, finance, international 
business, management, marketing and quantitative methods. 

Terminal Evaluation 

A terminal evaluation is required for the degree. Departmental requirements vary, however, 
and the student should checl^ with his department chair. In many cases students take 
Business Administration 596, M.B.A. Management Game, to satisfy this requirement, thus in- 
creasing the number of units offered for the degree from 30 to 33. The terminal evaluation 
may be repeated once during a two-year period. 

For further information, consult the School of Business, Administration and Economics An- 
nouncement and/or the associate dean, academic programs. In the School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics. 


*Students who have credit in cost accounting may not receive credit for Accounting 511. 


Business Administration 135 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The economics major is designed to prepare students for positions in business, education 

and government, and for graduate work in economics and related disciplines. 

Requirements 

Required of all students for the degree: 

1. Completion of 41 semester credit hours of courses in economics and business ad- 
ministration of which 27 semester credit hours must be in upper division courses. At 
least 15 semester hours must be completed in residence in the School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics. 

2. Completion of the major course requirements for economics majors as listed below. 
Students in economics are required to take Quantitative Methods 265 or equivalent as 
prerequisite to Quantitative Methods 361. 

3. Completion of at least 60 credit hours in areas other than economics and business ad- 
ministration. Of these 60 semester credit hours the department suggests that special 
attention be placed on related social sciences, particularly political science, sociology, 
history and geography, as well as philosophy and the fields of quantitative methods 
and mathematics. A list of suggested courses is available in the Economics Department 
office. 

Students must attain at least a 2.0 grade-point average in all college or university work 
attempted, and in all courses in the School of Business Administration and Economics. 

Business administration and economics courses required of all students majoring in 


economics are listed below: ^ 

Lower Division Units 

(Students who have done exceptionally well in high school economics may wish to 
consult the policy, appearing elsewhere in this catalog, on challenge ex- 
aminations.) 

Eco 100 and 200 or 210 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Math 130, A Short Course in Calculus and Acc 201A,B Elementary Accounting; or 

Math 150A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus and Acc 201A 10-11 

QM 265 Computer Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Total 18-20 

Upper Division 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 420 Money and Banking 3 

QM 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics 3 

Fifteen hours of upper division electives in economics approved by the student's 4 
adviser 15 

Total 27 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

A* minor in economics may be achieved by taking the following courses: Units 

Eco 100 and 200 or 210 Principles of Economics 5-6 

Eco 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Eco 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Upper division economics electives ? 

Total 20-21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

The Master of Arts in Economics is a program designed both for candidates who will be 
studying full time and for those employed full time or part time while working for the M.A. 
degree. The program is separated into two parts, the core requirements and the electives. 
The purpose of the core is to provide rigorous training fundamental to the discipline of 
economics, yet eminently useful to the candidate, whatever his special area of interest. It 
represents a planned sequence of work, progressing from economic theory (Economics 502 


136 Business Administration 


and 503) through methodology (Economics 505) to the seminar (Economics 506) in which the 
student prepares a project applying what he has learned in theory and method to an area of 
his special interest. The purpose of the electives is to provide the student an opportunity to 
broadly cover his special area of interest in an interdisciplinary way. 

The procedural steps for admission tO; and completion of, the Master of Arts In Economics 
follow: 

Admission Requirements (Classified Standing) 

1. Apply for admission to the university and declare the objective to be a Master of Arts in 
Economics degree. This must be accomplished at the Office of Admissions before the 
dates established in the universijy calendar. 

2. Contact the academic programs office of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics and the graduate coordinator of the Department of Economics to secure In- 
formal advisement. The informal advisement should occur at least three weeks prior to 
your first registration, but in any event during the first semester of work. 

3. Possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with an overall grade- 
point average in all undergraduate work of not less than 2.5. 

4. Satisfactory level of performance on the Graduate Record Examination (verbal and 
quantitative), aptitude only. 

5. Preparation of a study plan In consultation with the graduate adviser and approval. 

6. Completion of an application for classified standing form. 

7. Satisfactory completion of program prerequisites listed below. 

Prerequisites 

Acceptance into the program requires completion of the following prerequisite courses, or 
equivalent: 

1. For students without an undergraduate major in economics (a grade-point average of 
not less than 3.0 In the following prerequisites is required): 


Units 

Principles of Economics 6 

Calculus 4-5 

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Statistics (analytical) 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Total 22-23 


2. For students with an undergraduate major in economics: 24 semester units of work in 
economics or related courses (e.g., statistics), including one semester ot calculus, with a 
minimum grade-point average of 3.0. The 24 units must Include the following courses or 
their equivalent, with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 in each course: 
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis, Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis, 
Statistics (analytical). Money and Banking. 


Units in economics or related courses 24 

Calculus 4-5 

Total 28-29 


Admission Requirements (Conditionally Classified Standing) 

An applicant who does not meet the entrance requirements for classified standing, and/or 
who has deficiencies In a prerequisite preparation which in the opinion of the appropriate 
school authority can be met by additional preparation, including qualifying examinations, 
may be considered for admission into the Master of Arts in Economics program with con- 
ditionally classified graduate standing. Such students, at a minimum, must meet the general 
university admission requirements for graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 
attempted. Interested students should contact the graduate adviser. Department of 
Economics. 


Accounting 


137 


Program of Study 

1. A core of 12 graduate units in economics is required: Units 

Eco 502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Eco 503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Eco 505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar 3 

Eco 506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic 
Applications {project required) 3 

Total 12 


2. In addition to the core, 18 units of electives are required as follows: 

a. Eighteen units of electives at the 400 or 500 level, with a minimum of six and a max- 
imum of 12 In a field outside of but related to economics. 

b. At least nine units of electives must be at the 500 level, six of which must be in 
economics. In this regard. Economics 596 is specifically designed to serve as an elec- 
tive In this program. The topic of the course rotates every semester and it may be 
repeated for credit. The topics offered include international monetary systems, com- 
parative economic systems, history of economic thought, economic history, and ad- 
vanced topics in micro- and macrotheory. 

c. If nine or more units are taken In fields outside of economics, at least three units 
must be at the 500 level. 

For further information, consult the School of Business Administration and Economics An- 
nouncement and/or the associate dean, academic programs, in the School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics. See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" elsewhere In this 

catalog, and the Graduate Bulletin. 

ACCOUNTING COURSES 

201A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A must be taken before 201 B. Accounting concepts and techni- 
ques essential to the administration of a business enterprise; accounting as a process of 
measuring and communicating economic information; analyzing and recording finan- 
cial transactions; preparation of financial statements; analysis and interpretation of 
financial statements; introduction to manufacturing accounts and reports; the in- 
teraction of accounting with the areas of finance, quantitative methods, interpersonal 
relations, motivation, and data-information systems. 

301A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201B; 301A must be taken before 301B. The quantification, recor- 
ding, and presentation of balance sheet and income statement items with particular 
emphasis on the corporate type of organization; statement of application of funds; cash 
flow statement; basic concepts of accounting theory; interpretation of financial 
statements. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201B. The development of accounting information for 
management of manufacturing enterprises; cost records; cost behavior and allocation; 
standard costs; and an introduction to cost control. 

303 Governmental Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: one course in accounting. A consideration of the accounts and reports of non- 
profit Institutions, municipalities, state and federal governments; organization, 
procedures, budgets. 

304 Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Intended for students whose area of concentration is not ac- 
counting. Analysis, interpretation, and application of accounting information for 
managerial decision making; budgets and budgetary control; special-purpose reports; 
differential cost analyses. 

307 Distribution Costs (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201B and Marketing 351. The development of quantitative 
measures for marketing activity; costs of distributing through different channels of dis- 
tribution, advertising vs. personal selling, and movement activities; development of 
sales budgets, standard costs, and the analysis of actual performance in the light of 
budgets and standards. 


138 Accounting 

308 Federal Income Tax (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201B. Basic consideration of the history, theory, and accounting 
aspects of federal income taxation. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 301 B. A study of partnerships, statements for special purposes, 
receiverships, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting and foreign ex- 
change. 

402 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301B and 302. Nature of an audit, auditing standards and 
procedures, audit reports; professional ethics and responsibilities of the independent 
public accountant; introduction to internal auditing. 

406 Cost Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. A study of current and persistent problems in cost accounting; 
theories of cost allocation and absorption; flexible budgeting; responsibility accoun- 
ting; and distribution cost control. 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201B and QM 264 or 265. Integrated systems for the collection, 
processing, and transmission of information; aspects of the information service func- 
tion; feasibility studies; case studies of operating systems. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Research in problems of taxation with emphasis on income 
taxes as they relate to corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries. 

409 C.P.A. Problems and Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 401, or consent of instructor. Selected problems and questions as 
found in the uniform C.P.A. examination; preparation, analysis and revision of financial 
statements; assets, liabilities and ownership equities; income determination; cost ac- 
counting; governmental and institutional accounting; accounting theory. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by department chair. Open to qualified un- 
dergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be 
repeated for credit. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301B, classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. The con- 
cepts and theory of accounting; the effects of professional, governmental, business, 
and social forces on the evolution of accounting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Financial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accognting 502 and classified M.B.A. status. A critical examination of the 
current problems and areas of controversy in financial accounting. 

504 Seminar in Contemporary Managerial Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 511 or 302, classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. A 
critical examination of the current problems and areas of controversy in managerial ac- 
counting. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and classified M.B.A. status. Auditing theory and practices; 
professional ethics; auditing standards; SEC and stock exchange regulations; auditor's 
legal liability; statement trends and techniques. 

507 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 407 or equivalent, and classified M.B.A. status. Case studies of 
large scale accounting systems used by organizations such as universities, banks, and in- 
dustrial corporations. Applications of conceptual knowledge of system components 
and controls learned previously to actual operating systems. 

508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. A review 
of substantive provisions of federal tax law with an emphasis on tax planning from a cor- 
porate viewpoint; case studies of the effect of federal tax law on business decisions. 

510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. The basic fundamentals of accounting as they apply to 
the accumulation, organization, and interpretation of financial and quantitative data 


Economics 139 


relevant to the activities of the corporate business enterprise. The interaction of ac- 
counting wiliith the areas of finance, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data- 
information systems. 

511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201B or 510, consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Ac- 
counting information for management decision; elements of manufacturing, dis- 
tribution and service costs; cost systems; standard costs; cost reports; cost analysis. 

518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites; Accounting 201A, B or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Comparative 
analysis of accounting principles and practices, current problems of international finan- 
cial reporting, accounting planning and control for International operations with 
emphasis upon multinational companies. 

521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302, or 304, or 511; classified M.B.A. status; and consent of Instruc- 
tor. Integrative aspects of accounting, financial, and quantitative data for managerial 
decision-making; long-term, short-term profit planning; budgetary control; cost 
analysis; financial analysis and planning; taxation; and transfer pricing. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3—6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. Student will select and 
have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present 
himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1 — 3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor, and approval by department 
chair. M/iy be repeated for credit. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

495 Internship Experience (1-3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing, academic qualification and consent by the Internship adviser. 
Provides planned and supervised work experience in business, industry and public 
agencies, extending the student's learning experience beyond the classroom. Number 
of units granted is determined by number of hours worked per week. CredIt/no credit 
up to a maximum of six units. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core, senior standing and consent of Instructor. 
Application of research methods: selection and identification of a problem, determin- 
ing a method of approach, collection and analysis of relevant data, eliciting conclusions 
and solutions. 

596 M.B.A. Management Game (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status and within six units of completion of the M.B.A. study 
plan. This course serves as the required terminal evaluation for M.B.A. candidates. An 
integrated approach to policy decisions using the principles and practices of the several 
disciplines in the M.B.A. program. 

ECONOMICS COURSES 

100 The Economic Environment (3) 

An introduction to economics with application to problems such as unemploynier«t, 
poverty, discrimination, inflation, gold and foreign exchange, pollution, urban decay, 
defense, war, and industrialization. 

Ill Economics of Utopia (3) 

An economic analysis of utopian thought and attempts to create ideal economic systems. 
Emphasis is placed on the Importance of economic structure and environment to the 
performance of utopian experiments. 

200 Principles of Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100. A survey ot basic economic theory. Includes the central 
problem ot allocating resources, the distribution of income, unemployment, inflation, 
and the role of markets and public policies solving these problems. 


140 Economics 


210 Principles of Economics (5) 

Prerequisite: open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 100 and 200). An introduction to the 
principles of economic analysis and policy including the central problem of scarcity, 
basic economic institutions of the United States, resource allocation and income dis- 
tribution, economic stability and growth, and the role of public policy. 

301 Economic Principles (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B and QM 265 or equivalents. An introduction to economic prin- 
ciples for students who have a strong quantitative background, and who have a special 
interest in the technical areas of engineering and computer science. Not open to 
students majoring in business administration or economics. 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 and 200 or 210. An analysis and evaluation of (1) rational 
decision-making behavior of consumers and firms and (2) price and output deter- 
mination in markets; with special emphasis placed on the use of cases and problems to 
illustrate the application of the analysis to the contemporary scene. 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 200 or 210. The explanation and evaluation of the deter- 
minants of the level and fluctuations of such economic aggregates as national income 
and employment, with stress placed on the use of problems involving the application of 
analytical tools to modern macroeconomic Issues. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210 or 100 plus consent of instructor. A study of alternative 
economic systems with regard to their theoretical foundations, actual economic In- 
stitutions, and achievements and failures. The contrast between socialist and capitalist 
systems will be emphasized. 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. An analytical evaluation of Soviet economic 
development including the structure and performance of the Soviet economy and 
problems of planning and control. 

332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Analysis of the natural resources, population, 
agricultural. Industrial, transportation, communications, monetary, banking, etc. 
problems of Asia i.e. China, Japan, etc. and the Asian subcontinent. The relations of 
non-economic problems to the economic are considered In detail. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. An examination of the processes of economic growth 
with special references to developing areas. Considers capital formation, resource 
allocation, relation to the world economy, economic planning and institutional factors, 
with appropriate case studies. 

334 Economics of Poverty, Race and Discrimination (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. An economic analysis of the problems and policies deal- 
ing with poverty, race and discrimination. A field investigation or project is required of 
each student. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The development of American economic Institutions 
with special emphasis on economic problems, economic growth, and economic 
welfare. 

351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The evolution of European economic institutions and 
their relation to the development of industry, commerce, transportation, and finance in 
the principal European countries. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Theory and analysis of the urban economy, urban 
economic problems and policy. 

365 Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. A study of government finance at the federal, state, and 
local levels with particular reference to the impact of taxation and spending on 
resource allocation. Income distribution, stabilization and growth. 


Economics 


141 


370 Economics of Research, Development and Technological Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Examination of the importance of R&D and 
technological change in the economy; concepts, issues, and major figures in the study 
of economics of technology; analytical techniques for the assessment of technological 
change; and evaluation of the impacts of technological change. 

391 The Modernization of Russian Society, 1880-1939 (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 or 210. An interdisciplinary seminar on the historical, political, 
cultural and economic forces promoting and impeding modernization under both the 
Tsarist and Communist regimes. Course is team taught by an instructor from the 
Economics Department and the History Department. 

410 Government and Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An economic study of business organization, conduct and per- 
formance followed by an analysis of the rationale and impact of public policy on various 
segments of business and business activities, including the regulated industries, sick in- 
dustries and antitrust policy. 

411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An examination of the theory of international trade and the 
means and significance of balance of payments adjustments, with an analysis of past and 
present developments in international, commercial and monetary policy. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. An analysis of the basic economic and institutional influences 
operating in labor markets. Considers relevant aspects of wage differentials, un- 
employment, and problems of disadvantaged labor market groups. 

420 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the money supply process and the impact of 
monetary policy on economic activity. 

421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. A study of the techniques of monetary and fiscal policy and an 
appraisal of their relative roles in promoting economic stability and growth. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210 or 301 and QM 361 or equivalent. Development of ad- 
vanced statistical methods and their application in economic research. Advanced con- 
cepts in model building; development of different types of economic models. The use 
and effect of economic models in public policy. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210 or 301 and Math 130 or equivalent. Selected topics in 
economic theory, drawn from microeconomics and macroeconomics. Content varying 
from year to year but with emphasis on constrained optimization problems and rational 
decision-making. 

450 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 320. A study of the development of economic thought as 
reflected in the evolution of major schools of thought and of leading individual 
economists as they influenced economic thought and policy. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics major or concentration, senior standing and approval by the 
department chair. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 200 or 210, and 310; classified status in the M.A. in 
Economics program or consent of instructor. An advanced theoretical formulation of 
the principles of the determination of prices and outputs of goods and productive ser- 
vices in a market system. Topics include: consumer choice, demand, production, cost, 
the equilibrium of the firm and the market and distribution. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 200 or 210, and 320; classified status in the M.A. in 
Economics program or consent of instructor. Advanced theory of the determination 
of employment, fluctuations of real and money income and the forces underlying 
economic growth. 


142 Economics 


505 Methodology in Economic Research Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Classified status in the M.A. in Economics program or consent of instructor. 
Applications of statistical and econometric techniques in economic analysis. Emphasis is 
on practical problems In empirical research. Topics include statistical analyses of 
demand functions, consumption functions, cost and production functions, and models 
of national income determination. Practical problems Involved in using multiple 
regression analysis are examined. 

506 Seminar in Micro- and Macroeconomic Applications (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503 and 505; classified status in the M.A. in Economics program 
or consent of instructor. Complements the study of methodology in economic 
research. Students select approved topics and via independent investigation, seminar 
presentation and critique develop their analytical and research abilities, culminating 
with an acceptable paper. 

511 Economic Problems and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514, 515 and classified M.B.A. status. Seminar devoted to an ex- 
amination of the nature and implication of the major economic problems facing the 
economy and an evaluation of current and alternative policies for their solution. 
Problems considered will Include price level stabilization, balance of payments 
equilibrium, economic growth, and cyclical and technological unemployment. (Not 
open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

514 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy— Part A (3) 

Prerequisite: Classified M.B.A. status. An Intensive study of micro- and macroeconomic 
theory and policy within the framework of a market system. (Not open to Economics 
M.A. candidates.) 

515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy — Part B (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 and classified M.B.A. status. An integration of modern 
microeconomic theory, optimization techniques, and microeconomic policy. Topics in- 
clude: mathematical programming, consumer choice, production theory, firm and 
market equilibrium, and government regulation. (Not open to Economics M.A. can- 
didates.) 

522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 

Prerequistes: Economics 514 and 515 and classified M.B.A. status. A comparative study of 
various analytical and prescriptive approaches to economic problems of scarcity, 
development, fiscal and monetary policy, planning and poverty. (Not open to 
Economics M.A. candidates.) 

528 Seminar in International Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 or equivalent, consent of Instructor or classified M.B.A. status. 
A systematic survey of international monetary and International trade theories and 
policies. Includes analyses of international monetary reform, barriers to trade, 
economic integration, economic development and international capital flows. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

5% Selected Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210, 310 and 320; classified status in the M.A. in Economics 
program or consent of instructor. Seminar: Selected topics in economic analysis and 
policy will be covered in depth, with special emphasis on contemporary research and 
materials. Topics may include international monetary systems, comparative economic 
systems, history of economic thought, economic history, and advanced topics in mlcro- 
and macrotheory. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Projects (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent Inquiry. Student will select and 
have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present 
himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor and approval by department chair. 
Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent inquiry. May be 
repeated for credit. 


Finance 143 


FINANCE COURSES 

310 Personal Financial Management (3) (Formerly Finance 333) 

Financial problems of the household in allocating resources and planning expenditures. 
Consideration of housing, insurance, installment buying, medical care, savings and in- 
vestments. (May not be used to fulfill the area of concentration requirement in 
finance.) 

320 Business Finance (3) (Formerly Finance 330) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201B. Financing business enterprises; financial planning and con- 
trol; analysis of alternative sources and uses of combinations of short-, intermediate- 
and long-term debt and equity. Cost of capital. Study of capital investment decisions; 
capital budget analysis and valuation; working capital and capital structure 
management. 

331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Development of techniques for internal financial control and their 
application to business situations. Capital costs and optimal capital investment 
decisions. Budgets and forecasts for projection of long-term profitable operations. 
Analysis of current financial models. Group problems and case studies. 

332 Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Cost of cash, accounts receivable and inventories of each asset. 
Sources of short term funds and Interchange of alternative short term liabilities as a 
means of controlling costs. Cash flow analysis, funds flow analysis. 

340 Security Investments (3) (Formerly Finance 335) 

Prerequisites: Finance 320 and QM 265 or consent of instructor. Principles underlying the 
analysis, selection and management of securities; characteristics of securities, valuation, 
trading methods, role of mutual funds and other institutions; computerized statement 
analysis and portfolio selection methods; a computer securities game is played by 
members of the class. 

350 Principles and Practices of Real Estate (3) (Formerly Finance 336) 

Survey of urban real estate principles and practices; structure and growth of cities; economic 
Implication to real estate markets. Trends and factors affecting real property values, real 
estate financing and real estate law. Integrative cases and projects. Study of current 
urban mqdels used in urban development. Group problems and case studies. 

360 Principles of Insurance (3) (Formerly Finance 334) 

Principles of life, casualty and liability insurance, individual and group insurance programs; 
methods of establishing risks and rates. 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331. Application of analytical techniques to the solution of financial in- 
stitution problems. Major financial intermediaries and the broad range of decision- 
making problems they face. Regulation and its effect on management operations. 
Group problems and case studies. 

432 Financial Forecasting and Capftal Budgeting (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Role of forecasting in financial management; construction and in- 
terpretation of economic forecasts for the economy, industry, and the firm; con- 
struction and Interpretation of financial plans; evaluation of capital acquisition 
decisions under certainty and uncertainty conditions. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331. Comprehensive case studies including group problems of es- 
timating funds requirements, long-term financial planning, controlling and evaluating 
cash flows, and financing acquisitions and mergers. Group problems and case studies. 

440 Capital and Money Markets (3) (Formerly Finance 431) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Role of capital and money markets in the American economy; 
markets for new corporate and government issues; secondary markets; interrelation of 
financial institutions; factors Influencing yields and security prices. 

442 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) (Formerly Finance 435) 

Prerequisite: Finance 340 or consent of Instructor. Advanced securities analysis course utiliz- 
ing computer applications for statement analysis, valuation models, and portfolio 
selection and management models. The data base utilizes Standard and Poor's "com- 
pustat tapes." A simulated portfolio management game Is played at the end of the 
course. 


144 Finance 


451 Legal Aspects of Real Estate (3) (Formerly Fianance 436) 

Prerequisites: Management 246 or equivalent area, Finance 350. Law of real property; types 
of ownership; titles and estates; transfers of Interests; encumbrances; casements; fix- 
tures; land sale contracts; recording; zoning; leases; responsibilities of real estate 
brokers. 

452 Real Estate Finance (3) (Formerly. Finance 437) 

Prerequisite: Finance 350 or consent of instructor. Sources and uses of capital in financing 
real estate transactions. Financial institutions and their effect on credit. Money and 
capital market conditions and their effect on credit availability and cost. Instruments of 
real estate finance. Real estate as an investment medium. Group problems and case 
studies. 

453 Real Estate Valuation (3) (Formerly Finance 438) 

Prerequisite: Finance 350 or consent of instructor. Theory of real property value, historical 
development; methods used in urban and rural property appraisals; special purpose 
appraisals. Group problems, laboratory work as determined by computer terminal 
availability. 

454 Real Estate and Urban Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 350. Real estate and urban development deals with factors and in- 
fluences of urban growth and development. Economic factors as they relate to real es- 
tate supply and demand. Location theory and urban growth patterns. Real estate 
markets. 

459 Real Estate Research (3) (Formerly Finance 401) 

Prerequisites: Finance 350 and 452 or 453. Group problems, laboratory work as determined 
by computer terminal availability. 

460 Social Insurance (3) (Formerly Finance 439) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Financial problems and policies in old age pensions, health in- 
surance, unemployment insurance, workman's compensation, and private pension 
plans. 

461 Risk Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 360 or consent of instructor. Techniques and structures of risk 
management; risk planning, control and financing in the business enterprise. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1—3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by department chair. Open to qualified un- 
dergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent Inquiry. May be 
repeated for credit. 

517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510 and classified M.B.A. status. The methodology of financial 
management including the primary tools for financial analysis, long-term investment 
decisions, valuation and working capital management. 

523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 and classified M.B.A. status. Emphasis in this course is on the 
analysis of the financial decision-making process through case studies and seminar 
presentations. Current financial theory and models are utilized. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 523 and classified M.B.A. status. Optimal financing and asset ad- 
ministration; advanced techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical 
methods to the administration of the finance function of the business firm. 

540 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) (Formerly 534) 

Prerequisites: Finance 440 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Structure and 
operation of major financial institutions; portfolio composition, pricecost problems, 
and market behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and interrelation of financial 
institutions and markets. 

541 Seminar in Investment Management (3) (Formerly 535) 

Prerequisites: Finance 442 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of 
investment and portfolio management; concepts of risk evaluation and investment 
criteria; analysis of interest rate movements; investment valuation and timing; 
regulation and administrative problems of the industry. 


Management 145 


551 Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3) (Formerly 537) 

Prerequisites: Finance 320, 350 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of real es- 
tate investment; concepts of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of real 
property values; real estate development and financing. 

570 Seminar in International Financial Management (3) (Formerly 538) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Focus on the 
financial problems of the multinational firm. Included are international financing in- 
struments, capital investment decisions, and constraints on the profitability of mul- 
tinational businesses. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3—6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent Inquiry. Student will select and 
have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present 
himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1 — 3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of the instructor and approval by the 
department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

MANAGEMENT COURSES 

246 Business Law (3) 

Philosophy, institutions and role of law in business and society, with emphasis on functions 
of courts and attorneys, case studies in areas of contracts, and on the law relating to sale 
of goods. 

340 Behavioral Science for Business (3) 

Prerequisites: general education for social sciences. Study of social and cultural en- 
vironments of business. Communication, leadership, motivation, perception, per- 
sonality development, group dynamics and group growth. Covers fundamental aspects 
of human behavior with implications for organizational design and management prac- 
tice. 

341 Organization and Management Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210, or consent of instructor. Administrative processes, 
organization theories, applications In utility-creating business operations. Planning, 
control and Information systems, measuring and improving effectiveness. Leadership in 
creating utility. Open to non-business majors. 

342 Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341 and QM 265. Fundamentals of production systems which 
combine materials, labor, and capital resources to produce goods or services. Analysis 
of systems, models and methods for management of production operations. Product 
and process development. Case studies stress utilization of computer decision models. 

343 Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341 or consent of instructor. A study of the personnel function, 
its activities, and its opportunities. Emphasis upon management's responsibilities for 
selection, development and effective utilization of personnel. Open to non-business 
majors. 

347 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. Philosophy, institutions and role of law In 
business relationships, with emphasis on case studies in areas of agency, partnerships, 
corporations, bankruptcy, unfair competition and trade regulation. 

348 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. The philosophy, institutions and role of law in 
commercial and personal transactions, with emphasis upon case studies in the areas of 
personal property, bailments, commercial paper, secured transactions, real property, 
mortgages, trusts, community property, wills, estate administration and insurance. 

441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 341. Impact of labor-management relations upon labor, 
management, and the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining and 
settlement of disputes are among subjects examined. 


146 Management 


442 Collective Bargaining and Labor Legislation (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 441. Study of effects of federal and state legislation on union and 
nonunion environments in both private and public sectors. Practicum in collective 
bargaining procedures. Case studies of recent successful and unsuccessful labor 
negotiations. 

443 Individual, Interpersonal and Group Dynamics for Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 340, 341 or consent of instructor. Case studies and current 
literature on human problems of work situations. Focuses on developing self- 
knowledge; manager motivation; communicator strengths; Improving interaction 
skills; and improving interaction processes in groups. Laboratory work offers practical 
approach. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

4^4 Management of Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: QM core and other 300 level courses in student's program. Technology for 
managing business and other enterprises as cybernetic systems. Investigates the design 
and control of systems appropriate for product, project and program levels of analysis. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

445 Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 342 and QM core. Planning and control methodologies for 
production operations. Quantitative approaches which Integrate cost, schedule and 
technical performance criteria. Collection, evaluation and use of real-time information. 
Individual and group projects synthesize control systems for actual cases. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM core. Economics 310 and Management 341. A study of relationships of 
management tools to applied economics and statistics in decision-making process; use 
of cases and group problems to study the true economic meaning of cost, demand, 
supply, price, product and competition. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core less Management 449, or consent of instructor. A 
simulation of an oligopolistic Industry to provide the student with an opportunity, 
through group problems, to use statistics and other analytical tools to make managerial 
decisions in the functional areas of management. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 

449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: all other School of Business Administration and Economics core courses and 
departmental approval. Through analyzing integrative cases from top management 
viewpoint, students use business and liberal arts training, especially knowledge of 
business operations, administrative processes, organization theory, and policy for- 
mulation. Individual and team efforts. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, and approval by faculty sponsor 
and department chair of proposed statement of work. Open to qualified undergraduate 
students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

516 Organizational Theory and Management of Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, Accounting 510, Economics 514 and Quantitative 
Methods 512. Modern organization theory and application in utility creating 
operations. Planning, control, organizing, directing, communication and Information 
systems, and measures of effectiveness are explored. Business ethics and relationships 
to society and politics are examined. Graduate discussion and research reports. 

518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Prerequisites, classified M.B.A status and Accounting 510. Philosophy, institutions and role of 
law in business, with emphasis upon legal implications inherent In business decisions 
and upon case studies in areas of contracts, sale of goods, agency, partnerships and cor- 
porations. 

524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration (3) (Formerly 544) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, Management 516 and 518 or equivalent. Analysis of 
human behavior in organization, studies in organizational theories, and administrative 


Marketing 147 


541 Seminar in Project Operations Problem Solving (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. A seminar 
designed to focus attention on application of system analysis and other dynamic techni- 
ques to current operations problems. Special projects are used to demonstrate 
application of concepts. 

542 Seminar in Labor Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status. Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. Theories and 
philosophies of union-management relations in modern Industrial society with 
attention to trends In nonindustrial organizations. Issues in collective bargaining, con- 
tract administration, labor law, and government regulation. Discussion and analysis of 
literature. 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status. Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. Provides 
graduate students with opportunities to study cases, problems, and significant per- 
sonnel administration literature in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of 
personnel administration and human relations. 

548 Seminar in International Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status. Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. Problems in 
managerial qualifications and training, political structure within and without the 
operations, foreign receptivity to United States business, organization and controlling 
the international firm. Management in selected countries is examined. 

549 Seminar in Policy Planning and Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status. Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. Planning, im- 
plementing and controlling policy strategies to achieve objectives are considered. Ex- 
ecutive's role in overall enterprise operations and the firm's resource use are examined 
and supported by cases, literature and training techniques. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent project. Student will select and 
have approved a project proposal, conduct the project, and prepare a formal analysis 
and report. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent Inquiry. Student will select and 
have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present 
himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor and consent of department 
chair. May be repeated for credit. 

MARKETING COURSES 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. Analysis of how management markets output of the enterprise 
— and obtains revenue. Covers product management, pricing, promotion, distribution 
channels. Marketing's role in socioeconomic system is examined from viewpoints of 
consumer, management and government. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Covers problems retailers face such as store location, store 
design and layout, what goods should be purchased, how to: obtain sales volume, plan 
operations, control the enterprise, and react to competitors. Current problems in retail- 
ing will be examined. 

353 Marketing Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Major problems facing the marketing executive, including 
marketing organization, planning and forecasting, market analysis, budgeting, product 
policy, pricing, advertising and sales promotion, administration of the sales force. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the advertising function, including the role 
of advertising in marketing strategy, budgetary considerations, allocation among media, 
measurement of effectiveness, administration and control, and Its economic and social 
Implications. 


148 Marketing 

355 Credit and Credit Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The general nature and functions of credit, credit instruments; 
the management of the credit department; sources of credit information; acceptance 
of credit risk; establishment of credit limits; and the problem of collections. 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Salesmanship, in the very broad context, is persuading people 
to do what you want them to do. A fundamental managerial skill. Relevant principles of 
behavior are applied to the persuasion process. 

357 Industrial Purchasing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The principles and practices of purchasing for industrial 
organizations. Major buying policies, sources of materials, quantity and quality con- 
siderations, and the relation to production cost. 

358 Physical Distribution (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, QM 265. Introduction to the physical distribution system and 
its element — packaging, transporation, warehousing and inventory management. 
Analysis of physical distribution practices and problems leading to improved system 
design and effectiveness. 

379 Marketing Research Methods (3) (Formerly 452) 

Prerequisities: Marketing 351 and QM 361. Introduction to marketing research process: 
problem formulation, identifying data sources, selecting data collection and analysis 
techniques, preparing research reports. Emphasis placed upon selecting marketing 
problems for research. Lecture-discussion, cases. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour activity). 

451 Management of Physical Distribution Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 358, Finance 330, QM 361 and 362 (or consent of instructor). Builds 
on the material and techniques introduced in Marketing 358. Addresses the problems 
Involved in physical distribution operations management. Uses a ''case" or "situation" 
approach to simulate a "real world" problem context. 

453 Marketing to the Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and nondefense products to the 
government. The nature and administration of contractual agreements with 
government agencies. 

454 Advertising Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 354. Examines the interrelationships of product planning, advertis- 
ing management, sales management, financial management and corporate strategy in a 
competitive environment. 

455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Examines the job of the sales manager in such areas as 
organization; recruiting and selecting salesmen; sales training; formulating compen- 
sation and expense plans; supervising and stimulating sales activities; morale; sales 
planning, evaluating salesmen; and distribution cost analysis. 

456 Marketing Problems in Retail Sector (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 352. Structure and scope of the retail sector; entrepreneurial func- 
tion; franchising; consumer segment and store Image; assimilating the employee into 
the organization; pricing: measurement and elasticities; monopolistic competitive 
markets and nonprice competition; merchandising control; emerging trends in 
retailing— a macroeconomic view. 

457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, QM core. Finance 320 and Management 341 (or consent of in- 
structor). Develops the use of analytical tools and techniques as support for such 
marketing-management functions as planning, scheduling, evaluating, control. 
Emphasizes the analysis of marketing processes and systems and the development of 
appropriate action recommendations. 

458 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and senior standing. Presents analytical framework for studying 
development of domestic marketing systems. Marketing problems arising across 
national boundaries and within national markets will be analyzed. Emphasis is given 
U.S. firms Involved in International marketing operations. 


Marketing 149 


459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, two advanced marketing courses. Analysis and evaluation of 
marketing problems of both the firm and society. Emphasis placed upon integrative in- 
teractions between marketing activities and the interfaces of marketing with finance 
and production. Case method and current readings. 

470 Consumer Behavior (3) (Formerly 350) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. An investigation of consumer buying patterns, motivation and 
search behavior. Emphasis on the consumer decision-making process. Interdisciplinary 
study of consumer based on concepts from economics, sociology, psychology, cultural 
anthropology and mass communications. 

479 Research Problems in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 379. Marketing research practicum. Emphasis on matching research 
methodologies to problems of market analysis, product planning, advertising, sales 
forecasting and other marketing activities. Alternative data collection and analysis 
techniques explored. Seminars, research projects. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour activity) 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499/ Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: marketing concentration, senior standing, and approval by the department 
chair. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed in- 
dependent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

519 Marketing Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510, Economics 514, QM 512, 513, Management 516, 518 
(may be taken concurrently) and classified M.B.A. status. A graduate introductory 
course In marketing management. A contemporary analysis of concepts, principles and 
techniques used in the administration of the marketing variables. The role of marketing 
within the context of society and the business firm is explored. 

525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) (Formerly Marketing 551) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 and classified M.B.A. status. A managerial approach to major 
marketing problems facing industry: definition of and organization for marketing task; 
demand analysis; decisions concerning product, price, promotion, and trade channels. 
Use of case method and readings on current topics. 

552 Seminar in Price Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Critical analysis of pricing 
problems. Pricing function examined from standpoints of economic theory, 
management science, business practices, legal constraints, ethical considerations. 
Relationship of pricing objectives, policies, strategies, methods market behavior, goals 
of firm. 

553 Seminar in Product Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Designed to assist marketing 
management in the formulation and execution of marketing plans for new and existing 
products. Examination of the management decision areas and procedures search, 
preliminary evaluation, development, testing, commercialization products. 

554 Seminar in Promotion (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 379, 525, and classified M.B.A. status. Critical analysis of thc' 
promotion mix as employed by businesses to optimize profitable operations. Particular 
emphasis given to determination of promotional goals, planning, budgeting, controll- 
ing promotional programs; and measuring promotional effectiveness. 

555 Seminar in Marketing Research (3) 

Prerequiskes: Marketing 379, 525, consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. The 
application of scientific method to marketing decisions; research methodology and 
models; decision-making applications. 

556 Seminar in Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Design and evaluation of 
marketing communications programs in consumer and industrial settings based on the 
critical analysis of buyer decision-making and communications models. Discussion, 
cases, and projects. 


150 Quantitative Methods 

558 Seminar in International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Includes: com- 
parative international marketing systems; managerial techniques and strategies as they 
apply to multinational and domestic firms engaged in export; and the impact of 
political, legal, social, economic and cultural forces upon the decision-making process. 

559 Seminar in Marketing Thought and Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. Application of theoretical concepts 
in the behavioral sciences, managerial sciences and quantitative methods to the 
development of theories and models in marketing. The emphasis is on the Inter- 
disciplinary exchange of ideas relating to marketing. Evolving concepts and theories in 
marketing are appraised. May be repeated for credit. 

595 Modern Capitalism (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 595) 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed Independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. Student will select and 
have approved a thesis topic, show evidence of original research, and must present 
himself for a defense of the thesis before a faculty comm.ittee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of Instructor and approval by department 
chair. May be repeated for credit. 


QUANTITATIVE METHODS COURSES 

170 Introduction to Quantitative Methods (3) 

Prerequisite^ Math 150A or equivalent. For those business majors concentrating in quan- 
titative'^methods. Emphasizes application of the mathematical tools which the student 
learns in a first course in calculus and analytic geometry. 

264 Computer Programming (2) 

Introduction to problem-oriented languages of computers. The solving of problems using 
computer programming. May be repeated for credit. 

265 Computer Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 130 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Elementary probability 
and digital computer methods and their business and economic applications. Solving 
business and economics problems on a digital computer with a compiler language. 

266 Computer Methods and Probability (3) 

Prerequisite: college algebra or three years of high school mathematics including two 
courses in algebra. For computer science majors. Includes computer system con- 
figurations, terminology, algebraic compiler level programming, flow charts, 
probability, set theory, frequency distributions, expectation and binomial distribution. 

280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 264, 265, or equivalent. A study of selected computer languages. 
Introduction to formal language theory, numerical data processing, string and list 
processing, formal structure manipulating, recursive routines. 

289 Computer Methods in Social Science (3) 

An introduction to the history and application of digital computers to problems in the social 
sciences. Student written programs In a problem-oriented computer language. 
Discussion of computers, law and society; artificial intelligence; and other topics of 
current interest. 

361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 265 or equivalent and Math 130. Collection, analysis, and presentation of 
statistical data. Random sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Introduction to 
regression and correlation. 

362 Management Science Methods in Business and Economics (3) (Fornferly 360) 

Prerequisites: QM 265 or equivalent and Math 130. Concepts of mathematical methods and 
their application to business and economic problems. Elementary mathematical op- 
timization models. Students with a quantitative methods concentration must take QM 
363 In lieu of this course. 


Quantitative Methods 151 


363 Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150B or QM 170. Introduction to the basic concepts of management 
science and its relationship to economics and decision theory. Topics surveyed include 
optimization in continuous models, linear programming, queueing and inventory 
models, dynamic programming and decision-making in the business environment. 

364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 264, 265, or equivalent, and QM 280 (may be taken concurrently). An in- 
troductory survey of assembler language, hardware organization, design, logic, and 
system software of modern digital computers. 

367 Statistics and Society (3) 

A descriptive, non-mathematical survey of the impact of statistical concepts and techniques 
on social, political, biological, and environmental life of mankind. 

382 Information Structures and Machine Language Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364. A formal discussion of information structures, the types of processes 
for which they are appropriate, and their relative computational efficiencies. 
Assignments implemented in a variety of machine languages. 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 361 or Math 230 and Economics 310 or 320. Statistical methods applied to 
problems in business and Industry; fundamentals of index-number constructions; prac- 
tical multiple regression models with computer solutions; basic techniques in time- 
series analysis of trend, cyclical and seasonal components; correlation of time-series 
and forecasting with the computer. 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361 or Math 230. Principles for designing business and economic surveys. 
Applications in accounting, marketing research, economic statistics and the social 
sciences. Basic methods of sampling: simple random, stratified and multistage design; 
construction of sampling frames; detecting and controlling non-sampling errors. 

430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361 or Math 230. The application of nonparametric statistical methods to 
problems in business and economics. Topics covered include sign tests, rank cor- 
relation, contingency tables, order statistics, runs. 

446 Computer Programming Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. A study of techniques for establishing the correctness of algorithms, 
estimating time and storage requirements of algorithms, and selecting the operational 
environment and linguistic media appropriate for algorithms. 

448 Digital Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 280, and Math 435 or QM 461. A study of techniques of generating 
stochastic variates and their use In solving numerical problems and studying operational 
problems in queueing, communication, economic, inventory, scheduling and other 
business models. 

461 Advanced Statistics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 170 or Math 150B and QM 361 or Math 335 or Engineering 423. An ad- 
vanced treatment of the theory and application of the topics covered In QM 361, using 
the methods of the calculus. Moments, generating functions, point and Interval es- 
timation, Neyman-Pearson and Likelihood Ratio Hypothesis Tests. 

464 Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 364 or consent of instructor. An examination of modern computer 
hardware, the techniques of programming it, and the languages in which such 
programs are written. Includes discussion of memory protection. Interrupt systems, 
recursive programming, list-structured-languages and user-oriented languages. 

465 Linear Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Theory and applications of linear programming. Topics 
Include: problem formulation and solution, simplex method, duality, post-optimality 
and parametric analyses, techniques for specially structured problems such as upper 
bounded, transportation, and assignment problems. 


152 Quantitative Methods 


466 Integer and Nonlinear Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: calculus and consent of instructor. Theory and applications of nonlinear and 
integer programming. Topics in nonlinear programming include Kuhn-Tucker 
theorem, computational algorithms, quadratic programming. Topics in integer 
programming include cutting plane algorithms, branch and bound techniques, special 
techniques for specially structured problems. 

467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 361 or Math 230. Shewhart Control Charts for variables, percent defective, 
and defects. Tolerances, process capacity; special control charts, acceptance sampling, 
and batch processing problems. Bayesian aspects of process control. 

469 Reliability Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461 or equivalent. Statistical principles of reliability; hazard functions; 
point and interval estimation of reliability; reliability demonstration; growth models. 

470 Conflict; Bargaining and Cooperation (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 265, Math 120, or consent of instructor. Analysis of the structure of two-, 
three- and many-sided conflict, bargaining, and cooperation by means of the theory of 
games of strategy. The structure of strategy and utility, domination, negotiability and 
non-negotiability, cooperation and equilibrium. 

471 Dynamic Programming and Network Flows (3) 

Prerequisites: calculus and QM 465. Theory and applications for dynamic programming and 
network flows and their interrelationships. Topics include formulation of sequential 
decision processes such as cargo-loading, equipment replacement, resource allocation, 
and scheduling problems; shortest route problem; max. flow/min. cut theorem, 
generalized network problems. 

472 Quantitative Methods in Production & Inventory Control (3) 

Prerequisites: Calculus, QM 362 or 363 and 361. {s,S) inventory policies, static and dynamic 
models, deterministic and probabilistic models; aggregate production planning 
models, scheduling models, assembly line balancing. 

475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 461 or equivalent. The least squares principle; estimation and hypothesis 
testing in linear regression; multiple and curvilinear regression models; discriminant 
analysis; principal components analysis; application of multivariate analysis in business 
and industry. 

480 Information Theory and Cybernetics (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 265, 361 or Math 230, and Math 250. Study of complex systems in their 
static aspects; information contents and communications and their dynamic aspects; 
change, control and stability. 

482 Introduction to Discrete Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B and either QM 382 or consent of instructor. Combinatorial and 
graph theory techniques applied to study of known and unknown structures, to count- 
ing, approximate counting and enumeration of structural configurations, and to 
resolution of discrete optimization problems. 

484 Computer Assisted Instruction (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 264 and consent of instructor, knowledge of computer organization, ter- 
minology, and experience in programming. A survey of computer-assisted and 
computer-based Instruction consisting of a review of present research activities and in- 
cluding: methodology of educational approaches, implementations, and present 
achievements. 

485 Programming Systems and Programming Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite. QM 382. A study of monitor, assembler, and compiler systems and the 
hardware, firmware, and software characteristics required in a real-time, interactive en- 
vironment. 

486 Automata Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382 and Math 250, or consent of instructor. A formal introduction to the 
theory of computation and its relation to modern computing techniques. Includes 
development of Turing machines, recursive functions, equivalence theorems, and the 
algebraic theory of recognizers. 


Quantitative Methods 153 


487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 382. Selected topics of current interest from heuristic programming, 
pattern recognition, learning systems, problem solving systems, and formal symbol 
manipulating systems. 

488 Introduction to Pattern Recognition (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382 and 461, or consent of instructor. Classification techniques, dis- 
criminant functions, training algorithms, potential function theory, supervised and un- 
supervised learning, feature selection, clustering techniques, multidimensional 
rotations and rank ordering relations. 

490 Queueing and Stochastic Process Models in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Calculus, QM 362 or 363 and 361. Single and multichannel queueing systems of 
Markovia^ and general arrival and departure streams; birth-death processes, cost 
models and optimization of queues; Markov analyses; introduction to renewal theory; 
reliability. 

495 Symposium in Applied Mathematics (1) 

Prerequisites: a major in engineering, mathematics, or business administration (quantitative 
methods) and at least junior standing. A series of weekly lectures to be given on varied 
topics in applied mathematics by Invited experts in areas of current research and 
applications. 

497 Business and Economic Research (3) 

(Same as Business Administration 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: quantitative methods concentration, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chair. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

512, 513 Quantitative Business Decision Techniques (3,3) 

Prerequisites: QM 512 must be taken before QM 513 as must Accounting 510 and Economics 
514; classified M.B.A. status. The development and application of mathematical and 
statistical methods, including mathematical models, computer programming and 
simulation, used in business decision-making. 

526 Quantitative Business Decision Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques from probability, statistical 
decision theory, and computer simulation applied to problems of management. 

560 Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A, QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques of operations 
research, with emphasis on model construction. Topics include optimization in con- 
tinuous models, linear programming, queueing and scheduling models, inventory 
models, dynamic programming. (Not open to students with QM 363) 

561 Seminar in Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 560 or consent of Instructor and classified M.B.A. status. A particular topic 
In operations research, such as simulation, inventory theory, waiting line theory, or syn- 
thesis of large scale systems will be covered in depth with special emphasis on research 
methods. 

565 File Management and Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 464 or consent of instructor. An examination of innovative real-time com- 
puter based information systems in industry and government. 

566 Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 513 and classified M.B.A. status. A survey of the fundamentals of ex- 
perimental design, including analysis of variance, factorial experiments, nested designs, 
confounding, and fractional replication. 

571 Seminar in Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 363 or 560 and classified M.B.A. status. The synthesis, analysis and 
evaluation of policy alternatives through the use of quantitative methods. The 
analyst's role in evaluating operations of an enterprise is demonstrated by individual 
and team efforts In the design, development, performance and communication of 
results of operations research projects. 


154 Quantitative Methods 


576 Business Modeling and Simulation (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of instructor. Theory of modeling and simulation 
of business activities. Selected topics include planning models, flow graphs, queueing 
phenomena, industrial dynamics, human factors and large scale systems. 

584 Operating Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 485. A study of design and evaluation techniques for controlling automatic 
resource allocation, providing efficient programming environments and appropriate 
user access to the system, and sharing the problem solving facilities. 

585 Programming Language Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 584. A study of practical techniques for the design of compilers and their 
relation to formal automata models. 

586 Mathematical Automata Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382, Math 250, QM 486. A mathematically theoretic approach to com- 
putation, recursive function, syntactic compiler theory, ambiguity, soluability automata, 
probabilistic machines and decomposition theory. 

587 Formal Languages and Automata (3) 

Prerequisite: QM 485. A study of finite and infinite languages; generators, recognizers and 
acceptors, types of formal grammars; decidability and partial decidability. 

588 Mathematical Pattern Recognition (3) 

Prerequisites: QM 382, 461, 488. A mathematical approach to classification techniques, dis- 
criminant functions, training algorithms, potential function theory, supervised and un- 
supervised learning, feature selection, clustering techniques, multidimensional 
rotations and rank ordering relations. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Student will select and have approved a thesis topic, 
show evidence of original research and must present himself for a defense of the thesis 
before a faculty committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. 




156 


CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY 
PROGRAMS 


COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Ronald Colman 
Program Coordinator 

Gary Bloom (Quantitative Methods), Susan Bourgoin (Engineering), Joseph Bucuzzo 
(Mathematics), Wen Chow (Quantitative Methods), Michael Clapp (Mathematics), 
George Cohn (Engineering), Robert Curry (Mathematics), Ben Edmondson (Quantitative 
Methods), James Friel (Mathematics), Basil Gala (Quantitative Methods), Richard Gilbert 
(Mathematics), Walter Hudetz (Engineering), John Mathews (Mathematics), Marshall Mc- 
Fie (Quantitative Methods), Demetrios Michalopoulos (Quantitative Methods), Ronald 
Miller (Mathematics), Chennareddy Reddy (Engineering), FJerbert Rutemiller (Quan- 
titative Methods), Rollin Sandberg (Mathematics), Ram SInghania (Quantitative 
Methods), Edward Sowell (Engineering), Jesus Tuazon (Engineering), Mahedeva 
Venkatesan (Engineering) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE COUNCIL MEMBERS 

Susan Bourgoin, Ronald Colman, Robert Curry, Ben Edmondson, Demetrios Michalopoulos, 
Ronald Miller, Rollin Sandberg, Fred Silski,* Edward Sowell, Jesus Tuazon 

Bachelor of science and master of science degree programs in computer science are ad- 
ministered by the Computer Science Council, an interdisciplinary group representing the 
Department of Mathematics, the Department of Quantitative Methods and the Division of 
Engineering. 

The Association for Computing Machinery has given the following discipline description of 
computer science: 

''Computer science is not simply concerned with the design of computing devices — nor 
is it the design of computing devices— nor is it just the art of numerical calculation, as im- 
portant as these topics are. Computer science Is concerned with information In much the 
same sense that physics is concerned with energy; computer science is devoted to the 
representation, storage, manipulation and presentation of information In an en- 
vironment permitting automatic information systems. ...All forms of information- 
numeric, alphabetic, pictorial, verbal, tactile, olfactory, etc. — are of interest to computer 
science." 

The computer scientist is interested in effective ways to present information, algorithms to 
transform information, languages in which to express algorithms, effective means to monitor 
the process and display transformed information, and effective ways to accomplish these 
goals at reasonable cost. 

B.S. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The degree requires completion of 54 units of basic courses which include courses in 
mathematics and statistics as well as in computer languages. Information structures and com- 
puter logic design. Fifteen additional units are required beyond the basic courses. Con- 
siderable flexibility is provided to the student In that he may elect a 15-unit concentration in 
mathematics, engineering or quantitative methods. The student's grade-point average must 
be at least 2.0 for the 69 units required for the major, and none of these may be taken on a 
credit-no credit basis. 

Required courses are as follows: 

Units 

Lower Division 21 

Mathematics 150A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4,4) 

Mathematics 250 Intermediate Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 281 Linear Algebra with Differential Equations (3) 


• Student 


157 


Computer Science 

Quantitative Methods 266 Computer Methods and Probability (3) or 
Engineering 205 Digital Computation (3) 

Quantitative Methods 280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Upper Division 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Quantitative Methods 382 Information Structures and Machine Language 
Programming (3) 

Quantitative Methods 485 Programming Systems and Programming Language 
Processing (3) 

Engineering 402 Digital Logic Design (3) 

Engineering 405 Digital Computer Design and Organization (3) 

Mathematics 340 Numerical Analysis (3) 

Mathematics 335 Mathematical Probability (3) or 

Engineering 423 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

Mathematics 435 Mathematical Statistics (3) or Quantitative Methods 461 Ad- 
vanced Statistics (3) 

Quantitative Methods 448 Digital Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 
Quantitative Methods 363 Management Science (3) 

Economics 301 Economic Principles (3) 

Upper Division Electives 

A minimum of 15 units of upper division electives, selected from the list below to 
comprise a concentration in one of the three areas: Engineering, quantitative 
methods or mathematics. The 15 units may include courses in other areas besides the 
concentration, but all electives must be approved by the student's adviser. 

Total 

Upper Division Elective Courses: 

Accounting: 

407 Integrated Data Processing Systems (3) 

Computer Science: 

489 Mechanical Theorem Proving and Applications (3) 

495 Internship in Computer Science (3) 

Economic^: 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Engineering: 

300 Electric Circuits (3) 

300L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1) 

303 Electronics (3) 

303L Electronic Laboratory (1) 

303* Engineering Analysis (3) 

317 Introduction to Computer Science (3) 

402L Digital Logic Laboratory (2) 

405L Digital Computer Design Laboratory (2) 

424 Computer Simulation of Continuous Systems (3) 

445 Pulse and Digital Circuits (3) 

445L Pulse and Digital Circuits Laboratory (2) 

483 Computer Methods In Engineering (3) 

497 Senior Projects (1-3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Mathematics: 

302 Modern Algebra (3) 

304* Mathematical Logic (3) 

306 Vector and Tensor Analysis (3) 

308* Introduction to Applied Mathematics (3) 

310 Ordinary Differential Equations (3) 

330 Number Theory (3) 

350A,B Advanced Calculus (3,3) 

•Not both Mathematics 435 and Quantitative Methods 461 nor both Mathematics 340 and Engineering 403 may be used to 
fulfill minor requirements. Not both Mathematics 308 and Engineering 308 .. . nor both Mathematics 304 and Philosophy 
369 may be used to fulfill upper division elective requirements. 


Units 
15 • 


69 


158 Computer Science 


370 Mathematical Model Building (3) 

412 Complex Analysis (3) 

430 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

431 Methods of Applied Mathematics (3) 

440 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 

499 Independent Study (1) 

Philosophy: 

369* Second Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

Quantitative Methods: 

446 Computer Programming Theory (3) 

464 Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing (3) 

465 Linear Programming (3) 

466 Nonlinear Programming (3) 

467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

480 Information Theory and Cybernetics (3) 

482 Introduction to Discrete Structures (3) 

486 Automata Theory (3) 

487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

488 Introduction to Pattern Recognition (3) 

490 Stochastic Process Models in Business and Industry (3) 

495 Symposium In Applied Mathematics (1) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Note: up to six units of upper division electives not on the above approved list may be 
adviser-approved; more than six units of upper division electives not on the above list re- 
quires approval of the B.S. Curriculum Committee of the Computer Science Council. Only 
three units of Computer Science 495 may be included among upper division elective units. 
Independent Study 499 and Senior Projects 497 coursework must be related to computer 
science. 

Most courses within the computer science program originate in departments within the un- 
iversity. Students should refer to the department originating the course for description. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Students majoring in other fields, Including those without an extensive mathematics 
background, may earn a minor in computer science. A minimum of 21 units of computer 
science are required for a minor. These shall include Quantitative Methods 265, Quantitative 
Methods 289 or Engineering 205 in addition to Quantitative Methods 280 and either Quan- 
titative Methods 364 or Engineering 402, and a minimum of four courses (at most two from 
the same area) selected from the following upper division courses in the indicated areas: 
Engineering: 317, 402, 403*, 405, 424, 445, 458 
Mathematics: 335, 340*, 435*, 440 

Quantitative Methods: 364, 382, 446, 448, 461*, 464, 480, 482, 485, 487, 488, 495 
Students must have a 2.0 grade-point average or better In the minor. These courses may not 
be taken on a credit/no credit basis. 

Student Advisement 

Undergraduate students majoring In computer science may select a faculty adviser from a list 
of advisers from the faculties of engineering, mathematics and quantitative methods; 
otherwise an adviser will be arbitrarily assigned. Students are strongly urged to consult with 
their advisers each semester, or as frequently as needed. 

Group advisement sessions are sponsored each semester by the Computer Science Council 
in conjunction with the Computer Club. Entering students are especially urged to attend 
these sessions. Contact the coordinator of computer science for details. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The Division of Engineering, the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Quan- 
titative Methods jointly sponsor the master of science degree program in computer science 
which is administered by the Computer Science Council. Applicants, as well as continuing 
students, should read carefully the university requirements for masters' degree programs. 

’ Not both Mathomatirs 435 and Quantitative Methods 461 nor hath Matheniaties 340 and I n^in(‘(‘rin{• 403 ma\ he usetl to 
fulfill minor requirements. Not both Mathematics 308 and En^ineerinn 308 . . . nor both Mathematics 304 and Philosophy 
369 may be used to fulfill upper division elective rc'cjuirements. 


Computer Scier^ce 159 


Program objectives are to: (1) prepare students for the increasingly sophisticated application 
of computers to the needs of industry and society; (2) prepare students for research, 
teaching and further graduate programs in computer science; and (3) provide graduate level 
coursework in computer science which supplements the curriculum in other disciplines. 

Admission to Conditionally Classified Graduate Standing 

A bachelor's degree from an accredited Institution with a grade-point average of at least 2.5 
is required. Students with grade deficiencies may be considered; any deficiencies must be 
made up and will require six or more units of adviser-approved coursework with at least a 3.0 
average in addition to those required for the degree. 

Admission to Classified Graduate Standing 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Approval of a formal study plan (see description below) by the Computer Science 
Graduate Committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

2. Satisfactory completion of no more than nine units on the study plan. 

3. Satisfactory completion of Engineering 405, Mathematics 340 and 350A, Quantitative 
Methods 382 and 485, or their equivalents. No more than six units of these courses may be 
included in the study plan. 

Note: In view of the fact that talented professional computer scientists have traditionally 
come from a diversity of undergraduate preparations, the background preparation required 
above is just that preparation which Is both sufficient and necessary. The listed courses, 
prerequisites for required graduate courses In the program, have been carefully selected to 
provide an adequate basis for graduate work while not unfairly closing the door on persons 
without a bachelor's degree in computer science. It should be noted, however, that each of 
these courses has prerequisites and the student without preparation in a closely related 
degree may have considerable work to complete beyond the courses listed here. Reference 
should be made to the catalog descriptions for prerequisites of each course deficiency. 

Study Plan 

Prior to admission to classified graduate status in computer science, the student with the aid 
of his adviser shall prepare and submit for approval by the Computer Science Graduate 
Committee a formal study plan consisting of a minimum of 30 units of upper division or 
graduate coursework including Engineering 506, Quantitative Methods 584, and either 
Mathematics 540 or Quantitative Methods 565, and at least four more courses, including the 
other starred ( ^ ) courses selected from one of the four areas of concentration listed below. 

Additional elective courses, selected normally from among the courses listed below, or up to 
six units of coursework to be completed to remove deficiencies in required background 
preparation, shall be included in the study plan to satisfy the 30-unit minimum requirement. 
Up to three units of adviser-approved elective coursework related to the student's con- 
centration may be chosen from other disciplines. 

All coursework In the study plan must be completed with a GPA of at least 3.0. 

Areas of Concentration 
Information Processes and Structures 

Quantitative Methods: 

584 * Operating Systems (3) 

585 ☆ Programming Language Processing (3) 

586 Mathematical Automata Theory (3) 

587 * Formal Languages and Automata (3) 

588 Mathematical Pattern Recognition (3) 

446 Computer Programming Theory (3) 

487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

597/598 ☆ Project or Thesis (3) 

Information Processing Systems 
Engineering: 

506 Advanced Digital Computer Systems (3) 

527 Fault Diagnosis and Finite Automata (3) 


160 Environmental Studies 


554 ☆ Hybrid Computation (3) 

424 Computer Simulation of Continuous Systems (3) 

445 Pulse and Digital Circuits (3) 

483 Computer Methods in Engineering (3) 

597/598 <r Project or Thesis (3) 

Applications, Mathematical Methods 
Mathematics: 

530 Topics in Applied Mathematics (3) 

535 Applied Probability and Statistics (3) 

540 ☆ Topics in Numerical Analysis (3) 

545 Approximation Theory (3) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

430 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

431 Methods of Applied Mathematics (3) 

440 * Advanced Numerical Analysis (3) 

597 ☆ Project (3) 

Applications, Administrative Information Systems 
Quantitative Methods: 

507 ☆ Organizational Systems and their Information Requirements (3) 

560 Operations Research (3) 

565 File Management and Information Systems (3) 

581 Advanced Statistical Analysis for Business Decisions (3) 

448 Digital Simulation (3) 

464 Information Storage and Retrieval (3) 

597/598 if Project or Thesis (3) 

Graduate Student Advisement 

Each of the four faculty members of the Computer Science Graduate Committee is the ad- 
viser for those graduate students in his area of concentration; consult the coordinator of 
computer science for reference to the appropriate committee member. 

For further Information, consult the coordinator of computer science. See also "The 
Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES 

489 Mechanical Theorem Proving and Applications (3) 

Prerequisites: Quantitative Methods 487 or Mathematics 304 or Philosophy 368. A formal dis- 
cussion of mechanical theorem proving with applications in information retrieval, 
program analysis, program synthesis and other advanced areas in computer science. 

495 Internship in Computer Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer science or related major and consent of instructor. Practical ex- 
perience in the field in government or private agencies. May be repeated once for 
credit. 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

Joel Weintraub 

Program Coordinator 

COUNCIL OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Tom Corneto (student), Richard Brock (Engineering), Arthur Earick (Urban Studies), Lyle 
Kalish (Economics), Prem Saint (Earth Science), Barry Thomas (Environmental 
Education), James Woodward (Technological Studies) 

Environmental studies Is an Interdisciplinary program of courses dealing with man and his in- 
teractions with his environments — cultural as well as natural. The courses, both pre-existing 

in various departments and specially developed, attempt to integrate knowledge and 


Environmental Studies 161 


methods from several disciplines, all of which independently study special aspects of this 
area. The program will deal with man and his social and cultural aspect, as he exploits, 
modifies and attempts to achieve balance with his environment. The student will have the 
opportunity to cope with problems involving ecological changes, pollution, technological 
solutions, economics, balanced land use, and politics. 

The program is intended to provide the widest possible variety of students with an oppor- 
tunity to become acquainted with and acquire a common vocabulary in this vital area. A 
basic element will be an introductory seminar in environmental studies, which will bring 
together students and staff from various disciplines to delineate environmental problems 
and explore fundamental methods. This seminar may be taken either on the undergraduate 
or graduate level and will be prerequisite to all further work in the projected graduate 
program. Additional graduate-level interdisciplinary courses serve as foundations for 
graduate curricula in the program options. 

No degree objective in environmental studies Is planned for undergraduates; however, par- 
ticipation by such students in the program Is encouraged. Individuals interested in en- 
vironmental problems. Irrespective of their majors, and those planning to enter job-related 
areas should consider supplementing their regular course schedules with elements of this 
program. 

A Master of Science in Environmental Studies is offered. The student may elect emphases in 
human ecology, urban studies, environmental education or in technological studies. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 
Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission In conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted. In addition, three letters of 
recommendation are required. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: 

1. An overall GPA of at least 3.0 for the last 60 units. If the student has a grade deficiency, 
he will be eligible for classification If he achieves a GPA of 3.0 in nine units of adviser- 
approved coursework. 

2. Completion of Environmental Studies 440. 

3. Completion of no more than nine semester units of adviser-approved coursework. 

Study Plan 

The M.S. In Environmental Studies requires a minimum of 36 units of adviser-approved 
coursework with a GPA of 3.0 or better. 

I. Interdisciplinary Core, Environmental Studies 
440 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3) 

501 Environmental Analysis: Natural and Urban Environment (3) 

502 Environmental Evaluation and Protection (3) 

595 Environmental Problems: Seminar (3) 

II. Project, Internship, Thesis 

Every student will either prepare a research project or participate in an internship at an 
institutional or private agency. A thesis Is required on the results of these experiences. 
Projects will be interdisciplinary in nature. (6) 

III. Individualized Coursework 

Graduate level courses In the field of the undergraduate major or appropriate dis- 
cipline (6) and additional courses outside of the individual's major (12) will be 
chosen the student's background In mind. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


162 Human Services 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES 

440 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced standing in an academic major. Principles, fundamentals and current 
problems involving man and his physical, biological and man-made environment. 
Human ecology, urban studies, environmental education and technological studies are 
introduced to the student. Seminars, field trips and simulations. 

501 Environmental Analysis: Natural and Urban Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 440 or consent of instructor. A look at the factors in- 
fluencing our views and planning approaches In natural and urban situations. En- 
vironmental planning including use of environmental impact reports is included. 
Seminars, possible field trips and simulations. 

502 Environmental Evaluation and Protection (3) 

Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 440 or consent of instructor. A survey of selected en- 
vironmental problems with emphasis on evaluation of quality standards and their im- 
pact on human health. Seminars and possible field trips. 

595 Environmental Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: classified status in environmental studies or consent of instructor. An inter- 
disciplinary seminar discussing specific problems In environmental management. 

5% Internship (3) 

An opportunity for the student to gain field experience In governmental or private agencies. 
Only open to degree candidates in environmental studies. 

597 Project (3) 

Open to graduate students only by consent of Instructor with whom the student wishes to 
pursue independent study In environmental studies. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: an officially appointed thesis committee and advancement to candidacy. 
Guidance in the preparation of a project or thesis for the master's degree. 

HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

Michael Brown (Political Science) 

Program Coordinator 
ADVISORY BOARD 

Gerald Corey (Interdisciplinary Center), Helaine Feingold (Sociology), Wacira Gethalga 
(Afro-Ethnic Studies), Calvin Nelson (Special Education), Jack Russell (Counseling), 
George Watson (Psychology), jack Harper (Student), Dae Leckie (Student) 

The Bachelor of Science In Human Services is a carefully articulated program providing both 
an academic and experiential background for the student seeking a career working with 
people in the varied and expanding field of human services. The required core curriculum 
reflects a cross-cutting integration of psychology, sociology, education and counseling in ad- 
dition to phased experiences in supervised field placements. 

To attain intellectual depth and academic preparation in a particular area of concentration, 
the human services major will select 15-units of upper division courses In addition to the re- 
quired core curriculum. Students with specific career interests and/or exceptional oc- 
cupational backgrounds may construct an individual concentration core with the advice and 
approval of an adviser and the program coordinator. 


Units 

A. Required core curriculum 30 

Upper division: 

First semester: Human services 300, Character and Conflict (3); Ed-TE 312, Human 
Growth and Development (3), or Psychology 361, Developmental Psychology 
(3); Afro-Ethnic 311, Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3). 

Second semester: Sociology 466, Deviant Behavior (3); Psychology 341, Abnormal 
Psychology (3); Human Services 380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3). 


Human Services 


163 


Third semester: Human Services 470, Measurement: Individual and Aggregate 
Analysis (3); Human Services 480, Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques 
(3). 

Fourth semester: Human Services 485, Program Analysis, Design and Evaluation (3); 
Human Services 499, Assessment Seminar (3). 


B. Required field experience (to be taken in four consecutive semesters) 12 

Human Services 395, Practicum (3); Human Services 396, Practicum (3); Human 

Services 495, Internship (3); Human Services 496, Internship (3). 

C. Required core of concentration 15 

Coursework selected from curricula designed by faculty in the area of con- 
centration. 

Total 57 

Student Advisement 


Graduates of the human services program are prepared to seek employment in a wide 
variety of service agencies including those which deal with exceptionality, child care, ger- 
iatrics, probation, correction and detention, mental health, education, community change 
and minority relations, rehabilitation, and career development. Many graduates of the 
program prefer to continue their training in a specialized area rather than seek a career im- 
mediately. Students who intend to enter an advanced degree program after completing the 
B.S. in Human Services are urged to declare that intent by the end of their junior year in 
order that their concentration package is congruent with the required preparation for 
graduate work in their chosen area. 

Students interested in pursuing the ''double degree" option, a B.S. degree in human services 
and a B.A. in a related discipline, should declare their intent early in order to minimize the 
additional time necessary to fulfill the requirements for both the B.S. and the B.A. degrees. 

Students preparing for graduate work in psychology are advised to consider a double- 
degree option in human services and psychology. 

If entry Into a graduate program necessitates that certain substitutions be made for human 
services courses, equivalencies can be approved by the program coordinator. As a general 
rule, these substitutions are in statistics and research methods and certain courses demanded 
for graduate work in psychology and sociology. For example. Human Services 360 may be 
substituted by Psychology 331 plus Psychology 341; or Human Services 470 may be sub- 
stituted by Psychology 161 and Psychology 202 or by Sociology 331 A and 331 B or 331 X. 

Transfer students: Students transferring from a two- or four-year Institution are urged to 
complete all general education requirements prior to enrollment in the human services 
program. This will allow the student to embark upon the core curriculum with Its fieldwork 
component, as well as his area of concentration, without diversion of time and energy in 
satisfying the general education requirements. 

Cal State Fullerton students: Students doing their lower division work at this university are 
advised to complete all general education requirements before entering the human services 
program, although they may declare the human service major in either the freshman or 
sophomore year. 

Change of Majors 

Students making a change from their prior major Into human services must complete a 
change of major form available from the Office of Admissions and Records and approved as 
stipulated on the form. 

HUMAN SERVICES COURSES 

300 Character and Conflict (3) (Formerly Interdisciplinary Center 318) 

An exploration — via lectures, discussion and group encounter— into the problems and 
techniques of resolving the conflicts created by the individual's struggle to achieve and 
maintain personal autonomy while living successfully in an automated world. Topics in- 
clude: autonomy, masculinity-feminity, love, sex, marriage, meaning and encounter- 
ing others. 


164 Interdisciplinary Center 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 311) 

380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3) (Formerly 390) 

Basic techniques in a counseling situation; long-range and short-term approaches; 
limitations imposed by time, institutional function and counselor training; the art of 
referral; ethics of the counselor-client relationship. 

395 Practicum (3) (Formerly 445A) 

Survey of the field of human services; inventory of student aptitudes, abilities and goals; 
review of community agencies and their functions and requirements; observation and 
experience in basic helping situations. First semester practicum required of ail majors. 

396 Practicum (3) (Formerly 445B) 

Field placement In a variety of on-campus and community service locations. Students may 
substitute Ed-SE 395 or Human Services 490 with consent of program coordinator. 
Second semester practicum required of all majors, with the exception of those opting 
for the substitutions. 

470 Measurement: Individual and Aggregate Analysis (Formerly 388) 

Review and analysis of pertinent measuring instruments applicable to human service screen- 
ing procedures; use and limitations of available measurements; collection and analysis 
of aggregate data; uses of aggregate information from academic research and public 
agency reports; Interpretation and application of basic statistics In both individual and 
aggregate data analysis. 

480 Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3) 

Utilizing simulated field situations through role-playing and video observations of actual 
counseling encounters to critique techniques and strategies In counseling; stressing ex- 
perience in clear and cogent case writing and reporting. 

485 Program Analysis and Design (3) 

Programming in public and private agencies; design of new programs of intervention 
strategies; evaluation techniques applicable to new and continuing programs; program 
proposal writing; design of empirical research components for Innovative program- 
ming and accountability; analysis and critiques of agency task force programming for 
Immediate social problems; program-funding agencies and grant writing; program 
budget and effect on design. 

490 Practicum in Group Leadership (3) (Formerly Interdisciplinary Center 418) 

Prerequisites: Two semesters from Interdisciplinary Center 410, 411 or 412 and consent of in- 
structor. Supervised experience as a group leader, with emphasis on various approaches 
and techniques of group leadership. May be repeated for credit. May be substituted for 
two on-campus practica. 

495 Internship (3) (Formerly 445C) 

Supervised work In a community or campus human service location. Third semester of prac- 
tical experience required of all human services except for students opting for Ed-SE 495 
or Human Services 490. 

4% Internship (3) (Formerly 445D) 

Supervised field work in community human service agency. Fourth semester of practical ex- 
perience required of majors. 

499 Assessment Seminar (3) (Formerly 489) 

Analysis of student's academic performance, basic skills, aptitudes and satisfactory field per- 
formance; assessment of basic competencies In the general field of human services 
covered by the human services core curriculum; assessment of competencies in the 
special area of concentration by the Faculty Assessment Team. This assessment and 
evaluation seminar is to be taken in the last semester of course and field work by all ma- 
jors. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER 

FACULTY 

Paul Obler 
Coordinator 

Gerald Corey, Barbara D'Angelo 

The Interdisciplinary Center was created out of the conviction that much of the real ex- 
citement happening In the Intellectual world today (and probably other times as well) Is at 


Interdisciplinary Center 165 

the boundary lines where traditional disciplines converge. The reality of the human situation 
raises problems amenable to no facile descriptions or easy solutions — certainly none that any 
one discipline can yield. We are coming more and more to recognize the need for diverse 
perspectives — that whether we are confronting the immense complexity of the modern city 
or the subtle dimensions of love or anxiety, no single frame of reference or specialized 
knowledge can be sufficient. 

Many of the courses now offered or planned by the center lie outside the province of any 
single department or academic discipline. They challenge students and professors alike to 
utilize their specialized knowledges and yet to go beyond them. A subject like love may be 
approached from historical, psychological, aesthetic or philosophical perspectives. Several 
courses utilize the complementary methodologies of the physical sciences, social sciences or 
humanities It follows that Interdisciplinary courses frequenly Involve two or more professors 
and feature guests from outside the academic community. 


INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER COURSES 

301 Psychological Approaches to Literature (3) 

Analyses of literary works from Freudian, jungian and other psychological perspectives; 
analysis of audience responses and projections. 

303 Yoga (3) 

A study of Yoga: Its theories, literature and practices; some methods of meditation taught; its 
relevance for today's world. 

315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

Jazz — its primitive and European roots; cross-cultural description of improvisation. Lectures, 
demonstrations, some concerts. 

402 Art, Literature and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

An application of theories of consciousness, particularly existential and Jungian, to poems, 
paintings and musical compositions. Intensive encounters between the individual and 
the art work; opportunities at checking one's own responses against those of others and 
exploring the significance of the differences. (Same as Comparative Literature 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

A comparative study of quest narratives which exemplify the Eastern and Western man's 
search for self-identity and fulfillment. Religious, psychological and literary texts will be 
used to help illuminate the comparison. (Same as Comparative Literature 403 and 
Anthropology 416) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

An examination of the various dimensions of love as found in notable philosophical, psy- 
chological and literary works. (Same as Comparative Literature 404) 

410 Self-Actualization Group: Experiences in Human Growth (3) 

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Center 318 and consent of instructor. Intensive small group 
experiences will assist each Individual In unleashing his own growth potential and 
accelerating his own developmental processes. Self-actualization and related existential 
and humanistic concepts will be explored in depth, using recently developed methods. 
Lectures, individual assignments supplement the class experience. Credit-no credit 
grading only. 

411 Group Process and Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The impact of the individual on other persons in a group 
and what takes place in a group, the structure and process of a group; the influence of 
leadership. Theories and concepts of those forces operating In a group situation, as well 
as a first-hand experience in of one's own self in a group; feedback on how others see 
one in a group relation; and involvement in group dynamics. Credit-no credit grading 
only. 

412 Special Group Experiences (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive group experience familiarizing the student 
with a practical encounter approach and its theoretical basis. Sections may be repeated 
for credit including: transactional analysis group; Gestalt group; open couple; guided 
fantasies; residential marathon group; search for identity; therapeutic community; ex- 
istential group; and other experimental group approaches. Credit-no credit grading 
only. 


166 


Latin American Studies 


421 Great 19th- and 20th-Century Revolutionaries (3) 

Consideration of one or more thinkers who have shaped our time; such figures as Darwin, 
Marx, Einstein or Freud will be the focus of study. May be repeated for credit. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and philosophers as 
Freud, Spengler, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. (Same as English 451) 

470 Seminar: Interdisciplinary Issues (3) 

Concentrated study each year of a different key Issue approached from an Interdisciplinary 
view and frequently combined with two or three courses In other departments to form 
a nine-hour block. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with consent of instructor and program director. 
May be repeated for credit. 

799 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects to be taken with consent of instructor and program director. 
May be repeated for credit. 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Sheldon Maran 
Program Coordinator 

Oswaldo Arana (Foreign Languages), Nancy Baden (Foreign Languages), Warren Beck 
(History), James Dietz (Economics), David Feldman (Linguistics), Dagoberto Fuentcs 
(Chicano Studies), Frank Hatch (Dance), Arturo Jasso (Foreign Languages), Leroy Joesink- 
Mandeville (Anthropology), Paul Kane (Education), W'illiam Ketteringham (Geography), 
Martin Klein (Communications), John Lafky (Economics), Neil Maloney (Earth Science), 
Lon McClanahan (Biological Science), John F. H. Purcell (Political Science), Marlene de 
Rios (Anthropology), Edgar Wiley (Management), Jon Yinger (Political Science) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The Latin American studies program is designed for students desiring a general education 
with specific focus on Latin America. Students planning careers which will Involve residence 
in, or a knowledge of Latin America (such as teaching, business, government, scientific 
research, engineering, or journalism) will profit immensely from this program. Moreover, 
the program provides a sound base for students who will teach Spanish or the social sciences 
In the secondary schools. The program also prepares the student for graduate work in Latin 
American studies or in other disciplines involving a specialization in Latin America. 

Teachers 

The Latin American studies program has been approved for the single examination waiver in 
the social sciences and for the multiple subject waiver. 

Foundation Courses 

All students should develop a language proficiency level which Is the equivalent of Spanish 
204 and Portuguese 102. 

Students with no language background should take: 

Spanish 101 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Spanish 102 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Spanish 203 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Spanish 204 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Portuguese 101 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Portuguese 102 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

JHowever, a student with a knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese may be able to meet 
part or all of the foundation course requirements by taking a test administered by the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Required Core Courses 

Language: 

Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) or either 


Liberal Studies 


167 


Portuguese 317 or 318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 


Literature: 

Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature from Modernismo to Present (3) or 
Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

History and Culture: 

Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) or 
Portuguese 325 Introduction to Luzo Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 
History 350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

History 350B Republican Latin America (3) 

Recommended Selected Concentrations 

Fifteen units selected from three or more of the following groupings: 


Culture: 

Portuguese 315 Introduction to Luzo Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 
Portuguese 317 or 318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) or 
Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Portuguese 325 Contemporary Brazilian (3) or 
Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) 
Anthropology 322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Anthropology 326 Prehistory of South America (3) 


Fine Arts and Literature: 

Art 462 Art of Mesoamerica (3) 

Art 471 Art of Central and South America (3) 

Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3) or 

Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature from Modernismo to the Present (3) 
Spanish 440 Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1888 (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 485 Senior Seminar: Hispanic Topics (3) (with consent of program director) 
History and Politics: 

History 450 Change In Contemporary Latin America (3) 

History 453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

History 453B Mexico since 1910 (3) 

History 451 The Andean Nations (3) 

History 452A Brazil to 1889 (3) 

History 452B 20th-Century Brazil (3) 

Political Science 431 Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

Political Science 452 Latin American Foreign Policies (3) 

Geography and Economics 

Geography 333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Geography 433 Man and Geographic Relationships In Latin America (3) 

Economics 330 Comparative Economic Systems (3); 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

* Senior Seminar: 

Latin American Studies 401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 


LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Jara Krivanek 

Program Coordinator 

Ronald Clapper (English), Daniel Crary (Speech Communication), Robert Emry (Speech 


• Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary team taught senior seminar on topics relevant to contemporary 
Latin America. The exact content of the course will vary depending upon the faculty and present condition within Latin 
America. May be repeated for credit. 


168 Russian Area Studies 


Communication), Paul Kane (Education), Fraser Powlison (Education), Alexander Stupple 
(English), Michael Tang (Liberal Studies), Norman Zimmerman (Liberal Studies) 

BOARD MEMBERS 

Jara Krivanek, Chair, Daniel Estrada, John Ferrar, Gerald Gannon, Karen Lystra, June 
Poliak, Fraser Powlison, Gloria Rock, jerry Rosen, Otto Sadovszky, Eric Streitberger, Cur- 
tis Swanson, James Woodward 

Policy for the liberal studies program is determined by an interdisciplinary board of liberal 
studies. 

Liberal studies is an Interdisciplinary program designed to explore and evolve ideas and 
ideals appropriate to educated persons in contemporary society. The program affirms that 
specialized higher education Is not appropriate for every student or for every purpose, and 
that liberal or generalist programs of study have great value for both individuals and society. 
At the same time, the liberal studies program Is more than a simple absence of 
specialization — it has Its own purposefully structured form and content. Three major phases 
are involved: 

1. The Liberal Studies Core Curriculum: 12 units 

Liberal Studies in Communication Processes (3) 

Liberal Studies in Humanities & Fine Arts (3) 

Liberal Studies In Science (3) 

Liberal Studies In Social Sciences (3) 

Completion of appropriate areas of the general education requirements is prerequisite to 
enrollment In these courses. 

2. The Individualized Coordinated Program: 30 units 

Each student focuses on a broad, complex problem or theme of his/her own choosing 
and explores it through an Individualized study plan developed in consultation with 
faculty advisers. The plan may center on some career objective, or it may simply reflect a 
personal Interest, and the thesis sequence should emerge directly from it. The in- 
dividualized coordinated program (ICP) consists of 30 units chosen from the university's 
current offerings. The following restrictions apply: 

a. 27 of the 30 units must be upper division. 

b. The upper division ICP units must be distributed among the three major areas of 
humanities and arts, sciences and social sciences. The student shall designate one of 
these as an "area of emphasis," and the two others will become "supporting areas." 
The distribution of ICP courses shall then be as follows: 


Units 


Four courses in area of emphasis (e.g., social sciences) 12 

Two courses in supporting area I (sciences) 6 

Two courses In supporting area II (humanities and arts) 6 

Two additional courses, either in one of the above areas, or of the student's choice. 

One course may be lower division J6 

3. The Thesis Sequence: 6 units 

Liberal Studies 480 Practicum in Liberal Studies (3) 

Liberal Studies 490 Seminar in Liberal Studies (3) 


LIBERAL STUDIES COURSES 

For information concerning prerequisites and course descriptions, call or write to the liberal 
studies office or the academic advisement office. 

RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Charles Frazee 

Program Coordinator 


Russian Area Studies 169 


Dorothea de France (Comparative Literature), Marina Degtjarewsky (Foreign Languages), 
Robert Feldman (Ftistory), Ronald Helin (Geography), Karl Kahrs (Political Science), 
Harvey Mayer (Foreign Languages), Joyce Pickersglll (Economics), Otto Sadovszky 
(Anthropology), John Shippee (Political Science), Ted Smythe (Communications), Elena 
Tumas (Comparative Literatue), Bruce Wright (Political Science), Michael Yessis (Physical 
Education) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES 

The Russian area studies major is an interdisciplinary program designed for students in- 
terested in historical Russia and the Soviet Union. In addition to fulfilling the various cultural 
objectives common to any liberal arts program, the Russian area studies major provides a 
foundation for teaching the Russian language and social studies on the elementary and 
secondary levels. This major also serves the needs of students intending to pursue careers in 
communications, government service and international business. 

To qualify for this major, a student must complete (1) 16 units of Russian language or their 
equivalent, (2) 24 units of upper division Russian area courses from at least four of the follow- 
ing fields: anthropology, comparative literature, economics, geography, political science, 
history, foreign language, (3) 15 units of upper division coursework in a related discipline to 
be determined in consultation with a Russian area counselor. Students are encouraged to 
have these units apply toward a second major in a traditional discipline. 

The basic lower division courses also may be used to meet general education requirements. 


RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES COURSES 

All courses within the Russian area studies program originate in other departments within 
the university. Students should refer to the department originating the course for descrip- 
tion. 

Anthropology 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

408 The Uralic Languages (3) 

Communications 

431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Comparative Literature 
318 Baltic and Slavic Mythology (3) 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

374 Contemporary Russian Literature (3) 

Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

391 Modernization of Russian Society (3)* 

Foreign Language: Russian 
303 Readings in Scientific Russian (3) 

315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

375 Introduction to Literary Form (3) 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

441 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

Geography 

338 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

History 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

434B Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime (3) 


170 Social Sciences 


436 The Balkans (3) 

437 East Europe Since 1815 (3) 

490 Seminar in Polish History (3) 

490 Modernization of Russian Society (3)* 

490 Seminar in Russian Revolution, 1917 (3) 

Political Science 

430 Government and Politics of East Europe (3) 
430 Government and Politics of the U.S.S.R. (3) 
443 Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

452 Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R. (3) 


PROGRAM IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

FACULTY 

Lawrence de Graaf (History) 

Graduate Program Coordinator 
Wayne Hobson 
ADVISORY BOARD 

Aileen Baron (Anthropology), W. Garrett Capune (Criminal Justice), Isaac Cardenas 
(Chicano Studies), Carol Lindquist (Psychology), Boaz Namasaka (Afro-Ethnic Studies), 
Gary Pickersgill (Economics), Gerald Rosen (Sociology), James Weaver (American 
Studies), Barbara Weightman (Geography), Jon YInger (Political Science). Giles Brown 
(Graduate Studies) ex officio, Wayne Hobson (Social Sciences) ex officio 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

This degree encompasses a series of coordinated programs of graduate studies, which 
emphasize the examination of human behavior and its relation to social Institutions. These 
programs have the common purpose of exposing students to diverse methodologies, es- 
tablishing the relationship between disciplines, and providing the student with the oppor- 
tunity to explore a selected area from a variety of intellectual perspectives. 

The social sciences include the following related fields: Afro-ethnic studies, American 
studies. Anthropology, Chicano studies, criminal justice, economics, geography, history, 
political science, psychology and sociology. 

This degree is designed to provide Interdisciplinary Insights and tools for those students who 
are interested In pursuing careers In government and business; in elementary or secondary 
teaching In the area of social studies; a graduate program to complement their un- 
dergraduate degree in social science, liberal studies, area studies or other similar inter- 
disciplinary programs; or a custom-tailored program of advanced study in the liberal arts. 

Prerequisites 

A student may be admitted to the program in conditionally classified graduate standing with 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution and a minimum grade-point average 
of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted. Classified standing requires that a student have 
an undergraduate major or Its equivalent in one of the social sciences, a GPA of 3.0 In upper 
division social sciences courses, and substantial work in the social science fields selected for 
study. ♦♦ The graduate adviser will determine qualifications in these areas and may require 3- 
12 units of coursework beyond the study plan to compensate for deficiencies. A study plan 
must be developed and approved for admission to classified graduate standing. 

Study Plan 

The multidisciplinary core and Social Sciences 597 and 598 shall both have flexible values, 18 
to 21 units for the multidisciplinary core and three to six units for thesis/project. The study 
plan would be either: 


•Students may sign up for this course for history credit under History 490 or economics credit under Economics 391. 

••The prerequisite for "substantial work" will vary among departments and according to the specific courses within some 
departments. Lack of substantial work in one or more fields will not ordinarily bar a student from admission but will 
result in one or more additional courses being required before the student may be classified. 


Social Sciences 


171 



PLANA 

PLANB 

Social Sciences core 

6 

6 

Multidisciplinary core 

18 

21 

Thesis/Project 

6 

3 

Total units 

30 

30 


Units 

1. Social Sciences core 6 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Theories (3) or 
502 Role of the Social Science Professional (3) 

501 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Methods (3) 

2. Multidisciplinary core 18-21 

Minimum 500-level units (9) 

Maximum upper division units (9-12) 

The 21 units must be taken in at least two and generally three social science fields. At least 
two fields should be represented In the graduate units. 

3. Project or Thesis 3-6 

597 Proiect (3-6) 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Every student will prepare a project or thesis on a topic approved by the director and 
the student's committee. See descriptions below for details. Both the project and the 
thesis must reflect the student's interdisciplinary effort. 

Total 30 

For further information, consult the graduate program adviser. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSES 

385 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 385) 

500 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Theories (3) 

A seminar providing a philosophical and theoretical basis for graduate work in the area of 
social science. It will focus on the interrelationships which exist among the various 
social sciences as they relate to man In his social, physical and political environment. 

501 The Social Sciences in the Modern World: Methods (3) 

Analytical comparison of the historical, humanistic and scientific methodologies in the social 
sciences. This seminar will also deal with the contemporary trends in the social sciences 
methods. 

502 Role of the Social Science Professional (3) 

Examination of the role of the social science professional in public and private organizations. 
Focus on questions of role Identity, power and decision-making in organizations, 
relationships with clients, and relationships to broader questions of social policy. 

550 The Issues of Social Science: A Seminar for Teachers (3) 

Examination of problems encountered in the utilization of social science literature by 
teachers. Emphasis on identification and clarification of major issues as presented in 
works in history and the social sciences written from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

597 Project (3-6) 

Individual direction by committee of faculty In research and preparation of either: a 
prototype of a nonacademic professional paper; or an innovative work In a media other 
than the written essay. Recommended for students planning to enter government 
agency or business. 


172 Special Major 


598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual direction by committee of faculty in research 
and preparation of a written research essay which will reflect an interdisciplinary 
program of study. Recommended for students planning careers in higher education 
and research. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Open to graduate students in social science with the consent of program adviser or coor- 
dinator. May be repeated for credit. 

SPECIAL MAJOR PROGRAM 

From the total curriculum of the university, students may wish to plan a specially designed 
program of study that does not duplicate significantly any existing major or concentration at 
Cal State Fullerton. The special major (B.A. or M.A.) provides opportunities for selected 
students to pursue individualized programs of study leading to a degree when legitimate 
academic and professional goals can be satisfied by a judicious selection of courses from two 
or more fields; and these aims cannot be satisfied by the authorized standard degree majors 
that are available on the campus. This major, designed for exceptional cases of individual 
students only, provides an opportunity to develop concentrations or specializations outside 
the framework of existing majors. (It is not intended as a means of bypassing normal 
graduation requirements or as a means by which students may graduate who fail to complete 
the degree major in which they are enrolled.) 

GUIDELINES FOR THE B.A. IN THE SPECIAL MAJOR PROGRAM 

1. Initial counseling, record-keeping and faculty referrals for (he program will be the 
responsibility of the Office of Academic Advisement. 

2. Students desiring to work for a bachelor's degree in a special major will prepare a 
proposal in writing. Forms for the proposal are available in the Office of Academic Ad- 
visement. Students are advised to initiate the proposal well in advance. Normally the 
proposal should be approved during the semester prior to the student commencing 
work on his/her special major. 

3. A faculty member, the special major adviser, will work with the student to develop a 
suitable plan of coursework for approval. 

4. A special major faculty advisory committee, appointed by the Curriculum Committee, 
will review the requests for admission and make recommendations regarding each 
proposed program to the Office of the Vice President, Academic Affairs. The formal re- 
quest for admission to the special major program should include: the academic and 
professional reasons for wanting the program; a list of specific courses, which may in- 
clude alternatives and electives, that has been developed with and approved by the 
faculty adviser (the relevance of each course to the special major should be explained); 
and justification that the program of courses being proposed does not significantly 
duplicate any existing degree programs. 

Programs which give indication of a jurisdictional conflict, whether by virtue of their title 
or course content, shall require consultation of concerned departments. Evidence of 
such approval shall be attached to the proposal. In case of disagreement, the dispute will 
be resolved in accordance with University Policy Statement (UPS) 411.102. 

5. Final approval for a student to be admitted to the special major will rest with the Office 
of the Vice President, Academic Affairs. 

6. Following approval of the special major plan, the faculty adviser will be responsible for 
subsequent counseling and graduation certification. 

7. Entrance to the special majors is normally at the beginning of the junior year (60 units 
remaining for graduation). Under no conditions may a student enter the special major 
with less than 30 units remaining for graduation. 

8. The minimum requirements for a special major degree should be a program of at least 24 
semester units of upper division work recommended by the student's faculty adviser. 


Technological Studies 173 

9. Neither lower division nor upper division courses applied to general education-breadth 
requirements will be applicable toward the minimum, special major degree re- 
quirements. 

GUIDELINES FOR THE M.A. IN THE SPECIAL MAJOR PROGRAM 

1. A graduate student desiring to work for a master's degree with a special major will 
prepare a proposal in writing including justification for the request. Special major 
application forms are available in the University Graduate Office. 

2. This proposal, accompanied by statements from three professors who agree to serve on 
the student's graduate advisement committee, will be submitted for approval to the 
Special Major Advisory Committee, to the appropriate academic officers in the areas 
where coursework will be taken and to the dean of graduate studies (representing the 
vice president, academic affairs). 

Programs which give indication of a jurisdictional conflict, whether by virtue of their title 
or course content, shall require consultation of concerned departments. Evidence of 
such approval shall be attached to the proposal. In case of disagreement, the dispute will 
be resolved in accordance with UPS 411.102. 

3. Upon approval of the general plan, the student and the committee will develop a formal 
and detailed program of study, which may Include prerequisites. The study plan must 
conform to all university regulations governing graduate work. 

4. The dean of graduate studies then will approve the program of study and grant classified 
standing in accordance with existing policies. 

5. After admission (classified standing), the student will follow all university policies and 
procedures for graduate work as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin and this catalog. 

6. Upon completion of requirements for the master's degree (including a thesis, project or 
comprehensive examination), the master's degree with a special major may be awarded 
in conformity with university policy. 


TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

James F. Woodward 
Program Coordinator 

Al Baker (Library Science), John Cronquist (Philosophy), Roger Dittman (Physics), Jack Elen- 
baas (History), Barbara Finlayson (Chemistry), Barry Gerber (Political Science), Len 
Hitchcock (Anthropology), Chris Hulse (Anthropology), Judith Kandel (Biology), Merrill 
Ring (Philosophy), Ted Smythe (Communications), Ed Sowell (Engineering), Michael Tang 
(Liberal Studies). 

The general focus of the technological studies program is on the Interdisciplinary ex- 
amination of the impact of science and technology on society. The program provides an area 
for special study within recognized major fields of studies. Students may take separate 
courses or develop an individualized program of studies based on courses, directed readings 
and research participation. Wherever possible courses are conducted as seminars and bring 
together lecturers from relevant disciplines included in the sciences and humanities. 
Through Independent studies students are encouraged to pursue topics or problems of 
special interest beyond the scope of regular courses under the supervision of a faculty ad- 
viser. The technological studies program Is directly coordinated with the activities of 
departments and other programs of the university. 

The Man and Technology Program 

Man and Technology, a program developed jointly between the technological studies 
program and the Division of Engineering, directed to the study of man in the man-made 
world, the relationship between technology and the human condition. The program (1) 
enables engineering students to meet social science and general education requirements of 
the Division of Engineering by engaging in studies closely akin to their major studies; (2) 


174 Technological Studies 

provides a general course of study for students of other technologically oriented disciplines 
of the university; (3) makes available to nonengineering students a set of general education 
courses in the analysis and solution of engineering problems; and (4) provides a meeting 
ground for faculty and students concentrating in different fields of study through par- 
ticipation in interdisciplinary studies of technology. 


TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES COURSES 

100 Introduction to Technological Studies (3) 

An examination, in survey form, of questions about the development of human 
technologies. Examination of the various theories and methodologies which can be 
applied to the study of the role of technology in the process of cultural and social 
development. 

250 People and Machines (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 250) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Students can pursue topics of special interest beyond the scope of regular courses under the 
supervision of a faculty adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, and nor- 
mally culminates In a paper, project, comprehensive examination or performance. May 
be repeated; however, consent of supervising instructor is required. 

(Recommended by the Technological Studies Program) 

Anthropology 
460 Culture Change (3) 

Communications 

101 Communications Writing (3) 

102 Communications Writing (3) 

403 Technical Writing (3) 

428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Economics 

370 Economics of Research and Development and Technological Change (3) 
Engineering 

102 Graphical Communications (3) 

103 The Computer Revolution (3) 

205 Digital Computation (3) 

207 Pollution and Politics (3) 

208 Current Technological Problems in Southern California (3) 

220 New Energy Sources (3) 

334 Design Graphics (3) 

380 Human Factors in Design (3) 

History 

430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance (3) 

430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present (3) 

474 America in the Age of the Industrial Revolution (1876-19) (3) 

479 The Emergence of Urban America (3) 

Management 

545 Research and Development Project Management (3) 

Philosophy 
210 Logic (3) 

384 Philosophy of the Natural Sciences (3) 

435 Philosophy of Science (3) 





176 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Dean: Robert T. Stout 


RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION 

510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor's degree, Teacher Education 509 or equivalent. Elements of design, 
instrumentation, treatment of data, hypothesis testing and inference and analysis of 
educational data. Develop a research proposal. Practice in analyzing and evaluating 
research reports. 

DIVISION OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Chair: William L. Callison 

PROGRAMS IN COU NSEL I NG / PSYCH O M ET RY/SC H OO L 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FACULTY 
Marilyn Bates 
Program Coordinator 

Clarence Johnson, David Keirsey, Michael Parker 
PART-TIME 

DeWItt Bogue, Raul Cardoza, Edwin Carrigan, Raymond Choiniere, LeRoy Cordrey, Lang 
Dana, Keith Golay, Ski Harrison, Eleanor Hicks, David Mitchell, Donald Ridge, Richard 
Rogal, John Seeland 

PROGRAMS IN READING 

FACULTY 
Hazel Croy 

Program Coordinator; Director, Institute for Reading 
Natalie Babcock, Norma Bartin, Adelina Gutweiler, Deborah Osen Hancock, Ruth May, 
George Schick, Juan Vazquez 

PART-TIME 

Ann Coil, Clayton Credell 

PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 
Walter Beckman 
Program Coordinator 

Gerhard Ehmann, Tracy Gaffey, Robert Jenkins, Kenneth Preble, Stanley Rothstein 
PART-TIME 

Edward Beaubier, Spencer Covert, Barbara Dolph, Charles Kenney 

PROGRAMS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

FACULTY 
Robert Lemmon 
Program Coordinator 

Lester March, Calvin Nelson, Leo Schmidt, Shirl Stark 
PART-TIME 

Dennis Fenton, Marian Jobe, Thalia Larson, Glenn Smith 

OBJECTIVES OF THE DIVISION 

The courses, programs and services of the Division of Special Programs are directed toward 
the following objectives of students: 


Education 


177 


1. Master of Science in Education with a concentration in reading, school administration 
or special education. 

2. Master of Science in Counseling, 

3. Preservice education leading to the standard designated services credentials with 
specializations in pupil personnel services. 

4. Preservice teacher education leading to the specialist instruction credentials In reading 
and special education (physically handicapped, learning handicapped, severely han- 
dicapped and gifted). 

5. Professional training for staff serving in counseling, reading, school administration and 
special education positions. 

6. In-service programs for special services personnel. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION 

1. Graduate Programs in Counseling/Psychometry/School Psychology 

2. Graduate Programs in Special Education 

3. Master of Science in Education, Reading 

4. Master of Science In Education, School Administration 

PROGRAMS IN COUNSELING/PSYCHOMETRY/SCHOOL 
PSYCHOLOGY 

The counseling/psychometry/school psychology program Is focused on the competencies 
which students acquire. Students who exit from the program as graduates will be certified by 
the faculty as having demonstrated to a specified degree, a specified set of competencies. 
Curricula are offered leading to (1) the degree of Master of Science In Counseling and (2) 
credentials in counseling, psychometry and school psychology. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING 

Prerequisites 

An applicant miust meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). In addition, an applicant 
should have professional experience or other approved experience. Applications are screen- 
ed by a Faculty Review Committee and applicants are notified of their acceptance or non- 
acceptance. As soon as a student Is admitted to the university for work toward this degree, he 
should schedule an appointment with a faculty adviser to work out a program of studies and 
a schedule of classes. Applicants may wish to schedule a conference for preliminary program 
advisement before submitting a formal application. 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified student upon the 
development of an approved study plan: 

(1) An approved major; 

(2) A grade-point average of 2.5 overall; 

(3) Satisfactory interview, references and autobiography; 

(4) Coun 452 and 550 satisfactorily completed or in progress, and approved for further 
work In the program by the Faculty Review Committee. The student should submit an 
application for admission to the Program of Counseling/Psychometry/School 
Psychology and complete a formal study plan for the M.S. In Counseling degree In the 
Division of Special Programs, and file a request for classified standing in the university 
Graduate Office. Acknission to classified, standing is through formal and informal 
screening processes, is by faculty decision, and is approvfed by the dean of graduate 
studies. 

Study Plan 

The following Information is provided to assist students in planning programs and In seeking 


178 Education 


admission to classified graduate status. Students should consult the Graduate Bulletin for in- 
formation concerning standards for graduate study, steps in the master's degree program, 
and graduate policies and procedures. Thirty semester units of graduate work, specified on a 
formal study plan approved by the graduate adviser, must be completed within five years. 
The units are to be distributed as follows: 

Units 


Master's degree studies, supporting courses 9 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) or 

Coun 557 Research and Development in Counseling and Psychology (3) 
Adviser-approved courses (6) 

Courses for the concentration in counseling 21 


Coun 551 Career Education Data Systems: Research and Development (3) 

Coun 552 Group Leadership (3) 

Coun 553 Program Management and Operation (3) 

Coun 555 Psychological Disorders I (3) 

Coun 559A Fieldwork in Counseling (3)* 

Coun 559B Fieldwork in Counseling (3)* 

Coun 598 Thesis, or Coun 597 Project, or Coun 595 Advanced Studies (includes 

comprehensive examination) (3) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further Information, consult the program graduate adviser. 

See' also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 

The program offers an Internship program for bilingual/bicultural counselors In cooperation 
with sponsoring school districts. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

The program offers work toward the basic pupil personnel credentials with authorization for 
counseling, psychometry and psychology. Students are asked to check with an adviser to 
plan a program of study. 

COUNSELING/PSYCHOMETRY/SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY 
COURSES 

452 Explorations in Self Concepts: Professional/Personal (3) 

A didactic and experiential exploration of work in the helping professions with emphasis on 
personal and professional self-concepts. This screening course is designed to give 
members opportunity to "sample" the helping professions before making further 
career commitment. 

500 Survey of Collegiate Student Personnel Services (3) 

History, philosophy, objectives, organization and administration of collegiate student per- 
sonnel services. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

540 Seminar in Counseling in Normal and Deviant Human Sexuality (3) 

Learning and assessment opportunities leading to competencies In treating problems of a 
sexual nature using interaction methods of empathy, confrontation, sanction and 
didactic methods of assignment, explanation; competencies in diagnosing type, trait, 
defense, communication symptoms of a sexual nature. 

543 Individual Mental Tests Proseminar: Metric Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 555, 545 and consent of instructor. Student will have opportunity to 
learn and demonstrate competencies In administration, scoring and explaining of 
samples of cognitive behavior using the Stanford-Binet Scale, Wechsler Scales, Illinois 
Test of Psycholingulstic Ability and the Leiter International Scale. 

544 Individual Mental Tests Proseminar: Projective Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 546 and consent of instructor. Students will have opportunities to learn 
and demonstrate competencies in administration, scoring and explanation of samples 


’Admission to fieldwork should be requested on appropriate form at least one semester before a student expects to enroll 
(in both A,B/C and D). Students must have completed a minimum of six program units at Cal State Fullerton and obtain 
adviser's approval, which involves a competency progress report. 


Education 179 


of projective behavior using the Thematic Apperception Test, Family Drawings Tests, 
Draw a Man Test, House-Tree-Person Test, Bender Gestalt Test and a Sentence 
Completion Test. 

545 Diagnostic Observation I (3) 

Prerequisite: Coun 555, 550 and consent of instructor. In this seminar students will have op- 
portunity to learn and demonstrate competencies in eliciting, describing and explain- 
ing symptomatic behaviors in the framework of alternative theories of psychological 
disorders using a variety of interview, inventory, and test techniques. 

546 Psychological Disorders II (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 555, 545 and consent of instructor. In this proseminar the student will 
have opportunity to learn and demonstrate competencies in the definition and ex- 
planation of the spectrum of abnormal behaviors and experience of clients of varying 
age, sex, culture and ethnicity. 

547 Psychological Disorders III (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 546 and consent of instructor. Advanced proseminar. Students will have 
opportunity to learn and demonstrate additional competencies in the definition and 
explanation of abnormal behaviors and experiences with clients of varying age, sex, 
culture and ethnicity. 

548 Individual and Group Counseling Assessment Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 550, 552 and consent of Instructor. Coaching, and assessment oppor- 
tunities in individual treatment and group treatment technologies. 

549 Conjoint Counseling (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 556 and consent of instructor. Student will have the opportunity to learn 
and demonstrate competencies In applying the basic counseling repertoire in the 
setting of a related group comprising the identified patient and his significant others. 

550 Counseling Procedures I (3) 

Prerequisite: Coun 452 and consent of instructors. Team-taught seminar in the dynamics of 
16 counselor-client relationships, addressing competencies In both theory and practice 
of counseling, therapy and consulting. Large and small group instructional formats in- 
clude lectures, demonstrations, coaching, discussions, experiential, multimedia and 
autoinstructlonal modules. 

551 Career Education Data Systems: Research and Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 452 and consent of instructor. Team-taught seminar; students will be 
able to operate educational, occupational, leisure data systems; to describe location, 
coverage, and usefulness of literature in the field; to determine parameters of single 
and multiple distributions of characteristics of clients of varying age, sex, culture and 
ethnicity. 

552 Group Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: Coun 550 and consent of instructors. Team-taught seminar in Intensive study of 
groups emphasizing clinical group leadership training. Lecture, demonstration, 
coaching and experiential learning opportunities are offered toward competencies in 
interactive and didactic group processes originating from a variety of theoretical orien- 
tations appropriate to child and family counseling. 

553 Program Management and Operation (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 550, 551, 552, 555 and consent of instructor. Seminar in the management 
of human and information systems. Competencies in research, program development 
and management of public and private counseling services. Includes laws relating to 
family and child welfare. 

555 Psychological Disorders I (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 452 and consent of instructor. An opportunity to learn and demonstrate 
competencies in definition and explanation of the spectrum of abnormal behaviors and 
experiences of clients of varying age, sex, culture and ethnicity. 

556 Therapeutic Paradox (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 550, 552, 548, 559B and consent of instructor. An opportunity to examine 
each of the main treatment models In the framework of therapeutic paradox theory. 

557 Research and Development in Counseling and Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 559C and consent of Instructor. A proseminar In the techniques In the 
development of programs, projects, models and sampling devices including design and 
construction methodology. 


180 Education 


558A Diagnostic Observation II (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar in personality assessment. Advanced experience 
in the clinical case study, application of the structures and dynamics of individuals and 
groups to symptomatic behavior. 

558B Personality Study: Projectives (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar in problems of learning and metalearning. Ad- 
vanced work in diagnostic testing, clinical interview and interpretation of data, 
diagnosis and remediation of learning, effort, interpersonal and personal problems, ad- 
vanced work in dysfunctional communication. 

559A,B Fieldwork in Counseling (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 551, 552, 555 and consent of instructor. Student will work in a local 
school and/or other institutional setting under supervision of a local coordinator and 
university staff. Assignments are on an individual basis. Students will also meet in week- 
ly seminar. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 units. 

559C Fieldwork In Psychometry (3) 

Prerequisites: Coun 559A,B and consent of instructor. Students will participate In psy- 
chometry activities in their local setting under the supervision of a local coordinator 
and university staff. Work assignments are made on an individual basis. May be 
repeated for credit. 

559D Fieldwork in School Psychology (3-6) 

Prerequisites: Coun 559A,B,C and consent of instructor. Fieldwork in psychological services 
in the school and/or other institutional settings under the supervision of a local coor- 
dinator and university staff. Assignments are made on an individual basis. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas as 
behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, com- 
munication theory and Interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

5% Graduate Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conduct at a graduate level an educational practicum ex- 
perience with an individual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated 
for a maximum of six units. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with con- 
ferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, 
culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue 
independent inquiry. 


PROGRAMS IN READING 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
Reading 

A program of graduate studies leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education 
Reading, Is authorized by The California State University and Colleges Board of Trustees. The 
program Is designed to help qualified individuals gain the technical knowledge and 
scholarship requisite to becoming reading specialists. This professional program is based on 
and combined with sound preparation in the liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum 
proposes an interdisciplinary approach to the preparation of the professional specialist in the 
area of reading. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). In addition, an applicant 


Education 


181 


must have an approved major and complete an application to the reading program in the 
Division of Special Programs. He will confer with the graduate program adviser to discuss the 
prerequisites for attaining classified standing. 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: successful teaching experience or other approved 
experience; a grade-point average of 2.5 or better in academic and related work; sufficient 
background in reading; a satisfactory interview; and four references from school ad- 
ministrators, school supervisors or professors. 

Study Plan 

The final adviser-approved program of coursework for the degree must include: 

Units 


Master's degree studies 3 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Courses for the concentration in reading (no grade below B) 27 


Ed-R 507 Current Trends In Secondary and College Reading Programs (3), or 
Ed-R 508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) 

Ed-R 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Ed-R 517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 

Ed-R 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Ed-R 583A Remedial Reading Casework (3) 

Ed-R 583B Remedial Reading Casework (3) 

Ed-R 584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Elective(s) Adviser-approved course(s) In reading (3) 

Ed-R 595 Advanced Studies (includes comprehensive examination) (1) or 

Ed-R 597 Project (1) or Educ 598 Thesis (1) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further information, consult the program graduate adviser. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

Lower division courses in reading (Ed-R 101, 201 and 202) and an upper division course (Ed-R 
320) are designed to assist students in developing the critical and creative reading skills re- 
quired for efficient university learning. Ed-R 480 presents an overview of reading education 
(K-adult) and prepares teachers to assess reading skills and build a curriculum based on the 
results of continuing assessment. 

READING SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL 

The Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing granted approval to the Institute for 
Reading to offer the Reading Specialist Credential, effective In September, 1974. 

An examination of the course requirements will show overlapping between the Reading 
Specialist Credential and the Master of Science in Reading degree. With careful planning 
with a graduate adviser in reading, the student can virtually complete the requirements for 
both at the same time. 

Program pre-entry requirements for the Reading Specialist Credential are as follows: 

1. Methods of teaching reading. Prior to entering this approved program the students will 
present evidence (transcripts) demonstrating satisfactory completion of one of the 
following: 

A. Ryan Act reading methods courses, such as Ed-TE 433 or Ed-TE 440R, or 

B. Teaching of reading examination adopted by Teacher Preparation and Licensing Com- 
mission, or 

C. Ed-R 480, The Teaching of Reading (3 units). 

D. Entering students who received teacher training from out-of-state institutions since 
September 1973, may submit a transcript and catalog course description and petition 
to have an undergraduate course accepted in lieu of the above. 

2. Teaching experience. Prior to entering this approved program, both in-state and out-of- 
state students will present evidence In the form of letters of verification from the district 
office demonstrating satisfactory completion of one of the following: 


182 


Education 


A. Two or more years of successful experience teaching reading for at least one instruc- 
tional period per day in public and/or private elementary and/or secondary schools, 
this experience to include at least a two grade spread, or 

B. Two or more years of successful classroom teaching experience, this experience to in- 
clude at least a two-grade spread, or 

C. Two hundred fifty or more days of successful and extensive substitute teaching ex- 
perience, this experience to Include at least a two-grade spread, or 

D. Successful student teaching experience, at least part of which involved the teaching of 
reading, as well as at least 45 hours of successful experience as a 

— teaching aide in reading 

— reading tutor, this experience to include at least a two grade spread 

E. Students whose teaching experience on the above covers less than a two grade span 
may complete this requirement by tutoring students in Ed-R 581 and Ed-R 583A,B at a 
grade level at least two years different from previous experience. 

Top priority for entering the credential program will be given to those students meeting 
criteria listed above. Other applicants will be admitted, as space permits, in descending 
order according to the remaining criteria. 

3. Assessment of experienced reading specialists. Prior to entering this approved program, 
the applicant who has served as a school or district reading specialist will be assessed ac- 
cording to the following criteria and have his program planned around the needs reveal- 
ed by this assessment: 

A. Graduates of, or students enrolled in, the Master of Science In Education: Reading 
from California State University, Fullerton: evaluation of previous course work and ex- 
perience in light of current requirements by a faculty adviser In an interview and in 
consideration of transcripts or letters of verification. 

B. Graduates of other master's programs with an emphasis in reading, and applicants 
functioning as reading specialists who have not completed such a degree: evaluation 
of competencies required under this credential to be completed by a faculty member 
in conjunction with the applicant in Ed-R 5821, Analysis of Reading Practices: 
Assessment in Reading (1 unit). Assessment strategies include: 

(1) Self assessment of progress toward attaining specified program objectives. Students 

will rate themselves on a scale of 1-7 on each of the major program objectives. 

Students who rate themselves 

(a) 1 or 2 on a given objective will be advised to take the appropriate course(s) to 
meet that objective; 

(b) 3, 4 or 5 on a given objective will be given the opportunity to take a department 
prepared exam or write a professional paper under the guidance of an Instruc- 
tor which demonstrates that the student has achieved this objective to 
minimally stated standards. The student may opt to take coursework instead of 
writing the exam or paper. 

(c) 6 or 7 on the given objective will verify their competency In an oral exam dur- 
ing an interview with a faculty member; 

(d) Students who avail themselves of the oral and/or written evaluation 
procedures and do not meet previously specified standards will be required to 
take the required coursework related to these objectives. 

(2) Faculty assessment of progress toward attaining specified program objectives, this 

to include letters of evaluation from supervisory personnel, direct observation by 

faculty, and/or evaluation of oral or written evaluation. 

At the conclusion of the assessment phase, the faculty member will develop a credential 
study plan which specifies the coursework the student must complete before obtaining the 
credential. 

Program Description Units 

Ed-R 507, Current Trends In Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) 

Ed-R 582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curricufum (1), or 
Ed-R 508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) and 
Ed-R 582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Ed-R 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Ed-R 517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 


Education 183 


Ed-R 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Ed-R 583A,B Reading Improvement Casework (6) 

Ed-R 584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Electives and/or support courses (7-8) 

Total 31-32 

Electives include: 

Ed-R 582A Analysis of Reading Practices: The ITPA and Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582B Analysis of Reading Practices: Cloze Technique— Its Uses in Teaching 
Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582C Analysis of Reading Practices: Individualized Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582D Analysis of Reading Practices: Instructional Technology and 
Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582E Analysis of Reading Practices: Research in Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582F Analysis of Reading Practices: Writing for Publication, Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582C Analysis of Reading Practices: Establishing Reading Laboratories and 
Learning Centers (1) 

Ed-R 582H Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Gifted (1) 

Ed-R 5821 Analysis of Reading Practices: Assessment of Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582J Analysis of Reading Practices: Teaching Reading to Adults (1) 

Ed-R 582K Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Ethnically Different 
Child (1) 

Ed-R 582L Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading in Early Childhood (1) 

Ed-R 582M Analysis of Reading Practices: The Exceptional Child in Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582N Analysis of Reading Practices: Vision and Reading (1) 

Ed-R 5820 Analysis of Reading Practices: Comparative Reading (1) 

Ed-R 582P Analysis of Reading Practices: Fieldwork in a Community Reading 
Clinic (3) 

Ed-R 582Q Analysis of Reading Practices: Evaluation of Textbooks (1) 

Ed-R 582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Ed-R 582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1). 

READING COURSES 

101 Reading Development (1) 

An elective course for students who wish to Improve their reading efficiency. May be 
repeated for a maximum of three units of credit. 

201 Critical Reading Skills (3) 

Development of study-skills including textbook analysis, note-taking and study techniques, 
preparation for examinations and written reports. Close critical reading of selected 
writings for thorough understanding of general meaning. 

202 Vocabulary Building (3) 

Development of individual vocabulary through study of characteristics of the language 
usage, word formation exercises, dictionary practice. Selected reading. 

320 Power Reading (3) 

Intensive approach to reading improvement intended for the upper division student, with 
particular emphasis on Improvement of rate and comprehension, study skills and 
critical analysis. Not intended for student who has taken Ed-R 201 or has more than one 
unit of credit for Ed-R 101. 

480 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

Curriculum and methods In the teaching of reading In the elementary and secondary 
schools. Examination and analysis of the approaches to reading in teachers' manuals 
and guides. Practical experience in preparing lessons In classroom teaching of reading. 

507 Current Trends in Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate advisor in reading or instructor. Recent research findings 
on the learner, the teacher, approaches, materials and facilities in the teaching of 
reading at secondary and college levels. 

508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Current trends in the 
teaching of elementary reading, focusing on the teacher as diagnostician and the 
reading process as continuous and developmental for all learners. 


184 Education 


516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties . (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Studies of the factors un- 
derlying learning disabilities in reading in children, adolescents and young adults. 

517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Survey of individual and 
group intelligence, achievement, interest, aptitude, vocational and personality tests. 
Theory and practical application of individual and group tests used with students having 
learning problems. 

518 Behavioral Problems in Teaching Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or Instructor. Practical application of 
psychological principles to the diagnosis and management of behavioral problems in 
elementary and secondary reading classrooms. 

519 The Principal's Role in the Effective School Reading Program (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Includes techniques for 
developing the philosophy, goals and objectives of the school reading program con- 
sistent with the PPBS format procedures for assessing and developing students' reading 
ability and methods for providing faculty inservice experiences in reading. 

581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser In reading or instructor. Analysis and diagnosis of 
reading difficulties. Techniques and methods of prevention and treatment. Individual 
remediation of student. Primary through secondary. 

582A Analysis of Reading Practices: The ITPA and Reading (1) 

Study and application of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Ability to reading development. 
Course will include theoretical background, administration, interpretation and 
application of the instrument. 

582B Analysis of Reading Practices: Cloze Technique— Its Uses in Teaching Reading (1) 

Study of the classroom uses of the Cloze Technique In assessing readability difficulties of 
material and comprehension of specific material by the learner. Practical application of 
Cloze principles in teaching specific reading skills. 

582C Analysis of Reading Practices: Individualized Reading (1) 

Goals and objectives of the Individualized program. Assessment, selection and organization 
of materials. Management of the teacher student conferences, skill development, and a 
variety of learning opportunities. Evaluation procedures. 

582D Analysis of Reading Practices: Instructional Technology and Reading (1) 

Overview of instructional technology used In reading such as tachistoscopes, reading pacers, 
mechanized programmed material. Demonstration and practice in using these 
materials. Application of instruction technology to planning individual and group 
reading instruction. 

582E Analysis of Reading Practices: Research in Reading (1) 

Participation in seminars, related to student and/or instructor-sponsored research. In- 
volvement In action-research projects, including development and evaluation of 
research procedures. 

582F Analysis of Reading Practices: Writing for Publication — Reading (1) 

Consideration in depth of the selection, organization, and production of publishable 
materials concerning problems, strategies, techniques of the teaching of reading im- 
provement. 

582G Analysis of Reading Practices: Establishing Reading Laboratories and Learning 

Centers (1) 

Consideration in depth of the necessities and optional features of a reading center deemed 
appropriate to a specific situation within a particular community. 

582H Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Gifted (1) 

Techniques of teaching reading to the underachieving and achieving academically gifted 
child in grades 1-12. Methods of planning and implementing instruction to meet the 
unique learning abilities and needs of the gifted and to develop higher level thinking 
skills. 

5821 Analysis of Reading Practices: Assessment in Reading (1) 

Assessment of competencies of the experienced Reading Specialist in preparation for the 
Reading Specialist credential. 


Education 185 


582J Analysis of Reading Practices: Teaching Reading to Adults (1) 

Analysis and evaluation of current methods of teaching reading to adults including 
diagnostic and corrective techniques. Analysis of current research and evaluaton of 
materials, with emphasis on understanding special needs of the adult learner. 

582K Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Ethnically Different Child (1) 

Graduate seminar designed to survey the affective side of teaching reading to ethnically 
different children. 

582L Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading in Early Childhood (1) 

An overview of basic readiness needs and evaluation instruments with emphasis on tech- 
niques and materials for Increasing concentration, positive socialization, creativity 
and learning skills of preschool children. 

582M Analysis of Reading Practices: The Exceptional Child in Reading (1) 

Survey of the methods and materials to be effectively used In reading instruction with the 
physically handicapped, emotionally disturbed, learning disabled and slow learner in 
the regular classroom. 

582N Analysis of Reading Practices: Vision and Reading (1) 

Study of the relationship between vision factors and reading. Course will include screening 
techniques, behavioral symptoms and classroom and instructional accommodations to 
meet vision needs. 

5820 Analysis of Reading Practices: Comparative Reading (1) 

Study of general trends in reading improvement in the United States and In other countries. 
Emphasis on developmental reading programs. 

582P Analysis of Reading Practices: Fieldwork in a Community Reading Clinic (3) 

Fieldwork in a community reading clinic for children and adults, including both remedial 
and developmental instruction. 

582Q Analysis of Reading Practices: Evaluation of Textbooks (1) 

Formal evaluation of reading textbooks being considered for state adoption. Materials in- 
clude basals, supplementary and recreational materials, levels K-8 for state textbook 
adoption. 

582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Modern curriculum and techniques for teaching basic reading skills, K-6. 

582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Modern curriculum and techniques for teaching reading, grades 7-12. 

583A,B Remedial Reading Casework (3,3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fieldwork In diagnosis and remediation in reading 
through casework technique. Conferences with teachers, parents, consultants, and ad- 
ministrators. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

A study of linguistics and Its Influence on reading materials and Instruction. An analysis of 
trends in reading and changes affected by the science of linguistics. 

585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 

Study of word perception skills in the process of learning to read. A developmental hygiene 
of child vision. Visual anomalies and their applications to reading disorders. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies In such areas as 
behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, com- 
munication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with con- 
ferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, 
culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue 
Independent inquiry. 


186 Education 


PROGRAMS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
School Administration 

A program of graduate studies leading to the degree of Master of Science in Education with a 
concentration in school administration has been authorized by The California State Univer- 
sity and Colleges Board of Trustees. The principal objective of the curriculum is to prepare 
carefully selected individuals for certain leadership positions in school administration. 

The program Is designed to help these Individuals gain the technical knowledge and 
scholarship requisite to high achievement in these positions. This professional program is 
based on and combined with sound preparation in the liberal arts and sciences. The 
curriculum proposes an interdisciplinary approach to the preparation of the professional 
specialist in public education. Thus, those who qualify for the degree should have completed 
coursework in such fields as philosophy, public administration, psychology, political science, 
biology, English, sociology, economics, anthropology or history. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). In addition, an applicant 
should have a successful teaching experience in an elementary or secondary school, or com- 
munity college. If such experience is not available, other experience in related fields is a 
recommended alternative, which must be approved by a graduate adviser before starting the 
program. 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirement, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: at least 2.5 grade-point average in previous 
academic and related work. 


Programs of Study 

The degree study plan must include 30 units of committee-approved coursework, of which 
25 must be at the 500 level. A minimum of 22 units must be in school administration; five un- 
its may be assigned on an interdisciplinary basis from courses related to the needs of in- 
dividual students. Course requirements include field experience and a project. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken prior to classified status may be applied 
to a student's master's degree program. 

Students concentrating in school administration will take Ed-SA 503, Foundations for Ad- 
ministrative Leadership, as soon as they Identify their interest in this M.S. degree. To con- 
tinue in the program beyond this course, the student must be granted a "letter of admission 
to the program" and possess an official Cal State Fullerton program evaluation. Students who 
desire only isolated courses from the program are normally denied admission to such 
courses. The advisor-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will include: 

Units 


Master's degree studies, supporting courses 8 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Adviser-approved courses (5) 

Courses for the concentration in school administration 22 

All of the following (No grade below C) 

Ed-SA 505 The Supervision of Curriculum (3) 


Ed-SA 561 Governance, Systems, School and Community (3) 

Ed-SA 563 School Personnel Administration (2) 

Ed-SA 564 Seminar In School Law (2); 

Ed-SA 565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration and 
Buildings (2) 

Ed-SA 588 Organization Theory and Management (3) 

Ed-SA 567A.B Fieldwork and Project (2,2) 


Education 187 


One of the following: 

Ed-SA 566 Elementary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Ed-SA 586 Secondary Administration and Supervision (3) 

For advisement and further information, consult the Division of Special Programs. See also 
"'The Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

A selected number of teachers will be offered the opportunity to study and to practice 
school administration as school Interns in administration. A candidate must obtain admission 
to the program, and agreement must be reached with a sponsoring school or college district 
to employ the candidate as a full-time administrator during the school year. The concept of 
the internship in educational administration Is similar to that found in other professional 
fields. Its basic function is to enable the intern to gain the necessary experience in the per- 
formance of the critical tasks of his profession while under the close supervision of a fully- 
trained and experienced practitioner. It is an opportunity for the university and local school 
and college systems to work together in training well-qualified school administrators. The in- 
ternship in educational administration is but one phase of the program for preparing super- 
visory and administrative personnel for community college, high school, intermediate 
school, and elementary school positions of leadership. It is an investment in training super- 
visory leadership from which the cooperating school district, the university and the intern 
will derive benefit and in which ail three have responsibilities. Cooperation among all three 
Is essential to the success of the program. 

Internships are for a full academic year and require of all students the completion of a 
minimum of 21 graduate credits. During the period of the internship the student is required 
to be a registered graduate student at Cal State Fullerton. 

All candidates will be given a temporary credential for supervision and administration ac- 
cording to the regulations of the California Administrative Code, Title V, Section 6555. Such 
candidates should register In two courses: Ed-SA 561, Governance, Systems, School and 
Community, Ed-SA 563, School Personnel Administration. 

Both courses must be completed in the summer session if the student is to do his internship 
beginning in the fall semester. Applications for admission to the program should be sent to 
the chair. Internship Program in School Administration, by June 1. Careful planning of elec- 
tives will enable candidates to receive the Master of Science In Education with a con- 
centration In school administration upon further study, after completing the requirements 
for the internship. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 
School Administration 

Candidates in administration, upon completion of the degree requirements for a Master of 
Science in Education, should qualify for certification as a school administrator at any level 
providing they have taught three years. As certification requirements change yearly, can- 
didates are urged to have their adviser check their study program against current re- 
quirements. 

Candidates in administration accepted in the administrator internship program will be Issued 
the standard supervision credential conditionally upon partial fulfillment of requirements 
according to the California Administrative Code, Title V, Section 6555. 

OTHER STUDENTS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Experienced school administrators, holding a California administrative credential or a super- 
vision credential and exempt from degree requirements, may register for any course in the 
school administration concentration. Teachers wishing to take courses in school ad- 
ministration directed at helping them to understand administration problems are welcome 
to take selected courses. 


188 Education 


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

481 Issues in Higher Education (3) 

Seminar in structure, governance, administration and challenges of American higher 
education. 

483 The American College and University (3) 

Seminar in the development of higher education in the United States with special emphasis 
on purposes, functions, curriculum, and governance. 

485 Introduction to Educational Administration (3) 

Introduction to educational administration. Course directed toward better understanding of 
administrative tasks, processes, and skills involved in the various roles of school per- 
sonnel in administration. Special attention to the role of the teacher in school ad- 
ministration. 

503 Foundations for Administrative Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar on cultures and values to which schools must 
contribute. Introduction to community sociology, tax systems and public ad- 
ministration; the literature of leadership. Screening for admission to program. Course 
required of all students during their first registration In school administration. 

505 The Supervision of Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SA 566 or 586. Seminar on development of a quality program of instruction 
In both elementary and secondary schools; appraisal of programs of instruction; ad- 
vanced principles of curricular review and modification. Evaluation of subject matter 
competence in area of supervisory specialization. 

560 Contemporary Problems in School Administration (3) 

Seminar on contemporary problems in school organization and administration with par- 
ticular emphasis on collective bargaining, the computer as a business and educational 
tool and the needs of urban schooling including the problem of racial isolation. 

561 Governance, Systems, School and Community (3) 

Structure, functions, trends, fiscal responsibilities and issues In respect to the government of 
education at federal, state, county and local school district levels. Basic principles in 
school organization and administration. Community Involvement and school- 
community participation; communication between school and community. 

563 School Personnel Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SA 503 or concurrent enrollment. Seminar on principles of organizational 
behavior, social processes Inherent In effective leadership, and techniques of school 
personnel management. 

564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. School law as a reflection of public policy. California 
Education Code and the California Administrative Code, Title 5, and county counsel 
opinions as they affect administration. Instruction, and financial management of public 
schools. Legal basis for public education in California. 

565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration and Buildings (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Emphasis on school finance, business administration and 
buildings as they Implement an effective educational program. A study of financial prin- 
ciples. School revenues and expenditures, budgetary procedures and processes, cost 
analysis, business management and salary policies. 

566 Elementary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SA 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of elementary school principal 
and supervisor. Pupil personnel and Instructional program in elementary school; work- 
ing relations and morale among staff, community and pupils; parent education; 
relations with central district staff; management and recordkeeping functions; teacher 
evaluation. 

567 A,B Fieldwork and Project (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SA 566 or 586 or concurrent registration, and consent of instructor. Two- 
semester terminal sequence required for the M.S. in Education with a concentration in 
school administration. Includes directed fieldwork in selected public schools and dis- 
trict offices. Supervised project or thesis required for degree. (4 hours fieldwork, 2 
hours conference) 


Education 189 


568 Seminar for Administrative Trainees (3) 

Provides a behavioral analysis approach in the establishment of a sound foundation for 
educational administrators. The culminating offering of the administrator internship 
program. Objectives include (1) study of the behavior of human beings and (2) under- 
standing how theory contributes to effective administrative practice. 

569 The School in the Community (3) 

Seminar on the changing school in the changing community. The school and the community 
power structure; community involvement and school-community participation; com- 
munication between school and community; the power of community education and 
the community school. 

586 Secondary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SA 561 and 563. Seminar on leadership roles of the secondary school prin- 
cipal and supervisor, pupil personnel and instructional program in secondary schools; 
development and administration of vocational education; morale among staff, com- 
munity and pupils; relations with central district staff; management functions; teacher 
evaluation. 

587 Seminar in Financial Resource Allocation (PPBS) (3) 

Advanced finance, program budgeting, quality controls, expenditure programs, state- 
county-local-federal financing. Decision making in assigning financial resources. Finan- 
cial accountability. 

588 Organization Theory and Management (3) 

Principles and practices of public school management; planning and practice in task 
analysis; planning and practice in setting of goals and objectives; implementation of 
plans related to goals; management tools, social, political and economic forces 
affecting education; decision making based on factual data as it pertains to education. 

589 Staff Evaluation — Supervision (3) 

Seminar In group work supervision techniques as they apply to improvement of teaching 
process; analyzing and focusing role relationships between supervisors, students, 
teachers, parents; classroom dynamics and role of supervisor in planning and develop- 
ing educational programs. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified students desiring to pursue in- 
dependent inquiry. 

PROGRAMS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Special Education 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: (1) a grade-point average of 2.5 or better In 
previous academic and related work; (2) an approved major; (3) satisfactory interview, 
references and autobiography. 

Study Plan 

Students should consult the Graduate Bulletin for information concerning standards for 
graduate study, steps In the master's degree program, and graduate policies and procedures. 

Units 


Master's degree studies, supporting courses 9 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 
adviser-approved courses outside special education (6) 

Courses for the concentration In special education 21 


190 Education 


Adviser-approved courses in special education (18-20) 

Ed-SE 595 Advanced Studies including comprehensive examination ( 3 ) or 
Ed-SE 597, Project (3) or Ed-SE 598 Thesis (1-3) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further information, consult the program graduate adviser. See also 
"The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

The curriculum In specialist preparation which appears in this section of the catalog Is 
designed to meet the requirements of Teacher Preparation and Licensing Act of 1970 effec- 
tive in September, 1974. The curricula are subject to change pending approval by the Com- 
mission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. Students are advised to contact the special 
education office for appropriate publications in the event curricular modifications are in- 
troduced by commission action. 

Specialist Credentials 

Programs leading to four specialist credentials are available. They are: 

1. Specialist credential to teach the physically handicapped (including the blind and par- 
tially seeing and orthopedically handicapped) 

2. Specialist credential to teach the learning handicapped (including the learning dis- 
abilities, behavior disorders and educationally retarded) 

3. Specialist credential to teach the severely handicapped (including the trainable mental- 
ly retarded, severely multiple handicapped, seriously emotionally disturbed and the 
autistic) 

4. Specialist credential to teach the gifted 

All specialist training programs include a generic component and advanced specialist com- 
ponent, both of which must be completed in order that a student be credentialed. 
Completion of the generic component is prerequisite to admission to advanced specialist 
component training. 

Undergraduates wishing to earn an advanced specialist credential can meet the re- 
quirements of the generic component of the credential by (a) completing a bachelor's 
degree with a major in human services with a teaching-learning practicum thrust, and/or 
completing a bachelor's degree with another major and electing six units of approved 
coursework in human services (electives in exceptionality), (b) completing the preservice 
professional training program for a multiple subject credential with student teaching divided 
between the regular classroom and the special classroom. For details regarding admission to 
and completion of the multiple subject credential, consult the Division of Teacher 
Education. 

Graduate students entering the advanced specialist program who have completed multiple 
or single subject preservice training programs with majors other than human service must 
complete six units of courses in human services (electives in exceptionality) and six units of 
student teaching with exceptional children. This requirement may be waived upon sub- 
mission of satisfactory evidence of broad training and experience with exceptional children. 

Advanced specialist programs include coursework specific to the master's degree and the 
several advanced specialist credentials; students may, therefore, elect one of two options 
upon entry to the program. These are: 

1. Advanced specialist credential program 

2. Master's degree program. 

The advanced specialist program for each credential requires the same course sequence. 
However, different practicum activity sections are designed to meet the specific needs of 
each credential. Students seeking recommendation for any of the four credentials listed 
must satisfactorily complete the following: 

Prerequisites 

1. Bachelor's degree 

2. A multiple subject or single subject credential 

3. The specialist generic component of the program, including student teaching with ex- 
ceptional children (12 units) 


Education 


191 


Advanced Specialist Credential Requirements Units 

Ed-SE 463 Exceptionality: Cognitive-Affective Characteristics (3), or 
Ed-SE 464 Exceptionality: Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Ed-SE 465A,B,C or D* Educational Practices in Exceptionality (4) 

Ed-SE 573A,B,C or D* Advanced Practices in Exceptionality (4) 

Ed-SE 574 Exceptionality: Nonedxjcational Implications (3) 

Ed-SE 575 Exceptionality: Theory, Philosophy and Research (4) 

Total (including 12 prerequisite units) 30 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a credential under the special education 
program. During registration, the student should consult an adviser in the area In which he 
expects to major, as well as an adviser In special education, for assistance in selecting courses 
in his program. A student from another institution should bring transcripts of previous work 
and a tentative selection of courses. Transferred education courses must be of upper- 
division level and taken within the past 15 years to be applicable to upper division credential 
requirements. 


SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSES 

370 The Personal Quest (3) 

An experience-based course exploring the factors contributing to personality. Consideration 
will be made concerning individual needs, how they are met by the individual, other In- 
dividuals, society and society's Institutions. One objective will be to explore different 
life styles and attempt to understand how they meet the needs of individuals involved 
with them. 

371 Exceptional Individual (3) 

The study of children who deviate from the average in the elementary and the secondary 
schools; physically handicapped, mentally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, and 
emotionally disturbed. Special educational services, curriculum, procedures, and 
materials necessary to promote their maximum development. 

395 Methods and Techniques of Tutoring (3) 

Lecture/Practicum in tutoring theory and methods, use of diagnostic test and survey 
questionnaires in determining student needs. In conjunction with tutorial practice, 
student will receive practical training, utilize audiovisual equipment and auto- 
instructional materials at the Learning Assistance Resource Center. 

463 Exceptionality: Cognitive-Affective Characteristics (3) 

Seminar In the study of individuals who deviate from the norm with respect to cognitive and 
emotional functioning including the educable mentally retarded, gifted, slow learner, 
behavlorally disordered and emotionally disturbed. 

464 Exceptionality: Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Seminar in the study of individuals who deviate from the norm with respect to physical- 
sensory functioning including the visually handicapped, multiply handicapped, 
physically handicapped, and trainable mentally retarded. 

465A Exceptionality Educational Practices with the Learning Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Ed-SE 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the 
learning handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum relative to the creden- 
tial requirements. 

465B Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Severely Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Ed-SE 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the 
severely handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum relative to the creden- 
tial requirements. 

465C Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Physically Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Ed-SE 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the 
physically handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum relative to the creden- 
tial requirements. 

465D Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Gifted (4) 

Corequisite: Ed-SE 463. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the 
gifted. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum relative to the credential requirements. 


* See program pubikations regarding which sec tions ap[)ly to specitic c reclc*nlials. 


192 Education 


472 Gifted Children (2) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371. Identification, principles of instruction, grouping, individualized in- 
struction, classroom enrichment. Problem solving and research experiences in science, 
social studies, and mathematics, reading programs and literature, creative writing, oral 
language. 

473 Mental Retardation and Brain Injury (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371. Organic and cultural basis of mental retardation and brain injury, in- 
cluding social, psychological, and vocational problems. Child growth, sensory 
development, learning characteristics of mentally retarded and brain injured children, 
and techniques of working with parents will be considered. 

474 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 473. Curriculum development, methods, and materials for teaching the 
educable and trainable mentally retarded at the elementary and secondary levels. 

475 Observation and Individual Instruction with the Mentally Retarded (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 474. Supervised observation and participation with the educable and the 

trainable mentally retarded at both the elementary and secondary levels of education. 
(4 hours activity, 1 hour lecture and discussion) 

477 The Educationally Handicapped Child (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371. Behavioral characteristics of the educationally handicapped child, 
the child with a neurological handicap or a behavioral disorder as defined by the 
California Education Code. Educational procedures, perceptual and motor training, 
evaluation, parent guidance. 

478 Innovations in Special Education (3-6) 

Acquaints teachers and administrators with recent, dynamic and innovative methodologies 
and concepts related to the atypical child. Emphasis on assisting participants to update 
their present knowledge and skills through implementing new thought as it relates to 
special education. 

495 Innovative Teaching/Learning Seminar/Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 395 or consent of instructor. Seminar/practicum in developing and field 
testing innovative teaching/learning strategies for educationally disadvantaged and 
other students. Includes assessment of individual tutee's entry skills, specification of ter- 
minal behaviors, development, implementation of instructional objectives and 
evaluation of instructional outcomes. 

496 Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with educationally han- 
dicapped children. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Student will complete 
Individual studies under the direction of faculty member. Studies include experimental, 
library, or creative projects. Only students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will 
be approved. 

514 Graduate Seminar: Behavioral Research on Children with Learning Disorders (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-RP 510. Critical analysis of behavioral research on children with learning dis- 
orders. Resources, criteria for evaluation of studies with exceptional children, historical 
view of research. Research relating to learning, handicapping conditions, and efficacy 
of special methods. 

521 Group Processes in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371 or consent of instructor. Exploration of group interaction, teacher 
sensitivity, and their relevance to educational planning and management. Emphasis: 
emotionally disturbed, educationally handicapped. 

522 Behavior Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371 or consent of instructor. Identification and management of social and 
affective disturbances related to school performance. Emphasis: early detection, 
behavioral modification techniques, parent counseling. Interagency cooperation. 

523 Learning Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 371 or consent of instructor. Identification and educational management 
of learning problems. Emphasis: developmental sequences, related prescriptive 
teaching and remediation techniques. 


Education 193 


570 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Developmental 
Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory and practice in the physical-motor 
development, cognitive-intellectual growth and affective-personality organization of 
children and adolescents. Focus is given to educational interventions as a means of 
problem solving. 

571 Graduate Seminar in Educational Psychology: Advanced Psychology of Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research, theory and practice in the psychology of learn- 
ing and motivation: motoric, cognitive and affective. Focus on problem-solving 
situations in which educational Intervention is designed to facilitate learning in each 
domain. 

573A Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Learning Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SE 463 and 465A. Advanced instruction in the application of educational 
practices working with the learning handicapped. Seminar and fieldwork practicum will 
be undertaken at selected sites in the community at large. 

573B Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Severely Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SE 464 and 465B. Advanced instruction In the application of educational 
practices working with the severely handicapped. Seminar and field work practicum 
will be undertaken at selected sites in the community at large. 

573C Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Physically Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SE 464 and 465C. Advanced instruction in the application of educational 
practices working with the physically handicapped. Seminar and fieldwork practicum 
will be undertaken at selected sites in the community at large. 

573D Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Gifted (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed-SE 463 and 465D. Advanced instruction in the application of educational 
practices working with the gifted. Seminar and fieldwork practicum will be undertaken 
at selected sites In the community at large. 

574 Exceptionality: Noneducational Implications (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to graduate status. Consideration of economic and social im- 
plications of exceptionality. Advanced investigations regarding different aspects of the 
adjustment of the exceptional individual to society and of society's accommodation to 
the individual. 

575 Exceptionality: Theory, Philosophy and Research (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to graduate status and consent of instructor. A consideration of 
theories, philosophies and evaluation strategies dealing with exceptional individuals, 
critical evaluation of research on exceptionality and the consideration of Investigatory 
models for studying exceptionality. 

577 Seminar in Program Trends in Special Education (3) 

Prerequisites: recommendation of adviser and consent of instructor. A seminar designed for 
the study of historical development of educational programs for exceptional children. 
A critical analysis of Issues and trends in special education. 

578 Administration and Supervision of Special Education (12) 

Prerequisite: Ed-SE 577 or consent of Instructor. Problems of organization, administration, 
and supervision of special education programs: finance and attendance, physical 
facilities, budgeting, needed equipment, community agencies and curriculum 
development. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas as 
behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, com- 
munication theory and Interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

5% Graduate Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conduct at a graduate level an educational practicum ex- 
perience with an Individual under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated 
. for a maximum of six units. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with con- 
ferences with the Instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Individual research with conferences with the Instructor, 
culminating in a thesis. 


194 Education 


599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified graduate students desiring to pursue 
independent inquiry. 

779 Student Teaching with Exceptional Children (5-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Participation in a class for exceptional children for 
greater part of every school day. Includes a two-hour seminar each week in problems 
and procedures for teaching exceptional children. Students doing student teaching in 
conjunction with multiple subject student teaching will take student teaching for five 
units. Students entering with mutliple subject or single subject student teaching com- 
pleted will enroll for six units which includes one unit generic competencies assessment 
seminar. 


DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

Chair: Paul W. Kane 

FACULTY 

Betty jean Barnes, Ida Coppolino, lames Cusick, Kenneth Doane,* Mildred Donoghue, 
Stephanie Edwards-Evans, James Gilmore, Barbara Hartsig, Shirley Hill, Emma Holmes, 
Bernard Kravitz, Edith McCullough, Eugene McGarry,* Robert McLaren, Bryan Moffet, 
Donald Pease, Fraser Powlison, Nancy Reckinger, Morris Sica, Robert Simpson 

SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHING METHODS FACULTY 

James Alexander (Journalism Education), Arthur Bell (English Education), Carol Chadwick 
(Music Education), John Cooksey (Music Education), Ron Edwards (Physical Education), 
Gerald Gannon (Mathematics Education), Kaye Good (Speech Education), Donald Henry 
(Theatre Education), Jacqueline Kiraithe (Foreign Language Education), Joseph Landon 
(Music Education), Benton Minor (Music Education), David Pagni (Mathematics 
Education), Albert Porter (Art Education), Clarence Schneider (English Education), Eula 
Stovall (Physical Education), H. Eric Streltberger (Science Education), John White (English 
Education), Charles Williams (Science Education), George Williams (Art Education), Jon 
Zimmerman (Foreign Language Education) 

PART-TIME 

Marlita Bellot, William Burns, Dorte Christjansen, Marcia Cook, Margot Coons, Jeanne 
Fulton, Kathy Hammons, Dan Harrington, Margaret Kelley, Mardel Kolls, Lois Lytle, 
Rolando Mans, Nelson Rowen, Carolyn Schultz, Shirley Sulack, Michael Trapp. 

The courses, programs and services of the division are directed toward the following objec- 
tives of students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration in elementary curriculum and in- 
struction. 

2. Preservice teacher education (elementary school, secondary school, community 
college). 

3. Specialist's Credentials (Ryan Act) Bilingual/Cross-Cultural and Early Childhood 
Education. 

4. In-service teacher education. 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of the school as a basic institution of our 
culture, the methods and materials associated with effective teaching, and the current and 
persistent problems that confront teachers, and other professional workers in educational 
institutions. In addition to using published source materials and attending class sessions for 
presentations and discussions, many courses require fieldwork in schools, laboratories, 
clinics and other educational agencies. 

PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

1. Master of Science in Education, Elementary Curriculum and Instruction 

2. Admission to Teacher Education Policies 

3. Multiple Subject Instruction (elementary teacher education programs) 


•University administrative officer. 


Education 195 


4. Single Subject Instruction (secondary teacher education programs) 

5. Early Childhood Education Specialist's Credential 

PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement concerning teacher education is available in the Division of Teacher Education 
for programs in multiple subject instruction, single subject instruction, the specialist in early 
childhood, and the specialist in bilingual/cross-cultural and the Master of Science in 
Education with concentration in elementary curriculum and instruction. Students should 
consult with the coordinators of elementary or secondary teacher education and other 
faculty members in selecting courses for the basic teaching credential and either of the 
specialists' credentials. Graduate students interested In the master's degree program should 
consult with the graduate coordinator. Transfer students should have transcripts of previous 
work available. 

Students seeking the basic teaching credential in single subject instruction should also con- 
sult with teacher education advisers in the departments of their major. Departments having 
these advisers are Art, Communications, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
Mathematics, Physical Education, Music, Science, Education, Speech Communication and 
Theatre. Advisement for the social sciences and business education is available in the 
Division of Teacher Education. 

APPLICATION FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The teacher education programs meet the requirements of the State of California for the 
basic teaching credential. Upon completion of these requirements, the candidate for the 
credential can submit his application to the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licens- 
ing with the credential analyst at the university office of Admissions and Records. On those 
applications, the student Is asked about his citizenship status, his professional conduct, and Is 
asked to sign an oath of allegiance. He must also submit a statement of his physical and men- 
tal condition signed by a qualified physician, one fingerprint-identification card and the 
legal fee, which is currently $20. 

CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

MULTIPLE SUBJECTS INSTRUCTION (ELEMENTARY) 

ADMISSION TO THE MULTIPLE SUBJECT PROGRAM 

Before being permitted to enroll in a credential program, the student must have made for- 
mal application, been screened and been formally admitted to teacher education through 
the School of Education. The student will be permitted to apply for admission to teacher 
education in the semester previous to beginning his professional program. Students In- 
terested in the Track I program of the multiple subjects credential will submit their 
applications at the beginning of their second semester of the junior year. Students who want 
the Track II program of the multiple subjects credential will submit their applications at the 
beginning of the first semester of the junior year. A faculty committee will review infor- 
mation concerning the applicant's intellectual resources, command of fundamental skills of 
communication, scholarship, personality and character, interest in teaching and health. 
When more qualified students apply for admission to teacher education than can be accom- 
modated during a given semester, applicants will be ranked and those with the highest rank 
selected. Qualified candidates who are not admitted may reapply during subsequent 
semesters. Information concerning the criteria and the procedures for admission to teacher 
education may be obtained in the Office of Teacher Education. 

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION* 

The program leading to the recommendation for the multiple subjects credential includes: 

1. A bachelor's degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper division 
or graduate level. (If the student does not complete all requirements, a preliminary 
credential may be awarded at the end of four or more years of work If he has a 
bachelor's degree from an approved Institution and has completed the student 
teaching requirement.) 

• Regulations for the credential are subject to change by the state; any curricular changes will be available in later university 
publications. ^ 


196 Education 


3. A breadth of knowledge in subject matter to help in teaching. Students who plan to 
secure the multiple subjects credential should acquire breadth of knowledge by taking 
coursework in each of the following areas: 

A. English, including grammar, literature, composition and speech 

B. Humanities and the fine arts 

C. Mathematics 

D. Physical education 

E. Science, including life and physical sciences 

F. Social sciences 

G. Passage of a subject matter examination or a major with an approved waiver. 
Because schools exist in a culturally pluralistic society, teacher candidates are also en- 
couraged to take courses in the Chicano studies, Afro-ethnic studies and Indian studies 
programs. 

4. Professional education requirements which are currently met by the following 
programs: 

Track I — Two-semester sequence (See note below) 

First Semester: 

Ed-TE 430A Foundations In Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 433 Reading Instruction In the Public Schools (3) 

The first semester of Track I entails an all-day commitment, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
daily. 

Second Semester: 

OEd-TE 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (10) 

Ed-TE 439B Seminar in Elementary School Student Teaching (2) 

The second semester of Track I entails an all-day commitment of time. 

Track II— Three-semester sequence (See note below) 

First Semester 

Ed-TE 407 Principles of Teaching and Learning in the Elementary School (3); 
Ed-TE 433 Reading Instruction in the Public Schools (3) 

The first semester of Track II entails a commitment during the morning hours. 

Second Semester 

Ed-TE 435A Strategies of Teaching (4) 

Ed-TE 435B Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (2) 

The second semester of Track II entails a commitment during the morning hours. 
Third Semester 

oEd-TE439A Student Teaching In the Elementary School (10) 

Ed-TE 439B Seminar In Elementary School Student Teaching (2) 

The third semester of Track II entails an all-day commitment of time. 

Ed-TE 314 Drugs and Human Development (1), or the equivalent must be taken 
by all multiple subjects candidates. 

ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING 

The credential candidate must submit his application for student teaching by October 15 or 
March 1 of the semester preceding the semester in which the student expects a student 
teaching assignment. The application for admission is submitted to either the coordinator of 
elementary or secondary teacher education. 


ONote: Admission to the university does not include admission to the multiple subjects credential program. Admission to 
teacher education does not include admission to student teaching. 


Education 


197 


Ihe application for student teaching is part of the continuous process ot ('valu.iling ( redc'n- 
tial candidates on their suitability for elementary and secondary school leaching. Infor- 
mation concerning the criteria and procedures for admission to student teac hing, along with 
the application, may be obtained from the Office of Teacher Fducation. Admission to 
teacher education does not include admission to student teac hing. f ac h student is rc'sponsi- 
ble for meeting the rccjuirements and following the proccnlures for admission. 

SINGLE SUBJECT INSTRUCTIONO (Secondary Cooperative Teacher Education Program) 

1. Admission To The Program 

The application forms for admission to the program are available in the Division of 
Teacher Education. To become a candidate for the secondary school teacher education 
program the student must be enrolled In good standing in the university and must be ad- 
mitted to teacher education through the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. The 
student may apply for admission to teacher education at the beginning of the semester 
previous to the semester in which he Is within six units of completing his major (usually as 
a second semester junior). Admission to teacher education Is for the semester in which 
the student begins his professional coursework. If the student is admitted and does not 
enroll in the program, he must reapply in a future semester. 

If the student is not admitted, he may reapply in a future semester. A faculty committee, 
including faculty in the major department, will review information concerning the 
applicant's intellectual resources, command of fundamental skills of communication, 
scholarship, personality and character, interest in teaching, and health. The minimum 
overall grade-point average and the minimum grade-point average in the major is 2.5. 

When more qualified students apply for admission to the program than can be accom- 
modated during a given semester, applicants will be ranked and those with the highest 
rank selected. 

Students should consult with advisers prior to making application to the program usually 
by the beginning of the junior year for the purpose of establishing competency in the fun- 
damental skills. Courses or examinations are available in the areas of English and speech 
that will assist in meeting specific competencies in fundamental skills. It is also important 
that credential candidates for single subject Instruction in majors that are subsumed in the 
single subjects listed in the basic teaching credential (See requirements for the credential 
listed below) seek advisement on coursework outside of their major from teacher 
education advisers. This coursework can be planned in conjunction with meeting general 
education requirements or planning for completing a minor listed in this catalog: 

Because schools exist in a culturally pluralistic society, teacher candidates are also en- 
couraged to take courses in the Chicano studies, Afro-ethnic studies and Indian studies 
programs. 

2. Requirements and Curriculum in the Secondary Cooperative Teacher Education Program 
The Basic Teaching Credential Under the Ryan Act 

The program leading to the recommendation for the single subjects credential includes 
the following: 

A. A baccalaureate degree or higher degree, except in professional education from an 
approved Institution. 

B. A fifth year of study to be completed within five years of the first employment. A 
preliminary credential can be granted upon the completion of the baccalaureate 
degree and student teaching. 

C. An approved program of professional preparation. This refers to the.completlon of the 
professional program at Cal State Fullerton described in this document. 


^Regulations governing the credential are subject to change by the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing; 
changes will be available in later university publications. 


198 Education 


D. Passage of a subject matter examination or its waiver. The Ryan Act does not specify 
majors and minors, nor does it specify levels of teaching. Authorization for teaching is 
specified under only one teaching credential in either multiple subjects or in single 
subjects instruction. Multiple subjects instruction means the practice of assignment of 
teachers and students as is commonly practiced in California elementary schools. 

Single subjects instruction means the practice of assignment of teachers and students to 
specified subject matter courses as is commonly practiced in California senior high 
schools and most California junior high schools. 

Although this program Is described here as a program in secondary school teacher 
education, It is In fact, the program of preparation for the teaching of single subjects as 
defined by the Ryan Act. Single subjects categories provided for In the Ryan Act related to 
this university's offerings are: English, physical science, life science, mathematics, social 
science, history, government, physical education, business, music, art, and languages In- 
cluding but not limited to French, Spanish, Russian and German. Other single subjects in- 
cluded in the Ryan Act but not offered at this university are industrial arts and home 
economics. Other subject matter areas are subsumed, as directed by the commission in the 
above categories. 

Subject matter examinations in the above categories will be available after the commission 
completes the procedures for examinations. Contact the School of Education for further In- 
formation. 

E. Demonstration of a knowledge of the various methods of teaching reading, to a level 
deemed adequate by the commission, by successful completion of a program of study 
approved by the commission or passage of commission-approved reading examination. 

The course in instruction In reading for secondary school teaching meets this requirement. 
This requirement is optional for candidates in art, music and physical education. It is 
recommended especially for candidates in these fields who seek authorization to teach in 
other subject fields. 

3. Curriculum in Secondary School Teacher Education (Prerequisite— Admission to Teacher 

Education) 

This Is a two-semester program designed around extensive fieldwork in secondary 
schools. In the first semester the candidate for the credential is assigned to a learning 
center (a cooperating secondary school) dally from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. He meets in 
seminars and workshops on the university campus daily from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For this 
semester he is registered in: 

Ed-TE 440F Supervised Fieldwork in Secondary Schools (2) 

Ed-TE 440R Instruction in Reading for Secondary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 440S Foundations of Secondary School Teaching (4) 

Educ 442 Teaching — in the Secondary School (3) (methods class in the major offered 
by either the major department or the School of Education) 

This is a block program integrating field experience and subject matters to meet specific 
competencies required of a secondary school teacher. The entire block must be taken in 
one semester. In the second semester the student registers for full-time student teaching, 
and in most cases does his student teaching in the same learning center to which he was 
assigned In the first semester. Student teaching should be completed in the semester 
following the block program. Courses in the second semester of the two semester 
program: 

Ed-TE 449A Student Teaching in the Secondary School (10) 

Ed-TE 449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

Ed-TE 314 Drugs and Human Development (1) or the equivalent must be taken by all 
single subjects candidates. 

4. Admission to Student Teaching 

The credential candidate submits a formal application for student teaching by October 15 
or March 1 in the first semester of the two-semester program. This application Is part of 
the continuous process of evaluating credential candidates and their suitability for 
teaching In the secondary schools and their progress in acquiring competencies necessary 


Education 199 


for single subjects instruction. These evaluations will come from cooperating teachers and 
faculty working with the candidates in the program. Further information concerning the 
criteria and procedures for admission to student teaching, along with the application, will 
be available in the Division of Teacher Education. Since student teaching is done on a full- 
time basis, student teachers will be limited to one additional course for that semester. 
Students may take this course only in the late afternoon or evening. 

CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPECIALIST'S CREDENTIAL 

The Early Childhood Specialist's Credential, as authorized by the Teacher Preparation and 
Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act), is granted through the university program approved in 1974 
by the commission which oversees the law's implementation. The 20-unit program develops 
competencies in teaching and in supervision of educational programs for children at 
preschool, kindergarten and primary levels. The culminating experiences of the credential- 
ing program include work In field settings which is planned so as to coordinate with can- 
didates' personal teaching schedules. 

Admission to the Early Childhood Program 

Students with a basic teaching credential (elemcntary/multiple subjoris), or those who are 
satisfactorily completing work toward it, may declare the Early Childhood Specialist's 
Credential as an objective for postbaccalaureate study and apply for admission to the 
program. 

Program of Study 

The following coursework will be developed into a study plan in consultation with an ad- 
viser: 

Ed-TE 437 Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed-TE 526 Differentiated Staffing in Public Schools (3) 

Ed-TE 527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Human from 
Conception Through Eight Years (3) 

Ed-TE 538 Graduate Studies: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed-TE 591A Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood Education (emphasis on 
teaching) (4) 

Ed-TE 591B Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood Education (emphasis on super- 
vision) (4) 

BILINCUAL/CROSS-CULTURAL SPECIALIST'S CREDENTIAL 

The Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential as authorized by the Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act) is granted through the university program 
approved in 1974. The program has been developed cooperatively by the Department of 
Chicano Studies, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, and the School of 
Education working with the university's Board of Bilingual/Cross Cultural Studies. The 24- 
unit program develops specific competencies for teachers and resource personnel In 
bilingual/cross-cultural programs from kindergarten through the 12th grade. The credential- 
ing program includes experiences in language and culture of the target population, techni- 
ques and methods for bilingual/cross-cultural education, linguistics, fieldwork and com- 
munity Involvement planned to coordinate with candidates' personal teaching schedules. 

Admission to the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential Program 

Students with (1) a basic teaching credential (elementary/multiple subjects or secon- 
dary/single subjects), or those who are satisfactorily completing work toward It, and (2) a 
Spanish language competency equivalent to at least two years of college or university 
Spanish, may declare the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential as an objective for 
post-baccalaureate study and apply for admission to the program. 

Program of Study 

The following coursework will be developed in a study plan in consultation with an adviser. 
Students who have equivalent competencies prior to entry In the program will be advised as 
to how to obtain credit for such competencies. 

Ed-TE 454 Bilingual Education in the United States (3) 

Ed-TE 461 Instructional Techniques in Bilingual Education (3) 


200 Education 


Ed-TE 462 Fieldwork in Bilingual Education (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) or 
Spanish 468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 443 Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other 
Languages (3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 450 Spanish Classroom Vocabulary (optional) (3) 

Chicano Studies 450 Chicano Contemporary Issues (3) 

Chicano Studies 445 History of the Chicano (3). 


GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

This degree is reserved for professionally qualified graduate students who desire to prepare 
for or advance their careers in elementary curriculum and Instruction. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited Institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 


A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified student upon the 
development of an approved study plan: a basic teaching credential or equivalent ex- 
periences, an approved major (minimum of 24 units upper division or graduate), a 2.5 grade- 
point average on previous academic and related work, satisfactory interview, references and 
an autobiography. Credit will be given for previous postbaccalaureate studies when possible. 
Otherwise well-qualified students may be admitted with limited subject or grade deficien- 
cies, but these deficiencies must be removed. Grade-point average deficiencies may be 
removed by a demonstration of competency in the graduate program. 

Programs of Study 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will include the following: 

Units 

Coursework outside elementary education 9 


Two of the following: 

Ed-TE 406 Educational Sociology (3) 

Ed-TE 436 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) 

Ed-TE 501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Ed-TE 509 Theory and Practice In Educational Measurement (3) 

Ed-TE 510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Ed-TE 526 Differentiated Staffing in Public Schools (3) 

Ed-TE 527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology (3) 

Ed-TE 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Ed-TE 538 Graduate Studies In Elementary Education: Early Childhood 


Education (3) 

Other adviser-approved courses (3) 

Coursework in elementary education 

Ed-TE 536 Curriculum Theory and Development in the Elementary School 
Three of the following: 

Ed-TE 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second Languages 

Ed-TE 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Ed-TE 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Ed-TE 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed-TE 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Ed-TE 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading (3) 

Ed-TE 537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

One of the following: 

Ed-TE 597 Project (1-3; total of 3) 

Ed-TE 598 Thesis (1-3; total of 3) 


15 


( 3 ) 


( 3 ) 


Education 201 


Electives selected with approval of the adviser 6 

For further information; consult the chair. 

See also "'The Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES 

210 The Teaching Experience: Exploration (3) 

Exploration of one's self in relation to other people In the schools and an encounter with the 
teaching experience, through fieldwork. Accompanying seminar to help students ex- 
tend their observations and explore relevant issues. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

301 The Educated Man (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Various conceptions of the nature, 
concerns and activities of a truly educated person are studied: the humanitarian ideal; 
aspects of human freedom; and the relation of science to culture. 

302 The Campus in Transition (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Study of the history and development 
of American higher education. The roots of change and campus unrest are examined. 

303 Education and Its Critics (3) 

Examination of the criticisms of contemporary education and of proposals for reform. 
Includes visits to a variety of schools. Designed for all students. Not a part of the creden- 
tial program. 

304 Contemporary Educational Change (3) 

Emphasis on the changing educational scene In elementary and secondary levels. The quest 
for greater flexibility, better methods of teaching, improved staffing patterns and ac- 
countability serve as the course foundation. 

305 School and Society (3) 

Stability and change in contemporary society viewed in terms of the decline of traditional 
values and culture and the rise of legal-rational institutions. Urban life, social class, race 
relations and family organization will be examined. 

308 Education of Various Cultural Groups: Early Childhood (3) 

Designed for Head Start personnel and others engaged in the early education of culturally 
different children. Focus will be on development of learning, curriculum content, and 
methodology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

309 Fieldwork in the Education of Various Cultural Groups (3) 

Observation and participation In classes for various cultural groups. Integrated with 
coursework in Education of Various Cultural Groups. Must be taken concurrently with 
Ed-TE 308. (9 hours laboratory) 

310 The Teaching Experience: Participation (3) 

Active participation in school classrooms and analysis of the experience. Accompanying 
seminar will help students to analyze their fieldwork experiences. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 
hour seminar) 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. A comprehensive study of human growth and development with 
emphasis on childhood, adolescence and middle and old age. Includes mental, social, 
emotional and physical development. 

314 Drugs and Human Development (1) 

Examines substance abuse in relation to personal development, social stress, and 
physiological and psychological effects. Emphasizes methods of exploring values and 
making decisions In regard to substance abuse. 

340 Principles and Curriculum Secondary Education (3) 

Principles of secondary education in the United States: organization, curriculum, and 
teaching practices. Two hours of observation per week in selected junior and senior 
high school classes. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours fieldwork) 

385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

The physical growth and social and personality development of the human through the sixth 
year of life. 

386 Adolescence (3) 

A study of the physical, social and cultural development of human adolescence and youth. 
Particular attention is given to contemporary factors producing change. 


202 Education 


401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Seminar in philosophical, historical and sociological foundations of education, considered in 
the light of their influence on contemporary educational theory and practice in the 
United States. 

402 Comparative Education (3) 

A seminar centered in study of the various countries' education patterns, as part of the 
cultural setting in which found; designed to deepen insight into our own culture's 
educational program and offer bases for comparative evaluation with other systems. 

403 History of Education (3) 

The main streams of educational history in Europe and America, with particular emphasis on 
the ways these main streams have affected the current scene in the United States. 

406 Educational Sociology (3) 

The school in the social order; the school as a social system; analysis of cultural factors 
affecting the school; the special culture of the school; roles and role conflicts in the 
school; policy questions flowing from social issues and school-cultural relationships. 

407 Principles of Teaching and Learning in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the Teacher Education Program (Elementary). The course relates 

theories of learning and theories of child growth and development to effective teaching 
in elementary schools. The appropriate foundations of instructional practices are ex- 
amined. Fieldwork in the public schools is part of the course. 

408 Ghetto Schools (3) 

A study of the schools in the inner city, including educational issues related to or stemming 
from poverty, cultural differences, often inappropriate curricula, limited com- 
munication between parents and the system, and other problems. 

410 The Teaching Experience: Field Investigation (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Development of field investigation in area of interest. 
Includes needs assessment, study proposal, implementation of study and presentation 
of findings. Accompanying seminar. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

429 Individualized Instruction (3) 

The principles and operational components of individualized teaching and learning. 
Emphasis on practical classroom implementation of individualized instructional 
strategies. 

430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. A study of children's learning styles, and their 
overall growth and development with the aim of helping future elementary teachers ac- 
quire the behaviors necessary for effective teaching. To be taken concurrently with Ed- 
TE 430B,C and 433. 

430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. A study of elementary school curricula, in- 
structional materials, and teaching techniques with the aim of helping future elemen- 
tary teachers acquire the behaviors necessary for effective teaching. To be taken con- 
currently with Ed-TE 430A, C, and 433. 

430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Students will serve as teacher participants in an 
assigned elementary school classroom to apply information learned in the following 
courses which must be taken concurrently: Ed-TE 430A,B and 433. 

433 Reading Instruction in Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Experience in the teaching of reading which 
students will demonstrate the behavior necessary to work with children in public 
school. 

435A Strategies of Teaching (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 407 and 433. A course dealing with Implementation of principles of 
learning and teaching in the subject areas taught in the elementary schools. The 
approach is to focus on teacher tasks rather than on subject areas. Examples from the 
subject areas will be used In the examination of teacher tasks. 

435B Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (2) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education, Ed-TE 407 and 433; Ed-TE 435A Is to be taken 
concurrently. Students will serve as teacher aids in an assigned elementary school 
classroom to apply information learned in Ed-TE 407, 433 and 435A. 


Education 203 


436 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques the classroom teacher may use in under- 
standing individual children within his classroom who do not respond to the teacher 
and his peers in typical ways. 

437 Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of current literature and recent research in the 
area of education of young children through individual and group study. Emphasis will 
be placed on problems centered in cognitive processes, content, structure and in- 
struction at this level. 

439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (10) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Participation in a 
regular elementary school teaching program for the full school day. Concurrent 
enrollment In Educ 439B is required. 

439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (2) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 430A, B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Seminar in problems 
and procedures of elementary school teaching. Concurrent enrollment in Ed-TE 439A is 
required. 

440F Supervised Fieldwork in Secondary Schools (2) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Observation and participation in instruction 
In secondary school learning centers 3 hours daily. Fieldwork associated with Ed-TE 
440R, 440S and 442. Taken concurrently with these courses. Replaces Ed-TE 340, 496, and 
449. 

440R Instruction in Reading for Secondary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Instruction in developmental reading for 
prospective teachers in single subjects. Taken concurrently with Ed-TE 440F, 440S and 
442. 

440S Foundations Secondary School Teaching (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Includes development of teaching com- 
petencies related to adolescent development, the learning process and diagnosis of 
learning problems, evaluation of pupil achievement, and cultural differences in secon- 
dary school youth. Taken concurrently with Ed-TE 440F, 440R and 442. Replaces Ed-TE 
411. 

442 Teaching— in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Required before student teaching of students 
presenting major in following areas or subjects. 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Educ 442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (3) 

Educ 442 Teaching Social Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Engl Ed 442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

For Langs Ed 442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Journ Ed 442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (3) 

Mu Ed 442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Speech Ed 442 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (3) 

Theatre Ed 442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

445 Junior High School Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 442 or 331. Seminar on principles of junior high education. Purposes, 
curriculum, and organization of the junior high school including examination of recent 
innovations and proposals. For students with elementary or secondary backgrounds in- 
terested In this level. 

446 Secondary School Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: student teaching or teaching experience or consent of instructor. Fundamen- 
tals of curriculum development. Seminar on current issues within secondary education. 
Curricular organization and current practices. Survey and evaluation of newer 
curricular programs. 

448 Social Studies Simulation Games (2) 

A discussion-laboratory course in which students will study simulations, get acquainted with 


204 Education 


and play a number of commercially available simulations, and design and play their 
own. For teachers and prospective teachers of the social studies elementary and secon- 
dary schools. 

449A,B Student Teaching in the Secondary School and Seminar (12) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Full-time student teaching. 

451 Principles of Educational Measurement (3) 

Development, validation, and application of the principles of educational measurement. 
Construction and use of informal and standardized achievement tests. Summary and in- 
terpretation of results of measurement. 

454 Bilingual Education in the United States (3) 

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of bilingual education. Helpful, but not necessary ability to 
converse In another language (preferably Spanish). Study of bilingual education in the 
United States; the literature, the laws, the history and the impact such educational 
programs have had on the speaker of the foreign languages In the United States. 

461 Instructional Techniques in Bilingual Education (3) 

Designed to develop instructional techniques In bilingual education. Analyzes purposes, 
philosophies and concepts of bilingual education. Identifies theories of language learn- 
ing, cultural differences in learning processes and methodologies of bilingual instruc- 
tion. 

462 Fieldwork in Bilingual Education (3) 

Fieldwork in bilingual settings, designed for the student in the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural 
Specialist Credential. The student must be enrolled in the program and be in the 
second semester of training. 

491 Audiovisual Education (2) 

Media In communication, psychological bases, development, curricular function, 
evaluation. Survey of equipment and materials available, preparation of instructional 
materials for classroom use. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

492 Television in the Classroom (2) 

Television as a vehicle for instruction, information and enrichment. General theory of media 
In classroom, psychological bases, curricular capabilities and limitations of equipment. 
Responsibility of the classroom teacher, practice in utilization process. (1 hour lecture, 2 
hours activity) 

493 Production of Audiovisual Materials (2) 

Exploration and development of audiovisual materials. Students will participate in 
scriptwriting, story-board, photography and tape production. Experience will be 
provided in producing graphics, charts and bulletin boards. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours ac- 
tivity) 

4% Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum experience with an individual under 
the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of 
credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing, consent of Instructor and division prior to 
registration. Individual investigation under supervision of a faculty member. Only 
students of demonstrated capacity and maturity will be approved; adequate prere- 
quisite study necessary. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: postgraduate standing and Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B or 749, or consent of instructor. 
Uses of theories of knowledge, value and reality in dealing with educational problems; 
application of contemporary systems of thought to education. 

509 Theory and Practice in Educational Measurement (3) 

Introduction to concepts, theory, and procedures for construction of informal and standar- 
dized tests. Application of measurement theory and statistical techniques toward 
problems of analysis, scaling, norming, and Interpretation. Practice in item writing for 
tests and analysis of commercial standardized tests. 

511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 509, teaching experience. Review of descriptive statistics and statistical 
inference as applied to educational problems. Analysis of representative research 
papers. Principles of research design. Prepare a research proposal. 


Education 205 


525 Seminar for Secondary Education (3) (Formerly 547) 

Prerequisite: Educ 749 or consent of instructor. Persistent problems in secondary education 
and survey of related literature, causes of and solutions for these problems. Application 
of scientific method to educational problems, sources of educational research, and to 
techniques of cooperative thinking. 

526 Differentiated Staffing in Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar in the study of the 
processes and techniques in working with parents, paraprofessionals, specialists and 
community people. Includes basic principles of supervision and interaction with adults. 

527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Human from Conception 

Through Eight Years (3) 

Prerequisites: teaching, credential or consent of instructor. The physical, social, cognitive- 
intellectual and emotional development of human individuals from conception to mid- 
dle childhood is the subject of this seminar. Current problems, theories and research 
are given emphasis. 

529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Major theories of learning. The use of major theoretical positions in planning and in- 
terpreting classroom practices. Educational research findings supporting major 
theories, implications for curriculum developments and teaching practices. 

530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Seminar for the study of pertinent investigations and 
their application In the classroom together with significant curriculum developments 
and organization In the area of second language learning in the elementary school, in- 
cluding English as a foreign language. 

531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar for advanced study of trends and problems in 
teaching the fundamental skills of communication in the elementary school. Analysis of 
research in the language arts and related disciplines as background for curriculum 
development. 

532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math Ed 103A, Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of 
significant research, curricular developments and materials, criteria for planning and 
improving mathematics programs and instruction. 

533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of significant 
research In elementary school science. Criteria for planning and improving science 
programs and the development of materials. 

534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B, or consent of Instructor. Seminar for the study of 
significant research developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving 
social studies programs and current techniques of teaching. 

535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar in advanced study of 
trends and issues in teaching reading in elementary schools. Analysis of research or 
background for curriculum development and instructional procedures. 

536 .Curriculum Theory and Development in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar for the study of the elementary 

school curriculum including the forces operating on the curriculum and the par- 
ticipants involved in curriculum building. Emphasis also placed on the process of 
curriculum building. 

537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. A study of problems and issues in 
elementary education, their causes and possible solutions. 

538 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of Instructor. Exploration of the implications of 

research for curriculum development and instructional planning. Study of the ways in 
which different views of human development and learning have affected programs in 
early childhood education. 


206 Education 


591A Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood (4) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 538 or consent of instructor. Provides candidates with an opportunity to 
demonstrate instructional abilities in working with children, parents, professionals, and 
members of the community. 

591 B Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood (4) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 538 or consent of instructor. Provides candidates with opportunities to 
demonstrate supervisory, coordinating and administrative abilities in working with 
children, parents, professionals and members of the community in the development of 
early childhood education programs. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars designed to develop professional competencies in such areas as 
behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program development, com- 
munication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with con- 
ferences with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, 
culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: a teaching credential and one year of teaching experience. Designed for 
independent inquiry. 

701 Credential Studies (0) 

A course for students admitted to teacher education who find it impossible to maintain con- 
tinuous enrollment while they are completing the 30 units beyond the baccalaureate. 

709 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: a teaching credential and one year of teaching experience. Designed for 
teachers who supervise student teachers. Emphasis on principles and procedures of 
effective supervision and research. 

721 Philosophy and Objectives of Community College Education (2) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing. College movement in higher education in the United 
States. Socioeconomic forces creating needs for different post-high school education; 
community college education objectives, relationships to secondary and higher 
education; curriculum development and organization. 

744 Principles of Community College Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: postgraduate standing. Psychological foundations of community college 
teaching, measurement and evaluation of learning. Educational and philosophical bases 
for Instructional procedures in the community college. Instructional procedures in- 
cluding audiovisual materials, community college class observations. (2 hours seminar, 3 
hours fieldwork) 

749 Student Teaching in— in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

(For candidates for the Fisher standard teaching credentials in secondary teaching) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Student teaching for the standard teaching 
credential with specialization in secondary school teaching. Student teaching program 
for half-days for a full semester. Includes a 2 hour seminar each week. (Minimum of 15 
hours a week.) 

Art Ed 749 Student Teaching in Art in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Educ 749 Student Teaching in Business in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Educ 749 Student Teaching in Social Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Engl Ed 749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar 
For Langs Ed 749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Foreign Languages in the 
Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

Journ Ed 749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Math Ed 749 Student Teaching in Mathematics in the Secondary School 
and Seminar (6) 

Mu Ed 749 Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

PE 749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Sci Ed 749 Student Teaching in Science in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 
Speech Comm Ed 749 Student Teaching in Speech in the Secondary School and 
Seminar (6) 

Theatre Ed 749 Student Teaching in Theatre in Secondary School and Seminar (6) 


IHEAILTIH IEIDUCATI0N 
IPIHTSiCAIL lEIDUCATICN 
RCCREATIICN AMt) A¥irilLIETIC: 




208 


DIVISION OF HEALTH EDUCATION, 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION AND ATHLETICS 


Director: Paul Pastor 


ATHLETICS 

Neale Stoner, Director 

Charles Boyle, Roy Caldwell, Patrick Callahan, James Colletto, Robert Dye, Charles Gallo, 
August Garrido, jerry Lloyd, Donald Matson, Billie Moore, Warren Simmons, Melvin 
Sims, David Snow, V. Richard Wolfe, Ernest Zermeno 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Jean Barrett, Chair 

FACULTY 

Gene Adams, C. Ian Bailey, Katharine Barthels, Leslie Bleamaster, Ron Edwards, M. William 
Fulton, Eric Hanauer, Elmer Johnson, Alexander Omalev, Roberta Rikli, Iva Diane Ross, 
Virginia Scheel, Eula Stovall, Carol Weinmann, Ronald Witchey, Michael Yessis 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Physical Education offers the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
for students preparing to teach, for those preparing to pursue graduate work in physical 
education and for those preparing for careers in business, industry and government service. 
The degree consists of 124 units with a maximum of 12 lower division units and a minimum of 
28 upper division units in physical education. 

Transfer students must request transcripts of records of all previous scholastic work from 
each university or college attended. These transcripts are in addition to those required for 
admission to the university and must be sent by the issuing institution directly to the chair. 
Department of Physical Education. 

All transfer students must have transcripts evaluated by the department undergraduate ad- 
viser prior to registration. 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

It is strongly recommended that students take one or more of the following courses to fulfill 
their general education requirements: 

Chemistry 100, Introductory Chemistry (4); Physics 211A, Elementary Physics (4); Physical 
.‘Science 201, Modern Physical Science (4); Biological Science 101, Elements of Biology (5); 
Biological Science 361, Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology (4); 


Lower Division (maximum of 12 units) Units 

A minimum of six classes elected from the following 6 


PE 110, 120, 130, 170 and 180. (Although course number may be repeated to meet 
this requirement, a specific class may count only once.) 

Upper Division (minimum of 28 units) 

Theoretical and practical bases: 

Minimum of two courses 

PE 300 Fundamental Principles of Movement (3) 

PE 318 Developmental Adaptations of Atypical (3) 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

PE 360 Movement Anatomy (3) 

PE 370 Physiology of Exercise (4) 

PE 461 Biomechanics (3) 


HEPERA 209 


Contemporary understandings: 

Minimum of two courses 6 

PE 350 History of Physical Education (3) 

PE 356 Cultural Perspectives of Physical Activity (3) 

PE 436 Sport Psychology (3) 

PE 437 Sport Sociology (3) 

Analysis: 

Minimum of three courses 

Two courses selected from: 

PE 340 series, Analysis of Individual Sports (2) 

PE 341 series, Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

One course from: 

PE 340 Analysis of Individual Sports (2) 

PE 341 Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

PE 342 Analysis of Team Sports (2) 

Upper division physical education courses to complete the required 40 units for the 
major 

*Total 

Proficiency Requirements for Major and Minor Students 

Activity courses should be taken to meet the prerequisite requirements for any analysis 
series course the student plans to take. Proficiency screening tests are administered in the 
analysis classes at the beginning of the semester. 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A physical education minor shall consist of 20 units of coursework in physical education with 
a minimum of 12 upper division units which must include work from each of the following 
areas: theoretical and practical bases, contemporary understandings and analysis series. 


6-7 


40 


REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS SEEKING A 
TEACHING CREDENTIAL 

The university program for meeting the basic requirements for the teaching credential with a 
specialization in physical education (K-12) can be found elsewhere In this catalog (see School 
of Education, Division of Teacher Education). Additional requirements of the Department of 
Physical Education are as follows 

1. Required Coursework 

In addition to, or as part of, the requirements for a major In physical education all can- 
didates for the credential must complete the following with a minimum of a "C" grade: 
PE 300 Principles of Movement 

PE 324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 
PE 420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education 

2. Competency in Subject Matter of Physical Education 

All candidates for the credential must adequately demonstrate their competency in sub- 
ject matter scope and content of physical education. The major areas of emphasis iden- 
tified by the Physical Education Advisory Panel of the Commission for Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing include: (1) biological foundations, (2) sociological foun- 
dations, (3) psychological foundations, (4) historical — philosophical foundations, (5) 
evaluation and measurement, (6) health and safety concepts relating to physical activity 
and (7) instructional subject matter. 

3. Instructional Subject Matter of Physical Education 

Students seeking a credential with a specialization In physical education from this In- 
stitution must be able to demonstrate their competency in instructional subject matter 
which Is a part of the regular physical education program of the public schools. The 
Department of Physical Education specifically requires the following: 
a. Ability to perform and analyze basic movement skills common to a large number of in- 
structional physical activities. 


• Students wishing to take dance courses to fulfill part of the physical education major requirements should check with the 
Physical Education Department office. Final decisions on these classes were not made in time for inclusion in this 
catalog. 


210 HEPERA 


b. Adequate background and preparation to demonstrate breadth of understanding of 
the scope and content of physical education. 

c. Strong background and preparation in a minimum of three designated areas of 
physical education* to demonstrate "in-depth" understanding and ability to apply un- 
derstandings to the teaching learning situation. At present the areas identified by the 
Teacher Education Advisory Council of the Physical Education Department include: (1) 
team sports, (2) individual sports, (3) dual sports, (4) dance, (5) aquatics, (6) recreational 
(must be instructional in nature), (7) environmental, (8) developmental, (9) special 
programs and (10) coaching. 

4. Admission to Teacher Education 

In addition to the requirements set forth elsewhere in this catalog, the Department of 
Physical Education requires candidates to submit to an extensive review of qualifications 
for teaching. This review includes additional written documentation, and a personal 
evaluation by a select interview committee. 

Acceptance into the program allows the candidate to enroll in a two semester sequence: 
First semester: Ed-TE 440F, Ed-TE 440S, Ed-TE 440R (optional), PE 442. 

Second semester: Fisher credential— PE 449A,B, Ed-TE 401; Ryan credential— PE 449A,B 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The program of studies Is designed: (1) to prepare master teachers at the college level; (2) to 
Improve the professional background and competence of those in the field; (3) to prepare 
scholars who wish to pursue a doctoral program in physical education; and (4) to prepare 
students for sports related careers In fields other than teaching. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon development 
Df an approved study plan: 

1. completion of 24 approved upper division units in physical education 

2. a grade-point average of 3.0 or better, for all upper division work taken in physical 
education. (Contingency provisions: grade-point deficiencies in individual courses in 
physical education may be met by taking 6-12 hours of approved courses at Cal State 
Fullerton, and earning a 3.0 CPA in these courses. Such courses, while counted toward the 
prerequisites for the master of science program, may not be used to fulfill the program re- 
quirements.) 

3. three satisfactory letters of recommendation 

Study Plan 

The degree study plan normally consists of 30 units of graduate coursework with a CPA of 3.0 
or better. Coursework shall include a minimum of 18 units of 500-level courses of which 8-10 
units are required. Further work includes 8-10 units of 500-level physical education courses 
and a maximum of 12 units of electives. A thesis or a project and an oral examination at the 
conclusion of the program are required; a written examination may also be required. 

Units 

Required 8-10 

PE 508 Statistical Methods in Physical Education (3) 

PE 510 Research in Physical Education (3) 

PE 598 Thesis (4) or PE 597 Project (2) 


• Students are urged to consult with the teacher education adviser of the department before submitting documents re- 
quired for establishing subject matter competency. 


HEPERA 211 


Study plans shall be developed from the following list of approved courses with ad- 
viser's approval. 

Approved 500-level physical education 8-10 

PE 505 Seminar in Sports Administration (3) 

PE 515 Current Issues in Physical Education (3) 

PE 516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education (3) 

PE 520 International Physical Education (3) 

PE 530 Administration and Supervision of Physical Education (3) 

PE 532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

PE 533 Eacllities Development and Planning (3) 

PE 540 Seminar In Adapted Physical Education (3) 

PE 550 Internship (3-6) 

PE 551 Advanced Study In Physiology of Exercise (3) 

PE 552 Human Bio-Kinetics (3) 

PE 554 Advanced Studies in Motor Behavior (3) 

PE 555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

*PE 596 Advanced Studies in Physical Education (1-3) 

♦PE 599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Electives 12 

Twelve units of coursework are selected with adviser's approval which would be 
supportive of the Individual student's stated goals for graduate study. Coursework 
may be selected from the following categories in any combination: 

1. 500-level coursework in physical education. 

2. 400-level coursework In physical education approved by the department's 
Graduate Studies Committee for graduate students. 

3. Graduate or upper division coursework approved for graduate students from 
other departments within the university. 

Total 30 

For further details, consult the graduate studies adviser, Division of Health Education, 
Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

101 Personal and Community Health (2) 

Consideration of critical health issues as they relate to modern man. Physical, mental and 
social health and safety issues involved in everyday living are Investigated. 

102 Prevention and First Aid (2) 

Study of the hazards in man's environment and the common accidents related thereto. 
Emphasis is placed upon both the care and prevention of accidents. Students (upon 
successful completion of requirements) will be granted standard first aid certification by 
the American Red Cross. 

321 Drugs and Society (3) 

Critical study of habit-forming substances such as alcohol, tobacco, narcotics and related 
drugs. Social and legal aspects of the drug problem are also considered. 

410 Health Education for Teachers (3) 

Topics will include school health, drug education, family living community health teaching 
philosophy and strategy. For students seeking California teaching credential. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

General Education Requirements: 

Health and Physical Education Electives 

There are no specific health and physical education requirements. Each student, however, 
must take a minimum of three courses (9 units) with one from each of three fields included 
In Category IV, Basic Subjects: computer science, elementary foreign languages, health 
education, mathematics, oral communications, physical education, reading, statistics or 
writing. 

• PE 5% and 599 may be applied to the major area of study and/or the secondary area of optional electives. 


212 HEPERA 


100 A Athletics in Action: Specific Sport (1) 

Designed for spectator's understanding of athletics in our society. Knowledge of plays and 
appreciation are its primary focus. Attendance of four athletic events and class dis- 
cussion of specific assignments are required. Itinerary will be organized at the first class 
meeting. C/NC only. 

110 Aquatics (1) 

A physical activity experience in aquatics activities with a student in an educational setting 
and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs 
and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

120 Group Activities (1) 

A physical activity experience in group activities with a student in an educational setting and 
under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs and 
interests of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

130 Individual Activities (1) 

A physical activity experience in individual activities with a student in an educational setting 
and under the direction of a faculty member who directs the activity to meet the needs 
and interests of the student. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 

170 Intercollegiate Sports (W) (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of coach. An intercollegiate activity experience in individual or team 
sports for women in an educational setting under the direction of a coach who directs 
the activity to meet the needs and interests of the student. 

180 intercollegiate Sports (M) (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of coach. An intercollegiate activity experience in individual and team 
sports for men in an educational setting under the direction of a coach who directs the 
activity to meet the needs and interests of the student. 

190 Team Management (2) 

Prerequisites: consent of coach, undergraduate studies adviser and department chair. Field 
experience in the management of an intercollegiate sport. May be repeated for max- 
imum of eight units of credit. 

201 Introduction to Physical Education and Recreation (3) 

Introduction to physical education programs in public and private agencies, personal, social 
and professional requirements of the physical education teacher and recreation leader, 
includes the origin and development of the professions of health education, physical 
education and recreation with emphasis upon their significance and function in con- 
temporary American culture. 

206 Techniques of Officiating Team Sports (2) 

Analysis of officiating techniques and rules necessary for officiating team sports. May be 
repeated for various sports or combinations of sports. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

210 Water Safety Instructor (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 110 (Life Saving) or equivalent and consent of instructor. This course 
prepares the student to teach swimming and life saving and to supervise aquatic 
programs. Successful completion of this course will qualify the student for certification 
as an ARC water safety instructor. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

214 Skin and Scuba Diving (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 110 (Skin Diving), or ability to swim 400 yards, tread water one minute, and 
swim 25 yards underwater and consent of Instructor. The techniques of skin and scuba 
diving, theory of diving, safety procedures and applications of diving will be covered. (1 
hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

300 Principles of Movement (3) 

Understanding of the basic principles of movement and their application to general 
movement patterns as applied to sport and human movement. 

301 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, successful completion of HE 102 (or equivalent) and 
consent of instructor. Designed to assist trainers, coaches, physical education instruc- 
tors, health educators, YMCA and playground personnel, and athletes in the 
prevention and care of athletic injuries. Emphasis on practical applications as well as 
theory. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

303 Conditioning for Athletes (3) 

Fundamentals of conditioning for those who plan to coach. Includes specific programs such 


HEPERA 213 


as circuit training, nutrition, motivation, weight control and kinesiologic factors for 
women's and men's athletics. 

310 Applied Scuba Diving (2) 

Application of scuba diving, including spear fishing, photography, specimen collecting, 
night diving, boat diving and others. 

318 Developmental Adaptations of Atypical (3) (Formerly 418) 

The study and selection of activities and programs for students physically unable to par- 
ticipate in the regular physical education program. 

320 Theory of Coaching: Sports (2) 

A physical education experience designed to help prepare the student to coach specific 
individual and team sports. Emphasis will include coaching techniques, conditioning of 
athletes, budget preparation, purchase and care of equipment, scheduling and design 
and care of facilities. May be repeated for credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

324 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

An analysis of current theories ot motor learning as related to human pertormanc e. 
Philosophical bases are developed from which basic principles are evolved. 

325 Organization and Administration of Physical Education (3) 

Cases studies involving human physical performance. Sequence of activities, individual 
needs, institutional patterns of organization and programming. 

326 Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports (2) 

Organization and administration of Intramural sports programs at the elementary, secondary 
and college level. Selected fieldwork is included. 

333 Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or department chair required for physical education ma- 
jors. Emphasis on characteristics of the child, particularly as these relate to physical 
growth and development; basic mechanical principles underlying efficient movement; 
and programs for physical needs of children in the elementary school. 

340 Analysis of Individual Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: prior experience in the specific sport(s) offered. Must demonstrate adequate 
proficiency in each sport offered. Analysis of a specific sportfs) including game play and 
skill performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May 
be repeated for credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

341 Analysis of Dual Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: prior experience in the speclicific sport(s) offered. Must demonstrate adequate 
proficiency In each sport offered. Analysis of a specific sport(s) including game play and 
skill performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May 
be repeated for credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

342 Analysis of Team Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: prior experience in the specific sport offered. Must demonstrate adequate 
proficiency in each sport offered. Analysis of a specific sport(s) Including game play and 
skill performance. Emphasis on understanding the specific nature of the activity. May 
be repeated for credit with emphasis on a different sport. 

350 History of Physical Education (3) 

Historical development of thought and practice in athletics and physical education in 
American education. 

356 Cultural Perspectives of Physical Activity (3) 

An interdisciplinary approach to the examination of physical activity in the cultural milieu. 
Study will cover historical and contemporary interpretations of the role of play, games 
and sports, dance and recreation in human life. 

360 Movement Anatomy (3) 

Description of human movement especially as witnessed in sports. Comprehension of mus- 
cle action and function in various sports. 

370 Physiology of Exercise (4) 

The study of physiological processes in physical activities and the effects of training upon 
performance. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

3% Tutorial (1) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, tutorial adviser and department chair. Student aide in 
general education activity classes. May be repeated for maximum of six units of credit. 


214 HEPERA 


420 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3) 

A study of the development and use of tests and measurements in physical education in the 
evaluation of objectives, programs and student achievement. 

425 Special Programs: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite; upper division standing. Group investigation of selected topics determined by 
professionals in the field. May be repeated for credit. 

436 Sport Psychology (3) 

Discussion and analysis of literature, research and issues dealing with psychological aspects 
of play, games and sport. (Same as Psychology 436) 

437 Sport Sociology (3) 

A critical examination of the interrelationships of sport and athletics with other aspects of the 
culture'; special emphasis on 20th-century America. 

140 Sports Medicine (3) 

Prerequisites: Upper division standing, PE 370 or its equivalent or consent of instructor. The 
study of advanced athletic training as it pertains to the various factors (environmental, 
nutritional) which alters the typical physiological response to exercise and training. 

442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Deals with objectives, methods and materials 
of teaching physical education at the secondary school level. Required before student 
teaching. Course Is part of the 12-unit education block and may not be taken separately. 

449A Student Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

450A Advanced Study in Performance: Badminton and Tennis (2) 

Prerequisites: analysis of badminton and tennis or consent of instructor. An in-depth study 
of skills, techniques and strategy of top level performance in badminton and tennis. 
Included is the theory and analysis of outstanding performance. 

450B Advanced Study in Performance: Gymnastics (2) 

Prerequisites: analysis of gymnastics or consent of instructor. An in-depth study of skills, 
techniques and strategy of top level performance in gymnastics. Included is the theory 
and analysis of outstanding performance. 

450C Advanced Study in Performance: Track and Field (2) 

Prerequisites: analysis of track and field or consent of instructor. An In-depth study of skills, 
techniques and strategy of top level performance in track and field. Included is the 
theory and analysis of outstanding performance. 

461 Biomechanics (3) (formerly 361) 

An in-depth study of the application of mechanics to the analysis of human movement. 

4% Physical Education Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of supervisor, undergraduate adviser and department chair. Par- 
ticipation as an assistant in planning, preparing, coaching, teaching in public school, 
college, or community physical education or recreation programs. May be repeated for 
a maximum of six units of credit. Credit/No credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of instructor supervising the study, un- 
dergraduate adviser and department chair. Independent inquiry into problems of 
topics of special interest beyond the scope of regular coursework. May be repeated for 
credit up to six units. 

505 Seminar in Sports Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Management approaches related to the administration of com- 
mercial and professional sports including office management, radio and TV 
negotiations, public relations, arena and stadium management, ticket sales, the legal 
aspects and the supervision of the medical aspects of professional sports. 

508 Statistical Methods in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 420 or equivalent. Includes statistical theory, data collection procedures, 
techniques or analysis of data and Interpretation of data related to physical education. 

510 Research in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. The role and functions of research in physical education in- 
cluded are the different types of research with tools of and equipment for the respec- 


NEPER A 215 


tive research. Selection and development of research problems and critique of com- 
pleted studies are stressed. 

515 Current Issues in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major or minor in physical education. A study of current 
problems and issues in physical education through a critical analysis of the literature in 
the field and research findings. 

516 Philosophical Bases of Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. Identification of 
philosophical schools of thought as related to physical education including the role of 
the philosophical process. Examination and application of the philosophical process in 
physical education. 

520 International Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. An in-depth study of the 
theory and practice of physical education and sports in selected foreign countries. 
Evaluation of foreign physical education programs in relation to programs witnessed in 
the United States. 

530 Administration and Supervision of Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with major in physical education. An in-depth study and critical 
analysis of existing programs in physical education in terms of established evaluative 
criteria and norms of practice. 

532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. Study in desirable practices, 
procedures, and factors Influencing curricular development in the field of physical 
education. Especially designed for the practicing teacher, supervisor of physical 
education, and the school administrator concerned with physical education in the total, 
school program. 

533 Facilities Development and Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and a major in physical education. Analysis of new trends and 
research in the development of indoor and outdoor facilities in planning programs in 
health education, physical education and recreation with special emphasis upon 
design, safety, features, site selection, building construction and equipment needs. 

540 Seminar in Adapted Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 318. Identification and solutions of problems in planning, organization, ad- 
ministration, and evaluation of adapted physical education programs at local, state and 
national levels. 

550 Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 505 and classified status. On-the-job training experiences under the super- 
vision of a fully trained practitioner in the field. Requirements include 10 hours [)er 
week of on-the-job training and 1 hour weekly conference with instructor. May be 
repeated once for credit. 

551 Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 370 or equivalent. A study of advanced theories of exercise and 
physiological function. 

552 Human Bio-Kinetics (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 461 or equivalent background in kinesiology. A study of advanced ihecjries 
and a detailed analysis of human movement. 

554 Advanced Studies in Motor Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, PE 324 or consent of Instructor. An in-depth study of current 
issues In the area of motor behavior. 

555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, coursework in kinesiology, physiology of exercise, bio- 
kinetics and consent of Instructor. Detailed study of contemporary training with specific 
attention to the development of those qualities involved in various sports. Experience in 
evaluation of the effects of training. 

5% Advanced Studies: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Graduate seminars designed to develop competencies in such 
areas as: historical, philosophical, sociological, psychological, scientific bases of sport 
and dance. Opportunities are provided for individualization of instruction with 
appropriate experiences. May be repeated for credit. 


216 HEPERA 


597 Project (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 508, PE 510 and consent of project committee. Individual work on an em- 
pirical problem. Conferences with project chair and committee, culminating in a pro- 
ject. 

598 Thesis (4) 

Prerequisites: PE 508, 510 and consent of thesis committee. Individual research on an em- 
pirical problem. Conferences with thesis chair and committee, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of the faculty adviser and department chair. 
Research for qualified graduate students desiring to pursue independent inquiry. May 
be repeated for credit. 

749 Student Teaching in Physical Education in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

For candidates seeking the Fisher standard credential in secondary teaching. See description 
and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 


RECREATION COURSES 

203 Recreation Programs and Activities (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and activity course, leadership in recreation 
programs, activities in recreation agencies. Laboratory experiences and practice in- 
cluded. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

204 Camping and Camp Leadership (3) 

A study of camping designed to make a person become a more skillful camper, to un- 
derstand better the values of camping and to prepare students to organize and discuss 
camping activities and the role of the counselor. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

208 Recreational Film-Making (2) 

The theory and practice of the art of creative film-making as it pertains to the field of 
recreation. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

425 Special Programs in Recreation (1-3) 

Investigation and practical study of recreation programs, theory, technique and/or 
methodology. Topic varies according to current offering. May be repeated for credit 
with different emphasis. 




218 


SCHOOL OF 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Dean: Leland J. Bellot 

Associate Dean: Don A. Schweitzer 


The curricula of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences are designed to provide op- 
portunities for the student to expand his general knowledge, to develop a beginning 
specialization, to investigate areas of intellectual interest, and, if he chooses, to prepare 
himself for specialized professional studies. 

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences is presently comprised of 18 departments and 
programs offering undergraduate majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science degree and master's programs leading to the Master of Arts, Master of Science or 
Master of Public Administration. 

DEPARTMENT OF AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Wacira Cethaiga 
Department Chair 

Cheryl Armstrong, William Coffer, Carl Jackson, Boaz Namasaka 

The required minimum for the major is 36 units: Afro-Ethnic Studies 103,* 107 and 240 plus 
six additional units from lower division offerings and a minimum of 24 units in upper division 
courses. 

The purpose of the program is to provide a specialization in Afro-American studies within 
the framework of a more generalized and comprehensive ethnic studies perspective; to ac- 
quaint students with the problems, successes and failures of America's largest minority 
group; to help students understand the nature of contemporary ethnic and social turmoil 
and guide them into constructive modes of thought about current issues; to enable students 
to see the black experience In America in a world setting; and to enable students to lead 
more effective lives In a culturally pluralistic and rapidly changing society. 

To accomplish this, it Is Important that prospective majors and others interested in a minor 
consult with the Afro-Ethnic faculty for advice. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 

This degree program is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a variety of 
needs in contemporary higher education: extending opportunities for university education 
to students who have long been under-represented due to cultural differences between 
their experiences and the cultural emphasis of higher education; providing for personal 
consultation between faculty and students of diverse cultural backgrounds; and revising 
curriculum and promoting research to give all students and faculty an understanding of the 
interaction of ethnic groups In past and contemporary civilizations. 

Required 

*103 Effective Communication (3) 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

240 Afro-American History (3) 

Lower Division electives: (6 units required) 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

104 Swahili (4) 

105 Swahili (4) 

230 The Native American (3) 

240A Afro-American History to 1865 (3) 


* Students can be exempted from Afro-Ethnic Studies 103 by an examination and/or consent of department. 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 219 

240B Afro-American History from 1865 to Present (3) 

245 Black Political History (3) 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

260 Cultural Identity and the Contemporary Black (3) 

270 The Amer-Asian (3) 

Upper division electives: (24 units required including at least 9 units from 309, 335, 346, 385 
and 410) 

300 Black Man/Black Woman (3) 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

303 Ancient and Modern African Culture (3) 

304 African Religion and Philosophy (3) 

305 Community Organizations (3) 

309 The Black Family (3) 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

331 Tribalism and Reservation Life (3) 

332 American Indian Leaders (3) 

334 Equal Employment Opportunity Laws (3) 

335 History of Racism (3) 

346 The African Experience (3) 

352 African Literature (3) 

380 Role of Education In Changing Attitudes (3) 

385 Schoolc and Minority Groups (3) 

400 The Black Man and Reconstruction (3) 

401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

402 Africa and Self-Determination (3) 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

411 Black Writers' Workshop (3) 

420 Philosophy of Black Radical Thought (3) 

422 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

431 Southwestern Indians (3^ 

460 Afro-American Music (3) 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

497 Ethnic Internship (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

MINOR IN AFRO>AMERICAN STUDIES 

Students interested In the Afro-American studies minor are required to take a minimum of 
21 units. This includes six units of lower division courses including Ethnic Studies 107 or 101 
and an additional course. Fifteen units of upper division courses including Ethnic Studies 301 
and 309 also must be taken. 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

A survey of the basic concepts and problems involved In an examination of the perspective 
through which black and brown people have come to see themselves in terms of their 
own heroes, culture, and contributions to societies in which they live and world society 
in general. 

103 Effective Communication (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic skills, emphasizing writing and communication skills, 
stressing the use of idioms, proper pronunciation, intonation, and correct English 
patterns. 

104 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

(Same as Swahili 101) 

105 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

(Same as Swahili 102) 


220 A fro- Ethnic Studies 


107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Introduction to the aims and objectives of the Afro-American studies program. The course 
will define and explore the basic terms and references that give substance to Afro- 
American studies. It will provide uniform purpose and direction for students who seek 
an education in Afro-American studies. 

230 The Native American (3) 

A study of the American Indian experience in the United States as seen from the Indian's 
point of view in comparison with that of the white man. Special attention will be fo- 
cused on the problems of American Indians today. 

240A Afro-American History to 1865 (3) 

A survey of the economic, political and social history of black Americans In the United States, 
African origins, the slave trade, slavery, religion, abolition, slavery and territory and the 
Civil War. 

240B Afro-American History from 1865 to Present (3) 

A survey of the social, economic, political and cultural history of black Americans. Among 
the topics will be the black reconstruction role, jim Crow, the relationship between 
black workers and white workers and labor unions, lynching, black protest. World War 
I, black emigration, the Harlem renaissance, the New Deal, World War II, the inten- 
sification of the black emigration, the civil rights movement, the Korean War, Vietnam 
War, the black power movement and cultural developments. 

245 Black Political History (3) 

Background in the political development of the United States and the influence of slavery 
there on to the present date. Included is a survey and analysis of the U. S. Constitution 
showing separate political development of white and black. 

250 Cultural Scars of Oppression (3) 

An examination of the process of socialization of the black man in America and Its imprints 
upon his psyche. 

260 Cultural Identity of the Contemporary Black Man (3) 

An examination and study of the "identity crisis" or lack of it in young black individuals in 
the United States. An in-depth analysis of the changing points of view of the black 
toward acculturation. 

270 The Amer-Asian (3) 

A survey of the Asian-American experience from the early 19th century. Includes: analysis of 
the discriminatory legislation as reflected in immigration quotas; investigation of the 
fallacies surrounding the Asian-American experience; and study of present day at- 
titudes in the Asian community. 

300 Black Man/Black Woman (3) 

A study of black value systems, double standards, machismo figure, communication barriers 
caused by predefined roles, stereotype expectations according to the traditional class 
status, and how they affect individual abilities and self-esteem. 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

A survey of African cultural characteristics in the New World, as they relate to contemporary 
events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

303 Ancient and Modern African Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced sophomore or upper division standing. A survey of the African 
cultures specifically West African contrasted with East African) before the period of ex- 
ploration and after colonization. A look at the present-day American black culture and 
an estimation of the carry-over cultures. 

304 African Religion and Philosophy (3) 

An analysis of African life, the relationship between man, God and nature, the systems of 
African philosophical thought in terms of God, man, ethics, justice, morals, good and 
evil, life and death, and their interrelationships. 

305 Community Organizations (3) 

A study of organization agencies, such as Partners for Progress, fair housing, SER, Urban 
League and the local welfare systems and their relevancy to the minority community. 
Students will be involved in field research and assess the goals and accomplishments of 
an organization selected for study. 

309 The Black Family (3) 

A study of the American social conditions that shaped the black family from the African 
cultural patterns that were destroyed during slavery to the family that exists today. 
Special attention will be given to the roles of poverty, racism and discrimination. 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 221 


311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

Patterns of role learning as they vary within subpopulations; changes over time in the values, 
attitudes, and goals of both the general culture and of subcultures; stereotypes and 
realities; understanding and dealing with cultural variation as well as cultural "norms." 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

Theory and practice of movement of African and Haitian peoples. An investigation of how 
movement (dance) acts as quasi-language in perpetuating the life style of African 
cultures and cultures of African descent. 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

A study of African and Afro-American art from prehistoric to contemporary times, including 
African influences in other art forms and a stylistic analysis of drawings, sculpture and 
paintings. 

331 Tribalism and Reservation Life (3) 

The role of tribalism in contemporary Indian affairs, with special reference to Indian self- 
determination on reservations in terms of political, economic and social lifeways 
relative to the dominant society: Will include field trips to local reservations. 

332 American Indian Leaders (3) 

The diverse philosophies of American Indian leaders from various Indian nations, the 
political, sociological and religious aspects of their lives, and the impact on Indian- 
white relationships. 

334 Equal Employment Opportunity Laws (3) 

Designed to give Insight into Civil Rights laws and legislation of equal employment (Affir- 
mative Action) laws, it will deal with Title VII, Civil Rights Act of 1964 Executive 11246 
and 11375. 

335 History of Racism (3) 

An examination of the current dynamics of racism in terms of the historical roots of that 
racial phenomenon both in American society and the world setting. 

346 The African Experience (3) 

A survey of major themes of African history from the origin of the black man and traditional 
African civilization through the African diaspora to the Institutional realities of Africa 
today. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352) 

385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) 

A study of the prevailing educational practices in regard to minority groups in elementary 
school through college, including minority students' failure patterns, what is being done 
to change failures, and the outcomes of these practices. 

400 The Black Man and Reconstruction (3) 

An examination of the first attempt to bring about the realization of an interracial 
democratic American society. Special attention will be given to the conduct, 
achievements and contributions of those Afro-Americans who participated in that short 
lived experiment. 

401 Black American and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting black 
Americans, with an emphasis on problem solving. Particular focus will be placed on the 
effects American social attitudes and institutions have had on the black community. 
Research will focus on these areas. 

402 Africa and Self-Determination (3) 

Prerequisite: Afro-Ethnic Studies 303. A study of the national characters of African nations, 
how they shed labels like "tribes" and united to demand the Independence they had 
lost. 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

A study of the literary endeavors of Afro-Americans and their cultural impact, especially in 
relationship to the social and psychological evolution of the Afro-American. 

411 Black Writers' Workshop (3) 

Practice in writing prose, fiction, drama, short stories, book reviews, poetry and essays from 
the perspective of the black experience. 

420 Philosophy of Black Radical Thought (3) 

The philosophy of black radical thought as it emerged from the black experience in America 
through slavery. Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction, pre-World War 11 and contem- 


222 American Studies 


porary times and as it is expressed through music, sermons, literature, social 
movements, drama and political action. 

422 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

Psychological aspects of black identity and the life styles that have risen from racism. The 
socioeconomic, political, cultural conditions which have fostered the blackness con- 
cept and the psychological devices used by blacks to survive. 

431 Southwestern Indians (3) 

The various Indian tribes of the Southwestern United States beginning with the Anasazi, 
Mogollon and Hobokam cultures and their evolution to contemporary times, including 
cultural changes and assimilation. 

460 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of black music in America; the sociological conditions that help produce various 
forms of black music; and influential black music in America. 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: junior status or consent of Instructor. Special seminar In selected topics in Afro- 
American studies. 

497 Ethnic Internship (3) 

Interdepartmental course to acquaint minority students with career opportunities In Industry 
and social services. Students work up to 20 hours per week and meet weekly for 
guidance. Supervision provided by instructor and cooperating agencies. Can be 
repeated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and acceptance of the subject by department chair and instructor 
directing the study. 

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
William Coffer 

The American Indian studies program brings faculty members and students (Indian and non- 
Indian) together in a mutual effort to provide instruction on the status, condition and destiny 
of Indians in contemporary America. The program includes Indian-oriented courses 
dedicated to an Indian interpretation of tribal experience in America as well as related 
courses on Indian themes. 

COURSES 

Afro-ethnic Studies 230 The Native American (3) 

English 320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

Anthropology 321 The American Indian (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 331 Tribalism and Reservation Life (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 332 American Indian Leaders (3) 

Economics 334 Economics of Poverty, Race and Discrimination (3) 

Anthropology 407 California Indian Languages (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 431 Southwestern Indians (3) 

Sociology 431 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Art 461 Art of North American Indian (3) 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN STUDIES 

FACULTY 
E. James Weaver 
Department Chair 

John Ibson, Karen Lystra, Robert Porfirio, Ann Untereiner 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The degree in American studies is an interdisciplinary program designed for students with a 
special interest in the American experience, including the overseas experience. It permits, 
through intensive study of the United States, greater perception of American society, both 
contemporary and historical. By providing students with an opportunity to discover the 
larger relationships among disciplines, the student may receive a better sense of the whole. 


American Studies 223 


The American studies degree prepares students for teaching either on the elementary or 
secondary level. The American Studies Department has been granted a waiver right by the 
Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing which means that American studies ma- 
jors, providing they follow an acceptable program of courses, can be granted either the 
multi-subject (elementary) or single-subject (history or social sciences) credential without 
having to take the state examination otherwise required by the Ryan Act. American studies Is 
also useful for any career in which an understanding of American culture Is Important, such 
as law, government, business, journalism, library work and other services, as well as serving 
as a foundation for advanced study at the graduate level. Students who plan to go to law 
school may In consultation with their adviser devise a program composed in part of courses 
offered by different departments that Is concerned with the relationship between law and 
society. 

Since two alternative programs are available, the student interested in becoming a major 
must consult with an American studies counselor to develop a course of study mutually 
satisfactory. The major consists of 36 units distributed as follows between the core program 
and either Plan a or b: 

I. Core program (12 units) required of all majors. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

301 The American Character (3) 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

401 Prosemlnar in American Studies (3) 

II. Alternative plans (24 upper division units in either plan — electives In American studies 
may be used in conjunction with courses in other departments) 

a. The student may choose to work in two but not more than three disciplines related 
to the American experience; I.e.: history and literature or sociology, anthropology 
and political science. 

b. The student may choose to pursue a specialized theme or subject; i.e., mass culture, 
women in America, urbanization, ethnic groups in American society, law and 
society, or the child and the family, or the student may choose to concentrate on 
20th-century American problems. 

Students interested in the American studies major must consult with the department chair 
before establishing an individual course of study. 


AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

With the concept of culture as a unifying principle, focus is on four separate time periods in 
order to provide the framework for an understanding of American civilization. Several 
different kinds of documents will be used to illustrate the nature and advantages of an 
interdisciplinary approach. 

301 The American Character (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or History 170A or B or consent of Instructor. Studies the 
changing national character. Reading reflects an Interdisciplinary approach; from 
poetry to sociology. Some attention is paid to the American Negro and Indian in ad- 
dition to the transplanted European. 

320 The Dark Age of American Film, 1944-1955 (3) 

American film prevalent in the decade following World War II. The style and attitudes of a 
specific genre of film, involving the works of such diverse directors as Hitchcock, Nick 
Ray, Robert Siodmak and Sam Fuller within a sociocultural framework. Weekly film 
viewing and discussion. 

333 Visual Arts in Contemporary America (3) 

Visual phenomena in America as they reveal changes In recent American culture. Areas 
covered include the ''high" arts (painting, sculpture) as contrasted with the "low" arts 
(advertising, television); the artist as innovator, alienation, the business world, and 
American values in art. 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of Instructor. 
Designed to provide the American studies major with an understanding and 
appreciation of methodology, theories of society and images of man as they effect 
American studies contributions to scholarship. 


224 Anthropology 

386A American Social History, 1750-1860 (3) 

(Same as History 386A) 

386B American Social History, 1865-1930 (3) 

(Same as History 386B) 

401 Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of instructor. 
Designed to permit students to examine the relationship between theory and 
application. Emphasis on analytic readings and research. Topics will be announced each 
semester. Check the Class Schedule for topics being considered each semester. 

402 Religion in the Development of American Society (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of instructor. An 
intensive study of the changing role of religion in shaping, reflecting, and challenging 
dominant American values and Institutions. Focus is on the 19th and 20th centuries, 
although some attention will be paid to the colonial period. 

410 Irish-Americans and the Cult of Success (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B; or consent of instructor. 
Irish-American subculture from the Potato Famine Emigration to the present. Focuses 
on the quality and extent of the ''Americanization" process, including the retention, 
repression, and loss of Irish ethnicity. 

411 The White Ethnic in America (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B. A historical and contem- 
porary look at the white, but not Anglo, ethnic groups in America. Among topics will be 
ethnic stereotypes, loss and survival in America of national and religious heritages, the 
breadth and depth among these groups of prejudice against non-whites. 

412 Freedom and Repression in American Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B. The Puritan origins of early 
American history, and their consequences for the culture's later development. 

415 The Hero in American Popular Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 or 301; or History 170A or B, or consent of instructor. 
Nineteenth and 20th-century materials including dime novels, pulps, detective fiction, 
comic strips, and films, will be utilized to examine the role of the hero in American Im- 
agination. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

(Same as English 425) 

450 Women in American Society (3) 

An effort to explain the rise and decline of feminism in America. The first half of the course 
will be lecture. The second half will be devoted to discussion aimed at comparing and 
contrasting the contemporary woman's movement with its predecessors. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in American studies to be taken with the consent of instructor 
and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

FACULTY 
Judy Suchey 

Department Chair (Acting) 

Aileen Baron, Lawrence Christensen, Marlene Dobkin de Rios, David Evans, Christopher 
Hulse, E. T. Jacob-Pandian, LeRoy Joesink-Mandeville, Roger Joseph, Fred Katz, Hans 
Leder, Ngapare Mills, Otto Sadovszky*, Richard See, Wayne Untereiner, Wayne Wanke, 
Corinne Wood, Jack Zahniser 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The major in anthropology is designed for students desiring a broad generalist background, 
students preparing to become teachers of social sciences, and students preparing for 
graduate work In anthropology and in advanced specializations in particular areas (Africa, 
Asia, etc.) or with crosscultural and international emphasis. 

The required minimum for the major Is 45 semester units, in addition to those units taken for 
the general education requirement. Anthropology 201, 202 and 203 are required, and the 

•University administrative officer 


Anthropology 225 

remaining 36 units must be in upper division courses. Of the 45 units, a minimum of 27 must 
be within the department, and a maximum of 36 within the department may be counted 
toward the major (any figure from 27 through 36 includes the nine units of introductory 
courses). Thus, depending on the variable of 27-36 units within anthropology, nine to 18 un- 
its of outside upper division courses will be taken to fulfill the major. A maximum of six units 
In directed studies (499) may be counted toward the major requirements, but this does not 
prohibit taking additional 499 units. 

The broad scope of anthropology permits a student to plan a program tailored to his goals. In 
consultation with the major adviser, each student must formalize his program with the ad- 
viser before the program of study is begun. Only those courses on the approved study plan 
will count toward the major. Changes in the program are permitted, but must have adviser 
approval. The student must see his adviser as soon as possible in the first semester of declar- 
ing the major, but no later than the end of that semester. 

Students considering advanced professional careers in research, teaching, or applications of 
anthropology are urged to explore and sample widely from course offerings In the other 
social sciences, the biological and natural sciences and the humanities and arts. Through a 
judicious selection of these courses It is hoped that anthropology majors will broaden their 
interests and diversify and develop their skills in working towards a variety of Individualized 
career objectives. 

TEACHING MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The minor In anthropology is Intended as a second field for persons completing a major in 
another discipline In preparation for a teaching credential. Twenty-one units must be taken 
in anthropology; 15 of these in upper division courses. Anthropology 201 or 203, 202, and 480 
are required. Two additional courses must be selected from areal offerings in the field: 
Anthropology 303, 321, 322, 324, 325, 326, 328, 340, 341, 342, 346, 347, 350, 351, 352, 360, and 
361. Another course must be selected from theoretical/institutional courses in the field: 
Anthropology 313, 315, 403, 404, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 417, 418, 420, 421, 
422, 423, 424, 425, 428, 429, 430, 440, 441, 442, 450, 455, 460, 462, 465, 466, 470, 490, and 491. A 
final course must be either Anthropology 401 or 481. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The program offers advanced study of general anthropology, while simultaneously en- 
couraging specialization in one (or more) of the traditional subdisciplines, archaeology, 
cultural anthropology, linguistics and physical anthropology. Opportunities for field and 
laboratory research and for other related learning experiences permit students to enlarge 
upon formal classroom training and to work independently with original data. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: 

1. A bachelor's degree with a minimum of 27 units In anthropology, including the following 
courses or their equivalents. 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) or 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) or 
409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

480 Flistory of Anthropology (3) 

481 Contemporary Anthropology (3) 

One areal course (e.g.. Anthropology 328, Peoples of Africa) 


226 Anthropology 

One theoretical or topical course (e.g., Anthropology 415, Culture and Personality: 
Psychological Anthropology) 

Reading courses and special examinations may be substituted for some of these prere- 
quisites by the department. 

2. A CPA of 3.0 (B) for all work taken in anthropology. 

3. Evaluation and acceptance by the Graduate Study Committee. The applicant must submit 
a letter of intent and at least two letters of recommendation and may be required to 
attend a personal interview at the discretion of the Graduate Study Committc'e. 

Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for admission to 
the program if they agree to complete additional courses, selected by the Graduate Study 
Committee, with at least a 3.0 (B) average. Students entering from other colleges and un- 
iversities and/or from fields other than anthropology may discuss appropriate course sub- 


stitutions with the Graduate Study Committee. 

Study Plan 

The study plan for the degree must include the following: Units 

1. Anthropology 501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research 3- 

2. Anthropology 502 Contemporary Theory in Cultural Anthropology 3 

3. EITHER Anthropology 598 Thesis or Anthropology 597 Project 6 

4. Two additional graduate seminars in anthropology 6 

5. Upper division or graduate work in anthropology 6 

6. Upper division or graduate work in anthropology or related fields 6 


Any adviser-approved 300- or 400-level course taken as a graduate student may be used for 
requirements 5 and 6. Anthropology 599, Independent Graduate Research, may be used for 
requirement 5 and/or 6. 

For continuation in the program an average of 3.0 (B) for all work in the study plan must be 
maintained. 

A thesis or a project must be completed for the degree. Normally a student will register for 
thesis or project two times, for three units each semester. Students must demonstrate 
reading knowledge of an appropriate (adviser-approved) foreign language prior to com- 
pletion of the degree. Occasionally, the Graduate Study Committee will entertain a petition 
for the substitution of an appropriate alternative skill, such as computer programming. The 
core courses. Anthropology 501 and 502, must be taken within the first 1 V 2 years of graduate 
work. 

The progress of graduate students will be reviewed early in each fall and spring semester. 
For further Information, consult the Department of Anthropology. 

See also "'The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

Man as a biological organism and in evolutionary perspective. Concepts, methods, findings 
and Issues in the study of the order primates, including the relationships between fossil 
monkeys, apes and man, and the significance of genetic diversity between modern 
populations. 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

The nature of culture and its significance for man. Uniformities and variations in human 
cultures. Cultural analyses of major institutional forms such as the family, economy, 
government, religion and art with an emphasis on preliterate peoples. A consideration 
of central problems of cultural comparison and interpretation. 

203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

Relationship of archaeology, culture history and culture process, including some discussion 
of field methods and analysis of archaeological data; the uses and abuses of 
archaeology. A survey of world culture history from Pleistocene beginnings to the 
threshold of civilization. 


Anthropology 227 


204 Man's Many Faces (3) 

The study and analysis of a broad selection of human societies, which will provide a perspec- 
tive on how human problems have been solved and the possibilities for new solutions 
to our own problems. 

303 Woman in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 302. A description, analysis and survey of the influence of 
biological determinants as they are shaped by cultural factors such as beliefs, values, ex- 
pectations and socially defined roles for women. The changing role of women In in- 
dustrial society will form an important analytical segment. 

305 Anthropological Simulation Games (3) 

Description, criticism, construction and participation in games simulating a variety of 
sociocultural situations. 

313 Human Genetics (3) 

(Same as Biological Science 313) 

315 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

321 The American Indian (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of North 
American Indians north of Mexico; origins, languages, culture areas, cultural history; 
the impact of European contacts. 

322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. General survey of the ethnology of 
the Mesoamerican culture-area, with treatment of various Indian societies representing 
the principal sub-areas. 

324 Ancient Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. A culture history survey of the prin- 
cipal cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica from the dawn of incipient agriculture to 
the Spanish conquest. 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of Central and 
South America. Description of selected cultures representative of different cultural 
areas before and after contacts with Western countries. 

326 Prehistory of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Archaeological, physical and 
ethnohistorical survey of the various natural zones and culture areas of South America, 
lower Central America and the West Indies. 

328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of Africa with 
special emphasis on social change and contemporary African problems. 

340 Aboriginal Peoples of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural areas outside the 
centers of high civilizations of China and japan. Emphasis on steppe-nomadism, Siberia, 
and ethnic splinter groups between India and the Philippines, with focus upon their In- 
fluence on the cultural centers and vice versa. 

341 Peoples of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Description and analysis of the 
religious, social and technological systems of the civilizations of japan and China, as 
well as the Impact of nomadic herders of North and Central Asia upon those centers. 
Also, a comparison of community studies on these regions. 

342 Peoples of India (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Physical and social anthropology of 
India; development of regional cultural traditions; continuity and changes in patterns 
and processes of village religion, politics, and economy; transformation of cultural traits 
in urban/village interaction. 

345 Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of the Middle East 
with descriptions of selected cultures (Arab urban, nomadic, jewish, Turk, Berber, 
Kurd). 

346 Archaeology of Palestine (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 203 or consent of instructor. Survey of culture history of ancient 


228 Anthropology 

Palestine from the Paleolithic to historic times, with emphasis on changes through time 
in settlement patterns, resource base, and sociopolitical organization. 

347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey of the indigenous 
peoples and cultures of the Pacific Islands, including Australia. Special attention is given 
to the forces and processes contributing to social change in Island communities and 
current problems being faced by them. 

350 Peoples of Western Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Representative groups considered 
In modern and historical perspective, stressing especially rural-urban relationships and 
the dynamics of change. 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Peasant cultures of Russia, 
Southeast Europe, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the Baltic area, their traditional way of 
life and the impact of industrialization and Communist ideology. 

352 Peoples of Ancient Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A survey of the cultural and social 
Institutions of the peoples of pre-Christian Europe. Particular attention will be paid to 
the Greek, Italic, Germanic and Celtic peoples, and readings will be drawn largely from 
original ancient writers. 

360 Contemporary American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Application of anthropological 
methods, categories of analysis, and types of interpretation to American culture. Survey 
and critique of selected community studies and other kinds of relevant research. 

361 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. An introduction to African culture. 
A survey of African cultural characteristics In the New World, as they relate to contem- 
porary events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and six additional units of anthropology or consent of in- 
structor. Anthropological field research by students on various problems using par- 
ticipant observation techniques. 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or 203 and consent of Instructor. Excavation of a local 
archaeological site. Archaeological mapping, photography and recording. Laboratory 
methods of cataloging, preservation, description and interpretation of archaeological 
materials. Saturday field sessions, six fieldwork hours per week. May be repeated once 
for credit as an elective. 

404 Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 203 and 403. The employment of various physical data 
collecting techniques (e.g., photographic, palaeo-magnetic) in the field and the analysis 
of artifact collections and data from previous field operations in the laboratory. May be 
repeated once for credit as an elective. 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 406) 

407 California Indian Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 406. Survey of the Indian languages of California; descriptive 
analysis of their grammatical structure and their linguistic Interrelationship. (Same as 
Linguistics 407) 

408 The Uralic Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 406. The grammatical structure of the Uralic languages in Eastern 
Europe and Siberia and their interrelationship. (Same as Linguistics 408) 

409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Nature and functions of language; language structure and change; classification of 
languages; use of linguistic evidence in anthropology. (Same as Linguistics 409) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The study of language as a factor in 
culture. Trends In the study of language and culture. (Same as Linguistics 410) 

411 Folklore (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. An introduction to the study of 


Anthropology 229 

folktales, myths, legends, proverbs, riddles and other forms of the verbal traditions of 
peoples. Major concepts and theories and research methods in the study of folklore. 

412 Comparative Oral Literature (3) 

A comparative survey of oral literature and its role in society. The types of oral narratives, 
their themes, meanings, and functions will be analyzed. 

413 Ethnological Music (3) 

Music, music making and musicians in various nonliterate societies. 

415 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and Psychology 331 or 351 or Sociology 341 or consent of in- 
structor. Comparative study of the relationship between the individual and his culture. 
Child training in nonwestern cultures. Survey of important concepts, studies, and 
research techniques. 

416 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

417 Life Quests (3) 

An examination of contemporary ways to wisdom and humanness in cross-cultural and 
historical perspectives. A consideration of some new and comparative approaches to 
understanding the life cycle, development and fulfillment of Individual personalities. 

418 Mental Illness in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Problems in the cross-cultural definition and treatment of mental illness. Cross-cultural 
perspectives on symptomatology and etiology, culture bound disorders, the folk healer, 
and the relationship between cultural change and mental disorders. 

420 Primitive Value Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Study of what properly is con- 
sidered ''common sense" in the everyday life of people living within differing 
sociocultural environments. 

421 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of Instructor. Examination of beliefs and practices 
in the full human variation of religious phenomena, but with an emphasis on primitive 
religions. The forms, functions, structures, symbolism, and history and evolution of 
man's religious systems. 

422 Jewish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 422) 

423 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

An analysis of the metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the "grammars" of the art, 
poetry, languages, myths, music and rituals of various nonliterate and literate peoples 
and their development into creative experiences. 

424 Hallucinogens and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. A cross-cultural survey of mind-altering drugs, especially 
hallucinogens, as they have been utilized in religion, healing, divination, witchcraft and 
magic. 

425 Anthropology of Law and Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Sources of law-government in 
primitive societies; the cultural background of law; the functions and development of 
law and government in primitive politics; transitions to and comparisons with classical 
and modern legal and political systems. 

428 Social Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A study of the social organization of 
preindustrial societies; religious, political and economic institutions; status and value 
systems; conditions and theories of change. 

429 Kinship and Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 428 or consent of instructor. Kinship systems in 
primitive society and their significance in the organization of social life. Theories of 
kinship, marriage regulations, and kinship role patterns. 

430 Economic Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Analysis of anthropological con- 
cepts of economy, ecology, and technology; relationship between habitat, economy, 
and culture. A survey of the different types of economic systems found throughout the 
world; outline of the economic development of mankind. 


230 Anthropology 

440 Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Biological Science 404 Is suggested. Advanced primate 
evolution with emphasis on the origin of Homo sapiens as evidenced in the fossil record 
and through biochemical and molecular studies. Evolutionary theory and problems in 
human evolution. 

441 Human Variation (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Biological Science 313 and 412 are suggested. A survey of 
the processes underlying and the theories for the existence of the present variation 
between and within human populations. The genetics of human populations and the 
study of the significance of racial classifications. 

442 Medical Anthropology (3) 

A survey of human health and disease and their relationship to cultural practices, beliefs and 
environmental factors; histories of various diseases as factors of cultural change; ex- 
aminations of varying health care delivery systems. 

450 Culture and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or Education 301 or consent of instructor. The transmission 
of values, Implicit cultural assumptions, and the patterning of education in cross- 
cultural perspective, with special attention to American culture and development 
problems. 

455 Ethno-ecology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and consent of instructor. A comparative study of culture 
determining man's impact on his environment. Our factual knowledge, different major 
approaches, important research issues, and methods of study will be the subject of this 
survey. 

460 Culture Change (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and 301 or consent of instructor. Interrelations between 
cultural, social and psychological processes In the dynamics of culture growth and 
change. Impact of western technology on tribal and peasant societies. Anthropological 
contributions to the planning of directed sociocultural change In selected areas. 

462 Applied Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 plus nine other units of anthropology or consent of instruc- 
tor. The uses of anthropological skills and sensitivities in approaching contemporary 
human problems. Includes examination of Issues related to directed cultural change, 
organizational development, program planning and evaluation, and professional ethics. 

465 Alternative Futures (3) 

A study of the growing literature on the future and a consideration of its implications for 
anthropology and the other social sciences and humanities. 

466 Myths for Moderns (3) 

A comparative multidisciplinary exploration of the nature and needs for mythic types of 
belief systems In contemporary life. Examination and Interpretation of selected myths. 

470 Philosophical and Behavioral Foundations of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 and open to lower division students with the consent of In- 
structor. Consideration of basic assumptions and contexts of anthropological work. The 
synthesis of ideas and methods into professional skills and careers. 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A history of the principal con- 
tributions of leading anthropologists 1850-1950; review of evolutionary, diffusionist, 
historical, particularlst, configurationalist, and culture and personality approaches in 
anthropology. 

481 Contemporary Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. A study of the principal con- 
tributions of anthropologists from 1950 to the present; review of neoevolutionlst, 
sociological, structuralist, psychological and symbolic approaches in anthropology. 

490 Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in anthropology selected by the faculty and 
students participating in the course. May be repeated for credit. 

491 Internship in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: 18 upper division units in anthropology and/or related fields. Career oppor- 
tunities in anthropology. On-the-job training under faculty supervision will provide op- 


Chicano Studies 231 

portunity to translate theoretical concepts into vocational activity through museum, in- 
dustry or governmental service. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of adviser. Student selection of 
an individual research project involving either library or fieldwork. Conferences with 
the adviser as necessary, and the work results in one or more papers. May be repeated 
for credit. 

501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202, 401 and consent of Instructor. Examination, analysis and 
evaluation of the contemporary methodological spectrum in anthropology and of new 
trends In research planning and Implementation. Consideration and critique of specific 
cases involving differing research designs. 

502 Contemporary Theory in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 480 or consent of instructor. Critique of the basic assumptions 
and theoretical positions of leading contemporary anthropologists. 

504 Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate 
standing or consent of instructor. The topic chosen and a general outline of the seminar 
is circulated prior to registration. May be repeated. 

505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 505) 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 507) 

508 Modern Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 507 or Foreign Languages 507 or Linguistics 507 or consent of in- 
structor. Speech 404 and Anthropology 410 recommended. Study of contemporary 
theories of grammar, with special emphasis on transformational, generative, logical and 
electromechanical bases and techniques of utterance analysis. (Same as Linguistics 508) 

550 Seminar in Problems in the Teaching of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion of a variety of methods and materials for the 
teaching of anthropology at primary, secondary, and undergraduate college levels. 

592 Field Methods in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 505 and 507 or consent of instructor. Methods of analysis and 
description of language structures. Data elicited from informants will be analyzed and 
described. Controlled study of a live informant's language. (Same as Linguistics 592) 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The writing of a thesis based on 
original field or laboratory research, library study or an educational project, and its 
analysis and evaluation. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Individual research on a field, laboratory, or library study, 
with conferences with a project adviser as necessary, and resulting in one or more 
papers. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHICANO STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Isaac Cardenas 
Department Chair 
Dagoberto Puentes, Joseph Platt 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE CHICANO STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 

The degree program in Chicano studies is designed to provide an effective vehicle in fulfill- 
ing a variety of pressing needs in contemporary higher education. Among these needs are to 
educate students to the culture, language, education, history, politics, and socioeconomics 
of the Chicano population In the United States. 

The program emphasizes preparation for: (1) those interested in bilingual-bicultural 
education to meet elementary, secondary and cross-cultural specialist credentials; (2) 
students pursuing advanced degrees (M.A. and Ph.D.); (3) those entering a variety of oc- 
cupations in urban affairs, government, social work, school administration, counseling. 


232 Chicano Studies 


business, criminology, law, foreign service and other related areas; and (4) majors In other 
academic fields such as liberal ’studies, history, sociology, psychology, literature, 
anthropology, who wish to include additional scope to their field. 

The Chicano studies major consists of 36 units, 12 lower and 24 upper division.* 


Units 

Lower Division 12 

Required: 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3). 

Electives: 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

120 Bilingual Oral Expression (3) 

200 Chicano Movement (3) 

213 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3) 

218A Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

218B Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

Upper Division 

Required: (6 units to be selected from the following) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

453 Mexico since 1906 (3) 

Electives: 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

411 Mexican Arts and Mexican Society (3) 

415 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

441 Religion in the Chicano Society (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Total 36 

MINOR IN CHICANO STUDIES 

The minor in Chicano studies consists of 24 units in the following areas: 

Required lower division courses (6 units) 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Required upper division courses (6 units) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 


* Students must consult with their advisers to develop an approved study plan. 


Chicano Studies 233 


440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Approved electives 

Twelve units of approved coursework in lower and upper division classes that are selected by 
the adviser. 

TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The B.A. and minor in Chicano studies are approved by the State Board of Education for 
those seeking an elementary or secondary teaching credential. Additionally, the department, 
has submitted an application to the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing for 
obtaining a waiver for multiple subject (elementary) credential objective. Students should 
consult an adviser in the department and in the School of Education for meeting teaching 
credential requirements and waiver Information. 

THE BILINCUAL/CROSS-CULTURAL SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 

Requirements for this credential are described in a brochure available at the offices of the 
Department of Chicano Studies, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 
the School of Education. The Chicano studies component of the specialist credential 
program requires six units from the following Chicano studies courses: 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 


CHICANO STUDIES COURSES 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

A methodical presentation of the basic communication skills emphasizing oral and written 
expression which shall include a unit on the mechanics of writing and reporting on a 
term paper. 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

A study of the role of the Chicano in the United States. Special emphasis on the Chicano's 
cultural values, social organization, urbanization patterns, and the problems In the area 
of education, politics and legislation. 

^ 120 Bilingual Oral Expression (3) 

Recommended: Chicano Studies 102 and/or 103. Designed to train the bilingual Chicano in 
the process of oral expression in English and barrio Spanish. Pertinent topics will be 
selected in the areas of education, law enforcement and contemporary issues for 
bilingual oral expression. 

200 The Chicano Movement (3) 

A survey of the history of the Chicano movement, its present activists and their intellectual 
philosophies. 

213 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

The Spanish language as It Is spoken in the United States today. Designed to improve the 
basic communication skills in Spanish for students from Spanish-speaking backgrounds; 
emphasis on vocabulary building, syntactical analysis and conversation. Designed for 
Chicano students but not restricted to them. 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3,3) 

Chicano creative writing utilizing the barrio's trilingual expressions. Student work as well as 
the work of contemporary Chicano writers will be analyzed. 

218A,B Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

A survey of the Chicano's cultural heritage from the pre-Cortesian period to the present. A 
historical analysis of the music, literature, art and dance of the Chicano. A — Literature 
and art. B — History, music and dance. 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Introduction to the basic characteristics of the Mexican, especially the Chicano society and 
culture and its ramifications In the United States today. Covers the period of 1519 to the 


234 Chicano Studies 


present day. Emphasis is placed on the arts, literature, and history of Mexico and the 
Chicano in the United States. 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

Analysis of the Calo language of the southwestern states of the United States. Students will 
study the bicultural language of the Chicanos, origin, development and contemporary 
use In the barrios. 

301 La Raza Unida and Third Party Politics (3) 

The role of La Raza Unida as a political instrument of the Chicano community. The party's 
leadership, ideologies and differing political strategies in various states and at the 
national level. 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

A historical and cultural survey of the principal pre-Columbian cultures of Mexico and their 
significance for Mexican society. 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

The Chicano family development as an American social institution. Historical and cross- 
cultural perspectives. The socio- and psychodynamics of the Chicano family. 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 200 or 220 or consent of instructor. Classroom instruction 
covering the major characteristics of the barrio. Supervised fieldwork in the barrio is re- 
quired. Analysis of the barrio or agency will be made after fieldwork is completed. (2 
hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 306. Classroom instruction covering the major characteristics 
of the barrio and supervised fieldwork in the local barrios. An analysis of the barrio or 
agency will be made after fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

320 Chicano Art (3) 

An overview of Mexican art forms from pre-Cortesian epochs to the contemporary artists, 
with emphasis on the use of oil painting techniques as employed by modern Mexican 
and Chicano artists. 

336 Main Trends in Spanish American Literature (3) 

An introduction to the main currents of Spanish American literature emphasizing contem- 
porary works. Close attention will be given to the relation between the artistic ex- 
pression and the ideological values of the period. 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 101 or 106, or 220, or 237, or consent of instructor. A study of 
the modern Chicano writers in the United States. Special emphasis will be given to 
Allurista, Corky Gonzales, Octavio Romano, el teatro campesino and the major 
Chicano magazines and newspapers. 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

A study of the cultural conflicts in Mexico as seen by the contemporary thinkers of Mexico 
and the United States. Special emphasis will be given to the urban and rural problems. 

411 Mexican Arts and Mexican Society (3) 

Study of the ways in which Mexican artists, architects and designers have reacted to the 
political, social and artistic developments in Mexico and the world. 

415 Chicano Music Appreciation (3) 

A survey of Mexican music ranging from the pre-Cortesian period to the present in Mexico 
and in the southwestern states of the United States. The history and music are presented 
by lectures and recordings. 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher In the Barrio (3) 

Designed to imprpve the oral expression of teachers in the barrio elementary schools. 
Special emphasis will be given to the language patterns of the Chicano students and 
their parents. 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

Survey and analysis of the NahautI, Mexican and Chicano literature from the pre-Columbian 
period to the present. The latter part of the course will focus on contemporary Chicano 
writers. 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

Study of the Chicano child from preschool through grade six. Emphasis on motor, physical, 
social, intellectual and emotional growth and development and their effect on school 
adjustment and achievement. Observation of preschool and grade school children will 
be arranged. 


Communications 


235 


432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

A survey of the Chicano adolescents' social, Intellectual and emotional growth and 
development. Special emphasis will be placed on the bicultural pressures from the 
barrio, family structure, school and achievement values. 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

An in-depth study and analysis of the literature of Mexico since 1940. Emphasis on the works 
of Carlos Puentes, Luis Spota, Rodolfo Usigli, Xavier Villarrutia, juan Jose Arreola, Oc- 
tavio Paz, Roberto Blanco Moheno and Luis G. Basurto. 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish and Chicano Studies 237 and 302 recommended. 
Study and discussion of the emergence of the Chicano movement dealing with 
political, economic and sociological facets. Analyzes the writings of the Nahuatl, 
Spanish, Spanish-American and Chicano writers with special attention on the contem- 
porary writers. 

441 Religion in the Chicano Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 220 or consent of instructor. A comparative study of American 
Protestant and Mexican Catholic thought and their Influence on the values held by 
Anglos and Chicanos. Special emphasis will be placed on the contemporary issues. 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

History of the Chicano from the pre-Columbian period to the [)resent. S})e( iai emph.isis on 
the Chicano's changing role in the United States, his cultural identity crisis ,ind his 
achievements. 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

Analysis and discussion of the socioeconomic and political problems confronting the 
Chicano, with emphasis on proposed solutions. Particular focus on the effect that social 
institutions have had on the Chicano community. Study and research will be made In 
these areas. 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division class standing. A study of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 stress- 
ing the political, economic and social features of this period. Special emphasis on the 
Revolution and its contributions In the fields of art, literature and social reforms. 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

Theory of urban politics and evaluation of Issues that affect the Chicanos and American 
society. Evaluations and surveys will be made on political organizations in the Etispanic- 
surnamed communities. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and approval by the department chair and instructor(s) in charge 
of directing the study. An opportunity to do independent study under the guidance of 
the faculty, of a subject of special interest to the student. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

FACULTY 
Kenward Atkin 
Department Chair 

James Alexander, William Berg, Fenton Calhoun, George Fukasawa, Mary Lynn Elartman, 
Carolyn Johnson, Raynolds Johnson, Frank Kalupa, Martin Klein, Mary Koehler,* 
George Mastroianni, J. William Maxwell, Rick Pullen, Albert Ralston, Marvin Rosen, 
Ted Smythe, Larry Taylor 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Communications emphasizes study of broacJ 
principles of communications, functions of the mass media in a democratic society, and 
theories relevant to informing, instructing, and persuading through communications media. 
It may serve as preparation for careers in mass media, business, industry, government and 
education; and as a preparation for graduate and professional schools. 

A master of arts program in communications provides advanced study in communications 
and related disciplines for those seeking professional careers in teaching, research and 
development, and mass media. 


• University administrative officer 


236 Communications 


Programs in the department are designed to provide both theory and practice in the use of 
print, broadcast and film media of communication to inform, instruct and persuade. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

A communications major is required to take 15 units of core requirements in addition to 21 
units in a chosen emphasis. The department offers six emphases to choose from: advertising, 
news (journalism), photocommunications, public relations, technical and business com- 
munications, and telecommunications. Special emphases designed to meet the needs and 
interests of individual students also may be arranged. 

Collateral requirements: Twelve units of upper division coursework in other departments 
approved by the adviser are also required. Collateral courses for each emphasis are 
recommended by the emphasis coordinator. The major totals 48 units. 

COMMUNICATIONS CORE 
Nine units of required coursework: 

Com 233 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Com 407 Communication and the Law (3) 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

Plus six units selected from the following: 

Com 410 Principles of Communications Research (3) 

Com 426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Com 427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Com 428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Com 431 Mass Communications In Communist Systems (3) 

Com 480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

COMMUNICATIONS EMPHASES 

Every communications major must ‘ielect and complete 21 units of coursework in a major 
emphasis. 

ADVERTISING 

Coordinator: Fenton Calhoun 

Com lOl Communications Writing (3) 

Com 350 Introduction to Advertising (3) 

Com 353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Com 354 Retail Advertising (3) 

Com 356 Advertising Production (1,1) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

Plus five units selected from the following: 

Com 217A,B; 359; 361; 380; 381; 446; 451 

And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 
viser. 

NEWS COMMUNICATIONS (JOURNALISM) 

Coordinator: James Alexander 

Com 101 Communications Writing (3) 

Com 102 Communications Writing (3) 

Com 217A,B Introduction to Black-and-White Photography (2) 

Com 319 Communications Photography (2) 

Com 332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Com 335 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 

Com 338 Newspaper Production (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 


PHOTOCOMMUNICATIONS 

Coordinator: Marvin Rosen (Acting) 

Six units of writing courses selected from the following: 

Com 101, 102, 301, 334, 353, 362, 403 (Note: Com 101 Is a prerequisite to all the previousl> 
listed courses except 301 and 334.) 

Com 217A,B,C Introduction to Black-and-White Photography (3) 


Communications 237 


Com 220A,B/C Introduction to Color Photography (3) 

Com 319 Communications Photography (2) 

Com 321 Advanced Color Photography (2) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

Plus three units selected from the following: 

Com 306, 311, 338, 358, 359 

And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 
viser. 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Coordinator: Frank Kalupa 

Com 101 Communications Writing (3) 

Com 361 Theories and Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Com 362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

Com 463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Plus seven units selected from the following: 

Com 217A,B,C; 332; 338; 350; 353; 358; 359; 363; 465; 497 
And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 
viser 

TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

Coordinator: Martin Klein 

Com 101 Communications Writing (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

An additional six units from the following: 

Com 102 Communications Writing (3) 

Com 301 Writing for Telecommunications (3) 

Com 334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Com 358 Graphic Communications (3) 

Plus 10 units selected from the following: 

Com 217A,B; 303; 332; 359; 375; 380; 403 

And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 
viser. 


♦TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Coordinator: George Mastrolanni 

Com 301 Writing for Telecommunications (3) 

Com 371 RadioTelevislon News and Public Affairs (3) 

Com 380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

Com 390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

Plus seven units selected from the following: 

Com 217A,B; 220; 290; 311; 335; 375; 381; 411; 473; 475; 477; 479; 490 
And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by ad- 
viser. 


SPECIAL EMPHASIS 

Coordinator: Marvin Rosen 

Students whose interests involve more than one emphasis may seek approval of a special 
emphasis. Minimum requirements for the special emphasis are the same as for other 
emphases: 

15 units of core requirements; 21 units of coursework In communications, at least six of 
which will be in writing courses and 12 in upper division; and 12 collateral units of upper 
division courses in other departments. Approval of the special emphasis plan must be sought 
in advance from the Department of Communications. For further details, contact the special 
emphasis coordinator. 


* Tolocommunicalions students who wish to emphjsi/e film in broach astin^ should take. ( om 29()A or 29015, 311, 375; 411; 
and 439. 


238 Communications 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATIONS 


Twenty-one units approved by the department are required for a minor in communications. 
The following represents a basic framework: 

Core (9 units to be selected from the following) 

Com 233 Mass Communication and Modern Society (3) 

Com 407 Communications and the Law (3) 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

Com 426 World Communications Systems (3) 

Com 428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Com 431 Mass Communications In Communist Systems (3) 

Com 480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Emphasis (12 units) 

Twelve units of coursework required in an emphasis approved by the coordinator Including 
three units of communications writing courses. 

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 

The Department of Communications has developed an internship program designed to 
provide academic and practical experience for students in all emphases. The student must 
apply for work experience one semester in advance of the senior level semester in which the 
Internship is to be completed. Supervision is provided by the internship cooidinators and 
the cooperating agency. 

TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The department offers major and minor programs approved by the State Board of Education 
for those seeking an elementary or secondary teaching credential. For advisement, consult 
the department and an adviser in the School of Education. 

Elementary 

Communications majors may earn the multiple subject credential under the Ryan Act 
without being required to take the teac her examination. All departmental emphases cjualify 
for this program under an approval granted by the California State Commission for leacher 
Preparation and Licensing. Interested students should consult the department's multiple 
subject credential adviser at an early date to develop an approved study plan. 

Secondary 

Communications majors planning a teaching career at the secondary level must complete 
the communications core and News Communication emphasis. 

In addition, It Is recommended that a student have at least one semester of Communications 
358 or 359. The student must also fulfill professional education course requirements. Both 
journalism Education 442 and 749 (Student Teaching) are offered by the department. (See 
journalism Education.") 

Elementary and Intermediate 

A program of courses totaling 36 units may be designed for elementary and intermediate 
teacher candidates in consultation with the department chair. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

The Master of Arts In Communications is designed to provide advanced study in com- 
munications and related disciplines and to develop a research emphasis or option related to 
the processes and effects of communications. These options are: advertising, journalism 
education, news, public relations, technical communication or telecommunication. 

Students completing the Master of Arts in Communications with an emphasis in journalism 
education research are eligible for journalism teaching positions in high school or com- 
munity college. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 


Communications 239 


A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: an undergraduate grade-point average of 2.75 or 
3.0 in the major; satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude 
test; and satisfactory coursework appropriate for the emphasis selected. Subject matter 
deficiencies, as determined by the .emphasis adviser and approved by the department 
graduate adviser, are to be removed prior to advancement to candidacy. 

Study Plan 

Students are required to complete 30 units of approved study, including 18 units in 500-level 
communications courses and 12 units of emphasis-related courses. Six of the 18 units of 
graduate level courses are applicable to the thesis or project requirement. 

For further information, consult the Department of Communications. See also "The Program 
of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


COMMUNICATIONS COURSES 

100 Introduction to Communications (3) 

A survey of the mass media and their relationship to society today. 

101 Communications Writing (3) 

An introductory course covering principles of reporting and writing, with emphasis on con- 
tent organization, conciseness, and clarity. Typing ability required. 

102 Communications Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 101 or consent of instructor. Concentration on reporting and writing of 
more advanced material. Typing ability required. 

103 Applied Writing (3) 

Principles and practice in organizing and preparing letters, reports, documents, and 
proposals required in most occupations. Designed especially for non-communications 
majors. 

217A Introduction to Black and White Photography (1)* 

Camera, accessories, materials, exposure, subject treatment and composition. (No 
laboratory) 

217B Introduction to Black and White Photography (1) 

Prerequisite: Com 217A or concurrent enrollment. Laboratory processing, printing, finishing 
and studio techniques. 

217C Introduction to Black and White Photography (1) 

Prerequisite: Com 217B or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate composition and treatment; 
special photographic techniques and applications. 

220A Introduction to Color Photography (1)* 

Prerequisite: Com 217A or concurrent enrollment. Theories of light and color. Principles of 
color photography. Students use commercially processed color transparency film. (No 
laboratory) 

220B Introduction to Color Photography (1)* 

Prerequisite: 220A or concurrent enrollment. Color slides in communication. Developing 
theme and story in slide presentations. (No laboratory) 

220C Introduction to Color Photography (1) 

Prerequisite: 220B or concurrent enrollment. Theory and principles of color film and print 
processing. Limited laboratory practice in negative and positive film processing. 

233 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) (Formerly 333) 

Basic structure and interrelationships of newspapers, magazines, films, radio and television, 
in terms of their significance as social instruments and economic entities in modern 
society. 

234 Sports Writing (3) 

Preparation and writing of sports articles for specific audiences. 

280 History of Radio and Television (3) 

(Same as Theatre 280) 


* Students wishng a non-laboratory introduction to photography may enroll in Com 217A or 220A. 


240 Communications 


290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3,3) 

History and development of the motion picture as an art form and social force. A — the 
motion picture from its origins until 1945. B— the contemporary cinema from 1945 to 
present. (Same as Theatre 290A,B) 

301 Writing for Telecommunication (3) 

An introduction to theory and principles of writing employed in the broadcast and film 
media. 

303 Business Communications (3) 

Design and implementation of communications systems for various business enterprises. 
Utilizes graphic analysis and analytical techniques. Includes practice in producing 
messages and channeling them to avoid ambiguities. 

306 Photocommunications Production (2) 

Prerequisite: 10 units of photography or consent of instructor. Advanced production of 
photographs and photographic communications for the mass media, business, 
education, government, industry and science. May be repeated for credit to a max- 
imum of six units. (4 hours activity for each 2 units) 

311 Introduction to Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 217A,B or equivalent. Introduction to theory and practice of motion pic- 
ture photography and film production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

319 Communications Photography (2) 

Prerequisite: Com 217A,B or consent of instructor. Creative aspects and techniques of mak- 
ing photographs for publication: newspaper and magazine news, advertising, feature, 
sports and women's pages. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

321 Advanced Color Photography (2) 

Prerequisites: Com 217A,B,C. Positive and negative color fiLn processing, sensitometry, and 
color printing. 

332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Practice and theory of editing infor- 
mational materials for publication in newspapers and magazines. (6 hours activity) 

334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines. Including study of sources, methods and 
markets. 

335 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Coverage in depth of significant 
events pertinent to operations of governmental units and related organizations. 

338 Newspaper Production (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A lecture activity course in which members of the (lass 
constitute the editorial staff of the university newspaper. The group meets four hours 
per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing and makeup, followed by 
production. With consent of instructor, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 
nine units of credit. (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

350 Introduction to Advertising (3) 

Survey of advertising in America. Emphasis on the language and art of advertising and its role 
in marketing. 

353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of Instructor. Writing of copy and layout of adver- 
tisements, based on study of sales appeals, attention factors and illustrations. (6 hours 
activity) 

354 Retail Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of instructor. Principles and procedures of retail adver- 
tising; utilization of mass media; supervised field assignments In the analysis of specific 
advertising needs. 

356 Advertising Production (1) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of instructor. Preparation of advertisements for the unive*r- 
sity newspaper and magazine. Advertising accounts assigned to each student. Weekly 
critique sessions. Individual consultation with instructor. (5 hours laboratory) 

358 Graphic Communications (3) 

A lecture/activity class covering basic principles of graphic communication. Areas studied 
include printing processes, publication formats, copy preparation, copy-fitting techni- 
ques, layout principles, paper selection and distribution methods. (1 hour lecture', 4 
hours activity) 


Communications 241 


359 Publications Production (2) 

Prerequisite: Com 358 or consent of instructor. A production class for development of 
student publications, including the university magazine, authorized by appropriate un- 
iversity authorities. Activities include writing articles, editing copy, taking photographs 
and preparing layouts. (More than 6 hours laboratory) 

361 Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Examination of the social, behavioral, psychological, ethical, economic and political foun- 
dations of public relations, as well as the theories of public relations as a com- 
munications discipline. 

362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 101 or consent of instructor. A course in the practice of writing for 
business, industry and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis on creating effective forms of 
public relations communication. 

363 Publications Editing (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 361 and 362 or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of editing func- 
tions and techniques involved in creative development of publications for business, in- 
dustry and nonprofit organizations and institutions. Emphasis on magazines, new- 
spapers, newsletters and brochures. 

371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 101 or 301 and 380 or equivalent (or concurrent enrollment). Theory and 
practice of covering news events and public affairs for radio and television. (6 hours 
activity) 

375 The Documentary Film (3) 

Purpose, development, current trends, critical analysis and production requirements of the 
documentary film. Future of the medium in business, government, education and 
television. 

380 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

(Same as Theatre 380) 

381 Broadcast Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of instructor. Study of television and radio as advertising 
media. Planning advertising campaigns, costs and coverage. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 380. Basic theory and practice of radio and television program produc- 
tion. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

401 Report Writing (3) 

Planning, organizing, and writing of reports for business, education and government. Prac- 
tice will be given in use of graphic aids and preparation of copy for reports that are to 
be printed. Recommended for non-majors. 

403 Technical Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 101 or consent of instructor. Study of uses of technical writing in industry, 
science and engineering and completion of written assignments designed to test under- 
standing of, and provide experience with, various forms. 

407 Communication and the Law (3) 

The Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and press; statutes and administrative 
regulations affecting freedom of information and publishing, advertising and telecom- 
munication. Libel and slander, rights in news and advertising, contempt, copyright and 
invasion of privacy. 

410 Principles of Communication Research (3) 

Survey of research methods used to assess the effects of print, broadcast and film com- 
munications on audience attitudes, opinions, knowledge and behavior. Basic concepts 
of research design and data analysis in communications research. 

411 Advanced Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 217A or 218, 311, 301 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor. 
Advanced theory, procedures and practice In film production: motion picture (silent 
and sound), script-writing, transfer and mixes, production, distribution and financing. 


242 Communications 


425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

American mass communication, beginning g with newspapers and periodicals and continu- 
ing through radio and television, includes ideological, political, social and economic 
aspects. 

426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Major mass communication systems, both democratic and totalitarian, and the means by 
which news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 

427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Mass media regulation by the government, "objective" versus "interpretive" news reporting 
and ethical and legal questions of particular cases. 

428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Study of how innovations — ideas, products, and practices perceived as new— are com- 
municated to members of a social system. Examines the roles of adopters, opinion 
leaders, change agents, and communications as they relate to the diffusion of in- 
novations and consequent changes in social systems. 

431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Mass media in Communist societies, particularly the U.S.S.R., the People's Republic of 
China, Poland and Yugoslavia. Emphasis on the interrelationships of the mass media, 
people and party. 

439 Mass Media Internship (2) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, communications major. Student serves supervised internship, 
according to emphasis, with newspaper, magazine, radio or television station, press 
association, public relations firm or advertising agency. Application must be made 
through department coordinator one semester prior to entering program. 

442 Film Directors and Genres (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 290A or B or consent of instructor. An examination of films of significant 
directors, specific nations, or film genres, concentrating on historical, social and 
aesthetic qualities. 

446 Advertising and Media Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or Marketing 354. Principles and problem-solving techniques un- 
derlying the management of the advertising function; procedures and processes 
leading to sound decisions in solving advertising problems and utilization of the mass 
media. 

451 National Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of instructor. Advanced study of advertising campaigns 
and utilization of mass media — such as television, newspapers and magazines — in 
national advertising programs. Design of complete campaigns from Idea to production 
readiness. 

463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 361 or consent of instructor. Techniques used for effective 
public relations in both personal and mass communications. 

465 International Public Relations (3) 

Public relations principles applied to international operations, both private and public. 

473 Telecommunications Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 380. Self-regulation, governmental regulation and international 
regulation of broadcast programming. 

475 Telecommunications Programming 

Prerequisite: Com 380. Theory and practice of programming for television and radio. 

477 Telecommunications Station Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 380. Management functions and policies of broadcasting stations and 
networks. Effects of government, public opinion, employee groups and ownership. 
Technical, legal, financial and other obligations. 

479 Advanced Telecommunication Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 380 and 390 or consent of instructor. Advanced techniques in producing 
television-radio programs. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Processes and effects of persuasive communications applied to mass communication. 
Interaction of the communicator, audience, message content and structure, and social 
context in influencing attitudes, beliefs, and opinions. 


Communications 243 


485 Film Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 311, 375 and 411 or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of documentary 
film production planning and execution. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

489 Television Production Activities (3) 

Prerequisite: six units of television courses or equivalent and/or consent of instructor. 
Honors course. Students develop, write, product and direct regular programs of Infor- 
mation, instruction or diversion for distribution on the campus-wide closed-circuit 
television system and area cable systems. 

490 Film Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 290A and/or 290B or equivalent or consent of instructor. Analytical and 
comparative study of theories relating to film-making; nature of the film medium. 

497 Seminar in Public Communications Practices (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 463 and consent of instructor. Examination of the vital role of public 
relations in contemporary society. Emphasis on ethics, social responsibilities and future 
trends in the emerging profession. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Individually supervised mass media projects and 
research on campus and in the community. May involve newspaper and magazine 
publishers, radio and television stations and public relations agencies. May be repeated. 

500 Theories of Communication (3) 

Theoretical study of communication processes and effects in terms of source, media, 
message, audience and context variables. Review of research on the effects of com- 
munications on audience attitudes, opinions, knowledge and behavior. 

501 Literature of Communications (3) 

Types, sources and uses of communications literature; application to individual graduate 
studies. 

503 Practicum in Instructional Communication (3) 

Principles of programmed instruction applied to achieve training objectives through the use 
of the communication media. Includes development and empirical tryout of short 
programs in print, film, and/or broadcast media utilizing behavioral analysis of typical 
audiences to assess program effects. 

508 Humanistic Study of Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 410, 500 or concurrent enrollment and classified status. Seminar in 
humanistic methods of study in communications: historical research and critical 
analysis applied to problems, issues, and creative works in communication. 

509 Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 410, 500 and classified status. Principles of social-scientific research 
design and analysis applied to the study of communication processes and effects. 

510 Advanced Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 508 or 509 and classified status. Problems in theoretical, applied and 
evaluative research in communication. 

512 Graduate Seminar in Journalism Education (3) 

Study of selected problems in journalism education with emphasis on individual research. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Completion of a creative project in an emphasis beyond regularly offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Completion of a thesis in an emphasis beyond regularly offered coursework. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Individually supervised mass media projects or 
research for graduate students. May be repeated. 


JOURNALISM EDUCATION COURSES 

422 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Theory and technique of advising school new- 
spaper and yearbook staffs and teaching journalism. Relation of classroom instruction 
to staff assignments. 


244 Comparative Literature 

449A;B Journalism Education (12) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Full-time student teaching. A — Student 
teaching in the secondary school. B — Seminar. 

749 Student Teaching in Journalism in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See description and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PROGRAM 

The program in comparative literature is an interdisciplinary program directed by the Com- 
mittee on the Program in Comparative Literature. The committee is responsible for for- 
mulating curricular policies, approving courses and advising studies. The chair of the English 
Department administers the program, and the courses are taught by faculty from the English 
Department and other departments whose courses are approved by the committee. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The major in comparative literature provides professional competence and personal 
enrichment for students with an exceptional concern and appreciation for the study of the 
interrelationships between the languages and literatures of various civilizations. The 
program offers courses in literary form and content, theory and philosophy, genres and 
movements, providing insight into the backgrounds of mankind's worldwide culture and 
literature. The comparative literature courses are conducted in English and required reading 
is available in English. 

Upper Division Requirements (42 units) 

1. Eighteen units selected from courses listed under comparative literature. 

2. Reading competence in a foreign language, demonstrated by successfully completing an 
adviser-approved 400-level course offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures, provided it is not taught in translation. This requirement can be met through 
examination. Information on the examination is available in the Department of English of- 
fice. 

3. Six units selected from literature courses listed under English and numbered 300 or above. 

4. Six units of anthropology, history, art history, music history or philosophy approved by the 
adviser and aimed at enlarging total perspective. 

5. The remainder of the required 42 units selected from any 300- or 400-level literature 
course in comparative literature, English, French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish. 

Distribution 

1. Of these 42 units, 15 must span the chronological range of the literary continuum, one in 
each of the following literary periods: Classical or Medieval; Renaissance; Neoclassical or 
Baroque; Romantic; Contemporary (1850- ). 

2. One course in a literary genre. 

3. One course in a major figure. 

It should be noted that (2.) and (3.) can perform the dual function of also satisfying (1.) 
e.g., a senior seminar in Hugo would satisfy both the major figure and the Romantic 
Period requirements). 

More detailed information on the comparative literature major can be obtained from the 
brochure available in the Department of English office. The importance of close consultation 
with an adviser cannot be stressed enough for comparative literature, since the diversity of 
language specialties and other factors may necessitate individual tailoring in any given case. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The objectives of the master's degree program in comparative literature are to promote the 
understanding of other literatures, peoples, and cultures in various historical periods, in- 
cluding the present, and to prepare the student for more advanced work in comparative 
literature, leading to the Ph.D. degree. The program also prepares teachers of world 
literature in the high schools and community colleges and provides a liberal arts background 
preparation for library studies. 


Comparative Literature 245 


Students must meet the university and school requirements (a bachelor's decree from an 
accredited institution and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted) for 
admission to conditionally classified standing with the declared objective of this degree. Ad- 
mission to classified standing requires: 

1. An undergraduate major in comparative literature, English or foreign language with a 
GPA of 3.0 or better in the major courses and a GPA of 2.5 in all other college and/or un- 
iversity work. If the student's degree is in another field, he must have completed a total of 
24 units of upper division work in comparative literature, English or foreign language, 
with a GPA of 3.0. 

If the student lacks the prerequisite number of courses, he must make them up before he 
can begin work in the master's degree program, and he must earn at least a 3.0 in such 
makeup coursework. In the event that the student's GPA in these probationary courses is 
3.0 or better, he may be admitted (classified). Courses taken to remove qualitative and 
quantitative deficiencies may not be applied to the M.A. program. 

2. Satisfactory completion of a written examination in an approved foreign language, or 
satisfactory completion of an upper division course taught in an approved foreign 
language. 

3. Development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

Required are 30 units of coursework completed with a minimum GPA of 3.0 to be distributed 


as follows: 

1. A minimum of 18 units in 500-series courses: Units 

Courses at the 500-level in comparative literature (one adviser-approved 500- 

level course in English may help satisfy this requirement 15 

A course at the 500 level in a related area _3 

Total 18 

2. Upper division courses: 

Comparative Literature 410 3 

Adviser-approved course in comparative literature 3 

Adviser-approved courses in a related area 6 

(At least 3 units of related coursework must be in foreign literature, read in 

the original language.) 

Total 12 


At the conclusion of his coursework, the student will take a comprehensive examination for 
the master's degree. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" and the Gr,i(hj,iic Bulletin. 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

(Offered by the Department of English) 

202 Short Story (3) 

(Same as English 202) 

305 The Hebrew Prophets (3) 

(Sam*e as Religious Studies 333) 

311 Myths of Creation and Fall (1) 

Five weeks intensive study from ethnic groupings round the world, ancient to contemporary. 
Readings are selected from primary texts in translation, with emphasis on archetypal 
patterns and themes. 

312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

A comprehensive survey of Biblical literature emphasizing intrinsic literary qualities as well 
as the influence of major themes of both Old and New Testament writings upon 
Western literary traditions. 

314 The Oral Tradition in Literature (3) 

A study of storytelling as an art, particularly as developed through the media of the folktale. 


246 Comparative Literature 

315 Classical Mythology In World Literature (3) 

A basic study of those Greek and Roman myths which have been of continuing significance 
in Western world literature. 

316 Celtic Mythology and Early Irish Literature (3) 

A survey of early Irish literature and of Irish and Welsh mythological literature, with dis- 
cussion of comparative and archeological relationships. 

317 Indie Mythology (3) 

A study of the mythologies embodied in the Mahabharate, the Ramayana, the Vedas and the 
Sathapartha Brahamana of India, and in the Abast, Avesta, and Sha Namah of Persia, and 
their relation to the principal mythologies of Europe. 

318 Baltic and Slavic Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of the Balts and Slavs and their relationship to the Indo- 
European inheritance. 

319 African Mythology (3) 

A study of the principal myths of sub-Saharan Africa, together with their reflections in 
African art and custom. 

320 Greek and Roman Literature (3) 

Readings in English translation from the literature of classical Greece and Rome. 

321 Germanic Mythology and Saga Literature (3) 

A study of Germanic mythology, including comparative myth and archeological 
relationships, and an introduction to Icelandic saga. 

324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Selected readings in Oriental and western literature from the beginning to 1650. 

325 World Literature 1650 to Present (3) 

Selected readings in Oriental and western literature from 1650 to the present. 

332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) 

Selected readings in modern English translation from the medieval literature of England and 
the continent from St. Augustine to Sir Thomas Malory. 

333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 

Major phases of the Renaissance as a literary movement, from Erasmus to Montaigne and 
Cervantes. 

343 The Literature of the Romantic Period (3) 

Backgrounds in romanticism and study of major figures of European and American roman- 
ticism, such as Pushkin, Rousseau, Leopardi, Goethe, Thoreau, Schiller, Byron and Emily 
Bronte. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352) 

360 Irish Literature (3) 

Selected writings representative of Irish literature from the early Middle Ages to the present. 

371 Masters of French Literature through Neoclassicism (3) 

Survey of representative works of French literature in translation from the Middle Ages 
through the 18 century. 

372 Masters of French Literature from the Romantics to the Present (3) 

Survey of representative works of French literature In translation from the romantics to the 
present. 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

Reading, discussion and Interpretation of selected works by Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, 
Chekhov, Pasternak and others, and their relationship to western literature. 

374 Modern Russian Literature (3) 

A study of literary trends and representative works of Russian writers from Maxim Gorky to 
the present. Special consideration of the Soviet literary theory and its impact upon their 
literature. Lectures and readings in English. 

375 Hispanic Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations from Hispanic literature and their relations to world 
literature. Readings in the picaresque novel, Cervantes, Golden Age drama, Galdos, 
Unamuno, Lorca. 

376 Main Trends in Spanish- American Literature (3) 

An introduction to the main currents of Spanish-American literature, emphasizing contem- 
porary writers, such as Alegria, Asturias, Borges, Fuentes, Neruda. Close attention will 
be given to the relation between the artistic expression and the ideological values of the 
same period. 


Comparative Literature 247 


402 Art, Literature, and the Development of Consciousness (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 402) 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 403) 

404 The Nature of Love: Plato to Joyce (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 404) 

410 Theory and Method of Comparative Literature (3) 

Introduction to the theories and methods of comparative literature and the problems of 
translation. 

424 Chinese Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations of Chinese literature. 

425 Indian Literature (3) 

A study of selected works of Indian literature. 

426 Japanese Literature (3) 

A study of selected translations of Japanese literature. 

427 Modern Japanese Fiction (3) 

A study of major writers and literary movements in 20th-century Japanese fiction. 

430 Persian and Arabian Literature (3) 

A survey course on the nature and distribution of the classics of western Asia in English 
translation, with lectures, readings and discussion. 

445 Literature of the Americas: Contemporary Novelists (3) 

A study of the interdependency of the contemporary fiction of North and South America. 
Focuses on direct influences, such as Hemingway's and Faulkner's on Latin American 
writers, and Borges' influence on North American writers. Examines several parallels In 
techniques and themes as they reflect relationships in and between the Northern and 
Southern cultures. 

450 The Naturalists (3) 

A study of naturalism In the works of Turgenev, Balzac, the brothers Goncourt, Maupassant, 
Zola, Huysmans, Ibsen, Verga; and also the works of Gissing, Moore, Hardy, Garland, 
Crane, Norris, Dreiser, London and O'Neill. 

453 The Novel In France and Germany (3) 

Reading, discussion, and interpretation of outstanding novels in translation with a view 
toward determining some principles of the narrative arts. Emphasis on Goethe, 
Stendhal, Flaubert, Mann, Kafka, Proust and others. 

454 Contemporary Movements in European Literature (3) 

A study of modern literary movements, including naturalism, realism, symbolism, ex- 
pressionism and surrealism, with reading and discussion of selected examples. 

457 The Experimental Novel (3) 

A study of contemporary novels, including examples of surrealism and the nouveau romaih 
as well as other novels not readily classified. 

458 The Spanish Novel (3) 

A study of major Spanish novels in translation. 

473A,B World Drama (3,3) 

Reading, discussion and interpretation of great plays of the world in translation, emphasizing 
them as literature for performance. A — From ancient Greece through the mid-19th cen- 
tury. B — From Ibsen to the present. 

482 Senior Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures involving intensive study of 
major writers. The student should consult his adviser and the schedule of classes for the 
sections available. This course number may be repeated with different content for ad- 
ditional credit. 

483 Senior Seminar: Creek Tragedy (3) 

Fifth century Greek tragedy through the extant works of Aeschylus and Sophocles, and 10 
plays of Euripides. (Same as Theatre 492) 

491 Senior Seminar: Special Studies in Comparative Literature (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures devoted to significant periods, 
movements and themes in world literature. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

492 Literature of Action in 20th-Century France (3) 

(Same as French 492) 


248 


Criminal fustice 


492 German Literature in Translation (3) 

(Same as German 492) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

550 Graduate Seminar: Medieval Literature (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures, concerning special problems 
such as the development of medieval narrative, the growth and development of the 
Arthurian legend, lyric poetry, allegory and devotional literature. 

551 Graduate Seminar: The Renaissance and Baroque (3) 

Comparative investigation of a theme, genre, or major figures in western literature for the 
Renaissance and Baroque Period. Directed research and writing, group discussions. In- 
dependent study. Since the topic each year will vary, depending upon the specialized 
interests and publications of the instructor, this course may be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 

552 Graduate Seminar: The Enlightenment (3) 

553 Graduate Seminar: Romanticism (3) 

554 Graduate Seminar: Studies in the Modern Period (3) 

571 Graduate Seminar: The Novel (3) 

Offers directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures concerning the genre of 
the novel. An ability to read the novels in the original language will be helpful. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

572 Graduate Seminar: Poetry (3) 

573 Graduate Seminar: Drama (3) 

580 Graduate Seminar: Major Figures in World Literature (3) 

Directed study and research on a major figure in world literature. Students will write reports 
and a long paper on approved topics. 

582 Graduate Seminar: Dante (3) 

591 Seminar in Comparative Literary Criticism (3) 

598 Thesis (3) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM 

FACULTY 

W. Garrett Capune 
Program Coordinator 
William Hobbs 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal justice Is designed to acquaint 
preservice and inservice students with the principles and practices of criminal justice In 
America. Although the program's curriculum allows for the development of depth in one of 
the subject's substantive subsystems (I.e., law enforcement, courts or corrections), the 
overriding objective is to familiarize students with activities in the above areas. 

The program Is both academic and professional in that it is an interdisciplinary attempt to 
relate professional and practitioner perspectives to the challenge of crime in a free society. 
In this regard, the program provides the student with preparation lor emj)loyment with a 
related agency and/or further study. 

ADVISEMENT 

Students are urged to see a program adviser prior to their first semester at the university as a 
criminal justice major. This is particularly Important for community college transfers. Failure 
to do so may delay graduation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Every student must complete the core courses (15 units) and a minimum of 12 units In the 
concentration curriculum. In addition, each student Is required to complete 12 units in a cor- 
elated curriculum. 

For current information regarding the criminal justice program and its courses, students are 
advised to consult the program's bulletin board. 


Criminal justice 249 


Core Curriculum (15 units) 

Criminal Justice 300 Criminal Justice in America: An Analysis 
Criminal Justice 310 Criminal Law (Substantive and Procedural) 

Criminal Justice 320 Criminal Justice Administration: A Survey 

Criminal Justice 330 Crime and Delinquency 

Criminal Justice 340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology 

Concentration Curriculum (12 units) 

Criminal Justice 415 The Enforcement Function 

Criminal Justice 425 Juvenile Justice Administration 

Criminal Justice 435 Adjudication and the Judiciary 

Criminal Justice 445 Corrections: Institutional and Community Programs 

Criminal Justice 455 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 

Criminal Justice 465 Criminal Justice Planning 

Criminal Justice 475 The Administration of Justice: A Seminar. 

Corelated Curriculum (12 units) 

Courses for the related fields shall be selected in consultation with the student's adviser. The 
purpose of this requirement Is to allow for the establishment of an emphasis, such as public 
administration or counseling. Upper-division courses In the following fields can be con- 
sidered in this regard: accounting, business administration, communications, computer 
studies, finance, human services, law, management, philosophy, political science, psy- 
chology, public administration, quantitative methods, social welfare, sociology, 
technological studies. 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSES 

300 Criminal Justice in America: An Analysis (3) 

Analysis of the institutions involved In the administration of criminal justice (i.e., law en- 
forcement, courts and corrections), examination of some specific agencies and a review 
of the system's problems, policies and purposes as they relate to the processes of arrest, 
adjudication, ettttc. 

310 Criminal Law (Substantive and Procedural) (3) 

The nature of law, legal institutions and the legal process; a study of present Penal Code 
provisions both substantive and procedural, with special emphasis on current case con- 
siderations and their constitutional consequences vis-a-vis the right to counsel, the 
nature of due process. 

320 Criminal Justice Administration: A Survey (3) 

An analysis of justice administration as a "single system"; a review of modern management 
materials as applied to the Involved institutions; a specific study of line, staff, and aux- 
iliary activities both in principle and practice, and an examination of the associated ad- 
ministrative theories. 

330 Crime and Delinquency (3) 

The nature and extent of criminality; a review of traditional and topical theories regarding 
etiology, with a concern for research methods as well as the contribution's content 
(although physiological causes will be considered, the emphasis will be on the 
sociological and psychological theories). 

340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology (3) 

An introduction to elementary statistics including descriptives, measurements and tests; a 
review of data collection methods for effort evaluation and program prediction; and a 
survey of systems analysis techniques. 

415 The Enforcement Function (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 300 or comparable coursework. The historical and 
philosophical development of the enforcement function as it operates at federal, state 
and local levels; community controls, political pressures and legal limitations pertaining 
to law enforcement agencies at each level of government; examination of police 
policies and problems vIs-a-vIs the administration of justice as a system. 

425 Juvenile Justice Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 300 or comparable coursework. Development of our 
definitions of "delinquency" and the related responses of the interested institutions 


250 English 

(police, courts and correction), with special reference to the juvenile court (past and 
present), and prevention and correction programs (practicing and proposed). 

435 Adjudication and the Judiciary (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 300 or comparable coursework. Development of the 
associated sociolegal doctrine and institutions at the federal, state and local levels; 
political controls and legal limitations pertaining to each; a study of the nature of the 
judicial process and an examination of the participants' roles and their relationship to 
the administration of justice as a system. 

445 Corrections: Institutional and Community Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. The historical and 
philosophical development of our corrections concern; analysis of correctional in- 
stitutions as total institutions for prisoners and personnel; the theory and practice of 
probation and parole, with a consideration of rehabilitation and the alternative at- 
titudes; a review of current research and experimental programs. 

455 Comparative Criminal justice Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. Comparative analysis of 
criminal justice systems of other states and of selected other countries throughout the 
world. The systems, their theories and associated problems will be examined. 

465 Criminal Justice Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. Principles of social planning; 
sources and uses of criminal, demographic and economic data; examination of existing 
planning-coordinating agencies, basic research and evaluation techniques including 
mathematical analysis and model building. 

470 Sex and the Criminal Justice System (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. Analysis of rationale for law's 
concern with sexual conduct, developed via discussion of selected offenses and 
offenders. Lectures and guest speakers will also present opposing perspectives 
regarding the role of law enforcement, courts and corrections. Research and reform 
will be reviewed. 

475 The Administration of Justice: A Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. An examination of current 
social, legal and practical problems confronting the police, the courts and corrections 
as segments within a system concerned with such matters as riots, organized crime, 
recidivism. An analysis of the associated career groups as professions with problems and 
prospects. 

495 Internships (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300 or comparable coursework. Designed to acquaint student 
w'lth criminal justice professions. Each Individual works 8-20 hours per week as a super- 
vised intern in a public agency or related organization. In addition to the job ex- 
perience, Interns meet in a weekly three-hour seminar. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

FACULTY 

Howard Seller 
Department Chair 

Don Austin, Arthur Bell, Rosemary Boston, John Brugaletta, Miriam Cox, Sherwood Cum- 
mings, Dorothea de France, George Friend, Cynthia Fuller, Stephen Garber, Joseph 
Glide, Joan Greenwood, Annabelle Haaker, jean Hall, Mary Hayden, Joseph Hayes, Den- 
nis Hengeveld, jane Hipollto, Robert Hodges, Michael Holland, Wayne Huebner, 
Charlotte Hughes, Helen jaskoski, Dorothy Kilker, Thomas Klammer, William Koon, 
Joanne Lynn, Willis McNelly, Russell Miller, Keith Neilson, Priscilla Oaks, Paul Obler, Rita 
Oleyar, Urania Petalas, June Salz Poliak, Orrington Ramsay, Sally Romotsky, William 
Rubinstein, Joseph Sawick Clarence Schneider, Muriel Schulz, John Schwarz, Sari Scott, 
Alice Scoufos, Donald Sears, Som Sharma, George Spangler, Alexander Stupple, Irene 
Thomas, Elena Tumas, Martha Vogeler, M. John Wagner, John White, Fjelen Yanko 

The English Department offers course^ designed to acquaint the student with the nature and 

development of our language, with the literatures of England and America, and with the dis- 
ciplines involved in the various kinds of writing. Except for freshmen English offerings. 


English 251 

courses in world literature in English translation are listed separately, under Comparative 
Literature. In addition the Department of English offers some specialized professional 
courses for the preparation of teachers. On the senior and graduate levels, various oppor- 
tunities are provided for seminar work and independent study. 

The English Department offers a flexible program, designed to reflect various approaches to 
the study of language and literature. In planning a program to fit their particular Interests, all 
students should consult an English Department undergraduate adviser or a faculty member. 
A pamphlet, "The Bachelor of Arts in English: Information for Students," is available In the 
department office. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: 42 units In addition to English 100 or 103 or 105, or their equivalents. 

Lower Division (maximum of 12 units) 

Any 200 level course. 

Upper Division (minimum of 30 units) 

All students must complete 12 units of basic requirements. They may choose Core I or 
Core II. 


Core / 

English 334 Shakespeare, or 

English 435, Studies In Shakespeare 3 

Survey of literature, selected from among the following, and Including at least one 

course in an earlier period and at least one course In a later period 9 


English 311 Masters of British Literature to 1760 

English 312 Masters of British Literature from 1760 

English 321 American Literature to Whitman 

English 322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns 


Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 

Comp Lit 325 World Literature from 1650 

Total 12 

Core II Units 

English 334 Shakespeare, or 

English 435 Studies in Shakespeare 3 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms 3 

English 301 Advanced Composition, or 

English 364 Seminar in Writing 3 

English 302 Introduction to the English Language or 
English 303 Structure of Modern English or 
English 305 American Dialects or 

English 490 History of the English Language 3 

Total T2 


Electives to complete a minimum of 42 units shall be selected from additional courses in 
language and composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars and com- 
parative literature. Comparative literature offerings are listed separately but count toward an 
English major. 

Students are urged to consult an English Department undergraduate adviser or a faculty 
member when selecting a core of basic requirements, when choosing electives or when 
seeking evaluation of work completed at other institutions. 

English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire proficiency in at 
least one foreign language, and most graduate programs in English assume that the student 
has had a broad background in the study of major literary figures, periods and critical 
approaches, as well as some training in English language and linguistics. Such students are 
advised therefore to take the following: 

English 333 Chaucer 
English 341 Milton 

At least one course in language and linguistics, to be selected from: 


252 English 

English 302 Introduction to the English Language; 

English 303 Structure of Modern English 
English 490 History of the English Language 
and courses in a wide range of periods and genres. Both breadth and depth of 
preparation are important. 

Students seeking a secondary teaching credential must complete the following: 

English 301 Advanced Composition; and 

English 302 Introduction to the English Language or 

English 303 Structure of Modern English 

The following courses are required for the credential, but do not count toward the 42 units 
of major: 

English Education 442 Teaching English in the Secondary School 
English Education 449 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(Ryan Credential) or 

English Education 749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(Fisher Credential) 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: a total of 21 units 

A minimum of 12 units in Core I or Core II, described above in basic requirements, and nine 
units of electives. In choosing their core of basic requirements as well as their electives, 
students seeking a minor in English should consult an English Department undergraduate 
adviser or a faculty member. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The Master of Arts in English is designed to give the student a fuller understanding of English 
and American literature and language. The degree is useful to those teaching in high schools 
or community colleges, to those seeking careers in writing and publishing, and to those in- 
tending to take further graduate work. 

Students must meet the university and school requirements (a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited institution and a minimum CPA of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted) for 
admission to conditionally classified standing with the declared objective of this degree. 
To qualify for classified graduate standing in the program for the Master of Arts in English, a 
student must hold a bachelor's degree in English from an accredited institution at which he 
has maintained at least a 3.0 grade-point average in the major courses provided that he has a 
minimum of 24 units of upper-division coursework; or if he holds a bachelor's degree in 
another major, he must have completed 24 units of upper-division coursework in English 
with at least a 3.0 grade-point average. If the student lacks the prerequisite number of English 
courses, he must make them up before he may begin work in the master's degree program, 
earning at least a 3.0 in such makeup coursework. In the event that the student's GPA in 
prerequisite English courses is less than 3.0, he may be allowed to take from six to nine units 
of probationary, adviser-approved coursework. If his GPA in these probationary courses is 
3.0 or better, he may be admitted (classified). Courses taken to remove qualitative and quan- 
titative deficiencies may not be applied to the M.A. program. 

A student is required to have two years of one foreign language at the college or university 
level or six units of study in comparative literature. If taken as graduate work, these six units 
may be applied to the master's degree under "units in subjects related to English." 

A study plan must be developed and approved for admission to classified graduate standing. 


Study Plan: Units 

Minimum units in English courses restricted to graduate students (500 series) .. 18 

(with the permission of the graduate adviser, 3 of these 18 units may be taken in 
a comparative literature graduate seminar) 

Maximum units in specified upper-division courses in English 6 

Units in subjects related to English __6 

Total 30 


At the conclusion of his program he will take the written comprehensive examination for the 
master's degree. A student who fails the examination may retake the failed part only once. 


English 253 

Note: The student is strongly advised to take the steps necessary for admission to the 
program before registering for his first graduate courses. Part of the admission process is to 
confer with the graduate adviser, who will analyze prerequisites and designate those courses 
which will apply to the degree program. Courses taken by a conditionally cla«.sifled student 
do not necessarily apply toward a degree. At the time the student achieves classified stan- 
ding, no more than nine units of postgraduate coursework may be applied to the master's 
degree program. 

For further information, consult the Department of English. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" and the Craduatc Bulletin. 


ENGLISH COURSES 

For world literature in English translation see courses under comparative literature. 

100 Composition (3) 

A basic course in composition. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

103 Seminars in Writing (3) 

A course for the student with some proficiency in composition. Readings on a relevant topic 
are meant to motivate the student to express his thoughts in a meaningful, disciplined 
manner. 

105 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

An exploratory creative writing course in which the student is given the opportunity to write 
in various genres. The course carries no credit toward the major. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through Medieval Times (3) 

The study of representative writers and works from the ancient through the medieval world. 

111 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance through the 19th Century (3) 

The study of representative writers and works from the Renaissance through the 19th cen- 
tury. 

112 Modern Literature of the Western World (3) 

The study of representative writers and works of modern literature. 

202 The Short Story (3) 

A course designed to introduce the student to the study of the structure and technique of 
the short story. Emphasis on critical analysis of selected American and European short 
stories. (Same as Comparative Literature 202) 

205 Introduction to Drama (3) 

A course designed to introduce the students to the study of dramatic literature. Emphasis on 
close analysis of individual plays. 

206 Introduction to Poetry (3) 

A course designed to increase students' understanding and appreciation of the art of poetry. 
The primary activity will be close reading of poems written in English. 

210 Studies in Literature (3) 

Selected readings and discussion of English and American writers, emphasizing a particular 
theme, genre, trend or the works of individual writers. Section topics will vary ac- 
cording to special interests of instructor. 

300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

Themain literary forms— prose fiction, poetry and drama— are studied and analyzed. Various 
critical methods are applied to representative works mainly from English and American 
literature. English majors should schedule this basic course as early in their programs as 
possible. 

301 Advanced Composition (3) 

Prerequisites: English 100, 103, or their equivalents. Exercises in creativity, analysis, and 
rhetoric as applied in expository writing. Required of English majors seeking the secon- 
dary credential. 

302 Introduction to the English Language (3) 

A basic course in language emphasizing the history, structure and dialects of American 
English in its social, cultural and educational contexts. This course or English 303 re- 
quired of English majors seeking a secondary credential and must be taken before 
student teaching. 


254 English 

)03 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary English. Modern English usage. 
This course or English 302 required of English majors seeking a secondary credential and 
must be taken before student teaching. 

305 American Dialects (3) 

An examination of the principles of dialectology. Emphasis on the description of modern 
American dialects and their role in social, cultural and educational issues of today. 
(Same as Linguistics 305) 

311 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to major periods 
and movements, major authors and major forms through 1760. 

312 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to major periods 
and movements, major authors and major forms from 1760 through modern times. 

320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

A study of the prose and poetry of the American Indian, focusing on the literatures of the 
North American tribes. 

321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

Emphasis on major writers: Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman and 
others. 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Emphasis on Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

A survey of Anglo-American balladry and folksong, with attention to historical development, 
ethnic background and poetical values. 

326 The American Frontier in Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: any courses In American literature, American studies or American history. The 
moving American frontier from the beginnings to the close of the 19th century. Ac- 
counts of explorers and naturalists will be examined beside artistic, literary and popular 
treatments to identify the myths and symbols created by the fact of a frontier in 
American life. 

332 Medieval English Literature (3) 

An introduction to the literature of medieval England exclusive of Chaucer. Readings in 
modern English versions of representative major works and genres from Beowulf to 
Malory. 

333 Chaucer (3) 

A study of The Canterbury Tales and of Chaucer's language, with particular emphasis upon 
the understanding of the vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and syntax of the East 
Midland dialect of Middle English, as Indispensable to literary appreciation. 

334 Shakespeare (3) 

An introduction to Shakespeare's art through a detailed study of the more famous plays. 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

Studies of representative English dramatists of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. 
Emphasis on the development of the dramatic tradition In the plays of Marlowe, jonson, 
Webster, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

A study of the nondramatic literature of the English Renaissance from More to Campion. 
Emphasis on Renaissance thought and the works of Spenser. 

337 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

A survey of the major writers of the period from 1603 to 1660 exclusive of Milton. 

338 The Drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century (3) 

A study of representative plays of the Restoration and the 18th century. Emphasis will be 
placed on the development of such dramatic movements as the heroic play. Restoration 
comedy and sentimental drama. 

339 Restoration Literature (1660-1700) (3) 

Butler, Rochester, Dryden, Pepys, and selected minor writers. 

340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Swift, Addison and Steele, Pope, Boswell, Johnson, and selected minor writers. 

341 Milton (3) 

An intensive study of the poetry and prose in the light of Milton's intellectual development. 


English 255 


343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

Burns, Blake; Wordsworth, Coleridge; Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The reaction against 
rationalism, the rise of revolutionary and liberal thought, humanitarianism, and 
emphasis on individual creativity. 

344 Victorian Literature (3) 

A study of literature in Its relationship to the problems which emerge from the social, 
cultural, scientific and industrial revolutions of the Victorian period. 

345 The Development of the English Novel through Jane Austen (3) 

A study of the English novel from Its beginnings to the 19th century considering such 
novelists as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Austen. 

346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel (3) 

A study of such novelists as the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy. 

350 Detective Fiction (3) 

A study of detective fiction from Edgar Allan Poe to the present, including writers such as 
Sayers, Christie, Chandler, Hammet and Ross Macdonald. 

351 Science Fiction (3) 

The study of science fiction as a genre, including future-scene fiction, the utopian novel, the 
superman novel and short fantasy stories. 

352 African Literature (3) 

African literature written in the English language, with special emphasis on the fiction, 
poetry and drama of the new nations. (Same as Comparative Literature 352) 

353 Black Writers in America (3) 

A study of black American writers from Frederick Douglass to the present. Concentration on 
important figures such as Wright, Ellison and Baldwin. 

355 Images of Women in Literature (3) 

Images of women in various genres, such as autobiography, poetry, drama and the novel. A 
conventional literary period (Victorian, Modern, etc.) and specific cultures (Great 
Britain or the United States, etc.) at the discretion of Instructor. 

364 Seminar in Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: evidence of student's previous interest in creative writing and consent of in- 
structor. Study of superior models, development of style, and group criticism and 
evaluation of each student's independent work. May be repeated for credit. (Same as 
Theatre 364) 

391 Traditions of English Literary Criticism (3) 

The principal statements of the major English critics, from the Renaissance to the beginning 
of the 20th century, studied in their relationship to the classical theories of criticism. 

392 Modern Literary Criticism (3) 

A study of the major movements In 20th-century British and American criticism. 

421 Minority Images in American Literature (3) 

An examination of 19th- and 20th-century literature written by and about racial groups in 
America. Includes Uncle Tom's Cabin, Soul on Ice and /.augh/ng Boy. 

423 Early American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: English 321 or consent of instructor. The literature of colonial and revolutionary 
America, including the Puritans, 18th-century deism and rationalism, and the literary 
antecedents of American democratic thought. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. An examination of selected writings 
of Darwin and of such Darwinians as Spencer and Huxley; then a study of the literary 
adaptations and assimilations of Darwinism. (Same as American Studies 425) 

433 Children's Literature (3) 

Reading and discussion of works from world literature designed primarily for children, in- 
cluding material from the oral tradition, realistic fiction, fantasy and poetry. Designed 
for the general student as well as for elementary credential candidates. 

435 :>fud:es in Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of instructor. An intensive study of selected plays with 
primary emphasis upon problems of dramatic structure and artistic meanings. 

445 The American Tradition in Poetry (3) 

A study of selected American poems from the 17th century to 1914. Emphasis on the close 
reading of individual poems. 


256 English 

446 The American Novel to 1914 (3) 

A study of selected novelists from C. B. Brown, through Melville and Twain, to Dreiser. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

(Same as Interdisciplinary Center 451) 

462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature 
course; or consent of instructor. Development of modern British and American novels 
from 1900 to 1950. 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) 

The novel in English since World War II. 

464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature 
course; or consent of instructor. The development of British and American drama from 
1900 to 1950. 

465 Contemporary British and American Drama (3) 

British and American drama from 1950 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature 
course; or consent of instructor. The development of British and American poetry from 
1900 to 1950. 

467 Contemporary British and American Poetry (3) 

British and American poetry from 1950 to the present. 

480 Seminar in Old English (3) 

Study of the elements of Old English language, with cultural backgrounds and critical 
reading of lyrics and short prose pieces. 

490 History of the English Language (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English vocabulary, 
phonology, morphology and syntax from Indo-European to modern American English. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course In the area to be studied, a B average or better in 
English courses, or consent of instructor. Directed research and writing, group dis- 
cussion, and lectures covering selected topics from language studies, intensive studies 
of major writers, criticism, and literary types, periods, and ideological trends. 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Open to advanced students in English with consent of department chair. May be repeated 
for credit. 

570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering philology, historical 
development, and structure of English. Individual offerings under this course number 
may deal with only one aspect of language studies. May be repeated with different con- 
tent for additional credit. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor, this course will offer 
directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering major figures 
such as: Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Melville, Twain, Hawthorne, Joyce and 
Coleridge. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as 
Theatre 571) 

572 Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor, this course will offer 
directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures, covering such major 
literary types as: the epic, the novel, the short story, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy and 
historical drama. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as 
Theatre 572) 

573 Graduate Seminar: Cultural Periods (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor, this course will offer 
directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering the literature of 
a particular cultural period from the Anglo-Saxon to modern times. May be repeated 
with different content for additional credit. 

574 Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the instructor, this course will 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 257 

offer directed research and writing, group discussion and lectures covering special 
problems such as: the detailed critical study of varying influences on literature, in- 
cluding philosophical, religious, scientific, geographic and other ecological viewpoints. 
May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

579 Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering historical 
development and schools of criticism. Individual offerings within this course number 
may deal with only one aspect of critical problems. May be repeated with different con- 
tent for additional credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and 
written reports. May be repeated with different content for additional credit 


ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Principles, methods and materials of teaching 
English in the secondary school. 

449A English Education (10) 

Student Teaching In the Secondary School. The candidate, in the field for four and one-half 
days each week, has the same instructional hours of responsibility as the master teacher. 

449B English Education (2) 

One afternoon a week the candidate participates In a seminar with the university supervisor. 

749 Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

See description and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

FACULTY 

Nancy Baden 
Department Chair 

Linda Andersen-Bensimon, Oswaldo Arana, Gerald Boarino, Daniel Brondi, Samuel 
Cartledge, Marina Degtjarewsky, Gail de Mallac, Modesto Diaz, Leon Gilbert, Arturo 
Jasso, Jacqueline Kiraithe, Walter Kline, G. Bording Mathieu, Harvey Mayer, Doris 
Merrifleld, Ervie Pena, Marcial Prado, Charles Shapley, Curtis Swanson, Marjorie Tussing, 
Eva Van Ginneken, Stephen Vasari, Jon Zimmermann 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

Several options are offered: 

1. French major. Requirements: French 101, 102, 203, 204, 230, 240, or their equivalents; plus 
a minimum of 27 units of upper division courses Including 305, 315, 317, 325, 415, 425 and 
six units of 475A,B,C,D. 

2. German major. Requirements: German 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents; 
plus 24 units of upper division coursework, which must Include 315, 317, 375 and three of 
the following literature courses: 430, 440, 450, 460. 

3. Spanish major: Lower division requirements: Spanish 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their 
equivalents. Upper division requirements for: 

A. Standard major: Spanish 315, 316, 317 or 318, 375; plus 15 units of upper division 
Spanish which must Include 430, 441 and 461. 

B. Bilingual emphasis major: Spanish 315 or 316, 317 or 318, 375, 400 (or its 
equivalent), 466, 467, 468, plus two additional courses In Spanish at the 400 level, 
to be taken in consultation with the adviser. 

transfer students 

In accordance with university rules, all transfer students must complete 24 units in residence 

at Cal State Fullerton. Of these 24 units, the transfer student majoring in French, German or 


258 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

» 

Spanish is required to complete 12 upper division units, i.e., 300, 400 or 500 level courses, in 
the major on the Cal State Fullerton campus. The specific courses will be determined in con- 
sultation with the student's adviser and approved by the chair. 

MINOR IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214 or their equivalents, completed satisfac- 
torily; plus nine units In upper division courses selected in consultation with the adviser. 
Minor concentrations are offered in French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. 

PROGRAMMED COURSES IN UNCOMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES 

The department has available a number of programmed courses in languages which cannot 
be regularly taught, such as Arabic. For details see Foreign Languages 198. 

STANDARD TEACHING CREDENTIAL, SPECIALIZATION IN SECONDARY EDUCION 

All prospective teachers, before being admitted to a credential program, must pass a 
proficiency examination in which their skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and 
knowledge of linguistic principles will be tested. Students should make arrangements with 
the department to take the test during their junior year. 

The credential program is the same as for the liberal arts major, with the following additional 
requirements: Foreign Languages Education 442; French or German or Spanish Applied 
Linguistics 466. 

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

In accordance with recommendations made by the Modern Language Association of 
America, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures encourages all majors in- 
terested in a teaching career to participate in a study-abroad program. This will enable a 
student to perfect his mastery of the language and afford him additional insights into the 
foreign culture. To this end The California State University and Colleges' International 
Programs offer a wide variety of study opportunities on the junior, senior and graduate level. 

While the department encourages students to study overseas to provide an "externship" in 
language and culture, language majors are required to complete the following minimum of 
courses on campus before departure for, or upon return from, overseas: 

A. for the B.A.: 12 units of upper division courses consisting of a minimum of nine units at 
the 400 level in the major 

B. for the M.A.: 15 units consisting of a minimum of 12 units at the 500 level in the area of 
specialization. 

THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required, in addition to the regular class 
periods, to practice for the minimum of prescribed time in the language laboratory. The 30- 
station laboratory operates like a library; students may use it at a time most convenient to 
them preferably every day in sessions of 15 to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced 
by each instructor and by the supervisor of the language laboratory. 

Students are invited to make use of the collection of literary and cultural recordings in 
French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish available in the language laboratory. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: a major In French, German or Spanish (as 
appropriate) consisting of 24 units (or equivalent) of upper-division studies with above- 
average scholarship. (A candidate presenting a B.A. which has fewer than 24 upper division 
units in the major language, or is otherwise inadequate, normally will be required to take ad- 
ditional courses to build a full undergraduate major before beginning the graduate program. 
The student must also demonstrate proficiency in English, either by examination or a three- 
unit upper division course in English grammar. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 259 

The degrees of Master of Arts in French, German and Spanish require a minimum of 30 
semester units beyond the bachelor's degree including a minimum of 15 units in 500-level 
courses. 

The basic study plans are as follows: 


French 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

French 500 (Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style) or substitute 
French 510 (Graduate Seminar: Phonology), 520 (Old French) or 530 (Graduate 
Seminar: Historical Linguistics) 

B. Graduate seminars In literature (9 units) 

C. Other electives (15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level French courses. A maximum of six units may be 
taken, with approval of the adviser, in a related field. 

With the approval of his graduate committee, a student may elect to substitute a thesis for a 
part of the units required in Section C. 

A bibliographic project is to be completed prior to classification. A reading project is to be 
completed prior to advancement to candidacy. A reading list must be covered by all 
students. Final evaluation is by a comprehensive written and oral examination, including 
fluency in the French language. 

German 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

German 466 (Introduction to German Linguistics) or 530 (Graduate Seminar: Historical 
Linguistics) 

German 500 (Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style) or substitute 

B. Graduate seminars in literautre (9-12 units) 

C. Other electives (12-15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level German courses. A maximum of six units may be 
taken, with approval of the student's graduate committee, in a related field. 

With the approval of his graduate committee, a student may elect to substitute a thesis for a 
part of the units required in Section C. A reading list must be covered by all students. Final 
evaluation is by a comprehensive written and oral examination, including fluency in the 
German language. 

Spanish 

A. Core courses (6 units) 

Spanish 500 (Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style) or substitute. 

Spanish 530 (Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics) 

B. Graduate seminars in literature (9 units) 

C. Other electives (15 units) 

May be chosen from either 400- or 500-level Spanish courses. Up to six units may be taken, 
with approval of the adviser, in a related field. 

With the approval of his graduate committee, a student may elect to substitute a thesis for a 
part of the units required In Section C. A reading list must be covered by all students. Final 
evaluation is by a comprehensive written and oral examination, including fluency in the 
Spanish language. 

The candidate for the M.A. degree must consult a graduate adviser before beginning his 
program. Before being advanced to candidacy for the degree, he must demonstrate 
proficiency in the language to a faculty committee appointed for that purpose. 

For further information, consult the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


260 Foreign Languages and Literatures 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES COURSES 

1% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See page 85. 

198 Programmed Courses in Uncommonly Taught Languages (1-3) 

Intensive individualized programmed instruction in specific languages other than those 
regularly offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, such as 
Arabic, Turkish or Hindi. Designed to develop the skills of auditory comprehension and 
speaking in the language to form a basis for later development of the reading and 
writing skills. A minimum of 3 hours per week in the learning laboratory as well as 
regular sessions with native informants, are required for each unit of credit. May be 
repeated for credit. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See page 85. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisites: French, German or Spanish 466; and admission to teacher education or con- 
sent of Instructor. The theory and practice of language learning and language teaching 
with special emphasis on the audiolingual method. Conducted in English, with practice 
by students in the language they plan to teach. Required before student teaching. (2 
hours lecture, plus fieldwork) 

443 Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or above. New and recent trends, including the expanded use 
of electromechanical aids, programmed instruction, problems of bilingualism, and 
selected problems in the psychological and linguistic foundations of modern teaching 
of English to speakers of other languages. 

449A Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

450 Spanish Classroom Vocabulary (2) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or 318 or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. For the teacher or 
potential teacher in bilingual classroom situations. Provides practice in Spanish 
classroom vocabulary at the primary and secondary levels. 

542 Problems in Language Acquisition (2) 

Seminar focusing on current research Into language learning. Recent developments and in- 
novations In the structural approach to language behavior. 

545G German Culture in the Language Classroom (2) 

Prerequisite: German 315 or consent of instructor. A thorough review of the geography, 
social organization, political structure, contemporary patterns of culture and value 
systems of German speaking lands. Emphasis on the resources and techniques available 
to the teacher of German. 

749 Student Teaching in Foreign Languages in the Secondary School and Seminar (6) 

For candidates seeking the Fisher standard credential in secondary teaching. See description 
and prerequisite under Division of Teacher Education. 


CHINESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Chinese— A (3) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the 
sounds and the basic structure of Chinese. Audiolingual assignments will be prepared 
in the language laboratory. Conducted in Chinese. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 261 


102 Fundamental Chinese— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Chinese 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening-comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure 
of Chinese. Audiolingual assignments will be prepared in the language laboratory. Con- 
ducted in Chinese. 

FRENCH COURSES 

101 Fundamental French— A (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of French. Audiolingual 
assignments in the language laboratory are an integral part of the course. Conducted in 
French. 

102 Fundamental French — B (5) 

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and basic structure of French. 
Assignments in the language laboratory are an integral part of the course. Conducted in 
French. 

203 Intermediate French— A (3) 

Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in French. 

204 Intermediate French— B (3) 

Prerequisite: French 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in French. 

230 Intermediate Diction and Phonetics (2) 

Practice in oral delivery of cultural and literary materials. Detailed analysis of individual 
problems in pronunciation followed by intensive work in class and the language 
laboratory. May be taken concurrently with French 203. Conducted in French. 

240 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken con- 
currently with French 204. Conducted in French. 

300 French Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Designed to enable the student to develop further 
his oral control of the language in the context of his own or contemporary concerns. 
Conducted in French. 

305 Introduction to Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Examination of what is known about the nature of 
human language, the literary use of language, literary creation, reading, and what critics 
are able to say about literary works. Reading and discussion of some typical, mainly con- 
temporary, texts. Conducted in French. 

315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. The social. Intellectual and artistic origins of French 
civilization: feudal society becoming the anc/en regime; the medieval world-view trans- 
formed by the Renaissance. Literary selections will be read in modern French 
translation. Conducted in French. 

317 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Con- 
ducted In French. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or equivalent. Designed to give the student special competence in 
the control of French as an instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted 
in French. 

325 Contemporary French Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion to develop understanding of 
the social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions of present-day France, 
while at the same time strengthening facility with the language. Conducted in French. 

399 Advanced French Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisite: French 230 or consent of Instructor. Analysis of students' specific problems in 


262 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

pronunciation, followed by work in class and the language laboratory until articulatory 
proficiency is achieved. 

400 French for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken French, while 
developing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. 
Conducted in French. 

415 French Classicism (3) 

Prerequisite: French 305 and 317. The decisive moment in French experience. Focus on 
literature of the Classic period (1660-1685), but open to both ends to include the for- 
mation and perenniality of French Classicism. Conducted in French. 

425 French Romanticism (3) 

Prerequisites: French 305 and 317. The revolution in feeling and intellect in 19th-century 
France. Emphasis on the Romantic period (1820-1850) but the course may include 
material preceding or following those dates. Conducted In French. 

466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to French, with special attention to 
structural contrasts between French and English. Emphasis on the application of 
linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

475A,B,C,D Seminar in 20th-Century French Literature (3, 3, 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: French 305, 315, 317, and 415 or 425. If 415 or 425 has not been completed, one 
must be taken concurrently. Organizes the study of 20th-century French literature 
around four major themes. Conducted In French. 

475A Exploration of the Self (3) 

Search for identity and the quest for personal authenticity. The role of the conscious and un- 
conscious mind and of artistic creativity. Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Valery, etc. 

475B In Search of the Real (3) 

The surrealist revolt against bourgeois logic, mores and literature. From Dada to automatic 
writing to Revolution to I'amour fou. Includes precursors and kindred spirits (e.g. 
Lautreamont, jarry). 

475C The Individual and Society (3) 

Attitudes toward personal freedom; the existential sense of responsibility toward one's 
fellow man. Saint-Exupery, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, etc. 

475D Beyond Despair (3) 

Writers after World War II seeking tough-minded visions of man to replace the naive 
humanism of the '30's, new kinds of hope "beyond despair", (Sartre's "la vraie vie com- 
mence au-dela du desespoir"). 

485 Senior Seminar in French Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: French 305, 315, 317 and senior standing. Exploration of a literary current, 
period, author, genre or problem. Subject will change each time course is given and 
may be repeated for credit. Conducted in French. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in French language or literature to be taken with the consent of the In- 
structor and department chairman. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in French. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of Instructor. Conducted in French. 

520 Graduate Seminar: Old French (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Readings in the medieval literature of northern France 
representing a wide variety of dialects and centuries. Conducted In French. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of Instructor. Some previous study of Latin is highly 
recommended. Studies In the phonetic, morphological, syntactic and semantic changes 
that characterize the development of Latin into the French of today. Conducted in 
French. 

557 Graduate Seminar: French Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

571 Graduate Seminar: French Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Conducted in French. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 263 

575 Graduate Seminar: French Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in French. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in French and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in 
French language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


GERMAN COURSES 

100A-J Personalized Instruction in Fundamental German (3-10) 

Covers material equivalent to German 101 or 102. Students may enter at any level but must 
initially register for a minimum of three units. Course is divided into 10 one-unit 
modules. Students work Independently and meet individually with instructors for con- 
sultation and tests. 

101 Fundamental German — A (5) 

Intensive practice In listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of German. Audlolingual 
assignments prepared In the language laboratory are an integral part of the course. 

102 Fundamental German — B (5) 

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, 
speaking, reading, and writing on a basic level. Audlolingual assignments prepared in 
the language laboratory are an integral part of the course. 

203 Intermediate German— A (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in German. 

204 Intermediate German— B (3) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in German. 

213 intermediate Reading (2) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Practice in skills to develop reading comprehension. 
Required for major and minor. May be taken concurrently with German 203. Con- 
ducted in German. 

214 Intermediate Reading (2) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Continuation of German 213. Practice in skills to 
develop reading comprehension. Required for major and minor. May be taken con- 
currently with German 204. Conducted in German. 

301 Readings in German for the Non-Major (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Readings reflecting a broad spectrum of writing in 
the sciences and humanities. Special attention given to rapid reading and recognition of 
structure and vocabulary. 

315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Readings and discussions in German literature, arts and institutions to develop 
insights into German culture, while strengthening facility with the language. Con- 
ducted in German. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in German. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. Designed to give the student special com- 
petence in the control of German as an instrument for free oral and written expression. 
Conducted in German. 


264 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

325 Current Trends in Culture of German-Speaking Peoples (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Readings and discussion designed to acquaint the student with a broad range 
of German contributions to- present-day civilization while strengthening facility with 
German language. Conducted in German. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the principal literary 
forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and the essay and to the major concepts of literary 
techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpretation of various texts. Conducted 
in German. 

390 Group Reading and Oral Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: German through fourth semester or consent of instructor. Oral reading of Hor- 
spiele, dramatic literature and poetry in groups. Emphasis on practice in reading aloud, 
with simultaneous discussion of surface, inner and personal meaning of the works. 
Conducted in German. 

399 German Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. Detailed analysis of individual 
problems in pronunciation followed by intensive work in class and the language 
laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in German. 

400 German for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisites: German 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of German while 
developing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. 
Conducted in German. 

430 German Literature and Culture to the Baroque (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375 or consent of Instructor. Masterpieces of German 
literature from the Hildebrandslied to Dcr Abcnteuerliche Simplicissimus and their 
relationship to cultural, historical and Intellectual developments between ca. 800-1670 
A.D. Conducted in German. 

440 18th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. The principal authors and 
movements (Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, early Romanticism) of the 
18th century. Conducted in German. 

450 19th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of Instructor. Significant Impulses in 19th- 
century German literature from Romanticism to Naturalism, including examination of 
decisive philosophic, political, and economic Influences. Conducted in German. 

460 20th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: German 315, 317, 375, or consent of instructor. Major German prose, drama 
and poetry of the 20th century. Conducted in German. 

466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to German, with special attention 
to structural contrasts between German and English. Emphasis on the application of 
linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

482 German Literature and Culture in Film (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced standing in literature or consent of instructor. A critical study of 
literary works and their film adaptations. Significant works of German literature will be 
analyzed and compared in both art forms. 

485 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing In German. Research and discussion in depth of a literary 
movement, a genre or an author. Subject varies and is announced in the Class Schedule. 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

490 Oral Interpretation of Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Group and Individual reading of various types of 
literature to develop oral and Interpretative skills. Conducted in German. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in German Language or literature to be taken with consent of 
instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 265 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

550A,B,C Interpretation of Literature (2,2,2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Interpretation of literary works in advanced language 
classes. Conducted in German. A — the narrative, B — the drama, C — poetry. 

557 Graduate Seminar: German Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Con- 
ducted in German. 

571 Graduate Seminar: German Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class 
Schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

575 Graduate Seminar: German Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class 
Schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class 
Schedule. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in German and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in 
German language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


HEBREW COURSES 

101 Fundamental Hebrew— A (3) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

102 Fundamental Hebrew— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 101. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading 
and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic structure of Hebrew. 

203 Intermediate Hebrew— A (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speaking, understan- 
ding, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis 
from sound to sentence. Conducted in Hebrew. 

204 Intermediate Hebrew— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 203 or consent of instructor. Intensive practice in speaking, understand- 
ing, reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis 
from sound to sentence. Conducted in Hebrew. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Hebrew language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


ITALIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Italian— A (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to develop control of 
the sounds and the basic structure of Italian. Audiolingual assignments are an integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in 
Italian. 

102 Fundamental Italian— B (4) 

Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and basic structure of Italian. 
Audiolingual assignments are an integral part of the course. Conducted in Italian. 


266 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

203 Intermediate Italian— A (3) 

Prerequisite; Italian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Italian. 

204 Intermediate Italian — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Italian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Italian. 


JAPANESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Japanese— A (3) 

Practice in listening-comprehension, speaking and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic structure of Japanese. Audiolingual assignments will be prepared in the 
language laboratory. Conducted in Japanese. 

102 Fundamental Japanese — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening-comprehension, speaking and 
writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic structure of Japanese. 
Audiolingual assignments will be prepared in the language laboratory. Conducted in 
Japanese. 

LATIN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Latin- A (3) 

Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading knowledge and a fundamental 
writing ability In Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will be applied. 

102 Fundamental Latin — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice to develop a comprehensive reading 
knowledge and a fundamental writing ability In Latin. Modern techniques of language 
Instruction will be applied. 

203 Intermediate Latin (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 102 or equivalent (two years of high school Latin). Intensive reading and 
writing. Selected prose and poetry from the Golden Age. Audiolingual techniques of 
language learning are used when applicable. 

203 Intermediate Latin — A (3) 

Supervised projects in Latin language and Roman literature. To be taken with consent of 
department chair as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Subject matter wdl 
vary. May be repeated for credit. 

204 Intermediate Latin— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 203 or equivalent (three years of high school Latin). Intensive reading and 
writing. Selected prose from the Silver and Middle Ages. Audiolingual techniques of 
language learning are used when applicable. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Latin language and Roman llterautre. To be taken with consent of 
department chair as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Subject matter will 
vary. May be repated for credit. 

PORTUGUESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Portuguese — A (4) 

Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing to develop control 
of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of Portuguese. Enrollment restricted to 
students with previous study of a Romance language. Conducted in Portuguese. 

102 Fundamental Portuguese — B (4) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 101 or equivalent. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading 
comprehension, and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and 
structures of Portuguese. Enrollment restricted to students with previous study of a 
Romance language. Conducted in Portuguese. 

315 Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent, reading knowledge of Portuguese or consent of 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 267 


instructor. Insights into the main currents of Portuguese culture and civilization and 
Brazil's intellectual and artistic development from discovery through the Second Em- 
pire. Conducted in Portuguese. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of 
instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted In Portuguese. 

318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of 
instructor. Designed to give the student special competence in the control of Por- 
tuguese as an Instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted in Por- 
tuguese. 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. Readings and discussion toward 
developing an understanding of the social and intellectual problems, trends, and con- 
tributions to Brazil from the advent of the Republic. Major emphasis on present day 
Brazil. Conducted In Portuguese. 

431 Portuguese Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. Portuguese literature from the Middle 
Ages to the present. The major works of Gil Vicente, Luis de Camoens, Eca de Queiroz 
and others examined from an aesthetic and cultural standpoint. Conducted in Por- 
tuguese. 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The literature of Brazil from the Colonial period to the 
present. Conducted in Portuguese. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised pr-jjects In Portuguese language or literature to be taken with consent of instruc- 
tor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


RUSSIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Russian— A (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Russian. Audlolingual 
assignments are an integral part of the course and are to be prepared in the language 
laboratory. 

102 Fundamental Russian— B (5) 

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, 
speaking, reading and writing on a basic level. Audlolingual assignments are an Integral 
part of the course and are to be prepared In the language laboratory. 

203 Intermediate Russian— A (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading, and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 

204 Intermediate Russian— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 

315 Introduction to Russian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Readings and discussions of literature, arts and In- 
stitutions to develop insights into Russian traditions while strengthening facility with the 
language. Conducted In Russian. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Russian. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of Instructor. Introduction to the principal literary 
forms, prose fiction, poetry, drama and essay, and to the major concepts of literary 
techniques and criticism. Close analysis and interpretation of various texts. Conducted 
in Russian. 


268 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

400 Russian for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive review of spoken Russian, while 
developing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. 
Conducted in Russian. 

441 The Works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Major works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky in 
their intellectual and historical setting and their impact on Russian and world literature. 
Conducted in Russian. 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. A study of major literary works of the first 
half of the 19th century which exemplify cultural and intellectual movements in Russia. 
Conducted in Russian. 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Representative works of outstanding 
modern Russian writers. Analysis and discussion of their prose and poetry in the light of 
the social problems of present-day Russia. Conducted In Russian. 

466 Introduction to Russian Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. The analytical procedures of general 
linguistics as applied to Russian with special attention to structural contrasts between 
Russian and English. Emphasis on the application of linguistic analysis to the teaching of 
modern foreign languages. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects In Russian language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


SPANISH COURSES 

101 Fundamental Spanish— A (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop 
control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of Spanish. Assignments in the 
language laboratory are an integral part of the course. Conducted in Spanish. 

102 Fundamental Spanish— B (5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, 
speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and 
structures of Spanish. Assignments in the language laboratory are an integral part of the 
course. Conducted in Spanish. 

103 Intensive Review of Fundamental Spanish (5) 

For students who have completed 1-2 years of high school Spanish or equivalent and need an 
intensive review of first-year Spanish, equivalent to Spanish 101 and 102. Assignments in 
the language laboratory are an integral part of the course. Conducted in Spanish. 

203 Intermediate Spanish— A (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Spanish. 

204 Intermediate Spanish— B (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Intensive practice in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from 
sound to sentence. Conducted in Spanish. 

213 Intermediate Conversation (2) 

Practice in oral expression based on a variety of materials. May be taken concurrently with 
Spanish 203. Conducted In Spanish. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice In written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken con- 
currently with Spanish 204. Conducted in Spanish. 

299 Spanish Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of instructor. Detailed analysis of students' specific 
problems In pronunciation followed by intensive work In class and the language 
laboratory until articulatory proficiency is achieved. May be repeated for credit. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 269 


300 Spanish Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite; Spanish 204 or equivalent. Designed to enable the student to develop further 
his oral control of the language in the context of his own or contemporary concerns. No 
credit for major. Conducted in Spanish. 

315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Readings and discussions In Spanish literature, arts and institutions to develop 
Insights Into Spanish culture, while strengthening facility with the language. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Readings and discussion in Spanish-American literature, arts and institutions to 
develop insights into Spanish-American literature and culture while strengthening 
facility with the language. Conducted in Spanish. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of in- 
structor. Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

318 Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition (3) 

Emphasis on linguistic problems encountered by the Spanish/English bilingual student in 
connection with his written expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. Introduction to literary forms and con- 
cepts of literary techniques and criticism. Analysis and interpretation of various texts to 
increase the students' abilities in reading, language, and literary criticism. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

400 Spanish for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. Intensive study of spoken Spanish, while 
developing the student's powers of self-expression in the spoken and written language. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

415 Contemporary Spanish Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. An analysis and study of the cultural — 
social, economical, political — characteristics of contemporary Spanish life. Conducted 
In Spanish. 

430 Spanish Literature to Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 and 375. Spanish literature from its beginnings to 1700, with special 
emphasis on the outstanding representative works of each genre. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 316 and 375 or consent of instructor. Spanish- American Literature 
from The Conquest to 1888. Conducted In Spanish. 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 316 and 375 or consent .of instructor. Spanish-American Literature 
from modernismo to the present. Conducted in Spanish. 

461 Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 315 and 375 or consent of instructor. Representative works of 19th- 
and 20th-century Spain. Conducted in Spanish. 

466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

The analytical procedures of general linguistics as applied to Spanish, with special attention 
to structural contrasts between Spanish and English. Emphasis on the application of 
linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or 318, 400 or equivalent and 466, the latter of which may be taken 
concurrently. Focuses on the differences in phonology, morphology, syntax and lex- 
icon in linguistic patterns in all Spanish-speaking regions. 

468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or 318, 400 or equivalent, and 466, the latter of which may be taken 
concurrently. Theory and performance techniques for contrasting phonological, gram- 
matical and lexical structures of Spanish and English. 


270 Geography 

475 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Literature of Spain (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Spanish. Selected readings from the most outstanding writers 
of the Generacion del 98 and of the 20th century. Conducted in Spanish. 

485 Senior Seminar: Hispanic Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Spanish. Exploration of literary or cultural topics of Spain or 
Spanish America. Subject matter will change in alternate semesters. May be repeated 
for credit. Conducted In Spanish. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects In Spanish language or literature to be taken with consent of in- 
structor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted In Spanish. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or consent of Instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

556 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

557 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

567 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Novel (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in Spanish. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency In Spanish and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in 
Spanish language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


SWAHILI COURSES 

101 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing to master the basic 

structure of Swahili and the requisite skills for both oral and written communication. 
Conducted in Swahili. (Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 104) 

102 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Prerequisite: Swahili 101 or equivalent. Intensive practice in listening comprehension, 
speaking and writing to master the basic structure of-Swahill and the requisite skills for 
both oral and written communication. Conducted in Swahili. (Same as Afro-Ethnic 
Studies 105) 


DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

FACULTY 

William Ketteringham 
Department Chair 

George Britton, Arthur Earick, Peter Ellers, Wayne Engstrom, Glenn George, Gary Hannes, 
Ronald Helin, Tso-Hwa Lee, Bill Puzo, Gertrude Reith, Imre Sutton, Barbara Weightman 

The major In geography provides knowledge concerning variety and change in the earth's 
physical foundation, and In man's economic, cultural and political relationship to that foun- 
dation. In doing so it contributes to a broad, liberal education and furnishes sound 
preparation for employment in business, planning, and government service. The field also 


Geography 271 


provides a foundation for teaching on the elementary and secondary levels and for advanced 
geographic study on the graduate level leading to university teaching and research. 

Students and counselors are advised that departmental offerings are numbered according to 
instructional level and course content. These criteria are applied in the following ways: 

Instructional level 

survey courses designed primarily for non-majors 100-199 

survey courses designed primarily for majors 200-299 

courses designed for students with general needs and not normally applicable to 

graduate programs in geography 300-399 

courses designed for students with special needs; prerequisites cited are strictly inter- 
preted 400-499 

courses for graduate students and qualified undergraduate students 500-599 


Course content 
general courses: 
physical courses: 
regional courses: 
human courses: 
technical courses: 
special studies: 


00-09 (e.g., Geography 100 or 500) 
10-29 (e.g., Geography 211 or 323) 
30-49 (e.g., Geography 344 or 433) 
50-79 (e.g., Geography 250 or 367) 
80-89 (e.g., Geography 280 or 381) 
90-99 (e.g., Geography 499 or 599) 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

The major consists of at least 42 units of geography. Including: 

A. A 10-unit geography core (211, 250, 280) 

B. A 12-unlt breadth requirement in upper division geography, including one course from 
each of the following groups — physical, regional, human, technical. 

C. A six-unit requirement in 400-ievel geography, excluding the 490s. 

Students may satisfy requirements A, B and C with equivalent course work taken at other in- 
stitutions; they may also transfer into the major an additional six units of lower division 
geography and an unlimited amount of upper division geography. A three-unit non- 
laboratory course in introductory physical geography taken at another institution will be 
accepted in place of Geography 211, the four-unit laboratory course offered at this univer- 
sity. 

No unit credit toward the major will be allowed for geography courses in which a grade of D 
is received. Content credit for such courses may be allowed by the student's adviser. 

TEACHING MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography serves students who wish to pursue a second field related to a 
teaching credential, interdisciplinary studies, or an elective concentration. Interested 
students should take at least 21 units of geography, including the core (211, 250, 280) and a 
minimum of nine units of upper division work from at least three of the following groups — 
physical, regional, human, technical. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

This program provides advanced study in geographic concepts, techniques and methods. 
Through seminars and research it develops the analytical and interpretive abilities of the 
student, and provides requisite background for employment in teaching, government and 
business. 

Prerequisites 

Students must meet the university and school requirements for admission to conditionally 
classified graduate standing with the declared objective of this degree. Please see the section 
of this catalog on admission of graduates. 

Classified standing requires the equivalent of 33 semester units In geography, including the 
following: (1) nine units in introductory geography; (2) nine units in upper division physical 
and human geography, including at least three units in physical and three units in human 
geography; (3) three units in upper division geographic techniques; (4) three units In upper 


272 Geography 


division regional geography; and (5) nine units of geography electives, of which six units 
must be the equivalent of 400-level. A 3.0 (B) average In all geography courses is required 
prior to classification in the program. Course or grade deficiencies may be made up with 
consent of the departmental graduate committee. After completion of all prerequisites and 
removal of deficiencies, if any, the student is reviewed for classification Into the program by 
the departmental graduate committee, which then supervises the student in the formulation 
of an official study plan. 

A study plan must be developed and approved for admission to classified graduate standing. 

Study Plan 

Requirements for the completion of the degree program Include: 

A. 30 units of approved upper division or graduate-level work distributed as follows: 

Units 


Geography seminars (minimum of) 9 

Geography 597, Project, or Geography 598, Thesis 6 

Elective upper division or graduate work in geography (for which up to 6 units 
may be taken in related fields) including techniques 15 

Total 30 


B. A technique requirement equivalent to nine units, completed prior to Advancement to 
Candidacy. This includes the three units used as prerequisite. The remaining six units may 
be upper division undergraduate and/or graduate level. 

Candidacy is attained on the satisfactory completion of the following: (1) 12 approved units 
of work with B or better in all, including at least three units in a 500-level seminar; (2) the 
technique requirement; (3) selection of a field of specialization and an appropriate adviser as 
chair of the student's graduate committee. Each candidate will prepare either two three-unit 
projects or a six-unit thesis. Before registering for Geography 597 or 598, a candidate must 
have topic approved by the student's graduate committee. The candidate must submit to the 
committee a detailed written research proposal which indicates knowledge of the 
appropriate literature and of techniques of data collection and analysis. The committee will 
then discuss this proposal with the candidate, to determine his/her competence to pursue 
the topic as outlined, and assure that both the student and the committee understand what is 
to be done. The committee can modify, accept or reject the proposal. Students interested in 
foreign area studies are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in a suitable foreign 
language. 

All graduate students are to confer with the departmental graduate adviser sometime during 
the first two weeks of each semester; for further information, consult this adviser. 

See also ''The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 


GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

100 Man and the Land (3) 

An introduction to world geography, with emphasis on the world's major regions and on 
their use and modification by man. 

150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

A geographic analysis and approach to the problems of man and his environment, dealing 
with man's interpretation of the environment and his use and misuse thereof. Factors of 
discussion will include population, nutrition, health, settlement, pollution, resource 
utilization and local environmental problems. 

211 Physical Geography (4) 

A study of the basic elements of the physical environment (e.g. weather, climate, landforms, 
vegetation and soils) and an analysis of their world distribution and interrelationships. (3 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

250 Human Geography (3) 

A topical and thematic Interpretation of world human occupancy, with emphasis on pop- 
ulation patterns, cultural diversity, livelihood, and settlement. Discussions consider the 


Geography 273 

varying role of perception, human organization and technology in the modification of 
the earth environment. 

280a*f Introduction to Geographical Analysis (1) 

Basic introduction to the use of descriptive statistics in geography. Review of the 
relationships of graphs, functions and equations, logarithms and exponents, and an 
overview of the linear regression model. 

280a Interpretation of Maps and Aerial Photographs (2) 

An introduction to the uses ot maps and aerial photographs in geographic research. 
Emphasis is placed on types of data which can be obtained from these sources as well 
as on rudimentary measurement techniques. 

280b Introduction to Field Methods (1) 

A basic introduction to the study of geographic phenomena in their actual setting — ''the 
field." 

280c Introduction to Quantitative Methods (1) 

Basic introduction to the use of descriptive statistics in geography. Review of the 
relationships of graphs, functions and equations, logarithms and exponents, and an 
overview of the linear regression model. 

280d Terrain Measurement Techniques (1) 

An introduction to methods of measuring selected aspects of land surface from in the 
field and from topographic maps. 

280e Library Techniques for Geographers (1) 

An introductory study of library research for geographic inquiry, with emphasis on how 
and where to find the needed information as well as the uses of such information. 

280f Geographic Writing (1) 

A workshop providing writing experience relevant to the training of geographers. 

312 Geomorphology (3) 

Prerequisite Geography 211 or Earth Science 101. A study of the development of landforms 
through an analysis of the processes that construct and modify them. 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 211 or consent of Instructor. A study of atmospheric elements and 
controls, and climatic classification systems. 

325 Plant Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 211 or consent of instructor. A geographic analysis of world dis- 
tribution, ecology and description of vegetation patterns including reference to human 
Influences. 

330 Geography of California (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. Description and analysis of the 
geographic regions of California — their environmental diversity, occupance patterns, 
and current problems. 

332 Geography of Anglo-America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of the United States 
and Canada emphasizing the interrelated physical and cultural features that give 
geographic personality to the individual regions. 

$19333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of Instructor. A systematic and regional survey 
of Middle and South America with particular emphasis on the interrelationships of the 
physical and social factors of the area. 

336 Geography of Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. A survey of the basic physical and 
human lineaments of Europe and of the elements that distinguish and give character to 
Its major regional divisions. 

338 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or upper division standing. A study of the geographic factors, 
cultural and physical, that are basic to an understanding of the historical development 
of Russia and of the contemporary economic and cultural geography of the U.S.S.R. and 
its regions. 

340A Geography of East Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of China and Japan In 
terms of internal and external economic, social and political activities and in- 
terrelationships. 


274 Geography 

340B Geography of Southeast Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. A regional study of the diversity so 
characteristic of man and land in southeastern Asia, with special emphasis on the grow- 
ing significance — in economic, social and political terms — of the region's newly 
emergent nations. 

344 Geography of Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of Instructor. The physical, human and regional 
geography of Africa with emphasis on Saharan borderlands and East Africa. 

346 Australia and the Pacific Islands (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 100 or consent of instructor. The physical, cultural and regional 
geography of Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. 

350 Conservation and Ecology in Contemporary America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A survey of resource-use problems and the principles 
of conversation and ecology with discussions of philosophy, ethics, public policy and 
environmental law. 

355 Population Perspectives (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A systematic approach to the geography of population 
within a regional framework. Investigation of historical and contemporary 
demographic patterns and processes in terms of cultural, economic and environmental 
factors of population growth, mobility and distribution. 

360 Economic Geography (3) 

A systematic inquiry into the spatial distribution of economic activities: agriculture, extrac- 
tive and manufacturing Industries, and tertiary services. 

367 Political Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 250 or consent of instructor. A systematic inquiry into the 
geographic bases of political territories, from the municipal to the international level 
with an emphasis on sovereign states. Special consideration will be given to perception 
of political units and to relationships among political territories. 

370 Urban Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The city as a geographic unit; urban settlements as 
regional centers; city-region relationships; the structure of villages, towns and cities, 
and their historical developments; case studies. 

381 Cartography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Compilation and construction of 
maps and graphs as geographic tools, with emphasis on the principles of effective car- 
tographic representation. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

386 Data Processing for Geographic Information (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of Instructor. An introduction to the use of a digital 
computer in solving geographical problems. Includes the acquisition of basic computer 
programming skills and the investigation of spatially-oriented problems. (2 hours lec- 
ture, 2 hours activity) 

412 Regional Geomorphology of the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 312. A seminar examining the major physiographic provinces of the 
United States. Special emphasis is placed on the record that present and past 
geomorphic processes have left on the landscape. 

423 Physical Climatology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 323 or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected topics in at- 
mospheric science, including heat-transfer, atmospheric motion, synoptic and climatic 
analysis of weather data, and the effects of urban environment on the atmosphere. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

425 Cultural Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 211 or consent of instructor. A seminar for students in geography, 
related disciplines and in environmental studies. A topical (e.g. environmental health, 
nutrition) or regional (e.g. coastal, insular, desert) treatment of the ecological approach 
to man-land relationships. 

431 Man's Impact on the California Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 330 or upper division standing. A seminar analyzing selected 
geographic problems which have resulted from man's impact on the land and its 
resources, with particular emphasis on southern California. 


Geography 275 


432 Geography of Eastern America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 332 or History 170A or consent of instructor. A seminar on the 
geography of Eastern America eastward from the Great Plains. Emphasis will be on the 
natural setting, patterns of movement and settlement, population characteristics, 
economic development, and urbanization. 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 333 or consent of instructor. A seminar for advanced students in 
Latin American studies or geography. Studies of contemporary interest dealing with 
man and his development in the area of Latin America. Specific content of the course 
will vary from year to year, but major stress will be placed upon the larger countries of 
the region. 

451 Geographical Change in the American West (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 332 or 350 or consent of instructor. A seminar on geographical in- 
terpretations of cultural, historical and resource management aspects of changing 
Western America. 

457 Social Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 250. A seminar on man's social milieu from a spatial perspective. 
Emphasis will be placed on the subjective spatial constructs of various social groups in 
order to illuminate extant similarities and differences in the design of earth occupance. 

458 Spatial Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 355, or 360, or 370, or consent of instructor. A seminar on the 
sociogeographic approach to the dynamic processes of migration and diffusion with 
emphasis on the spread of people, ideas and technology in modern societies. 

464 Transportation Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 360 or 370 or consent of instructor. An inquiry into spatial patterns 
of both regional and urban transportation networks; use the elementary graph theory 
in geographic research, transportation planning and methodology. 

468 Law and Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 350 or Environmental Studies 440 or consent of instructor. An inter- 
disciplinary seminar in the role of law in the allocation, management, and ad- 
ministration of resources and the environment. Relevant studies relate to conservation 
law, land tenure, water rights, environmental health and other topics. 

472 Urban Growth and Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 370 or consent of Instructor. A seminar on urban development with 
an emphasis on the decentralizing forces operating in contemporary urban space; 
identification of trends in the planning process. 

482 Advanced Cartography—Thematic Mapping (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 381 and consent of instructor. Application of photographic techni- 
ques and cartographic analysis to advanced problems in map compilation and design. (1 
hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

484 Airphoto and Image Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisites: junior, senior or graduate standing and consent of Instructor. Use of aerial 
photography, space photography and other remote sensors as tools and research 
sources. Emphasis on interpretation of physical and cultural elements of the landscape. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

485 Quantitative Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of Instructor. An Introduction to spatial analysis and 
geographic application of basic concepts of descriptive and Inferential statistics. 
Includes some use of the electronic computer. (2 hours activity) 

487 Ecology of the Santa Ana Mountains (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core and consent of instructor. Field study, laboratory analysis and 
discussions of environmental factors of a wild region within urbanizing Southern 
California. 

488 Land Use Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: geography core and consent of instructor. Analysis and interpretation of 
urban and rural land use and settlement with specific references to geographic field 
problems. Application of geographic techniques and tools to local field studies. Satur- 
day field sessions. 


276 History 


495 Internship in Applied Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing and consent of instructor. Students work specified number of 
hours in appropriate public or private organizations under the supervision of their staff 
and as coordinated by departmental faculty. Interns meet with instructor by 
arrangement. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students. Student must have consent of instructor under whom study will 
be undertaken before enrolling. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Seminar in the Evolution of Geographic Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. An inquiry into the nature, scope, 
and development of the geographic discipline. 

510 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected topics per- 
taining to physical geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

530 Seminar in Regional Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected regions or 
selected topics within a regional setting. May be repeated once for credit. 

550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected topics per- 
taining to cultural, political or social geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

560 Seminar in Resource Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected problems in 
resource utilization, land use planning and economic geography. May be repeated 
once for credit. 

571 Seminar in Urban Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. An in-depth study of selected 
urban problems. Topics will vary from semester to semester and will allow for concerns 
of the participants. May be repeated once for credit. 

580 Seminar in Geo-Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar on selected topics per- 
taining to geographic techniques. May be repeated once for credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and consent of adviser. May be repeated once for 
a maximum of six units of credit. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and consent of adviser. May be repeated up to a 
maximum of six units of credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 


DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

FACULTY 
Thomas Flickema 
Department Chair 

Gordon Bakken,* Warren Beck, Leland Bellot,* Lauren Breese, Giles Brown,* Jack Crabbs, 
Lawrence de Graaf, jack Elenbaas, George Etue, Robert Feldman, Charles Frazee, George 
Giacumakis, Arthur Hansen, B. Carmon Hardy, Harry Jeffrey, Sam Kupper, Sheldon 
Maram, Michael Melselman, Frederic Miller, Mougo Nyaggah, Michael Onorato, David 
Pivar, Charles Povlovich, Jackson Putnam, Ronald Rietveld, Danton Sailor, Seymour 
Scheinberg, Gary Shumway, Cameron Stewart, Ernest Toy,* David Van Deventer, Nelson 
Woodard, James Woodward, Kinji Ken Yada, Cecile Zinberg 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in history is designed to provide cultural enrichment, a sense of 
alternative,, and perspectives especially relevant to a society confronted with widespread In- 
stitutional change. The department offers courses which expose the student to man's rich 


University administrative officer 


History 277 

and diverse experience. In addition to subject matter, the department gives particular 
emphasis to various methodologies and ways of thinking about mankind's past. The major 
may be pursued to fulfill various professional and cultural objectives common to a liberal arts 
program. It serves, especially, as a preparation for teaching, law, government, and other ser- 
vices, and as the foundation for advanced study at the graduate level. 

The undergraduate program for the history major contains three well defined levels of 
study: introductory, intermediate and advanced. At the introductory level, the student has 
the opportunity to enroll In topical or survey courses in various fields. At the intermediate 
level, the student builds on the foundations he has established In early study, extending his 
understanding and moving toward greater sophistication in the use of historical materials. At 
the advanced level, he will devote himself to seminar work and Independent study in his 
area or areas of specialization, at which time he will be required to apply his knowledge and 
training in original and challenging ways. 

The undergraduate major requires a total of 40 units: 13 in introductory classes and 27 in In- 
termediate and advanced courses. At the introductory level, each student is to enroll in 
History 100, Introduction to History. He must also complete four topical or survey offerings. 
At the intermediate level. History 399, History Methodology, must be taken along with 18 un- 
its, six each in the three fields of United States history; European history; and Latin American, 
Asian or African history. At the advanced level the student will be required to enroll in a 
research seminar and any other elective, at the upper division level, which he may choose. 

Except for History 100, all courses offered in the department may be counted toward 
fulfillment of the general education and social science requirement for the bachelor's 
degree at this university. 

Students majoring in history are encouraged to take work in other of the social sciences and 
humanities. Those intending to do graduate work in history should commence the study of 
at least one foreign language appropriate to the pursuit of advanced study in their particular 
specialty. 

Program of Study for the Major 

1. Introductory requirements: 13 units 

A. History 100 (prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses)* 

B. Four courses (100-200 level) from three of the following four fields. These may be sur- 
vey and/or topical courses: 

1. U.S. history (170A,B and/or 270 topic courses) 

2. European and ancient Mediterranean (110A,B, 120 and/or 220, 230 topic courses) 

3. Latin America, Asian and African (140, 160, 165 and/or 240, 250, 260 topic courses) 

4. World or comparative history (101A,B and/or 210 topic courses) 

2. Intermediate requirements: 21 units 

A. History 399 

B. At least six units of U.S. history 

C. At least six units of European history 

D. At least six units In Latin America, Asian or African history 

3. Advanced requirements: 6 units 

A. History 490 

B. Three units of elective, upper division level 

HISTORY MAJOR AND THE RYAN ACT 

The State Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing has approved the major In 
history under both the multiple subject and the single subject credential options of the 
Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act). 

Successful completion of the history major provides a single subject examination waiver in 
either the history or the social sciences categories for secondary school teaching. 


* Students transferring from accredited institutions who have completed nine or more semester units of work in introduc- 
tory or survey history courses are exempt from this requirement. 


278 History 


Successful completion of the history major and related course work provides a multiple sub- 
ject examination waiver for elementary school teaching. 

TEACHING MINOR IN HISTORY 

The teaching minor in history is composed of units In history exclusive of the general 
education requirements. This teaching minor only applies under the Fisher credential 
program. 


Recommended teaching minor: Units 

Introductory courses 9 

Electives at the intermediate and advanced levels 12 

Total 21 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The Master of Arts in History is designed to improve the student's academic and professional 
competence for educational services at the elementary, secondary and community college 
levels and as preparation for advanced graduate work toward the doctoral degree In history. 
It is relevant to various other specialties in public or private enterprise and general culture or 
community service. The program seeks to deepen the students understanding of man's con- 
dition through a careful study of human experience. 

Prerequisite 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditonally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: an undergraduate major in history equivalent to 
the Cal State Fullerton major with at least a CPA of 3.0 in the upper division history courses. 
Each student's background and record are evaluated by the department graduate program 
adviser. 

Students with limited subject, grade, or breadth deficiencies may be considered for classified 
standing In the program upon completing courses approved by the graduate program ad- 
viser in history in addition to those required for the degree, with at least a B average. 

Study Plan 

Of the 30 units of adviser-approved graduate courses on the study plan for the degree, 18 
must be In appropriate work at the 500-level. The remaining 12 units must Include a 
minimum of three units in history and, therefore, may Include up to nine units In other 
fields. The required courses for both Plan I and Plan II are: 

History 501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) 

History 590 History and Historians (3) 

A research seminar in a field of concentration (3 units) 

Plan I: 

A primary focus in one area in which a field Is intensively developed. This results in a specific 
topic of research with a written thesis as the final product (History 598, Thesis: 3-6 units). 

An oral examination on the thesis and the coursework will be required upon completion of 
the coursework but prior to the final draft of the thesis. 

Plan II: 

The focus In this plan Is in two fields not found in the same general area. There Is a minimum 
requirement of one graduate research seminar besides History 501 and 590. There is also a 
minimum requirement of one graduate reading seminar In the recent interpretations of 
history in the particular fields of interest. 

A written comprehensive In each of the two fields will be required upon completion of the 
program. 


History 279 

Students in the History Department's graduate program must demonstrate a broad cultural 
understanding of one or more foreign countries relevant to the student's area of 
specialization prior to advancement to candidacy. This requirement may be met by a reading 
knowledge of an appropriate foreign language usually dolermiru'd by dcparinK'ntal ex- 
amination or an approved selection of comparative studies (12 units post-B.A.i, but the 
method must be approved by the student's adviser. In certain programs, an examination in 
statistics may be substituted for the language requirement. 

For further information, consult the Department of History. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" in this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

HISTORY MAJOR CATEGORIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY COURSES (for undergraduate students) 

A. Survey Courses (Lower division) 

100 Introduction to History 
101A World History to 1500 
101B World History Since 1500 

110A Western Civilization to the 17th Century 

110B Western Civilization from 1648 

120 Ancient Civilizations 

140 Latin American Civilizations 

160 Asian Civilizations 

165 Introduction to the Middle East 

170A United States to 1877 

170B United States Since 1877 

B. Topical Courses (Lower division) 

210 Topics in World or Comparative History 

220 Topics in European History 

230 Topics in the History of Science and Technology 

240 Topics in Latin American History 

250 Topics In African History 

260 Topics in Asian History 

270 Topics in American History. 

II. INTERMEDIATE COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

A. Historical Methodology (Upper division) 

399 Historical Methodology 

B. Subject Area Courses (Upper division) 

The Ancient World 

412A Ancient Near East — Mesopotamia 

412B Ancient Near East — East Mediterranean 

415A Classical Greece 

415B Hellenistic Civilization 

417A Roman Republic 

417B Roman Empire. 

Europe 

340 Ancient and Medieval Britain 

341 Tudor-Stuart England 

342 History of England and Great Britain 

400 European Social and Intellectual History to 1500 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present 
419 The Byzantine Empire 

421A History of the Christian Church to 1025 

421B History of the Christian Church from 1025 to the Present 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1000 

423B Medieval Europe, 1000-1400 

425A The Renaissance 

425B The Reformation 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1763 


280 


History 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon 

428 19th Century Europe 

429 Europe Since 1914 
432 Germany Since 1648 
434A Russia to 1890 

434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime 

436 The Balkans 

437 East Europe 
439 History of Spain 

Latin America 

350A Colonial Latin America 
350B Republican Latin America 

450 Change in Contemporary Latin America 

451 The Andean Nations 
452A Brazil to 1889 
452B 20th-Century Brazil 
453A Mexico to 1910 
453B Mexico Since 1910 
Africa 

356 Africa to 1850 

357 Africa Since 1850 

455 Contemporary Africa 

456 History of West Africa 

458A Southern Africa to the 20th Century 
458B Southern Africa in the 20th Century 
East Asia 

365 Art of India 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East 

426A History of China 

462B History of China 

462C China Since 1949 

463A History of japan 

463B History of Japan 

464A History of Southeast Asia to 1850 

464B History of Southeast Asia, 1850-1945 

464C History of Contemporary Southeast Asia 

465A History of India 

465B History of India 

465C History of India 

Middle East 

466A The Arab Ascendancy 
466B The Islamic Imperial Age 

467 Middle East in the 19th Century 

468 Middle East in the 20th Century 

469 Intellectual and Cultural History of the Middle East 

The United States 

383 History of California 

386A American Social History 1750-1860 

386B American Social History 1865-1930 

470 American Colonial Civilization 

471 The United States From Colony to Nation 

472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 

474 United States and Industrial Organization (1876-1914) 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 

476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 
479 The Urbanization of American Life 

481 Westward Movement in the United States 
482A History of Business in American Society 


History 281 


482B History of Business in American Society 
483 American Religious History 
484A American Constitutional History to 1865 
484B American Constitutional History from 1865 
485A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 
485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 
486A United States Cultural History 
486B United States Cultural History 
487A History of Politics in American Society 
487B History of Politics in American Society 
488A American Negro From Slavery to Jim Crow 
488B American Negro Since 1890 

489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest 

Science and Technology 

330 History of Contemporary Science 

430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance 

430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present 

World or Comparative 

405 History of the jews 

407 War and Civilization 

ill. ADVANCED COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

A. Seminars (Upper division) 

490 Senior Research Seminar 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics 

492 Community History 

493 Oral History 

494 Special Research Techniques 

495 Colloquium in History 

498 History Internship 

B. Individualized Study (Upper division) 

499 Independent Study 

IV. GRADUATE COURSES (for graduate students) 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History 

505 Seminar in Recent Interpretations in History 

520 Seminar in European History 

550 Seminar in Latin American History 

560 Seminar in Afro-Asian History 

570 Seminar in American History 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations 
590 History and Historians 

598 Thesis 

599 Independent Graduate Research 


HISTORY COURSES 

100 Introduction to History (1) 

Designed to introduce the new history major to his academic discipline through exposure to 
the following topics: the uses and significance of history; the nature of history, areas 
and fields of history; the language and vocabulary of history; and methods of studying 
history. Required of all lower division majors. 

101 A World History to 1500 (3) 

The history of mankind from earliest times to 1500 A.D. Special attention is given to the 
definition, evolution, and interaction of the major civilizations. 

lOlB World History Since 1500 (3) 

Global history during the past four centuries, with special emphasis on the interaction 
between the expanding West and the non-Western areas of the world. 


282 History 

110A Western Civilization to the 17th Century (3) 

The study of man and Western institutions from their beginnings until the middle of the 17th 
century. 

110B Western Civilizations from 1648 (3) 

The study of man and the modernization of Western institutions from 1648 to the present. 

120 Ancient Civilizations (3) 

History of the ancient Near East, classical and Hellenistic Greece and Rome. The 
development of art, literature, science and political and economic history. 

140 Latin American Civilizations (3) 

Latin America, its people, politics, and culture from the conquest of Mexico to the 
overthrow of Salvador Allende, with emphasis on the 20th century. Lectures combined 
with discussion groups, films and talks by specialists in Latin American studies. 

160 Asian Civilizations (3) 

A study of the people and culture of East, South and Southeast Asia from historical times to 
the present. 

165 Introduction to the Middle East (3) 

The historical development of the Middle East from the Prophet Mohammed to the present. 
The Islamic religion, art, philosophy, poetry and key political conflicts of modern times. 

170A United States to 1877 (3) 

A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural development of the United States to 
1877. Attention is given to Old World background, rise of the new nation, sectional 
problems, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Satisfies the state requirement in U.S. 
history. 

170B United States Since 1877 (3) 

A survey of U.S. history from the late 19th century to the present. Attention is given to 
economic transformation, political reform movements, social, cultural, and intellectual 
changes, and the role of the United States in world affairs. Satisfies the state re- 
quirement in U.S. history. 

210 Topics in World or Comparative History (3) 

Introductory world or comparative history courses. 

220 Topics in European History (3) 

Introductory European history courses. 

230 Topics in the History of Science and Technology (3) 

Introductory science and technology history courses. 

240 Topics in Latin American History (3) 

Introductory Latin American history courses. 

250 Topics in African History (3) 

Introductory African history courses. 

260 Topics in Asian History (3) 

Introductory Asian history courses. 

270 Topics in American History (3) 

Introductory American history courses. 

340 Ancient and Medieval Britain (3) 

The history of Britain from 55 B.C. to 1485. Emphasis on the constitutional. Institutional and 
cultural aspects of Roman, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Plantagenet Britain. 

341 Tudor-Stuart England (3) 

The history of England from the accession of Henry VII to the Glorious Revolution. Emphasis 
on the political, institutional, ecclesiastical and cultural aspects of the period of the 
Tudors and Stuarts. 

342 History of England and Great Britain (3) 

A study of the political, economic and social history of Great Britain from the later Stuarts to 
the present. Particular stress on the modification of the parliamentary system and the 
growth of economic and social democracy within Britain and upon the development of 
responsible political systems In the dependent territories. 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

A survey of the pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portugal and the 
European background of these countries; the development of the socioeconomic, 
cultural, and governmental institutions in colonial life; the background of revolutions 
and the wars for independence. 


History 283 


350B Republican Latin America (3) 

A survey of the Latin American republic since 1826, emphasizing the struggle for responsible 
government, socioeconomic, and cultural changes, and the role of U.S. foreign oolicv. 

356 Africa to 1850 (3) 

The history of tropical Africa from earliest times to the colonial era. 

357 Africa Since 1850 (3) 

A study of the impact of the colonial period upon the peoples of tropical Africa including a 
comparative analysis of the various systems of colonial administration; the factors con- 
tributing to the rise of African nationalism and the achievement of independence; and 
the problems encountered by these new nations. 

365 Art of India (3) 

(Same as Art 341) 

383 History of California (3) 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of California from the aboriginaf in- 
habitants to the present, tracing the development of contemporary institutions and the 
historical background of current Issues. 

386A American Social History 1750-1860 

A social history of the United States to the Civil War with emphasis on reform movements, 
temperance, moral purity, women's rights, anti-slavery, spiritualism and their impor- 
tance to the formation of a modern society. 

386B American Social History 1865-1930 (3) 

A social history of the United States from the Civil War with emphasis on reform, social 
organization and values. Attention will be given to the woman's movement, censorship, 
divorce, the child and the limits of reform movements in an organizational society. 

399 Historical Methodology (3) 

A study of historical knowledge in relation to general knowledge; an Introduction to the 
plurality of approaches in the analysis of history through the social sciences and 
humanities. Special emphasis will be placed upon the application of theory in historical 
investigations and upon forms of historical communication. Required of all majors. 

400 European Social and Intellectual History to 1500 (3) 

A survey of the history of ideas from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Particular attention Is 
given to the development of western thought, its foundations in Graeco-Roman and 
Judao-Chrlstian tradition and its impact on the shaping of European society and culture. 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present (3) 

The history of the competing ideas in European history from 1500 to the present which have 
entered into the formation of modern European institutions. 

405 History of the Jews (3) 

History of the Jewish people from the post-biblical period to the present. Emphasis on the 
literature of each period as well as the relationships which exist between the Jewish 
communities and the societies In which they exist. 

407 War and Civilization (3) 

The political and social implications of modern warfare, of the development of military 
technologies and of changing concepts of military organizations. 

412A Ancient Near East— Mesopotamia (3) 

A study of the political, socioeconomic, religious, and literary history of Mesopotamian 
culture from the rise of the Sumerian city-states to Alexander the Great, a period of 
over three millennia. This will include discussion of the Sumerians, Assyrians, 
Babylonians, Hurrians and Persians. 

412B Ancient Near East — East Mediterraneans (3) 

A study of ancient Egypt from early dynastic times in the third millennium B.C. to the con- 
quest of Alexander the Great. The history of the Syro-Palestinlan region will be studied 
In light of its migrations and International culture. A careful study of the Hebrews and 
their contributions to modern civilization will be included. 

415A Classical Greece (3) 

A study of the civilization of ancient Greece. This course traces the rise and flourishing of the 
classical city-states; considerable attention is devoted to the literary and philosophic 
contributions to our modern civilization. 


284 History 


415B Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

A study of the Hellenistic synthesis and the new patterns in government, the arts and 
sciences, philosophy and literature that appeared between the Macedonian conquest 
and the intervention of Rome. 

417A Roman Republic (3) 

A study of the development of Roman social and political institutions under the republic. 

417B Roman Empire (3) 

A study of Roman imperial Institutions and culture. Attention is also given to the rise of 
Christianity. 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

An historical study of the East Roman Empire from Constantine to the Ottoman conquest of 
1453. Special attention to institutional aspects of Byzantine society: church, state, the 
economy, law and culture. 

421A History of the Christian Church to 1025 (3) 

This course traces the Christian Church from its origins In the apostolic preaching through 
the Middle Ages in both the East and West. 

421 B History of the Christian Church from 1025 to the Present (3) 

This course studies the western church as an institution from 1025 to the present. Orthodoxy, 
Catholicism and Protestantism are presented in historical perspective. 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1000 (3) 

The genesis of European society from the decline of Rome to the age of the Vikings. 
Attention Is given to the emergence of western Europe; to the barbarian migrations 
which culminated in the Carolingian Empire; and to Roman, Germanic and Celtic in- 
fluences in early medieval civilization. 

423B Medieval Europe, 1000-1400 (3) 

A topical approach is employed with particular attention given to Normandy and the 
Norman Conquest, technology and social change, Romanesque and Gothic art and 
Scholasticism. 

425A The Renaissance (3) 

The history of Europe from 1400 to 1525 with emphasis upon the beginnings of capitalism, 
the beginnings of the modern state, humanism, the pre-Reformation and the church on 
the eve of the Reformation. 

425B The Reformation (3) 

The history of Europe from 1525 to 1648; deals with the Protestants and Catholic Refor- 
mations; the religious wars; the price rise; royal absolution; the rise of science. 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1763 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 110B. European diplomatic history and the balance of power from 1648 
to 1763. Attention is given to the social and philosophical developments of the period. 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 

A survey of European history from 1763 to 1815. Emphasis Is placed on the politics, society, 
and culture of the Old Regime, the influence of the Enlightenment, the impact of the 
French Revolution on Europe, and the establishment of French hegemony by 
Napoleon. 

428 19th-Century Europe (3) 

Europe from 1815 to 1914. An examination of the political, economic, social, and cultural 
trends in European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. 
Special attention is given to the emerging forces of nationalism, liberalism, socialism, 
and secularism. 

429 Europe Since 1914 (3) 

Survey of events from the beginning of World War I to the present. Special emphasis given to 
the economic, political, social, diplomatic, and intellectual trends of 20th-century 
Europe. 

430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance (3) 

An examination of the origin and development of western science and its role in culture 
from the third millenlum B.C. through the beginnings of the Scientific Revolution of 
the 16th and 17th centuries. The hellenic, hellenistic and later medieval periods will 
receive special attention. 

430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present (3) 

A study of the development of science from the 16th century to the present. Particular 


History 285 


emphasis will be placed on the scientific revolutions of the 17th and 20th centuries. The 
interaction between science, technology and culture will be discussed in some detail. 

432 Germany Since 1648 (3) 

The evolution of Germany from the Peace of Westphalia to the present. Emphasis Is placed 
on political, social, economic, diplomatic and cultural trends in the 19th and 20lh cen- 
turies. 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

An analysis of the historical developments from the establishment of the Russian slate at Kiev 
through the great reforms, the revolutionary movement and reaction of the 19th cen- 
tury. Emphasis is placed upon the shaping of contemporary Russia. 

434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3) 

An evaluation of the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the subsequent consolidation ot f)ower 
under the Communist regime. Chief emphasis is placed upon the continuity and 
change in Russian social, political, cultural institutions and foreign policy effected by 
the impact of Marxist-Leninist-Stalinist ideology. 

436 The Balkans (3) 

The Balkan peoples from the Middle Ages through the Ottoman Conquest to the present. 
Emphasis Is placed on the role religion, nationalism, and communism have played in the 
development of modern Balkan consciousness. 

437 East Europe (3) 

The political and social history of the central East European peoples. 

439 History of Spain (3) 

Development of Hispanic civilization from the earliest times to the present. 

450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

An analysis of political, social and economic change in present-day Latin America. 

451 The Andean Nations (3) 

The social history of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile. 

452 A Brazil to 1889 (3) 

The development of Brazil from the beginning of the colonial period through the overthrow 
of the Brazilian monarchy in 1889. The emergence and development of a "colonial" 
economy and the contribution of the African, Amerindian, and Portuguese to Luso- 
Brazilian civilization. 

452B 20th-Century Brazil (3) 

The historical development of Brazil from 1889 to the present. Equal attention is given to 
social, economic and cultural trends and to the nation's political evolution. Approx- 
imately 40 per cent of the course focuses on Brazil after 1945. 

453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

A history of Mexico from the pre-Columbian period to 1910. The course stresses the Indian 
heritage, the impact upon the native civilizations of the Spanish Conquest and the 
blending of Hispanic institutions with those of the first Mexicans. 

453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

A study of the background of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the revolution itself from 
1910 to 1921 stressing the political, economic, and social features; special attention will 
be paid to the Revolution as the first of the great upheavals of the 20th century. 

455 Contemporary Africa (3) 

African history since 1945. Problems preceeding independence, postindependence, internal 
and external problems concerning economics, politics, boundaries, pan-Africanism, 
apartheid, racial conflicts and others. 

456 History of West Africa (3) 

Major themes of West African history. Including development of legitimate trade and states, 
colonialism, nationalism and post independence achievements and problems. 

458A Southern Africa from Earliest Times to the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the culture and history of the indigenous peoples of southern Africa; and the 
development and impact of European interests in this area with particular emphasis on 
the history of South Africa to the Union of 1910. 

458B Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

A survey of 20th-century developments In the Union (Republic) of South Africa, Central 
Africa (the Rhodesias and Nyasaland) and the Portuguese colonies with emphasis on the 
political, economic and social ramifications of race relations. 


286 History 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East (3) 

A study of the post-World War II history of East, South and Southeast with emphasis upon 
problems of nationalism, communism and economic development. 

462A History of China (3) 

Chinese history from ancient times to the middle of the 17th century, with special attention 
to the development of society, thought, economy and political institutions. 

462B History of China (3) 

Chinese history from the middle of the 17th century to the 1950s. A study of China's internal 
developments and foreign intrusion, with special attention to the rise of modern 
Chinese nationalism and intellectual developments in the Republican period, as well as 
the attempts at modernization and the triumph of communism. 

462C China Since 1949 (3) 

History of China from 1949 to the present. A study of the Communist Party, political in- 
stitutions, ideology, economic modernization and foreign relations of China. 

463A History of Japan (3) 

A study of the social, political, and economic history of japan until 1868, with emphasis upon 
the Tokugawa era. 

463B History of Japan (3) 

A study emphasizing the rise of the modern Japanese state, Japanese imperialism and the 
postwar era. 

464A History of Southeast Asia to 1850 (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia since early historical times to the establishment of the colonial em- 
pires of the West in the mid-19th century. 

464B History of Southeast Asia, 1850-1945 (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia under the impact of the imperialism and the effects of the Pacific 
War on the European empires. 

464C History of Contemporary Southeast Asia (3) 

A study of Southeast Asia since the Pacific War to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the 
problems of the area and American involvement in Southeast Asia. 

465A History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from ancient times to the fall of the first 
Islamic empire in India, 1526. In addition to political developments, the course Includes 
an examination of evolving religious institutions: Hinduism, Buddhism, class and caste. 

465B History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from the beginning of the Mughul Empire, 
1526 to the Indian Mutiny of 1857. The course includes an examination of European In- 
trusions and the crystallization of British supremacy In India. 

465C History of India (3) 

A survey of the history of India from 1857 to 1947 emphasizing India's struggle for in- 
dependence. 

466A The Arab Ascendancy (3) 

Events transpiring in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the Mongol Invasions of the 
13th century; the impact of Islamic civilization upon Middle East society. 

466B Islamic Imperial Age (3) 

The post-caliphal period with emphasis on the Mongol invasions of the Middle East and their 
effects; early modern Muslim empires — Ottoman, Safavid and Moghul — up to A.D. 
1800. 

467 The Middle East in the 19th Century (3) 

Western penetration of the Middle East and the reaction to it, modernization, the growth of 
nationalist movements and revolutionary disturbances ending with World War I. 

468 Middle East in the 20th Century (3) 

A study of the social, political and economic changes taking place In the Middle East primari- 
ly since World War I. Where possible, the Middle East will be treated as a whole and 
viewed through a topic-oriented approach. 

469 Intellectual and Cultural History of the Middle East (3) 

Major Muslim achievements In the social and natural sciences, belles-lettres, theology and 
philosophy, art and architecture from the advent of Islam to the 20th century. 

470 American Colonial Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. This course analyzes the creation of 


History 287 

societies in English North America from 1607-1754, stressing the emergence of 
economic, social and political patterns and structures in a maturing Anglo-American 
culture. 

471 The United States from Colony to Nation (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. This course analyzes and describes the 
social, economic, political and intellectual developments in 18th century America, 
stressing the Anglo-American imperial problems leading to the revolution, the origins 
of American nationalism, the social structure of the new nation, the formation of the 
Constitution and the rise of a party system. 

472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. Analyzes Jeffersonian values and their 
impact upon the social, political and cultural life of the nation during the era of their 
greatest relevance. 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. The study of America's "great national 
crisis" and the impact of slavery, civil war and national reconstruction upon the 
democratic process of the republic. 

474 The United States and Industrial Organization (1876-1914) (3) 

The organization of American industry and its impact upon American life. Special con- 
sideration is given to the populist and progressive reform movements. 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 (3) 

A multi-topic analysis of major trends in U. S. domestic policy, foreign policy, economy and 
society from World War I through World War II. Course will concentrate on conflicting 
values and ideals of domestic policy and U. S. role in world affairs. 

476 Age of Power, Affluence and Anxiety Since 1945 (3) 

Multi-topic analysis of U. S. History from 1945 to the present stressing the interrelationship of 
foreign policy, economic prosperity, domestic tensions and protest movements. 

479 The Urbanization of American Life (3) 

The historical development of urban life in America with special emphasis on the colonial 
town, the western town and the industrial city. 

481 Westward Movement in the United States (3) 

A survey of the expansion of the United States population and sovereignty from the eastern 
seaboard to the Pacific, colonial times to 1900, and a history of regional development 
during the frontier period. 

482A History of Business in American Society (3) 

The course explores the interaction of social and economic factors upon each other in the 
development of American society. Special attention is given to the role of business and 
labor in economic change. The first semester covers the development of a colonial 
economy and the early national economy. 

482B History of Business in American Society (3) 

The course continues to explore the interaction of social and economic factors upon each 
other in the development of American society beginning with the "takeoff stage of 
economic development" and ending with contemporary America. Special attention is 
given to the role of business and labor In economic change. 

483 American Religious History (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The vitality and creativity of American religious life 
and the proliferation of religious organizations as the result of the transplanting of 
European Christianity and its modification in the new environment. 

484A American Constitutional History to 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A, English and colonial origins, the growth of democracy, the slavery 
controversy, and the sectional conflict as they reflect constitutional development. 

484B American Constitutional History from 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170B. Constitutional problems involved in the post-Civil War era, the 
expansion of business. World War I, the New Deal, World War II, and civil rights in the 
postwar era. 

485A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) 

A comprehensive survey of the foreign relations of the United States from the beginning of 
the nation until 1900. Particular attention is given to bases of policy, critical evaluation 
of major policies and relationships between domestic affairs and foreign policy. 


288 History 


485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 (3) 

Relations from 1900 to the present. An analysis of the rise of the United States as a world 
power in the 20th century wifh special emphasis on the search for world order and the, 
diplomacy of the atomic age. 

486A United States Cultural History (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the Puritans to 
the Civil War. 

486B United States Cultural History (3) 

A study of the social and intellectual development of the United States from the Civil War to 
the present. 

487A History of Politics in American Society (3) 

This course traces political developments from the Colonial Period to the end of the Civil 
War. Its primary focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional development 
and the response of the American political system to changing social demands and 
needs. 

487B History of Politics in American Society (3) 

This course traces political developments from Reconstruction to Lyndon Baines Johnson. Its 
primary focus is upon political patterns of behavior, institutional development and the 
response of the political system to changing societal demands and needs. 

488A American Negro From Slavery to Jim Crow (3) 

A history of black Americans from African backgrounds through the era of slavery and the 
Civil War to the post-Reconstructlon era. 

488B American Negro Since 1890 (3) 

History of black Americans from Booker T. Washington to present, stressing both their 
culture and role in American life and the issues involved In their relations with other 
segments of the population In various regions. 

489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest (3) 

Historical role of the Mexican-American in the Southwest stressing the cultural uniqueness, 
contributions, with special emphasis upon migration, education, and economic 
changes since 1945. 

490 Senior Research Seminar (3) 

Directed research seminar with class discussions applied to specific topics and areas as 
schedule and staff allow. Designed to give students experience in original research and 
writing. Required of all history majors. 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) ^ 

Intensive study of trends, phenomena, themes or periods of history involving occasional lec- 
ture, discussion, directed reading, and student research. 

492 Community History (3) 

A study of the historical development of communities in general, and of the Orange County 
area in particular. Special emphasis on techniques of gathering and processing local 
historical data, including oral Interviews and other archival materials. 

493 Oral History (2) 

Utilization of tape recorded Interviews to document significant events in 20th-century 
history. Training will be given in Interviewing techniques, tape recording interviews and 
historical editing of the typed transcripts of interviews. May be repeated for a total of six 
units if student wishes to pursue a different emphasis. 

494 Special Research Techniques (3) 

Introduces student to specialized techniques applicable to a particular field of historical 
research, such as the use of nonliterary resources, quantitative methods, etc. Designed 
to provide experience in unusual kinds of original historical research. 

495 Colloquium in History (3) 

Interpretation and analysis of significant documents and works of history aimed at broad syn- 
thesis and mastery of major interpretations in an area. Involves extensive directed 
reading and discussion. Themes will vary according to instructor. 

498 History Internship (3) 

The internship program offers students community work experience directly related to the 
history academic program. The interns gain a more complete education by working, 
usually without pay, outside the university for 10 hours each week of the semester. This 
course may only be used in the upper division elective section of the major. 


Library Science 289 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in history with consent of department chair. May be repeated 
for credit. 

501 Seminar In the Content and Method of History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

505 Seminar in Recent Interpretations in History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

520 Seminar in European History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

550 Seminar in Latin American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

560 Seminar in Afro-Asian History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

570 Seminar in American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

590 History and Historians (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of the writings, personalities, and philosophies of 
representative historians from Herodotus to the present. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in history with consent of department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. 


DIVISION OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

FACULTY 
Doris Banks 
Division Director 

Al Baker, Dorothy Currie, Chester Gough, Joseph Palmer, Michael Sadoski, Patrick Sanchez, 
Taverekere Srikankaiah (KantI) 

PART-TIME 

Harriett Covey, Herbert Hoffman, Raymond Holt, Carolyn Johnson, Ruth Nycum, Harry 
Rowe, Kathryn Tucker, Shirley Woods 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The Division of Library Science provides graduate education for librarianship with a primary 
focus on the basic principles of library service. The program encompasses a coordinated plan 
of graduate studies, which emphasizes the foundations of library science together with a 
specialization such as school, public, academic and special librarianship. These studies 
provide background for employment as librarian as well as serve for incentive for further In- 
tellectual growth and as preparation for further academic work. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission in conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: (1) an academic major or equivalent; (2) com- 
pletion of one year's employment in a library with responsibilities satisfactory to the advisers 
or successful completion of the upper division course. Library Science 400, Introduction to 
Bibliographic Research, or Its equivalent; (3) satisfactory performance on the aptitude test of 
the Graduate Record Examination; (4) letters of recommendation from two qualified per- 
sons; and (5) satisfactorily complete an Interview. 


290 Library Science 

Study Plan 

The Master of Science in Library Science requires a minimum of 24 units of approved 
graduate work in library science plus six units of approved work for graduate credit in an 
area of concentrated study and either completion and acceptance by the faculty of the 
Division of Library Science of a written thesis, a project, or successful performance in a com- 
prehensive examination. 

Six units of required study shall be seminars on library topics, such as indexing and abstrac- 
ting, theories of bibliographic control, information systems, and six units shall be electives in 
an area of concentration. 

Prior to completion of the degree program the student will be required to demonstrate 
reading capability in one foreign language, either by evidence of two years' college or un- 
iversity work in the language or by passing a reading facility examination. The student will 
also be expected to demonstrate proficiency in basic computer programming and 
applications, either by evidence of completion of a course such as Quantitative Methods 265, 
Computer Programming and Applications, or Quantitative Methods 289, Computer Science 
for the Social Sciences or by passing an examination. 

Each student will develop an individual program of studies In consultation with an adviser 
from the Division of Library Science. 

See also "The Program of Master's Degrees" In this catalog and the Graduate Bulletin. 

School Librarianship Specialization 

The courses for the credential program and the foundation courses for the M.S.L.S. are 
Library Science 500, 501, 502, 503 and 504. The addition of three units In multimedia or in- 
structional materials such as Library Science 540, 541 or 525 and six units of electives such as 
Library Science 537, selection and use of materials for children and young adults. Com- 
parative Literature 314, The Oral Tradition in Literature, and English 433, Children's 
Literature, and 90 hours of supervised fieldwork in the school library would meet the re- 
quirements for specialized preparation applicable to the standard teaching credentials. This 
will authorize a teacher to serve as a school librarian. The minimum coursework required for 
the specialized preparation Is 24 units and the minimum for the master's degree with a 
specialization in school librarianship is 30 units. 


LIBRARY SCIENCE COURSES 

314 The Oral Tradition in Literature (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 314) 

400 Introduction to Bibliographic Research (3) 

A study of literature searching for advanced research problems including bibliographic form 
and documentation. Exploitation of the information content of library card catalogs, 
trade bibliographies, indexes, abstracts and reference literature. Abstracting, an- 
notating and critical reviewing are touched. 

500 Principles of Librarianship (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Consideration of libraries In con- 
temporary society. History of libraries, development of objectives of library service, 
identification and definition of user communities and their needs, survey of 
professional associations. Interrelationships within library organization. 

501 Library Collection Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 500. The principles of a library acquisitions program developed 
from an examination of methods of bibliographic control. Publishers and publishing 
and other factors of the book trade and their influence on the development of an ef- 
ficient order department. 

502 Organization and Operation of Libraries (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 500. An introduction to administrative theories and principles 
and their implications and applications to managerial activities in all kinds of libraries. 

503 Organization of Information for Retrieval (3) 

Theory and principles of classification, indexing, subject headings and cataloging and a sur- 
vey of systems for storing and retrieving information. Preferred to be taken concurrent- 
ly with Library Science 504 as early as possible in the study plan. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 


Library Science 291 


504 Theories of Readers' Services (3) 

A study of the history, theory and principles of reference service and information retrieval, 
of national and trade bibliographical tools, and of specialized reference tools; the iden- 
tification of requesters' needs, and the analysis of research techniques In special subject 
areas. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

505 Research in Librarianship (3) 

Prerequisite: three of the 500-level required courses. The scientific method and social 
science research methodology applied to library and information problems, focusing 
on library research and its accomplishments and evaluations of current research ac- 
tivities. 

520 Seminar on Systems Analysis in Libraries (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 500 or consent of Instructor. Analytical techniques drawn from 
systems analysis and industrial engineering applied to technical processing, circulation 
control, acquisitions and the development of library service models. 

521 Seminar on Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 500 or consent of instructor. Examination of information 
systems in business and corporate, scientific and governmental applications. Designs of 
local, national and International services are developed In theoretical models according 
to measured needs. 

522 Seminar on Current Problems in Technical Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 503 or consent of instructor. Implications of current trends In 
automation and cooperative systems viewed in the light of changing needs for library 
service and for information. 

523 Seminar on Indexing and Abstracting (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 503 or consent of instructor. Investigation of the theoretical and 
functional aspects of the approaches to the sources of information by individual 
research efforts in various fields. Current practices of commercial, governmental and 
society sponsored programs. 

524 Seminar on Theories of Bibliographic Control (3) 

Prerequisites: Library Science 503 and 504 or consent of instructor. Studies in the theoretical 
bases of systems for the organization and retrieval of information in all forms. 

525 Seminar on Information and Instructional Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Library Science 500 and 501 or consent of instructor. Focuses on organizing 
and Implementing media programs of wide application. Special attention to problems, 
organization of materials, physical environment, federal support programs and modern 
technology. Includes field trips to outstanding media centers in the area. 

526 Seminar on Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of Instructor. Discussion of contemporary Issues 
in library service such as libraries of the future, library service for the disadvantaged, in- 
tellectual freedom. Topics chosen will be described and announced to library science 
majors and in local library associations and institutions. May be repeated. 

527 Seminar on Library and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 500 or consent of instructor. Task oriented group case study in- 
volving the investigation of one library's structure and Its relationship with its clientele. 
The focus is on group process, an analog for professional study group and committee 
action. 

530 Introduction to Information Science (3) 

Basic introduction to the nature of information science and technology. Fundamental con- 
cepts of information handling; analysis and design of information systems; evaluation 
of retrieval effectiveness in library systems. 

531 Data Processing for Library Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. The devices and methods of the technology of data process- 
ing applied to particular library functions with a management system approach un- 
derlined throughout. The management and planning of automation projects Is stressed. 

532 History of Libraries and Information Media (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. FHistorical survey of the formation of libraries, from the 
beginnings In the archival collections of ancient Mesopotamia. The varieties of books, 
records and documents which have constituted library collections, and the varying im- 
portance of libraries in succeeding ages. 


292 Linguistics 

533 Non-Book Information Handling (3) 

Prerequisites: Library Science 503 and 504 or consent of instructor. The selection, cataloging, 
retrieval and use of the many types of documents, films, recordings and other forms of 
printed and produced information carriers in the various library service entities. Both 
alphabetic and coded information sources are considered. 

536 Scientific and Technical Information (3) 

Observation and evaluation of current techniques in special libraries tor obtaining, an- 
nouncing and distributing printed, near-print and non-printed materials. Development 
of a model system for improved information services. 

537 Selection and Use of Materials for Children and Young Adults (3) 

The examination of selection aids used to evaluate print and non-print materials, the con- 
struction of collection objectives and selection policies, and the development of 
programs and services for young people. 

538 History of Books and Printing (3) 

Historical survey of the many .written communication devices. North American picture 
writing, Mesopotamian clay tablets, wax tablets, leather and papyrus books of the 
classical world through medieval manuscripts to modern phototypesetting and photo- 
offset. 

539 Library Problems: Selected Topics (3) 

A course concerned with the role of the library/media center in contemporary education. It 
consists of a survey of current literature which requires regular class participation, 
following a structure to be established by the class. 

540 Development of Prototype Material (3) 

A course designed as an overview for persons that will be involved in the assessment, 
evaluation, production and use of various media used in instruction. The course is con- 
cerned with the process of message design, media choice, and production. 

541 Principles of Library Instructional Media (3) 

Prerequisite: Library Science 540. The principles of mediated materials in libraries for in- 
dividual use and for classroom Instruction. Selection, evaluation, and use of mediated 
materials with emphasis on media characteristics and behavioral objectives as they 
relate to information retrieval. 

550 Literature of Selected Subjects (3) 

Prerequisites: Library Science 400 or equivalent and 504. A study of the information 
resources including reference aids in various distinct fields of knowledge, such as 
humanities, social sciences, maps, law. May be repeated. 

574 Problems in Government Documents Information (3) 

Examination and use of the official publications of the United States, international 
organizations and Great Britain. Includes discussion of acquisition, organization and 
reference use of these publications. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of division director. Preparation and com- 
pletion of an approved project. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of division director. The writing of a thesis bas- 
ed on original research, library study or an educational project, and its analysis and 
evaluation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of division director. May be repeated for credit. 

749 Fieldwork School Libraries (2) 

Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in all of the 24 units required for the 
credential. Consists of 90 hours of field experience in a school library or media center 
supervised by a credentialed librarian. Enrollment requires preliminary filing and 
approval. 

DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 

FACULTY 

Alan Kaye 
Department Chair 

Geraldine Anderson, David Feldman, James Santucci, Peter Solon 

Linguistics is the scientific study of language — its nature and development, its universal 


Linguistics 293 

properties, its diversified structures and their dialectal variants, its systems of writing and 
transcription, its cultural role In the speech community, and its application to other areas of 
human knowledge. As such, it is concerned with the multiple aspects of human com- 
municative behavior which encompasses thought, symbolization, language, meaning, 
acoustics, perception and the physiological processes of utterance and audition. 

The interdisciplinary aspects of this study are reflected In the organization of the program 
which offers a core of general linguistics courses and draws upon linguistically-related 
courses In other departments. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

This program Is designed for students with an exceptional interest in and aptitude for the 
study of the systems of human communication. It enables the undergraduate student to un- 
derstand the essential relationships between language and thought and language and 
culture; to gain familiarity with the structure of foreign languages as well as English; to 
observe several types of linguistic structures; and to become conversant with the historical 
study of language and formal techniques and theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis. 
The program will enable the student with linguistic and philological interests to grasp the 
scope of the field and to determine more accurately the most meaningful concentrations in 
graduate study. 

Language Requirement 

One year of a non-Indo-European language, ancient language or classical language subject 
to the approval of the adviser. 


Lower Division Requirements 

Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 

Anthropology 202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Upper Division Requirements (minimum of 30 units) 

317 Course in a modern foreign language (3) 

Linguistics 351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology (3) 

Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

Linguistics 430 Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3) 

Three electives (or more) from the following: 

Education 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Education 380 The Teaching of Reading (3) 

English 302 Introduction to English Language (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modern English (3) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

French, German, Russian or Spanish 400 course (3) 

French, German, or Spanish 466 course (3) 

Linguistics, any undergraduate course other than those listed as required above 
Mathematics 304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Mathematics 305 Elements of Set Theory (3) 

Philosophy 368 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Philosophy 450 Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3) 

Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Psychology 415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Quantitative Methods 486 Automata Theory (3) 

Quantitative Methods 487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Speech Communication 304 Message Reception and Analysis (3) 

Speech Communication 340 Speech Science (3) 

Speech Communication 341 Introduction to Phonetics (3) 

Students must consult with an adviser in linguistics before establishing their Individual 
programs of study. Other courses in the university may be taken as an elective with the per- 
mission of the adviser. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

The M.A. in Linguistics Is designed for students who have exceptional interest In and ap- 
titude for the study of the systems of human communication, reinforced by undergraduate 


294 Linguistics 


study in linguistics and allied areas, such as foreign languages, English language, 
anthropology, speech communication and related areas in psychology and philosophy. It 
enables the graduate student to study in depth the position and function of human com- 
munication systems in the development of civilization; to understand more fully the essen- 
tial relationships between thought, language and culture; to deepen mastery of the structure 
of foreign languages as well as English; to work intensively with several types of linguistic 
structures with special attention to non-Indo-European languages; and to increase expertise 
in the historical study of language and formal techniques and theoretical foundations of 
linguistic analysis. 

The core courses of the program are devoted to an in-depth consideration of descriptive, 
historical and applied linguistics. The remainder of the program combines advanced work in 
the theory of phonological; morphological and syntactical analysis; articulatory and ex- 
perimental phonetics; semantics; lexicology; dialectology; language typology; and field 
methods, in which the procedures of the linguist working under field conditions are 
demonstrated by the analysis of several languages elicited from informants. A variety of 
approaches to descriptive analysis and several theoretical points of view including generative 
grammar, transformational analysis and prosodies are presented. A series of courses on the 
structure of individual languages, both ancient and modern, provides opportunities for 
applying the general principles of structural analysis and for establishing linguistic data by 
elicitation from informants and analysis of written records. General courses In comparative 
linguistics and comparison within individual language families review methods of es- 
tablishing genetic relationships among languages. The geographical diffusion of linguistic 
features and problems of language contact are studied by examining areal groupings of 
genetically unrelated languages. The relationship between linguistics and other disciplines 
and the application of the techniques, findings, and Insights of that science to such activities 
as language teaching are treated in interdisciplinary courses and seminars. 

The aim of the graduate program in linguistics is to provide thorough and well-balanced 
training for practice and research In the several areas of linguistic studies and to prepare 
qualified students for careers in the communication sciences and allied disciplines. 


Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission In conditionally classified 
graduate standing: a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade-point 
average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on 
admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well 
as the following requirements, may be admitted as a classified graduate upon the 
development of an approved study plan: a major in linguistics consisting of 24 upper- 
division semester credit hours, or equivalent, in the field, with grades testifying to above- 
average scholarship. Those having degrees with other related majors may be admitted if they 
have completed the following courses or their equivalents. These prerequisites may be 
fulfilled concurrently with graduate courseowrk In the program. 

Linguistics 351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology (3) 

Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

Linguistics 430 Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3) 

Knowledge of one foreign language Is required (equivalent of FL 317 course). Students 
without coursework in a foreign language may demonstrate proficiency by a score of 
average or better on the MLA-ETS Proficiency Examination for Advanced Students. Work 
toward fulfillment of this requirement may be taken concurrently with graduate work in 
linguistics. 


Modifications of certain prerequisite requirements may be permitted in exceptional circum- 
stances. 


Study Plan Course requirements Units 

Coursework in descriptive and historical linguistics 13 

Linguistics 501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Linguistics 505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

Linguistics 507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 


Linguistics 


Linguistics 508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Linguistics 530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Coursework selected from any one of the following six areas of subspecialization, 
including other courses in the university with the approval of the adviser ... 


Applied Linguistics 

English 302 Introduction to English Language (3) 

English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

English 570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 520, Advanced Seminar in Applied Linguistics (3) 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

French 599 independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 305 American Dialects (3) 

Speech and Language Development (3) 

Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Bilingualism (3) 

Sociolinguistics (3) 

Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 
Graduate Seminar: Linguistic Ontogeny (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Internship in Applied Linguistics (3) 

Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Introduction to Spanifh Linguistics (3) 

Dialectology: Current Trends In Modern Spanish (3) 

Spanish 468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Anthropological Linguistics 

Anthroplogy 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Linguistics 407 California Indian Languages (3) 

The Uralic Languages (3) 

Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Bilingualism (3) 

Soclolinguistcs (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Major Language Families (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Current Issues in Linguistics (3) 

Field Methods (3) 

Graduate Seminar: Linguistic Typology (3) 

Problems in Field Linguistics (3) 

Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Analysis of Specific Language Structures 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Jrench 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

German 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3)