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CALIFORNIA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 
FULLERTON 
1979-81 CATALOG 





CALIFORNIA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 
FULLERTON 
1979-81 CATALOG 




2 


THIS CATALOG 


Within this catalog may be found general academic and administrative information as well as specific 
descriptions of the departments, their majors and the courses offered in each. The first major part 
contains orienting information such as the calendar, materials on The California State University and 
Colleges, an overview of Cal State Fullerton and facts about student services and activities on the 
campus. 

The subsequent sections of the catalog are concerned with: admission, registration, records and 
regulations; academic advisement; and university courses. The next sections describe the depart- 
ments and the programs of study and courses they offer. The final part of the catalog contains a listing 
of the faculty and administration. An index can be found at the end to help the reader locate specific 
items. 

Because this catalog must be prepared well ahead of the academic year it covers, changes in some 
programs and rules occur. The class schedule and subsequent errata sheets are the final authority 
in regard to classes offered, instructors and revisions of regulations. This publication can be bought 
for a small fee from the Titan Bookstore. 

The production of the catalog is under the direction of the Office of Academic Programs. Steven 
H. Burton has done the graphic work and joe Barnet was responsible for the photography. 


NOTICE 


The Board of Trustees of The California State University and Colleges, in Section 43800 of Title 5 
of the California Administrative Code, has reserved the right to add, amend or repeal any of its 
regulations, rules, resolutions, standing orders, and rules of procedures in whole or in part, at such 
time as it may choose. None shall be construed, operate as or have the effect of an abridgement 
or limitation of any rights, powers or privileges of the Trustees. The chancellor reserves th^right to 
add, amend or repeal any of his executive orders, at such time as he may choose, and the president 
of California State University, Fullerton reserves the right to add, amend or repeal provisions of this 
catalog and rules of the university, including handbooks, at such time as he may choose. No 
executive order shall be construed, operate as, or have the effect of an abridgement or limitation 
of any rights, powers or privileges of the chancellor nor shall any catalog provision or rule of the 
university be construed, operate as, or have the effect of an abridgement or limitation of any rights, 
powers, or privileges of the president. 

Every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information in this catalog. Students are 
advised, however, that such information is subject to change without notice. Therefore, they should 
consult the appropriate instructional departments, schools or administrative offices for current 
information. Effective date: August 27, 1979. 



NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX 

The California State University and Colleges does not discriminate on the 
basis of sex in the educational programs or activities it conducts. Title IX 
of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, and the administrative 
regulations adopted thereunder prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex 
in education programs and activities operated by California State Univer- 
sity, Fullerton. Such programs and activities include admission of students 
and employment. Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX to pro- 
grams and activities of California State University, Fullerton may be referred 
to Everett Winters, the campus officer assigned the administrative responsi- 
bility of reviewing such matters or to the regional director of the Office of 
Civil Rights, Region 9, 760 Market Street, Room 700, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia 94102. 



3 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


GENERAL INFORMATION— Cal State Fullerton Calendars 6, The California 
State University and Colleges 9, Cal State Fullerton 13, Cal State Fullerton: 
An Overview 17, Student Services 29. 

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, RECORDS AND REGULATIONS— 

Admission to the University 40, Registration 53, Records and Regulations 58. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS— Bachelor's Degree 72. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT— 82. 

UNIVERSITY CURRICULA— 86. 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS— 92. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS— 126. 

SCHOOL OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY SERVICE- 

154. 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES— 194. 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING— 298. 
GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS— 358. 

DIRECTORIES — Faculty and Administration 414, Index 441. 






, 



GENERAL 

INFORMATION 


6 


CAL STATE FULLERTON CALENDAR 
1979-81 


FALL SEMESTER 1979 


November 1, 1978 

Initial period for filing applications for admission to the fall semester 1979 began. 

August 27, Monday 

..Academic year begins. Advisement, orientation and registra- 
tion begin. See class schedule for details 

August 31, Friday 

..Application deadline for baccalaureate candidates for 
graduation, June 1980 and August 1980, and for January 1980 
master's degree candidates to request a graduation check 

September 3, Monday 

..Labor day holiday — campus closed 

September 4, Tuesday 

..Instruction begins 

September 10, Monday 

..Admission Day — campus open 

September 22, Saturday 

..Rosh Hashanah — campus open 

October 1, Monday 

..Vom Kippur — campus open 

October 8, Monday 

..Columbus Day — campus open 

November 1, Thursday 

..Filing period opens for applications to the fall semester 1980 

November 12, Monday 

..Veterans Day — campus open 

November 22-23, Thursday — Friday 

..Thanksgiving recess — campus closed 

December 14, Friday 

..Last day of classes 

December 17, Monday 

..Examination preparation day 

December 18-21, Tuesday-Friday .... 

..Semester examinations 

December 22, Saturday 

..Winter recess begins 

January 2, Wednesday 

..Winter recess ends; grade reporting 

lanuarv 3. Thursdav 

Spmpstpr pnds: all cradp rpDorts dup 

SPRING SEMESTER 1980 


August 1, 1979 

Initial period for filing applications for the spring semester 1980 begins. 


January 24, Thursday Semester begins. Departmental and faculty meetings through 

Friday, January 25 

January 28, Monday Advisement, orientation and registration begin. See class 

schedule for details 

February 1, Friday Application deadline for baccalaureate candidates for 

graduation January 1981, and for June 1980 and August 1980 
master's degree candidates to request a graduation check 
February 4, Monday Instruction begins 

February 12, Tuesday Lincoln's Birthday holiday — campus open 

February 18, Monday Washington's Birthday holiday — campus closed 

March 31, Monday Spring recess begins 



7 


April 7, Monday Instruction resumes 

April 11, Friday Martin Luther King, )r., Memorial Observance Day — campus 

open 

May 23, Friday Last day of classes 

May 26, Monday Memorial Day holiday — campus closed 

May 27-30, Tuesday-Friday Semester examinations 

May 31, June 1, Saturday, Sunday Commencement exercises; semester ends 

SUMMER SESSION 1980 

June 2, Monday Instruction begins; registration and classes 

July 4, Friday Independence Day holiday — campus closed 

August 1, Friday Initial period for filing applications for admission to the spring 

semester 1981 begins 

August 22, Friday Instruction ends 

FALL SEMESTER 1980 


November 1, 1979 

Initial period for filing applications for admission to the fall semester 1980 begins. 


August 25, Monday Academic year begins. Advisement, orientation and registra- 

tion begin. See class schedule for details 

August 29, Friday Application deadline for baccalaureate candidates for 

graduation June 1981 and August 1981, and for January 1981 
master's degree candidates to request a graduation check 

September 1, Monday Labor day holiday — campus closed 

September 2, Tuesday Instruction begins 

September 9, Tuesday Admission Day — campus open 

September 11, Thursday Rosh Hashanah — campus open 

September 20, Saturday Yom Kippur — campus open 

October 13, Monday Columbus Day — campus open 

November 1, Saturday Filing period opens for applications to the fall semester 1981 

November 11, Tuesday Veterans Day holiday — campus open 

November 27-28, Thursday-Friday ....Thanksgiving recess — campus closed 

December 12, Friday Last day of classes 

December 15, Monday Examination preparation day 

December 16-19, Tuesday-Friday Semester examinations 

December 20, Saturday Winter recess begins 

January 5, Monday Winter recess ends. Grade reporting 

January 6, Tuesday Semester ends; all grade reports due 


8 


SPRING SEMESTER 1981 


August 1, 1980 

Initial period for filing applications for the spring semester 1981 begins. 


january 22, Thursday Semester begins. Departmental and faculty meetings through 

Friday, January 23 

January 26, Monday Advisement, orientation and registration begin. See class 

schedule for details 

January 30, Friday Application deadline for baccalaureate candidates for 

graduation January 1982, and for June 1981 and August 1981 
master's degree candidates to request a graduation check 
February 2, Monday Instruction begins 

February 12, Thursday Lincoln's Birthday holiday — campus open 

February 16, Monday Washington's Birthday holiday — campus closed 

April 6, Monday Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Observance Day — campus 

open 

April 13, Monday Spring recess begins 

April 20, Monday Instruction resumes 

May 22, Friday Last day of classes 

May 25, Monday Memorial Day holiday-campus closed 

May 26-29, Tuesday-Friday Semester examinations 

May 30, 31, Saturday, Sunday Commencement exercises; semester ends 


SUMMER SESSION 1981 


June 1, Monday Instruction begins; registration and classes 

July 4, Saturday Independence Day holiday — campus closed 

August 21, Friday Instruction ends 


9 


THE CALIFORNIA 

STATE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 



CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE. BAKERSFIELO 
CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY. 

POMONA 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. NORTHRIOGE 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. DOMINGUEZ HILLS 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. LONG BEACH 
OFF ICC OF THE CHANCELLOR. LONG BEACH 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. FULLERTON 
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE. SAN BERNARDINO 
SAN OIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY 
IMPERIAL VALLEY CAMPUS. CALEXICO 


HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. CHICO 
SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. SACRAMENTO 
SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. HAYttARD 
SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY 
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE. STANISLAUS 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. FRESNO 
CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY. 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 


The individual California State Colleges were brought together as a system by the Donohoe Higher 
Education Act of 1960. In 1972 the system became The California State University and Colleges and 
16 of the 19 campuses have the title University. 

The oldest campus — San Jose State University — was founded in 1857 and became the first institution 
of public higher education in California. The newest campus — California State College, Bakersfield — 
began instruction in 1970. 


10 


Responsibility for The California State University and Colleges is vested in the Board of Trustees, 
whose members are appointed by the governor. The trustees appoint the chancellor, who is the chief 
executive officer of the system, and the presidents, who are the chief executive officers on the 
respective campuses. 

The trustees, the chancellor and the presidents develop systemwide policy, with actual implementa- 
tion at the campus level taking place through broadly based consultative procedures. The Academic 
Senate of The California State University and Colleges, made up of elected representatives of the 
faculty from each campus, recommends academic policy to the Board of Trustees through the 
chancellor. 

Academic excellence has been achieved by The California State University and Colleges through 
a distinguished faculty, whose primary responsibility is superior teaching. While each campus in the 
system has its own unique geographic and curricular character, all campuses, as multipurpose 
institutions, offer undergraduate and graduate instruction for professional and occupational goals as 
well as broad liberal education. All of the campuses require for graduation a basic program of 
"General Education-Breadth Requirements" regardless of the type of bachelor's degree or major 
field selected by the student. A limited number of doctoral degrees are offered jointly with the 
University of California and with private universities in California. 

Presently, under the system's "New Approaches to Higher Education," the campuses are imple- 
menting a wide variety of innovative programs to meet the changing needs of students and society. 
Among pilot programs under way are instructional television projects, self-paced learning plans, 
minicourses, and credit-by-examination alternatives. The Consortium of The California State Univer- 
sity and Colleges fosters and sponsors local, regional, and statewide external degree and certificate 
programs to meet the needs of individuals who find it difficult or impossible to attend classes on 
a campus. 

Enrollments in fall 1978 totaled approximately 300,000 students, who were taught by a faculty of 
17,500. Last year the system awarded over 53 percent of the bachelor's degrees and 33 percent of 
the master's degrees granted in California. Almost 700,000 persons have been graduated from the 
19 campuses since 1960. 


OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 
THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY 
AND COLLEGES 


400 Golden Shore 
Long Beach 90802 
(213) 590-5506 


Glenn S. Dumke Chancellor 

Harry Harmon Executive Vice Chancellor 

D. Dale Hanner Vice Chancellor, Business Affairs 

Alex C. Sherriffs Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

Marjorie Downing Wagner Vice Chancellor, Faculty and Staff Affairs 

Mayer Chapman General Counsel 


11 

TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE 
UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 


Ex Officio Trustees 

The Honorable Edmund C. Brown, Jr State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Governor of California 

The Honorable Mike Curb State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Lieutenant Governor of California 

The Honorable Leo McCarthy State Capitol, Sacramento 95814 

Speaker of the Assembly 

The Honorable Wilson C. Riles 7 21 Capitol Mall, Sacramento 95814 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Glenn S. Dumke 400 Golden Shore, Long Beach 90802 

Chancellor of The California State University and Colleges 


Appointed Trustees 

Appointments are for a term of eight years, except for a student trustee and alumni trustee whose terms are for 
two years. Names are listed in order of appointment to the board. 


Charles Luckman (1982) 

9220 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles 90069 

Wendell W. Witter (1979) 

45 Montgomery St. San Francisco 94106 

Roy T. Brophy (1980) 

2160 Royale Rd., Suite 20, Sacramento 95815 

Mrs. C. Stewart Ritchie (1980) 

1064 Creek Dr., Menlo Park 94025 

Frank P. Adams (1981) 

235 Montgomery St., Suite 1922, San Francisco 94104 

Richard A. Garcia (1979) 

31851 E. Nine Dr., Laguna Niguel 92677 

Dean S. Lesher (1981 ) 

P.O. Box 5166, Walnut Creek 94598 

Claudia H. Hampton (1982) 

450 N. Grand, Room G353, Los Angeles 90012 

Mary Jean Pew (1983) 

2021 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles 90027 

Willie J. Stennis (1983) 

3947 Landmark, Culver City 90230 


Juan G6mez-Quiftones (1984) 

Professor, History Department 
University of California, Los Angeles 
405 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles 90024 

John F. O'Connell (1980) 

P.O. Box 3965, San Francisco 94119 

Blanche C. Bersch (1984) 

10889 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 628, Los Angeles 90024 

Michael R. Peevey (1985) 

215 Market St., Suite 930, San Francisco 94105 

John F. Crowley (1985) 

3068 16th St., San Francisco 94103 

Wallace Albertson (1986) 

1618 Sunset Plaza Dr., Los Angeles 90069 

Eli Broad (1986) 

10801 National Blvd., Los Angeles 90064 

Kevin Gallagher (1980) 

CSC, San Bernardino 

5500 State College Parkway, San Bernardino 92407 


Officers of the Trustees 


Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. 
President 

Roy T. Brophy 
Chair 


Claudia H. Hampton 
Vice Chair 

Chancellor Glenn S. Dumke 
Secretary-T reasurer 


12 


CAMPUSES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE 
UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES 


California State College, Bakersfield 
9001 Stockdale Highway 
Bakersfield, California 93309 
Jacob P. Frankel, President 
(805) 833-2011 

California State University, Chico 
1st and Normal Streets 
Chico, California 95929 
Stanford Cazier, President 
(916 ) 895-5011 

California State University, Dominguez Hills 
Carson, California 90747 
Donald R. Gerth, President 
(213) 515-3300 

California State University, Fresno 
Shaw and Cedar Avenues 
Fresno, California 93740 
Norman A. Baxter, President 
(209) 487-9011 

California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, California 92634 
L. Donald Shields, President 
(714) 773-2011 

California State University, Hayward 
Hayward, California 94542 
Ellis E. McCune, President 
(415) 881-3000 

Humboldt State University 
Areata, California 95521 
Alistair W. McCrone, President 
(707) 826-3011 

California State University, Long Beach 
1250 Bellflower Boulevard 
Long Beach, California 90840 
Stephen Horn, President 
(213) 498-4111 

California State University, Los Angeles 
5151 State University Drive 
Los Angeles, California 90032 
John A. Greenlee, President 
(213) 224-0111 

California State University, Northridge 
18111 Nordhoff Street 
Northridge, California 91330 
James W. Cleary, President 
(213) 885-1200 


California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 
3801 West Temple Avenue 
Pomona, California 91768 
Hugh O. LaBounty, Jr., President 
(714) 598-4592 

California State University, Sacramento 
6000 J Street 

Sacramento, California 95819 
W. Lloyd Johns, President 
(916) 454-6011 

California State College, San Bernardino 
5500 State College Parkway 
San Bernardino, California 92407 
John M. Pfau, President 
(714) 887-7201 

San Diego State University 
5300 Campanile Drive 
San Diego, California 92182 
Thomas B. Day, President 
(714) 286-5000 

Imperial Valley Campus 
720 Heber Avenue 
Calexico, California 92231 
(714) 357-3721 

San Francisco State University 
1600 Holloway Avenue 
San Francisco, California 94132 
Paul F. Romberg, President 
(415) 469-2141 

San Jose State University 
125 South Seventh Street 
San Jose, California 95192 
Gail Fullerton, President 
(408) 277-2000 

California Polytechnic State University, 

San Luis Obispo 

San Luis Obispo, California 93407 
Dale W. Andrews, Acting President 
(805 ) 546-0111 

Sonoma State University 
1801 East Cotati Avenue 
Rohnert Park, California 94928 
Peter Diamandopoulos, President 
(707) 664-2156 

California State College, Stanislaus 
800 Monte Vista Avenue 
Turlock, California 95380 
A. Walter Olson, President 
(209) 633-2122 


13 


CAL STATE FULLERTON 


UNIVERSITY ADVISORY BOARD 

E. B. Buster, Chair 

Executive Vice President, Townsend-Textron 

William J. McGarvey, Jr., Vice Chair 

Chairman of the Board, McGarvey-Clark, Inc. 

Evelyn E. Bauman 

James Beam 

President, Concordia Development 

Robert F. Beaver 

President, Willard-Brent Co., Inc 

William Bridgford 

Chairman of the Board, Bridgford Foods Corp 

Wyatt J. Frieson 

Business and Management Consultant, Wyatt Frieson and Associates 
Frederick T. Mason 

Attorney at Law 

James O. Perez 

Judge, Orange County Superior Court 

Ruth Schermitzler 

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 

President 

Administrative Assistant - 

Executive Assistant 

Affirmative Action Coordinator 

Associate Vice President, University Research - 

Director of Contracts and Grants 

Director of Development and Community Relations 

Coordinator of Alumni Affairs - 

Director of Public Affairs 

Director of Public Information 

Vice President, Administration 

Administrative Assistant 

Mass Mailing Systems Coordinator 

Associate Vice President, Facility Planning and Operations 

Administrative Assistant 

Campus Planner 

Director of Physical Plant 

Director of Public Safety 

Environmental Health and Safety Officer 

Business Manager 

Administrative Assistant 

Administrative Assistant 

Accounting Officer 

Budget Officer 

Procurement and Support Services Officer 

Personnel Management Director 

Assistant Personnel Management Director 

Personnel Management Specialist 

Personnel Management Specialist - 

Foundation Comptroller/ Manager 

Titan Shops, Inc., Manager - 

Vice President, Academic Affairs (acting) 

Administrative Assistant 

Dean, School of the Arts 

Dean, School of Business Administration and Economics (acting) .. 

Dean, School of Human Development and Community Service 

Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences (acting) 

Dean, School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering 

Associate Vice President, Resource Planning and Analysis 

Administrative Assistant 


Santa Ana 

Fullerton 

Fullerton 

San Bernardino 

Los Angeles 

Anaheim 

Santa Ana 

Fullerton 

Santa Ana 

La Habra 


L. Donald Shields 
... Ida M. Johnson 
. Mary A. Koehler 
... Everett Winters 
...G. Cleve Turner 
... Helen C. Carter 
Duane Day 


Jerry J. Keating 

Judy Mandel 

... Ivan L. Richardson 

Marianne Kreter 

Tim Hughes 

..James B. Sharp 

Joanie Donovan 

Glenn M. Lemon 

Beryl E. Kempton 

. William D. Huffman 
.Charles G. Robinson 
. Thomas A. Williams 
...Joseph J. Dusbabek 

Charles R. Umlauf 

Robert E. McPeek 

. Robert G. Fecarotta 

David D. Baird 

Richard D. Schulman 

Jesus Armendariz 

MaryAnn Cohn 

LaVerne Diggs 

Ronald G. Lamb 

E. Karl Lorentzen 

Leland J. Bel lot 

F. Caroline Cosgorve 

Jerry Samuelson 

Henry R. Anderson 

Peter A. Facione 

Don A. Schweitzer 

.A. James Diefenderfer 
... Charles J. Mosmann 
Stephen L. Daigle 


14 University Administration 


Dean of Admissions and Records Ralph Emerson Bigelow 

Director of Admissions Mildred H. Scott 

Registrar John B. Sweeney 

Director of Relations with Schools and Colleges 

Director of Computer Center Gene H. Dippel 

Director of Institutional Research Kenneth R. Doane 

Associate Vice President, Academic Programs Giles T. Brown 

Administrative Assistant Virginia P. Davis 

Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education Bernard L. Hyink 

Director, Faculty Development Center John W. Bedell 

Director, Learning Resource Services Ernest B. Gourdine 

University Librarian Ernest W. Toy 

Associate University Librarian Gladys J. Rohde 

Chair, Bibliographic Services Department Donald W. Keran 

Chair, Processing Services Department Margaret Keithahn 

Chair, Reader Services Department Barbara E. Davis 

Associate Vice President, Extended Education (acting) David L. Walkington 

Coordinator, Extension Program Alex W. Sharpe 

Coordinator, Summer Session James T. Mavity 

Coordinator, Women's Programs and Travel Study Elizabeth B. Robertson 

Director, Academic Advisement Michael P. Onorato 

Director, Faculty Affairs and Records Gordon M. Bakken 

Administrative Assistant Kay Adams-Hernandez 

Dean of Student Services T. Roger Nudd 

Assistant Dean William J. Reeves 

Associate Dean and Director of Educational Opportunity Program Arturo Franco 

Associate Dean, Programs and Operations Marion P. Sneed 

Administrator for Associated Students William G. Pollock 

Director of University Activities Charmaine Coker 

Director of University Center Harvey A. McKee 

Director of Financial Aid Thomas D. Morris 

Director of Handicapped Student Services Paul K. Miller 

Director of Housing and Academic Appeals Lynne K. McVeigh 

Director of International Education and Exchange Louise G. Lee 

Director of Career Development Center John W. Gillis 

Director of Student Health and Counseling Services (acting) William H. Wickett 

Director of Testing and Research Charles W. Buck 

Director of Veterans' Services Roy A. Williams 

Director of the Women's Center 


Schools, Divisions and Departments 

(Administrators serving as Chairs unless otherwise noted) 

Jerry Samuelson, Dean 

Donald R. Henry, Associate Dean 

Donald Lagerberg 

Benton Minor 

.... Alvin J. Keller 


School of the Arts 

Art Department 

Music Department 

Theatre Department 


School of Business Administration and Economics Henry r. Anderson, Acting Dean 

Kenneth D. Goldin, Associate Dean, Academic Programs 


Accounting Department 

Economics Department Joyce S. Pickersgill 

Finance Department Peter M. Mlynaryk 

Management Department James Conant 

Management Science Department John A. Lawrence 

Marketing Department Irene L. Lange 


School of Human Development and Community Service Peter a. Fadone, Dean 

Administrative Assistant Laela E. Handy 

Athletics Department Neale R. Stoner, Director 

Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation Department Paul J. Pastor 

Division of Teacher Education Donald E. Pease 

Child Development Faculty ( ) Coordinator 

Counseling/Psychometry/School Psychology Faculty David W. Keirsey, Coordinator 

Human Services Faculty Michael E. Brown, Coordinator 


Foundation 15 


Nursing Faculty 

Reading Faculty 

School Administration Faculty, 
Special Education Faculty 


.. Wilma J. Traber, Coordinator 
Norma Inabinette, Coordinator 
.... Kenneth Preble, Coordinator 
Calvin C. Nelson, Coordinator 


School of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Afro-Ethnic Studies Department 

American Studies Department 

Anthropology Department 

Chicano Studies Department.... 

Communications Department 

English Department 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Department 

Geography Department 

History Department 

Linguistics Department 

Philosophy Department - 

Political Science Department 

Psychology Department 

Religious Studies Department 

Sociology Department 

Speech Communication Department 

Criminal Justice Program 

Latin American Studies Program 

Liberal Studies Program 

Russian and East European Area Studies Program 

M.A. in Social Sciences Program 


(acting) Don A. Schweitzer, Dean 

(acting) Dennis Berg, Associate Dean 

Boaz N. Namasaka 

John B. Ibson 

Leroy V. Joesink-Mandeville 

Dagoberto Fuentes 

Kenward L. Atkin 

Urania C. Petalas 

Leon J. Gilbert 

Barbara A. Weightman 

Robert S. Feldman 

Donald A. Sears 

Richard L. Smith 

Julian F. S. Foster 

P. Christopher Cozby 

Morton C. Fierman 

(acting FALL 1979) Tony Bell 

Wayne Brockriede 

W. Garrett Capune, Coordinator 

...William J. Ketteringham, Coordinator 

Joseph J. Hayes, Coordinator 

Robert S. Feldman, Coordinator 

Roger Joseph, Coordinator 


School of Mathematics , , Science and Engineering 

Biological Science Department 

Chemistry Department 

Computer Science Department 

Earth Science Department 

Mathematics Department 

Physics Department 

Science Education Department 

Division of Engineering 

Civil Engineering Faculty 

Electrical Engineering Faculty - 

Mechanical Engineering Faculty 

Environmental Studies Program 

Radiation Safety Officer (all-University) 


A. James Diefenderfer, Dean 

Michael H. Clapp, Associate Dean 

Marvin J. Rosenberg 

Patrick A. Wegner 

(acting FALL 1979) Edward Sowell 

John A. Ryan 

. "(acting FALL 1979) Harris Shultz 

Louis N. Shen 

Francis P. Collea 

Michael Householder, Director 

Mahadeva Venkatesan 

Eugene B. Hunt 

Jesa Kreiner 

Barry Thomas, Coordinator 

John C. Elliott 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 
FULLERTON FOUNDATION 


Board of Directors 

Clarence J. Schwartz, President 
•Ivan L. Richardson, Vice President 
Richard M. Wagner, Treasurer 
*L. Jack Bradshaw, Secretary 
John Covington 
t Jerry Dees 

•A. James Diefenderfer 


•Anne Feraru 
•T. Roger Nudd 
David L. Palmer 
Walter J. Pray 
•L. Donald Shields 
*G. Cleve Turner 


Administrative Officer 

Ronald G. Lamb, Business Manager /Comptroller 


• Faculty 
f Student 


16 Titan Shops 

TITAN SHOPS, INC 

Board of Directors 

•Ivan L. Richardson, President 
David L. Palmer, Vice President 
Richard M. Wagner, Secretary-Treasurer 
t Jerry Dees 
•Robert Feldman 
Ronald G. Lamb 

Administrative Officer 

E. Karl Lorentzen 

• Faculty 

♦ Student 


fTom Miller 
•T. Roger Nudd 
Clarence J. Schwartz 
*L. Donald Shields 
t Kathy Tanner 
Jon J. Visel 


17 


CAL STATE FULLERTON: AN OVERVIEW 


GOVERNANCE 

Governance on the campus level at California State University, Fullerton is the responsibility of the 
president and his administrative staff. Working closely with the president are a number of faculty 
and student groups which initiate, review, and/or recommend for approval, various university 
programs, policies, and procedures. Although the president is vested with the final authority for all 
university activities, maximum faculty and staff participation in campus decision-making and gover- 
nance have become traditional. Students also are actively involved, with student representatives 
being included on almost all university, school, and departmental committees and policy-making 
bodies. 


ADVISORY BOARD 

The California State University, Fullerton Advisory Board consists of community leaders interested 
in the development and welfare of the university. The board advises the president on a number of 
matters, particularly those affecting university and community relations. Members are appointed by 
the president for terms of four years. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The institutions of higher learning disseminate and advance knowledge. The philosophy which 
guides an institution can limit or promote the successful achievement of these objectives. Therefore, 
from its inception, Cal State Fullerton has consciously endeavored, through its educational program, 
to enhance the fullest possible development of those it serves. For both professors and students this 
entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, to a comprehensive rather than a narrow 
approach in major areas of study, and to a concern with research and other creative activity. 

The university is committed to provide students with the intellectual skills necessary for their 
continued personal and professional development, as well as an awareness of human achievement. 
The general education forms one segment of a student's program of study. The other two major 
segments are courses taken in the major field of concentration, and courses taken as electives. 
Specifically, the general education program has as its objectives the development in each student 
of: 

• The skills of reading, writing, computing and thinking. 

• An understanding of the development of Western civilization. 

• An awareness of the content, approaches, and methods of the various disciplines and of the 
interrelationships of those disciplines. 

• An understanding of cultural diversity within our own society and of the cultures of other 
societies. 

• An appreciation of aesthetics through practice or criticism of the arts. 

To achieve these objectives the faculty of California State University, Fullerton has established a 
general education program described under "Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree." 

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT 

In 1957 Cal State Fullerton became the 12th State College in California to be authorized by the 
Legislature. The following year a site was designated in northeast Fullerton. It was purchased in 1959, 
when Dr. William B. Langsdorf was appointed as founding president, when the first staff was selected 
and when plans for opening the new college were made. Orange County State College started classes 
for 452 full- and/or part-time students in September, 1959, using leased quarters for its administrative 
offices on the Fullerton Union High School campus and for its classrooms at Fullerton's Sunny Hills 
High School. In the fall of 1960, the college opened classes on its own campus, where it occupied 
12 temporary buildings. The name changed to Orange State College in july, 1962, to California State 
College at Fullerton in July, 1964, to California State College, Fullerton in july, 1968 and to California 
State University, Fullerton in June, 1972. The first permanent building, the six-story Letters and 
Science Building, was occupied in 1963. 


18 The Campus and Its Buildings 

Today, there are many dramatic evidences of additional, rapid growth. Sixteen buildings or building 
clusters have been completed, and enrollment has climbed to approximately 21,000. Since 1963 the 
curriculum has expanded to include lower division work and many graduate programs. 

The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960 established the California State Colleges as a system 
under an independent Board of Trustees, redefined the functions of the State Colleges, and related 
them to both the community colleges and the University of California system. Cal State Fullerton 
was the first of the State Colleges to submit and secure approval for a five-year master curricular 
plan and one of the first three to secure approval of a master building plan. It also was able to think 
in terms of its ultimate enrollment objectives from the beginning. 

On May 26, 1971, Dr. L. Donald Shields, who had served as acting president for seven months, was 
appointed the second president of Cal State Fullerton. Under his leadership, the university is 
reevaluating and improving the functions it serves in higher education even as it also is developing 
more effective working relationships with the community. 

THE HUMAN AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Fullerton a city of approximately 100,000 inhabitants, is located in northern Orange County, about 
30 miles southeast of central Los Angeles. It is in the center of the new Southern California population 
center and within easy freeway access of all the diverse natural and cultural attractions of this region. 
Orange County, with an area of 782 square miles, is the 48th in size of California's 58 counties, but 
it is second largest county in population (1.6 million), and in total personal income. Orange County 
has experienced during the last 25 years almost unprecedented growth as communities continue to 
occupy the diminishing expanses of open land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture of the old and new economic and life styles in Orange 
Count/. Underneath the soil, archeologists and bulldozers uncover traces of the hunting and gather- 
ing Indian bands which flourished at least as early as 4,000 years ago in what was a benign and 
bountiful region. More visible traces remain of the Spanish and Mexican periods and cultures: 
Mission San juan Capistrano, which began the agricultural tradition in Orange County, and subse- 
quent adobes from the great land grants and ranches that followed. Additionally, both customs and 
many names persist from this period, and so does some ranching. The architectural and other 
evidences of the subsequent pioneer period are still quite visible: farmsteads, old buildings from the 
new towns that then were established in the late 1800's, mining operations, and traces of early resort 
and other types of promotional activities. For about 100 years, farming was the main economic 
activity with products such as grapes, walnuts, vegetables, and increasingly oranges, replacing the 
older wheat and cattle ranches. Today, agriculture still is very important. Orange County ranks high 
among California's counties in mineral production with its oil, natural gas, sand and gravel, and clay 
mining and processing activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 miles of beaches in Orange County and the development of 
such attractions as Disneyland, Knott's Berry Farm, the Laguna Festival of Arts and Pageant of 
Masters, and the Anaheim Stadium and Convention Center continue to make tourism an increasingly 
important activity. So does the Mediterranean-type climate with: rainfall averaging 14 inches per 
year; and generally mild days (with either freezing or 100-degree temperatures uncommon) with 
frequent morning fogs during the summer. Both downtown Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean can 
be reached by car in half an hour, and mountain and desert recreation areas are as close as an hour's 
drive from the campus. 

THE CAMPUS AND ITS BUILDINGS 

Once part of a vast orange grove, Cal State Fullerton's attractively landscaped campus now consists 
of 225 acres bounded on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the west by State College Boulevard, 
on the north by Yorba Linda Boulevard and on the east by the Orange Freeway. 

The portion of Orange County immediately surrounding the campus is predominantly suburban; it 
includes housing tracts, apartment complexes, shopping centers, space-age industrial firms and still 
remaining orange groves and undeveloped hills and fields. 

Other educational institutions also are part of the immediate environment. The new campus of the 
Southern California College of Optometry, with its four modernistic buildings, opened in the spring 
of 1973. It is just north of Cal State Fullerton. To Cal State's immediate south is Pacific Christian 


Students of the University 19 


College, a liberal arts school with a Bible emphasis, where students started classes in the fall of 1973. 
The Western State University College of Law, California's largest law school, occupied its new 
campus to the immediate west of Cal State in january, 1975. 

The Cal State Fullerton campus itself has a high density urban layout of buildings and facilities 
developed to serve a predominantly commuting public. The university's modern buildings were 
planned so that no student should need more than 10 minutes to go from one class to another. The 
campus is surrounded with landscaped parking facilities. 

The first permanent building, the Letters and Science Building, was occupied in 1963. This imposing 
structure, master planned to serve ultimately as a facility for undergraduate and graduate science 
instruction and research, has been used to house other programs until they could warrant new 
facilities of their own. 

Since 1963, growth has been rapid. The Performing Arts Center was completed in 1964, the Physical 
Education Building in 1965, the Library Building in 1966, the Commons in 1967, the Humanities-Social 
Sciences Building and Visual Arts Center in 1969, William B. Langsdorf Hall (Administration-Business 
Administration) and the Engineering Building in 1971, the Student Health Center in 1974, the 
Education-Classroom Building and University Center in 1976, and an addition to the Visual Arts 
Center in 1979. Langsdorf Hall and the Engineering Building reflect a commitment to programs with 
high community involvement. In addition to the many undergraduate students who study and learn 
in these buildings, many professional engineers and local businessmen also use these very advanced 
facilities to continue their education. 

In the northeast corner of the campus is a 20-acre Arboretum due to be ready for use in the fall of 
1979. It will include a 15-acre contoured botanical garden, a three-acre organic garden and a 
two-acre experimental plot. The ecologically arranged floras will depict habitat from the desert to 
the tropics. Upon completion, the Arboretum will include Heritage House, a 19th-century restored 
dwelling. Plans call for Heritage House to serve as a cultural museum for North Orange County as 
well as an Arboretum office. 

The ample freeway and surface street accommodations that approach the main entrance to the 
university's modern campus also provide comparatively easy access to the great and diverse learning 
resources available in Southern California: many other colleges and universities; museums, libraries, 
art galleries; zoos; and the wide variety of economic governmental, social, and cultural activities and 
experiments that may be found in this dynamic and complex region of California and the United 
States. 


STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Much of the distinctive character and learning atmosphere of any campus comes from the nature 
and vitality of its students. Diversity, the synthesis of academic with work and family interests, strong 
achievement records, and relative maturity are some of the predominant characteristics of the 
21,000-member student body at Cal State Fullerton. 

The university is a commuter institution. Less than one percent of the students live in university- 
affiliated housing. Thirty-four percent work 35 hours or more a week, and yet nearly 52 percent take 
1 2 or more units of course work each semester. Seventy-four percent come from a radius of 1 5 miles 
from the campus, but many have lived elsewhere before coming to Orange County. 
Twenty-seven percent are lower division students, 50 percent are university juniors and seniors, and 
another 23 percent are doing postbaccalaureate or graduate work. Over seven-eighths of the upper 
division students are transfers from other institutions, principally community colleges. Fifty percent 
are men, and the median age is 23. Fifty percent are women, and the median age is 23. Thirty-four 
percent are married. Fifty-two percent participate in both the day and evening programs during the 
regular semesters and 16 percent are involved only in the late afternoon or evening program. 
Many already have clearly defined disciplinary, professional and artistic interests. Sixteen percent 
have not declared an academic major and are in the process of exploring different fields of knowl- 
edge. For the past three or four years most of the undergraduates have searched for meaningful 
vocations and corresponding employment opportunities upon completion of degree programs. Most 
are trying to understand themselves and their world so that they can become more effective human 
beings and citizens. 


20 Schedule of Classes 

PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

Cal State Fullerton has inaugurated the President's Scholars Program as a means of recognizing the 
academic and extracurricular excellence of a highly select group of students. Unlike many scholar- 
ship opportunities at the university that are based on need and merit, this program is based solely 
on merit. 

Funded by the President's Associates, the program began in 1979 with the first President's Scholars 
selected from the high school graduating class of 1979. Each year, 10 additional President's Scholars 
will be selected with the eligibility of all chosen individuals extending for a maximum of four years. 
President's Scholars receive $500 a year, are hosted at special receptions, and are honored in other 
special ways. They will be highly visible on campus and are expected to assume leadership roles. 
Candidates are considered by a committee of members of the university faculty and administration, 
as well as a community representative. The committee makes its recommendations to the president, 
who personally selects the scholars. 

Application forms are available by telephoning or by writing President's Scholars Program; Office 
of the President; California State University, Fullerton; Fullerton, CA 92634. 

THE FACULTY 

Central to the effectiveness of any institution of higher learning is the quality and dedication of its 
faculty. Cal State Fullerton is proud of the high caliber of its faculty and of the commitments of its 
individual faculty members to teaching and scholarship. 

In the fall of 1978 there were 801 full-time and 491 part-time faculty members teaching on the 
campus. For the full-time faculty members, the median age was 42 and almost all had some previous 
college or university teaching experience before coming to Fullerton. Faculty members also have 
a wide variety of experiences and accomplishments in research, the arts, professional work, consult- 
ing and other creative activities. Seventy-three percent of the full-time faculty have earned their 
doctoral degrees, and these have come from more than 100 major colleges and universities. 
Criteria for selection to the faculty include mastery of knowledge in an academic specialty, demon- 
strated skill and experience in teaching, and continuing interest in scholarly study and research. 
Retention and promotion criteria include service to the university and to the community. 

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The goals of the Faculty Development Center are to foster faculty excellence and to provide services 
for those faculty who believe their own teaching, instructionally related research and other profes- 
sional activities may benefit from various kinds of instruction with their colleagues. 

The director of the Faculty Development Center may be contacted at the center. 

ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION 

The university offers a full four-year program of freshman through senior work as well as credential 
programs for teachers and graduate, master's level work in many disciplines and professional fields. 
The university provides a diversity of educational opportunities to satisfy the broad range of back- 
grounds and interests of its students. Approximately 3,500 courses have been developed to provide 
learning from introductory to highly specialized, in-depth and advanced, work in a wide variety and 
growing number of fields of study. 

Fullerton currently awards the baccalaureate and the master's degree in diverse fields of knowledge. 
Many of the baccalaureate and master's degree programs offer a choice of specializations (or 
options or emphases). Additionally, at least a few courses are given in many fields or subject matter 
areas in which some other colleges and universities offer full degree programs. 

Certain traditions have developed with the academic programs at Cal State Fullerton. One is that 
of relative balance in strength of the programs in the physical sciences, the social sciences, the 
humanities and the fine arts. Another is that of academic excellence in the various specializations 
offered by the university and the comparative freedom given to departments and professional 
schools to develop the depth programs for their majors. Still other tendencies include the encourage- 
ment of: a diversity of approaches to teaching; experimentation and innovation in courses and 
programs; and student participation in curricular planning and decision-making. The university is 
tightening its general education and breadth requirements program to guarantee that students are 
prepared in the basic subjects and gain experience in a variety of carefully selected disciplines. 


Extended Education 21 


ACCREDITATION 

Cal State Fullerton is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Specific 
programs have been accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the 
American Chemical Society, the American Council on Education for journalism, the American 
Speech and Hearing Association, the Engineers' Council for Professional Development, the National 
Association of Schools of Art, the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Assocation 
of Schools of Theater, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Board 
of Directors of the National Athletic Trainers Association. Cal State Fullerton is a member of the 
Council of Graduate Schools in the United States and the Western Association of Graduate Schools. 


SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

The regular, educational program of the university is offered continuously from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. The class schedule, listing all classes meeting during these hours, is prepared 
for each semester and can be purchased at the Titan Bookstore. 

The classes held during the late afternoon and evening hours are part of the regular university 
program. Students enrolling in these classes must have met all admission requirements of the 
university, including the filing of an official application for admission, the filing of complete official 
transcripts from other schools, colleges and universities and in the case of lower-division applicants, 
the completion of required tests for admission. 

The classes which are offered during the summer sessions and by means of extension do not require 
admission to the university, but some courses do require specific prerequisites. Special schedules 
are provided for the summer sessions and extension programs. 

EXTENDED EDUCATION 

The Office of Extended Education is comprised of self-supporting extension, summer session, exter- 
nal degree, adjunct enrollment and community programs. Through these programs the university 
attempts to meet the needs of both the traditional and nontraditional student. Instruction offered 
through the extension program may be credit-earning courses or noncredit earning activities. These 
may be offered on or off campus and may be for any duration. During the month of January, a 
program called intersession, between fall and spring semesters, a concentrated program of extension 
courses is offered. Subject matter ranges from academic offerings paralleling regular campus aca- 
demic programs to specially designed topics for selected groups. Most extension offerings are 
identical in content and instruction with corresponding regularly established university courses. Any 
adult may enroll in an extension course; it is not necessary to be enrolled at the university. 

The maximum extension credit that will be accepted toward a baccalaureate is 24 semester units. 
Six semester units of extension credit may be applied toward a master's degree with appropriate 
approvals. Extension credit may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirements for 
graduation. 

Veterans may use the educational benefits available to them under federal and state laws to enroll 
in university extension courses provided the classes are part of their prescribed and recognized 
objectives as approved by the Veterans Administration. 

For information about establishing an extension course, or for current offerings, write or telephone 
the Office of Extended Education. 

Summer session is for those who wish to accelerate completion of requirements for a degree or 
credential or to enrich their educational backgrounds. All courses are the equivalent of university 
courses offered during the academic year and confer residence credit. 

Day and evening classes are scheduled. Matriculation is not required of students who wish to enroll 
for the summer only, but such students are expected to have satisfied any prerequisites for courses. 
Admission to summer session does not grant admission to the regular session. 

Authorized Student Load 

There is no limit to the number of units a person may take in the summer session, however, a 
recommended program of study in the summer session should not exceed 1 % units of course work 


22 Instructionally Related Services 


per week of instruction. For Veterans benefit purposes one unit per week is considered a full load. 
Because of the structure of extended education and the nature of its student clientele, other programs 
(external degree and adjunct enrollment) have evolved into flexible and accessible on- and off- 
campus opportunities for students or community people with nontraditional educational needs. 
External degree programs are degree-granting programs in which all or a major portion of the 
instruction takes place off campus. The adjunct enrollment program provides the opportunity for 
nonmatriculated students to enroll in regular courses offered at the university. For more information 
regarding these opportunities as well as the many activities offered under community programs, call 
the Office of Extended Education. 


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS 

The California State University and Colleges (CSUC) offers opportunities for students to pursue their 
studies at a distinguished foreign university or special program center. Under the auspices of the 
CSUC Office of International Programs, participants in this program are concurrently enrolled at their 
home campus, where they earn academic credit and maintain campus residency, and at an overseas 
institution of higher education. 

Cooperating universities abroad include the University of Provence, France; the Universities of 
Heidelberg and Tubingen, Germany; the Hebrew University of jerusalem in Israel; the University of 
Florence, Italy; the Universidad Ibero-Americana, Mexico; the Universidad Catolica, Peru; the 
Universities of Granada and Madrid, Spain; the University of Uppsala, Sweden; Lincoln University 
College of Agriculture and Massey University, New Zealand; and Waseda University of Japan. In 
the United Kingdom, cooperating universities (which may vary from year to year) include, among 
others, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Bangor, Heriot-Watt, Leicester, London, Manchester, Oxford, Liver- 
pool, Lampeter, Sheffield, and Strathclyde. In addition, CSUC students may attend a special program 
in Taiwan, Republic of China, or an architecture program in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Eligibility for application is limited to those students who will have upper division or graduate 
standing by September 1980 at a CSUC campus; who have demonstrated the ability to adapt to a 
new cultural environment; and, who, in the cases of France, Germany, Mexico, Peru, and Spain, 
will have completed at least two years of college-level study in the language of instruction at the 
host university, or possess equivalent knowledge of the language. At the time of application, students 
must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) for all college level work of 2.75, 
except for the programs in Israel, New Zealand, Peru, and the United Kingdom where a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 is required. Selection is competitive and is based on home campus recommendations 
and the applicant's academic record. Final selection decisions are made by a statewide committee 
of faculty members, except for the programs in New Zealand and the United Kingdom where final 
selections are made by the respective host universities. 

The International Programs supports all tuition and other academic and administrative costs overseas 
for each of its participants to the same extent that such funds would be expended to support similar 
costs in California. Students assume costs for pre-departure orientation, insurance, transportation, 
housing, and meals. Home campus registration and other fees and personal incidental expenses or 
vacation travel costs while abroad are also paid by the student. Nonresident students are subject 
to nonresident fees. The Office of International Programs collects and administers funds for those 
items which the program must arrange or can negotiate more effectively, such as home campus fees, 
orientation costs, insurance, outbound transportation, and, in some centers, housing. International 
Programs participants may apply for any financial aid available at their home campuses, except for 
campus work-study. 

Applications for the 1980-81 academic year must be submitted before February 9, 1980, except for 
New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Applicants for the New Zealand program must be submitted 
by May 11, 1980, for participation during calendar year 1981. (The academic year in New Zealand 
begins in February and ends in October.) United Kingdom applications must be submitted by 
January 5, 1980. 

Detailed information and application materials may be obtained from the International Education 
Office; further information also may be obtained by writing to The California State University and 
Colleges International Programs, 400 Golden Shore, Suite 300, Long Beach, California 90802. 

INSTRUCTIONALLY RELATED SERVICES 

The university provides instructionally related services for its students and faculty. These include the 


Instructional^ Related Services 23 


universitywide services of the university Library, Learning Resource Services, the Instructional Media 
Center, Academic Advisement Center, and the Computer Center. Three offices. Academic Programs, 
Academic Resource Planning and Analysis, and Institutional Research, make studies on university 
programs and assist in coordinating, planning educational operations and sharing information on 
educational trends and innovations. 

The Library 

The Library houses books, periodicals, documents, microforms, phonorecords and other materials 
selected through the joint efforts of faculty and librarians to support the graduate and undergraduate 
programs of the university. In addition to the general collections, in-depth collections designed to 
support instructionally-related research have been created and developed. 

Introduction to the use of the Library is provided through general tours which are offered at the 
beginning of each semester, and specialized tours and lectures are given as requested by faculty. 
The Library offers courses in bibliographic research as a regular part of the curriculum. 

The book collection will include approximately 500, OCX) volumes by 1980, increasing at the rate of 
25,000-30,000 volumes per year. The Library currently subscribes to close to 4,000 periodicals and 
newspapers and has some 32,000 volumes of bound periodicals, which are supplemented by 

I extensive microform holdings in backfiles of periodicals and of local, national and international 
newspapers, representing over 1 1 ,000 titles. The Library will have about 250,000 items in its selective 
depository of U.S. government documents and in its collections of international, British and state 
documents by 1980. The documents area also contains California documents depository and League 
of Nations, United Nations, and foreign documents collections. 

In addition to the many items available on this campus, the collections of all The California State 
Universities and Colleges and of the University of California, Irvine, Fullerton College, and other local 
specialized colleges and universities are accessible to students and faculty through mutual use 
agreements. Interlibrary borrowing arrangements expand the number of volumes accessible into 
major universities throughout the country. 

Learning Resource Services 

The Learning Resource Services consists of a Learning Assistance Center and Instructional Media 
Center. 

Located on the lower level of the Library Building, a Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is for all 
university students who need improvement in their present learning skills, particularly in the areas 
of reading, writing, computation and study skills. This center contains special study materials, 
collateral textbooks and taped programs that supplement regular course offerings. Individual tutoring 
is available to students on request and through faculty or peer counselor referrals. All tutors are 
selected on the basis of ability in their area of concentration. Prior to tutoring, they are assigned to 
a series of education courses designed to give the prospective tutor a greater understanding and 
awareness of the nature of the learning process. 

Instructional Media Center 

The Instructional Media Center, located in the lower level of the Library building, includes audiovis- 
ual and instructional television services. 

Services to the faculty and students include use of audiovisual equipment and materials, and rental 
of films. Services for faculty include production of transparencies, charts, graphs, diagrams, audi- 
otapes and cassettes, tele-lectures and all types of still and motion picture photography. Instructional 
television services include distribution of off-the-air or videotaped programs from master control to 
classrooms, videotaping facilities and playback both in the studio or classroom and off the campus. 
The center is responsible for the coordination and development of instructional applications of 
media, and the improvement of programs and materials designed for instructional use. Liaison and 
service relations are maintained with other media learning-oriented units on the campus. Personnel 
of the center assist the faculty in their analysis of media needs and the procurement or production 
of materials pertinent to instructional development. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center, serves as the central computing facility for all of the university. As the central 
campus computing facility, it provides support for instruction, research and administrative comput- 
ing services. 


24 Research Organizations 


An integral part of the computing system at Fullerton is the State Distributed Computer Network 
which provides a wide range of computing services. The campus computer is a CDC 3150 with 
64,000 words of memory, card reader, card punch, three high speed tape drives, two high speed 
printers and disk drives. Also available are two timesharing PDP 11 computers; one supports RSTS 
and 32 terminals while the other computer provides UNIX. Thus students have access to a wide 
variety of computer languages — FORTRAN, COBAL, ALGOL, BASIC and other special purpose 
languages. Many general applications programs, (i.e., SPSS, GPSS) are provided by the facility. As 
a component of the network, the Computer Center can communicate with a large-scale dual CDC 
3300 Computer, two CDC 3170's and a Cyber 175 timesharing computer located at the Division of 
Information Systems in Los Angeles. Keypunch, teletype terminals, a sorter and an interpreter for 
student use are available in an open shop area located in the Computer Center. 

Students' jobs receive the highest priority of all work batch-processed on the CDC 3150. The 
Computer Center maintains a library of application programs for general use. Such languages offered 
by the system include FORTRAN, COBAL, ALGOL, BASIC and COMPASS (the assembly language 
for CDC). 

Office of Institutional Research 

The Office of Institutional Research serves as an information center and a problem-solving agency 
which collects, interprets and disseminates information. These data include enrollment histories and 
projections, distributions of data according to selected factors (e.g., level, type of instruction, unit 
value), summaries of student characteristics, and other statistics related to student population, 
course offerings and resources. Most of the data collection and analysis is related to the reporting 
requirements of The California State University and Colleges and other agencies. However, the office 
evaluates data, provides assistance in design of specialized studies and conducts analytic studies to 
serve the decision-making and policy-formulating needs of Cal State Fullerton. 

Office of Academic Programs 

The Office of Academic Programs coordinates the development of educational programs; provides 
an all-university perspective on educational activities at the campus; and stimulates academic 
innovations. The office provides leadership for the general education program, Interdisciplinary 
Center, and the Faculty Development Center, degree programs: Special Major, B.A., M.A.). The 
office provides administrative assistance and coordination with all-university pilot proposals for 
special funding by the Chancellor's Office and for minigrants to support innovative projects. 
Particular responsibilities include leadership with the Curriculum Committee, the General Education 
Committee, the Committee for Educational Development and Innovation, the Center for Internships 
and Cooperative Education, and other groups and individuals concerned with changing and improv- 
ing the educational programs of this institution. Responsibilities relating to the Chancellor's Office 
include regular review and updating of the Academic Master Plan; Cal State Fullerton coordination 
of program performance review; and staff reports for the Chancellor's Office relating to academic 
planning. 

The Office of Academic Programs coordinates the activities of the Learning Resource Services and 
the Library. The office is responsible for the production of the university catalog. 

Office of Academic Resource Planning and Analysis 

The Office of Academic Resource Planning and Analysis is responsible to the vice president, 
academic affairs for analysis and recommendations relating to the utilization of instructional re- 
sources and coordinates the activities of the Office of Institutional Research, the Computer Center 
and Office of Admissions and Records. 


RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICES 
AND SPECIAL STUDY CENTERS 

Much and varied research is going on at Cal State Fullerton. Most of this is being done by individual 
faculty members and students as part of their scholarly and professional development activities. 
Research training is an important part of the education for more advanced work in most disciplines 
and professions, and many of our students are encouraged and assisted to learn and apply research 
skills in either independent or team projects. 


Research Organizations 25 


The Research Committee of the Faculty Council and the Contracts and Grants Office provide 
stimulus, coordination and direction to the research efforts of the university. 

A Student Research Fellowship program and a Faculty Research Grant program award "seed grants" 
to research projects every year. Services supporting research are given by the Cal State Fullerton 
Foundation, the university Computer Center, and the university Library. Augmenting the on-campus 
aids to research are the great and diverse resources available for study in the Southern California 
area. 

In addition to encouragement received by the campus to participate in multi-campus and single 
campus research projects awarded by the New Program Development and Evaluation Office of the 
Chancellor's Office, the university receives a specified amount of money each year for the support 
of faculty projects on the campus. 

The university is particularly appreciative of the support money provided for faculty each year by 
the Friends of the State University. 

A number of special centers with specific research objectives are operating at the university. These 
include the Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community (with its affiliated 
Center for Economic Education), the International Business Center, the Institute for Molecular 
Biology, the Institute for Reading, the Sport and Movement Institute, the Institute for Early Childhood 
Education, the Institute for Teacher Leadership, the Institute for Bilingual Studies, the Laboratory for 
Phonetic Research, the Speech and Hearing Clinic, the Institute of Geophysics, the Institute for 
Community Research and Development, the Institute for Western Hemispheric Studies and the 
Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Center for Research in Business , Economics and the Community 

The Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community provides: 

1 . School of Business Administration and Economics and other faculty with additional opportunity 
to participate in research activities in order to improve and reinforce teaching and professional 
competence; 

2. Professional research and consultation services to private business, labor, agriculture, and local 
government agencies in the university service area. 

3. Educational services, e.g., seminars and conferences, to improve competence of local decision- 
makers in specialized areas relating to business administration and economics. 

The operations of the center are carried out by constituent institutes, programs, and projects for 
which the center provides overall leadership and coordination. Programs and projects within the 
center are organized to carry on work outside the institute's area of interest, which are of smaller 
scale and for a shorter time-span. 

Currently included within the Center for Research in Business, Economics and the Community is the 
affiliated Center for Economic Education. 

Center for Economic Education 

The Center for Economic Education is one of many such centers at colleges and universities in the 
United States working with the national joint Council on Economics Education, the California 
Council on Economic Education and the Economic Literacy Project to expand economic under- 
standing. Center programs include ( 1 ) services to schools and colleges, individual educators, and 
the community; (2) research and professional training; and (3) operation of an economic education 
information center. 


International Business Center 

The need for an international dimension to business education is underscored by the importance 
of international business operations to domestic firms and the development of multinational firms 
and agencies. Equally important is a growning awareness of the diversity among the world's cultures 
and economies, and an understanding of an unavoidable interdependence between nations. The 
International Business Center has undertaken to meet these challenges in the international area by 
developing international business programs within the School of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics. 

Institute for Molecular Biology 

The purposes of the institute are: ( 1 ) to foster and encourage communication of ideas and informa- 


26 Research Organizations 

tion among its membership for mutual professional improvement; (2) to encourage students to 
adopt affiliation with the membership and to adopt an interdisciplinary understanding of their 
particular areas of emphasis; (3) to foster an active research program on the part of the membership 
on problems best approached by the integration of chemistry, physics and biology; and (4) to seek 
ways of improving the individual teaching performance of its membership through interdisciplinary 
communication at all levels of instruction. 

The institute sponsors a series of special seminars devoted to topics in the molecular biological 
sciences, featuring speakers from its own personnel and from other campuses. 

Institute for Reading 

The Institute for Reading was established for the purpose of promoting an atmosphere congenial to 
research and creative activity for development of reading and related programs. In the fulfillment 
of this purpose, the institute is dedicated to the pursuit of issues encountered in teaching of reading 
to children and adults, using an interdisciplinary approach whenever feasible. 

The institute ( 1 ) encourages communication of ideas and information among its membership for 
mutual professional improvement; (2) encourages students to affiliate with members and to adopt 
an interdisciplinary understanding of their particular areas of emphasis; (3) seeks ways of improving 
the teaching performance of its membership through interdisciplinary communication at all levels 
of instruction; and (4) fosters research activities. 

The Reading Clinic is located in the School of Human Development and Community Service. It 
serves as a clinic and laboratory for graduate students in the reading option of the Master of Science 
in Education. Children from community schools attend the Reading Center for diagnosis and 
remediation. 

Institute for Early Childhood Education 

The Institute for Early Childhood Education (1 ) fosters and encourages communication of ideas and 
information among its membership for mutual professional development; (2) encourages its mem- 
bers to engage in research and writing related to the problems of early childhood education; (3) 
encourages students and teachers to adopt an approach of inquiry to solve their professional 
concerns relating to the education of young children; and (4) seeks ways of improving the individual 
teaching performance of its membership through communication with others at all levels of instruc- 
tion. 

Institute for Bilingual Studies 

The Bilingual /Cross-Cultural Institute was established to promote public awareness of the value of 
cultural and linguistic pluralism; to encourage educational policy makers to adopt and implement 
policies to guarantee equity in the provision of instruction; to encourage university faculty and 
interested scholars to develop programs and research directed toward high quality instruction based 
on cultural and linguistic pluralism; and to develop and operate activities that will prepare faculty 
for all levels of public education. 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 

The Laboratory for Phonetic Research is a research and training facility in the Department of 
Linguistics. It is equipped with electromechanical facilities for the acoustical, psychoacoustical, and 
physiological study of human speech. Its objectives are twofold: 

Instruction. To provide teaching, training and experience to assist the language handicapped. 
Research. To provide advanced students and faculty with facilities for research on language 
function and dysfunction. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton Founda- 
tion agency, providing speech and hearing services for individuals with communication disorders. 
In addition it is an off-campus clinical program for graduate students that involve experiences within 
medical and paramedical settings. The primary purpose of the clinics both on campus and off 
campus is to provide opportunities for teaching, service and research. The on-campus clinic is 
accredited by the Board of Examiners of the American Speech and Hearing Association and the 
California State Department of Education. 


Research Organizations 27 


Sport and Movement Institute 

The Sport and Movement Institute is concerned with human movement and endeavors to: (1) 
promote and support research and other scholarly activities on the part of the membership; (2) 
stimulate generation of new ideas and information; (3) interpret and disseminate research findings 
to facilitate application by practitioners; (4) provide the services of evaluation, consultation and 
advisement to members of the university and community at large: (5) provide opportunities for 
student participation in the activities of the institute. 

Institute for Teacher Leadership 

The Institute for Teacher Leadership includes California State University, Fullerton and the United 
Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA). It is to assist teachers in coping with desegregation. It is the only 
one of its kind in the country where a major university and a teachers union have gotten together 
to facilitate the needs of teachers. It also provides assistance in such areas as collective bargaining; 
crime and violence in schools; multicultural education and other related teacher problems. It is 
multifaceted serving the 28,000 teachers in Los Angeles and over 600,000 children. 

The Institute for Western Hemispheric Studies 

The Institute for Western Hemispheric Studies develops and implements cooperative professional 
activities and educational exchange with people of other nations in the western hemisphere. The 
institute coordinates activities, promotes innovation in universities and colleges and initiates cur- 
riculum proposals to demonstrate cross-cultural understanding and sensitivity. The institute stimu- 
lates and sponsors research and arranges for the exchange of faculty, students and educational 
materials. 

The Institute for Community Research and Development 

The purpose of the Institute is to make the research, scholarly, and professional resources of the 
university available to local communities. Technical arid research expertise is provided through 
problem-oriented research projects, consulting, workshops, seminars, and conferences on critical 
local policy questions. 

Center for Internships and Cooperative Education 

The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education was established to offer students the opportu- 
nity to combine their academic experience with periods of professional employment directly related 
to their academic major. The center provides services to students, faculty and employers to imple- 
ment the program. 

Students gain a clearer understanding of their career objectives through the application of their 
academic studies in the "world of work." Learning while working outside the classroom, students 
obtain a broader perspective of themselves. Many departments offer an internship course which 
carries academic credit. Some of the internships are salaried and consequently assist students in 
meeting the cost of living. 

The employing agency receives the services of individuals who are highly motivated, eager to learn 
and aware of theoretical developments in their field. The employer also finds participation in 
cooperative education to be one of the most reliable means of recruiting personnel for full-time 
employment upon graduation. 

The university, through the establishment of the Center for Cooperative Education, has provided a 
means for students to enhance their academic program (s). 

Institute of Geophysics 

The Institute of Geophysics is an interdisciplinary organization currently comprised of faculty mem- 
bers from the Departments of Earth Science and Physics. It was established to foster the communica- 
tion of ideas and information; encourage interdisciplinary research; and improve instruction in 
geophysics. Membership is open to all faculty members who are interested in all aspects of geophy- 
sics. 

Institute for Community Research and Development 

The purpose of the Institute for Community Research and Development is to make the research, 


28 Titan Shops 


scholarly and professional resources of the university available to local communities. Technical and 
research expertise is provided through problem-oriented research projects, consulting workshops, 
seminars and conferences on critical local policy questions. 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 

The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary operates as a nonprofit California State University, Fullerton Founda- 
tion agency. The sanctuary provides for a program of continuing educational service to the commu- 
nity; a research center for biological field studies; a facility for teacher education in nature 
interpretation and conservation education; and a center for training students planning to enter into 
the public service field of nature interpretation. 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 

FULLERTON FOUNDATION 

The California State University, Fullerton Foundation was established and incorporated in October 
1959 to provide essential student, faculty and staff services which cannot be provided from state 
appropriations; to supplement the program and activities of the university in appropriate ways; and 
to assist otherwise the university in fulfilling its purposes and in serving the people of the State of 
California — especially those of the area in which the university is located. 

Services provided by the foundation include administration of scholarship and student loan funds; 
sponsored research programs; Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary; and certain institutes. 

The foundation's overall policies are administered by a board of trustees composed of members of 
the university faculty, administration and students as well as community leaders. 

TITAN SHOPS, INC. 

Titan Shops, Inc., is comprised of the Titan Bookstore and food services and vending for the campus. 
Established and incorporated in july 1971, it is administered by a board of trustees composed of 
members of the university faculty, administration, students and community business leaders. 

Titan Bookstore 

Students are able to purchase or order books and supplies as needed for cfasses from the on-campus 
bookstore, owned and operated by Titan Shops, Inc. It is located in Commons I directly east of the 
University Center and west of the Library. 

Food Service 

Titan Shops, Inc., is responsible for the food service facilities on the campus. Titan Shops has a 
contract with Servomation to operate the campus food services and MAB Vendors to operate the 
vending machines on the campus. 


29 


STUDENT SERVICES 


While classroom activity is devoted to the academic development of the learner. Student Services 
offers programs which simultaneously provide students with services and opportunities for personal 
growth. Some Student Services programs such as housing and financial aid emphasize their service 
and educationally supportive roles; others, like counseling, accentuate their developmental aspects. 
The opportunities offered by the university's Student Services program vary from the traditional 
social activities to lectures and concerts funded through the Associated Students. Developmental 
activities include the exploration of personal and vocational life styles and holistic health. 

Student Services are comprised of the Career Development Center, Educational Opportunity Pro- 
gram, Financial Aid, Handicapped Student Services, Health and Counseling Center, Housing Office, 
International Education and Exchange Program, Testing and Research, University Activities Center, 
University Center (Student Union), Veterans' Services and Women's Center. 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

The efforts of all of the Student Services are coordinated and supervised by the Dean of Student 
Services. The dean is responsible for the quality of student life on the campus and works with faculty, 
administration and students to improve the campus environment. The dean is assisted by an associ- 
ate dean (programs and operations) and an assistant dean (budget and personnel). Additionally, 
this office is charged with administering the university's academic appeals procedure and the student 
disciplinary codes. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Career Development Center helps students within the context of their total educational develop- 
ment to define career goals and objectives and assists them in achieving these goals. In addition to 
its own resources, the center works closely with academic departments, the Academic Advisement 
Center, the Center for Cooperative Education and Internships, the Testing Center and other campus 
services to ensure that every student has an opportunity for career exploration and planning. The 
university believes that both students and employers are best served when graduates are placed in 
professions well suited to the student's interests, talents and education. All registered students are 
welcome to use the services of the center without cost. 

The university will furnish prospective students, upon request, information concerning the subse- 
quent employment of graduates from programs or courses of study which have the purpose of 
preparing students for a particular career field. This information includes data concerning average 
starting salary and the percentage of previously enrolled students who obtained employment. Copies 
of the published information may be requested from the director of the center. 

Career Development Services 

The Career Development Center assists students to explore and plan their career options. Profes- 
sional counselors help students evaluate personal values, skills and vocational interests through 
group and individual counseling and testing. The center's career library provides materials on career 
opportunities, labor market information, job search techniques and related topics. Information about 
careers in education, business, industry and government is also available. 

Programs on career exploration are conducted throughout the year. Career information sessions 
introduce students to professionals working in a variety of fields. Career seminars offer assistance 
in goal setting and career decision making, job search techniques, interviewing skills, resume writing 
and graduate school application procedures. 

A course titled "Career Exploration and Life Planning" (Counseling 252) is taught each semester 
by the center's counselors. This three-unit course is offered through the School of Human Develop- 
ment and Community Service. 


30 Student Activities 

JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES 

Part- Time Placement 

The center provides assistance for part-time or seasonal employment while attending the university. 
New students may contact the center regarding part-time employment after August 1 for the fall 
semester, or after january 1 for the spring semester. Listings for clerical workers, drivers, custodians, 
teacher aides, drafting, waiters, clerks, youth and recreation leaders, gardners, and other jobs are 
received daily and posted in the center. 

Business , Industry and Government Placement 

Career placement counselors assist students and alumni who are seeking full-time employment in 
defining occupational preference, pursuing job leads and writing resumes. Each semester, the center 
coordinates an on-campus recruitment program in which employers interview students who are 
approaching graduation. 

As a member of the State Employment Development Department's Job Bank, the center receives 
a daily listing of more than 1,000 job opportunities available in Southern California. 

Educational Placement 

Students in teacher education, pupil personnel services, or administration curricula of the university 
who are in the final semester of a credential, student teaching or directed fieldwork programs are 
eligible for educational placement services. Counselors help students establish a professional em- 
ployment file, supply information about openings and assist in making referrals to school districts 
and educational institutions. 

Minority Relations 

Minority Relations is responsible for broadening the awareness of the entire community to the career 
development services available to all minorities and for encouraging minority students to register 
with the center for career counseling and placement services. Minority relations counselors offer 
information regarding opportunities available to minority students for graduate study. This resource 
includes financial aid information, application filing, recruitment sessions and personal contacts with 
those involved with graduate programs on other campuses. 

Minority relations counselors work with colleagues responsible for other specialized functions, 
including teaching, part-time jobs, business, industry and government placement, and do not serve 
as the sole placement service for all minority students. 

TESTING AND STUDENT RESEARCH 

Universitywide testing programs are coordinated and administered by the Testing Center. These 
include university admissions tests and general tests for graduate school admission. In addition, the 
Testing Center provides advice and consulting services to instructional departments in the develop- 
ment and administration of admission, selection, and placement tests for use by a specific depart- 
ment or program. 

The Testing Center conducts ongoing research on the validity and appropriateness of tests used in 
university testing programs. It also designs and conducts surveys of student needs, attitudes, and 
other characteristics. 

Testing requirements for students seeking admission are listed in the admissions section of this 
catalog. Information about testing requirements for specific instructional programs, is available in the 
appropriate instructional division or the Testing Center. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The university recognizes the important role of extracurricular and cocurricular activities. An exten- 
sive organization of clubs, interest groups and committees exists within the student body and 
university structure. Opportunities for involvement are available to every student according to 
interest, ability and available time. In addition, each academic department has a student department 
association which provides informal contact with faculty, and opportunities for cocurricular acitivites 
related to majors or career interests. 


Student Activities 31 


University Activities Center 

The University Activities Center provides opportunity to participate in and to explore educational, 
cultural and social activities at the university. 

The center provides training programs to develop and strengthen management, leadership and 
organizational skills. A professional staff advises in planning, budgeting and publicizing programs 
such as lectures, culture weeks, symposia, special events and projects. The center advises students 
and organizations of university policies and procedures and assists in arranging for the use of 
university services and facilities. A master activity calendar of campus events is maintained by the 
University Activities Center. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations are vital to the total educational process. They are chartered to encourage and 
facilitate use of university resources and integrate activities with a goal of sustaining a viable 
university community. Any group of students may become a chartered organization, provided the 
goals and activities are consistent with university rules and regulations by applying through the 
University Activities Center. Organizations are classified under the following headings: ( 1 ) Academ- 
ic (organizations which share learning goals with a specific department); (2) Religious; (3) Profes- 
sional; and, (4) Special Interest. More than 100 organizations are now recognized including six 
national social fraternities, five national social sororities, a number of departmental associations and 
many special interest groups. 

Associated Students 

All students are members of the Associated Students, Inc., and are represented by the Associated 
Students Board of Directors and executive officers, who develop and maintain extracurricular 
programs of every type. Each year a budget is adopted in the spring which allocates anticipated 
activity fees and all other income to be derived from all programs during the following year. Directors 
are elected from various academic disciplines. The Departmental Associations Council is assigned 
a certain portion of the budget by the Board of Directors. The many departmental associations are 
established to promote closer relationships among students and faculty of their departments and 
bring programs to the departments that might not be possible without such funding. Most depart- 
ments have established active associations. 

Student Government 

The Associated Students, Inc., is governed through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches 
of the Associated Students organization. The president and commissioners constitute the executive 
branch which has the responsibility for the development and administration of the program, includ- 
ing such activities as publications, intercollegiate athletics, intramural athletics, forensics, and music. 
The Associated Students Board of Directors has full responsibility for legislation by which this 
program is directed and for the allocation of student funds for the program. The judicial branch 
serves as a legal body for interpretation of the constitution and enforcement of Associated Student 
policies. 

Student Publications 

The university newspaper, the Daily Titan, is published as a product of communications classes and 
financed by the Associated Students. A handbook is available for use by organizations in the 
development and operation of programs. 

Men's Athletics 

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of teams in baseball, basketball, football, golf, gymnas- 
tics, soccer, tennis, fencing and wrestling. A year-round program of intramural activities includes 
basketball, badminton, flag football, handball, softball, tennis and wrestling, swimming and weight 
lifting. 

The university is a member of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association (PCAA). All men's athletic 
teams compete under rules of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 

Intramural Activities 

The University Recreation Program offers team, dual and individual intramural activities to meet the 
competitive and recreational needs of students, faculty and staff members. Rules and regulations 


32 Student Activities 


governing participation in the intramural program are available in the Recreation Office, in the 
Physical Education Building. 

Women's Athletics 

Participation by women in intercollegiate volleyball, basketball, softball, tennis, gymnastics and golf 
is provided through membership in the Southern California Women's Intercollegiate Athletic Confer- 
ence, the Western Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, and the Association for 
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. 

Recreational Activities 

A recreational activities program is offered to students, faculty, staff, affiliated, and community 
members, and their families who wish to use the recreational facilities on an unstructured, noncom- 
petitive basis. Swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, tennis, table tennis, racquetball, jogging, 
handball and weight training are provided. Special instructional programs and club sports are 
available. 

Family Planning Services 

Birth control counseling at the Student Health Center has been supplemented by a birth control 
information service, financed and operated by the Associated Students under the direction of the 
university medical director. A part-time coordinator is available in the Student Health Center to make 
appointments with a Student Health Center physician. The physician advises the patient on birth 
control and provides physical examination. 

Campuswide Events 

Student boards, organized by the Associated Students, sponsor many campuswide events. The 
lecture series, pop concerts, film series and special events are part of the ongoing program. All 
recognized student organizations frequently cosponsor events in the area of their interests. 

Child Care Center 

Sponsored by the Associated Students, Inc., is the Children's Center which provides daytime nursery 
care for children of Cal State Fullerton students for a nominal fee. The professionally staffed center, 
located near the campus, is licensed by the State of California. 

Legal Information and Referral 

This office provides assistance to students on matters pertaining to law and makes referrals in 
cooperation with the Orange County Bar Association and the Legal Aid Society. A full-time law 
student attending a recognized school of law maintains office hours in the University Center. 

Mutual Ticket Agency 

The Associated Students, through its business office, operates a ticket agency for the benefit of all 
students. Purchases for drama, music, shows and sporting events may be made during regular office 
hours. The agency is located in the University Center. 

Student News Bureau 

The Student News Bureau was organized in 1960 to provide the outside press with news of student 
activities on the campus. 

University Center 

Funded and operated entirely by student fees, the University Center offers a broad range of services 
and programs to the university community. Specific facilities include an eight-lane bowling center, 
craft center, main lounge, secondary lounge, games lounge, billiard parlor, meeting rooms, television 
room, organizational work space, multipurpose room, small theater, music-listening room, informa- 
tion center, two retail shops, Associated Students offices, sunken plaza, courtyard and snack bar. 


Financial A id 33 


HOUSING OFFICE 

The Housing Office is concerned with helping students locate housing accommodations suitable to 
their life styles. 

Services include: 

• Summer orientations to find housing in advance of the fall semester. 

• Lists of off-campus rooms, apartments and houses. 

• Information about the two off-campus, privately owned and operated residence halls. 

• Bulletin boards for students seeking roommates. 

• A model rental agreement which represents the university's best recommendation to students. 

• Information about tenant rights and responsibilities. 

• Landlord/tenant mediation. 

• Community referrals. 

• A computerized car pool program. 

• Information and schedules for the Orange County Transit District. 

THE HEALTH AND COUNSELING CENTER 

The Student Health and Counseling Center is located on Gymnasium Campus Drive and is open from 
8 a m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

Doctors and nurses, laboratory and x-ray technologists, pharmacists, a physical therapist and aides 
are on duty. No one has access to a patient's medical records unless the patient gives permission 
for the transfer of records, or in the rare case, by court's subpoena. 

Most of the doctors are primary care physicians. In addition, there are gynecologists and an 
orthopedist. The center has a pharmacy (not for outside prescriptions), a laboratory, an x-ray 
service, physical therapy, a hearing clinic, birth control counseling and nutritional counseling. 

The cost of care given in the Health Center, except for a few specific fees, has been paid through 
student fees and by the State of California. Every registered student is eligible for care. However, 
the Health and Counseling Center cannot meet all medical needs. Students are urged to obtain health 
insurance if they do not already have adequate private insurance. A good, inexpensive policy is 
offered through the Student Health and Counseling Center. 

Students with emotional or personal problems may come to the Counseling and Mental Health 
Department where five psychological counselors and psychiatrists are available for consultations 
and treatment when needed. There is no charge for service and all information is confidential and 
will not be released without the written consent of the students. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Financial Aid Office provides guidance and assistance in financial matters to all students. 
Financial aid administers all scholarships, emergency loans, grants. National Direct Loans and the 
work-study programs. 

One application for aid covers all programs for which a student may be eligible. Deadlines for 
applications are as follows: March 1 for the fall semester; November 1 5 for the spring semester; and 
April 1 for the summer sessions. 

Dependent students, defined as those who are dependent upon their parents for support, must 
submit the following documents: ( 1 ) Student Aid Application for California; and (2) copy of parents 
form 1040. 

Independent students, defined as those who are not dependent upon their parents for support, must 
provide the following documents: (1 ) Student Aid Application for California; (2) copy of their own 
form 1040 and spouse's, when applicable. Early submission of documents is advised, as funds are 
limited. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of scholarships is available for outstanding students. Scholarship listings for the 
next academic year are advertised in April. Qualified students should obtain applications from the 
Financial Aid Office. Awards are based on scholastic record, financial need and personal qualifica- 
tions. Some scholarships are limited to students majoring in specified disciplines. For information on 
the President's Scholars Program, see page 20. 

2—78946 


34 Financial Aid 


Scholarships offered by Cal State Fullerton are made possible by interested organizations, business 
firms and indviduals. Recent contributors to the scholarship program include: 

Alpha Delta Kappa, Beta Zeta Center 
California China Painters' Art Association 
California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc. 

California Retired Teachers Association 

Council of Building and Construction Trades, AFL-CIO 

Ebell Club of Fullerton 

Fourth District, California Parents and Teachers Association 

Fullerton Rotary Club 

Mercury Savings and Loan 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship Fund 

Roberta King Maxwell Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Sadie Landon Memorial Music Scholarship Fund 

Sheryl Cummings Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Loans 

The generosity of organizations and individuals enables the university to offer short-term loans to 
students who meet unexpected financial difficulties of a temporary nature. Loans from these funds 
are made for various periods of time and to specified categories of students, according to university 
regulations and the wishes of the donors. Application for a short-term loan may be made at any time 
during the school year. 

The following is a listing of the loan funds available during the 1979-60 school year: 

Altrusa Club of Fullerton Loan Fund 
Anaheim East Rotary Loan Fund 
American Public Works Administration Loan Fund 
Brea Rotary Club Loan Fund 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers Loan Fund 

California Congress of Parents and Teachers Loan Fund, Fourth District 

California Retired Teachers Association 

Carrie Lou Sutherland Memorial Fund 

Cal State Fullerton Faculty Women's Club Loan Fund 

Don Miller Memorial Fund 

Gamma Epsilon Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Loan Fund 

Hughes Employees Give Once Club 

lames Merrick Memorial Fund 

Junior Ebell Club of Anaheim Loan Fund 

Laguna Beach Pan-Hellenic Loan Fund 

Laura E. Imhoff Memorial Fund 

Mary Virginia Lopez Memorial Fund 

Memorial Loan Fund 

Newport Harbor Children's Theatre Loan Fund 
Newport Harbor Pan-Hellenic Loan Fund 
Pierre Guyette Memorial Fund 
Rossmoor Women's Club Loan Fund 
Straub Distributing Company Scholarship 

Alan Pattee Scholarship (Children of Deceased Peace Officers or Firemen) 
Surviving children, natural or adopted, of California peace officers or firemen killed in the line of 
duty are not charged fees or tuition of any kind while enrolled at any of the California State University 
or Colleges, according to the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act and Section 23762, California Educational 
Code. 


Educational Opportunity Program 35 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

The Office of International Education and Exchange is the principal office for information and 
assistance for all foreign nationals and those students who plan to study overseas. 

Foreign Students 

Each year the university attracts applications from persons in foreign countries and currently more 
than 50 nations are represented. Special services are provided for these students and include 
orientation to the university; assistance with the resolution of academic and personal problems; help 
to comply with governmental regulations; and initiation of cocurricular activities. The office prepares 
documents for entering the United States, applications for extensions of stay and change of status. 
Requested letters of standing for foreign consulates and institutions are also provided. 

All foreign students are required to have proficiency in the use of the English language necessary 
for successful academic work and sufficient funds to cover all expenses of the first year at the 
university, including adequate health insurance coverage. An English placement examination is held 
before registration for all new students. (See section on admission of foreign students.) 

Study Overseas 

Information about opportunities to study in foreign universities is available in the Office. The director 
of international education and exchange coordinates the selection of students applying for admission 
to one of the foreign university programs operated by The California State University and Colleges. 
(See also section on International Programs.) 

A library of current programs sponsored by other institutions is maintained for student reference. 

HANDICAPPED STUDENT SERVICES 

Located in a new custom designed Handicapped Student Center on the first floor of the Library, this 
office provides assistance and offers services to all handicapped /disabled students. The goal of this 
program is to make full educational, cultural, social and physical facilities of the university available 
to students with orthopedic and/or perceptual handicaps/disabilities. 

A full range of services is available in cooperation with other university departments — a learning 
resource center and lounge, priority registration, orientation, attendant/reader/note-taker referral 
services, counseling, career planning, academic advisement, housing, transportation, handicapped 
parking and job placement. The purpose is to provide necessary services and assistance that will 
eliminate or significantly reduce barriers resulting from the mobility and perceptual problems en- 
countered by most handicapped /disabled students. The program serves as a centralized source of 
information and provides individual attention to students. It is staffed by personnel experienced in 
the particular needs of the handicapped /disabled. 

In order to sustain a quality program, this office needs and encourages the involvement and input 
from the students it serves. The director of handicapped student services may be contacted in the 
Handicapped Student Center. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM 

The Educational Opportunity Program provides comprehensive services for educationally, disadvan- 
taged and/or culturally different students. These services include the identification, selection, coun- 
seling and retention of students who would not normally acquire a university education because of 
academic, ethnic, financial or motivational barriers. 

EOP gives each of the students individual attention. It uses knowledge of the student's distinctive 
patterns of social behavior, learning styles, motivations, and aspirations to assist them realizing their 
full potentialities. EOP strives to develop a sense of community among its students through creative 
and identity-seeking activities. 

Students are encouraged to understand the background and strengths of their own ethnic groups, 
and to work together in support of central, universal human values. EOP is interested in advancing 
the understanding of different cultural groups on this campus by promoting an awareness of their 
concerns and potentialities. 


36 Alumni Affairs 


The services offered by the Educational Opportunity Program include: Talent Search, Upward 
Bound, Special Services, Upward Bound-Veterans, recruiting, counseling, tutoring, and secretarial 
services. The services ensure a progressive rate of student achievement. 

Talent Search 

This program is designed to seek out and help qualified high school students or dropouts who have 
financial need and an exceptional potential for postsecondary education. 

Upward Bound 

This program is directed to high school students with potential and the ability to complete college 
work, but who are underachieving. Upward Bound provides supplemental academic and counseling 
support to motivate students to complete high school and to assist them in entering higher education. 

Special Services 

Counseling, tutorial and other educational services are provided to students already in college or 
accepted for enrollment. The program is designed to remedy academic deficiencies and to provide 
career guidance, placement and other services to encourage them to continue (or re-enter) higher 
education. 

Upward Bound- Veterans 

This program has been established in order to assist veterans, (ages 27 or younger) to obtain a high 
school diploma, or GED, and to "bridge" into a college, university, or trade school. The program 
is geared for full-time participation. However, a veteran may participate only for GED preparation. 

Recruiting 

EOP recruiting teams visit high schools and colleges within a specified service area and advise 
students of the benefits of higher education at Cal State Fullerton. Utilizing Affirmative Action 
guidelines, a special attempt is made to recruit students with high academic potential. Assistance 
with admissions and financial aid procedures is provided. 

Counseling Service 

The counseling component is one key to the effectiveness of the entire EOP. Peer counselors, 
working under the direction of professional counselors, are the important liaisons between each 
individual EOP student and the university as a whole. Assistance and guidance is provided to help 
the student resolve academic, social, financial and personal problems. The EOP Counseling Center 
also acts as a referral point to direct students to the appropriate support services, e.g., financial aid, 
housing. Learning Assistance Center, tutorial services, health services, etc. 

ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

The Alumni Association was established to strengthen the bond between the alumni and the 
university. The association is directed by a board which acts as an informal advisory council in its 
biannual meetings with the university president. 

Through continuing education programs, cultural enrichment, and social activities, the association 
attempts to help graduates continue the growth and self discovery that began while they attended 
Cal State Fullerton. 

Membership benefits include discounts on cultural and athletic events; use of the University Center 
recreational facilities at the same rate as current students; ability to join ORCO credit union; and 
receipt of the university's quarterly magazine. Continuum, and a quarterly alumni newsletter. The 
Titan Quarterly, and a membership directory. 

Further information regarding membership and programs may be obtained by calling the Office of 
Alumni Affairs. 


Women's Center 37 


OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 


The Office of Veterans' Services was established to aid and assist all veterans, who are not now 
participating in a postsecondary educational experience. Functioning under an institutional award 
from the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the office is charged with the respon- 
sibilities of (1) outreach, (2) recruitment, (3) special programs and (4) counseling. In addition, it 
assists and aids veterans in registration, tutoring, benefit advisement, educational opportunities, 
housing and job placement (both on and off campus). 

The program director of veterans' services may be contacted in the Veterans' Services Office. 

WOMEN'S CENTER 

The Women's Center provides support, information and resources to help women explore the many 
options available today. Its goals are to provide: (l)a caring, supportive atmosphere to help develop 
meaningful friendships, share experiences, and enhance personal growth; (2) information and 
referrals to community and campus agencies; (3) individual and group counseling; (4) develop 
self-competence in making personal, educational, and career choices; (5) special services for 
re-entry to school or the work world; and (6) programs and workshops which reflect the special 
concerns of women's changing life patterns. The Women's Center is designed to serve specific needs 
of women and is open to all interested men. 









♦ 



ADMISSION 

REGISTRATION 

RECORDS 

AND REGULATIONS 



40 


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 


OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS 

The Office of Admissions and Records is responsible for the administration of the admission, 
registration, records, and relations with schools and colleges programs and services for undergradu- 
ate and graduate students in the regular sessions of California State University, Fullerton. These 
programs and services are to provide preadmission guidance to prospective students; to provide 
current information about the university's curricula and requirements to school and college counsel- 
ors; to admit and readmit students within enrollment categories, quotas and priorities; to evaluate 
the applicability of undergraduate transfer credit toward all-university requirements of the cur- 
riculum; to provide liaison in the identification and resolution of articulation problems of transfer 
students; to register student programs of study, including enrollment into classes; to maintain aca- 
demic records; to administer academic probation and disqualification policies; to provide enrollment 
certifications on student request, including transcripts of academic records, to the Veterans Adminis- 
tration and other purposes; to certify the completion of degree and credential requirements; to 
review petitions for exceptions to academic regulations; and to provide information about these 
programs and services. 

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES AND POLICIES 

Requirements for admission to California State University, Fullerton are in accordance with Title 5, 
Chapter 1, Subchapter 3, of the California Administrative Code. A prospective applicant who is 
unsure of his or her status under these requirements is encouraged to consult a high school or college 
counselor or the admissions office. Applications may be obtained from the admissions office at any 
of the campuses of The California State University and Colleges or at any California high school or 
community college. 

Undergraduate Application Procedures 

Prospective undergraduates, whether applying for part-time or full-time programs of study, in day 
or evening classes, must file within the appropriate filing period, a complete application including 
all the required forms and fees as described in the application booklet. The S25 nonrefundable 
application fee should be in the form of a check or money order payable to The California State 
University and Colleges. Undergraduate applicants may file only at their first choice campus. Alterna- 
tive choice campuses and majors may be indicated on the application, but applicants should list as 
alternative campuses only those campuses of The California State University and Colleges that they 
will attend if the first choice campus cannot accommodate them. Generally, an alternative major 
will be considered at the first choice campus before an application is redirected to an alternative 
choice campus. Applicants will be considered automatically at the alternative choice campus if the 
first choice campus cannot accommodate them. Transcripts and other supporting documents should 
not be submitted until requested by the campus. 

Postbaccalaureate and Graduate Application Procedures 

All applicants for any type of postbaccalaureate or graduate status (e.g., master's degree applicants, 
those seeking credentials, and those interested in taking courses for personal or professional growth) 
must file, within the appropriate filing period, a complete application including all of the required 
forms and fees described in the application booklet. Postbaccalaureate applicants who completed 
undergraduate degree requirements and graduated the preceding term are also required to complete 
and submit an application and the $25 nor efundable fee. Since applicants for postbaccalaureate 
programs may be limited to the choice of a single campus on each application, redirection to 
alternative campuses or later changes of campus choice will be minimal. In the event that a 
postbaccalaureate applicant wishes to be assured of initial consideration by more than one campus, 
it is necessary to submit a separate application (including fee) to each. 


Admissions Procedures 41 


Postbaccalaureate applicants seeking second baccalaureates are considered undergraduate appli- 
cants for purposes of application and admission procedures, categories, and quotas. 

Application materials may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records or the Graduate 
Studies Office of any of The California State University and Colleges. 

Admission Categories and Quotas; Impacted Programs 

Admission quotas have been established by some campuses, in some majors, where the number 
of applicants is expected to exceed campus resources. At Fullerton, categories have been established 
for students who are: first-time freshmen; freshmen and sophomore undergraduate transfer appli- 
cants; junior and senior undergraduate transfer applicants; special program applicants; hardship 
applicants; and foreign students. Also, there is a quota for some graduate level programs. 

After admission and enrollment, requests for change to a different (i.e., a new) academic objective 
involving established admission categories and quotas will be evaluated following policies and 
procedures parallel to those for new students. 

Impacted programs are those in which applications received in the first month of the filing period 
exceed the total spaces available, either locally (at an individual campus) or systemwide. You must 
make application for an impacted program during the first month of the filing period and may file 
more than one application and fee. Nonresidents, foreign or domestic, usually are not considered 
for admission to impacted programs. 

High school and community college counselors are advised before the opening of the fall filing 
period which programs will be impacted. Supplementary admission criteria are used to determine 
which applicants will be allocated space in impacted programs. 

Locally Impacted Programs 

In selecting first-time freshmen and lower division transfers with fewer than 12 transferable semester 
units, at least one-half of the available space will be reserved for the most highly qualified applicants 
based on previous academic performance as measured by the eligibility index. High school grade 
point averages based on grades earned in the final three years of high school exclusive of physical 
education and military science, as reported by applicants on the application, and test scores received 
by the campus no later than the end of the first month of the filing period will be used to compute 
the eligibility index. You should take the ACT or SAT test at the earliest date, although the inability 
of fall applicants to supply test scores by December 1 will not jeopardize admission priority. 
Remaining space may be allocated on the basis of self-declared grade point average or other criteria, 
details of which will be given applicants by the campuses. Applicants who cannot be accommodated 
will be considered at the same campus in an alternative major or redirected to an alternative campus 
where the program is not impacted. 

Systemwide Impacted Programs 

The supplementary admission criteria used by the individual campuses to screen applicants to 
systemwide impacted programs appear periodically in the Counselors' Digest and are sent to all 
applicants under consideration. Unlike unaccommodated applicants to locally impacted programs 
who may be redirected to another campus in the same major, unaccommodated applicants to 
systemwide impacted programs may not be redirected in the same major but may choose an 
alternative major either at the first choice campus or another campus. 

At the time of the preparation of this catalog, Fullerton had no impacted programs as defined in this 
section. 


42 Admissions Procedures 

How to Apply 

1 . Submit a completed application for admission within the announced filing period accompanied 
by the required application fee to: 

Office of Admissions and Records 
California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, California 92634 

2. Request required transcripts of record of all previous scholastic work from each school or 
college attended when asked to do so by the admissions office. The transcripts required at 
Fullerton are: 

— for undergraduate applicants with fewer than 56 transferable semester units — 

(a) the high school transcript, and 

(b) a transcript from each college or university attended. Undergraduate applicants for a 
teaching credential must submit two copies of the transcript from each college or 
university attended. 

— for undergraduates with 56 or more transferable semester units — 

(a) a transcript from each college or university attended. Applicants for a teaching creden- 
tial must submit two copies of the transcript from each college or university attended. 
— for graduates — 

(a) applicants for unclassified postbaccalaureate standing with no degree or credential 
objective must submit a transcript from the college or university where the baccalaure- 
ate was earned. Further, one transcript from other institutions attended is required as 
necessary so that the university has a complete record of the last 60 semester units 
attempted prior to enrollment at Fullerton. 

( b ) applicants for a master's degree or teaching credential, or both, must submit two copies 
of the transcript from each college or university attended. 

In addition, all students should have a personal set of college transcripts for advisement 
purposes. 

All transcripts must be received directly from the issuing institutions and become official 
records of the university; such transcripts therefore cannot be returned or reissued. Foreign 
language transcripts must be accompanied by certified English translations. 

3. All undergraduate students who have completed fewer than 56 semester or 84 quarter units 
of transferable work are required to submit scores from either one of two national testing 
programs before eligibility for admission to the university can be determined. This requirement 
does not affect undergraduate students who have previously attended Fullerton and who have 
submitted ACT or SAT scores at the time of their first admission. 

Registration forms and test dates for either test may be obtained from school or college 
counselors, from the address below, or from campus testing offices. For either test, submit the 
registration form and fee at least one month prior to the test date. 

ACT Address SA T Address 

American College Testing Program, Inc. College Entrance Examination Board 

Registration Unit, P.O. Box 414 P.O. Box 592 

Iowa City, Iowa 52240 Princeton, New Jersey 08541 

Applicants to classified graduate curricula must submit the scores of any qualifying examina- 
tions required in their prospective programs of study. 

Application Filing Periods 


Terms 

Fall 

Spring 


Filing Period Begins 
The previous November 
The previous August 


Filing Period Duration 
Until application 
quotas are filled 


Freshman Admission Requirements 43 


Space Reservations 

Applicants who can be accommodated will receive space reservation notices. Space reservation 
notices are not statements of admission but are a commitment by Cal State Fullerton to admit the 
applicants who establish their eligibility for admission. The space reservations direct applicants to 
arrange to have appropriate records forwarded promptly to the admissions office. Applicants should 
not request that any records be forwarded until they have received a space reservation notice. Space 
reservation notices are mailed by the university to those who apply in November for fall terms in 
December, and to those who apply in August for spring terms in September. Applicants filing after 
initial filing periods will normally receive their notices within three weeks of the receipt of their 
applications. 

Space reservations may not be transferred to other terms or campuses. 

Hardship Petitions 

Each college or university has established procedures to consider qualified applicants who would 
be faced with an extreme hardship if not admitted. Prospective hardship petitioners should write 
to the director of admissions regarding specific policies governing hardship admission. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRST-TIME FRESHMEN 

Applicants who have completed no college work after high school graduation will be considered 
for admission as first-time freshmen under one of the following provisions. Results of either the CEEB 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing program examination (ACT) are 
acceptable in establishing eligibility. 

Exceptions: College credit earned concurrent with high school enrollment; college credit earned 
in summer session after high school and prior to regular matriculation in college; college credit 
granted for the CLEP or advanced placement programs, or military or DANTES courses; will not 
affect the applicant's status as first-time freshmen for application quota purposes as well as 
admission. Further, the accelerated student, who completes a high school program mid-year, who 
has applied to The California State University and Colleges for the following fall term, but chooses 
to attend a local community college in the spring term, will be considered a first-time freshman 
for application quota purposes as well as admission. All such college or advanced standing credit, 
if fully acceptable as transfer credit, will be granted after admission. 

California high school graduates or legal residents for tuition purposes must have a grade-point 
average and total score on the SAT, or composite score on the ACT, that together provide an 
eligibility index placing them in the upper one-third of California high school graduates. The mini- 
mum eligibility index for these applicants is 3,072 using the SAT or 741 using the ACT. 

High school graduates from other states or possessions who are nonresidents for tuition purposes 
must present an eligibility index that places them in the upper one-sixth of California high school 
graduates. The minimum eligibility index is 3,402 using the SAT or 826 using the ACT for such 
applicants. 

The eligibility index is computed either by multiplying the grade-point average by 800 and adding 
it to the total SAT score, or multiplying the grade-point average by 200 and adding it to 10 times 
the composite ACT score. Grade-point averages are based on work completed in the final three years 
of high school, exclusive of physical education and military science. 

As an alternative, the following table may be used to determine the eligibility of graduates of 
California high schools (or California legal residents) for freshman admission to a California State 
University or College. 


44 Freshman Admission Requirements 


ADMISSIONS TABLE FOR CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
OR CALIFORNIA LEGAL RESIDENTS 



ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 

GPA 

Score 

Score 

CPA 

Score 

Score 

CPA 

Score 

Score 

(— ) • 



2.80 

19 

832 

2.39 

27 

1160 

3.20 

11 

512 

2.79 

19 

840 

2.38 

27 

1168 

3.19 

11 

520 

2.78 

19 

848 

2.37 

27 

1176 

3.18 

11 

528 

2.77 

19 

856 

2.36 

27 

1184 

3.17 

11 

536 

2.76 

19 

864 

2.35 

28 

1193 

3.16 

11 

544 

2.75 

20 

872 

2.34 

28 

1200 

3.15 

12 

552 

2.74 

20 

880 

2.33 

28 

1208 

3.14 

12 

560 

2.73 

20 

888 

2.32 

28 

1216 

3.13 

12 

568 

2.72 

20 

8% 

2.31 

28 

1224 

3.12 

12 

576 

2.71 

20 

904 

2.30 

29 

1232 

3.11 

12 

584 

2.70 

21 

912 

2.29 

29 

1240 

3.10 

13 

592 

2.69 

21 

920 

2.28 

29 

1248 

3.09 

13 

600 

2.68 

21 

928 

2.27 

29 

1256 

3.08 

13 

608 

2.67 

21 

936 

2.26 

29 

1264 

3.07 

13 

616 

2.66 

21 

944 

2.25 

30 

1272 

3.06 

13 

624 

2.65 

22 

952 

2.24 

30 

1280 

3.05 

14 

632 

2.64 

22 

960 

2.23 

30 

1288 

3.04 

14 

640 

2.63 

22 

968 

2.22 

30 

12% 

3.03 

14 

648 

2.62 

22 

976 

2.21 

30 

1304 

3.02 

14 

656 

2.61 

22 

984 

2.20 

31 

1312 

3.01 

14 

664 

2.60 

23 

992 

2.19 

31 

1320 

3.00 

15 

672 

2.59 

23 

1000 

2.18 

31 

1328 

2.99 

15 

680 

2.58 

23 

1008 

2.17 

31 

1336 

2.98 

15 

688 

2.57 

23 

1016 

2.16 

31 

1344 

2.97 

15 

6% 

2.56 

23 

1024 

2.15 

32 

1352 

2.96 

15 

704 

2.55 

24 

1032 

2.14 

32 

1360 

2.95 

16 

712 

2.54 

24 

1040 

2.13 

32 

1368 

2.94 

16 

720 

2.53 

24 

1048 

2.12 

32 

1376 

2.93 

16 

728 

2.52 

24 

1056 

2.11 

33 

1384 

2.92 

16 

736 

2.51 

24 

1064 

2.10 

33 

1392 

2.91 

16 

744 

2.50 

25 

1072 

2.09 

33 

1400 

2.90 

17 

752 

2.49 

25 

1080 

2.08 

33 

1408 

289 

17 

760 

2.48 

25 

1088 

2.07 

33 

1416 

2.88 

17 

768 

2.47 

25 

10% 

2.06 

33 

1424 

2.87 

17 

776 

2.46 

25 

1104 

2.05 

34 

1432 

2.86 

17 

784 

2.45 

26 

1112 

2.04 

34 

1440 

2.85 

18 

792 

2.44 

26 

1120 

2.03 

34 

1448 

2.84 

18 

800 

2.43 

26 

1128 

2.02 

34 

1456 

2.83 

18 

808 

2.42 

26 

1136 

2.01 

34 

1464 

2.82 

18 

816 

2.41 

26 

1144 

2.00 

35 

1472 

2.81 

18 

824 

2.40 

27 

1152 

(-) t 




• Students earning grade-point averages above 3.20 are eligible for admission, 
f Students earning grade-point averages below 2.0 are not eligible for admission. 


Admission of Undergraduate Transfer Students 45 

Graduates of Secondary Schools in Foreign Countries 

Applicants who are graduates of foreign secondary schools must have preparation equivalent to that 
required of eligible California high school graduates. The university will carefuly review the previous 
record of all such applicants and only those with promise of academic success equivalent to that of 
eligible California high school graduates will be admitted. 

Non-High School Graduates 

Applicants over 18 years of age, but who have not graduated from high school, will be considered 
for admission as first-time freshmen only when preparation in all other ways is such that the university 
believes promise of academic success is equivalent to that of eligible California high school graduates. 

High School Students 

Students still enrolled in high school will be considered for enrollment in certain special programs, 
including summer session, if recommended by their principal and if in the judgment of the appropriate 
academic department and the Office of Admissions and Records their preparation is equivalent to that 
required of eligible California high school graduates. Such admission is only for a given course or 
program; continued enrollment is not automatic. 

Recommended Preparation 

Overall excellence of performance in high school subjects and a test score giving evidence of academic 
potential provide the best bases for predicting success at Cal State Fullerton. While no specific course 
pattern is required, all prospective freshmen are strongly encouraged to include the following subjects 
in their preparation for work at Cal State Fullerton: college preparatory English; another language; 
mathematics including at least one year of algebra; laboratory science; history or social science (or 
both); and study in speech, music, art and other subjects contributing to a well-rounded academic 
background. Students who anticipate intensive study in science are urged to take four years of 
mathematics and three years of foreign language in high school. 

In addition to the foregoing general recommendations for preparation for university studies, the 
members of the faculty in certain departments have made further specific recommendations for those 
considering majoring in the following fields of study. 

Business Administration: A minimum of three years of mathematics including a second course in 
algebra; four years strongly encouraged. 

Elementary Credential Candidates. Algebra, geometry, one year of natural science recommended. 
Engineering: Algebra (two years), geometry, trigonometry, and one year of chemistry. One year of 
physics, and additional mathematics are desirable. Also, foreign languages are desirable, but not 
required. 

English: A minimum of four years of English courses, each course emphasizing basic elements of essay 
writing, two courses joining composition work to the analysis and interpretation of literature. 
Foreign Language: Up to five years in the proposed language of study. 

Mathematics: Four years of mathematics including geometry, trigonometry, and two years of algebra. 
Religious Studies: A minimum of three years of English, four years strongly encouraged. Comparative 
religion or the Bible as English literature if offered. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE 
TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for admission as undergraduate transfers in good standing at the last institution attended 
will be considered for admission under one of the following provisions: 

1. they were eligible for admission in freshman standing (see first-time freshman requirements) 
and have earned an average grade of C (2.0 on a scale where A equals 4.0) or better in all 
transferable college units attempted; or 

2. they have completed at least 56 transferable semester units or 84 transferable quarter units with 
an average grade of C (2.0 on a scale where A equals 4.0) or better if a California resident. 
Nonresidents must have a grade-point average of 2.4 or better. 

The California community college transfer student should consult the community college counseling 
office for information on transferability of courses. 


46 Admission of Postbaccalaureate and Graduate Students 


Other Applicants 

Applicants not admissible under one of the above provisions should enroll in a community college 
or other appropriate institution. Only under the most unusual circumstances, and then only by 
special action, will such applicants be permitted to enroll in the university. 


SPECIAL NOTICE TO ALL FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE APPLICANTS 

All students admitted as freshmen or sophomores, with fewer than 56 transferable semester 
units, are required to take The California State University and Colleges English Placement Test. 
The results of this test do not affect admissions eligibility. The results will be used, however, 
to provide information to the university and to students to aid in the selection of courses in 
writing skills and to prepare for the graduation requirement in writing. The Office of Admissions 
and Records will mail announcements about the test to eligible freshmen and sophomores. 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR POSTBACCALAUREATE 
AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Postbaccalaureate Standing. Unclassified. 

For admission to unclassified post baccalaureate standing, applicants must: hold an acceptable 
baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting association or have 
completed equivalent academic preparation as determined by an appropriate campus authority; 
have attained a grade point of at least 2.5 (on a five-point scale) in the last 60 semester (90 quarter) 
units attempted; and have been in good standing at the last college attended. 

Applicants ineligible for admission under these provisions may be admitted by special action if on 
the basis of acceptable evidence they are judged by appropriate university authority to possess 
sufficient academic, professional or other potential pertinent to their educational objectives to merit 
such action. 

Admission to a California State University or College with postbaccalaureate unclassified standing 
does not constitute admission to graduate degree curricula. 

Postbaccalaureate Standing. Classified. 

Applicants eligible for admission to a California State University or College in unclassified standing 
may be admitted to classified postbaccalaureate standing for the purpose of enrolling in a particular 
postbaccalaureate credential or certificate program; provided, that such additional professional, 
personal, scholastic, and other standards, including qualifying examinations, as may be prescribed 
for the particular program by the appropriate campus authority are satisfied. 

Graduate Standing. Conditionally Classified. 

Applicants eligible for admission to a California State University or College under unclassified 
postbaccalaureate standards above, but who have deficiencies in prerequisite preparation that in the 
opinion of the appropriate campus authority can be met by specified additional preparation, includ- 
ing qualifying examinations, may be admitted to authorized graduate degree curricula with condi- 
tionally classified graduate standing. 

Graduate Standing. Classified. 

Applicants eligible for admission to a California State University or College in unclassified or condi- 
tionally classified standing may be admitted to authorized graduate degree curricula of the campus 
as classified graduate students if they satisfactorily meet the professional, personal, scholastic or 
other standards for admission to graduate degree curricula, including qualifying examinations, as the 
appropriate campus authority may prescribe. Only those applicants who show promise of success 
and fitness will be admitted to graduate degree curricula, and only those who continue to demon- 
strate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and fitness shall be eligible to proceed in such 
curricula. 


Readmission of Former Students 47 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS FROM OTHER 
COUNTRIES 

Normally, the university accepts for consideration only two categories of applicants from other 
countries: 

1 . those who have completed, with a good academic record, a two-year program in an accredited 
institution of higher education; or 

2. those who have completed a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, with a good academic record, 
in an accredited institution and wish to enroll as graduate students. 

Persons applying from their home countries are normally considered for admission to the fall 
semester only. Those transferring from U.S. institutions may apply to the fall or spring semesters. 
All applicants whose native language is other than English are required to present a satisfactory score 
on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants should obtain the TOEFL Bulletin 
of Information and registration forms well in advance. Copies of this bulletin and registration forms 
are often available at American embassies and consulates, offices of the United States Information 
Service, United States educational commissions and foundations abroad, bi-national centers, and 
several private organizations. Those who cannot obtain locally a TOEFL Bulletin of Information 
should write to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S. A. 08541 . 
Application procedures in other respects are the same as for other students, except that transcripts 
of educational documents in languages other than English must be accompanied by translations into 
English certified by independent agencies. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SUMMER SESSION 
STUDENTS 

Although the quality of the program and most of the course offerings are the same as in the regular 
session, the university does not require an advance application or transcripts from students register- 
ing for credit courses in the summer session. Students normally must be high school graduates, 
however, and are expected to have satisfied the prerequisites for the courses in which they register. 
In addition, students are expected to file a request to register in the summer session. Admission to 
summer session does not grant admission to the regular session. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student previously enrolled in the university, planning to return after an absence of more than one 
semester, must file a new application for admission. A student absent for one semester, and who 
enrolls elsewhere in the interim, must also file an application for readmission. Unless a leave of 
absence was granted, catalog requirements at the time of readmission will apply. Please see the 
"Stop-Out Policy" section in the regulations subchapter of this catalog for further information on 
applications for readmission. 

Former Students in Good Standing 

A student who left the university in good standing will be readmitted provided any academic work 
attempted elsewhere since the last attendance does not change his or her scholastic status. Tran- 
scripts of the record of any work attempted in the interim are required. 

Former Students Who Were on Probation 

A student on probation at the close of the last enrollment will be readmitted on probation provided 
he or she is otherwise eligible. The student must furnish transcripts of any college work taken during 
the absence. 

Former Students Who Were Disqualified 

The readmission of a previously disqualified student is by special action only. Ordinarily the univer- 
sity will consider an application for reinstatement only after the student has remained absent for a 
minimum of one year following disqualification and has fulfilled all recommended conditions. In 
every instance, readmission action is based on evidence, including transcripts of study completed 
elsewhere after disqualification, that in the judgment of the university warrants such action. If 
readmitted, the student is placed on scholastic probation. 


48 Genera! Information About Admission 


GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ADMISSION AND 
EVALUATIONS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Records Retention 

The university retains the admissions materials for those who apply but who for whatever reason 
do not enroll for two years. For those who do enroll the university will retain the materials in student 
folders, including transcripts of the record of work completed elsewhere, for five years beyond the 
date of last attendance. 

Records of academic performance at California State University, Fullerton, including individual 
student records, faculty grade lists, and graduation lists are kept permanently. 

Determination of Residence 

New and returning students of The California State University and Colleges are classified for the 
purpose of determining the residence of each student for nonresident tuition purposes. The residence 
questionnaire and, if necessary, other evidence furnished by the student are used in making these 
determinations. A student may not register and enroll in classes until the residence questionnaire has 
been received by the admissions office. 

The following statement of the rules regarding residency determination for nonresident tuition 
purposes is not a complete discussion of the law, but a summary of the principal rules and their 
exceptions. The law governing residence determination for tuition purposes by The California State 
University and Colleges is found in the Education Code, Sections 68000-68090, 90403, 89705- 
89707.5 and 68122, 68124, and 68121, and in Title 5 of the California Administrative Code, Article 
4 (commencing with Section 41901 ) of Subchapter 5 of Chapter 1, Part V. A copy of the statutes 
and regulations is available for inspection at the campus admissions office. 

Legal residence may be established by an adult who is physically present in the state while, at the 
same time, intending to make California his or her permanent home. Steps must be taken at least 
one year prior to the residence determination date to evidence the intent to make California the 
permanent home with concurrent relinquishment of the prior legal residence. Some of the relevant 
indications of an intention to establish and maintain California residence are registering to vote and 
voting in elections in California; satisfying resident California state income tax obligations on total 
income, ownership of residential property or continuous occupancy or letting of an apartment on 
a lease basis where one's permanent belongings are kept; maintaining active resident memberships 
in California professional or social organizations; maintaining California vehicle plates and operator's 
license; maintining active savings and checking accounts in California banks; and maintaining perma- 
nent military address and home of record in California if one is in the military service. 

The student within the state for educational purposes only does not gain the status of resident 
regardless of the length of the stay in California. 

In general, the unmarried minor (a person under 18 years of age) derives legal residence from his 
or her parents, or, in the case of permanent separation of the parents, from the parent with whom 
the minor maintains the place of abode. The residence of a minor cannot be changed by act of the 
minor or that of the minor's guardian, so long as the minor's parents are living. 

A man or a woman may establish his or her residence; marriage is not a governing factor. 

The general rule is that a student must have been a California resident for at least one year 
immediately preceding the residence determination date in order to qualify as a resident student for 
tuition purposes. At the Fullerton campus, the residence determination date for fall terms is Septem- 
ber 20, and for spring terms is January 25. 

There are several exceptions for nonresident tuition. Some of the exceptions provide for: 

1 . Persons below the age of 19 whose parents were residents of California but who left the state 
while the student was still a minor. When the minor reaches age 18, the exception continues 
for one year to enable the student to qualify as a resident student. 

2. Persons below the age of 19 who have been present in California for more than a year before 
the residence determination date, and entirely self-supporting for that period of time. 

3. Persons below the age of 19 who have lived with and been under the continuous direct care 
and control of an adult, not a parent, for the two years immediately preceding the residence 
determination date. Such adult must have been a California resident for the most recent year. 

4. Dependent children and spouses of persons in active military service stationed in California 
on the residence determination date. This exception applies only for the minimum time 


General Information About Admission 49 


required for the student to obtain California residence and maintain that residence for a year. 
The exception, once attained, is not affected by transfer of the military person directly to a 
post outside the 50 states and the District of Columbia. 

5. Military personnel in active service stationed in California on the residence determination date 
for purposes other than education at state-supported institutions of higher education. This 
exception applies only for the minimum time required for the student to obtain California 
residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

6. A student who is an adult alien is entitled to residence classification if the student has been 
lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence in accordance with all applica- 
ble provisions of the laws of the United States; provided, however, that the student has had 
residence in California for more than one year after such admission prior to the residence 
determination date. A student who is a minor alien shall be entitled to residence classification 
if both the student and the parent from whom residence is derived have been lawfully 
admitted to the United States for permanent residence in accordance with all applicable laws 
of the United States, provided that the parent has had residence in California for more than 
one year after acquiring such permanent residence prior to the residence determination date 
of the term for which the student proposes to attend the university. 

7. Certain refugees and certain alien graduates of California public high schools. 

8. Certain credentialed, full-time employees of school districts. 

9. Full-time California State University and Colleges employees and their children and spouses. 
This exception applies only for the minimum time required for the student to obtain California 
residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

10. Certain exchange students. 

11. Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employees, who were 
California residents, and who were killed in the course of law enforcement or fire suppression 
duties. 

12. A person in continuous full-time attendance at an institution who had resident classification 
on May 1, 1973, shall not lose such classification as a result of adoption of the uniform student 
residency law on which this statement is based, until the attainment of the degree for which 
currently enrolled. 

Any student, following a decision on the residence classification, may request a review of the 
decision by the dean of admissions and records. Following a final decision on the Fullerton campus, 
the student may make written appeal to the Office of General Counsel, 400 Golden Shore, Long 
Beach, CA 90802, within 1 20 calendar days of notification of the final decision on campus of the 
classification. The Office of General Counsel may make a decision on the issue, or it may send the 
matter back to Fullerton with instructions for further review. Students classified incorrectly as 
residents or incorrectly granted an exception from nonresident tuition are subject to reclassification 
as nonresidents and payment of nonresident tuition in arrears. If incorrect classification results from 
false or concealed facts, the student is subject to discipline pursuant to Section 41301 of Title 5 of 
the California Administrative Code. Resident students who become nonresidents, and nonresident 
students qualifying for exceptions whose basis for so qualifying changes, must immediately notify 
the admissions office. Applications for a change in classification with respect to a previous term are 
not accepted. 

This summation of rules regarding residency determination is by no means a complete explanation 
of their meaning. Changes may have been made in the rate of nonresident tuition, in the statutes, 
and in the regulations between the time this cetalog is published and the relevant residence determi- 
nation date. 

Admission to Credential Programs 

Admission to the university as a student does not constitute admission to the teaching credential 
program. Students who plan to work toward teaching credentials must apply to the Division of 
Teacher Education following procedures available from the division. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student admitted to the university for a given semester but who does not register in the specified 
semester will have the admission canceled. The student must file a new application form when again 
seeking admission and must follow the complete application procedure and meet the then current 
admission requirements. 


50 General Information About Admission 


Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshman and transfer students who have demonstrated 
outstanding achievement in past academic work. For first-time freshmen with no previous college 
units earned, a grade point of 3.5 on a five-point scale must be earned in the course work considered 
for admission to the university. Students who have completed fewer than 56 transferable semester 
units of credit must meet the grade-point average criteria for first-time freshmen and must also have 
earned a 3.5 grade-point average on all college work attempted. Students who have completed 56 
or more transferable semester units are eligible if a grade-point average of 3.5 is earned in all college 
work completed. 

Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

The Office of Admissions and Records will evaluate previous college work in relation to the require- 
ments of Fullerton. All degree candidates will be issued a credit summary during the first semester 
of attendance which serves as a basis for determining remaining requirements for the student's 
specific objectives. 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as long as the student enrolls at the date 
specified, pursues the objective specified, and remains in continuous attendance. The student will 
not be held to additional graduation requirements unless such requirements become mandatory as 
a result of changes in the California Administrative Code or the California Education Code. If the 
student does not remain in continuous attendance and has not applied for and been granted a formal 
leave of absence, the evaluation issued upon readmission will specify the remaining requirements 
for the student's objectives. 

In view of the foregoing regulations, the student should notify the Office of Admissions and Records 
immediately of a change in the objective specified in the evaluation. While the evaluation for a 
student remains valid, the student is held responsible for complying with all changes in regulations 
and procedures which may appear in subsequent catalogs. 

Acceptance of Credit 

Credit for work completed at accredited institutions, other than course work identified by such 
institutions as remedial or in other ways as being nontransferable, will be accepted toward the 
satisfaction of degree and credential requirements at the university within limitations of residence 
requirements and community college transfer maximums. 

Transfer of Credit From a Community College 

Upper division credit is not allowed for courses taken in a community college. Credential credit is 
not allowed for courses in professional education taken in a community college. This does not 
invalidate credit for preprofessional courses taken at a community college, such as introduction to 
education, art or design, arithmetic, or music for classroom teachers. After a student has completed 
70 units of college credit at a community college, no further community college units may be 
accepted for unit credit. 

Credit for Military Service 

Students who have been in active military service for at least one year may be granted six units of 
undergraduate credit. Courses taken in service schools may be given credit on the basis of an 
evaluation which determines that they are of university level. Any credit for military experience will 
be given only upon request. Records verifying such experience must be filed with the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence and extension courses which may be 
allowed toward the bachelor's degree is 24 units, if otherwise applicable. 

Credit by Advanced Placement 

Students who have successfully completed courses in the advanced placement program of the 
College Entrance Examination Board (defined as receiving a score of 3, 4 or 5) shall normally be 
granted six units of credit for each advanced placement course toward graduation, advanced 
placement in the university's sequence of courses, and credit for curriculum requirements. 


General Information About Admission 51 


Advanced Placement 

Equivalent 

Semester 

Course 

Course: CSUF 

Units 

American History 

History 170A,B 

6 

Art History 

Art 201 B 

3-6* 

Studio Art 

Art 103 or 104 

Art 107 A or 107B 


Biology 

Biological Science 101 

5 ** 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 120A.B 
(lecture) 

6 *•* 

English 

English 100 or 103 

3 


English 110, 111, or 112 

3 

European History 

History 110A,B 

6 

French 

French 101, 102 

10 

German 

German 101, 102 

10 

Latin 4 

Latin 101 

3 

Latin 5 

Latin 101, 102 

6 

Mathematics A & B 

Mathematics 150A 

4 

Mathematics B & C 

Mathematics 150A,B 

8 

Physics 

Physics 21 1 A,B 

6 

Spanish 

Spanish 101, 102 

10 


College Level Examination Program 

The university shall accept three semester units of credit for each of the following College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP) examinations, subject to achievement of the scores indicated, pro- 
vided the examination was not taken previously within one calendar year and that degree credit has 
not been granted for previous course work at the equivalent or at a more advanced level than for 
the examination in question. 


Examination 

Mathematics General Exam (1975 edition) 
College Algebra-Trigonometry 
Introductory Calculus (including essay) 
Statistics (including essay) 

General Chemistry 


Passing score 

50 (on both parts of the examination) 
49 

48 

49 
48 


Fullerton may grant additional credit and advanced standing based upon CLEP examination results 
using as minimum standards: 


General Examinations 

1 . That the student achieve a score at or above the 50th percentile, college sophomore norms. 

2. That no unit credit be granted for any test in the general examinations, but that six units of 
general education requirements be waived for each test completed with the appropriate score. 

Subject Examinations 

1 . That the student submit a score at or above the 50th percentile of those in the norming group 
who earned a mark of C or better. 

2. That equivalency to Fullerton courses be determined by the appropriate academic department 
in conjunction with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

3. That university credit shall have not been previously earned in the courses in question. 

In no case will credit so awarded count towards residence credit. 


English Equivalency Examination 

Students passing the California State University and Colleges English Equivalency Examination shall 
be awarded six semester units of credit provided credit has not been granted previously at the 
equivalent or at more advanced levels. Further, those who pass this optional examination are exempt 
from the requirement to take the English Placement Test. 

* Consult the Department of Art for applicability of advanced placement examination credit 
** Consult the Department of Biological Sciences for applicability of advanced placement examination credit. 

***To complete the requirement for Chemistry 101A, B, the student must successfully complete four units of Chemistry 
101 A and 101 B laboratory at Cal State Fullerton. 


52 General Information About Admission 

Science/ Mathematics Equivalency Examinations 

Students may receive credit by examination in general mathematics, algebra-trigonometry, calculus- 
analytic geometry, statistics, chemistry, biology, and calculus by passing California State University 
and Colleges approved examinations. Each test offers those who pass three semester units of credit, 
provided credit has not previously been granted at the equivalent or at more advanced levels. 


Semester 


Examination 


Equivalent Course 


Units 


General Biology 
General Chemistry 
Algebra-T rigonometry 
Statistics 
Calculus 

General Mathematics 


Biological Science 101 


3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 


Chemistry 100 


Mathematics 100 
Mathematics 120 
Mathematics 130 
Elective credit in 


mathematics 


53 


REGISTRATION 


Orientation 

Various opportunities are provided for new students to obtain information relating to academic 
programs, student services and activities, and other aspects of university life. Information about 
specific programs will be published separately. 

Registration 

Class Schedule: A complete listing of courses offered will be found in the class schedule published 
prior to the start of each semester. This publication, which may be purchased in the Titan Bookstore, 
also states detailed information pertaining to the semester including class enrollment and fee pay- 
ment procedures. 

It is important that students familiarize themselves not only with the academic policies stated in this 
catalog but also with the requirements and procedures in the class schedule as both are used in the 
selection of classes for the semester. 

Registration: Registration is made up of two steps — class enrollment and fee payment, and may be 
accomplished through early registration by mail, walk-through registration in the week preceding the 
first day of instruction, or through late registration during the first two weeks of instruction. Most 
students should find early registration by mail advantageous. 

At registration, every student is required to file a study program with the Office of Admissions and 
Records. The filing of a program by the student and its acceptance by the university obligates the 
student to perform the designated work to the best of his or her ability. It is emphasized that 
registration does not become official until all fees have been paid. 

Computerized Records System 

The student records system, including the registration process, is computer based. This means that 
records and reports are produced from files maintained in the university computer center. It is a fact 
of life in a large institution such as Fullerton that use of the computer is essential. Thus, there is a 
requirement for data cards, code numbers, student file numbers and for meeting precise criteria for 
recording data, which introduces an element of the impersonal in the student records system. 
Despite these conditions, every effort is made to provide courteous, efficient and personalized 
service to students and the entire university community. To assist in providing this service, students 
are urged to be extremely careful and accurate in preparing forms, especially the official program 
and change of program forms. Accurate preparation of information will assure each student of 
error-free records. 

Controlled Entry Classes 

In general, all courses listed in the semester class schedule shall be available to all matriculated 
students except for appropriate academic restrictions as stated in the catalog. These restrictions, 
including special qualifications and other academic limitations, on class entry shall be published in 
the class schedule as appropriate footnotes to the designated class or class section and shall be 
consistent with the catalog. 

Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be announced in the class schedule. Late registrants 
will find themselves handicapped in arranging their programs and must pay a $5 late registration fee 
in addition to regular fees. 

Changes in Program 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses listed at registration. Changes may not be 
made thereafter without the filing of a change of program (add-drop) form in the Office of 
Admissions and Records following procedures announced in the class schedule. 

Failure to file an official change of program request in the case of dropped classes may result in a 
Penalty mark being recorded. Through the fourth week of instruction in the semester no record of 
enrollment is made of dropped classes. After four weeks students are expected to complete all 


54 Fee Schedule 


courses in which they are enrolled. However, for reasons of ill health or reasons involving other 
serious and unforeseen problems, the student may drop a class or classes and receive a W (With- 
drawal) by obtaining the approvals involved and filing the change with the registrar. 

No classes may be dropped during the last three weeks of instruction, although complete withdrawal 
from the university is possible. 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the university may enroll concurrently for additional courses at another 
institution only with advance written approval from the student's academic adviser on official forms 
filed in the Office of Admissions and Records. Permission will not be granted when the study load 
in the proposed combined program of study exceeds the units authorized at this university. 

Enrollment at Other CSUC Campuses 

Fullerton students may enroll at other campuses of The California State University and Colleges either 
while concurrently enrolled at Fullerton or as visitors. There are certain eligibility requirements and 
enrollment conditions that may be met, including completion of at least one semester at Fullerton 
and being in good academic standing. Information and application forms may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 

Auditors 

A properly qualified student may enroll in classes as an auditor. The student must meet the regular 
university admission requirements and must pay the same fees as other students. See the description 
of Audit in the "Administrative Symbols" section of this catalog. 

Handicapped Students 

Students physically handicapped who require assistance should consult the Handicapped Student 
Services Center prior to the announced semester registration period so that special arrangements for 
them can be made. 


VETERANS 

California State University, Fullerton is approved by the Bureau of School Approvals, State Depart- 
ment of Education, to offer programs to veterans seeking benefits under state and federal legislation. 
All students seeking veterans' benefits must have a degree or credential objective. 

Applications for benefits should be filed well in advance of the semester in which the veteran plans 
to use these benefits to have the authorization at the time of registration. 

RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS 

California State University, Fullerton does not have a Reserve Officer Training Corps program. 
However, through arrangements with Loyola Marymount University; the University of California, 
Los Angeles; and the University of Southern California, two-, three- and four-year Air Force Reserve 
Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) programs and scholarships are available to all qualified under- 
graduate students of the university. 

Further, in cooperation with the University of California, Los Angeles; California State University, 
Long Beach; and The Claremont Colleges, Army ROTC programs and scholarships are available to 
Fullerton students at these three institutions. Academic units earned in these programs are counted 
as elective credit towards the baccalaureate. Additional information may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 

SCHEDULE OF FEES, 1979-80 

Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California. The following are the fees and nonresident 
tuition currently assessed. At the time of publication of this catalog the schedule of fees for 1980-81 
had not been established. The 1980-81 schedule of fees will be published in the class schedule for 
that year. 


Fee Schedule 55 


All Students 

Application fee (nonrefundable) 

Payable by check or money order at time application is made $25 

Student services fee Semester 

0 to 6.0 units $57 

6.1 or more units 72 

Facilities fee 3 

Associated Students fee 10 

University Union fee 18 

Instructional^ related activity fee 5 

Nonresident and Foreign Visa Students 

Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees charged all students) 

15 or more units, maximum per semester $900 

Fewer than 15 units, per unit 60 

Per academic year 1,800 

Summer Session 

Course fee per unit $39 

Associated Students fee 3 

University Union fee 5 

Extension Fees 

Per unit $37 

Other Fees or Charges 

Campus service card $2 

Late registration fee (in addition to other fees listed above) 5 

Check returned from bank for any cause 10 

Transcript fee 1 

Graduation and diploma fee 7 

Failure to meet administratively required appointment or time limit 2 

Auditors pay the same fees as others. 


Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of The California State University and Colleges without 
advance notice. 

Alan Pattee Scholars 

Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employees, who were California 
residents and who were killed in the course of law enforcement or fire suppression duties, are not 
charged fees or tuition of any kind at any California state university or college, according to the Alan 
Pattee Scholarship Act, Education Code Section 23762. Students qualifying for these benefits are 
known as Alan Pattee scholars. For further information, get in touch with the dean of admissions 
and records, who determines eligibility. 

Waiver of Fees 

Section 10652 of the California Education Code provides for the waiver of certain fees other than 
nonresident tuition, for certain veterans' dependents. Those who meet one or more of the following 
criteria should present to the university registrar a certificate of eligibility obtained from the Division 
of Educational Assistance, California Department of Veterans Affairs, on or before the date of 
registration. 

A. Widows or dependents of deceased veterans killed in action or because of a service-connected 
disability who have resided in California for five years immediately preceding application. Also 
covers wives of totally disabled veterans and dependents of prisoners of war and of those missing 
in action. Dependents must apply between the ages of 16 and 21. Benefits for dependents are 
terminated at completion of education or age 27, whichever comes first. 

B. Children of veterans who have service-connected disabilities and whose annual income not 
including governmental compensation for such service-connected disability does not exceed 
$5,000. 

C. Children of veterans killed in action or because of a service-connected disability, where the 
annual income of such children, including the value of any support received from parents and 
the annual income of surviving parents, does not exceed $5,000. No limitations on age or length 
of residency. 


56 Fee Schedule 


Refund of Fees 

Fees may be refunded only as authorized by Sections 41802, 41803, and 41913 of Title 5, California 
Administrative Code. Whether a fee may be refunded and the circumstances under which a fee or 
any part of a fee may be refunded, vary depending on the particular fee involved. Requirements 
governing refund may include such matters as the reason for seeking a refund (for example, death, 
disability), the number of days of instruction that have elapsed before application for refund is made 
(for example, requests for refund of student services fees, student body organization fees, and 
student body center fees must be made no later than 14 days following the commencement of 
instruction and requests for refund of extension course tuition fees must be made prior to the fourth 
meeting of the class), and the degree to which the campus has provided the services for which the 
fee has been charged. Details concerning the fees which may be refunded, the circumstances under 
which fees may be refunded, and the appropriate procedure to be followed in seeking a refund may 
be obtained from the registrar. 


Parking Fees 

Semester pass (nonreserved spaces): 

Regular and limited students (4-wheeled vehicle) $18.00 

Regular and limited students (2-wheeled vehicle) 4.50 

Coin operated gate per exit 50 

Summer session (4-wheeled vehicle) 12.00 

Summer session (2-wheeled vehicle) 3.00 


Typical Student Fxpenses 

Typical school year budgets for California residents living at home or making other housing arrange- 
ments will vary widely. It is estimated that, including a $2,600 yearly allowance for room and board, 
the cost will approximate $4,000 for an unmarried person. Nonresident students must also allow for 
nonresident tuition. 

The Student Services Fee 

The student services fee was established in 1975 by the Board of Trustees of The California State 
University and Colleges in lieu of the materials and service fee. The student services fee provides 
financing for the following student services not covered by state funding. 

1 . Social and Cultural development Activities. Provides for the coordination of various student 
activities, student organizations, student government and cultural programs. 

2. Counseling. Includes the cost of counselors' salaries and clerical support, plus operating 
expenses and equipment. 

3. Testing. Covers the cost of test officers, psychometrists, clerical support, operating expenses, 
and equipment. 

4. Placement. Provides career information to students and faculty for academic program plan- 
ning and employment information to graduates and students. 

5. Financial Aids Administration. Includes the cost of the counseling and business services 
provided in connection with the financial aid programs. 

6. Health Services. Provides health services to students and covers the cost of salaries of 
medical officers and nurses and related clerical and technical personnel, as well as operating 
expenses and equipment. 

7. Housing. Supports personnel who provide housing information and monitor housing services 
available to students. 

8. Student Services Administration. Covers 50 percent of the cost of the office of the dean of 
student services, which has responsibility for the overall administration of student services. 

Procedure for the Establishment of the Associated Students Fee 
The law governing The California State University and Colleges provides that a student body fee, 
not to exceed $20 per academic year may be established by student referendum with the approval 
of two-thirds of those students voting. The Associated Students fee was established at California State 
University, Fullerton by student referendum in December 1959. The same fee can be abolished by 
a similar two-thirds approval of students voting on a referendum called for by a petition signed by 
20 percent of the regularly enrolled students ( Education Code, Section 89300). The level of the fee 
is set by the chancellor upon recommendation by the university. The Associated Students fee 


A verage Annual Costs and Sources of Funds 57 

supports a variety of cultural and recreational programs, child care centers and special student 
support programs. 

AVERAGE ANNUAL COSTS AND SOURCES OF FUNDS 

PER FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENT 

The 19 campuses and the Chancellor's Office of The California State University and Colleges are 
financed primarily through funding provided by the taxpayers of California. Including capital outlay, 
the CSUC 1978-79 budget totals $840 million. Approximately $815 million of the $840 million total 
has been budgeted to provide support for a projected 237,080 full-time equivalent (FTE*) students. 
Excluding capital outlay, the average cost per FTE student is $3,441 per year. Of this amount, the 
average student pays $312. Included in this average student payment is the amount paid by nonresi- 
dent students. The remaining $3,129 in costs are funded by state and federal taxes. 

Averages do not fit all students alike or even any specific student. To arrive at an average figure that 
is meaningful, the costs outlined above exclude "user fees" for living expenses, housing, and parking, 
as well as costs for extension and summer session work. Computations are based on full-time 
equivalent students, not individuals, and costs are prorated by system totals, not by campus. The 
average costs for a full-time equivalent student in the system are shown in the following chart: 


TOTAL 1978-79 CSUC BUDGET 
(PROJECTED ENROLLMENT: 237,080 FTE) 


Funding Average Cost 

Source Amount Per Student (FTE) * Percentage 

State appropriation (support) $695,340,533° $2,933 85.2 

Student charge 73,970,331 31 2* • 9.1 

Federal (financial aids) 46,458,850 196 5.7 

State funding (capital outlay) 23,873,000 M * * 

Total $839,642,714 $3,441 100.0 


* This amount will be reduced by the CSUC share of the statewide budget reductions required by Budget 

Act, Section 27.1 (a statewide reduction of $42.4 million in operating expense and equipment), and 
Section 27.2 (a statewide reduction of $54 million in personal services pursuant to the hiring freeze) . 

• For budgetary purposes, full-time equivalent (FTE) translates total individual enrollment into total 

academic student load. The term assumes that a full-time student in The California State University 
and Colleges is enrolled for 15 units of academic credit. Some students enroll for more than 15 units; 
some students enroll for fewer than 15 units. 

** The average costs paid by a student include the student services fee, health facilities fee, college union 
fee, student body fee, and nonresident tuition. This amount is derived by taking the total of all student 
fees and dividing by the total full-time equivalent student enrollment. Individual students may pay 
more or less than $312 depending on whether they are part-time, full-time, resident or nonresident 
students. 

*** Not included in the average cost per student (FTE) and percentage columns. The estimated replace- 
ment cost of all the system’s permanent facilities and equipment on the 19 campuses is currently 
valued at $2.6 billion, excluding the cost of land. 


58 


RECORDS AND REGULATIONS 


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

Each student is responsible for meeting the requirements printed in the university catalog and all 
published regulations of the university. 

The university establishes certain academic policies and requirements which must be met before a 
degree is granted. These include major and unit requirements and prerequisites. While advisers, 
directors, deans and faculty will provide a student with information and advice, responsibility for 
meeting these requirements rests with the student. Since failure to satisfy these requirements may 
result in the degree being withheld, it is important for each student to become thoroughly acquainted 
with all regulations. The catalog and the semester class schedule, available in the Titan Bookstore, 
are the best sources of information on current policy and regulations. 

The student also has the responsibility for securing the consent of the instructor before enrolling in 
a course with prerequisites that the student has not completed. 

To insure receipt of timely information and accurate grade reports from the university, each student 
must keep the Office of Admission and Records informed of changes in personal data, including 
changes in name, address and program of study. Each student is mailed a study list verification each 
semester during the third week of classes to ensure the accuracy of official enrollment for that term; 
corrections must be reported to the registrar by the 20th day of classes, using the Change of Program 
form. Also, a student data verification report is enclosed in each spring semester registration packet 
for continuing students. Corrections should be reported on the form and returned to the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

ENROLLMENT DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS 

Unit of Credit 

Each semester unit represents three hours of university work per week for one semester. Courses 
are of three types: 

( 1 ) Lecture — one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory — three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. All required courses carry unit credit. 

Classification in the University 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 semester units of work are classified as freshmen, 
30-59 semester units as sophomores, 60-89 semester units as juniors, and 90 or more as seniors. 

Maximum Number of Course Units 

Undergraduate students' requests to enroll for more than 19 units must be approved by the student's 
adviser and the department chair of the major. If such requests are denied, appeals may be made 
to the appropriate school dean. (Undeclared majors must receive the approval of the director of 
academic advisement.) The minimum full-time program is 12 units. 

A student whose academic record justifies a study list in excess of the normal may request to be 
allowed to enroll for extra units. Request forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and 
Records are submitted during the first week of instruction. In general, only students with superior 
academic records are allowed to enroll for more than the maximum. In addition, the need to enroll 
for the extra study must be established. Factors such as time spent in employment or commuting, 
the nature of the academic program, extracurricular activities and the student's health should be 
considered in planning a study program. Students who are employed or have outside responsibilities 
are advised to reduce their program of study. 

The minimum full-time program of study for graduate students is defined in the "Graduate Degree 
Programs" section of this catalog. 


Grading Policies 59 


Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Level Courses 

Graduate level (500) courses are organized primarily for graduate students. Undergraduate students 
may be permitted to enroll in a graduate level course if: 

1. they are within nine units of completion of graduation requirements, or 

2. they are exceptionally qualified seniors whose undergraduate work in the related field or fields 
has been of 3.5 grade-point average or better, and whose cumulative overall grade-point 
average is at least 3.25. 

Such cases shall require specific approval by the instructor and also the chair of the department or 
dean of the school in which the course is offered and by the chair or dean of the student's major 
department or school. 

Graduate level courses taken under 1 above may be applied to a graduate program if approved under 
graduate studies policies. 

Graduate level courses taken under 2 above may be applied to the undergraduate program only. 

Class Attendance 

While class attendance is not recorded officially by the university, regular attendance in class is often 
essential to success in a course. The policy on class attendance is within the discretion of the 
individual faculty member and shall be announced by the faculty member at the first class meeting 
of the semester. 

Initial Class Meeting 

It is especially important that students attend the first meeting of a class. Students absent from the 
first meeting and who fail to notify the instructor or departmental office no later than 24 hours after 
the class meeting may be denied admission to the class. Instructors may deny admission to absentees 
to admit persons on waiting lists. 

Instructor-Initiated Drops 

A student who registers for a class and whose name appears on the first day-of-class list should attend 
all class meetings in the first week or the first two class meetings, whichever alternative covers the 
longer time span. If the student is absent without notifying the instructor or departmental office within 
24 hours after any meeting missed, the student may then be dropped administratively from the class 
by the instructor. An instructor may also administratively drop a student who does not meet 
prerequisites for the course. These administrative withdrawals shall be without penalty and must be 
filed by the instructor with the registrar no later than the 20th day of instruction. 

GRADING POLICIES 

Grading System 

Every student of the university will have all course work evaluated and reported by the faculty using 
letter grades or administrative symbols. 

When, because of circumstances, a student does not complete a particular course, or withdraws, 
certain administrative symbols may be assigned by the faculty. Grades and symbols are listed in the 
chart below together with grade-point values. The chart also illustrates the academic bookkeeping 
involved for all grades and symbols used. 

The university uses a combination of traditional and nontraditional grading options as follows: 
Traditional 

Option 1 . Letter grades, defined as: 

A — outstanding performance 
B — above average performance 
C — average performance 

D — below average performance, though passing 
F — failure 
Nontraditional 

Option 2. CR (Credit) for satisfactory (equivalent to C or better in undergraduate courses; 
B or better in graduate courses.) and NC (No Credit) for less than satisfactory work. 


60 Grading Policies 





Grade 


Grade or Symbol 

Units 

Units 

Point 

Full 

Option 1 

Attempted 

Earned 

Value 

Credit 

A 

... Yes 

Yes 

Yes 


B 

... Yes 

Yes 

3 

Yes 

C 

... Yes 

Yes 

2 

Yes 

D 

... Yes 

Yes 

1 

No 

F 

... Yes 

No 

0 

No 

Option 2 





CR 

* 

Yes 

None 

Yes 

NC 

• 

No 

None 

No 

Administrative Symbols 





1 (Incomplete authorized) 

t 

No 



U (Unauthorized incom- 




plete) 

.... Yes 

No 

0 

No 

W (Withdrawal) 

No 

No 

None 

No 

AU (Audit) 

.... No 

No 

None 

No 

SP (Satisfactory progress).. 

No 

No 

None 

No 

RD (Report delayed) 

No 

No 

None 

No 

TOTALS 


Counted 

Used 



In 

in 

Toward 



CPA 

Objective 

CPA 



* Credit /No Credit course units are not included in grade-point computations, 
f If not completed within one calendar year the I will be changed to an F (or NC) . 


Selection of Grading Option 

Selection of a grading option, with certain exceptions, is the responsibility of the student. Graduate 
students must use option 1 for courses that are on study plans leading to master's degrees. Under- 
graduates must use option 1 for major, minor and general education requirements. 

Exceptions are those courses designated by the faculty to be graded solely on an option 2 basis. 
These courses will be so designated in the class schedule (and shall not be changed by the faculty 
after publication of the class schedule) for each semester and may be included in major, core, or 
special program requirements. 

Students shall inform the registrar up to the end of the fourth week of classes regarding the selection 
of grading options in designated courses. If a student does not do so, option 1 will be used. 

The faculty shall grade all students using the traditional A, B, C, D, or F grades except in Credit/ No 
Credit courses, and the registrar shall make the necessary changes from A, B, C, D or F, converting 
A, B, C to Credit, and D and F to No Credit in undergraduate courses; and A, B to Credit, and C, 
D, and F to No Credit in graduate level courses. In those courses offered only on a Credit/ No Credit 
basis, the instructor shall assign grades of CR or NC or appropriate administrative symbols. 

Nontraditional Grade Option 

A nontraditional grading option is available to undergraduate students, nonobjective graduate stu- 
dents, and to classified graduate students for courses not included in the approved study plan. Any 
student attempting a course using the nontraditional grading option must meet the prerequisites for 
that course. Each student shall be permitted to select courses in subjects outside of the major and 
general education requirements for enrollment on a Credit/ No Credit basis (grading option 2). The 
phrase "major requirements" shall be taken to include core plus concentration (or option) require- 
ments in departments using such terms, and professional course requirements in teacher education 
curricula. A student in any one term may take one course under option 2. In addition, he or she 
may enroll in a required course offered only under option 2; however, a maximum of 36 units of 
Credit/ No Credit courses including those transferred from other institutions may be counted toward 
the baccalaureate. 

Under option 2 the term "Credit" signifies that the student's academic performance was such that 
he or she was awarded full credit in undergraduate courses with a quality level of achievement 
equivalent to a C grade or better. In all graduate level courses Credit signifies academic performance 
equivalents to B or A grades. No Credit signifies that the student attempted the course but that the 
performance did not warrant credit toward the objective. 


Administrative Symbols 61 

Ordinarily, a student shall be limited to one nonmajor course per term using this option, exclusive 
of courses offered only on a Credit /No Credit basis. 

When an undergraduate student changes his or her major field of study to one where he or she has 
completed courses with CR grades, such lower division courses shall be included in major require- 
ments. Upper division courses may be included at the option of the department upon petition by 
the student. 


ADVISORY CAUTION: Undergraduate students who plan to pursue graduate or profes- 
sional studies later are advised to be selective in opting for courses on a Credit/ No Credit 
basis. As a general rule (advisory only), course work that is preparatory or prerequisite 
to advanced specialized study should be completed and evaluated on a letter grade basis 
and not Credit/No Credit. 


ADMINISTRATIVE SYMBOLS 

Incomplete Authorized (I) 

The symbol I signifies that a portion of required course work has not been completed and evaluated 
in the prescribed time period owing to unforeseen but fully justified reasons and that there is still 
a possibility of earning credit. It is the responsibility of the student to bring pertinent information to 
the instructor and to reach agreement on the means by which the remaining course requirements 
will be satisfied. A final grade is assigned when the work agreed upon has been completed and 
evaluated. 

An Incomplete must be made up within one calendar year immediately following the end of the term 
in which it was assigned. This limitation prevails whether or not the student maintains continuous 
enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an Incomplete being changed to an 
F or an NC. 

A grade of Incomplete may be given only when, in the opinion of the instructor, a student cannot 
complete a course during the semester of enrollment for reasons beyond the student's control. Such 
reasons are assumed to include: illness of the student or of members of the student's immediate 
family, extraordinary financial problems, loss of outside position, and other exigencies. In assigning 
a grade of I, the instructor shall file with the department for future reference and student access a 
Statement of Requirements for Completion of Course Work. The requirements shall not include 
retaking the course. The instructor will also designate a time limit (up to one year) for completing 
requirements. Upon request, a copy of the document will be furnished to the student. The student 
should review this statement at the earliest opportunity. 

The statement of requirements will include an indication of the quality of the student's work to date. 
This not only provides an interim evaluation for the student but assists the department chair in 
assigning a final grade in those instances where the instructor is no longer available. 

When the specific requirements are completed, the instructor will report a change of grade. The 
responsibility for changing the incomplete grade rests with the instructor. 

Withdrawal (W) 

The symbol W indicates that the student was permitted to drop the course after the 20th day of 
instruction with the approval of the instructor and department chair. It carries no connotation of 
quality of student performance and is not used in calculating grade-point averages or progress points. 
Withdrawal is permitted during the first 20 days of classes without record of enrollment. 

After the first 20 days of classes, students are expected to complete all courses in which they are 
enrolled. For serious and compelling reasons, however, students may, by obtaining appropriate 
authorizations, withdraw from a class or classes and receive the symbol W (withdrawal). Serious 
and compelling reasons include but are not limited to serious accident or illness, death in the 
immediate family, serious domestic problems, change in work hours or work conditions, and legal 
confinement. Authorization to withdraw after the census date and prior to the last three weeks of 
instruction, shall be granted only with the approval of the instructor and the department chair or 
school dean. All requests for permission to withdraw under these circumstances and all approvals 
shall be made in writing on the Change of Program form and shall briefly state the reason for the 
withdrawal. The completed Change of Program form shall be filed at the registrar's office by the 
students or their proxies. 


62 Administrative Symbols 

Withdrawals shall not be permitted during the final three weeks of instruction except in cases such 
as accident or serious illness where the assignment of an Incomplete is not practicable. Ordinarily, 
withdrawals in this category will involve total withdrawal from the campus, except that Credit, or 
an Incomplete, may be assigned for courses in which sufficient work has been completed to permit 
an evaluation to be made. Requests for permission to withdraw from all classes under these circum- 
stances, with authorizations as described above, shall be made on the Change of Program form and 
shall be presented to the registrar at the time of the exit interview. 

Unauthorized Incomplete ( U) 

The symbol U indicates that an enrolled student did not withdraw from the course but failed to 
complete course requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assign- 
ments or course activities or both were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic perform- 
ance possible. For purposes of grade-point average computations this symbol is equivalent to an F. 
A student may petition for a retroactive withdrawal provided the student can document both the 
serious and compelling reason or circumstances that required the withdrawal and the date of such 
withdrawal. Such a petition must be filed within 30 days after the first class day of the following 
semester. 

Petitions for retroactive withdrawal may be submitted for withdrawal in individual courses. 


ADVISORY NOTE: Students who unofficially withdraw and who are receiving financial 
aid or benefits which are dependent on completion of specified course units are advised 
that they may have such benefits suspended and may be subject to repayment of allow- 
ances received after date of unofficial withdrawal. 


Audit (AU) 

The symbol AU is used by the registrar in those instances where a student has enrolled in a course 
either for information or other purposes not related to the student's formal academic objective. 
Enrollment as an auditor is subject to the permission of the instructor, provided that enrollment in 
any course as an auditor shall be permitted only after students otherwise eligible to enroll in the 
course on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. Auditors are subject to the same fees 
as credit students and regular class attendance is expected. Once enrolled as an auditor, a student 
may not change to credit status unless such a change is requested prior to the last day to add classes. 
A student who is enrolled for credit may not change to audit after the fourth week of instruction. 
An auditor is not permitted to take examinations in the course; therefore, there is no basis for 
evaluation nor a formal grade report. 

Satisfactory Progress (SP) 

The SP symbol is used in connection with thesis, project or similar courses that extend beyond one 
academic term. It indicates that work is in progress, and has been evaluated and found to be 
satisfactory to date, but that assignment of a final grade must await completion of additional course 
work. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted may not exceed the total number applicable to the 
student's educational objective. Work is to be completed within a stipulated period which may not 
exceed one year except for graduate degree theses or projects for which the time may be longer, 
but may not exceed the overall limit for completion of all master's degree requirements. Any 
extension of time must receive prior authorization by the dean of the school (or the dean's designee) 
in which the course is offered. 

Report Delayed (RD) 

The RD symbol is used where a delay in the reporting of a final grade is due to circumstances beyond 
the control of the student. The symbol is assigned by the registrar and will be replaced as soon as 
possible. An RD shall not be included in calculation of a grade-point average. 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to each student at the end of each semester. 
Many students also leave self-addressed post cards for instructors of specific courses to send them 
earlier reports. 


Administrative Symbols 63 


Class Grade- Point A verages 

Beginning with the fall semester 1978, information is included on student grade reports and perma- 
nent academic records that is intended to depict the level of achievement of students in relation to 
other students in a particular class. The information is displayed in parentheses before each course 
grade. The first set of figures indicates the number of students officially completing the course and 
the second set is the class grade-point average. In making the computations, marks of W, I, CR, NC, 
and SP are excluded. This same information is displayed for summer session classes, but not for 
extension or intersession classes sponsored by the Office of Extended Education. 

Examinations 

Final examinations, if required by the instructor, will be given at times scheduled by the university. 
Once established, the final examination schedule may not be changed unless approved by the dean 
of the school. No makeup final examination will be given except for reason of illness or other verified 
emergencies. 

Credit by Examination 

Students may be granted credit toward the baccalaureate and to meet curriculum requirements in 
certain designated courses by the satisfactory completion of challenge examinations in the courses. 
The examinations are to be comprehensive and administered by the sponsoring departments. Well 
in advance of the semester in which a challenge examination is to be administered, the student, using 
the appropriate university form, will secure written approval of his or her major adviser and the chair 
of the department in which the course is offered. In general, prior work or academic experience will 
be required. 

Courses to be offered as challenge examinations will be determined by the academic departments. 
Matriculated students may either enroll in these courses during registration or add them during the 
first two weeks of the semester. The examination must be administered not later than the end of 
the second week of instruction. 

Upon successful completion of the examination, the instructor will report the grade of CR at the end 
of the term as part of the regular grade report for the class. Students who fail the challenge 
examination may elect to continue the course for credit or may officially withdraw from the course 
through the normal class withdrawal procedure. The challenge examination for any course may be 
administered only once. 

A maximum of 30 credits can be earned by challenge examination, including those earned by 
advanced placement. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence 
requirements. 

Grade-Point A verages 

The numerical grade-point values in the grading system chart are intended to give an exact determi- 
nation of a student's scholastic standing. To compute the grade-point average for course work at 
Fullerton, the grade-point value of each grade, with the exception noted in the "Repetition of 
Courses" section, is multiplied first by the unit value of each course to obtain a total of all grade 
points earned. The total is then divided by the total units attempted in all courses in which grades 
of A, B, C, D or F were received. The resulting figure is the grade-point average. 

Repetition of Courses 

Undergraduate students may repeat, using the traditional grading system (A, B, C, D, F), those 
courses for which grades of D or F were earned. In computing the grade-point average of a student 
who repeats courses in which he or she received D or F, only the most recently earned grades and 
grade points shall be used for the first 16 units repeated. Nevertheless, the original grade on the 
academic record shall not be changed or eradicated. 

In the case of any repetition beyond the 16 unit limitation, both grades are considered in computing 
grade-point averages. Successful repetition of a course originally passed carries no additional unit 
credit toward a degree or credential except for certain courses such as independent study or 
practicum (specified in this catalog as "may be repeated for credit"). 

An undergraduate student may request application of this policy when a course has been successful- 


64 Administrative Symbols 

ly repeated. This should be accomplished, using the appropriate petition form, immediately following 
the term in which the course has been completed, so that the student's grade point average can be 
revised. If not individually petitioned by a student, courses successfully repeated are routinely 
credited by the Office of Admissions and Records during degree requirement reviews at the time 
of graduation. 

Students transferring from other colleges where courses have been repeated may be eligible for 
consideration under this policy. In general, the policy of the college where the course was repeated 
shall be followed. Such students should inquire at the Office of Admissions and Records for further 
information. 

Grade Changes 

The university recognizes the long-standing prerogatives of faculty to set standards of performance 
and to apply them to individual students. The university will seek to correct injustices to students 
but at the same time believes that the instructor's judgment at the time the original grade is assigned 
is better than a later reconsideration of an individual case. Equity to all students is of fundamental 
concern. The following policies apply to changes of grades except for changes of Incomplete 
Authorized and Unauthorized Incomplete symbols. 

1 . In general, all course grades are final when filed by the instructor in the end-of-term course grade 
report. Each student is notified by mail of the grades earned during the term, and these grades 
become a part of the official record. 

2. A change of grade may occur only in cases of clerical error, administrative error, or where the 
instructor reevaluates the original course assignments of a student and discovers an error in the 
original evaluation. A clerical error is an error made by the instructor or an assistant in calculating 
or recording the grade. A change of grade shall not occur as a consequence of the acceptance 
of additional work or reexamination beyond the specified course requirements. 

3. A request for a change of grade shall be initiated by the student affected and shall be directed 
to the instructor within 60 calendar days of the first day of classes of the regular semester following 
the award of the original grade. If the instructor determines that there is a valid basis for the 
change, a Change of Grade form shall be used to notify the Office of Admissions and Records. 
These forms are available in department offices. If the instructor determines that there is not a 
valid basis for the change, and denies the student's request, the instructor's decision is final. The 
student may file a petition with the Academic Appeals Board on the basis of capricious or 
prejudicial treatment by the instructor. 

4. The Change of Grade form completed and signed by the instructor, noting the basis for the 
change, shall not be accepted by the registrar unless approved separately by the department chair 
and school dean. 

5. If a request for change of grade is initiated after 60 calendar days into the following semester, 
it will be approved only in extraordinary circumstances. An explanation of such circumstances 
must accompany the request and must be approved separately by the instructor, department 
chair, and the dean before the acceptance by the registrar. 

Academic Dishonesty 

Academic dishonesty (usually cheating or plagiarism) almost always involves an attempt by a 
student to show possession of a level of knowledge or skill which he or she does not possess. 
Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for work by the use of any 
dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to: using 
notes or aids or the help of other students on tests and examinations in ways other than those 
expressly permitted by the instructor, plagiarism as defined below, and tampering with the grading 
procedures. 

Plagiarism is defined as the act of taking the specific substance of another and offering it as one's 
own without giving credit to the source. When sources are used, acknowledgment of the original 
author or source must be made following standard scholarly practice. 

The initial responsibility for detecting and dealing with academic dishonesty lies with the instructor 
concerned. An instructor who believes that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred is obligated 
to discuss the matter with the student involved. The instructor should possess reasonable evidence, 
such as documents or personal observation. However, if circumstances prevent consultation with 
the student, the instructor may take whatever action, subject to student appeal, the instructor deems 
appropriate. 


Academic Renewal 65 


An instructor who is convinced by the evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty shall: 

1. Assign an appropriate academic penalty. This may range from an oral reprimand to an F in the 
course. To the extent that the faculty member considers the academic dishonesty to manifest the 
student's lack of scholarship and to reflect on the student's academic performance and academic 
integrity in a course, the student's grade should be adversely affected. Suggested guidelines for 
appropriate actions are an oral reprimand in cases where there is reasonable doubt that the 
student knew that his or her action constituted academic dishonesty; an F on the particular paper, 
project or examination where the act of dishonesty was unpremeditated, or where there was 
significant mitigating circumstances, or an F in the course where the dishonesty was premeditated 
or planned. 

2. Report to the student involved, to the department chair, and to the dean of student services the 
alleged incident of academic dishonesty, including relevant documentation, and make recom- 
mendations for action that he or she deems appropriate. 

The dean of student services shall maintain an academic dishonesty file of all cases of academic 
dishonesty with the appropriate documentation. Students shall be informed when their names are 
inserted into the file and provided with copies of any appeals or disciplinary procedures in which 
they may become involved. The dean of student services or his or her designees may initiate 
disciplinary proceedings under Title 5, California Administrative Code, Section 41301, and Chancel- 
lor's Executive Order 148; when two or more incidents involving the same student occur, he or she 
shall do so. Opportunities for appeal regarding sanctions resulting from disciplinary proceedings are 
provided by Executive Order 148. 

A student may appeal any action taken on a charge of academic dishonesty under the University 
Policy Statement 300.030, "Academic Appeals." If the Academic Appeals Board decides that a 
student is innocent of academic dishonesty, then no entry shall be made in the academic dishonesty 
file. 

If the Academic Appeals Board decides either that a student is innocent of academic dishonesty, 
or that a faculty member has acted arbitrarily or capriciously towards a student, it shall instruct the 
faculty member to meet with his or her department chair and, if appropriate, the dean of the school 
for the purpose of reassessing the student's performance. If the faculty member refuses to do so, 
the matter shall be referred to an ad hoc committee, to be established by the department, which 
shall have ultimate authority to act in the case. 

ACADEMIC RENEWAL 

Under certain circumstances, the university may disregard up to two semesters or three quarters of 
previous undergraduate course work taken at any college or university from all considerations 
associated with requirements for the baccalaureate. These circumstances are 

1. that the student has requested the action formally and has presented evidence that work com- 
pleted in the terms under consideration is substandard and not representative of present scholas- 
tic ability and level of performance; and 

2. that the level of performance represented by the terms under consideration was due to extenuat- 
ing circumstances; and 

3. that there is every evidence that the student would find it necessary to complete additional terms 
to qualify for the baccalaureate if the request were not approved. 

Final determination that one or more terms shall be disregarded in the determination of eligibility 
for graduation shall be based upon a careful review of evidence by the Review Committee for 
Academic Renewal and shall be made only when: 

1. five years have elapsed since the most recent work to be disregarded was completed; and 

2. the student has completed at Fullerton, since the most recent work to be disregarded was 
completed, 15 semester units with at least a 3.0 grade-point average (CPA), or 30 semester units 
with at least a 2.5 CPA, or 45 semester units with at least a 2.0 CPA. Work completed at another 
institution cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. 

When such action is taken, the student's permanent academic record shall be annotated so that it 
is readily evident to all users of the record that no work taken during the disregarded terms, even 
if satisfactory, may apply toward baccalaureate requirements. All work must remain legible on the 
record ensuring a true and complete academic history. 


3—78946 


66 Continuous Residency Regulations 


TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of courses taken at the university are issued only with the written permission of 
the student concerned. Partial transcripts are not issued. A fee of $1 for each transcript issued must 
be received before the transcript can be issued. 

Normally, transcripts are available within three working days, except at the end of the semester when 
the student should allow about 10 days after the last day of the semester. 

Transcripts from other institutions, which have been presented for admission or evaluation, become 
a part of the student's permanent academic file and are not returned or copied for distribution. 
Students desiring transcripts covering work attempted elsewhere should request them from the 
institutions concerned. 

CONTINUOUS RESIDENCY REGULATIONS 

Good Standing 

Good standing indicates that a student is eligible to continue and is free from financial obligation 
to the university. A student under academic disqualification, disciplinary suspension or disciplinary 
expulsion is not eligible to receive a statement of good standing on transcripts issued by the university 
or on other documents. 

Choice of Catalog Regulations for Meeting Degree Requirements 
A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing on in the same 
curriculum in any California state university or college, in any of the California community colleges 
or in any combination of California community colleges and The California State University and 
Colleges may, for purposes of meeting graduation requirements, elect to meet the graduation 
requirements of the California state university or college from which he or she will graduate in effect 
either at the time of entering the curriculum or at the time of graduation therefrom, except that 
substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the proper university 
authorities. 

Stop-Out Policy 

With certain exceptions, undergraduate students and postbaccalaureate unclassified students may 
be absent for one semester and maintain their continuing student status. This includes election of 
catalog requirements for graduation and eligibility to register for the next semester. The exceptions 
are as follows: 

Disqualified Students — Students who are disqualified at the end of a semester and have not been 
reinstated will not receive registration materials; they must apply for readmission, and if admitted, 
may be subject to new catalog requirements. 

Foreign-Visa Students — Students with foreign visas are required to maintain continuous enrollment. 
The stop-out policy is not applicable. 

Students absent for more than one semester, as well as those who attend another institution while 
absent for any period, must apply for readmission should they wish to return to Fullerton. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may petition for a leave of absence and, if approved, may upon return continue under 
the catalog requirements that applied to the enrollment prior to the absence. A leave of absence 
may be granted for a maximum of one year. Illness is the only routinely approved reason for a leave 
of absence. Students should realize that an approved leave of absence does not reserve a place for 
them in the university; they must reapply. 

Complete Withdrawal from the University 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the university during a semester must complete a Change 
of Program form. See the section on refund of fees for possible refunds. No student may withdraw 
after the date shown on the university calendar as the last day of instruction. Complete withdrawal 
from the university is accomplished by following the procedures for dropping classes. 


Academic Progress , Probation and Disqualification 67 


STUDENT HONORS 

Dean's Honor List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication each semester of a list of undergraduate 
students whose grade-point averages for the previous term were 3.5 or better. Students are notified 
in writing when they have earned this distinction. Eligibility is based on a minimum of 12 units of 
graded coursework. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation for baccalaureate recipients have been defined by the Faculty Council in three 
classifications: 


With honors GPA 3.5 

With high honors GPA 3.85 

With highest honors GPA 4.0 


ACADEMIC PROGRESS, PROBATION AND 
DISQUALIFICATION 

For purposes of determining a student's ability to remain in the university both quality of perform- 
ance and progress towards the educational objective will be considered. 

Academic Probation 

An undergraduate student shall be placed on academic probation if in any semester the cumulative 
grade-point average or the grade-point average at Fullerton falls below 2.0 (grade of C on a five-point 
scale). The student shall be advised of probation status promptly and, except in unusual instances, 
before the start of the next consecutive enrollment period. 

An undergraduate student shall be removed from academic probation and restored to clear standing 
upon achieving a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 in all academic work attempted, in all such 
work attempted at Fullerton, and is making satisfactory progress towards his or her educational 
objective. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program in either conditionally classified or 
classified standing shall be subject to academic probation if he or she fails to maintain a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 3.0 (grade of B on a five-point scale) in all units attempted after 
admission to the program. 

Academic Disqualification 

An undergraduate student on academic probation shall be subject to academic disqualification if: 

1. as a lower division student (fewer than 60 semester hours of college work completed) he or 
she falls 1 5 or more grade points below a 2.0 average on all college units attempted or in all 
units attempted at this institution; or 

2. as a junior (60 to 89% semester hours of college work completed) he or she falls nine or more 
grade points below a 2.0 average on all college units attempted or in all units attempted at this 
institution; or 

3. as a senior (90 or more semester hours of college work completed) he or she falls six or more 
grade points below a 2.0 average on all college units attempted or in all units attempted at this 
institution. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program shall be subject to disqualification if while 
on probation sufficient grade points are not achieved to remove probationary status. Disqualification 
may be either from further registration in a particular program or from further enrollment in the 
university, as determined by appropriate campus authority. 

A postbaccalaureate student (unclassified or classified) shall be disqualified if below a 2.0 average 
•n all units attempted at this institution as a postbaccalaureate student, or if he or she fails to earn 
during any semester twice as many progress points as all units attempted in that semester. 

Student Conduct 

The university properly assumes that all students are in attendance to secure a sound education and 
that they will conduct themselves as mature citizens of the campus community. Compliance with 


68 Academic Progress, Probation and Disqualification 

all regulations of the university is therefore expected. If, however, on any occasion a student or an 
organization is alleged to have compromised accepted university standards, appropriate judiciary 
procedures shall be initiated through the established university process. Every effort will be made 
to encourage and support the development of self-discipline and control by students and student 
organizations. The dean of student services, aided by members of the faculty, is responsible to the 
president of the university for the behavior of students in their relationships to the university. The 
president in turn is responsible to the chancellor and the trustees of The California State University 
and Colleges who themselves are governed by specific laws of the State of California. 

Students have the right to appeal certain disciplinary actions taken by appropriate university authori- 
ties. Regulations governing original hearings and appeal rights and procedures have been carefully 
detailed to provide maximum protection to both the individual charged and the university commu- 
nity. 

If the issue cannot be resolved informally, students should consult with the coordinator of academic 
appeals. 

The California Administrative Code, Article 1.1, Title 5, specifies prohibited student behavior: 
Expulsion, Suspension and Probation of Students. Following procedures consonant with due process estab- 
lished pursuant to Section 41304, any student of a campus may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation or 
given a lesser sanction for one or more of the following causes which must be campus related: 

(a) Cheating or plagiarsim in connection with an academic program at a campus. 

(b) Forgery, alteration or misuse of campus documents, records, or identification of knowingly furnishing false 
information to a campus. 

(c) Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization to be an agent of a campus. 

(d) Obstruction or disruption, on or off campus property, of the campus educational process, administrative 
process, or other campus function. 

(e) Physical abuse on or off campus property of the person or property of any member of the campus 
community or of members of his or her family or the threat of such physical abuse. 

(f) Theft, of, or non-accidental damage to, campus property, or property in the possession of, or owned by, 
a member of the campus community. 

(g) Unauthorized entry into, unauthorized use of, or misuse of campus property. 

(h) On campus property, the sale or knowing possession of dangerous drugs, restricted dangerous drugs, or 
narcotics as those terms are used in California statutes, except when lawfully prescribed pursuant to medical 
or dental care, or when lawfully permitted for the purpose of research, instruction or analysis. 

(o) This Section is not adopted pursuant to Education Code Section 89031. 

(p) Notwithstanding any amendment or repeal pursuant to the resolution by which any provision of this Article 
is amended, all acts and omissions occurring prior to that effective date shall be subject to the provisions 
of this Article as in effect immediately prior to such effective date. 

Expulsion, Suspension or Probation of Students; Fees and Notification. The President of the campus may 
place on probation, suspend, or expel a student for one or more of the causes enumerated in Section 41301. No 
fees or tuition paid by or for such student for the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is 
suspended or expelled shall be refunded. If the student is readmitted before the close of the semester, quarter, 
or summer session in which he or she is suspended, no additional tuition or fees shall be required of the student 
on account of the suspension. In the event that a student who has not reached his or her eighteenth birthday and 
who is a dependent of his or her parent (s) as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 is 
suspended or expelled, the President shall notify his or her parent or guardian of the action by registered mail to 
the last known address, return receipt requested. 

During periods of campus emergency, as determined by the President of the individual campus, the President may, 
after consultation with the Chancellor, place into immediate effect any emergency regulations, procedures, and 
other measures deemed necessary or appropriate to meet the emergency, safeguard persons and property, and 
maintain educational activities. 

The President may immediately impose an interim suspension in all cases in which there is reasonable cause to 
believe that such an immediate suspension is required in order to protect lives or property and to insure the 
maintenance of order. A student so placed on interim suspension shall be given prompt notice of charges and the 
opportunity for a hearing within 10 days of the imposition of interim suspension. During the period of interim 
suspension, the student shall not, without prior written permission of the President or designated representative, 
enter any campus of the California State University and Colleges other than to attend the hearing. Violation of any 
condition of interim suspension shall be grounds for expulsion. 

Debts Owed to the University 

Should a student or former student fail to pay a debt owed to the university, the university may 
"withhold permission to register, to use facilities for which a fee is authorized to be charged, to 
receive services, materials, food or merchandise or any combination of the above from any person 
owing a debt" until the debt is paid (see Title 5, California Administrative Code, Sections 42380 and 


Privacy Rights 69 


42381 ). For example, the institution may withhold such a service as furnishing copies of a student's 
transcript. If a student believes that he or she does not owe all or part of an unpaid obligation, the 
student should consult the business office. The business office, or another office to which the student 
may be referred, will review the pertinent information, including information the student may wish 
to present, and will advise the student of its conclusions with respect to the debt. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students may petition for review of certain university academic regulations when unusual circum- 
stances exist. It should be noted, however, that academic regulations when they are contained in 
Title 5, California Administrative Code, are not subject for petition. 

Petition forms are available in the Office of Admissions and Records and must first be reviewed and 
signed by appropriate department chairs before being reviewed by the university petitions commit- 
tee. This committee will take action on the petition and the student will be notified of the decision. 
Results of the action will be placed in the student's folder in the Office of Admissions and Records. 
The petitions committee members shall consist of the associate dean of each school, or equivalent, 
a professional staff member appointed by the dean of admissions and records, and the assistant 
registrar, who will serve as the secretary. 

RIGHT OF NONCOMPLIANCE, RISK ACTIVITIES 

Certain university activities either within or outside of the classroom may involve varying degrees 
of risk to the participants. It is university policy that the instructor directing such activities divulge 
fully to all potential participants the specific nature of such risks and obtain from them their expressed 
or implied consent prior to undertaking activities. 

The student who at any time comes to believe that the risks, whether physical or psychological, are 
excessive has the responsibility to withdraw from participation at the time and to inquire of the 
instructor if there are alternative means of fulfilling the requirements without penalty. If there is none, 
the student may petition for withdrawal from the course without penalty or appeal for an appropriate 
modification of the activity. The appeal may be made either to the chair of the department con- 
cerned, or to the chair of the Committee on Activities Involving Human Subjects, or both. 

RIGHT OF ACADEMIC APPEAL 

The right of due process, appeal and peer judgment is established by the Student Bill of Rights and 
Responsibilities for students who feel they have been treated capriciously or with prejudice by 
faculty or administrators. Students should make every effort to resolve the issue informally by 
consulting the individual concerned, and if necessary the department chair and dean of the school. 
Students who still believe the problem has not been resolved should consult with the coordinator 
of academic appeals. Upon the student's request, the coordinator will convene the Academic 
Appeals Board to hear the student's complaint. 

Copies of the governing documents are available in the Academic Appeals Office. 

PRIVACY RIGHTS OF STUDENTS 

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations 
adopted thereunder (45 C.F.R. 99), set out requirements designed to protect the privacy of parents 
and students concerning education records maintained by the institution. Specifically, the statute and 
regulations govern access to records maintained by the university, and the release of such records. 
In brief, the law provides that the university must provide students access to official records directly 
related to them and an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they 
are inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappropriate; the right to a hearing under the law does not 
include any right to challenge the appropriateness of a grade as determined by the professor. The 
law generally requires that written consent of the student be received before releasing personally 
identifiable data about the student from records to other than a specified list of exceptions. The 
institution has adopted a set of policies and procedures concerning implementation of the Act and 
the regulations on the campus. Copies of these policies and procedures may be obtained from the 
dean of student services. Among the types of information included in the campus statement of 
policies and procedures is: (1 ) the types of student records and the information contained therein; 
(2) the official responsible for the maintenance of each type of record; (3) the location of access 


70 Social Security Number 

lists which indicate persons requesting or receiving information from the record; (4) policies for 
reviewing and expunging records; (5) the access rights of students; (6) the procedures for challeng- 
ing the content of student records; (7) the cost which will be charged for reproducing copies of 
records, and (8) the right of the student to file a complaint with the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare. An office and review board have been established by the Department to investigate 
and adjudicate violations and complaints. The office designated for this purpose is: The Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 
330 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20201. 

The campus is authorized under the act to release public directory information concerning students. 
Directory information may include the student's name, address, telephone listing, date and place 
of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and 
height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most 
recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. Directory information is 
subject to release by the university at any time unless it has received prior written objection from 
the student specifying information that the student requests not be released. Written objections 
should be sent to the dean of student services. Further details are published each semester in the 
class schedule. 

The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees 
who have legitimate educational interests in such access. These persons are those who have 
responsibilities in connection with the university's academic, administrative or service functions and 
who have reason for using student records connected with university or other related academic 
responsibilities. 

REQUIREMENT AND USE OF SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 

Applicants are requested to include their social security number in designated places on applications 
for admission pursuant to the authority contained in Title 5, California Administrative Code, Section 
41201. The social security number is used on many campuses as a means of identifying records 
pertaining to the student as well as identifying the student for purposes of financial aid eligibility and 
disbursement and the repayment of financial aid and other debts payable to the institution. At 
Fullerton, student records are identified by a university-assigned student file number, not the social 
security number, though the latter is used in financial aids administration and in student payroll 
records. 



DEGREE 

REQUIREMENTS 


72 


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 


/. General Education Requirements * 

The faculty of California State University, Fullerton has designed a general education program to 
provide broad knowledge within the traditional areas of learning. It is strongly recommended that 
students expecting to complete their general education requirements at Fullerton include at least one 
year of high school algebra as part of their preparation. The California Administrative Code, Section 
40404, requires coursework to provide a further understanding of American government. The basic 
subject requirement reinforces student proficiency in writing, language, and formal logic or math- 
ematics. The other required courses in arts, humanities, natural science and social sciences, provide 
an opportunity to develop an appreciation for the development of Western civilization, an awareness 
of the content, approaches, and methods of the various disciplines, an understanding of one's culture 
and of other cultures, and an appreciation of the arts. 

To be eligible for a baccalaureate from the university, the student shall have completed a minimum 
of 48 semester units of general education courses selected in accordance with the pattern designated 
below. 

No more than nine units from Sections III through V, and no more than 12 units overall, from any 
single department may be used to satisfy the general education requirements. Except where express- 
ly required, students may not use courses offered by their major discipline to satisfy general educa- 
tion requirements. If the student pursues two or more majors, the above restriction on the use of 
major courses shall apply to the courses of one major discipline. 

All general education courses must be taken under grade option. 

/. Statutory Requirements in American Institutions and Values: six units 
The requirement is that each student "demonstrate competence in the Constitution of the United 
States, and in American history including the study of American institutions and ideals, and of the 
principles of state and local government established under the Constitution of this state. . . The 
following alternatives meet this requirement: (1 ) pass Political Science 100 and either (a) History 
180, or (b) History 170A and 170B, or (c) American Studies 201, or (2) pass comprehensive 
examinations offered by each of the relevant departments for their respective courses. Transfers from 
outside the State of California and who have already completed a basic course in American govern- 
ment may substitute Political Science 300 for Political Science 100. 

These units cannot be used to satisfy any other general education requirement. 

//. Basic Subjects: nine units minimum 

A. Writing Skills in English (three units) 

The student shall demonstrate competence in writing standard English by successfully com- 
pleting (with a grade of C or better) no fewer than three units of work chosen from among 
the following: 

Communications 103 Applied Writing (3) 

English 100 Composition (3) 

English 103 Seminar in Writing (3) 

B. Logical and Mathematical Skills (three units) 

The student shall demonstrate competence by completing (with a grade of C or better) no 
fewer than three units of work chosen from among the following: 

Engineering 205 Digital Computation (3) 

Management Science 264 Computer Programming (2) 

Management Science 289 Computer Methods in Social Science (3) 

Mathematics 100 Precalculus Mathematics (4) 

• The general education requirements described in this catalog were approved in 1978 to be applicable to students entering 
the curriculum in fall 1979 and later. Students entering the curriculum prior to fall 1979 should refer to the appropriate 
catalog for general education requirements. 


Bachelor's Degree 73 


Mathematics 110 Mathematics for Liberal Arts Students (3) 
Mathematics 120 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3) 
Mathematics 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 
Philosophy 210 Logic (3) 

Philosophy 368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 


C. Language Skills (three units) 

The student shall demonstrate competence by successfully completing (with a grade of C 
or better) no fewer than three units of work chosen from among the following: 
Afro-ethnic Studies 104 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Fundamental Foreign Languages (3-5) 

Fundamental Foreign Languages (3-5) 

Intermediate Foreign Languages (3) 

Intermediate Foreign Languages (3) 

Intermediate Diction and Phonetics (2) 

Intermediate Composition (2) 

Intermediate Reading (2) 

Intermediate Reading (2) 

Intensive Review of Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Intermediate Conversation (2) 

Intermediate Composition (2) 

Elements of Bibliographic Investigation (3) 

Linguistics 301 Sanskrit (3) 

Reading 201 Academic Reading: Analyses and Structures (3) 

Reading 202 Vocabulary Building (3) 

Speech Communication 100 Introduction to Personal Communication (3) 

Speech Communication 102 Public Speaking (3) 

Speech Communication 200 Personal Communication Theory (3) 

Theater 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

* Note: The fundamental courses in any language offered by the Foreign Languages and Literatures 
Department will fulfill this requirement. 


Foreign Languages 101* 
Foreign Languages 102* 
Foreign Languages 203* 
Foreign Languages 204* 
French 230 
French 240 
German 213 
German 214 
Spanish 103 
Spanish 213 
Spanish 214 
Library 300 


III. Foundations: 24 units minimum 
A. Western Civilization (nine units) 

The required courses in Western civilization give a holistic view of the development of 
Western society — its values, traditions and institutions. The complementary courses included 
in the arts or humanities are chronologically organized and cover a period of centuries or 
millennia. They trace the development of a single major aspect of Western civilization in the 
arts or humanities. 

/. The History of Western Civilization (six units) 

History 110A,B Western Civilization (6) or 
History 115A,B The Western Tradition: History (6) 

2. Arts and Humanities (three units) 

Art 201 A, B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

English 110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through Medieval Times (3) 
English 1 1 1 Literature of the Western World from Renaissance through the 1 9th Century 
(3) 

English 115A The Western Tradition: Literature (3) 

English 115B The Western Tradition: Literature (3) 

Music 100 Introduction to Music (3) 

Philosophy 115A The Western Tradition: Philosophy (3) 

Philosophy 115B The Western Tradition: Philosophy (3) 

Religious Studies 345A History and Development of 

Christian Thought: The Beginning to 1274 (3) 

Religious Studies 346A History and Development of Jewish Thought: The Beginning to 
Moses Maimonides (3) 


74 Bachelor's Degree 


B. Fundamentals of Natural Science * ( six or seven units) 

The courses included provide the content and methodology that form the bases for studies 
in all other areas of natural science. A solid foundation in this area will allow students to 
develop their interests in related areas or to go into depth in one particular field. 

1. Physical Science (three or four units) 

Chemistry 100 Introductory Chemistry (3) 

Chemistry 100L f Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Chemistry 115f Introductory Chemistry (4) 

Chemistry 120A f General Chemistry (5) 

Earth Science 101 Physical Geology (3) 

Earth Science 1 01 L t Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 

Physics 123 Perspectives of Man's Physical Universe (3) 

Physics 123L f Perspectives of Man's Physical Universe Laboratory (1) 

Physics 211 A Elementary Physics (3) 

Physics 212 t Elementary Physics Laboratory (1) 

Physics 225A f Fundamental Physics: Mechanics (4) 

2. Biological Science (three or four units) 

Biological Science 101 Elements of Biology (3) 

Biological Science 1 01 L f Elements of Biology Laboratory (1) 

Biological Science 141 | Principles of Botany (4) 

Biological Science 161 f Principles of Zoology (4) 

C. Fundamentals of Social Science (three units) 

Included are the introductory general courses in the fundamental social sciences whose con- 
tent and methodology form the bases for more specialized and interdisciplinary work. 
Anthropology 202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3) 

Economics 210 Principles of Economics (5) 

Geography 100 Man and the Land (3) 

Political Science 200 Introduction to the Study of Politics (3) 

Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Sociology 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

D. Introduction to the Arts and Humanities (six units) 

Included are introductory general courses in the arts and humanities whose content and 
methodology form the bases for more specialized and interdisciplinary work. They provide 
comprehensive surveys of the disciplines, with emphasis on both content and method. 

7. Arts (three units) 

Art 101 Introduction to Art (3) 

Music 101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Theatre 100 Introduction to the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 101 Introduction to Dance (3) 

2. Humanities (three units) 

English 202 The Short Story (3) 

English 205 Introduction to Drama (3) 

English 206 Introduction to Poetry (3) 

English 311 Masters of British Literature (3) 

English 312 Masters of British Literature (3) 

English 321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

English 322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

French 315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

French 375 Introduction to Literature (3) 

German 315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 

German 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 


* Students must complete a total of nine units including one laboratory course in Section IIIB or IV 
f Laboratory 


Bachelor's Degree 75 


Linguistics 252 Linguistics and Literature (3) 

Philosophy 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

Philosophy 110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) 

Philosophy 290 History of Philosophy: Greek Philosophy (3) 

Portuguese 315 Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Religious Studies 110 World's Great Religions (3) 

Spanish 315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 

Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

Spanish 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

IV. Alternatives Within Natural Science: * two or four units minimum ** 
These courses have a substantial scientific content. In addition, they are either introductory 
to the major subdisciplines in the natural sciences or they relate science to significant social 
problems. 

Courses listed in II IB or 2 or the following: 

Anthropology 201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

Biological Science 102 Crisis Biology (3) 

Biological Science 313 Human Genetics (3) 

Biological Science 314 Human Issues in Genetics (1) 

Biological Science 316 Principles of Ecology (3) 

Biological Science 319 Marine Organisms and Their Environment (3) 

Biological Science 31 9L f Marine Organisms and Their Environment Laboratory (1) 
Biological Science 323 Biology of VD ( 1 ) 

Biological Science 353 Principles of Horticulture (2) 

Biological Science 360 Biology of Human Sexuality (1) 

Biological Science 367 Insects and Man (3) 

Chemistry 111 Drugs and Diet in Life Processes (3) 

Chemistry 280 Water Pollution ( 1 ) 

Earth Science 120 Introduction to Earth Science (3) 

Earth Science 121 f Earth Science Laboratory (1) 

Earth Science 140 Earth's Atmosphere (3) 

Earth Science 201 Earth History (3) 

Earth Science 310 Directed Readings in Earth Science (1-2) 

Engineering 208 Current Technological Problems in Southern California (3) 

Engineering 220 New Energy Sources (3) 

Geography 110 Principles of Physical Geography (3) 

Geography 150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

History 231 Ascent of Man (3) 

Philosophy 384 Philosophy of the Natural Sciences (3) 

Physical Science 100 t Man and His Physical Environment (4) 

Physics 102 The Environmental Effects of Human Recreational Activities (1) 

Physics 105 Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science (1 ) 

Physics 107 Nuclear Energy and Its Impact on Society (1) 

Physics 200 Introduction to Astronomy (4) 

Physics 384 Philosophy of Natural Sciences (3) 

V. Explorations: six units minimum 

Six units must be chosen from among two of the following categories: 

A. Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences 

Courses may be chosen from those listed in III A, C or D. 

B. African, Asian, Latin American or Modern Middle Eastern Civilization 

The course included are continental surveys which provide an introduction to Asia, Africa, 
Latin America or the modern Middle East. 

Afro-ethnic Studies 346 The African Experience (3) 

* Students must complete a total of nine units including one laboratory course in Section IIIB or IV 

** Students who have completed the laboratory in Section IIIB must complete a minimum of two units in Section IV 

t Laboratory 


76 Bachelor's Degree 


Afro-ethnic Studies 352 African Literature (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Anthropology 326 Prehistory of South America (3) 

Anthropology 328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Anthropology 345 Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

Anthropology 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Chicano Studies 336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Comparative Literature 352 African Literature (3) 

Economics 332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

English 352 African Literature (3) 

Geography 333 Geography of Latin America (3) 

Geography 344 Geography of Africa (3) 

Geography 346 Australia and the Pacific Islands (3) 

History 140 Latin American Civilization (3) 

History 160 Introduction to Asia (3) 

History 165 Introduction to Middle East (3) 

Latin American Studies 100 Introduction to Latin America (3) 

Linguistics 201 Introduction to African Linguistics (3) 

Philosophy 350 Oriental Philosophy (3) 

Religious Studies £>0 The Religion of Islam (3) 

Religious Studies 270 Introduction to the Oriental Religions (3) 

Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

C. Cultural Pluralism in the United States 

Included are introductory survey courses emphasizing the interaction of cultures in the 
United States. 

Afro-ethnic Studies 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 230 The Native American (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 240A Afro-American History to 1865 (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 240B Afro-American History from 1865 to Present (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Afro-ethnic Studies 422 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

American Studies 301 The American Character (3) 

American Studies 411 The White Ethnic in America (3) 

Anthropology 321 The American Indian (3) 

Anthropology 361 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Chicano Studies 106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

Chicano Studies 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

History 488 Black American Since 1890 (3) 

History 489 The Mexican-American in the Southwest (3) 

Linguistics 107 Linguistics and Minority Dialects (3) 

Sociology 430 The Individual, Society, and Prejudice (3) 

Sociology 431 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Sociology 432 Afro- Sociology (3) 

Sociology 436 Social Stratification (3) 

D. Interdisciplinary Studies 

Included are those courses in which the contributions of two or more disciplines are clearly 
noted and in which the integration of these disciplines is a conscious and explicit part of the 
presentation. The purpose of this integration is to analyze a contemporary problem, issue or 
topic. 

Afro-ethnic Studies 107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

American Studies 345 The American Dream (3) 

American Studies 386A American Social History, 1750-1860 (3) 

American Studies 386B American Social History, 1865-1930 (3) 

Art 311 Art and the Modern Mind (3) 

Geography 160 Culture and Environment (3) 

Geography 170 Introduction to the City (3) 


Bachelor's Degree 77 


History 386A American Social History, 1750-1860 (3) 

History 386B American Social History, 1865-1930 (3) 

Music 350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Philosophy 341 Assumptions of Psychotherapy (3) 

Physical Education 381 Cultural Perspectives of Physical Activity (3) 

E. Participatory Experience 

Courses involving an individual participatory experience have been selected from one of the 
arts — art, dance, music, theatre — for the purpose of enchancing esthetic appreciation through 
creative engagement. They include theory as well as an opportunity to manipulate or perform. 
Afro-ethnic Studies 314 Pan- African Dance and Movement (3) 

Art 100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Art 103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

Art 107 A, B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Music 183 Voice Class for Non-majors (1 ) 

Music 184A Piano Class for Non-majors (1) 

Music 361 a-h Major Performance Ensemble (1) 

Music 362A Wind Ensemble — Jazz Ensemble (1) 

Music 362B Wind Ensemble — University Band (1) 

Music 362C Vocal Ensemble (1) 

Music 362D Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Music 362E Brass Ensemble (1) 

Music 362C String Ensemble (1) 

Music 362 H Chamber Orchestra ( 1 ) 

Music 3621 Instrumental Workshop (1) 

Music 362K Keyboard Workshop (1) 

Music 362L Jazz Laboratory (2) 

Music 362P Choral Laboratory (1) 

Music 362V Vocal Workshop (1) 

Music 362X Operatic Techniques 1 (1) 

Music 362Y Operatic Techniques 2 (1) 

Music 362Z Operatic Techniques 3 (1) 

Music 363b-x Chamber Music Ensembles ( 1 ) 

Music 400 Concert Music (1) 

Theatre 112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) 

Theatre 122 Beginning Modern Dance (2) 

Theatre 126 Improvisation (3) 

Theatre 162 Beginning Folk Dance (1) 

Theatre 163 Beginning Acting (3) 

Theatre 203 Oral Interpretation of Children's Literature (3) 

Theatre 206A Mime and Pantomime (3) 

Theatre 241 Voice Production for the Performer (3) 

Theatre 251 Body Movement for the Actor (3) 

Theatre 276A Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Theatre 310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 

Theatre 436 Musical Theatre Workshop (3) 

Transfer students certified under provisions of the California Administrative Code, Title 5, as having 
met the 40-unit minimum general education requirements will be required to complete eight addi- 
tional units selected from two or more subsections of the Fullerton pattern of general education. 


78 Bachelor's Degree 

Students who transfer with only partial certification must complete the requirements in those 
sections of general education in which certification is not complete. 


Statutory Requirements I 

Basic Subjects II 

Natural Sciences IIIB, IV 

Social Sciences IIIA(I), IIIC 

Arts and Humanities III A ( 2 ) , HID 


2. Electives 

After fulfilling the requirements in general education, and a specific major (and possibly a minor), 
each student is free to choose the rest of the courses needed to complete the semester units required 
for graduation. Different majors vary considerably in both the number of units they require in their 
own and related fields. They also vary considerably in the amount of latitude or choice they permit 
in selecting courses to satisfy the major requirement. The general education requirement encourages 
freedom of choice within the natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities, and basic 
subjects. Students at the university use their electives to broaden their general education, deepen 
some aspect of their specialties, pursue work in related fields, and satisfy curiosities and enthusiasms 
for particular subjects or areas of interest. 

Advisement on general education and electives is provided by the Academic Advisement Center. 

3. Units 

(a) Total units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for graduation with a bachelor of arts degree. 
Bachelor of Science degrees require 124 to 132 semester units. 

(b) Upper division units 

Completion of a minimum of 40 units of upper division credit is required. 

(c) Completion of a minimum of 30 semester units in residence is required. At least 24 of these 
units must be earned in upper division courses and 12 must be in the major. Extension credit 
or credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement, 
except that the chancellor may designate specified extension courses that may be offered for 
residence credit and may establish policies and procedures by which residence credit may 
be earned by evaluation. When individual circumstances warrant an exception, the university 
petitions committee may authorize the substitution of credit earned elsewhere for residence 
credit. 

4. Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted, including those 
accepted by transfer from another institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units in the major. 

(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on all units attempted at Fullerton 

5. Major 

Completion of all requirements for a major as specified by appropriate university authority is 
required. In bachelor of arts programs at least 24 units, including 12 at the upper division level, must 
be applied exclusively to the major requirements and may not be used to meet the requirements 
of general education. In bachelor of science programs, a minimum of 36 units, including 18 at the 
upper division level, must be applied exclusively to the major. 

6. Multiple Majors and Second Baccalaureate Degrees 

Within the units required for the baccalaureate it is possible for a student to complete the require- 
ments for more than one major within a degree program when the additional major is within the 
degree of the first major. At least 24 units, including 12 at the upper division level, in each bachelor 
of arts major, or 36 units, including 18 at the upper division level, in each bachelor of science major, 
must be applied exclusively to the respective major and may not be used to meet requirements in 
other majors or in general education. The student shall declare the additional major with the 
appropriate department not later than the beginning of the student's final year of study. The comple- 
tion of additional majors will be noted at the time of graduation by appropriate entries on the 
academic record and in the commencement program. 


Bachelor's Degree 79 


Second baccalaureate 

(a) First degree completed elsewhere, second at Fullerton 

Students seeking a bachelor's degree from Fullerton after having received a baccalaureate 
from another institution may qualify for graduation with the approval and recommendation 
of the faculty upon completion of the following: 

(1) general education requirements 

(2) all requirements in the major field of study 

(3) residence and scholarship requirements 

(b) Two baccalaureates from Fullerton 

With the approval and recommendation of the faculty, a student may qualify for a second 
baccalaureate under the following circumstances: 

(1) The second field of study is offered in a different degree (e.g., bachelor of arts to 
bachelor of science) 

(2) At least 30 units, including 24 upper division units and 12 in the major, are earned in 
residence after the conferral of the first degree 

(3) All requirements of the major are fulfilled 

Units included in second baccalaureate programs may not apply to graduate degrees or credential 
programs. 

7 . Minor 

A minor is not required for the baccalaureate, however, students may elect to complete one or more 
minors from those available and have that noted on their records. A minor consists of an academic 
program specified by the academic departments in the catalog. No courses in the major department 
may be counted toward the minor and also toward requirements for the major. General education 
courses, however, may be used to meet minor requirements. 

8. Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation must file an application for a graduation requirements check during 
registration week for the semester prior to the semester in which the student expects to graduate. 
The graduation and diploma fee is required when the application is filed. Application forms are 
available at the admissions and records information desk and in the registration center. 
Candidates for the baccalaureate should refer to the semester class schedule for application filing 
dates. A senior should have completed at least 100 units (including the current work in progress) 
and a substantial portion of the major requirements before requesting a graduation check. If the 
candidate does not complete the requirements in the semester indicated, a change of graduation 
date must be filed in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

9. Approval and Recommendation by the Faculty of the University 

Under provisions of the Faculty Council, the Office of Admissions and Records publishes a list of 
degree candidates twice a year: in the fall and in the spring (for both spring and summer graduates). 
After review and approval by the faculty, and upon verification of the completion of requirements, 
diplomas are issued with the last day of the respective term as the official date of graduation. 
Annual commencement exercises are held at the end of the spring semester for those who com- 
pleted degree requirements mid-year and for those completing degree requirements in the spring 
semester or summer session. The president of the university, with the authority of the Board of 
Trustees, confers all degrees, subject to the completion of remaining requirements. 




. 



ACADEMIC 

ADVISEMENT 


82 


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 


The Academic Advisement Center provides guidance information in the choice of an undergraduate 
major and selection of elective and general education courses. It is the administrative center for 
undeclared majors. All problems encountered by the undeclared major and requests, which normal- 
ly require the assistance of a department chair, are handled by the director of academic advisement. 
For choosing general education courses and help in choosing an undergraduate major, students 
should seek the advice of the director or of an adviser in the Academic Advisement Center. 

No appointment is necessary to engage the assistance of an adviser about various aspects of the 
academic life at the university. For more specific information about the office, the student should 
consult the Class Schedule. 

Undeclared Majors 

Lower division students who are uncertain about their primary educational or vocational goals 
should enroll as undeclared majors. During their freshman and sophomore years, such students 
should explore the possibilities that will meet their interests and potentialities. 

Choosing an Undergraduate Major 

Every student is expected to choose a major by the beginning of the junior year. Most major 
requirements allow students the freedom to take a number of courses in fields other than in their 
majors or closely related fields. 

To help students, the university has available a number of useful resources: the advisement session 
and orientation programs; a variety of counseling and testing services provided by the Counseling 
and Testing Centers; and the department and school offices for information and advice on particular 
fields, departmental brochures and manuals describing their programs of study and later work 
opportunities. There is a collection of college and university catalogs in the university Library. There 
are student organizations with disciplinary and professional interests. The Career Development 
Center has information on vocations and work opportunities. 

The task of selecting a major (and often a minor or other complementary specialization) becomes 
one of crystallizing ideas on the basis of experiences in specific courses, discussions with other 
students and faculty, etc. The option of taking a limited number of courses on a Credit/ No Credit 
basis often will be helpful in exploring new interests. "Minicourses" provide opportunity to explore 
the multiple areas of knowledge. 

Students, must plan freshman or sophomore programs which will permit their entering or taking 
advanced courses in fields they think they may want to be their majors. They should check such 
major requirements as mathematics, chemistry and foreign language which must be taken before 
the junior year or perhaps even begun during the freshman year. Students anticipating graduate or 
professional study should exercise special care in planning their undergraduate programs, and they 
should seek faculty counseling in the fields concerned. Advance examination of the possibilities of 
graduate or professional study will be helpful to students who have clear educational and vocational 
objectives. 

Those whose goals and objectives have not yet crystallized, will have opportunities to take courses 
in various fields and make up their minds during their lower division work. They should, however, 
take full advantage of the opportunities that exist on and outside the campus to learn more about 
available fields of study and occupational fields. 

Planning a Major Program 

When students have selected a major field, they should study all the requirements which are 
specified in this catalog under their chosen degree program. Then they should make a tentative 
semester by semester plan for completing the requirements, with regard for prerequisites. They 
should discuss this plan with their major advisers. 

In addition to courses in the major department, related courses in other fields and supporting courses 
in basic skills may be required. These should be included in the tentative semester by semester plan. 
Some departments require placement tests prior to admission to classes. The time and place for such 
tests are given in the Class Schedule. Students should purchase a copy of the Class Schedule at the 
Titan Bookstore well before registration for classes begins. 


Preprofessional Programs 83 


Choosing General Education Courses and Electives 

In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the university requires its graduates to have sampled a 
variety of disciplines as part of their general education. The broad categories of general education 
courses are presented in the catalog section on "Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor's 
Degree." 

All students are strongly encouraged to consult with faculty members or the Academic Advisement 
Center. 

Change of Major, Degree or Credential Objective 

To change major, degree, or credential objective, obtain the required form in the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records or the Academic Advisement Center. Such a change is not official until the form 
has been signed and filed in the Registrar's Office. The student will be responsible for the require- 
ments that are in the catalog in effect at the time a change is filed. 

DEPARTMENTAL ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Each department follows the advisement system which it finds the most appropriate for its majors. 
Each undergraduate student is assigned or may request an adviser who will help plan an academic 
program. The adviser is a resource person who can provide information and suggestions and who 
can assist the student to find the most desirable ways to meet the requirements for graduation and 
for the major or credential. The final choice of courses and the responsibility for the program lies 
with the student. Students who have not yet decided upon a major (undeclared majors) or who 
are not seeking a degree will be advised in the Academic Advisement Center. 

Academic program advisers are able to offer better advice if students provide lists of courses they 
have taken and their own copies of transcripts from colleges previously attended (if students are 
new to Cal State Fullerton). 

Undergraduate advisement coordinators are appointed by each department (for the School of 
Business Administration and Economics see below) in order to facilitate communication between 
students and faculty. They coordinate advisement in each department and act as resource persons 
for the students and the faculty of the department in all matters of advisement. Their names, room 
and telephone numbers and office hours are listed in the Academic Advisement Resource materials. 
The School of Business Administration and Economics provides advisement in the advisement center 
of the school. 

Graduate students will be assigned a major adviser in their fields of specialization, except in educa- 
tion where all will have a professional adviser from the School of Human Development and 
Community Service. Those students seeking a credential for teaching in secondary schools will be 
assigned both a professional and a major adviser. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

The academic programs of the university provide appropriate preparation for graduate work in a 
variety of fields. Students who have made tentative decisions about institutions in which they may 
wish to pursue graduate work should consult the catalogs of those graduate schools as they plan 
their undergraduate programs. Students planning to undertake graduate work should supplement 
their undergraduate programs by anticipating requirements at major graduate schools. 

The university offers a number of professional programs through the master's degree. These include 
programs in the fine arts, business administration, communications, education, engineering, health 
education and physical education and recreation, public administration, and speech pathology- 
audiology. Students interested in preparing for professional careers in these areas, either here or in 
other educational institutions, are encouraged to seek assistance and guidance from our faculty 
members in these fields. 

Prelegal Preparation 

It is recommended that prospective law students prepare themselves in such fields as English, 
American history, economics, political science (particularly the history and development of English 
and American political institutions) and such undergraduate courses as judicial process, administra- 
tive law, constitutional law and international law, philosophy ( particularly ethics and logic ) , business 
administration, anthropology, psychology and sociology. 


84 Health Professions 


A distribution of course sequences among the social sciences, the natural sciences and the humani- 
ties is desirable. Students with interest in becoming lawyers should contact the Prelaw Society. Some 
faculty members in the School of Business Administration and Economics and Departments of 
American Studies, History and Politicial Science, also can provide advice and assistance. 

Pretheological 

Students who might be interested in pursuing careers in counseling, social work, the teaching of 
religion, and the ministry and associated fields should take some courses in religion, psychology, 
anthropology, sociology, philosophy, education, communications, history, English, speech com- 
munication and a foreign language. Students desiring assistance and counseling regarding advanced 
work or professional careers may seek help from the faculty in the Department of Religious Studies. 

Social Welfare 

Students who plan to seek employment in social work or social welfare should prepare themselves 
in the fields of human services, psychology (particularly child and adolescent psychology), sociolo- 
gy, anthropology, political science, economics and research methods in social science. 

Students who intend to enter a professional school following undergraduate training should learn 
about the specific prerequisites for admission to the graduate school of their choice. Ordinarily a 
major in one of the social sciences, and some additional work in at least several other social sciences, 
is recommended. Students with interests in pursuing careers in the fields of social welfare should 
contact the Department of Sociology for advice and assistance. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

All health professions programs are seeking the best qualified applicants with a good command of 
communication skills, rigorous basic science preparation and as broad a general education base as 
possible. 

The Health Professions Committee assists students to prepare the best academic programs consistent 
with their former educational experience, interests, and professional objectives. 

Student Responsibility 

All new students, both first-time freshmen and transfer students, interested in preparing to enter one 
of the following health professions, or related health professions, should register with the secretary 
of the committee, in the Health Professions Office. These health professions are medicine, os- 
teopathic medicine, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, chiropractic, clinical pharmacy, den- 
tistry, optometry. 

The related health professions are anatomist, dental hygienist, histologist, medical technologist, 
nutritionist, occupational therapist, orthotist-prosthetist, pharmacologist, physical therapist, pharma- 
cist, physiologist, public health. 

Health Professions Committee. 

The committee assists the student to (a) gain some "preceptorship" experience with a practicing 
professional in the area appropriate to the field of interest; (b) a list of professional schools to which 
there is a likelihood of admission; (c) prepare for an admissions interview. 



UNIVERSITY 

CURRICULA 



86 


UNIVERSITY CURRICULA 


DEGREE PROGRAMS 

California State University, Fullerton offers the following baccalaureate degree programs which are 


described on the pages listed: 


Page 

B.A. American Studies 197 

B.A. Anthropology 199 

B.A. Art 92 

B.A. Biological Science 299 

B.A. Business Administration (including 
concentration in management 

information systems) 129 

B.A. Chemistry 310 

B.S. Chemistry 309 

B.S. Child Development 154 

B.A. Communications 209 

B.A. Communicative Disorders 289 

B.A. Comparative Literature 220 

B.S. Computer Science 315 

B.A. Criminal justice 218 

B.A. Earth Science 320 

B.A. Economics 134 

B.S. Engineering 325 

B.A. English 219 

B.A. Ethnic Studies (with 
concentration in Afro-American studies 

and Chicano Studies) 194, 205 

B.A. French 228 

B.A. Geography 240 

B.A. German 228 


Page 

B.A. History 244 

B.S. Human Services 159 

B.A. Latin American Studies 254 

B.A. Liberal Studies 256 

B.A. Linguistics 258 

B.A. Mathematics (including option 

in probability and statistics) 341 

B.A. Music 103 

B.M. Music 107 

B.S. Nursing 161 

B.A. Philosophy 261 

B.S. Physical Education 172 

B.A. Physics 348 

B.A. Political Science (including 
concentration in 

public administration) 266 

B.A. Psychology 272 

B.A. Religious Studies 278 

B.A. Russian and East European 

Area Studies 281 

B.A. Sociology 283 

B.A. Spanish 228 

B.A. Special Major 90 

B.A. Speech Communication 289 

B.A. Theatre Arts 115 


The following master's degree programs are offered: 

Page 

M.A. American Studies 359 

M.A. Anthropology 360 

M.A. Art 361 

M.A. Biology 362 

M.B.A. Business Administration (including 
concentration in international 

business) 363 

M.A. Chemistry 366 

M.A. Communications 367 

M.A. Communicative Disorders 289 

M.A. Comparative Literature 368 

M.S. Computer Science 369 

M.S. Counseling 370 

M.A. Economics 371 

M.S. Education (with emphases in 
bilingual/bicultural, 

elementary education, reading, school 
administration and special 

education ) 372-376 

M.S. Engineering 376 

M.A. English 379 

M.S. Environmental Studies 379 

M.A. French 380 


Page 


M.A. Geography 381 

M.A. German 382 

M.A. History 383 

M.A. Linguistics 384 

M.A. Mathematics 386 

M.A. Music 387 

M.M. Music 387 

M.S. Physical Education 388 

M.A. Political Science 389 

M.A. Psychology 390 

M.S. Psychology (concentration 

in clinical community) 391 

M.P.A. Public Administration 392 

M.A.T. Science 393 

M.A. Social Sciences 394 

M.A. Sociology 395 

M.A. Spanish (including 

emphasis bilingual studies) 396 

M.A. Special Major 90 

M.A. Speech Communication 397 

M.A. Theatre Arts 398 

M.F.A. Theatre Arts (technical 
theatre and design) 398 


The university is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for 
programs leading to credentials and master's degrees. 


Student-to-Student Tutorials 87 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Course descriptions briefly describe the content or subject matter to be covered and provide 
additional information on units of credit, the level of instruction (general course numbering code), 
prerequisites and the type of course (lecture, laboratory, activity, seminar and individually super- 
vised work). 


GENERAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

100-299 Lower division courses of freshman and sophomore level, but open also to upper division 
students. 

300-399 Upper division courses of junior and senior level, which do not give graduate credit unless 
included on an approved graduate study plan (such as a credential or graduate degree 
program) for a specific graduate student. 

400-499 Upper division courses of junior and senior level which give graduate credit when taken 
by a graduate student. (Note limitations in specific graduate programs.) 

500-599 Graduate courses organized primarily for graduating students. 

700-701 Course numbers which provide opportunity for graduate and post-baccalaureate students 
(including those seeking the credential) to maintain continuous enrollment during a par- 
ticular semester, and who are not enrolled in regular courses. These numbers do not 
represent courses and do not therefore grant credit. (See Continuous Enrollment for 
Graduate Students.) 


DEPARTMENTAL COURSE NUMBERING CODE 

Because of the differences in the organization and content of the various disciplines and professions, 
there is no uniform, reasonable way of numbering courses that would be equally useful for all fields 
of knowledge. Some of the departments explain the logic of their own course numbering system in 
this catalog. Sometimes, disciplines organize their course numbering partly in terms of criteria other 
than degree of difficulty: e.g., anthropology numbers its area courses in the 300's and its theoretical 
or institutional courses in the 400's. 


SPECIAL COURSE NUMBERS 

For uniformity, certain types of courses have been listed by all departments and schools with the 
same numbers: 499 and 599 are used for undergraduate and graduate "independent study"; 196 or 
496 for "student-to-student tutorials"; 597 for a graduate "project"; and 598 for a graduate "thesis." 
The course numbers for senior seminars are not so uniform but they tend to be numbered 485, 490, 
491 or 495. 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NOTATIONS 

Certain notations are uniformly used in the course descriptions in this catalog. 

1 . The figure in parentheses following the course title indicates the number of semester units for the 
course. Courses offered for varying units are indicated as (1-3) or (3-6). 

2. A course listing such as Afro-Ethnic Studies 108 (3) (same as Linguistics 107) indicates that 
although Linguistics is the parent department the course is cross-listed by the Afro-Ethnic Depart- 
ment and a student taking the course can choose to count it in either of those two disciplines. 

3. A notation such as (Formerly 433) following the course title and the number of units indicates 
the same course previously was numbered 433. 

STUDENT-TO-STUDENT TUTORIALS 

The "student-to-student tutorial" provides a formal way to encourage students to learn through 
teaching. It also extends tutoring to all of the kinds of students who need and want tutorial assistance. 
Each department will decide whether or not it wishes to offer this course. Departments choosing 
to offer the student-to-student tutorial course will follow the rules listed in the following course 
description. 

The course numbers will be 1 96 or 496, and one to three units of credit can be given for each course. 
Prerequisites: A 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or consent of instructor; simultaneous enroll- 
ment in the course or previous enrollment in a similar course or its equivalent. One to three students 


88 Library Courses 


may be tutored by the tutor unless the instructor decides that special circumstances warrant increas- 
ing the usual maximum of three tutees. Three hours of work are expected for each unit of credit, 
and this work may include, apart from contact hours with tutees, such other activities as: tutorial 
preparations; consulting with instructors; reporting, analysis and evaluation of the tutorial experi- 
ences; and participation in an all-university orientation and evaluation program for tutors. A max- 
imum of three units can be taken each semester and nine units of any combination of 196 and 496 
for an undergraduate program. This course must be taken as an elective and not counted toward 
general education, major or minor requirements. The course can be taken on a credit/ no credit basis 
by the tutor. Requests for tutors must be initiated by tutees and can be initiated up until the official 
university date for dropping a class with a W. Tutors electing to respond to such requests will receive 
credits at the end of the semester and can register in the course until the official university date for 
dropping a class with a W. Both tutors and tutees must submit written reports, analyses and 
evaluations of their shared tutorial experience, and both must participate in an all-university orienta- 
tion program as well as in any conference or critiques that the instructor of the course may require. 
Further information can be obtained from the department in which the student is interested in 
"student-to-student tutorials." 


INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Under the independent study program, the upper division student can pursue topics or problems 
of special interest beyond the scope of a regular course under the supervision of a faculty adviser. 
The work is of a research or creative nature, and normally culminates in a paper, project, compre- 
hensive examination, or performance. Before registering, the student must get his topic approved 
by the instructor who will be supervising independent study. The catalog numbers of independent 
study in departments are 499 and 599. Independent study courses may be repeated. A student 
wishing to enroll in more than six units of independent study in any one semester must have the 
approval of his major adviser and of the chair of the department (s) in which the independent study 
is to be conducted. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDY COURSES 

Cal State Fullerton students under The California State University and Colleges International Study 
Programs register concurrently at Cal State Fullerton and at the host institution abroad, with credits 
assigned to the student which are equivalent to courses offered at Cal State Fullerton. Undergraduate 
students who discover appropriate study opportunities at the host Institution but no equivalent 
course at Cal State Fullerton may use Independent Study 499 and International Study 292 or 492. 
Graduate students may use Independent Graduate Research 599 and International Study 592. 

292 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-6 lower division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

492 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 upper division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

592 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): (1-3 graduate units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University and Colleges International Programs. Study 
undertaken in a university abroad under the auspices of The California State University and 
Colleges. 

LIBRARY COURSES 

201 Introduction to Library Resources (1) 

Library materials and methods enabling undergraduate students to locate information for course- 
related, as well as independent study and research. 

300 Elements of Bibliographic Investigation (3) 

The elements of bibliographic research which will enable students to become sophisticated library 
users. The organization of knowledge in libraries, a survey of important research materials in 
various fields found in American libraries; how to prepare bibliographies and assemble informa- 
tion for term papers; and style manuals. 


Special Major Program 89 


302 Library Research Methods for Specific Majors (1) 

Library research methodology in special subject areas such as science and music. 

403 History of Books and Printing (3) (Formerly Library Science 538) 

Written communication devices. North American picture writing Mesopotamian clay tablets, leather 
and papyrus books of the classifical world through medieval manuscripts to modern phototype- 
setting and photo-offset 

CROSS-DISCIPLINARY UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS 

There are two types of cross-disciplinary university programs: joint degree programs and non-degree 
programs. The joint degree program is an endeavor involving two or more existing academic 
departments which need not be within the same school. Such programs are administered by program 
councils composed of representatives elected by participating departments. The joint degree pro- 
grams are housed in administration units as follows: 

School of Human Development and Community Service 

Child Development, B.S. 

Human Services, B.S. 

School of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Latin American Studies, B.A. 

Liberal Studies, B.A. 

Russian and East European Area Studies, B.A. 

Social Sciences, M.A. 

School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering 

Computer Science, B.S., M.S. 

Environmental Studies, M.S. 

The degree descriptions are located within the appropriate schools. 

BILINGUAL/CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES 

Students may pursue a course of study with a bilingual /cross-cultural emphasis. 

Complete course listings and details are available from the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures, the Department of Chicano Studies, and Educational Opportunity Program advisers. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER 

The goals of this center are to foster academic community and to promote academic excellence 
through encouraging, coordinating, and when necessary negotiating: (a) multidisciplinary teaching 
and scholarship; (b) development of interdisciplinary perspectives among those individual faculty 
who find them appropriate for their academic disciplines; (c) departmental and joint degree pro- 
gram interaction with Interdisciplinary Center activities; and (d) development of Interdisciplinary 
Center courses. 

Participants in this program will have the special privilege of interacting with several schools and 
faculty from numerous and diverse departments. This will enable them to examine a single topic from 
the perspective of different disciplines. 

SPECIAL MAJOR PROGRAM 

From the total curriculum of the university, students may wish to plan a specially designed program 
of study that does not duplicate significantly any existing major or concentration. The special major 
provides opportunities for selected students to pursue individualized programs of study leading to 
a degree when legitimate academic and professional goals can be satisfied by a judicious selection 
of courses from two or more fields, and when these aims cannot be satisfied by the authorized 
standard degree majors or double majors that are available on the campus (e.g., liberal studies, social 
sciences). This major, designed for exceptional cases of individual students only, provides an 
opportunity to develop concentration or specializations outside the framework of existing majors. 
(It is not intended as a means of bypassing normal graduation requirements or as a means by which 
students may graduate who fail to complete the degree in which they are enrolled. ) 


90 Special Major Program 


B.A. SPECIAL MAJOR 

1. Students desiring to work for a bachelor's degree with a special major will consult with the 
Interdisciplinary Center Office and fill our initial request form available at the Interdisciplinary 
Center Office. 

2. Entrance to the special major program is normally at the beginning of the junior year. Under 
no conditions may a student enter the special major with less than 60 units remaining for 
graduation). 

3. The minimum requirement for the major is 48 units. A minimum of 36 upper division units must 
be included in the major. 

4. Although students may include on their study plans course work in progress and a maximum 
of 1 2 units of course work completed prior to the time of filing, approval of these courses is not 
automatic. 

5. No more than six units of 499 (Independent Study) and/or internship course work may be 
included in the major. 

6. Neither lower nor upper division courses applied to general education breadth requirements will 
be applicable toward the major. 

7. At least three units of appropriate course work in methodology shall be included in the student's 
study plan, where appropriate this requirement may be waived by the Interdisciplinary Center 
Board. 

8. All courses in the major must be taken under Grade Option 1. A GPA of 3.0 in the major is 
required for graduation. 

9. Prior to taking any substitute course work a petition for change of the study plan must be 
approved by the student's adviser and the current director of the Interdisciplinary Center Board. 

10. A "senior paper" shall be written by the student in this program during the semester preceding 
graduation. This paper should show scholarly evidence of the merit in the student's choice of 
an interdisciplinary program. This paper shall be written under the direction of the student's 
special major adviser and approved by the faculty designated by the departments represented 
on the student's study plan. 

M.A. SPECIAL MAJOR 

1 . A graduate student desiring to work for a master's degree with a special major will consult with 
the Interdisciplinary Center Office and fill out an initial request form available at the Interdiscipli- 
nary Center Office or the university Graduate Office. 

2. Entrance to the special major program requires a grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 in the 
undergraduate major and a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 units of course work. 

3. The minimum requirement of units in the special major program is 30 units of which at least 
half must be graduate courses (500 level). 

4. Although students may include on their proposed study plan course work in progress or com- 
pleted prior to the time of filing, approval of these courses is not automatic. No more than nine 
units of course work taken prior to classified standing can be approved on the program. 

5. The program may contain no more than 6 units of Independent Study, Project or Thesis. 

6. All courses on the study plan must be taken under Grade Option 1. A GPA of 3.0 is required 
on all work on the study plan. 

7. Prior to taking any substitute course work, a petition for change of the study plan must be 
approved by the student's graduate adviser, the Interdisciplinary Center director and the dean 
of graduate studies. 

8. A thesis or project shall be required for the completion of the program. The completed thesis 
will be filed with the Library, whereas the project shall be filed with the Interdisciplinary Center 
Office. 

For further information, consult the director of the Interdisciplinary Center. 

Note: This program will be reevaluated during the spring semester of 1980 to determine whether 

it should be continued or revised. If discontinued, students who are classified at that time will be 

allowed to complete the degree. 



THE ARTS 


92 


SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 

Dean: Jerry Samuelson 
Associate Dean: Donald R. Henry 


DEPARTMENT OF ART 

FACULTY 
Donald Lagerberg 
Department Chair 

Robert Caddes, Alvin Ching, Eileen Cowin, Darryl Curran, Henry Evjenth, Robert Ewing, Dextra 
Frankel, Carmel Goode, Maurice Gray, Ray Hein, Thomas Holste, George James, Claude Kent, G. 
Ray Kerciu, Ruth Kline, Naomi Knox, Clinton MacKenzie, Robert Partin, Albert Porter, Leo Robinson, 
jerry Rothman, Jerry Samuelson,* Vic Smith, Jon Stokesbary, Vincent Suez, Connie Zehr. 

The Department of Art offers a program which includes the scholarly fields of art history, theory, 
analysis and criticism; the studio fields of drawing and painting, printmaking, sculpture, crafts 
(including fibers, jewelry, wood and metal), ceramics (including glass), graphic design, illustration, 
environmental design, exhibition design, and creative photography; and the single subject teaching 
field of art education. 

The general objective of the art program is to provide a comprehensive learning environment which 
contributes technically and conceptually to the development of the creative artist, the art scholar, 
and the art teacher. More specifically, the art program provides opportunities for students: ( 1 ) to 
develop a knowledge and understanding of fundamental visual experiences and concepts basic to 
many forms and fields of art; (2) to develop a critical appreciation of historical and contemporary 
art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values; (3) to express creatively one's 
personal experience and thought with skill and clarity in visual terms; and (4) to develop those 
understandings and skills necessary to pursue graduate studies in the field, to qualify for a position 
in business and industry as an art specialist, or to teach art in the schools. 

Although the art program is oriented primarily toward the art professional, the department also offers 
courses for the non-art major and the art minor which enrich visual experiences and understandings. 
Art department advisers will recommend courses which provide skills and concepts for the non- 
professional and which relate the visual arts humanistically to culture, environment, consciousness 
and perception. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

Three different program plans meet the individual interest and needs of students working for the 
bachelor of arts degree in art. In the development of specific course offerings which make up these 
different program plans, it is the concern of the art faculty that each plan contains: ( 1 ) basic courses 
in art history, theory, analysis, criticism and studio practice which have as their primary focus the 
study of broad, fundamental concepts and skills underlying many fields of art; (2) specialized 
courses which provide concentration preparation in depth in a single field of art. The teaching of 
art history, theory, and criticism is not confined to courses bearing that title. Rather, each studio 
course involves theory and analysis as well as the practice of art, includes as part of its content the 
study of related art-historical concepts and form, and has as part of its purpose the development 
of critical abilities necessary to understanding and evaluating art. 

Plan I is for students specializing in art history, theory analysis and criticism and is particularly 
recommended for those students who wish to pursue graduate studies in art history or museology. 
Plan II is for students specializing in studio performance with a preprofessional orientation an area 
of specialization selected from: (1) drawing and painting; (2) printmaking; (3) sculpture; (4) crafts 
(including emphases in fibers, jewelry, wood or metal); (5) ceramics (including emphasis in glass); 
(6) graphic design; (7) illustration; (8) environmental design; (9) exhibition design; and (10) 
creative photography. 

Plan III is for those students who wish to meet the requirements for single subject instruction (Ryan 
Act) for teaching art in grades K-12. 


University administrative officer 


Art 93 


Plan I requires a minimum of 60 units in art or approved related courses with a minimum of 36 units 
of upper division in art. Plan II requires a minimum of 60 units in art with a minimum of 33 units 
of upper division in art. Plan III requires a minimum of 54 units of art including a minimum of 27 
units of upper division art. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other university 
requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III must meet any specific 
requirements for the desired teaching credential (see section in catalog for School of Human 
Development and Community Service). 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, students must have a C or better in all 
courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major 


courses in which a grade of D is obtained. 

PLAN I: ART HISTORY Units 

Preparation for the Major: 201 A, B (6 units); 6 units of studio courses; approved 
electives (12 units) in art, American studies, anthropology, foreign languages, 

history, literature, music, philosophy, or theater 24 

The Major: 24 units of upper-division art history to be taken from the following: 301, 

302, 411, 412, 420A, 420B, 431, 432, 451, 452; 481 (3 units); and 9 units of 
approved upper-division electives 36 

PLAN II: STUDIO 
Drawing and Painting 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B; 117(3 units); 201 A, B and 207A,B 27 

The Major: Art 307A,B; 317A,B; 487A,B or C (6 units); 6 units of upper division art 

history and 9 units of art electives 33 

Printmaking 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B, 117 (3 units); 201 A, B; 247; and 3 units 

of art electives 27 

The Major: Art 347A,B; 487D (6 units); 307 A; 31 7A; 6 units of upper division art history; 

and 9 units of art electives 33 

Sculpture 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); 201 A, B; 216A,B 27 

The Major: Art 316A,B; 336A,B; 486 (6 units); 6 units of upper division art history; and 

9 units of art electives 33 

Crafts 

Preparation for the Major — General Crafts, Jewelry/ Metalsmithing and Fibers: Art 1 03; 

104; 107A,B; 201 A, B; 205A; and 6 units selected from 106A; 117 (3 units); 123B; 

205B; or 21 6A 27 

Preparation for the Major — Wood: 103; 104; 107A,B; 201 A, B; 205A,B, and 3 units 

selected from 106A; 117 (3 units); 123B; or 216A 27 

The Major — General Crafts: Art 305A; 325A; 330 or 355A or 365A; 6 units of upper- 
division art history; 1 2 units selected from Art 305B; 31 5B; 325B; 485A; 485B; 485C; 

485D; 485E or 485F; and 3 units of art electives 33 

The Major— Jewelry / Metalsmithing: Art 305A; 315A,B; 325A,B; 6 units of upper-divi- 
sion art history; 9 units from 485A and/or 485C; and 3 units of art electives .... 33 

The Major— Wood: Art 305A,B; 31 5A; 325A; 6 units of upper-division art history; 9 

units of 485B; and 6 units of art electives 33 

The Major— Fibers: Art 330; 355A,B; 365A,B; 6 units of upper-division art history; 6 

units from 485D, 485E or 485F; and 6 units of art electives 33 

Ceramics 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 106A,B; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); 201 A, B 27 

The Major: Art 306A,B; 326A,B or 426A,B; 484 ( 6 units); 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 9 units of art electives 33 

Graphic Design 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); 201 A, B; 223 A, B 27 

The Major: Art 323 A, B; 338A; 363 A; 483 A (6 units); 6 units of upper division art history; 

and 9 units of art electives 33 

Illustration 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107 A, B; 117 (3 units); 123A; 201 A, B; and 3 
units of art electives 


94 Art 


27 


The Major: Art 317A,B; 323 A; 363 A, B; 483C (6 units); 6 units of upper division art 

history; and 6 units of art electives 33 

Environmental Design 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107 A,B; 123B; 201 A, B; 21 3A; and 3 units of 

art electives 27 

The Major: 313A,B; 333A,B; 483B (6 units); 453A; 6 units of upper division art history; 

and 6 units of art electives 33 

Creative Photography 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); Art 201 A, B; 247; and 

3 units of art electives 27 

The Major: 338A,B; 489 (6 units); 347A; 6 units of upper division art history; and 6 units 

selected from 323A, 363A, 307 A, 347B; and 6 units of art electives 33 

PLAN III: TEACHING 

Single Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 

(Qualifies for teaching art in grades K-12) 

Preparation for the Major: Art 103; 104; 107A,B; 117 (3 units); 201A,B; 205A; and 206A 27 

The Major: (Select one of the following areas) 

Drawing and Painting: 507 310A; 317A; 338A; 347A; 402 or 411 or 412; and 441 A, B 27 

Crafts: 305A; 306A,B, 307A or 310A; 315A; 330; 402 or 411 or 412; and 441 A, B 27 

Graphic Design and Photography: 307 A or 310A; 323 A, B; 338 A, B; 363 A; 402 or 41 1 

or 412; and 441 A, B 27 

Professional Preparation 

Art Ed 442 3 

Education course work 9 

Student teaching (one semester full time) 12 


Program Requirements: 

1. Assignment by the Art Department chair to a faculty adviser in art education. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in this catalog within the School of Human 
Development and Community Service for the curriculum pertinent to the Ryan 
Act provisions. 

3. Meet the requirements listed under Plan III, Teaching for the bachelor's degree 
in art. 

4. Completion of the major requirements prior to enrolling in the teacher education 
program. 

5. Admission to teacher education through the School of Human Development and 
Community Service is required prior to enrollment in Art Ed 442 and student 
teaching. 

6. Acceptance for teacher education and student teaching is based on candidate 
quotas, a review of a candidate's portfolio of art work, and evidence of success 
in completed university course work. 

7. Recommendation by the faculty adviser in art education. 

Upon completion of the above program and the bachelor of arts degree, the student 
is eligible for a partial credential, which meets state requirements for teaching in grades 
K-12. Within a specified period of time from the beginning of a teaching assignment, 

30 units of course work must be completed at an accredited college or university to 
qualify for a full credential. Credentials are issued from the institution where this unit 
requirement has been completed. 

Multiple Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in 
the elementary schools in multiple subject classrooms: 

Units 


Art 380 3 

Music 333 3 

Theatre 402 _3 

9 


The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any student who wishes 
to expand his/her knowledge in any or all of the arts: 


Art 95 


Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 107A, 115, 201 A, B, 310A,B, 330, 380, and 441 A, B 
Music 1 1 1 A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281A,C,E,G, 283A, 381 B, 435 

Theatre 100, 101, 112, 122, 132, 142, 162, 206A,B, 263, 276A, 277, 323A,B, 370A,B, 402A,B, 403A,B, 
422 

MINOR IN ART FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

A minimum of 24 units is required for a minor in art for the bachelor of arts degree of which a 
minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. Included in the program must be a basic 
course in each of the following areas: (1 ) art history, theory, analysis and criticism; (2) design; (3) 
drawing and painting; and (4) crafts. Those students planning to qualify for a standard teaching 
credential with specialization in elementary or secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain 
approval from the Art Department for the courses selected to meet the upper division requirements 
for a' minor in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


ART COURSES 

100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Use of a variety of art materials, processes, and concepts. Field trips required. Not open to art majors 
for credit except by permission of Art Department. (6 hours activity) 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

Historical and contemporary art forms. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and design. Field trips 
required. Not open to art majors for credit except by permission of Art Department. 

103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

Materials, concepts, and elements of two-dimensional visual organization (6 hours activity) 

104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

Materials, concepts, and elements of three-dimensional visual organization (6 hours activity) 

106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Form as related to ceramic materials, tools, processes. Kiln loading and firing, hand building, wheel 
throwing and raku. (6 hours activity) 

106B Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 106A. Form as related to ceramics. Glaze batching, and its application, and the 
presentation of ceramic technique. (6 hours activity) 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

The traditional and contemporary use of drawing and painting materials integrated with visual 
experiences and concepts. 107A emphasizes drawing; 107B emphasizes painting. (9 hours 
laboratory ) 

117 Life Drawing (1) 

The live model. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units. (3 hours laboratory for each unit) 

123A,B Descriptive Drawing (3,3) 

Traditional and contemporary drawing techniques and theories. 123A, representation of nature 
forms; 123B, manmade and mechanical forms including linear perspective. (9 hours laboratory) 

201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

The ideas, forms and styles of the visual arts as they developed in various cultures from prehistoric 
time to the present. 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. Craft concepts, processes and 
materials and the development of esthetic forms based on function. (6 hours activity) 

205 B Beginning Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Art 104 may be taken concurrently. Woodworking concepts and 
processes and the development of wood into esthetic form based on function. (6 hours activity) 

207A,B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and Materials) (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 1 17, 107 A,B or equivalents. Traditional and contemporary methods and materials. 
(9 hours laboratory) 


96 Art 


213A Beginning Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Design methodology and communication skills in the environmental 
design field. (6 hours activity) 

213B Interior Space Planning and Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 21 3A or consent of instructor. The planning and organization of residen- 
tial and commercial interior space. 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 104. sculpture: The creative use of wood and metal, power equipment and hand 
tools. (6 hours activity) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. The history, design and use of letter forms; techniques for rough and compre- 
hensive layouts; the use of hand-lettered forms and handset type. (6 hours activity) 

226 Beginning Glass Forming (3) 

Hot glass laboratory equipment and techniques. Handling hot glass. (6 hours activity) 

247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B. Printmaking forms; litho, etching, woodcut and serigraphy. (6 hours activ- 
ity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

(Same as Theatre 288) 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

The developments in art from the Paleolithic to late antiquity. 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

The developments in art from the late antiquity through the Gothic. 

305 A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205A. Craft concepts, processes, and materials and the development of esthetic 
forms based on function. (9 hours laboratory) 

305 B Advanced Crafts: Wood (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 205B. Craft concepts and processes and the development of wood into utilitarian 
and esthetic form. (9 hours laboratory) 

306 A, B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 1 03, 1 04 and 1 06A,B. Forms and the creative use of ceramic concepts and materials; 
design, forming, glazing and firing. (6 hours activity) 

307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, 207A,B or equivalents. The concepts, materials and activities of 
drawing and painting, emphasizing individual growth, plan and craft. (9 hours laboratory) 

310A,B Painting for Teachers: Watercolor Media (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B or equivalents. An exploration of watercolor media related to varied subject 
and design applications. Provides skills related to school art programs. Includes field painting 
experiences. (6 hours activity) 

311 Art and the Modern Mind (3) 

The visual arts in modern thought. For the non-art major. Slide lecture and discussion. Art and the 
ideas and influences of McLuhan, Freud, Jung, Wittgenstein, Levi-Straus, Skinner, etc. 

312 History of Architecture (3) 

Architecture from antiquity to the present. Buildings and the societies which produced them, their 
symbolic content and their contributions to the evolution of western architectural tradition. 

31 3 A Environmental Design: Unit Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 213. Environmental design projects and the study of unit concepts. 
(6 hours activity) 

313B Environmental Design: Systems Concepts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 3 A. Environmental design projects and systems concepts. (6 hours activity) 

315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. Design and creation of 
jewelry. (9 hours laboratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 21 6A. Sculptural materials and processes. (9 hours laboratory) 

317A,B Advanced Life Drawing (3,3) 

Prerequisite: three units lower division life drawing. Drawing and painting from the live model. (9 
hours laboratory) 


Art 97 


321 Architecture Now (3) 

Architectural developments in Southern California: contemporary public and residential buildings 
and their historical sources. 

323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 223 A. Development and projection of ideas in relation to the technical, 
esthetic, and psychological aspects of advertising art. (6 hours activity) 

325A,B Metalsmithing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concurrently. Metalsmithing concepts, 
processes and materials; utilitarian forms, raising, silversoldering, forging, casting, engraving, 
chasing and repousse. (9 hours laboratory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 117 or consent of instructor. Development of ceramic technology into 
individual sculptural forms and techniques. (6 hours activity) 

327A,B Supergraphics (3,3) 

Environmental painting. Team and individual projects. Studio and lecture. A historical survey of 
environmental painting, concepts and techniques. (6 hours activity) 

330 Fibers and Fabrics, Non-woven Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104, or consent of instructor. Techniques using fibers and fabrics as an 
art form. Selected from stitchery, applique, quilting, basketry, knotting, crochet, felting and 
papermaking. (6 hours activity) 

333A Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 3B. Materials and structural concepts as design determinants. (6 hours activity) 

333B Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 333A. Change and growth as design determinants; experimental design concepts 
and methods. (6 hours activity) 

336A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 316A. Waxing, molding and metal casing techniques. Aluminum and bronze and 
the lost wax process. (9 hours laboratory) 

338A Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. The photographic media in personal expression. Historical 
attitudes and processes; new materials and contemporary esthetic trends. Field trips required. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

338B Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A. The photographic medium in personal expression. Historical and new proc- 
esses. Field trips required. (9 hours laboratory) 

347 A Printmaking — Etching (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107 A,B, 117, and 247. Concept development, exploration and materials involved 
in printmaking techniques. Includes etching, aquatint. (9 hours laboratory) 

347B Printmaking — Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, and 247. Concept development, exploration and materials involved 
in lithography. (9 hours laboratory) 

353 History of Textiles (3) 

The history of textiles: Pre-Columbian, Coptic and early Islamic textiles; Oriental fabrics; European 
tapestries; velvets and brocades; and American textiles such as Navajo blankets, quilts, printed 
and painted fabrics. 

355A,B Fibers: Fabric Printing and Dyeing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or B or consent of instructor. Design and fabric surfaces; printing and 
dyeing techniques applied to the creation of art works. (6 hours activity) 

363A,B Illustration (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107 A, B and 117. Story, book, magazine, and film illustration. (6 hours activity) 

364A,B Stained Glass (3) 

Leaded and stained glass; individual exploration, growth, planning and craftsmanship. 

365A,B Fibers: Weaving (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104 or 205A,B or consent of instructor. The use of a loom applied to the 
creation of art works through weaving techniques. (6 hours activity) 


4—78946 


98 Art 


373 Methods in Exhibit Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 123B. Exhibition Design: spatial concepts, modular systems, traffic pat- 
terns, and object visual criteria. Drawings, working and finished models, and material specifica- 
tions. 

380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Art concepts, materials, and processes as they relate to child development. (6 hours activity) 

401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of Arts or consent of instructor. Criteria and 
vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts. Lectures, readings, discussions, and 
exhibit and performance attendance. Descriptive and evaluative skills in music, art, theatre, 
dance and cinema criticism. 

402 Contemporary Art (3) 

Perspectives and esthetics in specific works of art and the relationship between art and society. 

411 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Painting and sculpture of the realism, impressionism, post-impressionism periods. 

412 Art of the 20th Century — 1900 to Present (3) 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphics and architecture. 

423A,B Film Animation (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B and 117. Esthetic and technical considerations of animation in 
the production of film. (6 hours activity) 

426A,B Glass Forming (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 206A,B, 306A, and consent of instructor. The chemistry, handling and manipulation 
of glass and its tools and equipment for the ceramic artist. (6 hours activity) 

431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance period. Lectures, discussion and field trips. 

432 Baroque and Rococo Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Baroque and Rococo period. Lectures, discussion and field 
trips. 

436 Erotic Art (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 201 A, B may not be used to satisfy the Art History requirement in the major. Artistic 
eroticism in social, esthetic and humanistic values. 

438A,B Creative Color Photography (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 338A,B. Concepts and techniques in creative color photography. Historical atti- 
tudes and contemporary trends. Personal involvement with the medium. 

441A,B Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B, 205A or consent of instructor. Exploring the art media used in 
secondary school art programs today. Materials for secondary art curriculum. Two and three 
dimensional media in subject matter applications. (6 hours activity) 

451 Oceanic Art (3) 

The styles of the aborginal people of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Indonesia. 

452 Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3) 

The art forms of West Coastal Africa and the Sudan, Niger River kingdoms, Yoruba kingdoms, 
Cameroon chieftainships, Congo tribes, Central Africa and East Coastal Africa. 

453A,B Exhibition Design (3,3) 

Technical and esthetic experience in problem-solving exhibition design concepts, evaluation, and 
design analysis. The production of exhibitions in the University Art Gallery, their selection, 
design, installation, lighting, and supportive interpretive material. (More than 9 hours labora- 
tory) 

461 A American Art: Colonial Period to the Late 19th Century (3) 

The historical development of painting and sculpture in America from the Colonial Period until the 
late 19th century. The role of the visual arts in helping to define, reflect and challenge American 
values and institutions. 

461 B American Art: Late 19th Century to the 1950's (3) 

Painting and sculpture in America from the late 19th century until the post-World War II period. The 
role of the visual arts in helping to define, reflect and challenge American values and institutions. 


Art 99 


463 Museum Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 453A, six units of art history or anthropology, and consent of instructor. Museums, 
their structure, function and operation. Museum governance, ethics, grant proposal preparation, 
conservation and educational programming. 

470 History and Esthetics of Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: 21 0A, B. Photography from ancient optical observations through 19th century inven- 
tion to 20th-century acceptance as an art form. Esthetic movement and influential innovators. 
Lectures, slides and class discussion. 

481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and evaluation in one area of art history and appreciation. 

483 Special Studies in Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 units in any one area 
in a single semester. 

483A Graphic Design (6 hours activity) 

483B Environmental Design (6 hours activity) 

483 C Design and Composition (6 hours activity) 

483D Exhibition Design (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

484A Special Studies in Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units in ceramics. Maximum of 12 units, but not more 
than three units in any one area in a single semester. (6 hours activity) 

484B Special Studies in Glass (3) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of six upper division units in glass. Maximum of 12 units, but not more than 
three units in any one area in a single semester. (6 hours activity) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper division units in designated area or consent of instructor. 
Maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units in any one area in a single semester. (6 
hours activity) 

485A Jewelry 

485 B General Crafts 

485C Metalsmithing 

485D Fibers — Weaving 

485E Fibers — Fabric Printing and Dyeing 

485F Fibers and Fabrics 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three 
units in a single semester. (6 hours activity) 

486A Modeling and Fabrication 
486B Casting 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper division units in drawing and painting and consent of instruc- 
tor. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units in any one area in a single semester. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

487 A Painting 
487 B Life Drawing 
487C Drawing 
487D Printmaking 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A,B. Photography as personal expression. Maximum of 12 units but no more 
than three units may be obtained in a single semester. (6 hours activity) 

490 Professional Seminar (3) 

Guest speakers from professions in the visual arts. A lecture/discussion seminar relevant to current 
issues and concepts in making and experiencing art. Topics will differ each semester. For the 
senior and graduate art major. 

498 Internship in Art (3) 

Work in a specific art field in business or industry. Must be senior standing. 

499 Independent Research (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in art with consent of department chair and written consent of instructor. 
May be repeated for credit. 


100 Art 


500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: classified standing. Problems and issues in art. Intellectual clarification and verbal 
articulation of individual intent as an artist. Oral and written material in support of the master's 
project. 

500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 500A. Directed research in the area of major emphasis. Oral and written material 
on historical backgrounds and developments in art as they relate to individual intent as an artist 
(stated in Art 500A) and in support of the master's project. 

501 Curatorship (3) 

Prerequisites: B.A. in art, anthropology or other major by special permission, and Art 481 and 463. 
The curator who collects, cares for and studies objects. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects 
listed below. Maximum of 12 units in each area, but no more than three units in any one area 
in a single semester. 

503A Graphic Design (6 hours activity) 

503B Environmental Design (6 hours activity) 

503C Design and Composition (6 hours activity) 

503D Exhibition Design (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development and evaluation of individual projects in 
ceramics. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. (6 hours 
activity) 

505 Graduate Problems in Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects 
listed below. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. (6 hours 
activity) 

505A Jewelry 

505 B General Crafts 

505C Metalsmithing 

505 D Fibers — Weaving, Fibers and Fabrics 
505E Fibers — Fabric Printing and Dyeing 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development, and evaluation of individual projects in 
sculpture. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. (6 hours 
activity) 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing and Painting (3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper division drawing and painting. Planning, development and evaluation 
of individual projects listed below. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three units in a single 
semester. (9 hours activity) 

507 A Painting 
507B Life Drawing 
507C Drawing 
507D Printmaking 

511 Seminar on the Content and Method of Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 481. Methods of research, bibliography, and theories and philosophies of art 
historical scholarship. 

512 Seminar on Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: appropriate upper division Art course approved by instructor and Art 511 or consent 
of instructor. Analysis and evaluation of specific historical significance including cultural, social 
and economic circumstances; maximum of 12 units but no more than 3 units in a single 
semester. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and recommendation of the student's gradu- 
ate committee. Art 500B may be taken concurrently with Art 597 on approval of instructor. 
Development and presentation of a creative project in the concentration beyond regularly 
offered coursework. 


Music 101 


598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 511, 512, written consent of instructor and recommendation of the student's 
graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate student in art with consent of department chair and written consent of instructor. 
May be repeated for credit. 


ART EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods, and materials including audiovis- 
ual instruction for teaching art in secondary school. Required before student teaching of majors 
in art for the standard teaching credential. 

449A Student Teaching Secondary School, Art (10) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act credential. See description and prerequisites 
under Division of Teacher Education. Concurrent enrollment in Art Education 449B required. 

449B Seminar in Secondary School Student Teaching, Art (2) 

Seminar for student teachers in art. The practical aspects of art instruction in secondary schools. 
Concurrent enrollment in Art Education 449A is required. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

FACULTY 
Benton Minor 

Department Chair 

Bruno Amato, Charles Baker, Martha Baker, John Benham, David Berfield, Carole Chadwick, An- 
drew Charlton, Keith Clark, John Cooksey, M'lou Dietzer, Rita Fuszek, J. Justin Cray, Su Harmon, 
Nors Josephson, Burton Karson, Leo Kreter, Michael Kurkjian, Joseph Landon, Cary Maas, 
Benton Minor, Cordon Paine, Jane Paul, Lloyd Rodgers, Preston Stedman, Robert Stewart, 
David Thorsen, Laurence Timm, Rodger Vaughan, Mary Mark Zeyen. 

PART TIME 

Kalman Bloch (clarinet), Kay Brightman (bassoon), Ken Foberg (trombone), Patricia Carside 
(flute), Robert Grayson (voice), Roger Greenberg (saxophone), Sylvia Greenfield (flute), 
David Grimes (guitar), Esther Jones (organ), Myra Kestenbaum (viola), Stephen Klein (tuba), 
John Lasser (clarinet), Joan Lunde (cello), Todd Miller (percussion & french horn), Linda 
Owen (strings/ music education), Richard Pattie (guitar), Thomas Pedrini (string bass), Jay 
Roberts (varsity band), John Sambuco (violin), James Stamp (trumpet), Mary Ellen Trefry 
(flute), Lori Ulanova (violin), Leigh Unger (piano), Earle Voorhies (piano), Scott Zeidel 
(guitar). 

The Department of Music offers courses for both majors and non-majors. The fundamental purpose 
of the music curriculum is threefold: ( 1 ) to promote excellence in all aspects of music and academic 
course work; (2) to provide basic preparation for careers in music; and (3) to promote interest in 
all musical and artistic endeavors in the university and the surrounding community. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

1. All entering music majors must register for the Bachelor of Arts degree program for the first 
semester of residence. Students may change the degree objective to the Bachelor of Music 
program upon completion of at least one semester of course work at the university, successful 
completion of an examination in applied music and recommendation of the coordinator in the 
appropriate area of concentration. 

2. A placement audition in the principal performance area (student's voice or instrument), and 
proficiency examinations in theory and basic piano will be given to all music majors at the time 
of entrance to the university. Each student must pass the proficiency examination in theory and 
basic piano before being approved for graduation. The basic piano requirement may be 
satisfied by successful completion of Mu 282 B. Students deficient in any of the above areas 
should take additional course work. 

3. Each music major must declare a single principal performance area with the approval of a 
faculty adviser who will be assigned upon completion of the placement audition at the time 
of entrance. Before being approved for graduation, each student must achieve at least the 300 
level of performance proficiency in the area of principal performance. 


102 Music 


4. Each music major is required to present a senior recital appropriate to the degree program 
before being approved for graduation. In the music history and theory, conducting, composi- 
tion, accompanying and musical theatre programs, this requirement may be met by some 
means other than a conventional recital. All B.M. junior recitals and B.A. senior performance 
recitals are fulfilled under Mu 398. B.M. senior recitals and B.A. recitals in history, theory, and 
conducting are done under Mu 498. Consult the appropriate coordinator for information. 

5. All undergraduate music majors are required to participate in a major performance ensemble 
(band, orchestra, opera or chorus) every semester. Students who declare wind or percussion 
as principal performance area must register for band (or orchestra, if designated by the 
instrumental coordinator); string majors must register for orchestra; and voice majors must 
register for chorus (or opera, if designated by the choral-vocal coordinator). A music major 
whose principal performance area is piano, organ or guitar shall be assigned to an appropriate 
major performance ensemble (361 series) by his faculty adviser. 

6. The principal performance area for the major in music requires work in applied music, as 
follows: 

a. Music majors (except those covered in 6b below) must complete a minimum of six 
semesters (eight semesters for the Bachelor of Music) of applied music in the principal 
performance area. (Maximum applied music units: B.A. — 8; B.M. — 14) 

b. A student pursuing the Bachelor of Music (Composition) or the Bachelor of Arts (Music 
History and Theory ) may reach the 300 level in applied music before using all of the units 
designated in the degree requirements for that purpose. If the 300 level is reached before 
the required units in applied music (principal performance area) are expended, the 
remainder of these units may be satisfied by music major electives. A music history and 
theory major may elect additional units in applied music only upon the recommendation 
of the adviser and the coordinator in the area of performance, and with the approval of 
the coordinator of applied music. The composition major must also complete six units 
of composition beyond Mu 422A culminating in the successful presentation of a senior 
recital of the student's own compositions. 

c. A student pursuing the Bachelor of Music (instrumental, keyboard, voice or accompany- 
ing specializations) must achieve the 300 level of performance proficiency before giving 
the junior recital, and must achieve the 400 level before giving the senior recital, and may 
not receive double lessons (two units) for more than three semesters at any given jury 
level. Specific information about jury level criteria is available in the Music Department 
Office. 

d. In order to receive state-funded lessons in applied music, an undergraduate student (with 
the exception of a student who is within six units of completing all degree requirements) 
must be enrolled for a minimum of six units, two of which must be in an academic area 
of music (any courses other than performing ensembles and applied music), must 
maintain a CPA in academic music courses of 2.0, and be making satisfactory progress 
toward a degree. If courses are dropped during the semester reducing his enrollment 
below the six-unit minimum, state-funded lessons will be withheld in a subsequent 
semester of enrollment. In order to receive state-funded lessons, the student also must 
be enrolled in an approved major performance ensemble or be excused from that 
requirement by means of a petition signed by the department chair. 

7. Senior transfer students entering Cal State Fullerton with a major in music, or graduate students 
in music entering to satisfy the legal waiver for teaching credentials are expected to complete 
a minimum of one semester of successful upper division work in music before they may be 
approved for admittance to teacher education. Required courses and competencies must be 
satisfied before endorsement by the faculty committee for acceptance in the credential pro- 
gram. 

8. All credential candidates are required to pass functional examinations in piano and voice (in 
addition to the piano proficiency described in 2 above) before being approved for admittance 
to teacher education. This requirement may also be satisfied by successful completion of Mu 
282B and 283. 

9. A music major must maintain a 2.5 grade-point average in major field course work at this 
institution in order to be approved for graduation. 

10. All exceptions to departmental or curricular requirements should be directed by petition to the 
department chair. 


Music 103 


MUSIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Music offers a variety of courses and programs leading to baccalaureate and 
graduate degrees in teaching and the professions. The baccalaureate degree may be earned in either 
of two degree programs (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Music). Within these patterns, a student 
will normally pursue an emphasis in liberal arts, music history and theory, music education, perform- 
ance, composition, accompanying. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts in Music shall consist of no fewer than 50 units, of which at least 29 shall be 
in the upper division. All Bachelor of Arts students must complete the basic requirements in lower 
and upper division and in addition select and complete the requirements listed in one of three 


options: Liberal Arts, Music History-Theory or Music Education. 

Basic Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Music 

Lower Division Units 

Music theory (Mu 111A,B, 211) 9 

Music literature (Mu 251) 3 

Applied techniques (Ensemble 4, Principal Performance Area 4) 8 

20 

Upper Division 

Music theory (Mu 31 9A, 320A)* 5 

Music history (Mu 351 A) _3 

8 

Liberal Arts Option 


This allows a student to take an academic major in music without being involved in 
a program of professional preparation. The curricular thrust is in the liberal arts tradition 
in music and can include in addition an emphasis in a non-music field as well. The 
degree emphasis is historically the oldest such study plan in music in higher education 
and represents a liberal arts response to the highly professional program of the Bache- 
lor of Music. 

Units 


Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Non-Professional Upper Division Aggregate 

Music Theory (Mu 316 or 318, 323A or 422A) 4 

Music History (Mu 352A, B) 6 

Conducting (Mu 391 A or 392A) 2 

Ensemble (Mu 361 ) 2 

t Electives in Music _8 

50 

Special Requirement: Senior Project 


Option 1 : Achievement of the 300 level of performance proficiency in the area of 
principal performance one semester in advance of the semester in which the student 
intends to graduate, plus the presentation of a brief recital in Instrumental, Keyboard 
or Vocal Workshop following that classification. Option 2: Achievement of the 200 
level of performance two semesters in advance of the semester in which the student 
intends to graduate, plus the preparation of a special project in the senior year cul- 
minating in a lecture, lecture-recital or other form of public presentation. This project 
should be an independent investigation into an area of special interest with minimal 
faculty guidance. The public demonstration will be presented before a faculty commit- 
tee, as is the case with senior recitals, and must be approved by that committee prior 
to graduation. 

Music History and Theory Option 

This is designed as a balanced program in music history and theory and provides 
suitable preparation for advanced degrees in theory, literature or musicology and basic 
preparation for advanced study in other fields, such as musical acoustics, music thera- 

• In the Music History and Theory Option. Mu 320B or 319C may be substituted for Mu 320A 

t Electives must include two units of music literature (Mu 451^160) and may not include more than two units of applied 
study (Mu 171-471). 


104 Music 


py, ethnomusicology, library science in music, and music in industry and recreation. Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music theory (Mu 316, 31 9A or C) 4 

Music history and literature (Mu 352A,B, 498, 499) 8 

Conducting and composition (Mu 391 A or 392A or 422A) 2 

Ensemble (Mu 361 ) 2 

Electives in music (conducting, history or theory) _6 

50 

Allied requirements for Music History and Theory Option 


1. An academic minor (20 units) with written approval of the history or theory 

coordinator. 

2. Foreign language, preferably German, to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level. 

b. Pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
or 

c. Completion of the second semester of the beginning university course in foreign 
language. 

Music Education Option 

This is designed to provide in-depth preparation for teaching in the California public 
schools under the provisions of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 


(Ryan Act). 

Instrumental Emphasis: Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281) 6 

Music theory (Mu 323A and 320B, 323B or 324) 4 

Conducting (Mu 391 A, 392A,B) 6 

Ensemble (Mu 361 ) _3 

50 

Vocal-Choral Emphasis: Units 

Basic requirement for the Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Diction for singers (Mu 390) 1 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281B,P,S,W) 4 

Conducting (Mu 391 A, B, 392A) 6 

Literature and interpretation (Mu 453A or B and 457A or B) 4 

Opera theatre (Mu 361 d) 1 

Ensemble (Mu 361) _3 

50 

General Music Emphasis: Units 

Basic requirements for Bachelor of Arts 28 

Music and child development (Mu 333) 3 

Conducting (Mu 391 A, B) 4 

Orchestral instruments (Mu 281B,P,S,W) 4 

Recreational instruments (Mu 381 B) 1 

Music in the classroom (Mu Ed 435) 3 

Music history (Mu 351 B) 3 

Ensemble (Mu 361 ) 3 

Electives in music 1 

50 

TEACHING CREDENTIAL PREPARATION 


Students desiring a California teaching credential in music must complete the following 
courses prior to enrolling in the professional education program as required by the 


Division of Teacher Education. Units 

Instrumental emphasis: Mu Ed 342, 399 1 4 

Choral-vocal emphasis: Mu Ed 342, Mu 354, 399 V 6 


Music 105 


Units 


* General music emphasis: Mu Ed 342, 399V, 441 7 

Students who wish to earn a teaching credential in addition to a Bachelor of Arts with 
a music education option must complete the following: 

Mu Ed 442 (3) and professional education courses Ed-TE 440F and 440S 9 

Student teaching, full-time 12 


21 

The following competency examinations must be passed prior to admission to teacher 
education: 

300 jury level 
Keyboard functional 
Voice functional 

Multiple Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all students intending to teach in 


the elementary schools in multiple subject classrooms: Units 

Art 380 3 

Mu 333 or 433 3 

Theatre 402 _3 

9 


The following additional list of courses would be strongly recommended for any 
student who wishes to expand his knowledge in the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, and 380 
Mu 100, 101, 1 1 1 A,B, 184A,B, 251, 281B,P,S,W, 283A, 381B, Mu Ed 435 
Theatre 100, 110, 112, 122, 132, 142, 152, 162, 163, 206A,B, 276A, 277, 316, 323, 
370A,B, 402, 403 41 0C and 422 • 

Minor in Music 

The minor in music may be used by persons whose majors are in other fields, or may 
be used to satisfy minor field requirements for elementary or secondary teaching 
credentials. A maximum of 12 units from the lower division may be included in work 
counted toward the music minor. The music minor requires a minimum preparation 
of 20 units. 


Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division Units 

Theory of music (selected from Mu 101, 1 1 1 A,B, 211 or any 300- or 400-level theory 

classes for which student is qualified) 6 

Music history and literature (Mu 100, 251, 350 or courses at the 400- or 500-level for 

which student is qualified) 5-6 

Applied techniques (selected from Mu 183, 184A,B, 281 B, P, S, W, 283 or any course 
in ensemble, conducting, piano, voice and orchestral instruments at the 300 or 400 

level for which student is qualified 8-9 

20 


Note: Students expecting to use the minor for teaching must complete four units of Mu 281 B, P, 
S, W and/or Mu 381 B Recreational Instruments, and a minimum of two units in an ensemble 
appropriate to their area of specialization. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This degree program is designed to provide training for the highly gifted students who show promise 
and capability of becoming professional performers and composers. 

This degree shall consist of no fewer than 70 semester units, of which at least 32 shall be in the upper 


division. 

Basic Requirements for the Bachelor of Music Units 

Music theory (Mu 111 A,B, 211) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 251, 351 A) 6 

Principal performance area (Mu 171) 2 

Major performance ensemble ( Mu 361 ) 4 

Senior recital (Mu 498) 1 

22 


Mu Ed 436 (3) recommended for elementary emphasis in addition to above. 


106 Music 


Composition Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 318, 319A and 319B or 319C, 320A,B, 323A, 422A) 17 

Music history and literature (Mu 352A,B) 6 

Conducting (Mu 391 A or 392A) 2 

* Principal performance area 4 

Applied composition 5 

Major performance ensemble ( Mu 361 ) 4 

Electives in music 10 

70 

Instrumental Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 319A, 323A, 422A) 11 

Music history and literature (351B or 352A,B) 3-6 

Principal performance area 10 

Recital (Mu 398) 1 

Major performance ensemble ( Mu 361 ) 4 

Conducting (392A,B) 4 

Chamber music 6 

Electives in music 6^ 

70 

Keyboard Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 319A, 422A) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 454A,B) 7-10 

Conducting (Mu 391 A or 392 A) 2 

Recital (Mu 398) 1 

Principal performance area 10 

Chamber music 3 

Accompanying (Mu 386) 1 

Pedagogy (Mu 372 or 373, 467 A, B) 5 

Electives in music 7-10 

70 

Voice Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 320A or B, 319A, 422A) 9 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 456, 457A,B) 10-13 

Recital (Mu 398) 1 

Principal performance area 10 

Major performance ensemble (2 units minimum in Mu 361 d) 4 

Diction (Mu 390A,B,C) 3 

Conducting (Mu 391 A) 2 

Pedagogy (Mu 468 A) 2 

Electives in music 4 -7 

70 

Allied requirement for voice specialization: 

Two foreign languages, each to be satisfied by one of the following: 


a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary school level, or 

b. A pass examination given by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completion of the second semester of the beginning university course in foreign 


language. 

Accompanying Specialization Units 

Basic requirements for the Bachelor of Music 22 

Music theory (Mu 316, 318, 319A, 320A or B, 422A) 11 

Music history and literature (Mu 351 B or 352A,B, 455, 457A) 8-11 


See 6b under Requirements of the Department of Music. 


Music 107 


Principal performance area 10 

Chamber music (Mu 363) 2 

Harpsichord class (Mu 372) 1 

Organ class (Mu 373) 1 

Sight reading (Mu 385) 2 

Accompanying (Mu 386) 2 

Conducting (Mu 391 A) 2 

Diction (Mu 390A,B,C) 3 

Recital (Mu 398) 1 

Electives in music 2^5 

70 


MASTER OF ARTS, MASTER OF MUSIC 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


MUSIC COURSES 

100 Introduction to Music (3) 

Musical enjoyment and understanding through a general survey of musical literature representative 
of styles and performance media. Music will be related to other arts through lectures, recordings 
and concerts. For non-music majors only. 

101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Basic theory and practical applications to improve music performance and listening skills. Includes 
sightsinging and relationship to keyboard and simple melodic instruments. For non-music ma- 
jors only. 

102 History of Jazz (3) 

Historical study of jazz music in America; chronological development and stylistic evolution with 
consideration of peripheral trends. Emphasis on listening. For non-music majors. 

103 History of Rock (3) 

Rock music around the world; its origins and the development of national styles. Emphasis on 
listening. For non-music majors. 

111A,B Diatonic Harmony (3,3) 

Diatonic harmony and musicianship. Includes scales and intervals, triads and their inversions, 
harmonizations, nonharmonic tones, modulation and dominant seventh chords. Includes sight- 
singing, dictation and keyboard harmonizations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

171, 271, 371, 471 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual study with approved instructor. Emphasis on tech- 
nique and repertoire. Music majors must register for a minimum of one unit per semester. 
Performance majors approved by jury recommendation should register for two units per 
semester, jury examination required. May be repeated for credit. 

172 Piano Class for Piano Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Group instruction in basic pianistic technique and repertoire. 
May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

174 Guitar Class for Guitar Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Group instruction in basic guitar technique and repertoire. 
May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

182 Piano Class for Music Majors (2) (Formerly 182A) 

Keyboard technique for students whose major performance instrument is not piano. (3 hours 
activity) 

183 Voice Class for Non-majors (1) 

Beginning and elementary techniques in singing for the non-music major. May be repeated for credit. 
(2 hours activity) 

184 A Piano Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 . Beginning and elementary piano techniques for the non-music major. (2 hours 
activity) 

184B Piano Class for Non-majors (1) 

Prerequisite: Art 184A or consent of instructor. Continuation of 184A. 

1% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Prerequisites: A 3.0 or higher grade-point average and/or consent of instructor and simultaneous 


108 Music 


enrollment in the course or previous enrollment in a similar course or its equivalent. Consult 
"University Curricula" in this catalog for more complete course description. 

211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 11 IB. Continuation of Mu 111 A,B; the chromatic practice of the 19th century. 
Secondary dominants; ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords; sequence, and chromatically 
altered chords. Includes sightsinging, melodic and harmonic dictation, and keyboard practice. 
Required of all music majors. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

251 Survey of Musical Literature (3) 

Literature of music in Western civilization. Open to minors and qualified students by consent of 
instructor. Students should be able to read music as a part of the analysis of form, design and 
style. Required of majors. (3 hours lecture) 

267 Observation in Applied Music (1) 

Prerequisites: piano major, sophomore standing. Observation of specialists in private music teaching, 
teaching techniques, materials, development of student and preparation for beginners, adult 
beginners, intermediate and early advanced students under the specialist in these areas. Re- 
quires written reports of activity in these areas. 

281B,P,S,W Orchestral Instruments (1/l,1,1) (Formerly 281a-g) 

Techniques and materials for classroom instruction in teaching orchestral instuments. One semester 
of Music 281B,P,S and W required for B.A. Music Education emphasis. Instrumental majors are 
required to take one additional semester of Music 281 B, S, and W. (3 hours activity) 

281 B Brass Instruments (1) (Formerly 281c,d) 

Trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone and tuba. Brass majors should normally complete 
requirements in one semester. 

281 P Percussion Instruments (1) (Formerly 281g) 

Snare drum and mallet-played instruments with related work on other standard percussion instru- 
ments. Percussion majors are exempt. 

281S String Instruments (1) (Formerly 281a,b) 

Violin, viola, cello and string bass. String majors should normally complete requirements in one 
semester. 

281 W Woodwind Instruments (1) (Formerly 281e,f) 

Flute, clarinet, saxophone, oboe and bassoon. Woodwind majors should normally complete 
requirements in one semester. 

282A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 182 or placement by instructor. Meets minimum piano proficiency requirements 
for degree. Keyboard technique for students whose major performance field is not piano. Not 
required for keyboard majors. (3 hours activity) 

283 Voice Class (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Recommended for credential candidates. Not required for 
voice majors. (2 hours activity) 

311 Advanced Harmony Skills (1) 

Prerequisites: Mu 211, audition and consent of instructor. Continuation of the laboratory work of 
Mu 211. For the advanced student. Ear training with exercises in singing and/or keyboard. May 
be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

312 Commercial Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 211. Harmonic practices in commercial music; stage band and jazz writing 
techniques. 

314 Special Projects in Commercial Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 312 or consent of instructor. Scoring for commercial bands including the stage 
band. May be repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture, one hour activity) 

316 16th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 21 1 or consent of instructor. Sixteenth-century counterpoint in two, three and four 
parts, covering motet, canon, double counterpoint. 

318 18th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 316 or consent of instructor. Eighteenth-century counterpoint in two, three and four 
parts, covering invention, canon, double and triple counterpoint and fugue. 

319A,B,C Form and Analysis (3,2,2) (Formerly 321A,B,C) 

Prerequisite: Mu 21 1 or consent of instructor. A — Analysis of structural elements of music such as 
motive phrase and period: binary, tenary, rondo, sonato allegro and larger musical forms in 


Music 109 

representative musical works. Required of all music majors. B — Continuation of A; larger 
musical works. C — Continuation of A and B; literature of the 20th century. 

320A,B 20th-Century Techniques (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 31 9A. Compositional practices of the 20th century; emphasis on written examples 
in the various styles, includes sightsinging, keyboard practice and dictation. A — Compositional 
techniques from 1 890 to 1 945. B — Compositional techniques since 1 945, to include the synthesis 
of sound. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

323A,B Orchestration (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 31 9A, 320 or consent of instructor. Writing and analysis of orchestral music. 

324 Scoring for the Band (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 323A or consent of instructor. Devices, techniques, and skills required to produce 
complete transcriptions for the contemporary public school wind band. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 101 or equivalent or successful completion of proficiency test. The relationship of 
music to child growth and development for the child from 5 to 12. Teaching-learning strategies. 
Field work in a neighboring public school. 

350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 100 or consent of instructor. Music in its relationship to general culture. A sociologi- 
cal approach; musical criticism and journalism, concert life, audience psychology and the 
political/religious/business aspects of the American musical scene. 

351A,B History and Literature of Music (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 211 and 251 or consent of instructor. A — The history and literature of Western 
music from early Creek through the Renaissance. B — The history and literature of music 
covering the Baroque, Classic, Romantic periods and the 20th century. Required of all music 
majors. 

352A,B History and Literature of Music from 1600 to the Present (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, or consent of instructor. A — The baroque and classic periods. B — The 
romantic period and 20th century. May replace 351 B. To fulfill music history requirements, both 
A and B sections of Mu 352 must be completed. Recommended to majors who intend to 
continue music study at the graduate level. 

353 Survey of Instrumental Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 392A. Thorough examination and analysis of beginning through advanced instru- 
mental literature. To develop skills in the use of materials for performance in public schools. 
For credential candidates. 

354 Survey of Public School Choral Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391 A. Examination and analysis of choral repertoire suitable for junior and senior 
high choruses. 

361a-w Major Performance Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of standard and contemporary music literature. Public concerts on campus 
and in the community each semester and participation is required. A concert tour may be 
included by some groups. (More than 3 hours major production) May be repeated for credit. 

361a Symphony Orchestra (1) 

Prerequisite: audition or consent of instructor. 

361b University Choir (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

361c University Concert Band (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

361 d Opera Theatre (1) 

Roles and representative excerpts from standard and contemporary operas and the musical, 
dramatic and language techniques of the musical theatre. Performance of operatic excerpts and 
complete operas. Also open to non-vocal majors. 

361e University Singers (1) 

Prerequisite: advanced voice students or those accepted by audition. 

361f University Wind Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: advanced wind and percussion students accepted by audition. 

361h Symphonic Band (1) 

Prerequisite: audition or consent of instructor. 


110 Music 


361m Men's Choir (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Performance of choral litrature. 

361 v Varsity Band (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The Varsity Band provides music for Titan football and basket- 
ball games, and, occasionally, other related activities. May be repeated for credit. 

361 w Women's Choir (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Performance of choral literature. 

362A Jazz Ensemble (1) 

Open by audition or consent of instructor. Public performances on campus and in the community. 

362C Vocal Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: audition. Study and performance of choral literature of the Renaissance and baroque 
periods. Public performance required. (2 hours activity) 

362D Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance of music written for the Percussion 
Ensemble. (2 hours activity) 

362E Brass Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance of music written for large brass choir/ 
ensemble. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

362G String Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: auditon or consent of instructor. Study and performance of string orchestra literature 
covering all periods of musical style. 

362 H Chamber Orchestra (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance of representative chamber orchestra 
literature. Open to university students and qualified adults in the community. 

3621 Instrumental Workshop (1) 

Application of instrumental technique to performance practices through lecture, demonstrations, 
master classes and ancillary recitals. Recommended for instrumental major each semester. 

362 K Keyboard Workshop (1) 

Weekly workshop performances by students, faculty and guests. Recommended for keyboard major 
each semester. 

362L Jazz Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: ability to read music. The commercial as well as artistic aspects of composing, arranging 
and improvisation. Melodizing harmony, the 32 bar song, composing and recording jingles, and 
the mechanics of jazz improvisation. 

362 P Choral Laboratory (1) 

Open by audition or with consent of instructor. Performance of choral literature for small vocal 
ensembles using student conductors. 

362 R Composition Workshop (1) 

Weekly workshop presentation by student composers, faculty and guests. 

362T Titan Chorus (1) 

Study and performance of choral literature from many periods and styles. One public performance 
required. For non-music majors. CR/NC Grading only. (2 hours activity) 

362V Vocal Workshop (1) 

Application of vocal technique to performance practices through lecture — demonstrations, master 
classes and ancillary recitals. Recommended for vocal major each semester. 

362X Beginning Opera Techniques (1) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of voice faculty. Arias for the beginning opera student, and fundamen- 
tals of stage movement. 

362Y Intermediate Opera Techniques (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of Libretti: Dramatic values, language and diction, stage 
movement and musical styles and traditions. Audition techniques for performance majors. 

362Z Advanced Opera Techniques (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Aria preparation, role study and character analysis. Musical style 
of contrasting arias; orchestral techniques; language and transliterations of libretti. 

363b-x Chamber Music Ensembles (1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string or keyboard students. Ensembles will study, read and perform 
representative chamber literature of all periods. (2 hours activity) 


Music 111 


363b Brass 
363g Guitar 
363k Keyboard 
363r Renaissance 
363s Strings 
363w Woodwind 
363x Saxophone 

367 Pedagogy Internship (1) 

Prerequisites: Mu 267 and 467A. Supervised internship in private piano teaching. 

372 Harpsichord Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano or organ or consent of instructor. The harpsichord as an 
instrument, the application of baroque stylistic characteristics, and training in the rudiments of 
continuo playing in ensemble with voices and instruments. (2 hours activity) 

373 Organ Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano or consent of instructor. The organ as an instrument, the playing 
techniques, and repertoire. The differences between piano and organ techniques. (2 hours 
activity) 

381B Survey of Recreational Instruments (1) 

Recreational instrument practices for credential candidates. Emphasis on recorder and guitar. (2 
hours activity) 

385 Keyboard Sight-reading (2) 

Prerequisite: 200-jury level in piano or organ or consent of instructor. Sightreading skills and proce- 
dures. Development of ability to read solo, ensemble and scores without hesitation at first sight. 
(4 hours activity) 

386 Piano Accompanying (1) 

Prerequisite: by audition only. Piano accompaniments for instrumentalists, vocalists and ensembles. 
Participation in rehearsals, recitals and concerts required. (2 hours activity) 

390A,B,C Diction for Singers (1,1,1) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Proper singing diction; may not be 
considered a substitute for formal language study. Examples from standard vocal literature 
explained through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. A — Italian. B — German. 
C — French. 

391 A, B Choral Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: one semester of voice class or consent of instructor. A — Principles, techniques and 
methods of conducting choral groups. Required of all music education majors. (4 hours activ- 
ity) B — Continuation of 391 A including laboratory work with class and vocal ensembles, using 
standard choral repertoire. (4 hours activity) 

392A,B Instrumental Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: two courses from 281B,P,S,W or consent of instructor. A— Principles, techniques and 
methods of conducting orchestral and band groups. Required of all music education majors. 
(4 hours activity) B — Continuation of 392 A, including laboratory experience in conducting 
instrumental groups, using standard instrumental literature. (4 hours activity) 

393 Music Instrument Care and Repair (2) 

The care and repair of band and orchestra instruments. Experience in the preventative maintenance 
of music instruments, and basic repairs which require a minimal amount of equipment, skill and 
time. 

3% Internship: Professional Experience (1-3) 

Fieldwork in music under supervision of resident faculty and professionals in the field. Requires 
minimum six hours fieldwork per week for each unit credit. May be repeated for credit to a 
maximum of six units. Open to all music students by consent of instructor. 

398 Recital (1) 

Corequisite: enrollment in Mu 362I,J,K, or R. Preparation and presentation of representative works 
in principal performance area. Students presenting junior recital under the B.M. degree or senior 
recital under the B.A. Music Education option will substitute this course for one unit of 371 in 
the semester of the recital presentation. 

400 Concert Music (1) 

Open to all students. Weekly performances by university students, faculty and performing organiza- 
tions, with lectures and discussions relative to the performing arts. Attendance required at 
additional concerts during the semester. Open to all students. May be repeated for credit. 


112 Music 


422A,B Composition (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 316, 31 9A and 320A or B or consent of instructor. A — Ear-training analysis of 
smaller forms, simple composition of two- and three-part song form styles. B — Analysis and 
writing of more complex musical forms. 

424 Practicum: Electronic Music Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Music 320B, 471 level in applied music composition and consent of instructor. Individ- 
ual and group instruction in electronic music composition. May be repeated once for credit. 
(3 hours laboratory) 

433 Music in Early Childhood (3) 

Prerequisite: ability to read and perform simple songs and games for young children. Songs, games, 
creative activities and materials suitable for young children in nursery school and early child- 
hood education (approximately 3-6 years). Teaching-learning strategies. Field work is con- 
ducted in a neighboring public school. 

451 Composer Survey (1) 

Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division theory courses. The life, times and compositions of 
a selected composer. May be repeated for credit with different content. 

452 Symphonic Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Music 320A and 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Historical survey of the symphony 
from Baroque antecedents through contemporary examples. (3 hours lecture) 

453A,B Choral Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisites: MU 391 A or equivalent and 351 A,B. A — Choral literature from the medieval, renais- 
sance and baroque eras analyzed in historical perspective. Appropriate performance practices. 
B — Continuation of A with representative examples from the classic, romantic and contempo- 
rary eras. 

454A,B Piano Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisites: 351 A, B and junior level piano standing or consent of instructor. Performance of 
representative styles and schools of piano literature; solo and ensemble repertoire. A — Con- 
trapuntal forms, sonatas and variations. B — Concerti, character pieces, fantasies, suites and 
etudes. 

455 Instrumental Chamber Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Open to all music majors, or to non-majors by consent of instructor. The class will be grouped into 
ensembles for demonstration purposes. The stylistic differences required in performing works 
of all periods. 

456 Opera Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. All periods and nationalities, including stylistic and 
historical connotations. 

457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390B or consent of instructor. Study and performance of German Lieder with 
representative examples of periods and styles. 

457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 390C or consent of instructor. Study and performance of French art songs with 
representative examples of periods and styles. 

458 Collegium Musicum Practicum (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Study and performance of rare and old music, both 
instrumental and vocal. Techniques of musical research. Students should be competent per- 
formers. 

459 Guitar Literature, Interpretation and Pedagogy (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in guitar or consent of instructor. The literature available to guitarists. 
Works for lute, vihuela and baroque guitar and the compositions and transcriptions for the 
modern guitar. Materials and methods essential for the guitar instructor. 

460 Interpretation of Early Music (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in principal performance area. The stylistic interpretations of vocal and 
instrumental literature from the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. For the senior or graduate student 
majoring in performance. (2 hours lecture) 

467A,B,C Piano Pedagogy (2,2,1) 

Prerequisite: junior piano standing or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of piano pedagogy for 
individual and group instruction. A — Materials and methods for beginning and elementary 


Music 113 


students. B — Materials and methods of intermediate and early advanced students. Physiology 
and psychology for studio teachers. C — Prerequisite: 467A or consent of instructor. Observation 
and practice teaching while learning organizational procedures, teaching techniques and course 
literature for class piano. 

468A,B Vocal Pedagogy (2,2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. A — Fundamentals of vocal pedagogy for studio 
and public school teaching; physiology and acoustics as they apply to singing. B — Application 
of the fundamentals discussed in A. Seminar discussions and actual studio teaching. The diagno- 
sis and cure of specific vocal problems. 

4% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Prerequisites: A 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or consent of instructor and simultaneous 
enrollment in the course or previous enrollment in a similar course or its equivalent. Consult 
"Student-to-Student Tutorials" in this catalog for more complete course description. 

497 Senior Project (1) 

Independent investigation of an area of special interest in music culminating in a public performance, 
lecture, lecture-recital or other suitable demonstration. 

498 Senior Recital (1) 

Prerequisites: 371 -level (471 -level for performance majors) and consent of instructor. Corequisites: 
concurrent enrollment in Mu 3621, K or R. Preparation and presentation of representative works 
in the principal performance area. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

A special topic in music selected in consultation with and supervised by the instructor. May be 
repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (2) 

Required of all graduate music majors. Basic bibliography, literature, and research techniques and 
materials useful in graduate music study. 

524 Seminar in Music Theory (2) 

Theoretical subjects (form/style analysis, history of music theory, etc.) to be chosen by instructor. 
May be repeated for credit. 

551 Seminar in Music of the Medieval Period (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The music forms, structures and styles from 500 to 1450. Analysis 
of representative works and the contributions of individual composers and theoretical writers. 

552 Seminar in Music of the Renaissance (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The forms, styles, and development characteristics of music 
between 1450 and 1600. Analysis of works by representative composers and theoretical writers. 

553 Seminar in Music of the Baroque Period (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Musical forms, styles, and performance practices 
of the baroque period. Analysis of representative works. 

554 Seminar in Music of the Classic Period (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A,B or consent of instructor. The history and literature of music from approxi- 
mately 1750 to 1825. Analysis of representative works. 

555 Seminar in Music of the Romantic Period (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The structure and development of music in the 19th century. 
Analysis of representative works. 

556 Seminar in 20th-Century Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 351 A, B or consent of instructor. Developments in the music of western Europe and 
the western hemisphere since 1890. Contemporary music and its structure. 

558 Collegium Musicum (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced studies in the performance of rare and old music. (See 
Mu 458 for general description.) May be repeated for credit. 

559 Composer Studies (2) 

The life, times and musical style of a selected composer. A seminar for graduate students in music; 
lectures, discussion sessions and analytical projects. Open to seniors in music by consent of 
instructor. May be repeated for credit with different content. 

571 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual instruction with approved instructor. Emphasis on 
performance techniques and repertoire. Required of all graduate students whose terminal 
project is the graduate recital. May be repeated for credit. 


114 Music 


591 Seminar in Advanced Choral Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 391 B, conducting experience or consent of instructor. Choral conducting tech- 
niques. Laboratory work with student groups and concert conducting. May be repeated for 
credit. 

592 Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Conducting and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisites: Mu 392B, keyboard facility for score reading and consent of instructor. Conducting 
techniques. Interpretive problems of each period covered in lectures. May be repeated for 
credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Systematic study and report of a significant undertaking in the area of musical composition, musical 
performance, or other related creative activity. A written critical evaluation of the work or 
activity will be required. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Individual investigations of specific problems in the area of concentration by candidates for the M.A. 
degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music and consent of instructor. Research and study projects in 
areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and written reports required. 


MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES 

2991 Clinical Practice in Instrumental Techniques (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of instrumental techniques classes, as in public and private 
schools. Co-enrollment in Mu 281 recommended. (3 hours weekly TBA in nearby school) 

299V Clinical Practice in Choral Techniques (1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of choral techniques classes, as in public and private schools. 
Co-enrollment in Mu 391 A recommended. (3 hours weekly TBA in nearby school) 

342 Practicum in School Materials and Techniques (3) (Formerly 342A and 342B) 

Corequisite: Mu Ed 3991 or 399V. For the music education major. Experience in the use of musical 
materials, conducting, organization and management. Observation and application of rehearsal 
and classroom techniques. 

3991 Clinical Practice in Instrumental Conducting (1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 2991. Clinical practice and field applications of concepts, materials and procedures 
as applied to field situations, as in public and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu Ed 342B. 

399V Clinical Practice in Choral Conducting (1) 

Prerequisite: Mu 299V. Clinical practice and field applications of concepts, materials and procedures 
as applied to field situations, as in public and private schools. Co-enrollment in Mu Ed 342A. 

435 Music in the Modern Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Mu 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of 20th-century materials and techniques of 
recordings for creative movement to music, and of choral materials and techniques appropriate 
for the elementary school choir. Adaptation of materials for use in classroom music. 

436 Orff Techniques for Children (3) 

Methods and techniques influenced by Carl Orff in teaching music for children. Rhythmic speech, 
song and movement. (2 hours lecture, 1 hour activity) 

441 Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, senior standing or consent of instructor. Objectives, 
methods and materials for teaching general music or allied art-humanities classes in secondary 
schools, including their relationship to specialized instrumental and choral programs. Practical 
problems and field work are included. 

442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. History, principles of public education, grades K— 1 2, 
with emphasis on music. Philosophy, methods, materials and procedures for organizing and 
teaching music in elementary and secondary schools. Must be taken concurrently with Ed-TE 
440 F and 440S. 

444 Administration, Materials for the Marching Band (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques, materials, administration for marching band. Chart- 
ing for the football field; parade activities. The needs of school bands. 


Theatre 115 


449A Student Teaching in Music in the Secondary School (10) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act credential. See description and prerequisite 
under. Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

Must be taken concurrently with MuEd 449A. For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act 
credential. See description and prerequisites under Division of Teacher Education. 

530 Practicum of Research in Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music and completion of Mu 500. Research techniques and 
procedures in music education. Research paper required. 

531 Foundations of Music Education (2) 

Prerequisite: Mu 500. Philosophical and historical bases which have influenced music education. 
Philosophic frames of leading educators. Contemporary trends. Prerequisite for all graduate 
music education courses. 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) 

The trends and application of educational theory in relation to the teaching of music in the public 
schools. 

544 Curriculum Planning and Construction in Music (2) 

Principles and practices of curriculum planning in music education; public elementary, junior and 
senior high school. Required of majors who seek supervision credential. 

^545 Leadership in Music Education (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. Philosophy, principles and practices of 
leadership in music in the public elementary and secondary schools. Modern principles of 
leadership, types of services, organization, management and evaluation of programs of instruc- 
tion. Required for all graduate students specializing in supervisory-leadership roles in music 
education. 


DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 

FACULTY 
Alvin Keller 

Department Chair 

Joseph Arnold, Wilson Barrilleaux, Ronald Dieb, Lynn Hachten, Susan Hallman, Donald Henry,* 
Dean Hess, Gretchen Kanne, Gladys Kares, Araminta Little, Michael McPherson, Sallie Mitchell, 
S. Todd Muffatti, Dwight Richard Odle, jerry Pickering, Arthur Rank, Robert Renee, Lee Scanlon, 
Dan Wilhelm, Ron Wood, James Young,* Allen Zeltzer 
The Department of Theatre program includes the several fields of playwriting, oral interpretation, 
acting-directing, technical theatre, theatre history and theory, television and dance. Specifically, the 
course work is arranged to provide opportunities for students ( 1 ) to develop an appreciation for 
the theatre; (2) to become aware, as audience or participants, of the shaping force of the theatre 
in society; (3) to improve the understandings and skills necessary for work in the theatre as a 
profession; (4) to prepare for teaching theatre; and (5) to pursue graduate studies. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in theatre, students must have a C or better in 
all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the major will be allowed for specific major 
courses in which a grade of D is obtained. In addition to course requirement, all theatre majors will 
enroll for two units of Theatre 478B each semester. 

Students who wish to transfer, for credit in the major, courses equivalent to Theatre 200, 276A,B, 
277 and 285 must pass a transfer equivalency examination in the specific courses. These examina- 
tions are administered at the beginning of each semester. Contact the Theatre Department office for 
the times at which the examinations will be administered. Theatre 200, or its equivalent, is a 
prerequisite for all upper division theatre courses taken for the major with the exception of Theatre 
478A,B. Transfer students may take Theatre 200 concurrently with their first semester of upper 
division courses. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

Course programs have been planned to meet the individual needs and interests of students working 
for the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Arts. 

Plan I is for those who wish to study theatre as a cultural contribution or who wish to pursue graduat 


University administrative officer 


116 Theatre 


degrees in theatre with emphasis in theatre history and theory. It is strongly recommended that 
students electing this plan support the major with approved electives from art, music, foreign 
languages, literature, philosophy or speech. 

Plan II is designed to develop competency for pursuing theatre as a profession, or for pursuing 
graduate degrees in theatre with an emphasis in an area of concentration other than history of the 
theatre. Areas of concentration are: playwriting; acting; directing; oral interpretation; television; 
technical theatre; and dance. 

Plan III meets the requirements of the teaching credential with specialization in secondary teaching. 
In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other university 
requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III must meet any specific 
requirements for the desired teaching credential. See description of secondary school teaching 
credential program under Division of Teacher Education. In addition, Plan III students should see 
the department's secondary education adviser regarding course sequence required for the single 
subject waiver. Those students who plan to work on the M.A. degree as well as the credential should 


see the chair of the Department of Theatre. 

PLAN I: THEATRE HISTORY AND THEORY EMPHASIS Units 

Lower Division: Theatre 110, Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3), Theatre 200, Art 
of the Theatre (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft 
(6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup 

(3) 18 

Upper Division: Theatre 310, Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3); Theatre 370A, 

Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D,E, World Theatre (15); 

Theatre 477 A, B, Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (6); electives (3 units).. 30 

PLAN II: PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS IN AN AREA OF CONCENTRATION Units 

Playwriting — 

Lower Division: Theatre 110, Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 200, Art 
of the Theatre (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft 
(6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup 
(3); Theatre 284, Introduction to Television Production (3) 21 


Upper Division: Theatre 364, Seminar in Playwriting (3,3), or Theatre 364 (3) and 
Theatre 365, Television/Film Writing (3); Theatre 370A,B, Fundamentals of Di- 
recting (6); Theatre 384, Television Production and Direction (3); Theatre 470A, 

Advanced Directing (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 

477A,B, Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (6) 36 

Oral Interpretation — 

Lower Division: Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 200, Art of the Theatre 
(3); Theatre 203, Oral Interpretation of Children's Literature (3); Theatre 241, 

Voice Production for the Performer (2,2); Theatre 251, Body Movement for the 
Actor (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A, Beginning Stagecraft (3); 

Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3) or Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (3) 25 

Upper Division: Theatre 310, Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3); Theatre 370A, 

Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 410A,B,C, Oral Interpretation of Prose, 

Poetry and Drama (9); Theatre 414, Readers Theatre (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, 

World Theatre (12) 30 

Acting — 

Lower Division: Theatre 110, Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 200, Art 
of the Theatre ( 3 ) ; Theatre 241 , Voice Production for the Performer ( 2,2 ) ; Theatre 
251, Body Movement for the Actor (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A, 

Beginning Stagecraft (3); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, 


Theatrical Makeup (3) 25 

Upper Division: Theatre 310, Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3); Theatre 363AB, 

Intermediate Acting (6); Theatre 370A, Fundamentals of Directing (3); Theatre 
463A,B, Advanced Acting (6); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); Theatre 
482, Acting for Film and Television (3) 33 


Completion of Physical Education 155, Beginning Fencing (1 ), is required of all acting 
majors. 

Television — 

Lower Division: Theatre 110, Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 184, 


Theatre 117 


Introduction to Radio and Television (3); Theatre 200, Art of the Theatre (3); 

Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft (6); Theatre 284, 

Introduction to Television Production (3) 21 

Upper Division: Theatre 365, Television/Film Writing (3), Theatre 370A, Fundamentals 
of Directing (3); Theatre 384, Television Production and Direction (3); Theatre 
386, Beginning Lighting (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D or E, World Theatre (6); Theatre 
484, Television Dramatic Techniques (3); Theatre 490, Television/ Film Aesthetics 


and Criticism (3) 24 

Electives: 9 units selected from Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, 

Theatrical Makeup (3); Theatre 288, Design for the Theatre (3); Theatre 387, 

Audio Techniques; Theatre 486, Advanced Lighting (3) 9 

Directing — 

Lower Division: Theatre 200, Art of the Theatre (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 
276A,B, Beginning Stagecraft (6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); 

Theatre 284, Introduction to TV Production (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup 

(3); Theatre 288, Design for the Theatre (3) 24 


Upper Division: Theatre 350, Organization for Production ( 1 ); Theatre 370A,B, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (6); Theatre 384, Television Production and Direction (3); 
Theatre 386, Beginning Lighting (3); Theatre 450, Theatre Management (3); 
Theatre 470A,B, Advanced Directing (6); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre 


02 ) 34 

Technical Production/Design — 

Lower Division: Theatre 200, Art of the Theatre (3); Theatre 276A,B, Beginning Stage- 
craft (6); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Make- 
up (3); Theatre 288, Design for the Theatre (3) 18 


Upper Division: Theatre 350, Organization for Production (1 ); Theatre 370A, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (3); Theatre 377, Stage Costuming (3); Theatre 379, Render- 
ing for the Theatre (3); Theatre 386, Beginning Lighting (3); Theatre 388, 
Historical Styles for Scene Design (3); Theatre 475A,B,C,D, World Theatre (12); 
Theatre 486, Advanced Lighting (3) Theatre 488, Advanced Design and Technol- 


ogy (3) 34 

Electives: 6 units selected from Theatre 284, Introduction to Television Production (3); 

Theatre 385, Advanced Theatre Makeup (3); Theatre 387, Audio Techniques (3) 6 

Dance — 


Lower Division: Theatre 112, Beginning Classical Ballet (2); Theatre 122, Beginning 
Modern Dance (2); Theatre 126A,B, Improvisation (4); Theatre 200, Art of the 
Theatre (3); Theatre 212, Intermediate Classical Ballet (2); Theatre 222, Interme- 
diate Modern Dance (2); Theatre 226, Rhythmic Analysis (3); Theatre 277, 

Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup (3) 24 

Upper division: Theatre 323A,B, Dance Composition (6); Theatre 372, Dance Kinesiol- 
ogy (3); Theatre 374, Dance in Cultural Perspective (3); Theatre 386, Beginning 
Lighting (3); Theatre 422, Advanced Modern Dance (3); Theatre 423, Advanced 
Dance Composition (3); Theatre 424, Fundamentals of Dance Instruction (3); 3 
units selected from Theatre 471, Creative Dance for Children (3); Theatre 474, 

Forces and Figures in 20th Century Dance (3); 6 units selected from Theatre 387, 

Audio Techniques (3); Theatre 414, Readers Theatre (3), Theatre 450, Theatre 


Management (3); Theatre 486, Advanced Lighting (3) 33 

PLAN III: TEACHING EMPHASIS (Single Subject) Units 

Lower Division: Theatre 110, Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3); Theatre 200, Art 
of the Theatre (3); Theatre 263, Acting (3); Theatre 276A, Beginning Stagecraft 
(3); Theatre 277, Costume Fundamentals (3); Theatre 285, Theatrical Makeup 

(3); Theatre 288, Design for the Theatre (3) 21 

Upper Division: Theatre 350, Organization for Production (1 ); Theatre 370A,B, Funda- 
mentals of Directing (6); Theatre 386, Beginning Lighting (3); Theatre 402A, 

Dramatic Activities for Children (3); Theatre 403A, Theatre for Children (3); 

Theatre 414, Readers Theatre (3); Theatre 450, Theatre Management (3); Theatre 

470A, Advanced Directing (3); Theatre 475A,D,E, World Theatre (9) 34 

Theatre Education majors are required to complete the following courses before the 


preliminary single-subject teaching credential will be awarded: English 100, 300 
and 303 and Speech Communication 102. 


118 Theatre 

MASTER OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


THEATRE COURSES 

100 Introduction to the Theatre (3) 

For the general student leading to an appreciation and understanding of the theatre as an entertain- 
ment medium and as an art form. Recommended for non-majors. 

101 Introduction to Dance (3) 

Historical and contemporary dance forms. Experiences in various dance forms such as ballet, 
modern, jazz, folk, Afro, mime. Recommended for non-majors. 

102 Theatre in Performance (3) 

The theatregoing experience. Attendance at stage plays, films and other theatrical productions both 
on and off campus; discussions with directors, actors and designers. Recommended for non- 
majors. 

110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

The analysis and performance of literature by the interpreter. 

112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) 

The fundamental structure and technique of classical ballet. (4 hours activity) 

122 Beginning Modern Dance (2) 

Development of proficiency in modern dance technique and appreciation for modern dance as an 
art form. (4 hours activity) 

126A,B Dance Improvisation (2,2) 

A — Improvisation in movement to overcome inhibitions, to move freely and naturally and to impro- 
vise imaginatively. B — Improvisation in expressing imagery and experience in movement, de- 
veloping choreographic concepts and enhancing performance. (4 hours activity) 

132 Beginning Jazz Dance (2) 

Modern jazz dance techniques and basic jazz choreography. (4 hours activity) 

142 Beginning Tap Dance (2) 

Structure and technique of tap dance and tap choreography. (4 hours activity) 

162 Beginning Folk Dance (2) 

Traditional and contemporary forms of folk dance. Dances of various countries. The development 
of proficiency in folk dance skills and stylization. (4 hours activity) 

163 Beginning Acting (3) 

The form and content of acting: improvisation, action, motivation, and behavior. Recommended for 
non-majors. (6 hours activity) 

180 Great Moments in Radio and TV (3) 

Presentation and analysis of radio and television programs from 1926 to the present, including guest 
artists from the radio and television industry. 

184 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) (Formerly 380) 

The broadcasting industry and its impact and influence on our society. Broadcasting practices, 
audiences, production and programming. 

200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre as an art form, involving the interrelated processes of playwriting, directing, acting, design 
and theatre management. Study of current plays, films and television with emphasis on dramatic 
analysis and cultural significance. Required of all theatre majors. 

203 Oral Interpretation of Children's Literature (3) 

Oral presentation of children's literature in classroom, recreation and home situations, including 
individual and group performance of fiction, drama, and poetry. 

206A,B Mime and Pantomime (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 206A is prerequisite for 206B. Individual development of creative skill in mime 
and pantomime. (6 hours activity) 

212 Intermediate Classical Ballet (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 112, audition, or consent of instructor. Intermediate level technique of classical 
ballet. (4 hours activity) 


Theatre 119 


222 Intermediate Modern Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 122, audition, or consent of instructor. Intermediate modern dance and move- 
ment vocabulary in terms of composition and communication. May be repeated for credit. (4 
hours activity) 

226 Rhythmic Analysis (3) 

Musical form and structure; musically notating dance rhythms and percussion accompaniment. 

232 Intermediate Jazz Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 132 or consent of instructor. Intermediate level skills in jazz technique and 
choreography. (4 hours activity) 

241 Voice Production for the Performer (2) 

Use of voice in the theatre. Correction of speech faults and regional accents. Study of basic 
interpretive material. May be repeated for credit. (4 hours activity) 

242 Intermediate Tap Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 142 or consent of instructor. Intermediate skills in tap technique and choreogra- 
phy. (4 hours activity) 

251 Body Movement for the Actor (3) 

The body as an expressive instrument; acquiring of strength, flexibility, relaxation, control. The 
relationship of the body to the creative project. May be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 

262 Intermediate Folk Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 162 or consent of instructor. Intermediate level skills in traditional and contem- 
porary forms of folk dance. Stylization and performance. (4 hours activity) 

263 Acting (3) 

Improvisations, exercises, and techniques of acting for the stage. Motivation and behavior in charac- 
terization. (6 hours activity) 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 276A is prerequisite to B. Planning and construction of stage and television scenery. 
Use of tools, stage equipment; reading of technical drawings. Work in the scene shop for 
department productions. (6 hours activity) 

277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Costuming theatrical and television productions. Construction techniques, organization and duties 
of the costume crew. (6 hours activity) 

284 Introduction to Television Production (3) 

The fundamentals of production for television. (6 hours activity) 

285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Makeup for stage and television. Individual skill in character analysis, application in pigment, plastic, 
hair makeup, and selection and use of makeup equipment. (6 hours activity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Scene design, including script analysis, formation of visual concepts, floor plan development and 
model building. (6 hours activity) 

290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3,3) 

The motion picture as an art form and social influence. A — From its origins until 1945. B — From 1945 
to present. Viewing of films on and/or off the campus. (Same as Communications 290A,B) 

310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 

Development of techniques for oral interpretation of Shakespeare with special emphasis on the 
problems of verse. 

312 Advanced Classical Ballet (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 212, audition, or consent of instructor. Stylization and performance of classical 
ballet. (6 hours activity) 

323A,B Dance Composition (3,3) 

A— Prerequisites: Theatre 1 22, 1 26A, or equivalents. Study of basic elements and forms of dance 
composition. B — Prerequisite: Theatre 323A or consent of instructor. Problem solving studies 
in space, time, and energy using choreographic devices in solo and group situations. Final 
project required. (6 hours activity) 

332 Advanced Jazz Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 232 or consent of instructor. Advanced jazz techniques and choreography 
through grade three of professional jazz dance. The relation of jazz to other forms of dance. 
(6 hours activity) 


120 Theatre 


336A,B Dance for Musical Theatre (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 336A is prerequisite to 336B. Dance utilized in musical theatre. A — Ensemble and 
individual approaches to the style. B — Choreography of musical theatre. (6 hours activity) 

343 Dialects for Actors (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 241 or consent of instructor. Dialects and accents for theatrical performance. 
Source materials, analysis, and application to scripted material. (6 hours activity) 

350 Organization for Production (1) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 370A. Backstage management, including interrelationships of production per- 
sonnel. (2 hours activity) 

363A,B Intermediate Acting and Characterization (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 241, 251, 263 and audition. Characterization; roles, special problems, and 
application of acting techniques through exercises and two-character scenes from the contem- 
porary theatre. (6 hours activity) 

364 Seminar in Playwriting (3) 

Prerequisite: evidence of interest in creative writing and consent of instructor. Study of superior 
models, development of style, and group criticism and evaluation of independent work, as it 
relates to playwriting. May be repeated for credit. 

365 Television/Film Writing (3) 

The writing of scripts and other forms of continuity for television /film. May be repeated for credit. 

370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 263, or consent of instructor. 370A is prerequisite to B. Prerehearsal problems 
and procedures, structural analysis of plays, composition, picturization, pantomimic dramatiza- 
tion, movement and rhythm on stage and in television. Practice in directing scenes. (6 hours 
activity) 

372 Dance Kinesiology (3) 

Structural aspects of the human body and factors that affect movement in dance. (2 hours lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

374 Dance in Cultural Perspective (3) 

History of dance from primitive times to the 20th century. Dance in Europe, the Orient, Asia, America 
in its general relation to culture. 

377 Stage Costuming (3) 

Fashions and textiles of major historical periods, methods of research; interpretation and communi- 
cation of historical dress for theatrical statement. (6 hours activity) 

379 Rendering for the Theatre (3) 

Scenic and costume sketching and rendering for communication between production director and 
designers. Full scale costume and scenic painting required. Theoretical and actual production 
idea presentation and execution. (6 hours activity) 

381 Radio and Television Announcing (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 110. Control room operation, including practice in microphone and camera 
techniques. (6 hours activity). 

384 Television Production and Direction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 284. Theory and practice in the production of television programs and an- 
nouncements: the planning, organizing, directing, rehearsing, performing, recording and editing 
of television programs and announcements. (6 hours activity) 

385 Advanced Theatre Makeup (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 285. Problems in makeup including special techniques and materials: prosthet- 
ics, hairpieces, masks for stage and television productions. Application of study through design 
and supervision of makeup for departmental production. (6 hours activity) 

386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theories of lighting for stage, television and film productions. (6 hours activity) 

387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Practice necessary to integrate live and recorded sound into performing arts productions. Recording, 
reproduction and studio techniques. (6 hours activity) 

400 Theatre Internship (3) 

Consent of faculty appropriate supervisor. Supervised work experience in all areas of theatre to 
expand the dimensions of the classroom by integrating the formal academic training with direct 
application. Periodic seminar meetings to discuss work. 


Theatre 121 


401 Criticism of the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of the Arts or consent of instructor. Criteria 
and vocabulary for criticism of the visual and performing arts through lectures, readings, 
discussions, and exhibit and performance attendance. Descriptive and evaluative skills in music, 
art, theatre, dance and cinema criticism. 

402A,B Dramatic Activities for Children (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 402A prerequisite for 402B, or consent of instructor. Creative dramatics as a tool for 
building and developing creative and socialized processes in children. A— Sense memory, 
movement/mime, dialogue, characterization, dramatization. B — Advanced techniques includ- 
ing improvisation. (6 hours activity) 

403A,B Theatre for Children (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 403A prerequisite for 403B or consent of instructor. Theatrical production for an 
audience of children. A — Philosophy, theory and practice; B — Application of production princi- 
ples. (6 hours activity) 

41 0A Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature (3) 

Criticism and performance in the oral interpretation of prose literature. 

410B Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Criticism and performance in the oral interpretation of poetry. 

410C Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Criticism and performance in the oral interpretation of drama. 

414 Readers Theatre (3) 

The interpretation of literature in the medium of readers theatre. May be repeated for credit. 

422 Advanced Modern Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 222, audition or consent of instructor. Advanced level skills in modern dance. 
Emphasis on individual techniques. May be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 

423 Advanced Dance Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 323A, B or equivalent. Elements and forms in dance composition. The choreo- 
graphing of dances of concert quality. (6 hours activity) 

424 Fundamentals of Dance Instruction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 112, 122, 132, 162 and consent of instructor. Philosophies, techniques, and 
methods for developing progressions in dance instruction. 

426 Experimental Dance Theatre (3) 

Environmental and sensorial experiences in dance: creativity, sensitivity and perception. Experiments 
in composition using improvisation, happenings, geographic design and special effects. (6 hours 
activity) 

436 Musical Theatre Workshop (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Roles and excerpts from musical theatre; the musical, dramatic, 
language, and dance techniques. Scenes and musical numbers in workshop. (6 hours activity) 

450 Theatre Management (3) 

Organizational principles of front-of-house and box office operation. Participation in School of the 
Arts public presentations. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours activity) 

460 Audience Development for the Arts (3) 

Analysis of artist/audience composition and interdependence. Methods of securing public attention 
and support for creative works in art, music, theatre and dance. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours 
activity) 

463A,B Advanced Acting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 310, Theatre 363 A, B and audition. Historical theories and techniques of styles 
of acting. First semester. Creek through renaissance periods; second semester, the neoclassic 
periods to contemporary styles. (6 hours activity) 

468 Experimental Theatre (3) 

Experiments in production of full length and one-act plays using various styles of acting and staging. 
May be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 

470A,B Advanced Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 288, 350, and 370A,B, or consent of instructor. Readings in theory, analysis 
of scripts and practice in directing plays for their oral and visual value as theatre. A— Each 
student directs a one-act play. B— Each student directs two one-act plays or equivalent. (6 hours 
activity) 


122 Theatre 


471 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Methods and materials for teaching creative dance/movement to children. Interrelated arts tech- 
niques (movement, music, drama, visual art) for teaching in the classroom and the dance class. 
(6 hours activity) 

474 Forces and Figures in 20th-Century Dance (3) 

Development of forms (ballet, social, modern) from 1900 to the present; their general relation to 
culture. 

475A,B,C,D,E World Theatre (3,3, 3, 3,3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The historical and dramatic evolution of world theatre. A — 
Ancient Greece and Rome, Middle Ages; Italian renaissance; B — England from 1558-1790; 16th- 
and 17th-century Spain and France; C — 18th- and 19th-century Europe and Russia; 19th-century 
England; D — 18th- and 19th-century America; the Orient; the modern world; E — Historical 
background and contemporary view of the musical theatre. 

477 A,B Senior Seminar in Critical Techniques (3,3) 

Theatre 477A or consent of instructor prerequisite to B. First semester, major critical theories in 
theatre. Second semester, application of critical theories to local dramatic productions. 

478A,B Production and Performance (2,2) 

A — Acting in stage or television performances. B — Technical crew work on stage or television 
performances. One section of 478B per semester required of all theatre majors and non-majors 
cast in theatre department productions. (More than 6 hours activity) 

482 Acting for Film and Television (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 363 A, B. The adaptation of stage techniques for the camera; audition, re- 
hearsal, and final performance, utilizing videotape and studio equipment. (6 hours activity) 

484 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 384 and consent of instructor. Techniques of production, the director, actor 
and designer in televised drama. (6 hours activity) 

486 Advanced Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 386 or consent of instructor. Design and technology of lighting. Design for the 
stage and television. (6 hours activity) 

488 Advanced Design and Technology (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A, B, 277, 288 and consent of instructor. Advanced design, coordination 
of scenery and/or costume design projects for various types of theatres and television. 

490 Television/Film Aesthetics and Criticism (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 290A,B, 384 or consent of instructor. The nature of film and television; 
aesthetic and theoretical and critical bases for film and television evaluation and understanding. 

497 Production and Performance Projects in Theatre (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of instructor. Application form with appropriate 
signatures on file in department office prior to registration. Projects which culminate in produc- 
tion or performance. May be repeated once for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Undergraduate research projects. Open to advanced students with consent of instructor. May be 
repeated for credit. Course application form with appropriate signatures, must be on file in 
department office prior to registration. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Theatre (3) 

Methodological problems in graduate research. Location of source materials, including library and 
original data; interpretation of research and practice in scholarly writing. Must be taken the first 
semester after admission to graduate study. 

501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 500. Directed research; the relationship between historical backgrounds and 
developments in the theatre and the student's area of concentration. 

503 Graduate Seminar: Theatre for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 403A or consent of instructor. Philosophies, theories, techniques and trends of 
the art of theatre for children. Problems related to the use of materials in educational, commu- 
nity and professional children's theatres. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Oral Interpretation (3) 

Historical and philosophical development of oral interpretation and its relationship to contemporary 
theory and practice. 


Theatre 123 


523 Graduate Studies in Choreography (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 423 or consent of instructor. Experiments in choreography using improvisation 
and innovative composition techniques. Environmental and sensorial experiences and studies 
in creativity and perception. 

550 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) 

Production problems in theatre arts. Planning production within the limitations of budgets and 
physical facilities. 

566 Seminar: Stagecraft (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced theories in the preparation and installation of scenery 
for theatrical production; engineering drawings, exploration of materials, and research into new 
methods of theatre technology. 

570 Styles of Directing (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 470A,B and 475A,B,C,D, or consent of instructor. Readings in theories of 
directing styles and practice in directing period plays. Each student will direct scenes for 
workshop performance in Greek tragedy and comedy, Roman comedy, Elizabethan and jaco- 
bean tragedy and comedy. Restoration and 18th-century comedy, French neo-classical com- 
edy, melodrama, and drama of language/ idea. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

(Same as English 571 ) 

572 Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

(Same as English 572) 

574 Graduate Seminar: Dance Aesthetics (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 401 , 423, and 474 or equivalent. Techniques of criticism through a comparative 
study of forms and styles of professional choreographers. 

577 Seminar: Costuming (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Costume production problems and their solutions. Explanation 
of specific designers, past and present. Research in practical methods of interpreting the de- 
signer's sketch. 

578 Graduate Seminar: Scene Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Scenic design projects involving in-depth production style and 
scheme development. 

586 Seminar: Lighting Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced theoretical lighting design projects. Production prob- 
lems and their solutions. Examination of specific theoretical projects past and present. 

588 Seminar: Design and Technical Theatre (6) 

Design for productions prior to final project. Faculty and student critiques. Tailored to individual 
student needs. Enrollment limited to M.F.A. students. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, student's graduate committee and department executive com- 
mittee. Development and presentation of a creative project beyond regularly offered course- 
work. May be repeated to a maximum of six units. Student must complete course application 
form by the end of the seventh week of the semester preceding that in which the work is to 
be done. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of student's graduate committee; development and presentation of a thesis 
in the student's area of concentration; application form , with appropriate signatures, on file in 
department office prior to registration. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: course application form, with appropriate signatures on file in department office. 
Research in theatre with consent of instructor and graduate committee. May be repeated for 
credit. 


124 Theatre 

THEATRE EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods and materials for teaching in the 
secondary school. 

449A Student Teaching in Theatre in the Secondary School (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 


126 


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Acting Dean: Henry Anderson 
Associate Dean: Ken Goldin 


FACULTY 

Department of Accounting: 

Henry Anderson*, Dale Bandy, Eugene Corman, Clyde Hardman, John Hinds, A. Jay Hirsch, 
Trini U. Melcher, Robert Miller, Shirish Seth, Randy Swad, Anita Tyra, Robert Vanasse, 
Dorsey Wiseman, John Woo 
Department of Economics: Joyce Pickersgill, Chair 

Robert Ayanian, Kwang-wen Chu, James Dietz, Peter Formuzis, Carroll Foster, Ken Goldin, Ellen 
Goldstein, Levern Graves, Lionel Kalish, Sidney Klein, John Lafky, Maryanna Lanier, Stewart 
Long, Robert Michaels, Gary Pickersgill, Jack Pontney, Anil Puri, Guy Schick, Eric Solberg 
Department of Finance: Peter Mlynaryk, Chair 

Albert Bueso, Donald Crane, Kenneth Daane, Albert J. Fredman, John Nichols, Dennis O'Con- 
nor, Radha Sharma, P. James Stickels, Frank Taylor, Marco Tonietti, B. E. Tsagris, Dale Vorder- 
landwehr 

Department of Management: James Conant, Chair 

Farouk Abdelwahed, Michael Ames, Thomas Apke, Mei Liang Bickner, Kenneth Bobele, Albert 
Brandli, Robert Chapman, Fred Colgan, Richard Gilman, Leo Guolo, Pierre Hostettler, Granville 
Hough, Richard Houston, Geoffrey King, Brian Kleiner, Thomas Maher, Leland McCloud, Kent 
McKee, Tai Oh, Edgar Wiley, Edward Zilbert 
Department of Management Science: John Lawrence, Chair 

Gora Bhaumik, Shu-Jen Chen, Wen Chow, Jacqueline Dana, Roger Dear, Ben Edmondson, 
Nicholas Farnum, William Heitzman, William Lau, F. Walter Mueller, Barry Pasternack, Herbert 
Rutemiller, Sohan Sihota, Ram Singhania, LaVerne Stanton, David Stoller 
Department of Marketing: Irene Lange, Chair. 

Robert Barath, William Bell, Paul Hugstad, Robert Olsen, Frank Roberts, James Taylor, Robert 
Zimmer 

The School of Business Administration and Economics offers the only programs in Orange County 
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. Accreditation assures a 
rigorous course of study covering the full spectrum of business administration. It also indicates a 
well-qualified faculty, high standards for students, and access to an extensive library system. 

The school offers a broad exposure to business administration and economics. Behavioral and 
quantitative sciences are studied within both theoretical and applied contexts. Mathematics is used 
as an integral tool in the analysis of complex problems and in the interpretation of data. Emphasis 
is placed on effective communication, both verbal and written. Students are made aware of the need 
for imaginative, innovative solutions to business problems, which encompass human needs and 
ethical objectives. 

The school- also offers the opportunity to develop technical expertise in a chosen discipline, at a 
beginning professional level acceptable to prospective employers. Seven concentrations are offered 
within the business administration major as well as an economics major and a business education 
credential program. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 
Academic Advisement 

The Business Advising Center on the seventh floor of Langsdorf Hall serves both business administra- 
tion and economics majors. (Economics students should also consult a faculty adviser in the 
Economics Department. ) Transfer students should see an adviser immediately regarding transfer 
credit. For information on general education, consult the Academic Advisement Center in the 
Humanities Building. 


University administrative officer 


Business Administration 12 7 


Accounting Concentration 

The accounting concentration covers financial, cost, governmental and tax accounting. Specialized 
courses are offered in auditing, advanced taxation, managerial accounting and information systems. 
The accounting concentration prepares students for management level accounting positions in 
business, government or public accounting, and is an excellent preparation for graduate study in 
accounting. In general, a master's degree is preferred for a career in accounting. For information on 
master's programs contact the Accounting Department. 

Business Administration Major 

The curriculum for a business administration degree includes courses surveying all of the fields of 
business, as well as a series of courses in one area of concentration. 

Business Education 

With a teaching credential in business, there are job opportunities in business and in junior and senior 
high schools. To qualify for the credential, it is necessary to complete all of the requirements for a 
B.A. in Business Administration (including one of the concentrations). Additional courses in office 
administration may be required. Interested students should see the business education adviser in the 
Division of Teacher Education. Office administration courses are not offered at the University, but 
may be taken at nearby colleges. Up to 12 units of such courses may be counted as lower division 
business electives. The credential program also involves 30 units of teacher education courses. 

Economics Concentration — Economics Major 

Agribusinesses and other large companies hire economic analysts to deal with pricing strategy and 
market trends. Local and state governments also hire economic analysts in statistical and planning 
departments. Some economics majors find employment as management trainees or in sales. The 
economics concentration leads to a degree in business administration. Alternatively the Bachelor of 
Arts in Economics requires fewer business courses, allowing greater opportunity to study economics 
and other social sciences. Both degrees provide a good foundation for advanced studies in law, 
business or economics. 


English Proficiency Requirement 

Proficiency in English writing is required of all business administration and economics majors. 
Students should take the English Proficiency Examination as soon as possible, in order to correct 
deficiencies early. 

A passing score on the English Proficiency Examination is a prerequisite to Management 340 
(required for all business administration majors) and Economics 420. 

The examination stresses written English and is given at least four times per year. Register in 
the Testing Center. (Fee charged) 

Students may be exempted from the English Proficiency Examination if they have already taken 
one of the following tests and have received at least the minimum score shown. ( 1 ) College 
Board Achievement Test in English Composition, minimum score 500. (The College Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) does satisfy the requirement.) (2) College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP) General Examination in English Composition, minimum score 500 orCLEP 
Subject Examination in English Composition, minimum score 50. (3) California State University 
English Placement Test — Composition, minimum score Cl 50 or California State University 
English Equivalency Test, minimum score Pass. (The University of California Subject "A" 
Examination does not satisfy the requirement.) 


Finance Concentration 

There are four areas of emphasis within the finance concentration. Students with a financial manage- 
ment emphasis may qualify for jobs as financial analyst for banks, public utilities and other large 
companies. With a real estate administration emphasis, employment possibilities include financial 
analyst for a developer, or real estate broker. The securities and investments emphasis can lead to 
positions as account executive or securities analyst for a stock broker or bank. And the insurance 
emphasis offers preparation for insurance sales and estate and pension planning. 

Internships and Cooperative Education 

Students may earn academic credit, first-hand work experience and financial remuneration as well. 
Opportunities exist in accounting and auditing; cost-benefit analysis and econometrics; finance and 
real estate; insurance and banking; management and industrial relations; marketing, sales and 


128 Business Administration 


advertising; and business data systems. For more information, consult the internship adviser in your 
department or in the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. 

Management Concentration 

There are job opportunities in large businesses, hospitals, labor unions and government agencies. 
By managing human and material resources, useful goods and services are produced in a satisfactory 
work environment. Management students learn the ethical, psychological and sociological founda- 
tions for human behavior and examine the impacts of group dynamics, information organization and 
interpersonal relationships on the administrative process. The management concentration offers 
three emphases: administrative management, operations management and human resources. 

Management Information Systems Concentration 

The management information systems concentration offers preparation for careers in the fields of 
electronic data processing and decision support systems. Included are the design, implementation, 
operation and management of information systems. The design emphasis focuses on computing 
technology for handling large amounts of data. The management emphasis stresses the manner in 
which information and information systems are developed and utilized in support of management 
decision-making and control in organizations. With a degree in business administration and experi- 
ence as a programmer or systems analyst, advancement is possible to positions such as data 
processing manager or director of information systems. 

Management Science Concentration 

Management science integrates the computer with mathematics and business to model complex 
business situations. This program prepares the student to effectively utilize management science 
techniques to evaluate alternatives and to make optimal decisions. Employment opportunities in 
statistics include insurance, government, market research and business forecasting. Operations 
research can lead to careers in business analysis, inventory control, or urban planning. Openings in 
data processing and information systems are available in all fields of business. 

Marketing Concentration 

Marketing is useful for sales and many other careers. With a marketing concentration and suitable 
experience, possible jobs include department store manager or product line manager, as well as jobs 
in market research, advertising, physical distribution or sales management. The concentration offers 
emphases in international marketing, marketing research, advertising management, sales manage- 
ment, retailing, physical distribution and marketing management. 

Student Organizations 

Chapters of the following national honor societies have been established on campus with member- 
ship open to qualified students: Beta Alpha Psi (accounting), Beta Gamma Sigma (business), 
Financial Management Association FHonor Society (finance), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), 
Phi Kappa Phi (all campus). Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing). In addition there are the following 
departmentally affiliated clubs which students are encouraged to join: the Accounting Society, Circle 
K (management), Data Processing Management Association, Economics Association, Finance As- 
sociation, Marketing Club, Personnel and Industrial Relations Association, Personnel Management 
Association of Aztlan, Rho Epsilon (real estate-finance). Securities and Investment Association and 
Society for the Advancement of Management. 

Transfer Credit for Business and Economics Courses 

Students should see an adviser immediately regarding transfer credit. Lower division courses taken 
at four-year institutions and all courses taken at two-year colleges may be used to satisfy only lower 
division (i.e., 100 and 200 level) requirements at the university. Upper division courses taken at 
four-year institutions may be used to satisfy upper division (i.e., 300 and 400 level) requirements 
at the university. Lists of approved courses are available in the Business Advising Center; other 
courses are subject to approval by the department chair concerned. In all cases, courses must be 
transferred from an appropriately accredited institution. In most cases, courses taken in the extension 
division of a university, or by correspondence, are not acceptable. If the institution is located outside 
the Southern California area, the student should supply catalog descriptions, course outlines and 
textbook titles. Although "D" grades are accepted on transfer courses, students must have a "C" 
average to graduate. 

PREPARATION FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Algebra and geometry are necessary for many required business courses. The equivalent of three 


Business Administration 129 


years of high school mathematics, including a second course in algebra, is the prerequisite for the 
required Math 130, A Short Course in Calculus. Students without the necessary background should 
enroll in Math 100, Precalculus Mathematics. 

A passing score on the English Proficiency Exam (designed to test writing skills) is a prerequisite 
to the required Management 340. Students without adequate writing skills should enroll in Communi- 
cations 103, Applied Writing; English 100, Composition; English 103, Seminar in Writing; English 301, 
Advanced Composition; or Foreign Language Education 105A,B, English as a Second Language. 
Business students are encouraged to take courses in sociology, psychology, political science, history, 
philosophy, geography and foreign languages. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Degree Requirements 

All of the following requirements must be met for the degree. For assistance in interpreting these 
requirements contact the Business Advising Center. 

Required Lower Division Core Courses 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3) 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5) may be substituted for Economics 100 and 
Economics 200. Students who have taken one semester of Principles of Economics (micro, 
macro or general) should enroll in Economics 200. 

Math 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4) 

or Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 

Note: The management science concentration requires both Math 150A and Math 150B. 
Accounting 201 A, B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Management Science 265 Computer and Probability Methods in Business and Economics (3) 
Note: Management Science 264, Computer Programming (2) a/7r/Math 120, Introduction to 
Probability and Statistics (3) may be substituted for Management Science 265. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Pass the English Proficiency Examination administered by the School of Business Administration 
and Economics. 

Note: A passing score on this test is a prerequisite to Management 340 and Economics 420. 
Required Upper Division Core Courses 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

or Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Note: The management and management science concentrations require Economics 310. 
Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Management 339 Principles of Management (3) 

Management 340 Behavioral Science for Business (3) 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Management Science 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Management Science 362 Management Science Methods in Business and Economics (3) 
or Management Science 363 Management Science (3) 

Note: The management science concentration requires Management Science 363. 

Required Concentration Courses 

18 units of courses are required in one concentration. See listing of concentration requirements 
below. 

Required Capstone Core Course 

After completing all lower and upper division core courses, take: 

Management 449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Requirements in Other Subjects, Grades and Residence 

Other subjects. Complete at least 50 units of courses outside the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics. Complete all university requirements for the bachelor's degree. 
Grade-Point Average (CPA). Attain at least a 2.0 G PA ("C") average in all university courses, 


5—78946 


130 Business Administration 


in all courses taken in the School of Business Administration and Economics, and in the area 
of concentration. 

Grade option. Take all required core courses and all required concentration courses in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics for a letter grade (A,B,C,D,F). The Credit/ No 
Credit grading option may not be used for these courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will not 
satisfy the requirements for the degree. Exception: Math 130 or Math 150A,B may be taken 
under the Credit /No Credit grading option. 

Residence. At least 9 units of courses in the area of concentration and at least 1 5 of the last 
24 units of courses must be taken in residence at the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. Also fulfill university residence requirements. 

Concentration Requirements for Majors in Business Administration 

Business administration majors must complete the requirements of one concentration in addition to 
the degree requirements shown above. 


Accounting Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with an accounting concentration are required to take: 

Accounting 301 A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Accounting 308 Federal Income Tax (3) 
and two of the following courses: 

Accounting 401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Accounting 402 Auditing (3) 

Accounting 403 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities (3) 
Accounting 406 Advanced Management Accounting (3) 

Accounting 407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Accounting 408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Accounting 470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 


Economics Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with an economics concentration are required to take: 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 
as part of their business administration core requirements. In addition, the concentration requires: 
Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Economics 410 Government and Business (3) 

and\2 units of upper division economics electives, 3 units of which must be 400-level. ( Management 
446, Managerial Economics, will be accepted as an economics elective) 

Students interested in economics should also consider the B.A. in Economics. 


Finance Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with a finance concentration are required to take: 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3 ) or 
Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 
and units of upper division finance electives (other than Finance 310) 

Students may choose all of their courses from one of the following emphases , or may sample several 
emphases. 

Financial Management Emphasis (18 units including both Finance 331 and Finance 332) 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 

Finance 425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Finance 432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 

Finance 433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Finance 440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 


Real Estate Emphasis (18 units including either Finance 331 or Finance 332) 

Courses marked (•) partially satisfy the California State Real Estate Brokers License Examination 
requirements. Contact the Finance Department for further details. 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) or 
Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 351 Real Estate and Urban Land Analysis *(3) 


Business Administration 131 


Finance 451 
Finance 452 
Finance 453 
Finance 454 
Finance 455 
Finance 456 
Finance 459 


Real Estate/ Land Use Law — Case Studies * (3) 

Real Estate Finance * (3) 

Real Estate Valuation * (3) 

Real Estate and Urban Development * (3) 

Real Estate Investment Analysis * (3) 

Property Development and Real Estate Policy Analysis * (3) 
Real Estate Research (3) 


Securities-lnvestments Emphasis (18 units including either Finance 331 or Finance 332) 
Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3 ) or 
Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 340 Security Investments (3) 

Finance 440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Finance 442 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 

Finance 443 Portfolio Analysis (3) 

and 3 units upper division finance electives (other than Finance 310) 

Insurance Emphasis (18 units including either Finance 331 or Finance 332) 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3 ) or 
Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Finance 461 Business Risk Management (3) 

Finance 462 Life and Health Insurance (3) 

and 6 units division finance electives (other than Finance 310) 


Management Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with a management concentration are required to take: 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 
as part of their business administration core requirements. In addition, students must choose one 
of the following emphases. 

Administrative Management Emphasis ( 1 8 units required ) General supervision of organized activity. 
Management 342 Production Operations (3) 

Personnel Management (3) 

Management of Systems (3) 

Managerial Economics (3 ) or 
Management Decision Games (3 ) or 
Seminar in Small Business Consulting (3) 
and 6 units of upper division management electives. 

Operations Management Emphasis ( 1 8 units required ) Management of new projects and production 
operations. 

Production Operations (3) 

Personnel Management (3) 

Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Managerial Economics (3 ) or 
Management Decision Games or 
Seminar in Small Business Consulting (3) 
and 6 units of upper division management electives. 

Human Resources Management Emphasis (18 units required) Interpersonal relations and group 
leadership. 

Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 

Management 441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

Management 443 Individual, Interpersonal, and Group Dynamics for Management (3) 
Management 444 Management of Systems (3) 
and 6 units of upper division management electives. 


Management 343 
Management 444 
Management 446 
Management 447 
Management 448 


Management 342 
Management 343 
Management 445 
Management 446 
Management 447 
Management 448 


Management Information Systems Concentration (18 units plus 6 units electives required.) 

All students with a management information systems concentration must choose one of the follow- 
ing emphases. In addition, 6 units of electives are required. See below. 

Design Emphasis (18 units required. See note.) 

Management 244 Introduction to Systems Concepts (3) 

Management Science 270 File Concepts and COBOL Programming (3) 


132 Business Administration 


Management Science 300 Elements of Information Systems Design and Data Communication ( 3 ) 
Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Management Science 404 Analysis of Information Systems (3) 

Management Science 408 Data Base Management Systems (3) 


Management Emphasis (18 units required. See note.) 

Management 244 Introduction to Systems Concepts (3) 

Management Science 270 File Concepts and COBOL Programming (3) 

Management Science 300 Elements of Information Systems Design and Data Communication 
(3) 

Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Management 444 Management of Systems (3) 

Management 494 Seminar in Management Information Systems (3) 

Note: All students with a management information systems concentration are also required 
to take: 

6 units of upper division electives in business administration or economics. 


These electives should be chosen in consultation with the faculty coordinator of the management 
information systems concentration, and should be chosen from among the following courses: 
Accounting 407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Computer Science 302 * Information Structures (3) 

Computer Science 310 * Systems Programming (3) 

Computer Science 412 * Computer Performance Evaluation (3) 

Computer Science 414 * Mini-Computer Software Systems (3) 

Management 450. Information Systems for Production and Operations Management: 

Material Requirements Planning (3) 

Management Science 310 Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 

Management Science 409 Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Management Science 411 Data Processing with Minicomputers (3) 

Management Science 412 Privacy, Security and Data Processing (3) 

Management Science 420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Management Science 448 Computer Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 


Management Science Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with a management science concentration are required to take: 

Math 150A, B Analytic Geometry and Calculus ** (4,4) 

Management Science 363 Management Science (3) 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 
as part of their business administration core requirements. In addition, the concentration requires: 

Management Science 461 Advanced Statistics (3) 
and 1 5 units of upper division management science electives, to be approved by the chair of the 
Management Science Department. 

Students may choose all of their courses from one of the following emphases, or may sample several 
emphases. 


Information Systems Emphasis (18 units including Management Science 461 ) 

Management Science 300 Elements of Information System Design and Data Communications 
(3) 


Management Science 310 
Management Science 404 
Management Science 408 
Management Science 409 
Management Science 41 1 
Management Science 412 
Management Science 461 


Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 
Analysis of Information Systems (3) 

Data Base Management Systems (3) 
Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Data Processing with Minicomputers (3) 
Privacy, Security and Data Processing (3) 
Advanced Statistics (3) 


Operations Research Emphasis (18 units including Management Science 461 ) 

Management Science 448 Computer Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 


• These computer science courses will be counted as business administration electives for students with a management 
information systems concentration. 

*• Math 150A.B may be taken with the credit / no credit option. 


Business Administration 133 


Management Science 461 
Management Science 465 
Management Science 466 
Management Science 480 
Management Science 490 


Advanced Statistics (3) 

Linear Programming (3) 

Mathematical Programming (3) 

Inventory and Production Analysis in Business and Economics (3) 
Queueing and Other Stochastic Process Models in Business and 
Economics (3) 


Statistics Emphasis (18 units including Management Science 461 ) 

Management Science 420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Management Science 422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications (3) 
Management Science 430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 

Management Science 461 Advanced Statistics (3) 

Management Science 467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Management Science 468 Design of Experiments (3) 

Management Science 469 Reliability Statistics (3) 

Management Science 475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Marketing Concentration (18 units required) 

All students with a marketing concentration must choose one of the following emphases: 
Advertising Management Emphasis (18 units required) 

Marketing 354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Marketing 470 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Marketing 454 Advertising Management (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 3 unit upper division marketing electives 
Marketing Management Emphasis (18 units required) 

3 unit behavioral course (Marketing 354, 356 or 470. See note.) 

Marketing 359 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3 ) or 
Marketing 457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 6 units of upper division marketing electives 


Note: BEHA VIORAL COURSES IN MARKETING 
Marketing 354 Principles of Advertising (3 units) 

Marketing 356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3 units) 
Marketing 470 Consumer Behavior (3 units) 


Marketing Research Emphasis (18 units required) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Marketing 470 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Marketing 479 Research Problems in Marketing (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 6 units of upper division marketing electives 
Physical Distribution Emphasis (18 units required) 

Marketing 358 Physical Distribution (3) 

3 unit behavioral course (Marketing 354, 356 or 470. See note.) 
Marketing 457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 6 units of upper division marketing electives. 

Retailing Emphasis (18 units required) 

Marketing 352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Marketing 354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Marketing 456 Marketing Problems in Retail Sector (3) 
Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Marketing 470 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Sales Management Emphasis (18 units required) 

Marketing 356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3) 


134 Economics 


Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 
Marketing 470 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Marketing 455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 
Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 3 unit upper division marketing elective 


International Marketing Emphasis ( 1 8 units required ) 

3 unit behavioral course (Marketing 354, 356 or 470. See note.) 
Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Marketing 458 International Marketing (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 6 units of upper division marketing electives 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 
Degree Requirements 

All of the following requirements must be met for the degree. For assistance in interpreting these 
requirements contact the Business Advising Center on the seventh floor of Langsdorf Hall. Students 
should also contact their faculty adviser in the Economics Department prior to or during their first 
semester. 


Required Lower Division Courses 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3 units) 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics (3 units) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5 units) may be substituted for Economics 100 
and Economics 200. Students who have taken one semester of Principles of Economics (micro, 
macro or general ) should enroll in Economics 200. 

Accounting 201 A, B Elementary Accounting (3,3 units) 

Math 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4 units) 

Note: Accounting 201 A, Elementary Accounting (3 units) a/7c/Math 150A,B Analytic Geometry 
and Calculus (4,4 units) may be substituted for Accounting 201 A, B and Math 130. 
Management Science 265 Computer and Probability Methods in Business and Economics (3 
units) 

Note: Management Science 264, Computer Programming (2 units) <?r?</Math 120, Introduction 
to Probability and Statistics (3 units) may be substituted for Management Science 265. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Pass the English Proficiency Examination administered by the School of Business Administration 
and Economics. 

Note: A passing score on this test is a prerequisite to Economics 420. 

Required Upper Division Courses 
Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Management Science 361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

and 18 units of upper division economics electives, 6 units of which must be 400 Level. 

Requirements in Other Subjects, Grades and Residence 

Other subjects. Complete at least 50 units of courses outside the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics. The department recommends that these courses be from the social 
sciences, mathematics and management science. Students planning to do graduate work in 
economics are advised to take Math 150A,B; Economics 440 and Economics 441. Complete all 
university requirements for the bachelor's degree. 

Grade Point Average (GPA). Attain at least a 2.0 GPA ("C" average) in all university courses; 
in all required courses in economics, accounting and management science and in all courses 
in economics. 

Grade Option. Take all required courses in economics, accounting and management science 
for a letter grade (A,B,C,D,F). The credit/no credit grading option may not be used for these 
courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will not satisfy the requirements for the degree. Exception: 
Courses in calculus (Math 130 or Math 150A,B,) may be taken under the credit/no credit 
grading option. 

Residence. At least 1 5 units of courses must be taken in residence at the School of Business 


Accounting 135 

Administration and Economics at Cal State Fullerton. Also fulfill university residence require- 
ments. 

MINORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

A minor in business administration or in economics covers the role of business in society and the 
methods used by business. Both the diploma and the transcript mention the minor. A working 
knowledge of algebra is necessary for several of the courses, but calculus is not required. See an 
adviser in the Business Advising Center. 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Requirements 

Lower Division Courses 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3) 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may be substituted for Economics 100 and 
Economics 200. Students who have taken one semester of Principles of Economics (micro, 
macro or general) should enroll in Economics 200. 

Accounting 201 A, B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Management Science 289 Computer Methods in Social Science (3) 

Note: Math 130, A Short Course in Calculus (4 units) and Management Science 265, Computer 
and Probability Methods in Business and Economics (3 units) may be substituted for Manage- 
ment Science 289. This substitution is recommended for students planning to take additional 
electives, many of which require Management Science 265 as a prerequisite. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Pass the English Proficiency Examination administered by the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. 

Note: A passing score on this test is a prerequisite to Management 340. 

Upper Division Courses 

Management 339 Principles of Management or 
Management 340 Behavioral Science for Business (3) 

Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

Requirements 

Lower Division Courses 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3) 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may be substituted for Economics 100 and 
Economics 200. Students who have taken one semester of Principles of Economics (micro, 
macro or general) should enroll in Economics 200. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Pass the English Proficiency Examination administered by the School of Business Administration 
and Economics. 

Note: A passing score on this test is a prerequisite to Economics 420. 

Upper Division Courses 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
and 9 units of upper division economics electives 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


136 Accounting 


ACCOUNTING COURSES 

201 A, B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A must be taken before 201 B. Accounting concepts and techniques 
essential to the administration of a business enterprise; measuring and communicating econom- 
ic information; analyzing and recording financial transactions; preparation, analysis and inter- 
pretation of financial statements; introduction to managerial accounting; product costing; 
analysis and techniques for aiding management decisions; management control; interaction 
with finance, management science, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data-information 
systems. ( Not open to freshmen ) 

301A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B; 301 A must be taken before 301 B. Accounting theory; preparation 
of income statements, balance sheets, and statements of changes in financial position; present 
value and amount concepts; assets, liabilities and stockholders equity; price-level accounting; 
pensions; leases; earnings per share; financial statement analysis; accounting changes and error 
analysis. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Accounting information for management of manufacturing enter- 
prises; cost records; cost behavior and allocation; product costing and inventory valuation; 
flexible budgeting; standard costs; responsibility accounting; cost planning and control; and 
operating decision analysis. 

308 Federal Income Tax (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Provisions, legislative history and implications of the federal in- 
come tax. The individual taxpayer. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 301 B. Business combinations; meaning, usefulness and methodology of 
consolidated financial statements; investments in non-subsidiary affiliates and corporate joint 
ventures; consolidated financial statements for overseas units of U.S. -based multinational com- 
panies; translations of foreign currencies. 

402 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B and 302. The auditing standards and procedures used by the 
independent auditor (CPA) to provide preparation for the auditing section of the CPA Examina- 
tion. Evaluation of internal control; nature of and procedures for gathering audit evidence; 
professional responsibilities and legal liability; the standards of reporting financial information. 

403 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B or 51 1 . Fund accounting as applied to governmental and nonprofit 
entities; state and federal governments, municipalities, hospitals, and universities. Budgets, tax 
levies, revenues and appropriations, expenditures and encumbrances, various types of funds, 
and accounting statements. 

406 Advanced Management Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. Current problems in management accounting; cost allocation; be- 
havioral aspects of management accounting quantitative model applications; planning and 
control of production, distribution, and administrative expenses; and governmental cost ac- 
counting standards. 

407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 A and 302 and Management Science 265 or equivalent. Alternative 
accounting systems used for the collection, organization and presentation of information. 
Theory and practice of information processing, organizational, behavioral, and mechanical. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Federal income tax as it applies to corporations, partnerships, fiduci- 
aries, international operations, securities and fringe benefits including retirement plans, federal 
estate and gift taxes as they apply to taxable transfers. 

470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. The methodology of tax research including case studies; the manage- 
ment of a tax practice; administration procedures governing tax controversies; rights and 
obligations of taxpayers and tax practitioners. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B (may be taken concurrently). Accounting 302, a major in account- 
ing, consent of the department internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one 
semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work experience. May be 


Accounting 137 


repeated for credit up to a total of six units. Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by department chair. Open to qualified undergraduate 
students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 3018, classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. The effects of 
professional, governmental, business, and social forces on the evolution of accounting theory. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and classified M.B.A. status. Auditing theory and practices; profes- 
sional ethics; auditing standards; SEC and stock exchange regulations; auditor's legal liability; 
statement trends and techniques. 

508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified M.B.A. status, or consent of instructor. Substantive 
provisions of federal tax law; tax planning from a corporate viewpoint; case studies of the effect 
of federal tax law on business decisions. 

510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Accumulation, organization, and interpretation of financial and 
quantitative data relevant to the activities of the corporate business enterprise. The interaction 
of accounting with finance, interpersonal relations, motivation, and data-information systems. 

511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B or 510, consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Accounting 
information for management decisions; elements of manufacturing, distribution and service 
costs; cost systems; standard costs; cost reports; cost analysis. 

518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B or 51 1 and classified M.B.A. status. Comparative analysis of account- 
ing principles and practices outside the United States; international financial accounting stand- 
ards; current problems of international financial reporting, accounting planning and control for 
international operations; multinational companies. 

521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302 or 511; classified M.B.A. status and consent of instructor. Integrative 
aspects of accounting, financial, and quantitative data for managerial decision-making; long- 
term, short-term profit planning; budgetary control; cost analysis; financial analysis and plan- 
and planning; taxation; and transfer pricing. 

572 Seminar in Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308 and classified M.B.A. status, or consent of instructor. Federal taxation 
relating to corporations; organizing distributions, liquidations and reorganizations. 

573 Seminar in Taxation of Property Transactions (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified M.S.T. or M.B.A. status or consent of instructor. Federal 
taxation relating to sales, exchanges and other transfers. 

574 Seminar in Taxation of International Business Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified M.S.T. or M.B.A. status or consent of instructor. Federal 
taxation relating to U.S. citizens and corporations with foreign source income and of foreign 
persons with U.S. source income; planning for foreign operations. 

575 Seminar in Estate, Gift, Inheritance Taxes and Estate Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308 and classified M.B.A. status, or consent of instructor. Federal and 
California death taxes and the planning of personal estates. 

576 Seminar in State and Local Taxation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified M.S.T. or M.B.A. status or consent of instructor. Applica- 
tion of interstate income allocations; multi-state tax compact; separate v. apportionment ac- 
counting; foreign country sourced income. Also, California taxes as applied to businesses and 
individuals. 

577 Seminar in Taxation of Employee Compensation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified M.S.T. or M.B.A. status or consent of instructor. Federal 
taxation relating to employee compensation including pensions and profit sharing, stock op- 
tions, ESOP's, IRA's, Keogh's, maximum tax 10-year averaging, death benefits, group term life, 
etc. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 


138 Economics 


599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor, and approval by department chair. May 
be repeated for credit. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

596 M.B.A. Management Game (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status and within six units of completion of the M.B.A. study plan. This 
serves as the required terminal evaluation for M.B.A. candidates. Policy decisions using the 
principles and practices of the several disciplines in the M.B.A. program. Teams, plan and 
execute strategies and analyze the impacts of their decisions under uncertainty. 


ECONOMICS COURSES 

100 The Economic Environment (3) 

The application of economics to the problems of unemployment and inflation, the distribution of 
income, competition and monopoly, the role of government in the economy, and other policy 
issues. 

200 Principles of Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100. Basic economic theory. The central problem of allocating scarce 
resources in a market economy and the determination of the level of output, employment, and 
prices, and international applications. 

210 Principles of Economics (5) 

Prerequisite: open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 100 and 200.) Economic analysis and policy. 
The central problem of scarcity, economic institutions of the United States, resource allocation 
and income distribution, economic stability and growth, the role of public policy, and interna- 
tional applications. 

301 Economic Principles (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150A,B and Management Science 265 or equivalents. Economic principles in the 
technical areas of engineering and computer science. Not open to students majoring in business 
administration or economics. 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210. Rational decision-making behavior of consumers and firms and 
price and output determination in markets. 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210. The determinants of the level of national income, employment 
and prices, and monetary and fiscal policies. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Alternative economic systems; their theoretical foundations, 
actual economic institutions, and achievements and failures. Contrast between socialist and 
capitalist systems. 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The structure and performance of the Soviet economy; the 
problems of allocating scarce resources and sustaining economic growth in a planned economy. 

332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The natural resources, population, agricultural, industrial, trans- 
portation, communications, monetary, banking, etc. problems of Asia, i.e. China, Japan, and the 
Asian subcontinent. The relation of non-economic problems to the economy. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The processes of economic growth with references to develop- 
ing areas. Capital formation, resource allocation, relation to the world economy, economic 
planning and institutional factors, with case studies. 

335 The International Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The theory, practice and institutions of the international econ- 
omy. International trade and investment; European economic community; balance of payments; 
foreign exchange rates; multinational enterprise; trade with developing countries; East-West 
trade; international economic policy. 


Economics 139 


340 The Economics of Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The laws pertaining to regulation and the implications for each 
regulated industry. Industry studies; the effects of regulation on price, output, innovations, etc. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The development of American economic institutions; economic 
problems, economic growth, and economic welfare. 

351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. The evolution of European economic institutions and their 
relation to the development of industry, commerce, transportation, and finance in the principal 
European countries. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Theory and analysis of the urban economy, urban economic 
problems and policy. 

362 Environmental Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210, or consent of instructor. Economic analysis of environmental 
problems. Externalities, property rights, social costs and benefits, and policy alternatives as these 
relate to the environment. 

364 Benefit-Cost Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or consent of instructor. Evaluation of benefit-cost studies prepared for 
government programs; educational and water resources. Methods of estimating environmental, 
cultural, life-saving, and macroeconomic benefits and costs; handling future benefits and costs. 

365 Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200 or 210. Government finance at the federal, state, and local levels; the 
impact of taxation and spending on resource allocation, income distribution, stabilization and 
growth. 

370 Economics of Research, Development and Technological Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 210. Research and development and technological change in the 
economy; concepts, issues, and major figures in the study of the economics of technology; the 
assessment of technological change; the impacts of technological change. 

391 The Modernization of Russian Society, 1880-1939 (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 100 or 210. The historical, political, cultural and economic forces promot- 
ing and impeding modernization under both the Tsarist and Communist regimes. Team taught 
by instructors from the Economics Department and the History Department. 

410 Government and Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. Business organization, conduct and performance; the rationale and 
impact of public policy on business and business activities, including the regulated industries, 
sick industries and antitrust policy. 

411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. The theory of international trade and the means and significance of 
balance of payments adjustments; past and present developments in international, commercial 
and monetary policy. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310. Labor supply and demand, labor force participation, employment, 
unemployment, human capital, wage differentials, disadvantaged labor market groups, discrimi- 
nation and wage-related income transfers. 

420 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320 and a passing score on the English Proficiency Examination. The money 
supply process and the impact of monetary policy on economic activity. 

421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320. The techniques of monetary and fiscal policy; of their relative roles in 
promoting economic stability and growth. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210 or 301 and Management Science 361. The theory and applica- 
tion of econometrics, economic measurement; the specification and estimation of econometric 
models; statistical methods in economic research. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 200 or 210 or 301 and Math 130 or equivalent. Economic theory, from 
microeconomics and macroeconomics. Content varies; constrained optimization problems and 


140 Economics 


rational decision-making. 

450 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 320. Major schools of thought and of leading individual economists 
as they influenced economic thought and policy. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 (may be taken concurrently), Economics 310 or 320, a 
major in economics, consent of the department internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 
2.5 GPA and one semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work experi- 
ence. May be repeated to a total of six units credit. Credit/No Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics major or concentration, senior standing and approval by the department 
chair. Open to undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May 
be repeated for credit. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and classified status in the M.A. in Economics program or consent of 
instructor. The determination of prices and outputs in a market system. Demand, cost, produc- 
tion, theories and programming models of the firm, probabilistic and investment models of the 
firm, game theoretic and behavioral models of the firm. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 320; and classified status in the M.A. in Economics program or consent of 
instructor. The determination of employment, fluctuations of real and money income, and the 
forces underlying economic growth. 

505 Models and Economic Forecasts (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440 or consent of instructor, and classified status in the M.A. in Economics 
program. Statistical methods of econometric estimation and forecasting. Practical problems of 
economic forecasting: Model specification, multivariate regression, forecasting for firms, re- 
gional areas such as Orange County, and the national economy. 

506 Seminar in Economic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503 and 505; classified status in the M.A. in Economics or consent of 
instructor. Students select topics and via independent investigation, seminar presentation and 
critique develop their analytical and research abilities, culminating with an acceptable paper. 

514 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy — Part A (3) 

Prerequisite: Classified M.B.A. status. Micro- and macroeconomic theory and policy within the 
framework of a market system. International applications. (Not open to Economics M.A. 
candidates.) 

515 Principles and Problems of Economic Policy — Part B (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 and classified M B A. status. Modern microeconomic theory, optimiza- 
tion techniques, and microeconomic policy. Mathematical programming, consumer choice, 
production theory, firm and market equilibrium, and government regulation. (Not open to 
Economics M.A. candidates.) 

516 Economics and Benefit-Cost Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in the M.P.A., M.B.A. or the environmental studies M.A. Economics 
and benefit-cost analysis of public projects. Consumer demand and the estimation of benefits; 
the nature of cost in a market economy; price controls, unemployment and inflation; and criteria 
for choice, for multi-year projects. For elective credit in the M.P.A., M.B.A., or the environmen- 
tal studies M.A. 

517 Economics of Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Classified status in M.P.A. program or consent of instructor. Economics and federal, 
state and local governmental spending, taxation and borrowing. Major taxes, their effects on 
market prices, income distribution, employment and inflation and evaluation of reform propos- 
als. (Not open to M.A. Economics or M.B.A. candidates.) 

522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 and 515 and classified M.B.A. status. Analytical and prescriptive 
approaches to economic problems of scarcity, development, fiscal and monetary policy, plan- 
ning and poverty. (Not open to Economics M.A. candidates.) 

528 Seminar in International Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 514 or equivalent, consent of instructor or classified M.B.A. status. Interna- 
tional monetary and international trade theories and policies. International monetary reform, 


Finance 141 


barriers to trade, economic integration, economic development and international capital flows. 

5% Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and 320; classified status in the M.A. in Economics program or consent 
of instructor. Contemporary research and materials such as: resource economics; history of 
economic thought; international monetary systems; economic forecasting; economics of plan- 
ning; macroeconomics; human resource economics. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent inquiry. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of instructor and approval by department chair. Open to 
graduate students desiring to pursue independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 


FINANCE COURSES 

310 Personal Financial Management (3) 

Financial problems of the household in allocating resources and planning expenditures. Housing, 
insurance, installment buying, medical care, savings and investments. ( May not be used to fulfill 
the concentration requirement in finance.) 

320 Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Financing business enterprises; financial planning and control; analy- 
sis of alternative sources and uses of combinations of short-, intermediate- and long-term debt 
and equity. Cost of capital. Study of capital investment decisions; capital budget analysis and 
valuation; working capital and capital structure management; relative impact on the internation- 
al environment of financial decisions. 

331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Fund statement analysis; cash budgeting and pro forma financial state- 
ments; traditional versus modern financial statement analysis; break-even analysis; cash, 
marketable securities, inventory, and accounts receivable management models; short-term 
borrowing. 

332 Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Financial leverage; debt, common, and preferred stock financing; cost of 
capital and capital structure; leasing; dividend policy; mergers; failure and reorganizations; 
capital budgeting. 

340 Security Investments (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 320 and Management Science 265, or consent of instructor. The analysis, 
selection and management of securities; characteristics of securities, valuation, trading methods, 
role of mutual funds and other institutions; computerized statement analysis and portfolio 
selection methods. 

351 Real Estate and Urban Land Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320 or consent of instructor. Real estate principles, practices and investment 
decisions. Equity investment, finance, legal aspects, practices, principles, property development, 
real estate administration in the public sector, real estate market analysis, valuation. 

360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior status. Life, casualty and liability insurance, individual and group 
insurance programs; methods of establishing risks and rates. 

370 International Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320 or consent of instructor. Financing problems of international business. The 
international financial environment, taxation of foreign income, international capital and money 
markets, problems of risk in foreign investments, and financial techniques for the operation of 
a multinational firm. 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. The solution of financial institution problems. Major financial intermediar- 
ies and the decision-making problems they face. Regulation and its effect on management 
operations. Group problems and case studies. 

432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Forecasting in financial management; construction and interpretation of 
economic forecasts for the economy, industry, and the firm; construction and interpretation of 
financial plans; evaluation of capital acquisition decisions under certainty and uncertainty 
conditions. 


142 Finance 


433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331 or 332. Case studies. Group problems of estimating funds requirements, 
long-term financial planning, controlling and evaluating cash flows, and financing acquisitions 
and mergers, capital budgeting, and cost of capital. Group problems and case studies. 

440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Capital and money markets in the American economy; markets for new 
corporate and government issues; secondary markets; interrelation of financial institutions; 
factors influencing yields and security prices. 

442 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 340 or consent of instructor. Computer applications for statement analysis, 
valuation models, and portfolio selection and management models. Standard and Poor's "com- 
pustat tapes." A simulated portfolio management game at the end of the course. 

443 Portfolio Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 340 and Management Science 361. Markowitz and Sharpe models; basic 
statistical, mathematical and economic concepts in portfolio theory; Efficient capital markets; 
applications of portfolio theory to assets other than securities; portfolio revisions; survey of 
developments in the field; computer applications. 

451 Real Estate/Land Use Law — Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Real estate law. Cases provide illustrations of specific legal situations; 
financial institutions, property rights, zoning, land use law, and environmental impact require- 
ments. 

452 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Financial institutions and real estate credit. Sources and uses of capital 
(funds) in financing real estate transactions. Money and capital markets and their effect on 
credit availability. Instruments in real estate finance. Investment methods and decisions. Group 
problems and case studies. 

453 Real Estate Valuation (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Real property value, historical evolution of valuation principles, ap- 
proaches in urban and real property appraisals, alternative methods and techniques for property 
valuation. 

454 Real Estate and Urban Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Factors and influences of urban growth and development. Economic 
factors and real estate supply and demand. Location theory and urban growth patterns. Public 
policy as a factor in real estate development. Analysis of real estate markets. 

455 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Alternative analytical techniques in evaluating real estate investments. Tax 
aspects, measurement of investment returns, application of computer models to investment 
decisions. Lecture, discussion and case analysis of major investment types — raw land, apart- 
ment houses, commercial and industrial uses. 

456 Property Development and Real Estate Policy Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Decision making process in the property development process — from raw 
land to retail marketing of completed product. Policy formulation and implementation, project 
feasibility analysis, financial analysis, computer assisted analysis; case studies. 

459 Real Estate Research: Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 351 and 452 or 453. Group problems, laboratory work as determined by 
computer terminal availability. 

461 Business Risk Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 360 or consent of instructor. Techniques and structures of risk management; 
risk planning, control and financing in the business enterprise. 

462 Life and Health Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 360 or consent of instructor. Life and health insurance coverages, both individ- 
ual and group policies; the operation of insurance companies. Business and estate planning, 
pension plans, and government benefits. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 331 or 332, a major in finance, consent of department internship adviser, junior 
standing, 2.5 GPA and one semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work 
experience. May be repeated for credit up to a total of six units. Credit /No Credit only. 


Management 143 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by department chair. Open to undergraduate students 
desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510 and classified M.B.A. status. The methodology of financial manage- 
ment. The primary tools for financial analysis, long-term investment decisions, valuation and 
working capital management. International applications. 

523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 and classified M.B.A. status. The analysis of the financial decision-making 
process through case studies and seminar presentations. Current financial theory and models. 
International applications. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 523 and classified M.B.A. status. Optimal financing and asset administration; 
advanced techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical methods to the administra- 
tion of the finance function of the business firm. 

540 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 440 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Structure and opera- 
tion of major financial institutions; portfolio composition, price-cost problems, and market 
behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and interrelation of financial institutions and 
markets. 

541 Seminar in Investment Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 340 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of invest- 
ment and portfolio management; concepts of risk evaluation and investment criteria; analysis 
of interest rate movements; investment valuation and timing; regulation and administrative 
problems of the industry. 

551 Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 351 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. Problems of real 
estate investment; concepts of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of real property 
values; real estate development and financing. Case studies. 

570 Seminar in International Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or consent of instructor and classified M.B.A. status. The financial prob- 
lems of the multinational firm. International financing instruments, capital investment decisions, 
and constraints on the profitability of multinational businesses. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor and approval by department chair. May 
be repeated for credit. 


MANAGEMENT COURSES 

244 Introduction to Systems Concepts (3) 

The functions of goal-seeking organizations, basic systems concepts in business and society, and the 
systems approach to problem solving. 

245 Personal Law (3) 

The role of law as it affects the citizen in our society. Case studies relating to a person's role as a 
student, family member, owner of a vehicle, consumer, insured, homeowner, renter, saver, 
investor, employee and estate planner. 

246 Business Law (3) 

Philosophy, institutions and role of law in business and society. Functions of courts and attorneys, 
case studies in areas of contracts, and on the law relating to sale of goods. 

339 Principles of Management (3) 

Prerequisites: All lower division business core courses or instructor's consent. Administrative proc- 
esses in utility-creating business operations: decision-making; planning; controlling; organizing; 
staffing; supporting business information systems; measuring and improving effectiveness; pro- 
duction processes, production operations and institutions in American and worldwide business. 
Uses the Production Lab. Includes taking the English Proficiency Exam (fee charged). 


144 Management 


340 Behavioral Science for Business (3) 

Prerequisites: general education in social sciences, and a passing score on the English Proficiency 
Examination. Social and cultural environments of business. Business ethics. Communication, 
leadership, motivation, perception, personality development, group dynamics and group 
growth. Human behavior and organizational design and management practice in American and 
world-wide business. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

342 Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339 and Management Science 265. Production systems which combine 
materials, labor, and capital resources to produce goods or services. Systems, models and 
methods for management of production operations. Product and process development. Utiliza- 
tion of computer decision models. Uses the Production Lab. 

343 Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 339 or consent of instructor. The personnel function, its activities, and its 
opportunities. Management's responsibilities for selection, development and effective utiliza- 
tion of personnel. Open to non-business majors. 

347 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. Philosophy, institutions and role of law in business 
relationships. Business ethics. Case studies in areas of agency, partnerships, corporations, bank- 
ruptcy, unfair competition and trade regulation. 

348 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. The philosophy, institutions and role of law in commer- 
cial and personal transactions: case studies in personal property, bailments, commercial paper, 
secured transactions, real property, mortgages, trusts, community property, wills, estate admin- 
istration and insurance. 

400 Regulatory Law of Business (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 246, Economics 310. Philosophy, institutions and role of law as it regu- 
lates business. Courts, administrative agencies, cases studies relating to securities, antitrust, 
consumer protection, employment, environment and managerial social responsibility. 

431 Women in Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 340. (For men and women.) Increasing participation in the management 
of organizations. Employment and earnings, affirmative action, understanding male-female and 
female-female work relationships, dual careers, and learning how to increase one's effectiveness 
in organizations. 

440 Emerging Issues in Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339 and 340 or consent of instructor. For upper division and graduate 
students. Business and management in America. The interrelationships of technological, eco- 
nomic, political and social forces with the business enterprises and their ethical obligations to 
owners, employees, consumers and society at large. Open to non-business majors. 

441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 339. Impact of labor-management relations upon labor, management, and 
the public. Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining and settlement of disputes. Uses 
the Behavioral Lab. 

442 Advanced Labor Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 441. Effects of federal and state legislation on union and nonunion 
environments in both private and public sectors. Practicum in collective bargaining procedures. 
Case studies. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

443 Individual, Interpersonal and Group Dynamics for Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339, 340 or consent of instructor. Case studies and current literature on 
human problems of work situations. Developing self-knowledge; manager motivation; com- 
municator strengths; improving interaction skills; and improving interaction processes in groups. 
Uses the Behavioral Lab. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

444 Management of Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Management and Management Science core and other 300 level management courses 
in student's concentration. Technology for managing business and other enterprises as cyber- 
netic systems. The design and control of systems appropriate for product, project and program 
levels of analysis. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) Uses Production Lab. 

445 Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 342 and Management Science core. Planning and control methodologies 


Management 145 


for production operations. Quantitative approaches which integrate cost, schedule and techni- 
cal performance criteria. Collection, evaluation and use of real-time information. Individual and 
group projects. Uses the Production Lab. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science core, Economics 310 and Management 339. Management tools 
applied. Economics and statistics in decision-making process; use of cases and group problems; 
cost, demand, supply, price, product and competition. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core less Management 449, or consent of instructor. A simula- 
tion of an oligopolistic industry. Statistics and other analytical tools to make managerial deci- 
sions in management. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 

448 Seminar in Small Business Consulting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B, Management 339, Marketing 351, and senior standing. A seminar. 
Planning and working in a consulting relationship with small local businesses. Lectures, research 
and field work. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours fieldwork) 

449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: all other School of Business Administration and Economics core courses and depart- 
mental approval. Integrative cases from top management viewpoint. Administrative processes, 
ethical-legal-economic implications of business decisions, international applications; organiza- 
tion theory, and policy formulation. Individual and team efforts. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

450 An Information System for Production and Operations Management: Material Require- 
ments Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 445, or Management 342 with consent of the instructor. Conceptual 
foundations, logic, design, and use of computerized production and distribution planning and 
information systems. Material Requirements Planning (MRP), forecasting, the master schedule, 
product structure, and time-phased inventory management. Uses the Production Lab. 

494 Seminar in Management Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: 300-level business core courses, 300-level requirements for concentration in manage- 
ment information systems and Management 444. Senior seminar and applications in the design, 
implementation and use of management decision /information systems. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Six units of upper division management courses, including Management 339, major 
in management, consent of department internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA 
and one semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work experience. May 
be repeated for credit up to a total of six units. Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, and approval by faculty sponsor and 
department chair of proposed statement of work. Open to qualified students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

516 Organizational Theory and Management of Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M B A. status. Accounting 510, Economics 514 and Management Science 
512. Modern organization theory and application in utility-creating operations. Interpersonal 
behavior, planning, control, organizing, directing, communication production and information 
systems, and measures of effectiveness. International applications. Business ethics and relation- 
ships to society and politics. Graduate discussion and research reports. 

518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M B A. status and Accounting 510. Philosophy, institutions and role of law 
in business. Legal implications inherent in business decisions. Business ethics. Case studies in 
areas of contracts, sale of goods, agency, partnerships and corporations. 

524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, Management 516 and 518 or equivalent. Human behavior in 
organization, studies in organizational theories, and administrative action. 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M B A. status, Management 51 6 and 518, or equivalent. Cases, problems, and 
significant personnel administration literature in personnel administration and human relations. 

547 Comparative Management (3) 

Management practices and processes in five geographical areas; market-structures and management 
characteristics different from those in the United States. Constraints which vary between coun- 


146 Management Science 


tries because of cultural, legal, economic, and/or political differences. 

548 Seminar in International Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, Management 516 and 518, or equivalent. Problems in 
managerial qualifications and training, political structure within and without the operations, 
foreign receptivity to United States business, organizing and controlling the international firm. 
Management in selected countries. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent project. Student will select and have 
approved a project proposal, conduct the project, and prepare a formal analysis and report. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, consent of instructor and consent of department chair. May 
be repeated for credit. 


MANAGEMENT SCIENCE COURSES 

170 Quantitative Methods for Management Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 150A or equivalent. Application of the mathematical tools; calculus and analytic 
geometry. 

264 Introduction to Computer Programming (2) 

Problem-oriented languages of computers. Using computer programming. May be repeated for 
credit for each separate computer language (with departmental approval). 

265 Computer and Probability Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 130 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Probability and digital computer 
methods and their business and economic applications. Axioms of probability, frequency distri- 
bution, expectation, binomial distribution, and solving business problems on a digital computer 
with a compiler language. 

270 File Concepts and COBOL Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 264 or 265 or equivalent. Decision tables and flowcharting; 
elements of COBOL; table handling and subscripting; file organizations and processing: sequen- 
tial, indexed sequential, direct; sort/merge; documentation; testing and debugging; projects in 
COBOL. 

280 Computer Language Survey (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 264 or 265, or equivalent. Computer languages. Formal language 
theory, numerical data processing, string and list processing, formal structure manipulating, 
recursive routines. 

289 Computer Methods in Social Science (3) 

The history and application of digital computers to problems in the social sciences. Student-written 
programs in a problem-oriented computer language. Computers; law and society; artificial 
intelligence; and other topics. 

300 Elements of Information System Design and Data Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 270. Data coding and classification; table searching; randomizing; 
list processing; structured design; data base and data management systems; operating systems; 
on-line, multiprogramming, multiprocessing, virtual memory; data communication concepts; 
data entry; networks, error detection and handling. 

310 Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 270 or consent of the instructor. Advanced COBOL features: 
Indexed and direct file processing, report writer, sort feature, declarative and linkage sections, 
segmentation. Overlay structure, survey of job control language, libraries. Direct access. Hard- 
ware devices. 

361 Statistical Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 265 or equivalent and Math 130. Collection, analysis, and 
presentation of statistical data. Random sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Regression 
and correlation; production quality control and forecasting. 

362 Management Science Methods in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 265 or equivalent and Math 130. Mathematical methods and 
their application to business and economic problems, e.g., production control, scheduling, 
inventory control, PERT, and network analysis. Elementary mathematical optimization and 
production models. Students with a management science concentration must take Management 


Management Science 14 7 


Science 363 in lieu of this course. 

363 Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 or both Math 335 and Computer Science 112. The basic 
concepts of management science and its relationship to economics and decision theory. Optim- 
ization in continuous models, linear programming, queueing and inventory models, network 
analysis and dynamic programming, and production scheduling and control. 

404 Analysis of Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300 or equivalent. Feasibility study; data compaction; operations 
systems vs. information systems; tradeoffs between retrieval time and cost; file maintenance and 
ease of access; cost effectiveness and system optimization; hardware/ software selection; case 
studies and computer projects. 

408 Data Base Management Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 404 or equivalent. Integrated data base systems; logical organiza- 
tion; data description language (DDL); data manipulation language (DML); data independ- 
ence; relational data bases; comparative analysis of hierarchical, network, and relational data 
bases; overview of selected data base management systems (DBMS). 

409 Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Distributed data processing, current hardware and software 
developments in transmission technology, distributed data bases, network topology and proto- 
cols, tradeoffs among various distributed and centralized processing systems, interface prob- 
lems and case studies. 

411 Data Processing with Minicomputers (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Minicomputer technology in data processing; evaluating and 
designing minicomputer systems; how to implement, maintain and support these systems. 

412 Privacy, Security and Data Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Security and privacy problems associated with the use of 
computer systems; ways to minimize risks and losses. 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 or Math 230. Statistical methods applied to problems in 
business and industry; fundamentals of index-number constructions; practical multiple regres- 
sion models with computer solutions; basic techniques in time-series analysis of trend, cyclical 
and seasonal components; correlation of time-series and forecasting with the computer. 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 or Math 230. Principles for designing business and economic 
surveys. Applications in accounting, marketing research, economic statistics and the social 
sciences. Sampling: simple random, stratified and multistage design; construction of sampling 
frames; detecting and controlling non-sampling errors. 

430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 or Math 230. Nonparametric statistical methods and prob- 
lems in business and economics. Sign tests, rank correlation, contingency tables, order statistics, 
runs. 

448 Computer Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 or Management Science 461 or Math 435. Generating 
variates; their use in solving numerical problems. Queueing, communications, computer sys- 
tems, economics, inventory, scheduling, and other management science topics. 

461 Advanced Statistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Both Math 150B (or Management Science 170) and Management Science 361 (or 
Math 335 or Engineering 423 ) . The theory and application of the topics covered in Management 
Science 361, using calculus. Moments, generating functions, point and interval estimation, 
Neyman-Pearson and Likelihood Ratio Hypothesis Tests. 

465 Linear Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 362 or 363, or both Math 281 (or 291) and Computer Science 
112 (or equivalent). Theory and applications of linear programming and extensions. Problem 
formulation and solution, simplex method, duality, sensitivity analyses, network, transportation 
and assignment models, and efficient computing techniques for specially structured problems. 

466 Mathematical Programming (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 465 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. 
Nonlinear, integer and dynamic programming. Unconstrained and constrained non-linear op- 


148 Management Science 


timization, branch and bound techniques, cutting plane algorithms, and dynamic programming. 

467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 or Math 230. Control charts for variables, percent defective, 
and defects. Tolerances, process capacity; special control charts, acceptance sampling, and 
batch processing problems. Bayesian aspects of process control. 

468 Design of Experiments (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 or Engineering 205 and Math 230. Experimental design. 
Analysis of variance, factorial experiments, nested designs, confounding and factorial replica- 
tions. 

469 Reliability Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 461 or equivalent. Statistical principles of reliability; hazard 
functions; point and interval estimation of reliability; reliability demonstration; growth models. 

475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 461 or equivalent. The least squares principle; estimation and 
hypothesis testing in linear regression; multiple and curvilinear regression models; discriminant 
analysis; principal components analysis; application of multivariate analysis in business and 
industry. 

480 Inventory and Production Analysis in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 and either 362 or 363. Inventory and production models 
(deterministic and probablistic). Optimal policy forms and efficient computational methods. 
The specification and control of standards in equipment, jobs, products, and processes. 

490 Queuing and Other Stochastic Process Models in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 362 (or 363) «?/?<y361. Single and multichannel queuing systems 
of Markovian and general arrival and departure streams; birth-death processes, cost models and 
optimization of queues; Markov analyses; introduction to renewal theory; reliability. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 and 362, (or 363) and major in management science, or 
Management Science 300 and major in Management Information Systems, consent of depart- 
ment internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 2.5 CPA and one semester in residence 
at the university. Planned and supervised work experience. May be repeated for credit up to 
a total of six units. Credit/ No Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 and either 362 or 363, senior standing, and approval by the 
department chair. Open to qualified students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. 
May be repeated for credit. 

507 Organizations and Their Informational Systems Requirements (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 407 or equivalent. Non-mathematical study of the information processing 
requirements of organizations and the abstract factors which characterize them. 

512 Management Science Techniques for Business and Economics, A (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 130 and Management Science 264 (or equivalents), classified M.B.A. status. 

Probability anjl decision analysis; linear programming; inventory; PERT /CPM; queueing; simula- 
tion, computer application and other optional topics. 

513 Management Science Techniques for Business and Economics, B (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 512 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Descriptive 

statistics; sampling techniques; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple and multiple regres- 
sion; correlation analysis; non-parametric statistics; forecasting; time series; analysis of variance; 
computer packages and other optional topics. 

526 Decision Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 513 and classified M.B.A. status. Techniques from probability, 
statistical decision theory, and computer simulation applied to problems of management; prob- 
lems of decisionmaking under uncertainty, related to managerial decisions. 

560 Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 513 or equivalent and classified M.B.A. status. Optimization of 
discrete and continuous models, duality, sensitivity analysis, dynamic and mathematical pro- 
gramming, probablistic models such as queueing, scheduling and inventory models, Markov 
analysis; computer applications. 

565 File Management and Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 300 or consent of instructor. Innovative real-time computer- 


Marketing 149 


based information systems in industry and government. 

570 Seminar in Operations Research (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 560 and classified M.B.A. status. Topics vary and include inven- 
tory control systems, resource allocations, decision processes, scheduling, and other business 
operations research techniques. May be repeated for credit with departmental approval. 

576 Business Modeling and Simulation (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of instructor. Theory of modeling and simulation of 
business activities. Planned models, flow graphs, queueing phenomena, industrial dynamics, 
human factors and large-scale systems. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.B.A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status and consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


MARKETING COURSES 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 200. How management markets output of the enterprise and obtains reve- 
nue. Product management, pricing, promotion, distribution channels. Marketing's role in socio- 
economic system from viewpoints of consumer, management, social responsibility and 
government in American and worldwide business. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Structure, scope, and evolution of retail institutions; retail merchandise 
management and pricing; dimensions of retail competition: identifying markets, defining the 
retail mix and positioning the mix components to convey meaning. 

353 Marketing Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Problems facing the marketing executive, including organization, plan- 
ning, and forecasting, market analysis, budgeting, product policy, pricing, advertising and sales 
promotion, administration of the sales force. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the advertising function; the role of advertising in 
marketing strategy, budgetary considerations, allocation among media, measurement of effec- 
tiveness, administration and control, and its economic and social implications. Uses the Behav- 
ioral Lab. 

356 Creative Motivation in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Salesmanship as an interpersonal influence process. Selling using princi- 
ples of human behavior. Selling skills and techniques. Uses the behavioral lab. 

358 Physical Distribution (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and Management Science 265. The physical distribution system and its 
elements — packaging, transportation, warehousing and inventory management. Physical distri- 
bution practices and problems leading to improved system design and effectiveness. 

359 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Marketing of business goods and services to other businesses, govern- 
ment agencies, and social institutions by the manufacturer. Market analysis, sales forecasting, 
product strategy, effective use of sales force, and industrial advertising media. 

379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and Management Science 361. Marketing research process: problem 
formulation, identifying data sources, selecting data collection and analysis techniques, prepar- 
ing research reports. Selecting marketing problems for research. Lecture-discussion, cases. (3 
hours lecture, 1 hour activity). 

452 Advanced Salesmanship (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and 356. Negotiation style selling techniques; videotape, audio-tape, 
structured and unstructured role plays. Sales writing skills. Field case studies. 


150 Marketing 


453 Marketing to the Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The marketing of defense and nondefense products to the government. 
The nature and administration of contractual agreements with government agencies. 

454 Advertising Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 354. The interrelationships of product planning, advertising management, 
sales management, financial management and corporate strategy in a competitive environment. 

455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The sales manager in organization; recruiting and selecting salesmen; 
sales training; formulating compensation and expense plans; supervising and stimulating sales 
activities; morale; sales planning; evaluating salesmen; and distribution cost analysis. Uses the 
Behavioral Lab. 

456 Marketing Problems in Retail Sector (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 352. Merchandise management, planning and control; market structures, 
entrepreneurial function and competitive strategies (price and non-price competition); the 
dynamic consumer goods segment and correlates of store patronage: socioeconomic implica- 
tions, psychographics, changing life styles, and product risk; atmospherics fashion perspectives; 
and trends in the retail sector — a macroeconomic view. 

457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, Management Science 361 or consent of instructor. Marketing-manage- 
ment functions; scheduling, evaluating, control. The analysis of marketing processes and sys- 
tems and the development of appropriate action recommendations. 

458 International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and senior standing. Domestic marketing systems. Marketing problems 
across national boundaries and within national markets. U.S. firms involved in international 
marketing operations. 

459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, two advanced marketing courses. Marketing problems of firm and 
society. Integrative interactions between marketing activities and the interfaces of marketing 
with finance and production. Case method and current readings. 

470 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Consumer buying patterns, motivation and search behavior. The con- 
sumer decision-making process. Interdisciplinary concepts from economics, sociology, psy- 
chology, cultural anthropology and mass communications. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

479 Research Problems in Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 379. Marketing research practicum. Matching research methodologies to 
problems of market analysis, product planning, advertising, sales forecasting and other market- 
ing activities. Alternative data collection and analysis techniques. Seminars, research projects. 
(3 hours lecture, 1 hour activity) 

495 Internship (1-3 units) 

Prerequisites; Six units of upper division marketing courses, including Marketing 351, major in 
marketing, consent of department internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and 
one semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work experience. May be 
repeated for credit up to a total of six units. Credit /No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: marketing concentration, senior standing, and approval by the department chair. Open 
to undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated 
for credit. 

519 Marketing Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510, Economics 514, Management Science 512, 513, Management 516, 518 
(may be taken concurrently) and classified M.B.A. status. Concepts, principles and techniques 
used in the administration of the marketing variables. The role of marketing within the context 
of society and the business firm, social responsibility of business and international marketing. 

525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 and classified M B A. status. Major marketing problems facing industry: 
definition of and organization for marketing task; demand analysis; decisions concerning prod- 
uct, price, promotion, and trade channels. Use of case method and readings. 

554 Seminar in Promotion (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified M.B.A. status. The promotion mix as employed by 


Marketing 151 


businesses to optimize profitable operations. Determination of promotional goals, planning, 
budgeting, controlling promotional programs, and measuring promotional effectiveness. 

558 Seminar in International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 or equivalent and classified M B. A. status. Comparative international 
marketing systems; managerial techniques and strategies in multinational and domestic firms 
engaged in export; and the impact of political, legal, social, economic and cultural forces upon 
the decision-making process. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M B A. status. Directed independent inquiry. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified M B. A. status, consent of instructor and approval by department chair. May 
be repeated for credit. 











































HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 


154 


SCHOOL OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Dean: Peter A. Facione 


The School of Human Development and Community Service provides preservice education and 
professional development for professionals in education, nursing and other forms of public service. 
Courses are offered at the bachelor's degree level in child development, counseling, human services, 
nursing, physical education, recreation, reading and teacher training. In addition, graduate work is 
offered in bilingual education, early childhood education, counseling, physical education, reading, 
school administration, special education and teacher education. 

RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN EDUCA TION 

510 Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: bachelor's degree, Teacher Education 509 or equivalent. Elements of design, in- 
strumentation, treatment of data, hypothesis testing and inference and analysis of educational 
data. Develop a research proposal. Analyzing and evaluating research reports. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Program Coordinator 

The B.S. in Child Development is administered by an interdisciplinary group representing the Depart- 
ment of Anthropology, the ethnic studies programs, the nursing program, the Department of Psy- 
chology, the Department of Sociology and the Division of Teacher Education. 

This degree is designed for students interested in child related vocations. The objective of this 
program is to expand the degree candidate's understanding of growing human individuals and the 
ability to work effectively with them. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

The major in child development requires the successful completion of a minimum of 50 units which 
satisfy the pattern indicated below. Each degree candidate and faculty adviser will select course 
options consistent with the student's background and interests, and assure that the program forms 
a coherent entity. 

Students are encouraged to master their writing and speaking skills. Preference should be given to 
the selection of courses that enhance such abilities. 

Many upper division courses require prerequisites. It is the student's responsibility to become familiar 
with all appropriate campus regulations and degree requirements. 

Units 

Upper Division 50 

Required (Either of the following): 

Child Development 312, Human Growth and Development (Same as Ed-TE 312) (3) 

Psychology 361, Developmental Psychology (3) 

Required (Minimum of 6 units selected from the following): 

Child Development 385, Infancy and Early Childhood (Same as Ed-TE 385) (3) 

Child Development 390, Middle Childhood (Same as Ed-TE 390) (3) 

Child Development 386, Adolescence (Same as Ed-TE 386) (3) 

Required (Each of the following courses — minimum of 17 units): 

Biological Science 314, Ethics and Genetics (1 ) 

Biological Science 360, Biology of Human Sexuality ( 1 ) 

Child Development 391, Practicum (3) 

Child Development 496, Senior Seminar (3) 

Special Education 371, Exceptional Individual (3) 

Psychology 463, Experimental Child Psychology (3) 

Sociology 453, Child in American Society (3) 

Required (Minimum of 6 units selected from the following): 


Counseling/Psychometrics/School Psychology 155 

Afro-ethnic Studies 309, Black Family (3) 

Anthropology 415, Culture and Personality (3) 

Chicano Studies 431, Chicano Child (3) 

Criminal justice 330, Crime and Delinquency (3) 

Sociology 413, juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Sociology 451, Sociology of the Family (3) 

Required (Minimum of 9 units — select from the following): 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 422, Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

American Studies 301, American Character (3) 

Anthropology 450, Culture and Education (3) 

Art 380, Art and Child Development (3) 

Biological Science 313, Human Genetics (3) 

Chicano Studies 305, Chicano Family (3) 

Criminal justice 425, juvenile justice (3) 

Education-TE 406, Educational Sociology (3) 

Education-TE 437, Early Childhood Education (3) 

English 433, Children's Literature (3) 

Music 333, Music and Child Development (3) 

Psychology 311, Educational Psychology (3) 

Psychology 470, Behavior Modification (3) 

Physical Education 372, Physical Education and Human Development (3) 

Sociology 341, Social Interaction (3) 

Speech 403, Speech and Language Development (3) 

Theatre 402, Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

Theatre 471, Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Required 9 units of electives selected with approval of adviser. Units must be upper division, 
exceptions only on the prior approval of program coordinator and electives must be for a letter grade 
unless course is offered only on a credit /no credit basis. 

Total for major 50 


CHILD DEVELOPMENT COURSES 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

(Same as Ed-TE 312) 

385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

(Same as Ed-TE 385) 

386 Adolescence (3) 

(Same as Ed-TE 386) 

390 Middle Childhood (3) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 361 or Ed TE 312, or equivalent. Physical growth, personality development 
and social participation during middle childhood. Patterns of cognitive growth and emotional 
adjustment. 

391 Practicum in Child Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Child Development 385, 390 or 386 and consent of instructor. Supervised experience 
with children or adolescents in community settings. Seminar and field placement. Nine units 
maximum for the major. Six units maximum credit in any one practicum. At least eight hours/ 
week in the field required for each three units. 

4% Senior Seminar in Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in child development selected by the faculty and students 
participating in course. Theory, methodology and findings. 

COUNSELING/PSYCHOMETRICS/SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY 

FACULTY 

David Keirsey 
Coordinator 

Raymond Choiniere, Barbara D'Angelo, Keith Golay, Patricia Hannigan, Milton Lucius, Michael 

Parker 

PART-TIME 

LeRoy Cordrey, Lang Dana, Evelyn Delunas 


156 Counseling/ Psychometrics/School Psychology 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 

The counseling program is designed to equip graduates with counseling skills (sociatric and psychiat- 
ric). The graduates are frequently employed by enforcement, correctional, educational and health 
care institutions. 

The program has a competency base. Degrees, certificates and credentials are granted when the 
candidate has demonstrated a sufficient repertoire at sufficient proficiency, each competency sepa- 
rately observed and certified by faculty (even though credits are given for courses). 

CREDENTIALS 
Counseling Credential 

Employment as a counselor or psychologist by a school district requires a credential issued by the 
State Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. The university's counseling program is 
authorized by law (Ryan Act) to offer these credentials. Prerequisites for the counseling credential 
objective are: 

1. Possession of the M.S. in Counseling; 

2. 4 level ratings in all competencies listed for the M.S. degree. 

Upon applying for and receiving the credential objective the student becomes eligible for supervised 
fieldwork (Counseling 581 and 582). Upon satisfactory completion of two semesters of fieldwork, 
together with three courses in advanced pathology (Counseling 534, 535, 536),* the student is 
eligible for the counselor credential. 

Counseling Credential Courses 

Units 


Fieldwork: (Counseling 581, 582) 6 

Advanced Pathology: (Counseling 534, 535, 536) 9 

Total 15 


School Psychology Credential 

Prerequisites for the school psychology credential objective are: 

1. Possession of an M.S. in Counseling or its equivalent; 

2. Possession of a Counseling Credential issued by the State Commission for Teacher Preparation 
and Licensing; 

3. Rating of 5 in all competencies * listed for the M.S. and credential in counseling. 

* Those applicants who possess the M.S. and the credential in counseling, but do not have ratings 
of 5 in the competencies, may acquire or keep the counseling credential objective and acquire 
or bring up the competency ratings by taking further instruction and examination in the degree 
and credential courses. Once the competencies are rated at 5 the student may acquire the 
school psychology credential objective. 

After successful completion of paradox counseling (Counseling 515) and ability testing (Counseling 
523 ) the student is eligible for the first semester of intern supervised practice ( Counseling 583 ) . Upon 
completion of conjoint counseling (Counseling 524) the student is eligible for the final semester of 
internship (Counseling 584). Upon successful completion of the six courses (18 units) indicated 
above, the student is eligible for the school psychology credential: 

School Psychology Credential Courses 

Units 


Advanced Treatment: (Counseling 515, 516) 6 

Detection: (Counseling 523, 524) 6 

Internship: (Counseling 583, 584) 6 

Total 18 


COUNSELING COURSES 

252 Career Exploration and Life Planning (3) (Formerly Service Program 252) 

Exploration of personal career potentials, employment trends, decision-making, goal-setting, and job 
search methods. 

• Any of the advanced pathology’ courses may be waived provided that the applicant has passed a comprehensive examina- 
tion in advanced pathology. 


Counseling/Psychometrics/School Psychology 157 


315 Self-Actualization and Human Growth (3) 

Small group experiences in exploring the process of self-actualization and self-regulation in human 
contexts; existential phenomenology, humanism, reciprocity, etc. 

316 Group Process and Membership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The impact of other group members. How one is perceived by 
others. Controlled hygienic setting. 

317 Special Group Experiences (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. "Gestalt", "Transactional", "Existential Polarity", etc. 

452 Exploration in Self Concepts: Temperament and Character (3) 

Temperament. Style in teaching, parenting, leading, guidance and spousing. For counseling majors. 

511 Casework (3) (Formerly 558A) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Counseling program or consent of instructor. Casework and 
planning of intervention strategies. Case study with interview and observation. 

512 Counseling Procedures (3) (Formerly 550) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 51 1 and consent of instructor. Intervention methods usable in educational, 
enforcement, correctional and health care agencies. May be repeated once for credit. 

513 Counseling Procedures Assessment Seminar (3) (Formerly 548) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 511, 512, 531, 521 and consent of instructor. Standard treatment models. 
The paradoxical properties of these methods. May be repeated for credit. 

514. Group Leadership (3) (Formerly 552) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 513 and consent of instructor. Group treatment usable with unrelated 
groups in educational, enforcement, correctional and health care agencies. May be repeated 
once for credit. 

515 Paradox Counseling Procedures (3) (Formerly 556) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 513 and instructor consent. The double bind methods of Milton Erickson 
and the paradoxical uses of standard treatment methods, usable in educational, enforcement, 
correctional, and health care agencies. Required for school psychology credential. May be 
repeated once for credit. 

516 Conjoint Counseling Procedures (3) (Formerly 549) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 515 and consent of instructor. Applications of the Interdiction Model of 
Milton Erickson and Jay Haley to related groups. The nuclear family. Required for the school 
psychology credential. May be repeated once for credit. 

521 Research in Counseling (3) (Formerly 557) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Counseling program or consent of instructor. Informal 
phenomenological enquiry and reductionist inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

522 Detection Procedure: Formal Experiments (3) (Formerly 545) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521 and consent of instructor. The phenomenology of test, inventory, and 
interview methods of detection, usable in educational, enforcement, correctional, and health 
care agencies. May be repeated once for credit. 

523 Detection Procedure: Ability Tests (3) (Formerly 543) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 533, 534, 535, admission to school psychology credential program and 
consent of instructor. The administration, scoring of, and consultation about, ability test sample. 
The Stanford-Binet and Wechsler scales. Required for school psychology credential. 

524. Detection Procedure: Projective Tests (3) (Formerly 544) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 533, 534, 535, admission to the school psychology credential program and 
consent of instructor. Administration and scoring of, and consultation about, projective test 
samples. The Thematic Apperception, Family Drawings, Draw-A-Man, House-Tree-Person, 
Bender-Gestalt, Sentence completion experiments, and the Rorschach Experiment. Required for 
school psychology credential. May be repeated once for credit. 

525 Personality Study: Rorschach Test (3) (Formerly 558B) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521, 522, 523, 524, and consent of instructor. Thought, language, emotion, 
motives, motion and propioception. Learning, enculturation, and adaptation styles. 

531 Pathology: Comparative Etiology (3) (Formerly 555) 

Prequisite: admission to M.S. in Counseling program or consent of instructor. The spectrum of 
abnormal behaviors and experiences of clients of varying age, sex, culture and ethnicity. May 
be repeated for credit. 


158 Counseling/Psychometrics/School Psychology 

532 Child and Family Dysfunction (3) (Formerly 553) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521 and 531 and consent of instructor. The management of guidance 
programs in child maldevelopment, family and school dysfunctions, including child welfare 
laws. May be repeated for credit. 

533 Career and Occupational Guidance (3) (Formerly 551) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521, 522, 531, 532, and consent of instructor. Preventing mismatch of 
clients and opportunities. Prevention consulting. Institutional iatrogenicity of mismatch. May be 
repeated once for credit. 

534 Pathology: Sexual Dysfunction and Social Delinquency (3) (Formerly 540) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. Etiology, phenomenology, prognostics, 
demographics, syndromes and bibliography of the major forms of sexual, addictive, acquisitive 
and destructive delinquency, including rape, vandalism, kleptomania, pyromania, perversions, 
dypsomania and narcomania. Required for counseling credential. 

535 Pathology: Disorders of Thought and Language (3) (Formerly 546) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. Etiology, phenomenology, prognostics, 

demographics, syndromes, and bibliography of the major forms of thought and language 
disorder. Dyspraxias, Dysaesthesias, phobias and obsessions. Required for counseling creden- 
tial. 

536 Pathology: Affective and Psychosomatic Disorders (3) (Formerly 547) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. Etiology, phenomenology, prognostics, 
demographics, syndromes, and bibliography of the major forms of dysphoria, and organ system 
disorders. Hypochondria, neurasthenia, melancholia, anxiety states, migraine, colitis, essential 
hypertension, ulcer, etc. Required for counseling credential. May be repeated for credit. 

581 Fieldwork in Counseling (3) (Formerly 559A) 

Prerequisites: approval by Academic Review Board and admission to counseling credential program. 
140 clock hours of supervised practice in helping troubled clients in a public school setting. A 
weekly casework consultation seminar. Required for counseling credential. 

582 Fieldwork in Counseling (3) (Formerly 559B) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of Counseling 581 and approval by the Academic Review 
Board. 140 clock hours of supervised practice in helping troubled clients in educational, correc- 
tional, and/or health care agencies. Weekly casework consultation seminar. Required for coun- 
seling credential. 

583 Internship in School Psychology (3) (Formerly 559C) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 515, 523, admission to school psychology credential program and approval 
by Academic Review Board. 240 clock hours of supervised practice in helping troubled clients 
in a public school setting. Weekly casework consultation seminar. Required for school psy- 
chology credential. 

584 Internship in School Psychology (3) (Formerly 559D) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 583, 516, 524/or concurrent, admission to school psychology credential 
program and approval by Academic Review Board. 240 clock hours of supervised practice in 
helping troubled clients in educational, enforcement, correctional, and/or health care agencies. 
Weekly casework consultation seminar. Required for school psychology credential. 

595 Competency Certification Seminar (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Approval by Academic Review Board. Candidates present written, live, videotape, or 
audiotape samples to the Board of Professional Supervisors, to acquire exit skill ratings on the 
competencies required. 

5% Counseling Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Practicum in counseling. May be repeated for a maximum of six 
units. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Student invents and devises a tool, instrument, or technique and 
reports. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Writing of a thesis. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research and development in counseling pursued independently 
with periodic conference with instructor. 


Counseling/ Psychometrics/School Psychology 159 


HUMAN SERVICES 

Michael Brown (Political Science) 

Program Coordinator 

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services is a carefully articulated program providing both an 
academic and experimental background for the student seeking a career working with people in the 
varied and expanding field of human services. The required core curriculum reflects a cross-cutting 
integration of psychology, sociology, education and counseling in addition to phased experiences 
in supervised field placements. 

To attain intellectual depth and academic preparation in a particular area of concentration, the 
human services major will select 15-units of upper division courses in addition to the required core 
curriculum. Students with specific career interests and/or exceptional occupational backgrounds 
may construct an individual concentration core with the advice and prior approval of an adviser 
and the program director. 

Teacher credential seeking students: students planning to go on for a teaching credential after 
completion of the B.S. in Human Services are urged to complete all of their human services 
requirements during the first three semesters of their participation in the program to free their final 
semester for the teacher education block of courses. 

Multiple Subjects Credential Waiver Program: The human services major has been approved for the 
multiple subject credential option of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1 970 ( Ryan Act ) . 
Students who have properly selected their undergraduate courses can be granted the multi-subject 
(elementary) credential without having to take the State Licensing Examination. Contact the human 
services office for further information. 

Degree Requirements: Majors must demonstrate English language proficiency on the College English 
Placement Test in the first semester of matriculation in human services. 

Majors must achieve a grade of C or better in all courses included in the core requirements and 
concentration package. 

Units 

A. Required core curriculum 42 

Upper division: 

First semester: Human Services 300, Character in Conflict (3); Human Services 380, 

Theories of Counseling (3); Psychology 361, Developmental Psychology (3 ) or 
Child Development 312, Human Growth and Development (3) Human Services 
395, The Human Services (3) 

Second semester: Human Services 311, Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3); Psy- 
chology 341, Abnormal Psychology (3); Sociology 466, Deviant Behavior (3); 

Human Services 396, Practicum (3) 

Third semester: Human Services 470, Measurement: Program Analysis and Evaluation 
(3); Human Services 480, Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3); Human 
Services 485, Program Design and Proposal Writing (3); Human Services 495, 

Internship (3) 

Fourth semester: Human Services 497, Assessment (3); Human Services 496, Intern- 
ship (3) 


B. Required core of concentration 15 

Coursework selected from curricula designed by faculty in the area of concentration. 

Total 57 


Student Advisement 

Graduates of the human services program are prepared to seek employment in a wide variety of 
service agencies including those which deal with exceptionality, child care, geriatrics, probation, 
correction and detention, mental health, education, community change and minority relations, 
rehabilitation, and career development. Students who intend to enter an advanced degree program 
after completing the B.S. in Human Services are urged to declare that intent by the end of their junior 
year in order that their concentration package is congruent with the required preparation for 
graduate work in their chosen area. 

Students interested in pursuing the “double degree" option, a B.S. degree in human services and 
a B.A. in a related discipline, should declare their intent early in order to minimize the additional 
time necessary to fulfill the requirements for both the B.S. and the B.A. degrees. 


160 Counseling/Psychometrics/School Psychology 


Students preparing for graduate work in psychology are advised to consider a double-degree option 
in human services and psychology. 

If entry into a graduate program necessitates that certain substitutions be made for human services 
courses, equivalencies can be approved by the program coordinator. As a general rule, these 
substitutions are in statistics and research methods and certain courses demanded for graduate work 
in psychology and sociology. For example, Human Services 470 may be substituted by Psychology 
161 and Psychology 202 or by Sociology 331 A and 331 B or 331 X. 

Transfer students: Students transferring from a two- or four-year institution are urged to complete 
all general education requirements prior to enrollment in the human services program. This will allow 
the student to embark upon the core curriculum with its fieldwork component, as well as the area 
of concentration, without diversion of time and energy in satisfying the general education require- 
ments. 

Cal State Fullerton students: Students doing their lower division work at this university are advised 
to complete all general education requirements before entering the human services program, al- 
though they may declare the human service major in either the freshman or sophomore year. 

Change of Majors 

Students making a change from their prior major into human services must complete a change of 
major form available from the Office of Admissions and Records and approved as stipulated on the 
form. 


HUMAN SERVICES COURSES 

300 Character in Conflict (3) 

The problems and techniques of resolving conflicts created by the struggle to achieve and maintain 
personal autonomy in an automated world. Autonomy, masculinity-feminity, love, sex, mar- 
riage, meaning and encountering others. Lectures, discussion and group encounter. 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 311 ) 

380 Theories of Counseling (3) 

The counseling situation; long-range and short-term applicability; situational and functional appropri- 
ateness of theory; ethics and the counselor-client relationship. 

395 The Human Services (3) 

Survey of human services; inventory of student aptitudes, abilities and goals; review of community 
agencies and their functions and requirements; observation and experience in basic helping 
situations. Required of all majors in the first semester. 

3% Practicum (3) 

Field placement in a variety of on-campus and community service locations. First semester prac- 
ticum required of all majors. 

470 Measurement: Program Analysis and Evaluation (3) 

Corequisite: Human Services 485. Measuring instruments applicable to human service screening 
procedures; use and limitations of available measurements; collection and analysis of aggregate 
data; uses of aggregate information from academic research and public agency reports; interpre- 
tation and application of basic statistics in aggregate data analysis; evaluation techniques appli- 
cable to new and continuing programs. 

480 Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 380, Human Services 395, and Sociology 466 or Psychology 341. 
Techniques of counseling; appropriateness in the utilization of theoretical modalities; limitations 
of time, institutional function, and counselor training; the art of referral. Role-playing and video 
observations of actual counseling encounters. Case writing and reporting. 

485 Program Design and Proposal Writing (3) 

Corequisite: Human Services 470. Programming in public and private agencies; program proposal 
writing; design of empirical research components for innovative programming and accountabili- 
ty; analysis and critiques of agency task force programming for immediate social problems; 
program-funding agencies and grant writing; program budget. 

490 Practicum in Group Leadership (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 300, Human Services 380 and consent of instructor. Supervised 


Nursing 161 

experience as a group leader, Approaches and techniques of group leadership. May be repeated 
for credit. May be substituted for 495 or 496. 

495 Internship (3) 

Supervised work in a community or campus human service location. Second semester of practical 
experience required of all human services majors. 

4% Internship (3) 

Supervised field work in community human service agency. Third semester of practical experience 
required of majors. 

497 Assessment Seminar (3) 

Analysis of student's academic performance, basic skills, aptitudes and satisfactory field perform- 
ance; assessment of basic competencies in the general field of human services covered by the 
human services core curriculum; assessment of competencies in the special area of concentra- 
tion by the Faculty Assessment Team. To be taken in the last semester of course and field work 
by all majors. 

NURSING 

FACULTY 
Wilma Traber 

Program Coordinator 
Arlene Cray, Vera Robinson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Nursing is an upper division program for registered nurses seeking a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 
The curriculum prepares students for professional nursing functions: initial and continuing assess- 
ment of the health status of individuals and families in collaboration with, or independently from 
others; decision making regarding, and evaluation of, appropriate interventions; and accountability 
as a consumer advocate. The student will have the opportunity to expand skills in physical assess- 
ment, mental health, community health leadership, and research. Graduates are prepared to function 
as professional nurses. Educational foundations provide for continuing professional development. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Qualify for admission to the university. 

2. Possess current licensure to practice as a registered nurse in the state of California. 

3. Attain upper division standing. 

4. Possess transferable college courses (or equivalents) in anatomy and physiology, microbiology 
and introduction to chemistry (with labs). A combined inorganic and organic chemistry is 
preferred. A minimum of "C" grade must be attained in each course and proficiency should be 
equivalent to the past five years. 

5. Possess at least 6 units of transferable college courses in psychology, sociology or anthropology. 

6. Possess malpractice insurance. 

7. Possess a current California driver's license and access to transportation to extended campus 
clinical facilities. 

8. Have access to an approved nurse-practitioner preceptor. 

The student must submit duplicate transcripts of all previous college work: one to the Office of 
Admissions and one to the nursing program. 

One year of work experience as a registered nurse is encouraged. 

Study Plan 

The total number of units required for graduation is 128: 

1. Nursing 34 units 

2. Chemistry 300 3 units 

Chemistry 300L 1 unit 

3. Biological Science 425 4 units 

A minimum of nine units of behavioral sciences are strongly recommended as support courses. 
Students preparing for graduate school must take an upper division statistics course. 

A battery of entry and exit tests will be administered after admission and prior to graduation. There 
is a fee for these exams. 

The student is responsible to contact the nursing program office regarding dates and times of testing. 
Both the Chemistry Department and the Biological Science Department administer pre-tests prior 
6—78946 


162 Nursing 


to progression in Chemistry 300 and Biological Science 425, respectively. 

All required nursing and support courses must be taken in sequence. Students must apply for specific 
nursing courses each semester prior to enrolling in the class (November 15 for spring semester and 
April 15 for fall semester). Admission to all nursing Field/ Laboratory classes is restricted. Faculty 
advisers are assigned to individual students to help with program planning. Students are required to 
make an appointment with advisers at least once a semester. To remain in the nursing sequence, 
students must attain a minimum grade of "C" in all required courses. 

The nursing curriculum requires a minimum of four semesters. Students may attend part time or full 
time. 


Course Requirements: 


Nursing 305 
Nursing 305L 
Nursing 307 
Chemistry 300 
Chemistry 300L 


Nursing Process I (2) 

Nursing Processe I Field /Laboratory (3) 

Human Life Cycle I (3) 

Introduction to Organic and Physiological Chemistry 
Introduction to Organic and Physiological 
Chemistry Laboratory ( 1 ) 


(3) 


Nursing 355 Nursing Process II (2) 

Nursing 355L Nursing Process II Field /Laboratory (3) 

Nursing 357 Human Life Cycle II (3) 

Biological Science 425 Pathobiology (4) 


Nursing 400 
Nursing 400L 
Nursing 402 
Nursing 402L 


Professional Dimensions of the Nursing Process (2) 

Professional Dimensions of the Nursing Process Field /Laboratory (1 ) 
Clinical Studies: Community Health Nursing (2) 

Clinical Studies: Community Health Nursing Field/ Laboratory (4) 


Nursing 450 
Nursing 450L 
Nursing 452 
Nursing 452L 


Advanced Nursing Process (Nursing Research) (2) 

Advanced Nursing Process (Nursing Research) Field /Laboratory (1) 
Advanced Clinical Studies (2) 

Advanced Clinical Studies Field /Laboratory (4) 


NURSING COURSES 

305 Nursing Process I (2) 

Prerequisites: current California Registered Nurses' license. Associate Degree (junior standing) and 
consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 305L. The theory and concepts of the nursing 
process: health assessment, self concept, bio-psycho-socio-cultural concepts, communication 
skills and the humanistic helping process. 

305 L Nursing Process I Field/Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: current California Registered Nurses' license. Associate Degree (junior standing) and 
consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 305. Application of theories and concepts to facilitate 
increased awareness of self and others by the use of the communication process and laboratory 
practice of health assessment skills. 

307 Human Life Cycle I (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. The physiological, social, intellectual and 
emotional aspects of growth and development from conception through adolescence; the 
dynamic relationship of familial, environmental, social and cultural values. 

355 Nursing Process II (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 305, 305L, 307, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425, and 
consent of instructor. ( Biological Science 425 must be taken prior to or concurrently.) Corequi- 
site: Nursing 355L. Theory and concepts of the nursing process; planning, intervention and 
evaluation; physical assessment, health promotion and prevention of disease. 

355L Nursing Process II Field/Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 305, 305L, 307, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425 (must 
be taken prior to or concurrently), and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 355. Labora- 
tory on in-depth assessment and beginning implementation and evaluation. 

357 Human Life Cycle II (3) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 307, junior standing and consent of instructor. The physiological, social. 


Reading 163 

intellectual and emotional aspects of growth and development from young adulthood through 
aging, including the process of death and dying. 

400 Professional Dimensions of the Nursing Process (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355, 355L, 357, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425, and 
consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 400L. Collaborative leadership and professional 
dimensions of nursing process; accountability and transmission and advancement of nursing 
knowledge and skills. Group Dynamics, Teaching-learning principles, bioethics. 

400L Professional Dimensions of the Nursing Process Field/Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355, 355L, 357, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425, and 
consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 400. Clinical/seminar application of Nursing 400 
concepts; educational model in prevention of illness and maintenance of health. 

402 Clinical Studies: Community Health Nursing (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355, 355L, 357, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425, access 
to cassette tape recorder, and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 402L. Utilization of 
the nursing process with client/family/community health related problems in the community 
setting. 

402L Clinical Studies: Community Health Nursing Field/Laboratory (4) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355, 355L, 357, Chemistry 300, Chemistry 300L, Biological Science 425, and 
consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 402. Clinical /seminar applying professional nursing 
care to clients/families with diverse life styles and health needs in the community setting. 

450 Advanced Nursing Process (Nursing Research) (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 450L. 
Research: identification of nursing problems, data collection and analysis, writing a report. 

450L Advanced Nursing Process (Nursing Research) Field /Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Nursing 450. 
Clinical/seminar conducting a study in a clinical setting. 

452 Advanced Clinical Studies (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L and consent of instructor. (Nursing 450 and 450L must 
be taken prior to or concurrently.) Corequisite: Nursing 452L. Synthesizes the nursing process 
in the professional nursing role. Principles and concepts of leadership, advocacy, change and 
decision-making. 

452L Advanced Clinical Studies Field/Laboratory (4) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L and consent of instructor. (Nursing 450 and 450L must 
be taken prior to or concurrently.) Corequisite: Nursing 452. Clinical/seminar: operationalize 
the professional nursing role, develop expertise in a clinical area through contractual study. 

499 Independent Study in Nursing (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing in nursing and/or consent of instructor. Individually supervised 
projects and/or study either in the library or in the clinical setting. 

READING 

FACULTY 

Norma Bartin Inabinette, 

Coordinator 

Ashley Bishop, Deborah Osen Hancock, Ruth May, joAnn Wells 
PART-TIME: 

Thomas Bean, jane Ballback, Ann Coil, Mary Ellmann, Kathleen Engstrom, jane Hopper, janice 
Lewis, joAnn Wells 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 

UNDERGRADUATE READING SKILL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS COURSES 

Lower division courses in reading (Reading 101, 103 minicourses, 201 and 202) and an upper 
division course (Reading 320) are designed to assist students in developing the critical and creative 
reading skills required for efficient university learning. 

READING SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL 

The Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing has granted approval to the Reading Pro- 
gram to offer the Reading Specialist Credential. 


164 Reading 


An examination of the course requirements will show overlapping between the Reading Specialist 
Credential and the Master of Science in Reading degree. By careful planning with a graduate adviser 
in reading, the student can virtually complete the requirements for both at the same time. 
Program pre-entry requirements for the Reading Specialist Credential are as follows: 

1 . Methods of teaching reading. Prior to entering this approved program the students will present 
evidence (transcripts) demonstrating satisfactory completion of one of the following: 

A. Ryan Act reading methods courses, such as Ed-TE 433 or Ed-TE 440R, or 

B. Teaching of reading examination adopted by Teacher Preparation and Licensing Commission, 
(National Teacher Exam No. 20) or 

C. Reading 480, The Teaching of Reading (4 units) or the departmental exam offered in lieu of 
the course. 

D. Entering students who received teacher training from out-of-state institutions since September 
1973, may submit a transcript and catalog course description and petition to have an under- 
graduate course accepted in lieu of the above. 

2. Teaching experience. Prior to entering this approved program, both in-state and out-of-state 
students will present evidence in the form of letters of verification from the district office demon- 
strating satisfactory completion of one of the following: 

A. Two or more years of successful experience teaching reading for at least one instructional 
period per day in public and/or private elementary and/or secondary schools, this experience 
to include at least a two grade spread, or 

B. Two or more years of successful classroom teaching experience, this experience to include 
at least a two-grade spread, or 

C. Two hundred fifty or more days of successful and extensive substitute teaching experience, 
this experience to include at least a two-grade spread, or 

D. Successful student teaching experience, at least part of which involved the teaching of reading, 
as well as at least 45 hours of successful experience as a 

teaching aide in reading 

reading tutor, this experience to include at least a two grade spread. 

Students whose teaching experience on the above covers less than a two grade span may complete 
this requirement by tutoring students in Reading 581 and Reading 583A at a grade level at least two 
years different from previous experience. 

Top priority for entering the credential program will be given to those students meeting criterion "A" 
listed above. Other applicants will be admitted, as space permits, in descending order according to 
the remaining criteria. 

3. Assessment of experienced reading specialists. Prior to entering this approved program, the 
applicant who has served as a school or district reading specialist will be assessed according to 
the following criteria and have the program planned around the needs revealed by this assess- 
ment: 

Graduates of master's programs with an emphasis in reading, and applicants functioning as 
reading specialists who have not completed such a degree: evaluation of competencies required 
under this credential to be completed by a faculty member in conjunction with the applicant in 
Reading 5821, Analysis of Reading Practices, Assessment of Reading Specialist Competencies (1 
unit) 

Assessment strategies include: 

( 1 ) Self assessment of progress toward attaining specified program objectives. Students will rate 
themselves on a scale of 1-7 on each of the major program objectives. Students who rate 
themselves 

(a) 1 or 2 on a given objective will be advised to take the appropriate course (s) to meet 
that objective; 

(b) 3, 4 or 5 on a given objective will be given the opportunity to take a department 
prepared exam or write a professional paper under the guidance of an instructor which 
demonstrates that the student has achieved this objective to minimally stated standards. 
The student may opt to take coursework instead of writing the exam or paper; 

(c) 6 or 7 on the given objective will verify their competency in an oral exam during an 
interview with a faculty member; 

(d) Students who avail themselves of the oral and/or written evalation procedures and do 
not meet the previously specified standards will be required to take the required course- 
work related to these objectives. 

(2) Faculty assessment of progress toward attaining specified program objectives, this to include 


Reading 165 


letters of evaluation from supervisory personnel, direct observation by faculty, and/or 
evaluation of oral or written evaluation. 

At the conclusion of the assessment phase, the faculty member will develop a credential study plan 
which specifies the coursework the student must complete before obtaining the credential. 

Program Description Units 

Reading 507 Current Trends in Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) and 
Reading 582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curriculum (1) or 
Reading 508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) and 
Reading 582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Reading 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Reading 517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 

Reading 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Reading 583A,B Reading Improvement Casework (6) 

Reading 584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Electives and/or support courses (7-8) 

Total 31-32 

Electives include: 

Reading 582 Analysis of Reading Practices: Contemporary Issues (1) 

Reading 582B Analysis of Reading Practices: Cloze Technique — Its Uses in Teaching 
Reading (1) 

Reading 582C Analysis of Reading Practices: Individualized Reading (1) 

Reading 582D Analysis of Reading Practices: Instructional Technology and Reading (1) 
Reading 582G Analysis of Reading Practices: Establishing Reading Laboratories and Learning Cen- 
ters ( 1 ) 

Reading 582H Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Gifted (1 ) 

Reading 5821 Analysis of Reading Practices: Assessment of Reading Specialist Competencies ( 1 ) 
Reading 582) Analysis of Reading Practices: Teaching Reading to Adults (1) 

Reading 582K Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Ethnically Different Child (1 ) 
Reading 582L Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading in Early Childhood (1) 

Reading 582N Analysis of Reading Practices: Vision and Reading ( 1 ) 

Reading 582P Analysis of Reading Practices: Fieldwork in a Community Reading Clinic (1-3) 
Reading 582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Reading 582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1) 


READING COURSES 

101 Reading Development (1) 

To improve reading efficiency. May be repeated for a maximum of three units. 

103A Assessment of Reading Skills (1) 

Assessment of reading and study skills, vision and perceptual screening, personal conferences, 
time-study management and scheduling. 

103B Textbook Mastering (1) 

Systematic procedures for more effective study. Techniques for reading chapters as well as entire 
books more effectively. 

103C Note-taking Skills (1) 

Listening and note-taking skills. Memory and comprehension in auditing skills and note-taking. 

103D Preparing for and Taking Examinations (1) 

Techniques for attaining examination readiness, taking essay tests, objective tests, open book tests 
and oral tests. 

103F Vocabulary Development (1) 

Vocabulary development, study of derivatives and root words, spelling improvement, and dictionary 
study. 

103G Critical Reading (1) 

Critical reading skills. Detecting fact and opinion, author's purpose, tone and bias, making critical 
judgments and drawing inferences. 

201 Academic Reading: Analyses and Strategies (3) 

Reading and study strategies. The analysis of the student's current skills in academic reading. 


166 Reading 


202 Vocabulary Building (3) 

Development of individual vocabulary. Language usage, word formation exercises, dictionary prac- 
tice. Selected reading. 

320 Power Reading (3) 

Reading improvement for the upper division student. Improvement of rate and comprehension, 
study skills and critical analysis. Not for student who has taken Reading 201 or has more than 
one unit of credit for Reading 101. 

480 The Teaching of Reading (4) 

Curriculum and methods in the teaching of reading in the elementary and secondary schools. 
Teachers' manuals and guides. Preparing lessons in classroom teaching of reading. 

493 Teaching Reading to the Adult Basic Education Student (3) 

Reading problems in the adult basic education student; assessment, diagnosis and prescription of the 
reading needs of adults; analysis of current research in teaching reading to adults. 

497ABC Reading Aide Practicum (1,1,1) 

Training aides in the Cal State Fullerton reading centers. For students seeking teaching credential. 
May be repeated once for credit. A — Fundamentals of reading development. B — Prerequisite: 
497A. Audiovisual equipment, in the reading lab. C — Prerequisite: 497 AB. Tutor-student rela- 
tionship. 

507 Current Trends in Secondary and College Reading Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Recent research on the learner, 
the teacher, approaches, materials and facilities in the teaching of reading at secondary and 
college levels. 

508 Teaching Reading in Today's Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Current trends in the teaching of 
elementary reading, the teacher as a decision-maker and the reading process for all learners. 

516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Studies of the factors underlying 
learning disabilities in reading in children, adolescents and young adults. 

517 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Theory and application of individ- 
ual and group intelligence, achievement and interest tests used with students in a reading 
program. 

581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Analysis and diagnosis of reading 
difficulties. Techniques and methods of prevention and treatment. Individual remediation of 
student. Primary through secondary. 

582 Analysis of Reading Practices: Contemporary Issues (1) 

Current issues in reading instruction, such as the exceptional child in reading, textbook evaluation 
procedures and comparative reading. Can be repeated for credit with different content. 

582B Analysis of Reading Practices: Cloze Technique — Its Uses in Teaching Reading (1) 

The Cloze Techinque. Assessing readability difficulties of material and comprehension of specific 
material by the learner. Practical application of Cloze principles in teaching specific reading 
skills. 

582C Analysis of Reading Practices: Individualized Reading (1) 

Goals and objectives of the individualized program. Assessment, selection and organization of 
materials. Management of teacher student conferences, skill development, and a variety of 
learning opportunities. Evaluation procedures. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 units of 
credit. 

582D Analysis of Reading Practices: Instructional Technology and Reading (1) 

Instructional technology used in reading such as tachistoscopes, reading pacers, mechanized pro- 
grammed material. Demonstration and practice in using materials. Instruction technology in 
planning individual and group reading instruction. 

582G Analysis of Reading Practices: Establishing Reading Laboratories and Learning Centers 

( 1 ) 

The necessities and optional features of a reading center appropriate to a specific situation. 

582H Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Gifted (1) 

Teaching reading to the underachieving and achieving academically gifted child in grades 1-12. 
Planning and implementing instruction to meet the learning abilities and needs of the gifted and 


School Administration 167 


to develop higher level thinking skills. 

5821 Analysis of Reading Practices: Assessment of Reading Specialist Competencies (1) 

Assessment of competencies of students entering the Reading program in preparation for the Reading 
Specialist Credential. 

582| Analysis of Reading Practices: Teaching Reading to Adults (1) 

Current methods of teaching reading to adults, including diagnostic and corrective techniques. 
Current research and evaluation of materials. Understanding special needs of the adult learner. 

582K Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading and the Ethnically Different Child (1) 

Graduate seminar to survey the affective side of teaching reading. 

582L Analysis of Reading Practices: Reading in Early Childhood (1) 

Readiness needs and evaluation instruments; techniques and materials for increasing concentration, 
positive socialization, creativity and learning skills of preschool children. 

582N Analysis of Reading Practices: Vision and Reading (1) 

Vision factors and reading. Screening techniques, behavioral symptoms and classroom and instruc- 
tional accommodations. 

582P Analysis of Reading Practices: Fieldwork in Community Reading Clinic (1) 

Fieldwork in a community reading clinic for children and adults, including both remedial and 
developmental instruction. May be repeated for a maximum of three units of credit. 

582R Analysis of Reading Practices: Elementary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Modern curriculum and techniques for teaching basic reading skills, K-6. 

582S Analysis of Reading Practices: Secondary Reading Curriculum (1) 

Modern curriculum and techniques for teaching reading, grades 7-12. 

583A Reading Improvement Casework (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar and fieldwork in the development of diagnostic-prescrip- 
tive procedures for working with developmental and corrective students in other than a one-to- 
one clinic setting. 

583B Reading Improvement Casework (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fieldwork in assessment and instruction through casework tech- 
nique. Training in inservice education and communication with teachers, parents, consultants, 
and administrators. Includes grant proposal writing and program development techniques. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or instructor. Linguistics and reading materials 
and instruction. Language development and the acquisition of reading. Teaching reading to 
linguistically different learners. 

585 Word Perception Skills in Reading (3) 

Word perception skills in the process of learning to read. A developmental hygiene of child vision. 
Visual anomalies and their applications to reading disorders. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars in such areas as behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program 
development, communication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Independent inquiry for qualified graduate students. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

Kenneth Preble 
Coordinator 

Edward Beaubier, Walter Beckman, William Callison, Gerhard Ehmann, Tracy Gaffey, Barbara 
Peterson, Stanley Rothstein 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


168 School Administration 


INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

A selected number of teachers will be offered the opportunity to study and to practice school 
administration as school interns in administration. A candidate must obtain admission to the pro- 
gram, and agreement must be reached with a sponsoring school or college district to employ the 
candidate as a full-time administrator during the school year. The internship is to enable the intern 
to gain the necessary experience in the performance of the critical tasks of the profession while under 
the close supervision of a fully-trained and experienced practitioner. The internship in educational 
administration is but one phase of the program for preparing supervisory and administrative person- 
nel for community college, high school, intermediate school, and elementary school positions of 
leadership. 

Internships are for a full academic year and require of all students the completion of a minimum 
of 21 graduate credits. During the period of the internship the student is required to be a registered 
graduate student at Cal State Fullerton. 

All candidates will be given a temporary credential for supervision and administration according to 
the regulations of the California Administrative Code, Title V, Section 6555. Such candidates should 
register in two courses: Sch Ad 561, Governance, Systems, School and Community, Sch Ad 563, 
School Personnel Administration. 

Both courses must be completed in the summer session if the student is to do an internship beginning 
in the fall semester. Applications for admission to the program should be sent to the chair, Internship 
Program in School Administration, by June 1. Careful planning of electives will enable candidates 
to receive the Master of Science in Education with a concentration in school administration upon 
further study, after completing the requirements for the internship. 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 
School Administration 

Candidates in administration, upon completion of the degree requirements for a Master of Science 
in Education, should qualify for certification as a school administrator at any level providing they 
have taught three years. As certification requirements change yearly, candidates are urged to have 
their adviser check their study program against current requirements. 

Candidates in administration accepted in the administrator internship program will be issued the 
Administrative Services Credential. 

OTHER STUDENTS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Experienced school administrators, holding a California administrative credential or a supervision 
credential and exempt from degree requirements, may register for any course in the school adminis- 
tration concentration. Teachers wishing to take courses in school administration directed at helping 
them to understand administration problems are welcome to take selected courses. 


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

481 Issues in Higher Education (3) 

Seminar in structure, governance, administration and challenges of American higher education. 

503 Foundations for Administrative Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Cultures and values to which schools must contribute. Commu- 
nity sociology, tax systems and public administration; the literature of leadership. Screening for 
admission to program. Required of all students during their first registration in school administra- 
tion. 

505 The Supervision of Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: Sch Ad 566 or 586. Development of a quality program of instruction in elementary and 
secondary schools; appraisal of programs of instruction; advanced principles of curricular 
review and modification. Evaluation of subject matter competence in supervisory specialization. 

560 Contemporary Problems in School Administration (3) 

Contemporary problems in school organization and administration including collective bargaining, 
finance, staff and school integration, declining enrollment, pupil achievement and affirmative 
action. 

561 Governance, Systems, School and Community (3) 

Structure, functions, trends, fiscal responsibilities and issues in the government of education at 
federal, state, county and local school district levels. School organization and administration. 


Special Education 169 


Community involvement; school-community participation and communication. 

563 School Personnel Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Sch Ad 503 or concurrent enrollment. School personnel management, collective 
negotiations, and role definition. 

564 Seminar in School Law (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School law as a reflection of public policy. California Education 
Code and the California Administrative Code, Title 5, and county counsel opinions: administra- 
tion, instruction, and financial management of public schools. Legal basis for public education 
in California. 

565 Seminar in School Finance, Business Administration and Buildings (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School finance, business administration and buildings and the 
effective educational program. Financial principles. School revenues and expenditures, budget- 
ary procedures and processes, cost analysis, business management and salary policies. 

566 Elementary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Prerequisites: Sch Ad 561 and 563. Leadership roles of elementary school principal and supervisor. 
Pupil personnel and instructional program in elementary school; working relations and morale 
among staff, community and pupils; parent education; relations with central district staff; man- 
agement and recordkeeping functions; teacher evaluation. 

567A,B Fieldwork and Project (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Sch Ad 566 or 586 and 510. Fieldwork and project or thesis, as required for Master's 
degree. Directed fieldwork in administrative areas in school systems. Supervised Master's 
Project or Thesis required in problem or area approved by the instructor. ( May be repeated 
for credit. ) 

568 Seminar for Administrative Trainees (3) 

A behavioral analysis approach in the establishment of a sound foundation for educational adminis- 
trators. The culminating offering of the administrator internship program. Objectives include ( 1 ) 
study of the behavior of human beings and (2) how theory contributes to effective administra- 
tive practice. 

569 The School in the Community (3) 

The changing school in the changing community. Power structure; community involvement and 
school-community participation; communication between school and community; the power 
of community education and the community school. 

586 Secondary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Prerequisites: Sch Ad 561 and 563. Leadership roles of the secondary school principal and supervisor, 
pupil personnel and instructional program in secondary schools; development and administra- 
tion of vocational education; morale among staff, community and pupils; relations with central 
district staff; management functions; teacher evaluation. 

588 Organization Theory and Management (3) 

Public school management; planning and practice in task analysis; planning and practice in setting 
of goals and objectives; implementation of plans related to goals; management tools, social, 
political and economic forces affecting education; decision making. 

589 Staff Evaluation — Supervision (3) 

Supervision techniques as they apply to improvement of teaching process. Role relationships 
between supervisors, students, teachers, parents; classroom dynamics and the supervisor in 
planning and developing educational programs. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Independent inquiry for qualified students. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

Calvin Nelson 
Coordinator 

Robert Lemmon, Lester March, Leo Schmidt, Shirl Stark 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 

ADVANCED CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

The curriculum in specialist preparation meets the requirements of Teacher Preparation 


170 Special Education 


and Licensing Act of 1970 effective in September, 1974. The curricula are subject to change pending 
approval by the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. Students are advised to contact 
the special education office for appropriate publications in the event curricular modifications are 
introduced by commission action. 

Specialist Credentials 

Programs leading to four specialist credentials are available. They are: 

1. Specialist credential to teach the physically handicapped (including the blind and partially 
seeing and orthopedically handicapped) 

2. Specialist credential to teach the learning handicapped (including the learning disabilities, 
behavior disorders and educationally retarded) 

3. Specialist credential to teach the severely handicapped (including the trainable mentally re- 
tarded, severely multiple handicapped, seriously emotionally disturbed and the autistic) 

4. Specialist credential to teach the gifted 

All specialist training programs require a generic component and advanced specialist component, 
for the credential. Completion of the generic component is prerequisite to admission to advanced 
specialist component training. 

Undergraduates wishing to earn an advanced specialist credential can meet the requirements of the 
generic component of the credential by (a) completing a bachelor's degree with a major in child 
development or human services with a teaching-learning practicum thrust, (b) completing the 
preservice professional training program for a multiple subject credential with student teaching in 
a regular classroom which has integrated handicapped children. For details regarding admission to 
and completion of the multiple subject credential, consult the Division of Teacher Education. 
Graduate students entering the advanced specialist program who have completed multiple or single 
subject preservice training programs with majors other than human service must complete six units 
of courses in human services (electives in exceptionality) and six units of student teaching with 
exceptional children. This requirement may be fulfilled upon submission of satisfactory evidence of 
broad training and experience with exceptional children. 

Advanced specialist programs include course work specific to the master's degree and the several 
advanced specialist credentials; students may, therefore, elect one of two options upon entry to the 
program. These are: 

1. Advanced specialist credential program 

2. Master's degree program. 

The advanced specialist program for each credential requires the same course sequence. However, 
different practicum activity sections are designed to meet the specific needs of each credential. 
Students seeking recommendation for any of the four credentials listed must satisfactorily complete 
the following: 

Prerequisites 

1 . Bachelor's degree 

2. A multiple subject or single subject credential 

3. The specialist generic component of the program, including student teaching with exceptional 
children (12 units) 

Advanced Specialist Credential Requirements Units 

Sp Ed 463 Exceptionality: Cognitive- Affective Characteristics (3) or 
Sp Ed 464 Exceptionality: Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Sp Ed 465A,B,C or D * Educational Practices in Exceptionality (4) 

Sp Ed 573A,B,C or D * Advanced Practices in Exceptionality (4) 

Sp Ed 574 Exceptionality: Noneducational Implications (3) 

Sp Ed 575 Exceptionality: Theory, Philosophy and Research (4) 

Total (including 12 prerequisite units) 30 

Advisement is available to any student seeking a credential under the special education program. 
During registration, the student should consult an adviser in the area in which he expects to major, 
as well as an adviser in special education. A student from another institution should bring transcripts 
of previous work and a tentative selection of courses. Transferred education courses must be of 
upper-division level and taken within the past 15 years to be applicable to upper division credential 
requirements. 


• See program publications regarding which sections apply to specific credentials. 


Special Education 171 


SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSES 

370 The Personal Quest (3) 

The factors contributing to personality. Individual needs, how they are met by the individual, other 
individuals, society and society's institutions. Life styles and how they meet the needs of 
individuals. 

371 Exceptional Individual (3) 

Children who deviate from the average in the elementary and the secondary schools; physically 
handicapped, mentally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, and emotionally disturbed. Spe- 
cial educational services, curriculum, procedures, and materials. 

463 Exceptionality: Cognitive-Affective Characteristics (3) 

Individuals who deviate from the norm in cognitive and emotional functioning; the educable mental- 
ly retarded, gifted, slow learner, behaviorally disordered and emotionally disturbed. 

464 Exceptionality: Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Individuals who deviate from the norm in physical-sensory functioning; the visually handicapped, 
multiply handicapped, physically handicapped, and trainable mentally retarded. 

465A Exceptionally Educational Practices with the Learning Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Sp Ed 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the learning 
handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

465B Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Severely Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Sp Ed 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the severely 
handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

465C Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Physically Handicapped (4) 

Corequisite: Sp Ed 464. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the physical- 
ly handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

465D Exceptionality: Educational Practices for the Gifted (4) 

Corequisite: Sp Ed 463. Curriculum development, methods and materials for teaching the gifted. 
Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

478 Innovations in Special Education (1-3) 

Recent, dynamic and innovative methodologies and concepts as they relate to special education. 
May be taken for a maximum of six units. 

4% Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum with educationally handicapped children. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Individual studies under the 
direction of faculty member. Experimental, library, or creative projects. 

520 Atypical Children, Fundamentals of Measurement (3) 

Principles of measurement and the evaluation of atypical children. Areas covered: teacher design 
tests; normed tests and exceptional children; and using test for instructional planning. 

522 Behavior Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Sp Ed 371 or consent of instructor. Identification and management of social and 
affective disturbances related to school performance. Early detection, behavioral modification 
techniques, parent counseling, interagency cooperation. 

573A Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Learning Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Sp Ed 463 and 465A. The application of educational practices with the learning 
handicapped. Seminar and fieldwork at selected sites in the community. 

573B Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Severely Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Sp Ed 464 and 465B. The application of educational practices working with the severely 
handicapped. Seminar and field work at selected sites in the community. 

573C Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Physically Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Sp Ed 464 and 465C. The application of educational practices with the physically 
handicapped. Seminar and fieldwork at selected sites in the community. 

573D Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Gifted (4) 

Prerequisites: Sp Ed 463 and 465D. The application of educational practices with the gifted. Seminar 
and fieldwork at selected sites in the community. 


172 HEPER 


574 Exceptionality: Noneducational Implications (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to graduate status. Economic and social implications of exceptionality. The 
adjustment of the exceptional individual to society. Society's accommodation to the individual. 

575 Exceptionality: Theory, Philosophy and Research (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to graduate status and consent of instructor. Theories, philosophies and 
evaluation strategies: exceptional individuals, critical evaluation of research on exceptionality 
and the consideration of investigatory models for studying exceptionality. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars to develop professional competencies in behavior, teaching strategies, education- 
al technology, program development, communication theory and interpersonal relations. May 
be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Independent inquiry. For qualified graduate students. 

DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS 

Neale Stoner 
Director 
Leanne Grotke 

Director of Women's Athletics 

James Colletto, John Culwell, Robert Dye, August Garrido, Jill Goldberg, jerry Lloyd, Donald Matson, 
Wayne Nunnely, Greg Robinson, Lynn Rogers, Melvin Sims, Bill White, V. Richard Wolfe 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION, 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

FACULTY 
Paul Pastor 
Department Chair 

Gene Adams, C. Ian Bailey, Jean Barrett, Anne Marie Bird, Margaret Elliot, M. William Fulton, Eric 
Hanauer, Elmer Johnson, Ann Keough, Alexander Omalev, Kenneth Ravizza, Roberta Rikli, Iva 
Diane Ross, Virginia Scheel, Eula Stovall, Carol Weinmann, Ronald Witchey, Michael Yessis 
The primary mission of the department is to advance and disseminate knowledges created through 
the study of human movement, of leisure needs and interests, and of total health which includes 
physical, mental, social and emotional dimensions. The secondary mission focuses on: ( 1 ) develop- 
ment of knowledges and skills essential for entry into a variety of occupations, (2) development of 
opportunities for participation in internships or cooperative education work experiences related to 
academic study, and (3) development of attitudes and behaviors appropriate for promotion and 
maintenance of personal and environmental health. 

The study of human movement encompasses the mechanisms which influence and are significant 
to participation. These include philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological and biological 
factors. Environmental determinants, including the social context and movement structures in which 
activity occurs are considered. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation offers the Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education for students preparing to teach, to pursue graduate work in physical 
education and for careers in business, industry and government service. The degree consists of 124 
units with a maximum of 1 2 lower division units and a minimum of 33 upper division units in physical 
education. 

Transfer students must request transcripts of records of all previous scholastic work from each 
university or college attended. These transcripts are in addition to those required for admission to 
the university and must be sent by the issuing institution directly to the chair, Department of Health 


HEPER 173 


Education, Physical Education and Recreation. 

All transfer students must have transcripts evaluated by the department undergraduate adviser prior 
to registration. 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Lower Division (Maximum of 12 units) 

Required Courses: 

PE 260 Movement Anatomy 3 units 

A minimum of six courses, one from each of the following areas: 

Fitness: PE 100, Physical Conditioning; 102, Jogging; 103, Track and Field; 102, Gymnastics; 144, 
Exercise Weight Control. 

Aquatics: PE 110, Swimming; 111, Life Saving; 112, Water Polo; 114, Skin Diving; 115, Synchro- 
nized Swimming; 116, Springboard Diving; 214, Basic Scuba. 

Combatives: PE 150, Wrestling; 151, Aikido; 152, Karate; 154, Self-Defense; 155, Fencing; 156, 
Sabre; 157, Epee. 

Individual Sports: PE 104, Horseback Riding; 105, Cycling; 106, Skiing; 107, Ice Figure Skating; 108, 
Roller Skating; 117, Bowling; 118, Archery; 119, Golf; 125, Rock Climbing; 246, Introduction to Hatha 
Yoga. 

Court/ Racquet Sports: PE 130, Badminton; 131, Tennis; 132, Racquetball; 133, Handball. 

Team Sports: PE 160, Baseball; 161, Softball; 162, Lacrosse; 163, Field Hockey; 164, Volleyball; 165, 
Soccer; 166, Team Handball; 167, Basketball; 168, Basic Football; 169, Flag Football. 

(Intercollegiate sports course may be applied in the appropriate area.) 

A maximum of 12 lower division units may be counted toward completion of the major. However, 
students may elect to take upper division work in lieu of further lower division work excluding 
requirements stated above. All work taken at other institutions as lower division work must be 
counted as such at Cal State Fullerton. 

Upper Division (Minimum of 33 units) 

Required courses (18 units): 

Units 


PE 300 Principles of Movement 3 

PE 352 Physiology of Exercise (352L optional) 3-4 

PE 371 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (371L optional) 3-4 

or 

PE 383 Psychological Aspects of Human Movement 3 

PE 380 History of Physical Education and Sport..,. 3 

or 

PE 382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human Movement 3 

PE 381 Human Movement in Cultural Perspective 3 

or 

PE 384 Sport Sociology 3 


andxYuee units selected from courses 371, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384 which have not been 
used to meet the above requirements. 

Electives: (Minimum 15 units) 

Upper division physical education courses to complete the required 45 units for the 

major. To be selected under advisement. 

Total 45 

TRACKS 

The Department of Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation has identified 10 tracks 
which can help prepare students for careers in the field or for graduate study. These tracks are 
advisory only, but can be valuable in meeting academic and career objectives. Advisers' office hours 
for obtaining information on the various tracks are available in the department office. Students are 
encouraged to contact the adviser in the area of choice. Career opportunities are available in: 
Elementary and Secondary Teaching 
Coaching 
Athletic Training 

Physical Education for the Handicapped 


174 HEPER 


Sports Careers 
Humanities — Arts 
Sports Medicine 
Human Factors 
Health 
Recreation 

Proficiency Requirements for Major and Minor Students 

Activity courses should be taken to meet the prerequisite requirements for any analysis series course. 
Proficiency screening tests are administered in the analysis classes at the beginning of the semester. 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A physical education minor shall consist of 24 units of course work in physical education with a 


minimum of 18 upper division units. 

Required Courses: Units 

PE 260 Movement Anatomy (or Human Anatomy equivalent) 3 

PE 300 Principles of Movement 3 

PE 352 Physiology of Exercise 3 

PE 371 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 3 

or 

PE 383 Psychological Aspects of Human Movement 3 

PE 381 Human Movement in Cultural Perspective 3 

or 

PE 384 Sport Sociology 3 

PE 380 History of Physical Education and Sport 3 

or 

PE 382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human Movement 3 

Electives: 

A maximum of 3 units lower division electives (100 and 200 level courses) 3 

A minimum of 3 units upper division electives (300 and 400 level courses) _3 

Total 24 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS SEEKING A 
TEACHING CREDENTIAL 


The university program for meeting the basic requirements for the teaching credential with a 
specialization in physical education (K-12) can be found elsewhere in this catalog (see School of 
Human Development and Community Service, Division of Teacher Education). Additional require- 
ments of the Department of Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation are as follows: 

1. Advisement 

For the credential program see the teacher education adviser in physical education two to three 
semesters before making formal application. This will help students to evaluate qualifications and 
to plan appropriate course work. 

2. Required Course Work 

In addition to, or as part of, the requirements for a major in physical education all candidates 
for the credential must complete the following with a minimum of a " C " grade: 

PE 300 Principles of Movement 

PE 340 Contemporary Movement Environments 

PE 349 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education 

PE 371 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 

Minimum of two analysis classes and one technique of coaching class. 

3. Completion of the Approved Waiver Program 

All candidates for the credential must adequately demonstrate competency in subject matter 
scope and content of physical education. The major areas of emphasis identified by the Physical 
Education Advisory Panel of the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing include: (1 ) 
biological foundations, (2) sociological foundations, (3) psychological foundations, (4) histori- 
cal-philosophical foundations, (5) evaluation and measurement, (6) health and safety concepts 
relating to physical activity and (7) instructional subject matter. 

Copy of the waiver can be obtained from the teacher education adviser in physical education. 

4. Instructional Subject Matter of Physical Education 

Students seeking a credential with a specialization in physical education from this institution must 


HEPER 175 


be able to demonstrate competency in instructional subject matter which is a part of the regular 
physical education program of the public schools. The Department of Health Education, Physical 
Education and Recreation specifically requires the following: 

a. Ability to perform and analyze basic movement skills common to a large number of instruction- 
al physical activities. 

b. Adequate background and preparation to demonstrate breadth of understanding of the scope 
and content of physical education. 

c. Strong background and preparation in a minimum of three designated areas of physical 
education * to demonstrate "in-depth" understanding and ability to apply understandings to 
the teaching learning situation. At present the areas identified by the Teacher Education 
Advisory Council of the Physical Education Department include: (1 ) team sports, (2) individ- 
ual sports, (3) dual sports, (4) dance, (5) aquatics, (6) recreational (must be instructional 
in nature), (7) athletic training, (8) adaptives, (9) special programs and (10) coaching. 

5. Experiences 

Students are expected to have been involved in several leadership experiences prior to formal 
application. These experiences could be in coaching, recreation, camping, youth leagues, and 
aiding in public school physical education classes. These experiences can be self-designed or 
designed through PE 496 (off-campus teacher aides), and PE 396 (on-campus teacher aides). 

6. Admission to Teacher Education 

In addition to the requirements set forth elsewhere in this catalog, the Department of Physical 
Education requires candidates to submit to an extensive review of qualifications for teaching. This 
review includes additional written documentation, and a personal evaluation by a select faculty 
committee. 

Acceptance into the program allows the candidate to enroll in a two semester sequence: 

First semester: Ed-TE 440F, Ed-TE 440S, Ed-TE 440R (optional), PE 442. 

Second semester: Ryan credential — PE 449A,B 

ATHLETIC TRAINING CERTIFICATION 

Athletic Training Certification accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association must be 
earned in conjunction with a major in physical education and a teaching credential. 

Specific requirements for the certificate in athletic training include completion of: 

1. A bachelor's degree with a major in physical education with a GPA of at least 2.75 overall; 3.0 
in the major; and 2.5 in biological science. 

2. All requirements for a teaching credential through this institution. 

3. Graduation from California State University, Fullerton. 

4. CPR card (yearly). 

5. The following specific course work (or equivalence): 

Biol 361, Human Anatomy, or PE 260, Movement Anatomy 
Biol 362, Human Physiology 
PE 352, Physiology of Exercise 
PE 300, Principles of Movement 

Physics 211 A, Elementary Physics, or Chemistry 100, Introduction to Chemistry 

PE 480, Psychological Aspects of Human Movement 

PE 371, Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 

Health Education 102, Prevention and First Aid 

Chemistry 111, Drugs and Diet in Life Processes 

PE 363, Developmental Adaptations of Atypical 

PE 451, Sports Medicine 

PE 365, Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 

PE 366, Advanced Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 

PE 4%, Practicum (Clinical Training Internship: six semester units — 800 clock hours) 

6. Recommended in addition to the above: 

Emergency Medical Training 
Advanced First Aid 

Principles of Conditioning (PE 351) 

Drugs and Society (Health Education 321) 

* Students are urged to consult with the teacher education adviser of the department before submitting documents 
required for establishing subject matter competency. 


176 HEPER 


CORRECTIVE THERAPY AFFILIATION 

Corrective therapy is the application of the principles, tools, techniques and psychology of medically 
oriented physical education to assist the physician in accomplishment of prescribed objectives. The 
course of study includes undergraduate and graduate programs in physical education. Certification 
requires the following subject areas (for specific courses contact the department office): 
APPLIED SCIENCES: anatomy; kinesiology; physiology; physiology of exercise; neurology; pathol- 
ogy; growth and development; neuroanatomy. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION: analysis of human movement; health education and prob- 
lems; principles health-physical education; physical-mental habilitation; tests and measurements; 
evaluation health-physical education; research-health-physical education; skills-applied atypical; 
organization-administration corrective therapy; kinesiotherapy; recreation-rehabilitation; interthera- 
py relations evaluation and research applied to corrective and adapted programs. 

PSYCHOLOGY: general psychology; abnormal psychology; physiology psychology; developmental 
psychology; mental health; psychotherapy; social psychology. 

An overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in all courses taken in the above subject areas are required. 
All required courses must be completed prior to application for admittance to the internship at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital, Long Beach (more than 400 hours are required in the one-year 
internship). Upon successful completion, the student must apply to the Corrective Therapy Associa- 
tion for examination to obtain their certification. Certified Corrective Professionals operate with 
Veterans Hospitals throughout the United States. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

101 Personal Health (3) 

Modern critical health issues. Mental health, family life education, drugs, nutrition, fitness, heart 
disease and cancer. 

102 Prevention and First Aid (2) 

The hazards in environment. The care and prevention of accidents. Standard first aid certification 
by the American Red Cross granted upon successful completion of requirements. 

250 Exercise, Sport and You (3) 

(Same as PE 250) 

321 Drugs and Society (3) 

Habit-forming substances such as alcohol, tobacco, narcotics and related drugs. Social and legal 
aspects of the drug problem. 

410 Health Education for Teachers (3) 

School health, drug education, family living, community health, teaching philosophy, and strategy. 
For California teaching credential. 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

100-169 Activity Courses (1) 

May be offered for different skill levels. PE 100 Physical Conditioning; 101 Athletic Conditioning; 102 
Jogging; 103 Track and Field; 104 Horseback Riding; 105 Cycling; 106 Skiing; 107 Ice Figure 
Skating; 108 Roller Skating; 110 Swimming; 111 Life Saving; 112 Water Polo; 114 Skin Diving; 
115 Synchronized Swimming; 116 Springboard Diving; 117 Bowling; 118 Archery; 1 19 Golf; 120 
Gymnastics; 125 Rock Climbing; 130 Badminton; 131 Tennis; 132 Racquetball; 133 Handball; 
142 Children's Games; 143 Adapted Physical Education (c/nc only); 144 Exercise Weight 
Control; 150 Wrestling; 151 Aikido; 152 Karate; 154 Self Defense; 155 Fencing; 156 Sabre; 160 
Baseball; 161 Softball; 163 Field Hockey; 164 Volleyball; 165 Soccer; 166 Team Handball; 167 
Basketball; 168 Football Fundamentals; 169 Flag Football. Activity courses are primarily instruc- 
tional. Students who already possess some proficiency in an activity should consider the course 
chosen from the standpoint of the level of skill development which may be encountered, 
standards of proficiency expected and their own ability level. Initial assessment and determina- 


HEPER 177 


tion will be made by the course instructor. 

Note: Activities for handicapped students are offered in various sports. Check the class schedule for 
courses. 

170-189 Intercollegiate Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of coach. An intercollegiate activity in individual or team sports in an educa- 
tional setting under the direction of a coach. PE 170 Gymnastics; 171 Golf; 175 Tennis; 176 
Wrestling; 177 Fencing; 178 Basketball; 179 Baseball; 180 Soccer; 184 Football; 185 Volleyball; 
186 Softball. 

190 Team Management (2) 

Prerequisites: consent of coach, undergraduate studies adviser and department chair. Field experi- 
ence in the management of an intercollegiate sport. May be repeated for maximum of eight units 
of credit, (c/nc only.) 

201 Introduction to Human Movement (3) 

Human movement as a discipline through an overview of the subdisciplines, and an examination 
of opportunities for personal and professional application. Closed to upper division majors. 

206 Techniques of Officiating Sports (2) 

Officiating techniques and rules necessary for officiating team sports. May be repeated for various 
sports or combination of sports. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

210 Water Safety Instructor (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 1 1 1 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Prepares the student to teach swimming 
and life saving and to supervise aquatic programs. Successful completion will qualify the student 
for certification as an ARC Water Safety Instructor. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

214 Basic Scuba (2) 

Prerequisite: PE 114, or ability to swim 400 yards, tread water one minute and swim 25 yards 
underwater. Skin and scuba diving, theory of diving, safety procedures, and ocean environment. 
NAUI basic scuba certification for successful completion. ( 1 hour lecture, 2 hours pool activity/ 
ocean dives) 

220 Introduction to Coaching (2) 

Leadership, teaching and personal traits. Motivation, social, medical and physical hazards. The 
novice coach, responsibilities, administration and effects of superstition and myths. Application 
procedures, resume and interview. (Non-major credit only.) 

246 Introduction to Hatha Yoga (2) 

Basic yoga postures, breathing and relaxation techniques, and beginning meditation techniques from 
theoretical and experiential perspectives. Awareness, concentration, and breathing patterns that 
accompany the movements of hatha yoga. 

260 Movement Anatomy (3) 

The musculo-skeletal system and its function in human movement. Movement in sports skills and 
the muscles involved. 

300 Principles of Movement (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 260 or equivalent human anatomy. General movement patterns as applied to sport 
and human movement. 

302-319 Analysis of Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: prior experience in the specific sport (s) to be studied. Must demonstrate proficiency. 
Analysis of specific sport (s), including game play and skill performance. Understanding the 
nature of the activity. 302 Track and Field; 304 Swimming; 305 Golf; 306 Gymnastics; 308 
Soccer; 309 Badminton/Racquetball; 312 Tennis; 314 Wrestling; 315 Fencing; 316 Volleyball; 
317 Basketball; 319 Softball. 

320-339 Techniques of Coaching: Selected Sports (2) 

To prepare the student to coach specific individual and team sports. Coaching techniques, condition- 
ing of athletes, budget preparation, purchase and care of equipment, scheduling and design and 
care of facilities. 321 Track and Field; 323 Swimming and Diving; 327 Wrestling; 328 Gymnastics; 
330 Softball; 332 Tennis; 334 Baseball; 335 Football; 337 Basketball; 338 Volleyball. A maximum 
of 6 units may be applied toward completion of the units required for the major. 

340 Contemporary Movement Environments (3) 

The acquisition of physical skills in diverse environments; similarities and differences among age 
groups. Useful for those considering teaching careers. Required visits to schools and other sites. 

343 Intermediate Scuba (2) 

Prerequisite: basic scuba certification. Application of scuba diving, including photography, naviga- 


178 HEPER 


tion, salvage, game hunting, night diving and others. NAUI advanced scuba certification for 
successful completion. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours pool activity /ocean dives). 

345 Underwater Photography (2) 

Prerequisite: basic scuba certification. Photography in the underwater environment. Equipment, 
underwater camera techniques, flash, and macrophotography. ( 1 hour lecture, 2 hours pool 
activity /ocean dives) 

348 Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports (2) 

Organization and administration of intramural sports programs at the elementary, secondary and 
college level. Fieldwork included. 

349 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education (3) 

Tests and measurements used in the evaluation of human movement. Statistical analysis, domains 
of learning, and the construction, selection and administration of tests. 

351 Principles of Conditioning (3) 

Conditioning for those who plan to coach or supervise fitness programs. Circuit training, nutrition, 
motivation, weight control and kinesiology factors for women's and men's athletics. 

352 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Recommended: Biol 362. Physiological processes in physical activities and the effects of training 
upon performance. (3 hours lecture) 

352L Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: PE 352. (May be taken concurrently.) (3 hours laboratory) 

363 Developmental Adaptations of Atypical (3) 

Prerequisites: PE 300, 352, 364, or consent of instructor. The disabled whose unique needs in motor 
development determine their least restrictive environment in physical activity. Programs of 
games, sports and exercise in diversified settings; legally mandated regulations. 

364 Motor Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Anatomy and PE 352, or consent of instructor. Life span motor development: age, sex, 
ethnic, cultural and perceptual components; their implications and the main course of action 
needed in developmental strategies for optimal motor behavior development. 

365 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing. Health Education 102 or equivalent and consent of instructor. 
For trainers, coaches, physical education instructors, health educators, YMCA and playground 
personnel, and athletes in the prevention and care of athletic injuries. Practical applications and 
theory. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

366 Advanced Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, PE 365, or consent of instructor. Prevention and care of 
athletic injuries, administrative responsibilities, advanced treatment modalities, preconditioning, 
and rehabilitation. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

371 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

Information processing as an explanation of motor learning and motor memory. 

371 L Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: PE 371 (may be taken concurrently). Laboratory techniques in motor learning studies. 
(3 hours laboratory) 

372 Movement and the Child (3) 

Characteristics of the child; physical growth and development; basic mechanical principles underly- 
ing efficient movement; and programs for physical needs of children in the elementary school. 

373 Movement Concepts (3) 

Physical activity: space, force, time, and flow. Observation, participation, analysis, and synthesis of 
movement experiences. 

380 History of Physical Education and Sport (3) 

Historical development of thought and practice in athletics, sport, and physical education beginning 
with the ancient Creeks up to the modern period with special emphasis upon the historical role 
of sport in American life. 

381 Human Movement in Cultural Perspective (3) 

Human movement in the cultural milieu. Historical and contemporary interpretations of the role of 
play, games and sports, dance and recreation in human life. 

382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human Movement (3) 

The meaning and significance of participation in human movement. Human movement relative to 
personal identity, meditation, aesthetics, values, ethics, and the nature of competition. 


HEPER 179 


383 Psychological Aspects of Human Movement (3) (Formerly 480) 

Psychological variables and individual performance in human movement settings. Observational 
learning, arousal, anxiety, achievement motivation, causal attributions, aggression, personality, 
and attitudes. 

384 Sport Sociology (3) (Formerly 482) 

Sport in society. Sport and social institutions and social processes. Understanding sport as a social 
phenomenon. 

396 Tutorial (1) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, tutorial adviser and department chair. Student aides in general 
education activity classes. May be repeated for six units of credit, a maximum of three units 
may be applied toward the major. 

405 Sports Administration (3) (Formerly 505) 

Management approaches to the administration of commercial and professional sports including 
office management, radio and TV negotiations, public relations, arena and stadium manage- 
ment, ticket sales, the legal aspects and the supervision of the medical aspects of professional 
sports. 

425 Special Programs: Physical Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Croup investigation of selected topics determined by profes- 
sionals in the field. May be repeated for credit. 

442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods and materials of teaching physical 
education K to 12. Required before student teaching. Part of the 12-unit education block and 
may not be taken separately. (c/nc only) 

449A Student Teaching Physical Education (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education, (c/nc only.) 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education, (c/nc only.) 

451 Sports Medicine (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, PE 352 or its equivalent or consent of instructor. Factors 
(environmental, nutritional, etc.) which alter the typical physiological response to exercise and 
training. 

452 Physical Performance Testing and Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing in physical education; PE 352, PE 351 and 451 recommended. 
Testing and counseling techniques used to assess and develop physical performance. Physical 
performance and the improvement of general health. 

461 Biomechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 300 or consent of instructor. The application of biomechanics to the analysis of 
human movement. 

473 Motor Impairment in Children (3) 

Prerequisites: PE 363, 364 or consent of instructor. Identification of abnormal motor behavior of 
neurologically handicapped children. Assessment factors, development of educational and/or 
therapeutic models of remediation and action strategies. Disorders of neuromotor, convulsive, 
impulsive and minimal dysfunction child syndrome. 

4% Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of faculty sponsor, field supervisors, departmental coordinator, and department 
chair. Planning, preparing, coaching, teaching in public school, college, or community physical 
education or recreation programs. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. Credits 
not applicable toward major, (c/nc only) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division or graduate standing. Topics based on a study plan prepared in coopera- 
tion with a faculty supervisor. Culminates in a paper, project, comprehensive examination or 
performance. Maximum of three units in any one semester; may be repeated once. 

508 Statistical Methods in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 349 or equivalent. Statistical theory, data collection procedures, techniques for 
analysis and interpretation of data. 

510 Research in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status. Research in physical education. The types of research with tools of and 
equipment for the respective research. Selection and development of research problems and 


180 HEPER 


critique of completed studies. 

515 Current Issues in Physical Education and Sport (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major or minor in physical education. Current problems and 
issues in physical eduction through a critical analysis of the literature in the field and research 
findings. 

516 Advanced Study of the Philosophical Perspective of Human Movement (3) 

Methods of the philosophical process and human movement. 

520 International Physical Education and Sport (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. The theory and practice of physical 
education and sports in selected foreign countries. Evaluation of foreign physical education 
programs in relation to programs in the United States. 

530 Administration of Physical Education and Athletics (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with major in physical education. Administrative processes in effective 
management of physical education and athletic programs in public and private institutions. 

532 Curriculum Design in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status with a major in physical education. Curriculum development models 
and factors influencing curriculum development in physical education. For curriculum develop- 
ment and/or improvement of a physical education program. 

533 Facilities Development and Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and a major in physical education. New trends and research in the 
development of indoor and outdoor facilities in planning programs in health education, physical 
education and recreation: design, safety, features, site selection, building construction and 
equipment needs. 

540 Advances Studies in Adapted Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisites: PE 363, 364, 473, or consent of instructor. Motor development theories and issues as 
they relate to functional levels in physical activity for the disabled. 

550 Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: Classified status and consent of graduate adviser. On-the-job training experiences 
supervised by a fully trained practitioner. Requirements include 10 hours per week of on-the-job 
training and 1 hour weekly conference with instructor. May be repeated once for credit. 

551 Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 352 or equivalent. Theories of exercise and physiological function. 

552 Advanced Study in Biomechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: PE 461 or equivalent background in biomechanics. Biomechanical analysis and current 
research. 

554 Advanced Study in Human Motor Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, PE 371 or consent of instructor. Current issues in motor behavior. 

555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, PE 351, 352, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Training: the 
physiological bases for developing the primary fitness components. 

580 Advanced Study in Psychological Aspects of Human Movement (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, PE 480, or consent of instructor. Current issues and research in 
psychology and human movement. 

582 Advanced Study in Sport Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status, PE 482, or consent of instructor. The theories and methods of sociolo- 
gy and the study of the sport phenomenon. 

597 Project (2) 

Prerequisites: PE 508, 510 and consent of project committee. Directed independent project. Student 
will select and have approved a project proposal, conduct the project, and prepare a formal 
analysis and report. 

598 Thesis (4) 

Prerequisites: PE 508, 510 and consent of thesis committee. Directed independent research. Student 
will select and have approved a research proposal, conduct the research, and prepare a formal 
analysis and report. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and consent of the faculty adviser and department chair. Open to 
qualified graduate students. May be repeated for credit. 


Teacher Education 181 


RECREATION COURSES 

203 Recreation Programs and Activities (2) 

Theory and practice in conducting programs and activities in recreational agencies. ( 1 hour lecture, 
2 hours activity) 

384 Leisure in America: A Social History (3) 

(Same as History 384) 

DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 

FACULTY 
Donald Pease 

Chair 

Betty jean Barnes, Carol Barnes, James Cusick, Kenneth Doane,* Mildred Donoghue, Manuel Es- 
camilla, Sheryl Ana Garza, James Gilmore, Shirley Hill, Emma Holmes, Paul Kane, Bernard 
Kravitz, Edith McCullough, Eugene McGarry, Robert McLaren, Bryan Moffet, Norma Molina, 
Fraser Powlison, Nancy Reckinger, Morris Sica, Robert Simpson, Anthony M-Vega 
SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHING METHODS FACULTY 

James Alexander (Journalism Education), Martha Baker (Music Education), Jean Barret (Physical 
Education), John Benham (Music Education), Carol Chadwick (Music Education), John Cook- 
sey (Music Education), Gerald Gannon (Mathematics Education), Kaye Good (Speech Educa- 
tion), Justin Gray (Music Education), Donald Henry (Theatre Education), Tracy Hetrick 
(Physical Education), Jacqueline Kiraithe (Foreign Languages Education), Joseph Landon (Mu- 
sic Education), Edith McCullough (Business Education), Benton Minor (Music Education), 
Sallie Mitchell (Theatre Education), David Pagni (Mathematics Education), Albert Porter (Art 
Education), Lawrence Przekop (Science Education), Nancy Reckinger (Social Science Educa- 
tion), Clarence Schneider (English Education), Morris Sica (Social Science Education), Eula 
Stovall (Physical Education), H. Erick Streitberger (Science Education), Irene (Nims) Thomas 
(English Education), John White (English Education), Charles Williams (Science Education), 
George Williams (Art Education), Jon Zimmermann (Foreign Languages Education) 
PART-TIME 

Gay Collins, Marcia Cook, Clayton Credell, Kathy Escamilla, Betsy Gibbs, Candyce Goodfellow, 
Grace Grant, Marilym Kochendorfer, Mardell Kolls, Linda Lifur, Marion Patzem, Ann Pease, 
Virginia Pickering, Nelson Rowen, Marlene Savodnik, Carolym Shultz, Harriet Schultz, James 
Stanfill, Marvin Stewart, Ronald Stoker, Michael Trapp, Karen Watson, Judith Wilson. 

The courses, programs and services of the division are directed toward the following objectives of 
students: 

1. Master of Science in Education with concentration in elementary curriculum and instruction. 

2. Preservice teacher education (elementary school, secondary school, community college). 

3. Specialist's Credentials (Ryan Act) Bilingual/Cross-Cultural and Early Childhood Education. 

4. In-service teacher education. 

Instruction concentrates on the central principles of the school as a basic institution of our culture, 
the methods and materials associated with effective teaching, and the current and persistent prob- 
lems that confront teachers, and other professional workers in educational institutions. In addition 
to using published source materials and attending class sessions for presentations and discussions, 
many courses require fieldwork in schools, laboratories, clinics and other educational agencies. 

THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATION IS AVAILABLE FROM THE DIVISION OF 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

1. Credential and Masters Program Handbook: Division of 

Teacher Education 

This publication includes all information related to: 

a. Multiple Subject Credential 

b. Single Subject Credential 

c. Early Childhood Education Specialist Credential 

d. Bilingual/Cross Cultural Specialist Credential 

e. M.S. in Education: Bilingual/ Bicultural Education 

f. M.S. in Education: Elementary Curriculum and Instruction 


University administrative officer 


182 Teacher Education 


PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Advisement is available in the Division of Teacher Education for programs in multiple subject 
instruction, single subject instruction, the specialist in early childhood, and the specialist in bilingual/ 
cross-cultural, Master of Science with a Concentration in Bilingual-Bicultural Education (Spanish- 
English), and the Master of Science in Education with concentration in elementary curriculum and 
instruction. Students should consult with the coordinators of elementary or secondary teacher 
education and other faculty members in selecting courses for the basic teaching credential and either 
of the specialists' credentials. Graduate students interested in the master's degree program should 
consult with the graduate coordinator. Transfer students should have transcripts of previous work 
available. 

Students seeking a Multiple Subjects Credential (elementary teaching) should seek advisement 
regarding competency in general subject areas as soon as they decide to enter the teaching field. 
The general subject area competency requirement may be met by completing the specified list of 
requirements of a degree program with a commission approved waiver or by a satisfactory group 
of scores on the Commons Examination. Students should check with the Division of Teacher 
Education for further information and obtain bulletin "General Subject Area Competency." 
Students seeking the basic teaching credential in single subject instruction should also consult with 
teacher education advisers in the departments of their major. Departments having these advisers are 
Art, Communications, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Mathematics, Physical Education, 
Music, Science Education, Speech Communication and Theatre. Advisement for the social sciences 
and business education is available in the Division of Teacher Education. 

APPLICATION FOR CREDENTIALS FOR TEACHING 

The teacher education programs are approved by the State of California for issuance of the basic 
teaching credential. Upon completion of a credential program, the candidate for the credential must 
submit an application to the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing with the credential 
analyst at the university. On the application, the candidate is asked questions regarding personal and 
professional fitness and is asked to sign an oath of allegiance. The applicant must also submit a 
fingerprint-identification card and the legal fee, which is currently $20. 

CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

MULTIPLE SUBJECTS INSTRUCTION (ELEMENTARY) 

ADMISSION TO THE MULTIPLE SUBJECT PROGRAM 

Before being permitted to enroll in a credential program, the student must have made formal 
application, been screened and been formally admitted to teacher education through the School of 
Human Development and Community Service. The student will be permitted to apply for admission 
to teacher education at the beginning of the semester previous to beginning his professional program. 
Students interested in the program of the multiple subjects credential will submit their applications 
at the beginning of their second semester of the junior year. A faculty committee will review 
information concerning the applicant's intellectual resources, command of fundamental skills of 
communication, scholarship, personality and character, interest in teaching and health. When more 
qualified students apply for admission to teacher education than can be accommodated during a 
given semester, applicants will be ranked and those with the highest rank selected. Qualified 
candidates who are not admitted may reapply during subsequent semesters. Information concerning 
the criteria and the procedures for admission to teacher education may be obtained in the Office 
of Teacher Education. 

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER EDUCATION • 

The program leading to the recommendation for the multiple subjects credential includes: 

1 . A baccalaureate degree from an approved institution. 

2. A fifth year of college or university postgraduate education taken at the upper division or 
graduate level. ( If the student does not complete all requirements, a preliminary credential may 
be awarded at the end of four or more years of work if the student has a bachelor's degree 
from an approved institution and has completed the student teaching requirement). 

3. A breadth of knowledge in subject matter to help in teaching. Students who plan to secure the 
multiple subjects credential should acquire breadth of knowledge by taking coursework in each 

• Regulations for the credential are subject to change by the state; any curricular changes will be available in later 
university publications. 


Teacher Education 183 


of the following areas: 

A. English, including grammar, literature, composition and speech 

B. Humanities and the fine arts 

C. Mathematics 

D. Physical education 

E. Science, including life and physical sciences 

F. Social sciences 

C. To demonstrate this breadth of knowledge students must either pass a subject matter 
examination (currently the Common Section of the National Teacher Exam) or complete a 
major with an approved waiver program. ** 

Because schools exist in a culturally pluralistic society, teacher candidates are also encouraged 
to take courses in the Chicano studies, Afro-ethnic studies and Indian studies programs. 

4. Professional education requirements which are currently met by the following programs: 
Two-semester sequence (See note below) 

First Semester: 

Ed-TE 430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (1) 

Ed-TE 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Ed-TE 433 Reading Instruction in the Public Schools (3) 

Ed-TE 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (4) 

Ed-TE 439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (1) 

The first semester of the program entails an all-day commitment, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
daily. It also requires further time for preparation of assignments. 

Second Semester: 

Ed-TE 429 Individualized Instruction (3) 

Ed-TE 430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (2) 
t Ed-TE 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (8) 

Ed-TE 439B Seminar in Elementary School Student Teaching (2) 

Ed-TE 314 Drugs and Human Development (1), or the equivalent must be taken by all 
multiple subjects candidates. 

Multiple Subject Waiver Programs approved for examination waiver: 

To demonstrate competence in a broad range of academic areas, candidates must either pass the 
Common Portion of the National Teacher Examination or complete an approved waiver program. 
The programs at Cal State Fullerton that have approved waiver programs are: 

American Studies, Chicano Studies, Child Development, Communications, French, German, History, 
Human Services, Latin American Studies, Liberal Studies, Psychology, Spanish. 

ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING 

The credential candidate makes application for student teaching during the first semester of the 
Multiple Subjects Program. 

The application for student teaching is part of the continuous process of evaluating credential 
candidates on their suitability for elementary and secondary school teaching. Information concern- 
ing the criteria and procedures for admission to student teaching, along with the application, may 
be obtained from the Office of Teacher Education. Admission to teacher education does not include 
admission to student teaching. Each student is responsible for meeting the requirements and follow- 
ing the procedures for admission. 

SINGLE SUBJECT INSTRUCTION f (Secondary Cooperative Teacher Education Program) 

1. Admission To The Program 

The application forms for admission to the program are available in the Credential Preparations 
Center. To become a candidate for the secondary school teacher education program the student 
must be enrolled in good standing in the university and must be admitted to teacher education 
through the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. The student may apply for admission to 
teacher education at the beginning of the semester previous to the semester in which he is within 

** Refer to section on Multiple Subject Waiver Program. 

1 Note: Admission to the university does not include admission to the multiple subjects credential program. Admission to 
teacher education does not include admission to student teaching, 
t Regulations governing the credential are subject to change by the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing; 
changes will be available in later university publications. 


184 Teacher Education 


six units of completing his major (usually as a second semester junior). Admission to teacher 
education is for the semester in which the student begins his professional coursework. If the 
student is admitted and does not enroll in the program, he must reapply in a future semester. 
If the student is not admitted, he may reapply in a future semester. A faculty committee, including 
faculty in the major department; will review information concerning the applicant's intellectual 
resources, command of fundamental skills of communication, scholarship, personality and char- 
acter, interest in teaching, and health. The minimum gradepoint average requirements are 3.00 
in the major and 2.75 in all college and university work. 

When more qualified students apply for admission to the program than can be accommodated 
during a given semester, applicants will be ranked and those with the highest rank selected. 
Students should consult with advisers prior to making application to the program usually by the 
beginning of the junior year for the purpose of establishing competency in the fundamental skills. 
Courses or examinations are available in the areas of English and speech that will assist in meeting 
specific competencies in fundamental skills. 

Persons seeking this credential should carefully plan the work in the major as early as the 
freshman year so that the pattern of coursework will be equivalent to the program of study in 
the major that has been designed for credential candidates (See item D of the requirements listed 
below ) . 

Because schools exist in a culturally pluralistic society, teacher candidates are also encouraged 
to take courses in the Chicano studies, Afro-ethnic studies and Indian studies programs. 

2. Requirements and Curriculum in the Secondary Cooperative Teacher Education Program 
For The Basic Teaching Credential Under the Ryan Act — Single Subject Instruction 

Single subjects instruction means the practice of assignment of teachers and students to specified 
subject matter courses as is commonly practiced in California senior high schools and most Califor- 
nia junior high schools. 

A. A baccalaureate degree ox higher degree, except in professional education from an approved 
institution. 

B. A fifth year of study to be completed within five years of the completion of the B.A. or B.S. 
A preliminary credential can be granted upon the completion of the baccalaureate degree and 
student teaching. The fifth year of study must be an institution approved program of study. 

C. An approved program of professional preparation. This refers to the completion of the profes- 
sional program at Cal State Fullerton described in this document. 

D. Authorization to teach in a single subject under the Ryan Act is based upon the passage of 
a subject matter examination or the completion of a program of study approved by the State 
Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing for a waiver of the examination. 


Single Subject Waiver Programs at Cal State Fullerton 

Single Subject Credential Authorization 

Degree Major 

Art 

B.A. Art 

Business 

B.A. Business Administration 

English 

B.A. Communications journalism Emphasis 
B.A. Drama/Theatre 

B.A. English 

B.A. Speech 

Foreign Languages 

B.A. French 

B.A. German 

B.A. Spanish 

Government 

*B.A. Political Science 

History 

*B.A. American Studies 

B.A. History 

Life Science 

B.A. Biological Science 

Mathematics 

B.A. Mathematics 

Music 

B.A. Music 

Physical Education 

B.S. Physical Education 

Physical Science 

B.A. Biological Science 

• Single Subject interim waivers granted through June 30, applicable to students enrolled prior to June 30, 1 


Teacher Education 185 


B.A. Chemistry 
B.A. Earth Science 
*B.A. Physics 

Social Science *B.A. American Studies 

*B.A. Anthropology 
*B.A. Economics 

*B.A. Ethnic Studies (Afro-American 
Option, Chicano Studies Option, 

Native American Studies Program) 

B.A. History 

*B.A. Latin American Studies 
*B.A. Philosophy 
*B.A. Psychology 
*B.A. Sociology 

Candidates should consult with departmental advisers concerning the waiver program in the degree 
major. The subsumed subjects authorized by the State Commission for Teacher Preparation and 
Licensing under the single subject areas available at Cal State Fullerton are: 

A. Art. Subsumed thereunder are: arts and crafts, ceramics, commercial art, costume design, 
crafts, design, drawing and painting, history, appreciation and theory, illustration (including 
cartooning), interior decoration, jewelry, leathermaking, photography, sculpture, stagecraft, 
and other courses of which the content and prerequisites relate to art. 

B. Business. Subsumed thereunder are: bookkeeping, business education, business English, busi- 
ness law, business machines, business mathematics, consumer problems, data processing, 
distributive education, economics, secretarial /stenographic, typing, and other courses of 
which the content and prerequisites relate to business. 

C. English. Subsumed thereunder are: composition, creative writing, debate, drama, forensics, 
humanities, journalism, language arts, literature, play production, public speaking, newspaper 
staff, speech (oral communication), theater arts, writing, and other courses of which the 
content and prerequisites relat to English. 

D. Languages. Including, but not limited to, French, Spanish, Russian, German, and Chinese. 

E. Government. Subsumed thereunder are: American government and politics, comparative 
government, international politics, law, political philosophy, and other courses of which the 
content and prerequisites relate to government. 

F. History. Subsumed thereunder are: European history, United States history, world history, 
and other courses of which the content and prerequisites relate to history. 

G. Life science. Subsumed thereunder are: biology, botany, general science, health science, 
physiology, plant science, zoology, and other courses of which the content and prerequisites 
relate to life science. 

H. Mathematics. Subsumed thereunder are: algebra, business mathematics, consumer math- 
ematics, geometry, industrial shop mechanics, statistics and probability, number systems, 
mathematical analysis, computer science, trigonometry, and other courses of which the con- 
tent and prerequisites relate to mathematics. 

I. Music. Subsumed thereunder are: instrumental, theory and appreciation, vocal, and other 
courses of which the content and prerequisites relate to music. 

J. Physical education. Subsumed thereunder are: aquatics, body dynamics, dance, gymnastics, 
health education, interscholastic sports, sports, and other courses of which the content and 
prerequisites relate to physical education. 

K. Physical science. Subsumed thereunder are: astronomy, chemistry, earth science, general 
science, geology, physics, and other courses of which the content and prerequisites relate to 
physical science. 

L. Social science. Subsumed thereunder are: anthropology, economics, geography, govern- 
ment, history, humanities/cultural studies, law, psychology, sociology, world affairs, and other 
courses of which the content and prerequisites relate to social science. 

These titles are descriptive only and are not an exhaustive listing of courses to which holders of the 
credential may be assigned by school districts. They are intended to indicate the breadth of the 
authorization under each single subject area. 


186 Teacher Education 


Subject matter examinations are available through the National Teachers Examinations in 
English, Physical Science, Life Science, Mathematics, Social Studies, Industrial Arts, Physical 
Education, Business, Music, Art, Home Economics, and Languages (French, German and 
Spanish). Applications for these examinations are available in the Division of Teacher 
Education Office, and the credential preparation center. 

Waivers for these examinations are authorized by the Commission for Teacher Preparation and 
Licensing for programs of study offered through degree programs at this University. Candidates 
should consult with major advisers or the coordinator of secondary education for information 
concerning waiver programs. 

E. Demonstration of a knowledge of the various methods of teaching reading, to a level deemed 
adequate by the commission, by successful completion of a program of study approved by the 
commission or passage of commission-approved reading examination. 

The course in instruction in reading for secondary school teaching meets this requirement. This 
requirement is optional for candidates in art, music and physical education. It is recommended 
especially for candidates in these fields who seek authorization to teach in other subject fields. 

F. All credential applicants must also have completed a course on the United States Constitution 
or have passed an examination in lieu of this course. 

G. The candidate is required by law to complete a health unit requirement in drug education prior 
to the issuance of a clear credential. Ed-TE 314, Drugs and Human Development, or its equivalent 
meets this requirement. 

H. By law all individuals receiving a clear credential after july 1 , 1979, shall have training in the needs 
of, and methods of providing educational opportunities to, individuals with exceptional needs. 
Consult the bulletins of the Division of Teacher Education for the ways in which this requirement 
can be met. 

3. Curriculum in Secondary School Teacher Education (Prerequisite — Admission to Teacher 
Education) 

The curriculum is centered in extensive fieldwork in secondary schools in the two semester 
program. In the first semester the candidate for the credential is assigned to a learning center (a 
cooperating secondary school district) daily from approximately 8 a.m. to noon. The fieldwork 
involves (1)a period of orientation — observation, (2) an assignment to master teacher (s) in the 
classes in which the candidate will do student teaching in the second semester, (3) tutoring 
individual secondary students in reading, (4) seminars and workshop sessions with faculty in the 
program, and (5) preparation time for planning for the student teaching semester. Other clas- 
swork is taken in the afternoons so that the obligation to the program is daily from 8 a.m. to 3 
p.m. 

The curriculum for the first semester is an integrated block of courses around the fieldwork. 
Students are assigned to specific learning centers, but arrangements can be made for work with 
master teachers outside of the learning center districts. The second semester is a semester of 
full-time student teaching. 

The candidate registers for the following courses in the first semester: 

Ed-TE 440F Supervised Fieldwork in Secondary Schools (2) 

Ed-TE 440R Instruction in Reading for Secondary School Teaching (3) 

(Optional for candidates in Art, Music, and Physical Education) 

Ed-TE 440S Foundations of Secondary School Teaching (4) 

442 Teaching — in the Secondary School (3) 

( Methods class is offered by either the major department, e.g., English Education 
442, or in the Division of Teacher Education, Ed-TE 442.) 

In the second semester the candidate registers in: 

Ed-TE 449A Student Teaching — in Secondary Schools (10) 

Ed-TE 449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

(Student teaching and the seminar courses are offered by either the major department, e.g., 
English Education 449A and 449B or in the Division of Teacher Education, Ed-TE 449A and 449B. ) 

4. Admission to Student Teaching. To be eligible for student teaching the student must have 
completed 12 units work at this university. 

The credential candidate submits a formal application for student teaching by December 1 or May 
1 in the first semester of the two-semester program. This application is part of the continuous 
process of evaluating credential candidates and their suitability for teaching in the secondary 
schools along with their progress in acquiring competencies necessary for single subjects instruc- 


Teacher Education 187 


tion. These evaluations will come from cooperating teachers and faculty working with the candi- 
dates in the program. Further information concerning the criteria and procedures for admission 
to student teaching, along with the application, will be available in the Credentials Preparation 
Center. Since student teaching is done on a full-time basis, student teachers will be limited to one 
additional course for that semester. Students may take this course only in the late afternoon or 
evening. 

Within the program of preparation for teaching a single subject it is possible to elect an emphasis 
in teaching in secondary alternative schools; different kinds of public school programs designed 
to meet diverse needs of students, teachers and parents. 

The student electing the emphasis in educational alternatives will be registered in the same 
courses but will focus much attention on current efforts to reform, improve and revitalize second- 
ary education. 

CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPECIALIST S CREDENTIAL 

The Early Childhood Specialist's Credential, as authorized by the Teacher Preparation and Licensing 
Law of 1970 (Ryan Act), is granted through the university program approved in 1974 by the 
commission which oversees the law's implementation. The 20-unit program develops competencies 
in teaching and in supervision of educational programs for children at preschool, kindergarten and 
primary levels. The culminating experiences of the credentialing program include work in field setting 
which is planned so as to coordinate with candidates' personal teaching schedules. 

Admission to the Early Childhood Program 

Students with a basic teaching credential (elementary /multiple subjects), or those who are satisfac- 
torily completing work toward it, may declare the Early Childhood Specialist's Credential as an 
objective for postbaccalaureate study and apply for admission to the program. 

Program of Study 

The following coursework will be developed into a study plan in consultation with an adviser: 
Ed-TE 437 Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed-TE 526 Differentiated Staffing in Public Schools (3) 

Ed-TE 527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: the Human from 
Conception Through Eight Years (3) 

Ed-TE 538 Graduate Studies: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed-TE 591 A Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood Education (emphasis on 
teaching) (4) 

Ed-TE 591 B Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood Education (emphasis on supervision) 
(4) 

BILINGUAL/CROSS-CULTURAL SPECIALIST'S CREDENTIAL 

The Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential as authorized by the Teacher Preparation and 
Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act) is granted through the university program approved in 1974. The 
program has been developed cooperatively by the Department of Chicano Studies, the Department 
of Foreign Languages and Literatures, and the School of Human Development and Community 
Service working with the university's Board of Bilingual/Cross Cultural Studies. The 27-unit program 
develops specific competencies for teachers and resource personnel in bilingual /cross-cultural 
programs from kindergarten through the 12th grade. The credentialing program includes experiences 
in language and culture of the target population, techniques and methods for bilingual /cross-cultural 
education, linguistics, fieldwork and community involvement planned to coordinate with candi- 
dates' personal teaching schedules. 

Admission to the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential Program 

Students with (1) a basic teaching credential (elementary/multiple subjects or secondary /single 
subjects), or those who are satisfactorily completing work toward it, and (2) a Spanish language 
competency as determined by personal interview and/or written examination, may declare the 
Bilingual /Cross-Cultural Specialist's Credential as an objective for post-baccalaureate study and 
apply for admission to the program. 

Program of Study 

The following coursework will be developed in a study plan in consultation with a adviser. Students 
who have equivalent competencies prior to entry in the program will be advised as to how to obtain 
credit for such competencies. 


188 Teacher Education 


Ed-TE 454 Bilingual Education in the United States (3) 

Ed-TE 461 Instructional Techniques in Bilingual Education (3) 

Ed-TE 462 Fieldwork in Bilingual Education (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) or 
Spanish 468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 443 Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other 
Languages (3) 

Foreign Languages Ed 450 Spanish Classroom Vocabulary (optional) (3) 

Chicano Studies 300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

Cultural Differences of Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher of the Barrio (3) 

The Chicano Child (3) 

The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

Issues in Bilingual Education in the Chicano Community (3) 

History of the Chicano (3) 

Chicano Contemporary Issues (3) 

Other upper division courses in Chicano studies may be substituted with consultation with the 
coordinator and the Chicano Studies Department. 


Chicano Studies 403 
Chicano Studies 420 
Chicano Studies 431 
Chicano Studies 432 
Chicano Studies 438 
Chicano Studies 445 
Chicano Studies 450 


GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES 

210 The Teaching Experience: Exploration (3) 

Exploration of one's self in relation to other people in the schools and an encounter with the teaching 
experience, through fieldwork. Accompanying seminar to help students extend their observa- 
tions and explore relevant issues. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

310 The Teaching Experience: Participation (3) 

Active participation in school classrooms and analysis of the experience. Accompanying seminar 
will help students to analyze their fieldwork experiences. (4 hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 
310 is repeatable for credit. 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Human growth and development. Childhood, adolescence and 
middle and old age. Mental, social, emotional and physical development. 

314 Drugs and Human Development (1) 

Substance abuse in relation to personal development, social stress, and physiological and psycholog- 
ical effects. Methods of exploring values and making decisions in regard to substance abuse. 

332 The Effective Parent (3) 

Developmental tasks of children and parents; social and psychological factors in family structure and 
communication; major concerns in child-rearing. 

343 School Law for Teachers (3) 

The legal aspects of professional rights and responsibilities of teachers and student teachers. Author- 
ity sources; teacher duties and responsibilities; employment, termination, certification, con- 
tracts, tenure and employee relations; and liability of teachers. 

385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

The physical growth and social and personality deelopment of the human through the sixth year 
of life. 

386 Adolescence (3) 

The physical, social and cultural development of human adolescence and youth. Contemporary 
factors producing change. 

390 Middle Childhood (3) 

(Same as Child Development 390) 

401 Social Foundations of Education (4) 

Philosophical, historical and sociological foundations of education; their influence on contemporary 
educational theory and practice in the United States. 


Teacher Education 189 


406 Educational Sociology (3) 

The school in the social order; the school as a social system; analysis of cultural factors affecting 
the school; the special culture of the school; roles and role conflicts in the school; policy 
questions flowing from social issues and school-cultural relationships. 

410 The Teaching Experience: Field Investigation (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Field investigation in area of interest. Needs assessment, study 
proposal, implementation of study and presentation of findings. Accompanying seminar. (4 
hours fieldwork, 1 hour seminar) 

429 Individualized Instruction (1-3) 

The principles and operational components of individualized teaching and learning. Classroom 
implementation of individualized instructional strategies. May be repeated for a maximum 
credit of 3 units. 

430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Children's learning styles, and their overall growth and 
development. To be taken concurrently with Ed-TE 430B,C and 433. 

430B Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School Teaching (1-3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Elementary school curricula, instructional materials, 
and teaching techniques. To be taken concurrently with Ed-TE 430A, C, and 433. 

430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Corequisites: Ed-TE 430A, B and 433. Students will 
serve as teacher participants in an assigned elementary school classroom. 

433 Reading Instruction in Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. The teaching of reading. The behaviors necessary to 
work with children in public school. 

436 Child Study Techniques for Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques for understanding individual children who do not 
respond in typical ways. 

437 Early Childhood Education (3) 

Current literature and recent research in the education of young children through individual and 
group study. Problems in cognitive processes, content, structure and instruction at this level. 

439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (4-12) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Corequisite: Ed-TE 439B. 
Participation in a regular elementary school teaching program for the full school day. 

439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student teaching. Corequisite: Ed-TE 439A. 
Seminar in problems and procedures of elementary school teaching. 

440F Supervised Fieldwork in Secondary Schools (2) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Observation and participation in instruction in sec- 
ondary school learning centers 3 hours daily. Fieldwork associated with Ed-TE 440R, 440S and 
442. Taken concurrently with the courses. 

440R Instruction in Reading for Secondary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Instruction in developmental reading for prospective 
teachers in single subjects. Taken concurrently with Ed-TE 440F, 440S and 442. 

T40S Foundations Secondary School Teaching (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education. Teaching competencies related to adolescent devel- 
opment, the learning process and diagnosis of learning problems, evaluation of pupil achieve- 
ment, and cultural differences in secondary school youth. Taken concurrently with Ed-TE 440F, 
440 R and 442. 

T41 Reading In Early Childhoold (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or student teaching. Procedures and problems of teaching reading 
to preschool and kindergarten children. Recent research in the fundamental skills of communi- 
cation among young pupils. Reading instruction and the affective behavior of preschool chil- 
dren. 


190 Teacher Education 


442 Teaching — in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Required before student teaching of students present- 
ing major in following areas or subjects. 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Ed-TE 442 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (3) 

Ed-TE 442 Teaching Social Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Engl Ed 442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

For Langs Ed 442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Journ Ed 442 Journ Ed 442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Math Ed 442 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (3) 

Mu Ed 442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

PE 442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Sci Ed 442 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Speech Ed 442 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (3) 

Theatre Ed 442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

443 Behavior Problems (1-3) 

Prerequisite: completion of student teaching or consent of instructor. Productive teacher-pupil 
interaction in the regular classroom. Understanding, identification and correction of maladap- 
tive classroom behavior of children and adolescents. May be repeated for a maximum credit 
of 3 units. 

444 The Effective Substitute Teacher (3) 

Prerequisite: completed student teaching or consent of instructor. Techniques, procedures and 
strategies for successful substitute teaching. Developing of materials and resources for class- 
room use. 

448 Social Studies Simulation Games (3) 

Commercially available simulations. Students design and play their own. For teachers and prospec- 
tive teachers of the social studies elementary and secondary schools. 

449A,B Student Teaching in the Secondary School and Seminar (12) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Full-time student teaching. 

Art Ed 449 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Ed-TE 449 Teaching Business in the Secondary School (3) 

Ed-TE 449 Teaching Social Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Engl Ed 449 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

For Langs Ed 449 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Journ Ed 449 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Math Ed 449 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (3) 

Mu Ed 449 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the Public Schools (3) 

PE 449 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School (3) 

Sci Ed 449 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3) 

Speech Ed 449 Teaching Speech in the Secondary School (3) 

Theatre Ed 449 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

454 Bilingual Education in the United States (3) 

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of bilingual education. The literature, the laws, the history and the 
impact bilingual educational programs have had on the speaker of the foreign languages in the 
United States. 

456 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 

Prerequisites: a teaching credential and one year of teaching experience. For teachers who supervise 
student teachers. Principles and procedures of effective supervision and research. 

461 Instructional Techniques in Bilingual Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed-TE 454, 443. Purposes, philosophies and concepts of bilingual education. Theories 
of language learning, cultural differences in learning processes and methodologies of bilingual 
instruction. 

462 Fieldwork in Bilingual Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 461. Fieldwork in bilingual settings, for the Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Specialist 
Credential. The student must be enrolled in the second semester of training. 

493 Production of Audiovisual Materials (2) 

Exploration and development of audiovisual materials. Scriptwriting, story-board, photography and 
tape production. Producing graphics, charts and bulletin boards. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 


Teacher Education 191 


4% Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum under the direction of a faculty member. 
May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing, consent of instructor and division prior to registration. 
Individual investigation under supervision of a faculty member. Only students of demonstrated 
capacity and maturity will be approved. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Development and Implementation of Bilingual-Bicultural Curriculum (3) 

Identification and development of bilingual-bicultural curricula relative to Spanish-speaking students. 

Adaptation and modification or existing curricula. Development of units of instruction for use 
in bilingual-bicultural classrooms. 

501 Philosophy of Education (3) 

Prerequisites: postgraduate standing and Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B or 749, or consent of instructor. 
Theories of knowledge, value and reality, and educational problems; contemporary systems of 
thought and education. 

511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Descriptive statistics and statistical inferences in educational research. Representative research 
papers. Principles of research design. Prepare papers using research findings. 

526 Differentiated Staffing in Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar; the processes and techniques in 
working with parents, paraprofessionals, specialists and community people. Supervision and 
interaction with adults. 

527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Human from Conception Through 
Eight Years (3) 

Prerequisites: teaching, credential or consent of instructor. The physical, social, cognitive-intellectual 
and emotional development of human individuals from conception to middle childhood. Cur- 
rent problems, theories and research. 

529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Major theoretical positions in planning and interpreting classroom practices. Educational research 
findings, implications for curriculum developments and teaching practices. 

530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar: curriculum developments and organization in the area 
of second language learning in the elementary school, including English as a foreign language. 

531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Language Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminar: trends and problems in teaching the fundamental skills 
of communication in the elementary school. Research in the language arts and related disci- 
plines. 

532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math Ed 103A, Ed-TE 439A,B or consent of instructor. Seminar: significant research, 
curricular developments and materials, criteria for planning and improving mathematics pro- 
grams and instruction. 

533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar: research in elementary school science. 
The development of materials. 

534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Prerequisite. Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar: research developments and 
materials, criteria for planning and improving social studies programs and current techniques 
of teaching. 

535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 339 or 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar: teaching reading in elementary 
schools. Research for curriculum development and instructional procedures. 

536 Curriculum Theory and Development in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Seminar: the elementary school curriculum 


192 Teacher Education 


including the forces operating on the curriculum and the participants involved in curriculum 
building. The process of curriculum building. 

537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 439A,B, or consent of instructor. Problems and issues in elementary education, 
their causes and possible solutions. 

538 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor: completion of Ed-TE 437 and 527 or 
equivalents. The implications of research for curriculum development and instructional plan- 
ning. The ways in which views of human development and learning have affected programs 
in early childhood education. 

541 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Bilingual-Bicultural Education (3) 

Application of psychological and sociological theory and techniques to the design of programs of 
instruction for limited and non-English-speaking children. The use of these disciplines for the 
development of emotionally and socially supportive learning environments. 

542 Current Issues and Problems in Bilingual-Bicultural Education (3) 

Problems and issues in the development and implementation of bilingual-bicultural education. 

591 A Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood (4) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 538 or consent of instructor. Provides opportunity to demonstrate instructional 
abilities in working with children, parents, professions, and members of the community. 

591B Fieldwork and Seminar in Early Childhood (4) 

Prerequisite: Ed-TE 538 and Ed-TE 591 A, or consent of instructor. Provides opportunities to demon- 
strate supervisory, coordinating and administrative abilities in working with children, parents, 
professionals and members of the community in the development of early childhood education 
programs. 

594 Research Seminar (3) 

The preparation, evaluation, development, and presentation of curriculum research proposals. In- 
dividuals and groups will participate in critiquing proposals and research results. 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars in such areas as behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, program 
development, communication theory and interpersonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the instructor, culminating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequsites: a teaching credential and one year of teaching experience. Independent inquiry. 

701 Credential Studies (0) 

For students admitted to teacher education who find it impossible to maintain continuous enrollment 
while completing the 30 units beyond the baccalaureate. 



HUMANITIES 

AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 


7—78946 


194 


SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Acting Dean: Don A. Schweitzer 
Acting Associate Dean: Dennis F. Berg 


The curricula of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences are designed to provide opportunities 
for students to expand their general knowledge, to develop beginning specializations, to investigate 
areas of intellectual interest, and, if they choose, to prepare themselves for specialized professional 
studies. 

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences is presently comprised of 21 departments and 
programs offering undergraduate majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
degree and master's programs leading to the Master of Arts, Master of Science or Master of Public 
Administration. 


DEPARTMENT OF AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Boaz Namasaka 
Department Chair 

Cheryl Armstrong, Carl Bryant, William Coffer, (Vice Chair), Carl jackson, Wacira Gethaiga 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 

Students majoring in the Afro-ethnic studies program have a special preparation in and sensitivity 
to the black experience as it relates to the life in America as a part of a world community. The 
program is multidisciplinary in nature in that all aspects of Afro-ethnic studies affect and are affected 
by other programs. 

Graduates from the Afro-ethnic studies progam have gone into careers in teaching, community 
development, community leadership, social work, urban research, law, civil service, industrial rela- 
tions and a variety of comparable fields. 

Many have gone into graduate work in this field and some have entered more traditional disciplines 
where a general knowledge of social sciences and humanities is prerequisite. 

In addition to the broadly based program in ethnic studies with an option in Afro-American studies, 
the department provides coursework in the American Indian experience. 

The purpose of the department is to provide an opportunity for majors and non-majors to become 
specialists in understanding the problems, achievements, contributions and failures of America's 
largest and smallest minority groups; to help these students to academically understand the black 
and native American experiences in the United States and within a world setting in terms of the past 
and contemporary problems and issues, and to enable them to lead effective and constructive lives 
in a culturally pluralistic and rapidly changing society. 

A minor in the Afro-American option is available for students majoring in other academic fields. The 
degree program also is designed to provide an effective vehicle for meeting a variety of needs in 
contemporary higher education: extending opportunities for university education to students who 
have long been under-represented due to cultural differences between their experiences and the 
cultural emphasis of higher education; and revising curriculum and promoting research to give all 
students and faculty an understanding of the interaction of ethnic groups in past and contemporary 
civilizations. 

The required minimum for the major is 36 units: Afro-Ethnic Studies 103,* 107 and 240 plus six 
additional units from lower division offerings and a minimum of 24 units in upper division courses. 

Required 

103 Effective Communication (3) * 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

240 Afro-American History (3) 


Students can be exempted from Afro-Ethnic Studies 103 by an examination and/or consent of department 


Afro-Ethnic Studies 195 


MINOR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 

Students interested in the Afro-American studies minor are required to take a minimum of 21 units. 
This includes six units of lower division courses including Afro-Ethnic Studies 101 or 107 and an 
additional course. Fifteen units of upper division courses including Afro-Ethnic Studies 301 and 309 
also must be taken. 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

The perspective through which black and brown people have come to see themselves in terms of 
their own heroes, culture, and contributions to societies in which they live and world society 
in general. 

103 Effective Communication (3) 

The basic skills, emphasizing writing and communication skills, stressing the use of idioms, proper 
pronunciation, intonation, and correct English patterns. 

104 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

(Same as Swahili 101 ) 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

The aims and objectives of the Afro-American studies. The basic terms and references that give 
substance to Afro-American studies. 

108 Linguistics and Minority Dialects (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 107) 

230 The Native American (3) 

The American Indian experience in the United States from the Indian's point of view in comparison 
with that of the white man. The problems of American Indians today. 

240A Afro-American History to 1865 (3) 

The economic, political and social history of black Americans in the United States, African origins, 
the slave trade, slavery, religion, abolition, slavery and territory and the Civil War. 

240B Afro-American History from 1865 to Present (3) 

The social, economic, political and cultural history of black Americans. The black reconstruction 
role, jim Crow, the relationship between black workers and white workers and labor unions, 
lynching, black protest. World War I, black emigration, the Harlem renaissance, the New Deal, 
World War II, the intensification of the black emigration, the civil rights movement, the Korean 
War, Vietnam War, the black power movement and cultural developments. 

255 The Age of Malcolm X (3) 

The ideas and ideals of Malcolm X; their roots, their impact on local, state, national and international 
levels. Compared with W E B. DuBois and Martin Luther King. 

300 Black Man/Black Woman (3) 

Black value systems, double standards, machismo figure, communication barriers caused by prede- 
fined roles, stereotype expectations according to the traditional class status, and their affect on 
individual abilities and self-esteem. 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

African cultural characteristics in the New World and contemporary events, including art, ideas, 
dance and literature. 

309 The Black Family (3) 

The American social conditions that shaped the black family from the African cultural patterns to 
the family that exists today. The roles of poverty, racism and discrimination. 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

Patterns of role learning as they vary within subpopulations; changes over time in the values, 
attitudes, and goals of both the general culture and of subcultures; stereotypes and realities; 
understanding and dealing with cultural variation as well as cultural "norms.'' 

314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

Theory and practice of movement of African and Haitian peoples. Movement (dance) as quasi- 
language in perpetuating the life style of African cultures and cultures of African descent. 

315 Pan-African Art (3) 

Prerequisites: Afro-Ethnic Studies 240A, B; History 1 50 or Art 101; consent of instructor. African and 
Afro-American art from prehistoric to contemporary times. African influence on black art and 
the aesthetics of urban black art. 


196 Afro-Ethnic Studies 


318 Cultural Pluralism in American Educational Institutions (3) 

Cultural pluralism in American educational institutions; social conflict as created by decentralized 
educational systems; change due to integration and segregation of educational institutions. 

331 Tribalism and Reservation Life (3) 

Tribalism in contemporary Indian affairs. Indian self-determination on reservations; political, eco- 
nomic and social lifeways relative to the dominant society: Field trips to local reservations. 

332 American Indian Leaders (3) 

The diverse philosophies of American Indian leaders; the political, sociological and religious aspects 
of their lives, and the impact on Indian-white relationships. 

334 Equal Employment Opportunity Laws (3) 

Civil Rights laws and legislation of equal employment ( Affirmative Action ) laws. Title VII, Civil Rights 
Act of 1964 Executive 11246 and 11375. 

335 History of Racism (3) 

Racism in terms of the historical roots of that racial phenomenon in American society and the world 
setting. 

340 Comparative Responses to Imperialism (3) 

The ways in which Africans, Afro-American and native Americans have responded to slavery, 
imperialism and colonialism. Contemporary impact of colonialism, types of military resistance, 
accommodation efforts, demoralization, independence, and current social, political and eco- 
nomic struggles. 

346 The African Experience (3) 

African history from the origin of the black man and traditional African civilization through the 
African diaspora to the institutional realities of Africa today. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352) 

385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) 

The prevailing educational practices in regard to minority groups in elementary school through 
college, including minority students' failure patterns, what is being done to change failures, and 
the outcomes of these practices. 

410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

The literary contributions by major black American authors. Contemporary black writers and the 
recurring themes of protest and quest for identity. 

411 Black Writers' Workshop (3) 

Writing prose, fiction, drama, short stories, book reviews, poetry and essays from the perspective 
of the black experience. 

422 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

Black identity and the life styles that have risen from racism. The socioeconomic, political, cultural 
conditions which have fostered the blackness concept and the psychological devices used by 
blacks to survive. 

431 Southwestern Indians (3) 

Indian tribes of the Southwestern United States; Anasazi, Mogollon and Hobokam. Cultural changes 
and assimilation. 

434 American Indian Education (3) 

Prerequisites: Afro-Ethnic Studies 230 and 331 or consent of instructor. Legislation which affects 
education. Field activities. Observations in public and government facilities. 

440 Comparative Study of European, American and African Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: at least one college course in American or European literature. The influences of Europe 
and America on 20th-century Africa novelists, playwrights and poets. 

445 American Political System and the Blacks (3) 

Prerequisites: Afro-Ethnic Studies 219, 279, 245 or 444; or Political Science 100. The causes and 
effects of legislation passed to protect and oppress black people in American society; 1865 to 
the present. 

460 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 

Black music in America; the sociological conditions that help produce various forms of black music. 

463 Black Music Ensemble (3) 

Prerequisite: Vocal or instrumental experience or consent of instructor. Black musical styles such as 
spirituals, blues, soul and jazz. A vocal and instrumental concert of these styles. 


American Studies 197 


483 Black Child and the Educational System (3) 

The cultural impact of traditional American educational system upon the black child. Civil rights acts 
and the black child; separate and equal doctrine, desegregation school plan, Article 3.3, the Stull 
Act, and sociological and psychological problems in the black community. 

495 Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: junior status or consent of instructor. Selected topics in Afro-American studies. 

497 Ethnic Internship (3) 

Career opportunities in industry and social services. Students work up to 20 hours per week and meet 
weekly for guidance. Supervision by instructor and cooperating agencies. Can be repeated for 
credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and acceptance of the subject by department chair and instructor directing 
the study. 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN STUDIES 

FACULTY 
john Ibson 
Department Chair 

Allan Axelrad, Wayne Hobson, Karen Lystra, Robert Porfirio, Michael Steiner, E. James Weaver 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

American studies is a field that intensively examines the American cultural environment, past and 
present. The B.A. program is built around a core of work in the discipline of American studies itself 
but it requires work in related fields to discover the relationships among disciplines as they analyze 
the American experience. At the center of American studies training is the analysis of culture, that 
complex system of belief, behavior, symbols and material objects through which Americans give 
meaning to their lives. 

American studies is sound preparation for careers in which a thorough understanding of American 
culture is important, such as law, government, business, journalism, library work and other services. 
The B.A. program also serves as a foundation for advanced study at the graduate level. 

Two alternative programs are available and consultation with a department advisor is essential to 
plan a rewarding course of study. The major consists of 36 units distributed between the core 
program and either Plan a or b: 

I. Core program (12 units) required of all majors. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

301 The American Character (3) 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

401 Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

II. Alternative plans (24 upper division units in either plan — electives in American studies in 
conjunction with approved work in other departments) 

a. Work in American studies and one or two other fields related to the American experience 
such as history, sociology, literature, political science, anthropology and psychology. 

b. Course work pursuing a particular theme or subject such as law and society, ethnicity in 
America, the child and the family, American sex roles, urbanization. 

THE DOUBLE MAJOR: AMERICAN STUDIES AND ANOTHER FIELD 

All American studies majors must include course work from another department; consequently, a 
double major is easy to arrange. 

AMERICAN STUDIES AS PREPARATION FOR A TEACHING CREDENTIAL 

The American studies major has been approved for the multiple subject credential option of the 
Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 1970 (Ryan Act). Students who have properly selected 
their undergraduate courses are eligible for a waiver which excuses them from taking the State 
Licensing Examination for a credential. Contact the Department of American Studies for further 
information. 

MASTER of ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


198 American Studies 


AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

101 Introduction to Culture Studies: American Studies as Interdisciplinary Social Science (3) 

The concepts of interdisciplinary culture studies, focusing on analysis of cultural change in complex, 
literate society. American culture, including cross-cultural comparisons. Topics include popular 
culture, subcultures, regionalism, myths and symbols, and culture and personality. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

With the concept of culture as a unifying principle, focus is on four separate time periods in order 
to provide the framework for an understanding of American civilization. Several different kinds 
of documents will be used to illustrate the nature and advantages of an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach. 

301 The American Character (3) 

Cultural environment and personality. The extent to which there have been and continue to be 
distinctly American patterns of belief and behavior. Similarities, as well as class, ethnic, sex and 
regional differences among Americans. 

320 The Dark Age of American Film, 1941-1960 (3) 

American film prevalent in the decade following World War II. The style and attitudes of a specific 
genre of film, ("film noir") will be examined within a sociocultural framework. Course involves 
weekly film-viewing, lecture and discussion, and occasional guests from the film industry. 

325 '30's America Through Films (3) 

A cultural history of Depression America using contemporary films as one measure of that culture. 
The relationship between social values and institutions and popular arts. Hollywood produc- 
tions such as King Kong and Duck Soup will be shown. 

333 Visual Arts in Contemporary America (3) 

Visual phenomena in America as they reveal changes in recent American culture. Areas covered 
include the "high" arts (painting, sculpture) as contrasted with the "low" arts (advertising, 
television); the artist as innovator, alienation, the business world, and American values in art. 

345 The American Dream (3) 

An interdisciplinary analysis, in settings both historical and contemporary, of the myth and reality 
surrounding the notion of America as a land of unparalleled and unlimited possibilities, especial- 
ly in the achievement of personal material success. 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or consent of instructor. To provide an understanding 
and appreciation of methodology, theories of society and images of man as they affect Ameri- 
can studies contributions to scholarship. 

355 American Sexual Politics (3) 

Why sexuality has become increasingly important in American culture and politics. Historical and 
contemporary reform and the current sexual counter-reform movement (involving issues such 
as abortion and gay rights). 

360 Cultural Radicalism in America (3) 

The designs and strategies for cultural transformation of selected radical groups and individuals from 
the Puritans to the present. 

385 Images of Women in American Film (3) 

(Same as History 385) 

386A American Social History, 1750-1860 (3) 

(Same as History 386A) 

386B American Social History, 1865-1930 (3) 

(Same as History 386B) 

401 Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or consent of instructor. The relationship between 
theory and application. Analytic readings and research. Check the Class Schedule for topics 
being considered. 

402 Religion in the Development of American Society (3) 

The changing role of religion in shaping, reflecting, and challenging dominant American values and 
institutions. The 19th and 20th centuries, with some attention to the colonial period. 

411 The White Ethnic in America (3) 

The white, but not Anglo, ethnic groups in America. Ethnic stereotypes, loss and survival in America 
of national and religious heritages, the origins, breadth and depth of prejudice against blacks 
among these groups. 


Anthropology 199 


412 Freedom and Repression in American Culture (3) 

Focuses on pre-industrial American culture, comparing features of modern industrial American 
culture to that earlier "world we have lost." Privacy, social control, sexual expression, child 
rearing and aggression. 

413 The Shifting Role and Image of the American Male (3) 

The effect of economic, social, political and cultural changes on American males. Emphasis on the 
19th and 20th centuries. 

415 The Hero in American Popular Culture (3) 

Nineteenth- and 20th-century materials, including dime novels, pulps, detective fiction, comic strips, 
and films, will be utilized to examine the role of the hero in American imagination. 

416 Southern California Culture: A Study of American Regionalism (3) 

Regionalism as a concept and as a fact of American life. Theories of regionalism measured against 
a study of Southern California and one other distinct American region. 

420 Childhood and Family in American Culture (3) 

Historical and contemporary culture study of childhood and family in America. The idea of child- 
hood, changing concepts of child-rearing, growing up in the American past, the impact of 
modernization, mother and home as dominant cultural symbols. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

(Same as English 425) 

450 Women in American Society (3) 

The rise and decline of feminism in America. The first half of the course will be lecture. The second 
half will be discussion comparing and contrasting the contemporary women's movement with 
its predecessors. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in American studies to be taken with the consent of instructor and 
department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

501 The Search for Method in American Studies: Concept and Culture (3) 

The American studies movement. Its conceptual and methodological development. The way this 
development was affected by and in turn reflected larger trends in the culture itself. 

502 Practicum in Interdisciplinary Methods in American Studies (3) 

A particular problem or topic as a case study in the use of interdisciplinary methods in American 
studies. Problems of integration and synthesis, disciplinary expertise, jargon and technical 
language barriers, impressionistic versus methodological self-consciousness. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in American studies and consent of graduate coordinator. The writing 
of a thesis based on original research and its analysis and evaluation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in American studies and consent of graduate coordinator. May be 
repeated for credit. 

department of anthropology 

FACULTY 

LeRoy Joesink-Mandeville 
Department Chair 

Aileen Baron, Marlene Dobkin de Rios, Roger Joseph, Fred Katz, Hans Leder, Jacob Pandian, Otto 
Sadovszky, Richard See, Judy Suchey, Wayne Untereiner, Corinne Wood 

bachelor of arts in anthropology 

The required minimum for the major is 45 semester units (in addition to those units taken for the 
general education requirement). Anthropology 201, 202 and 203 are required, and the rest must be 
in upper division courses. Of these 36 units, a minimum of 6 units must be within the category of 
anthropology courses listed as "topical," a minimum of 6 units from the category areal, and a 
minimum of 3 units from the category "methods." Of the remaining 21 units, students are required 
to take 9-1 2 units of upper division courses in anthropology, and 9-1 2 units of upper division courses 
«n related fields. 

Lower Division: Required 9 units 

Anthropology 201, 202, 203 

Topical: Required ^ units 


200 Anthropology 


Anthropology 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 417, 418, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 428, 

429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 436, 438, 440, 442, 444, 447, 450, 455, 456, 460, 461, 

462, 465, 466, 470, 480, 481 . 

Areal: Required 6 un ' ts 

Anthropology 321, 322, 324A, 3246, 325, 326, 327, 328, 335, 341, 342, 345, 346, 347, 

350, 351, 352, 360, 361, 370, 373. 

Methods: Required 3 units 

Anthropology 401 , 403, 404, 405, 406, 409. 

Additional Units: Required 9-12 units 

All upper division courses in anthropology. These courses must be selected in consulta- 
tion with the adviser. 

Related Fields: Required 9-1 2 units 

These courses must be selected in consultation with the student's adviser; no related 
field courses will be counted towards the major requirements unless they have 
the approval of the adviser. 

Total 45 units 

Note. In anthropology courses, the 300 level is used for areal, and 400 level is used 
for topical and methods courses. This numbering system does not imply different 


levels of difficulty or complexity. Students are urged to select courses in any order 
from any of these categories that will best serve their interests and needs. 

MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The minor in anthropology is intended as a second field for persons completing a major in another 
discipline. Twenty-one units must be taken in anthropology; 15 of these in upper division courses. 
Anthropology 201 (or 203), 202, and 480 are required. Two additional courses must be selected from 
areal offerings in the field: 

Anthropology 321, 322, 324A, 324B, 325, 326, 327, 328, 335, 340, 341, 342, 345, 346, 347, 350, 351, 
352, 360, 361, 370, 373. Another course must be selected from theoretical /institutional courses in 
the field: Anthropology 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 436, 438, 440, 441, 442, 450, 455, 456, 460, 461, 
462, 465, 466, 470, 490 and 491. A final course must be either Anthropology 401 or 481. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

201 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) 

Man as a biological organism and in evolutionary perspective. Concepts, methods, findings and 
issues in the study of the order primates, including the relationships between fossil monkeys, 
apes and man, and the significance of genetic diversity between modern populations. 

202 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

The nature of culture and its significance for man. Uniformities and variations in human cultures. 
Cultural analyses of major institutional forms such as the family, economy, government, religion 
and art with an emphasis on preliterate peoples. Central problems of cultural comparison and 
interpretation. 

203 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

Relationship of archaeology, culture history and culture process, field methods and analysis of 
archaeological data; the uses and abuses of archaeology. World culture history from Pleistocene 
beginnings to the threshold of civilization. 

204 Man's Many Faces (3) 

The study and analysis of a broad selection of human societies; perspectives on how human 
problems have been solved; possible solutions to our own problems. 

321 The American Indian (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. North American Indians north of Mexico; 
origins, languages, culture areas, cultural history; the impact of European contacts. 

322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Prerequisite. Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The ethnology of the Mesoamerican culture- 
area, with treatment of various Indian societies representing the principal sub-areas. 


Anthropology 201 


324A The Ancient Maya (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The archaeology and ethnohistory of the 
Maya area of Southern Mesoamerica. The problems of initial settlement of the area and the 
"rise" and dynamics of ancient Maya civilization. 

324B The Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Archaeological survey of principal 
Mesoamerica pre-Columbian cultures north and west of Maya area. The Aztecs and their 
predecessors, religion, art, architecture, intellectual achievements and the Olmec heritage. 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Central and South America. Representative 
cultural areas before and after contacts with Western countries. 

326 Archaeology of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Archaeological and ethnohistorical survey 
of the culture areas and ecological zones of South America, lower Central America and the West 
Indies, including Inca civilization and its origin, possible trans-oceanic contact, religion, medi- 
cine and technology. 

327 Origins of Civilizations (3) 

The development of civilization in both the Old and New Worlds in primary centers such as 
Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, Mesoamerica and Peru, and secondary centers 
such as the Aegean and Europe. 

335 Curanderismo: Chicano-Mexican Folk Medicine (3) 

(Same as Chicano Studies 335) 

341 Peoples of China and Japan (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The religious, social and technological 
systems of the civilizations of Japan and China. The impact of nomadic herders of North and 
Central Asia. 

342 Peoples of India (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Physical and social anthropology of India, 
development of regional cultural traditions; continuity and changes in patterns and processes 
of village religion, politics, and economy; transformation of cultural traits in urban/ village 
interaction. 

345 Peoples of the Middle East (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Interrelationship between culture, economy, 
political structure and belief system of selected cultures in the Middle East and North Africa. 

346 Archaeology of Palestine (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 203 or consent of instructor. Culture history of ancient Palestine from the 
Paleolithic to historic times. Changes in settlement patterns, resource base, and sociopolitical 
organization. 

347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The indigenous peoples and cultures of the 
Pacific Islands, including Australia. The forces and processes contributing to social change in 
island communities and current problems being faced by them. 

350 Peoples of Western Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Representative groups considered in mod- 
ern and historical perspective. Rural /urban relationships and the dynamics of change. 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Peasant cultures of Russia, Southeast Europe, 
Poland, Czechoslovakia and the Baltic area, their traditional way of life and the impact of 
industrialization and Communist ideology. 

352 Peoples of Ancient Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The cultural and social institutions of the 
peoples of pre-Christian Europe. The Creek, Italic, Germanic and Celtic peoples. Readings from 
original ancient writers. 

360 Contemporary American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Application of anthropological methods, 


202 Anthropology 

categories of analysis, and types of interpretation to American culture. Survey and critique of 
selected community studies and other kinds of relevant research. 

361 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. African cultural characteristics in the New 
World, as they relate to contemporary events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

370 Human Variation (3) (Formerly 441) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Biological Science 313 and 412 are suggested. The processes under- 
lying and the theories for the existence of the present variation between and within human 
populations. The genetics of human populations and the significance of racial classifications. (2 
hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

373 Health and Nutrition in the Third World (3) 

Traditional beliefs and practices related to health and nutrition in Third World cultures. Conflicts 
between tradition and attempts to introduce new approaches. 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and six additional units of anthropology or consent of instructor. 
Anthropological field research by students on various problems using participant observation 
techniques. 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or 203 and consent of instructor. Excavation of a local archaeologi- 
cal site. Archaeological mapping, photography and recording. Laboratory methods of catalog- 
ing, preservation, description and interpretation of archaeological materials. Saturday field 
sessions. May be repeated once for credit as an elective. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

404 Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 203 and 403. The employment of physical data collecting techniques 
(e.g., photographic, palaeo-magnetic) in the field and the analysis of artifact collections and 
data from previous field operations in the laboratory. May be repeated once for credit as an 
elective. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 406) 

409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Nature and functions of language; language structure and change; classification of languages; use of 
linguistic evidence in anthropology. (Same as Linguistics 409) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Language as a factor in culture. Trends in 
the study of language and culture. (Same as Linguistics 410) 

411 Folklore (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Folktales, myths, legends, proverbs, riddles 
and other forms of the verbal traditions of peoples. Major concepts and theories and research 
methods in the study of folklore. 

412 Myth, Legend and Folktale 

A comparative survey of oral literature and its role in society. The types of oral narratives, their 
themes, meanings, and functions. 

413 Ethnological Music (3) 

Music, music making and musicians in nonliterate societies. 

415 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The relationship between the individual and 
the culture. Child training in nonwestern cultures. Survey of concepts, studies, and research 
techniques. 

417 Life Quests (3) 

Contemporary ways to wisdom and humanness in cross-cultural and historical perspectives. New 
and comparative approaches to understanding the life cycle, development and fulfillment of 
individual personalities. 

418 Mental Illness in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Problems in the cross-cultural definition and treatment of mental illness. Cross-cultural perspectives 


Anthropology 203 

on symptomatology and etiology, culture bound disorders, the folk healer, and the relationship 
between cultural change and mental disorders. 

420 Comparative Values and Beliefs (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. "Common sense" in the everyday life of 
people living within differing sociocultural environments. 

421 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Beliefs and practices in the full human 
variation of religious phenomena, with an emphasis on primitive religions. The forms, functions, 
structures, symbolism, and history and evolution of religious systems. 

422 Jewish and Comparative Mysticism (3) 

A description and analysis of Jewish mysticism, and its comparison with other systems of mysticism. 

423 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

The metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the "grammars" of the art, poetry, languages, 
myths, music and rituals of various nonliterate and literate peoples and their development into 
creative experiences. 

424 Hallucinogens and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. Mind-altering drugs, especially hallucinogens, as they have been 
utilized in religion, healing, divination, witchcraft and magic. 

425 Anthropology of Law and Government (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Sources of law-government in primitive 
societies; the cultural background of law; the functions and development of law and govern- 
ment in primitive politics; transitions to and comparisons with classical and modern legal and 
political systems. 

428 Social Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The social organization of preindustrial 
societies; religious, political and economic institutions; status and value systems; conditions and 
theories of change. 

429 Kinship and Social Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Kinship systems in primitive society and 
their significance in the organization of social life. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, and 
kinship role patterns. 

430 Economic Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The ethnology and ethnography of econom- 
ic life, principally in non-Western societies; the operation of systems of production and distribu- 
tion within diverse cultural contexts. 

432 Woman in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202. The influence of biological determinants as they are shaped by 
cultural beliefs, values, expectations and socially defined roles for women. The changing role 
of women in industrial society. 

434 Anthropological Simulation Games (3) 

Description, criticism, construction and participation in games simulating sociocultural situations. 

436 Jazz: Past, Present and Future (3) 

Jazz — its primitive and European roots; cross-cultural description of improvisation. Lectures, demon- 
strations, some concerts. 

438 Magic in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

The ancient traditions of magic and the modern vaudeville magic of contemporary societies, the 
domain of magic in the activities of shamans, priests and medicine men. 

440 Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 . Biological Science 404 recommended. Advanced primate evolution; 
the origin of Homo sapiens as evidenced in the fossil record and through biochemical and 
molecular studies. Evolutionary theory and problems in human evolution. (2 hours lecture, 3 
hours laboratory) 

442 Medical Anthropology (3) . . 

Human health and disease and their relationship to cultural practices, beliefs and environmental 
factors; histories of various diseases as factors of cultural change; health care delivery systems. 


204 Anthropology 


(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

444 Human Osteology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques in the basic identification of human skeletal remains. 
Aging, sexing, racing, and stature reconstruction. For those interested in archaeology, homid 
evolution and/or forensic science. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

447 Humanistic Anthropology (3) 

The foundations and applications of humanistic anthropology. The comparative study of meaning 
in terms of analyzing the quality of human experience as it is conceptualized in diverse cultural 
settings. 

450 Culture and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or Ed-TE 301 or consent of instructor. The transmission of values, 
implicit cultural assumptions, and the patterning of education in cross-cultural perspective. 
American culture and development problems. 

455 Ethno-ecology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 and consent of instructor. Man's impact on environment as deter- 
mined by factual knowledge, different major approaches, important research issues, and meth- 
ods of study. 

456 Anthropology of Ethnicity (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Social groupings that are formed on the basis 
of ethnicity; Contemporary plural societies. 

460 Culture Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Interrelations between cultural, social and 
psychological processes in the dynamics of culture growth and change. Impact of western 
technology on tribal and peasant societies. Anthropological contributions to the planning of 
directed sociocultural change in selected areas. 

461 Cultural Criticism (3) 

Ideas and approaches in evaluating previous, existing or imagined (new) cultures or cultural expres- 
sions. 

462 Applied Anthropology (3) 

The uses of anthropological skills and sensitivities in approaching contemporary human problems. 
Cultural change, organizational development, program planning and evaluation, the consul- 
tant's role, and professional ethics. 

465 Alternative Futures (3) 

Literature on the future and its implications for anthropology and the other social sciences and 
humanities. 

466 Myths for Moderns (3) 

The nature and needs for mythic types of belief systems in contemporary life. Selected myths. 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. The principal contributions of anthropolo- 
gists 1850-1950; evolutionary, diffusionist, historical, particularism configurationalist, and culture 
and personality approaches in anthropology. 

481 Contemporary Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Anthropologists from 1950 to the present; 
neoevolutionist, sociological, structuralist, psychological and symbolic approaches. 

490 Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in anthropology. May be repeated for credit. 

491 Internship in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: 18 upper division units in anthropology and/or related fields. Career opportunities. 
On-the-job training under faculty supervision in museum, industry or governmental service. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of adviser. Individual research project 
involving either library or fieldwork. Conferences with the adviser as necessary. Results in one 
or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 


Chicano Studies 205 


501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthropology 202, 401 and consent of instructor. The contemporary methodological 
spectrum in anthropology and new trends in research planning and implementation. 

502 Contemporary Theory in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 480 or consent of instructor. The basic assumptions and theoretical 
positions of leading contemporary anthropologists. 

504 Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing or 
consent of instructor. The topic chosen and a general outline of the seminar is circulated prior 
to registration. May be repeated. 

505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 505) 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 507) 

508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Same as Linguistics 508) 

592 Field Methods in Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 592) 

597 Project (3-6) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The completion of a project derived from 
original field or laboratory research, and/or on library study. May be repeated for credit. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The writing of a thesis based on original 
field or laboratory research, and/or on library study, and its analysis and evaluation. May be 
repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Individual research involving fieldwork, laboratory, or library study, 
and conferences with a project adviser as necessary, and resulting in one or more papers. May 
be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHICANO STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Dagoberto Fuentes 
Department Chair 

Isaac Cardenas, Joseph Platt, Adolfo Ortega 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE CHICANO STUDIES OPTION OF ETHNIC STUDIES 

The degree program in Chicano studies fulfills a variety of needs in contemporary higher education: 
to educate students to the culture, language, education, history, politics, and socioeconomics of the 
Chicano population in the United States. 

The program emphasizes preparation for: (1) those interested in bilingual-bicultural education to 
meet elementary, secondary and cross-cultural specialist credentials; (2) students pursuing ad- 
vanced degrees (M.A. and Ph.D.); (3) those entering a variety of occupations in urban affairs, 
government, social work, school administration, counseling, business, criminology, law, foreign 
service and other related areas; and (4) majors in other academic fields such as liberal studies, 
history, sociology, psychology, literature, anthropology, who wish to include additional scope to 
their field. 

The Chicano studies major consists of 36 units, 12 lower and 24 upper division.* 

Units 

Lower Division 12 

Required: 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Electives: 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

200 Chicano Movement (3) 

Students must consult with their advisers to develop an approved study plan. 


206 Chicano Studies 


213 Spanish for the Spanish Speaking (3) 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3) 

218 Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

Upper Division 24 

Required: (6 units to be selected from the following) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

453 Mexico since 1906 (3) 

Electives: 

233 Introduction to Mexican Folk Dance for Elementary and Secondary Teachers (3) 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

316 The Chicano Music Experience (3) 

318 Cultural Pluralism in American Educational Institutions (3) 

335 Curanderismo: Chicano-Mexican Folk Medicine (3) 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

360 Chicanos and the Law (3) 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

406 La Chicana (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

438 Issues in Bilingual /Cross-Cultural Education (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

480 The Immigrant and the Chicano (3) 

497 Ethnic Internship (3) 

499 Independent Study ( 1-3) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Total 36 

MINOR IN CHICANO STUDIES 

The minor in Chicano studies consists of 24 units in the following areas: 

Required lower division courses (6 units) 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Required upper division courses (6 units) 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Approved electives 

Twelve units of approved coursework in lower and upper division classes that are selected by the 
adviser. 

TEACHER CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS 

The B.A. in Chicano studies is approved by the State Board of Education for those seeking a single 
subject or multiple subject (Ryan) teaching credential. Additionally, the department has been 


Chicano Studies 207 

approved for waiver of the examination requirement for Chicano studies major with a multiple 
subject credential objective. 

An adviser in the department and in the Division of Teacher Education should be consulted for 
information. 

THE BILINGUAL/CROSS-CULTURAL SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 

Requirements for this credential are described in a brochure available at the offices of the Depart- 
ment of Chicano Studies, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, or the School of 
Human Development and Community Service. The Chicano studies component of the specialist 
credential program requires nine units from the following Chicano studies courses: 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

438 Issues in Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Education (3) 

445 History of the Chicano (3) 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 


CHICANO STUDIES COURSES 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

The basic communication skills including oral and written expression. A unit on the mechanics of 
writing and reporting on a term paper. 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

The role of the Chicano in the United States. The Chicano's cultural values, social organization, 
urbanization patterns, and the problems in the area of education, politics and legislation. 

200 The Chicano Movement (3) 

The history of the Chicano movement, its present activists and their intellectual philosophies. 

213 Spanish for the Spanish-Speaking (3) 

The Spanish language as it is spoken in the United States today. Designed to improve the basic 
communication skills in Spanish for students from Spanish-speaking backgrounds; vocabulary 
building, syntactical analysis and conversation. Not restricted to Chicano students. 

215 Chicano Creative Writing (3,3) 

Chicano creative writing utilizing the barrio's trilingual expressions. Student work as well as the work 
of contemporary Chicano writers will be analyzed. 

218 Survey of Chicano Culture (3) 

The Chicano's cultural heritage from the pre-Cortesian period to the present. The Music, literature, 
art and dance. 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

The basic characteristics of the Mexican, especially the Chicano society and culture. From 1519 to 
the present. Emphasis on the arts, literature and history of Mexico and the Chicano in the United 
States. 

233 Introduction to Mexican Folk Dance for Elementary and Secondary Teachers (3) 

A variety of basic folk dances indigenous to various regions in Mexico that can be applied in 
elementary and secondary classroom settings. No previous knowledge of dance skills required. 

300 Barrio Conversational Spanish (3) 

Analysis of the Calo language of the southwestern states of the United States. The bicultural language 
of the Chicanos, origin, development and contemporary use in the barrios. 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

A historical and cultural survey of the principal pre-Columbian cultures of Mexico and their signifi- 
cance for Mexican society. 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

The Chicano family development as an American social institution. Historical and cross-cultural 
perspectives. The socio- and psychodynamics of the Chicano family. 


208 Chicano Studies 


306 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 200 or 220 or consent of instructor. The major characteristics of the 
barrio. Supervised fieldwork in the barrio is required. Analysis of the barrio or agency wil be 
made after fieldwork is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

307 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 306. The major characteristics of the barrio and supervised fieldwork 
in the local barrios. An analysis of the barrio or agency will be made after fieldwork is com- 
pleted. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

316 The Chicano Music Experience (3) (Formerly 415) 

Mexican folk and popular music and its relation to the culture which produced it. The pre-Cortesian 
period to the present in Mexico and in the Southwestern United States. 

318 Cultural Pluralism in American Educational Institutions (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 318) 

335 Curanderismo: Chicano-Mexican Folk Medicine (3) 

The nature of Mexican folk medicine. Ethno-medicine and culture in Mexico and the Southwest. The 
underlying aspects of modern and folk medicine. 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

The main currents of Spanish American literature emphasizing contemporary works. The relation 
between the artistic expression and the ideological values of the period. 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicano Studies 101 or 106, or 220, or 237, or consent of instructor. The modern 
Chicano writers in the United States: Allurista, Corky Gonzales, Octavio Romano, el treatro 
campesino and the major Chicano magazines and newspapers. 

360 Chicanos and the Law (3) 

The relationship between Chicanos and the legal and judicial system, including the administration 
of justice, Chicano-police relations, and Chicanos and the prison system. Guest speakers will 
be a regular feature. 

403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 

The cultural conflicts in Mexico as seen by the contemporary thinkers of Mexico and the United 
States. Urban and rural problems. 

406 La Chicana (3) 

The cultural influences that the family, religion, economic status and community play upon the 
lifestyles, the values and the roles held by Chicanas. 

420 Spanish for the Elementary School Teacher in the Barrio (3) 

To improve the oral expression of teachers in the barrio elementary schools. The language patterns 
of the Chicano students and their parents. 

430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

Survey and analysis of the Nahautl, Mexican and Chicano literature from the pre-Columbian period 
to the present. 

431 The Chicano Child (3) 

The Chicano child from preschool through grade six. Motor, physical, social, intellectual and emo- 
tional growth and development and their effect on school adjustment and achievement. Obser- 
vation of preschool and grade school children. 

432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

The Chicano adolescents' social, intellectual and emotional growth and development. The bicultural 
pressures from the barrio, family structure, school and achievement values. 

433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

The literature of Mexico since 1 940: Carlos Fuentes, Luis Spota, Rodolfo Usigli, Xavier Villarrutia, Juan 
Jose Arreola, Octavio Paz, Roberto Blanco Moheno and Luis G. Basurto. 

438 Issues in Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Education (3) 

The Chicano community involvement in issues of bilingual-bicultural education. Chicano education, 
literature, legislation, court decisions, political issues and programmatic efforts. 

440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish and Chicano Studies 237 and 302 recommended. The 
emergence of the Chicano movement dealing with political, economic and sociological facets. 
The writings of the Nahautl, Spanish, Spanish-American, Chicano and contemporary writers. 


Communications 209 


445 History of the Chicano (3) 

History of the Chicano from the pre-Columbian period to the present. The Chicanos' changing role 
in the United States, their cultural identity crisis and their achievements. 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

The socioeconomic and political problems confronting the Chicano including proposed solutions. 
The effect that social institutions have had on the Chicano community. 

453 Mexico Since 1906 ( 3) 

Prerequisite: upper division class standing. The Mexican Revolution of 1910 stressing the political, 
economic and social aspects as well as its contributions in the fields of art, literature and social 
reforms. 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

Theory of urban politics and evaluation of issues that affect the Chicanos and American society. 
Evaluations and surveys will be made on political organizations in the Hispanic-surnamed 
communities. 

480 The Immigrant and the Chicano (3) 

Mexican immigration to the United States and its social, economic and political impacts on the 
Chicano and non-Chicano communities and other immigrant groups. 

497 Ethnic Internship (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 497) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior level and approval by the department chair and instructor (s) in charge of 
directing the study. An opportunity to do independent study under the guidance of the faculty, 
of a subject of special interest to the student. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and classified status. Individual research for Chicano studies 
components in M.A. in Bilingual Studies (Spanish) M.S. in Bilingual Education (Education) and 
related programs. Maximum of 3 hours credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

FACULTY 
Kenward Atkin 
Department Chair 

james Alexander, Fenton Calhoun, Wendell Crow, Ronald Dyas, George Fukasawa, Mary Lynn 
Hartman, Terry Hynes, Carolyn johnson, Raynolds Johnson, John Kaufman, Mary Koehler,* 
George Mastroianni, J. William Maxwell, Norman Nager, Rick Pullen, Lewis Riley, Marvin 
Rosen, Ted Smythe, Michael Stanton, Don Sunoo, Edgar Trotter, Larry Ward 
Effective ethical communications are essential for the well-being of a democratic society. Thus there 
is a need for persons trained in the theory and practice of informing, instructing, and persuading 
through communications media. The educational objectives of the programs leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts in Communications are: (1 ) to ensure that all majors receive a broad liberal education; (2) 
to provide majors with a clear understanding of the role of communications media in society; and 
(3) to prepare majors desiring communications-related careers in the mass media, business, govern- 
ment and education by educating in depth in one or more of the specialized sequences within the 
department. 

A master of arts program in communications provides advanced study in communications and 
related disciplines for those seeking professional careers in teaching, research, and mass media. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

A communications major is required to take 12 units of core requirements in addition to 24 units 
in a chosen sequence. The department offers six sequences to choose from: advertising, news — 
editorial, photocommunications, public relations, technical and business communications, and tele- 
communications. 


University administrative officer 


210 Communications 


The major totals 36 units. 

Collateral requirements: Twelve units of upper division coursework in other departments approved 
by the adviser are also required. Collateral courses for each sequence are recommended by the 
sequence coordinator. 

A minimum of 65 percent of the total units taken before graduation must be taken outside the 
Communications Department. 

COMMUNICATIONS CORE 

The communications core provides background and perspective appropriate to all the departmental 
sequences and an understanding of the role of communicators and their contribution to the develop- 
ment of high standards of professionalism. 

Nine units of required course work: 

Com 233 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Com 407 Communications Law (3) 

Com 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

Plus three units selected from the following: 

Com 410 Principles of Communications Research (3) 

Com 426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Com 427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Com 428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Com 431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Com 480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Com 481 Communications and Conflict in the 20th Century (3) 

Com 482 Communications and Popular Culture (3) 

COMMUNICATIONS SEQUENCES 

Every communications major must select and complete 24 units of course work in a major sequence. 

ADVERTISING 

The objective of the advertising sequence is to prepare students for entry level positions in one or 
more of the four basic advertising activities: creative (copy, layout design), media representation, 
research, and management. Students are provided with knowledge and skills needed for work with 
an advertiser, advertising agency, the print and broadcast media, or support service industry. 
Com 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Introduction to Advertising (3) 

Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Graphics Communications (3) 

Mass Media Internship (3) 

Advertising and Media Management (3) 

Plus six units selected from the following: 

Com 354, 381, 451, 453 

And M collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by adviser. 

NEWS-EDITORIAL 

The principal objective of the news-editorial sequence is to provide the skills and practice necessary 
for careers in the print media. Specifically, the sequence objectives are: (1 ) to provide experience 
in writing various types of news stories, and to develop skills in reporting and news gathering 
techniques; (2) to develop critical acumen necessary to check news stories for accuracy and 
correctness; (3) to develop skills in graphics or photography that complement the journalistic writing 
skills; (4) to provide actual on-the-job experience by working on the campus newspaper and 
through an internship; and (5) to add breadth and depth to the professional's specialized skills 
through collateral courses. 

Com 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Reporting for the Mass Media (3) 

Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 

Newspaper Production (3) 

Mass Media Internship (3) 

Com 318, 358 
Com 334, 430, 435, 436 


Com 350 
Com 353 
Com 358 
Com 439 
Com 446 


Com 201 
Com 332 
Com 335 
Com 338 
Com 439 
Plus three units from: 
And three units from: 


Communications 211 


AndM collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education which must be selected 
from the following list of approved courses, and this selection must represent at least one course 
from each of four departments: English 322, 462, 463, 464; History 476; Sociology 341, 345, 348; 
Political Science 300, 310, 350, 413; Economics 332, 333, 334 and 350. 

PHOTOCOMMUNICATIONS 

The sequence in photocommunications provides a comprehensive study of the theories and prac- 
tices of photography for intelligent applications of principles to produce photographs acceptable to 
the mass media. 

Six units of writing courses selected from the following: Com 101, 201, 301, 334, 353, 362. 

Com 217 Introduction to Black-and-White Photography (3) 

Com 319 Communications Photography (3) 

Com 321 Advanced Color Photography (3) 

Com 326 Photocommunications Production (2) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus four units selected from the following: 

Com 220, 240, 311, 338, 340, 358, 359 

And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by adviser. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

This sequence provides preparation in both theory and practice of two-way communication for 
prospective professional public relations careers in business, industry, government, and nonprofit 
sections of society. 

Com 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Com 361 Theories and Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Com 362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Com 463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Plus nine units selected from the following: 

Com 301, 318, 332, 338, 350, 358, 359, 363, 410, 446, 497 
And 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by adviser. 
Recommended departments include Management, Marketing, Psychology, Sociology, Political 
Science and Speech Communication. 

TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

This sequence provides the knowledge and skills necessary for careers in technical and business 
communications in industry. Attention is paid to matching student talents and interests to the needs 
of industry. 

Com 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Com 401 Report Writing (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (3) 

An additional six units from the following: 

Com 201 Reporting for the Mass Media (3) 

Com 301 Writing for Telecommunications (3) 

Com 334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Com 358 Graphics Communications (3) 

Plus nine units selected from the following: 

Com 303, 318, 332, 363, 375, 382 

And 1 2 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by adviser. 

'TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Courses in this sequence are designed for an understanding of the history, theory and practice of 
radio-television and film. Students are prepared for entry level positions in business, education, and 
the broadcasting and film industries. 

Com 301 Writing for Telecommunications (3) 

Com 371 Radio Television News and Public Affairs (3) 

Com 382 Broadcasting in America (3) 

Students who wish to emphasize film in broadcasting should take six units of writing, including Com 301; 290A or 290B, 
311; 375; 411; 442 and 439; and 12 collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by 
adviser. 


212 Communications 


Com 390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Com 439 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus six units selected from the following: 

Com 217, 290A, 290B, 311, 335, 375, 378, 381, 411, 442, 479; 485; 490 
Plus three units selected from the following: 

Com 473 Broadcast Regulation (3) 

Com 475 Broadcast Programming (3) 

Com 477 Broadcast Station Management (3) 

And M collateral units of upper division courses beyond general education approved by adviser. 

JOURNALISM EDUCATION 

The department offers major programs approved by the State Board of Education for those seeking 
an elementary or secondary teaching credential. For advisement, consult the department and an 
adviser in the School of Human Development and Community Service. 

Elementary 

Communications majors may earn the multiple subject credential under the Ryan Act without being 
required to take the teacher examination. All departmental sequences qualify for this program under 
an approval granted by the California State Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. 
Interested students should consult the department's multiple subject credential adviser at an early 
date to develop an approved study plan. 

Secondary 

Communications majors planning a teaching career at the secondary level must complete the 
communications core and news-editorial sequence. 

It is recommended that a student have at least one semester of Communications 358 or 359. The 
student must fulfill professional education course requirements. Journalism Education 442 (Student 
Teaching) is offered by the department. (See "Journalism Education.") 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


COMMUNICATIONS COURSES 

100 Introduction to Communications (3) 

A survey of the mass media and their relationship to society today. 

101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications Department English Usage Test; typing ability. Principles and practices 
of writing for major types of mass communications media. Content, organization, conciseness 
and clarity. 

103 Applied Writing (3) 

Principles and practice in organizing and preparing letters, reports, documents, and proposals 
required in most occupations. For non-communications majors. 

201 Reporting for the Mass Media (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 101 or equivalent; typing 
ability. Development of expertise in the use of news reporting techniques combined with 
development of ability to compose complex journalistic writing forms for possible publication. 

217 Introduction to Black and White Photography (3)* 

Cameras, accessories, materials, exposure, processing, printing, finishing, composition, filters, flash, 
studio techniques, and special subject treatments and applications. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

220 Introduction to Color Photography (2) 

Theory, principles and practice of color photography in mass communication. Production of slide- 
tape presentations. Work done with commercially processed slide film. 

233 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Newspapers, magazines, films, radio and television; their significance as social instruments and 
economic entities in modern society. 

* Students wishing a non-laboratory introduction to photography may enroll in Com 220. 


Communications 213 


234 Sports Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 101 or equivalent. Preparation and writing of sports articles for specific audiences. 

240 Pictorial Journalism in America (3) 

Pictorial reportage in America as a means of mass communication and social influence; significant 
historical and contemporary pictorial journalists. The forms and media of modern pictorial 
journalism, their uses and effects. Individual projects. 

290A,B History and Aesthetics of Motion Pictures (3,3) 

(Same as Theatre 290A,B) 

301 Writing for Telecommunication (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications Department English Usage Test; typing ability. Theory and principles 
of writing in the broadcast and film media. 

303 Business Communications (3) 

Design and implementation of communications systems for business enterprises. Graphic analysis 
and analytical techniques. Practice in producing messages and channeling them to avoid 
ambiguities. 

311 Introduction to Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 217 or equivalent. Theory and practice of motion picture photography and film 
production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

318 Introduction to Mass Communications Photography (3) 

Mass communication photography (photojournalism) in publications. Black and white processing. 
News, feature, public relations, advertising, photo essay and editing assignments. For non- 
photocommunications sequence majors. (2 hours lecture/discussion, 3 hours laboratory) 

319 Communications Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 217 or equivalent. Photography for publication in print media. News, advertising, 
feature, sports, lifestyle, photo essay, and documentary applications. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

321 Advanced Color Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 217 and 220 or equivalent. Positive and negative color film processing, sensitome- 
try, and color printing. Creative and effective use of color in publications photography. (2 hours 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

326 Photocommunications Production (2) (Formerly 306) 

Prerequisite: six units of photography or consent of instructor. Photographs and photographic 
communications for the mass media, business, education, government, industry and science. 
(1 hour lecture, 3 hours activity) 

332 Copy Editing and Makeup (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test and Com 201 or equivalent. Princi- 
ples and practice of newspaper editing: copy improvement, headline writing, news photos and 
cutlines, wire services, typography, copy schedules and control, page design and layout, law 
and ethics. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test and Com 101 or equivalent. Nonfic- 
tion writing for newspapers and magazines; sources, methods and markets. 

335 Public Affairs Reporting (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 101 and 201, or consent of 
instructor. Com 407 recommended. Reporting public interest news such as courts, education, 
finance, government, police and urban problems. 

338 Newspaper Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 201 or equivalent and consent 
of instructor. Members of the class constitute the editorial staff of the university newspaper. 
Meets four hours per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing and makeup, followed 
by production. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. (More than 9 hours 
laboratory) 

340 Photography in Advertising and Public Relations (2) 

Prerequisite: a basic course in photography. Advertising and public relations photography. Materials 
and techniques for producing color and black-and-white photographs with visual impact suita- 
ble for photoreproduction. Techniques for shooting outdoors and indoors under studio and 
natural conditions. Students prepare a portfolio of photographs. ( 1 hour lecture, 3 hours activ- 
ity) 


214 Communications 


350 Introduction to Advertising (3) 

Advertising in America. The language and art of advertising and its role in marketing. 

353 Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test and Com 101, 350 or consent of 
instructor. Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales appeals, 
attention factors and illustrations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

354 Retail Advertising (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 350, 353, or consent of instructor. Retail advertising and sales; supervised field 
assignments in the analysis of advertising needs. 

355 Newspaper Advertising Sales Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 350, 353 and 354. Organizing newspaper advertising sales staff, servicing local 
accounts, structuring advertising rates. Principles of advertising sales, promotion, market and 
readership research. Newspaper sales administration. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

358 Graphics Communications (3) 

Printing processes, publication formats, copy preparation, copy-fitting techniques, layout principles, 
paper selection and distribution methods. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

361 Principles of Public Relations (3) 

The social, behavioral, psychological, ethical, economic and political foundations of public relations, 
and the theories of public relations as a communications discipline. 

362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test and Com 101 or consent of instruc- 
tor; typing ability. Writing for business, industry and nonprofit organizations. Creating effective 
forms of public relations communication. 

363 Publications Editing (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 361 and six units of communications writing or consent of instructor. Editing 
functions and techniques involved in creative development of publications for business, industry 
and nonprofit organizations and institutions. Magazines, newspapers, newsletters and bro- 
chures. 

371 Radio-Television News and Public Affairs (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 101 or 301, Com 382 and 390; 
typing ability. Covering news events and public affairs for radio and television. (2 hours lecture, 
3 hours lab) 

375 The Documentary Film (3) 

Purpose, development, current trends, critical analysis and production requirements of the docu- 
mentary film. Future of the medium in business, government, education and television. 

378 Introduction to Audio Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications majors only. Audio production as it pertains to radio broadcasting, 
commercial production and recording, television and film audio. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

381 Broadcast Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or consent of instructor. Television and radio as advertising media. Planning 
advertising campaigns, costs and coverage. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

382 Broadcasting in America (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications major or consent of instructor. The foundation course of the telecom- 
munications sequence. Radio and television from a professional perspective. Economic, histori- 
cal, regulatory aspects and the social effects of these media. 

390 Introduction to Telecommunications Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 382. Radio and television program production. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours labora- 
tory) 

401 Report Writing (3) 

Planning, organizing, and writing of reports for business, education and government. Use of graphic 
aids and preparation of copy for reports that are to be printed. For non-majors. 

407 Communications Law (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. The Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and 
press; statutes and administrative regulations affecting freedom of information and publishing, 
advertising and telecommunication. Libel and slander, rights in news and advertising, contempt, 
copyright and invasion of privacy. 


Communications 215 


410 Principles of Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. Research methods used to assess the effects of print, 
broadcast and film communications on audience attitudes, opinions, knowledge and behavior. 
Research design and data analysis in communications research. 

411 Advanced Motion Picture Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 217, 311, 301 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor. Theory, proce- 
dures and practice in film production: motion picture (silent and sound), script-writing, transfer 
and mixes, production, distribution and financing. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 

420 Writing the Nonfiction Book (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topic selection, outline preparation, research organization and 
writing of nonfiction books suitable for publication. 

425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. American mass communication; newspapers and peri- 
odicals through radio and television; ideological, political, social and economical aspects. 

426 World Communication Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. Major mass communication systems, both democratic 
and totalitarian, and the means by which news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 

427 Current Issues in Mass Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Com 233, 407 and 425. Mass media regulation by the government, 
"objective" versus "interpretive" news reporting and ethical and legal questions of particular 
cases. Seminar. 

428 Communications and Social Change (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. How innovations — ideas, products, and practices per- 
ceived as new — are communicated to members of a social system. The roles of adopters, 
opinion leaders, change agents, and communications in the diffusion of innovations and conse- 
quent changes in social systems. 

430 Newspaper Management (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Organization, operation and administration of a newspaper's 
departmental activities: advertising, business, circulation, mechanical, news-editorial, and pro- 
motion. (3 hours lecture, field trips, detailed study of one selected newspaper department) 

431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Mass media in Communist societies; the U.S.S.R., the People's Republic of China, Poland and 
Yugoslavia. The mass media, people and party. 

435 Editorial and Critical Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 101 and upper division writing 
course. The roles of the editorial and critical writer and opinion columnist. Techniques of 
editorial writing and aspects of critical thinking. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab and fieldwork) 

436 Investigative and Specialized Reporting (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications Department english Usage Test, Com 332, 335 and 407. Investigative 
and interpretive reporting of complex or specialized subjects. 

439 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, communications major and consent of instructor. Supervised intern- 
ship, according to sequence, with newspaper, magazine, radio or television station, press 
association, public relations firm or advertising agency. Application must be made through 
department coordinator one semester prior to entering program. (C/NC only) 

446 Advertising and Media Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 350 or Marketing 354. Principles of management in advertising function; proce- 
dures leading to sound decisions in solving advertising problems and utilization of the mass 
media. 

451 National Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 350 and 353 or consent of instructor. Advertising campaigns and utilization of 
mass media — such as television, newspapers and magazines — in national advertising programs. 
Design of complete campaigns from idea to production readiness. 

453 Advanced Advertising Copywriting (3) 

rerequisites: Communications Department English Usage Test, Com 350 and 353. The practical 
problems and creative solution of professional advertising copywriting. Marketing strategy for 
creative platform, theme and execution in writing advertising copy for the mass media. In-class 
assignments on real accounts. 


216 Communications 


463 Public Relations Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 361 or consent of instructor. Techniques for effective public relations in both 
personal and mass communications. 

465 International Public Relations (3) 

Public relations principles applied to international operations, both private and public. 

473 Broadcast Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 382. Self-regulation, governmental regulation and international regulation of 
broadcast programming. 

475 Broadcast Programming 

Prerequisite: Com 382. Theory and practice of programming for television and radio. Participation 
in the computer programming game SIMTEL. 

477 Broadcast Station Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 382. Management functions and policies of broadcasting stations and networks. 
Effects of government, public opinion, employee groups and ownership. Technical, legal, finan- 
cial and other obligations. Computer television station management game. 

479 Advanced Telecommunication Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 382 and 390 or consent of instructor. Producing television-radio programs. (2 
hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. Persuasive communications applied to mass communi- 
cation. The communicator, audience, message content and structure, and social context in 
influencing attitudes, beliefs, and opinions. 

481 Mass Communication and Conflict (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. Changes and similarities in the mass communication of 
conflict issues over the past 75 years; war and peace, the role of women, and various reform 
movements. Undergraduate seminar. 

482 Communication and Popular Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 233 and junior standing. Analysis of critical views which interrelate some signifi- 
cant themes in American popular culture from a mass communication perspective. 

490 Film Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 290A or B or equivalent or consent of instructor. Theories relating to film-making; 
nature of the film medium. 

4% Student-to-Student Tutorial (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and previous superior performance in a similar or equivalent 
course. Under faculty supervision, student provides tutorial assistance in a communications 
course. May involve small group demonstrations and discussions, individual tutoring, and 
evaluation of student performance as appropriate. May be repeated to a maximum of four units 
either separately or in combination with Com 499. 

497 Seminar in Public Communications Practices (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 463 and consent of instructor. Role of public relations in contemporary society. 
Ethics, social responsibilities and trends in the emerging profession. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Individually supervised mass media projects and research 
on campus and in the community. May involve newspaper and magazine publishers, radio and 
television stations and public relations agencies. May be repeated up to a maximum of four units 
either separately or in combination with Com 496. 

500 Theories and Literature of Communication (3) 

Theories and research on communication processes and effects; source, media, message, audience 
and content variables. Types, sources, and uses of communication literature. Graduate seminar. 


Criminal Justice 217 


508 Humanistic Study of Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 410, 500 or concurrent enrollment and classified status. Humanistic methods of 
study in communications: historical research and critical analysis applied to problems, issues, 
and creative works in communication. 

509 Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Com 410, 500 and classified status. Social-scientific research design and analysis and 
the study of communication processes and effects. 

510 Advanced Seminar in Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisite: Com 508 or 509 and classified status. Theoretical, applied and evaluative research in 
communication. 

512 Graduate Seminar in Journalism Education (3) 

Problems in journalism education; individual research. 

515A,B,C,D Professional Problems in Specialized Fields (3,3, 3, 3) 

Prerequisite: Com 500. Topics and issues in: A — advertising, B — journalism, C — telecommunica- 
tions, and D — public relations. May be repeated, if in different fields, for a maximum of six units. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Completion of a creative project in a sequence beyond regularly offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Completion of a thesis in a sequence beyond regularly offered coursework. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Individually supervised mass media projects or research 
for graduate students. May be repeated. 


JOURNALISM EDUCATION COURSES 

442 Teaching Journalism in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Techniques of advising school newspaper and year- 
book staffs and teaching journalism. Relation of classroom instruction to staff assignments. 

449 A, B Journalism Education (12) 

Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Full-time student teaching. A — Student teaching in the 
secondary school. B — Seminar. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
W. Garrett Capune 
Program Coordinator 

Beverly Baker-Kelly, James Farris, Betty Haven, William Hobbs 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is designed to acquaint preservice 
and inservice students with the principles and practices of criminal justice in America. Although the 
program's curriculum allows for the development of depth in one of the subject's substantive 
subsystems (i.e., law enforcement, courts or corrections), the overriding objective is to familiarize 
students with activities in all the above areas. 

The program is both academic and professional in that it is an interdisciplinary attempt to relate 
professional and practitioner perspectives to the challenge of crime in a free society. In this regard, 
the program provides preparation for employment with a related agency and/or further study. 

ADVISEMENT 

Students are urged to attend a "New Student's Advisement Session" prior to their first semester at 
the university as a criminal justice major. This is particularly important for community college 
transfers. Failure to do so may delay graduation.* 

The criminal justice program's “New Student Advisement Sessions” are regularly and frequently scheduled. See the CJ 
Bulletin board for details. 


218 Criminal Justice 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Every student must complete the core courses ( 1 5 units ) and a minimum of 1 2 units in the concentra- 
tion curriculum. In addition, each student is required to complete 12 units in a correlated curriculum. 
For current information regarding the criminal justice program and its courses, consult the program's 
bulletin board. 

Core Curriculum (15 units) 

Criminal justice 300 Criminal Justice in America: An Analysis 
Criminal Justice 310A Criminal Law (Substantive) 

Criminal Justice 320 Criminal Justice Administration: A Survey 

Criminal Justice 330 Crime and Delinquency 

Criminal Justice 340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology 

Concentration Curriculum (12 units) 

Criminal Justice 31 0B Criminal Law (Procedural) 

Criminal Justice 415 The Enforcement Function 

Criminal Justice 425 Juvenile Justice Administration 

Criminal Justice 435 Adjudication and the Judiciary 

Criminal Justice 445A Corrections: Community 

Criminal Justice 445B Corrections: Institutions 

Criminal Justice 470 Sex and the Criminal Justice System 

Criminal Justice 475 Topics in Administration of Justice: A Seminar 

Criminal Justice 480 Courtroom Evidence 

Criminal Justice 485A, B Search, Seizure and Interrogation 

Criminal Justice 495 Internship 

Criminal Justice 499 Independent Study 

Correlated Curriculum (12 units) 

Courses for the related fields shall be selected in consultation with the student's adviser. The purpose 
of this requirement is to allow for the establishment of an emphasis, such as public administration 
or counseling. Upper-division courses in the following fields can be considered in this regard: 
accounting, business administration, communications, computer studies, finance, human services, 
law, management, management science, philosophy, political science, psychology, public adminis- 
tration, social welfare, sociology. 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSES 

300 Criminal Justice in America: An Analysis (3) 

The institutions involved in the administration of criminal justice (i.e., law enforcement, courts and 
corrections), examination of some specific agencies and a review of the system's problems, 
policies and purposes as they relate to the processes of arrest, adjudication, etc. 

310A Criminal Law: Substantive (3) 

The general doctrines of criminal liability in the United States and the classification of crimes as 
against persons, property and the public welfare. The concept of governmental sanction of the 
conduct of the individual. 

310B Criminal Law: Procedural (3) 

Legal problems associated with the investigation of crime, the acquisition of evidence, the com- 
mencement of a criminal proceeding, the prosecution and defense of charges sentencing and 
appeal. The development of existing procedures and examination of current efforts for reform. 

320 Criminal Justice Administration: A survey (3) 

Justice administration as a "single system"; modern management materials as applied to the involved 
institutions; line, staff, and auxiliary activities both in principle and practice, and the associated 
administrative theories. 

330 Crime and Delinquency (3) 

The nature and extent of criminality; traditional and topical theories regarding etiology; research 
methods, sociological and psychological theories. 

340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology (3) 

Elementary statistics including descriptives, measurements and tests; data collection methods for 
effort evaluation and program prediction; systems analysis techniques. 


English 219 


415 The Enforcement Function (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. The historical and philosophical development of the enforcement 
function at federal, state and local levels; community controls, political pressures and legal 
limitations pertaining to law enforcement agencies at each level of government; police policies 
and problems vis-a-vis the administration of justice as a system. 

425 Juvenile Justice Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. Definitions of "delinquency" and the related responses of the 
interested institutions (police, courts and correction); the juvenile court (past and present), and 
prevention and correction programs (practicing and proposed). 

435 Adjudication and the Judiciary (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. The associated sociolegal doctrine and institutions at the federal, 
state and local levels; political controls and legal limitations pertaining to each; the nature of 
the judicial process; the participants' roles and relationships to the administration of justice as 
a system. 

445A Corrections: Community Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. The philosophy and practice of community corrections, including: 
historical antecedents, juvenile and adult probation, parole, diversion practices, private pro- 
grams, and their interrelation with institutional corrections and the criminal justice system. 

445B Corrections: Institution Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. Histories and philosophies of juvenile and adult correctional 
institutions; analysis of each "total institution" for prisoners and personnel; theory and practice 
of rehabilitation and alternative attitudes. Current research and experimental programs. 

470 Sex and the Criminal Justice System (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. Rationale for law's concern with sexual conduct, developed via 
discussion of selected offenses and offenders. Lectures and guest speakers will present perspec- 
tives regarding the role of law enforcement, courts and corrections, research and reform. 

475 Topics in Administration of Justice: A Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. Current social, legal and practical problems confronting the police, 
the courts and corrections. A "variable topic" class with specific subjects to be announced each 
semester. 

480 Courtroom Evidence (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. The rules of evidence in the context of a criminal trial in a 
California court. The rules, their application and their rationale. Lecture, discussion and simulat- 
ed courtroom situations. 

485 A Search, Seizure and Interrogation I (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal justice 300. The more common rules of law that apply to searches, seizures 
and interrogations in California; how they have changed and where they are going. 

485 B Search, Seizure and Interrogation II (3) 

Prerequisites: Criminal justice 485A or consent of instructor. Rules of law that apply to searches, 
seizures and interrogations in California. Extension of Criminal justice 485A. 

495 Internships (3) 

Prerequisites: Criminal justice 300 and consent of instructor. The criminal justice professions. 8-20 
hours per week as a supervised intern in a public agency or related organization. In addition 
to the job experience, interns meet in a weekly three-hour seminar. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 1 2 hours of criminal justice and consent of adviser. Student selects an individual 
research project, either library or field. Conferences with adviser as necessary, culminating in 
one or more papers. May be repeated for credit. 

510 Seminar in Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Problems in criminal justice appropriate to the specialized research 
interests of the instructor, such as: corrections, law enforcement, juvenile delinquency or court 
administration. Topics to be announced each semester course offered. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

faculty 

Urania Petalas 
Department Chair 

Don Austin, Arthur Bell, Rosemary Boston, john Brugaletta, Miriam Cox, Sherwood Cummings, 


220 English 

George Friend, Stephen Garber, Joseph Gilde, Joan Greenwood, Ann Haaker, Jean Hall, Mary 
Hayden, Joseph Hayes, Dennis Hengeveld, Jane Hipolito, Robert Hodges, Michael Holland, 
Wayne Huebner, Charlotte Hughes, Helen Jaskoski, Dorothea (deFrance) Kenny, Dorothy 
Kilker, Thomas Klammer, William Koon, Joanne Lynn, Willis McNelly, Keith Neilson, Priscilla 
Oaks, Paul Obler, June Salz Poliak, Sally Romotsky, William Rubinstein, Joseph Sawicki, Muriel 
Schulz, John Schwarz, Alice Scoufos, Howard Seller, Som Sharma, George Spangler, Elena 
Tumas, Martha Vogeler, M. John Wagner, John White, Helen Yanko 
The English Department offers the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Comparative Literature 
and Bachelor of Arts and the Master of Arts in English. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The major in comparative literature provides professional competence and personal enrichment for 
students with an exceptional concern and appreciation for the study of the interrelationships 
between the languages and literatures of various civilizations. The program offers courses in literary 
form and content, theory and philosophy, genres and movements, providing insight into the back- 
grounds of mankind's worldwide culture and literature. The comparative literature courses are 
conducted in English and required reading is available in English. 

Upper Division Requirements (42 units) 

1. Eighteen units selected from among comparative literature courses and distributed as follows: 


Required Courses (9 units) Units 

Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 3 

Comp Lit 325 World Literature 1650 to Present _3 

6 

Three units from 

Comp Lit 332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) 

Comp Lit 333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 3 

Comp Lit 343 Literature of the Romantic Period (3) 

Nine units from comparative literature courses _9 

18 


2. Reading competence in a foreign language, demonstrated by successfully completing an adviser- 
approved 400-level course offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
provided it is not taught in translation. This requirement can be met through examination. 
Information on the examination is available in the Department of English office. 

3. Six units selected from literature courses listed under English and numbered 300 or above. 

4. Six units of anthropology, history, art history, music history or philosophy approved by the adviser 
and aimed at enlarging total perspective. 

5. The remainder of the required 42 units selected from any 300- or 400-level literature course in 
comparative literature, English, French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish. 

More detailed information on the comparative literature major can be obtained from the brochure 
available in the Department of English office. Special courses on mythology, theory and methods, 
literary genres, and literary movements will be offered periodically. The importance of close consul- 
tation with an adviser cannot be stressed enough for comparative literature, since the diversity of 
language specialties and other factors may necessitate individual tailoring. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The courses in English concern the nature and development of our language, the literatures of 
England and America, and the disciplines involved in the various kinds of writing. 

The Department of English offers some specialized professional courses for the preparation of 
teachers. On the senior and graduate levels, various opportunities are provided for seminar work 
and independent study. The English Department offers a flexible program, designed to reflect various 
approaches to the study of language and literature. In planning a program to fit their particular 
interests, all students are urged to consult an English Department faculty member. 

Requirements: 42 units in addition to English 100 or 103, or their equivalents. 

Lower Division (maximum of 12 units) 

Any 200 level course. 


English 221 


Upper Division (minimum of 30 units) 

Required courses (9 units) 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

English 301 Advanced Composition (3) 

English 334 Shakespeare (3) 

Survey courses (minimum of 6 units), selected from among the following: 

English 311 Masters of British Literature to 1760 (3) 

English 312 Masters of British Literature from 1760 (3) 

English 321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

English 322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Comp Lit 325 World Literature from 1650 (3) 

Period, Genre and Criticism courses (9 units — at least 3 units from courses prior to 1800, i.e., 332, 
335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 345, 423), selected from among the following: 

English 332 Medieval English Literature (3) 

English 335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

English 336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

English 337 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

English 338 The Drama of the Restoration and the 18th-Century (3) 

English 339 Restoration Literature (1660-1700) (3) 

English 340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

English 343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

English 344 Victorian Literature (3) 

English 345 The Development of the English Novel Through Jane Austen (3) 

English 346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel (3) 

English 391 Traditions of English Literature Criticism (3) 

English 423 Early American Literature (3) 

English 445 The American Tradition in Poetry (3) 

English 446 The American Novel to 1914 (3) 

English 462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

English 463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) 

English 464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

English 465 Contemporary British and American Drama (3) 

English 466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

English 467 Contemporary British and American Poetry (3) 

Major author courses (Shakespeare — English 334 — plus 3 units) 

English 333 Chaucer (3 ) or 

English 341 Milton (3) 

Language courses (minimum of 3 units), selected from among the following: 

English 302 Introduction to the English Language (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modern English (3) 

English 305 American Dialects (3) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

Electives to complete a minimum of 42 units shall be selected from courses in language and 
composition, period courses, literary criticism, senior seminars and comparative literature. Compara- 
tive literature offerings are listed separately but count toward an English major. 

Students are urged to consult a faculty member when choosing electives or when seeking evaluation 
of work completed at other institutions. 

English majors who intend to pursue graduate study are urged to acquire proficiency in at least one 
foreign language, and most graduate programs in English assume that the student has had a broad 
background in the study of major literary figures, periods and critical approaches, as well as some 
training in English language and linguistics. Both breadth and depth of preparation are important. 
Students seeking a secondary teaching credential must complete the following: 

English 301 Advanced Composition; and 
English 302 Introduction to the English Language or 
English 303 Structure of Modern English 

The following courses are required for the credential, but do not count toward the 42 units of major: 


222 English 


English Education 442 
English Education 449 


Teaching English in the Secondary School 

Student Teaching in English in the Secondary School and Seminar 
(Ryan Credential) 


MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Requirements: a total of 21 units 

A minimum of 1 5 units described below and 6 units of electives. In choosing their electives, students 
seeking a minor in English should consult a faculty member. 

Required courses (9 units) 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

English 301 Advanced Composition (3) 

English 334 Shakespeare (3) 

Survey courses (minimum of 6 units), selected from among the following: 


English 311 
English 312 
English 321 
English 322 
Comp Lit 324 
Comp Lit 325 
Electives 

Six units drawn from additional English Department courses. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


Masters of British Literature to 1760 (3) 

Masters of British Literature from 1760 (3) 

American Literature to Whitman (3) 

American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 
World Literature to 1650 (3) 

World Literature from 1650 (3) 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

202 Short Story (3) 

(Same as English 202) 

203 Introduction to the Novel (3) 

The techniques and structure of representative European and American novels. (Same as 
English 203) 

257 Writing Haiku (1-3) 

(Same as English 257) 

305 The Major Prophets of Israel (3) 

(Same as Religious Studies 333A) 

312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

Literary qualities of biblical literature and the influence of major themes upon Western literary 
traditions. 

314 The Oral Tradition in Literature (3) 

Storytelling as an art, through the media of the folktale. 

315. Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) 

Greek and Roman myths which have been of continuing significance in Western world literature. 

316 Celtic Mythology and Early Irish Literature (3) 

Early Irish literature and of Irish and Welsh mythological literature; comparative and archeological 
relationships. 

320 Greek and Roman Literature (3) 

Readings in English translation from the literature of classical Greece and Rome. 

321 Germanic Mythology and Saga Literature (3) 

Germanic mythology, including comparative myth and archeological relationships, and Icelandic 
saga. 

324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Oriental and western literature from the beginning to 1650. 

325 World Literature 1650 to Present (3) 

Oriental and western literature from 1650 to the present. 

332 Medieval Literature of Western Europe (3) 

Readings in modern English translation from the medieval literature of England and the continent 
from St. Augustine to Sir Thomas Malory. 


English 223 


333 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 

The Renaissance as a literary movement, from Erasmus to Montaigne and Cervantes. 

343 Literature of the Romantic Period (3) 

The romantic movement in European and American literature. 

352 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 352 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 352) 

355 Images of Women in Literature (3) 

(Same as English 355) 

360 Irish Literature (3) 

Irish literature from the early Middle Ages to the present. 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and others, and their relationship to western 
literature. 

374 Modern Russian Literature (3) 

Modern Soviet literary trends in representative works from Gorky to the present. 

403 The Quest for Self: East and West (3) 

A comparative study of quest narratives which exemplifies the search for self-identity and fulfillment. 
Religious, psychological and literary texts will be used. 

424 Chinese Literature (3) 

Selected translations of Chinese literature. 

426 Japanese Literature (3) 

Selected translations of Japanese literature. 

427 Modern Japanese Fiction (3) 

Major writers and literary movements in 20th-century Japanese fiction. 

453 The Novel in France and Germany (3) 

Novels in translation; principles of the narrative arts. Goethe, Stendhal, Flaubert, Mann, Kafka, 
Prouse and others. 

457 The Experimental Novel (3) 

Contemporary novels, including surrealism and the nouveau roman. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: an undergraduate course in the area to be studied, a B average or better in comparative 
literature and/or English courses, or consent of instructor. Selected topics in world literature. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

550 Graduate Seminar: Medieval Literature (3) 

The development of medieval narrative, the growth and development of the Arthurian legend, lyric 
poetry, allegory and devotional literature. 

571 Graduate Seminar: The Novel (3) 

The genre of the novel. An ability to read the novels in the original language will be helpful. May 
be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

573 Graduate Seminar: Drama (3) 

580 Graduate Seminar: Major Figures in World Literature (3) 

Directed study and research on a major figure in world literature. Reports and a long paper on 
approved topics. 

591 Seminar in Comparative Literary Criticism (3) 

598 Thesis (3) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 


ENGLISH COURSES 

for world literature in English translation see courses under Comparative Literature. 

College Writing (3) 

Practice in the writing of expository prose. Emphasis is on basic skills, such as organization, para- 
graph development, syntax and mechanics. No credit toward the major. 


224 English 


103 Seminar in Writing (3) 

Expository writing for the student with some proficiency in composition. In each section readings 
and essays will be thematically related. No credit toward the major. 

105 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

Exploratory creative writing with the opportunity to write in various genres. No credit toward the 
major. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through Medieval Times (3) 

Representative writers and works from the ancient through the medieval world. 

111 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance through the 19th Century (3) 

Representative writers and works from the Renaissance through the 19th century. 

112 Modern Literature of the Western World (3) 

Representative writers and works of modern literature. 

115A The Western Tradition: Literature (3) 

One component of a set of courses providing an integrated study of the major developments in the 
heritage of Western Civilization from the Ancient Near East to Renaissance Europe. Concurrent 
enrollment in History 1 1 5A and Philosophy 115A is required. 

115B The Western Tradition: Literature (3) 

One component of a set of courses providing an integrated study of the major developments in the 
heritage of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Concurrent enroll- 
ment in Philosophy 1 1 5B and History 1 1 5B is required. 

202 The Short Story (3) 

The structure and technique of the short story. Critical analysis of selected American and European 
short stories. (Same as Comparative Literature 202) 

203 Introduction to the Novel (3) 

(Same as Comparative Literature 203) 

205 Introduction to Drama (3) 

Analysis of individual examples of dramatic literature. 

206 Introduction to Poetry (3) 

Analysis of the various kinds of English poems. 

210 Studies in Literature (3) 

English and American writers emphasizing a particular theme, genre, trend or the works of individual 
writers. Section topics will vary according to special interests of instructor. 

252 Linguistics and Literature (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 252) 

257 Writing Haiku (1-3) 

After a brief study of the development of haiku in Japan, students will write and revise haiku in English 
and share them with the class. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for no more than 
three units of credit. (Same as Comparative Literature 257) 

300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

The main literary forms — prose fiction, poetry and drama — are studied and analyzed. English majors 
should schedule this basic course as early as possible. 

301 Advanced Composition (3) 

Prerequisites: English 100, 103, or their equivalents. Exercises in creativity, analysis, and rhetoric as 
applied in expository writing. Required of English majors seeking the secondary credential. 

302 Introduction to the English Language (3) 

The history, structure and dialects of American English in its social, cultural and educational contexts. 
This course or English 303 required of English majors seeking a secondary credential must be 
taken before student teaching. 

303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary English. Modern English usage. This 
course or English 302 required of English majors seeking a secondary credential must be taken 
before student teaching. 

305 The English Language in America (3) (Formerly American Dialects) 

American English, its origins, its regional and social dialects, and its role in American history and in 
such institutions as schools, corporations, government, and the media. (Same as Linguistics 305) 

311 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Major periods and movements, major 
authors and major forms through 1760. 


English 225 


312 Masters of British Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Major periods and movements, major 
authors and major forms from 1760 through modern times. 

320 Literature of the American Indian (3) 

The prose and poetry of the North American Indian tribes. 

321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

Major writers such as Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson. 

322 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Major writers such as Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Frost, Eliot. 

325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

Anglo-American balladry and folksong; their historical development, ethnic background and poetical 
values. 

326 The American Frontier in Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: any courses in American literature, American studies or American history. The Ameri- 
can frontier from the beginnings to the close of the 19th century. Explorers and naturalists; 
artistic, literary and popular treatments to identify the myths and symbols created by the fact 
of a frontier in American life. 

332 Medieval English Literature (3) 

The literature of medieval England exclusive of Chaucer. Readings in modern English versions of 
representative major works and genres from Beowulf to Malory. 

333 Chaucer (3) 

The Canterbury Tales and Chaucer's language. The vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and syntax 
of the East Midland dialect of Middle English. 

334 Shakespeare (3) 

A study of the major plays. 

335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

The dramatic tradition in plays by such dramatists as Marlowe, jonson, Webster, Beaumont and 
Fletcher. 

336 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

The nondramatic literature of the English Renaissance. 

337 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Nondramatic literature of the period from 1603 to 1660 exclusive of Milton. 

338 The Drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century (3) 

Representative plays of the Restoration and the 18th century. The development of such dramatic 
movements as the heroic play, Restoration comedy and sentimental drama. 

339 Restoration Literature (1660-1770) (3) 

Major writers such as Butler, Rochester, Dryden, Pepys; selected minor writers. 

340 18th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Major writers such as Swift, Addison and Steele, Pope, Boswell, Johnson; selected minor writers. 

341 Milton (3) 

The poetry and prose in the light of Milton's intellectual development. 

343 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

Major writers such as Burns, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

344 Victorian Literature (3) 

Major writers such as Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Ruskin, Pater. 

345 The Development of the English Novel through Jane Austen (3) 

The English novel from its beginnings to the 19th century; such novelists as Defoe, Richardson, 
Fielding, Sterne and Austen. 

346 The Development of the 19th-Century English Novel (3) 

Major novelists such as the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. 

349 Fantasy Fiction (3) 

Fantasy in literature from Ariosto to Brautigan. 

350 Detective Fiction (3) 

Elective fiction from Edgar Allan Poe to the present, including writers such as Sayers, Christie, 
Chandler, Hammet and Ross Macdonald. 


78946 


226 English 


351 Science Fiction (3) 

Science fiction as a literary genre, including future-scene fiction, the utopian novel, the superman/ 
woman novel and short stories. 

352 African Literature (3) 

African literature written in the English language; the fiction, poetry and drama of the new nations. 
(Same as Comparative Literature 352 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 352) 

355 Images of Women in Literature (3) 

Images of women in various genres, such as autobiography, poetry, drama and the novel. A 
conventional literary period (Victorian, Modern, etc.) and specific cultures (Great Britain or 
the United States, etc.) at the discretion of instructor. (Same as Comparative Literature 355) 

356 Maturity: The Literature of Aging (3) 

Aging and old age in the various literary genres: autobiography, biography, poetry, drama and fiction. 

365 Legal Writing (3) 

Advanced composition; stressing logic, reasoning, and legal analysis. 

391 Traditions of English Literary Criticism (3) 

The major English critics, from the Renaissance to the beginning of the 20th century, in relationship 
to the classical theories of criticism. 

392 Modern Literary Criticism (3) 

The major movements in 20th-century British and American criticism. 

423 Early American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: English 321 or consent of instructor. The literature of colonial and revolutionary Ameri- 
ca, including the Puritans, 18th-century deism and rationalism and the literary antecedents of 
American democratic thought. 

425 Darwinism in American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. Selected writings of Darwin and of such 
Darwinians as Spencer and Huxley; literary adaptations and assimilations of Darwinism. (Same 
as American Studies 425) 

433 Children's Literature (3) 

World literature written primarily for children, including material from the oral tradition, realistic 
fiction, fantasy and poetry. 

434 Adolescent Literature (3) 

The evaluation, selection, and interpretation of fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry reflecting the 
broad range of interest of young people from 12 to 17 years of age. 

435 Studies in Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 334 or consent of instructor. Problems of dramatic structure and artistic mean- 
ings. 

445 The American Tradition in Poetry (3) 

American poems from the 17th century to 1914. Reading of individual poems. 

446 The American Novel to 1914 (3) 

American novelists from Cooper to Dreiser. 

451 Philosophical Backgrounds of Modern Literature (3) 

The connection between representative writers and such thinkers and philosophers as Freud, Spen- 
gler, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. 

462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of instructor. Modern British and American novels from 1900 to 1950. 

463 Contemporary British and American Novels (3) 

The novel in English since World War II. 

464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of instructor. British and American drama from 1900 to 1950. 

465 Contemporary British and American Drama (3) 

British and American drama from 1950 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an upper division literature course; or 
consent of instructor. British and American poetry from 1900 to 1950. 


English 227 


467 Contemporary British and American Poetry (3) 

British and American poetry from 1950 to the present. 

480 Seminar in Old English (3) 

Old English language, and cultural backgrounds; critical reading of lyrics and short prose pieces. 

490 History of the English Language (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. The historical development of English vocabulary, 
phonology, morphology and syntax from Indo-European to modern American English. 

491 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in the area to be studied, a B average or better in English 
and/or comparative literature courses, or consent of instructor. Directed research and writing, 
group discussion, and lectures covering selected topics in language or literature. 

498 English Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior status and consent of faculty supervisor. Experience in the practical 
application of studies in literature and language to work outside the university, Hours — to be 
specified; enrollment limited; C/NC — no credit toward major. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in English with consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

570 Graduate Seminar: Language Studies (3) 

Directed research and writing, group discussion, and lectures covering philology, historical develop- 
ment, and structure of English. Individual offerings under this course number may deal with only 
one aspect of language studies. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor; major figures such as 
Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer, Melville, Twain, Hawthorne, Joyce and Coleridge. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as Theatre 571 ) 

572 Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor; major literary types such 
as the epic, the novel, the short story, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy and historical drama. May 
be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as Theatre 572) 

573 Graduate Seminar: Cultural Periods (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of instructor; the literature of a cultural 
period from the Anglo-Saxon to modern times. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

574 Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publicvation of the instructor; special problems such 
as influences on literature, including philosophical, religious, scientific, geographic and other 
ecological viewpoints. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Topics in High School Teaching (3) 

Specific topics will vary from semester to semester. 

579 Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

Historical development and schools of criticism. Individual offerings within this course number may 
deal with only one aspect of critical problems. May be repeated with different content for 
additional credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and written 
reports. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 


ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES 

*42 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Principles, methods and materials of teaching English 
in the secondary school. 

**9A English Education (10) 

Student teaching in the secondary school. The candidate, in the field for four and one-half days each 
week, has the same instructional hours of responsibility as the master teacher. 

**9B English Education (2) 

One afternoon a week the candidate partcipates in a seminar with the university supervisor. 


228 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

FACULTY 
Leon Gilbert 

Department Chair 

Linda Andersen-Fiala, Oswaldo Arana, Nancy Baden, Gerald Boarino, Daniel Brondi, Samuel Cart- 
ledge, Modesto Diaz, Ronald Harmon, Arturo Jasso, Jacqueline Kiraithe, Walter Kline, G. 
Bording Mathieu, Harvey Mayer, Doris Merrifield, Ervie Pena, Marcial Prado, Charles Shapley, 
Curtis Swanson, Marjorie Tussing, Eva Van Ginneken, Stephen Vasari, Jon Zimmermann 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

Several options are offered: 

1. French major. Requirements: French 101, 102, 203, 204, 230, 240, or their equivalents; plus a 
minimum of 27 units of upper division courses including 31 5, 31 7, 325, 375, 41 5, 425 and six units 
of 475 A,B,C,D. 

2. German major. Requirements: German 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their equivalents; plus 24 
units of upper division coursework, which must include 315, 317, 375 and three of the following 
literature courses: 430, 440, 450, 460 

3. Spanish major: Lower division requirements: Spanish 101, 102, 203, 204, 213, 214, or their 
equivalents. Upper division requirements for: 

A. Standard major: Spanish 315, 316, 317 or 318, 375; plus 15 units of upper division Spanish 
which must include 430, 441 and 461. 

B. Bilingual emphasis major: Spanish 315 or 316, 317 or 318, 375, 400 (or its equivalent), 466, 
467, 468, plus two additional courses in Spanish at the 400 level, to be taken in consultation 
with the adviser. 

PLACEMENT: Students may enroll at any point in the sequence of courses for which their previous 
study and/or experience prepares them. Students with no language background should enroll in 
fundamental 101 -level courses. Normally, two years of high school language study are counted as 
one year of college language. Students just completing two years of high school language should 
probably begin at 200-level intermediate courses. A minimum of four years of high school language, 
or its equivalent, is considered a prerequisite for more advanced 300-level major work. Due to the 
sequential nature of language instruction, consultation with an adviser in the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures is strongly recommended before enrolling. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

In accordance with university rules, all transfer students must complete 24 units in residence at Cal 
State Fullerton. Of these 24 units, the transfer student majoring in French, German or Spanish is 
required to complete 12 upper division units, i.e., 300, 400 or 500 level courses, in the major on the 
Cal State Fullerton campus. The specific courses will be determined in consultation with the student's 
adviser and approved by the chair. 

MINOR IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Requirements : Courses 101, 102, 203, 204, 21 3, 214 or their equivalents, completed satisfactorily; plus 
nine units in upper division courses selected in consultation with the adviser. Minor concentrations 
are offered in French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Students interested in applying to a credential or a certificate program must consult with a teacher 
education adviser for a preliminary program review in the semester prior to their application to the 
program. Information concerning the programs is available from the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

SINGLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL, SPECIALIZATION IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Before being admitted to a credential program, all prospective teachers must pass a proficiency 
examination in which their skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and knowledge of linguistic 
principles will be tested. Students should make arrangements with the department to take the test 
during their junior year. 

MULTIPLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL WAIVER FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE MAJORS 

The State Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing has approved the department's foreign 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 229 


language majors for the Multiple Subject Credential option of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing 
Law of 1970 (Ryan Act). For further information consult the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

CERTIFICATE FOR TEACHERS OF ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

In cooperation with the Departments of English and Linguistics, the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures offers a Certificate for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages 
(TESOL). The program consists of 24 units, some of which (with consent of the admitting commit- 
tee) may be taken during the candidate's undergraduate study. In order to participate in the program, 
students must declare the TESOL Certificate along with their degree objective. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Senior standing or admission to either postbaccalaureate or graduate standing. 

2. Overall GPA of 2.5 (minimal) and 3.0 in the major. 

3. Completion of English 301 and 303 with grades of B or better. 

4. At least two years of one foreign language or one year each of two different languages or the 
equivalent. This requirement will normally be waived for students from foreign countries who 
have studied English as a foreign language. 

5. An interview to determine oral proficiency in English at the time of application. 

6. Consent of the admitting committee to enter the program and to develop a study plan. 
Program Requirements 

1. Required Core (12 units): Foreign Languages Education 443A, 443B, 468 (or Spanish 468) and 
596 (or Linguistics 596) 

2. Electives (12 units) chosen, in consultation with the adviser, from the following: 

a. English (3 units): English 305, 490, 491 (if appropriate), 570 

b. Foreign Languages (3 units): French, German, Russian, Spanish 466, Spanish 467 and 525 

c. Linguisitics (3 units): Linguistics 351, 403, 406, 505, 507, 508 

d. Other (3 units): an appropriate course from the above or a course in American studies, 
American literature, American governmental institutions, speech communication or foreign 
languages and literatures. 

3. Maintenance of a 3.0 GPA while in the program. 

international programs 

In accordance with recommendations made by the Modern Language Association of America, the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures encourages all majors interested in a teaching 
career to participate in a study-abroad program. This will enable a student to perfect mastery of the 
language and will afford additional insights into the foreign culture. The California State University 
and Colleges' International Programs offers a wide variety of study opportunities on the junior, senior 
and graduate level. 

Language majors are required to complete the following minimum of courses on campus before 
departure for, or upon return from, overseas: 

A. for the B.A.: 12 units of upper division courses consisting of a minimum of nine units at the 400 
level in the major 

for the M.A.: 15 units consisting of a minimum of 12 units at the 500 level in the area of 
specialization. 

THE language laboratory 

Students enrolling in courses 101, 102, 203, 204 are required, in addition to the regular class periods, 
t0 Practice for the minimum of prescribed time in the language laboratory. The 36-station laboratory 
operates like a library; students may use it at a time most convenient to them preferably every day 
' n sessions of 15 to 30 minutes. Further details will be announced by each instructor and by the 
supervisor of the language laboratory. 

Students are invited to make use of the collection of literary and cultural recordings in French, 
Gentian, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish available in the language laboratory. 

The CSUC/UCLA Cooperative Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures 

The Cooperative Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures gives students the opportunity, 
w 'lhout additional fees, to take courses in foreign languages not available on this campus or any 
ne 'ghboring CSUC campus but offered at UCLA. For information regarding enrollment and qualifca- 
,0ns ' interested students should inquire at this office. 


230 Foreign Languages and Literatures 


MASTER OF ARTS IN FRENCH, GERMAN OR SPANISH 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES COURSES 

196 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See page 87. 

198 Programmed Courses in Uncommonly Taught Languages (1-3) 

Intensive individualized programmed instruction in specific languages other than those regularly 
offered, such as Turkish. To develop the skills of auditory comprehension and speaking in the 
language to form a basis for later development of the reading and writing skills. A minimum of 
3 hours per week in the learning laboratory and regular sessions with native informants are 
required for each unit of credit. May be repeated for credit. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

See index. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES EDUCATION COURSES 

105A,B English as a Second Language (4) 

English for non-native speakers. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing 
to improve control of the basic sounds and structures of English. Language laboratory assign- 
ments are included. 

442 Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisites: French, German or Spanish 466; and admission to teacher education or consent of 
instructor. The theory and practice of language learning and language teaching. Special empha- 
sis on the audiolingual method. Conducted in English, with practice by students in the language 
they plan to teach. Required before student teaching. (2 hours lecture, plus fieldwork) 

443A Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or above. Recent trends, including the expanded use of electromechani- 
cal aids, programmed instruction and applied linguistics in the teaching of English to speakers 
of other languages. Techniques related to auditory comprehension and oral production of 
English. (Same as Linguistics 443A.) 

443B Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or above and successful completion of Foreign Languages Education 
443A. Recent trends, including the use of electromechanical aids, programmed instruction, and 
applied linguistics in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Techniques related 
to the reading and writing of English. (Same as Linguistics 443B) 

449A Teaching Foreign Languages in the Secondary School (10) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449B Student Teaching Seminar (2) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

468 TESOL Constrastive Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing or above, successful completion of Spanish, French or German 466 and 
at least one 400-level linguistics class. Theory and performance techniques for contrasting 
phonological, grammatical and lexical structures of English and three selected world languages. 

545G German Culture in the Language Classroom (2) 

Prerequisite: German 315 or consent of instructor. The geography, social organization, political 
structure, contemporary patterns of culture and value systems of German speaking lands. 
Resources and techniques available to the teacher of German. 

596 TESOL Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of Foreign Languages Education 443 A, B, Spanish 468 or Foreign Languages 
Education 468 and one elective. Teaching English to speakers of other languages on the Cal State 
Fullerton campus or in local schools. Supervised by faculty and cooperating individuals. Seminar 
meetings with instructor by arrangement. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 231 


ARABIC COURSES 

101 Fundamental Arabic-A (4) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic forms and structures of modern standard Arabic. 

102 Fundamental Arabic-B (4) 

Prerequisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structures of modern standard 
Arabic. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Arabic 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Arabic language or literature to 
be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


CHINESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Chinese — A (4) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic structure of Chinese. Audiolingual assignments in the language laboratory. Con- 
ducted in Chinese. 

102 Fundamental Chinese — B (4) 

Prerequisite: Chinese 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening-comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing to develop control of the sounds and the basic forms and structure of Chinese. Audiolin- 
gual assignments in the language laboratory. Conducted in Chinese. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Chinese 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Chinese language or literature 
to be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


FRENCH COURSES 

101 Fundamental French — A (5) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic forms and structure of French. Audiolingual assignments in the language labora- 
tory. Conducted in French. 

102 Fundamental French — B (5) 

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing to develop control of the sounds and basic structure of French. Assignments in the 
language laboratory. Conducted in French. 

203 Intermediate French — A (3) 

Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in French. 

204 Intermediate French — B (3) 

Prerequisite: French 203 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in French. 

230 Intermediate Diction and Phonetics (2) 

Practice in oral delivery of cultural and literary materials. Analysis of individual problems in pronun- 
ciation. May be taken concurrently with French 203. Conducted in French. 

240 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Prerequisite: French 203 or equivalent. Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary 
materials. May be taken concurrently with French 204. Conducted in French. 

300 French Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Development of oral control of the language in the context 
of students' own or contemporary concerns. Conducted in French. 

315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. The social, intellectual and artistic origins of French civiliza- 
tion: feudal society becoming the ancien regime; the medieval world-view transformed by the 


232 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Renaissance. Literary selections in modern French translation. Conducted in French. 

317 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Free oral and written expression. Conducted in French. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or equivalent. The control of French as an instrument for free oral and 
written expression. Conducted in French. 

325 Contemporary French Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. Reading and discussion to develop understanding of the 
social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions of present-day France. Strengthening 
facility in the language. Conducted in French. 

375 Introduction to Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent. The nature of human language, the literary use of language, 
literary creation, reading, and what critics are able to say about literary works. Reading and 
discussion of some typical, mainly contemporary, texts. Conducted in French. 

399 Advanced French Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisite: French 230 or consent of instructor. Analysis of students' specific problems in pronun- 
ciation, work in class and the language laboratory. 

415 French Classicism (3) 

Prerequisites: French 317 and 375. The decisive moment in French experience. Focus on literature 
of the Classic period ( 1 660-1 685 ) but open at both ends to include the formation and perennial- 
ly of French Classicism. Conducted in French. 

425 French Romanticism (3) 

Prerequisites: French 317 and 375. The revolution in feeling and intellect in 19th-century France. The 
Romantic period (1820-1850). May include material preceding or following those dates. Con- 
ducted in French. 

466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: French 317 or 318. Analytical procedures of general linguistics applied to French. 
Structural contrasts between French and English. The application of linguistic analysis to the 
teaching of modern foreign languages. 

475A,B,C,D Seminar in 20th-Century French Literature (3, 3,3,3) 

Prerequisites: French 31 5, 31 7, 375, and 41 5 or 425. If 41 5 or 425 has not been completed, one must 
be taken concurrently. The study of 20th-century French literature organized around four major 
themes. Conducted in French. 

475A Exploration of the Self (3) 

Search for identity and the quest for personal authenticity. The role of the conscious and unconscious 
mind and of artistic creativity. Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Valery, etc. 

475B In Search of the Real (3) 

The surrealist revolt against bourgeois logic, mores and literature. From Dada to automatic writing 
to Revolution to /'amour fou. Includes precursors and kindred spirits (e.g. Lautreamont, jarry). 

475C The Individual and Society (3) 

Attitudes toward personal freedom; the existential sense of responsibility toward one's fellows. 
Saint-Exupery, Malraux, Sartre, Camus, etc. 

475D Beyond Despair (3) 

Writers after World War II seeking tough-minded visions to replace the humanism of the '30's, new 
kinds of hope "beyond despair", (Sartre's "la vraie vie commence au-dela du desespoir"). 

485 Senior Seminar in French Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: French 315, 317, 375, and senior standing. A literary current, period, author, genre or 
problem. Subject will change each time course is given. May be repeated for credit. Conducted 
in French. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in French language or literature. Consent of the instructor and department chair 
required. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: French 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 233 


520 Graduate Seminar: Old French (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Readings in the medieval literature of northern France. A variety 
of dialects and centuries. Conducted in French. 

557 Graduate Seminar: French Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

571 Graduate Seminar: French Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French. 

575 Graduate Seminar: French Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in French 

576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in French. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in French and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in French 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


GERMAN COURSES 

100A-J Personalized Instruction in Fundamental German (3-10) 

Equivalent to German 101 or 102. Students may enter at any level but must initially register for a 
minimum of three units. Course is divided into 10 one-unit modules. Students work independ- 
ently and meet individually with instructors for consultation and tests. 

101 Fundamental German — A (5) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing to develop control of the sounds 
and the basic forms and structures of German. Audiolingual assignments in the language 
laboratory. 

102 Fundamental German — B (5) 

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and 
writing on a basic level. Audiolingual assignments in the language laboratory. 

203 Intermediate German — A (3) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in German. 

204 Intermediate German — B (3) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in German. 

213 Intermediate Reading (2) 

Prerequisite: German 102 or equivalent. Reading comprehension development. Required for major 
and minor. May be taken concurrently with German 203. Conducted in German. 

214 Intermediate Reading (2) 

Prerequisite: German 203 or equivalent. Continuation of German 213. Reading comprehension 
development. Required for major and minor. May be taken concurrently with German 204. 
Conducted in German. 

300 German Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Development of oral control of the language in the context 
of students' own or contemporary concerns. Conducted in German. 

315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Readings and discussions in German literature, arts and institutions to develop insights into 
German culture, while strengthening facility with the language. Conducted in German. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Free oral and written expression. Conducted in German. 

318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 

rerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. Competence in the control of German as an 


234 Foreign Languages and Literatures 


instrument for free oral and written expression. Conducted in German. 

325 Current Trends in Culture of German-Speaking Peoples (3) 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Readings and discussion of German contributions to present-day civilization while strengthen- 
ing facility with German language. Conducted in German. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. The principal literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, 
drama and the essay and the major concepts of literary techniques and criticism. Analysis and 
interpretation of various texts. Conducted in German. 

390 Group Reading and Oral Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: German through fourth semester or consent of instructor. Oral reading of Horspiele, 
dramatic literature and poetry in groups. Reading aloud, with discussion of surface, inner and 
personal meaning of the works. Conducted in German. 

399 German Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. Analysis of individual problems in pronuncia- 
tion. Work in class and the language laboratory. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in 
German. 

430 German Literature and Culture to the Baroque (3) 

Prerequisites: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. Masterpieces of German literature 
from the Hi/debrands/iedto Der A benteuer/iche Simp/icissimus and their relationship to cultural, 
historical and intellectual developments between ca. 800-1670 A.D. Conducted in German. 

440 18th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. The principal authors and move- 
ments (Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, early Romanticism) of the 18th century. 

Conducted in German. 

\ 

450 19th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: German 315, 317 and 375, or consent of instructor. 19th-century German literature 
from Romanticism to Naturalism. Decisive philosophic, political, and economic influences. 
Conducted in German. 

460 20th-Century German Literature and Culture (3) 

Prerequisites: German 315, 317, 375, or consent of instructor. Major German prose, drama and 
poetry of the 20th century. Conducted in German. 

466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: German 317 or consent of instructor. Analytical procedures of general linguistics as 
applied to German. Structural contrasts between German and English. The application of 
linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

482 German Literature and Culture in Film (3) 

Prerequisite: advanced standing in literature or consent of instructor. Literary works and their film 
adaptations. Significant works of German literature will be analyzed and compared in both art 
forms. 

485 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in German. Research and discussion of a literary movement, a genre 
or an author. Subject varies and is announced in the Class Schedule. May be repeated for credit 
with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in German language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: German 466 or consent of instructor. Conducted in German. 

550A,B,C Interpretation of Literature (2,2,2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Interpretation of literary works in advanced language classes. 
Conducted in German. A— the narrative, B— the drama, C— poetry. 

571 Graduate Seminar: German Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class Schedule 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 235 


576 Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Subject will vary and will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Conducted in German. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in German and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in German 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


GREEK COURSES 

101 Fundamental Greek — A (3) 

Practice to develop a reading knowledge and a writing ability in ancient Greek. Biblical texts. 

102 Fundamental Greek — B (3) 

Practice to develop a reading knowledge and a writing ability in ancient Greek. Biblical texts. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Greek 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Greek language or literature to 
be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


HEBREW COURSES 

101 Fundamental Hebrew — A (4) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing Hebrew. 

102 Fundamental Hebrew — B (4) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 101. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing He- 
brew. 

203 Intermediate Hebrew — A (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or consent of instructor. Practice in speaking, reading and writing based 
on cultural and literary materials. Conducted in Hebrew. 

204 Intermediate Hebrew — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 203 or consent of instructor. Practice in speaking, reading and writing based 
on cultural and literary materials. Linguistics analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in 
Hebrew. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Hebrew language or literature 
to be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


ITALIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Italian — A (4) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing of Italian. Audiolingual assignments in the 
language laboratory. Conducted in Italian. 

102 Fundamental Italian — B (4) 

Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing of Italian. Audiolingual assignments. Conducted in Italian. 

Directed Study (1-3) 

rerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Italian language or literature to 
be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


JAPANESE COURSES 

p 01 Fundamental Japanese — A (3) (4) 

ra ctice in listening-comprehension, speaking and writing of Japanese. Audiolingual assignments in 
the language laboratory. Conducted in Japanese. 


236 Foreign Languages and Literatures 


102 Fundamental Japanese — B (3) (4) 

Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening-comprehension, speaking and writing 
of Japanese. Audiolingual assignments in the language laboratory. Conducted in Japanese. 

203 Intermediate Japanese — A (3) 

Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or equivalent. Instruction in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehend- 
ing of modern Japanese. Conducted in Japanese. 

204 Intermediate Japanese — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Japanese 203 or equivalent. Instruction in reading, writing, speaking and comprehend- 
ing of modern Japanese. Conducted in Japanese. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Japanese language or literature 
to be taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


LATIN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Latin — A (3) 

Practice to develop a reading knowledge and a writing ability in Latin. Modern techniques of 
language instruction will be applied. 

102 Fundamental Latin — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Practice to develop a reading knowledge and a writing ability 
in Latin. Modern techniques of language instruction will be applied. 

299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 102 or equivalent. Supervised study projects in Latin language or literature to be 
taken with consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


PORTUGUESE COURSES 

101 Fundamental Portuguese — A (4) 

Prerequisite: Previous study of a Romance language. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading 
comprehension, and writing of Portuguese. Conducted in Portuguese. 

102 Fundamental Portuguese — B (4) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 101 or equivalent. Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehen- 
sion of Portuguese. Conducted in Portuguese. 

315 Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent, reading knowledge of Portuguese or consent of instruc- 
tor. The main currents of Portuguese culture and civilization and Brazil's intellectual and artistic 
development from discovery to independence. Conducted in Portuguese. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written 
expression. Conducted in Portuguese. 

318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Use of Portuguese as an instru- 
ment of free oral and written expression. Conducted in Portuguese. 

325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. Readings and discussion to develop under- 
standing of the social and intellectual problems, trends, and contributions to Brazil since in- 
dependence. Present day Brazil. Conducted in Portuguese. 

431 Portuguese Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 315 or consent of instructor. Portuguese literature from the Middle Ages to 
the present. The major works of Gil Vicente, Luis de Camoens, Ega de Queiroz and others 
examined from an aesthetic and cultural standpoint. Conducted in Portuguese. 

441 Brazilian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The literature of Brazil from the colonial period to the present. 
Conducted in Portuguese. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Portuguese language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor and 
department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 237 


RUSSIAN COURSES 

101 Fundamental Russian — A (5) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing of Russian. Audiolingual assign- 
ments are prepared in the language laboratory. 

102 Fundamental Russian — B (5) 

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing. Audiolingual assignments are prepared in the language laboratory. 

203 Intermediate Russian — A (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 102 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing 
cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 

204 Intermediate Russian — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 203 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing 
cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted in Russian. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Emphasis on free oral and written 
expression. Conducted in Russian. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. The principal literary forms, prose fiction, poetry, 
drama and essay, and the major concepts of literary techniques and criticism. Analysis and 
interpretation of various texts. Conducted in Russian. 

441 The Works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 316 or consent of instructor. Major works of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky in their 
intellectual and historical setting and their impact on Russian and world literature. Conducted 
in Russian. 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 316 or consent of instructor. Major literary works of the first half of the 19th 
century which exemplify cultural and intellectual movements in Russia. Conducted in Russian. 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 315 or consent of instructor. Representative works of modern Russian writers. 
Analysis and discussion of their prose and poetry in light of the social problems of present day 
Russia. Conducted in Russian. 

466 Introduction to Russian Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Russian 317 or consent of instructor. The analytical procedures of general linguistics 
as applied to Russian. Structural contrasts between Russian and English. The application of 
linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects in Russian language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor and 
department chair. May be repeated for credit. 


SPANISH COURSES 

!01 Fundamental Spanish — A (5) 

Intensive practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing of Spanish. Assignments 
in the language laboratory. Conducted in Spanish. 

102 Fundamental Spanish — B (5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent. Practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and 
writing of Spanish. Assignments in the language laboratory. Conducted in Spanish. 

^3 Intensive Review of Fundamental Spanish (5) 

For students who have completed 2 years of high school Spanish or equivalent and need an intensive 
review of first-year Spanish, equivalent to Spanish 101 and 102. Assignments in the language 
laboratory. Conducted in Spanish. 

105 Spanish for the Public Service Professional (3) 

Fundamentals of Spanish with emphasis on a specific professional vocabulary (e.g., health service, 


238 Foreign Languages and Literatures 

law enforcement) to be announced in Class Schedule. No credit for Spanish major. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

203 Intermediate Spanish — A (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

204 Intermediate Spanish — B (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing 
based on cultural and literary materials. Linguistic analysis from sound to sentence. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

213 Intermediate Conversation (2) 

Practice in oral expression. May be taken concurrently with Spanish 203. Conducted in Spanish. 

214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Practice in written expression based on cultural and literary materials. May be taken concurrently 
with Spanish 204. Conducted in Spanish. 

299 Spanish Diction and Phonetics (2) 

Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in, or former completion of, a 200-level Spanish course. Analysis 
of students' specific problems in pronunciation. Work in class and the language laboratory. May 
be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

300 Spanish Conversation (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. To develop oral control of the language in the context of 
students' own of contemporary concerns. No credit for major. Conducted in Spanish. 

315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Readings and discussions in Spanish 
literature, arts and institutions. Strengthening of facility in the language. Conducted in Spanish. 

316 Introduction to Spanish-American Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Readings and discussion in Spanish- 
American literature, arts and institutions. Strengthening of facility in the language. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Open to lower division students with consent of instructor. 
Emphasis on free oral and written expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

318 Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition (3) 

Emphasis on linguistic problems of the Spanish/English bilingual student in connection with written 
expression. Conducted in Spanish. 

375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or consent of instructor. Introduction to literary forms and concepts of 
literary techniques and criticism. Analysis and interpretation of various texts. Strengthening of 
students' abilities in reading, language and literary criticism. Conducted in Spanish. 

400 Spanish for Advanced Students and Teachers (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or 318 or consent of instructor. Spoken and written Spanish. Development 
of students' powers of self-expression and ability to analyze the structure of the written lan- 
guage. Conducted in Spanish. 

415 Contemporary Spanish Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 or consent of instructor. The cultural — social, economical, political — 
characteristics of contemporary Spanish life. Conducted in Spanish. 

416 Contemporary Spanish-American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 316 or consent of instructor. The social, economic, artistic, and political aspects 
of contemporary life in Spanish America. Conducted in Spanish. 

430 Spanish Literature to Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 315 and 375. Spanish literature from its beginnings to 1700. Representative 
works of each genre. Conducted in Spanish. 

440 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 316 and 375 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature from the 
Conquest to 1888. Conducted in Spanish. 

441 Spanish-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 316 and 375 or consent of instructor. Spanish-American Literature from 
modernismo to the present. Conducted in Spanish. 


Foreign Languages and Literatures 239 


461 Spanish Literature Since Neoclassicism (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 315 and 375 or consent of instructor. Representative works of 19th- and 
20th-century Spain. Conducted in Spanish. 

466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 317 or 318 or equivalent with consent of instructor. The analytical procedures 
of general linguistics as applied to Spanish. Structural contrasts between Spanish and English. 
The application of linguistic analysis to the teaching of modern foreign languages. Conducted 
in Spanish. 

467 Dialectology: Current Trends in Modern Spanish (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 317 or 318, 400 or equivalent and 466, which may be taken concurrently. The 
differences in phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon in linguistic patterns in all Spanish- 
speaking regions. Conducted in Spanish. 

468 Spanish-English Contrastive Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 317 or 318, 400 or equivalent, and 466 which may be taken concurrently. 
Theory and performance techniques for contrasting phonological, grammatical and lexical 
structures of Spanish and English. Conducted in Spanish. 

475 Senior Seminar: Topics in Spanish Peninsular Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Spanish. Selected topics of the literature of Spain. Subject matter will 
change. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

485 Senior Seminar: Topics in Spanish American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in Spanish. Selected topics of the literature of Spanish America. Subject 
matter will change. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in Spanish language or literature to be taken with consent of instructor 
and department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Phonology (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

525 Graduate Seminar: Research in Bilingual Language Acquisition (Spanish-English) (3) 

Prerequisites: Spanish 466, 468 and/or consent of instructor. Methodology for research in: language 
acquisition and development patterns of the Spanish-English bilingual; sociolinguistics and 
psycholinguistics as related to the Spanish-English bilingual; the interaction of culture and 
language acquisition and development. 

530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 466 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

556 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 430 or 461 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

557 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 441 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

567 Graduate Seminar: Spanish-American Novel (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 441 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

571 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Prose (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 430 or 461 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

575 Graduate Seminar: Spanish Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 430 or 461 or equivalent. Conducted in Spanish. 

576 Graduate Seminar: Hispanic Topics (3) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 430 or 441 or 461 or equivalent. May be repeated for credit with different 
subject matter. Conducted in Spanish. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of student's graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: fluency in Spanish and consent of instructor. Supervised research projects in Spanish 
language or literature. May be repeated for credit. 


240 Geography 


SWAHILI COURSE 

101 Fundamental Swahili (4) 

Practice in listening comprehension, speaking and writing of Swahili. Conducted in Swahili. (Same 
as Afro-Ethnic Studies 104) 


DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 


FACULTY 

Barbara Weightman 
Department Chair 

Arthur Earick, Peter Eilers, Wayne Engstrom, Glenn George, Gary Hannes, Ronald Helin, William 
Ketteringham, Tso-Hwa Lee, Bill Puzo, Gertrude Reith, Imre Sutton, Robert Young 
The major in geography provides knowledge concerning variety and change in the earth's physical 
foundation and in economic, cultural and political relationships to that foundation. In doing so it 
contributes to a broad, liberal education and furnishes sound preparation for employment in busi- 
ness, planning, and government service. The field also provides a foundation for teaching on the 
elementary and secondary levels and for advanced geographic study on the graduate level leading 
to university teaching and research. 


Students and counselors are advised that departmental offerings are numbered according to course 


content as follows. 


general courses: 

00-09 

physical courses: 

10-29 

regional courses: 

30-49 

human courses: 

50-79 

technical courses: 

80-89 

special studies: 

90-99 


(e.g., Geography 100) 

(e.g., Geography 110 or 323) 
(e.g., Geography 344 or 433) 
(e.g., Geography 160 or 367) 
(e.g., Geography 280 or 381 ) 
(e.g., Geography 495 or 599) 


JOB-RELATED EMPHASES 

Geography graduates can expect to find employment opportunities in several areas such as environ- 
mental, urban and travel. A program of study in geography and related fields, leading to specializa- 
tion in these and other career areas, may be designed in consultation with the undergraduate adviser. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 


The major consists of at least 42 units of geography, excluding all work used to satisfy the general 
education requirements and including: 

A. A 9-unit geography core (110, 160, 280) 

B. A 12-unit breadth requirement in upper division geography, including one course from each 
of the following groups — physical regional, human, technical. 

C. A six-unit requirement in 400-level geography, excluding the 490s and all work used to satisfy 
the 12-unit breadth requirement. 

Students may satisfy requirements A, B and C with equivalent course work taken at other institutions; 
they may also transfer into the major an additional six units of lower division geography and an 
unlimited amount of upper division geography. 

No unit credit toward the major will be allowed for geography courses in which a grade of D is 
received. Content credit for such courses may be allowed by the departmental undergraduate 
adviser. 


MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography serves students who wish to pursue a second field related to interdisciplinary 
studies or an elective concentration. Interested students should take at least 21 units of geography, 
including the core (110, 160, 280) and a minimum of nine units of upper division work from at least 
three of the following groups — physical, regional, human, technical. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

100 World Habitats (3) 

The world s major geographical regions. The physical and human elements that differentiate the 
regions and give identity to each. Ways of life and the environments in which they are found 


Geography 241 


110 Principles of Physical Geography (3) (Formerly 211) 

The major components of the physical environment, including landforms, climate, natural vegetation 
and soils. 

150 Environment in Crisis (3) 

A geographic analysis of the use and misuse of environment. 

160 Culture and Environment (3) (Formerly 250) 

Patterns of settlement and livelihood, and the varying roles of population, social organization, 
religious and political ideologies, resources and technology. 

170 Introduction to the City (3) 

Geographic variations in the urbanization process, great world and American cities, and spatial 
patterns within the city. The city as a man-made environment. 

280a-g Introduction to Geographical Analysis (1) 

Prerequisite: minimum of one other core course in geography (i.e., 110 or 160) or consent of 
instructors. The technical interpretation of physical and human features and activities in the 
landscape. Majors must take a total of three units. 

280a Interpretation of Maps and Aerial Photographs (1) 

The uses of maps and aerial photographs in geographic research. Types of data which can be 
obtained from these sources. Rudimentary measurement techniques. 

280b Introduction to Field Methods (1) 

Geographic phenomena in their actual setting — "the field." 

280c Introduction to Quantitative Methods (1) 

Descriptive statistics in geography. Graphs, functions and equations, logarithms and exponents, 
and an overview of the linear regression model. 

280d Terrain Measurement Techniques (1) 

Methods of measuring land surface form from topographic maps. 

280e Library Techniques for Geographers (1) 

Library research for geographic inquiry. How and where to find the needed information. The uses 
of such information. 

280f Geographic Writing (1) 

A workshop or tutorial instruction, providing writing experience relevant to the training of geogra- 
phers. 

280g Analysis of Weather Maps (1) 

The use and analysis of weather maps. 

312 Geomorphology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110 or Earth Science 101 or consent of instructor. Landforms and the 
processes responsible for their evolution. 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110 or consent of instructor. Atmospheric elements and controls, fronts, 
severe weather, and climatic classification systems. 

325 Plant Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110 or consent of instructor. World distribution, ecology, and patterns of 
vegetation, including human influences. 

330 California Landscapes (3) 

The landscapes of California — their environmental characteristics, development patterns and current 
problems. 

332 United States and Canada (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The United States and Canada. The interrelated physical and 
cultural features that give geographic personality to the regions. 

333 Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Middle and South America. The interrelationships of the 
physical and social factors of the area. 

336 Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The basic physical and human lineaments of Europe. The 
elements that distinguish and give character to its major regional divisions. 

338 Soviet Union (3) 

rerequisite: upper division standing. Physical, historical and political geography of the Soviet Union. 
Economic and social themes that lend identity to the country's major geographical regions. 


242 Geography 


341 Asia: Selected Regions (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. A regional geography of countries or groups of countries (e.g., 
China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia). Physical and cultural characteristics and interrelationships. 
May be repeated once for credit with different content. 

344 Africa Today (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The physical, human and regional geography of Africa. Saharan 
borderlands, East Africa and Southern Africa. 

346 Australia and the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The physical, cultural and regional geography of Australia, New 
Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. 

350 Conservation and Ecology in America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Environmental change and resource-use problems. Land ethics, 
environmental law, public policy and technological impacts. 

352 Parks of North America (3) 

The park system and its evolution as related to conservation, preservation, and recreational land use. 
Cultural heritage and physical environment. 

355 Populations in Transition (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Social, economic and environmental factors of population 
growth, mobility and distribution. Developing nations. 

357 Social Geography — Perception and Behavior (3) (Formerly 457) 

Prerequisite: Geography 160 or consent of instructor. Human behavior in spatial environments. 
Perception and related social problems. 

359 Topics in Human Geography (1) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Social, cultural, economic or political relationships and the 
environment. May be repeated for credit. 

360 Economic Geography (3) 

The spatial distribution of economic activities: agriculture, manufacturing industries, and tertiary 
services. 

362 Geography of Wine (3) 

Prerequisite: age 21 or over. Vineyards and wineries of California and the world. Physical, historical, 
economic and social factors and forces. 

363 International Travel (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Natural and cultural conditions influencing travel; modes and routes 
of travel; and a cost/benefit evaluation of the economic, cultural and environmental impact of 
travel. 

367 International Geopolitics (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The geographic bases of political territories, from the municipal 
to the international level. Sovereign states and international affairs. 

370 Urban Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. The city as a geographic unit; urban settlements as regional 
centers; city-region relationships; the structure of villages, towns and cities, and their historical 
developments; case studies. 

381 Cartography (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Compilation and construction of maps and 
graphs as geographic tools. The principles of effective cartographic representation. (1 hour 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

384 Airphoto and Image Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Use of aerial photography, space photography 
and other remote sensors as tools and research sources. Interpretation of physical and cultural 
elements of the landscape. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours activity) 

385 Quantitative Geography (3) (Formerly 485) 

Prerequisite: geography core or consent of instructor. Spatial analysis and geographic application of 
descriptive and inferential statistics. Use of the electronic computer. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity.) 

386 Data Processing for Geographic Information (3) 

Prerequisite, geography core or consent of instructor. The digital computer in solving geographical 
problems. The acquisition of basic computer programming skills. Spatially-oriented problems. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 


Geography 243 


412 Regional Geomorphology of the United States (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 312 or consent of instructor. The major physiographic provinces of the 
United States. The record that present and past geomorphic processes have left on the land- 
scape. 

422 A, B Climatology (3,3) (Formerly 423) 

Prerequisite: Geography 323 or consent of instructor. A — Physical — Topics in atmospheric sciences. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) B — Regional — Major climatic regions of the world; the 
physical factors that produce climatic patterns. 

426 Man and the Coastal Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110, 325 and 312 recommended. An ecological approach to man's impact 
on coastal environments, emphasizing the West Coast of North America. 

431 Man's Impact on the California Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. Geographic problems caused by man's impact on the land and 
its resources. 

433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 333 or consent of instructor. For students in Latin American studies or 
geography. Contemporary studies concerning man and his development of Latin America. 

468 Law and Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 350 or consent of instructor. The role of law in the management of resources 
and in environmental planning. Property and land use regulations. 

472 Urban Dynamics and Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 370 or consent of instructor. Urban development; the decentralizing forces 
operating in contemporary urban space; identification of trends in the planning process. 

482 Advanced Cartography (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 381 and consent of instructor. Application of photographic techniques and 
cartographic analysis to problems in map compilation and design. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory) 

488 Land Use Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: geography core and consent of instructor. Urban and rural land use and settlement; 
geographic field problems. Application of geographic techniques and tools to local field studies. 

495 Internship in Applied Geography (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor. Students work specified number of hours 
in appropriate public or private organizations under the supervision of their staff and as coor- 
dinated by departmental faculty. Interns meet with instructor by arrangement. May be repeated 
for a maximum of three units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing. Consent of instructor under whom study will be taken required before 
enrolling. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit. 

510 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics pertaining to physical geography. 
May be repeated once for credit. 

530 Seminar in Regional Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Regions or topics within a regional setting. 
May be repeated once for credit. 

550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics pertaining to cultural, political or 
social geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

56 ° Seminar in Land Utilization (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Problems in resource utilization, land use 
planning and economic geography. May be repeated once for credit. 

571 Seminar in Urban Problems (3) 

rerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Topics vary from semester to semester 
and allow for concerns of the participants. May be repeated once for credit. 

580 Seminar in Geo-Techniques (3) 

rerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics pertaining to geographic techniques. 
May be repeated once for credit. 


244 History 


590 Seminar in Geographic Research (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. A required seminar to be taken prior to 
the development of a thesis. The research, organization and written preparation of a thesis 
proposal. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Geography 590, advancement to candidacy and consent of instructor. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 


DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

FACULTY 
Robert S. Feldman 
Department Chair 

Gordon Bakken,* Warren Beck, Leland Bellot,* Lauren Breese, Giles Brown,* jackCrabbs, Lawrence 
de Graaf, Jack Elenbaas, George Etue, Robert Feldman, Thomas Flickema, Charles Frazee, 
Arthur Hansen, B. Carmon Hardy, Harry Jeffrey, Sam Kupper, Sheldon Maram, Michael Meisel- 
man, Frederic Miller, Mougo Nyaggah, Michael Onorato, David Pivar, Charles Povlovich, 
Jackson Putnam, Ronald Rietveld, Danton Sailor, Seymour Scheinberg, Gary Shumway, Camer- 
on Stewart, Ernest Toy,* David Van Deventer, Nelson Woodard, James Woodward, Kinji Yada, 
Cecile Zinberg. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The undergraduate major in history is designed to provide cultural enrichment, a sense of alternative, 
and perspectives especially relevant to a society confronted with widespread institutional change. 
The department offers courses which expose the student to humanities' rich and diverse experience 
and the various methodologies and ways of thinking about our past. The major may be pursued to 
fulfill professional and cultural objectives common to a liberal arts program. It serves especially as 
a preparation for teaching, law, business, government and other fields. 

To aid students pursuing specific career orientation, the History Department has developed advise- 
ment material concerning careers in law, public policy, international business, domestic business, 
archival /library work and religious studies. Students seeking to combine an interest in one of these 
fields with a history major should seek advisement as soon as possible. The History Department 
offers internships (History 498) which provide work experience as part of the regular class load. 
The undergraduate program for the history major contains three well defined levels of study: 
introductory, intermediate and advanced. At the introductory level, the student has the opportunity 
to enroll in topical or survey courses in various fields. At the intermediate level, the students build 
on the foundations established in early study, extending their understanding and moving toward 
greater sophistication in the use of historical materials. At the advanced level, they will devote 
themselves to seminar work and independent study in their area or areas of specialization, at which 
time they will be required to apply their knowledge and training in original and challenging ways. 
The undergraduate major requires a total of 39 units: 12 in introductory classes, including 1 10A and 
HOB and 27 in intermediate and advanced courses. At the introductory level, each student must 
complete four topical or survey offerings. At the intermediate level, History 399, Historical Me- 
thodology, must be taken along with 18 units, six each in the three fields of United States history; 
European history; and Latin American, Asian or African history. At the advanced level the student 
will be required to enroll in a research seminar and any other elective, at the upper division level. 
Students majoring in history are encouraged to take work in other of the social sciences and 
humanities. Those intending to do graduate work in history should commence the study of at least 
one foreign language appropriate to the pursuit of advanced study in their particular specialty. 
Program of Study for the Major 

1. Introductory requirements: Four courses (100-200 level) in the following manner: 

A. All students must complete both History 110A and 1 1 0B or History 115A and 115B (6 units); 

B. The additional six units may be completed by taking: 

( 1 ) History 1 70A and 1 70B, or 


University administrative officer 


History 245 


(2) History 180 and one other three-unit lower division history course 

2. Intermediate requirements: 21 units 

A. History 399 

B. At least six units of U.S. history 

C. At least six units of European history (including Ancient World) 

D. At least six units in Latin America, Middle East, Asian, African or Canadian history 

3. Advanced requirements: 6 units 

A. History 490 

B. Three units of elective, upper division level 

HISTORY MAJOR AND THE RYAN ACT 

The State Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing has approved the department's history 
major for the multiple subject credential option of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 
1970 (Ryan Act), as well as for the single subject credential option in history and for the single 
subject credential option in the social sciences. The successful completion of any of the three subject 
waivers mentioned above permits a student to receive a credential without taking the State Licensing 
Examination. For further information consult the History Department. 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

The minor in history is composed of units in history exclusive of the general education requirements. 


Recommended minor: Units 

Introduction courses 9 

Electives at the intermediate and advanced levels 12 

Total 21 

MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 

HISTORY MAJOR CATEGORIES 


L INTRODUCTORY COURSES (for undergraduate students) 

A. Survey Courses (Lower division) 

100, Introduction to History; 101 A, B, World History; 1 10A, Western Civilization to the 16th 
Century; 1 1 0B, Western Civilization Since the 16th Century; 115A,B,* The Western Tradi- 
tion: History; 120, Ancient Civilizations; 140, Latin American Civilizations; 160, Introduction 
to Asia; 165, Introduction to the Middle East; 170A,B, United States; 180, Survey of American 
History. 

B. Topical Courses (Lower division) 

220, Topics in European History; 230, Topics in the History of Science and Technology; 231, 
The Ascent of Man; 240, Topics in Latin American History; 260, Topics in Asian History; 270, 
Topics in American History. 

II- INTERMEDIATE COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

A. Historical Methodology (Upper division) 

399, Historical Methodology. 

B. Subject Area Courses (Upper division) 

The Ancient World 

41 2A, Ancient Near East — Mesopotamia; 41 2B, Ancient Near East — East Mediterranean; 
41 5A, Classical Greece; 41 5B, Hellenistic Civilization; 41 7A, Roman Republic; 41 7B, Roman 
Empire 
Europe 

310, Behind the Lines: World War II; 330, History of the Occult and Pseudo Sciences; 340, 
Ancient and Medieval Britain: Law and Society; 341, Tudor-Stuart England; 342, History of 
Modern England and Great Britain; 401, European Intellectual History from 1500 to the 
Present; 410, World at War; 419, The Byzantine Empire; 421 A, B, History of the Christian 
Church; 423A,B, Medieval Europe; 425A, The Renaissance; 425B, The Reformation; 426, Rise 
of Modern Europe, 1648-1763; 427, Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napole- 
on; 428, 19th Century Europe; 429, Europe Since 1914; 432, Modern Germany from the 18th 
Century; 434A, Russia to 1890; 434B, The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime; 436, 
The Balkans; 437, East Europe; 438,* Cultural Heritage of Spain; 439, History of Spain. 

Barcelona summer session program offering 


246 History 


Canada 

380, Canada, 1534-1967. 

Latin America 

3 50 A, Colonial Latin America; 350B, Latin America Since Independence; 450, Change in 
Contemporary Latin America; 451, The Andean Nations; 452B, 20th-Century Brazil, 453A, 
B, Mexico. 

Africa 

356, Africa to 1850; 357, Africa Since 1850; 455, Contemporary Africa; 458B, Southern Africa 
in the 20th Century. 

Asia 

365, Art of India; 460, Problems of the Contemporary Far East; 462A, B, C, History of China; 
463A, B, History of Japan; 464A, B, Southeast Asia; 464C, History of Contemporary Southeast 
Asia; 465A,B,C, India. 

Middle East 

368, The Arab-lsraeli Conflict; 369, History of Modern Israel; 466A, Islamic Civilization: Arab 
Era; 466B, Islamic Civilization. Imperial Age; 467, Middle East in the 19th Century; 468, 
Middle East in the 20th Century. 

United States 

370, American Sex Reformers; 383, History of California; 384, Leisure in America: A Social 
History; 385, Images of Women in American Film; 386A, B, American Social History; 470, 
American Colonial Civilization; 471, The United States From Colony to Nation; 472, Jeffer- 
sonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861; 473, Democracy on Trial, 1845-1877; 474, 
The United States — 1876-1914; 475, America Comes of Age, 1914-1945; 476, United States 
Since 1945; 478, The History of Orange County; 479, The Urbanization of American Life; 
480, Development of American Law; 481, Westward Movement in the United States; 482B, 
History of Business in American Society; 483, American Religious History; 484A, B, Ameri- 
can Constitutional History; 485A,B, United States Foreign Relations; 486A,B, United States 
Cultural History; 487B, History of Politics in American Society; 488, Black American Since 
1890. 

Science and Technology 
430A, B, History of Science. 

World or Comparative 

303, Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies; 405, History of the Jews; 407, War and Civiliza- 
tion. 

III. ADVANCED COURSES (for undergraduate and graduate students) 

490, Senior Research Seminar; 491, Proseminar in Special Historical Topics; 492, Community 
History; 493A, Oral History; 493B, Oral History Processing; 498, Internship; 499, Independ- 
ent Study. 

IV. GRADUATE COURSES (for graduate students) 

501, Seminar in the Content and Method of History; 505, Seminar in Recent Interpretation 
in History; 520, Seminar in European History; 560, Seminar in Afro-Asian History; 570, 
Seminar in American History; 585, Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations; 
590, History and Historians; 597, History Project; 598, Thesis; 599, Independent Graduate 
Research. 


HISTORY COURSES 

100 Introduction to History (1) 

The uses and significance of history; the nature of history; areas and fields of history; the language 
and vocabulary of history; and methods of studying history. 

101A World History to 1500 (3) 

Mankind from earliest times to 1500 A.D. The definition, evolution, and interaction of the major 
civilizations. 

101 B World History Since 1500 (3) 

Global history during the past four centuries. The interaction between the expanding West and the 
non-Western areas of the world. 


History 247 


110A Western Civilization to the 16th century (3) 

Western Civilization from its origins to the 16th century. 

110B Western Civilization Since the 16th century (3) 

Western Civilization from the 16th century to the present. 

115A The Western Tradition: History (3) 

One of a set of courses providing an integrated study of Western Civilization from the beginnings 
of Western culture to the 16th century. Concurrent enrollment in English 115A and Philosophy 
115A is required. 

115B The Western Tradition: History (3) 

One of a set of courses providing an integrated study of Western civilization from the development 
of the nation state to the present. Concurrent enrollment in English 115B and Philosophy 115B 
is required. 

120 Ancient Civilizations (3) 

The ancient Near East, classical and Hellenistic Greece and Rome. Art, literature, science and 
political and economic history. 

140 Latin American Civilizations (3) 

Latin America, its people, politics, and culture from the conquest of Mexico to the overthrow of 
Salvador Allende, with emphasis on the 20th century. Lectures, discussion groups, films and 
talks by specialists in Latin American studies. 

160 Introduction to Asia (3) 

The people and history of East, South and Southeast Asia from earliest times to the present. 

165 Introduction to the Middle East (3) 

The Middle East from the Prophet Mohammed to the present. The Islamic religion, art, philosophy, 
poetry and key political conflicts of modern times. 

170A United States to 1877 (3) * 

The political, social, economic and cultural development of the United States to 1877. Old World 
background, rise of the new nation, sectional problems, the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

170B United States Since 1877 (3) • 

U.S. history from the late 19th century to the present. Economic transformation, political reform 
movements, social, cultural, and intellectual changes, and the role of the United States in world 
affairs. 

180 Survey of American History (3) 

American history from prehistoric times (before 1492) to the present according to chronological 
time periods. Basic themes which pervade the entire sweep of the nation's history. Satisfies state 
requirement in U.S. history. 

220 Topics in European History (3) 

Introductory Euopean history courses. 

230 Topics in the History of Science and Technology (3) 

The origin and development of science and technology in western culture. 

231 The Ascent of Man (3) 

Science and technology in the development of human culture. Especially the development of science 
in western culture since the 17th century. Scientific concepts, their emergence, and the social 
impact of science. 

240 Topics in Latin American History (3) 

Introductory Latin American history courses. 

260 Topics in Asian History (3) 

Introductory Asian history courses. 

270 Topics in American History (3) 

Introductory American history courses. 

^03A, B Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies (3, 3) 

'he origins and development of modes of thought and forms of expression in the three core areas 

0°th History 170A and 170B must be taken to satisfy the state requirement in U.S. history. 


248 History 

of liberal studies, the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities. 

310 Behind the Lines: World War II (3) 

World War II. The home fronts, military occupation, the resistance, espionage, genocide and the war 
in historical perspective. Extensive use of films. 

330 History of the Occult and Pseudo Sciences (3) 

The occult and pseudo sciences — magic, astrology, alchemy and witchcraft, juxtaposed to the 
development of the rational sciences. Some emphasis on ESP, pyramidology and biocosmic 
energy. 

340 Ancient and Medieval Britain: Law and Society (3) 

Britain from 55 B.C. to 1485. The constitutional, institutional and cultural aspects of Roman, Celtic, 
Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Plantagenet Britain. 

341 Tudor-Stuart England (3) 

England from the accession of Henry VII to the Glorious Revolution. The political, institutional, 
ecclesiastical and cultural aspects of the period of the Tudors and Stuarts. 

342 History of Modern England and Great Britain (3) 

Modern British history (Glorious Revolution to present). The achievement of constitutional monar- 
chy, transition from agragarian to industrial society, establishment of political democracy and 
the rise of socialism. 

350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

The pre-Columbian cultures; the conquests by Spain and Portugal and the European background of 
these countries; the socioeconomic, cultural, and governmental institutions in colonial life; the 
background of revolutions and the wars for independence. 

350B Latin America Since Independence (3) 

The Latin American nations since 1826; political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes, and the role 
of U.S. foreign policy. 

356 Africa to 1850 (3) 

Tropical Africa from earliest times to the colonial era. 

357 Africa Since 1850 (3) 

The impact of the colonial period upon the peoples of tropical Africa; the various systems of colonial 
administration; the rise of African nationalism and the achievement of independence; and the 
problems encountered by these new nations. 

365 Art of India (3) 

(Same as Art 341 ) 

368 The Arab-lsraeli Conflict (3) 

The conflict between Israel and the Arab states. The four major wars in the area, the issues which 
divide the two sides and diplomatic efforts as a solution to the problem. 

370 American Sex Reformers (3) 

Sex reform and its implication for social thought and behavior. Sex reformers to be considered are 
Havelock Ellis, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alfred Kinsey, William Masters and Virgina Johnson, 
and David Reuben. 

380 Canada, 1534-1967 (3) 

Canadian history from the founding of New France and the rise of British power in North America 
to the establishment of an independent Canadian nation which celebrated the centenary of 
self-governing status in 1967. 

383 History of California (3) 

The political, economic, and social history of California from the aboriginal inhabitants to the present; 
the development of contemporary institutions and the historical background of current issues. 

384 Leisure in America: A Social History (3) 

Leisure in America from the colonial period to the present. The contest in the early period between 
man's urge to play and the Puritan work ethic until the contemporary triumph of the fun society. 

385 Images of Women in American Film (3) 

Film history; the image of American women as a cultural institution as it emerges from a social 
context and relates to a social context. Film content will be considered primarily as "ideology/ 
(Same as American Studies 385) 

386A American Social History 1750-1860 

A social history of the United States to the Civil War; reform movements, temperance, moral purity/ 
women s rights, anti-slavery, spiritualism and their importance to the formation of a modern 
society. (Same as American Studies 386A) 


History 249 


386B American Social History 1865-1930 (3) 

A social history of the United States from the Civil War; reform, social organization and values. The 
woman's movement, censorship, divorce, the child and the limits of reform movements in an 
organizational society. (Same as American Studies 386B) 

399 Historical Methodology (3) 

Historical knowledge in relation to general knowledge; the analysis of history through the social 
sciences and humanities; the application of theory in historical investigations and in forms of 
historical communication. Required of all majors. 

401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to the Present (3) 

The competing ideas in European history from 1500 to the present which have shaped modern 
European institutions. 

403 History of Books and Printing (3) 

(Same as Library 403) 

405 History of the Jews (3) 

The jewish people from the post-biblical period to the present. The literature of each period as well 
as the relationships which exist between the jewish communities and the societies in which they 
exist. 

407 War and Civilization (3) 

The political and social implications of modern warfare, of the development of military technologies 
and of changing concepts of military organizations. 

410 World War II (3) 

A history of World War II: Films, documentaries, lectures and discussion. 

41 2 A Ancient Near East — Mesopotamia (3) 

The political, socioeconomic, religious, and literary history of Mesopotamian culture from the rise 
of the Sumerian city-states to Alexander the Great. The Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, 
Hurrians and Persians. 

412B Ancient Near East — East Mediterraneans (3) 

Egypt from early dynastic times in the third millennium B.C. to the conquest of Alexander the Great. 
The Syro-Palestinian region, its migrations and international culture. The Hebrews and their 
contributions to modern civilization. 

415A Classical Greece (3) 

The civilization of ancient Greece. The rise and flourishing of the classical city-states; the literary and 
philosophic contributions to modern civilization. 

415B Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

The hellenistic synthesis and the new patterns in government, the arts and sciences, philosophy and 
literature between the Macedonian conquest and the intervention of Rome. 

417A Roman Republic (3) 

Roman social and political institutions under the republic. 

417B Roman Empire (3) 

Roman imperial institutions and culture with attention to the rise of Christianity. 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

The East Roman Empire from Constantine to the Ottoman conquest of 1453. Institutional aspects of 
Byzantine society: church, state, the economy, law and culture. 

421A History of the Christian Church to 1025 (3) 

The Christian Church from its origins in the apostolic preaching through the Middle Ages in both 
the East and West. 

421 B History of the Christian Church from 1025 to the Present (3) 

The western church as an institution from 1025 to the present. Orthodoxy, Catholicism and Protes- 
tantism in historical perspective. 

423A Medieval Europe, 300-1000 (3) 

European society from the decline of Rome to the age of the Vikings. The emergence of western 
Europe, the barbarian migrations which culminated in the Carolingian Empire, and Roman, 
Germanic and Celtic influences. 


250 History 


423B Medieval Europe, 1000-1400 ( 3) 

The history of France, and the intellectual, artistic and scientific developments of the High Middle 
Ages. 

425 A The Renaissance (3) 

Europe from 1400 to 1525. The beginnings of capitalism, the beginnings of the modern state, 
humanism, the pre-Reformation and the church on the eve of the Reformation. 

425 B The Reformation (3) 

Europe from 1525 to 1648; The Protestants and Catholic Reformations; the religious wars; the price 
rise; royal absolution; the rise of science. 

426 Rise of Modern Europe, 1648-1763 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 1 10B. European diplomatic history and the balance of power from 1648 to 1763. 
The social and philosophical developments of the period. 

427 Europe in the Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 

European history from 1763 to 1815. The politics, society, and culture of the Old Regime, the 
influence of the Enlightenment, the impact of the French Revolution on Europe, and the 
establishment of French hegemony by Napoleon. 

428 19th-Century Europe (3) 

Europe from 1815 to 1914. The political, economic, social, and cultural trends in European history 
from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. Nationalism, liberalism, socialism, 
and secularism. 

429 Europe Since 1914 (3) 

The beginning of World War I to the present. The economic, political, social, diplomatic, and 
intellectual trends of 20th-century Europe. 

430A History of Science: Ancient to Renaissance (3) 

Western science and its role in culture from the third millennium B.C. through the beginnings of the 
Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries. The hellenic, Hellenistic and later medieval 
periods will receive special attention. 

430B History of Science: Copernicus to the Present (3) 

Science from the 16th century to the present especially the scientific revolutions of the 1 7th and 20th 
centuries and the interaction between science, technology and culture. 

432 Modern Germany from the 18th Century (3) 

German history from the era of Frederick the Great to the present. 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

The establishment of the Russian state at Kiev through the great reforms, the revolutionary movement 
and reaction of the 19th century. The shaping of contemporary Russia. 

434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3) 

The 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the subsequent consolidation of power under the Communist 
regime. The continuity and change in Russian social political, cultural institutions and foreign 
policy effected by the impact of Marxist-Lennist-Stalinist ideology. 

436 The Balkans (3) 

The Balkan peoples from the Middle Ages through the Ottoman Conquest to the present. The roles 
of religion, nationalism, and communism in the development of modern Balkan consciousness. 

437 East Europe (3) 

The political and social history of the central East European peoples. 

439 History of Spain (3) 

Hispanic civilization from the earliest times to the present. 

451 The Andean Nations (3) 

The social history of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile. 

452B 20th-Century Brazil (3) 

Brazil from 1889 to the present. Social, economic and cultural trends and the nation's political 
evolution. Approximately 40 per cent, Brazil after 1945. 

453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

Mexico from the pre-Columbian period to 1910. The Indian heritage, the impact upon the native 
civilizations of the Spanish Conquest and the blending of Hispanic institutions with those of the 
first Mexicans. 

453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

The background of the Mexican Revolution of 1910; the revolution itself from 1910 to 1921; > he 
political, economic, and social features; the Revolution as the first of the great upheavals of if*® 


History 251 


20th century. 

455 Contemporary Africa (3) 

African history since 1945. Problems preceding independence, postindependence, internal and 
external problems concerning economics, politics, boundaries, pan-Africanism, apartheid, ra- 
cial conflicts and others. 

458B Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

Twentieth-century developments in the Union (Republic) of South Africa, Central Africa (the 
Rhodesias and Nyasaland) and the Portuguese colonies; the political, economic and social 
ramifications of race relations. 

460 Problems of the Contemporary Far East (3) 

The post- World War II history of East, South and Southeast; problems of nationalism, communism 
and economic development. 

462A History of China (3) 

Chinese history from ancient times to the middle of the 17th century; society, thought, economy 
and political institutions. 

462B History of China (3) 

Chinese history from the middle of the 1 7th century to the 1 950s. China's internal developments and 
foreign intrusion, the rise of modern Chinese nationalism and intellectual developments in the 
Republican period, and the attempts at modernization and the triumph of communism. 

462C China Since 1949 (3) 

History of China from 1949 to the present. The Communist Party, political institutions, ideology, 
economic modernization and foreign relations of China. 

463A History of Japan (3) 

The social, political, and economic history of japan until 1868 stressing the Tokugawa era. 

463B History of Japan (3) 

The rise of the modern Japanese state, Japanese imperialism and the postwar era. 

464A History of Southeast Asia to 1850 (3) 

Southeast Asia since early historical times to the establishment of the colonial empires of the West 
in the mid-19th century. 

464B History of Southeast Asia, 1850-1945 (3) 

Southeast Asia under the impact of the imperialism and the effects of the Pacific War on the 
European empires. 

464C History of Contemporary Southeast Asia (3) 

Southeast Asia since the Pacific War to the present. The problems of the area and American 
involvement in Southeast Asia. 

465 A History of India (3) 

The Indian subcontinent from ancient times to the fall of the first Islamic empire in India, 1526. 
Political developments and evolving religious and social institutions: Hinduism, Buddhism, 
Jainism, class and caste. 

465B History of India (3) 

The Indian subcontinent from the beginning of the Mughul Empire, 1 526 to the Indian Mutiny of 1 857. 
European intrusions and the crystallization of British supremacy in India. 

465C History of India (3) 

' n dia from 1857 to 1947, especially the struggle for independence. 

466A Islamic Civilization: Arab Era (3) 

Arab predominance in the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the Mongol invasions of the 13th 
century. 

466B Islamic Civilization: Imperial Age (3) 

The Mongol invasions of the Middle East and their effects. The Ottoman Turkish, Safavid Persian 
and Moghul Empires down to A.D. 1800. 

J67 The Middle East in the 19th Century (3) 

Western penetration of the Middle East and the reaction to it, modernization, the growth of national- 
ist movements and revolutionary disturbances ending with World War I. 

4h8 Middle East in the 20th Century (3) 

°cial, political and economic changes in the Middle East since World War I. The period after World 
War II and recent independence movements. 


252 History 


470 American Colonial Civilization (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A, History 180 or consent of instructor. Analyzes the creation and develop- 
ment of societies in English North America from 1492-1754; the emergence of economic, social 
and political patterns and structures in a maturing Anglo-American culture. 

471 The United States from Colony to Nation (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A, 180 or consent of instructor. Social, economic, political and intellectual 
developments in late 18th-century America, the coming of American Revolution, origins of 
American nationalism, social structure of the new nation, formation of the Constitution and rise 
of a party system. 

472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 1800-1861 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. Jeffersonian values and their impact upon the 
social, political and cultural life of the nation. 

473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or consent of instructor. America's "great national crisis" and the impact 
of slavery, civil war and national reconstruction upon the democratic process of the republic. 

474 The United States 1876^1914 (3) 

American industry and its impact upon American life. The populist and progressive reform move- 
ments. 

475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 (3) 

Major trends in U.S. domestic policy, foreign policy, economy and soceity from World War I through 
World War II. Conflicting values and ideals of domestic policy and U.S. role in world affairs. 

476 United States Since 1945 (3) 

U.S. History from 1945 to the present; the interrelationship of foreign policy, economic prosperity, 
deomestic tensions and protest movements. 

478 The History of Orange County (3) 

The history of Orange County. Stress on the process of urbanization. 

479 The Urbanization of American Life (3) 

Urban life in America; the colonial town, the western town and the industrial city. 

480 Development of American Law (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A or 170B. American law; contracts, property, commercial law, criminal 
law, corporations, torts, civil procedure and the legal profession. 

481 Westward Movement in the United States (3) 

The expansion of the United States population and sovereignty from the eastern seaboard to the 
Pacific, colonial times to 1900; regional development during the frontier period. 

482B History of Business in American Society (3) 

The rise of business. Social factors and influences of the business community upon American society, 
i.e.: changes in the reputation and image of businessmen, their role in reform, politics, philan- 
thropy, community relations and arts. 

483 American Religious History (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. American religious life and the proliferation of religious organi- 
zations as the result of the transplanting of European Christianity in the new environment. 

484A American Constitutional History to 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170A. English and colonial origins, the growth of democracy, the slavery 
controversy, and the sectional conflict as they reflect constitutional development. 

484B American Constitutional History from 1865 (3) 

Prerequisite: History 170B. Constitutional problems involved in the post-Civil War era, the expansion 
of business, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, and civil rights in the postwar era. 

485 A United States Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) 

The foreign relations of the United States from the beginning of the nation until 1900. Bases of policy/ 
major policies and relationships between domestic affairs and foreign policy. 

485B United States Foreign Relations from 1900 ( 3) 

Relations from 1900 to the present. The United States as a world power in the 20th-century; the 
search for world order and the diplomacy of the atomic age. 

486A United States Cultural History (3) 

The social and intellectual development of the United States from the Puritans to the Civil War. 

486B United States Cultural History (3) 

The social and intellectual development of the United States from the Civil War to the present. 


Latin American Studies 253 


487 B History of Politics in American Society (3) 

Political developments from Reconstruction to Lyndon Baines Johnson. Political patterns of behav- 
ior, institutional development and the response of the political system to changing societal 
demands and needs. 

488 Black American Since 1890 (3) 

Black Americans from Booker T. Washington to present; their culture and role in American life and 
the issues involved in their relations with other segments of the population in various regions. 

490 Senior Research Seminar (3) 

Directed research seminar with class discussions applied to specific topics and areas as schedule 
and staff allow. Original research and writing. Required of all history majors. Various topics may 
be repeated for credit. 

491 Proseminar in Special Historical Topics (3) 

Trends, phenomena, themes or periods of history involving occasional lecture, discussion, directed 
reading, and student research. 

492 Community History (3) 

Historical development communities in general including the Orange County area. Techniques of 
gathering and processing local historical data, including oral interviews and other archival 
materials. 

493A Oral History (3) 

The utilization of tape recorded interviews to document significant events in 20th-century history. 
Training will be given in interviewing techniques, specific background research and equipment 
use, after which students conduct a number of tape recorded interviews. 

493B Oral History Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Specialized techniques required for processing oral historical 
documents including oral interviews and other archival materials. 

498 History Internship (3) 

The internship program offers work experience related to the history academic program or to areas 
of public and private employment where any liberal arts major is appropriate. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in history with consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

501 Seminar in the Content and Method of History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

505 Seminar in Recent Interpretations in History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

520 Seminar in European History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

560 Seminar in Afro-Asian History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

570 Seminar in American History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

585 Seminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

59 0 History and Historians (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The writings, personalities, and philosophies of representative 
historians from Herodotus to the present. 

^97 History Project (3 or 6) 

he editing of a significant body of primary source materials, including a critical and interpretive 
introduction as well as appropriate reference and explanatory notes. Foreign sources will 
normally be translated into English. 

p Thesis (3 or 6) 

^ rec J u ' s ite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

9 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Pen to graduate students in history with consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

l atin American studies program 

FACULTY 

William Ketteringham 
r ogram Coordinator 


254 Latin American Studies 


PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Oswaldo Arana (Foreign Languages), Nancy Baden (Foreign Languages), Warren Beck (History), 
Harvey Blend (Physics), Isaac Cardenas (Chicano Studies), James Dietz (Economics), Thomas 
Flickema (History), Dagobert Fuentes (Chicano Studies), Ron Harmon (Foreign Languages), 
Pierre Hostettler (Management), Arturo Jasso (Foreign Languages), Leroy Joesink-Mandeville 
(Anthropology), Carolyn Johnson (Communications), Paul Kane (Education), William J. Ket- 
teringham (Geography), Jackie Kiraithe (Foreign Languages), John Lafky (Economics), Neil 
Maloney (Earth Science), Sheldon Maram (History), Lon McClanahan (Biological Science), 
Adolfo Ortega (Chicano Studies), Ervie Pena (Foreign Languages), Joseph Platt (Chicano 
Studies), John Purcell (Political Science), Marlene de Rios (Anthropology), Gerald Rosen 
(Sociology), Edgar Wiley (Management), Jon Yinger (Political Science) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The Latin American studies program is for students desiring a general education with focus on Latin 
America, careers which will involve residence in, or a knowledge of Latin America (such as teaching, 
business, government, scientific research, engineering, or journalism), for teaching Spanish or the 
social sciences in the secondary schools, or for graduate work in Latin American studies or other 
disciplines involving a specialization in Latin America. 

Teachers 

The Latin American studies program has been approved for the multiple subject waiver, under 
provisions of the Ryan Act. 

Foundation Courses 

All students should develop a language proficiency level which is the equivalent of Spanish 204 and 
Portuguese 102. 

Students with no language background should take: 

Spanish 101 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Spanish 102 Fundamental Spanish (5) 

Spanish 203 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Spanish 204 Intermediate Spanish (3) 

Portuguese 101 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

Portuguese 102 Fundamental Portuguese (4) 

However, a student with a knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese may be able to meet part or 
all of the foundation course requirements by taking a test administered by the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures. 

Required Fields of Study 

Language (3 units): 

Spanish 317 or 318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) (318 is designed for bilingual 
students ) or either 

Portuguese 317 or 318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

History and Culture (9 units): 

Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) or 
Portuguese 325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) 

History 350A Colonial Latin America (3) 

History 350B Latin America Since Independence (3) 

Social Science ( 6 units) selected from two departments: 

Anthropology 322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 324A Ancient Maya (3) 

Anthropology 324B Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Anthropology 326 Prehistory of South America (3) 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

Geography 333 Latin America (3) 

Geography 433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

Political Science 431 Government & Politics of Latin America (3) 

Political Science 452 Latin American Foreign Politics (3) 

ELECTIVE FIELDS OF STUDY 

Twelve units selected from three or more of the following groupings: 


Libera! Studies 255 


/. Culture: 

Anthropology 322 Peoples of Mesoamerica (3) 

Anthropology 324A The Ancient Maya (3) 

Anthropology 324B Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3) 

Anthropology 325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Anthropology 326 Archaeology of South America (3) 

Chicano Studies 302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

Chicano Studies 403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 
Portuguese 315 Introduction to Luzo Brazilian Culture and Civilization (3) 

Portuguese 317 or 318 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) or 
Spanish 317 Advanced Conservation and Composition (3) 

Portuguese 325 Contemporary Brazilian Civilization (3) or 
Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American Civilization (3) 

Spanish 416 Contemporary Spanish-American Culture (3) 

//. Fine Arts and Literature: 

Chicano Studies 430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

Chicano Studies 433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

Portuguese 441 Brazilian Literature (3 ) or 
Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature from Modernismo to the Present (3) 
Spanish 440 Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1888 (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Spanish 485 Senior Seminar: Hispanic topics (3) (with consent of program director) 

III. History and Politics: 

History 450 Change in Contemporary Latin America (3) 

History 451 The Andean Nations (3) 

History 452B 20th-Century Brazil (3) 

History 453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

History 453B Mexico since 1910 (3) 

Political Science 431 Government and Politics of Latin America (3) 

Political Science 452 Latin American Foreign Policies (3) 

IV. Geography and Economics 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analyses and Case Studies (3) 

Geography 333 Latin America (.3) 

Geography 433 Man and Geographic Relationships in Latin America (3) 

V Senior Seminar: 

Latin American Studies 401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

100 Introduction to Latin America (3) 

Team-taught on topics relevant to contemporary Latin America using an interdisciplinary approach. 
Core areas will include man, environment, society, institutions and culture. Content will vary 
depending upon the faculty and existing conditions in Latin America. 

401 Contemporary Latin America (3) 

An interdisciplinary team-taught senior seminar on topics relevant to contemporary Latin America. 
Content will vary depending upon the faculty and present conditions within Latin America. May 
be repeated for credit. 

liberal studies program 

faculty 

Joseph j. Hayes 
Program Coordinator 
PROGRAM COUNCIL 

ea °d Bellot* (History), Janet Borreson (student), Bert Buzan (Political Science), Gaylen Carlson 
(Science Education), Ronald Clapper (English), Carol Copp (Sociology), Ronald Crowley 

University Administrative Officer. 


256 Liberal Studies 


(Physics), Roger Dittmann-Djakovic (Physics), Gerald Gannon (Mathematics), Ronald 
Hughes (Sociology), Terry Hynes (Communications), Dorothea Kenny (English), Emmett 
Long (Speech Communication), Sally McCorkle (Art), Sallie Mitchell (Theatre), Margaret 
Oldendorf (student), Robin Porter (student), Gloria Rock (Philosophy), Erv Triplett (Assistant 
Registrar), James Weaver (American Studies), Bruce Weber (Chemistry), Charles Williams 
(Science Education), James Woodward (History) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES 

The B.A. in Liberal Studies is a diversified or liberal arts degree for students who do not wish to 
specialize in one academic discipline. Liberal studies majors may take either of the following plans: 

I. Elementary Education Plan (84 units) 

Students who complete the elementary education plan can be granted the multiple subjects (ele- 
mentary) credential without having to take the state examination otherwise required by the Ryan 
Act. The 84 units required under this plan are distributed evenly in four major areas. 

A. English Requirements (21 units) 

1. Speech Communication 305 Liberal Studies in Communication Processess (3) 

2. English 301 L Advanced Composition (3) t 

3. English 303 Structure of Modern English (3) | 

4. World Literature (6) English 110-111 or Comparative Literature 324-325. 

5. Elective in communications, comparative literature, English, linguisitics or speech com- 
munication (6 units) 

B. Science and Mathematics Requirements (21 units) 

1. Nine units of general education courses in the natural sciences 

2. Liberal Studies 307 Liberal Studies in the Sciences (3) 

3. Mathematics 303A,B Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (3, 3) | 

4. Science Education 310 Elementary Experimental Science (3) f or 
Science Education 453 Life Science Concepts (3) t 

C. Social Sciences Requirements (21 units) 

1. Nine units of general education courses in the Social Sciences 

2. History 303A-B Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies (3-3) 

3. Liberal Studies 308 Liberal Studies in the Social Sciences (3) 

4. Upper-division electives in Afro-ethnic studies, American studies, anthropology, Chicano 
studies, criminal justice, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology or 
sociology (3 units). 

D. Humanities and Fine Arts Requirements (21 units) 

1. Nine units of general education courses in arts-humanities 

2. Philosophy 304 Methods of Inquiry (3) 

3. Liberal Studies 306 Liberal Studies in the Humanities and Arts (3) 

4. Upper-division electives in art or music (3 units) 

5. Upper-division electives in Afro-ethnic studies, American studies, Chicano studies, foreign 
languages and literatures, philosophy, religious studies or theatre (3 units) 

Note: The Elementary Education Plan does not include all requirements in general education and 
American institutions and values. The complete requirements are listed in this catalog under gradua- 
tion requirements for the bachelor's degree. 

II. Thematic Plan (51 units) 

The thematic plan allows students to synthesize and integrate their knowledge and experience by 
focusing on a theme that is broad in scope and cuts across the traditional lines of the academic 
disciplines. The 51 units required are distributed in three major phases: the liberal studies core 
courses, the personalized coordinated program, and the seminar sequence. 

1 In exceptional cases substitutions may be made with the approval of the program coordinator and the department 
concerned. 


Libera! Studies 25 7 


A. The Liberal Studies Core Courses (21 units) 

The liberal studies core courses build a foundation for interdisciplinary study by providing an 
overview of the major areas of human knowledge and an introduction to the basic 
methodologies of interdisciplinary study. The following courses are required: 

1. History 303A-B Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies (3-3) 

2. Philosophy 304 Methods of Inquiry (3) 

3. Speech Communication 305 Liberal Studies in Communication Processes (3) 

4. Liberal Studies 306 Liberal Studies in Humanities and Arts (3) 

5. Liberal Studies 307 Liberal Studies in the Sciences (3) 

6. Liberal Studies 308 Liberal Studies in the Social Sciences (3) 

B. The Personalized Coordinated Program (24 units) 

Students apply the basic methodologies learned in the core courses by selecting, in consulta- 
tion with an adviser, a theme and 24 units of upper-division course work. Upper-division 
course work may be selected from each of the three major areas of human knowledge 
(humanities and arts, science, and social sciences.) A minimum of six units of course work 
must be chosen from each area. Or upper-division course work may be selected from two 
of the three areas of human knowledge. Not more than 15 units may be chosen from one 
area and not more than nine units from one department. 

Note: Students must ha ve their study plan appro ved by a liberal studies adviser prior to taking course 
work. 

C. The Seminar Sequence (6 units) 

Students apply some of the knowledge obtained from courses taken in the personalized 
coordinated program by writing a thesis or engaging in a project or creative work under the 
direction of an instructor of the student's choice. 

English 301 Advanced Composition (3) 

499 Independent Study (3) 

Directed by an instructor chosen by the student. Student will enroll in the home department 
of the Professor. 

INTERNSHIP 

Liberal studies majors may take up to three units of an approved internship offered by any depart- 
ment or program in the university as part of their liberal studies major. 

advisement 

Students are urged to see a program adviser prior to their first semester at the university as a liberal 
studies major. A handbook describing the liberal studies program in more detail is available from 
the Cross-Disciplinary Programs office. 


liberal studies courses 

306 Liberal Studies in the Humanities and Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of arts-humanities general education requirement. The nature of the arts 
and humanities, their purposes and structure, sources and traditional forms. 

307 Liberal Studies in the Sciences (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of natural sciences general education requirement. The nature of the 
scientific enterprise, contemporary models in physical and biological sciences; and the role of 
science in society. 

308 Liberal Studies in the Social Sciences (3) 

^requisite: completion of social sciences general education requirement. The theoretical frame- 
works of the social sciences and their methodologies and strategies for formulating and answer- 
ing social questions. 

^80 Practicum in Liberal Studies (1) 

ormally to be taken during the first five weeks in the first semester of the senior year. The student 
Plans a project, thesis or creative work based on knowledge gained from some of the courses 
taken in the major. 


^ 78946 


258 Linguistics 

490 Seminar in Liberal Studies (1) 

Prerequisites: completion of Liberal Studies 480 and four units of independent study in a department 
other than liberal studies. The student presents a project, thesis or creative work and critiques 
the projects of the other students in the seminar. 


DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 

FACULTY 
Donald Sears 

Department Chair 

Alan Kaye, James Santucci, Ernie Smith 

Linguistics is the scientific study of language — its nature and development, its universal properties, 
its diversified structures and their variants, its systems of writing and transcription, its cultural role 
in the speech community, and its application to other areas of human knowledge. As such, it is 
concerned with the multiple aspects of human communicative behavior which encompasses 
thought, symbolization, language, meaning, acoustics, perception and the physiological processes 
of utterance and audition. 

The interdisciplinary aspects of this study are reflected in the organization of the program which 
offers a core of general linguistics courses and draws upon linguistically-related courses in other 
departments. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

For students with an exceptional interest in and aptitude for the study of the systems of human 
communication. The essential relationships between language and thought and language and culture; 
the structure of foreign languages as well as English; linguistic structures; the historical study of 
language and formal techniques and theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis. 


Language Requirement 

Two progressive semesters of any two languages or four progressive semesters of any one language. 

Lower Division Requirements 9 units 

Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 

Any two 200-level linguistics courses (6) 

Upper Division Requirements 24 units 

Linguistics 351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology (3) 

Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Linguistics 410 Language and Culture (3) 

Linguistics 430 Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3) 


Four electives two of which must be from linguistics upper division courses: Linguistics, any 
upper division course other than those listed as required above 

Education-TE 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

English 303 Structure of Modern English (3) 

English 480 Seminar in Old English (3) 

English 490 History of the English Language (3) 

Foreign Languages, any upper division course (3) 

Mathematics 304 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Mathematics 305 Elements of Set Theory (3) 

Philosophy 368 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Philosophy 475 Seminar in the Philosophy of Language (3) 

Physics 405 Acoustics (4) 

Psychology 415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Quantitative Methods 364 Computer Logic and Programming (3) 

Quantitative Methods 486 Automata Theory (3) 

Quantitative Methods 487 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Speech Communication 304 Message Reception and Analysis (3) 

Speech Communication 340 Speech Science (3) 

Students must consult with an adviser in linguistics before establishing their individual programs of 
study. Other courses in the university may be taken as an elective with the permission of the adviser 

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


Linguistics 259 


LABORATORY FOR PHONETIC RESEARCH 

See Research Organizations and Services and Special Study Centers. 


LINGUISTICS COURSES 

105A English as a Second Language (4) 

(Same as Foreign Languages Education 105A) 

105B English as a Second Language (4) 

(Same as Foreign Languages Education 105B) 

1% Language and Linguistics (3) 

The nature of language, its origin and development; language in culture, the system of language, and 
language and thought. 

107 Linguistics and Minority Dialects (3) 

The sounds, meanings and vocabulary of Afro-American, Caribbean, and other English dialects and 
their historical origin. (Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 108) 

201 Introduction to African Linguistics (3) 

The analyses of the phonological, morphological, syntactic and semanto lexemic structure of select- 
ed Hamito-Semitic, Niger-Congo and West African Kordofanian languages. (Same as Afro- 
Ethnic 201). 

251 Animal Language and Communication (3) 

Animal linguistic behavior in comparison with human speech and its derivatives, and an exploration 
of experiments concerned with dolphins, chimps, and other species. 

252 Linguistics and Literature (3) 

Language as the medium of literature; the new stylistics, including theories of word choice, prosody, 
prose style, structure, statistical analysis, metaphor. Application to various literary forms. (Same 
as English 252) 

254 Introduction to Paralanguage and Kinesics: Body Language (3) 

The physical actions, gestures, and changes in the physiognomy that occur together with language 
and paralanguage in human communication; substitutions for language and modifications of it 
in varying cultures. 

301 Sanskrit (3) 

The Sanskrit language; the acquisition of reading fluency. The devanagari script, phonology, mor- 
phology and syntax, relevant points on Hindu culture and on the place of Sanskrit in the 
development of the Indo-European language family. 

302 Sanskrit (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 301 or equivalent. Continuation of 301, concentrating on the reading of 
Sanskrit texts. Paleographic techniques and graphemics. 

305 The English Language in America (3) 

(Same as English 305) 

351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology (3) 

The nature and structure of sound systems in language; analytic methods, phonetics, phonemics, 
distinctive features, acoustic and articulatory phonetics. 

3 7 0 Linguistic Theories: National Schools (3) 

'he linguistic theories of a national school such as the Prague Circle, the London School, the Russian 
formalists, the School of Panini. Phonology, syntax, semantics. May be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 

375 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (3) 

(s *me as Philosophy 375) 

Advanced Phonetics (3) 

Same as Speech Communication 402) 


260 Linguistics 


403 Speech/Language Development (3) 

(Same as Speech Communication 403) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

The nature of human linguistic behavior. Phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of 
languages. (Same as Anthropology 406) 

409 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 409) 

410 Language and Culture (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 410) 

411 Bilingualism (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or equivalent. The personal and social development of bilingual com- 
munities as reflected in the conflict between the language of the home and the language of the 
community. 

412 Sociolinguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or equivalent. Social dialects in relation to the surrounding communities. 
Social stratification, acculturation, language maintenance, standardization, language planning 
and language change. 

417 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3) 

(Same as Psychology 417) 

430 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406, its equivalent, or consent of instructor. The comparative method in 
diachronic linguistic methodology and theory, graphemics, glottochronology, language families, 
dialect geography and internal reconstruction. 

443A Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 

(Same as Foreign Languages Education 443 A) 

443B Principles of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3) 

(Same as Foreign Languages Education 443B) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised projects with consent of department chair. Topic varies with the student. May be 
repeated for credit. 

501 Research Methods and Bibliography (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and Linguistics 406, or equivalent. Principal books, periodicals, and 
collections in general linguistics, specific languages and related fields; techniques of preparing 
research papers and field reports in linguistics. To be taken concurrently with Linguistics 597. 

505 Phonological Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 351 and Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. Phonological systems that 
occur in languages. The phonetic and phonemic analysis of selected language data. (Same as 
Anthropology 505) 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 406 or consent of instructor. Word formation and sentence construction in 
a variety of languages. Application of transformational analysis to selected linguistic data. (Same 
as Anthropology 507) 

508 Theories of Syntax (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 507 or consent of instructor. Contemporary theories of grammar; transforma- 
tional, generative, logical and electromechanical bases and techniques of utterance analysis 
(Same as Anthropology 508) 

515 Graduate Seminar: Psycholinguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: Linguistics 406 and 417 or equivalents. The behavioral, conceptual, motivational and 
social aspects of language; recent developments in information theory, behavioral theory and 
linguistic theory as applied to human communication. (Same as Psychology 515) 

530 Historical Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 430, its equivalent or consent of instructor. The history of language, including 
principles and techniques for the historical study and classification of individual languages an 
language families, writing systems, lexicostatistical methods and linguistic geography. 

592 Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Methods of analysis and description of language structures. D ata 
elicited from informants will be analyzed and described. Controlled study of an informant 5 
language. (Same as Anthropology 592.) May be repeated for credit. 


Philosophy 261 


5% Internship in Applied Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 443 or consent of instructor. The practical application of linguistic theory to 
second language learning, particularly at the community college level. Individual supervision by 
the faculty and cooperating individuals. Interns meet with the instructor by arrangement. May 
be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (2) 

Preparation and completion of an approved project. To be taken concurrently with Linguistics 501. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

FACULTY 
Richard Smith 
Department Chair 

John Cronquist, David Depew, Craig lhara, Merrill Ring, Gloria Rock, J. Michael Russell, Frank 
Verges, Marjorie Weinzweig 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

The major in philosophy provides (1 ) information about the achievements of the world's outstand- 
ing philosophers in the analysis and resolution of philosophic issues, and (2) skill in analyzing and 
resolving such issues as they arise in the student's own areas of interest. Course requirements in 
philosophy to provide both breadth and depth. 

Requirements for the Major 

T A minimum of 36 units in philosophy. 

2. Required courses (15 units): 

Philosophy 290 (3) 

Philosophy 291 (3) 

Philosophy 300 (3) 

Philosophy 301 (3) 

Philosophy 499 (3) 

3. History of contemporary philosophy requirement: Three units to be met by one of the following 
courses: 305, 323, 380, 382, 490. 

4. Area requirements: Nine units (three courses) to include courses from at least two of the 
following areas: 

Area I — Ethics, Aesthetics, Value Theory: 310, 311, 345, 365, 455. 

Area II — Metaphysics and Epistemology: 420, 425, 430, 440, 470 
Area III — Logic and Language: 368, 369, 375, 468, 475 

Area IV — Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences: 341, 360, 384, 385, 435 

5. Seminar requirement: Three units to be met by any senior seminar not used to fulfill area or history 
of philosophy requirements. (Senior seminars in philosophy are numbered between 447 and 
490.) 

6 Electives: 6 units of philosophy courses, upper- or lower-division, which have not been used to 
meet requirements 2-5, above. 

Recommended Work 

A program in philosophy profits greatly through the study of psychology, the social sciences, and 
'terature. Students are advised to supplement their studies in philosophy with coursework offered 
,n these fields. Philosophy majors are urged to acquire proficiency in a foreign language. 

Reparation for Graduate School 

Students who are planning to attend graduate school in philosophy are urged to include in their 
P r °grams, besides the required courses, as many as possible of the following: 
philosophy 310 and 455, Ethics 
philosophy 368 and 369, Logic 
hilosophy 375, Philosophy of Language 
hilosophy 380, Analytic Philosophy 
hilosophy 420, Metaphysics 
hi osophy 430 , Epistemology 
ilosophy 440, Philosophy of Mind 


262 Philosophy 


Transfer Credit 

Work done at other institutions may be counted toward the major, subject to the rules of the 
university and the following departmental rules: (1) only senior seminars can fulfill the seminar 
requirement; (2) only upper-division work can fulfill upper-division requirements; (3) in no case 
can more than six units of lower-division work taken at another institution count toward the major 
requirement of 36 units. 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 
Requirements for the Minor 

There are two options for a minor in philosophy, each of which requires a total of 21 units in 
philosophy, at least 12 of which must be upper-division. 

Option A 

Among the 21 units, at least six units from among these courses: 115A, 1 15B, 290, 291, 300, 301, 
305; 

and either a senior seminar or else 3 units of Philosophy 499. 

Option B 

Among the 21 units, at least 15 units chosen from among philosophy courses correlative to the 
student's major, as approved by the departmental adviser. 

A student's plan for the minor under either option must be approved by the department adviser. 


PHILOSOPHY COURSES 

For more detailed course descriptions, consult the course guide which is available each semester 

at registration time in the Philosophy Department office. 

100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 

The nature, methods and some of the main problems of philosophy. Primarily for freshmen and 
sophomores. Not a prerequisite for advanced courses. 

101 Contemporary Moral Issues (3) 

Application of philosophical techniques to such issues as the justification of civil disobedience, the 
morality of war and revolution, the nature and justification of violence, the legal enforcement 
of morality, and women's liberation. 

110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) 

A philosophical study of some of the world's important religions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, 
Buddhism, Hinduism, et cetera. (Same as Religious Studies 110) 

115A The Western Tradition: Philosophy (3) 

One component of a set of courses providing an integrated study of major developments in the 
heritage of Western civilization from the beginnings of Western culture to the 16th century. 
Concurrent enrollment in English 115A and History 115A is required. 

115B The Western Tradition: Philosophy (3) 

One component of a set of courses providing an integrated study of major developments in the 
heritage of Western civilization from the 16th /1 7th centuries to the present. Concurrent enroll- 
ment in English 115B and History 115B is required. 

210 Logic (3) 

The logical structure of language and correct reasoning: deduction, induction, scientific reasoning, 
informal fallacies. Recommended for students majoring in humanities and social sciences. 
(Linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, or science majors should usually take Philosophy 368.) 

290 History of Philosophy: Greek Philosophy (3) 

The origins of Western philosophy in ancient Greece, and its development to the time of Socrates, 
Plato and Aristotle. 

291 History of Philosophy: Medieval Philosophy (3) 

Scholastic philosophy and its precursors in ancient thought. 

300 History of Philosophy: Rationalism and Empiricism (3) 

The rationalism of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, and the empiricism of Locke, Berkeley and Hume- 

301 History of Philosophy: Kant and the 19th Century (3) 

The empiricistic and rationalistic influences on Kant, followed by a study of the major trends in 
19th-century philosophy. 


Philosophy 263 


304 Methods of Inquiry (3) 

Methods for identifying and analyzing philosophical issues, especially those arising across discipli- 
nary lines of the arts and humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. 

305 Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

Main trends of 20th-century philosophy, pragmatism, linguistic analysis and existentialism. 

310 Ethics (3) 

Problems of human conduct and moral evaluation: standards for moral assessment of conduct and 
persons; morality and its relation to mores, social demands, and personal commitments. 

311 Aesthetics (3) 

The conditions and aims of art and of aesthetic experience. 

323 Existentialism (3) 

The existentialism movement in modern philosophy. 

324 Existential Group (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. An investigation of how themes in the writings of existentialist 
philosophers pertain to the life styles, actions, and feelings of the class participants. 

341 Assumptions of Psychotherapy (3) 

Philosophical concepts and assumptions pertinent to the theory of psychotherapy, such as the 
Cartesian, the mechanistic and the deterministic assumptions of Freud. 

343 Philosophy and Women's Liberation (3) 

The basic value concepts and moral principles underlying such issues in the women's movement 
as: oppression of women, marriage as exploitation, sex stereotypes and femininity, sexuality, 
alternative family styles, the morality of abortion, and preferential hiring. 

345 Political Philosophy (3) 

Selected problems in political philosophy. (Not the same as Political Science 340) 

347 Selected Problems in Philosophy (1-3) 

Examination and clarification of some philosophical topic or group of related topics not adequately 
covered in other listed philosophy courses. May be repeated with different content for addition- 
al credit. 

350 Oriental Philosophy (3) 

Major philosophical systems of India, China and Japan, including various schools of Buddhism, 
Confucianism and Taoism. 

355 Legal Philosophy (3) 

Theories about the nature of various legal institutions and processes. The concept of law and 
important subsidiary concepts. 

360 Philosophy of History (3) 

Conceptual problems about historical inquiry, argument and writing. Assessment of traditional 
speculative philosophy of history in the light of these problems. 

365 Social Philosophy (3) 

Theories about the nature of various social, political and legal institutions, and arguments about what 
these institutions ought to be. 

368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

The recognition and construction of correct deductions in the sentential logic and the first-order 
predicate calculus. 

369 Second Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 368 or equivalent. Continuation of the study of the recognition and con- 
struction of correct deductions in the full first-order predicate calculus with identity and the 
calculus of descriptions. Axiomatized deductive systems of propositional calculus. 

370 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

^e role of philosophy in shaping theological doctrine, in critically evaluating religious experience, 
in arguing for or against the existence of Cod, and in considering the problem of evil. 

373 Philosophy in Literature (3) 

Philosophical themes in literature. Mostly recent American novels; some British and continental 
authors. 

375 Introduction to the Philosophy of Language (3) 

The major issues in semantical theory: truth, meaning, analytic-synthetic, semiotics. (Same as 
Linguistics 375) 


264 Philosophy 


380 Analytic Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. 20th-century analytic philosophers such 
as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ryle, Austin, Quine, Strawson, and Hare. 

382 Marx and Marxism (3) 

Marx and his followers in their philosophic aspect. Theories of human nature, society and intellectual 
activity; conceptual tools for the analysis of phenomena; sources; and followers, critical or 
dogmatic. 

384 Philosophy of the Natural Sciences (3) 

Space, time and relativity; quantum mechanics, causality and real existence; laws, theories and 
models; topics in the history of science. Some facility in either mathematics or philosophy is 
presupposed. (Same as Physics 384) 

385 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3) 

Methodological problems about psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science 
and history. Objectivity and value judgments in social science; emergence; explanation; reduc- 
tionist and functionalist accounts. Some acquaintance with the social sciences is presupposed. 
(Same as Social Sciences 385) 

399 Directed Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval of department. Supervised individual study as an elective. May be repeated 
for credit with different content. No more than three units may be taken with any one adviser 
in any one semester. 

420 Metaphysics (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. Such philosophical problems as freedom 
and determinism, mind and body, time and becoming, causation, deity, substratum, personal 
identity. 

425 Introduction to Phenomenology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. The historical background and basic 
viewpoints which have provided a framework for philosophical research and study in the 
writings of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. 

430 Epistemology (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. The nature of knowledge, belief, 
certainty, truth, perception, and the a priori, examinations of skepticism, traditional responses 
to skepticism, and the foundations of knowledge. 

435 Philosophy of Science (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. Some logical features of scientific 
inquiry, such as the relation of observation to theory, and the impact of scientific knowledge 
on social issues and values. 

440 Philosophy of Mind (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. The concept of mind, and such related 
issues as the mind-body relation, behavior, consciousness, voluntary action, weakness of will 
and our knowledge of other minds. 

447 Seminar in Selected Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive study of one philosophical 
concern, such as an individual philosopher or topic. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 

455 Seminar in Values (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 310 or 311, or consent of instructor. Valuation or some important form oi 
value: ethical, aesthetic, political. May be repeated with different content for additional credit- 

465 Seminar on Law and Morals (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Concepts which bear on questions of responsibility in both law 
and morals: will, intention, freedom, negligence, recklessness, ignorance, mistake, act and 
cause. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

468 Seminar in Advanced Symbolic Logic (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 369 or equivalent. Axiomatized systems of deduction in the propositional 
and predicate calculi and alternative systems of logic; topics in philosophical logic. May b e 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

470 Seminar in Metaphysics (3) 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 420 or 430 or 440, or consent of instructor. Some single concept, such as 
identity, person, time, causality, substance, understanding, reality; or some cluster of issues, 


Political Science 265 


such as thought and reality, freedom and determinism. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 

475 Seminar in the Philosophy of Language (3) 

Prerequisite: six units in philosophy or consent of instructor. The theory of meaning and formal 
semantics. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

480 Seminar in the History of Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: an appropriate course from among 290, 291, 300, 301, or consent of instructor. Some 
important work, figure, school, or problem in the history of philosophy before 1900. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. 

490 Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: appropriate coursework or consent of Instructor. Issues raised by such 20th-century 
philosophers as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Austin, Quine, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Mer- 
leau-Ponty or Foucault. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval of department. To develop competency in research. May be repeated for 
credit. No more than three units may be taken with any one adviser in any one semester. 


DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 


FACULTY 
Julian F.S. Foster 
Department Chair 

Sidney Baldwin, Charles Bell, Michael Brown, Keith Boyum, Vincent Buck, Bert Buzan, Virginia 
Ermer, Anne Feraru, Phillip Cianos, Harvey Crody, Cary Guertner, Bernard Hyink, Karl Kahrs, 
Alana Northrop, James Pfiffner, John Purcell, Ivan Richardson,* Alan Saltzstein, Vera Simone, 
Barbara Stone, Irving Stone, Sandra Sutphen, Bruce Wright, Jon Yinger 


Political science is the study of people's behavior as it relates to power and public organizations. 
The discipline is normally divided into six sub-fields: 

Political philosophy, which deals with normative questions about how power should be used and 
distributed, rights and obligations, the nature of justice and the ideal state. 

American politics, which is concerned with campaigns and elections, parties, elected executives, 
legislative processes, and issues of public policy. 

Public administration, the role played by the public employees in policy making, planning, person- 
nel management', taxation and finance, and in responding to the needs and problems of 
communities and the nation. 

Public law, which involves the judicial process, civil rights and liberties, and the significance of 
such terms as "equal opportunity" and "due process" in the United States. 

Comparative government, which raises the same questions of politics, administration and law 
about other countries, and moves towards conclusions based on comparisons between them. 

International relations, which is concerned with relations between states and other international 
actors such as multinational corporations and the United Nations; and with the underlying 
realities of power, based on resources, wealth, military preparedness and national security. 
A major in political science prepares students for law school, government employment on the local, 
s tate and national levels, foreign service, teaching, business, journalism, or leadership in civic and 
Political activities. 


^ department offers a concentration in public administration for those who seek careers in public 
service. The concentration describes the environment within which the profession exists and the 
concepts and goals which underlie such functions as budgeting, personnel work, policy analysis and 
Management. Experience is gained through the administrative internship. 

F °r prelaw students, the department provides a series of law-related courses numbered in the 370 
an 4^0 series (see course descriptions). There is a prelaw adviser and and active Prelaw Society 
y, ' c ^ en ables students to make close and direct contact with the work of attorneys, judges, etc. 

e department is closely tied to the College Legal Clinic, which provides free legal advice for 
^ents and others who cannot afford the usual costs. 


n *'ersity administrative officer 


266 Political Science 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Basic Requirements 

The major consists of 36 units of political science, of which at least 30 units must be in the upper 
division, plus 12 upper division units in related disciplines, such as American studies, anthropology, 
economics, geography, history, philosophy, psychology, sociology and statistics. Work in related 
fields must be approved in writing by one of the department's undergraduate advisers. Courses in 
related fields may be taken on a Credit/ No Credit option. The 48 units required for majors are in 
addition to those meeting the general education requirement. 


Breadth Requirements 


Majors, with the exception of those choosing the Public Administration concentration, are required 
to take 300-level courses in five of the six sub-fields of political science. Two courses are required: 
Political Science 330, Comparative Political Analysis, and Political Science 340, Political Philosophy. 


Three courses must be selected from the following: 


Political Science 310 

Political Science 320 
Political Science 350 
Political Science 375 


American Political Behavior or Political Science 315 American Political 
Process 

Politics, Policy and Administration 

World Politics or Political Science 352 American Foreign Policy 
Public Law 


Those choosing the public administration concentration described below take Political Science 320 
and one other course listed above. 


Research Methods Requirement 

All majors must acquire a knowledge of research methods and approaches either by taking Political 
Science 407, Quantitative Methods in Political Science, orby taking one of the research proseminars: 
Political Science 311, 316, 321, 341, 351 or 376. Those concentrating in public administration must 
take either 407 or 321. 

Public Administration Concentration 

In addition to fulfilling the breadth and research methods requirements in the ways described above, 
those who wish to concentrate in public administration must take: 

1. Nine units from among the following courses on administrative and management processes: 
Political Science 421, 422, 423, 424, 426, 428, 429, 475 and 497. 

2. Six units from among the following courses on policy and administrative analysis: Political 
Science 411, 418, 420, 425, 427, 446, 456 and 482. 

3 Six units from courses in the general area of the American political process, as approved by 
the adviser. 


Internships 

The department offers a variety of interships. Each one involves students in working in an agency 
or political organization, and in meeting in an on-campus seminar to discuss and analyze their 
experiences. Internship courses are numbered 298, 491, 492, 497 and 498 (see course descriptions). 

Advisers 

The department emphasizes proper advisement, and all majors are strongly urged to talk with either 
the undergraduate, the prelaw or the public administration adviser as soon as possible after entering 
the program. The adviser helps with study plans, and gives information about subsequent career 
possibilities, including law and other graduate schools, postbaccalaureate fellowships and scholar- 
ships, and job possibilities in local government. 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The minor is composed of 21 units of political science, in addition to those meeting the general 
education requirements. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


Political Science 267 


POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES f 

Political Science 100 or its equivalent is the prerequisite for all upper division political science 

courses; 300-level courses beginning with 310 may require concurrent enrollment in a research 

proseminar. See the department bulletin for details not provided in the course descriptions below. 

100 American Government (3) 

People, their politics, and power; contemporary issues, changing political styles and processes, 
institutions and underlying values of the American political system. Satisifies state requirements 
in U.S. Constitution and California state and local government. 

171 Lawyers and the Legal Profession (1) 

Lawyers in American society. Current trends and projections. Law schools and legal education, the 
employment market, and alternative law-related jobs. 

200 Introduction to the Study of Politics (3) 

Describing and evaluating politics; political science as an academic discipline. 

210 Problems in American Government (3) (Formerly 400) 

The role of the federal government regarding pollution, drugs and narcotics (education, law enforce- 
ment). The seniority system in Congress; the role of lobbies, etc., using government reports. 
Congressional hearings, newspapers and journals of opinion. 

298 Political Externship (3) 

Politics for the nonmajor or beginning political science student. Work in campaigns or in the offices 
of elected public officials; supervision by faculty and cooperating agency; seminars and individ- 
ual conferences. May be repeated once. 

300 Contemporary Issues in California Government and Politics (3) 

Regional, county, and community subdivisions. Decisionmaking and costs of democracy; crisis in 
the cities, flight to the suburbs, and race relations. Comparisons will be made with other states 
and their subdivisions. Satisfies state requirement in California state and local government. 

309 Introduction to Metropolitan Politics (3) 

The inner city and suburbia. Political processes: power in the city, the urban-suburban relationship, 
political fragmentation and the national government in urban areas. 

310 American Political Behavior (3) 

Political behavior in America. Perspectives examined include those drawn from psychology and 
biology; the analysis of social structure and politics as rational behavior. 

311 Research Proseminar in American Political Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 310 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in American political behavior. 

315 American Political Process (3) 

Structures, processes, and institutions in the American political system. 

316 Research Proseminar in American Political Process (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 315 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in American political process. 

320 Politics, Policy and Administration (3) 

Public administration and the roles played by administrators in the formulation and execution of 
public policy. 

321 Research Proseminar in Politics, Policy and Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in public administration and policy analysis. 

330 Comparative Political Analysis (3) 

Compares patterns of political behavior and interaction in various political systems. 

335 Comparative Political Change (3) 

A comparative study of sources and patterns of political change. 

3*0 Political Philosophy (3) 

The major thinkers in the Western tradition of political philosophy from Plato to the present; the 
principal concepts and theories. (Not the same as Philosophy 345) 

341 Research Proseminar in Political Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 340 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in political philosophy. 

345 Political Culture and Political Value (3) 

Political values as they relate to aspects of political culture such as perceptions, attitudes and 

^ Participation. 

♦ Pr 


Requisite may be waived only with consent of instructor. 


268 Political Science 


347 Political Theory and Political Practice (3) 

Thought and action in politics. Alternative modes of participation in political activity. 

350 World Politics (3) 

The global political system; institutions and processes of interaction among states and other interna- 
tional actors. 

351 Research Proseminar in International Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in international relations. 

352 American Foreign Policy (3) 

United States' foreign policy since World War II. Institutions and bureaucracies of foreign policy 
decision-making, military and national security policy, domestic sources of foreign policy, and 
changes brought about by detente with communist nations. 

375 Public Law (3) 

Nature and function of public law particularly within the Anglo-American political tradition. 

376 Research Proseminar in Public Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 (may be taken concurrently). Research concepts and techniques 
applied to an individual project in public law. 

407 Quantitative Methods in Political Science (3) 

Quantitative research methods in political science. Introduction to computer data processing tech- 
niques and instruction in statistical measures employed in analyzing social science research 
data. 

410 Political Parties (3) 

The structure and methods by which the political parties operate in the American political system 
with some comparisons to their structure and operation in other democratic societies. 

411 Art of Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Public administration as "art" rather than "science." Administra- 
tive novels and other fictional literature, and other audio-visual media. 

412 The Art of Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Politics as practiced and understood by practitioners of the art. 
A seminar which features guest lecturers. 

413 Pressure Groups and Public Opinion (3) 

The power and growth of farm, labor, business, and noneconomic pressure groups; interest group 
activity in Congress, administration and courts; public opinion and propaganda. 

414 The Legislative Process (3) 

The legislative process in Congress and state legislatures. Policy, representation, reform and behavior 
of individual legislators. Bureaucratic lawmaking and the legislative roles of the President and 
interest groups. 

415 Power and Participation in America (3) 

How and why people behave politically in the United States. The "power elite" debate, the changing 
American voter, and the dynamics of political participation. 

416 The American Presidency (3) 

Presidential power, the resources on which that power is based, and the limitations on the use of 
that power. The relations between the President and Congress, the bureaucracy, the press and 
the public. 

418 Public Policy Process (3) 

Public policy-making models and evaluation of their applicability to selected contemporary policy 
issues. 

420 Governing the Urban Community (3) 

Ideas, institutions, interests in the governance of urban communities, emphasizing decision-making/ 
problem-solving, policy-making, and administrative institutions. 

421 Public Finance Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320. Role of finance administration and budgeting in determination of 
public policy. Assessment administration and governmental revenues and expenditures; princi- 
ples and practices of cost accounting, treasury management, and capital budgeting. 

422 Public Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320. The civil service and the merit system; recruitment procedures 
and examinations; position classification, salary structures retirement plans, in-service training/ 
employee organizations, and personnel supervision. 


Political Science 269 


423 Regional Planning and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of instructor. Governmental policies, procedures, and 
agencies involved in planning and development of regions. Regional problems and objectives, 
emerging views of regional planning, and investment allocation during the development proc- 
ess. 

424 Urban Planning and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or consent of instructor. City planning; the legal bases and funda- 
mental concepts of planning; and the organization of the general plan, zoning laws and adminis- 
tration, urban renewal, and capital programming. 

425 Comparative Public Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Political Science 320. Cross-cultural comparison of public administration systems; 
application of different models of analysis to administrative institutions; bureaucracy; ecology 
of public administration in modernized and developing societies; and the role of public adminis- 
tration in nation-building. 

426 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320. Bargaining in the public sector; principles, practices, problems in 
negotiating labor contracts; mediation, conciliation, fact-finding and arbitration settlement tech- 
niques; government as an intervenor, moderator, and judge of last resort. 

427 Current Issues in Urban and Metropolitan Policy (3) 

Policy issues and alternatives in urban and metropolitan problem areas such as law enforcement, 
transportation, housing or education. 

428 Administrative Systems and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320. Administrative systems and analysis in contemporary govern- 
ment. Systems planning and design, data processing, work flow, control systems, operations 
research, cost-benefit analysis and forms design. 

429 Public Personnel Training (3) 

Training methodology in public administration. The problems, methods and institutions in the train- 
ing of public personnel emphasizing labor-management relations. 

430 Government and Politics of a Selected Nation-State (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 330 or consent of instructor. The political institutions and processes 
of a selected nation-state. May be repeated for credit. 

431 Government and Politics of a Selected Area (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 330 or consent of instructor. The structures and functions of national 
political systems in a selected geographic area. May be repeated for credit. 

440 Political Ideologies and Attitudes (3) 

The content and historical evolution of modern ideologies such as liberalism, democracy, commu- 
nism, socialism and fascism. Their relationship to social and political change. 

442 Problems of Democratic Political Thought (3) 

Philosophies and theories of democratic political systems; American political thought. 

443 The Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 340. Marxist theory and philosophy from its pre-Hegelian roots to the 
present. 

446 Corruption, Ethics and Public Policy (3) 

Ethical problems which face persons in the public service. The focus is on practical decision-making. 

451 Problems in International Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350. International politics and foreign policy, as specified by instructor. 
See department bulletin for subject focus each semester. May be repeated for credit. 

452 Foreign Policy of a Selected Country or Group of Countries (3) 

Objectives, capabilities, policy-making processes, and implementation of the foreign policies of a 
particular country or group of countries. Focus may be on United States, Soviet Union, Latin 
America or other countries or areas. May be repeated for credit. 

45 5 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policies (3) 

Erameworks for analyzing the foreign policies of state domestic and external determinants of foreign 
policy actions; foreign policy decision-making institutions and processes, foreign policy objec- 
tives and instruments. 

456 The National Security Establishment (3) 

Conflicting theories of national security, the functions of defense and intelligence bureaucracies in 
foreign and domestic policy making, problems of arms control, and the dangers to democratic 


270 Political Science 


values and institutions posed by the technology of national security. 

457 Politics of International Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 1 00 or consent of instructor. The link between economics and international 
politics. The political economy of free trade and imperialism, of neo-colonialism and foreign 
aid. 

461 The United Nations and Other Public International Organizations (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350. Structure and functions of United Nations and various specialized 
and regional international organizations. 

470 Judicial Process (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 or consent of instructor. The nature, functions and roles of courts 
in the Anglo-American legal system; the nature, functions and roles of major participants in the 
American legal system, including judges, attorneys and citizens. 

473 Introduction to Constitutional Law (3) 

The role of the courts, the presidency, Congress and the states within the US constitutional system, 
judicial review, presidential impoundment and impeachment, presidential foreign and military 
powers, regulation of the economy and public morals, and congressional investigations. 

474 Seminar in Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 375 or consent of instructor. Case studies in constitutional rights and 
liberties, involving relationships between the individual and government which are affected by 
the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment. 

475 Administrative Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 375 or consent of instructor. Law as it affects public officials 
and agencies in their relations with private citizens and the business community. Case materials 
and regulatory practices. 

476 International Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 350 or 375 or consent of instructor. The law of war and peace; the 
rights and duties of nations in their international relationships. The World Court: purpose, 
problems, and prospects. 

481 Politics Through Literature (3) 

The novel as a means of explicating political behavior in various nation-states. 

482 Environmental Policy and Politics (3) 

The nature of environmental problems, national and international. The public policy-making process 
and environmental issues. 

485 Politics of Change (3) 

A specific cultural, religious, or ethnic interest group; the impact of an ideology, movement or 
individual or political processes and behavior. Role of women, politics of women and the law, 
women's liberation movement. May be repeated for credit. 

490 Seminar in Selected Topics (3) 

Seminar in selected topics to be announced on a semester basis. May be repeated for credit. 

491 International Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 10 hours work per week with officials of foreign governments in 
the Los Angeles-Orange County area, usually consular officials. Individual supervision by faculty 
and cooperating officials. Interns meet with instructor by arrangement. 

492 Prelaw Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The legal profession the public rather than private spheres. A 
supervised working commitment of 10 hours weekly with an assigned individual or organiza- 
tion. 

497 Government Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: public administration concentration and consent of instructor. Students work 15-20 
hours per week as supervised interns in a public agency. Supervision by the faculty and 
cooperating agency. In addition, a weekly three-hour seminar. 

498 Political Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: political science concentration and consent of instructor. Students work 8-12 hours 
per week with elected officials or candidates for elective office. Individual supervision by the 
faculty and cooperating individuals. Interns meet with instructor by arrangement. May he 
repeated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: open to advanced students in political science with consent of department chair. 


Political Science 271 


506 Seminar in the Scope and Theory of Political Science (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The nature of the discipline, approaches, tools, concepts and 
theories. 

509 Administrative Organization and Process (3) (Formerly 419) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. For graduate students in public administration who have not had 
an introductory course in public administration. Organizational theory and practice, decision 
making, systems analysis, performance evaluation and administrative improvement. 

511 Seminar in American Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The political process in the United States. 

515 Seminar in Political Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in political behavior. 

519 State and Local Government (3) 

The structure, processes, functions, and interrelationships of state and local governments in Ameri- 
can society. State, county, municipal and special district government in California as compared 
with other states. 

521 Seminar in Public Administration Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The concepts, models and ideologies of public administration 
within the larger political system. 

522 Seminar in Public Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in public personnel administration. 

523 Administrative Research and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 320 or 509. Concepts and methods employed in administrative re- 
search and analysis: Organization and procedure surveys, performance evaluation techniques, 
administrative data sources and their uses, and report writing. 

524 Seminar in Environmental Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Problems and issues in the physical and human environment of 
the urban community. 

525 Seminar in Metropolitan Area Government (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The different approaches to metropolitan areawide government. 
Interjurisdictional conflict and cooperation and the roles of state and national governments. 

526 Seminar in Administrative Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Concepts, functions and techniques of administrative leadership; 
group dynamics; decisionmaking; the organization and the individual. 

528 Seminar in Public Administration and Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The interplay between public policy development and program 
administration. 

531 Seminar in Comparative Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Political systems. 

540 Seminar Readings in Political Philosophy (3) 

Prerequisite: undergraduate preparation in political theory or philosophy. Readings of classics in 
political philosophy. Politics from the perspective of normative political theory. 

541 Seminar in Contemporary Political Theory (3) 

Recent social and political theories; the problems of the post-industrial world, such as imperialism, 
bureaucracy and alienation, and possible resolutions. 

550 Seminar on Foreign Policy Formulation (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The foreign policy-making process. The interaction between 
domestic and international sources for policy formulation. 

551 Seminar in International Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Problems in international relations; individual research and contri- 
butions. May be repeated for credit. 

57 1 Seminar in Public Law (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in public law. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

59 8 Thesis (3-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 


272 Psychology 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

FACULTY 

P. Christopher Cozby 
Department Chair 

Frank Bagrash, Ernest Dondis, Peter Ebersole, Allen Gottfried, Arthur Graesser, Richard Lindley, 
William Lindner, Carol Lindquist, Richard Lippa, Richard McFarland, Douglas Navarick, David 
Perkins, Michael Scavio, Louis Schmidt, Don Schweitzer,* William Smith, Edward Stearns, 
George Watson, Arthur Webber, Geoffry White, Margaret White, Stanley Woll 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The major is designed to educate students in a wide variety of the content areas in psychology. A 
structured program of core requirements presents the multifaceted nature of psychological inquiry. 
The program also allows flexibility in constructing a concentration. 

Courses provide the present knowledge in the field and the methods used to obtain new knowledge. 
Thus, course content generally reflects the interplay among theory, method, data, and practice. 
Majors may expect to become familiar with the scientific method, statistics, experimental design, 
and the use of psychological tests as tools of inquiry into the nature of behavior. 

The major provides a sound background in psychology as part of a liberal arts education. This 
background may serve as preparation for career choices related to the field of psychology. Alternate- 
ly, it may provide a basis for employment and professional training in business, law, or public 
organizations. The major also provides a foundation for professional careers in psychology through 


graduate education. 

Requirements for the Major Units 

I. Lower Division 9 

Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Psychology 202 Research Methods in Psychology (3) 

Psychology 203 Elementary Statistics (3) 

II. Upper Division 15 


Psychology 302 Learning and Motivation 
One of the following three courses (3): 

Psychology 303 Sensation and Perception (3) 

Psychology 304 Comparative Animal Behavior 
Psychology 321 Physiological Psychology 
One of the following three courses (3): 

Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality 
Psychology 351 Social Psychology 
Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology 
Psychology 408 History of Psychology (3) 

Psychology 461 Psychological Testing (3) 

III. Upper Division (300/400 level) Psychology Electives 12 

A full range of options, including complementary courses, are available for the 1 2 units 
of upper-division (300—400 level) electives. These courses can form an area of 
focus wherein students can pursue their own interests in depth, especially at the 
400 level. These courses should be selected in consultation with a psychology 
adviser. 

IV Total 36 

No more than three units of Independent Study (Psychology 498 or 499) may be counted toward 

the major. Each course counted toward the major must be completed with a grade of C or higher- 

Student Advisement 

The department undergraduate advisement coordinator serves as a general adviser and assists 

students in selecting a specific faculty member to provide advisement. 

All who declare psychology as theif major should meet with a psychology faculty adviser during 

t^e^first semester to develop a study plan. Students are also encouraged to obtain a copy of the 

• University administrative officer 


Psychology 273 


Psychology Department Student Handbook from the department office. The handbook presents 
information on student advisement and faculty teaching and research interests. Early consultation 
with a psychology faculty adviser is especially important for those interested in pursuing graduate 
training, careers in psychology or related fields or a double major or minor. 

Community College Transfer Students: A maximum of nine units of psychology credit may be applied 
towards the requirements for the major by community college transfer students. These must fit the 
requirements of Psychology 101, 202, and 203 as specified in the course descriptions. Any additional 
units taken in psychology at a community college and approved by the university may be used for 
university credit towards the required 124 units for graduation. 

Elementary/Secondary Teaching Credential 

The Psychology Department has been granted a waiver by the Commission for Teacher Preparation 
and Licensing which means that psychology majors, providing they follow an acceptable program 
of courses, can be granted either the multiple subject (elementary) or single subject (secondary) 
credential without having to take the state examination otherwise required by the Ryan Act. See the 
department's undergraduate advisement coordinator. 


Honors Courses 

The Psychology Department offers a sequence of honors courses for qualified students who wish 
to do advanced work in psychology. The first of these honors courses (Psychology 491 ) provides 
an opportunity to carry out research under the tutorial guidance of a faculty member. The second 
(Psychology 492) is a seminar in contemporary issues in psychology. Perfomance on the research 
project and seminar participation will be evaluated for departmental honors. Obtain further informa- 
tion and applications from the department office. 

Minor in Psychology . 

The Psychology Department offers an approved minor program consisting of 21 units. The minor 
permits recognition for a concentration in Psychology. Students majoring in related disciplines (e.g., 
sociology, human services) may find the minor useful in improving their career opportunities. 
The minor program consists of the following courses: 

Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology 

Psychology 202 Research Methods in Psychology 

One of the following laboratory/field research courses: 


Psychology 302 
Psychology 303 
Psychology 304 
Psychology 321 
Psychology 441 
Psychology 451 
Psychology 453 
Psychology 463 
Psychology 470L 
One of the following: 
Psychology 331 
Psychology 341 
Psychology 351 
Psychology 361 


Learning and Motivation 
Sensation and Perception 
Comparative Animal Behavior 
Physiological Psychology 
Experimentation in Personality 
Experimental Social Psychology 
Attitude Formation & Change 
Experimental Child Psychology 
Behavior Modification Laboratory 


Psychology of Personality 
Abnormal Psychology 
Social Psychology 
Developmental Psychology 
p lus three other upper division courses or two other upper division courses and Psychology 203. 
No more than three units of Independent Research (Psychology 498 or 499) may be used to meet 
the requirements of the minor. Each course counted toward the minor must be completed with a 
grade of C or higher. 


master of arts in psychology 

Master OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY (Clinical/Community) 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


274 Psychology 

PSYCHOLOGY COURSES 

101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Basic concepts and problems in psychology. Perception, learning, cognitive processes, development, 
motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, physiological and social psychology. 

202 Research Methods in Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. The fundamentals of psychological research methods. Participation in 
conducting experiments and analyzing data. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

203 Elementary Statistics (3) (Formerly 161) 

Descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlational techniques. 

301 The Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101 or consent of instructor. Topics in human sexual behavior integrating sexual- 
ity as social, clinical, developmental and biological. Sexual identity, sexual behaviors, romantic 
love, causes and treatment of sexual dysfunctions. 

302 Learning and Motivation (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Theoretical and experimental investiga- 
tions in learning, memory, thinking, problem solving and motivation. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

303 Sensation and Perception (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Theoretical and experimental investiga- 
tions in sensory and perceptual processes, including vision and audition. (2 hours lecture, 3 
hours laboratory) 

304 Comparative Animal Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Theoretical and experimental investiga- 
tions in animal behavior, including humans. The interspecies comparisons of behavior and 
sensory, motor, endocrine, and neural structures. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory; one or 
more field trips required) 

311 Educational Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Application of psychological research and theory to the educational proc- 
ess. The problems of learning, individual differences, intellectual capacities and behavior. 

321 Physiological Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 202 or Bio Sci 101 or equivalent. Anatomy and physiology of the nervous 
system, role of neural and humoral agents in complex behavior. Relation between behavioral 
and biological processes. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

331 Psychology of Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Broad survey of research, theory and assessment techniques in the area of 
personality. 

341 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention of psychopathology; the 
neuroses, the personality disorders, psychophysiological disorders, psychoses, addictions, sexu- 
al deviations and organic disorders. 

342 Mental Health (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. The concepts of mental health; positive factors in the individual, group and 
community which are conducive to improving mental health. No credit toward psychology 
majors. 

350 Environmental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101 or consent of instructor. Theory, research and method in the study of 
behavior-environment relationships. The influence of such variables as population density and 
urban design on human behavior. 

351 Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Phenomena related to social behavior and the nature of group processes 
and influences. Attitude formation and change, aggression, altruism, affiliation and socialization. 

361 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Psychological and physical development from birth through adulthood 
Theories, methods and research findings regarding the development of perception, cognition, 
learning, personality and social behavior. 

364 Intelligence: A Life-span Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite. Psych 101 or consent of instructor. Nature, determinants and consequences of intelli* 
gence. Sociopolitical aspects of the testing movement. Stability, change, and prediction of IQ' 


Psychology 275 

social and biological influences, educational and occupational consequences, genetic vs. envi- 
ronmental controversy. 

391 Industrial Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 101. Traditional and current psychological principles and techniques in industrial 
and business settings. Selection, placement, training, work motivation, human factors, environ- 
mental influences, system safety, product liability, problems of people at work, organizational 
development and consumer behavior. 

408 History of Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing. The development of psychology from early times to the present; major 
traditions and conceptual issues. 

411 Human Learning and Memory (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or consent of instructor. Methodological and theoretical analysis of the 
acquisition, retention, and retrieval of information in human beings. 

412 Theories of Learning (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or consent of instructor. Principles of learning according to the major 
theoretical systems. Critical evaluation of the theories and systems. 

413 Perception (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 303 or consent of instructor. Psychological problems in perception. 

415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302, 303 or consent of instructor. Theory and research with respect to problem 
solving, thinking, concept learning, language, decision making and judgment, cognitive struc- 
ture, cognitive development. 

416 Motivation (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 302 or consent of instructor. Concepts and evidence concerning the activation 
and direction of behavior, including consideration of needs, wishes, drives, incentives and 
preferences. 

417 Introduction to Psycholinguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: six hours of upper division work in psychology or linguistics, or consent of instructor. 
Psychological and linguistic approaches to the study of language. Innate and learned aspects 
of language development, motivational and social aspects of language, symbolism, language 
disorders and universal. (Same as Linguistics 417) 

431 Theories of Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 331. Traditional and contemporary theories of personality, including psy- 
choanalytic, humanistic-existential, behavioral, trait and social interaction approaches. 

441 Experimentation in Personality (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 331. Laboratory experience in personality research. Students will design and 
conduct experiments. Creativity, projective tests as personality measures, experimental psycho- 
dynamics, personality structure and interpersonal judgment. Topics will vary according to 
preferences of students and instructor. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

451 Experimental Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 203 or equivalent, 202 and 351. Topics in social behavior, group processes and 
influences. Laboratory experiments in attitude formation and change; group processes such as 
communication, problem solving, and norm formation; interpersonal influence and perception. 
(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

452 Interpersonal Processes (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 351 or Sociology 341, or consent of instructor. Theory and research on basic 
interpersonal processes (interpersonal judgment, communication, social performance, attrac- 
tion and affiliation) and current models of interaction. 

453 Attitude Formation and Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 351 or consent of instructor. The theories of attitude formation and change; 
research methodologies and measurement strategies. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

454 Social Cognition (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 351 or 415. Theory and research on the processing and representation of social 
information. Cognitive and social psychology, including impression formation, attribution theo- 
ry, non-verbal communication, sociolinguistics, developmental issues. 

4^1 Psychological Testing (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 203 or equivalent. Intelligence, aptitude, interest, and personality testing. Theory, 
construction, evaluation, interpretation and uses of psychological tests. 


276 Psychology 

463 Experimental Child Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 202 and 361. Research methodology in developmental psychology. Critical 
examination of empirical studies. Design and execution of an original empirical investigation 
in an area of the student's choice. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

465 Analysis of Variance (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 203. Application of analysis of variance techniques to research design and 
evaluation of data. 

466 Social Science Computer Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 289 or consent of instructor. Computers in psychology. Batch 
processing; interactive computing; on-line experimentation. 

467 Correlational Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 203. The theory and techniques of correlational analysis. 

470 Behavior Modification (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 341, and junior or senior standing. Recommended: Psych 202 or 302. 
Exposition and evaluation of theory, research, and procedures for human behavior modifica- 
tion. 

470-L Behavior Modification Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 470 (may be taken concurrently), and consent of instructor. A laboratory 
experience in the natural environment where students apply the principles and procedures of 
behavior modification. (9 hours per week). 

472 Community Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 341, or consent of instructor. Theory and research. A survey of a variety 
of programs developed within this model; their service delivery aspects and the methodology 
of program evaluation. 

474 Medical Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101 and 341 or consent of instructor. Psych 321 is recommended. Medical- 
neurophysiological clinical psychology. Neuropathology; clinical neuropsychological testing, 
psychosomatic, nutritional, endocrine, and developmental disorders; chemotherapy; biofeed- 
back; behavioral medicine. 

475 Psychopharmacology (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 321 or 15 units of biological science. Basic principles underlying the use of drugs 
and related substances to modify experience and behavior. Historical and cultural variations 
in drug usage. Psychological, medical and social potentialities and limitations of these tech- 
niques. 

477 Human Sexual Dysfunction (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 301 and 341, and constent of instructor. Symptoms, causes, treatment and 
prevention of sexual disorders. Male and female inadequacy, aging, sex and disability, drug 
complications, homosexuality, transvestism and transexuals, ethical and legal issues. 

481 Survey of Clinical Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 331, 341 and 461. Methods, diagnosis, therapeutic techniques, research, and 
problems. 

491 Honors Project Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 101, 202, 203, 302 and consent of departmental honors committee. Students will 
design and carry out an honors research project, and will discuss this project in the seminar. 

492 Honors Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Psych 491. An issue-oriented seminar focusing on broad conceptual problems in 
psychology. Discussion of a general problem, followed by student presentations of alternative 
approaches. 

495 Internship in Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: 9 units of psychology and consent of instructor. Supervised experience in an off- 
campus location. Class meetings will be spent discussing the internship experience both from 
a practical and a theorectical standpoint. Application forms must be completed prior to enroll- 
ment. 

4% Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Consult "Student-to-Student Tutorials" in this catalog for more complete course descriptions. 

498 Independent Laboratory Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Individually conducted laboratory investigation of a selected 
topic area of human or animal experimental psychology under the direction of a faculty 


Psychology 277 


member. No more than 3 units of credit towards the major. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of at least one upper-division laboratory course in Psychology and consent 
of instructor. Individual library study under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for 
credit. No more than 3 units of credit towards the major. 

501 A Proseminar (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. To prepare 
beginning graduate students for more advanced courses. Sensation and perception, physiologi- 
cal psychology and learning. 

501 B Proseminar (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. To prepare 
beginning graduate students for more advanced courses. Personality, social psychology, and 
abnormal psychology. 

510 Experimental Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 203, 465 and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of 
instructor. Principles and methods of planning and carrying out systematic investigations on the 
behavior of complex organisms, interdependence of experimental design and statistical evalua- 
tion of results. Practice in formulation of testable hypotheses. 

515 Seminar: Psycholinguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 515) 

520 Seminar: Experimental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 465, 501 A and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of 
instructor. The data, methods, problems and current developments in sensation-perception; 
animal learning; human motor and verbal learning; thinking and problem solving; or motivation. 
May be repeated for credit. 

521 Seminar: Personality (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 501 B and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. 
Central problems in personality. May be repeated for credit. 

522 Seminar: Developmental Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 361 and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. 
Theory and research in developmental psychology. May be repeated for credit. 

531 Individual Mental Testing (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 461 and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. 
The major tests of intelligence. Practical experience in administration, scoring and interpretation 
of these instruments. 

540 Proseminar: Community Psychology (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to the M.S. Clinical/Community program. Community psychology; its histori- 
cal and philosophical roots, theoretical framework, research within the area, and current 
practical applications. 

542 Proseminar: Clinical Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 481 or equivalent; and admission to M.S. Clinical/Community program. Clinical 
psychology; broad theoretical considerations as well as their relationship to clinical practice in 
testing, diagnosis, ethics, and psychotherapy. 

544A Psychodiagnostics A (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. Clinical/Community program. A skills course in conducting diagnos- 
tic interviews, writing case histories, and giving and scoring objective diagnostic tests, and 
relevant issues in testing assessment. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

544B Psychodiagnostics B (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to M.S. Clinical/Community program and successful completion of Psych 
544 A. A laboratory course covering administration, scoring, and interpretation of traditional 
projective tests and relevant issues in testing assessment and research. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory) 

546 Behavior Therapy (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. Clinical/Community program or consent of instructor. Behavior 
influence. The student will design and execute project in a clinical setting. (2 hours lecture, 3 
hours laboratory) 

55 1 Seminar: Social Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Psych 501 B and admission to a psychology graduate program or consent of instructor. 


278 Religious Studies 

Central problems and major theories in the field of social psychology. May be repeated for 
credit. 

560 Individual Therapy Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Clinical /Community program or consent of instructor. Specific 
therapy techniques and general approaches to individual psychotherapy. Theoretical material, 
and the material's practical application to clients. 

562 Group Therapy Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the first one and one-half years' work in the M.S. in 
Clinical /Community Psych program. Specific techniques and general approaches to group 
psychotherapy. Theoretical material and the material's practical application to clients in field 
work. 

564A,B Fieldwork Seminar (3,3) 

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of first year's work in the M.S. in Clinical/Community Psych 
program. Theoretical and applied problems arising from the fieldwork experience. Must be 
taken concurrently with Psych 566A or B. 

566A,B Fieldwork (4,4) 

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of first year's work in the M.S. in Clinical/Community program. 
Supervised clinical work in mental health agencies. Must be taken concurrently with Psych 564A 
or B. (Minimum of 12 hours field experience per week.) 

598 Thesis Research (3) 

Prerequisites: formal advancement to candidacy and consent of instructor. Development of a 
proposal for a major piece of empirical research, execution of the study, analysis of the results, 
and writing of a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to a psychology graduate program and consent of instructor. Empirical 
research in a selected area of psychology. Designed, conducted and written by the student with 
the collaboration of a member of the faculty. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

FACULTY 
Morton Fierman 

Department Chair 

Daniel Brown, Donald Gard, Joseph Kalir, George Saint-Laurent, James Santucci 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

This program provides the intellectual tools and scholarly background required for understanding 
the forms and traditions of religion that have appeared in human culture. 

Students in fields other than religion are encouraged to ask the questions which pertain to the real 
excitement at the boundary lines where the usual studies converge. The aim of each course is an 
open and nontraditional examination of ultimate questions as they apply to contemporary situations. 
The relevance of belief in both Eastern and Western civilizations for the cultural development of 
mankind is examined. An understanding of prejudice, war and other dimensions of religious value 
systems may be gained. 

Major in Religious Studies 

Six hours of introduction to world religions and six hours of a senior seminar in two semesters on 
contemporary religious issues are required. 

In addition, will be at least six hours of upper division courses chosen from each of the following 
categories: 

1 . The History and Sociology of Religion: religion studied as a cultural phenomenon with the 
historical context; its development and controversies; religion and science; religion and eco- 
nomics; the sociology of religion 

History: 405, 412A,B, 417A,B, 425B, 466B 

Sociology: 458 

Anthropology: 421 

Religious Studies: 333A,B, 334, 345A,B, 346A,B, 378, 405, 406, 430, 476, 485, 486 

2. The Phenomenology of Religion: religion as a human phenomenon; the psychology of religion; 
the philosophy of religion; religion and poetry, the arts. 

Philosophy: 311, 323, 370 


Religious Studies 279 

Religious Studies: 335, 343, 375, 376, 431, 433, 434A,B, 450, 475, 477, 485, 486 
3. Comparative Religion: a study of religious traditions and practices in Western and non-Western 
cultures: religious scriptures; comparative theology; major religious figures. 

Religious Studies: 332, 333A,B, 334, 335, 376, 430, 432, 435 
Courses in other schools and departments may be acceptable upon consultation with the chair of 
the Department of Religious Studies. 

Minor in Religious Studies 

The minor in religious studies is composed of at least 20 upper division units in religious studies 
exclusive of the general education requirements. For further information, contact the department 
chair. 


RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES 

100 Introduction to the Study of Primitive Religions (3) 

An introduction into the beliefs, thought-patterns and religious impact of prescientific people; those 
of the Australian aborigines, the African tribal communities, the North American Indians, the 
ancient Egyptians and Vedic Indians. 

110 Comparative Study of the World's Great Religions (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 110) 

111 Problems in the History of Religious Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Religious Studies 110 or consent of department chair. Problems that have appeared 
in the religious traditions of both East and West. 

150 Does God Exist? (1) 

The classic answers to the question of God's existence together with the reasons behind them, 
whether based on faith or natural reason, within both eastern and western traditions. 

200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 

The Christian scriptures and their background in the light of modern exegesis; the Synoptic Gospels, 
written creeds and liturgical formulae associated with the Orthodox, Roman and Protestant 
communions. 

201 Origins of the New Testament (3) 

The sources and content of the New Testament writings which reflect the life and beliefs of the 
Christians in the first century of the Common Era, including literary and historical criticism. 

210 Judaism: From the Beginning to the Middle Ages (3) (Formerly 330) 

The historical role of the religion of the jews including the Genesis and the development of Judaism. 

211 Judaism: From the Middle Ages to the Present (3) (Formerly 331) 

The history and contemporary social significance of the religion of the jews from the Middle Ages 
to the present; contemporary Judaism Characteristics of Orthodox, Conservative and Reform 
Judaism. 

250 The Religion of Islam (3) 

The religion of Islam, its background and main teachings: the rise of Islam, the caliphate, Islamic 
theology, teachings, mysticism and philosophy. 

253 Language and Religion (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 253) 

270 Introduction to the Oriental Religions (3) 

The beliefs and practices of the Eastern religions. One Eastern religion will be highlighted each 
semester it is offered. Will include Hinduism and Buddhism. 

332 The Land of the Bible: Everyday Life in Old Testament Times (3) 

How people lived in the Mediterranean world in the first century of the Christian era. 

333A Hebrew Prophets: The Major Prophets of Israel (3) 

Lectures and seminar discussions: the cultural, historical, values of and contemporary application 
of Isaiah, Second Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. (Same as Comparative Literature 305) 

333B The Minor Prophets of Israel (3) 

Lectures and seminar discussions; the cultural, historical, religious and political backgrounds of the 
Twelve Minor Prophets. 

334 Wisdom Literature (3) 

Values in Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Ecclesiasticus, the Wisdom of Solomon, Egyptian and 


280 Religious Studies 

Mesopotamian Wisdom writers as applied to the modern world. 

335 Christianity and Judaism (3) 

Differences and similarities between Christianity and Judaism. The age of transition from Judaism to 
Christianity; origins and destinies. 

343 The Bible and Its Ethics (3) 

The ethics of the Bible, its significance, its problems and its meaning for modern times. The ideals 
of the ethics of the Bible and its approach to the contemporary problems. 

345A History and Development of Christian Thought: The Beginning to 1274 (3) 

Christian thought from apostolic times to the death of Thomas Aquinas; Old and New Rome, the 
Great Councils, the Middle Ages, and the marriage of faith and reason. 

345B History and Development of Christian Thought: 1275 to the Present (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 345A or consent of instructor. Christian thought from the death of 
Thomas Aquinas to the present; the cultural and philosophical backgrounds of the successive 
ages of scholasticism, the renaissance, baroque, reason and revolution, and the modern world. 

346A,B, History and Development of Jewish Thought (3,3) 

Every philosophy of Judaism dealing with the fundaments of the Jewish religious experiences. 
A — The beginning to Moses Maimonides. B — Prerequisite: Religious Studies 346A. Ben Gerson 
to the present. 

370 Modern Non-traditional Religious Movements in America (3) 

The beliefs, history, ritual and organizational make-up of non-traditional modern religions in Ameri- 
ca. Scientology, Unification Church, Eckankar, the Aetherius Society, Witchcraft, and the Build- 
ers of the Adytum and others. 

376 Dimensions of Religion (3) 

The great themes of religious thought viewed objectively and subjectively in history and in the 
present day. Seminar and discussion presentation. 

378 Directions in Biblical Archeology (3) 

The present state of Biblical archeology. Biblical archeology and its recent discoveries, including the 
Dead Sea Scrolls. 

405 Indian Religions (3) 

The major religions of ancient India. The Upanisads, Buddhism and Vedanta. May be repeated for 
credit. 

406 Indian Religions (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 405 or consent of instructor. The major religions of ancient India. The 
Upanisads, Buddhism and Vedanta. May be repeated for credit. 

430 Rabbinic Literature: The Writings of Law and Lore (3) 

The historical, sociological and cultural background of the beginnings of the Talmud. The Talmud 
as one basis of modern ethics. Man as a moral being, free will, labor, justice, truth and 
truthfulness, peace, charity, parents and children, country and community. 

431 Jewish Mythology, Religion and Mysticism (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 331 or consent of instructor. Jewish mysticism, its inner significance, 
problems and meaning. The function which Jewish mysticism has had at varying periods. 

432 The Worlds of Martin Buber, "The Philosophy and Theology of Martin Buber" (3) 

Buber's views concerning relationship of man to God and man to man. 

433 Myth and Legend in Ancient Israel (3) 

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 330 or consent of instructor. Comparative folklore and mythology of 
the Old Testament. The myths and stories of the Old Testament. 

434A The Psalms: Books I and II (3) 

Major concepts in the Psalm Literature (Psalms 1-72, Books I and II). Structure, authorship and style 
of individual Psalms. The historical, theological, intellectual and political backgrounds and 
significance of Books I and II. 

434B The Psalms: Books III— V (3) 

Major concepts in the Psalms Literature (Psalms 73-150, Books III to V). Structure, authorship and 
style of individual Psalms. The historical, theological, intellectual and political backgrounds and 
significance of Books III to V. 

435 Old Testament Criticism (3) 

The Old Testament, its development and a literary study of its contents. 


Russian and East European Area Studies 281 


475 Anxiety, Guilt and Freedom (3) 

The distinction between psychiatry and religious methods of understanding basic human emotions: 
"authority", "God", "faith", "forgiveness", "sin", "error", "repentance", "sex" and "absolu- 
tion". 

476 The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry 1933-1945 (3) 

The ordeal of European Jewry during World War II as reflected in art, music, drama, fiction, poetry, 
historical, psychological and religious writing. 

477 Philosophical Foundations of Religious Education (3) 

Philosophical foundations of education and their impact on contemporary educational theory and 
practice in religious schools in the United States and courses in religion in public schools and 
colleges and universities. 

485 Major Contemporary Religious Thinkers (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, Religious Studies 1 1 1 or the equivalent. Religious thinkers contempo- 
rary to the modern world. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

486 Major Contemporary Religious Topics (3) 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 110, Religious Studies 111 or the equivalent. Modern topics of a religious 
nature related to social, political, psychological trends. May be repeated with different content 
for additional credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in religious studies to be taken with consent of instructor and the 
department chair. May be repeated for credit. 

RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM 

FACULTY 
Robert Feldman 
Program Coordinator 

David Depew (Philosophy), Robert Feldman (History), Charles Frazee (History), Gary Guertner 
(Political Science), Ronald Helin (Geography), Karl Kahrs (Political Science), Harvey Mayer 
(Foreign Languages), Joyce Pickersgill (Economics), Otto Sadovszky (Anthropology), Ted 
Smythe (Communications), Elena Tumas (Comparative Literature), Bruce Wright (Political 
Science), Michael Yessis (Physical Education) 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES 

The Russian and East European area studies program is an interdisciplinary program designed for 
students whose interests and career objectives are in government service, communication, interna- 
tional business or education. The program provides students already majoring in an existing disci- 
pline or department (i.e., history, business, biology, etc.) the opportunity to have a second major. 
In addition, the program fulfills the various cultural objectives common to any liberal arts program. 
To qualify for this major, a student must complete (1) 16 units of Russian language or their 
equivalent, (2) 24 units of upper division Russian area courses from at least four of the following 
fields: anthropology, comparative literature, economics, geography, philosophy, political science, 
history, foreign language, (3) 15 units of upper division coursework in a related discipline to be 
determined in consultation with a Russian area counselor. Students are encouraged to have these 
units apply toward a major in a traditional discipline. 

The basic lower division courses also may be used to meet general educational requirements. 


RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES COURSES 

All courses within the Russian and East European area studies program originate in other departments 
within the university. Students should refer to the department originating the course for description. 

Anthropology 

351 Peoples of Eastern Europe (3) 

Communications 

431 Mass Communications in Communist Systems (3) 

Comparative Literature 

373 Masters of Russian Literature (3) 

374 Contemporary Russian Literature (3) 


282 Social Sciences 


Economics 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

391 Modernization of Russian Society (3)* 

Foreign Language: Russian 
317 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3) 

375 Introduction to Literary Form (3) 

441 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3) 

451 The Golden Age of Russian Literature (3) 

461 Russian Literature from 1917 (3) 

466 Introduction to Russian Linguistics (3) 

Geography 

338 Geography of the Soviet Union (3) 

History 

419 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

434B Russian Revolution and the Soviet Regime (3) 

436 The Balkans (3) 

437 East Europe Since 1815 (3) 

490 Seminar in Polish History (3) 

490 Modernization of Russian Society (3)* 

490 Seminar in Russian Revolution, 1917 (3) 

Philosophy 

382 Marx and Marxism (3) 

Political Science 

430 Government and Politics of East Europe (3) 

431 Government and Politics of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

443 Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 

452 Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R. (3) 

SOCIAL SCIENCES— MASTER OF ARTS 

An interdisciplinary program offered by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences 

FACULTY 

Roger Joseph (Anthropology) 

Acting Graduate Program Coordinator 
Wayne Hobson (American Studies) 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Carol Copp (Sociology), Lawrence B. de Graff (History), Arthur Earick (Geography), Wacira 
Gethaiga (Afro-Ethnic Studies), Harvey Grody (Political Science), William Hobbs, (Criminal 
justice), Wayne Hobson (American Studies), Maryanna Lanier (Economics), Richard Lippa 
(Psychology), Peter McGoey (student), Joseph Platt (Chicano Studies), John Siegel (student), 
Giles Brown (Graduate Studies), ex officio. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


SOCIAL SCIENCES COURSES 

385 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 385) 

500 Social Science Theories (3) 

A philosophical and theoretical basis for graduate work in the areas of social science. The interrela- 
tionships among the various social sciences as they relate to social, physical and political 
environments. 

* Students may sign up for this course for history credit under History 490 or economics credit under Economics 391 


Sociology 283 


501 Social Science Methods (3) 

Analytical comparison of the historical, humanistic and scientific methodologies in the social 
sciences. Contemporary trends in the social sciences methods. 

502 Role of the Social Science Professional (3) 

The role of the social science professional in public and private organizations. Role identity, power 
and decision-making in organizations, relationships with clients, and relationships to broader 
questions of social policy. 

550 The Issues of Social Science: A Seminar for Teachers (3) 

The utilization of social science literature by teachers. Identification and clarification of major issues 
as presented in works in history and the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

597 Project (3-6) 

Individual direction by committee of faculty in research and preparation of either: a prototype of 
a nonacademic professional paper; or an innovative work in a media other than the written 
essay. For students planning to enter government agency or business. 

598 Thesis (3-6) 

Individual direction by committee of faculty in research and preparation of a written research essay 
which will reflect an interdisciplinary program of study. For students planning careers in higher 
education and research. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Open to graduate students in social science with the consent of program adviser or coordinator. May 
be repeated for credit. 


DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

FACULTY 
Tony Bell 

(Acting) Department Chair 

Takenori Aso, Donald Baker, John Bedell, Dennis Berg, Jonathan Brower, Carol Copp, Helaine 
Feingold, Rosalie Gilford, Ronald Hughes, Hilla Israely, Perry Jacobson, Elliott Kushell, Pat 
Lackey, Michael Mend, G. Nanjundappa, Rae Newton, Myron Orleans, Bartolemeo Palisi, 
Houshang Poorkaj, Lorraine Prinsky, Gerald Rosen, J. Rex Smith, C. Michael Stuart, Clarence 
Tygart, Ernest Works, Troy Zimmer 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 


Sociology attempts to identify and understand the social functions and processes of human behavior. 
Sociology's subject matter ranges from the intimate family to the hostile mob, from crime to religion, 
from divisions of race and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture, from the sociology 
of work to the sociology of sport and leisure, from the study of conformity to the study of deviance, 
from childhood to old age. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Sociology will prepare a student for a diverse set of career options as well 
as for advanced studies in several areas including sociology, social welfare, environmental studies, 
education, public health and urban planning. To prepare for these goals students may group their 
studies around Contemporary Social Institutions; Social Psychology, The Individual in Society; The 
Theory and Methods of Sociology; Social Differentiation; Crime, Delinquency and Deviance; Ap- 
plied Sociology; Environment, Population and Urbanization; Life Course Development, Students 
majoring in sociology are required to complete a minimum of 36 units of coursework in sociology. 
Included within the 36 units are 12 units of core courses required of all majors and 24 units of 
adviser-approved electives tailored to each student's career objectives. At least 27 units must be 
upper division and a total of nine units may be transferred from a community college or selected 
from either lower or upper division sociology course offerings. 


Required courses: 
Sociology 101 
Sociology 301 
Sociology 302 
Sociology 303 


Introduction to Sociology (3) 
Theories of Social Behavior (3) 
Social Research Methods (3) 
Statistics for the Social Sciences (3) 


Units 

12 


A minimum of 24 units of elective course work must be selected consistent with the student's career 
objective. Faculty advisers are available and a student handbook has been designed to help in the 
selection of these courses. 


284 Sociology 


MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

For a minor in sociology, 21 units of sociology course work are required. The requirements for a 
minor in sociology are: 

Units 

Required courses: 9 

Sociology 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

Sociology 203 Introduction to Sociological Analysis (3) 

Sociology 301 Theories of Social Behavior (3) 

Electives ^ 

Students minoring in sociology are to select 12 units of upper division course work in sociology. The 
Department of Sociology handbook can be used to help in the selection of these objectives. Faculty 
advisers are also available. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

See "Graduate Degree Programs." 


SOCIOLOGY COURSES 

101 Introduction to Sociology (3) (Formerly 201) 

The basic concepts of sociology: includes social interaction, culture, personality, social processes, 
population, social class, the community, social institutions and sociocultural change. 

102 Social Problems (3) (Formerly 202) 

The extent, causes and consequences of a number of social problems. 20th-century America. The 
changing society. 

203 Introduction to Sociological Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The logical, conceptual and empirical founda- 
tions of a scientific analysis of human behavior. The theoretical, empirical and statistical aspects 
of sociology. 

300 Introduction to Social Welfare (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The history, philosophy and development of 
thought in social welfare; the social work methods (casework, group work and community 
organization); social work as a career objective; social work practice; availability of employ- 
ment and qualifications necessary. 

301 Theories of Social Behavior (3) (Formerly 481) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The main schools of sociological thought, both 
European and American. Systems of theory, methodology of theorists, cultural change and 
social institutions. 

302 Social Research Methods (3) (Formerly 331 A) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of department. Topics include: research design, methods of 
gathering data, the role of theory in research, sampling methods and problems, data processing 
and analysis. 

303 Statistics for the Social Sciences (3) (Formerly 331 B) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and 302, or consent of department. The techniques for the elementary 
statistical analysis of social data. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

305 Techniques of Social Welfare (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and 300 or consent of instructor. Methods and theories underlying social 
work practice. History, values and philosophy of the profession. Methods and skills. Casework, 
issues and trends in social work practice. 

331X Social Research Methods (6) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101, or consent of instructor. The content of Sociology 302, 303 will be 
integrated. Students may take the course as a six-unit, one-semester course or as two consecu- 
tive courses of three units each. The content of this course is the same as Sociology 302, 303. 

333 Sociology of Aging (3) (Formerly 454) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Influence of age/social structure; aging theories; 
a 8' n 8 process: family, leisure, health, economy, polity, ethnicity; inter-generational negotiations; 
social policy and future ages and society. 


Sociology 285 


341 Social Interaction (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The social and sociopsychological dimensions 
of group behavior and the socialization of the individual. Social interaction and its impact on 
the individual and personality formation. 

343 Program Evaluation (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 and a course in statistics or methods or consent of instructor. Evaluation 
designs and problems, goal definition and operationalization, measurement, sampling, data 
analysis techniques and the politics of evaluation. (2 hours lecture; 2 hours activity) 

345 Sociology of Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The social processes involved in communicating 
with symbols — verbal, visual and "body-language" — in interpersonal settings and the mass 
media. 

348 Collective Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Characteristics of crowds, mobs, publics. Analy- 
sis of social movements and revolutions, their relation to social unrest and their role in develop- 
ing and changing social organization. 

360 Human Ecology: Problems and Solutions (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Ecological approach to social phenomena. 
Analysis of ecosystem in terms of interdependencies involving population, environment, tech- 
nology and organization; social and demographic characteristics of societies. 

361 Population Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Population composition, growth and movement. 
Social factors affecting birth rates, death rates and migration. The population of the United States 
and selected areas of the world. 

371 Urban Sociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The population and ecology, patterns of growth, 
institutions, characteristic social interaction, values and problems of the urban community. 

372 Social Futures (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The tools for projecting future probabilities and 
possibilities. The broad social and moral implications of scientific and technological advances. 
Procedures and consequences of social design. 

400 Sociological Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Supervised field experience permitting applica- 
tion of relevant sociological material in practical settings. 

404 Biosociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Multimedia inquiry into nature and future of 
social life. Differences among human and animal societies. Violence and aggression, territorial- 
ity and dominance, love and sex, right to life. 

407 Woment in Contemporary Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Women in American society. Sex role socializa- 
tion, sexism in institutions, labor force participation, female health and sexuality. 

411 Criminology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The extent, causes and control of criminal 
behavior. The criminal law, causal factors and theories, correctional institutions, probation and 
parole, and preventive efforts. 

413 Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Juvenile delinquency as a social problem. 
Sociological study of the causes of delinquent behavior, and programs of control, treatment and 
prevention. 

414 Sociology of Public Health (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The social and organizational context of health 
care in the American community: social forces, processes and relationships which influence or 
determine the nature of health service. 

415 Sociology of Corrections (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or Sociology 411 or 413 or consent of instructor. Current problems and 
programs in probation, parole and correctional institutions. For students planning careers in 
corrections. 


286 Sociology 


416 Sociology of Alcoholism (4) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or Sociology 102 or consent of instructor. Sociological analysis of 
alcoholism. The socioemotional causes and consequences of this type of drug addiction. 

418 Microsociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or consent of instructor. Small-scale environments. Face-to-face interac- 
tion from a variety of sociological perspectives through participant-observation, videotaping 
and audiotaping. 

419 Delinquency Corrections (4) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and 413 or consent of instructor. Extension of Sociology 413. Field 
experience in agencies dealing with juvenile delinquency. Sociological analysis of juvenile 
delinquency. Correctional facility as social organization and institution. (2 hours seminar; 4 
hours activity) 

431 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Racial, national and religious minorities in the 
United States. Discrimination, prejudice, patterns of intergroup adjustment, and attempts to 
change group status. 

433 Aging and Social Services (4) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 and 333 or consent of instructor. Extension of Sociology 333 requiring 
field experience in services to older adults. Social problems of aging. Strategies of intervention 
and barriers to service utilization. (2 hours seminar; 4 hours activity) 

436 Social Stratification (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Social class structures and their functions. Styles 
of life; determinants of class status; vertical social mobility; change in class systems. 

442 Small Groups (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or Sociology 341, 342, or consent of instructor. Theories, methodology, 
and studies in small group research. Communication channels, coalition formation, group 
cohesion, leadership and conformity in groups. 

445 Sociology of Adult Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Social-psychological theories of adult develop- 
ment, roles, and role relationships: family, work, and leisure; bio-psychosocial processes of adult 
development; adult socialization stability and change. 

446 Aging and Sexuality (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Impact of bio-psychosocial dynamics of aging 
on sexuality and affectual dimensions of marriage in later years; explicit forms and process of 
sexual expression in old age; singlehood, widowhood, homosexuality; sexuality in institutional- 
ized elderly. 

450 Sociology of Sex Roles (3) ^ 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The effect of traditional and nontraditional 
sexual stereotypes on attitudes and behavior within the family, the educational system, the 
economic system and the legal system. 

451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The family as a social institution. Historical and 
cross-cultural perspectives; social change affecting marriage and the family; analysis of Ameri- 
can courtship and marriage patterns; the psychodynamics of family life. 

452 The Sociology of Education (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Education as a social process and a social 
institution. The relationship between education as a social process and a social institution, 
between education and sociology, the social functions of education. The socialization process, 
the school and the community, and the school as a social institution. 

453 Child in American Society (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The child's role in America peer group partici- 
pation, sibling rivalry and sibling order. The societal attitudes toward the child's place in society 

455 Medical Sociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor and upper division standing. A sociological 
perspective for interpreting medicine and medical behavior. 

456 Mental Illness (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Sociological analysis of the process of diagnosis, 
recognition, and treatment of mental illness. 


Sociology 287 


457 The Mental Hospital: A Sociological Perspective (4) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 456 and consent of instructor. Field experience in mental hospitals. 
Sociological analysis of mental illness. The mental hospital as a social organization and institu- 
tion. Three hour seminar and four hours of field experience per week. 

458 Sociology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Religion as a social institution in complex 
societies. The structure and functioning of religious organizations; roles and role relationships; 
types of religious organizations and leadership; the relationships of religion to other social 
institutions; religion and social change. 

459 The Sociology of Marital Dissolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The social-psychological causes and conse- 
quences of voluntary marital dissolution (separation, divorce.) Topics include: the erosion of 
attachment, personal identity changes, changing and new relationships with others, starting 
over, dating again, sexuality changes, loneliness, anxieties. 

460 Sociology of Death and Dying (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Dying as a social process; functions of bereave- 
ment behavior, fear of death and dying; death related rituals, demographic aspects of mortality; 
American death acceptance-denial controversy. 

463 Political Sociology (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Theoretical perspectives; nature of power and 
authority; social structure and political institutions; elites and decision making; social influences 
on political behavior; political movements. 

465 Law and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The law and lawyers in the context of human 
society. Law as formal social control, variations in legal systems, social change and selected 
areas of law, the legal profession. 

466 Deviant Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Topics include: drug addiction, sexual deviance, 
delinquency, alcoholism, mental illness, and life style. 

467 Sociology of Sport (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The nature, position, functions, and growing 
importance of sport in contemporary industrial society. The relationships between structure, 
variety, and extent of sport activity and other institutional sectors in society. 

470 Sociology of Occupations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Causes of unemployment; employment pros- 
pects; professions; labor unions and/or employee associations; and effects of work on the 
physical and mental health of workers. 

473 Formal Organizations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. Schools, hospitals, industries, prisons and 
government industries. Self-actualization and alienation, human relations, communication, lead- 
ership, conflicts within and between organizations and impact on democratic institutions and 
social change. 

477 Social Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or consent of instructor. The behavioristic approach of B. F. Skinner and 
exchange theory in small groups. Interaction, equality and inequality, personal attraction and 
deviance. 

484 Using Computers in Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 302, 303, (331X) or consent of instructor. "Canned" statistical pro- 
grams in data analysis. Research design and data preparation relevant to computer analysis. 

495 Senior Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 senior classification. Open to sociology majors who have had the upper 
division coursework in the area of the seminar. The seminar will depend upon the specialty and 
training of instructor. 


288 Sociology 

498 Seminar in the Sociology of Health Care Services Organizations (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101; 455 is recommended. The organization and problems of health service 
programs and institutions. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 101, at least 12 hours of sociology and consent of adviser. An individual 
research project, either library or field. The student must enroll with an instructor whose 
recognized interests are in the area of the planned independent study. Conferences with the 
adviser as necessary, and the work culminated in one or more papers. May be repeated for 
credit. 

501 Seminar: Selected Topics in Societal Structure and Process (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of a specialization within the study of society such as: 
socialization and personality; deviance; social change; institutional structure and process. May 
be repeated. 

502A The Research Process (3) 

Requires the completion of a research project including such elements as theory construction, 
hypotheses formation, sampling, survey construction, data collection and data analysis. 

502B The Research Process (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 502A. Problems of social research. Causal inferences, value bias and meas- 
urement, the construction scales. 

511 Seminar in Crime and Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 411 or 413, or consent of department. Problems in the crime and delin- 
quency. Independent investigation into the theoretical and research contributions on the causes, 
prevention and treatment of criminal and delinquent behavior. 

530 Advanced Statistical Analysis (3) 

Techniques most commonly utilized by sociologists but not covered in Sociology 302, 303. Multivari- 
ate analysis such as tests of significance, tests for interaction, measures of association, regression 
analysis and factor analysis. 

533 Seminar in Intergroup Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 431 or consent of department. Relations among ethnic, racial and religious 
groups throughout the world. Processes leading to, sustaining, and associated with changes in 
relations among such groups. 

541 Seminar in Social Interaction (3) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 341 or consent of department. Social interaction, sociological factors in 
personality development and analysis of primary group behavior. 

542 Practicum in Sociological Experimentation (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 342, 302, 303 or consent of instructor. Practical training in experimental 
sociology. Students will design and conduct an experiment in all its phases, including selecting 
a testable hypothesis, designing the appropriate equipment, producing the data, analyzing the 
results, and preparing the final report. 

581 Advanced Theories of Social Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 301 or equivalent and consent of department. The basic elements and key 
problems in constructing and evaluating sociological theories. 

596 Community College Symposium (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Introductory sociology, social problems and marriage and the 
family; teaching preparation. Includes an oral exam. 

597 Project: Agency Placement (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Twenty hours per week for one semester or 10 hours per week for 
two semesters. Choice limited by the availability of positions which meet the level of supervision 
and training for which credit may be given. Includes an oral exam conducted by a master's 
committee. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: acceptance as a candidate for the M.A. in Sociology, and approval of the topic 
Individual research under supervision, reported in a thesis, and defended successfully in an oral 
examination conducted by a faculty committee. 


Speech Communication 289 


599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser and department. Individual research on either a library or 
empirical project, with conferences with the adviser as necessary, culminating in one or more 
papers. May be repeated for credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

FACULTY 
Wayne Brockriede 
Department Chair 

Ralph Beckett, Daniel Crary, Robert Emry, George Enell, Joyce Flocken, Kaye Good, Lee Granell, 
Donald Kaplan, Lucy Keele, Emmett Long, Michael Metz, Max Nelson, Norman Page, Glyndon 
Riley, Philip Schreiner, Arden Thorum, Terralynn Walters, Richard Wiseman 
Course work in the Department of Speech Communication aims toward five goals: to assist the 
student's development of intellectual, social and political maturity by applying the principles of 
individual and group communication; to discover the relationships between human communication 
and other modes of human interaction; to provide theoretical understandings and functional skills 
which enable the individual to affect and critically assess social processes; to improve the quality 
and availability of professional services within the realm of human communication; to improve the 
quality of human interaction through better communication practices. 

The major in speech communication for the bachelor of arts degree requires a minimum of 36 units, 
at least 24 of which must be in 300- and 400-level courses. 

The major in communicative disorders for the bachelor of arts degree requires a minimum of 42 
units, at least 36 of which must be in 300- and 400- level courses. 

Course programs are planned to prepare students who seek: (1)a liberal arts emphasis in speech 
communication as a means for becoming intellectually independent citizens and consumers, (2) to 
become communication specialists in business or government, (3) to apply communication skills 
in the ministry, law, business or other areas in which effective communication is basic, (4) graduate 
study, (5) school, hospital, clinic, community center and private practice in communicative disor- 
ders. 

Speech Communication 100, Introduction to Human Communication, should be taken by all com- 
municative disorders majors as a part of the language skills component in general education. Speech 
Communication 200, Human Communication, is recommended to all transfer students in lieu of 
Speech Communication 100. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
Lower division requirements (9-12 units): 

A course in human communication: Speech Communication 100 or 200 
Speech Communication 102 
Speech Communication 235 

Upper division requirements: 

Core Courses: 

Speech Communication 300 
Speech Communication 324 

A course in social influence or persuasion: Speech Communication 332 or 334 
An advanced course in argumentation: Speech Communication 335 
A general course in communicative disorders: Speech Communication 342 
Any three courses from among the following: 

Courses in organizational communication: Speech Communication 333 or 425 

Speech Communication 420 

Speech Communication 430 

Speech Communication 434 

Speech Communication 438 

Electives in communication theory and process, adviser approved, to complete the major. 

TEACHING EMPHASIS IN LANGUAGE ARTS AREA (Single Subject Waiver Program) 

Speech Communication: Speech Communication 100, Introduction to Human Communication (3); 
Speech Communication 102, Public Speaking (3); Speech Communication 138, Forensics (2); 
Speech Communication 235, Essentials of Argumentation and Debate (3); Speech Communica- 
10—78946 


290 Speech Communication 


tion 300, Introduction to Research in Speech Communication (3); Speech Communication 324, 
Small Group Communication (3); Speech Communication 332, Processes of Social Influence